WorldWideScience

Sample records for hexavalent uranium uvi

  1. Hexavalent uranium reduction from solid phase by thermophilic bacterium Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khijniak, T.V.; Slobodkin, A.I.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E.A.; Medvedeva-Lyalikova, N.N.; Coker, V.; Lloyd, J.R.; Birkeland, N.K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: It has been reported that in uranium-contaminated sites, solid-phase U(VI) present in sediments is resistant to microbial reduction. Also, it was demonstrated that mesophilic iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria can reduce hexavalent uranium and sulphate-reducing bacteria were able to grow via uranium reduction. Among thermophilic microorganisms reduction of hexavalent uranium has been demonstrated only for cell suspensions of two genera: Pyrobaculum and Thermus. In the present study, Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens was tested for reduction of U(VI), a thermophilic, gram-positive anaerobic bacterium capable for growth with the reduction of various electron acceptors including Fe(III). Kinetic of bacterial growth, uranium reduction and influence of different uranium concentrations were investigated at 65 deg. C. Due to presence of phosphate in the basal medium yellow uranium phosphate precipitate was formed after addition of uranyl acetate. After 68 h of incubation control tubes without bacteria were contained yellow precipitate whereas in presence of bacteria precipitate turned to the grey color. In the control tubes uranium phosphates and other elements formed a uniform mixture of crystals, but in presence of bacteria the round shape particles, containing uranium, were found by Environmental Scan Electron Microscopy of air-dried or frozen samples. To determine valent state speciation spectroscopic investigations were performed also. Initial yellow uranium phosphate precipitate was separated and identified as uramphite - (NH 4 )(UO 2 )(PO 4 )*3H 2 O by X-Ray Powder Diffraction. Grey precipitate, which was formed by bacterial reduction, was identified as ningyoite - CaU(PO 4 ) 2 *H 2 O. The fact that final grey precipitate contain U(IV) was also confirmed by EXAFS investigation. High concentration of uranium has toxic effect. 1 and 2.5 mM of uranium (VI) support bacterial growth and bacterial biomass was accumulated, but if 5 or 10

  2. Remediation of uranium contaminated soils with bicarbonate extraction and microbial U(VI) reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, E.J.P.; Landa, E.R.; Lovley, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for concentrating uranium from contaminated soils in which the uranium is first extracted with bicarbonate and then the extracted uranium is precipitated with U(VI)-reducing microorganisms was evaluated for a variety of uranium-contaminated soils. Bicarbonate (100 mM) extracted 20-94% of the uranium that was extracted with nitric acid. The U(VI)-reducing microorganism, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans reduced the U(VI) to U(IV) in the bicarbonate extracts. In some instances unidentified dissolved extracted components, presumably organics, gave the extract a yellow color and inhibited U(VI) reduction and/or the precipitation of U(IV). Removal of the dissolved yellow material with the addition of hydrogen peroxide alleviated this inhibition. These results demonstrate that bicarbonate extraction of uranium from soil followed by microbial U(VI) reduction might be an effective mechanism for concentrating uranium from some contaminated soils. (author)

  3. Remediation of uranium contaminated soils with bicarbonate extraction and microbial U(VI) reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips , Elizabeth J.P.; Landa, Edward R.; Lovely, Derek R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for concentrating uranium from contaminated soils in which the uranium is first extracted with bicarbonate and then the extracted uranium is precipitated with U(VI)-reducing microorganisms was evaluated for a variety of uranuum-contaminated soils. Bicarbonate (100 mM) extracted 20–94% of the uranium that was extracted with nitric acid. The U(VI)-reducing microorganism,Desulfovibrio desulfuricans reduced the U(VI) to U(IV) in the bicarbonate extracts. In some instances unidentified dissolved extracted components, presumably organics, gave the extract a yellow color and inhibited U(VI) reduction and/or the precipitation of U(IV). Removal of the dissolved yellow material with the addition of hydrogen peroxide alleviated this inhibition. These results demonstrate that bicarbonate extraction of uranium from soil followed by microbial U(VI) reduction might be an effective mechanism for concentrating uranium from some contaminated soils.

  4. Potentiometric determination of hexavalent uranium in uranium silicide samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlegui, Oscar

    1999-01-01

    The Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission's Department of Nuclear Materials has among its projects the production of fuels elements for nuclear reactors, and, therefore, the Chemical Analysis Laboratory must have a rapid and reliable method for uranium analysis, to control the uranium concentration during each stage of the production process. For this reason the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission's Chemical Analysis Laboratory has validated a potentiometric method, which is a modification of the Davies and Gray method proposed by A.R. Eberle. This method uses the Potentiometric Titration Technique and is based on the direct and rapid reduction of uranium (VI) to Uranium (IV), in a concentrated phosphoric acid medium, with excess iron (II) used as a reducing agent. In this medium the excess iron (II) selectively oxidizes to iron (III) with nitric acid, using molybdenum (IV) as a catalyzer, the nitrous acid that is produced is eliminated by adding amidosulfuric acid. The solution is diluted with 1M sulfuric acid and the uranium (IV) obtained is titrated potentiometrically with potassium dichromate in the presence of vanadilic sulfate to obtain a better defined final titration point. The samples were softened with hydrochloric acid and nitric acid and later 50 ml were estimated in a 20% sulfuric acid medium. The analytical method was validated by comparing it with Certified Reference Material (C.R.M.) from the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), Metallic Uranium, CRM 112-A. The F Test and the T Test show that the value calculated is less than the tabulated value so the result is traceable to the reference material. The quantification limit, sensitivity, precision and accuracy were quantified for the method

  5. Sorption and bioreduction of hexavalent uranium at a military facility by the Chesapeake Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Wenming; Xie Guibo; Miller, Todd R.; Franklin, Mark P.; Oxenberg, Tanya Palmateer; Bouwer, Edward J.; Ball, William P.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2006-01-01

    Directly adjacent to the Chesapeake Bay lies the Aberdeen Proving Ground, a U.S. Army facility where testing of armor-piercing ammunitions has resulted in the deposition of >70,000 kg of depleted uranium (DU) to local soils and sediments. Results of previous environmental monitoring suggested limited mobilization in the impact area and no transport of DU into the nation's largest estuary. To determine if physical and biological reactions constitute mechanisms involved in limiting contaminant transport, the sorption and biotransformation behavior of the radionuclide was studied using geochemical modeling and laboratory microcosms (500 ppb U(VI) initially). An immediate decline in dissolved U(VI) concentrations was observed under both sterile and non-sterile conditions due to rapid association of U(VI) with natural organic matter in the sediment. Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) occurred only in non-sterile microcosms. In the non-sterile samples, intrinsic bioreduction of uranium involved bacteria of the order Clostridiales and was only moderately enhanced by the addition of acetate (41% vs. 56% in 121 days). Overall, this study demonstrates that the migration of depleted uranium from the APG site into the Chesapeake Bay may be limited by a combination of processes that include rapid sorption of U(VI) species to natural organic matter, followed by slow, intrinsic bioreduction to U(IV). - At the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland, USA, migration of depleted uranium into the Chesapeake Bay is limited by rapid sorption of the radionuclide to natural organic matter followed by slow biological reduction of water-soluble U(VI) to the insoluble and less toxic U(IV) species

  6. Carbonate effects on hexavalent uranium removal from water by nanocrystalline titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazne, Mahmoud; Meng, Xiaoguang; Korfiatis, George P.; Christodoulatos, Christos

    2006-01-01

    A novel nanocrystalline titanium dioxide was used to treat depleted uranium (DU)-contaminated water under neutral and alkaline conditions. The novel material had a total surface area of 329 m 2 /g, total surface site density of 11.0 sites/nm 2 , total pore volume of 0.415 cm 3 /g and crystallite size of 6.0 nm. It was used in batch tests to remove U(VI) from synthetic solutions and contaminated water. However, the capacity of the nanocrystalline titanium dioxide to remove U(VI) from water decreased in the presence of inorganic carbonate at pH > 6.0. Adsorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and surface charge measurements were used to investigate the causes of the reduced capacity. The surface charge and the FTIR measurements suggested that the adsorbed U(VI) species was not complexed with carbonate at neutral pH values. The decreased capacity of titanium dioxide to remove U(VI) from water in the presence of carbonate at neutral to alkaline pH values was attributed to the aqueous complexation of U(VI) by inorganic carbonate. The nanocrystalline titanium dioxide had four times the capacity of commercially available titanium dixoide (Degussa P-25) to adsorb U(VI) from water at pH 6 and total inorganic carbonate concentration of 0.01 M. Consequently, the novel material was used to treat DU-contaminated water at a Department of Defense (DOD) site

  7. The mechanism of uranium transformation from U(VI) into nano-uramphite by two indigenous Bacillus thuringiensis strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Fanbing; Cheng, Yangjian; Lin, Zhang; Guan, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Indigenous B. thuringiensis exhibited highly accumulation ability to U(VI) in the absence of additional nutrients. • The amorphous uranium compound would transformed into crystalline nano-uramphite by B. thuringiensis. • The chemical nature of formed U-species were monitored. • The cell-free extracts of B. thuringiensis had better uranium-immobilization ability than its cell debris. • Provided the understanding of the uranium transformation mechanism. - Abstract: The mechanism of uranium transformation from U(VI) into nano-uramphite by two indigenous Bacillus thuringiensis strains was investigated in the present work. Our data showed that the bacteria isolated from uranium mine possessed highly accumulation ability to U(VI), and the maximum accumulation capacity was around 400 mg U/g biomass (dry weight). X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analyzes indicated that the U(VI) was adsorbed on the bacterial surface firstly through coordinating with phosphate, −CH 2 and amide groups, and then needle-like amorphous uranium compounds were formed. With the extension of time, the extracellular crystalline substances were disappeared, but some particles were appeared in the intracellular region, and these particles were characterized as tetragonal-uramphite. Moreover, the disrupted experiment indicated that the cell-free extracts had better uranium-immobilization ability than cell debris. Our findings provided the understanding of the uranium transformation process from amorphous uranium to crystalline uramphite, which would be useful in the regulation of uranium immobilization process

  8. The mechanism of uranium transformation from U(VI) into nano-uramphite by two indigenous Bacillus thuringiensis strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhi [Key Lab of Biopesticide and Chemical Biology, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Ministry of Education & Fujian–Taiwan Joint Center for Ecological Control of Crop Pests, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Key Laboratory of Design and Assembly of Functional Nanostructures, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Chen, Fanbing [Key Lab of Biopesticide and Chemical Biology, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Ministry of Education & Fujian–Taiwan Joint Center for Ecological Control of Crop Pests, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Cheng, Yangjian [Key Laboratory of Design and Assembly of Functional Nanostructures, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Lin, Zhang, E-mail: zlin@fjirsm.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Design and Assembly of Functional Nanostructures, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guan, Xiong, E-mail: guanxfafu@126.com [Key Lab of Biopesticide and Chemical Biology, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Ministry of Education & Fujian–Taiwan Joint Center for Ecological Control of Crop Pests, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Indigenous B. thuringiensis exhibited highly accumulation ability to U(VI) in the absence of additional nutrients. • The amorphous uranium compound would transformed into crystalline nano-uramphite by B. thuringiensis. • The chemical nature of formed U-species were monitored. • The cell-free extracts of B. thuringiensis had better uranium-immobilization ability than its cell debris. • Provided the understanding of the uranium transformation mechanism. - Abstract: The mechanism of uranium transformation from U(VI) into nano-uramphite by two indigenous Bacillus thuringiensis strains was investigated in the present work. Our data showed that the bacteria isolated from uranium mine possessed highly accumulation ability to U(VI), and the maximum accumulation capacity was around 400 mg U/g biomass (dry weight). X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analyzes indicated that the U(VI) was adsorbed on the bacterial surface firstly through coordinating with phosphate, −CH{sub 2} and amide groups, and then needle-like amorphous uranium compounds were formed. With the extension of time, the extracellular crystalline substances were disappeared, but some particles were appeared in the intracellular region, and these particles were characterized as tetragonal-uramphite. Moreover, the disrupted experiment indicated that the cell-free extracts had better uranium-immobilization ability than cell debris. Our findings provided the understanding of the uranium transformation process from amorphous uranium to crystalline uramphite, which would be useful in the regulation of uranium immobilization process.

  9. Non-enzymatic U(VI) interactions with biogenic mackinawite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramani, H.; Qafoku, N. P.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Reductive immobilization of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] by stimulation of dissimilatory metal and/or sulfate reducing bacteria (DMRB or DSRB) has been extensively researched as a remediation strategy for subsurface U(VI) contamination. These bacteria derive energy by reducing oxidized metals as terminal electron acceptors, often utilizing organic substrates as electron donors. Thus, when evaluating the potential for in-situ uranium remediation in heterogeneous subsurface media, it is important to understand how the presence of alternative electron acceptors such as Fe(III) and sulfate affect U(VI) remediation and the long term behavior and reactivity of reduced uranium. Iron, an abundant subsurface element, represents a substantial sink for electrons from DMRB, and the reduction of Fe(III) leads to the formation of dissolved Fe(II) or to reactive biogenic Fe(II)- and mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III)- mineral phases. Consequently, abiotic U(VI) reduction by reactive forms of biogenic Fe(II) minerals could be a potentially important process for uranium immobilization. In our study, the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was used to synthesize a biogenic Fe(II)-bearing sulfide mineral: mackinawite, that has been characterized by XRD, SEM, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Batch experiments involving treated biogenic mackinawite and uranium (50:1 molar ratio) were carried out at room temperature under strict anoxic conditions. Following complete removal of uranium from solution, the biogenic mackinawite was analyzed by a suite of analytical techniques including XAS, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy to determine the speciation of uranium and investigate concomitant Fe(II)-phase transformation. Determining the speciation of uranium is critical to success of a remediation strategy. The present work elucidates non-enzymatic/abiotic molecular scale redox interactions between biogenic mackinawite and uranium.

  10. Study on the interaction of U(VI) species with natural organic matters in KURT groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Euo Chang; Baik, Min Hoon; Cho, Hye Ryun; Kim, Hee Kyung; Cha, Wansik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The interaction of U(VI) (hexavalent uranium) species with natural organic matter (NOM) in KURT (KAERI Underground Research Tunnel) groundwater is investigated using a laser spectroscopic technique. The luminescence spectra of the NOM are observed in the ultraviolet and blue wavelength regions by irradiating a laser beam at 266 nm in groundwater. The luminescence spectra of U(VI) species in groundwater containing uranium concentrations of 0.034-0.788 mg·L-1 are measured in the green-colored wavelength region. The luminescence characteristics (peak wavelengths and lifetime) of U(VI) in the groundwater agree well with those of Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) in a standard solution prepared in a laboratory. The luminescence intensities of U(VI) in the groundwater are weaker than those of Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) in the standard solution at the same uranium concentrations. The luminescence intensities of Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) in the standard solution mixed with the groundwater are also weaker than those of Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}(aq) in the standard solution at the same uranium concentrations. These results can be ascribed to calcium-U(VI)-carbonate species interacting with NOM and forming non-radiative U(VI) complexes in groundwater.

  11. U(VI) speciation and reduction in acid chloride fluids in hydrothermal conditions: from transport to deposition of uranium in unconformity-related deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dargent, Maxime

    2014-01-01

    Circulations of acidic chloride brines in the earth's crust are associated with several types of uranium deposits, particularly unconformity-related uranium (URU) deposits. The spectacular high grade combined with the large tonnage of these deposits is at the origin of the key questions concerning the geological processes responsible for U transport and precipitation. The aim of this work is to performed experimental studies of U(VI) speciation and its reduction to U(IV) subsequently precipitation to uraninite under hydrothermal condition. About uranium transport, the study of U(VI) speciation in acidic brines at high temperature is performed by Raman and XAS spectroscopy, showing the coexistence of several uranyl chloride complexes UO 2 Cl n 2-n (n = 0 - 5). From this study, complexation constants are proposed. The strong capability of chloride to complex uranyl is at the origin of the transport of U(VI) at high concentration in acidic chloride brines. Concerning uranium precipitation, the reactivity of four potential reductants under conditions relevant for URU deposits genesis is investigated: H 2 , CH 4 , Fe(II) and the C-graphite. The kinetics of reduction reaction is measured as a function of temperature, salinity, pH and concentration of reductant. H 2 , CH 4 , and the C-graphite are very efficient while Fe(II) is not able to reduce U(VI) in same conditions. The duration of the mineralizing event is controlled by (i) the U concentration in the ore-forming fluids and (ii) by the generation of gaseous reductants, and not by the reduction kinetics. These mobile and efficient gaseous reductant could be at the origin of the extremely focus and massive character of ore in URU deposits. Finally, first partition coefficients uraninite/fluid of trace elements are obtained. This last part opens-up new perspectives on (i) REE signatures interpretation for a given type of uranium deposit (ii) and reconstruction of mineralizing fluids composition. (author) [fr

  12. Tetra- and hexavalent uranium forms bidentate-mononuclear complexes with particulate organic matter in a naturally uranium-enriched peatland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikutta, Christian; Langner, Peggy; Bargar, John R.; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Peatlands frequently serve as efficient biogeochemical traps for U. Mechanisms of U immobilization in these organic matter-dominated environments may encompass the precipitation of U-bearing mineral(oid)s and the complexation of U by a vast range of (in)organic surfaces. The objective of this work was to investigate the spatial distribution and molecular binding mechanisms of U in soils of an alpine minerotrophic peatland (pH 4.7–6.6, E_h = –127 to 463 mV) using microfocused X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and bulk and microfocused U L_3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The soils contained 2.3–47.4 wt % organic C, 4.1–58.6 g/kg Fe, and up to 335 mg/kg geogenic U. Uranium was found to be heterogeneously distributed at the micrometer scale and enriched as both U(IV) and U(VI) on fibrous and woody plant debris (48 ± 10% U(IV), x̄ ± σ, n = 22). Bulk U X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed that in all samples U(IV) comprised 35–68% of total U (x̄ = 50%, n = 15). Shell-fit analyses of bulk U L_3-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra showed that U was coordinated to 1.3 ± 0.2 C atoms at a distance of 2.91 ± 0.01 Å (x̄ ± σ), which implies the formation of bidentate-mononuclear U(IV/VI) complexes with carboxyl groups. We neither found evidence for U shells at ~3.9 Å, indicative of mineral-associated U or multinuclear U(IV) species, nor for a substantial P/Fe coordination of U. As a result, our data indicates that U(IV/VI) complexation by natural organic matter prevents the precipitation of U minerals as well as U complexation by Fe/Mn phases at our field site, and suggests that organically complexed U(IV) is formed via reduction of organic matter-bound U(VI).

  13. Tetra- and Hexavalent Uranium Forms Bidentate-Mononuclear Complexes with Particulate Organic Matter in a Naturally Uranium-Enriched Peatland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikutta, Christian; Langner, Peggy; Bargar, John R; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2016-10-04

    Peatlands frequently serve as efficient biogeochemical traps for U. Mechanisms of U immobilization in these organic matter-dominated environments may encompass the precipitation of U-bearing mineral(oid)s and the complexation of U by a vast range of (in)organic surfaces. The objective of this work was to investigate the spatial distribution and molecular binding mechanisms of U in soils of an alpine minerotrophic peatland (pH 4.7-6.6, E h = -127 to 463 mV) using microfocused X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and bulk and microfocused U L 3 -edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The soils contained 2.3-47.4 wt % organic C, 4.1-58.6 g/kg Fe, and up to 335 mg/kg geogenic U. Uranium was found to be heterogeneously distributed at the micrometer scale and enriched as both U(IV) and U(VI) on fibrous and woody plant debris (48 ± 10% U(IV), x̅ ± σ, n = 22). Bulk U X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed that in all samples U(IV) comprised 35-68% of total U (x̅ = 50%, n = 15). Shell-fit analyses of bulk U L 3 -edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra showed that U was coordinated to 1.3 ± 0.2 C atoms at a distance of 2.91 ± 0.01 Å (x̅ ± σ), which implies the formation of bidentate-mononuclear U(IV/VI) complexes with carboxyl groups. We neither found evidence for U shells at ∼3.9 Å, indicative of mineral-associated U or multinuclear U(IV) species, nor for a substantial P/Fe coordination of U. Our data indicates that U(IV/VI) complexation by natural organic matter prevents the precipitation of U minerals as well as U complexation by Fe/Mn phases at our field site, and suggests that organically complexed U(IV) is formed via reduction of organic matter-bound U(VI).

  14. Separation and concentration of uranium by extraction chromatography : U(VI) - H3PO4 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobre, J.S.M.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using the extraction chromatographic technique as a way to recover uranium from phosphatic rocks evaluated. The behaviour of uranium from raw phsophoric acid solutions in chromatographic systems using the mixture di(2-ethylhexyl) orthophosphoric acid (D2EHPA) - tributyl phosphate (TBP) as the stationary phase was studied. Materials as alumina, activated carbon and the macroporous resins XAD-4 and XAD-7 were used as supports for organic stationary phase. The best results were obtained with poliacrilic polymer XAD-7, due to its excellent chromatographic properties and efficient organic phase retention. Uranium was quantitatively retained by D2EHPA-TBP-XAD-7 columns from synthetic phosphoric acid solutions with typical composition of phosphatic acid liquors. The elution of uranium from this system was also studied, and the best results were obtained with phosphoric acid solutions. This chromatographic column presented a high stability, not changing their properties even after more than twenty cycles, including the conditioning, sorption, wasking and elution steps. Uranium determinations were perfpormed by indirect titration with potassium dichromate and by molecular absorption spectrophotometry with hydrogen peroxide- carbonate. A new and more sensitive method for uranium determination in phosphoric medium, which might be applied to acid liquors of phosphatic ores, was developed. An extraction-photometric method was used, with Arsenazo III (1,8-dihydroxynaphtalene-3,6-disulphonic acid-2,7-bis(azo-2)-phenylarsonic acid) as the reagent for uranium. (Author) [pt

  15. Persistent U(IV) and U(VI) following in-situ recovery (ISR) mining of a sandstone uranium deposit, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Tanya J.; Campbell, Kate M.; Zielinski, Robert A.; Reimus, P.W.; J.T. Clay,; N. Janot,; J. J. Bargar,; Benzel, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Drill-core samples from a sandstone-hosted uranium (U) deposit in Wyoming were characterized to determine the abundance and distribution of uranium following in-situ recovery (ISR) mining with oxygen- and carbon dioxide-enriched water. Concentrations of uranium, collected from ten depth intervals, ranged from 5 to 1920 ppm. A composite sample contained 750 ppm uranium with an average oxidation state of 54% U(VI) and 46% U(IV). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated rare high uranium (∼1000 ppm U) in spatial association with P/Ca and Si/O attributed to relict uranium minerals, possibly coffinite, uraninite, and autunite, trapped within low permeability layers bypassed during ISR mining. Fission track analysis revealed lower but still elevated concentrations of U in the clay/silica matrix and organic matter (several 10 s ppm) and yet higher concentrations associated with Fe-rich/S-poor sites, likely iron oxides, on altered chlorite or euhedral pyrite surfaces (but not on framboidal pyrite). Organic C (mining, the likely sequestration of uranium within labile iron oxides following mining and sensitivity to changes in redox conditions requires careful attention during groundwater restoration.

  16. Effect of flavin compounds on uranium(VI) reduction- kinetic study using electrochemical methods with UV-vis spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Shinya; Tanaka, Kazuya; Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The reduction of uranium hexavalent (U(VI)) to tetravalent (U(IV)) is an important reaction because of the change in its mobility in the natural environment. Although the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) has acted as an electron shuttle for the U(VI) reduction in vivo system, which is called an electron mediator, only the rate constant for the electron transfer from FMN to U(VI) has been determined. This study examined the rate constant for the U(VI) reduction process by three flavin analogues (riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide, flavin adenine dinucleotide) to elucidate their substituent group effect on the U(VI) reduction rate by electrochemical methods. The formation of the U(IV) was monitored by UV-vis spectrometry at 660 nm during the constant potential electrolysis of the U(VI) solution in the presence of the mediator. The cyclic voltammograms indicated that the three flavin analogues behaved as electron mediator to reduce U(VI). The logarithmic rate constant for the U(VI) reduction was related to the standard redox potential of the mediators. This linear relationship indicated that the redox-active group of the mediator and the substituent group of the mediator dominate capability of the U(VI) reduction and its rate, respectively. The apparent reduction potential of U(VI) increased about 0.2 V in the presence of the mediators, which strongly suggests that the biological electron mediator makes the U(VI) reduction possible even under more oxidative conditions. - Highlights: • The rate constant for the U(VI) reduction by flavin analogues was determined. • The flavins showed a mediator effect on the U(VI) reduction. • The logarithmic rate constants for the U(VI) reduction was proportional to redox potential of the mediator. • The presence of the mediator increased about 0.2 V apparent redox potential of U(VI) to U(IV).

  17. Tetra- and hexavalent uranium forms bidentate-mononuclear complexes with particulate organic matter in a naturally uranium-enriched peatland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikutta, Christian; Langner, Peggy; Bargar, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Peatlands frequently serve as efficient biogeochemical traps for U. Mechanisms of U immobilization in these organic matter-dominated environments may encompass the precipitation of U-bearing mineral(oid)s and the complexation of U by a vast range of (in)organic surfaces. The objective of this work...... of bidentate-mononuclear U(IV/VI) complexes with carboxyl groups. We neither found evidence for U shells at ∼3.9 Å, indicative of mineral-associated U or multinuclear U(IV) species, nor for a substantial P/Fe coordination of U. Our data indicates that U(IV/VI) complexation by natural organic matter prevents...... the precipitation of U minerals as well as U complexation by Fe/Mn phases at our field site, and suggests that organically complexed U(IV) is formed via reduction of organic matter-bound U(VI)....

  18. Voltametric determination of O:U relation in uranium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, F.M.S. de; Abrao, A.

    1988-07-01

    Uranium oxide samples are dissolved in hot concentrated H 3 PO 4 - H 2 SO 4 mixture and the solution diluted with 1M H 2 SO 4 . One aliquot of such solution (A) is used to record the first voltamogram which gives the U(VI) content. To a second aliquot HNO 3 and H 2 O 2 is added to oxidise uranium to the hexavalent state (B) and the second voltamogram is recorded from 0.0 to 0.4 V X SCE. The O:U ratio in the original sample is calculated by the expression: O/U = 2.000 + [U (VI) soln.A/% U(VI) soln. B]. The method provides an accurate means for determining O to U ratios in high-purity uranium dioxide, fuel pellets and a variety of oxides prepared for developmental work on ceramic fuel materials. (author) [pt

  19. Enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addelouas, A.; Gong, W.; Lutze, W.; Nuttall, E.; Fritz, B.; Crovisier, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    The use of enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in remediation of groundwater contaminated with U(VI) is receiving considerable attention. Certain strains of bacteria can combine the oxidation of an organic compound to the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV), which precipitates as uraninite. In the present study, we tested the reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters with various origins and compositions. In all groundwaters u(VI) was reduced by sulfate reducing bacteria that had been activated by ethanol and tri-metaphosphate. The reduction rate of U(VI) depends on sulfate concentration in water and the abundance of bacteria in the system. This work shows that bacteria capable of U(VI) reduction are ubiquitous in nature, and suggests the possibility of a large application of the enzymatic reduction of U(VI) for in situ clean up of groundwaters contaminated with uranium. (authors)

  20. Enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters; Reduction enzymatique de U(VI) dans des eaux souterraines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addelouas, A.; Gong, W. [Center for Radioactive Waste Management, Advanced Materials Laboratory, 1001 University, Albuquerque (United States); Lutze, W.; Nuttall, E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Fritz, B.; Crovisier, J.L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 67 - Strasbourg (France). Centre de Sedimentologie et Geochimie de la Surface

    1999-03-01

    The use of enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in remediation of groundwater contaminated with U(VI) is receiving considerable attention. Certain strains of bacteria can combine the oxidation of an organic compound to the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV), which precipitates as uraninite. In the present study, we tested the reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters with various origins and compositions. In all groundwaters u(VI) was reduced by sulfate reducing bacteria that had been activated by ethanol and tri-metaphosphate. The reduction rate of U(VI) depends on sulfate concentration in water and the abundance of bacteria in the system. This work shows that bacteria capable of U(VI) reduction are ubiquitous in nature, and suggests the possibility of a large application of the enzymatic reduction of U(VI) for in situ clean up of groundwaters contaminated with uranium. (authors) 12 refs.

  1. Polarographic behaviour of uranium (VI) in tributyl phosphate organic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.A.; Meklati, M.

    1984-01-01

    U(VI) determination by D.C. and differential pulse polarography was studied in the organic solutions derived from tributyl phosphate - diluent extracts (after separation from nitric acid media) along with a selected aprotic solvent (i.e.: propylene carbonate and N,N-dimethylacetamide). Miscibility of the TBP-diluent (e.g. cyclohexane, n-hexane, kerosene, n-dodecane) phase with nitric acid as supporting electrolyte, either by addition or already present in the extract was larger in DMA than in PC. In the DMA organic mixture, U(VI) exhibited a DPP peak due to a one electron step, with Esub(p)=-0.4 V (position connected with H 2 O and HNO 3 concentrations). This peak which was proportionnel to the U(VI) concentration from 5x10 -6 to 10 -3 M can be used to determinate directly hexavalent uranium in the industrial organic extraction phases TBP-diluent. (orig.)

  2. Extraction of hexavalent uranium, tetravalent plutonium and fission products by N, N'-tetraalkyldiamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonnel, M.C.

    1988-10-01

    This study deals with the extractive properties of N, N'-tetraalkylglutaramides of generic formula R 2 NC(0)(CH 2 ) 3 C(0)NR 2 . These molecules were considered as alternative extractants to tributylphosphate in nuclear fuels reprocessing. They are selective extractants of uranium and plutonium as far as trivalent actinides and lanthanides remain in aqueous nitric solutions. Distribution ratios measurements and F.T. Infra-Red investigations show that HN0 3 extraction takes place via the formation of the following species: 2L.HN0 3 , L.HN0 3 and L.2HN0 3 in the organic phase (L: glutaramide). Distribution ratios of actinide ions followed by UV-visible spectroscopy and Infra-Red investigations agree with formation of the following neutral organometallic complexes in low nitric acidity conditions: L.U0 2 (N0 3 ) 2 and L.Pu(N0 3 ) 4 and the anionic species at higher acidities: L.U0 2 (N0 3 ) 3 H and L.Pu(N0 3 ) 6 H 2 . Interactions occur through neutral complexes and free molecules of diamides which explain the non ideality of the organic phase. Degradation products of these molecules don't seem to alter the extractive properties of these extractants towards uranium and plutonium [fr

  3. Separation and concentration of uranium by extraction chromatography : U(VI) - H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobre, J S.M.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using the extraction chromatographic technique as a way to recover uranium from phosphatic rocks is evaluated. The behaviour of uranium from raw phsophoric acid solutions in chromatographic systems using the mixture di(2-ethylhexyl) orthophosphoric acid (D2EHPA) - tributyl phosphate (TBP) as the stationary phase was studied. Materials as alumina, activated carbon and the macroporous resins XAD-4 and XAD-7 were used as supports for organic stationary phase. The best results were obtained with poliacrilic polymer XAD-7, due to its excellent chromatographic properties and efficient organic phase retention. Uranium was quantitatively retained by D2EHPA-TBP-XAD-7 columns from synthetic phosphoric acid solutions with typical composition of phosphatic acid liquors. The elution of uranium from this system was also studied, and the best results were obtained with phosphoric acid solutions. This chromatographic column presented a high stability, not changing their properties even after more than twenty cycles, including the conditioning, sorption, washing and elution steps. Uranium determinations were perfpormed by indirect titration with potassium dichromate and by molecular absorption spectrophotometry with hydrogen peroxide- carbonate. A new and more sensitive method for uranium determination in phosphoric medium, which might be applied to acid liquors of phosphatic ores, was developed. An extraction-photometric method was used, with Arsenazo III (1,8-dihydroxynaphtalene-3,6-disulphonic acid-2,7-bis(azo-2)-phenylarsonic acid) as the reagent for uranium.

  4. Field-portable and automated immunosensors for hexavalent uranium, other heavy metals and chelators. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, Diane A.

    2009-01-01

    This is the final technical report for this 10-year project. A better understanding of in situ bioremediation processes and the development of strategies to enhance bacterial remediation of contaminated sites depend either directly or indirectly upon accurate detection and measurement of organics, metal and other toxic elements prior to, during and following the remediation process. Detection and measurement costs are presently high due to the complex methodologies required for analysis. Remediation costs could be significantly reduced through the use of rapid, simple on-site methods. The cost of laboratory analysis continues to climb and the outlay for the assessment of a single site can frequently reach hundreds of thousands of dollars. One estimate suggests that the use of low cost field methods (defined as less than $100/test) with 5-20% standard laboratory confirmation could reduce analytical costs by greater than 70%. Perhaps as important as the cost of analysis is ability to obtain data about the remediation process in near real-time. The instruments normally used for environmental analysis of uranium (atomic absorption spectrophotometer, inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometer, IC-MS and kinetic phosphorescence analyzer) or can be quite expensive; these instruments are thus usually located only in centralized facilities. Environmental samples must therefore be transported to these facilities and often wait in a queue before they can be analyzed. Both sample transport and time-in-queue lead to long turn-around times (days to weeks). Such long turn-around times are especially worrisome during site remediation, especially when an unexpected finding might dictate a change in the methodologies being employed at the site. The goal of this project was to develop sensors that could yield reliable data in near realtime (< 1 hour) be field-ready (ie, simple, durable and accurate) and present low costs (<< $100/assay and <$5,000 for the initial equipment

  5. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagus, Paul S. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203-5017 (United States); Nelin, Connie J. [Consulting and Services, 6008 Maury' s Trail, Austin, Texas 78730 (United States); Ilton, Eugene S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-12-28

    A rigorous study is presented of the physical processes related to X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, in the 4f level of U oxides, which, as well as being of physical interest in themselves, are representative of XPS in heavy metal oxides. In particular, we present compelling evidence for a new view of the screening of core-holes that extends prior understandings. Our analysis of the screening focuses on the covalent mixing of high lying U and O orbitals as opposed to the, more common, use of orbitals that are nominally pure U or pure O. It is shown that this covalent mixing is quite different for the initial and final, core-hole, configurations and that this difference is directly related to the XPS satellite intensity. Furthermore, we show that the high-lying U d orbitals as well as the U(5f) orbital may both contribute to the core-hole screening, in contrast with previous work that has only considered screening through the U(5f) shell. The role of modifying the U-O interaction by changing the U-O distance has been investigated and an unexpected correlation between U-O distance and XPS satellite intensity has been discovered. The role of flourite and octahedral crystal structures for U(IV) oxides has been examined and relationships established between XPS features and the covalent interactions in the different structures. The physical views of XPS satellites as arising from shake processes or as arising from ligand to metal charge transfers are contrasted; our analysis provides strong support that shake processes give a more fundamental physical understanding than charge transfer. Our theoretical studies are based on rigorous, strictly ab initio determinations of the electronic structure of embedded cluster models of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our results provide a foundation that makes it possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and materials properties.

  6. Theoretical modeling of the uranium 4f XPS for U(VI) and U(IV) oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Connie J.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2013-12-01

    A rigorous study is presented of the physical processes related to X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, in the 4f level of U oxides, which, as well as being of physical interest in themselves, are representative of XPS in heavy metal oxides. In particular, we present compelling evidence for a new view of the screening of core-holes that extends prior understandings. Our analysis of the screening focuses on the covalent mixing of high lying U and O orbitals as opposed to the, more common, use of orbitals that are nominally pure U or pure O. It is shown that this covalent mixing is quite different for the initial and final, core-hole, configurations and that this difference is directly related to the XPS satellite intensity. Furthermore, we show that the high-lying U d orbitals as well as the U(5f) orbital may both contribute to the core-hole screening, in contrast with previous work that has only considered screening through the U(5f) shell. The role of modifying the U-O interaction by changing the U-O distance has been investigated and an unexpected correlation between U-O distance and XPS satellite intensity has been discovered. The role of flourite and octahedral crystal structures for U(IV) oxides has been examined and relationships established between XPS features and the covalent interactions in the different structures. The physical views of XPS satellites as arising from shake processes or as arising from ligand to metal charge transfers are contrasted; our analysis provides strong support that shake processes give a more fundamental physical understanding than charge transfer. Our theoretical studies are based on rigorous, strictly ab initio determinations of the electronic structure of embedded cluster models of U oxides with formal U(VI) and U(IV) oxidation states. Our results provide a foundation that makes it possible to establish quantitative relationships between features of the XPS spectra and materials properties.

  7. Uranium sorption from aqueous solutions by activated biochar fibres investigated by FTIR spectroscopy and batch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loukia Hadjittofi; Ioannis Pashalidis

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of activated biochar fibres obtained from Opuntia ficus indica regarding the sorption of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solutions has been investigated by batch experiments, as a function of various physicochemical parameters, and FTIR spectroscopy prior and after U(VI) sorption. The experimental results show that the activated biochar fibres possess extraordinary sorption capacity for U(VI) even in acidic solutions (q max = 210 g kg -1 ), which is attributed to the formation of inner-sphere complexes with the surface carboxylic moieties, available in high density on the lamellar structures of the bio-sorbent. The adsorption process is described by a two-step exothermic reaction. (author)

  8. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Cuney, M.; Bruneton, P.; Virlogeux, D.; Capus, G.

    2010-01-01

    With the worldwide revival of nuclear energy comes the question of uranium reserves. For more than 20 years, nuclear energy has been neglected and uranium prospecting has been practically abandoned. Therefore, present day production covers only 70% of needs and stocks are decreasing. Production is to double by 2030 which represents a huge industrial challenge. The FBR-type reactors technology, which allows to consume the whole uranium content of the fuel, is developing in several countries and will ensure the long-term development of nuclear fission. However, the implementation of these reactors (the generation 4) will be progressive during the second half of the 21. century. For this reason an active search for uranium ores will be necessary during the whole 21. century to ensure the fueling of light water reactors which are huge uranium consumers. This dossier covers all the aspects of natural uranium production: mineralogy, geochemistry, types of deposits, world distribution of deposits with a particular attention given to French deposits, the exploitation of which is abandoned today. Finally, exploitation, ore processing and the economical aspects are presented. Contents: 1 - the uranium element and its minerals: from uranium discovery to its industrial utilization, the main uranium minerals (minerals with tetravalent uranium, minerals with hexavalent uranium); 2 - uranium in the Earth's crust and its geochemical properties: distribution (in sedimentary rocks, in magmatic rocks, in metamorphic rocks, in soils and vegetation), geochemistry (uranium solubility and valence in magmas, uranium speciation in aqueous solution, solubility of the main uranium minerals in aqueous solution, uranium mobilization and precipitation); 3 - geology of the main types of uranium deposits: economical criteria for a deposit, structural diversity of deposits, classification, world distribution of deposits, distribution of deposits with time, superficial deposits, uranium

  9. Adsorption of uranium(VI) to manganese oxides: X-ray absorption spectroscopy and surface complexation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zimeng; Lee, Sung-Woo; Catalano, Jeffrey G; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S; Bargar, John R; Tebo, Bradley M; Giammar, Daniel E

    2013-01-15

    The mobility of hexavalent uranium in soil and groundwater is strongly governed by adsorption to mineral surfaces. As strong naturally occurring adsorbents, manganese oxides may significantly influence the fate and transport of uranium. Models for U(VI) adsorption over a broad range of chemical conditions can improve predictive capabilities for uranium transport in the subsurface. This study integrated batch experiments of U(VI) adsorption to synthetic and biogenic MnO(2), surface complexation modeling, ζ-potential analysis, and molecular-scale characterization of adsorbed U(VI) with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The surface complexation model included inner-sphere monodentate and bidentate surface complexes and a ternary uranyl-carbonato surface complex, which was consistent with the EXAFS analysis. The model could successfully simulate adsorption results over a broad range of pH and dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations. U(VI) adsorption to synthetic δ-MnO(2) appears to be stronger than to biogenic MnO(2), and the differences in adsorption affinity and capacity are not associated with any substantial difference in U(VI) coordination.

  10. Biogenic non-crystalline U(IV) revealed as major component in uranium ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Amrita; Campbell, Kate M.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Roebbert, Yvonne; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Borch, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Historically, it is believed that crystalline uraninite, produced via the abiotic reduction of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) is the dominant reduced U species formed in low-temperature uranium roll-front ore deposits. Here we show that non-crystalline U(IV) generated through biologically mediated U(VI) reduction is the predominant U(IV) species in an undisturbed U roll-front ore deposit in Wyoming, USA. Characterization of U species revealed that the majority (~58-89%) of U is bound as U(IV) to C-containing organic functional groups or inorganic carbonate, while uraninite and U(VI) represent only minor components. The uranium deposit exhibited mostly 238U-enriched isotope signatures, consistent with largely biotic reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). This finding implies that biogenic processes are more important to uranium ore genesis than previously understood. The predominance of a relatively labile form of U(IV) also provides an opportunity for a more economical and environmentally benign mining process, as well as the design of more effective post-mining restoration strategies and human health-risk assessment.

  11. Enzymatic U(VI) reduction by Desulfosporosinus species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kelly, S.D.; Kemner, K.M.; Banfield, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Here we tested U(VI) reduction by a Desulfosporosinus species (sp.) isolate and type strain (DSM 765) in cell suspensions (pH 7) containing 1 mM U(VI) and lactate, under an atmosphere containing N 2 -CO 2 -H 2 (90: 5: 5). Although neither Desulfosporosinus species (spp.) reduced U(VI) in cell suspensions with 0.25% Na-bicarbonate or 0.85% NaCl, U(VI) was reduced in these solutions by a control strain, desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 642). However, both Desulfosporosinus strains reduced U(VI) in cell suspensions depleted in bicarbonate and NaCl. No U(VI) reduction was observed without lactate and H 2 electron donors or with heat-killed cells, indicating enzymatic U(VI) reduction. Uranium(VI) reduction by both strains was inhibited when 1 mM CuCl 2 was added to the cell suspensions. Because the Desulfosporosinus DSM 765 does not contain cytochrome c 3 used by Desulfovibrio spp. to reduce U(VI), Desulfosporosinus species reduce uranium via a different enzymatic pathway. (orig.)

  12. Importance of c-Type cytochromes for U(VI reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leang Ching

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to study the mechanism of U(VI reduction, the effect of deleting c-type cytochrome genes on the capacity of Geobacter sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI with acetate serving as the electron donor was investigated. Results The ability of several c-type cytochrome deficient mutants to reduce U(VI was lower than that of the wild type strain. Elimination of two confirmed outer membrane cytochromes and two putative outer membrane cytochromes significantly decreased (ca. 50–60% the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI. Involvement in U(VI reduction did not appear to be a general property of outer membrane cytochromes, as elimination of two other confirmed outer membrane cytochromes, OmcB and OmcC, had very little impact on U(VI reduction. Among the periplasmic cytochromes, only MacA, proposed to transfer electrons from the inner membrane to the periplasm, appeared to play a significant role in U(VI reduction. A subpopulation of both wild type and U(VI reduction-impaired cells, 24–30%, accumulated amorphous uranium in the periplasm. Comparison of uranium-accumulating cells demonstrated a similar amount of periplasmic uranium accumulation in U(VI reduction-impaired and wild type G. sulfurreducens. Assessment of the ability of the various suspensions to reduce Fe(III revealed no correlation between the impact of cytochrome deletion on U(VI reduction and reduction of Fe(III hydroxide and chelated Fe(III. Conclusion This study indicates that c-type cytochromes are involved in U(VI reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens. The data provide new evidence for extracellular uranium reduction by G. sulfurreducens but do not rule out the possibility of periplasmic uranium reduction. Occurrence of U(VI reduction at the cell surface is supported by the significant impact of elimination of outer membrane cytochromes on U(VI reduction and the lack of correlation between periplasmic uranium accumulation and the capacity for uranium

  13. Post Audit of a Field Scale Reactive Transport Model of Uranium at a Former Mill Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, G. P.

    2015-12-01

    Reactive transport of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) in a shallow alluvial aquifer at a former uranium mill tailings site near Naturita CO has been monitored for nearly 30 years by the US Department of Energy and the US Geological Survey. Groundwater at the site has high concentrations of chloride, alkalinity and U(VI) as a owing to ore processing at the site from 1941 to 1974. We previously calibrated a multicomponent reactive transport model to data collected at the site from 1986 to 2001. A two dimensional nonreactive transport model used a uniform hydraulic conductivity which was estimated from observed chloride concentrations and tritium helium age dates. A reactive transport model for the 2km long site was developed by including an equilibrium U(VI) surface complexation model calibrated to laboratory data and calcite equilibrium. The calibrated model reproduced both nonreactive tracers as well as the observed U(VI), pH and alkalinity. Forward simulations for the period 2002-2015 conducted with the calibrated model predict significantly faster natural attenuation of U(VI) concentrations than has been observed by the persistent high U(VI) concentrations at the site. Alternative modeling approaches are being evaluating evaluated using recent data to determine if the persistence can be explained by multirate mass transfer models developed from experimental observations at the column scale(~0.2m), the laboratory tank scale (~2m), the field tracer test scale (~1-4m) or geophysical observation scale (~1-5m). Results of this comparison should provide insight into the persistence of U(VI) plumes and improved management options.

  14. Uranium sorption on tezontle volcanic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez M, B. E.; Duran B, J. M.; Iturbe G, J. L.; Olguin G, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    It is described a study that demonstrates that hexavalent uranium ions were sorbed by the naturally occurring mineral using a batch technique. This mineral is found in abundant quantities in Mexico. Our study focused on the separation of U Vi from synthetic aqueous systems of both H 2 O-UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O (acid) and H 2 O-Na 4 [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ] (basic). The chemical speciation was performed by using high voltage electrophoresis, and the uranium content was determined by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The quantified U(Vi) sorption by tezontle from acidic and basic systems was 2.72 and 1.68 μmol/g, respectively, and the sorption behavior is discussed considering the surface charge of the tezontle at different ph values based on the point of zero charge characteristic of this material. (Author)

  15. Role of U(VI) adsorption in U(VI) Reduction by Geobacter species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovely, Derrick

    2008-01-01

    Previous work had suggested that Acholeplasma palmae has a higher capacity for uranium sorption than other bacteria studied. Sorption studies were performed with cells in suspension in various solutions containing uranium, and results were used to generate uranium-biosorption isotherms. Results from this study showed that the U(VI) sorption capacity of G. uraniireducens was relatively similar in simple solutions, such as sodium chloride or bicarbonate. However, this ability to sorb uranium significantly decreased in groundwater. This suggested that certain chemicals present in the groundwater were inhibiting the ability of cell components of Geobacter to adsorb uranium. It was hypothesized that uranium removal would also be diminished in the bicarbonate solution. However, this did not seem to be the case, as uranium was as easily removed in the bicarbonate solution as in the sodium chloride solution.

  16. New Technique for Speciation of Uranium in Sediments Following Acetate-Stimulated Bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-06-22

    Acetate-stimulated bioremediation is a promising new technique for sequestering toxic uranium contamination from groundwater. The speciation of uranium in sediments after such bioremediation attempts remains unknown as a result of low uranium concentration, and is important to analyzing the stability of sequestered uranium. A new technique was developed for investigating the oxidation state and local molecular structure of uranium from field site sediments using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), and was implemented at the site of a former uranium mill in Rifle, CO. Glass columns filled with bioactive Rifle sediments were deployed in wells in the contaminated Rifle aquifer and amended with a hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) stock solution to increase uranium concentration while maintaining field conditions. This sediment was harvested and XAS was utilized to analyze the oxidation state and local molecular structure of the uranium in sediment samples. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data was collected and compared to known uranium spectra to determine the local molecular structure of the uranium in the sediment. Fitting was used to determine that the field site sediments did not contain uraninite (UO{sub 2}), indicating that models based on bioreduction using pure bacterial cultures are not accurate for bioremediation in the field. Stability tests on the monomeric tetravalent uranium (U(IV)) produced by bioremediation are needed in order to assess the efficacy of acetate-stimulation bioremediation.

  17. Influence of U(VI) on the metabolism of plant cells studied by microcalorimetry and TRLFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, Susanne; Geipel, Gerhard [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry; Fahmy, Karim; Oertel, Jana [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biophysics; Bok, Frank [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes

    2017-06-01

    Uranium(VI) shows a concentration-dependent influence on the metabolic activity of plant cells. With increasing U(VI) concentration, the predominant U(VI) species in medium R{sub red} changes from UO{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}(s) to (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(OH){sub 5}{sup +}, which may affect the bioavailability of U(VI).

  18. Uranium speciation in Fernald soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D.E.; Conradson, S.D.; Tait, C.D.; Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Berg, J.; Musgrave, J.

    1992-01-01

    This report details progress made from January 1 to May 31, 1992 in this analytical support task to determine the speciation of uranium in contaminated soil samples from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site under the auspices of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration funded through the US DOE's Office of Technology Development. The authors' efforts have focused on characterization of soil samples collected by S.Y. Lee (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) from five locales at the Fernald site. These were chosen to sample a broad range of uranium source terms. On the basis of x-ray absorption spectroscopy data, they have determined that the majority of uranium (> 80--90%) exists in the hexavalent oxidation state for all samples examined. This is a beneficial finding from the perspective of remediation, because U(VI) species are more soluble in general than uranium species in other oxidation states. Optical luminescence data from many of the samples show the characteristic structured yellow-green emission from the uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) moiety. The luminescence data also suggest that much of the uranium in these soils is present as well-crystallized UO 2 2+ species. Some clear spectroscopic distinctions have been noted for several samples that illustrate significant differences in the speciation (1) from site to site, (2) within different horizons at the same site, and (3) within different size fractions of the soils in the same horizon at the same site. This marked heterogeneity in uranyl speciation suggests that several soil washing strategies may be necessary to reduce the total uranium concentrations within these soils to regulatory limits

  19. Determining uranium speciation in contaminated soils by molecular spectroscopic methods: Examples from the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, P.G.; Berg, J.M.; Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Conradson, S.D.; Donohoe, R.J.; Morris, D.E.; Musgrave, J.A.; Tait, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's former uranium production facility located at Fernald, OH (18 mi NW of Cincinnati) is the host site for an Integrated Demonstration for remediation of uranium-contaminated soils. A wide variety of source terms for uranium contamination have been identified reflecting the diversity of operations at the facility. Most of the uranium contamination is contained in the top ∼1/2 m of soil, but uranium has been found in perched waters indicating substantial migration. In support of the development of remediation technologies and risk assessment, we are conducting uranium speciation studies on untreated and treated soils using molecular spectroscopies. Untreated soils from five discrete sites have been analyzed. We have found that ∼80--90% of the uranium exists as hexavalent UO 2 2+ species even though many source terms consisted of tetravalent uranium species such as UO 2 . Much of the uranium exists as microcrystalline precipitates (secondary minerals). There is also clear evidence for variations in uranium species from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale. However, similarities in speciation at sites having different source terms suggest that soil and groundwater chemistry may be as important as source term in defining the uranium speciation in these soils. Characterization of treated soils has focused on materials from two sites that have undergone leaching using conventional extractants (e.g., carbonate, citrate) or novel chelators such as Tiron. Redox reagents have also been used to facilitate the leaching process. Three different classes of treated soils have been identified based on the speciation of uranium remaining in the soils. In general, the effective treatments decrease the total uranium while increasing the ratio of U(IV) to U(VI) species

  20. Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Logistics 4 Initiative - DoD Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Non- Chrome Primer IIEXAVAJ ENT CHRO:M I~UMI CHROMIUM (VII Oil CrfVli.J CANCEfl HAnRD CD...Management Office of the Secretary of Defense Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188...00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  1. Evidence for Multiple Modes of Uranium Immobilization by an Anaerobic Bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Allison; Bargar, John R.; Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran; Dohnalkova, Alice; Fujita, Yoshiko; Peyton, Brent M.; Magnuson, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium has been studied widely for its potential role in bioremediation and immobilization of soluble U(VI) in contaminated groundwater. More recently, some microorganisms have been examined for their role in immobilization of U(VI) via precipitation of uranyl phosphate minerals mediated by microbial phosphate release, alleviating the requirement for long-term redox control. Here, we investigated the mechanism of U(VI) removal mediated by an environmental isolate, strain UFO1, that is indigenous to the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN and has been detected in U(VI)-contaminated sediments. Changes in U(VI) speciation were examined in the presence and absence of the electron-shuttling moiety, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Cell suspensions were capable of nearly complete removal of 100 (micro)M U(VI) from solution within 48 hours; U(VI) removal was not dependent on the presence of an exogenous electron donor or AQDS, although AQDS increased the rate of U(VI) removal. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopic measurements indicated that U(IV) was the predominant oxidation state of uranium in cell suspensions in both the absence and presence of 100 (micro)M AQDS. However, extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements indicated that 17% of the cell-associated precipitates in a U(VI)-treated suspension that lacked AQDS had spectral characteristics consistent with a uranyl phosphate solid phase. The potential involvement of phosphate was consistent with observed increases in soluble phosphate concentrations over time in UFO1 cell suspensions, which suggested phosphate liberation from the cells. TEM-EDS confirmed the presence of uranyl phosphate with a U:P ratio consistent with autunite (1:1). EXAFS analyses further showed that U(IV) was present predominantly as a monomeric complex sorbed to carboxylate functional groups on biomass and also suggested that a fraction of the U

  2. Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite by plasma technique for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xinghao [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Intelligent Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230088 (China); Cheng, Cheng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xiao, Chengjian, E-mail: xiaocj@caep.cn [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Shao, Dadong, E-mail: shaodadong@126.com [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xu, Zimu, E-mail: xzm@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Intelligent Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230088 (China); Wang, Jiaquan; Hu, Shuheng [Intelligent Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230088 (China); Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Weijuan [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • PANI/bentonie can be synthesized by simple plasma technique. • PANI/bentonie has an excellent adsorption capacity for trace uranium in solution. • U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite is a spontaneous and endothermic process. - Abstract: Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite (PANI/bentonie) was synthesized by plasma induced polymerization of aniline on bentonite surface, and applied to uptake of uranium(VI) ions from aqueous solution. The as-synthesized PANI/bentonie was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch adsorption technique was utilized to investigate the adsorption of U(VI) on bentonite and PANI/bentonite. The adsorption of U(VI) (10 mg/L) on PANI/bentonite surface is fairly depend on solution pH, ionic strength, and temperature in solution. The modified PANI on PANI/bentonite surface significantly enhances its adsorption capability for U(VI). The presence of humic acid (HA) can sound enhance U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite at pH < 6.5 because of the strong complexation, and inhibits U(VI) adsorption at pH > 6.5. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the adsorption of U(VI) on PANI/bentonite surface is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results highlight the application of PANI/bentonite composites as candidate material for the uptake of trace U(VI) from aqueous solution.

  3. uVis Studio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantazos, Kostas; Kuhail, Mohammad Amin; Lauesen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Vis Studio. Instead of programming, developers apply a Drag-Drop-Set-View-Interact approach. Developers bind controls to data, and the Studio gives immediate visual feedback in the Design Panel. This is a novel feature, called What-You-Bind-Is-What- You-Get. The Studio also provides Modes that allow......A toolkit facilitates the visualization development process. The process can be further enhanced by integrating the toolkits in development environments. This paper describes how the uVis toolkit, a formula-based visualiza- tion toolkit, has been extended with a development environment, called u...... developers to interact and view the visualization from the end-user's perspective without switching workspace, and Auto-Completion; a feature of the Property Grid that provides suggestions not only for the formula language syntax but also for the tables, the table elds and the relationships in the database...

  4. Thermodynamic parameters and sorption of U(VI) on ACSD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donat, R.; Cilgi, G.K.; Cetisli, H.; Aytas, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the sorption properties for U(VI) by alginate coated CaSO 4 x 2H 2 O sepiolite and calcined diatomite earth (Kieselguhr) (ACSD). The removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution by sorption onto ACSF in a single component system with various contact times, pH, temperatures, and initial concentrations of U(VI) was investigated. The sorption patterns of uranium on the composite adsorbent followed the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkhevic (D-R) isotherms. The Freundlich, Langmuir, and D-R models have been applied and the data correlated well with Freundlich model and that the sorption was physical in nature (sorption energy, E a = 17.05 kJ/mol). The thermodynamic parameters such as variation of enthalpy ΔH, variation of entropy ΔS and variation of Gibbs free energy ΔG were calculated from the slope and intercept of lnK 0 vs. 1/T plots. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH ads = 31.83 kJ/mol, ΔS ads = 167 J/mol x K, ΔGdeg ads (293.15 K) = -17.94 kJ/mol) showed the endothermic heat of sorption and the feasibility of the process. The thermodynamics of U(VI) ion/ACSD system indicates the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the process. It was noted that an increase in temperature resulted in a higher uranium loading per unit weight of the adsorbent. (author)

  5. Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite by plasma technique for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xinghao; Cheng, Cheng; Xiao, Chengjian; Shao, Dadong; Xu, Zimu; Wang, Jiaquan; Hu, Shuheng; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Weijuan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • PANI/bentonie can be synthesized by simple plasma technique. • PANI/bentonie has an excellent adsorption capacity for trace uranium in solution. • U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite is a spontaneous and endothermic process. - Abstract: Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite (PANI/bentonie) was synthesized by plasma induced polymerization of aniline on bentonite surface, and applied to uptake of uranium(VI) ions from aqueous solution. The as-synthesized PANI/bentonie was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch adsorption technique was utilized to investigate the adsorption of U(VI) on bentonite and PANI/bentonite. The adsorption of U(VI) (10 mg/L) on PANI/bentonite surface is fairly depend on solution pH, ionic strength, and temperature in solution. The modified PANI on PANI/bentonite surface significantly enhances its adsorption capability for U(VI). The presence of humic acid (HA) can sound enhance U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite at pH 6.5. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the adsorption of U(VI) on PANI/bentonite surface is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results highlight the application of PANI/bentonite composites as candidate material for the uptake of trace U(VI) from aqueous solution.

  6. Kinetics of U(VI) reduction by a dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium under non-growth conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truex, M.J.; Peyton, B.M.; Valentine, N.B.; Gorby, Y.A.

    1997-01-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms may be useful in processes designed for selective removal of uranium from aqueous streams. These bacteria can use U(VI) as an electron acceptor and thereby reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). While significant research has been devoted to demonstrating and describing the mechanism of dissimilatory metal reduction, the reaction kinetics necessary to apply this for remediation processes have not been adequately defined. In this study, pure culture Shewanella alga strain BrY reduced U(VI) under non-growth conditions in the presence of excess lactate as the electron donor. Initial U(VI) concentrations ranged from 13 to 1,680microM. A maximum specific U(VI) reduction rate of 2.37 micromole-U(VI)/(mg-biomass h) and Monod half-saturation coefficient of 132 microM-U(VI) were calculated from measured U(VI) reduction rates. U(VI) reduction activity was sustained at 60% of this rate for at least 80 h. The initial presence of oxygen at a concentration equal to atmospheric saturation at 22 C delays but does not prevent U(VI) reduction. The rate of U(VI) reduction by BrY is comparable or better than rates reported for other metal reducing species. BrY reduces U(VI) at a rate that is 30% of its Fe(III) reduction rate

  7. Hexavalent Chromium Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about chromium, exposure to which can increase your risk of lung cancer and cancer of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. Hexavalent chromium compounds have been used as corrosion inhibitors in a wide variety of products and processes.

  8. UVIS Flat Field Uniformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, Jessica Kim

    2009-07-01

    The stability and uniformity of the low-frequency flat fields {L-flat} of the UVIS detector will be assessed by using multiple-pointing observations of the globular clusters 47 Tucanae {NGC104} and Omega Centauri {NGC5139}, thus imaging moderately dense stellar fields. By placing the same star over different portions of the detector and measuring relative changes in its brightness, it will be possible to determine local variations in the response of the UVIS detector. Based on previous experience with STIS and ACS, it is deemed that a total of 9 different pointings will suffice to provide adequate characterization of the flat field stability in any given band. For each filter to be tested, the baseline consists of 9 pointings in a 3X3 box pattern with dither steps of about 25% of the FOV, or 40.5", in either the x or y direction {useful also for CTE measurements, if needed in the future}. During SMOV, the complement of filters to be tested is limited to the following 6 filters: F225W, F275W, F336W, for Omega Cen, and F438W, F606W, and F814W for 47 Tuc. Three long exposures for each target are arranged such that the initial dither position is observed with the appropriate filters for that target within one orbit at a single pointing, so that filter-to-filter differences in the observed star positions can be checked. In addition to the 9 baseline exposures, two sets of short exposures will be taken:a} one short exposure will be taken of OmegaCen with each of the visible filters {F438W, F606W and F814W} in order to check the geometric distortion solution to be obtained with the data from proposal 11444;b} for each target, a single short exposure will be taken with each filter to facilitate the study of the PSF as a function of position on the detector by providing unsaturated images of sparsely-spaced bright stars.This proposal corresponds to Activity Description ID WF39. It should execute only after the following proposal has executed:WF21 - 11434

  9. Inhibition of bacterial U(VI) reduction by calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, Scott C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Carroll, S. L.; Kennedy, David W.; Zachara, John M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Fendorf, S.

    2003-01-01

    The rapid kinetics of bacterial U(VI) reduction and low solubility of uraninite (UO2,cr) make this process an attractive option for removing uranium from groundwater. Nevertheless, conditions that may promote or inhibit U(VI) reduction are not well-defined. Recent descriptions of Ca-UO2-CO3 complexes indicate that these species may dominate the aqueous speciation of U(VI) in many environments. We monitored the bacterial reduction of U(VI) in bicarbonate-buffered solution in the presence and absence of Ca. XAFS measurements confirmed the presence of a Ca-U(VI)-CO3 complex in the initial solutions containing calcium. Calcium, at millimolar concentrations (0.45-5 mM), caused a significant decrease in the rate and extent of bacterial U(VI) reduction. Both facultative (Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32) and obligate (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Geobacter sulfurreducens) anaerobic bacteria were affected by the presence of calcium. Reduction of U(VI) ceased when the calculated system Eh re ached -0.046+/- 0.001 V, based on the Ca2UO2(CO3)(3) -- > UO2,cr couple. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that U is a less energetically favorable electron acceptor when the Ca-UO2-CO3 complexes are present. The results do not support Ca inhibition caused by direct interactions with the cells or with the electron donor as the reduction of fumarate or Tc(VII)O-4(-) under identical conditions was unaffected by the presence of Ca

  10. A comparative evaluation of synergistic extraction behaviour of hexavalent uranium with thenoyl tri-fluoro-acetone (HTTA) and 1-phenyl, 3-methyl, 4-benzoyl pyrazolone-5 (HPMBP) using mono-functional and bi-functional neutral donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai, S.A.; Lohithakshan, K.V.; Mithapara, P.D.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    Synergistic extraction of hexavalent uranium was studied using acidic extractants HTTA/HPMBP with two different bifunctional neutral donors, DHDECMP and CMPO, from HNO 3 medium at various fixed temperatures. The equilibrium constants for the organic phase addition reaction (log K s ) were correlated with the basicity (K h ) of the neutral donors. The data reported earlier for monofunctional neutral donors (DPSO, TBP, TOPO) were used for the comparison. A linear correlation between log K s and log K h was observed for U(VI)/HTTA/S (S = neutral donor) system. However, in U(VI)/HPMBP/S system, the observed log K s values for bifunctional neutral donors were much lower than those expected from linear correlation. This was attributed to the different mechanisms operative in the synergistic extraction i.e. substitution in the former vs. addition in the latter. These conclusions are also supported by the thermodynamic data obtained in the present studies. Nevertheless, it is seen that bifunctional neutral donors act only as monofunctional with both HTTA and HPMBP. (orig.)

  11. Uranium extraction history using pressure leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, K.S.; Thomas, K.G.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 60 years of uranium process development only a few commercial uranium plants have adopted a pressure leaching process in their flowsheet. The selection of acid versus alkaline pressure leaching is related to the uranium and gangue mineralogy. Tetravalent (U"+"4) uranium has to be oxidized to hexavalent (U"+"6) uranium to be soluble. Refractory tetravalent uranium requires higher temperature and pressure, as practised in pressure leaching, for conversation to soluble hexavalent uranium. This paper chronicles the history of these uranium pressure leaching facilities over the past 60 years, with specific details of each design and operation. (author)

  12. WFC3 UVIS Detector Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Heather C.; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Gosmeyer, Catherine; Bourque, Matthew; MacKenty, John W.; Anderson, Jay; WFC3 Team

    2015-01-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a fourth-generation imaging instrument installed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) in May 2000. WFC3 has two observational channels, UV/visible (UVIS) and infrared (IR); both have been performing well on-orbit. Since installation, the WFC3 team has been diligent in monitoring the performance of both detectors. The UVIS channel consists of two e2v, backside illuminated, 2Kx4K CCDs arranged in a 2x1 mosaic. We present results from some of the monitoring programs used to check various aspects of the UVIS detector. We discuss the growth trend of hot pixels and the efficacy of regular anneals in controlling the hot pixel population. We detail a pixel population with lowered-sensitivity that evolves during the time between anneals, and is largely reset by each anneal procedure. We discuss the stability of the post-flash LED lamp, used and recommended for CTE mitigation in observations with less than 12 e-/pixel backgrounds. Finally, we summarize long-term photometric trends of the UVIS detector, as well as the absolute gain measurement, used as a proxy for the on-orbit evolution of the UVIS channel.

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdoun, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  14. Hexavalent Chromium Substitution Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    Hexavalent Chromium Substitution Projects Date (12 May 2011) Gene McKinley ASC/WNV (937) 255-3596 Gene.McKinley@wpafb.af.mil Aeronautical Systems...valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 12 MAY 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hexavalent ...A-10) – AETC (T-6, T-38 and T1A) • Both Cr Primers & Non-Cr primers as well as Cr Surface Treatment – F-22 8 Non- Chrome Tie-coat & touch-up

  15. Uranium sorption on tezontle volcanic rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez M, B. E.; Duran B, J. M.; Iturbe G, J. L.; Olguin G, M. T., E-mail: beatriz.lopez@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    It is described a study that demonstrates that hexavalent uranium ions were sorbed by the naturally occurring mineral using a batch technique. This mineral is found in abundant quantities in Mexico. Our study focused on the separation of U Vi from synthetic aqueous systems of both H{sub 2}O-UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O (acid) and H{sub 2}O-Na{sub 4}[UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}] (basic). The chemical speciation was performed by using high voltage electrophoresis, and the uranium content was determined by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The quantified U(Vi) sorption by tezontle from acidic and basic systems was 2.72 and 1.68 mumol/g, respectively, and the sorption behavior is discussed considering the surface charge of the tezontle at different ph values based on the point of zero charge characteristic of this material. (Author)

  16. Ex-situ bioremediation of U(VI from contaminated mine water using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eRomero-Gonzalez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The ex-situ bioremoval of U(VI from contaminated water using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain 8455 and 13538 was studied under a range of pH and uranium concentrations. The effect of pH on the growth of bacteria was evaluated across the range 1.5 – 4.5 pH units. The respiration rate of At. ferrooxidans at different U(VI concentrations was quantified as a measure of the rate of metabolic activity over time using an oxygen electrode. The biosorption process was quantified using a uranyl nitrate solution, U-spiked growth media and U-contaminated mine water. The results showed that both strains of At. ferrooxidans are able to remove U(VI from solution at pH 2.5 – 4.5, exhibiting a buffering capacity at pH 3.5. The respiration rate of the micro-organism was affected at U(VI concentration of 30 mg L-1. The kinetics of the sorption fitted a pseudo-first order equation, and depended on the concentration of U(VI. The KD obtained from the biosorption experiments indicated that strain 8455 is more efficient for the removal of U(VI. A bioreactor designed to treat a solution of 100 mg U(VI L-1 removed at least 50% of the U(VI in water. The study demonstrated that At. ferrooxidans can be used for the ex-situ bioremediation of U(VI contaminated mine water.

  17. Interaction of uranium with in situ anoxically generated magnetite on steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, Miquel; El Aamrani, Souad; Duro, Lara; Gimenez, Javier; Pablo, Joan de; Bruno, Jordi

    2007-01-01

    In the high level nuclear waste repository concept, spent nuclear fuel is designed to be encapsulated in steel canisters. Thus, it is necessary to study the influence of the steel and/or its corrosion products on the behaviour of the radionuclides released from the fuel. In this sense, the main objective of this work is to contribute to the knowledge of the influence of the steel and/or its corrosion products on the uranium(VI) retention. To this aim, magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) has been generated by anaerobic steel corrosion in an autoclave reactor at an overpressure of 8 atm of H 2 (g). After characterisation by X-ray diffraction (XRD), the obtained corroded steel coupons were contacted, at two different H 2 (g) pressures (1 atm and 7.6 atm), with a U(VI) solution. The evolution of the uranium concentration in solution is determined and a study of the composition of the coupons at the end of the experiments is carried out. The main conclusion obtained from this work is that magnetite generated on a steel coupon is able not only to retain uranium via sorption, but also to reduce hexavalent to tetravalent uranium in a higher extent than commercial magnetite, thus, providing an effective retardation path to the migration of uranium (and, potentially, other actinides) out of the repository

  18. Bicarbonate Impact on U(VI) Bioreduction in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, L.; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al. 2003, Williams et al. 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al. 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, that the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ~3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in aquifers.

  19. Bicarbonate impact on U(VI) bioreduction in a shallow alluvial aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Chris; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al., 2003; Williams et al., 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al., 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer sediments desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ∼3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction in the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  1. Factors influencing U(VI adsorption onto soil from a candidate very low level radioactive waste disposal site in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuo Rui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The properties of soil at disposal sites are very important for geological disposal of very low level radioactive waste in terms of U(VI. In this study, soil from a candidate very low level radioactive waste disposal site in China was evaluated for its capacity on uranium sorption. Specifically, the equilibrium time, initial concentration, soil particle, pH, temperature, and carbonate were evaluated. The results indicated that after 15-20 days of sorption, the Kd value fluctuated and stabilized at 355-360 mL/g. The adsorptive capacity of uranium was increased as the initial uranium concentration increased, while it decreased as the soil particle size increased. The pH value played an important role in the U(VI sorption onto soil, especially under alkaline conditions, and had a great effect on the sorption capacity of soil for uranium. Moreover, the presence of carbonate decreased the sorption of U(VI onto soil because of the role of the strong complexation of carbonate with U(VI in the groundwater. Overall, this study assessed the behavior of U(VI sorption onto natural soil, which would be an important factor in the geological barrier of the repository, has contribution on mastering the characteristic of the adsorption of uranium in the particular soil media for the process of very low level radioactive waste disposal.

  2. Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite by plasma technique for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinghao; Cheng, Cheng; Xiao, Chengjian; Shao, Dadong; Xu, Zimu; Wang, Jiaquan; Hu, Shuheng; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Weijuan

    2017-07-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite (PANI/bentonie) was synthesized by plasma induced polymerization of aniline on bentonite surface, and applied to uptake of uranium(VI) ions from aqueous solution. The as-synthesized PANI/bentonie was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch adsorption technique was utilized to investigate the adsorption of U(VI) on bentonite and PANI/bentonite. The adsorption of U(VI) (10 mg/L) on PANI/bentonite surface is fairly depend on solution pH, ionic strength, and temperature in solution. The modified PANI on PANI/bentonite surface significantly enhances its adsorption capability for U(VI). The presence of humic acid (HA) can sound enhance U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite at pH 6.5. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the adsorption of U(VI) on PANI/bentonite surface is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results highlight the application of PANI/bentonite composites as candidate material for the uptake of trace U(VI) from aqueous solution.

  3. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article briefly discusses the Australian government policy and the attitude of political party factions towards the mining and exporting of the uranium resources in Australia. Australia has a third of the Western World's low-cost uranium resources

  4. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  5. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  6. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  7. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  8. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  9. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  10. Uranium Phases in Contaminated Sediments Below Hanford's U Tank Farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Um, Wooyong; Wang, Zheming; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Williams, Benjamin D.; Brown, Christopher F.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Francis, Arokiasamy J.

    2009-01-01

    Macroscopic and spectroscopic investigations (XAFS, XRF and TRLIF) on Hanford contaminated vadose zone sediments from the U-tank farm showed that U(VI) exists as different surface phases as a function of depth below ground surface (bgs). Dominant U(VI) silicate precipitates (boltwoodite and uranophane) were present in shallow-depth sediments (15-16 m bgs). In the intermediate depth sediments (20-25 m bgs), adsorbed U(VI) phases dominated but small amounts of surface precipitates consisting of polynuclear U(VI) surface complex were also identified. The deep depth sediments (> 28 m bgs) showed no signs of contact with tank wastes containing Hanford-derived U(VI), but natural uranium solid phases were observed. Most of the U(VI) was preferentially associated with the silt and clay size fractions and showed strong correlation with Ca, especially for the precipitated U(VI) silicate phase in the shallow depth sediments. Because U(VI) silicate precipitates dominate the U(VI) phases in the shallow depth sediments, macroscopic (bi)carbonate leaching should result in U(VI) releases from both desorption and dissolution processes. Having several different U(VI) surface phases in the Hanford contaminated sediments indicates that the U(VI) release mechanism could be complicated and that detailed characterization of the sediments would be needed to estimate U(VI) fate and transport in vadose zone

  11. Complexation of Eu(III), Th(IV) and U(VI) by humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, V.; Reiller, P.; Dautel, C.; Plancque, G.; Laszak, I.; Moulin, C.

    1999-01-01

    Complexation of actinides by humic substances has been studied by different techniques depending on the actinide and its oxidation state. For trivalent actinide (using a rare earth element, Eu as an analogue of trivalent actinide), Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) has been retained as a method for direction speciation at low level. By varying pH and physicochemical conditions (absence of carbonate ions) and at fixed ionic strength, it is possible together to identify spectrally and temporally, all the hydroxo and carbonato complexes. This approach has also been retained for U(VI) as a model of hexavalent actinide, for which hydroxo complexes have been characterized by TRLIF (the simple carbonato complexes are not fluorescent). In the case of U(VI), titrations hy humic acids of U(VI) solutions at various pH have allowed to characterize organic complexes formed with U(VI): single complexes (UO 2 HA) and mixed complexes (UO 2 (OH) 3 HA). The impact on U(VI) speciation has then been identified. In the case of Th(IV) as a model of tetravalent actinides, a competitive method has been used to obtain data on the Th-HA system by studying the ternary system silica colloid/HA/Th at constant pH (Schubert method). Apparent interaction constants have been calculated depending on Th hydrolysis constants used. A study of the system Th/HA/silica has a function of pH and for different HA concentrations has shown the strong complexing character of humic acids towards Th in the pH range 4-9. (orig.)

  12. WFC3/UVIS image skew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, Larry

    2009-07-01

    This proposal will provide an independent check of the skew in the ACS astrometric catalog of Omega Cen stars, using exposures taken in a 45-deg range of telescope roll. The roll sequence will also provide a test for orbital variation of skew and field angle dependent PSF variations. The astrometric catalog of Omega Cen, improved for a skew, will be used to derive the geometric distorion to all UVIS filters, which has preliminarily been determined from F606W images and an astrometric catalog of 47 Tuc.

  13. Interactions of U(VI), Nd, and Th(IV) at the Calcite-solution interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.A.; Dran, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The interactions of U(VI), Nd, and Th(IV) at the calcite-solution interface at controlled pCO 2 (g) have been investigated by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive (EDS) analyses of reacted calcite. Uranium precipitation at the calcite-solution interface was observed only for those experiments in which the initial [U(VI)] was greater than the solubility of rutherfordine, UO 2 CO 3 (s). At pH 8.0, flat radial uranium and calcium zoned precipitates form at the mineral-solution interface. At pH 4.3, uranium forms an anastomosing precipitate throughout the calcite surface. RBS analyses confirmed the SEM analyses showing that uranium forms a solid phase within the calcite surface, but formation of an uranium-calcium solid solution at depth is limited. In sharp contrast to U(VI), Nd is concentrated in the solid phase as individual neodymium-calcium carbonate crystals. Calcite and pure orthorhombic neodymium carbonate crystals dissolve at the expense of the formation of a more stable neodymium-calcium solid solution. In the presence of calcite, a thorium-calcium solid solution forms by exchanging Th for Ca in the calcite structure. Thorium precipitates in two linear trends which intersect each other at approximately 105deg C and 75deg C, parallel to calcite rhombohedral cleavage faces. (orig.)

  14. Stripping study of U(VI) from loaded TBP/n-paraffin using ammonium nitrate bearing waste as strippant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrishma Paik; Biswas, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Roy, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Stripping studies of U(VI) from loaded solvent TBP/n-paraffin was carried out using ammonium nitrate solution as strippant. Effects of various stripping parameters such as concentration of ammonium nitrate solution, U(VI) concentration in organic phase, initial pH of strippant, temperature etc. have been investigated in detail. Kinetics of the stripping process by ammonium nitrate was found to be slower than that of stripping with water. It was observed that with the increase in ammonium nitrate concentration in aqueous solution, stripping of U(VI) decreased. With the increase in U(VI) loading in the organic phase, there was an increase in uranium stripping for ammonium nitrate whereas for distilled water it becomes reverse. With the increase in pH of the aqueous ammonium nitrate solution, stripping increased up to a certain pH of 8.5 and after that precipitation of uranium started. Increase in temperature of the biphasic system shows an enhancing effect of U(VI) stripping. Evaluation of thermodynamic data such as ΔH indicated that the process is endothermic. Based on the optimized conditions, McCabe-Thiele diagram was constructed for U(VI) stripping using ammonium nitrate solution at room temperature. (author)

  15. Application of HDTMA-intercalated bentonites in water waste treatment for U(VI) removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajnak, Adrian; Viglasova, Eva; Galambos, Michal; Krivosudsky, Lukas; Universitat Wien, Vienna

    2017-01-01

    Bentonite deposits in Slovakia are systematically investigated as potential adsorbents for wastewater and radioactive waste treatment applications. Herein, adsorption properties (isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamics) of raw and organo-modified bentonites towards uranium species in aqueous solutions were investigated. Organo-modified bentonites was prepared by practical and simple chemical modification method with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (denoted as HDTMA-bentonites). The adsorption processes of U(VI) on HDTMA-bentonites were spontaneous and endothermic, and well simulated by pseudo-second-order model. The maximum adsorption capacity of U(VI) was calculated to be 31.45 mg/g at pH 8.5 and T = 298 K. Slovak bentonites Jelsovy potok and Kopernica, their natural and HDTMA-modified forms might be a promising sorbent for the treatment of U(VI) contaminants in aqueous solutions. (author)

  16. Kinetic study of time-dependent fixation of U"V"I on biochar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, A.; Bailey, E.H.; Chenery, S.R.N.; Young, S.D.

    2016-01-01

    Biochar, a by-product from the production of biofuel and syngas by gasification, was tested as a material for adsorption and fixation of U"V"I from aqueous solutions. A batch experiment was conducted to study the factors that influence the adsorption and time-dependent fixation on biochar at 20 °C, including pH, initial concentration of U"V"I and contact time. Uranium (U"V"I) adsorption was highly dependent on pH but adsorption on biochar was high over a wide range of pH values, from 4.5 to 9.0, and adsorption strength was time-dependent over several days. The experimental data for pH > 7 were most effectively modelled using a Freundlich adsorption isotherm coupled to a reversible first order kinetic equation to describe the time-dependent fixation of U"V"I within the biochar structure. Desorption experiments showed that U"V"I was only sparingly desorbable from the biochar with time and isotopic dilution with "2"3"3U"V"I confirmed the low, or time-dependent, lability of adsorbed "2"3"8U"V"I. Below pH 7 the adsorption isotherm trend suggested precipitation, rather than true adsorption, may occur. However, across all pH values (4.5-9) measured saturation indices suggested precipitation was possible: autunite below pH 6.5 and either swartzite, liebigite or bayleyite above pH 6.5.

  17. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  18. Geochemical behaviour of uranium in sedimentary formations: insights from a natural analogue study - 16340

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noseck, Ulrich; Brasser, Thomas; Havlova, Vaclava; Cervinka, Radek; Suksi, Juhani

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater data from the natural analogue site Ruprechtov have been evaluated with special emphasis on the uranium behaviour in the so-called uranium-rich clay/lignite horizon. In this horizon in-situ Eh-values in the range of -160 to -280 mV seem to be determined by the SO 4 2- /HS - couple. Under these conditions U(IV) is expected to be the preferential redox state in solution. However, on-site measurements in groundwater from the clay/lignite horizon show only a fraction of about 20 % occurring in the reduced state U(IV). Thermodynamic calculations reveal that the high CO 2 partial pressure in the clay/lignite horizon can stabilise hexavalent uranium, which explains the occurrence of U(VI). The calculations also indicate that the low uranium concentrations in the range between 0.2 and 2.1 μg/l are controlled by amorphous UO 2 and/or the U(IV) phosphate mineral ningyoite. This confirms the findings from previous work that the uranium (IV) mineral phases are long-term stable under the reducing conditions in the clay/lignite horizon without any signatures for uranium mobilisation. It supports the current knowledge of the geological development of the site and is also another important indication for the long-term stability of the sedimentary system itself, namely of the reducing geochemical conditions in the near-surface (30 m to 60 m deep) clay/lignite horizon. Further work with respect to the impact of changes in redox conditions on the uranium speciation is on the way. (authors)

  19. Removal of U(VI) from aqueous solutions using Shewanella sp. RCRI7, isolated from Qurugoel Lake in Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdehvand, Adib Zaheri; Keshtkar, Alireza; Fatemi, Faezeh [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research School; Tarhiz, Vahideh; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid [Tabriz Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Molecular Medicine Research Center

    2017-04-01

    Isolation, genotypic and phenotypic characterization of an aqueous bacterium, Shewanella sp RCRI7, from Qurugoel Lake in Iran and uranium removal from aqueous solutions using the isolate is described. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and phylogenetic tree, strain RCRI7{sup T} falls into genus Shewanella. Closely related type strains include Shewanella xiamenensis S4{sup T} KJ542801, Shewanella profunda DSM15900{sup T} FR733713, Shewanella putrefaciens LMG 26268{sup T} X81623 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1{sup T} AE014299. Anaerobic incubation of the bacteria in the presence of U(VI) led to uranium removal from the solution and formation of a black precipitate. Analysis of the precipitate using UV-vis confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). The effects of pH, temperature, U(VI) concentration and cell density on uranium removal were elucidated. The maximum uranium removal was 97%. As a conclusion, the findings revealed the ability of the local strain RCRI7 for U(VI) bioreduction as an effective bacterium for uranium immobilization.

  20. Removal of U(VI) from aqueous solutions using Shewanella sp. RCRI7, isolated from Qurugoel Lake in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdehvand, Adib Zaheri; Keshtkar, Alireza; Fatemi, Faezeh; Tarhiz, Vahideh; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Isolation, genotypic and phenotypic characterization of an aqueous bacterium, Shewanella sp RCRI7, from Qurugoel Lake in Iran and uranium removal from aqueous solutions using the isolate is described. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and phylogenetic tree, strain RCRI7 T falls into genus Shewanella. Closely related type strains include Shewanella xiamenensis S4 T KJ542801, Shewanella profunda DSM15900 T FR733713, Shewanella putrefaciens LMG 26268 T X81623 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 T AE014299. Anaerobic incubation of the bacteria in the presence of U(VI) led to uranium removal from the solution and formation of a black precipitate. Analysis of the precipitate using UV-vis confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). The effects of pH, temperature, U(VI) concentration and cell density on uranium removal were elucidated. The maximum uranium removal was 97%. As a conclusion, the findings revealed the ability of the local strain RCRI7 for U(VI) bioreduction as an effective bacterium for uranium immobilization.

  1. Uranium adsorption by non-treated and chemically modified cactus fibres in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melpomeni Prodromou; Ioannis Pashalidis

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption efficiency of Opuntia ficus indica fibres regarding the removal of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] from aqueous solutions has been investigated prior and after the chemical treatment (e.g. phosphorylation and MnO 2 -coating) of the biomass. The separation/removal efficiency has been studied as a function of pH, uranium concentration, adsorbent mass, ionic strength, temperature and contact time. Evaluation of the experimental data shows that biosorption is strongly pH-depended and that the MnO 2 -coated product presents the highest adsorption capacity followed by the phosphorylated and non-treated material. Experiments with varying ionic strength/salinity don't show any significant effect on the adsorption efficiency, indicating the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes. The adsorption reactions are in all cases exothermic and relatively fast, particularly regarding the adsorption on the MnO 2 -coated product. The results of the present study indicate that adsorption of uranium from waters is very effective by cactus fibres and particularly the modified treated fibres. The increased adsorption efficiency of the cactus fibres is attributed to their primary and secondary fibrillar structure, which result in a relative relative high specific surface available for sorption. (author)

  2. Energy Transfer between U(VI) and Eu(III) Ions Adsorbed on a Silica Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, K. K.; Cha, W.; Cho, H. R.; Im, H. J.; Jung, E. C.; Song, K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Understanding of chemical behavior of actinide in a groundwater flow is important for assessing the possibility of their migration with water flows in a radioactive waste disposal site. Uranium is ubiquitous in the environment and a major actinide in a nuclear fuel cycle. Americium and curium having isotopes of long half life are minor actinides in a spent fuel. If a minor actinide coexists with uranium in a groundwater flow, some interactions between them could be expected such as minor actinide adsorption onto uranium precipitates and competition with each other for an adsorption to a mineral surface site. Eu(III) ion is frequently used as a chemical analogue of Am(III) and Cm(III) ions in a migration chemistry. The luminescent spectra of U(VI) and Eu(III) ions show a dependency on the coordination symmetry around them, and the changes in intensity or bandwidth of spectra can yield valuable information on their local environment. The luminescent lifetime also strongly depends on the coordination environment, and its measurement is valuable in probe studies on micro-heterogeneous systems. The excited U(VI) ion can be quenched through Stern.Volmer process, hydrolysis of excited species, exciplex formation, electron transfer or energy transfer. In case of U(VI)-Eu(III) system, the interaction between two ions can be studied by measuring the effect of Eu(III) ion on the quenching of U(VI) ion luminescence. There are only a few investigations on the interaction between an excited U(VI) ion and a lanthanide(III) ion. In perchlorate solution, the energy transfer to Eu(III) ion occurred only in solutions of pH>3.87. In this study, the quenching of U(VI) luminescence by Eu(III) on a silica surface was measured. The results will be discussed on the basis of a chemical interaction between them

  3. Processing hexavalent uranium gels and their properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Benadik, A.; Spitzer, Z.

    1980-01-01

    The properties of xerogels of ammonium polyuranate prepared by various drying procedures were studied. The individual drying procedures affect differently both the chemical structure of the material (its composition) and the physicochemical properties of the final product (specific surface area, porosity). In addition, the physicochemical properties of xerogels depend on the properties of the starting material, i.e., on the type of the initial gel. The physicochemical properties of xerogels, in particular their porosity, are in turn relevant for their subsequent high-temperature processing. The porous structure is essential for thermal treatment. The structure of xerogels obtained by distillation procedures is affected both by the conditions of azeotropic distillation and by the medium employed. By judicious selection of these two variables it is possible to prepare materials with different pore size distributions. (author)

  4. Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R M

    1976-01-01

    Evidence of expanding markets, improved prices and the short supply of uranium became abundantly clear in 1975, providing the much needed impetus for widespread activity in all phases of uranium operations. Exploration activity that had been at low levels in recent years in Canada was evident in most provinces as well as the Northwest Territories. All producers were in the process of expanding their uranium-producing facilities. Canada's Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) by year-end had authorized the export of over 73,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ all since September 1974, when the federal government announced its new uranium export guidelines. World production, which had been in the order of 25,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ annually, was expected to reach about 28,000 tons in 1975, principally from increased output in the United States.

  5. The effect of various cations and pH on the adsorption of U(VI) on Amberlite IR-118H resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilislioglu, Ayben

    2003-01-01

    The effects of various metal cations and pH on the adsorption of uranium(VI) on strongly acidic cation exchanger Amberlite IR-118H (AIR-118H) were studied. The metal cations suppress U(VI) adsorption differently depending on their ionic radii. Adsorption of U(VI) on AIR-118H peaks at pH 3.4, which was attributed to the occurrence of different forms of U(VI) at different pH values. The adsorption data were then processed using the Frumkin-Fowler-Guggenheim equation, and the standard free energy of adsorption was calculated

  6. Recovery of U(Vi) with unexpanded perlite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas J, A.K.; Davila R, J. I.; Lopez del R, H.; Mireles G, F.

    2015-09-01

    Perlite is a glass volcanic rock that is hydrated by the addition of water during its formation. Is a natural material widely used in the chemical and construction industries, but recently beginning to be studied their adsorptive properties. In this paper the adsorption capacity of unexpanded perlite to remove U(Vi) in aqueous solution depending on the grain size of the material was investigated, as well as the contact time between the liquid and solid phases, ph of solution and initial concentration of uranium. The adsorption was dependent on the surface area of the material, recovering higher uranium percentage to smaller particle size. Meanwhile kinetics showed that the uranium adsorption is rapid, reaching equilibrium in 1 h. Adsorption to slightly acidic conditions was favored but dropped dramatically to ph highly acidic and basic; at a concentration of 1 x 10 -3 M UO 2 +2 the maximum uranium recovery was 46% at ph 6. In dilute solutions (1 x 10 -5 to 1 x 10 -3 M) the adsorption percentage reached values between 34 and 42%, but was reduced to 1% at a concentration of 1 x 10 -2 M. (Author)

  7. Recovery of U(Vi) with unexpanded perlite; Recuperacion de U(VI) con perlita no expandida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas J, A.K.; Davila R, J. I.; Lopez del R, H.; Mireles G, F., E-mail: cuja2105@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Perlite is a glass volcanic rock that is hydrated by the addition of water during its formation. Is a natural material widely used in the chemical and construction industries, but recently beginning to be studied their adsorptive properties. In this paper the adsorption capacity of unexpanded perlite to remove U(Vi) in aqueous solution depending on the grain size of the material was investigated, as well as the contact time between the liquid and solid phases, ph of solution and initial concentration of uranium. The adsorption was dependent on the surface area of the material, recovering higher uranium percentage to smaller particle size. Meanwhile kinetics showed that the uranium adsorption is rapid, reaching equilibrium in 1 h. Adsorption to slightly acidic conditions was favored but dropped dramatically to ph highly acidic and basic; at a concentration of 1 x 10{sup -3} M UO{sub 2}{sup +2} the maximum uranium recovery was 46% at ph 6. In dilute solutions (1 x 10{sup -5} to 1 x 10{sup -3} M) the adsorption percentage reached values between 34 and 42%, but was reduced to 1% at a concentration of 1 x 10{sup -2} M. (Author)

  8. Sediment studies of the biological factors controlling the reduction of U(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2004-01-01

    Studies were conducted primarily with sediments, both in laboratory incubations and in a field experiment, with supporting studies with pure cultures. To our knowledge the sediment studies were the first on microbial U(VI) reduction in actual uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments, under conditions that mimic those found in situ. Important findings included: (1) U(VI) reduction is a biotic process in subsurface sediments. (2) U(VI) reduction can be stimulated most effectively with the addition of acetate. Although it had been speculated that microbial U(VI) reduction might be capable of this type of environmental remediation ever since the discovery of microbial U(VI) reduction, this had not been previously demonstrated under environmentally relevant conditions. (3) U(VI) is reduced concurrently with Fe(III) and prior to sulfate reduction. U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction proceeded concurrently, accompanied by a dramatic enrichment in organisms in the Geobacteraceae. Sulfate-reducing microorganisms do not appear to be important components of the microbial community reducing U(VI) in these subsurface sediments. (4) Nitrate has important influences on U(VI) reduction. Nitrate inhibits the reduction of metals until nitrate is depleted. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms such as Geobacter metallireducens and Desulfitobacterium species can oxidize Fe(II) with the reduction of nitrate which is an important consideration because our previous studies have demonstrated that freshly precipitated Fe(III) oxides can reoxidize U(IV) to U(VI). The discovery that G. metallireducens can ''run backwards'' and oxidize U(IV) when nitrate is present reveals another mechanism preventing precipitation of U(IV) in the presence of nitrate as well as potential novel strategy for removing uranium from the subsurface after a site has been remediated. (5) Importance of understanding Fe(III) forms available for microbial reduction. Fe(III) is orders of magnitude more abundant than U(VI) as an

  9. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  10. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelman, J.W.; Chenoweth, W.L.; Ingerson, E.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U 3 O 8 ; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  11. Retention of U(VI) onto silica in presence of model organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, T.T.H.; Mercier-Bion, F.; Drot, R.; Lagarde, G.; Simoni, E.; Lambert, J.

    2008-01-01

    It is well-known that the organic matter influences the retention of ions onto mineral surfaces. However, the major part of concerned studies implies humic substances and complex solids. Another approach for identifying the sorption mechanisms is possible by studying simpler solids than those present in natural medium. So, silica is chosen as mineral surface because of its abundance in soils and of the presence of Si-O groups in clayey minerals. Uranium (VI) is selected as cation. Simple organic molecules like acetic (one carboxylic group) and oxalic (two carboxylic functions) acids are considered as models of the natural organic matter for understanding their role in the retention of U(VI) onto powders and slides of silica. Binary (organics/silica, U(VI)/silica) and ternary systems (organics/silica/U(VI)) are studied by complementary approaches. Sorption edges as function of pH are obtained by liquid scintillation methods and capillary electrophoresis. Different spectroscopic techniques are used to deduce the interactions between the organic matter and U(VI) sorbed onto the silica whose: Time-Resolved Laser induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Nuclear Microprobe Analysis (NMA). The results of the effect of these model organic molecules onto the U(VI) retention showed a good agreement between the different techniques. Concerning the acetic acid, there are not differences in the sorption percentages of uranyl (see the figure). All these results indicate that the uranyl-acetate complexes stay in the aqueous solution rather than sorbing onto the silica. On the contrary, oxalic acid influences the sorption of U(VI) onto the silica surface. The sorption percentage of U(VI) in the ternary system (oxalic acid/silica/U(VI)) is lower than the binary system (U(VI)/silica) (see the figure). So, the presence of oxalic acid decreases the sorption of U(VI) onto the silica surface. (authors)

  12. Modeling the effectiveness of U(VI) biomineralization in dual-porosity porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, B. E.; Barry, D. A.; Gerhard, J. I.; Small, J. S.

    2011-05-01

    SummaryUranium contamination is a serious environmental concern worldwide. Recent attention has focused on the in situ immobilization of uranium by stimulation of dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB). The objective of this work was to investigate the effectiveness of this approach in heterogeneous and structured porous media, since such media may significantly affect the geochemical and microbial processes taking place in contaminated sites, impacting remediation efficiency during biostimulation. A biogeochemical reactive transport model was developed for uranium remediation by immobile-region-resident DMRB in two-region porous media. Simulations were used to investigate the parameter sensitivities of the system over wide-ranging geochemical, microbial and groundwater transport conditions. The results suggest that optimal biomineralization is generally likely to occur when the regional mass transfer timescale is less than one-thirtieth the value of the volumetric flux timescale, and/or the organic carbon fermentation timescale is less than one-thirtieth the value of the advective timescale, and/or the mobile region porosity ranges between equal to and four times the immobile region porosity. Simulations including U(VI) surface complexation to Fe oxides additionally suggest that, while systems exhibiting U(VI) surface complexation may be successfully remediated, they are likely to display different degrees of remediation efficiency over varying microbial efficiency, mobile-immobile mass transfer, and porosity ratios. Such information may aid experimental and field designs, allowing for optimized remediation in dual-porosity (two-region) biostimulated DMRB U(VI) remediation schemes.

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Australian Government will ensure a significant expansion of the uranium industry. Development at Roxby Downs may proceed and Ranger may fulfil two new contracts but the decision specifies that apart from Roxby Downs, no new mines should be approved. The ACTU maintains an anti-uranium policy but reaction to the decision from the trade union movement has been muted. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) has been asked by the Government to conduct an inquiry into a number of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. The inquiry will examine in particular Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements and the adequacy of existing waste management technology. In two additional decisions the Government has dissociated itself from a study into the feasibility of establishing an enrichment operation and has abolished the Uranium Advisory Council. Although Australian reserves account for 20% of the total in the Western World, Australia accounts for a relatively minor proportion of the world's uranium production

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The French Government has decided to freeze a substantial part of its nuclear power programme. Work has been halted on 18 reactors. This power programme is discussed, as well as the effect it has on the supply of uranium by South Africa

  15. U(VI) sorption on granite: prediction and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebelung, C.; Brendler, V.

    2010-01-01

    One widely accepted approach - component additivity (CA) - to describe the sorption of contaminants onto complex materials such as rocks or soils is based on the assumption that the surface of a complex mineral assemblage is composed of a mixture of mineral constituents whose surface properties are known from independent studies. An internally consistent SCM (surface complexation model) database can be developed that describes the adsorption reactions of solutes to each phase. Here, the capability of such a methodology was tested, using the code MINTEQA2 including thermodynamic data of the NEA-TDB, and literature data for SCM, namely the DDL model. The sorption characteristics of U(VI) on granite (from Eibenstock, Saxony, Germany, with the main components quartz, albite, orthoclase, and muscovite) was predicted and then compared to batch experiments. Granite plays an important role in the remediation of former uranium ore mining and milling sites, but is also one of the host rocks considered for final disposal of nuclear materials. Safety assessment requires a detailed understanding of this system and its retention potential with regard to hazardous components. Namely the sorption of uranium in this complex rock is not fully understood yet. The experiments thus also provided a better understanding of the far-field behaviour in granitic geological nuclear repositories. The robustness of the prediction was tested by variation of the granite composition and the variation of the specific surface area (SSA) - first all components were predicted with a uniform granite SSA, second with a distinct SSA for each granite component (determined on pure minerals for the same grain size fractions). Changes in compositions yielded only marginal differences in the prediction. Different approaches to SSA showed somewhat larger deviations. In conclusion, the CA methodology is a valid and robust approach to U(VI) sorption onto complex substrates such as granite, provided sufficient

  16. Aqueous Complexation Reactions Governing the Rate and Extent of Biogeochemical U(VI) Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott C. Brooks; Wenming Dong; Sue Carroll; James K. Fredrickson; Kenneth M. Kemner; Shelly D. Kelly

    2006-01-01

    The proposed research will elucidate the principal biogeochemical reactions that govern the concentration, chemical speciation, and reactivity of the redox-sensitive contaminant uranium. The results will provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of the mechanisms that govern the biogeochemical reduction of uranium in subsurface environments. In addition, the work plan is designed to: (1) Generate fundamental scientific understanding on the relationship between U(VI) chemical speciation and its susceptibility to biogeochemical reduction reactions. (2) Elucidate the controls on the rate and extent of contaminant reactivity. (3) Provide new insights into the aqueous and solid speciation of U(VI)/U(IV) under representative groundwater conditions

  17. The Effect of Si and Al Concentration Ratios on the Removal of U(VI) under Hanford Site 200 Area Conditions-12115

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsenovich, Yelena; Gonzalez, Nathan; Moreno-Pastor, Carol; Lagos, Leonel [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 W. Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Injection of reactive gases, such as NH{sub 3}, is an innovative technique to mitigate uranium contamination in soil for a vadose zone (VZ) contaminated with radionuclides. A series of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of the concentration ratio of silicon to aluminum in the presence of various bicarbonate concentrations on the coprecipitation process of U(VI). The concentration of Al in all tests remained unchanged at 2.8 mM. Experiments showed that the removal efficiency of uranium was not significantly affected by the different bicarbonate and U(VI) concentrations tested. For the lower Si:Al molar ratios of 2:1 and 18:1, the removal efficiency of uranium was relatively low (≤ 8%). For the Si:Al molar ratio of 35:1, the removal efficiency of uranium was increased to an average of ∼82% for all bicarbonate concentrations tested. At higher Si:Al molar ratios (53:1 and above), a relatively high removal efficiency of U(VI), approximately 85% and higher, was observed. These results demonstrate that the U(VI) removal efficiency is more affected by the Si:Al molar ratio than by the bicarbonate concentration in solution. The results of this experiment are promising for the potential implementation of NH{sub 3} gas injection for the remediation of U(VI) -contaminated VZ. (authors)

  18. Surface complexation modeling of U(VI) adsorption by aquifer sediments from a former mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, S.P.; Fox, P.M.; Davis, J.A.; Campbell, K.M.; Hayes, K.F.; Long, P.E.

    2009-01-01

    A study of U(VI) adsorption by aquifer sediment samples from a former uranium mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado, was conducted under oxic conditions as a function of pH, U(VI), Ca, and dissolved carbonate concentration. Batch adsorption experiments were performed using tailings site at Naturita, Colorado, indicated that possible calcite nonequilibrium of dissolved calcium concentration should be evaluated. The modeling results also illustrate the importance of the range of data used in deriving the best fit model parameters. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  19. Hexavalent Chromium Free Coatings Projects for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    laboratory qualification of a total hexavalent chrome free coating systems for use on magnesium transmission housings. This project will leverage... hexavalent chrome free coating system by utilizing a hexavalent chrome free topcoat, primer, and pretreatment for magnesium parts used on Army...of the hexavalent chrome free conversion coatings. Hexavalent Chromium Free Coating System for Magnesium Housings on Aviation Systems Desert

  20. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of ''local equilibrium'' assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of

  1. Mechanisms of uranium interactions with hydroxyapatite: Implications for groundwater remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C.C.; Bargar, J.R.; Davis, J.A.; Piana, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The speciation of U(VI) sorbed to synthetic hydroxyapatite was investigated using a combination of U LIII-edge XAS, synchrotron XRD, batch uptake measurements, and SEM-EDS. The mechanisms of U(VI) removal by apatite were determined in order to evaluate the feasibility of apatitebased in-situ permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). In batch U(VI) uptake experiments with synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA), near complete removal of dissolved uranium (>99.5%) to use in development of PRBs for groundwater U(VI) remediation.

  2. Uranium isotopic effect studies on cation and anion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarpal, S.K.; Gupta, A.R.

    1975-01-01

    Uranium isotope effects in exchange reactions involving hexavalent and tetravalent uranium, on ion exchange resins, have been re-examined. The earlier work on uranium isotope effects in electron exchange reactions involving hexavalent and tetravalent uranium, has been critically reviewed. New experimental data on these systems in hydrochloric acid medium, has been obtained, using break-through technique on anion-exchange columns. The isotope effects in these break-through experiments have been reinterpreted in a way which is consistent with the anion exchange behaviour of the various uranium species in these systems. (author)

  3. Selective removal of U(VI) from low concentration wastewater by functionalized HKUST-1@H3PW12O40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui Zhang; Jinhua Xue; Nan Hu; Jing Sun; Dexin Ding; Yongdong Wang; Le Li

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption of U(VI) from low concentration solution by HKUST-1@H 3 PW 12 O 40 was studied as a function of various experimental parameters including pH, interfering ions, contact time, initial uranium concentration and temperature by batch experiments. Equilibrium data were found to fit with Langmuir isotherm model better than Freundlich isotherm model. The kinetic adsorption was fitted by the pseudo-second-order model well. Thermodynamic data from the adsorption experiments indicate that adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic. HKUST-1@H 3 PW 12 O 40 can selectively adsorb U(VI) from multi-metal ion solutions and the adsorption capacity of HKUST-1@H 3 PW 12 O 40 don't decrease significantly after three cycles of desorption-reuse. The results show that HKUST-1@H 3 PW 12 O 40 is suitable for removal of U(VI) from low concentration solutions. (author)

  4. Sorption study of 226Ra(II) et 238U(VI) on to peat organic matter, in mining environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordelet, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    The environmental footprint of former uranium mining sites is a major concern for society. In order to guarantee the protection of ecosystems and thus a minimal radiological impact on the biosphere, it is important to understand and to be able to model the phenomena controlling the migration of uranium and its decay products, specially radium ( 226 Ra) (AREVA's Envir-at-Mines project). In the environment, among solid phases which can retain 238 U(VI) and 226 Ra(II), peat is known to have relevant affinity for U(VI). Because peat is usually composed at 90% dry weight of organic matter, the aim of this study was to qualify and quantify peat organic matter affinity for 238 U(VI) and 226 Ra(II). Peat samples extracted from Les Sagnes (close to a former uranium mining site in Limousin area, France) was characterised and batch adsorption/desorption experiments were conducted. The results indicate that 226 Ra(II) adsorption onto that peat is higher than 97% for pH ≥ 4-6 (depending on the organic/mineral ratio in dry peat) corresponding to K d values about 4500 ± 500 mL/g and 238 U(VI) adsorption is higher than 80% at pH ≥ 3 with K d maximal values reaching 11000 mL/g around pH 4.5. Only a little desorption was measured after one month. An ion exchange modelling for radium adsorption onto one type of organic matter sorption site was enough to fit the experimental adsorption K d for the peat over the whole range of pH. However, uranium sorption on peat can be modelled on that organic sorption site only from pH 1 to 5. From pH 5 to 10, to explain the experimental uranium adsorption K d values (close to 1500 mL/g), uranium sorption onto mineral phases (such as smectite and iron oxide in this study) has to be considered. An operational data set is given for both 238 U(VI) and 226 Ra(II) sorption onto Les Sagnes peat. Unlike usual peat, peat from Les Sagnes contains more than 10% dry weight of mineral matter. That is why it is necessary to model sorption of those two

  5. Effect of pH and Fe/U ratio on the U(VI) removal rate by the synergistic effect of Fe(II) and O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yukui; Luo, Yingfeng; Fang, Qi; Xie, Yanpei; Wang, Zhihong; Zhu, Xiangyu

    2018-02-01

    As for the decommissioned uranium deposits of acid in-situ leaching, both of the concentrations of U(VI) and Fe(II) are relatively high in groundwater. In the presence of O2, the oxidation of Fe(II) into Fe(III) that forms Fe-hydroxides could effectively remove U(VI) in the forms of sorption or co-precipitation. In this process, pH condition and Fe content will have a significant effect on the U(VI) removal rate by the synergistic effect of Fe(II) and O2. In the present work, a series of batch experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of pH values and Fe/U mass ratio on the U(VI) removal rate by the synergistic effect of Fe(II) and O2. Experiment results show that the removal rate of U(VI) is mainly controlled by pH and secondly by Fe/U mass ratio. In the neutral conditions with pH at 7 and 8, the removal rate of U(VI) reaches up to 90% for all solutions with different initial Fe(II) concentrations. The optimal pH for the removal rate of U(VI) is above 7. In the acidic conditions with pH below 6, the effect of Fe/U mass ratio on the removal rate of U(VI) becomes more obvious and the optimal Fe/U mass ratio for U(VI) removal is 1:2.

  6. Nuclear waste glasses of SON68 type and their weathering products, optical spectroscopy of uranium and rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollier, N.

    2002-09-01

    This study concerns the long-term behaviour of high-level waste glasses and more precisely lanthanides and uranium behaviour with weathering. The leaching was performed on glass powder at 90 deg. C in a pseudo-dynamic mode. Two weathering gels were obtained, with different renewal rate and leaching duration. In glass, we demonstrate that U(IV) and U(VI) species coexist. Time-resolved spectroscopy and XPS measurements show that hexavalent uranium is present under uranyl entities and UO 3 type environment. In weathering gels, U(VI) is still present under uranyl form as well as uranyl hydroxide. It means that U behaviour depends on renewal rate, moreover precipitation of crystallized phases like bauranolte BaU 2 O 7 .xH 2 O and uranyl silicate of uranophane type occur. Concerning lanthanides, Eu 3+ was used as a luminescent local probe. Two sites were found in glass and gels. In glass, the sites were attributed to a silicate and a borate one. In gels, the silicate site is conserved whereas the second one is supposed to correspond to an aluminate one. Photoluminescence and Moessbauer measurements show that the rare earth site symmetry increases in gel. This result confirms that order is higher in gels than in glass. The third part of the thesis concerns irradiation effect in glasses. The main result shows some behaviour differences between a 5 oxides borosilicate glass and a more complex one close to the SON68 glass. Presence of mixed alkali (Na, Li and Cs) seems to notably reduce the Na migration. (author)

  7. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  8. Sorption of U(VI) species on hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, P.; Moore, R.C.; Choppin, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    The sorption of uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) cations to hydroxyapatite was studied as a function of the amount of sorbent, ionic strength, U(VI) concentration, pH and temperature. The rate of uranyl sorption on hydroxyapatite decreased with increased uranyl concentrations. The amount sorbed decreased with increased ionic strength and increased with pH to a maximum at 7-8. The sorption data for UO 2 2+ were fitted well by the Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms. The anions Cl - , NO 3 - , SO 4 2- and CH 3 COO - decreased the sorption of uranium on hydroxyapatite while S 2 O 3 2- slightly increased it. The sorbed uranium was desorbed by 0.10 M and 1.00 M solutions of HCl and HNO 3 . The thermodynamic parameters for the sorption of UO 2 2+ were measured at temperatures of 298, 313, 323 and 333 K. The temperature dependence confirmed an endothermic heat of sorption. The activation energy for the sorption process was calculated to be +2.75±0.02 kJ/mol. (orig.)

  9. The reduction of U(VI) on corroded iron under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, D.; Spahiu, K.

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion of iron and the interaction between corroded iron and U(VI) in anoxic conditions were investigated. The anoxic conditions were obtained by flushing an 99.97% Ar-0.03% CO 2 gas mixture through the test vessel, in which an oxygen trap and six reaction bottles containing synthetic groundwater (10 mM NaCl and 2 mM HCO 3 - .) were placed. The dark-green coloured corrosion product, formed on iron surface after three months corrosion in synthetic groundwater solutions, was identified by powder X-ray diffraction to be carbonate green rust, Fe 4 II Fe 2 III (OH) 12 CO 3 . The iron foil that reacted in a solution (10 ppm U(VI), 10 mM NaCl and 2 mM HCO 3 - ) for three months was analysed by SEM-EDS. The result shows that: (i) an uneven layer of carbonate green rust (1-5 μm thick) formed on the metallic iron; (ii) a thin (0.3 μm) uranium-rich layer deposited on top of the carbonate green rust layer; and (iii) some UO 2 crystals (3-5 μm sized) on the thin uranium layer. The experimental results proved that the U(VI) removal capacity of metal iron is not hindered by formation of a layer of carbonate green rust on the iron. Tests with cast iron and pure iron indicate that they have similar U(VI) removal capacities. At the end of experiment, U concentrations in solution approached the solubility of UO 2 (s), 10 -8 M. The stability of the carbonate green rust at the experimental conditions, pH, E h , [Fe 2+ ] and [HCO 3 - ], is discussed. (orig.)

  10. Determination of U(VI) using novel reagent by extractive spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suvardhan, K.; Subrahmanyam, P.; Dilip Kumar, J.; Chiranjeevi, P.

    2007-01-01

    A simple and spectrophotometric method for the determination of U(VI) using a 5-(4-pyridyl azo)-8-quinolinol (PAQ) is developed the reagent was synthesized and used for extraction of uranium. At pH 7.0 ±0.2 uranium forms a yellowish orange colored complex with PAQ, which was then quantitatively extracted from chloroform showing maximum absorbance at wavelength of 485 nm. The proposed method obeys Beer's law in the range of 0.2-10.0 μg ml -1 . Molar absorptivity and Sandelson's sensitivity of extracted species was calculated to be 1.325x10 4 lmol -1 cm -1 and 0.421 x10 -4 μg cm -2 respectively. The method was applied for the determination of uranium in food and plant samples. It was found that the newly developed method is competent to those of standard methods. (author)

  11. Valence-associated uranium isotope fractionation of uranium enriched phosphate in a shallow aquifer, Lee County, Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, J.M.; Levine, B.R.; Cowart, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    The source of anomalously high concentrations of uranium, characterized by U-234/U-238 activity ratios significantly less than unity, in shallow groundwaters of Lee County, Florida, was investigated. Uranium in cores samples was separated into U(IV) and U(VI) oxidation state fractions, and uranium analyses were conducted by alpha spectrometry. Uranium mobility was also studied in selected leaching experiments. Results indicate that mobilization of unusually soluble uranium, present in uranium enriched phosphate of the Pliocene age Tamiami Formation at determined concentrations of up to 729 ppm, is the source for high uranium concentrations in groundwater. In leaching experiments, approximately one-third of the uranium present in the uranium enriched phosphate was mobilized into the aqueous phase. Results of previous investigations suggest that U-234, produced in rock by U-238 decay, is selectively oxidized to U(VI). The uranium enriched phosphate studied in this investigation is characterized by selective reduction of U-234, with a pattern of increasing isotopic fractionation with core depth. As a consequence, U-234/U-238 activity ratios greater than 1.0 in the U(IV) fraction, and less than 1.0 in the U(VI) fraction have developed in the rock phase. In leaching experiments, the U(VI) fraction from the rock was preferentially mobilized into the aqueous phase, suggesting that U-234/U-238 activity ratios of leaching groundwaters are strongly influenced by the isotopic characteristics of the U(VI) fraction of rock. It is suggested that preferential leaching of U(VI), present in selectivity reduced uranium enriched phosphate, is the source for low activity ratio groundwaters in Lee County

  12. Analytical method of uranium (IV) and uranium (VI) in uranium ores and uranium-bearing rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zhuqin; Zheng Yongfeng; Li Qingzhen; Zhong Miaolan; Gu Dingxiang

    1995-11-01

    The best conditions for keeping the original valences of uranium during the dissolution and separation procedure of geological samples (especially those micro uranium-bearing rock) were studied. With the exist of high concentration protectants, the sample was decomposed with concentration HF at 40 +- 5 degree C. The U(VI) was dissolved completely and formed stable complex UO 2 F 2 , the U(IV) was precipitated rapidly and carried by carrier. Quantitative separation was carried out immediately with suction. The decomposition of sample and separation of solid/liquid phases was completed within two minutes. After separation, the U(IV) and U(VI) were determined quantitatively with laser fluorescence or voltametry respectively according to the uranium content. The limit of detection for this method is 0.7 μg/g, RSD is 10.5%, the determinate range of uranium is 2 x 10 -6 ∼10 -1 g/g. The uranium contents and their valence state ratio were measured for more than one hundred samples of sand stone and granite, the accuracy and precision of these results are satisfactory for uranium geological research. (12 tabs.; 11 refs.)

  13. Microbial Community Changes in Response to Ethanol or Methanol Amendments for U(VI) Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A.; Brandt, Craig C.; Madden, Andrew; Drake, Meghan M.; Kostka, Joel; Akob, Denise M.; Kusel, Kirsten; Palumbo, Anthony Vito

    2010-01-01

    Microbial community responses to ethanol, methanol and methanol + humics amendments in relationship to uranium bioremediation were studied in laboratory microcosm experiments using sediments and ground water from a uranium-contaminated site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Ethanol addition always resulted in uranium reduction at rate of 0.8-1.0 mol l -1 d -1 while methanol addition did so occasionally at rate 0.95 mol l -1 d -1 . The type of carbon source added, the duration of incubation, and the sampling site influenced the bacterial community structure upon incubation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicated (1) bacterial communities found in ethanol- and methanol-amended samples with U(VI) reduction were similar due to presence of -Proteobacteria, and -Proteobacteria (members of the families Burkholderiaceae, Comamonadaceae, Oxalobacteraceae, and Rhodocyclaceae); (2) methanol-amended samples without U(VI) reduction exhibited the lowest diversity and the bacterial community contained 69.2-92.8% of the family Methylophilaceae; and (3) the addition of humics resulted in an increase of phylogenetic diversity of -Proteobacteria (Rodoferax, Polaromonas, Janthinobacterium, Methylophilales, unclassified) and Firmicutes (Desulfosporosinus, Clostridium).

  14. Simultaneous adsorption and reduction of U(VI) on reduced graphene oxide-supported nanoscale zerovalent iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yubing [School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); Wang, Xiangke, E-mail: xkwang@ipp.ac.cn [School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sorption and in-situ reduction of U(VI) is observed. • The composites are more effective for U(VI) removal and solidification. • The inner-sphere surface complexes are observed. - Abstract: The reduced graphene oxide-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI/rGO) composites were synthesized by chemical deposition method and were characterized by SEM, high resolution TEM, Raman and potentiometric acid-base titrations. The characteristic results showed that the nZVI nanoparticles can be uniformly dispersed on the surface of rGO. The removal of U(VI) on nZVI/rGO composites as a function of contact time, pH and U(VI) initial concentration was investigated by batch technique. The removal kinetics of U(VI) on nZVI and nZVI/rGO were well simulated by a pseudo-first-order kinetic model and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, respectively. The presence of rGO on nZVI nanoparticles increased the reaction rate and removal capacity of U(VI) significantly, which was attributed to the chemisorbed OH{sup −} groups of rGO and the massive enrichment of Fe{sup 2+} on rGO surface by XPS analysis. The XRD analysis revealed that the presence of rGO retarded the transformation of iron corrosion products from magnetite/maghemite to lepidocrocite. According to the fitting of EXAFS spectra, the U-C (at ∼2.9 Å) and U-Fe (at ∼3.2 Å) shells were observed, indicating the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes on nZVI/rGO composites. Therefore, the nZVI/rGO composites can be suitable as efficient materials for the in-situ remediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater in the environmental pollution management.

  15. Uranium speciation in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, A.; Bernhard, G.; Geipel, G.; Reich, T.; Rossberg, A.; Nitsche, H.

    2003-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the nature of uranium complexes formed after the uptake by plants is an essential prerequisite to describe the migration behavior of uranium in the environment. This study focuses on the determination of uranium speciation after uptake of uranium by lupine plants. For the first time, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the chemical speciation of uranium in plants. Differences were detected between the uranium speciation in the initial solution (hydroponic solution and pore water of soil) and inside the lupine plants. The oxidation state of uranium did not change and remained hexavalent after it was taken up by the lupine plants. The chemical speciation of uranium was identical in the roots, shoot axis, and leaves and was independent of the uranium speciation in the uptake solution. The results indicate that the uranium is predominantly bound as uranyl(VI) phosphate to the phosphoryl groups. Dandelions and lamb's lettuce showed uranium speciation identical to lupine plants. (orig.)

  16. Controlling Hexavalent Americium – A Centerpiece to a Compact Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer/Braley, Jenifer; Nash, Kenneth L; Lumetta, Gregg; McCann, Kevin; Sinkov, Sergey I

    2014-10-01

    Closing the nuclear fuel cycle could be simplified by recovering the actinides U through Am as a group. This could be achieved by converting U, Np, Pu and Am to the hexavalent state. Uranium, Np and Pu are readily oxidized to the hexavalent state. Generation of hexavalent Am in acidic solutions is more difficult, as the standard reduction potential of the Am(VI) /Am(III) couple (+1.68 V in 1 M HClO4) is well outside of the electrochemical stability window of water. While the oxidation and separation of Am has been demonstrated under laboratory conditions, several issues could plague scale up and implementation of this separation with used fuel. Two primary concerns are considered. The first issue concerns the stability of the oxidized Am. The second involves the undesirable co-extraction of tetravalent f-elements with the hexavalent actinides. To address the first concern regarding Am redox instability, Am reduction will be monitored under a variety of different conditions to establish the means of improving the stability of Am(VI) in the organic phase. Identifying the components contributing most significantly to its reduction will allow thoughtful modification of the process. To address the second concern, we propose to apply branched chain extractants to separate hexavalent actinides from tetravalent f-elements. Both branched monoamide and organophosphorus extractants have demonstrated significant selectivity for UO22+ versus Th4+, with separation factors generally on the order of 100. The efforts of this two-pronged research program should represent a significant step forward in the development of aqueous separations approaches designed to recover the U-Am actinides based on the availability of the hexavalent oxidation state. For the purposes of this proposal, separations based on this approach will be called SAn(VI) separations, indicating the Separation of An(VI).

  17. Functionalized Sugarcane Bagasse for U(VI) Adsorption from Acid and Alkaline Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shouzheng; Liu, Qi; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Hongsen; Li, Rumin; Jing, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jun

    2018-01-15

    The highly efficient removal of uranium from mine tailings effluent, radioactive wastewater and enrichment from seawater is of great significance for the development of nuclear industry. In this work, we prepared an efficient U(VI) adsorbent by EDTA modified sugarcane bagasse (MESB) with a simple process. The prepared adsorbent preserves high adsorptive capacity for UO 2 2+ (pH 3.0) and uranyl complexes, such as UO 2 (OH) + , (UO 2 ) 2 (OH) 2 2+ and (UO 2 ) 3 (OH) 5 + (pH 4.0 and pH 5.0) and good repeatability in acidic environment. The maximum adsorption capacity for U(VI) at pH 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0 is 578.0, 925.9 and 1394.1 mg/g and the adsorption capacity loss is only 7% after five cycles. With the pH from 3.0 to 5.0, the inhibitive effects of Na + and K + decreased but increased of Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ . MESB also exhibits good adsorption for [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ] 4- at pH 8.3 from 10 mg/L to 3.3 μg/L. Moreover, MESB could effectively extract U(VI) from simulated seawater in the presence of other metals ions. This work provided a general and efficient uranyl enriched material for nuclear industry.

  18. Microbial reductive transformation of phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in fluvial subsurface sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, James K; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Boyanov, Maxim I; Kemner, Kenneth M; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W; Bjornstad, Bruce N; Konopka, Allan E; Moore, Dean A; Resch, Charles T; Phillips, Jerry L

    2012-04-03

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) was investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in subsurface sediments incubated in sulfate-containing synthetic groundwater with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without, and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction of phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

  19. Uranium speciation and stability after reductive immobilization in sediments.

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp J.O

    2011-01-01

    It has generally been assumed that the bioreduction of hexavalent uranium in groundwater systems will result in the precipitation of immobile uraninite (UO2). In order to explore the form and stability of uranium immobilized under these conditions we introduced lactate (15 mM for 3 months) into flow through columns containing sediments derived from a former uranium processing site at Old Rifle CO. This resulted in metal reducing conditions as evidenced by concurrent uranium uptake and iron re...

  20. Uranium speciation and stability after reductive immobilization in sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, Jonathan O.; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Webb, Sam; Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Blue, Lisa; Chinni, Satyavani; Veeramani, Harish; Junier, Pilar; Margot-Roquier, Camille; Suvorova Buffat, Elena; Tebo, Bradley M.; Giammar, Daniel E.; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2011-01-01

    It has generally been assumed that the bioreduction of hexavalent uranium in groundwater systems will result in the precipitation of immobile uraninite (UO2). In order to explore the form and stability of uranium immobilized under these conditions, we introduced lactate (15 mM for 3 months) into flow-through columns containing sediments derived from a former uranium-processing site at Old Rifle, CO. This resulted in metal-reducing conditions as evidenced by concurrent uranium uptake and iron ...

  1. Simultaneous removal and recovery of uranium from aqueous solution using TiO_2 photoelectrochemical reduction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huichao He; Meirong Zong; Faqin Dong; Southwest University of Science and Technology, Sichuan; Pengpan Yang; Gaili Ke; Mingxue Liu; Xiaoqin Nie; Wei Ren; Liang Bian; Southwest University of Science and Technology, Sichuan; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xinjiang

    2017-01-01

    U(VI)-containing wastewater has potential radiation hazard to the environment, but contains valuable uranium resource. Based on the reduction of U(VI) and the difference in solubility between U(VI) and U(IV), here we construct a TiO_2-based photoelectrochemical cell to remove U(VI) and recover uranium from aqueous solution. By irradiating TiO_2 photoanode at E = 0.45 V versus SCE, U(VI) can be simultaneously removed from aqueous solution and recovered as solid uranium compounds on a FTO glass cathode. Since ethanol can act as hole scavenger to protect the formed U(IV) and provide CO_2"−"· as reductant, ethanol adding improved the U(VI) reduction efficiency of TiO_2-based photoelectrochemical cell. (author)

  2. Studies on the sorption behaviours of Th(IV) and U(VI) from aqueous sulphate solutions using impregnated resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatab, A.F.; Sheta, M.E.; Mahfouz, M.G.; Tolba, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    The sorption behaviours of thorium (IV) and uranium (VI) from aqueous sulphate solutions have been studied using n-dodecylamine and tri-n-octylamine (TOA) dissolved in benzene and impregnated onto amberlite XAD-4 (styrene-divinyl benzene copolymer). The sorption behaviours were evaluated as a function of free acidity, salting out effect, ph value, equilibrium time, V/m ratio, initial metal ion concentration, loaded amine concentration and sorption temperature. The equilibrium time for Th(IV) and U(VI) sorption from aqueous sulphate solution was found to be 90 and 60 minutes, respectively. The sorption of Th(IV) was quantitatively at ph range 3.7-4.3 and at 4.3-5.2 for U(VI). The sorption capacity of the impregnated resin was determined by batch method and it was found to be 0.031 and 0.033 mmol/g for Th(IV) and U(VI), respectively. Elution of Th(IV) from thorium-loaded impregnated resin was quantitatively achieved by using 2 mol/l HNO 3 and by using 0.1 mol/l HCl for U(VI)

  3. U(VI) sorption on kaolinite. Effects of pH, U(VI) concentration and oxyanions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Gao; Ziqian Yang; Keliang Shi; Xuefeng Wang; Zhijun Guo; Wangsuo Wu

    2010-01-01

    U(VI) sorption on kaolinite was studied as functions of contact time, pH, U(VI) concentration, solid-to-liquid ratio (m/V) by using a batch experimental method. The effects of sulfate and phosphate on U(VI) sorption were also investigated. It was found that the sorption kinetics of U(VI) can be described by a pseudo-second-order model. Potentiometric titrations at variable ionic strengths indicated that the titration curves of kaolinite were not sensitive to ionic strength, and that the pH of the zero net proton charge (pH PZNPC ) was at 6.9. The sorption of U(VI) on kaolinite increased with pH up to 6.5 and reached a plateau at pH >6.5. The presence of phosphate strongly increased U(VI) sorption especially at pH <5.5, which may be due to formation of ternary surface complexes involving phosphate. In contrast, the presence of sulfate did not cause any apparent effect on U(VI) sorption. A double layer model was used to interpret both results of potentiometric titrations and U(VI) sorption on kaolinite. (author)

  4. Sorption of Cs, Eu and U(VI) onto rock samples from Nizhnekansky massive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, V.; Vlasova, I.; Kalmykov, S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Kuzmenkova, N. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Science (Russian Federation); Petrov, V.; Poluektov, V. [Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy and Geochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences - IGEM RAS (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The accepted in Russia concept for high level wastes (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) disposal is based on their isolation into the deep underground crystalline rock formations. The 'Eniseysky' area (Nizhnekansky massive) is supposed as the most perspective location for the future HLW and SNF repository. Core materials from different areas of Nizhnekasnsky massive have been studied in terms of petrographic and mineralogical characterization; definition of filtration, elastic, petro-physical and strength properties; estimation of hydrothermal-metasomatic transformation of rocks. We used both undisturbed sliced cores and crushed material for the sorption experiments. Preliminary results of uranium sorption show some significant differences between used rock samples from different depth in sorption rate and pH-dependence. In all cases maximum sorption (more than 90%) is reached in 2-3 weeks. The pH-dependence of sorbed uranium fraction has typical hump-shape: increase of sorption percentage with increasing pH values to 6, plateau (90-98 % of uranium sorbed), decrease of sorption percentage with increasing pH values from 8 due to U(VI) hydrolysis. In the case of cesium the sorption maximum is reached within 10-12 days and in the case of europium - about 5 days. All radionuclides sorbed preferentially onto dark minerals. Local distribution and preferential sorption of cesium, europium and uranium (VI) onto different minerals within the sample were studied by radiography, SEM-EDX, etc. These data accompanying with rock sample composition will allow the development of quantitative model for Cs, Eu and U(VI) sorption onto investigated rocks. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  5. The potential impact of microbial Fe(III) reduction on subsurface U(VI) mobility at a low level radioactive waste storage site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, M.J.; Livens, F.R.; Vaughan, D.J.; Lloyd, J.R.; Beadle, I.; Small, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Fe(III) oxy-hydroxides have the potential to be utilised as terminal electron acceptors by indigenous microbial communities in the British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) low level radioactive waste storage site at Drigg (Cumbria, UK) and these organisms may have a critical control on the biogeochemical cycling of several environmentally important radionuclides. In terms of radiological impact at Drigg, uranium is the most significant contributor to radiological impact and it is strongly influenced by biogeochemical processes. In terms of mass (moles) it is also the most abundant radionuclide in the Drigg inventory. Thus, the potential biotic and abiotic effects of Fe(III) reduction on U(VI) mobility in the Drigg subsurface are of interest. Culture-dependent and molecular techniques showed that the sediments in and around the Drigg site contained a diversity of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria. A series of microcosm experiments were utilised to create environmentally relevant experimental conditions. Microcosms set up using Drigg sediment and synthetic ground water were spiked with 100 μM U(VI) and acetate as an electron donor. U(VI) concentrations in groundwater were measured using a chemical assay while total U levels were determined using ICP-MS. Fe(II) levels were determined using the ferrozine method. Sediment surface areas were measured using BET analysis. The low surface area of the sediments resulted in only a small proportion of the 100 μM U(VI) spike sorbing onto mineral surfaces. The addition of ferri-hydrite to some microcosms resulted in an immediate lowering of soluble U(VI) concentrations, suggesting that the formation of soluble U(VI) complexes were not responsible for the minimal adsorption. The presence of biogenic Fe(II) in the microcosms did not affect the soluble U(VI) concentration. Similarly, soluble U(VI) levels remained unchanged when sediments were spiked with U(VI) post-microbial Fe(III) reduction. However, a lowering in

  6. Spectroscopic Evidence of Uranium Immobilization in Acidic ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6-5.8) conditions using U L3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U-C bond distance at ~2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulating the SRS wetland process, U immobilization on roots was 2 orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was reoxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication on the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands. There were several former U processing facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC. As a result of their operations, uranium has entered the surrounding environments. For example, approximately 45,000 kg o

  7. Efficacy of a novel chelator BPCBG for removing uranium and protecting against uranium-induced renal cell damage in rats and HK-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Yizhong; Wang, Dan [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Li, Zhiming [Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Hu, Yuxing; Xu, Aihong [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wang, Quanrui [Department of Chemistry, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Shao, Chunlin [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Chen, Honghong, E-mail: hhchen@shmu.edu.cn [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2013-05-15

    Chelation therapy is a known effective method to increase the excretion of U(VI) from the body. Until now, no any uranium chelator has been approved for emergency medical use worldwide. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of new ligand BPCBG containing two catechol groups and two aminocarboxylic acid groups in decorporation of U(VI) and protection against acute U(VI) nephrotoxicity in rats, and further explored the detoxification mechanism of BPCBG for U(VI)-induced nephrotoxicity in HK-2 cells with comparison to DTPA-CaNa{sub 3}. Chelating agents were administered at various times before or after injections of U(VI) in rats. The U(VI) levels in urine, kidneys and femurs were measured 24 h after U(VI) injections. Histopathological changes in the kidney and serum urea and creatinine and urine protein were examined. After treatment of U(VI)-exposed HK-2 cells with chelating agent, the intracellular U(VI) contents, formation of micronuclei, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed. It was found that prompt, advanced or delayed injections of BPCBG effectively increased 24 h-urinary U(VI) excretion and decreased the levels of U(VI) in kidney and bone. Meanwhile, BPCBG injection obviously reduced the severity of the U(VI)-induced histological alterations in the kidney, which was in parallel with the amelioration noted in serum indicators, urea and creatinine, and urine protein of U(VI) nephrotoxicity. In U(VI)-exposed HK-2 cells, immediate and delayed treatment with BPCBG significantly decreased the formation of micronuclei and LDH release by inhibiting the cellular U(VI) intake, promoting the intracellular U(VI) release and inhibiting the production of intracellular ROS. Our data suggest that BPCBG is a novel bi-functional U(VI) decorporation agent with a better efficacy than DTPA-CaNa{sub 3}. - Highlights: ► BPCBG accelerated the urine U(VI) excretion and reduced the tissues U(VI) in rats.

  8. Extraction and Separation of Uranium (VI) and Thorium (IV) Using Tri-n-dodecylamine Impregnated Resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metwally, E.; Saleh, A.Sh.; El-Naggar, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) from chloride and nitrate solutions with tri-n- dodecylamine impregnated on Amberlite XAD4, was investigated. The distribution of U(VI) and Th(IV) was studied at different concentrations of acid, salting-out agent, extractant, aqueous metal ion and other parameters. Absorption spectral studies have been investigated for uranium species in both aqueous HCl solution and the resin phase. From these studies, it is suggested that the tetrachloro complex of U(VI) is formed in the extraction of uranium (VI) from hydrochloric acid solutions by TDA impregnated resin. Stripping of the extracted U(VI) and Th(IV) was assayed with HCl and HNO 3 . Finally, the separation of uranium from thorium and fission products in HCl media was achieved

  9. Titrimetric determination of uranium in tributyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobkowska, A.

    1978-01-01

    The titrimetric method involving the reduction of U(VI) to uranium(IV) by iron(II) in phosphoric acid, selective oxidation of the excess of iron(II) and potentiometric titration with dichromate was directly used for the determination of uranium in tributyl phosphate mixtures. The procedure was applied to solutions containing more than 2 mg of uranium in the sample but the highest precision and accuracy were obtained in the range from 20 to 200 mg of uranium. Dibutyl phosphate and monobutyl phosphate as well as the other radiolysis products of TBP had no influence on the results of determinations. (author)

  10. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  11. Hexavalent Chromium IV-Free Primer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, Michael J.; Buck, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Primer materials provide corrosion protection for metal parts as well as an increased adhesion between metallic substrates and thermal protection systems (TPSs). Current primers for use in cryogenic applications contain hexavalent chromium. This hexavalent chromium provides excellent corrosion protection even in a cryogenic environment, but it is a carcinogen that requires special equipment and waste control procedures to use. The hazardous nature of hexavalent chromium makes it an obsolescence risk in the future. This study included two phases of evaluation. Thirteen primers were initially identified as candidates and twelve of those primers were tested in phase 1. Four of the best performing candidates from phase 1 continued into phase 2 testing. Phase 1 testing consisted mostly of liquid constituent and physical property testing. Cryoflex and salt fog testing were included in phase 1 because of their importance to the overall success of a candidate material. Phase 2 consisted of physical, thermal, and mechanical properties for nominally processed and fabricated specimens.

  12. Uranium extraction in phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Figueiredo, C. de

    1984-01-01

    Uranium is recovered from the phosphoric liquor produced from the concentrate obtained from phosphorus-uraniferous mineral from Itataia mines (CE, Brazil). The proposed process consists of two extraction cycles. In the first one, uranium is reduced to its tetravalent state and then extracted by dioctylpyrophosphoric acid, diluted in Kerosene. Re-extraction is carried out with concentrated phosphoric acid containing an oxidising agent to convert uranium to its hexavalent state. This extract (from the first cycle) is submitted to the second cycle where uranium is extracted with DEPA-TOPO (di-2-hexylphosphoric acid/tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide) in Kerosene. The extract is then washed and uranium is backextracted and precipitated as commercial concentrate. The organic phase is recovered. Results from discontinuous tests were satisfactory, enabling to establish operational conditions for the performance of a continuous test in a micro-pilot plant. (Author) [pt

  13. Reduction of hexavalent chromium collected on PVC filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Y C; Paik, N W

    2000-01-01

    Chromium exists at various valences, including elemental, trivalent, and hexavalent chromium, and undergoes reduction-oxidation reactions in the environment. Since hexavalent chromium is known as a human carcinogen, it is most important to evaluate the oxidation-reduction characteristics of the hexavalent chromium species. Although hexavalent chromium can be reduced to trivalent state, the detailed information on this in workplace environments is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate hexavalent chromium reduction in time in various conditions. A pilot chrome plating operation was prepared and operated in a laboratory for this study. There was evidence that the hexavalent chromium was reduced by time after mist generation. The percentage ratio (with 95% confidence intervals in parentheses) of hexavalent chromium to total chromium was almost 100% (99.1 approximately 102.3) immediately after mist generation, and was reduced to 87.4% (84.8 approximately 89.9) at 1 hour and 81.0% (78.3 approximately 83.5) at 2 hours, respectively. Another test indicated that hexavalent chromium collected on PVC filters was also reduced by time after sampling. Hexavalent chromium was reduced to 90.8% (88.2 approximately 93.3) at 2 hours after sampling. It also was found that hexavalent chromium was reduced during storage in air. It is recommended that air samples of hexavalent chromium be protected against reduction during storage.

  14. Using proteomic data to assess a genome-scale "in silico" model of metal reducing bacteria in the simulation of field-scale uranium bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabusaki, S.; Fang, Y.; Wilkins, M. J.; Long, P.; Rifle IFRC Science Team

    2011-12-01

    A series of field experiments in a shallow alluvial aquifer at a former uranium mill tailings site have demonstrated that indigenous bacteria can be stimulated with acetate to catalyze the conversion of hexavalent uranium in a groundwater plume to immobile solid-associated uranium in the +4 oxidation state. While this bioreduction of uranium has been shown to lower groundwater concentrations below actionable standards, a viable remediation methodology will need a mechanistic, predictive and quantitative understanding of the microbially-mediated reactions that catalyze the reduction of uranium in the context of site-specific processes, properties, and conditions. At the Rifle IFRC site, we are investigating the impacts on uranium behavior of pulsed acetate amendment, acetate-oxidizing iron and sulfate reducing bacteria, seasonal water table variation, spatially-variable physical (hydraulic conductivity, porosity) and geochemical (reactive surface area) material properties. The simulation of three-dimensional, variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport during a uranium bioremediation field experiment includes a genome-scale in silico model of Geobacter sp. to represent the Fe(III) terminal electron accepting process (TEAP). The Geobacter in silico model of cell-scale physiological metabolic pathways is comprised of hundreds of intra-cellular and environmental exchange reactions. One advantage of this approach is that the TEAP reaction stoichiometry and rate are now functions of the metabolic status of the microorganism. The linkage of in silico model reactions to specific Geobacter proteins has enabled the use of groundwater proteomic analyses to assess the accuracy of the model under evolving hydrologic and biogeochemical conditions. In this case, the largest predicted fluxes through in silico model reactions generally correspond to high abundances of proteins linked to those reactions (e.g. the condensation reaction catalyzed by the protein

  15. Speciation of uranium with respect to hydrogeological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinrath, G.

    1997-01-01

    Until 1991, eastern Germany has been third largest uranium producer in the world. After the cease of uranium production, larger areas remained contaminated by uranium mining debris, mill-tailings and mining areas. Since 1991 these areas are in the process of remediation by intervention. In Germany, legal stipulations require the prognosis of the likely mid-term impact of an intervention. The benefit of a planned remediation procedure must be evident against the Zero option (doing nothing) and alternative actions. Thermodynamic data of geochemically relevant reactions for uranium under conditions of natural aqueous solution serve as important input data into geochemical reactive transport codes. Especially hydrolysis and carbonato complexation of hexavalent uranium influence the geochemical behaviour of uranium. The first part of the report report summarizes the fundamental chemical facts on mineralogy, electronic structure, UV-Vis and emission spectroscopy of hexavalent uranium. A second part reports in depth the experimental and numerical procedures to study the hydrolytic and carbonate complexation behaviour of hexavalent uranium. The evaluation of single component spectra of the relevant uranium species is discussed. Spectral curves are quantitatively deconcoluted into single components. In all cases the associated uncertainties are given. Thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and carbonato species derived from these experiments are compared to existing data in the literature. (orig.)

  16. Plutonium(VI) accumulation and reduction by lichen biomass: correlation with U(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Aoyagi, Hisao; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Samadfam, Mohammad; Kimura, Yasuhiko; William Purvis, O.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of plutonium(VI) and uranium(VI) by lichen biomass was studied in the foliose lichen Parmotrema tinctorum to elucidate the migration behavior of Pu and U in the terrestrial environment. Pu and U uptake by P. tinctorum averaged 0.040±0.010 and 0.055±0.015 g g dry -1 , respectively, after 96 h incubation with 4.0x10 -4 mol l -1 Pu solutions of pH 3, 4 and 5. SEM observations showed that the accumulated Pu is evenly distributed on the upper and lower surfaces of P. tinctorum, in contrast to U(VI), which accumulated in both cortical and medullary layers. UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that a fraction of Pu(VI) in the solution is reduced to Pu(V) by the organic substances released from P. tinctorum, and the accumulated Pu on the surface is reduced to Pu(IV), while U(VI) keeps the oxidation state of VI. Since the solubility of Pu(IV) hydroxides is very low, reduced Pu(VI) does not penetrate to the medullary layers, but is probably precipitated as Pu(IV) hydroxides on the cortical lichen surface. It is concluded that the uptake and reduction of Pu(VI) by lichens is important to determine the mobilization and oxidation states of Pu in the terrestrial environment

  17. Solvent extraction of uranium(VI), plutonium(VI) and americium(III) with HTTA/HPMBP using mono- and bi-functional neutral donors. Synergism and thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai, S.A.; Lohithakshan, K.V.; Mithapara, P.D.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2000-01-01

    Synergistic extraction of hexavalent uranium and plutonium as well as trivalent americium was studied in HNO 3 with thenoyl, trifluoro-acetone (HTTA)/1-phenyl, 3-methyl, 4-benzoyl pyrazolone-5 (HPMBP) in combination with neutral donors viz. DPSO, TBP, TOPO (mono-functional) and DBDECMP, DHDECMP, CMPO (bi-functional) with wide basicity range using benzene as diluent. A linear correlation was observed when the equilibrium constant log Ks for the organic phase synergistic reaction of both U(VI) and Pu(VI) with either of the chelating agents HTTA or HPMBP was plotted vs. the basicity (log Kh) of the donor (both mono- and bi-functional) indicating bi-functional donors also behave as mono-functional. This was supported by the thermodynamic data (ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 ) obtained for these systems. The organic phase adduct formation reactions were identified for the above systems from the thermodynamic data. In the Am(III) HTTA system log K s values of bi-functional donors were found to be very high and deviate from the linear plot (log K s vs. log K h ) obtained for mono-functional donors, indicating that they function as bi-functional for the Am(III)/HTTA) system studied. This was supported by high +ve ΔS 0 values obtained for this system. (author)

  18. Origin of hexavalent chromium in groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazakis, N.; Kantiranis, N.; Kalaitzidou, K.

    2017-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium constitutes a serious deterioration factor for the groundwater quality of several regions around the world. High concentrations of this contaminant have been also reported in the groundwater of the Sarigkiol hydrological basin (near Kozani city, NW Greece). Specific interest w...

  19. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    be used again to adsorb heavy metal ions. ... Among these heavy metals are chromium, copper and ... poisoning can result from high exposure to hexavalent chromium [2]. Most of the ..... At low pH, the sorbent is positively charged because of.

  20. Effect of natural uranium on the UMR-106 osteoblastic cell line: impairment of the autophagic process as an underlying mechanism of uranium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrefite-Carle, Valérie; Santucci-Darmanin, Sabine; Breuil, Véronique; Gritsaenko, Tatiana; Vidaud, Claude; Creff, Gaelle; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Pagnotta, Sophie; Al-Sahlanee, Rasha; Auwer, Christophe Den; Carle, Georges F

    2017-04-01

    Natural uranium (U), which is present in our environment, exerts a chemical toxicity, particularly in bone where it accumulates. Generally, U is found at oxidation state +VI in its oxocationic form [Formula: see text] in aqueous media. Although U(VI) has been reported to induce cell death in osteoblasts, the cells in charge of bone formation, the molecular mechanism for U(VI) effects in these cells remains poorly understood. The objective of our study was to explore U(VI) effect at doses ranging from 5 to 600 µM, on mineralization and autophagy induction in the UMR-106 model osteoblastic cell line and to determine U(VI) speciation after cellular uptake. Our results indicate that U(VI) affects mineralization function, even at subtoxic concentrations (metal exposure. We observed that U(VI) was able to rapidly activate autophagy but an inhibition of the autophagic flux was observed after 24 h. Thus, our results indicate that U(VI) perturbs osteoblastic functions by reducing mineralization capacity. Our study identifies for the first time U(VI) in the form of meta-autunite in mammalian cells. In addition, U(VI)-mediated inhibition of the autophagic flux may be one of the underlying mechanisms leading to the decreased mineralization and the toxicity observed in osteoblasts.

  1. Sorption of environmentally relevant radionuclides (U(VI), Np(V)) and lanthanides (Nd(III)) on feldspar and mica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Constanze

    2015-11-05

    A safe storage of radioactive waste in repositories is an important task to protect humans and the environment from radio- and chemotoxicity. Long-term safety assessments predict the behavior of potential environmental contaminants like the actinides plutonium, uranium, or neptunium, in the near and far field of repositories. For such safety assessments, it is necessary to know the migration behavior of the contaminants in the environment, which is mainly dependent on the aquatic speciation, the solubility product of relevant solid phases, and the retardation due to sorption on surrounding minerals. Thus, an investigation of sorption processes of contaminants onto different minerals as well as the derivation of mineral specific surface complexation model (SCM) parameters is of great importance. Feldspar and mica are widely distributed in nature. They occur as components of granite, which is considered as a potential host rock for a repository in Germany, and in numerous other rocks, and thus also in the far field of nearly all repositories. However, their sorption behavior with actinides has only been scarcely investigated until now. In order to better characterize these systems and subsequently to integrate these minerals into the long-term safety assessments, this work focuses on the investigation of the sorption behavior of U(VI), Np(V), and Nd(III) as analogue for An(III) onto the minerals orthoclase and muscovite, representing feldspars and mica, respectively. All investigations were performed under conditions relevant to the far field of a repository. In addition to the extensive characterization of the minerals, batch sorption experiments, spectroscopic investigations, and surface complexation modeling were performed to elucidate the uptake and speciation of actinides on the mineral surfaces. In addition, the influence of microorganisms naturally occurring on the mineral surfaces and the effect of Ca{sup 2+} on U(VI) uptake on the minerals was studied. The

  2. Sorption of environmentally relevant radionuclides (U(VI), Np(V)) and lanthanides (Nd(III)) on feldspar and mica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Constanze

    2015-01-01

    A safe storage of radioactive waste in repositories is an important task to protect humans and the environment from radio- and chemotoxicity. Long-term safety assessments predict the behavior of potential environmental contaminants like the actinides plutonium, uranium, or neptunium, in the near and far field of repositories. For such safety assessments, it is necessary to know the migration behavior of the contaminants in the environment, which is mainly dependent on the aquatic speciation, the solubility product of relevant solid phases, and the retardation due to sorption on surrounding minerals. Thus, an investigation of sorption processes of contaminants onto different minerals as well as the derivation of mineral specific surface complexation model (SCM) parameters is of great importance. Feldspar and mica are widely distributed in nature. They occur as components of granite, which is considered as a potential host rock for a repository in Germany, and in numerous other rocks, and thus also in the far field of nearly all repositories. However, their sorption behavior with actinides has only been scarcely investigated until now. In order to better characterize these systems and subsequently to integrate these minerals into the long-term safety assessments, this work focuses on the investigation of the sorption behavior of U(VI), Np(V), and Nd(III) as analogue for An(III) onto the minerals orthoclase and muscovite, representing feldspars and mica, respectively. All investigations were performed under conditions relevant to the far field of a repository. In addition to the extensive characterization of the minerals, batch sorption experiments, spectroscopic investigations, and surface complexation modeling were performed to elucidate the uptake and speciation of actinides on the mineral surfaces. In addition, the influence of microorganisms naturally occurring on the mineral surfaces and the effect of Ca 2+ on U(VI) uptake on the minerals was studied. The

  3. Uranium Sequestration During Biostimulated Reduction and In Response to the Return of Oxic Conditions In Shallow Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Christopher C.; Johnson, Kelly J.; Akstin, Katherine; Singer, David M.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Fuhrmann, M.

    2015-01-01

    A proposed approach for groundwater remediation of uranium contamination is to generate reducing conditions by stimulating the growth of microbial populations through injection of electron donor compounds into the subsurface. Sufficiently reducing conditions will result in reduction of soluble hexavalent uranium, U(VI), and precipitation of the less soluble +4 oxidation state uranium, U(IV). This process is termed biostimulated reduction. A key issue in the remediation of uranium (U) contamination in aquifers by biostimulated reduction is the long term stability of the sequestered uranium. Three flow-through column experiments using aquifer sediment were used to evaluate the remobilization of bioreduced U sequestered under conditions in which biostimulation extended well into sulfate reduction to enhance precipitation of reduced sulfur phases such as iron sulfides. One column received added ferrous iron, Fe(II), increasing production of iron sulfides, to test their effect on remobilization of the sequestered uranium, either by serving as a redox buffer by competing for dissolved oxygen, or by armoring the reduced uranium. During biostimulation of the ambient microbial population with acetate, dissolved uranium was lowered by a factor of 2.5 or more with continued removal for over 110 days of biostimulation, well after the onset of sulfate reduction at ~30 days. Sequestered uranium was essentially all U(IV) resulting from the formation of nano-particulate uraninite that coated sediment grains to a thickness of a few 10’s of microns, sometimes in association with S and Fe. A multicomponent biogeochemical reactive transport model simulation of column effluents during biostimulation was generally able to describe the acetate oxidation, iron, sulfate, and uranium reduction for all three columns using parameters derived from simulations of field scale biostimulation experiments. Columns were eluted with artificial groundwater at equilibrium with atmospheric oxygen to

  4. Recovery of uranium (VI) from low level aqueous radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulshrestha, Mukul

    1996-01-01

    Investigation was undertaken to evaluate the uranium (VI) removal and recovery potential of a naturally occurring, nonviable macrofungus, Ganoderma Lucidum from the simulated low level aqueous nuclear waste. These low level waste waters discharged from nuclear mine tailings and nuclear power reactors have a typical U(VI) concentration of 10-100 mg/L. It is possible to recover this uranium economically with the advent of biosorption as a viable technology. Extensive laboratory studies have revealed Ganoderma Lucidum to be a potential biosorbent with a specific uptake of 2.75 mg/g at an equilibrium U(VI) concentration of 10 mg/L at pH 4.5. To recover the sorbed U(VI), the studies indicated 0.2N Na 2 CO 3 to be an effective elutant. The kinetics of U(VI) desorption from loaded Ganoderma Lucidum with 0.2N Na 2 CO 3 as elutant, was found to be rapid with more than 75% recovery occurring in the first five minutes, the specific metal release rate being 0.102 mg/g/min. The equilibrium data fitted to a linearised Freundlich plot and exhibited a near 100% recovery of sorbed U(VI), clearly revealing a cost-effective method of recovery of precious uranium from low level wastewater. (author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  5. In situ Microbial Community Control of the Stability of Bio-Reduced Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Phillip E.; McKinley, James P.; White, David C.

    2006-01-01

    In aerobic aquifers typical of many Department of Energy (DOE) legacy waste sites, uranium is present in the oxidized U(VI) form which is soluble and thus mobile compared to U(IV). Previous work at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site demonstrated that biostimulation by acetate injection promoted growth of Geobacteraceae and stimulated the microbial reduction of U(VI) to less soluble U(IV) (1, 4). Despite the potential for oxidative dissolution of bio-reduced U(IV), field experiments at the Old Rifle site show that although the rate of U(VI) reduction decreases following the on-set of sulfate reduction, U(VI) reduction continues even following the cessation of acetate injection (1, 4). However, U(VI) reduction is reversible and the basis for the observed maintenance of U(VI) reduction post-stimulation is a critical but as yet unresolved issue for the application of biostimulation as a treatment technology. The continued U(VI) reduction and the maintenance of reduced U(IV) may result from many factors including U(VI) reduction by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), generation of H2S or FeS0.9 which serves as an oxygen sink, or the preferential sorption of U(VI) by microbial cells or biopolymers. The overall goal of the project is to develop an understanding of the mechanisms for the maintenance of bio-reduced uranium in an aerobic aquifer under field conditions following the cessation of electron donor addition

  6. Contribution of extracellular polymeric substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to U(VI) immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, Bulbul; Kennedy, David W; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J; Fredrickson, Jim K; Isern, Nancy G; Majors, Paul D; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells with minimal EPS, we show that (i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contribute significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; (ii) bEPS can be considered a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at lower initial U(VI) concentrations; and (iii) the U(VI) reduction efficiency is dependent upon the initial U(VI) concentration and decreases at lower concentrations. To quantify the relative contributions of sorption and reduction to U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(VI). We found that, when reduced, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated the reactivity of laEPS, while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, possibly facilitated U(VI) reduction.

  7. Potential Aquifer Vulnerability in Regions Down-Gradient from Uranium In Situ Recovery (ISR) Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium ore deposits originate when U(VI) dissolved in groundwater is reduced and precipitated as insoluble U(IV) minerals. Groundwater redox geochemistry, aqueous complexation, and solute migration are instrumental in leaching uranium from source rock...

  8. Adsorptive property of rice husk for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yuan; Yi Facheng

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption experiments were researched by using the rice husk powder as the adsorbent to remove the U(VI) from aqueous solution. The affecting factors on the U(VI) removal rate such as rice husk particle size, pH, initial concentration, adsorption time, temperature and dosage of adsorbent were evaluated, kinetics and adsorption isotherm law were analyzed, and mechanisms for U(VI) removal were discussed by SEM, FT-IR and energy spectrum analysis. The results show that U(VI) removal rate increases with the decrease of the size of adsorbent, and with the increase of adsorbent dosage and temperature. The process of adsorption can be described by an equation of pseudo 2nd-order mode, and the relation coefficient is 1. The process of adsorption also fits to Freundlich isotherm (R 2 =0.995 4). The adsorption of uranium on rice husk changes the surface form of rice husk. Hydroxyl, carboxylic, P-O and Si-O are the main functional groups in the reaction with U(VI). The adsorption mechanism is mixture adsorption, including the physical and chemical adsorption. (authors)

  9. A coupled mass transfer and surface complexation model for uranium (VI) removal from wastewaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenhart, J.; Figueroa, L.A.; Honeyman, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    A remediation technique has been developed for removing uranium (VI) from complex contaminated groundwater using flake chitin as a biosorbent in batch and continuous flow configurations. With this system, U(VI) removal efficiency can be predicted using a model that integrates surface complexation models, mass transport limitations and sorption kinetics. This integration allows the reactor model to predict removal efficiencies for complex groundwaters with variable U(VI) concentrations and other constituents. The system has been validated using laboratory-derived kinetic data in batch and CSTR systems to verify the model predictions of U(VI) uptake from simulated contaminated groundwater

  10. Mesoporous polymer-coated PAN beads for environmental applications. Fabrication, characterisation and uranium adsorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Z.; Scales, N.; Davis, J.; Lumpkin, G.

    2017-01-01

    Adsorption of U(VI) and other heavy metals on millimetre sized polymer-coated polyacrylinitrile (PAN) beads was investigated. PAN was used as scaffolds for the polymer layer thus producing porous material of high surface area, improved mechanical strength and improved adsorption capabilities. Extensive U(VI) adsorption studies were undertaken and results modelled using different kinetic and equilibrium models. Parameters including thermodynamic parameters were evaluated. Sorbent capacities were assessed as 124, 16, and 33 mg g"-"1 for PCP, SPP and Dowex at 60 deg C respectively. U(VI) adsorption mechanism for these adsorbents was postulated. Recovered uranium may be used for production of cheap electricity. (author)

  11. Interaction of erythrocytes and hexavalent uranium compounds -an autoanalytical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, W.I.; Shying, M.E.

    1980-05-01

    An automated analytical system was devised to measure the kinetics of hemolysis by uranyl compounds. Accurate plots of percentage hemolysis v. time were obtained; these, together with the corresponding differential curves, show that hemolysis of plasma-free erythrocytes is a two-stage process. The first stage of hemolysis is particularly affected by pH and anion content of uranyl solutions, and also by incubation of cell suspensions at 37 deg. before mixing with lysing solution. Complementary studies involving Coulter counting and microscopic observation established the general pattern of hemolysis and showed that cell agglutination is a prominent feature of the interaction of cells with uranyl solutions

  12. Understanding Uranium Behavior in a Reduced Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janot, N.; Lezama-Pacheco, J. S.; Williams, K. H.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Long, P. E.; Davis, J. A.; Fox, P. M.; Yang, L.; Giammar, D.; Cerrato, J. M.; Bargar, J.

    2012-12-01

    Uranium contamination of groundwater is a concern at several US Department of Energy sites, such Old Rifle, CO. Uranium transport in the environment is mainly controlled by its oxidation state, since oxidized U(VI) is relatively mobile, whereas U(IV) is relatively insoluble. Bio-remediation of contaminated aquifers aims at immobilizing uranium in a reduced form. Previous laboratory and field studies have shown that adding electron donor (lactate, acetate, ethanol) to groundwater stimulates the activity of metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, which promotes U(VI) reduction in contaminated aquifers. However, obtaining information on chemical and physical forms of U, Fe and S species for sediments biostimulated in the field, as well as kinetic parameters such as U(VI) reduction rate, is challenging due to the low concentration of uranium in the aquifers (typically bio-remediation experiment at the Old Rifle site, CO, from early iron-reducing conditions to the transition to sulfate-reducing conditions. Several in-well chromatographic columns packed with sediment were deployed and were sampled at different days after the start of bio-reduction. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray microscopy were used to obtain information on Fe, S and U speciation and distribution. Chemical extractions of the reduced sediments have also been performed, to determine the rate of Fe(II) and U(IV) accumulation.

  13. Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, B.; Kennedy, David W.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-06-05

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent upon initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.

  14. Current status and future prospects of uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuronuma, Chosuke

    1997-01-01

    Uranium is contained in various things in natural world, for example, 3 ppm in granite and 3x10 -3 ppm in seawater. Uranium exists in the state of tetra, penta and hexa-valence in nature, and in oxidizing environment, it exists as uranyl radical of hexa-valence, forms soluble complexes, and easily moves with water. In reducing environment, it becomes insoluble state of tetra-valence and precipitates. This property of uranium is deeply related to the way of forming the deposit, and it is explained. The uranium resources of the recovery cost being 80 dollars per kg U or less are 2,120,000 t, and 60% of the total exists in Australia, Kazakstan and Canada. The cumulative production of uranium in the world from 1945 to 1995 was 1,810,000 t. Of the total production, 875,000 t was used for civil purpose, and 750,000 t was used for military purpose. The uranium deposits in Canada are very high quality, and produce 1/3 of the world uranium production. There are the inventories of 150,000-200,000 t U. The diversion of military high enriched uranium to civil purpose is reported. The state of uranium market, the prospect of demand and supply of uranium, and the exploration and development of uranium resources are described. (K.I.)

  15. Predictive calculations to assess the long-term effect of cementitious materials on the pH and solubility of uranium(VI) in a shallow land disposal environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criscenti, L.J.; Serne, R.J.; Krupka, K.M.; Wood, M.I.

    1996-09-01

    One proposed method of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal is to mix the radioactive waste streams with cement, place the mixture in steel barrels, and dispose of the barrels in near-surface unsaturated sediments. Cement or concrete is frequently used in burial grounds, because cement porewaters are buffered at high pH values and lanthanides and actinides; are very insoluble in highly alkaline environments. Therefore, leaching of these contaminants from the combined cement/low-level radioactive waste streams will at least initially be retarded. The calculations performed in this study demonstrate that the pH of cement porewaters will be maintained at a value greater than 10 for 10,000 years under Hanford specific hydrogeochemical conditions. Ten thousand years is the period generally studied in longterm performance assessments per regulatory guidance. The concentrations of dissolved hexavalent uranium [U(VI)], the valence form of dissolved U usually present in oxidizing surface and groundwaters, are also constrained by the high pH and predicted solution compositions over the 10,000-year period, which is favorable from a long-term performance perspective

  16. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Rhizopus Oryzae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    reduction data and the specific growth rate constant value was calculated as 0.082 and the ... Key words: Hexavalent chromium, Rhizopus Oryzae, leather tanning, Monod and Haldane models. ... composition; Glucose 1 g; K2HPO4 0.5 g; NaCl 0.5 g; MgCl2 1.0 g; ... ficantly, because of the inhibitor role of high concentration.

  17. Hexavalent Chromium reduction by Trichoderma inhamatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Battera, L.; Cristiani-Urbina, E.

    2009-07-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] is a useful and attractive process for remediation of ecosystems and industrial effluents contaminated with Cr(VI). Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(II) can be achieved by both chemical and biological methods; however, the biological reduction is more convenient than the chemical one since costs are lower, and sludge is generated in smaller amounts. (Author)

  18. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Asgari ، F. Vaezi ، S. Nasseri ، O. Dördelmann ، A. H. Mahvi ، E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Removal of chromium can be accomplished by various methods but none of them is cost-effective in meeting drinking water standards. For this study, granular ferric hydroxide was used as adsorbent for removal of hexavalent chromium. Besides, the effects of changing contact time, pH and concentrations of competitive anions were determined for different amounts of granular ferric hydroxide. It was found that granular ferric hydroxide has a high capacity for adsorption of hexavalent chromium from water at pH≤7 and in 90 min contact time. Maximum adsorption capacity was determined to be 0.788 mg Cr+6/g granular ferric hydroxide. Although relatively good adsorption of sulfate and chloride had been specified in this study, the interfering effects of these two anions had not been detected in concentrations of 200 and 400 mg/L. The absorbability of hexavalent chromium by granular ferric hydroxide could be expressed by Freundlich isotherm with R2>0.968. However, the disadvantage was that the iron concentration in water was increased by the granular ferric hydroxide. Nevertheless, granular ferric hydroxide is a promising adsorbent for chromium removal, even in the presence of other interfering compounds, because granular ferric hydroxide treatment can easily be accomplished and removal of excess iron is a simple practice for conventional water treatment plants. Thus, this method could be regarded as a safe and convenient solution to the problem of chromium-polluted water resources.

  19. Effect of pH and uranium concentration on interaction of uranium(VI) and uranium(IV) with organic ligands in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.C.; Victor, D.M.; Chakrabarti, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of pH and uranium concentration on the interactions of uranium(VI) and uranium(IV) with organic ligands was studied by employing dialysis and ultrafiltration techniques. The interactions of U(VI) and U(IV) with organic ligands in nitrate or chloride aqueous solution have been found to be pH-dependent. The stability constants of uranium-organic complexes decrease in the order: fulvic acid>humic acid>tannic acid for U(VI) and humic acid>tannic acid>fulvic acid for U(IV). Scatchard plots for the uranium-organic acid systems indicate two types of binding sites with a difference in stability constants of about 10 2 . Ultrafiltration of uranium-humic acid complexes indicates that U(VI) and U(IV) ions are concentrated in larger molecular size fractions (>5.1 nm) at pH less than or equal to 3 and in smaller molecular size fractions (in the range 5.1 to 3.1 nm and 2.4 to 1.9 nm) at pH greater than or equal to 5. 7 figures, 4 tables

  20. REMOVAL OF U(VI) IN MULTI-COMPONENT SYSTEMS BY ADSORPTION USING ACTIVATED CARBON DERIVED FROM RICE STRAW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YAKOUT, S.M.; RIZK, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The use of low cost activated carbon derived from rice straw has been investigated as a replacement for the current expensive methods for radionuclides removal from wastewater. The adsorption studies were carried out in multi-component systems. The effects of common cations and anions on uranium uptake were investigated. Different cations under investigation showed marginal effect on the adsorption of uranium, except in case of iron ion where the adsorption was significantly depressed by the addition of Fe ion (R % was 20%). Coexistence of iron ions at high levels may compete strongly for the adsorption sites with uranium ions resulting in a substantial reduction of uranium removal. The prepared activated carbon showed good selectivity in uranium extraction even in the presence of large concentrations (100 ppm) of anionic complexing agents and common electrolyte species.The simultaneous presence of both U(VI) / Th(IV) reduced sorption through competition for sorption sites on carbon surface. It is concluded that multi-species adsorption can be significantly affected by adsorbate interactions. Understanding these interactions needs great attention in adsorption study in the future

  1. Effect of porosity and surface chemistry on the adsorption-desorption of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakout, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Rice straw-based biochars modified with different chemical regents were used as an adsorbent for uranium(VI). Effect of pyrolysis temperature and nature of modifying agent's as well as surface chemistry, surface charge, and pore structure on U(VI) removal was investigated. Amount and nature of the surface groups has, in general, more influence than its porosity on U(VI) adsorption. The adsorption was maximum for the initial pH of 5.5. Rice straw derived biochars had comparable U(VI) adsorption as compared to other adsorbents. The U(VI) removal was 90 % from groundwater. NaHCO 3 was found to be the most efficient desorbent eluent for U(VI). (author)

  2. Cassini UVIS Observations of Saturn during the Grand Finale Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, W. R.; Esposito, L. W.; West, R. A.; Jouchoux, A.; Radioti, A.; Grodent, D. C.; Gerard, J. C. M. C.; Gustin, J.; Lamy, L.; Badman, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    In 2016 and 2017, the Cassini Saturn orbiter executed a final series of high inclination, low-periapsis orbits ideal for studies of Saturn's polar regions. The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) obtained an extensive set of auroral images, some at the highest spatial resolution obtained during Cassini's long orbital mission (2004-2017). In some cases, two or three spacecraft slews at right angles to the long slit of the spectrograph were required to cover the entire auroral region to form auroral images. We will present selected images from this set showing narrow arcs of emission, more diffuse auroral emissions, multiple auroral arcs in a single image, discrete spots of emission, small scale vortices, large-scale spiral forms, and parallel linear features that appear to cross in places like twisted wires. Some shorter features are transverse to the main auroral arcs, like barbs on a wire. UVIS observations were in some cases simultaneous with auroral observations from the Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) that will also be presented. UVIS polar images also contain spectral information suitable for studies of the auroral electron energy distribution. The long wavelength part of the UVIS polar images contains a signal from reflected sunlight containing absorption signatures of acetylene and other Saturn hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon spatial distribution will also be examined.

  3. Influence of Reactive Transport on the Reduction of U(VI) in the Presence of Fe(III) and Nitrate: Implications for U(VI) Immobilization by Bioremediation/Biobarriers - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B.D. Wood

    2007-01-01

    Subsurface contamination by metals and radionuclides represent some of the most challenging remediation problems confronting the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. In situ remediation of these contaminants by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) has been proposed as a potential cost effective remediation strategy. The primary focus of this research is to determine the mechanisms by which the fluxes of electron acceptors, electron donors, and other species can be controlled to maximize the transfer of reductive equivalents to the aqueous and solid phases. The proposed research is unique in the NABIR portfolio in that it focuses on (i) the role of flow and transport in the initiation of biostimulation and the successful sequestration of metals and radionuclides [specifically U(VI)], (ii) the subsequent reductive capacity and stability of the reduced sediments produced by the biostimulation process, and (iii) the potential for altering the growth of biomass in the subsurface by the addition of specific metabolic uncoupling compounds. A scientifically-based understanding of these phenomena are critical to the ability to design successful bioremediation schemes. The laboratory research will employ Shewanella putrefaciens (CN32), a facultative DMRB that can use Fe(III) oxides as a terminal electron acceptor. Sediment-packed columns will be inoculated with this organism, and the reduction of U(VI) by the DMRB will be stimulated by the addition of a carbon and energy source in the presence of Fe(III). Separate column experiments will be conducted to independently examine: (1) the importance of the abiotic reduction of U(VI) by biogenic Fe(II); (2) the influence of the transport process on Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization, with emphasis on methods for controlling the fluxes of aqueous species to maximize uranium reduction; (3) the reductive capacity of biologically-reduced sediments (with respect to re-oxidation by convective fluxes of O2 and NO3-) and

  4. Uranium band types in carbonaceous sediments with different diagenesis levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borstel, D. von.

    1984-01-01

    Uraniferous peats, lignites and coals were studied by chemical and geological methods in order to determine the influence of carbonaceous substances with different diagenesis levels on uranium enrichment in sediments. It was found that the main factor of deposit genesis is not the chemical bending of uranium to the organic substance but rather the reduction from mobile U(VI) to immobile U(IV) in the course of diagenesis to epigenesis. (orig./PW) [de

  5. Biosolubilization of uranyl ions in uranium ores by hydrophyte plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecal, Alexandru; Calmoi, Rodica; Melniciuc-Puica, Nicoleta

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigated the bioleaching of uranyl ions from uranium ores, in aqueous medium by hydrophyte plants: Lemna minor, Azolla caroliniana and Elodea canadensis under different experimental conditions. The oxidation of U(IV) to U(VI) species was done by the atomic oxygen generated in the photosynthesis process by the aquatic plants in the solution above uranium ores. Under identical experimental conditions, the capacity of bioleaching of uranium ores decreases according to the following series: Lemna minor > Elodea canadensis > Azolla caroliniana. The results of IR spectra suggest the possible use of Lemna minor and Elodea canadensis as a biological decontaminant of uranium containing wastewaters. (author)

  6. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications: Joint Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgeb, Matt; Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of the Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications project is to evaluate and test pretreatments not containing hexavalent chrome in avionics and electronics housing applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing strong performing coating systems from prior NASA and DoD testing or new coating systems as determined by the stakeholders.

  7. The unexpected teratogenicity of RXR antagonist UVI3003 via activation of PPARγ in Xenopus tropicalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jingmin; Janesick, Amanda; Wu, Lijiao; Hu, Lingling; Tang, Weiyi; Blumberg, Bruce; Shi, Huahong

    2017-01-01

    The RXR agonist (triphenyltin, TPT) and the RXR antagonist (UVI3003) both show teratogenicity and, unexpectedly, induce similar malformations in Xenopus tropicalis embryos. In the present study, we exposed X. tropicalis embryos to UVI3003 in seven specific developmental windows and identified changes in gene expression. We further measured the ability of UVI3003 to activate Xenopus RXRα (xRXRα) and PPARγ (xPPARγ) in vitro and in vivo. We found that UVI3003 activated xPPARγ either in Cos7 cells (in vitro) or Xenopus embryos (in vivo). UVI3003 did not significantly activate human or mouse PPARγ in vitro; therefore, the activation of Xenopus PPARγ by UVI3003 is novel. The ability of UVI3003 to activate xPPARγ explains why UVI3003 and TPT yield similar phenotypes in Xenopus embryos. Our results indicate that activating PPARγ leads to teratogenic effects in Xenopus embryos. More generally, we infer that chemicals known to specifically modulate mammalian nuclear hormone receptors cannot be assumed to have the same activity in non-mammalian species, such as Xenopus. Rather they must be tested for activity and specificity on receptors of the species in question to avoid making inappropriate conclusions. - Highlights: • UVI3003 is a RXRs antagonist and shows teratogenicity to Xenopus embryos. • UVI3003 activated xPPARγ either in Cos7 cells or Xenopus embryos. • UVI3003 did not activate human or mouse PPARγ in Cos7 cells. • Activating PPARγ leads to teratogenic effects in Xenopus embryos.

  8. 76 FR 71926 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium Policy to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... 0750-AH39 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium... the use of materials containing hexavalent chromium. DATES: Comment Date: Comments on the proposed... human health and environmental risks related to the use of hexavalent chromium. Hexavalent chromium is a...

  9. Towards a consistent geochemical model for prediction of uranium(VI) removal from groundwater by ferrihydrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Daessman, Ellinor; Baeckstroem, Mattias

    2009-01-01

    Uranium(VI), which is often elevated in granitoidic groundwaters, is known to adsorb strongly to Fe (hydr)oxides under certain conditions. This process can be used in water treatment to remove U(VI). To develop a consistent geochemical model for U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite, batch experiments were performed and previous data sets reviewed to optimize a set of surface complexation constants using the 3-plane CD-MUSIC model. To consider the effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on U(VI) speciation, new parameters for the Stockholm Humic Model (SHM) were optimized using previously published data. The model, which was constrained from available X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy evidence, fitted the data well when the surface sites were divided into low- and high-affinity binding sites. Application of the model concept to other published data sets revealed differences in the reactivity of different ferrihydrites towards U(VI). Use of the optimized SHM parameters for U(VI)-DOM complexation showed that this process is important for U(VI) speciation at low pH. However in neutral to alkaline waters with substantial carbonate present, Ca-U-CO 3 complexes predominate. The calibrated geochemical model was used to simulate U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite for a hypothetical groundwater in the presence of several competitive ions. The results showed that U(VI) adsorption was strong between pH 5 and 8. Also near the calcite saturation limit, where U(VI) adsorption was weakest according to the model, the adsorption percentage was predicted to be >80%. Hence U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite-containing sorbents may be used as a method to bring down U(VI) concentrations to acceptable levels in groundwater

  10. Chemical Interaction between U(VI) and Eu(III) ions on a Silica Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K. K.; Cha, W. S.; Cho, H. R.; Im, H. J.; Jung, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the chemical behavior of actinide in groundwater flow is important for assessing the possibility of its migration with water flow in the radioactive waste disposal site. Precipitation/ dissolution in groundwater and adsorption/desorption onto a geological solid surface would determine its migration. The sorption in a geochemical system was expected to be a reaction on a naturally equilibrated surface. However, the construction of a waste disposal facility could disturb this equilibrium state, induce a new reaction environment and affect a nanoscopic surface reaction of actinide. Uranium is ubiquitous in the natural environment and a representative element in a nuclear fuel cycle and in a high level radioactive waste. In oxic environments, it is typically present as uranyl oxocation (UO 2 2+ ), which is easily adsorbed and thereby removed from a solution in the near neutral pH range. This adsorption would form a new surface condition to give an unexpected adsorption behavior for other actinide ions. Eu(III) frequently is used as a chemical analogue of Am(III) and Cm(III) in migration chemistry. The adsorption phenomena has been interpreted with the help of a SCM(surface complexation model). Some spectroscopic techniques such as EPR (Electron Paramagnetic Resonance), IR (InfraRed), EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) and TRLFS (Time Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy) have been used for the identification of a modeled adsorbing species. In the case of fluorescence elements, TRLFS has advantages over other techniques for its high sensitivity being proportional to laser source intensity and good selectivity depending on specific transition and lifetime. This technique can be applied to a species on a solid surface not absorbing light such as silica. U(VI) and Eu(III) have fluorescente properties reflecting their coordination structure. In this study, the interaction between U(VI) and Eu(III) on a silica surface was studied by a

  11. Development of supported noble metal catalyst for U(VI) to U(IV) reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Deepak; Varma, Salil; Bhattacharyya, K.; Tripathi, A.K.; Bharadwaj, S.R.; Jain, V.K.; Sahu, Avinash; Vincent, Tessy; Jagatap, B.N.; Wattal, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Uranium-plutonium separation is an essential step in the PUREX process employed in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. This partitioning in the PUREX process is achieved by selective reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) using uranous nitrate as reductant and hydrazine as stabilizer. Currently in our Indian reprocessing plants, the requirement of uranous nitrate is met by electrolytic reduction of uranyl nitrate. This process, however, suffers from a major drawback of incomplete reduction with a maximum conversion of ~ 60%. Catalytic reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) is being considered as one of the promising alternatives to the electro-reduction process due to fast kinetics and near total conversion. Various catalysts involving noble metals like platinum (Adams catalyst, Pt/Al 2 O 3 , Pt/SiO 2 etc.) have been reported for the reduction. Sustained activity and stability of the catalyst under harsh reaction conditions are still the issues that need to be resolved. We present here the results on zirconia supported noble metal catalyst that is developed in BARC for reduction of uranyl nitrate to uranous nitrate. Supported noble metal catalysts with varying metal loadings (0.5 - 2 wt%) were prepared via support precipitation and noble metal impregnation. The green catalysts were reduced either by chemical reduction using hydrazine hydrate or by heating in hydrogen flow or combination of both the steps. These catalysts were characterized by various techniques such as, XRD, SEM, TEM, N 2 adsorption and H 2 chemisorption. Performance of these catalysts was evaluated for U(VI) to U(IV) reduction with uranyl nitrate feed using hydrazine as reductant. The results with the most active catalyst are named as 'BARC-CAT', which was developed in our lab. (author)

  12. Uranium geochemistry and dating of Pacific island apatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roe, K K; Burnett, W C [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee (USA). Dept. of Oceanography

    1985-07-01

    Uranium-series disequilibrium dating of island phosphate deposits is evaluated in terms of known associated coral ages, uranium geochemistry, and stratigraphic sequences as well as the concordance between the geochronometers /sup 234/U//sup 238/U, /sup 230/Th//sup 234/U and /sup 226/Ra//sup 238/U. U(VI) is the predominant oxidation state of uranium in island phosphorites and by analogy to the youngest surficial deposits, most of the uranium initially bound is in the form of U(VI) sorbed by surfaces from seawater. Insular deposits contain more organic matter than even very young ocean floor samples and this leads to a greater probability of reduction of available recoil uranium than occurs in marine deposits. As a consequence, R(VI) <= R(T) <= R(VI), where R represents the /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratio. This situation is completely opposite from that observed for marine-origin phosphorites. We determined that a fraction of U(VI) in ancient insular phosphorites is very labile and lost to alkaline carbonate solutions with a uranium activity ratio even more depleted in /sup 234/U than the bulk R(VI). The results are discussed.

  13. Uranium(VI) transport modeling: geochemical data and submodels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    Understanding the geochemical mobility of U(VI) and modeling its transport is important in several contexts including ore genesis, uranium exploration, nuclear and mill-tailings waste management, and solution mining of uranium ores. Adsorption is a major control on partitioning of solutes at the mineral/solution interface. The effect of carbonate, fluoride, and phosphate complexing on adsorption of uranium was investigated. A critical compilation of stability constants of inorganic complexes and solid compounds of U(VI) necessary for proper design of experiment and for modeling transport of uranium was prepared. The general features of U(VI) adsorption in ligand-free systems are similar to those characteristic of other hydrolyzable metal ions. The adsorption processes studied were found to be reversible. The adsorption model developed in ligand-free systems, when solution complexing is taken into account, proved remarkably successful in describing adsorption of uranium in the presence of carbonate and fluoride. The presence of phosphate caused a much smaller decrease in the extent of adsorption than expected; however, a critical reassessment of the stability of UO 2 2+ .HPO 4 2- complexes, showed that phosphato complexes, if any, are extremely weak under experimental conditions. Removal of uranium may have occurred due to precipitation of sodium uranyl phosphates in addition to adsorption

  14. Biotransformation involved in sustained reductive removal of uranium in contaminant aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes progress made from August 2004 to July 2005. During this period research focused primarily on obtaining a better understanding of the factors controlling the reduction of U(VI) during in situ uranium bioremediation as well as investigating the potential for using electrodes as an alternative electron donor to promote in situ uranium reduction. Analysis of the 2003 experiment at the field study site in Rifle, CO was completed. The results demonstrated the substantial heterogeneity of the zone undergoing bioremediation, both in terms of geochemistry and microbiology. The lack of U(VI) reduction under sulfate-reducing conditions was clearly documented. The need for more detailed sampling both with time and with depth in the aquifer was demonstrated. For the first time a comparison between the composition of the microbial community in the sediments and the microbes in the corresponding groundwater was attempted. The findings from this study are important not only in further demonstrating the potential for in situ uranium bioremediation, but also for indicating how methods and sampling approaches should be improved in the future. A manuscript summarizing these findings has been accepted for publication in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. In summer of 2004 a new field experiment was conducted at the Rifle site. A novel feature of this study was much more intensive sampling in order to better define the progression of microbial processes during in situ uranium bioremediation. The results demonstrated that stimulation of in situ uranium bioremediation with added acetate was a repeatable phenomenon and that U(VI) reduction was clearly linked to the presence and activity of microorganisms in the family Geobacteraceae. A manuscript summarizing these results is in preparation. A surprising result of the field studies at the Rifle site was that although Geobacter species actively reduced U(VI) in the groundwater, removing it from solution, a high

  15. Adsorption of uranium on halloysite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilislioglu, A.; Bilgin, B.

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solutions on halloysite type clay was studied as a function of amount of adsorbent, initial concentration and pH. The values of adsorption data were fitted to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The mean energy of adsorption was calculated as 5.91 kJ/mol from D-R adsorption isotherm. Lagergren and Bangham equation has been used for dynamic modelling of process and the rate constants of adsorption of uranium on halloysite type clay were calculated at 293, 313 and 333 K. In order to explain the mechanism of adsorption reaction, the rate constants were calculated at high and low uranium concentrations. Adsorption reaction was studied at 293, 303, 313, 323 and 333 K for halloysite type clay and also thermodynamic constants have been calculated. The results show that the adsorption reaction was endothermic and more spontaneous at high temperature. (orig.)

  16. Adsorption of uranium on halloysite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilislioglu, A.; Bilgin, B. [Istanbul Univ. (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering

    2002-07-01

    Adsorption of uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solutions on halloysite type clay was studied as a function of amount of adsorbent, initial concentration and pH. The values of adsorption data were fitted to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The mean energy of adsorption was calculated as 5.91 kJ/mol from D-R adsorption isotherm. Lagergren and Bangham equation has been used for dynamic modelling of process and the rate constants of adsorption of uranium on halloysite type clay were calculated at 293, 313 and 333 K. In order to explain the mechanism of adsorption reaction, the rate constants were calculated at high and low uranium concentrations. Adsorption reaction was studied at 293, 303, 313, 323 and 333 K for halloysite type clay and also thermodynamic constants have been calculated. The results show that the adsorption reaction was endothermic and more spontaneous at high temperature. (orig.)

  17. Migration of uranium process wastes from the uranium-233--thorium-232 cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fried, S.; Sabau, C.; Hines, J.; Friedman, A.

    1978-03-01

    With the advent of fuel loadings of 233 U in the Shippingport Reactor, it has become important to understand the migratory behavior of uranium. The purpose of this study is the determination of the parameters influencing the migration of U(VI), the most likely chemical form of uranium to be mobilized from a repository. Samples of rhyolite tuff were used to measure the absorption coefficients of solutions of U(VI) in ground waters. In addition, columns of tuff were used to measure the elution behavior of U(VI) at various conditions of pH, U(VI) concentration, and flow saturation. These results indicate that there are several elution peaks with values of K/sub d/ between 35 and 120. This behavior is not the same as that of Pu(VI) on tuff; and the experimental results to date have not revealed the reason for this difference. Values of K/sub d/ in this range imply that geological containment would be difficult in strata of this type. It may be possible to find more retentive strata than tuff. Rocks containing reducing components are the most likely candidates and further investigation is urgently needed if the 233 U-Th cycle is to be widely used

  18. Uranium preconcentration from seawater using adsorptive membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sadananda; Pandey, A.K.; Manchanda, V.K.; Athawale, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium recovery from bio-aggressive but lean feed like seawater is a challenging problem as it requires in situ preconcentration of uranium in presence of huge excess of competing ions with fast sorption kinetics. In our laboratory, widely used amidoxime membrane (AO-membrane) was evaluated for uranium sorption under seawater conditions. This study indicated that AO-membrane was inherently slow because of the complexation chemistry involved in transfer of U(VI) from (UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ) 4 - to AO sites in membrane. In order to search better options, several chemical compositions of membrane were scanned for their efficacy for uranium preconcentration from seawater, and concluded that EGMP-membrane offers several advantages over AO-membrane. In this paper, the comparison of EGMP-membrane with AO-membrane for uranium sorption under seawater conditions has been reviewed. (author)

  19. Biotransformations Involved in Sustained Reductive Removal of Uranium in Contaminated Aquifers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2008-01-01

    The studies completed under this grant significantly advanced the understanding and design of strategies for in situ uranium bioremediation. Novel strategies identified show promise to make in situ uranium bioremediation technically simpler and less expensive. As detailed, important findings included: (1) Development of an electron donor delivery strategy to prolong the in situ activity of Geobacter species and enhance the removal of uranium from the groundwater; (2) Demonstration that reproducible year-to-year field experiments were possible at the ERSP study site in Rifle, CO, making hypothesis-driven field experimentation possible; (3) Elucidation of the geochemical and microbiological heterogeneities with the subsurface during in situ uranium bioremediation, which must be accounted for to accurately model the bioremediation process; (4) The discovery that most of the U(VI) contamination at the Rifle site is sediment-associated rather than mobile in the groundwater, as previously considered; (5) The finding that unlike soluble U(VI), sediment-associated U(VI) is not microbially reducible; (6) The demonstration that electrodes may be an effective alternative to acetate as an electron donor to promote microbial U(VI) reduction in the subsurface with the added benefit that electrode-promoted microbial U(VI) reduction offers the possibility of removing the immobilized uranium from the subsurface; and (7) The finding that, after extended acetate inputs, U(VI) continues to be removed from groundwater long after the introduction of acetate into the subsurface is terminated and that this appears to be due to adsorption onto biomass. This potentially will make in situ uranium bioremediation much less expensive than previously envisioned.

  20. Polarography applied to the determination of uranium oxide composition; Application de la polarographie a la determination de la composition d'oxydes d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nens, C; Canton, C; Molina, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Departement de Chimie, Services d' Etudes Chimiques et d' Analyse, Service d' Etudes Analytiques, Section de Chimie Analytique du Plutonium et d' Electroanalyse

    1967-03-01

    An analytical method based on conventional polarography has been developed, for the determination of the O/U ratio in uranium oxides. The dissolution of the samples is effected by means of molten ammonium bifluoride. After a transfer to aqueous solution, polarography is used to determine the oxide composition by measurement of both the hexavalent and the total uranium. (author) [French] Une methode d'analyse utilisamt la polarographie conventionnelle a ete mise au point pour la determination du rapport O/U dans les oxydes d'uranium. La mise en solution des echgantillons est realisee en milieu de bifluorure d'ammonium fondu. Apres passage en salution aqueuse, la polarographie permet d'atteindre la composition de l'oxyde par determination de l'uranium hexavalent et de l'uranium total. (auteur)

  1. Uranium(VI) speciation by spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinrath, G.

    1997-01-01

    The application of UV-Vis and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TRLF) spectroscopies to direct of uranium(VI) in environmental samples offers various prospects that have, however, serious limitations. While UV-Vis spectroscopy is probably not sensitive enough to detect uranium(VI) species in the majority of environmental samples, TRLFS is principially able to speciate uranium(VI) at very low concentration levels in the nanomol range. Speciation by TRLFS can be based on three parameters: excitation spectrum, emission spectrum and lifetime of the fluorescence emission process. Due to quenching effects, the lifetime may not be expected to be as characteristics as, e.g., the emission spectrum. Quenching of U(VI) fluorescence by reaction with organic substances, inorganic ions and formation of carbonate radicals is one important limiting factor in the application of U(VI) fluorescence spectroscopy. Fundamental photophysical criteria are illustrated using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectra of U(VI) hydrolysis and carbonato species as examples. (author)

  2. Ammonium carbonate and/or bicarbonate plus alkaline chlorate oxidant for recovery of uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, uranium values are extracted from materials containing uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state by contacting the materials containing uranium with an aqueous alkaline leach solution containing an alkaline chlorate in an amount sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state to its hexavalent state. In a further embodiment of the present invention, the alkaline leach solution is an aqueous solution of a carbonate selected from the group consisting of ammonium carbonate, ammonium bicarbonate and mixtures thereof. In yet another embodiment of the present invention, at least one catalytic compound of a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, cobalt, iron, nickel, chromium and mixtures thereof adapted to assure the presence of the ionic species Cu ++ , Co ++ , Fe +++ , Ni ++ , Cr +++ and mixtures thereof, respectively, during the contacting of the material containing uranium with the alkaline leach solution and in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of at least a portion of the uranium in its lower valence states to its hexavalent state, is present

  3. In Situ Microbial Community Control of the Stability of Bio-reduced Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, Brett R.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Resch, Charles T.; Arntzen, Evan; Smithgall, Amanda N.; Pfiffner, Susan; Gan, M.; McKinley, James P.; Long, Philip E.; White, David C.

    2008-01-01

    In aerobic aquifers typical of many Department of Energy (DOE) legacy waste sites, uranium is present in the oxidized U(VI) form which is more soluble and thus more mobile. Field experiments at the Old Rifle UMTRA site have demonstrated that biostimulation by electron donor addition (acetate) promotes biological U(VI) reduction (2). However, U(VI) reduction is reversible and oxidative dissolution of precipitated U(IV) after the cessation of electron donor addition remains a critical issue for the application of biostimulation as a treatment technology. Despite the potential for oxidative dissolution, field experiments at the Old Rifle site have shown that rapid reoxidation of bio-reduced uranium does not occur and U(VI) concentrations can remain at approximately 20% of background levels for more than one year. The extent of post-amendment U(VI) removal and the maintenance of bioreduced uranium may result from many factors including U(VI) sorption to iron-containing mineral phases, generation of H2S or FeS0.9, or the preferential sorption of U(VI) by microbial cells or biopolymers, but the processes controlling the reduction and in situ reoxidation rates are not known. To investigate the role of microbial community composition in the maintenance of bioreduced uranium, in-well sediment incubators (ISIs) were developed allowing field deployment of amended and native sediments during on-going experiments at the site. Field deployment of the ISIs allows expedient interrogation of microbial community response to field environmental perturbations and varying geochemical conditions.

  4. In Situ Microbial Community Control of the Stability of Bio-reduced Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, Brett, R.; Peacock, Aaron, D.; Resch, Charles, T.; Arntzen, Evan; Smithgall, Amanda, N.; Pfiffner, Susan; Gan, M.; McKinley, James, P.; Long, Philip, E.; White, David, C.

    2008-03-28

    In aerobic aquifers typical of many Department of Energy (DOE) legacy waste sites, uranium is present in the oxidized U(VI) form which is more soluble and thus more mobile. Field experiments at the Old Rifle UMTRA site have demonstrated that biostimulation by electron donor addition (acetate) promotes biological U(VI) reduction (2). However, U(VI) reduction is reversible and oxidative dissolution of precipitated U(IV) after the cessation of electron donor addition remains a critical issue for the application of biostimulation as a treatment technology. Despite the potential for oxidative dissolution, field experiments at the Old Rifle site have shown that rapid reoxidation of bio-reduced uranium does not occur and U(VI) concentrations can remain at approximately 20% of background levels for more than one year. The extent of post-amendment U(VI) removal and the maintenance of bioreduced uranium may result from many factors including U(VI) sorption to iron-containing mineral phases, generation of H2S or FeS0.9, or the preferential sorption of U(VI) by microbial cells or biopolymers, but the processes controlling the reduction and in situ reoxidation rates are not known. To investigate the role of microbial community composition in the maintenance of bioreduced uranium, in-well sediment incubators (ISIs) were developed allowing field deployment of amended and native sediments during on-going experiments at the site. Field deployment of the ISIs allows expedient interrogation of microbial community response to field environmental perturbations and varying geochemical conditions.

  5. Uranium nanoparticle synthesis from leaching solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, Z.; Sklodowska, A.

    2014-01-01

    The removal of uranium from leaching and bioleaching solutions is of great significance for an environment protection. In comparison with conventional separation techniques, synthesis of uranium nanoparticles has a number of benefits. It has been demonstrated that the uranium nanoparticles show high catalytic activity. In the present studies a variety of synthesis systems have been used for reduction of uranium from bioleaching solution. Among various catalytical templates the hematite Fe_2O_3 nanoparticles are most interest It was presented the report on development of synthesis method to produce nano structured Fe_2O_3 particles. The efficiency of hematite nanoparticles for adsorption of uranium ions from bioleaching solutions was investigated. Bacterial leaching is alternate technique used to extract uranium from mining wastes. The bioleaching process is environment friendly and gives the extraction yield of over 90%. The bioleaching solutions were obtained from bioleaching experiments using waste materials from different places at Lower Silesia (Kowary, Grzmiaca, Kopaniec, Radoniow). Chemoautotrophic bacteria were used for bioleaching tests. The significant adsorption capacity of U(VI) onto iron oxide and hydroxides (goethite, hematite, and magnetite) was observed. The sorption of U(VI) onto the hematite surface was connected with the chemical reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by Fe"2"+ ions. The initial reaction system contained excess of Fe"2"+ ions which were used to reduce of U(VI). The reduction of U(VI) occurred at pH at the vicinity of pH=2.4. The colloid particles of hematite with UO_2 nanoparticles were obtained. The results of zeta potential measurements of hematite nanoparticles showed that at the ionic strength equals 10"-"3M NaCl, the average zeta potential was +32.4±3.5 mV at pH = 2.6. The interaction of hematite nanoparticles with the bioleaching solutions led to decrease of positive zeta potential to the value of 6.4± 2.7 mV. (author)

  6. Interaction between U(VI) and Fe(II) in aqueous solution under anaerobic conditions. Closed system experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myllykylae, E.; Ollila, K.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of these experiments is to investigate the potential reduction of U(VI) carbonate and hydroxide complexes by aqueous Fe(II). This reduction phenomenon could be important under the disposal conditions of spent fuel. If groundwater enters the copper/iron canister, alpha radiolysis of the water may locally induce oxidizing conditions on the surface of UO 2 fuel, leading to the dissolution of UO 2 as more soluble U(VI) species. A potential reducing agent in the intruding water is Fe(II)(aq) from anaerobic corrosion of the copper/iron canister. The reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) would substantially decrease the solubility of U as well as co-precipitate other actinides and radionuclides. The interaction experiments were conducted in 0.01 M NaCl and 0.002 M NaHCO 3 solutions using an initial uranium concentration of either 8.4 x 10 -8 or 4.2 x 10 -7 mol/L with an initial Fe(II) concentration of 1.8 x 10 -6 in the NaCl solutions and 1.3 x 10 -6 mol/L in the NaHCO 3 solutions. Only after an equilibration period for U(VI) complexation was Fe(II) added to the solutions. The reaction times varied from 1 week to 5 months. For extra protection against O 2 , even inside a glove-box (N 2 atmosphere), the plastic reaction vessels were closed in metallic containers. The concentrations of U, Fe TOT and Fe(II) were analysed as a function of time for unfiltered, micro- and ultrafiltered samples. In addition, the precipitate on the ultrafilters was analysed with ESEM-EDS. The evolution of pH and Eh values was measured. The oxidation state of U in solution was preliminarily analysed for chosen periods. The results of the tests in 0.01 M NaCl showed an initial rapid decrease in U concentration after the addition of Fe(II) to the solution. The U found on test vessel walls at the end of the reaction periods, as well as the ESEM-EDS analyses of the filtered precipitates from the test solutions, showed that precipitation of U had occurred. The oxidation state analyses showed the presence

  7. Effect of anthropogenic organic complexants on the solubility of Ni, Th, U(IV) and U(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felipe-Sotelo, M., E-mail: m.felipe-sotelo@lboro.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Loughborough University, LE11 3TU Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom); Edgar, M. [Department of Chemistry, Loughborough University, LE11 3TU Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom); Beattie, T. [MCM Consulting. Täfernstrasse 11, CH 5405 Baden-Dättwil (Switzerland); Warwick, P. [Enviras Ltd., LE11 3TU Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom); Evans, N.D.M.; Read, D. [Department of Chemistry, Loughborough University, LE11 3TU Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Citrate increases the solubility of Ni, Th and U between 3 and 4 orders of magnitude. • Theophrastite is the solubility controlling phase of Ni in 95%-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2}. • U(VI) and Ni may form Metal-citrate-OH complexes stabilised by the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. - Abstract: The influence of anthropogenic organic complexants (citrate, EDTA and DTPA from 0.005 to 0.1 M) on the solubility of nickel(II), thorium(IV) and uranium (U(IV) and U(VI)) has been studied. Experiments were carried out in 95%-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions, representing the high pH conditions anticipated in the near field of a cementitious intermediate level radioactive waste repository. Results showed that Ni(II) solubility increased by 2–4 orders of magnitude in the presence of EDTA and DTPA and from 3 to 4 orders of magnitude in the case of citrate. Citrate had the greatest effect on the solubility of Th(IV) and U(IV)/(VI). XRD and SEM analyses indicate that the precipitates are largely amorphous; only in the case of Ni(II), is there some evidence of incipient crystallinity, in the form of Ni(OH){sub 2} (theophrastite). A study of the effect of calcium suggests that U(VI) and Ni(II) may form metal-citrate-OH complexes stabilised by Ca{sup 2+}. Thermodynamic modelling underestimates the concentrations in solution in the presence of the ligands for all the elements considered here. Further investigation of the behaviour of organic ligands under hyperalkaline conditions is important because of the use of the thermodynamic constants in preparing the safety case for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes.

  8. Impact of water quality parameters on the sorption of U(VI) onto hematite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Donglin; Wang Xianbiao; Yang Shitong; Guo Zhiqiang; Sheng Guodong

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the sorption of U(VI) from aqueous solution on hematite was studied as a function of various water quality parameters such as contact time, pH, ionic strength, soil humic acid (HA) or fulvic acid (FA), solid content and temperature by using a batch technique. The results demonstrated that the sorption of U(VI) was strongly dependent on ionic strength at pH 6.0 and the sorption was mainly dominated by inner-sphere surface complexation. The presence of HA/FA increases U(VI) sorption at low pH, whereas decreases U(VI) sorption at high pH. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 , and ΔG 0 ) were calculated from the temperature dependent sorption isotherms, and the results suggested that U(VI) sorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results might be important for the application of hematite in U(VI) pollution management. Highlights: ► The sorption of U(VI) was strongly dependent on ionic strength at pH 6.0. ► A positive effect of HA/FA on U(VI) sorption was found at low pH, whereas a negative effect was observed at high pH. ► U(VI) sorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process. ► The results are quite important for the application of hematite in U(VI) pollution management.

  9. Development and demonstration of biosorbents for clean-up of uranium in water. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faison, B.D.; Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Reeves, M.E.; Williams, L.; Schmidt-Kuster, W.; Darnell, K.

    1997-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium, shows particular promise as the basis of an immobilized-cell process for removal of dissolved uranium from contaminated wastewaters. It was characterized with respect to its sorptive active. Living, heat-killed, permeabilized, and unreconstituted lyophilized cells were all capable of binding uranium. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H + competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe 3+ loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe 3+ , suggesting that Fe 3+ and uranium may share the same binding sites on biomass

  10. Development and demonstration of biosorbents for clean-up of uranium in water. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faison, B.D.; Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Reeves, M.E.; Williams, L.; Schmidt-Kuster, W.; Darnell, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Ogden Environmental Service, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium, shows particular promise as the basis of an immobilized-cell process for removal of dissolved uranium from contaminated wastewaters. It was characterized with respect to its sorptive active. Living, heat-killed, permeabilized, and unreconstituted lyophilized cells were all capable of binding uranium. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H{sup +} competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe{sup 3+} loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe{sup 3+}, suggesting that Fe{sup 3+} and uranium may share the same binding sites on biomass.

  11. Evaluation of an automatic uranium titration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, K.

    1980-01-01

    The titration system utilizes the constant current coulometric titration of Goldbeck and Lerner. U(VI) is reduced to U(IV) by Fe(II). V(V) is generated to titrate the U(IV), and the titration is followed potentiometrically. The evaluation shows that the recovery of uranium is 100% at the 40-mg level. The accuracy is generally +-0.10% or better. The smallest sample weight at which reliable results were obtained was 40 mg of uranium. Time for one analysis is 15 minutes. Advantages and disadvantages of the automated titrator are listed

  12. Electrochemistry of uranium in sodium chloroaluminate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'olieslager, W.; Meuris, F.; Heerman, L.

    1990-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of uranium was studied in basic, NaCl-saturated NaAlCl 4 melts at 175 deg C. Solutions of UO 3 exhibit two oxidation/reduction waves (cyclic voltammetry). Analysis of the peak currents (cyclic voltammetry), the limiting currents (pulse polarography) and the non-linear log i-t curves (anodic controlled potential coulometry) leads to the conclusion that uranium(IV) in the basic chloroaluminate melt exists as two different species in slow equilibrium with one another, of which only one species can be oxidized to U(VI). (author) 16 refs.; 7 figs.; 3 tabs

  13. Efficient removal of uranium from aqueous solution by zero-valent iron nanoparticle and its graphene composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zi-Jie; Wang, Lin; Yuan, Li-Yong; Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Mei, Lei; Zheng, Li-Rong; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Ju-Hua; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Zhu, Zhen-Tai; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Uranium removal by ZVI-nps: independent of pH, the presence of CO 3 2− , humic acid, or mimic groundwater constituents. • Rapid removal kinetics and sorption capacity of ZVI-nps is 8173 mg U/g. • Two reaction mechanisms: sufficient Fe 0 → reductive precipitation as U 3 O 7 ; insufficient Fe 0 → hydrolysis precipitation of U(VI). • Fe/graphene composites: improved kinetics and higher U(VI) reduction ratio. - Abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticle (ZVI-np) and its graphene composites were prepared and applied in the removal of uranium under anoxic conditions. It was found that solutions containing 24 ppm U(VI) could be completely cleaned up by ZVI-nps, regardless of the presence of NaHCO 3 , humic acid, mimic groundwater constituents or the change of solution pH from 5 to 9, manifesting the promising potential of this reactive material in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) to remediate uranium-contaminated groundwater. In the measurement of maximum sorption capacity, removal efficiency of uranium kept at 100% until C 0 (U) = 643 ppm, and the saturation sorption of 8173 mg U/g ZVI-nps was achieved at C 0 (U) = 714 ppm. In addition, reaction mechanisms were clarified based on the results of SEM, XRD, XANES, and chemical leaching in (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 solution. Partially reductive precipitation of U(VI) as U 3 O 7 was prevalent when sufficient iron was available; nevertheless, hydrolysis precipitation of U(VI) on surface would be predominant as iron got insufficient, characterized by releases of Fe 2+ ions. The dissolution of Fe 0 cores was assigned to be the driving force of continuous formation of U(VI) (hydr)oxide. The incorporation of graphene supporting matrix was found to facilitate faster removal rate and higher U(VI) reduction ratio, thus benefitting the long-term immobilization of uranium in geochemical environment

  14. WFC3 TV2 Testing: UVIS Channel Glint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas M.

    2007-10-01

    The UVIS spare detector (UVIS build 2) was housed in WFC3 during the most recent epoch of thermal vaccum ground testing. We scanned the chip gap with a HeNe laser, to look for scattering from any material in the CCD chip gap or the edges of the CCD chips themselves. Although we found no such scattering issues, we did find a significant glint problem involving reflection from the surface of the CCD to the CCD housing and back down to the CCD. The glint appears as a large streak, ~10,000 pixels in area, containing anywhere from 1% to 30% of the energy within the source itself, depending upon the wavelength and position of the source. Approximately 10% of the detector area leads to glint when a source is placed in that area. Although any one glint comprises a tiny fraction of the detector area, the glint sweeps over a large area as the source is moved, implying that approximately 15% of the detector could be significantly illuminated by glint when observing a crowded field. As a result, the UVIS detectors currently not installed in the instrument have been modified to mask the surfaces responsible for the glint, to avoid this issue on orbit.

  15. Electrodeposited tungsten-nickel-boron: A replacement for hexavalent chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-04-01

    Chromium, deposited from acidic solutions of its hexavalent ion, has been the rule for wear resistant, corrosion resistant coatings for many years. Although chromium coatings are durable, the plating process generates air emissions, effluent rinse waters, and process solutions that are toxic, suspected carcinogens, and a risk to human health and the environment. Tungsten-nickel-boron (W-Ni-B) alloy deposition is a potential substitute for hexavalent chrome. It has excellent wear, corrosion, and mechanical properties and also may be less of an environmental risk. This study examines the electroplating process and deposit properties of W-Ni-B and compares them with those of hexavalent chrome

  16. Multistage bioassociation of uranium onto an extremely halophilic archaeon revealed by a unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, Miriam; Müller, Katharina; Foerstendorf, Harald; Drobot, Björn [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Schmidt, Matthias; Musat, Niculina [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZ, Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Swanson, Juliet S.; Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Repository Science and Operations, 1400 University Drive, Carlsbad, NM, 88220 (United States); Stumpf, Thorsten [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Cherkouk, Andrea, E-mail: a.cherkouk@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden – Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • First prolonged kinetics study of uranium to halophilic archaea was performed. • An atypical time-dependent bioassociation behavior of uranium was observed. • Unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods was used. • In situ ATR FT-IR showed association of U(VI) to phosphoryl and carboxylate groups. • Time-dependent changes of U(VI) localization could be monitored by SEM/EDX. - Abstract: The interactions of two extremely halophilic archaea with uranium were investigated at high ionic strength as a function of time, pH and uranium concentration. Halobacterium noricense DSM-15987 and Halobacterium sp. putatively noricense, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository, were used for these investigations. The kinetics of U(VI) bioassociation with both strains showed an atypical multistage behavior, meaning that after an initial phase of U(VI) sorption, an unexpected interim period of U(VI) release was observed, followed by a slow reassociation of uranium with the cells. By applying in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, the involvement of phosphoryl and carboxylate groups in U(VI) complexation during the first biosorption phase was shown. Differences in cell morphology and uranium localization become visible at different stages of the bioassociation process, as shown with scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate for the first time that association of uranium with the extremely halophilic archaeon is a multistage process, beginning with sorption and followed by another process, probably biomineralization.

  17. Multistage bioassociation of uranium onto an extremely halophilic archaeon revealed by a unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, Miriam; Müller, Katharina; Foerstendorf, Harald; Drobot, Björn; Schmidt, Matthias; Musat, Niculina; Swanson, Juliet S.; Reed, Donald T.; Stumpf, Thorsten; Cherkouk, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • First prolonged kinetics study of uranium to halophilic archaea was performed. • An atypical time-dependent bioassociation behavior of uranium was observed. • Unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods was used. • In situ ATR FT-IR showed association of U(VI) to phosphoryl and carboxylate groups. • Time-dependent changes of U(VI) localization could be monitored by SEM/EDX. - Abstract: The interactions of two extremely halophilic archaea with uranium were investigated at high ionic strength as a function of time, pH and uranium concentration. Halobacterium noricense DSM-15987 and Halobacterium sp. putatively noricense, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository, were used for these investigations. The kinetics of U(VI) bioassociation with both strains showed an atypical multistage behavior, meaning that after an initial phase of U(VI) sorption, an unexpected interim period of U(VI) release was observed, followed by a slow reassociation of uranium with the cells. By applying in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, the involvement of phosphoryl and carboxylate groups in U(VI) complexation during the first biosorption phase was shown. Differences in cell morphology and uranium localization become visible at different stages of the bioassociation process, as shown with scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate for the first time that association of uranium with the extremely halophilic archaeon is a multistage process, beginning with sorption and followed by another process, probably biomineralization.

  18. Layered Double Hydroxides as Effective Adsorbents for U(VI and Toxic Heavy Metals Removal from Aqueous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Pshinko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacities of different synthesized Zn,Al-hydrotalcite-like adsorbents, including the initial carbonate [Zn4Al2(OH12]·CO3·8H2O and its forms intercalated with chelating agents (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA, and hexamethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (HMDTA and heat-treated form Zn4Al2O7, to adsorb uranium(VI and ions of toxic heavy metals have been compared. Metal sorption capacities of hydrotalcite-like adsorbents have been shown to correlate with the stability of their complexes with the mentioned chelating agents in a solution. The synthesized layered double hydroxides (LDHs containing chelating agents in the interlayer space are rather efficient for sorption purification of aqueous media free from U(VI irrespective of its forms of natural abundance (including water-soluble bi- and tricarbonate forms and from heavy metal ions. [Zn4Al2(OH12]·EDTA·nH2O is recommended for practical application as one of the most efficient and inexpensive synthetic adsorbents designed for recovery of both cationic and particularly important anionic forms of U(VI and other heavy metals from aqueous media. Carbonate forms of LDHs turned out to be most efficient for recovery of Cu(II from aqueous media with pH0≥7 owing to precipitation of Cu(II basic carbonates and Cu(II hydroxides. Chromate ions are efficiently adsorbed from water only by calcinated forms of LDHs.

  19. Aqueous U(VI) interaction with magnetite nanoparticles in a mixed flow reactor system: HR-XANES study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pidchenko, I; Heberling, F; Finck, N; Schild, D; Bohnert, E; Schäfer, T; Rothe, J; Geckeis, H; Vitova, T; Kvashnina, KO

    2016-01-01

    The redox variations and changes in local atomic environment of uranium (U) interacted with the magnetite nanoparticles were studied in a proof of principle experiment by the U L 3 and M 4 edges high energy resolution X-ray absorption near edge structure (HR-XANES) technique. We designed and applied a mixed flow reactor (MFR) set-up to maintain dynamic flow conditions during U-magnetite interactions. Formation of hydrolyzed, bi- and poly-nuclear U species were excluded by slow continuous injection of U(VI) (10 -6 M) and pH control integrated in the MFR set-up. The applied U HR-XANES technique is more sensitive to minor changes in the U redox states and bonding compared to the conventional XANES method. Major U(VI) contribution in uranyl type of bonding is found in the magnetite nanoparticles after three days operation time of the MFR. Indications for shortening of the U-O axial bond length for the magnetite compared to the maghemite system are present too. (paper)

  20. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PE Long; SB Yabusaki; PD Meyer; CJ Murray; AL N'Guessan

    2008-01-01

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation

  1. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PE Long; SB Yabusaki; PD Meyer; CJ Murray; AL N’Guessan

    2008-04-01

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation.

  2. Retention of uranium(VI) by laumontite, a fracture-filling material of granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, M.H.; Lee, S.Y.; Shon, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Retention of U(VI) by laumontite, a fracture-filling material of granite as investigated by conducting dynamic and batch sorption experiments in a love-box using a granite core with a natural fracture. The hydrodynamic properties of the granite core were obtained from the elution curve of a on-sorbing tracer, Br - . The elution curve of U(VI) showed a similar behavior to Br - . This reveals that the retention of U(VI) by the fracture-filling material was not significant when migrating through the fracture at a given condition. From the dynamic sorption experiment, the retardation factor R a and the distribution coefficient K a of U(VI) were obtained as about 2.9 and 0.16 cm, respectively. The distribution coefficient K d ) of U(VI) onto laumontite obtained by conducting a batch sorption experiment resulted in a small value of 2.3±0.5 mL/g. This low K d value greed with the result of the dynamic sorption experiment. For the distribution of uranium on the granite surface investigated by an X-ray image mapping, the fracture region filled with laumontite showed a relatively lower content of uranium compared to the surrounding granite surface. Thus, the low retention of U(VI) by the fracture-filling material can be explained by following two mechanisms. One is that U(VI) exists as anionic uranyl hydroxides or uranyl carbonates at a given groundwater condition and the other is the remarkably low sorption capacity of the laumontite for U(VI). author)

  3. Modeling of geochemical processes related to uranium mobilization in the groundwater of a uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, P.; Garralon, A.; Buil, B.; Turrero, Ma.J.; Sanchez, L.; Cruz, B. de la

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the processes leading to uranium distribution in the groundwater of five boreholes near a restored uranium mine (dug in granite), and the environmental impact of restoration work in the discharge area. The groundwater uranium content varied from < 1 μg/L in reduced water far from the area of influence of the uranium ore-containing dyke, to 104 μg/L in a borehole hydraulically connected to the mine. These values, however, fail to reflect a chemical equilibrium between the water and the pure mineral phases. A model for the mobilization of uranium in this groundwater is therefore proposed. This involves the percolation of oxidized waters through the fractured granite, leading to the oxidation of pyrite and arsenopyrite and the precipitation of iron oxyhydroxides. This in turn leads to the dissolution of the primary pitchblende and, subsequently, the release of U(VI) species to the groundwater. These U(VI) species are retained by iron hydroxides. Secondary uranium species are eventually formed as reducing conditions are re-established due to water-rock interactions

  4. Geochemical control on the reduction of U(VI) to mononuclear U(IV) species in lacustrine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetten, L.; Mangeret, A.; Brest, J.; Seder-Colomina, M.; Le Pape, P.; Ikogou, M.; Zeyen, N.; Thouvenot, A.; Julien, A.; Alcalde, G.; Reyss, J. L.; Bombled, B.; Rabouille, C.; Olivi, L.; Proux, O.; Cazala, C.; Morin, G.

    2018-02-01

    Contaminated systems in which uranium (U) concentrations slightly exceed the geochemical background are of particular interest to identify natural processes governing U trapping and accumulation in Earth's surface environments. For this purpose, we examined the role of early diagenesis on the evolution of U speciation and mobility in sediments from an artificial lake located downstream from a former mining site. Sediment and pore water chemistry together with U and Fe solid state speciation were analyzed in sediment cores sampled down to 50 cm depth at four locations in the lake. These organic-rich sediments (∼12% organic C) exhibited U concentrations in the 40-80 mg kg-1 range. The sediment columns were anoxic 2-3 mm below the sediment-water interface and pore waters pH was circumneutral. Pore water chemistry profiles showed that organic carbon mineralization was associated with Fe and Mn reduction and was correlated with a decrease in dissolved U concentration with depth. Immobilization of U in the sediment was correlated with the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) at depth, as shown by U LIII-edge XANES spectroscopic analysis. XANES and EXAFS spectroscopy at the Fe K-edge showed the reduction of structural Fe(III) to Fe(II) in phyllosilicate minerals with depth, coincident with U(VI) to U(IV) reduction. Thermodynamic modeling suggests that Fe(II) could act as a major reducing agent for U(VI) during early diagenesis of these sediments, leading to complete U reduction below ∼30 cm depth. Shell-by-shell and Cauchy-Wavelet analysis of U LIII-EXAFS spectra indicates that U(VI) and U(IV) are mainly present as mononuclear species bound to C, P or Si ligands. Chemical extractions confirmed that ∼60-80% of U was present as non-crystalline species, which emphasizes that such species should be considered when evaluating the fate of U in lacustrine environments and the efficiency of sediment remediation strategies.

  5. Carbon Paste Electrode Modified with Carbamoylphosphonic Acid Functionalized Mesoporous Silica: A New Mercury-Free Sensor for Uranium Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yantasee, Wassana; Lin, Yuehe; Fryxell, Glen E.; Wang, Zheming

    2004-01-01

    This study reports a new approach for developing a uranium (U(VI)) electrochemical sensor that is mercury-free, solid-state, and has less chance for ligand depletion than existing sensors. A carbon-paste electrode modified with carbamoylphosphonic acid self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous silica was developed for uranium detection based on an adsorptive square-wave stripping voltammetry technique. Voltammetric responses for U(VI) detection are reported as a function of pH, preconcentration time, and aqueous phase U(VI) concentration. The uranium detection limit is 25 ppb after 5 minutes preconcentration and improved to 1 ppb after 20 minutes preconcentration. The relative standard deviations are normally less than 5%

  6. Synergetic treatment of uranium-bearing waste water with sulfate reducing bacteria and zero-valent iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Quanyu; Tan Kaixuan; Zeng Sheng; Liu Dong

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of uranium-bearing wastewater from uranium mine and using microorganism to treat wastewater were paid much attention to environmental researchers. Based on column experiments, we investigated the potential using sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and zero-valent iron (ZVI) to synergetic treat contamination in wastewater such as sulfate, uranium, etc. SRB+ZVI can effectively remove contamination U(VI) and SO 4 2- in wastewater. The removal rate is 99.4% and 86.2% for U(VI) and SO 4 2- , respectively. The pH of wastewater can be basified to neutral. U(VI) and SO 4 2- as electron acceptor of sulfate reducing bacteria are removed by biological reduction. The corrosion of ZVI is benefit to enhance the pH of wastewater, forms anaerobic reducing environment, strengthens survival and metabolism reaction of SRB, and plays a synergetic enhancement. (authors)

  7. Effective bioreduction of hexavalent chromium–contaminated water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING ... Evaluation after reactor termination with SEM-EDX and XRD confirmed the ... Keywords: Bioreduction, fixed-film reactor, hexavalent chromium, microbial diversity ...

  8. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (Peer Review Plan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hexavalent chromium that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  9. Biosorption of uranium by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU: Characterization and comparison studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, M.Z.C.; Norman, J.M.; Faison, B.D.; Reeves, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium (as UO 2 2+ and/or its cationic hydroxo complexes) was characterized with respect to its sorptive activity. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa CSU was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H + competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe 3+ loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe 3+ . Thus, a two-state process in which iron and uranium are removed in consecutive steps was proposed for efficient use of the biomass as a biosorbent in uranium removal from mine wastewater, especially acidic leachates

  10. Irradiation defects in clayey minerals in association with discordance-type uranium deposit; Les Defauts d'Irradiation dans les Mineraux argileux associes aux gisements d'Uranium de type Discordance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morichon, E.; Beaufort, D. [Universite de Poitiers, Laboratoire HydrASA, CNRS-FRE 3114, 86 - Poitiers (France); Morichon, E.; Allard, Th. [IMPMC, UMR 7590, 75 - Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    Radioactivity generates defects in minerals and these defects are the witnesses of the presence of radio-elements, and therefore represent an interesting potential for uranium prospecting. Investigations made in the Athabasca basin in Canada reveal irradiation defects in very old clays (kaolinite, illite and sudoite) in the alteration halo of discordance-type uranium deposits. The authors comment the defect concentration variation among the different drillings. These differences show that hexavalent uranium circulated in the whole geological system

  11. RDT&E Progress and Plansfor Hexavalent Chromium (Cr6+)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    RDT&E Progress and Plans for Hexavalent Chromium (Cr6+) Bruce Sartwell Weapons Systems and Platforms Program Manager E2S2 Conference May 12, 2011...2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RDT&E Progress and Plansfor Hexavalent Chromium (Cr6+) 5a...Development of Accelerated Corrosion Test Protocols Alternatives to Hex Chrome and Cadmium Plating Alternatives to Hex Chrome Pretreatments

  12. Field-scale model for the natural attenuation of uranium at the Hanford 300 area using high performance computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtner, Peter C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hammond, Glenn E [PNNL

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional reactive flow and transport simulations are carried out to better understand the persistence of uranium [U(VI)] at the Hanford 300 Area bordering the Columbia River. The massively parallel code PFLOTRAN developed under a DOE SciDAC-2 project is employed in the simulations. The calculations were carried out on 4096 processor cores on ORNL's Jaguar XT4 & 5 Cray supercomputers with run times on the order of 6 hours, equivalent to several years if performed on a single processor with sufficient memory. A new conceptual model is presented for understanding present-day and future attenuation rates of U(VI) at the 300 Area site. Unique to the conceptual model is the recognition of three distinct phases in the evolution of the site corresponding to: (I) initial emplacement of waste; (II) present-day conditions of slow leaching of U(VI) from the Hanford sediments; and (III) the complete removal of non-labile U(VI) from the source region. This work focuses on Phase II. Both labile and non-labile forms of U(VI) are included in the model as sorbed and mineralized forms of U(VI), respectively. The non-labile form plays an important role in providing a long-term source of U(VI) as it slowly leaches out of the Hanford sediment. Rapid fluctuations in the Columbia River stage on hourly, weekly and seasonal time scales are found to' playa major role in determining the migration behavior of U(VI). The calculations demonstrate that U(VI) is released into the Columbia River at a highly fluctuating rate in a ratchet-like behavior with nonzero U(VI) flux occurring only during flow from contaminated sediment into the river. The cumulative flux, however, is found to increase approximately linearly with time. The flow rate and U(VI) flux into the Columbia River predicted by the model is highly sensitive to the value used in the conductance boundary condition at the river-sediment interface. By fitting the conductance to the measured piezometric head at well 399

  13. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quaternized wood as sorbent for hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, K S; Lee, C K; Lee, C Y

    2001-01-01

    The potential of quaternized wood (QW) chips in removing hexavalent chromium from synthetic solution and chrome waste under both batch and continuous-flow conditions was investigated. Sorption was found to be dependent on pH, metal concentration, and temperature. QW chips provide higher sorption capacity and wider pH range compared with untreated wood chips. The equilibrium data could be fitted into the Langmuir isotherm model, and maximum sorption capacities were calculated to be 27.03 and 25.77 mg/g in synthetic chromate solution and chrome waste, respectively. The presence of sulfate in high concentration appeared to suppress the uptake of chromium by QW chips. Column studies showed that bed depth influenced the breakthrough time greatly whereas flow rate of influent had little effect on its sorption on the column.

  15. NASA TEERM Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt; Rothgeb, Matt

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the NASA project to select an alternative to hexavalent chrome in the aerospace industry. Included is a recent historic testing and research that the Agency has performed on (1) the external tank, (2) the shuttle orbiter, (3) the Shuttle Rocket Booster, and (4) the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Other related Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) projects are reviewed. The Phase I process of the project performed testing of alternatives the results are shown in a chart for different coating systems. International collaboration was also reviewed. Phase II involves further testing of pretreatment and primers for 6 and 12 months of exposure to conditions at Launch Pad and the beach. Further test were performed to characterize the life cycle corrosion of the space vehicles. A new task is described as a joint project with the Department of Defense to identify a Hex Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics.

  16. Hexavalent chrome: threshold concept for carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R E

    1990-03-01

    Certain hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) compounds when administered via inhalation at high doses have the potential to induce lung tumors in humans and experimental animals. Trivalent chromium (Cr3+) is an essential human and animal nutrient at levels of 50 to 200 micrograms/day. Recent data have shown that the human body is able to reduce Cr6+ to Cr3+. This reduction occurs in bodily fluids such as gastric juice, epithelial lining fluid of the respiratory tract, blood, and other fluids. Secondary reduction occurs at the cellular level by the cytosol, mitochondria, and microsomes. Thus, at low levels of exposure hexavalent chromium ions are reduced before the 6+ ions can interact with DNA unless the dose is sufficient to overwhelm the body's reduction capacity. This paper summarizes the available data concerning the reducing ability of the body and formulates the steps in the mechanism of cancer induction. These steps include: (1) only certain Cr6+ compounds have the capacity to interact with cellular components; (2) Cr6+ is reduced by body fluids and excess Cr6+ enters the cell (Cr3+ is poorly absorbed across membranes); (3) cellular organelles and the cytoplasm reduce Cr6+ to Cr3+; (4) excess Cr6+ can enter the nucleus; (5) Cr6+ reduction through 5+ and 4+ to 3+ has a potential to interact with the DNA molecule; and (6) if unrepaired, this DNA damage can lead to cancer induction. On the basis of current evidence Cr6+ has a threshold for carcinogenic potential in humans that is greater than the current TLV.

  17. Influence of radiolytic products on the chemistry of uranium VI in brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchini, J-F.; Reed, D.T.; Borkowski, M.; Rafalski, A.; Conca, J.

    2004-01-01

    In the near field of a salt repository of nuclear waste, ionizing radiations can strongly affect the chemistry of concentrated saline solutions. Radiolysis can locally modify the redox conditions, speciation, solubility and mobility of the actinide compounds. In the case of uranium VI, radiolytic products can not only reduce U(VI), but also react with uranium species. The net effect on the speciation of uranyl depends on the relative kinetics of the reactions and the buildup of molecular products in brine solutions. The most important molecular products in brines are expected to be hypochlorite ion, hypochlorous acid and hydrogen peroxide. Although U(VI) is expected not to be significantly affected by radiolysis, the combined effects of the major molecular radiolytic products on the chemistry of U(VI) in brines have not been experimentally established previously. (authors)

  18. A combined wet chemistry and EXAFS study of U(VI) uptake by cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, E.; Harfouche, M.; Tits, J.; Kunz, D.; Daehn, R.; Fujita, T.; Tsukamoto, M.

    2006-01-01

    The sorption behaviour and speciation of U(VI) in cementitious systems was investigated by a combination of wet chemistry experiments and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. Radiotracer studies using 233 U were carried out on hardened cement paste (HCP) and calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), which are the major constituents of HCP, to determine the uptake kinetics and sorption isotherms. C-S-H phases were synthesized using different methods for solid phase preparation, which enabled us to study the U(VI) uptake by different types of C-S-H phases and a wide range of Ca/Si compositions, and to distinguish U(VI) sorption on the surface of C-S-H from U(VI) incorporation into the structure. XAS measurements were performed using U(VI) loaded HCP and C-S-H materials (sorption and co-precipitation samples) to gain structural information on the U(VI) speciation in these systems, i.e., the type and number of neighbouring atoms, and bond distances. Examples of studies that have utilized XAS to characterize U(VI) speciation in cementitious systems are still rare, and to the best of our knowledge, detailed XAS investigations of the U(VI)/C-S-H system are lacking. The results obtained from the combined use of wet chemical and spectroscopic techniques allow mechanistic models of the immobilization process to be proposed for cementitious waste forms containing low and high U(VI) inventories. In the latter case U(VI) immobilization is controlled by a solubility-limiting process with the U(VI) mineral predominantly formed under the conditions prevailing in cementitious systems. At low U(VI) concentrations, however, U(VI) appears to be predominantly bound onto C-S-H phases. The coordination environment of U(VI) taken up by C-S-H was found to resemble that of U(VI) in uranophane. A mechanistic understanding of the U(VI) binding by cementitious materials will allow more detailed and scientifically well founded predictions of the retention of

  19. Acid Dissolution of Depleted Uranium from Catalyst using Microwave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Jin Hyun; Jeong, Seong Gi; Park, Kwang Heon [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The separation process of uranium is one of the most important fields in nuclear industry because uranium is used primary in nuclear power plants. Uranium ores are treated by either acid or alkaline reagents. Uranium can be dissolved by acid or alkaline solutions. There are two oxidation states in which the hexavalent form, the oxide of which is UO{sub 3}, and the tetravalent form, the oxide of which is UO{sub 2}. However, depleted uranium(DU) has also been used as a catalyst in specialized chemical reaction such as ammoxidation. The preferred catalyst for propylene oxidation with ammonia was a uranium oxide-antimony oxide composition. The active phase of catalyst was known as USbO{sub 5} and USb{sub 3}O{sub 10}. There is pentavalent form. Waste catalyst containing DU was generated and stored in chemical industry. In this work, we removed DU from catalyst by acid dissolution

  20. Anaerobic bacterial systems result in the removal of soluble uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, B.M.; Barton, L.L.; Steenhoudt, K.; Tucker, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria, nitrate-reducing bacteria and bacteria present in sewage sludge were examined for their ability to reduce the level of soluble U(VI) in enriched media. Cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, D. gigas, and D. vulgaris were grown in sulfate-containing media while Pseudomonas putida and P. denitrificans were cultivated in nitrate media. The amount of U(VI) removed from solution was dependent on metabolism because greater levels of uranium were removed when U(VI) was added to a growing culture than when added to a culture in stationary phase. The presence of vanadate, arsenate, selenate or molybdate at 0.1 and 0.01 M levels in sulfate-reducing cultures, nitrate-respiring cultures or in sludge cultures did not have an effect on the amount of uranium removed. In all cultures the amount of uranium in solution was markedly reduced after 10 to 20 days and reduced uranium, as U(IV), was detected in several cultures. Present in the cultures of D. desulfuricans were crystals of uranium. Examination of these cultures by electron microscopy indicates that the uranium (IV) is deposited outside of the cell and these needle-like crystals are associated with cellular material. X-ray probe analysis with the electron microscope gave an image that was in close agreement with U(IV). With D. desulfuricans in a continuous stirred tank reactor, kinetic parameters have been calculated for uranium reduction. Over a period of 20 to 60 hours, the amount of soluble uranium removed from the bioreactor was proportional to residence time over a period of 20 to 60 hours

  1. Discovery Of B Ring Propellers In Cassini UVIS, And ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sremcevic, Miodrag; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2012-10-01

    We present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. We identify two propeller populations: (1) tens of degrees wide propellers in the dense B ring core, and (2) smaller, more A ring like, propellers populating the inner B ring. The prototype of the first population is an object observed at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. The ubiquitous propeller "S" shape is seen both in UVIS occultations as an optical depth depletion and in ISS as a 40 degrees wide bright stripe in unlit geometries and dark in lit geometries. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap embedded in the high optical depth region of the B ring. The gap moves at orbital speed consistent with its radial location. From the radial separation of the propeller wings we estimate that the embedded body, which causes the propeller structure, is about 1.5km in size located at a=112,921km. The UVIS occultations indicate an asymmetric propeller "S" shape. Since the object is located at an edge between high and relatively low optical depth, this asymmetry is most likely a consequence of the strong surface mass density gradient. We estimate that there are possibly dozen up to 100 other propeller objects in Saturn's B ring. The location of the discovered body, at an edge of a dense ringlet within the B ring, suggests a novel mechanism for the up to now illusive B ring irregular large-scale structure of alternating high and low optical depth ringlets. We propose that this B ring irregular structure may have its cause in the presence of many embedded bodies that shepherd the individual B ring ringlets.

  2. uVis: A Formula-Based Visualization Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantazos, Kostas; Xu, Shangjin; Kuhail, Mohammad Amin

    Several tools use programming approaches for developing advanced visualizations. Others can with a few steps create simple visualizations with built-in patterns, and users with limited IT experience can use them. However, it is programming and time demanding to create and customize...... these visualizations. We introduce uVis, a tool that allows users with advanced spreadsheet-like IT knowledge and basic database understanding to create simple as well as advanced visualizations. These users construct visualizations by combining building blocks (i.e. controls, shapes). They specify spreadsheet...

  3. Behavior of Colorado Plateau uranium minerals during oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrels, Robert Minard; Christ, C.L.

    1956-01-01

    Uranium occurs as U(VI) and U(IV) in minerals of the Colorado Plateau ores. The number of species containing U(VI) is large, but only two U(IV) minerals are known from the Plateau: uraninite, and oxide, and coffinite, a hydroxy-silicate. These oxidize to yield U(VI) before reacting significantly with other mineral constituents. Crystal-structure analysis has shown that U(VI) invariable occurs as uranyl ion, UO2+2. Uranyl ion may form complex carbonate or sulfate ions with resulting soluble compounds, but only in the absence of quinquevalent vanadium, arsenic, or phosphorous. In the presence of these elements in the +5 valence state, the uranyl ion is fixed in insoluble layer compounds formed by union of uranyl ion with orthovanadate, orthophosphate, or orthoarsenate. Under favorable conditions UO2+2 may react to form the relatively insoluble rutherfordine, UO2CO3, or hydrated uranyl hydroxides. These are rarely found on the Colorado Plateau as opposed to their excellent development in other uraniferous areas, a condition which is apparently related to the semiarid climate and low water table of the Plateau. Uranium may also be fixed as uranyl silicate, but little is known about minerals of this kind. In the present study emphasis has been placed on a detailing of the chemical and crystal structural changes which occur in the oxidation paragenetic sequence.

  4. Laser fluorimetric analysis of uranium in water from Vishakhapatnam and estimation of health risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhangare, R.C.; Tiwari, M.; Ajmal, P.Y.; Sahu, S.K.; Pandit, G.G.

    2014-01-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radioactive element that is both radiologically and chemically toxic. The presence of uranium in the aquatic environment is due to the leaching from natural deposits, release in mill tailings, the combustion of coal and other fuels, and the use of phosphate fertilizers that contain uranium up to a concentration of 150g g -1 and contribute to ground water pollution. The most prevalent states of uranium are the hexavalent and tetravalent. The hexavalent state of uranium is particularly important in water because of the insolubility of almost all tetravalent compounds. Uranium enters into human tissues mainly through drinking water, food, air and other occupational and accidental exposures. Intake of uranium through air and water is normally low, but in circumstances in which uranium is present in a drinking water source the majority of intake can be through drinking water. Seeing potential health hazards from natural radionuclides in consuming water, many countries worldwide adopted the guideline activity concentration for drinking water quality recommended by the WHO (2011). For uranium WHO has set limit for drinking water to 30μgL -1 . The main purpose of this study was to measure the level of uranium in drinking water samples from the health hazard point of view and to observe the trend in the variation of uranium content in drinking water from upcoming BARC site at Vishakhapatnam area

  5. Bio-precipitation of uranium by two bacterial isolates recovered from extreme environments as estimated by potentiometric titration, TEM and X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merroun, Mohamed L., E-mail: merroun@ugr.es [Institute of Radiochemistry, Helmholtz Centre Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Departamento de Microbiologia, Universidad de Granada, Campus Fuentenueva s/n 18071, Granada (Spain); Nedelkova, Marta [Institute of Radiochemistry, Helmholtz Centre Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Ojeda, Jesus J. [Cell-Mineral Interface Research Programme, Kroto Research Institute, University of Sheffield, Broad Lane, Sheffield S3 7HQ (United Kingdom); Experimental Techniques Centre, Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Reitz, Thomas [Institute of Radiochemistry, Helmholtz Centre Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Fernandez, Margarita Lopez; Arias, Jose M. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Universidad de Granada, Campus Fuentenueva s/n 18071, Granada (Spain); Romero-Gonzalez, Maria [Cell-Mineral Interface Research Programme, Kroto Research Institute, University of Sheffield, Broad Lane, Sheffield S3 7HQ (United Kingdom); Selenska-Pobell, Sonja [Institute of Radiochemistry, Helmholtz Centre Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation of uranium as U phosphates by natural bacterial isolates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The uranium biomineralization involves the activity of acidic phosphatase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uranium bioremediation could be achieved via the biomineralization of U(VI) in phosphate minerals. - Abstract: This work describes the mechanisms of uranium biomineralization at acidic conditions by Bacillus sphaericus JG-7B and Sphingomonas sp. S15-S1 both recovered from extreme environments. The U-bacterial interaction experiments were performed at low pH values (2.0-4.5) where the uranium aqueous speciation is dominated by highly mobile uranyl ions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) showed that the cells of the studied strains precipitated uranium at pH 3.0 and 4.5 as a uranium phosphate mineral phase belonging to the meta-autunite group. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses showed strain-specific localization of the uranium precipitates. In the case of B. sphaericus JG-7B, the U(VI) precipitate was bound to the cell wall. Whereas for Sphingomonas sp. S15-S1, the U(VI) precipitates were observed both on the cell surface and intracellularly. The observed U(VI) biomineralization was associated with the activity of indigenous acid phosphatase detected at these pH values in the absence of an organic phosphate substrate. The biomineralization of uranium was not observed at pH 2.0, and U(VI) formed complexes with organophosphate ligands from the cells. This study increases the number of bacterial strains that have been demonstrated to precipitate uranium phosphates at acidic conditions via the activity of acid phosphatase.

  6. Laser based analytical spectroscopy of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argekar, A.A.; Kulkarni, M.J.; Godbole, S.V.; Page, A.G.; Samuel, J.K.; Paranjape, D.B.; Singh Mudher, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical spectroscopy of uranium has been studied using a XeCl excimer laser, using the fluorescence emission of U(VI) ions doped in a solid solution of sodium fluoride (NaF) and sodium chloride (NaCl) in 3:2 proportion. An electronic circuitry involving time-gating of the photomultiplier tube and facility to integrate the analytical signal over ten laser pulses has been developed to enable laser operation and signal detection with high S/N ratio. The matrix enhanced U(VI) fluorescence emission is free from chemical and spectral interferences due to the concomitant presence of ten metallic elements generally associated with uranium. The digital signal output is highly precise and does not saturate upto 5 ppm uranium concentration. X-ray diffraction patterns obtained for uranium doped compounds at 2.5% and 10% dopant concentrations are broadly similar to that of Na 2 U 2 O 7 . The detailed studies have, however, revealed fine structure for individual peaks, thereby, revealing the formation of sodium fluoro-uranate complex which is responsible for the enhanced intensity of fluorescence emission. (author). 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  8. Bio-precipitation of uranium by two bacterial isolates recovered from extreme environments as estimated by potentiometric titration, TEM and X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merroun, Mohamed L; Nedelkova, Marta; Ojeda, Jesus J; Reitz, Thomas; Fernández, Margarita López; Arias, José M; Romero-González, María; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja

    2011-12-15

    This work describes the mechanisms of uranium biomineralization at acidic conditions by Bacillus sphaericus JG-7B and Sphingomonas sp. S15-S1 both recovered from extreme environments. The U-bacterial interaction experiments were performed at low pH values (2.0-4.5) where the uranium aqueous speciation is dominated by highly mobile uranyl ions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) showed that the cells of the studied strains precipitated uranium at pH 3.0 and 4.5 as a uranium phosphate mineral phase belonging to the meta-autunite group. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses showed strain-specific localization of the uranium precipitates. In the case of B. sphaericus JG-7B, the U(VI) precipitate was bound to the cell wall. Whereas for Sphingomonas sp. S15-S1, the U(VI) precipitates were observed both on the cell surface and intracellularly. The observed U(VI) biomineralization was associated with the activity of indigenous acid phosphatase detected at these pH values in the absence of an organic phosphate substrate. The biomineralization of uranium was not observed at pH 2.0, and U(VI) formed complexes with organophosphate ligands from the cells. This study increases the number of bacterial strains that have been demonstrated to precipitate uranium phosphates at acidic conditions via the activity of acid phosphatase. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of new complexes of uranium and comba radical. I.- Complexes defective in sodium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera Palomino, J.; Galiano Sedano, J. A.; Parellada Bellod, R.; Bellido Gonzalez, A.

    1975-01-01

    Some complexes formed in presence of defect of sodium carbonate with respect to the stoichiometric ratio (U): (C0 3 ) = 1:3 are studied. This ratio corresponds to the main complex which is responsible for the uranium extraction with CDMBAC organic solutions and from U(VI) aqueous solutions with an excess of sodium carbonate. (Author) 10 refs

  10. Phosphoryl functionalized mesoporous silica for uranium adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Guo; Yurun, Feng; Li, Ma; Dezhi, Gao; Jie, Jing; Jincheng, Yu; Haibin, Sun; Hongyu, Gong; Yujun, Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Phosphoryl functionalized mesoporous silica (TBP-SBA-15) is synthesized. • The amino and phosphoryl groups are successfully grafted on SBA-15. • TBP-SBA-15 has high and rapid uranium adsorption capacity in broad pH range. • The U(VI) adsorption of TBP-SBA-15 is spontaneous and belongs to chemical adsorption. - Abstract: Phosphoryl functionalized mesoporous silica (TBP-SBA-15) was synthesized by modified mesoporous silica with γ-amino propyl triethoxy silane and tributyl phosphate. The obtained samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD), thermo-gravimetric/differential thermalanalyzer (TG/DTA), N_2 adsorption–desorption (BET) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. Results showed that TBP-SBA-15 had large surface areas with ordered channel structure. Moreover, the effects of adsorption time, sorbent dose, solution pH, initial uranium concentration and temperature on the uranium adsorption behaviors were investigated. TBP-SBA-15 showed a high uranium adsorption capacity in a broad range of pH values. The U(VI) adsorption rate of TBP-SBA-15 was fast and nearly achieved completion in 10 min with the sorbent dose of 1 g/L. The U(VI) adsorption of TBP-SBA-15 followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Freundlich isotherm model, indicating that the process was belonged to chemical adsorption. Furthermore, the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG"0, ΔH"0 and ΔS"0) confirmed that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous.

  11. Phosphoryl functionalized mesoporous silica for uranium adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Guo; Yurun, Feng; Li, Ma; Dezhi, Gao; Jie, Jing; Jincheng, Yu; Haibin, Sun [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution & Processing of Materials of Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Key Laboratory of Special Functional Aggregated Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Hongyu, Gong, E-mail: gong_hongyu@163.com [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution & Processing of Materials of Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Key Laboratory of Special Functional Aggregated Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Yujun, Zhang, E-mail: yujunzhangcn@163.com [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution & Processing of Materials of Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Key Laboratory of Special Functional Aggregated Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Phosphoryl functionalized mesoporous silica (TBP-SBA-15) is synthesized. • The amino and phosphoryl groups are successfully grafted on SBA-15. • TBP-SBA-15 has high and rapid uranium adsorption capacity in broad pH range. • The U(VI) adsorption of TBP-SBA-15 is spontaneous and belongs to chemical adsorption. - Abstract: Phosphoryl functionalized mesoporous silica (TBP-SBA-15) was synthesized by modified mesoporous silica with γ-amino propyl triethoxy silane and tributyl phosphate. The obtained samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD), thermo-gravimetric/differential thermalanalyzer (TG/DTA), N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption (BET) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. Results showed that TBP-SBA-15 had large surface areas with ordered channel structure. Moreover, the effects of adsorption time, sorbent dose, solution pH, initial uranium concentration and temperature on the uranium adsorption behaviors were investigated. TBP-SBA-15 showed a high uranium adsorption capacity in a broad range of pH values. The U(VI) adsorption rate of TBP-SBA-15 was fast and nearly achieved completion in 10 min with the sorbent dose of 1 g/L. The U(VI) adsorption of TBP-SBA-15 followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Freundlich isotherm model, indicating that the process was belonged to chemical adsorption. Furthermore, the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG{sup 0}, ΔH{sup 0} and ΔS{sup 0}) confirmed that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous.

  12. Solvent impregnated resin for isolation of U(VI) from industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karve, M.; Rajgor, R.V.

    2008-01-01

    A solid-phase extraction method based upon impregnation of Cyanex 302 (bis(2,4,4- trimethylpentyl)mono-thio-phosphinic acid) on Amberlite XAD-2 resin is proposed for isolation of U(VI) from uranmicrolite ore tailing samples and industrial effluent samples. U(VI) was sorbed from nitric acid media on the solvent-impregnated resin (SIR) and was recovered completely with 1.0 M HCl. Based upon sorption behavior of U(VI) with Cyanex 302, it was quantitatively sorbed on the SIR in a dynamic method, while the other metal ions were not sorbed by the modified resin. The preparation of impregnated resin is simple, based upon physical interaction of the extractant and solid support, has good sorption capacity for U(VI), and is also reliable for detection of traces of U(VI). (authors)

  13. Selective Adsorption of Uranium (VI) on NaHCO 3 Leached ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ion imprinted nano-magnetic composite polymers for selective removal of hexavalent uranium were prepared by a precipitation polymerization technique in the presence of γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (γ-MPS) coated magnetite and other pre-polymerization reagents. The synthesized magnetic polymers were then ...

  14. Reductive immobilization of U(VI) in Fe(III) oxide-reducing subsurface sediments: Analysis of coupled microbial-geochemical processes in experimental reactive transport systems. Final Scientific/Technical Report-EMSP 73914

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eric E. Roden Matilde M. Urrutia Mark O. Barnett Clifford R. Lange

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to provide information to DOE on microbiological and geochemical processes underlying the potential use of dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) to create subsurface redox barriers for immobilization of uranium and other redox-sensitive metal/radionuclide contaminants that were released to the environment in large quantities during Cold War nuclear weapons manufacturing operations. Several fundamental scientific questions were addressed in order to understand and predict how such treatment procedures would function under in situ conditions in the subsurface. These questions revolved the coupled microbial-geochemical phenomena which are likely to occur within a redox barrier treatment zone, and on the dynamic interactions between hydrologic flux and biogeochemical process rates. First, we assembled a robust conceptual understanding and numerical framework for modeling the kinetics of microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and associated DMRB growth in sediments. Development of this framework is a critical prerequisite for predicting the potential effectiveness of DMRB-promoted subsurface bioremediation, since Fe(III) oxides are expected to be the primary source of electron-accepting capacity for growth and maintenance of DMRB in subsurface environments. We also defined in detail the kinetics of microbial (enzymatic) versus abiotic, ferrous iron-promoted reduction of U(VI) in the presence and absence of synthetic and natural Fe(III) oxide materials. The results of these studies suggest that (i) the efficiency of dissolved U(VI) scavenging may be influenced by the kinetics of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in systems with relative short fluid residence times; (2) association of U(VI) with diverse surface sites in natural soils and sediments has the potential to limit the rate and extent of microbial U(VI) reduction, and in turn modulate the effectiveness of in situ U(VI) bioremediation; and (3) abiotic, ferrous iron (Fe(II)) drive n U(VI

  15. Cassini UVIS Auroral Observations in 2016 and 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Wayne R.; Esposito, Larry W.; Jouchoux, Alain; Radioti, Aikaterini; Grodent, Denis; Gustin, Jacques; Gerard, Jean-Claude; Lamy, Laurent; Badman, Sarah; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Cassini UVIS Team, Cassini VIMS Team, Cassini ISS Team, HST Saturn Auroral Team

    2017-10-01

    In 2016 and 2017, the Cassini Saturn orbiter executed a final series of high-inclination, low-periapsis orbits ideal for studies of Saturn's polar regions. The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) obtained an extensive set of auroral images, some at the highest spatial resolution obtained during Cassini's long orbital mission (2004-2017). In some cases, two or three spacecraft slews at right angles to the long slit of the spectrograph were required to cover the entire auroral region to form auroral images. We will present selected images from this set showing narrow arcs of emission, more diffuse auroral emissions, multiple auroral arcs in a single image, discrete spots of emission, small scale vortices, large-scale spiral forms, and parallel linear features that appear to cross in places like twisted wires. Some shorter features are transverse to the main auroral arcs, like barbs on a wire. UVIS observations were in some cases simultaneous with auroral observations from the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), and the Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) that will also be presented.

  16. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial Phosphatases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Robert J.; Beazley, Melanie J.; Wilson, Jarad J.; Taillefert, Martial; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2005-04-05

    The overall goal of this project is to examine the role of nonspecific phosphohydrolases present in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of radionuclides through the production of uranium [U(VI)] phosphate precipitates. Specifically, we hypothesize that the precipitation of U(VI) phosphate minerals may be promoted through the microbial release and/or accumulation of PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}. During this phase of the project we have been conducting assays to determine the effects of pH, inorganic anions and organic ligands on U(VI) mineral formation and precipitation when FRC bacterial isolates were grown in simulated groundwater medium. The molecular characterization of FRC isolates has also been undertaken during this phase of the project. Analysis of a subset of gram-positive FRC isolates cultured from FRC soils (Areas 1, 2 and 3) and background sediments have indicated a higher percentage of isolates exhibiting phosphatase phenotypes (i.e., in particular those surmised to be PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}-irrepressible) relative to isolates from the reference site. A high percentage of strains that exhibited such putatively PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}-irrepressible phosphatase phenotypes were also resistant to the heavy metals lead and cadmium. Previous work on FRC strains, including Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Rahnella spp., has demonstrated differences in tolerance to U(VI) toxicity (200 {micro}M) in the absence of organophosphate substrates. For example, Arthrobacter spp. exhibited the greatest tolerance to U(VI) while the Rahnella spp. have been shown to facilitate the precipitation of U(VI) from solution and the Bacillus spp. demonstrate the greatest sensitivity to acidic conditions and high concentrations of U(VI). PCR-based detection of FRC strains are being conducted to determine if non-specific acid phosphatases of the known molecular classes [i.e., classes A, B and C] are present in these FRC isolates. Additionally, these

  17. Effect of Salicylic and Picolinic Acids on the Adsorption of U(VI) onto Oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyoung Kyun; Jung, Euo Chang; Cho, Hye Ryun; Song, Kyu Seok

    2009-01-01

    The effect of organic acids on the adsorption of U(VI) onto oxide surfaces (TiO 2 (anatase), SiO 2 (amorphous) and Al 2 O-3(amorphous)) has been investigated. Two different organic acids, salicylic and picolinic acids, were used. Changes of adsorption ratio of U(VI), which depend on the existence of organic acids in a sample, were measured as a function of pH. Quantities of adsorbed organic acids, which depend on the existence of U(VI) in a sample, were also measured as a function of pH. It is confirmed that the soluble complex formation of U(VI) with organic acids can deteriorate the adsorption of U(VI) onto TiO 2 surface. It is noteworthy that salicylic acid does not affect the adsorption of U(VI) onto SiO 2 surface, however, picolinic acid enhances the adsorption of U(VI) onto SiO 2 surface. The latter effect can be understood by considering the formation of a ternary surface complex on SiO 2 surface, which was confirmed by the co-adsorption of picolinic acid with U(VI) and the change in a fluorescence spectra of U(VI) on surface, In the case of Al 2 O-3, organic acids themselves were largely adsorbed onto a surface without deteriorating the adsorption of U(VI). This would support the possibility of a ternary surface complex formation on the Al 2 O-3 surface, and an additional spectroscopic study is required.

  18. 75 FR 18041 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Minimizing Use of Hexavalent Chromium (DFARS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ...-AG35 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Minimizing Use of Hexavalent Chromium (DFARS... Regulation Supplement (DFARS) to address requirements for minimizing the use of hexavalent chromium in... of items containing hexavalent chromium under DoD contracts unless an exception applies. DATES...

  19. Uranium Immobilization in Wetland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Li, Dien; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Scheckel, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    In wetlands, which are a major feature at the groundwater-surface water interface, plants deliver oxygen to the subsurface to keep root tissue aerobic. Some of this oxygen leaches into the rhizosphere where it will oxidize iron that typically precipitates on or near roots. Furthermore, plans provide carbon via root exudates and turnover, which in the presence of the iron oxides drives the activity of heterotrophic iron reducers in wetland soils. Oxidized iron is an important electron acceptor for many microbially-driven transformations, which can affect the fate and transport of several pollutants. It has been shown that heterotrophic iron reducing organisms, such as Geobacter sp., can reduce water soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). The goal of this study was to determine if and how iron cycling in the wetland rhizosphere affects uranium dynamics. For this purpose, we operated a series of small-scale wetland mesocosms in a greenhouse to simulate the discharge of uranium-contaminated groundwater to surface waters. The mesocosms were operated with two different Fe(II) loading rates, two plant types, and unplanted controls. The mesocosms contained zones of root exclusion to differentiate between the direct presence and absence of roots in the planted mesocosms. The mesocosms were operated for several month to get fully established, after which a U(VI) solution was fed for 80 days. The mesocosms were then sacrificed and analyzed for solid-associated chemical species, microbiological characterization, micro-X-ray florescence (µ-XRF) mapping of Fe and U on the root surface, and U speciation via X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). Results showed that bacterial numbers including Geobacter sp., Fe(III), as well as total uranium, were highest on roots, followed by sediments near roots, and lowest in zones without much root influence. Results from the µ-XRF mapping on root surfaces indicated a strong spatial correlation between Fe and U. This correlation was

  20. Spectroscopic characterization of uranium in evaporation basin sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, M. C.; Morris, D. E.; Hunter, D. B.; Bertsch, P. M.

    2000-05-01

    Evaporation ponds in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV), CA, used for the containment of irrigation drainage waters contain elevated levels of uranium (U) resulting from the extensive leaching by carbonate-rich irrigation waters of the local agricultural soils that contain low levels of naturally-occurring U. The SJV ponds are subjected to changes in redox chemistry with cycles of drying and flooding. Our past studies have shown that U in the SJV Pond 14 surface sediments is present as mostly the oxidized and soluble form, U(VI). However, we were uncertain whether the U in the soil was only present as a U oxide of mixed stoichiometry, such as U 3O 8(s) (pitchblende) or other species. Here we present characterization information, which includes wet chemical and in situ spectroscopic techniques (X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and low temperature time-resolved luminescence spectroscopies) for samples from two SJV Pond sediments. Surface sediments from SJV Pond 16 were characterized for average oxidation state of U with XANES spectroscopy. The fraction of U(VI) to U(IV) in the Pond 16 sediments decreased with depth with U(IV) being the dominant oxidation state in the 5 cm to 15 cm depth. Two luminescent U(VI) species were identified in the surface sediments from Pond 14; a U(VI)-tricarbonate phase and another phase likely comprised of U(VI)-hydroxide or hydroxycarbonate. The luminescent U(VI) population in the Pond 16 sediments is dominated by species with comparable spectral characteristics to the U(VI)-hydroxide or hydroxycarbonate species found in the Pond 14 sediments. The luminescence spectroscopic results were complemented by wet chemical U leaching methods, which involved the use of carbonate and sulfuric acid solutions and oxidizing solutions of peroxide, hypochlorite and Mn(IV). Leaching was shown to decrease the total U concentration in the sediments in all cases. However, results from luminescence studies of the residual fraction in the leached

  1. Potentiometric determination of uranium with cobalt (3) acetate as oxidimetric titrant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, H.; Ishrat, P.; Zyka, J.

    1972-01-01

    A potentiometric method for the determination of uranium through the reduction of hexavalent to tetravalent state and its potentiometric oxidation in 8 N sulphuric acid with standard cobalt (3)-acetate has been worked out. The method is quite accurate with the error not exceeding 1% for mg amounts. Moreover an apparatus for preservation of reduced solution of uranium and its delivery for titrations has been designed. The same apparatus can be used for reducing and preserving solutions of strong reducing titrants. (author)

  2. Multistage bioassociation of uranium onto an extremely halophilic archaeon revealed by a unique combination of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Miriam; Müller, Katharina; Foerstendorf, Harald; Drobot, Björn; Schmidt, Matthias; Musat, Niculina; Swanson, Juliet S; Reed, Donald T; Stumpf, Thorsten; Cherkouk, Andrea

    2017-04-05

    The interactions of two extremely halophilic archaea with uranium were investigated at high ionic strength as a function of time, pH and uranium concentration. Halobacterium noricense DSM-15987 and Halobacterium sp. putatively noricense, isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository, were used for these investigations. The kinetics of U(VI) bioassociation with both strains showed an atypical multistage behavior, meaning that after an initial phase of U(VI) sorption, an unexpected interim period of U(VI) release was observed, followed by a slow reassociation of uranium with the cells. By applying in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, the involvement of phosphoryl and carboxylate groups in U(VI) complexation during the first biosorption phase was shown. Differences in cell morphology and uranium localization become visible at different stages of the bioassociation process, as shown with scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate for the first time that association of uranium with the extremely halophilic archaeon is a multistage process, beginning with sorption and followed by another process, probably biomineralization. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Removing uranium (VI) from aqueous solution with insoluble humic acid derived from leonardite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fande; Yuan, Guodong; Larson, Steven L; Ballard, John H; Waggoner, Charles A; Arslan, Zikri; Han, Fengxiang X

    2017-12-01

    The occurrence of uranium (U) and depleted uranium (DU)-contaminated wastes from anthropogenic activities is an important environmental problem. Insoluble humic acid derived from leonardite (L-HA) was investigated as a potential adsorbent for immobilizing U in the environment. The effect of initial pH, contact time, U concentration, and temperature on U(VI) adsorption onto L-HA was assessed. The U(VI) adsorption was pH-dependent and achieved equilibrium in 2 h. It could be well described with pseudo-second-order model, indicating that U(VI) adsorption onto L-HA involved chemisorption. The U(VI) adsorption mass increased with increasing temperature with maximum adsorption capacities of 91, 112 and 120 mg g -1 at 298, 308 and 318 K, respectively. The adsorption reaction was spontaneous and endothermic. We explored the processes of U(VI) desorption from the L-HA-U complex through batch desorption experiments in 1 mM NaNO 3 and in artificial seawater. The desorption process could be well described by pseudo-first-order model and reached equilibrium in 3 h. L-HA possessed a high propensity to adsorb U(VI). Once adsorbed, the release of U(VI) from L-HA-U complex was minimal in both 1 mM NaNO 3 and artificial seawater (0.06% and 0.40%, respectively). Being abundant, inexpensive, and safe, L-HA has good potential for use as a U adsorbent from aqueous solution or immobilizing U in soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Formation of stable uranium(VI) colloidal nanoparticles in conditions relevant to radioactive waste disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots, Pieter; Morris, Katherine; Hibberd, Rosemary; Law, Gareth T W; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Brown, Andy P; Doutch, James; Smith, Andrew J; Shaw, Samuel

    2014-12-09

    The favored pathway for disposal of higher activity radioactive wastes is via deep geological disposal. Many geological disposal facility designs include cement in their engineering design. Over the long term, interaction of groundwater with the cement and waste will form a plume of a hyperalkaline leachate (pH 10-13), and the behavior of radionuclides needs to be constrained under these extreme conditions to minimize the environmental hazard from the wastes. For uranium, a key component of many radioactive wastes, thermodynamic modeling predicts that, at high pH, U(VI) solubility will be very low (nM or lower) and controlled by equilibrium with solid phase alkali and alkaline-earth uranates. However, the formation of U(VI) colloids could potentially enhance the mobility of U(VI) under these conditions, and characterizing the potential for formation and medium-term stability of U(VI) colloids is important in underpinning our understanding of U behavior in waste disposal. Reflecting this, we applied conventional geochemical and microscopy techniques combined with synchrotron based in situ and ex situ X-ray techniques (small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray adsorption spectroscopy (XAS)) to characterize colloidal U(VI) nanoparticles in a synthetic cement leachate (pH > 13) containing 4.2-252 μM U(VI). The results show that in cement leachates with 42 μM U(VI), colloids formed within hours and remained stable for several years. The colloids consisted of 1.5-1.8 nm nanoparticles with a proportion forming 20-60 nm aggregates. Using XAS and electron microscopy, we were able to determine that the colloidal nanoparticles had a clarkeite (sodium-uranate)-type crystallographic structure. The presented results have clear and hitherto unrecognized implications for the mobility of U(VI) in cementitious environments, in particular those associated with the geological disposal of nuclear waste.

  5. Study on the electrolytic reduction of Uranium-VI to Uranium-IV in a nitrate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, B.F. de; Almeida, S.G. de; Forbicini, S.; Matsuda, H.T.; Araujo, J.A. de.

    1981-05-01

    The determination of the best conditions to prepare hydrazine stabilized uranium (IV) nitrate solutions for utilization in Purex flowsheets is dealt with. Electrolytic reduction of U(VI) has been selected as the basic method, using an open electrolytic cell with titanum and platinum electrodes. The hydrazine concentration, the current density, acidity, U(VI) concentration and reduction time were the parameters studied and U(IV)/U(VI) ratio was used to evaluate the degree of reduction. From the results it could be concluded that the technique is reliable. The U(IV) solutions remains constant for at least two weeks and can be used in the chemical processing of irradiated uranium fuels. (Author) [pt

  6. Uranium sorption onto activated carbon prepared from rice straw: Competition with humic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakout, S.M.; Metwally, S.S.; El-Zakla, T.

    2013-01-01

    Adsorptive competition between uranium (VI) and humic acids (HA) was investigated using Rice Straw activated carbon modified with KOH (RSK carbon). The investigations were conducted for individual components adsorption along with simultaneous and sequential adsorption of both components. The experimental results showed that the equilibrium data fit well Langmuir equation. It was found that, for single component system, RSK carbon can achieve adsorption of U(VI) ion at 100 mg/g, and HA at 21.1 mg/g, respectively. Adsorption isotherms for multi-component systems were studied. U(VI) showed a decreased adsorbability when it coexisted with HA from the start (41.5 mg/g in simultaneous) compared with the case when U(VI) was added after equilibrium adsorption of HA on activated carbon (11.9 mg/g in sequential). The interactions between uranium ions and HA caused the formation of U–HA complexes that changed the surface interactions of both uranium ions and HA with carbon surface. The underlying mechanism of the difference in the uranium sorption was discussed in the view of absence and presences (sequential and Simultaneous) of HA. It could be concluded that, humic substance is strong inhibitor of uranium binding and should be removed before from waste water treatment for uranium.

  7. Uranium Biominerals Precipitated by an Environmental Isolate of Serratia under Anaerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Laura; Morris, Katherine; Lloyd, Jonathan. R.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulating the microbially-mediated precipitation of uranium biominerals may be used to treat groundwater contamination at nuclear sites. The majority of studies to date have focussed on the reductive precipitation of uranium as U(IV) by U(VI)- and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter and Shewanella species, although other mechanisms of uranium removal from solution can occur, including the precipitation of uranyl phosphates via bacterial phosphatase activity. Here we present the results of uranium biomineralisation experiments using an isolate of Serratia obtained from a sediment sample representative of the Sellafield nuclear site, UK. When supplied with glycerol phosphate, this Serratia strain was able to precipitate 1 mM of soluble U(VI) as uranyl phosphate minerals from the autunite group, under anaerobic and fermentative conditions. Under phosphate-limited anaerobic conditions and with glycerol as the electron donor, non-growing Serratia cells could precipitate 0.5 mM of uranium supplied as soluble U(VI), via reduction to nano-crystalline U(IV) uraninite. Some evidence for the reduction of solid phase uranyl(VI) phosphate was also observed. This study highlights the potential for Serratia and related species to play a role in the bioremediation of uranium contamination, via a range of different metabolic pathways, dependent on culturing or in situ conditions. PMID:26132209

  8. NASA TEERM Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.; Rothgeb, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The overall objective of the Hex Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics project is to evaluate and test pretreatment coating systems not containing hexavalent chrome in avionics and electronics housing applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing strong performing coating systems from prior NASA and DoD testing or new coating systems as determined by the stakeholders. The technical stakeholders have agreed that this protocol will focus specifically on Class 3 coatings. Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), depots, and support contractors have to be prepared to deal with an electronics supply chain that increasingly provides parts with lead-free finishes, some labeled no differently and intermingled with their SnPb counterparts. Allowance of lead-free components presents one of the greatest risks to the reliability of military and aerospace electronics. The introduction of components with lead-free terminations, termination finishes, or circuit boards presents a host of concerns to customers, suppliers, and maintainers of aerospace and military electronic systems such as: 1. Electrical shorting due to tin whiskers 2. Incompatibility of lead-free processes and parameters (including higher melting points of lead-free alloys) with other materials in the system 3. Unknown material properties and incompatibilities that could reduce solder joint reliability

  9. Sorption mechanism of U(VI) on to natural soil system: a study using intra-particle diffusion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, S.; Kumar, A.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    The rate of U(VI) adsorption onto natural soils from different parent materials has been studied experimentally using the batch adsorption method at five different initial U(VI) concentrations. The utility of Weber and Morris Interparticle diffusion model for describing the mechanism and kinetics of sorption is discussed. The study reveals that the mechanism of U(VI) sorption involves three steps such as: external surface adsorption, gradual adsorption stage which is the rate determining step and the last portion refers to the final equilibrium stage. The steps involved in sorption of U(VI) on to soil is same irrespective of soil types and initial U(VI) concentration. (author)

  10. Extractants for uranium recovery from wet phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musikas, C.; Benjelloun, N.; Lours, S.

    1981-08-01

    It must be pointed out that despite their lower affinity for uranyl, the dialkyldithiophosphates show higher extraction coefficients than dialkylphosphates. In addition, it is possible to back extract uranium with oxalate solutions at pH levels where the solvents remain in their acidic form. This last possibility seems to be correlated with the presence of a H 2 PO 4 - ion in the U(VI) organic complexes

  11. Enceladus Plume Morphology and Variability from UVIS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Candice; Esposito, Larry; Colwell, Josh; Hendrix, Amanda; Portyankina, Ganna

    2017-10-01

    The Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on the Cassini spacecraft has been observing Enceladus’ plume and its effect on the Saturnian environment since 2004. One solar and 7 stellar occultations have been observed between 2005 and 2017. On 27 March 2017 epsilon Canis Majoris (CMa) passed behind the plume of water vapor spewing from Enceladus’ tiger stripe fissures. With this occultation we have 6 cuts through the plume at a variety of orientations over 12 years. Following our standard procedure the column density along the line of sight from Enceladus to the star was determined and the water flux calculated [1]. The mean anomaly was 131, well away from the dust flux peak associated with Enceladus at an orbital longitude near apoapsis [2]. We find that the water vapor flux was ~160 kg/sec (this number will be refined when the final reconstructed trajectory is available). That puts it “in family” with the other occultations, with values that cluster around 200 kg/sec. It is at the low end, which may be consistent with the drop in particle output observed over the last decade [3]. UVIS results show that the supersonic collimated gas jets imbedded in the plume are the likely source of the variability in dust output [4], rather than overall flux from the tiger stripes. An occultation of epsilon Orionis was observed on 11 March 2016 when Enceladus was at a mean anomaly of 208. Although the bulk flux changed little the amount of water vapor coming from the Baghdad I supersonic jet increased by 25% relative to 2011. The Baghdad I jet was observed again in the 2017 epsilon CMa occultation, and the column density is half that of 2016, further bolstering the conclusion that the gas jets change output as a function of orbital longitude. UVIS results describing gas flux, jets, and general structure of the plume, the observables above the surface, are key to testing hypotheses for what is driving Enceladus’ eruptive activity below the surface. [1] Hansen, C. J. et

  12. Study of the role of magnetite in the immobilisation of U(VI) by reduction to U(IV) under the presence of H{sub 2}(g) in hydrogen carbonate medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, Miquel; Pablo, Joan de [Centre Tecnologic de Manresa (Spain); El Aamrani, Souad [Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Duro, Lara; Grive, Mireia; Bruno, Jordi [Enviros Spain SL (Spain)

    2003-01-01

    This report corresponds to the work carried out during the period March 2001-July 2002. The interaction of Uranium(VI) in hydrogen carbonate medium with commercial magnetite as well as with magnetite formed as a corrosion product on the surface of a steel coupon has been studied. The influence of the hydrogen pressure and the mass of magnetite have been two of the factors studied in detail. Results obtained with commercial magnetite indicates that uranium concentration in solution can be explained taking into account the solubility of UO{sub 2}(am) at the experimental conditions employed (pe+pH{approx}6) and at different hydrogen pressures. The uranium(VI) reduction has been clearly demonstrated by using X-Ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). Experiments performed during 30 days in hydrogen atmosphere showed a reduction of the 80% of U(VI). Results obtained by using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy also corroborate the U(VI) reduction on the surface of the magnetite. In the case of magnetite obtained on a steel coupon, it seems that the presence of zero-valent iron below the magnetite surface might account for an increase of the electronic density at the surface and, therefore causing a preferential oxidation of the structural iron in front of the experiment conducted with commercial magnetite. Uranium concentration seems also to be controlled by UO{sub 2}(am) solubility.

  13. Study of the role of magnetite in the immobilisation of U(VI) by reduction to U(IV) under the presence of H2(g) in hydrogen carbonate medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, Miquel; Pablo, Joan de; El Aamrani, Souad; Duro, Lara; Grive, Mireia; Bruno, Jordi

    2003-01-01

    This report corresponds to the work carried out during the period March 2001-July 2002. The interaction of Uranium(VI) in hydrogen carbonate medium with commercial magnetite as well as with magnetite formed as a corrosion product on the surface of a steel coupon has been studied. The influence of the hydrogen pressure and the mass of magnetite have been two of the factors studied in detail. Results obtained with commercial magnetite indicates that uranium concentration in solution can be explained taking into account the solubility of UO 2 (am) at the experimental conditions employed (pe+pH∼6) and at different hydrogen pressures. The uranium(VI) reduction has been clearly demonstrated by using X-Ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). Experiments performed during 30 days in hydrogen atmosphere showed a reduction of the 80% of U(VI). Results obtained by using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy also corroborate the U(VI) reduction on the surface of the magnetite. In the case of magnetite obtained on a steel coupon, it seems that the presence of zero-valent iron below the magnetite surface might account for an increase of the electronic density at the surface and, therefore causing a preferential oxidation of the structural iron in front of the experiment conducted with commercial magnetite. Uranium concentration seems also to be controlled by UO 2 (am) solubility

  14. SEPARATION OF URANIUM, PLUTONIUM, AND FISSION PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, R.; Lister, M.W.

    1958-12-16

    Uranium and plutonium can be separated from neutron-lrradiated uranium by a process consisting of dissolvlng the lrradiated material in nitric acid, saturating the solution with a nitrate salt such as ammonium nitrate, rendering the solution substantially neutral with a base such as ammonia, adding a reducing agent such as hydroxylamine to change plutonium to the trivalent state, treating the solution with a substantially water immiscible organic solvent such as dibutoxy diethylether to selectively extract the uranium, maklng the residual aqueous solutlon acid with nitric acid, adding an oxidizing agent such as ammonlum bromate to oxidize the plutonium to the hexavalent state, and selectlvely extracting the plutonium by means of an immlscible solvent, such as dibutoxy dlethyletber.

  15. Studies on the determination of uranium by potentiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataramana, P.; John, Mary; Nair, P.R.; Kasar, U.M.; Natarajan, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    A potentiometric method for the determination of uranium standardised earlier has been in use for the chemical quality control of plutonium fuels. The method involves the reduction of U(VI) in phosphoric acid medium and titration of U(IV) against Cr(VI). An extension of the range of the quantity of uranium determined by the same method is reported here. The precisions have been evaluated at 13 concentration levels. 20 titrations were carried out at each concentration. the precision at 20 μg level was found to be 3.8% while it was better than 0.03% at concentrations ranging from 20 mg upto 200 mg. At 100 mg and 200 mg of uranium the total volume of the reagent solutions was 50 ml while in other cases it was 25 ml. The effects of a few impurities on the uranium determination were also studied for the 2-5 mg range of uranium. (author)

  16. Reduction of uranium in disposal conditions of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myllykylae, E.

    2008-02-01

    This literature study is a summary of publications, in which the reduction of uranium by iron has been investigated in anaerobic groundwater conditions or in aqueous solution in general. The basics of the reduction phenomena and the oxidation states, complexes and solubilities of uranium and iron in groundwaters are discussed as an introduction to the subject, as well as, the Finnish disposal concept of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel itself mainly (∼96 %) consists of a sparingly soluble uranium(IV) dioxide, UO 2 (s), which is stable phase in the anticipated reducing disposal conditions. If spent fuel gets in contact with groundwater, oxidizing conditions might be induced by the radiolysis of water, or by the intrusion of oxidizing glacial melting water. Under these conditions, the oxidation and dissolution of uranium dioxide to more soluble U(VI) species could occur. This could lead to the mobilization of uranium and other components of spent fuel matrix including fission products and transuranium elements. The reduction of uranium back to oxidation state U(IV) can be considered as a favourable immobilization mechanism in a long-term, leading to precipitation due to the low solubility of U(IV) species. The cast iron insert of the disposal canister and its anaerobic corrosion products are the most important reductants under disposal conditions, but dissolved ferrous iron may also function as reductant. Other iron sources in the buffer or near-field rock, are also considered as possible reductants. The reduction of uranium is a very challenging phenomenon to investigate. The experimental studies need e.g. well-controlled anoxic conditions and measurements of oxidation states. Reduction and other simultaneous phenomena are difficult to distinghuish. The groundwater conditions (pH, Eh and ions) influence on the prevailing complexes of U and Fe and on forming corrosion products of iron and, thus they determine also the redox chemistry. The partial reduction of

  17. Photo-oxidation. Of the system chrome hexavalent-4-chlorophenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil Pavas, Edison; Cabrera Limpias, Marianela; Jaramillo Jimenez, Sergio Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    As a proposal to eliminate highly toxic chemical components derived from industrial waste, the researchers study the behavior of the compound hexavalent chromium / 4-chlorophenol system when subjected to photo degradation in a photo-reactor compound parabolic cylinder (CPC) to scale pilot. The effect is analyzed in order to determine the operation conditions to reach the highest degradation levels possible. The analyzed variables were pH, concentration of catalyst (TiO 2 ), time of recirculation and the relation of initial concentrations among polluting agents. The factor that most influences the levels of removal reached is the pH, which has a different effect for each of the pollutants. This implies that, theoretically, you cannot adopt a unique group of operation parameters to favor the degradation of both however, in the practice; high levels of degradation of both pollutants are obtained in the optimal point of operation of the chrome. It is also observed that the catalyst concentration does not influence the degradation of the polluting agents significantly, at least for the initial concentrations studied. The recirculation time is closely related to the kinetics of degradation of each polluting agent. Elevated degradation levels are reached in a short time for 4-chlorophenol, while more prolonged recirculation times are required for hexavalent chromium. The relation of initial concentrations of the polluting agents also exerts an opposite effect on the degradation levels reached for each polluting agent; the hexavalent chromium reduction is favored with high initial concentrations of 4-chlorophenol, whereas the oxidation of 4-chlorophenol is favored with high initial hexavalent chromium concentrations, which suggests some synergy between the oxidation-reduction reactions of 4-chlorophenol and hexavalent chromium. Finally, a 97% hexavalent chromium reduction and a 94.9% oxidation of 4-chlorophenol were obtained

  18. A process for uranium recovery in phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Neto, J.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented about studies carried out envisaging the development of a process for uranium recovery from phosphoric acid, produced from the concentrate obtained from phosphorus-uraniferous mineral from Itataia mines (CE, Brazil). This process uses a mixture of DEPA-TOPO as extractant and the extraction cycle involves the following stages: acid pre-treatment; adjustment of the oxidation potential so to ensure that all uranium is hexavalent; extraction of uranium from the acid; screening of the solvent to remove undesirable impurities; uranium re-extraction and precipitation; solvent recovery. A micro-pilot plant for continuous processing was built up. Data collected showed that uranium can be recovered with an yield greater than 99%, thus proving the feasibility of the process and encouraging the construction of a bigger scale plant. (Author) [pt

  19. Speciation and spectrophotometric determination of uranium in seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. KONSTANTINOU

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A series of ion-exchange and extraction procedures for the separation of uranium from seawater samples and subsequent spectrophotometric determination of uranium in seawater by means of arsenazo(III is described. According to the measurements performed by means of traced samples at every stage of separation, the yield of the pre-analytical procedures is generally over 90% and the separation of uranium very selective. The mean uranium concentration in seawater samples collected from five different coastal areas in Cyprus was found to be 3.2 ± 0.2 & micro; g L-1. Uranium in seawater is stable in its hexavalent oxidation state and UO2 (CO334- is the predominant species under normal coastal conditions (pH ≥ 8, EH ≥ 0.35 mV, 1 atm and 0.03% CO2.

  20. Enhanced Uranium Immobilization and Reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologgi, Dena L.; Speers, Allison M.; Bullard, Blair A.; Kelly, Shelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms formed by dissimilatory metal reducers are of interest to develop permeable biobarriers for the immobilization of soluble contaminants such as uranium. Here we show that biofilms of the model uranium-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens immobilized substantially more U(VI) than planktonic cells and did so for longer periods of time, reductively precipitating it to a mononuclear U(IV) phase involving carbon ligands. The biofilms also tolerated high and otherwise toxic concentrations (up to 5 mM) of uranium, consistent with a respiratory strategy that also protected the cells from uranium toxicity. The enhanced ability of the biofilms to immobilize uranium correlated only partially with the biofilm biomass and thickness and depended greatly on the area of the biofilm exposed to the soluble contaminant. In contrast, uranium reduction depended on the expression of Geobacter conductive pili and, to a lesser extent, on the presence of the c cytochrome OmcZ in the biofilm matrix. The results support a model in which the electroactive biofilm matrix immobilizes and reduces the uranium in the top stratum. This mechanism prevents the permeation and mineralization of uranium in the cell envelope, thereby preserving essential cellular functions and enhancing the catalytic capacity of Geobacter cells to reduce uranium. Hence, the biofilms provide cells with a physically and chemically protected environment for the sustained immobilization and reduction of uranium that is of interest for the development of improved strategies for the in situ bioremediation of environments impacted by uranium contamination. PMID:25128347

  1. Electrochemical investigation of uranium β-diketonates for all-uranium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Tomoo; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu; Yamana, Hajimu; Moriyama, Hirotake

    2002-01-01

    The redox flow battery using uranium as the negative and the positive active materials in polar aprotic solvents was proposed. In order to establish the guiding principle for the uranium compounds as the active materials, the investigation of uranium β-diketonate complexes was conducted on (i) the solubility of active materials, (ii) the electrode reaction of U(VI) and U(IV) β-diketonate complexes and (iii) the estimation of the open circuit voltage of the battery. The solubilities of higher than 0.8 mol dm -3 of U(VI) complexes and higher than 0.4 mol dm -3 of a U(IV) complex were obtained in the solvents. The electrode reactions of U(pta) 4 , UO 2 (dpm) 2 , UO 2 (fod) 2 and UO 2 (pta) 2 were first studied and the redox potentials of uranium β-diketonates were thermodynamically discussed. The open circuit voltage is estimated more than 1 V by using Hacac or Hdpm. The larger open circuit voltage is expected when a ligand with the larger basicity is used

  2. Uranium in bone: metabolic and autoradiographic studies in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priest, N.D.; Haines, J.W.; Howells, G.R.; Green, D.

    1982-01-01

    The distribution and retention of intravenously injected hexavalent uranium-233 in the skeleton of the female rat has been investigated using a variety of autoradiographic and radiochemical techniques. These showed that approximately one third of the injected uranium is deposited in the skeleton where it is retained with an initial biological half-time of approximately 40 days. The studies also showed that: 1) Uranium is initially deposited on to all types of bone surface, but preferentially on to those that are accreting. 2) Uranium is deposited in the calcifying zones of skeletal cartilage. 3) Bone accretion results in the burial of surface deposits of uranium. 4) Bone resorption causes the removal of uranium from surfaces. 5) Resorbed uranium is not retained by osteoclasts and macrophages in the bone marrow. 6) Uranium removed from bone surfaces enters the bloodstream where most is either redeposited in bone or excreted via the kidneys. 7) The recycling of resorbed uranium within the skeleton tends to produce a uniform level of uranium contamination throughout mineralized bone. These results are taken to indicate that uranium deposition in bone shares characteristics in common with both the 'volume-seeking radionuclides' typified by the alkaline earth elements and with the 'bone surface-seeking radionuclides' typified by plutonium. (author)

  3. Uranium in bone: metabolic and autoradiographic studies in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, N D; Howells, G R; Green, D; Haines, J W

    1982-03-01

    The distribution and retention of intravenously injected hexavalent uranium-233 in the skeleton of the female rat has been investigated using a variety of autoradiographic and radiochemical techniques. These showed that approximately one third of the injected uranium is deposited in the skeleton where it is retained with an initial biological half-time of approximately 40 days. The studies also showed that: 1 Uranium is initially deposited onto all types of bone surface, but preferentially onto those that are accreting. 2 Uranium is deposited in the calcifying zones of skeletal cartilage. 3 Bone accretion results in the burial of surface deposits of uranium. 4 Bone resorption causes the removal of uranium from surfaces. 5 Resorbed uranium is not retained by osteoclasts and macrophages in the bone marrow. 6 Uranium removed from bone surfaces enters the bloodstream where most is either redeposited in bone or excreted via the kidneys. 7 The recycling of resorbed uranium within the skeleton tends to produce a uniform level of uranium contamination throughout mineralized bone. These results are taken to indicate that uranium deposition in bone shares characteristics in common with both the 'volume-seeking radionuclides' typified by the alkaline earth elements and with the 'bone surface-seeking radionuclides' typified by plutonium.

  4. Application of NKF-6 zeolite for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pengfei Zong; Hai Wang; Hui Pan; Yaolin Zhao; Chaohui He

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the application of NKF-6 zeolite as an adsorbent for the removal of U(VI) from radionuclides and heavy metal ions polluted water, herein, NKF-6 zeolite was employed to remove U(VI) at different experimental conditions. The influence of solid/liquid ratio, contact time, pH, ionic strength, humic substances and temperature on sorption of U(VI) to NKF-6 zeolite was investigated using batch technique under ambient conditions. The experimental results demonstrated that the sorption of U(VI) on NKF-6 zeolite was strongly dependent on pH. The sorption property of U(VI) was influenced by ionic strength at pH 7.0. The presence of fulvic acid or humic acid promoted the sorption of U(VI) on NKF-6 zeolite at low pH values while restrained the sorption at high pH values. The thermodynamic parameters (i.e., ΔS 0 , ΔH 0 , and ΔG 0 ) calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms demonstrated that the sorption process of U(VI) on NKF-6 zeolite was endothermic and spontaneous. At low pH values, the sorption of U(VI) was dominated by outer-sphere surface complexation and ion exchange with Na + /H + on NKF-6 zeolite surfaces, while inner-sphere surface complexation was the main sorption mechanism at high pH values. From the experimental results, one can conclude that NKF-6 zeolite can be used as a potential adsorbent for the preconcentration and solidification of U(VI) from large volumes of aqueous solutions. (author)

  5. Incorporation of Uranium into Hematite during Crystallization from Ferrihydrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Ferrihydrite was exposed to U(VI)-containing cement leachate (pH 10.5) and aged to induce crystallization of hematite. A combination of chemical extractions, TEM, and XAS techniques provided the first evidence that adsorbed U(VI) (≈3000 ppm) was incorporated into hematite during ferrihydrite aggregation and the early stages of crystallization, with continued uptake occurring during hematite ripening. Analysis of EXAFS and XANES data indicated that the U(VI) was incorporated into a distorted, octahedrally coordinated site replacing Fe(III). Fitting of the EXAFS showed the uranyl bonds lengthened from 1.81 to 1.87 Å, in contrast to previous studies that have suggested that the uranyl bond is lost altogether upon incorporation into hematite. The results of this study both provide a new mechanistic understanding of uranium incorporation into hematite and define the nature of the bonding environment of uranium within the mineral structure. Immobilization of U(VI) by incorporation into hematite has clear and important implications for limiting uranium migration in natural and engineered environments. PMID:24580024

  6. Uranium Biomineralization By Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taillefert, Martial [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This project investigated the geochemical and microbial processes associated with the biomineralization of radionuclides in subsurface soils. During this study, it was determined that microbial communities from the Oak Ridge Field Research subsurface are able to express phosphatase activities that hydrolyze exogenous organophosphate compounds and result in the non-reductive bioimmobilization of U(VI) phosphate minerals in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The changes of the microbial community structure associated with the biomineralization of U(VI) was determined to identify the main organisms involved in the biomineralization process, and the complete genome of two isolates was sequenced. In addition, it was determined that both phytate, the main source of natural organophosphate compounds in natural environments, and polyphosphate accumulated in cells could also be hydrolyzed by native microbial population to liberate enough orthophosphate and precipitate uranium phosphate minerals. Finally, the minerals produced during this process are stable in low pH conditions or environments where the production of dissolved inorganic carbon is moderate. These findings suggest that the biomineralization of U(VI) phosphate minerals is an attractive bioremediation strategy to uranium bioreduction in low pH uranium-contaminated environments. These efforts support the goals of the SBR long-term performance measure by providing key information on "biological processes influencing the form and mobility of DOE contaminants in the subsurface".

  7. Reactivity of Uranium and Ferrous Iron with Natural Iron Oxyhydroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Brandy D; Cismasu, A Cristina; Williams, Kenneth H; Peyton, Brent M; Nico, Peter S

    2015-09-01

    Determining key reaction pathways involving uranium and iron oxyhydroxides under oxic and anoxic conditions is essential for understanding uranium mobility as well as other iron oxyhydroxide mediated processes, particularly near redox boundaries where redox conditions change rapidly in time and space. Here we examine the reactivity of a ferrihydrite-rich sediment from a surface seep adjacent to a redox boundary at the Rifle, Colorado field site. Iron(II)-sediment incubation experiments indicate that the natural ferrihydrite fraction of the sediment is not susceptible to reductive transformation under conditions that trigger significant mineralogical transformations of synthetic ferrihydrite. No measurable Fe(II)-promoted transformation was observed when the Rifle sediment was exposed to 30 mM Fe(II) for up to 2 weeks. Incubation of the Rifle sediment with 3 mM Fe(II) and 0.2 mM U(VI) for 15 days shows no measurable incorporation of U(VI) into the mineral structure or reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). Results indicate a significantly decreased reactivity of naturally occurring Fe oxyhydroxides as compared to synthetic minerals, likely due to the association of impurities (e.g., Si, organic matter), with implications for the mobility and bioavailability of uranium and other associated species in field environments.

  8. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Presentation on the NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings project. Project is in response to a Memorandum of Understanding between NASA and ESA Concerning Cooperation in the Field of Space Transportation - signed September 11, 2009. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) have expressed mutual interest in pursuing cooperation in the areas of evaluating hexavalent chrome-free coatings, environmentally-preferable coatings for maintenance of launch facilities and ground support equipment, citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys.

  9. GSDO Program Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives: Final Pretreatments Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chrome free pretreatments should be considered for use on Ground Support Equipment (OSE) and Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EOSE). Both of the hexavalent chrome free pretreatments (Metalast TCP HF and SurTec 650C) evaluated by this project met, and in some instances exceeded, the requirements ofMIL-DTL-5541 "Chemical Conversion Coatings on Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys". For DC resistance measurements, both Metalast TCP HF and SurTec (!50C met initial requirements following assembly and in many cases continued to maintain passing readings for the duration of testing.

  10. Genes for Uranium Bioremediation in the Anaerobic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Judy D.

    2003-06-01

    Surprising results were obtained following an attempt to induce or derepress the machinery for U(VI) reduction by growing Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 in the presence of 1 mM uranyl acetate. G20 cells grown on lactate-sulfate medium amended with U(VI) reduced uranium at a slower rate than cells grown in the absence of this metal. When periplasmic extracts of these cells were prepared, Western analysis of the proteins revealed that the cytochrome c3 was absent. This observation has been further investigated.

  11. Influence of attrition scrubbing, ultrasonic treatment, and oxidant additions on uranium removal from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timpson, M.E.; Elless, M.P.; Francis, C.W.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration Project being conducted by the US Department of Energy, bench-scale investigations of selective leaching of uranium from soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project site in Ohio were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Two soils (storage pad soil and incinerator soil), representing the major contaminant sources at the site, were extracted using carbonate- and citric acid-based lixiviants. Physical and chemical processes were used in combination with the two extractants to increase the rate of uranium release from these soils. Attrition scrubbing and ultrasonic dispersion were the two physical processes utilized. Potassium permanganate was used as an oxidizing agent to transform tetravalent uranium to the hexavalent state. Hexavalent uranium is easily complexed in solution by the carbonate radical. Attrition scrubbing increased the rate of uranium release from both soils when compared with rotary shaking. At equivalent extraction times and solids loadings, however, attrition scrubbing proved effective only on the incinerator soil. Ultrasonic treatments on the incinerator soil removed 71% of the uranium contamination in a single extraction. Multiple extractions of the same sample removed up to 90% of the uranium. Additions of potassium permanganate to the carbonate extractant resulted in significant changes in the extractability of uranium from the incinerator soil but had no effect on the storage pad soil

  12. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  13. Polarographic determination of uranium dioxide stoichiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viguie, J.; Uny, G.

    1966-10-01

    The method described allows the determination of small deviations from stoichiometry for uranium dioxide. It was applied to the study of surface oxidation of bulk samples. The sample is dissolved in phosphoric acid under an argon atmosphere; U(VI) is determined by polarography in PO 4 H 3 4.5 N - H 2 SO 4 4 N. U(IV) is determined by potentiometry. The detection limit is UO 2,0002 . The accuracy for a single determination at the 95% confidence level is ±20 per cent for samples with composition included between UO 2,001 and UO 2,01 . (authors) [fr

  14. An experimental study on the sorption of U(VI) onto granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Pil Soo

    2002-01-01

    The sorption of U(VI) on a domestic granite is studied as a function of experimental conditions such as contact time, solution-solid ratio, ionic strength, and pH using a batch procedure. The distribution coefficients, K d 's, of U(VI) are about 1-100mL/g depending on the experimental conditions. The sorption of U(VI) onto granite particles is greatly dependent upon the contact time, solution-solid ratio, and pH, but very little is dependent on the ionic strength. It is noticed that an U(VI)-carbonato ternary surface complex can be formed in the neutral range of pH. In the alkaline range of pH above 7, U(VI) sorption onto granite particles is greatly decreased due to the formation of anionic U(VI)-carbonato aqueous complexes

  15. Bioleaching of UO22+ ions from a Romanian poor uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecal, Al.; Popa, K.; Moraru, R.T.; Patachia, S.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental study on the bioleaching of a poor uranium ore by means of hydrophytic plants Lemna minor and Riccia fluitans, under various operating conditions is discussed. The maximum degree of bioleaching (42%) of the reduced uranium species to U(VI) has been attained for the ore-Lemna minor-alkaline carbonate solution system. The UO 2 2+ ions amount accumulated in the plants is negligible as compared to the dissolved quantity, owing to the ionic competition between uranyl ions and the cations necessary to the mineral nutrition. The X-ray diffraction patterns prove that the uranium species in pyrochlore mineral are completely oxidized to U(VI), while thucolite is only partially turned into UO 2 2+ ions, in the presence of living plants. (author)

  16. Potential for Methanosarcina to contribute to uranium reduction during acetate-promoted groundwater bioremediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, Dawn E; Orellana, Roberto; Giloteaux, Ludovic

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies of acetate-promoted bioremediation of uranium-contaminated aquifers focused on Geobacter because no other microorganisms that can couple the oxidation of acetate with U(VI) reduction had been detected in situ. Monitoring the levels of methyl CoM reductase subunit A (mcrA) transcr......Previous studies of acetate-promoted bioremediation of uranium-contaminated aquifers focused on Geobacter because no other microorganisms that can couple the oxidation of acetate with U(VI) reduction had been detected in situ. Monitoring the levels of methyl CoM reductase subunit A (mcr......(VI) reduction was observed in inactive controls. These results demonstrate that Methanosarcina species could play an important role in the long-term bioremediation of uranium-contaminated aquifers after depletion of Fe(III) oxides limits the growth of Geobacter species. The results also suggest...

  17. Ligand Influences on Properties of Uranium Coordination Complexes - Structure, Reactivity, and Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kosog, Boris

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis several different aspects of uranium chemistry are presented. It was shown that terminal uranium(V) oxo and imido complexes [((RArO)3tacn)UV(O)] and [((RArO)3tacn)UV(NSiMe3)] (R = t Bu, Ad) can be oxidized by silver(I) hexafluoro-antimonate to the uranium(VI) oxo and imido complexes [((RArO)3tacn)UVI(O)]SbF6 and [((RArO)3tacn)UVI(NSiMe3)]SbF6. While for the t Bu-derivative of the oxo complex an equatorial coordination is observed due to stabilization by the inverse trans-influe...

  18. [Occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium during aircraft painting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherardi, M; Gatto, M P; Gordiani, A; Paci, E; Proietto, A

    2007-01-01

    Hygienists are interested in hexavalent chromium due to its genotoxic and carcinogenic effect on humans. The use of products containing hexavalent chromium is decreasing in many industrial fields because of the substitution with less-toxic compounds. In the aeronautical industry, however, the chromate are added to primer paint as a corrosion inhibitor of aircrafts surfaces: so hexavalent chromium compounds are available in many primers with a composition ranging from 10% to 13%. The application of these primers by using electrostatic guns potentially exposes painting and coating workers at high concentrations of aerosols containing Cr(VI). The aim of the present study is the evaluation of professional exposure to hexavalent chromium during aircraft painting, by adopting both environmental personal sampling and biological monitoring. To valuate workers exposure levels the personal measurements results have been compared with the exposure limit values (TLV-TWA) and the urinary chromium contents with the biological exposure indices (IBE). Moreover the strategy of coupling environmental sampling with biological monitoring seems to be a useful instrument to measure the validity of the individual protection devices.

  19. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by graphite–chitosan binary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Graphite chitosan binary (GCB) composite was prepared for hexavalent chromium adsorption from studied water. GCB was characterized by TGA, FTIR, SEM and X-ray diffraction techniques.Wide porous sorptive surface of 3.89 m 2 g − 1 and absorptive functionalities of GCB was due to 20% (w/w) graphite support on ...

  20. Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solutions using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hexavalent chromium exists in aquatic media as water soluble complex anions and persist. These are concentrated in industrial waste water especially from the tannery industries and release of effluents from industries adversely affects the environment. The removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions is carried ...

  1. Review article. Adverse hematological effects of hexavalent chromium: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Rina Rani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Workers of tanneries, welding industries, factories manufacturing chromate containing paints are exposed to hexavalent chromium that increas¬es the risk of developing serious adverse health effects. This review elucidates the mode of action of hexavalent chromium on blood and its adverse effects. Both leukocyte and erythrocyte counts of blood sharply decreased in Swiss mice after two weeks of intraperitoneal treatment with Cr (VI, with the erythrocytes transforming into echinocytes. The hexavalent chromium in the blood is readily reduced to trivalent form and the reductive capacity of erythrocytes is much greater than that of plasma. Excess Cr (VI, not reduced in plasma, may enter erythrocytes and lymphocytes and in rodents it induces microcytic anemia. The toxic effects of chromium (VI include mitochondrial injury and DNA damage of blood cells that leads to carcinogenicity. Excess Cr (VI increases cytosolic Ca2+ activity and ATP depletion thereby inducing eryptosis. Se, vitamin C, and quercetin are assumed to have some protective effect against hexavalent chromium induced hematological disorders.

  2. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by graphite–chitosan binary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hexavalent chromium; graphite–chitosan composite; adsorption kinetics. 1. Introduction ... [2], while Cr(III) is less toxicity and relatively innocuous. Cr(VI) generates in ..... Human Environments (New York: Wiley Inter-Science) p 3. [4] U.S. EPA ...

  3. Bioreduction of Uranium(VI) Complexed with Citric Acid by Clostridia Affects its Structure and Mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.; Dodge, C.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium contamination of the environment from mining and milling operations, nuclear-waste disposal, and ammunition use is a widespread global problem. Natural attenuation processes such as bacterial reductive precipitation and immobilization of soluble uranium is gaining much attention. However, the presence of naturally occurring organic ligands can affect the precipitation of uranium. Here, we report that the anaerobic spore-forming bacteria Clostridia, ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and wastes, capable of reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), Mn(IV) to Mn(II), U(VI) to U(IV), Pu(IV) to Pu(III), and Tc(VI) to Tc(IV); reduced U(VI) associated with citric acid in a dinuclear 2:2 U(VI):citric acid complex to a biligand mononuclear 1:2 U(IV):citric acid complex, which remained in solution, in contrast to reduction and precipitation of uranium. Our findings show that U(VI) complexed with citric acid is readily accessible as an electron acceptor despite the inability of the bacterium to metabolize the complexed organic ligand. Furthermore, it suggests that the presence of organic ligands at uranium-contaminated sites can affect the mobility of the actinide under both oxic and anoxic conditions by forming such soluble complexes.

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of N,N-di-alkyl-2-methoxyacetamides for the separation of U(VI) and Pu(IV) from nitric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaresan, R.; Prathibha, T.; Selvan, B. Robert; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2017-07-01

    The homologs of N,N-di-alkyl-2-methoxyacetamides (DAMeOA) having three different alkyl chains varying from hexyl to decyl (C{sub 6}, C{sub 8} and C{sub 10}) were synthesized and characterized by NMR and IR spectral analyses. Extraction behavior of U(VI) and Pu(IV) from nitric acid medium in a solution of 0.5 M of DAMeOA in n-dodecane (n-DD) was studied and the results were compared with those obtained using N,N-di-hexyloctanamide (DHOA) in n-dodecane. The effect of various parameters on the distribution ratio of U(VI) and Pu(IV) in DAMeOA was studied. The extraction of nitric acid increased with decrease in chain length of alkyl group attached to amidic nitrogen atom of DAMeOA and the conditional nitric acid extraction constant was determined. The extraction of nitric acid in DAMeOA/n-DD resulted in the formation of third phase in organic phase and the third phase occurred early with DAMeOA having smaller alkyl chain length. In contrast to this, the distribution ratio (D) of U(VI) and Pu(IV) in DAMeOA/n-DD increased with increase in the concentration of nitric acid and with increase in the chain length of alkyl group attached to amidic nitrogen atom of DAMeOA. The stoichiometry of the metal - solvate was determined from the slope of extraction data. Quantitative recovery of uranium and plutonium from the loaded organic phase was achieved using dilute nitric acid.

  5. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  6. Effect of blended materials on U(VI) retention characteristics for portland cement solidification product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Hongbin; Ma Xiaoling; Li Yuxiang

    2006-01-01

    Using the simulated groundwater as leaching liquid, the retention capability of U(VI) in solidification products with Portland cement, the Portland cement containing silica fume, the Portland cement containing metakaolin and the Portland cement containing fly ash was researched by leaching experiments at 25 degree C for 42 d. The results indicate silica fume and metakaolin as blended materials can improve the U(VI) retention capability of Portland cement solidification product, but fly ash can not. (authors)

  7. Regeneration of pilot-scale ion exchange columns for hexavalent chromium removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korak, Julie A; Huggins, Richard; Arias-Paic, Miguel

    2017-07-01

    Due to stricter regulations, some drinking water utilities must implement additional treatment processes to meet potable water standards for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), such as the California limit of 10 μg/L. Strong base anion exchange is effective for Cr(VI) removal, but efficient resin regeneration and waste minimization are important for operational, economic and environmental considerations. This study compared multiple regeneration methods on pilot-scale columns on the basis of regeneration efficiency, waste production and salt usage. A conventional 1-Stage regeneration using 2 N sodium chloride (NaCl) was compared to 1) a 2-Stage process with 0.2 N NaCl followed by 2 N NaCl and 2) a mixed regenerant solution with 2 N NaCl and 0.2 N sodium bicarbonate. All methods eluted similar cumulative amounts of chromium with 2 N NaCl. The 2-Stage process eluted an additional 20-30% of chromium in the 0.2 N fraction, but total resin capacity is unaffected if this fraction is recycled to the ion exchange headworks. The 2-Stage approach selectively eluted bicarbonate and sulfate with 0.2 N NaCl before regeneration using 2 N NaCl. Regeneration approach impacted the elution efficiency of both uranium and vanadium. Regeneration without co-eluting sulfate and bicarbonate led to incomplete uranium elution and potential formation of insoluble uranium hydroxides that could lead to long-term resin fouling, decreased capacity and render the resin a low-level radioactive solid waste. Partial vanadium elution occurred during regeneration due to co-eluting sulfate suppressing vanadium release. Waste production and salt usage were comparable for the 1- and 2-Stage regeneration processes with similar operational setpoints with respect to chromium or nitrate elution. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Influence of uranyl speciation and iron oxides on uranium biogeochemical redox reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, B.D.; Amos, R.T.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

    2010-03-15

    Uranium is a pollutant of concern to both human and ecosystem health. Uranium's redox state often dictates its partitioning between the aqueous- and solid-phases, and thus controls its dissolved concentration and, coupled with groundwater flow, its migration within the environment. In anaerobic environments, the more oxidized and mobile form of uranium (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and associated species) may be reduced, directly or indirectly, by microorganisms to U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO{sub 2}. However, various factors within soils and sediments may limit biological reduction of U(VI), inclusive of alterations in U(VI) speciation and competitive electron acceptors. Here we elucidate the impact of U(VI) speciation on the extent and rate of reduction with specific emphasis on speciation changes induced by dissolved Ca, and we examine the impact of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite and hematite) varying in free energies of formation on U reduction. The amount of uranium removed from solution during 100 h of incubation with S. putrefaciens was 77% with no Ca or ferrihydrite present but only 24% (with ferrihydrite) and 14% (no ferrihydrite) were removed for systems with 0.8 mM Ca. Imparting an important criterion on uranium reduction, goethite and hematite decrease the dissolved concentration of calcium through adsorption and thus tend to diminish the effect of calcium on uranium reduction. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) can proceed through different enzyme pathways, even within a single organism, thus providing a potential second means by which Fe(III) bearing minerals may impact U(VI) reduction. We quantify rate coefficients for simultaneous dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) in systems varying in Ca concentration (0 to 0.8 mM), and using a mathematical construct implemented with the reactive transport code MIN3P, we reveal the predominant influence of uranyl speciation, specifically the formation of uranyl

  9. Microbial reduction of uranium(VI) by anaerobic microorganisms isolated from a former uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Ulrike; Krawczyk-Baersch, Evelyn [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry; Arnold, Thuro [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures

    2017-06-01

    The former uranium mine Koenigstein (Germany) is currently in the process of controlled flooding by reason of remediation purposes. However, the flooding water still contains high concentrations of uranium and other heavy metals. For that reason the water has to be cleaned up by a conventional waste water treatment plant. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between anaerobic microorganisms and uranium for possible bioremediation approaches, which could be an great alternative for the intensive and expensive waste water treatment. EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) and XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) measurements were performed and revealed a complete reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) only by adding 10 mM glycerol.

  10. Microbial reduction of uranium(VI) by anaerobic microorganisms isolated from a former uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, Ulrike; Krawczyk-Baersch, Evelyn; Arnold, Thuro; Scheinost, Andreas C.

    2017-01-01

    The former uranium mine Koenigstein (Germany) is currently in the process of controlled flooding by reason of remediation purposes. However, the flooding water still contains high concentrations of uranium and other heavy metals. For that reason the water has to be cleaned up by a conventional waste water treatment plant. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between anaerobic microorganisms and uranium for possible bioremediation approaches, which could be an great alternative for the intensive and expensive waste water treatment. EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) and XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) measurements were performed and revealed a complete reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) only by adding 10 mM glycerol.

  11. Bacillus lichenformis γ-glutamyl exopolymer: Physicochemical characterization and U(VI) interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, L.M.; Neu, M.P.; Vanderberg, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Complexation by microbially produced exopolymers may significantly impact the environmental mobility and toxicity of metals. This study focused on the conformational structure of the bacterial exopolymer, γ-D-poly(glutamic acid) and its interactions with U(VI) examined using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Solution pH, polymer concentration, and ionic strength affected the conformation of the exopolymer, and U(VI) binding was monitored. At low pH, low concentration, or low ionic strength, this exopolymer exists in an α-helical conformation, while at high pH, concentration, or ionic strength the exopolymer exhibits a β-sheet structure. The change in exopolymer conformation is likely to influence the number and nature of exposed surface functional groups, sites most responsible for metal complexation. The authors found the polyglutamate capsule binds U(VI) in a binuclear, bidentate fashion; in contrast the glutamate monomer forms a mononuclear, bidentate complex with U(VI). The apparent polynuclear binding of U(VI) may induce β-sheet structure formation provided the U(VI) Concentration is sufficiently high

  12. Effect of selected ligands on the U(VI) immobilization by zerovalent iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noubactep, C.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Cl - , CO 3 2- , EDTA, NO 2 - , NO 3 - , PO 4 3- , SO 4 2- , and humic substances (HS) on the U(VI) co-precipitation from aqueous solutions by zerovalent iron (ZVI) was investigated in the neutral pH range.Batch experiments without shaking were conducted for 14 days mostly with five different ZVI materials (15 g/l), selected ligands (10mM) and an U(VI) solution (20 mg/l, 0.084mM). Apart from Cl - , all tested ligands induced a decrease of U(VI) coprecipitation. This decrease is attributed to the surface adsorption and complexation of the ligands at the reactive sites on the surface of ZVI and their corrosion products. The decrease of U(VI) removal was not uniform with the five ZVI materials. Generally, groundwater with elevated EDTA concentration could not be remediated with the ZVI barrier technology. The response of the system on the pre-treating by two ZVI materials in 250mM HCl indicated that in situ generated corrosion products favor an irreversible U(VI) uptake. Thus for the long term performance of ZVI barrier, the iron dissolution should continue in such a way that fresh iron oxide be always available for U(VI) coprecipitation. (author)

  13. Stability of uranium(VI) doped CSH phases in high saline water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolter, Jan-Martin; Schmeide, Katja [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the long-term stability of U(VI) doped calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) phases at high saline conditions, leaching experiments with NaCl, NaCl/Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaCl/NaHCO{sub 3} containing solutions were performed. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) were applied to study the U(VI) binding onto the CSH phases and to get a deeper understanding of structural changes due to leaching. Results indicate that neither NaCl nor Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} affect the structural stability of CSH phases and their retention potential for U(VI). However, carbonate containing solutions lead to a decomposition of CSH phases and thus, to a release of incorporated uranium.

  14. Uranium(VI) retention by Ca-bentonite under (hyper)alkaline conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Thimo; Schmeide, Katja [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes

    2017-06-01

    The sorption behavior of U(VI) on Ca-bentonite was studied in saline, (hyper)alkaline solution via batch experiments. At pH 8.5-9.5 sorption is low in the presence of CO{sub 2} due to the formation of weakly sorbing uranyl carbonate species, which have been observed to dominate speciation up to pH 10 by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). In the pH region 10-12, U(VI) retention is almost complete. The retention can either be attributed to strongly sorbing uranyl hydroxo complexes or to a partial precipitation of uranium due to an altered solubility of U(VI) induced by ions leached out of the bentonite.

  15. Kinetic Controls on the Desorption/Dissolution of Sorbed U(VI) and their Influence on Reactive Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachara, John M.; Chongxuan Liu; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; McKinley, James P.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Brown, Gordon E. Jr.; Davis, James A.

    2006-01-01

    A number of published studies have sought to understand geochemical kinetic process of uranium (U) that are relevant to nuclear waste sites and repositories by studying the weathering of U ore bodies and downgradient transport of weathering products. Such studies have provided important insights on processes operative over many thousand to millions of years. This project also seeks knowledge on the geochemical kinetics of U, but for shorter in-ground time periods (e.g., 20-50 years) relevant to DOE legacy waste sites. Several representative field sites were selected for intense study at Hanford as part of EMSP research to provide: (1) fundamental insights on intermediate duration geochemical events of U controlling fate and transport, and (2) key scientific information needed for remedial action assessment and informed decision making. The site discussed in this poster is the 300 A uranium plume. This plume is located at the south end of Hanford and discharges directly to the Columbia River. The plume resulted from the discharge of fuels fabrication wastes (nitric acid solutions containing U and Cu) and cladding dissolution wastes (basic sodium aluminate) to the North and South Process Ponds between 1943 and 1975 near the Columbia River. A Kd-based remedial action assessment fifteen years ago predicted that the plume would dissipate to concentrations below the DWS within 10 y. As a result of this assessment, an interim, MNA remedial decision was agreed to by DOE and state/federal regulators. It has been 15 y since the above assessment, and groundwater concentrations have not decreased (attenuated) as projected. Stakeholders are now demanding remedial intervention, and DOE seeks science-based conceptual and numeric models for more accurate future projections. The objectives are: (1) Identify the chemical speciation (e.g., adsorption complexes precipitates), mineral residence, and physical location of contaminant U in a depth sequence of sediments from the disposal

  16. Kinetic Controls on the Desorption/Dissolution of Sorbed U(VI) and Their Influence on Reactive Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. M. Zachara; C. Liu; N. Qafoku; J. P. McKinley; J. A. Davis; D. Stoliker; Y. Arai; J. G. Catalano; G. E. Brown, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A number of published studies have sought to understand geochemical kinetic process of uranium (U) that are relevant to nuclear waste sites and repositories by studying the weathering of U ore bodies and downgradient transport of weathering products. Such studies have provided important insights on processes operative over many thousand to millions of years. This project also seeks knowledge on the geochemical kinetics of U, but for shorter in-ground time periods (e.g., 20-50 years) relevant to DOE legacy waste sites. Several representative field sites were selected for intense study at Hanford as part of EMSP research to provide: (1) fundamental insights on intermediate duration geochemical events of U controlling fate and transport, and (2) key scientific information needed for remedial action assessment and informed decision making. The site discussed in this poster is the 300 A uranium plume. This plume is located at the south end of Hanford and discharges directly to the Columbia River. The plume resulted from the discharge of fuels fabrication wastes (nitric acid solutions containing U and Cu) and cladding dissolution wastes (basic sodium aluminate) to the North and South Process Ponds between 1943 and 1975 near the Columbia River. A Kd-based remedial action assessment fifteen years ago predicted that the plume would dissipate to concentrations below the DWS within 10 y. As a result of this assessment, an interim, MNA remedial decision was agreed to by DOE and state/federal regulators. It has been 15 y since the above assessment, and groundwater concentrations have not decreased (attenuated) as projected. Stakeholders are now demanding remedial intervention, and DOE seeks science-based conceptual and numeric models for more accurate future projections. The objectives are: (1) Identify the chemical speciation (e.g., adsorption complexes or precipitates), mineral residence, and physical location of contaminant U in a depth sequence of sediments from the

  17. Comparison of U(VI) adsorption onto nanoscale zero-valent iron and red soil in the presence of U(VI)–CO_3/Ca–U(VI)–CO_3 complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhibin; Liu, Jun; Cao, Xiaohong; Luo, Xuanping; Hua, Rong; Liu, Yan; Yu, Xiaofeng; He, Likai

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • NZVI can be used for adsorbing U(VI)–CO_3 complexes. • Use of NZVI is feasible for remediation of uranium-contaminated soils. • The mechanism of U(VI)–CO_3 complexes adsorbing onto NZVI has been explained. - Abstract: The influence of U(VI)–CO_3 and Ca–U(VI)–CO_3 complexes on U(VI) adsorption onto red soil and nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) was investigated using batch adsorption and fixed-bed column experiments to simulate the feasibility of NZVI as the reactive medium in permeable- reactive barriers (PRB) for in situ remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils. The adsorption capacity (q_e) and distribution constant (K_d) of NZVI and red soil decreased with increasing pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentrations, but the q_e and K_d values of NZVI were 5–10 times higher than those of red soil. The breakthrough pore volume (PV) values increased with the decrease of pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentration; however, the breakthrough PV values of the PRB column filled with 5% NZVI were 2.0–3.5 times higher than the 100% red soil column. The U(VI)–CO_3 complexes adsorbed onto the surface of red soil/NZVI (≡SOH) to form SO–UO_2CO_3"− or SO–UO_2 (CO_3)_2"3"−. XPS and XRD analysis further confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) and the formation of FeOOH on NZVI surfaces. The findings of this study are significant to the remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils and the consideration of practical U(VI) species in the natural environment.

  18. Comparison of U(VI) adsorption onto nanoscale zero-valent iron and red soil in the presence of U(VI)–CO{sub 3}/Ca–U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhibin [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Liu, Jun [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Cao, Xiaohong, E-mail: xhcao@ecit.cn [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Luo, Xuanping [Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Hua, Rong; Liu, Yan [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Yu, Xiaofeng; He, Likai [Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); and others

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • NZVI can be used for adsorbing U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes. • Use of NZVI is feasible for remediation of uranium-contaminated soils. • The mechanism of U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes adsorbing onto NZVI has been explained. - Abstract: The influence of U(VI)–CO{sub 3} and Ca–U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes on U(VI) adsorption onto red soil and nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) was investigated using batch adsorption and fixed-bed column experiments to simulate the feasibility of NZVI as the reactive medium in permeable- reactive barriers (PRB) for in situ remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils. The adsorption capacity (q{sub e}) and distribution constant (K{sub d}) of NZVI and red soil decreased with increasing pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentrations, but the q{sub e} and K{sub d} values of NZVI were 5–10 times higher than those of red soil. The breakthrough pore volume (PV) values increased with the decrease of pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentration; however, the breakthrough PV values of the PRB column filled with 5% NZVI were 2.0–3.5 times higher than the 100% red soil column. The U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes adsorbed onto the surface of red soil/NZVI (≡SOH) to form SO–UO{sub 2}CO{sub 3}{sup −} or SO–UO{sub 2} (CO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 3−}. XPS and XRD analysis further confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) and the formation of FeOOH on NZVI surfaces. The findings of this study are significant to the remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils and the consideration of practical U(VI) species in the natural environment.

  19. Influence of Uranium on Bacterial Communities: A Comparison of Natural Uranium-Rich Soils with Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondani, Laure; Benzerara, Karim; Carrière, Marie; Christen, Richard; Mamindy-Pajany, Yannick; Février, Laureline; Marmier, Nicolas; Achouak, Wafa; Nardoux, Pascal; Berthomieu, Catherine; Chapon, Virginie

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of uranium on the indigenous bacterial community structure in natural soils with high uranium content. Radioactive soil samples exhibiting 0.26% - 25.5% U in mass were analyzed and compared with nearby control soils containing trace uranium. EXAFS and XRD analyses of soils revealed the presence of U(VI) and uranium-phosphate mineral phases, identified as sabugalite and meta-autunite. A comparative analysis of bacterial community fingerprints using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed the presence of a complex population in both control and uranium-rich samples. However, bacterial communities inhabiting uraniferous soils exhibited specific fingerprints that were remarkably stable over time, in contrast to populations from nearby control samples. Representatives of Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and seven others phyla were detected in DGGE bands specific to uraniferous samples. In particular, sequences related to iron-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter and Geothrix were identified concomitantly with iron-oxidizing species such as Gallionella and Sideroxydans. All together, our results demonstrate that uranium exerts a permanent high pressure on soil bacterial communities and suggest the existence of a uranium redox cycle mediated by bacteria in the soil. PMID:21998695

  20. Uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina

    2006-03-01

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF 6 and UF 4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  1. Influence of Bicarbonate, Sulfate, and Electron Donors on Biological reduction of Uranium and Microbial Community Composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [ORNL; Wu, Weimin [ORNL; Yan, Tingfen [ORNL; Criddle, Craig [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    A microcosm study was performed to investigate the effect of ethanol and acetate on uranium(VI) biological reduction and microbial community changes under various geochemical conditions. Each microcosm contained an uranium-contaminated sediment (up to 2.8 g U/kg) suspended in buffer with bicarbonate at concentrations of either 1 mM or 40 mM and sulfate at either 1.1 or 3.2 mM. Ethanol or acetate was used as an electron donor. Results indicate that ethanol yielded in significantly higher U(VI) reduction rates than acetate. A low bicarbonate concentration (1 mM) was favored for U(VI) bioreduction to occur in sediments, but high concentrations of bicarbonate (40 mM) and sulfate (3.2 mM) decreased the reduction rates of U(VI). Microbial communities were dominated by species from the Geothrix genus and Proteobacteria phylum in all microcosms. However, species in the Geobacteraceae family capable of reducing U(VI) were significantly enriched by ethanol and acetate in low bicarbonate buffer. Ethanol increased the population of unclassified Desulfuromonales, while acetate increased the population of Desulfovibrio. Additionally, species in the Geobacteraceae family were not enriched in high bicarbonate buffer, but the Geothrix and the unclassified Betaproteobacteria species were enriched. This study concludes that ethanol could be a better electron donor than acetate for reducing U(VI) under given experimental conditions, and electron donor and geoundwater geochemistry alter microbial communities responsible for U(VI) reduction.

  2. Influence of bicarbonate, sulfate, and electron donors on biological reduction of uranium and microbial community composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Wensui [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Wu Wei-Min; Criddle, C.S. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Yan Tingfen [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Jardine, P.M.; Gu Baohua [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Zhou Jizhong [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Botany and Microbiology

    2007-12-15

    A microcosm study was performed to investigate the effect of ethanol and acetate on uranium(VI) biological reduction and microbial community changes under various geochemical conditions. Each microcosm contained an uranium-contaminated sediment (up to 2.8 g U/kg) suspended in buffer with bicarbonate at concentrations of either 1 or 40 mM and sulfate at either 1.1 or 3.2 mM. Ethanol or acetate was used as an electron donor. Results indicate that ethanol yielded in significantly higher U(VI) reduction rates than acetate. A low bicarbonate concentration (1 mM) was favored for U(VI) bioreduction to occur in sediments, but high concentrations of bicarbonate (40 mM) and sulfate (3.2 mM) decreased the reduction rates of U(VI). Microbial communities were dominated by species from the Geothrix genus and Proteobacteria phylum in all microcosms. However, species in the Geobacteraceae family capable of reducing U(VI) were significantly enriched by ethanol and acetate in low-bicarbonate buffer. Ethanol increased the population of unclassified Desulfuromonales, while acetate increased the population of Desulfovibrio. Additionally, species in the Geobacteraceae family were not enriched in high-bicarbonate buffer, but the Geothrix and the unclassified Betaproteobacteria species were enriched. This study concludes that ethanol could be a better electron donor than acetate for reducing U(VI) under given experimental conditions, and electron donor and groundwater geochemistry alter microbial communities responsible for U(VI) reduction. (orig.)

  3. Fundamental study on decontamination of wastes contaminated by uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids - dissolution and electrochemistry of uranium in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriko Asanuma; Yusuke Ohhashi; Yukio Wada; Masayuki Harada; Yasuhisa Ikeda

    2008-01-01

    Treatment method for wastes contaminated uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids as media of pyrochemical process instead of alkali metal chloride molten salts was proposed. In this method, uranium fluorides such as UF 4 or NaF adsorbing UF 6 are dissolved in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMICl) and dissolved uranium species are recovered as deposits by electrochemical reduction. Under the atmospheric condition, UF 4 was completely dissolved in BMICl at 100 deg. C. UV-vis absorption spectra of the sample solution indicated that main species of uranium are U(VI) and a part of uranium exists as U(IV). Chemical form of uranium in the NaF adsorbents is Na 3 UO 2 F 5 . Therefore, it was immediately dissolved to BMICl. However, complete dissolution was not achieved. Cyclic voltammetry of the solutions prepared by dissolution experiments was performed. Redox properties of uranium species in each sample were irreversible. It was assigned to reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). As a result of preliminary bulk electrolysis, it was expected that reduction products are deposited on the carbon cathode. (authors)

  4. Fundamental study on decontamination of wastes contaminated by uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids - dissolution and electrochemistry of uranium in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noriko Asanuma [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University 1117 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Yusuke Ohhashi; Yukio Wada [Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency Kagamino-cho, Tomata-gun, Okayama 708-0698 (Japan); Masayuki Harada; Yasuhisa Ikeda [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Treatment method for wastes contaminated uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids as media of pyrochemical process instead of alkali metal chloride molten salts was proposed. In this method, uranium fluorides such as UF{sub 4} or NaF adsorbing UF{sub 6} are dissolved in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMICl) and dissolved uranium species are recovered as deposits by electrochemical reduction. Under the atmospheric condition, UF{sub 4} was completely dissolved in BMICl at 100 deg. C. UV-vis absorption spectra of the sample solution indicated that main species of uranium are U(VI) and a part of uranium exists as U(IV). Chemical form of uranium in the NaF adsorbents is Na{sub 3}UO{sub 2}F{sub 5}. Therefore, it was immediately dissolved to BMICl. However, complete dissolution was not achieved. Cyclic voltammetry of the solutions prepared by dissolution experiments was performed. Redox properties of uranium species in each sample were irreversible. It was assigned to reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). As a result of preliminary bulk electrolysis, it was expected that reduction products are deposited on the carbon cathode. (authors)

  5. Uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Voto, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the methodology and technology that are currently being used in varying degrees in uranium exploration activities worldwide. Since uranium is ubiquitous and occurs in trace amounts (0.2 to 5 ppm) in virtually all rocks of the crust of the earth, exploration for uranium is essentially the search of geologic environments in which geologic processes have produced unusual concentrations of uranium. Since the level of concentration of uranium of economic interest is dependent on the present and future price of uranium, it is appropriate here to review briefly the economic realities of uranium-fueled power generation. (author)

  6. Biosorption of heavy metals and uranium by starfish and Pseudomonas putida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Ju Young; Yang, Jung-Seok

    2009-01-01

    Biosorption of heavy metals and uranium from contaminated wastewaters may represent an innovative purification process. This study investigates the removal ability of unit mass of Pseudomonas putida and starfish for lead, cadmium, and uranium by quantifying the adsorption capacity. The adsorption of heavy metals and uranium by the samples was influenced by pH, and increased with increasing Pb, Cd, and U concentrations. Dead cells adsorbed the largest quantity of all heavy metals than live cells and starfish. The adsorption capacity followed the order: U(VI) > Pb > Cd. The results also suggest that bacterial membrane cells can be used successfully in the treatment of high strength metal-contaminated wastewaters

  7. Potential for Methanosarcina to contribute to uranium reduction during acetate-promoted groundwater bioremediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, Dawn E; Orellana, Roberto; Giloteaux, Ludovic

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies of in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater with acetate injections have focused on the role of Geobacter species in U(VI) reduction because of a lack of other abundant known U(VI)-reducing microorganisms. Monitoring the levels of methyl CoM reductase subunit...... an important role in the long-term bioremediation of uranium-contaminated aquifers after depletion of Fe(III) oxides limits the growth of Geobacter species. The results also suggest that Methanosarcina have the potential to influence uranium geochemistry in a diversity of anaerobic sedimentary environments....

  8. Laser enhanced reductions of uranium(VI) ion in aqueous phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.Y.; Harada, M.; Tomiyasu, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Takashima, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Photochemical reactions of U(VI) ions with inorganic anions (I - , Br - , Cl - , NCS - ) and organic compounds (1-hexene, cyclohexene, pyridine) in phosphoric acid were studied for the purpose of finding an efficient method of adjusting the oxidation states of uranium ions in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The formation of U(IV) was observed in the photoreactions with I - , Br - and NCS - , but not with Cl - . The yield of U(VI) increased in the order, Br - - - . This order was the same as the quenching rate constants of the excited U(VI) ions with these anions, and the reverse of their standard redox potentials. The rates of the formation of U(IV) in the presence of Br - were measured spectrophotometrically. It was found that the rate equation was first order in both [U(VI)] and [Br - ]. The results were reasonably interpreted by a series of reaction processes involving U(V) and Br radical. With organic molecules, 1-hexene, cyclohexene, and pyridine, the formation of U(IV) were observed. The yield of U(IV) increased in the order pyridine < 1-hexene < cyclohexene. This order is the reverse of their vertical ionization potentials, suggesting an electron transfer mechanism between these organic molecules and excited U(VI). (author)

  9. Uranium Sequestration by Aluminum Phosphate Minerals in Unsaturated Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerden, James L. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A mineralogical and geochemical study of soils developed from the unmined Coles Hill uranium deposit (Virginia) was undertaken to determine how phosphorous influences the speciation of uranium in an oxidizing soil/saprolite system typical of the eastern United States. This paper presents mineralogical and geochemical results that identify and quantify the processes by which uranium has been sequestered in these soils. It was found that uranium is not leached from the saturated soil zone (saprolites) overlying the deposit due to the formation of a sparingly soluble uranyl phosphate mineral of the meta-autunite group. The concentration of uranium in the saprolites is approximately 1000 mg uranium per kg of saprolite. It was also found that a significant amount of uranium was retained in the unsaturated soil zone overlying uranium-rich saprolites. The uranium concentration in the unsaturated soils is approximately 200 mg uranium per kg of soil (20 times higher than uranium concentrations in similar soils adjacent to the deposit). Mineralogical evidence indicates that uranium in this zone is sequestered by a barium-strontium-calcium aluminum phosphate mineral of the crandallite group (gorceixite). This mineral is intimately inter-grown with iron and manganese oxides that also contain uranium. The amount of uranium associated with both the aluminum phosphates (as much as 1.4 weight percent) has been measured by electron microprobe micro-analyses and the geochemical conditions under which these minerals formed has been studied using thermodynamic reaction path modeling. The geochemical data and modeling results suggest the meta-autunite group minerals present in the saprolites overlying the deposit are unstable in the unsaturated zone soils overlying the deposit due to a decrease in soil pH (down to a pH of 4.5) at depths less than 5 meters below the surface. Mineralogical observations suggest that, once exposed to the unsaturated environment, the meta-autunite group

  10. Fate of Uranium in Wetlands: Impact of Drought Followed by Re-flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, E.; Huang, S.; Koster van Groos, P. G.; Scheckel, K.; Peacock, A. D.; Kaplan, D. I.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Uranium contamination in groundwater can be mitigated in anoxic zones by iron-reducing bacteria that reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) and by uranium immobilization through complexation and sorption. Wetlands often link ground and surface-waters, making them strategic systems for potentially limiting migration of uranium contamination. Little is known about how drought periods that result in the drying of wetland soils, and consequent redox changes, affect uranium fate and transport in wetlands. In order to better understand the fate and stability of immobilized uranium in wetland soils, and how dry periods affect the uranium stability, we dosed saturated wetland mesocosms planted with Scirpus acutus with low levels of uranyl-acetate for 5 months before imposing a 9-day drying period followed by a 13-day rewetting period. Concentrations of uranium in mesocosm effluent increased after rewetting, but the cumulative amount of uranium released in the 13 days following the drying constituted less than 1% of the uranium immobilized in the soil during the 5 months prior to the drought. This low level of remobilization suggests that the uranium immobilized in these soils was not primarily bioreduced U(IV), which could have been oxidized to soluble U(VI) during the drought and released in the effluent during the subsequent flood. XANES analyses confirm that most of the uranium immobilized in the mesocosms was U(VI) sorbed to iron oxides. Compared to mesocosms that did not experience drying or rewetting, mesocosms that were sacrificed immediately after drying and after 13 days of rewetting had less uranium in soil near roots and more uranium on root surfaces. Metal-reducing bacteria only dominated the bacterial community after 13 days of rewetting and not immediately after drying, indicating that these bacteria are not responsible for this redistribution of uranium after the drying and rewetting. Results show that short periods of drought conditions in a wetland may

  11. In Situ Bioreduction of Uranium (VI) to Submicromolar Levels and Reoxidation by Dissolved Oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Weimin; Carley, Jack M.; Luo, Jian; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A.; Cardenas, Erick; Leigh, Mary Beth; Hwang, Chaichi; Kelly, Shelly D.; Ruan, Chuanmin; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy; Gentry, Terry J.; Lowe, Kenneth Alan; Mehlhorn, Tonia L.; Carroll, Sue L.; Luo, Wensui; Fields, Matthew Wayne; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David B.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong; Fendorf, Scott; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip M.; Criddle, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Groundwater within Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN (ORFRC) contains up to 135 (micro)M uranium as U(VI). Through a series of experiments at a pilot scale test facility, we explored the lower limits of groundwater U(VI) that can be achieved by in-situ biostimulation and the effects of dissolved oxygen on immobilized uranium. Weekly 2 day additions of ethanol over a 2-year period stimulated growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and immobilization of uranium as U(IV), with dissolved uranium concentrations decreasing to low levels. Following sulfite addition to remove dissolved oxygen, aqueous U(VI) concentrations fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant limit (MCL) for drinking water ( -1 or 0.126 (micro)M). Under anaerobic conditions, these low concentrations were stable, even in the absence of added ethanol. However, when sulfite additions stopped, and dissolved oxygen (4.0-5.5 mg L -1 ) entered the injection well, spatially variable changes in aqueous U(VI) occurred over a 60 day period, with concentrations increasing rapidly from <0.13 to 2.0 (micro)M at a multilevel sampling (MLS) well located close to the injection well, but changing little at an MLS well located further away. Resumption of ethanol addition restored reduction of Fe(III), sulfate, and U(VI) within 36 h. After 2 years of ethanol addition, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) analyses indicated that U(IV) comprised 60-80% of the total uranium in sediment samples. At the completion of the project (day 1260), U concentrations in MLS wells were less than 0.1 (micro)M. The microbial community at MLS wells with low U(VI) contained bacteria that are known to reduce uranium, including Desulfovibrio spp. and Geobacter spp., in both sediment and groundwater. The dominant Fe(III)-reducing species were Geothrix spp

  12. Uranium redox transition pathways in acetate-amended sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargar, John R.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Campbell, Kate M.; Long, Philip E.; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Suvorova, Elenal I.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Alessi, Daniel S.; Stylo, Malgorzata; Webb, Samuel M.; Davis, James A.; Giammar, Daniel E.; Blue, Lisa Y.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2013-01-01

    Redox transitions of uranium [from U(VI) to U(IV)] in low-temperature sediments govern the mobility of uranium in the environment and the accumulation of uranium in ore bodies, and inform our understanding of Earth’s geochemical history. The molecular-scale mechanistic pathways of these transitions determine the U(IV) products formed, thus influencing uranium isotope fractionation, reoxidation, and transport in sediments. Studies that improve our understanding of these pathways have the potential to substantially advance process understanding across a number of earth sciences disciplines. Detailed mechanistic information regarding uranium redox transitions in field sediments is largely nonexistent, owing to the difficulty of directly observing molecular-scale processes in the subsurface and the compositional/physical complexity of subsurface systems. Here, we present results from an in situ study of uranium redox transitions occurring in aquifer sediments under sulfate-reducing conditions. Based on molecular-scale spectroscopic, pore-scale geochemical, and macroscale aqueous evidence, we propose a biotic–abiotic transition pathway in which biomass-hosted mackinawite (FeS) is an electron source to reduce U(VI) to U(IV), which subsequently reacts with biomass to produce monomeric U(IV) species. A species resembling nanoscale uraninite is also present, implying the operation of at least two redox transition pathways. The presence of multiple pathways in low-temperature sediments unifies apparently contrasting prior observations and helps to explain sustained uranium reduction under disparate biogeochemical conditions. These findings have direct implications for our understanding of uranium bioremediation, ore formation, and global geochemical processes.

  13. An experimental and modeling study of grain-scale uranium desorption from field-contaminated sediments and the potential influence of microporosity on mass-transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliker, D.; Liu, C.; Kent, D. B.; Zachara, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The aquifer below the 300-Area of the Hanford site (Richland, WA, USA) is plagued by a persistent plume of dissolved uranium (U(VI)) in excess of the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water maximum contamination level even after the removal of highly contaminated sediments. The aquifer sediments in the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone act as both a source and sink for uranium during stage changes in the nearby Columbia River. Diffusion limitation of uranium mass-transfer within these sediments has been cited as a potential cause of the plume's persistence. Equilibrium U(VI) sorption is a strong function of variable chemical conditions, especially carbonate, hydrogen, and uranyl ion activities. Field-contaminated sediments from the site require up to 1,000 hours to reach equilibrium in static batch reactors. Increases in U(VI) concentrations over longer time-scales result from changes in chemical conditions, which drive reactions with sediments that favor U(VI) desorption. Grain-scale U(VI) sorption/desorption rates are slow, likely owing to diffusion of U(VI) and other solutes through intra-granular pore domains. In order to improve understanding of the impact of intra-granular diffusion and chemical reactions controlling grain-scale U(VI) release, experiments were conducted on individual particle size fractions of a single set of constant chemical conditions with multiple stop-flow events, were similar for all size fractions displacement from equilibrium and multiple diffusion domains were described with a two-parameter lognormal distribution of mass-transfer rate coefficients. Parameters describing mass transfer were the same for all size fractions reaction models calibrated with individual size fractions predicted U(VI) and chemical composition as a function of time for the bulk sediment sample. Volumes of pores less than 2.4 nm, quantified using nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, were the same for all size fractions < 2 mm, nearly double

  14. Determination of the oxygen-metal-ratio of uranium-americium mixed oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartscher, W.

    1982-01-01

    During the dissolution of uranium-americium mixed oxides in phosphoric acid under nitrogen tetravalent uranium is oxidized by tetravalent americium. The obtained hexavalent uranium is determined by constant potential coulometry. The coulombs measured are equivalent to the oxygen in excess of the minimum composition of UO 2 x AmO 1 . 5 . The total uranium content of the sample is determined in a subsequent coulometric titration. The oxygen-metal ratio of the sample can be calculated for a given uranium-americium ratio. An excess of uranium dioxide is necessary in order to suppress the oxidation of water by tetravalent americium. The standard deviation of the method is 0.0017 O/M units. (orig.) [de

  15. Primary uranium mineralization in paleochannels of the Um Bogma formation at Allouga Southwestern Sinai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisher, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    The Um Bogama formation in the Allouga area is within a major Graben trending NNW-SSE. The formation is composed mainly of sandy dolostone. Lactomicin marl, siltstone and carbonaceous shale with a high content of organic matter. The black carbonaceous shale represents the redox-front (reduced facies) at which hexavalent uranium can reduce to the presence state, resulting in the redeposition of uranium mineral. The presence of uranium minerals are increased with an increasing amount of carbonaceous matter in the paleochannels of the Allouga area. Small-scale fault planes also show an increase in the uranium content. The present study reveals the presence of the primary uranium contents, uranium, pitch blends and coffinite, which are recorded for the first time in the area. (Author)

  16. Feasibility studies on electrochemical recovery of uranium from solid wastes contaminated with uranium using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazorium chloride as an electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Yusuke, E-mail: ohhashi.yusuke@jaea.go.jp [Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1550 Kamisaibara, Kagamino-cho, Tomata-gun, Okayama 708-0698 (Japan); Harada, Masayuki [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Asanuma, Noriko [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Ikeda, Yasuhisa [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The uranium component of steel wastes and spent NaF adsorbent are easily dissolved into BMICl. • The uranyl(VI) species in BMICl are reduced to U(V) irreversibly around −0.8 to −1.3 V. • The dissolved uranium species in BMICl are recovered as black deposits electrolytically. • The deposit is the mixtures of U(IV) and U(VI) compounds containing O, F, Cl, and N elements. - Abstract: In order to examine feasibility of the electrochemical deposition method for recovering uranium from the solid wastes contaminated with uranium using ionic liquid as electrolyte, we have studied the electrochemical behavior of each solution prepared by soaking the spent NaF adsorbents and the steel waste contaminated with uranium in BMICl (1-butyl-3-methyl- imidazolium chloride). The uranyl(VI) species in BMICl solutions were found to be reduced to U(V) irreversibly around −0.8 to −1.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The resulting U(V) species is followed by disproportionation to U(VI) and U(IV). Based on the electrochemical data, we have performed potential controlled electrolysis of each solution prepared by soaking the spent NaF adsorbents and steel wastes in BMICl at −1.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Black deposit was obtained, and their composition analyses suggest that the deposit is the mixtures of U(IV) and U(VI) compounds containing O, F, Cl, and N elements. From the present study, it is expected that the solid wastes contaminated with uranium can be decontaminated by treating them in BMICl and the dissolved uranium species are recovered electrolytically.

  17. Influence of ammonium availability on expression of nifD and amtB genes during biostimulation of a U(VI) contaminated aquifer: implications for U(VI) removal and monitoring the metabolic state of Geobacteraceae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouser, Paula J.; N' Guessan, A. Lucie; Elifantz, Hila; Holmes, Dawn E.; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2009-03-25

    The influence of ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the physiological status of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by 2 orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 ?M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences suggested that ammonium may have been one factor influencing the community composition prior to acetate amendment with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species with higher ammonium and Dechloromonas species dominating at the site with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to acetate concentrations rather than ammonium levels. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium transporter gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during uranium reduction. The abundance of amtB was inversely correlated to ammonium levels, whereas nifD transcript levels were similar across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB transcript expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of subsurface Geobacter species. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical and physiological interactions at the field scale in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes during bioremediation.

  18. Determination of kinetic coefficients for the simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, M.D.

    1995-05-01

    Uranium contamination of groundwaters and surface waters near abandoned mill tailings piles is a serious concern in many areas of the western United States. Uranium usually exists in either the U(IV) or the U(VI) oxidation state. U(VI) is soluble in water and, as a result, is very mobile in the environment. U(IV), however, is generally insoluble in water and, therefore, is not subject to aqueous transport. In recent years, researchers have discovered that certain anaerobic microorganisms, such as the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, can mediate the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). Although the ability of this microorganism to reduce U(VI) has been studied in some detail by previous researchers, the kinetics of the reactions have not been characterized. The purpose of this research was to perform kinetic studies on Desulfovibrio desulficans bacteria during simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium and to determine the phase in which uranium exists after it has been reduced and precipitated from solution. The studies were conducted in a laboratory-scale chemostat under substrate-limited growth conditions with pyruvate as the substrate. Kinetic coefficients for substrate utilization and cell growth were calculated using the Monod equation. The maximum rate of substrate utilization (k) was determined to be 4.70 days -1 while the half-velocity constant (K s ) was 140 mg/l COD. The yield coefficient (Y) was determined to be 0.17 mg cells/mg COD while the endogenous decay coefficient (k d ) was calculated as 0.072 days -1 . After reduction, U(IV) Precipitated from solution in the uraninite (UO 2 ) phase. Uranium removal efficiency as high as 90% was achieved in the chemostat

  19. Adsorption of uranium from aqueous solution using biochar produced by hydrothermal carbonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi-bin Zhang; East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou; China University of Geosciences, Wuhan; China University of Geosciences, Wuhan; Xiao-hong Cao; Yun-hai Liu; East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou; Ping Liang; East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou; China University of Geosciences, Wuhan

    2013-01-01

    The ability of biochar produced by hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) has been explored for the removal and recovery of uranium from aqueous solutions. The micro-morphology and structure of HTC were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The influences of different experimental parameters such as solution pH, initial concentration, contact time, ionic strength and temperature on adsorption were investigated. The HTC showed the highest uranium sorption capacity at initial pH of 6.0 and contact time of 50 min. Adsorption kinetics was better described by the pseudo-second-order model and adsorption process could be well defined by the Langmuir isotherm. The thermodynamic parameters, ΔGdeg(298 K), ΔHdeg and ΔSdeg were determined to be -14.4, 36.1 kJ mol -1 and 169.7 J mol -1 K -1 , respectively, which demonstrated the sorption process of HTC towards U(VI) was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The adsorbed HTC could be effectively regenerated by 0.05 mol/L HCl solution for the removal and recovery of U(VI). Complete removal (99.9 %) of U(VI) from 1.0 L industry wastewater containing 15.0 mg U(VI) ions was possible with 2.0 g HTC. (author)

  20. Evaluating chemical extraction techniques for the determination of uranium oxidation state in reduced aquifer sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Campbell, Kate M.; Fox, Patricia M.; Singer, David M.; Kaviani, Nazila; Carey, Minna; Peck, Nicole E.; Barger, John R.; Kent, Douglas B.; Davis, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Extraction techniques utilizing high pH and (bi)carbonate concentrations were evaluated for their efficacy in determining the oxidation state of uranium (U) in reduced sediments collected from Rifle, CO. Differences in dissolved concentrations between oxic and anoxic extractions have been proposed as a means to quantify the U(VI) and U(IV) content of sediments. An additional step was added to anoxic extractions using a strong anion exchange resin to separate dissolved U(IV) and U(VI). X-ray spectroscopy showed that U(IV) in the sediments was present as polymerized precipitates similar to uraninite and/or less ordered U(IV), referred to as non-uraninite U(IV) species associated with biomass (NUSAB). Extractions of sediment containing both uraninite and NUSAB displayed higher dissolved uranium concentrations under oxic than anoxic conditions while extractions of sediment dominated by NUSAB resulted in identical dissolved U concentrations. Dissolved U(IV) was rapidly oxidized under anoxic conditions in all experiments. Uraninite reacted minimally under anoxic conditions but thermodynamic calculations show that its propensity to oxidize is sensitive to solution chemistry and sediment mineralogy. A universal method for quantification of U(IV) and U(VI) in sediments has not yet been developed but the chemical extractions, when combined with solid-phase characterization, have a narrow range of applicability for sediments without U(VI).

  1. Extraction of tetravalent and hexavalent actinide ions by tetraheptylammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swarup, Rajendra; Patil, S.K.

    1977-01-01

    Extraction of Th(IV), Np(IV), Pu(IV), U(VI), Np(VI), and Pu(VI) by tetraheptylammonium nitrate in Solvesso-100 has been studied from nitric acid medium. Attempts were made to identify the complex species in the organic phase by studying the dependence of the distribution coefficient of the actinide on amine concentration and taking the absorption spectra of the organic phase containing actinide ions. A compound tetraheptylammonium trinitratodioxouranate (VI) has been isolated and characterised. (author)

  2. Extraction and separation of U(VI and Th(IV from hydrobromic acid media using Cyanex-923 extractant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghag Snehal M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic study of the solvent extraction of uranium(VI and thorium(IV from hydrobromic acid media was performed using the neutral phosphine oxide extractant Cyanex-923 in toluene. These metal ions were found to be quantitatively extracted with Cyanex-923 in toluene in the acidity range 5x10-5-1x10-4 M and 5x10-5-5x10-3 M, respectively, and they are stripped from the organic phase with 7.0 M HClO4 and 2.0- 4.0 M HCl, respectively. The effect of the equilibrium period, diluents, diverse ions and stripping agent on the extraction of U(VI and Th(IV was studied. The stoichiometry of the extracted species of these metal ions was determined based on the slope analysis method. The extraction reactions proceed by solvation and their probable extracted species found in the organic phase were UO2Br2•2Cyanex-923 and ThBr4•2Cyanex-923. Based on these results, a sequential procedure for their separation from each other was developed.

  3. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications: Joint Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Regardless of the corrosivity of the environment, all metals require periodic maintenance activity to guard against the insidious effects of corrosion and thus ensure that alloys meet or exceed design or performance life. The standard practice for protecting metallic substrates is the application of a coating system. Applied coating systems work via a variety of methods (barrier, galvanic, and/or inhibitor) and adhere to the substrate through a combination of chemical and physical bonds. For years hexavalent chromium has been a widely used element within applied coating systems because of its self healing and corrosion resistant properties. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) studies have concluded that hexavalent chromium (hex chrome) is carcinogenic and poses significant risk to human health. On May 5, 2011 amendments to the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) were issued in the Federal Register. Subpart 223.73 prohibits contracts from requiring hexavalent chromium in deliverables unless certain exceptions apply. These exceptions include authorization from a general or flag officer and members of the Senior Executive Service from a Program Executive Office, and unmodified legacy systems. Otherwise, Subpart 252.223-7008 provides the contract clause prohibiting contractors from using or delivering hexavalent chromium in a concentration greater than 0.1 percent by weight for all new contracts and to be included down to subcontractors for supplies, maintenance and repair services, and construction materials. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Department of Defense (DoD), and industry stakeholders continue to search for alternatives to hex chrome in coatings applications that meet their performance requirements in corrosion protection, cost, operability, and health and safety, while typically specifying that performance must be equal to or greater than existing systems.

  4. Removal and transformation of hexavalent chromium in sequencing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the efficiency of removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and to ascertain the fate of Cr(VI) in the treatment process. An SBR was operated with the FILL, REACT, SETTLE, DRAW and IDLE periods in the time ratio of 2:12:2:1.5:6.5 for a cycle ...

  5. Hexavalent Chromium Is Cytotoxic and Genotoxic to American Alligator Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, Catherine; Xie, Hong; Guillette, Louis J.; Zhu, Cairong; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-01-01

    Metals are a common pollutant in the aquatic ecosystem. With global climate change, these levels are anticipated to rise as lower pH levels allow sediment bound metals to be released. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is an apex predator in the aquatic ecosystem and is considered a keystone species; as such it serves as a suitable monitor for localized pollution. One metal of increasing concern is hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). It is present in the aquatic environment and is ...

  6. Hexavalent chromium induces chromosome instability in human urothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Sandra S. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Liou, Louis [Department of Pathology, Boston University School of Medicine, 670 Albany St., Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Adam, Rosalyn M. [Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Wise, John Pierce Sr., E-mail: john.wise@louisville.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Cr(VI) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24 h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer, specifically, and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer, in general. - Highlights: • Hexavalent chromium is genotoxic to human urothelial cells. • Hexavalent chromium induces aneuploidy in human urothelial cells. • hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells model the effects seen in primary urothelial cells. • Hexavalent chromium has a strong likelihood of being carcinogenic for bladder tissue.

  7. Real-Time Speciation of Uranium During Active Bioremediation and U(IV) Reoxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komlos, J.; Mishra, B.; Lanzirotti, A.; Myneni, S.; Jaffe, P.

    2008-01-01

    The biological reduction of uranium from soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) has shown potential to prevent uranium migration in groundwater. To gain insight into the extent of uranium reduction that can occur during biostimulation and to what degree U(IV) reoxidation will occur under field relevant conditions after biostimulation is terminated, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was used to monitor: (1) uranium speciation in situ in a flowing column while active reduction was occurring; and (2) in situ postbiostimulation uranium stability and speciation when exposed to incoming oxic water. Results show that after 70 days of bioreduction in a high (30 mM) bicarbonate solution, the majority (>90%) of the uranium in the column was immobilized as U(IV). After acetate addition was terminated and oxic water entered the column, in situ real-time XANES analysis showed that U(IV) reoxidation to U(VI) (and subsequent remobilization) occurred rapidly (on the order of minutes) within the reach of the oxygen front and the spatial and temporal XANES spectra captured during reoxidation allowed for real-time uranium reoxidation rates to be calculated.

  8. Kinetics of U(VI) reduction control kinetics of U(IV) reoxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senko, J.M.; Minyard, M.L.; Dempsey, B.A.; Roden, E.E.; Yeh, G.-T.; Burgos, W.D.

    2006-01-01

    For the in situ reductive immobilization of U to be an acceptable strategy for the removal of that element from groundwater, the long-term stability of U(IV) must be determined. Rates of biotransformation of Fe species influence the mineralogy of the resulting products (Fredrickson et al., 2003; Senko et al., 2005), and we hypothesize that the rate of U(VI) reduction influences the mineralogy of resultant U(IV) precipitates. We hypothesize that slower rates of U(VI) reduction will yield U(IV) phases that are more resistant to reoxidation, and will therefore be more stable upon cessation of electron donor addition. U(IV) phases formed by relatively slow reduction may be more crystalline or larger in comparison to their relatively rapidly-formed counterparts (Figure 1), thus limiting the reactivity of slowly-formed U(IV) phases toward various oxidants. The physical location of U(IV) precipitates relative to bacterial cells may also limit the reactivity of biogenic U(IV) phases. In this situation, we expect that precipitation of U(IV) within the bacterial cell may protect U(IV) from reoxidation by limiting physical contact between U(IV) and oxidants (Figure 1). We assessed the effect of U(VI) reduction rate on the subsequent reoxidation of biogenic U(IV) and are currently conducting column scale studies to determine whether U(VI) reduction rate can be manipulated by varying the electron donor concentration used to stimulate U(VI) reduction

  9. Removal U(VI) from artificial seawater using facilely and covalently grafted polyacrylonitrile fibers with lysine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenting; Liu, Qi; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Hongsen; Li, Rumin; Li, Zhanshuang; Jing, Xiaoyan [Key Laboratory of Superlight Material and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Jun, E-mail: zhqw1888@sohu.com [Key Laboratory of Superlight Material and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Institute of Advanced Marine Materials, Harbin Engineering University, 150001 (China)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Novel lysine modified fibrous adsorbents were prepared using a facile and green method. • PAN-Lys exhibited high adsorption activity and fast adsorption rate. • PAN-Lys significantly remove U(VI) from simulated seawater. - Abstract: Polyacrylonitrile fibers (PANF) covalently modified with lysine (PAN-Lys) was facilely synthesized and carefully characterized. The critical factors affecting U(VI) adsorption from aqueous solution were exploited, such as initial pH, contact time, concentration and temperature. The adsorption process is strongly dependent on solution pH. With excellent adsorption capacity and high affinity toward U(VI), the process for U(VI) is extremely rapid and the equilibrium can be reached within 20 min. The thermodynamics and kinetics were strictly evaluated. In addition, the hypothetical adsorption mechanisms were proposed. Moreover, the adsorption behavior at low concentrations (3–30 μg L{sup −1}) in simulated seawater was also investigated. Therefore, PAN-Lys can be potentially utilized for the efficient removal of U(VI) from seawater.

  10. Extractive behavior of U(VI) in the paraffin soluble ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rama, R.; Kumaresan, R.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    An Aliquat-336 based ionic liquid namely, tri-n-octylmethylammonium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate ((A3636) + (DEHP) - ) was prepared and studied for the extraction of U(VI) from nitric acid medium. Since the ionic liquid, (A336) + (DEHP) - , was miscible in n-dodecane (n-DD), the extraction of U(VI) in the solution of tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) in n-DD, was investigated in the presence of small concentrations of ionic liquid. The distribution ratio of U(VI) in 0.3 M (A336) + (DEHP) - /n-DD decreased with increase in the concentration of nitric acid. The effect of concentration of TBP, ionic liquid nitric acid and nitrate ion on the extraction of U(VI) in ionic liquid medium was studied. The mechanistic aspect of extraction was investigated by the slope analysis of the extraction data. The studies indicated the feasibility of modifying the extractive properties of U(VI) in TBP/n-DD using ionic liquid. (author)

  11. Facile synthesis of magnetic Fe3O4/graphene composites for enhanced U(VI) sorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Donglin; Zhu, Hongyu; Wu, Changnian; Feng, Shaojie; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hayat, Tasawar; Chen, Changlun

    2018-06-01

    A novel magnetic Fe3O4/graphene composite (FGC) was fabricated by a facile one-step reaction route and shown to be effective for sorbing U(VI) from aqueous solution. The structure, properties and application of the prepared FGC composite were well evaluated. The high saturation magnetization (45.6 emu/g) made FGC easier to be separated from the media within several seconds under an external magnetic. Effects of different ambient conditions (i.e., pH and ionic strength, contact time, temperatures) on sorption behaviors of U(VI) on FGC were carried out by batch experiments. According to the calculation of Langmuir model, the maximum sorption capacity of U(VI) on the FGC at pH 5.5 and 298 K was 176.47 mg/g. The sorption was correlated with the effects of pH, contact time, and temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that U(VI) was sorbed on FGC via oxygen-containing functional groups. This work demonstrated that FGC could be recycled and used as an effective recyclable sorbent for sorption of U(VI).

  12. The solubility of uranium in cementitious near-field chemical conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Brownsword, M.; Cross, J.E.; Hobley, J.; Moreton, A.D.; Smith-Briggs, J.L.; Thomason, H.P. [AEA Decommissioning and Waste Management, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1993-05-01

    Tetravalent and hexavalent uranium solubilities have been measured in cement-equilibriated water for pH values from 4 to 13. Tetravalent uranium solubilities at pH 12 have been measured by three experimental techniques: oversaturation, undersaturation and by the use of an electrochemical cell which controlled the redox conditions. The experimentally obtained data have been simulated using the thermodynamic equilibrium program HARPHRQ in conjunction with three different sets of thermodynamic data for uranium. In each case, differences were found between the predicted and measured uranium behaviour. For hexavalent uranium at high pH values the model suggested the formation of anionic hydrolysis products which led to the prediction of uranium solubilities significantly higher than those observed. Refinement of the thermodynamic data used in the model enabled the derivation of maximum values for the formation constants of these species under cementitious conditions. Similarly, the experimental data have been used to refine a model of tetravalent uranium solubility under cementitious near-field conditions. (author).

  13. The solubility of uranium in cementitious near-field chemical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Brownsword, M.; Cross, J.E.; Hobley, J.; Moreton, A.D.; Smith-Briggs, J.L.; Thomason, H.P.

    1993-05-01

    Tetravalent and hexavalent uranium solubilities have been measured in cement-equilibriated water for pH values from 4 to 13. Tetravalent uranium solubilities at pH 12 have been measured by three experimental techniques: oversaturation, undersaturation and by the use of an electrochemical cell which controlled the redox conditions. The experimentally obtained data have been simulated using the thermodynamic equilibrium program HARPHRQ in conjunction with three different sets of thermodynamic data for uranium. In each case, differences were found between the predicted and measured uranium behaviour. For hexavalent uranium at high pH values the model suggested the formation of anionic hydrolysis products which led to the prediction of uranium solubilities significantly higher than those observed. Refinement of the thermodynamic data used in the model enabled the derivation of maximum values for the formation constants of these species under cementitious conditions. Similarly, the experimental data have been used to refine a model of tetravalent uranium solubility under cementitious near-field conditions. (author)

  14. Data compilation and evaluation of U(IV) and U(VI) for thermodynamic reference database THEREDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Anke; Bok, Frank; Brendler, Vinzenz

    2015-07-01

    THEREDA (Thermodynamic Reference Database) is a collaborative project, which has been addressed this challenge. The partners are Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT-INE), Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit Braunschweig mbH (GRS), TU Bergakademie Freiberg (TUBAF) and AF-Consult Switzerland AG (Baden, Switzerland). The aim of the project is the establishment of a consistent and quality assured database for all safety relevant elements, temperature and pressure ranges, with its focus on saline systems. This implied the use of the Pitzer approach to compute activity coefficients suitable for such conditions. Data access is possible via commonly available internet browsers under the address http://www.thereda.de. One part of the project - the data collection and evaluation for uranium - was a task of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The aquatic chemistry and thermodynamics of U(VI) and U(IV) is of great importance for geochemical modelling in repository-relevant systems. The OECD/NEA Thermochemical Database (NEA TDB) compilation is the major source for thermodynamic data of the aqueous and solid uranium species, even though this data selection does not utilize the Pitzer model for the ionic strength effect correction. As a result of the very stringent quality demands, the NEA TDB is rather restrictive and therefore incomplete for extensive modelling calculations of real systems. Therefore, the THEREDA compilation includes additional thermodynamic data of solid secondary phases formed in the waste material, the backfill and the host rock, though falling into quality assessment (QA) categories of lower accuracy. The data review process prefers log K values from solubility experiments (if available) to those calculated from thermochemical data.

  15. Data compilation and evaluation of U(IV) and U(VI) for thermodynamic reference database THEREDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Anke; Bok, Frank; Brendler, Vinzenz

    2015-01-01

    THEREDA (Thermodynamic Reference Database) is a collaborative project, which has been addressed this challenge. The partners are Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT-INE), Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit Braunschweig mbH (GRS), TU Bergakademie Freiberg (TUBAF) and AF-Consult Switzerland AG (Baden, Switzerland). The aim of the project is the establishment of a consistent and quality assured database for all safety relevant elements, temperature and pressure ranges, with its focus on saline systems. This implied the use of the Pitzer approach to compute activity coefficients suitable for such conditions. Data access is possible via commonly available internet browsers under the address http://www.thereda.de. One part of the project - the data collection and evaluation for uranium - was a task of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The aquatic chemistry and thermodynamics of U(VI) and U(IV) is of great importance for geochemical modelling in repository-relevant systems. The OECD/NEA Thermochemical Database (NEA TDB) compilation is the major source for thermodynamic data of the aqueous and solid uranium species, even though this data selection does not utilize the Pitzer model for the ionic strength effect correction. As a result of the very stringent quality demands, the NEA TDB is rather restrictive and therefore incomplete for extensive modelling calculations of real systems. Therefore, the THEREDA compilation includes additional thermodynamic data of solid secondary phases formed in the waste material, the backfill and the host rock, though falling into quality assessment (QA) categories of lower accuracy. The data review process prefers log K values from solubility experiments (if available) to those calculated from thermochemical data.

  16. The state-of-the-art and prospects of the oxidation titration method for the determination of uranium in geological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jiayan

    1986-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of the oxidation titration method for the determination of uranium in geological samples is reviewed in some respects such as the prereduction of U(VI), oxidation of U(IV) and the detection of the end-point. Comments are also made on the prospects of further improvements of this method

  17. In Situ Community Control of the Stability of Bioreduced Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, David C.

    2006-01-01

    The overall objective of this research is to understand the mechanisms for maintenance of bio-reduced uranium in an aerobic to microaerophylic aquifer under actual field conditions after electron donor addition for biostimulation has ended. Primary Objectives: (1) Determine the relative importance of microbial communities and/or chemical and physical environments mediating uranium reduction/oxidation after cessation of donor addition in an aerobic aquifer. (2) Determine, after cessation of donor addition, the linkages between microbial functions and abiotic processes mediating. Initial Hypotheses: (1) The typical bio-reduced subsurface environments that maintain U(VI) reduction rates after biostimulation contain limited amounts of oxidized iron on mineral surfaces. Therefore, the non sulfate-reducing dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria will move to more conducive areas or be out-competed by more versatile microbes. (2) Microbes capable of sulfate reduction play an important role in the post-treatment maintenance of bio-reduced uranium because these bacteria either directly reduce U(VI) or generate H2S, and/or FeS0.9 which act as oxygen sinks maintaining U(IV) in a reduced state. (3) The presence of bioprecipitated amorphous FeS0.9 in sediments will maintain low U(IV) reoxidation rates under conditions of low biomass, but FeS0.9 by itself is not sufficient to remove U(VI) from groundwater by abiotic reduction. FIELD SCALE EXPERIMENTS: Field-scale electron donor amendment experiments were conducted in 2002, 2003, and 2004 at the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site in Rifle, Colorado

  18. An electrochemical study of U(VI) and Cr(VI) in molten borates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigaudeau, M.; Gregori de Pinochet, I. de

    1977-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of U(VI) and Cr(VI), in molten Na 2 B 4 O 7 at 800 deg C was studied by means of linear sweep voltammetry, and chronopotentiometry. The reduction of U(VI) to U(V) proceeded reversibly at a platinum electrode. The diffusion coefficient for the U(VI) species at 800 deg C was 4.10 -7 cm 2 .s -1 . The activation energy of diffusion was (34,8 +- 0,8) kcal. mole -1 . Electrochemical studies of Cr(VI) at 800 0 C reveal a two-step reduction process at a platinum electrode. Only the voltammogram for the first step charge transfer process was studied. Analysis indicated that Cr(VI) is reversibly reduced to Cr(III) at a platinum electrode. The diffusion coefficient for Cr(VI) at 800 0 C is 1,9.10 -7 cm 2 .s -1 [fr

  19. Methylbutylmalonamide as an extractant for U(VI), Pu(IV), and Am(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, G.M.; Prabhu, D.R.; Mahajan, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The unsymmetrical diamide methylbutylmalonamide has been synthesized and used in the extraction of U(VI), Pu(IV), and Am(III) in benzene medium. The distribution ratio for three cations was found to increase with increasing aqueous nitric acid concentration. U(VI) and Pu(IV) were found to be extracted as disolvates while Am(III) as a trisolvate. The thermodynamic parameters determined by the temperature variation method showed the extraction reactions to be mainly enthalphy-controlled. Am(III) was found to be back-extracted with dilute nitric acid, while Pu(IV) by dilute nitric acid - hydrofluoric acid mixture and U(VI) by dilute sodium carbonate solution. (author) 6 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  20. Thermodynamics of U(VI) and Eu(III) complexation by unsaturated carboxylates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawat, Neetika; Bhattacharyya, A. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tomar, B.S., E-mail: bstomar@barc.gov.in [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ghanty, T.K. [Theoretical Chemistry Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Manchanda, V.K. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2011-05-10

    Highlights: {yields} {Delta}H and log K determined for U(VI) and Eu(III) complexes with maleate and fumarate. {yields} log K and coordination environment of Eu(III) complexes has been studied by TRFS. {yields} Higher log K of U(VI) complexes than Eu(III) complexes is due to higher entropy. {yields} Plot of log K vs log K{sub P} suggest charge polarization in fumarate complexes. {yields} Ab initio calculations support charge polarization in fumarate complexes. - Abstract: The thermodynamic parameters ({Delta}G, {Delta}H and {Delta}S) of complexation of U(VI) and Eu(III) by unsaturated dicarboxylic acids, namely, maleic and fumaric acid, has been determined by potentiometric and microcalorimetric titrations at fixed ionic strength (I = 1.0 M) and temperature (298 K). The results show formation of 1:1 complexes by both the ligands with Eu(III). In the case of U(VI), maleate forms both 1:1 and 1:2 complexes, while only 1:1 complex was formed with fumarate. The fluorescence emission spectra of Eu(III)-dicarboxylate solutions at varying ligand to metal ratio were also used to obtain their stability constants. In addition, the fluorescence lifetimes reveal higher dehydration of Eu(III)-maleate compared to Eu(III)-fumarate which corroborates the {Delta}S values. The thermodynamic quantities suggest charge polarization effects in the case of U(VI) and Eu(III) complexes of fumarate, which is further corroborated by theoretical calculations. For the same ligand, U(VI) complexes were found to be more stable which was mainly due to higher entropy term.

  1. Uranium sorption to natural substrates-insights provided by isotope exchange, selective extraction and surface complexation modelling approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, T.D.; Payne T.E.; Davis, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    An extensive experimental program has been conducted over the last three years into the interaction of U(VI) with both single oxides and clays and complex natural substrates from the weathered zone in the vicinity of a uranium ore body in northern Australia. While iron oxides have frequently been considered to account for much of the uptake on such natural substrates, the results of laboratory open-quotes pH edgeclose quotes studies and of isotope exchange and selective extraction studies suggest that other phases must also play a significant role in controlling the partitioning of U(VI) between solid and solution phases. Supporting studies on kaolinite, the dominant clay in this system, provide insight into the most appropriate method of modelling the interaction of U(VI) with these natural substrates. The problems still remaining in adequately describing sorption of radionuclides and trace elements to complex natural substrates are discussed

  2. Laboratory Validation and Demonstrations of Non-Hexavalent Chromium Conversion Coatings for Steel Substrates (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    UNCLASSIFIED: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Laboratory Validation and Demonstrations of Non- Hexavalent Chromium Conversion...00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Laboratory Validation and Demonstrations of Non- Hexavalent Chromium Conversion Coatings for Steel Substrates 5a...to MRAP II Acquisition Pretreatment /conversion coatings omitted: • Hex- chrome pretreatments prohibited for new ground vehicles • Hydrogen

  3. Solvent extraction as a method of promoting uranium enrichment by chemical exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathurrachman.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis examines a chemical exchange process for uranium enrichment using solvent extraction. The system selected is the isotope exchange for uranium species in the form of uranous and uranyl chloride complexes. Solvent extraction has been studied before by French workers for this application but little was published on this. Much of this present work is therefore novel. The equilibrium data for the extraction of U(IV) as U 4+ and U(VI) as UO 2 2+ from hydrochloric media into an organic phase containing tri-n-octylamine (TOA) in benzene is given. Benzene is used to prevent third phase formation. In 4 M HCl U(VI) was found to be very soluble in the organic phase but U(IV) was virtually insoluble. Most of the equilibrium data has been correlated by the Langmuir isotherm. This thesis also outlines the methodology that has to be used to design a plant based on this process. (author)

  4. Uranium(VI) retention on quartz and kaolinite. Experiments and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignot, G.

    2001-01-01

    The behaviour of uranium in the geosphere is an important issue for safety performance assessment of nuclear waste repositories, or in the context of contaminated sites due to mining activity related to nuclear field. Under aerobic conditions, the fate of uranium is mainly governed by the ability of minerals to sorb U(VI) aqueous species. Hence, a thorough understanding of U(VI) sorption processes on minerals is required to provide a valuable prediction of U(VI) migration in the environment. In this study, we performed sorption/desorption experiments of U(VI) on quartz and kaolinite, for systems favouring the formation in solution (i) of UO 2 2+ and monomeric hydrolysis products or (ii) of di-/tri-meric uranyl aqueous species, and / or U(VI)-colloids or UO 2 (OH) 2 precipitates, or (iii) of uranyl-carbonate complexes. Particular attention was paid to determine the surface characteristics of the solids and their modification due to dissolution/precipitation processes during experiments. A double layer surface complexation model was applied to our experimental data in order to derive surface complexation equilibria and intrinsic constants which allow a valuable description of U(VI) retention over a wide range of pH, ionic strength, initial concentration of uranium [0.1-10μM] and solid - solution equilibration time. U(VI) sorption on quartz was successfully modeled by using two sets of adsorption equilibria, assuming (i) the formation of the surface complexes SiOUO 2 + , SiOUO 2 OH and SiO(UO 2 ) 3 (OH) 5 , or (ii) the formation of the mono-dentate complex SiO(UO 2 ) 3 (OH) 5 and of the bidentate complex (SiO) 2 UO 2 . Assumptions on the density of each type of surface sites of kaolinite and on their acid-base properties were made from potentiometric titrations of kaolinite suspensions. We proposed on such a basis a set of surface complexation equilibria which accounts for U(VI) uptake on kaolinite over a wide range of chemical conditions, with aluminol edge sites as

  5. Separation of Th(IV) and U(VI) by extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadkarni, M.N.; Mayankutty, P.C.; Pillai, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    Application of extraction chromatography to the analytical separation of Th(IV) and U(VI) has been investigated. The stationary phase was a macroporous resin Amberlite XE-270 impregnated with undiluted tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) and the mobile phase was either 5.0M HNO 3 or 6M HCl. Separation of traces of Th(IV) from large quantities of U(VI) was achieved on a laboratory column by elution of the absorbed Th(IV) with 6M HCl. (author)

  6. Adsorption of U(VI) onto kaolin studied by batch method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongxia Zhang; Zhi Liu; Peizhuo Hu; Tonghuan Liu; Wangsuo Wu

    2013-01-01

    Adsorption of U(VI) on purified kaolin was studied by batch methods under ambient conditions, including contact time, pH, fulvic acid, etc. Three kinetic models were used to model the kinetic adsorption which was very well described by the pseudo-second-order rate equation, and the activation energy of adsorption was 52.20 kJ/mol. The Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models fitted the experimental data better than the Langmuir model for the adsorption and desorption isotherms. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption of U(VI) on kaolin was an endothermic and spontaneous process. (author)

  7. Removal of uranium(VI) from the aqueous phase by iron(II) minerals in presence of bicarbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regenspurg, Simona, E-mail: regens@gfz-potsdam.de [Industrial Ecology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Schild, Dieter; Schaefer, Thorsten; Huber, Florian [Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung (INE), Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Malmstroem, Maria E. [Industrial Ecology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE 10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-09-15

    Uranium(VI) mobility in groundwater is strongly affected by sorption of mobile U(VI) species (e.g. uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) to mineral surfaces, precipitation of U(VI) compounds, such as schoepite (UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O(OH){sub 6}.6H{sub 2}O), and by reduction to U(IV), forming sparingly soluble phases (uraninite; UO{sub 2}). The latter pathway, in particular, would be very efficient for long-term immobilization of U. In nature, Fe(II) is an important reducing agent for U(VI) because it frequently occurs either dissolved in natural waters, sorbed to matrix minerals, or structurally bound in many minerals. Redox reactions between U(VI) and Fe(II) depend not only on the availability of Fe(II) in the environment, but also on the chemical conditions in the aqueous solution. Under natural groundwater condition U(VI) forms complexes with many anionic ligands, which strongly affect its speciation. Carbonate, in particular, is known to form stable complexes with U, raising the question, if U(VI), when complexed by carbonate, can be reduced to UO{sub 2}. The goal of this study was to find out if Fe(II) when structurally bound in a mineral (as magnetite, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) or sorbed to a mineral surface (as corundum, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) can reduce U(VI) to U(IV) in the presence of HCO{sub 3}{sup -}. Batch experiments were conducted under anaerobic conditions to observe U removal from the aqueous phase by the two minerals depending on HCO{sub 3}{sup -} addition (1 mM), U concentration (0.01-30 {mu}M) and pH value (6-10). Immediately after the experiments, the mineral surfaces were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to obtain information on the redox state of U bound to the solid surfaces. XPS results gave evidence that U(VI) can be reduced both by magnetite and by corundum amended with Fe(II). In the presence of HCO{sub 3}{sup -} the amount of reduced U on the mineral surfaces increased compared to carbonate-free solutions. This can be explained by the formation

  8. Spectroscopic investigations on sorption of uranium onto suspended bentonite. Effects of pH, ionic strength and complexing anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Parveen Kumar; Pathak, Priyanath; Mohapatra, Manoj; Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry Div.; Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Jha, Sambhunath; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Atomic and Molecular Physics Div.

    2015-06-01

    Batch sorption experiments were carried out under aerobic conditions to understand the sorption behavior of U(VI) onto bentonite clay under varying pH (2-8) and ionic strength (I = 0.01 - 1 M (NaClO{sub 4})) conditions. The influences of different complexing anions (1 x 10{sup -4} M) such as oxalic acid (ox), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}), citric acid (cit), and humic acid (HA, 10 mg/L) on the sorption behavior were also investigated. The sorption of U(VI) increased with increasing pH up to pH 6 beyond which a decrease was attributed to the formation of anionic carbonate species. Marginal influence of the change in the ionic strength of the medium on the sorption profile of uranium suggested inner-sphere complexation onto the bentonite surface. The presence of humic acid showed interesting sorption profile with varying pH. Initially, there was an enhancement in the sorption with increased pH followed by a plateau and finally a decrease thereafter due to the formation of aqueous U(VI)-humate complexes. Spectroscopic studies such as UV spectrophotometry, luminescence and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements were also performed to understand the changes in aqueous speciation of U(VI) ion. The luminescence yields of different aqueous U(VI) species followed the order: U(VI){sub Hydroxy} > U(VI){sub HumicAcid} > U(VI){sub carbonate} > U(VI){sub citrate}. The lower luminescence yield of U(VI)carbonate complex can be attributed to the strong dynamic quenching by carbonate at room temperature. The U(VI) samples shows two distinct life-time suggesting the presence of the different luminescent U(VI) species. Similar trend was observed for U(VI)-bentonite suspension in presence/absence of the complexing ligands. There was luminescence quenching for the sorbed U(VI) due to surface complexation. These observations were further supported by spectrophotometric measurements. EXAFS spectra of U(VI) samples were recorded in luminescence mode at the U L{sub 3

  9. A biamperometric method for the determination of O/U ratio in uranium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xavier, Mary; Nair, P.R.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2007-01-01

    The methodology based on the dissolution of the uranium dioxide samples in H 2 SO 4 + HF mixture and the indirect determination of U(VI) by biamperometric redox titration is a simple method for determining ratio in hyperstoichiometric UO 2 powders.Analytical methods for % measurements in hyperstoichiometric. The present paper describes a simple method based on the determination of U(IV) and total U by biamperometric titration

  10. Chemistry of Uranium in brines related to the spent fuel disposal in a salt repository. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Arocas, P.; Grambow, B.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the work performed from september 1991 to december 1992. Our work is focused on the chemistry of uranium in highly saline solution. Experiments were performed to study the formation process and the stability of solid phases of U(VI) in NaCl solution at different ionic strength. The characterization of solid phases and of uranium concentration in solution are reported as a function of time. Experiments in NaClO 4 at low concentration have been performed for comparison. A method is proposed for uranium analyses in highly concentrated salt solution. The work has been carried out in KfK (INE), Germany. (Author) 10 figs

  11. Changes in Uranium Speciation through a Depth Sequence of Contaminated Hanford Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalano, Jeffrey G.; McKinley, James P.; Zachara, John M.; Heald, Steve M.; Smith, Steven C.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2006-01-01

    The disposal of basic sodium-aluminate and acidic U(VI)-Cu(II) wastes into the now-dry North and South 300 A Process Ponds at the Hanford site resulted in U(VI) groundwater plume. To gain insight into the geochemical processes that occurred during waste disposal and that will affect the future fate and transport of this uranium plume, the solid-phase speciation of uranium in a depth sequence from the base of the North Process Pond through the vadose zone to the water table was investigated using electron microprobe measurements and x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Uranium in sediments from the base of the pond was predominantly coprecipitated with calcite. From ∼2 m below the pond base to the water table uranium occurred dominantly in a sorbed form, likely on the surface aluminosilicate clay minerals. The presence of a U(VI)-phosphate phase was also observed in this region, but it only occurred as a major uranium species at one depth. The initial sequestration of U(VI) in these sediments likely occurred through coprecipitation with calcite as conditions did not favor adsorption. As the calcite-bearing pond sediments have been removed as part of a remediation effort, future uranium fate and transport will likely be controlled primarily by adsorption/desorption phenomena

  12. Uranium Detection - Technique Validation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colletti, Lisa Michelle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Garduno, Katherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Lujan, Elmer J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Mechler-Hickson, Alexandra Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); May, Iain [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division; Reilly, Sean Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Chemistry Division

    2016-04-14

    As a LANL activity for DOE/NNSA in support of SHINE Medical Technologies™ ‘Accelerator Technology’ we have been investigating the application of UV-vis spectroscopy for uranium analysis in solution. While the technique has been developed specifically for sulfate solutions, the proposed SHINE target solutions, it can be adapted to a range of different solution matrixes. The FY15 work scope incorporated technical development that would improve accuracy, specificity, linearity & range, precision & ruggedness, and comparative analysis. Significant progress was achieved throughout FY 15 addressing these technical challenges, as is summarized in this report. In addition, comparative analysis of unknown samples using the Davies-Gray titration technique highlighted the importance of controlling temperature during analysis (impacting both technique accuracy and linearity/range). To fully understand the impact of temperature, additional experimentation and data analyses were performed during FY16. The results from this FY15/FY16 work were presented in a detailed presentation, LA-UR-16-21310, and an update of this presentation is included with this short report summarizing the key findings. The technique is based on analysis of the most intense U(VI) absorbance band in the visible region of the uranium spectra in 1 M H2SO4, at λmax = 419.5 nm.

  13. Pre-concentration and quantification of uranium from lean feed by stir adsorptive membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sadananda; Pandey, A.K.; Manchanda, V.K.; Athawale, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Uranium recovery from bio-aggressive but lean feed like seawater is a challenging problem as it requires in situ preconcentration of uranium in presence of huge excess of competing ions with fast sorption kinetics. In our laboratory, widely used amidoxime membrane (AO-membrane) was evaluated for uranium sorption under seawater conditions. This study indicated that AO-membrane was inherently slow because of the complexation chemistry involved in transfer of U(VI) from (UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ) 4- to AO sites in membrane. In order to search better options, several chemical compositions of membrane were scanned for their efficacy for uranium preconcentration from seawater, and concluded that EGMP-membrane offers several advantages over AO-membrane. In this paper, the comparison of EGMP-membrane with AO-membrane for uranium sorption under seawater conditions has been reviewed. (author)

  14. Bioremediation of ground water contaminants at a uranium mill tailings site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, L.L.; Nuttall, H.E.; Thomson, B.M.; Lutze, W.

    1995-01-01

    Ground water contaminated with uranium from milling operations must be remediated to reduce the migration of soluble toxic compounds. At the mill tailings site near Tuba City, Arizona (USA) the approach is to employ bioremediation for in situ immobilization of uranium by bacterial reduction of uranyl, U(VI), compounds to uraninite, U(IV). In this initial phase of remediation, details are provided to indicate the magnitude of the contamination problem and to present preliminary evidence supporting the proposition that bacterial immobilization of uranium is possible. Additionally, consideration is given to contaminating cations and anions that may be at toxic levels in ground water at this uranium mill tailing site and detoxification strategies using bacteria are addressed. A model concept is employed so that results obtained at the Tuba City site could contribute to bioremediation of ground water at other uranium mill tailings sites

  15. Uranium 234U and 238U isotopes in the southern Baltic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borylo, A.; Skwarzec, B.

    2002-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of uranium in water and sediment of selected basins of the southern Baltic Sea have been analysed. It was observed that the concentration of uranium in sediments increases with core depth. This is probably connected to diffusion processes from sediments to water through interstitial water where uranium concentration is much higher than in bottom water. The measurements of 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios indicate that sedimentation of terrigenic material and transport through Vistula river are the major sources of uranium in sediments of the southern Baltic Sea. Estimation of the 234 U/ 238 U ratios in reduction areas of the Baltic Deep and the Bornholm Deep suggest that the processes of reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) and of removal of authogenic uranium from seawater to sediments do not play major roles in the Gdansk Deep. (author)

  16. In situ mobility of uranium in the presence of nitrate following sulfate-reducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Charles J; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Watson, David B; McKay, Larry D; Hazen, Terry C; Park, Melora; Istok, Jonathan D

    2016-04-01

    Reoxidation and mobilization of previously reduced and immobilized uranium by dissolved-phase oxidants poses a significant challenge for remediating uranium-contaminated groundwater. Preferential oxidation of reduced sulfur-bearing species, as opposed to reduced uranium-bearing species, has been demonstrated to limit the mobility of uranium at the laboratory scale yet field-scale investigations are lacking. In this study, the mobility of uranium in the presence of nitrate oxidant was investigated in a shallow groundwater system after establishing conditions conducive to uranium reduction and the formation of reduced sulfur-bearing species. A series of three injections of groundwater (200 L) containing U(VI) (5 μM) and amended with ethanol (40 mM) and sulfate (20 mM) were conducted in ten test wells in order to stimulate microbial-mediated reduction of uranium and the formation of reduced sulfur-bearing species. Simultaneous push-pull tests were then conducted in triplicate well clusters to investigate the mobility of U(VI) under three conditions: 1) high nitrate (120 mM), 2) high nitrate (120 mM) with ethanol (30 mM), and 3) low nitrate (2 mM) with ethanol (30 mM). Dilution-adjusted breakthrough curves of ethanol, nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, and U(VI) suggested that nitrate reduction was predominantly coupled to the oxidation of reduced-sulfur bearing species, as opposed to the reoxidation of U(IV), under all three conditions for the duration of the 36-day tests. The amount of sulfate, but not U(VI), recovered during the push-pull tests was substantially more than injected, relative to bromide tracer, under all three conditions and further suggested that reduced sulfur-bearing species were preferentially oxidized under nitrate-reducing conditions. However, some reoxidation of U(IV) was observed under nitrate-reducing conditions and in the absence of detectable nitrate and/or nitrite. This suggested that reduced sulfur-bearing species may not be fully effective at

  17. Characterization of uranium redox state in organic-rich Eocene sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumberland, Susan A; Etschmann, Barbara; Brugger, Joël; Douglas, Grant; Evans, Katy; Fisher, Louise; Kappen, Peter; Moreau, John W

    2018-03-01

    The presence of organic matter (OM) has a profound impact on uranium (U) redox cycling, either limiting or promoting the mobility of U via binding, reduction, or complexation. To understand the interactions between OM and U, we characterised U oxidation state and speciation in nine OM-rich sediment cores (18 samples), plus a lignite sample from the Mulga Rock polymetallic deposit in Western Australia. Uranium was unevenly dispersed within the analysed samples with 84% of the total U occurring in samples containing >21 wt % OM. Analyses of U speciation, including x-ray absorption spectroscopy and bicarbonate extractions, revealed that U existed predominately (∼71%) as U(VI), despite the low pH (4.5) and nominally reducing conditions within the sediments. Furthermore, low extractability by water, but high extractability by a bi-carbonate solution, indicated a strong association of U with particulate OM. The unexpectedly high proportion of U(VI) relative to U(IV) within the OM-rich sediments implies that OM itself does not readily reduce U, and the reduction of U is not a requirement for immobilizing uranium in OM-rich deposits. The fact that OM can play a significant role in limiting the mobility and reduction of U(VI) in sediments is important for both U-mining and remediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. TRLFS Study of U(VI) at Variable Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. Y.; Yun, J. I.

    2010-01-01

    Uranium is one of the most important radionuclides in a nuclear waste repository. Transport phenomena for radioactive elements are of crucial importance for a safe geological disposal of nuclear waste. Chemical speciation and solubility are used for understanding and predicting radionuclides migration in aquifer system. Decay heat released from high level waste and geothermal temperature gradient cause higher temperature above room temperature in deep geologic formation. However, most chemical thermodynamic data are obtained at room temperature until recently. There are few studies at temperatures above 25 .deg. C. Therefore, a better understanding of thermodynamic properties at high temperatures is necessary for reliable safety assessment of high level waste repositories. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) has been applied as a sensitive and selective method for chemical speciation. The fluorescence spectrum is unique for each chemical species. The duration time of fluorescence emission is used as another indicator for decomposition of overlapped fluorescence spectrum. The objective of this study is to investigate fluorescence properties of uranium hydrolysis species at elevated temperature using TRLFS

  19. Uranium solubility and speciation in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollila, K.

    1985-04-01

    The purpose of this study has been to assess the solubility and possible species of uranium in groundwater at the disposal conditions of spent fuel. The effects of radiolysis and bentonite are considered. The assessment is based on the theoretical calculations found in the literature. The Finnish experimental results are included. The conservative estimate for uranium solubility under the oxidizing conditions caused by alpha radiolysis is based on the oxidation of uranium to the U(VI) state and formation of carbonate complex. For the groundwater with the typical carbonate content of 275 mg/l and the high carbonate content of 485 mg/l due to bentonite, the solubility values of 360 mg u/l and 950 mg U/l, are obtained, respectively. The experimental results predict considerably lower values, 0.5-20 mg U/l. The solubility of uranium under the undisturbed reducing conditions may be calculated based on the hydrolysis, carbonate complexation and redox reactions. The results vary considerably depending on the thermodynamic data used. The wide ranges of the most important groundwater parameters are seen in the solubility values. The experimental results show the same trends. As a conservative value for the solubility in reducing groundwater 50-500 μg U/l is estimated. (author)

  20. Czechoslovak uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluskal, O.

    1992-01-01

    Data and knowledge related to the prospecting, mining, processing and export of uranium ores in Czechoslovakia are presented. In the years between 1945 and January 1, 1991, 98,461.1 t of uranium were extracted. In the period 1965-1990 the uranium industry was subsidized from the state budget to a total of 38.5 billion CSK. The subsidies were put into extraction, investments and geologic prospecting; the latter was at first, ie. till 1960 financed by the former USSR, later on the two parties shared costs on a 1:1 basis. Since 1981 the prospecting has been entirely financed from the Czechoslovak state budget. On Czechoslovak territory uranium has been extracted from deposits which may be classified as vein-type deposits, deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones and deposits connected with weathering processes. The future of mining, however, is almost exclusively being connected with deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones. A brief description and characteristic is given of all uranium deposits on Czechoslovak territory, and the organization of uranium mining in Czechoslovakia is described as is the approach used in the world to evaluate uranium deposits; uranium prices and actual resources are also given. (Z.S.) 3 figs

  1. Surface modification to improve the sorption property of U(VI) on mesoporous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lijuan Song; Yulong Wang; Lu Zhu; Bolong Guo; Suwen Chen; Wangsuo Wu

    2014-01-01

    Polyoxometalates K 7 [α-PW 11 O 39 ]·14H 2 O (PW11) modified mesoporous silica (MCM-48) with cubic structure, was prepared by impregnation and calcination methods. The modified mesoporous silica sorbent (PW11/MCM-48) was studied as a potential adsorbent for U(VI) from aqueous solutions. MCM-48 and PW11/MCM-48 were confirmed by X-ray diffraction and nitrogen physisorption techniques. The results indicate the original keggin structure of PW11 and mesoporous structure of MCM-48 are maintained after supporting PW11 on mesoporous silica MCM-48. The effects of contact time, solid-to-liquid ratio (m/V), solution pH and ionic strength on U(VI) sorption behaviors of the pure and modified mesoporous silicas were also studied. Typical sorption isotherms such as Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were determined for sorption process. The results suggest that the sorption of U(VI) on MCM-48 or PW11/MCM-48 are strongly dependent on pH values but independent of ionic strength. The sorption capacity of PW11/MCM-48 for U(VI) is about ten times more than that of MCM-48. (author)

  2. Hexavalent chromium reduction by a hypocrea tawa fungal strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales-Battera, L.; Guillen-Jimenez, F. M.; Cristiani-Urbina, E.

    2009-01-01

    Microbial transformation of the highly toxic, water-soluble and mobile hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], to the less toxic, insoluble and immobile trivalent chromium [Cr(III)], is an economically feasible alternative for the treatment of wastewaters contaminated with Cr(VI). The main purpose of this work was to isolate, identify and characterize a microbial strain water by batch enrichment culture techniques, and further identified as Hypocrea tawa by its D1/D2 domain sequence of the 26S rRNA gene with 99,44% similarity. (Author)

  3. Uranium speciation and stability after reductive immobilization in aquifer sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Jonathan O.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Junier, Pilar; Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Chinni, Satya; Veeramani, Harish; Margot-Roquier, Camille; Webb, Samuel M.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Giammar, Daniel E.; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2011-11-01

    It has generally been assumed that the bioreduction of hexavalent uranium in groundwater systems will result in the precipitation of immobile uraninite (UO 2). In order to explore the form and stability of uranium immobilized under these conditions, we introduced lactate (15 mM for 3 months) into flow-through columns containing sediments derived from a former uranium-processing site at Old Rifle, CO. This resulted in metal-reducing conditions as evidenced by concurrent uranium uptake and iron release. Despite initial augmentation with Shewanella oneidensis, bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes dominated the biostimulated columns. The immobilization of uranium (˜1 mmol U per kg sediment) enabled analysis by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Tetravalent uranium associated with these sediments did not have spectroscopic signatures representative of U-U shells or crystalline UO 2. Analysis by microfocused XAS revealed concentrated micrometer regions of solid U(IV) that had spectroscopic signatures consistent with bulk analyses and a poor proximal correlation (μm scale resolution) between U and Fe. A plausible explanation, supported by biogeochemical conditions and spectral interpretations, is uranium association with phosphoryl moieties found in biomass; hence implicating direct enzymatic uranium reduction. After the immobilization phase, two months of in situ exposure to oxic influent did not result in substantial uranium remobilization. Ex situ flow-through experiments demonstrated more rapid uranium mobilization than observed in column oxidation studies and indicated that sediment-associated U(IV) is more mobile than biogenic UO 2. This work suggests that in situ uranium bioimmobilization studies and subsurface modeling parameters should be expanded to account for non-uraninite U(IV) species associated with biomass.

  4. Comparative analysis of uranium bioassociation with halophilic bacteria and archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Miriam; Müller, Katharina; Foerstendorf, Harald; Schmidt, Matthias; Simmons, Karen; Swanson, Juliet S.; Reed, Donald T.; Stumpf, Thorsten

    2018-01-01

    Rock salt represents a potential host rock formation for the final disposal of radioactive waste. The interactions between indigenous microorganisms and radionuclides, e.g. uranium, need to be investigated to better predict the influence of microorganisms on the safety assessment of the repository. Hence, the association process of uranium with two microorganisms isolated from rock salt was comparatively studied. Brachybacterium sp. G1, which was isolated from the German salt dome Gorleben, and Halobacterium noricense DSM15987T, were selected as examples of a moderately halophilic bacterium and an extremely halophilic archaeon, respectively. The microorganisms exhibited completely different association behaviors with uranium. While a pure biosorption process took place with Brachybacterium sp. G1 cells, a multistage association process occurred with the archaeon. In addition to batch experiments, in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was applied to characterize the U(VI) interaction process. Biosorption was identified as the dominating process for Brachybacterium sp. G1 with this method. Carboxylic functionalities are the dominant interacting groups for the bacterium, whereas phosphoryl groups are also involved in U(VI) association by the archaeon H. noricense. PMID:29329319

  5. Stripping of Uranium (IV) from D2EHPA + TBP system with ammonium oxalate and its recovery as uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.K.; Singh, H.

    2014-01-01

    Uranium is an important fissile material for the generation of electricity by nuclear reactors. To obtain uranium as a final product meeting the stringent nuclear specifications, many process steps are involved starting from ore processing to the precipitation of yellow cake. Solvent extraction is one of the process industrially adopted worldwide to achieve such purity of uranium from leach liquor and usually uses amine or organophosphorus types of extractant depending upon the composition of feed material. In solvent extraction technique, stripping is a prominent hydrometallurgical operation which brings the metal values of interest in aqueous solution for further treatment. In the case of uranium, stripping is dependent on its oxidation state. For hexavalent state generally carbonate solutions are used, where as in the case of tetravalent form salt solution such as ammonium oxalate is effective. Use of ammonium oxalate as stripping agent for tetravalent uranium from pyrophosphoric acid has been reported in patent however the details are not disclosed. In the present investigation an effort has been made to investigate the stripping behaviour of uranium from a synthetically loaded synergistic solvent mixture of uranium in tetravalent state

  6. High performance of phosphate-functionalized graphene oxide for the selective adsorption of U(VI) from acidic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China); Li, Jiaxing, E-mail: lijx@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (China); School for Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X), Soochow University, 215123, Suzhou (China); Wang, Xiangxue; Chen, Changlun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); Wang, Xiangke [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (China); School for Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X), Soochow University, 215123, Suzhou (China); Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-11-15

    In this study, phosphate-functionalized graphene oxide (PGO) was prepared by grafting triethyl phosphite onto the surface of GO using Arbuzov reaction. The as-prepared PGO was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and Zeta potential. The application of the PGO to remove U(VI) from aqueous solution was investigated with a maximum adsorption capacity of 251.7 mg/g at pH = 4.0 ± 0.1 and T = 303 K. The adsorption mechanism was also investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, indicating a chemical adsorption of U(VI) on PGO surface. Moreover, experimental results gave a better removal efficiency toward U(VI) on PGO surface than other heavy metal ions at acidic solution, indicating the selective extraction of U(VI) from environmental pollutants. - Highlights: • The successful grafting phosphonate to graphene oxide by the Arbuzov reaction. • Selective adsorption of U(VI) on PGO surface over other heavy metal ions from acidic solution. • Electrostatic interactions of U(VI) with phosphonate and oxygen-containing functional groups on PGO surface. • Higher sorption capacity on PGO surface than GO surface for the U(VI) removal.

  7. Studies on extraction of uranium (VI) with petroleum sulfoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yanzhao; Sun Sixiu; Bao Borong

    1999-01-01

    The extraction of uranium(VI) with petroleum sulfoxides(PSO) in different diluents is studied. The extraction ability of U(VI) decreases in the following order: benzene, toluene, cyclohexane, heptane, kerosene, carbon tetrachloride and chloroform. The influence of the concentrations of nitric acid, PSO, salting out agent, complexing anion and temperature on the extraction equilibrium is also investigated, and the enthalpy of the extraction reaction is obtained. The relationship between the extraction equilibrium constants K ex and the physical parameters of diluents is derived. The extraction mechanism and equilibrium are examined by measurement of IR spectrophotometry

  8. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan [Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Parker, Jack C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  9. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fan; Luo Wensui; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C.; Watson, David B.; Jardine, Philip M.; Gu Baohua

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO 3 - , SO 4 2- , U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  10. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fan, E-mail: zhangfan@itpcas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing, 100085 (China); Luo Wensui [Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen, 361021 (China); Parker, Jack C. [Institute for a Secure and Sustainable Environment, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Brooks, Scott C.; Watson, David B. [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Jardine, Philip M. [Biosystems Engineering and Soil Science Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Gu Baohua [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  11. Equilibrium and kinetics of co-extraction of U(VI) and HNO3 using tri-n-butyl phosphate and tri-iso-amyl phosphate in paraffin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Diptendu; Juvekar, V.A.; Biswas, Sujoy; Roy, S.B.; Bhattacharya, R.

    2014-01-01

    Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) is versatile solvent for recovery of actinides as it is cheaper and the extracted actinides can be stripped from the loaded organic phase using plain water. However there are inherent problems associated TBP such as i) formation of the third phase ii) high solubility in aqueous phase iii) radiolytic hydrolysis at high radiation environment and iv) high propensity for extraction of mineral acids. The last mentioned property makes it less suitable for liquid emulsion membrane (LEM) extraction where acid transport to the strip phase drastically reduces extraction efficiency. Therefore there is need to replace TBP with an extractant which has lesser propensity for acid extraction. Many researcher reported Tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP) as an alternative extractant which can sustain high radiation environment without chemical/radiative degradation. However there are no studies available on co-extraction of U(VI) and mineral acids by TiAP. In this research paper equilibrium and kinetics of co-extraction of U(VI) and HNO 3 from nitric acid medium into a hydrocarbon phase (paraffin) using Tri n- butyl phosphate (TBP), Tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP) has been studied. Relative rates of extraction of uranium(VI) and HNO 3 by TiAP and TBP were measured simultaneously using bulk-liquid membrane (BLM) system. Study reveals although TiAP is less efficient in extracting U(IV), than TBP, it transfers lesser quantity of nitric acid to organic phase. Hence TiAP is more suitable as a carrier for LEM extraction than TBP

  12. Biogeochemical Modeling of In Situ U(VI) Reduction and Immobilization with Emulsified Vegetable Oil as the Electron Donor at a Field Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, G.; Parker, J.; Wu, W.; Schadt, C. W.; Watson, D. B.; Brooks, S. C.; Orifrc Team

    2011-12-01

    A comprehensive biogeochemical model was developed to quantitatively describe the coupled hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological processes that occurred following injection of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor to immobilize U(VI) at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge site (ORIFRC) in Tennessee. The model couples the degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), glycerol, hydrogen and acetate, reduction of nitrate, manganese, ferrous iron, sulfate and uranium, and methanoganesis with growth of multiple microbial groups. The model describes the evolution of geochemistry and microbial populations not only in the aqueous phase as typically observed, but also in the mineral phase and therefore enables us to evaluate the applicability of rates from the literature for field scale assessment, estimate the retention and degradation rates of EVO and LCFA, and assess the influence of the coupled processes on fate and transport of U(VI). Our results suggested that syntrophic bacteria or metal reducers might catalyze LCFA oxidation in the downstream locations when sulfate was consumed, and competition between methanogens and others for electron donors and slow growth of methanogen might contribute to the sustained reducing condition. Among the large amount of hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological parameter values, the initial biomass, and the interactions (e.g., inhibition) of the microbial functional groups, and the rate and extent of Mn and Fe oxide reduction appear as the major sources of uncertainty. Our model provides a platform to conduct numerical experiments to study these interactions, and could be useful for further iterative experimental and modeling investigations into the bioreductive immobiliztion of radionuclide and metal contaminants in the subsurface.

  13. Uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Roux, J.

    1998-01-01

    The processing of uranium ores for uranium extraction and concentration is not much different than the processing of other metallic ores. However, thanks to its radioactive property, the prospecting of uranium ores can be performed using geophysical methods. Surface and sub-surface detection methods are a combination of radioactive measurement methods (radium, radon etc..) and classical mining and petroleum prospecting methods. Worldwide uranium prospecting has been more or less active during the last 50 years, but the rise of raw material and energy prices between 1970 and 1980 has incited several countries to develop their nuclear industry in order to diversify their resources and improve their energy independence. The result is a considerable increase of nuclear fuels demand between 1980 and 1990. This paper describes successively: the uranium prospecting methods (direct, indirect and methodology), the uranium deposits (economical definition, uranium ores, and deposits), the exploitation of uranium ores (use of radioactivity, radioprotection, effluents), the worldwide uranium resources (definition of the different categories and present day state of worldwide resources). (J.S.)

  14. Uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.; Asem, M.A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The historical development of the uranium market is present in two periods: The initial period 1947-1970 and from 1970 onwards, with the establishment of a commercial market. The world uranium requirements are derived from the corresponding forecast of nuclear generating capacity, with, particular emphasis to the brazilian requirements. The forecast of uranium production until the year 2000 is presented considering existing inventories and the already committed demand. The balance between production and requirements is analysed. Finally the types of contracts currently being used and the development of uranium prices in the world market are considered. (author)

  15. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report looks at the following issues: How much Soviet uranium ore and enriched uranium are imported into the United States and what is the extent to which utilities flag swap to disguise these purchases? What are the U.S.S.R.'s enriched uranium trading practices? To what extent are utilities required to return used fuel to the Soviet Union as part of the enriched uranium sales agreement? Why have U.S. utilities ended their contracts to buy enrichment services from DOE?

  16. Local structure and speciation of uranium in strontium orthosilicate: TRFS and EXAFS studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Santosh K.; Thulasidas, S.K.; Natarajan, V.; Yadav, A.K.; Bhattacharya, D.

    2015-01-01

    TRFS is used to investigate the valence state and coordination behavior of uranium in strontium orthosilicate. From TRFS measurement it was observed that uranium exists as U(VI) in the form of UO 2 2+ in Sr 2 SiO 4 . Based on life time measurement and EXAFS studies it was inferred that uranyl is stabilized on both 9- and 10- coordinated strontium polyhedra. Majority of uranyl ion occupy relatively asymmetric site in strontium silicate most probably 9-coordinated Sr sites. (author)

  17. Enhanced accumulation of U(VI) by Aspergillus oryzae mutant generated by dielectric barrier discharge air plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wencheng Song; North China Electric Power University, Beijing; Xiangxue Wang; Soochow University, Suzhou; Wen Tao; Hongqing Wang; Tasawar Hayat; Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad; Xiangke Wang; Soochow University, Suzhou; King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae was isolated from radionuclides' contaminated soils, and dielectric barrier discharge plasma was used to mutate A. oryzae to improve bioremediation capability of U(VI) pollution. The maximum accumulation capacities of U(VI) on mutated A.oryzae was 627.4 mg/g at T = 298 K and pH = 5.5, which was approximately twice than that of raw A.oryzae. XPS analysis indicated that U(VI) accumulation on mutated A. oryzae was largely attributable to nitrogen- and oxygen-containing functional groups on fungal mycelia. The mutated A. oryzae can be harnessed as bioremediation agents for radionuclides pollution. (author)

  18. Study of new complexes of uranium and comba radical. I.- Complexes defective in sodium carbonate; Estudio de nuevos complejos entre el uranio y el radical CDMBA. I. Complejos con defectos de carbonato sodico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera Palomino, J; Galiano Sedano, J A; Parellada Bellod, R; Bellido Gonzalez, A

    1975-07-01

    Some complexes formed in presence of defect of sodium carbonate with respect to the stoichiometric ratio (U): (C0{sub 3}) = 1:3 are studied. This ratio corresponds to the main complex which is responsible for the uranium extraction with CDMBAC organic solutions and from U(VI) aqueous solutions with an excess of sodium carbonate. (Author) 10 refs.

  19. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-06-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and COD(Cr) of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms.

  20. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-01-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and CODCr of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms. PMID:15909347

  1. [Hexavalent chromium pollution and exposure level in electroplating workplace].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-hui; Zhang, Xuan; Yang, Zhang-ping; Jiang, Cai-xia; Ren, Xiao-bin; Wang, Qiang; Zhu, Yi-min

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the pollution of hexavalent chromium in the electroplating workplace and screen the biomarkers of chromium exposure. Field occupational health investigation was conducted in 25 electroplating workplaces. 157 electroplating workers and 93 healthy unexposed controls were recruited. The epidemiological information was collected with face to face interview. Chromium in erythrocytes was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The median of short-term exposure concentration of chromium in the air at electroplating workplace was 0.06 mg/m(3) (median) and ranging from 0.01 (detect limit) to 0.53 mg/m(3)). The median concentration of Cr (VI) in erythrocytes in electroplating workers was 4.41 (2.50 ∼ 5.29) µg/L, which was significantly higher than that in control subjects [1.54 (0.61 ∼ 2.98) µg/L, P electroplating workers and control subjects, except for the subjects of age less than 30 years old (P = 0.11). There was hexavalent chromium pollution in electroplating workplace. Occupational hazards prevention measures should be taken to control the chromium pollution hazards.

  2. A gravimetric method for the determination of oxygen in uranium oxides and ternary uranium oxides by addition of alkaline earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, Takeo; Tagawa, Hiroaki; Adachi, Takeo; Hashitani, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    A simple gravimetric determination of oxygen in uranium oxides and ternary uranium oxides is described. In alkaline earth uranates which are formed by heating in air at 800-1100 0 C, uranium is in the hexavalent state over certain continuous ranges of alkaline earth-to-uranium ratios. Thus, if an alkaline earth uranate or a compound containing an alkaline earth element, e.g. MgO, is mixed with the oxide sample and heated in air under suitable conditions, oxygen can be determined from the weight change before and after the reaction. The standard deviation of the O:U ratio for a UOsub(2+x) test sample is +-0.0008-0.001, if a correction is applied for atmospheric moisture absorbed during mixing. (Auth.)

  3. The Nopal 1 Uranium Deposit: an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calas, G.; Allard, T.; Galoisy, L.

    2007-05-01

    The Nopal 1 natural analogue is located in the Pena Blanca uranium district, about 50 kms north of Chihuahua City, Mexico. The deposit is hosted in tertiary ignimbritic ash-flow tuffs, dated at 44 Ma (Nopal and Colorados formations), and overlying the Pozos conglomerate formation and a sequence of Cretaceous carbonate rocks. The deposit is exposed at the ground surface and consists of a near vertical zone extending over about 100 m with a diameter of 40 m. An interesting characteristic is that the primary mineralization has been exposed above the water table, as a result of the uplift of the Sierra Pena Blanca, and subsequently oxidized with a remobilization of hexavalent uranium. The primary mineralization has been explained by various genetic models. It is associated to an extensive hydrothermal alteration of the volcanic tuffs, locally associated to pyrite and preserved by an intense silicification. Several kaolinite parageneses occur in fissure fillings and feldspar pseudomorphs, within the mineralized breccia pipe and the barren surrounding rhyolitic tuffs. Smectites are mainly developed in the underlying weakly welded tuffs. Several radiation-induced defect centers have been found in these kaolinites providing a unique picture of the dynamics of uranium mobilization (see Allard et al., this session). Another evidence of this mobilization is given by the spectroscopy of uranium-bearing opals, which show characteristic fluorescence spectra of uranyl groups sorbed at the surface of silica. By comparison with the other uranium deposits of the Sierra Pena Blanca and the nearby Sierra de Gomez, the Nopal 1 deposit is original, as it is one of the few deposits hving retained a reduced uranium mineralization.

  4. Gravimetric determination of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) with substituted pyrazolones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, H.C.; Rao, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    4-Acylpyrazolones like 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone (PMBP), 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-p-nitrobenzoyl-5-pyrazolone (PMNP) and 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-(3,5 dinitrobenzoyl)-5-pyrazolone (PMDP) have been synthesized and developed as gravimetric reagents for the determination of U(VI) and Th(IV). Uranium(VI) is almost quantitatively precipitated with PMBP, PMNP, and PMDP at pH 2.20, 1.85 and 1.70 respectively. The pH values for the complete precipitation of thorium(IV) with PMBP, PMNP and PMDP are 2.90, 2.75 and 2.50 respectively. PMBP has proved to be an efficient ligand for gravimetric determination of U(VI) by direct weighing method after drying at 100 +- 10 deg C. The percentage relative error varies from 0.4 to 1.6 in the determination of U(VI) by this method. The effect of a number of interfering ions on the precipitation of U(VI) by PMBP has been reported. (author)

  5. Biomineralization of Uranium by PhoY Phosphatase Activity Aids Cell Survival in Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yung, M C [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jiao, Y [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-07-22

    Caulobacter crescentus is known to tolerate high levels of uranium [U(VI)], but its detoxification mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that C. crescentus is able to facilitate U(VI) biomineralization through the formation of U-Pi precipitates via its native alkaline phosphatase activity. The U-Pi precipitates, deposited on the cell surface in the form of meta-autunite structures, have a lower U/Pi ratio than do chemically produced precipitates. The enzyme that is responsible for the phosphatase activity and thus the biomineralization process is identified as PhoY, a periplasmic alkaline phosphatase with broad substrate specificity. Furthermore, PhoY is shown to confer a survival advantage on C. crescentus toward U(VI) under both growth and nongrowth conditions. Results obtained in this study thus highlight U(VI) biomineralization as a resistance mechanism in microbes, which not only improves our understanding of bacterium-mineral interactions but also aids in defining potential ecological niches for metal-resistant bacteria.

  6. Subcellular distribution of uranium in the roots of Spirodela punctata and surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Xiaoqin, E-mail: xiaoqin_nie@163.com [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Wastes and Environmental Safety Laboratory, Mianyang 621010 (China); Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology (Sichuan University), Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Dong, Faqin, E-mail: fqdong2004@163.com [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Wastes and Environmental Safety Laboratory, Mianyang 621010 (China); Liu, Ning [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology (Sichuan University), Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Liu, Mingxue [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Wastes and Environmental Safety Laboratory, Mianyang 621010 (China); Zhang, Dong; Kang, Wu [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry,China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Sun, Shiyong; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Jie [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Wastes and Environmental Safety Laboratory, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The proportion of uranium concentration approximate as 8:2:1 in the cell wall organelle and cytosol fractions of roots of S. punctata. • The particles including 35% Fe (wt%) released from the cells after 100 mg/L U treatment 48 h. • Most of the uranium bound onto the root surface and contacted with phosphorus ligands and formed as nano-scales U-P lamellar crystal. • FTIR and XPS analyses result indicates the uranium changed the band position and shapes of phosphate group, and the region of characteristic peak belongs to U(VI) and U(IV) were also observed. - Abstract: The subcellular distribution of uranium in roots of Spirodela punctata (duckweed) and the process of surface interaction were studied upon exposure to U (0, 5–200 mg/L) at pH 5. The concentration of uranium in each subcelluar fraction increased significantly with increasing solution U level, after 200 mg/L uranium solution treatment 120 h, the proportion of uranium concentration approximate as 8:2:1 in the cell wall organelle and cytosol fractions of roots of S. punctata. OM SEM and EDS showed after 5–200 mg/L U treatment 4–24 h, some intracellular fluid released from the root cells, after 100 mg/L U treatment 48 h, the particles including 35% Fe (wt%) and other organic matters such as EPS released from the cells, most of the uranium bound onto the root surface and contacted with phosphorus ligands and formed as nano-scales U-P lamellar crystal, similar crystal has been found in the cell wall and organelle fractions after 50 mg/L U treatment 120 h. FTIR and XPS analyses result indicates the uranium changed the band position and shapes of phosphate group, and the region of characteristic peak belongs to U(VI) and U(IV) were also observed.

  7. Fracture-filling minerals as uranium sinks and sources, a natural analogue study at Palmottu, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, D.; Eriksen, T.

    2000-01-01

    The nucleation of a mineral crystal and its growth in groundwater carrying fractures 300 m above the Palmottu uranium deposit provide an impressive example of geochemical selectivity of uranium. Fracture-filling material was collected from a 3 mm thick fracture at depth 74.8-75 m (drillcore R348). SEM and EDS analyses on a thin section of the original fracture-filling show that the fracture filling is heterogeneous, composing mineral crystal particles and very porous clay-rich aggregates. The results of INAA on millimetre-sized single mineral crystals and aggregates selected from grinded fracture-filling show that porous aggregates (composed of clays and micrometer sized mineral particles) contain up to 1000 ppm U, which is higher than the average of the whole fracture-filling (400 ppm) and host rock related millimetre sized mineral particles (18-100 ppm). 233 U/ 238 U isotope exchange proves that a large fraction of the uranium in the fracture-filling is not easily exchanged with uranium in the solution. The amount of 238 U released in the isotope exchange experiment is too high to be explained by reversible U(VI) sorption. Oxidation state analyses show that 30% of the uranium exists as U(IV). Laboratory batch experiment at anoxic conditions proved that pyrite can immobilise U(VI). (orig.)

  8. Adsorption of uranium ions by crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemal Oezeroglu; Niluefer Metin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the crosslinked polyester resin containing acrylic acid functional groups was used for the adsorption of uranium ions from aqueous solutions. For this purpose, the crosslinked polyester resin of unsaturated polyester in styrene monomer (Polipol 353, Poliya) and acrylic acid as weight percentage at 80 and 20%, respectively was synthesized by using methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKp, Butanox M60, Azo Nobel)-cobalt octoate initiator system. The adsorption of uranium ions on the sample (0.05 g copolymer and 5 mL of U(VI) solution were mixed) of the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid was carried out in a batch reactor. The effects of adsorption parameters of the contact time, temperature, pH of solution and initial uranium(VI) concentration for U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid were investigated. The adsorption data obtained from experimental results depending on the initial U(VI) concentration were analyzed by the Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity and free energy change were determined by using D-R isotherm. The obtained experimental adsorption data depending on temperature were evaluated to calculate the thermodynamic parameters of enthalpy (ΔH o ), entropy (ΔS o ) and free energy change (ΔG o ) for the U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions. The obtained adsorption data depending on contact time were analyzed by using adsorption models such as the modified Freundlich, Elovich, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. (author)

  9. Uranium-series disequilibria as a means to study recent migration of uranium in a sandstone-hosted uranium deposit, NW China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Maozhong; Peng Xinjian; Wang Jinping; Osmond, J.K.

    2005-01-01

    Uranium concentration and alpha specific activities of uranium decay series nuclides 234 U, 238 U, 230 Th, 232 Th and 226 Ra were measured for 16 oxidized host sandstone samples, 36 oxic-anoxic (mineralized) sandstone samples and three unaltered primary sandstone samples collected from the Shihongtan deposit. The results show that most of the ores and host sandstones have close to secular equilibrium alpha activity ratios for 234 U/ 238 U, 230 Th/ 238 U, 230 Th/ 234 U and 226 Ra/ 230 Th, indicating that intensive groundwater-rock/ore interaction and uranium migration have not taken place in the deposit during the last 1.0 Ma. However, some of the old uranium ore bodies have locally undergone leaching in the oxidizing environment during the past 300 ka to 1.0 Ma or to the present, and a number of new U ore bodies have grown in the oxic-anoxic transition (mineralized) subzone during the past 1.0 Ma. Locally, uranium leaching has taken place during the past 300 ka to 1.0 Ma, and perhaps is still going on now in some sandstones of the oxidizing subzone. However, uranium accumulation has locally occurred in some sandstones of the oxidizing environment during the past 1 ka to 1.0 Ma, which may be attributed to adsorption of U(VI) by clays contained in oxidized sandstones. A recent accumulation of uranium has locally taken place within the unaltered sandstones of the primary subzone close to the oxic-anoxic transition environment during the past 300 ka to 1.0 Ma. Results from the present study also indicate that uranium-series disequilibrium is an important tool to trace recent migration of uranium occurring in sandstone-hosted U deposits during the past 1.0 Ma and to distinguish the oxidation-reduction boundary

  10. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, G.

    1975-01-01

    The winning of uranium ore is the first stage of the fuel cycle. The whole complex of questions to be considered when evaluating the profitability of an ore mine is shortly outlined, and the possible mining techniques are described. Some data on uranium mining in the western world are also given. (RB) [de

  11. Uranium in Malwa region of Punjab, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochhar, Naresh; Dadwal, Veena; Balaram, V.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known in Punjab that the Malwa region shows a very high incidence of cancer, stunted growth and other neurological disorders. The high values of uranium have been attributed to Kota nuclear power plant; Khushab heavy water plant in Pakistan; and uranium - carrying winds from Afghanistan, without any scientific basis. Though Malwa is a part of Punjab, geologically it is more akin to Haryana and Rajasthan. Uranium is a naturally occurring radioactive element which is present in trace in rocks, minerals plants and natural waters. It occurs along with thorium and potassium in granitic rocks. It has the property to get dissolved in water in hexavalent form at a normal pH of 5 to 7. It gets precipitated in the reducing environment in tetravalent form and form complexes such as hydroxides, phosphate, sulfate, carbonate etc. Uranium compounds are soluble in water, very mobile and travel kilometers. When the bed rocks containing uranium and thorium and other elements are exposed to sun, rain, wind, they get weathered and breakdown to form soil. Uranium gets dispersed in matrix, soil and finally gets re-deposited in areas/pockets where reducing conditions are present. Hence we get higher concentration of uranium in pockets. There are no rocks exposed on the surface in the SW Punjab. However the rocks of Aravalli-Delhi ridge and Malani granites and rhyohtes are exposed at Tusham district Bhiwani just south of the region. These rocks take a northwest turn from Tusham and become submerged under the Punjab Plains only to get resurfaced at Kirana Hills Pakistan. The gravity data have delineated 6 km wide and 240 km long per shaped body under the Punjab plains covering the SW Punjab. The Tusham granites are high heat producing granites that is they are enriched in uranium, thorium and Potasium. The uranium concentration in Tusham granites is 8 to 11 .5 parts per million (ppm) as compared to the normal value of 4.5 in granites in general. The average crustal values is 2

  12. Rapid removal of uranium from aqueous solutions using magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 composite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fang-Li; Qin, Zhi; Bai, Jing; Rong, Wei-Dong; Fan, Fu-You; Tian, Wei; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Liang

    2012-04-01

    Rapid removal of U(VI) from aqueous solutions was investigated using magnetic Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) composite particles as the novel adsorbent. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of initial pH, amount of adsorbent, shaking time and initial U(VI) concentrations on uranium sorption efficiency as well as the desorbing of U(VI). The sorption of uranium on Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) composite particles was pH-dependent, and the optimal pH was 6.0. In kinetics studies, the sorption equilibrium can be reached within 180 min, and the experimental data were well fitted by the pseudo-second-order model, and the equilibrium sorption capacities calculated by the model were almost the same as those determined by experiments. The Langmuir sorption isotherm model correlates well with the uranium sorption equilibrium data for the concentration range of 20-200 mg/L. The maximum uranium sorption capacity onto magnetic Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) composite particles was estimated to be about 52 mg/g at 25 °C. The highest values of uranium desorption (98%) was achieved using 0.01 M HCl as the desorbing agent. Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) composite particles showed a good selectivity for uranium from aqueous solution with other interfering cation ions. Present study suggested that magnetic Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) composite particles can be used as a potential adsorbent for sorption uranium and also provided a simple, fast separation method for removal of heavy metal ion from aqueous solution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sphaerotilus natans, a neutrophilic iron-related filamentous bacterium : mechanisms of uranium scavenging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seder-Colomina, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals and radionuclides are present in some ecosystems worldwide due to natural contaminations or anthropogenic activities. The use of microorganisms to restore those polluted ecosystems, a process known as bioremediation, is of increasing interest, especially under near-neutral pH conditions. Iron minerals encrusting neutrophilic iron-related bacteria, especially Bacterio-genic Iron Oxides (BIOS), have a poorly crystalline structure, which in addition to their large surface area and reactivity make them excellent scavengers for inorganic pollutants. In this PhD work we studied the different mechanisms of uranium scavenging by the neutrophilic bacterium Sphaerotilus natans, chosen as a model bacterium for iron-related sheath-forming filamentous microorganisms. S. natans can grow as single cells and filaments. The latter were used to investigate U(VI) bio-sorption and U(VI) sorption onto BIOS. In addition, uranium sorption onto the abiotic analogues of such iron minerals was assessed. In order to use S. natans filaments for U(VI) scavenging, it was necessary to identify factors inducing S. natans filamentation. The influence of oxygen was ascertained by using molecular biology techniques and our results revealed that while saturated oxygen conditions resulted in single cell growth, a moderate oxygen depletion to ∼ 3 mg O 2 .L -1 led to the desired filamentous growth of S. natans. BIOS attached to S. natans filaments as well as the abiotic analogues were analysed by XAS at Fe K-edge. Both materials were identified as amorphous iron(III) phosphates with a small component of Fe(II), with a high reactivity towards scavenging of inorganic pollutants. In addition, EXAFS at the U LIII-edge revealed a common structure for the O shells, while those for P, Fe and C were different for each sorbent. An integrated approach combining experimental techniques and speciation calculations made it possible to describe U(VI) adsorption isotherms by using a surface complexation

  14. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    GAO was asked to address several questions concerning a number of proposed uranium enrichment bills introduced during the 100th Congress. The bill would have restructured the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation to allow it to compete more effectively in the domestic and international markets. Some of GAO's findings discussed are: uranium market experts believe and existing market models show that the proposed DOE purchase of a $750 million of uranium from domestic producers may not significantly increase production because of large producer-held inventories; excess uranium enrichment production capacity exists throughout the world; therefore, foreign producers are expected to compete heavily in the United States throughout the 1990s as utilities' contracts with DOE expire; and according to a 1988 agreement between DOE's Offices of Nuclear Energy and Defense Programs, enrichment decommissioning costs, estimated to total $3.6 billion for planning purposes, will be shared by the commercial enrichment program and the government

  15. Uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This is a press release issued by the OECD on 9th March 1976. It is stated that the steep increases in demand for uranium foreseen in and beyond the 1980's, with doubling times of the order of six to seven years, will inevitably create formidable problems for the industry. Further substantial efforts will be needed in prospecting for new uranium reserves. Information is given in tabular or graphical form on the following: reasonably assured resources, country by country; uranium production capacities, country by country; world nuclear power growth; world annual uranium requirements; world annual separative requirements; world annual light water reactor fuel reprocessing requirements; distribution of reactor types (LWR, SGHWR, AGR, HWR, HJR, GG, FBR); and world fuel cycle capital requirements. The information is based on the latest report on Uranium Resources Production and Demand, jointly issued by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency. (U.K.)

  16. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: Contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachara, John M.; Long, Philip E.; Bargar, John; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Konopka, Allan E.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Yabusaki, Steve B.

    2013-04-01

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 μg/L or 0.126 μmol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (oxidation of naturally reduced, contaminant U(IV) in the saturated zone and a continuous influx of U(VI) from natural, up-gradient sources influence plume persistence. Rate-limited mass transfer and surface complexation also control U(VI) migration velocity in the sub-oxic Rifle groundwater. Flux of U(VI) from the vadose zone at the Rifle site may be locally important, but it is not the dominant process that sustains the plume. A wide range in microbiologic functional diversity exists at both sites. Strains of Geobacter and other metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences between the sites include the geochemical nature of

  17. Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: contrasting mechanisms at two DOE sites in the groundwater-river interaction zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachara, John M; Long, Philip E; Bargar, John; Davis, James A; Fox, Patricia; Fredrickson, Jim K; Freshley, Mark D; Konopka, Allan E; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P; Rockhold, Mark L; Williams, Kenneth H; Yabusaki, Steve B

    2013-04-01

    We examine subsurface uranium (U) plumes at two U.S. Department of Energy sites that are located near large river systems and are influenced by groundwater-river hydrologic interaction. Following surface excavation of contaminated materials, both sites were projected to naturally flush remnant uranium contamination to levels below regulatory limits (e.g., 30 μg/L or 0.126 μmol/L; U.S. EPA drinking water standard), with 10 years projected for the Hanford 300 Area (Columbia River) and 12 years for the Rifle site (Colorado River). The rate of observed uranium decrease was much lower than expected at both sites. While uncertainty remains, a comparison of current understanding suggests that the two sites have common, but also different mechanisms controlling plume persistence. At the Hanford 300 A, the persistent source is adsorbed U(VI) in the vadose zone that is released to the aquifer during spring water table excursions. The release of U(VI) from the vadose zone and its transport within the oxic, coarse-textured aquifer sediments is dominated by kinetically-limited surface complexation. Modeling implies that annual plume discharge volumes to the Columbia River are small (oxidation of naturally reduced, contaminant U(IV) in the saturated zone and a continuous influx of U(VI) from natural, up-gradient sources influence plume persistence. Rate-limited mass transfer and surface complexation also control U(VI) migration velocity in the sub-oxic Rifle groundwater. Flux of U(VI) from the vadose zone at the Rifle site may be locally important, but it is not the dominant process that sustains the plume. A wide range in microbiologic functional diversity exists at both sites. Strains of Geobacter and other metal reducing bacteria are present at low natural abundance that are capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in localized zones of accumulated detrital organic carbon or after organic carbon amendment. Major differences between the sites include the geochemical nature of

  18. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobecky, Patricia A. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2015-04-06

    In this project, inter-disciplinary research activities were conducted in collaboration among investigators at The University of Alabama (UA), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light source (SSRL) to: (i) confirm that phosphatase activities of subsurface bacteria in Area 2 and 3 from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center result in solid U-phosphate precipitation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions; (ii) investigate the eventual competition between uranium biomineralization via U-phosphate precipitation and uranium bioreduction; (iii) determine subsurface microbial community structure changes of Area 2 soils following organophosphate amendments; (iv) obtain the complete genome sequences of the Rahnella sp. Y9-602 and the type-strain Rahnella aquatilis ATCC 33071 isolated from these soils; (v) determine if polyphosphate accumulation and phytate hydrolysis can be used to promote U(VI) biomineralization in subsurface sediments; (vi) characterize the effect of uranium on phytate hydrolysis by a new microorganism isolated from uranium-contaminated sediments; (vii) utilize positron-emission tomography to label and track metabolically-active bacteria in soil columns, and (viii) study the stability of the uranium phosphate mineral product. Microarray analyses and mineral precipitation characterizations were conducted in collaboration with DOE SBR-funded investigators at LBNL. Thus, microbial phosphorus metabolism has been shown to have a contributing role to uranium immobilization in the subsurface.

  19. Uranium Biomineralization by Natural Microbial Phosphatase Activities in the Subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    In this project, inter-disciplinary research activities were conducted in collaboration among investigators at The University of Alabama (UA), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light source (SSRL) to: (i) confirm that phosphatase activities of subsurface bacteria in Area 2 and 3 from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center result in solid U-phosphate precipitation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions; (ii) investigate the eventual competition between uranium biomineralization via U-phosphate precipitation and uranium bioreduction; (iii) determine subsurface microbial community structure changes of Area 2 soils following organophosphate amendments; (iv) obtain the complete genome sequences of the Rahnella sp. Y9-602 and the type-strain Rahnella aquatilis ATCC 33071 isolated from these soils; (v) determine if polyphosphate accumulation and phytate hydrolysis can be used to promote U(VI) biomineralization in subsurface sediments; (vi) characterize the effect of uranium on phytate hydrolysis by a new microorganism isolated from uranium-contaminated sediments; (vii) utilize positron-emission tomography to label and track metabolically-active bacteria in soil columns, and (viii) study the stability of the uranium phosphate mineral product. Microarray analyses and mineral precipitation characterizations were conducted in collaboration with DOE SBR-funded investigators at LBNL. Thus, microbial phosphorus metabolism has been shown to have a contributing role to uranium immobilization in the subsurface.

  20. Uranium supply and demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spriggs, M J

    1976-01-01

    Papers were presented on the pattern of uranium production in South Africa; Australian uranium--will it ever become available; North American uranium resources, policies, prospects, and pricing; economic and political environment of the uranium mining industry; alternative sources of uranium supply; whither North American demand for uranium; and uranium demand and security of supply--a consumer's point of view. (LK)

  1. A modelling exercise on the importance of ternary alkaline earth carbonate species of uranium(VI) in the inorganic speciation of natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vercouter, Thomas; Reiller, Pascal E.; Ansoborlo, Eric; Février, Laureline; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Lomenech, Claire; Philippini, Violaine

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The U(VI) speciation in natural waters has been modelled through a modelling exercise. • The results evidence the importance of alkaline earth U(VI) carbonate complexes. • Possible solubility-controlling phases were reported and discussed. • The differences were related to the choice and reliability of thermodynamic data. • Databases need to be improved for reliable U(VI) speciation calculations. - Abstract: Predictive modelling of uranium speciation in natural waters can be achieved using equilibrium thermodynamic data and adequate speciation software. The reliability of such calculations is highly dependent on the equilibrium reactions that are considered as entry data, and the values chosen for the equilibrium constants. The working group “Speciation” of the CETAMA (Analytical methods establishment committee of the French Atomic Energy commission, CEA) has organized a modelling exercise, including four participants, in order to compare modellers’ selections of data and test thermodynamic data bases regarding the calculation of U(VI) inorganic speciation. Six different compositions of model waters were chosen so that to check the importance of ternary alkaline earth carbonate species of U(VI) on the aqueous speciation, and the possible uranium solid phases as solubility-limiting phases. The comparison of the results from the participants suggests (i) that it would be highly valuable for end-users to review thermodynamic constants of ternary carbonate species of U(VI) in a consistent way and implement them in available speciation data bases, and (ii) stresses the necessary care when using data bases to avoid biases and possible erroneous calculations

  2. Use of combined microscopic and spectroscopic techniques to reveal interactions between uranium and Microbacterium sp. A9, a strain isolated from the Chernobyl exclusion zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas [CEA, DSV, IBEB, SBVME, LIPM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); CNRS, UMR 7265, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Université d' Aix-Marseille, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/L2BT, bat 183, B.P. 3, F-13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chapon, Virginie [CEA, DSV, IBEB, SBVME, LIPM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); CNRS, UMR 7265, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Université d' Aix-Marseille, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Coppin, Fréderic; Floriani, Magali [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/L2BT, bat 183, B.P. 3, F-13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Vercouter, Thomas [CEA, DEN, DANS, DPC SEARS, LANIE, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Sergeant, Claire [Univ Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Camilleri, Virginie [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/L2BT, bat 183, B.P. 3, F-13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Berthomieu, Catherine [CEA, DSV, IBEB, SBVME, LIPM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); CNRS, UMR 7265, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Université d' Aix-Marseille, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Février, Laureline, E-mail: laureline.fevrier@irsn.fr [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/L2BT, bat 183, B.P. 3, F-13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • Microbacterium sp. A9 develops various detoxification mechanisms. • Microbacterium sp. A9 promotes metal efflux from the cells. • Microbacterium sp. A9 releases phosphate to prevent uranium entrance in the cells. • Microbacterium sp. A9 stores U intracellularly as autunite. - Abstract: Although uranium (U) is naturally found in the environment, soil remediation programs will become increasingly important in light of certain human activities. This work aimed to identify U(VI) detoxification mechanisms employed by a bacteria strain isolated from a Chernobyl soil sample, and to distinguish its active from passive mechanisms of interaction. The ability of the Microbacterium sp. A9 strain to remove U(VI) from aqueous solutions at 4 °C and 25 °C was evaluated, as well as its survival capacity upon U(VI) exposure. The subcellular localisation of U was determined by TEM/EDX microscopy, while functional groups involved in the interaction with U were further evaluated by FTIR; finally, the speciation of U was analysed by TRLFS. We have revealed, for the first time, an active mechanism promoting metal efflux from the cells, during the early steps following U(VI) exposure at 25 °C. The Microbacterium sp. A9 strain also stores U intracellularly, as needle-like structures that have been identified as an autunite group mineral. Taken together, our results demonstrate that this strain exhibits a high U(VI) tolerance based on multiple detoxification mechanisms. These findings support the potential role of the genus Microbacterium in the remediation of aqueous environments contaminated with U(VI) under aerobic conditions.

  3. Interaction and transport of actinides in natural clay rock with consideration of humic substances and clay organics. Characterization and quantification of the influence of clay organics on the interaction and diffusion of uranium and americium in the clay. Joint project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhard, Gert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (Germany). Inst. of Radiochemistry; Schmeide, Katja; Joseph, Claudia; Sachs, Susanne; Steudtner, Robin; Raditzky, Bianca; Guenther, Alix

    2011-07-01

    , was found to be endothermic and entropy-driven. In contrast, the complex stability constants determined for U(VI) humate complexation at 20 and 40 C are comparable, however, decrease at 60 C. For aqueous U(IV) citrate, succinate, mandelate and glycolate species stability constants were determined. These ligands, especially citrate, increase solubility and mobility of U(IV) in solution due to complexation. The U(VI) sorption onto crushed Opalinus Clay (OPA, Mont Terri, Switzerland) was studied in the absence and presence of HA or low molecular weight organic acids, in dependence on temperature and CO2 presence using OPA pore water as background electrolyte. Distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) were determined for the sorption of U(VI) and HA onto OPA with (0.0222 {+-} 0.0004) m{sup 3}/kg and (0.129 {+-} 0.006) m{sup 3}/kg, respectively. The U(VI) sorption is not influenced by HA ({<=}50 mg/L), however, decreased by low molecular weight organic acids ({>=} 1 x 10{sup -5} M), especially by citrate and tartrate. With increasing temperature, the U(VI) sorption increases both in the absence and in the presence of clay organics. The U(VI) diffusion in compacted OPA is not influenced by HA at 25 and 60 C. Predictions of the U(VI) diffusion show that an increase of the temperature to 60 C does not accelerate the migration of U(VI). With regard to uranium-containing waste, it is concluded that OPA is suitable as host rock for a future nuclear waste repository since OPA has a good retardation potential for U(VI). (orig.)

  4. Interaction and transport of actinides in natural clay rock with consideration of humic substances and clay organics. Characterization and quantification of the influence of clay organics on the interaction and diffusion of uranium and americium in the clay. Joint project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, Gert; Schmeide, Katja; Joseph, Claudia; Sachs, Susanne; Steudtner, Robin; Raditzky, Bianca; Guenther, Alix

    2011-01-01

    and entropy-driven. In contrast, the complex stability constants determined for U(VI) humate complexation at 20 and 40 C are comparable, however, decrease at 60 C. For aqueous U(IV) citrate, succinate, mandelate and glycolate species stability constants were determined. These ligands, especially citrate, increase solubility and mobility of U(IV) in solution due to complexation. The U(VI) sorption onto crushed Opalinus Clay (OPA, Mont Terri, Switzerland) was studied in the absence and presence of HA or low molecular weight organic acids, in dependence on temperature and CO2 presence using OPA pore water as background electrolyte. Distribution coefficients (K d ) were determined for the sorption of U(VI) and HA onto OPA with (0.0222 ± 0.0004) m 3 /kg and (0.129 ± 0.006) m 3 /kg, respectively. The U(VI) sorption is not influenced by HA (≤50 mg/L), however, decreased by low molecular weight organic acids (≥ 1 x 10 -5 M), especially by citrate and tartrate. With increasing temperature, the U(VI) sorption increases both in the absence and in the presence of clay organics. The U(VI) diffusion in compacted OPA is not influenced by HA at 25 and 60 C. Predictions of the U(VI) diffusion show that an increase of the temperature to 60 C does not accelerate the migration of U(VI). With regard to uranium-containing waste, it is concluded that OPA is suitable as host rock for a future nuclear waste repository since OPA has a good retardation potential for U(VI). (orig.)

  5. Fleet Readiness Center - Southeast Technology Development Program (Cadmium & Hexavalent Chromium Reduction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Fleet Readiness Center - Southeast TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (Cadmium & Hexavalent Chromium Reduction) Jack Benfer Senior Materials...Development Program (Cadmium & Hexavalent Chromium Reduction) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...Rinse Black Oxide Rinse CRES Passivation Chrome Plating Cadmium Plating Cadmium Brush Plating Class N (TRL 9) Class N (TRL 7) Class N (TRL 6

  6. Linking specific heterotrophic bacterial populations to bioreduction of uranium and nitrate using stable isotope probing in contaminated subsurface sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akob, Denise M.; Kerkhof, Lee; Kusel, Kirsten; Watson, David B.; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Kostka, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Shifts in terminal electron-accepting processes during biostimulation of uranium-contaminated sediments were linked to the composition of stimulated microbial populations using DNA-based stable isotope probing. Nitrate reduction preceded U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction in [ 13 C]ethanol-amended microcosms. The predominant, active denitrifying microbial groups were identified as members of the Betaproteobacteria, whereas Actinobacteria dominated under metal-reducing conditions.

  7. Comparison of heavy metals and uranium removal using adsorbent in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Yun, Hunsik

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates heavy metals (As, Ni, Zn, Cd, and Pb) and uranium removal onto geomaterials (limestone, black shale, and concrete) and biosorbents (Pseudomonas putida and starfish) from waste in soil. Geomaterials or biosorbents with a high capacity for heavy metals and uranium can be obtained and employed of with little cost. For investigating the neutralization capacity, the change in pH, Eh, and EC as a function of time was quantified. The adsorption of heavy metals and uranium by the samples was influenced by pH, and increased with increasing heavy metals and uranium concentrations. Dead cells adsorbed the largest quantity of all heavy metals than lother sorbents. The adsorption capacity followed the order: U(VI) > Pb > Cd > Ni. The results also suggest that bacterial membrane cells can be used successfully in the treatment of high strength metal-contaminated soil.

  8. Removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution using TiO{sub 2} modified β-zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Peng; Yuan, Ni; Xiong, Wei; Wu, Hanyu; Pan, Duoqiang; Wu, Wangsuo [Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry and Nuclear Environment Laboratory; Ministry of Education, Lanzhou (China). Key Laboratory of Special Function Materials and Structure Design

    2017-07-01

    β-Zeolite was synthesized and modified with TiO{sub 2}. The synthesized materials were characterized and used for removal of U(VI) from aqueous solutions. The influences of pH, contact time and temperature on U(VI) adsorption onto modified β-zeolite by TiO{sub 2} were studied by batch technique, and XPS was employed to analysed the experimental data. The dynamic process showed that the adsorption of U(VI) onto TiO{sub 2}/β-zeolite matched the pseudo-second-order kinetics model, and the adsorption of U(VI) were significantly dependent on pH values. Through simulating the adsorption isotherms by Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubini-Radushkevich (D-R) models, it could be seen, respectively that the adsorption patterns of U(VI) onto TiO{sub 2}/β-zeolite were mainly controlled by surface complexation, and the adsorption processes were endothermic and spontaneous. The modification of β-zeolite by TiO{sub 2} it shows a novel material for the removing of U(VI) from water environment for industrialized application.

  9. Sequential potentiometric determination of uranium and plutonium in a single aliquot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, V.K.; Charyulu, M.M.; Natarajan, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    A method is reported for sequential potentiometric determination of uranium and plutonium present is an aliquot. Plutonium is first determined by oxidizing it to the hexavalent state with perchloric acid followed by iron(II) reduction and titration of excess ferrous iron with chromium(VI). Uranium is subsequently determined by reduction to the quadrivalent state using titanium(III) and titration with vanadium(V). The interference of plutonium and iron(II) is eliminated by the addition of a mixture containing sulfamic acid, nitric acid, and molybdenum(VI). The results of the analysis of mixture containing 3-5 mg quantities of uranium and plutonium are reliable with errors less than 0.3% and 0.2%, respectively. The application of the method for the analysis of mixtures containing various amounts of uranium and plutonium has been examined. (author)

  10. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics: Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding Effectiveness (SE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Determine the suitability of trivalent chromium conversion coatings that meet the requirements of MIL-DTL-5541, Type II, for use in applications where high-frequency electrical performance is important. Evaluate the ability of hexavalent chrome free pretreated aluminum to form adequate EMI seals, and maintain that seal while being subjected to harsh environmental conditions. Assess the performance of trivalent chromium pretreatments against a known control hexavalent chrome pretreatment before and after they have been exposed to a set of environmental conditions. It is known that environmental testing causes a decrease in shielding effectiveness when hexavalent chrome pretreatments are used (Alodine 1200s). Need to determine how shielding effectiveness will be affected with the use of hexavalent chrome free pretreatments. Performance will be assessed by evaluating shielding effectiveness (SE) test data from a variety of test samples comprised of different aluminum types and/or conversion coatings. The formation of corrosion will be evaluated between the mating surfaces and gasket to assess the corrosion resistant properties of the pretreatments, comparing the hexavalent control to the hexavalent chrome free pretreatments.

  11. Kinetic analysis and modeling of oleate and ethanol stimulated uranium (VI) bio-reduction in contaminated sediments under sulfate reduction conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fan, E-mail: zhangfan@itpcas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Wu Weimin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Parker, Jack C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Mehlhorn, Tonia [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kelly, Shelly D.; Kemner, Kenneth M. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Zhang, Gengxin [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Schadt, Christopher; Brooks, Scott C. [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Criddle, Craig S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Watson, David B. [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Jardine, Philip M. [Biosystems Engineering and Soil Science Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Microcosm tests with uranium contaminated sediments were performed to explore the feasibility of using oleate as a slow-release electron donor for U(VI) reduction in comparison to ethanol. Oleate degradation proceeded more slowly than ethanol with acetate produced as an intermediate for both electron donors under a range of initial sulfate concentrations. A kinetic microbial reduction model was developed and implemented to describe and compare the reduction of sulfate and U(VI) with oleate or ethanol. The reaction path model considers detailed oleate/ethanol degradation and the production and consumption of intermediates, acetate and hydrogen. Although significant assumptions are made, the model tracked the major trend of sulfate and U(VI) reduction and describes the successive production and consumption of acetate, concurrent with microbial reduction of aqueous sulfate and U(VI) species. The model results imply that the overall rate of U(VI) bioreduction is influenced by both the degradation rate of organic substrates and consumption rate of intermediate products.

  12. Kinetic analysis and modeling of oleate and ethanol stimulated uranium (VI) bio-reduction in contaminated sediments under sulfate reduction conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fan; Wu Weimin; Parker, Jack C.; Mehlhorn, Tonia; Kelly, Shelly D.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Zhang, Gengxin; Schadt, Christopher; Brooks, Scott C.; Criddle, Craig S.; Watson, David B.; Jardine, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Microcosm tests with uranium contaminated sediments were performed to explore the feasibility of using oleate as a slow-release electron donor for U(VI) reduction in comparison to ethanol. Oleate degradation proceeded more slowly than ethanol with acetate produced as an intermediate for both electron donors under a range of initial sulfate concentrations. A kinetic microbial reduction model was developed and implemented to describe and compare the reduction of sulfate and U(VI) with oleate or ethanol. The reaction path model considers detailed oleate/ethanol degradation and the production and consumption of intermediates, acetate and hydrogen. Although significant assumptions are made, the model tracked the major trend of sulfate and U(VI) reduction and describes the successive production and consumption of acetate, concurrent with microbial reduction of aqueous sulfate and U(VI) species. The model results imply that the overall rate of U(VI) bioreduction is influenced by both the degradation rate of organic substrates and consumption rate of intermediate products.

  13. Extraction chromatography of U(VI) and Pu(IV) adsorbed on amberlite XAD-7/dibutyloctanamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, D.R.; Mahajan, G.R.; Nair, G.M.; Subramanian, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The adsorption of U(VI) and Pu(IV) into the neutral poly acrylic resin Amberlite XAD-7, impregnated with dibutyloctanamide was found to be maximum at around 6M HNO 3 . Both these ions were found to be adsorbed as their monosolvates. The thermodynamic parameters obtained from the data at different temperatures indicated that the adsorption reaction was enthalpy favoured and entropy disfavored. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab

  14. U(VI) extraction by 8-hydroxyquinoline. A comparison study in ionic liquid and in dichloromethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Li-Yong; Shi, Wei-Qun [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Lab. of Nuclear Energy Chemistry; Liao, Xiang-Hong [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Lab. of Nuclear Energy Chemistry; East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang (China). School of Nuclear Engineering and Geophysics; Liu, Zhi-Rong [East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang (China). School of Nuclear Engineering and Geophysics; Chai, Zhi-Fang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Lab. of Nuclear Energy Chemistry; Soochow Univ., Suzhou (China). School of Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences and Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine

    2017-08-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) represent a recent new class of solvents with potential application in liquid/liquid extraction based nuclear fuel reprocessing due to their unique physical and chemical properties. The work herein provides a comparison of U(VI) extraction by 8-hydroxyquinoline (HOX) in a commonly used RTIL, i.e. 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C{sub 4}mim][PF{sub 6}]) and in conventional solvent, i.e. dichloromethane (CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}). The effect of HOX concentration, solution acidity and nitrate ions on the extraction were discussed in detail, and the speciation analyses of the extracted U(VI) were performed. One of the main emphasis of this work is the extraction mechanism of U(VI) extracted from aqueous phase into RTILs and conventional solvent. In CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, the extraction occurs through a combination of ion change and neutral complexation, and the extracted complex is proposed as UO{sub 2}(OX){sub 2}HOX. In [C{sub 4}mim][PF{sub 6}], although a cation-change mechanism as previously reported for RTILs-based system was involved, the extracted complex of UO{sub 2}(OX){sub 1.5}(HOX){sub 1.5}(PF6){sub 0.5} gave a clear indication that the usage of HOX as an acidic extractant markedly inhibited the solubility loss of [C{sub 4}mim][PF{sub 6}] during the extraction by leaching H{sup +} to aqueous phase. Moreover, the extracted U(VI) in [C{sub 4}mim][PF{sub 6}] can be easily stripped by using 0.01 M nitric acid, which provides a simple way of the ionic liquid recycling.

  15. Extraction of U(VI) with unsymmetrical N-methyl-N-octyl alkylamides in toluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Guoxin; Li Yexin; Zhang Zhenwei; Cui Yu; Shandong University, Jinan; Sun Sixiu

    2005-01-01

    Extraction of U(VI) with three new unsymmetrical monoamides, N-methyl-N-octyloctylamide (MOOA), N-methyl-N-octyldecanamide (MODA), and N-methyl-N-octyldodecanamide (MODOA), from nitric acid solution employing toluene as diluent is discussed. The effects of nitric acid, sodium nitrate and extractant concentrations and also the temperature on the distribution ratio have been investigated. The extracted species were studied by IR spectrometry. (author)

  16. Ship-in-a-bottle CMPO in MIL-101(Cr) for selective uranium recovery from aqueous streams through adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Decker, Jeroen [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Center for Ordered Materials, Organometallics, and Catalysis (COMOC), Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S3, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Folens, Karel [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry and Applied Ecochemistry, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Clercq, Jeriffa [Department of Materials, Textiles, and Chemical Engineering, Industrial Catalysis and Adsorption Technology (INCAT), Ghent University, Valentin, Vaerwyckweg 1, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Meledina, Maria; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Du Laing, Gijs [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry and Applied Ecochemistry, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Der Voort, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.vandervoort@ugent.be [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Center for Ordered Materials, Organometallics, and Catalysis (COMOC), Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S3, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-08-05

    Highlights: • Highly stable metal-organic framework, MIL-101(Cr), for uses in aqueous, acidic adsorption. • Uranium recovery from low concentration acidic solutions. • One-step ship-around-the-bottle synthetic approach to incorporate CMPO in MIL-101(Cr). • Highly selective U(VI) adsorbent in competition with a high variety of metals, incl. rare earths and transition metals. • Regenerable and reusable adsorbent via 0.1 M nitric acid stripping. - Abstract: Mesoporous MIL-101(Cr) is used as host for a ship-in-a-bottle type adsorbent for selective U(VI) recovery from aqueous environments. The acid-resistant cage-type MOF is built in-situ around N,N-Diisobutyl-2-(octylphenylphosphoryl)acetamide (CMPO), a sterically demanding ligand with high U(VI) affinity. This one-step procedure yields an adsorbent which is an ideal compromise between homogeneous and heterogeneous systems, where the ligand can act freely within the pores of MIL-101, without leaching, while the adsorbent is easy separable and reusable. The adsorbent was characterized by XRD, FTIR spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, XRF, ADF-STEM and EDX, to confirm and quantify the successful encapsulation of the CMPO in MIL-101, and the preservation of the host. Adsorption experiments with a central focus on U(VI) recovery were performed. Very high selectivity for U(VI) was observed, while competitive metal adsorption (rare earths, transition metals...) was almost negligible. The adsorption capacity was calculated at 5.32 mg U/g (pH 3) and 27.99 mg U/g (pH 4), by fitting equilibrium data to the Langmuir model. Adsorption kinetics correlated to the pseudo-second-order model, where more than 95% of maximum uptake is achieved within 375 min. The adsorbed U(VI) is easily recovered by desorption in 0.1 M HNO{sub 3}. Three adsorption/desorption cycles were performed.

  17. Ship-in-a-bottle CMPO in MIL-101(Cr) for selective uranium recovery from aqueous streams through adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Decker, Jeroen; Folens, Karel; De Clercq, Jeriffa; Meledina, Maria; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Du Laing, Gijs; Van Der Voort, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Highly stable metal-organic framework, MIL-101(Cr), for uses in aqueous, acidic adsorption. • Uranium recovery from low concentration acidic solutions. • One-step ship-around-the-bottle synthetic approach to incorporate CMPO in MIL-101(Cr). • Highly selective U(VI) adsorbent in competition with a high variety of metals, incl. rare earths and transition metals. • Regenerable and reusable adsorbent via 0.1 M nitric acid stripping. - Abstract: Mesoporous MIL-101(Cr) is used as host for a ship-in-a-bottle type adsorbent for selective U(VI) recovery from aqueous environments. The acid-resistant cage-type MOF is built in-situ around N,N-Diisobutyl-2-(octylphenylphosphoryl)acetamide (CMPO), a sterically demanding ligand with high U(VI) affinity. This one-step procedure yields an adsorbent which is an ideal compromise between homogeneous and heterogeneous systems, where the ligand can act freely within the pores of MIL-101, without leaching, while the adsorbent is easy separable and reusable. The adsorbent was characterized by XRD, FTIR spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, XRF, ADF-STEM and EDX, to confirm and quantify the successful encapsulation of the CMPO in MIL-101, and the preservation of the host. Adsorption experiments with a central focus on U(VI) recovery were performed. Very high selectivity for U(VI) was observed, while competitive metal adsorption (rare earths, transition metals...) was almost negligible. The adsorption capacity was calculated at 5.32 mg U/g (pH 3) and 27.99 mg U/g (pH 4), by fitting equilibrium data to the Langmuir model. Adsorption kinetics correlated to the pseudo-second-order model, where more than 95% of maximum uptake is achieved within 375 min. The adsorbed U(VI) is easily recovered by desorption in 0.1 M HNO 3 . Three adsorption/desorption cycles were performed.

  18. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  19. Use of Cork Waste as Biosorbent for Hexavalent Chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sfaksi, Z.; Azzouz, N.; Abdelwahab, A.

    2011-01-01

    The biosorption by cork powder is considered as a new method for heavy metal removal from industrial waste waters such as chromium tanning factories. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency extent of this method using a cork powder as biosorbent for hexavalent chromium Cr(VI). The Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis permits to distinguish the type of functional groups likely to participate in metal binding. A linear form of BET isotherms for all the three used temperatures (25, 35 and 45 0 C) and a pseudo-second-order Lagergren equation of adsorption kinetics are obtained. Other experimental results highlight the meaningful influence of parameters such as contact time, pH and concentrations of the solution, on chromium adsorption rate that reach a 97% value under definite conditions particularly a pH of 2-3 values. (author)

  20. Electrochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium in ground water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Electrochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup +6}) to its trivalent state (Cr{sup +3}) is showing promising results in treating ground water at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Main Site. An electrolytic cell using stainless-steel and brass electrodes has been found to offer the most efficient reduction while yielding the least amount of precipitate. Trials have successfully lowered concentrations of Cr{sup +6} to below 11 parts per billion (micrograms/liter), the California state standard. We ran several trials to determine optimal voltage for running the cell; each trial consisted of applying a voltage between 6V and 48V for ten minutes through samples obtained at Treatment Facility C(TFC). No conclusive data has been obtained yet.

  1. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects; Uranium, uranium appauvri, effets biologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  2. Uranium toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreyra, Mariana D.; Suarez Mendez, Sebastian

    1997-01-01

    In this paper are presented the methods and procedures optimized by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) for the determination of: natural uranium mass, activity of enriched uranium in samples of: urine, mucus, filters, filter heads, rinsing waters and Pu in urine, adopted and in some cases adapted, by the Environmental Monitoring and Internal Dosimetry Laboratory. The analyzed material corresponded to biological and environmental samples belonging to the staff professionally exposed that work in plants of the nuclear fuel cycle. For a better comprehension of the activities of this laboratory, it is included a brief description of the uranium radiochemical toxicity and the limits internationally fixed to preserve the workers health

  3. Isolation of Electrogenic Microorganisms with Potential to Reduce Hexavalent Chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mora Collazos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of cultivable microorganisms was made from the biofilm formed on the anode of a microbial fuel cell put into operation for 30 days; isolated microorganisms were evaluated for their ability to produce energy and reduce the hexavalent chromium Cr (VI. Five microorganisms were isolated, which were characterized by analysis of 16S rRNA gene, placing them in four bacterial genera: Exiguobacterium (CrMFC1, Acinetobacter (CrMFC2, Aeromonas (CrMFC3 and CrMFC5 and Serratia (CrMFC4. All isolates showed electrogenic activity and ability to reduce hexavalent chromium; the Acinetobacter CrMFC1 strain showed the best electrochemical performance registering a maximum power density of 18.61 mW/m2; the other strains showed values of maximum power density between 4.6 mW/m2and 7.1 mW/m2. Strains Aeromonas CrMFC5 and Exiguobacterium CrMFC1 showed the best rates of chromium reduction being able to reduce 100 % of the Cr (VI in less than 24 hours, the Aeromonas CrMFC5 strain was the most efficient, reducing 100 % of Cr (VI in 10 hours; the other strains reduced 100% of the contaminant after 28 to 30 hours. The microorganisms isolated in this study are hardly known for their electrogenic capacity and for reducing Cr (VI; however, show promise for their use in combined systems involving energy production system coupled to bioremediation of chromium contaminated water.

  4. Third phase formation revisited: the U(VI), HNO3 - TBP, n-dodecane system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarizia, R.; Jensen, M.P.; Borkowski, M.; Ferraro, J.R.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Littrell, K.C.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, the system U(VI), HNO 3 -tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP), n-dodecane has been revisited with the objective of gaining information on the coordination chemistry and structural evolution of the species formed in the organic phase before and after third phase formation. Chemical analyses, spectroscopic and EXAFS data indicate that U(VI) is extracted as the UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ·2TBP adduct, while the third phase species have the average composition UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ·2TBP·HNO 3 . Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements on TBP solutions loaded with only HNO 3 or with increasing amounts of U(VI) have revealed the presence, before phase splitting, of ellipsoidal aggregates with the major and minor axes up to about 64 and 15 A, respectively. The formation of these aggregates, very likely of the reverse micelle-type, is observed in all cases, that is, when only HNO 3 , only UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 , or both HNO 3 and UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 are extracted by the TBP solution. Upon third phase formation, the SANS data reveal the presence of smaller aggregates in the light organic phase, while the heavy organic phase contains pockets of diluent, each with an average of about two molecules of n-dodecane.

  5. Application of supported liquid membranes for removal of uranium from groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarizia, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Rickert, P.G.; Hodgson, K.M.

    1989-01-01

    The separation of uranium from Hanford site groundwater as studied by hollow-fiber supported liquid membranes, SLM. The carrier bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinic acid, H[DTMPep], contained in the commercial extractant Cyanex trademark 272 was used as a membrane carrier, because of its selectivity for U over calcium and magnesium. The water soluble complexing agent, 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid, HEDPA, was used as stripping agent. Polypropylene hollow-fibers and n-dodecane were used as polymeric support and diluent, respectively. Laboratory scale hollow-fiber modules were employed in a recycling mode, using as feed synthetic groundwater at pH 2, to confirm the capability of the proposed SLM system to separate and concentrate U(VI) in the strip solution. Information was obtained on the U(VI) concentration factor and on the long-term performance of the SLMs. Encouraging results were obtained both with a conventional module and with a module containing a carrier solution reservoir. Industrial scale modules were used at Hanford to test the SLM separation of U(VI) from real contaminated groundwater. The uranium concentration was reduced from approximately 3500 ppB to about 1 ppB in a few hours. 9 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  6. A Site Wide Perspective on Uranium Geochemistry at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M.; Brown, Christopher F.; Christensen, J. N.; Davis, Jim A.; Dresel, P. Evan; Liu, Chongxuan; Kelly, S. D.; McKinley, James P.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Um, Wooyong

    2007-10-26

    Uranium (U) is an important risk-driving contaminant at the Hanford Site. Over 200,000 kg have been released to the vadose zone over the course of site operations, and a number of vadose zone and groundwater plumes containing the uranyl cation [UO22+, U(VI)] have been identified. U is recognized to be of moderate-to-high mobility, conditions dependent. The site is currently making decisions on several of these plumes with long-lasting implications, and others are soon to come. Uranium is one of nature’s most intriguing and chemically complex elements. The fate and transport of U(VI) has been studied over the long lifetime of the Hanford Site by various contractors, along with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and its collaborators. Significant research has more recently been contributed by the national scientific community with support from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Science through its Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). This report represents a first attempt to integrate these findings into a cohesive view of the subsurface geochemistry of U at the Hanford Site. The objective is to inform all interested Hanford parties about the in-ground inventory of U and its geochemical behavior. This report also comments on the prospects for the development of a robust generic model to more accurately forecast future U(VI) migration at different Hanford waste sites, along with further research necessary to reach this goal.

  7. Study of uranium oxidation states in geological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidchenko, I; Salminen-Paatero, S; Rothe, J; Suksi, J

    2013-10-01

    A wet chemical method to determine uranium (U) oxidation states in geological material has been developed and tested. The problem faced in oxidation state determinations with wet chemical methods is that U redox state may change when extracted from the sample material, thereby leading to erroneous results. In order to quantify and monitor U redox behavior during the acidic extraction in the procedure, an analysis of added isotopic redox tracers, (236)U(VI) and (232)U(IV), and of variations in natural uranium isotope ratio ((234)U/(238)U) of indigenous U(IV) and U(VI) fractions was performed. Two sample materials with varying redox activity, U bearing rock and U-rich clayey lignite sediment, were used for the tests. The Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox-pair of the mineral phases was postulated as a potentially disturbing redox agent. The impact of Fe(III) on U was studied by reducing Fe(III) with ascorbic acid, which was added to the extraction solution. We observed that ascorbic acid protected most of the U from oxidation. The measured (234)U/(238)U ratio in U(IV) and U(VI) fractions in the sediment samples provided a unique tool to quantify U oxidation caused by Fe(III). Annealing (sample heating) to temperatures above 500 °C was supposed to heal ionizing radiation induced defects in the material that can disturb U redox state during extraction. Good agreement between two independent methods was obtained for DL-1a material: an average 38% of U(IV) determined by redox tracer corrected wet chemistry and 45% for XANES. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Adsorption property of Br-PADAP-impregnated multiwall carbon nanotubes towards uranium and its performance in the selective separation and determination of uranium in different environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamirchi, Ramzanali; Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad; Alahabadi, Ahmad; Sivamani, Selvaraju; Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl; Shahryari, Taher; Anastopoulos, Ioannis; Miri, Mohammad; Tran, Hai Nguyen

    2018-04-15

    A newer efficient U(VI) ion adsorbent was synthesized by impregnating Br-PADAP [2-(5-Bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino)phenol] onto multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The effects of various operation conditions on uranium adsorption (i.e., pH contact time, temperature, and initial uranium concentration) were systematically evaluated using batch experiments. The results indicated that the uranium adsorption on modified MWNCTs (5.571 × 10 -3 g/mg × min) reached faster equilibrium than that on pristine MWNCTs (4.832 × 10 -3 g/mg × min), reflecting the involvement of appropriate functional groups of Br-PADAP on the chelating ion-exchange mechanism of U(VI) adsorption. Modified MWNCTs (83.4mg/g) exhibited significantly higher maximum Langmuir adsorption capacity than pristine MWNCTs (15.1mg/g). Approximately 99% of uranium adsorbed onto modified MWNCTs can be desorbed by 2.5mL of 1M HNO 3 solution. Therefore, Br-PADAP-modified MWNCTs can server as a promising adsorbent for efficient uranium adsorption applications in water treatment. Subsequently, the proposed solid-phase extraction (using a mini-column packed with Br-PADAP/MWCNT) was successfully utilized for analysing trace uranium levels by the ICP-AES method in different environmental samples with a pre-concentration factor of 300-fold. The coexistence of other ions demonstrated an insignificant interference on the separative pre-concentration of uranium. the detection limit was recognized as 0.14μg/L, and the relative standard deviation was approximately 3.3% (n = 7). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Co-extraction and co-stripping of U(VI) and Pu(IV) using tri-iso-amyl phosphate and tri-n-butyl phosphate in n-dodecane from nitric acid media under high loading conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreenivasulu, Balija; Suresh, Ammath; Sivaraman, Nagarajan; Rao, P.R. Vasudeva [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Chemistry Group

    2016-08-01

    The extraction of Pu(IV) using 1.1 M solution of tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP)/n-dodecane (DD) from plutonium nitrate solutions in nitric acid media was examined as a function of equilibrium aqueous phase metal ion concentration and equilibrium aqueous phase acidity at 303 K. The nitric acid concentration in the organic phase was measured as a function of equilibrium organic phase plutonium concentration. The co-extraction of U(VI) and Pu(IV) was studied using 1.1 M TiAP/DD system as a function of their equilibrium aqueous phase metal ion concentration and compared with 1.1 M tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/n-DD system under identical conditions. Co-extraction and co-stripping of U(VI) and Pu(IV) were studied using 1.1 M TiAP/DD and 1.1 M TBP/DD systems in cross current mode to evaluate the number of stages required for the extraction and stripping of heavy metal ions (uranium and plutonium). The extraction and stripping efficiencies were calculated for both the systems. The saturation limit of the organic phase was also established in these studies.

  10. Co-extraction and co-stripping of U(VI) and Pu(IV) using tri-iso-amyl phosphate and tri-n-butyl phosphate in n-dodecane from nitric acid media under high loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivasulu, Balija; Suresh, Ammath; Sivaraman, Nagarajan; Rao, P.R. Vasudeva

    2016-01-01

    The extraction of Pu(IV) using 1.1 M solution of tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP)/n-dodecane (DD) from plutonium nitrate solutions in nitric acid media was examined as a function of equilibrium aqueous phase metal ion concentration and equilibrium aqueous phase acidity at 303 K. The nitric acid concentration in the organic phase was measured as a function of equilibrium organic phase plutonium concentration. The co-extraction of U(VI) and Pu(IV) was studied using 1.1 M TiAP/DD system as a function of their equilibrium aqueous phase metal ion concentration and compared with 1.1 M tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/n-DD system under identical conditions. Co-extraction and co-stripping of U(VI) and Pu(IV) were studied using 1.1 M TiAP/DD and 1.1 M TBP/DD systems in cross current mode to evaluate the number of stages required for the extraction and stripping of heavy metal ions (uranium and plutonium). The extraction and stripping efficiencies were calculated for both the systems. The saturation limit of the organic phase was also established in these studies.

  11. Carbonate effects and pH-dependence of uranium sorption onto bacteriogenic iron oxides: Kinetic and equilibrium studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsoyiannis, Ioannis A.

    2007-01-01

    The removal of U(VI) from groundwaters by adsorption onto bacteriogenic iron oxides (BIOS) has been investigated under batch mode. The adsorbent dosage, the uranium concentration, the concentration of carbonate and the use of a real groundwater spiked with uranium comprised the examined parameters. In addition, the effect of pH was examined in two different water matrixes, i.e., in distilled water and in real groundwater. Equilibrium studies were carried out to determine the maximum adsorption capacity of BIOS and the data correlated well with the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The presence of carbonate affected adversely the adsorption of U(VI) onto BIOS. The maximum adsorption capacity of BIOS was 9.25 mg g -1 at 0.1 mM carbonate concentration and decreased to 6.93 mg g -1 at 0.5 mM carbonate concentration, whereas at carbonate concentration of 2 mM practically no adsorption occurred. The data were further analyzed using the pseudo-second order kinetic equation, which fitted best the experimental results. The initial adsorption rate (h) was found to increase with decreasing the concentration of carbonate in all cases. When experiments were accomplished in the absence of carbonate, the pH values did not have an effect on the adsorption of U(VI). However, the extent of U(VI) adsorption was strongly pH-dependent when the experiments were carried out in the real groundwater. The maximum adsorption capacity increased sharply as the pH decreased and optimum removal was obtained in the pH range 3.2-4.0, thus bacteriogenic iron oxides can found application in the removal of U(VI) by adsorption from low pH or low carbonate waters

  12. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

  13. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project

  14. Tellurites of hexavalent uranium: first observation of polymerized (UO{sub 4}){sup 2-} tetraoxido cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zadoya, Anastasiya I.; Siidra, Oleg I.; Nazarchuk, Evgeny V.; Bocharov, Sergey N. [Department of Crystallography, St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Bubnova, Rimma S. [Department of Crystallography, St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Institute of Silicate Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    Two novel Ca{sub 2}(UO{sub 3})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2} (1) and K{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}O{sub 2}(TeO{sub 3}) (2) uranyl tellurites were obtained from telluric acid, used as a starting reagent for both compounds. In 1, the tetraoxido core is coordinated by TeO{sub 3} groups and UO{sub 4} squares polymerize into [UO{sub 3}] chains. The tetraoxido core coordination modes in compound 1 are unique. New layered {sub ∞}{sup 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(TeO{sub 3})O{sub 2}]{sup 2-} topology is observed for 2. Both of the compounds were studied by the means of high-temperature X-ray diffraction. The thermal decomposition of 1 and 2 is different and leads to formation of uranate compounds. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Kinetic studies on uranium stripping in D2EHPA+TBP/phosphoric acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, K.K.; Singh, D.K.; Kotekar, M.K.; Anitha, M.; Vijayalakshmi, R.; Singh, H.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: A novel process based on synergistic mixture of 1.5 M D2EHPA (di 2 ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid) + 0.2 M TBP (tri-n-butyl phosphate) to recover uranium from wet process phosphoric acid (WPA) has been developed. Though the equilibrium study for the above process has been investigated in detail its kinetic behavior has not been reported so far. The work presented in the paper is an attempt to study the kinetics of U(VI) stripping from extractant phase to aqueous phase in a constant interfacial area cell (Lewis cell). Kinetic study of the solvent extraction process helps in designing of equipment and optimizing process condition for the better utilization of solvent inventory. Mass transfer kinetics of stripping of U(VI) from loaded 1.5M D2EHPA+ 0.2M TBP with phosphoric acid (AR) has been studied over a wide range of experimental conditions such as stirring speed, interfacial contact area, phosphoric acid concentration, uranium concentration, extractant concentration in organic phase and temperature. Investigation on effect of stirring speed (100-500 rpm) on stripping of U(VI) showed that the rate constant (k) values increases linearly with increase in stirring speeds from 100 to 300 rpm (0.03 to 0.075 cm/min), while the k values were almost constant (0.0819 cm/min) in 300 to 400 rpm range, beyond 450 rpm the k values again increased due to increased turbulence at the interface. The rate constant value (∼0.0814 cm/min) was found to be independent of interfacial contact area (24.6 to 67.02 cm 2 ) available for mass transfer. The rate constants were found to increase with increase in phosphoric acid concentration (6-10M) and temperature (30-60 deg C), the values being in the range of 0.01 to 0.082 cm/min. The slopes of ln-ln plot showed that the stripping of U(VI) has a second order dependence on phosphoric acid concentration (slope∼2) at temperatures ranging from 30 to 60 deg C. The activation energy value for uranium stripping was found to be in the

  16. Rossing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    In this article the geology of the deposits of the Rossing uranium mine in Namibia is discussed. The planning of the open-pit mining, the blasting, drilling, handling and the equipment used for these processes are described

  17. Electrochemical investigations on cation-cation interaction between Np(V) and U(VI) in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, P.K.; Murali, M.S.; Pathak, P.N.; Mohapatra, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Ever since the first report on cation-cation interactions (CCIs) in 1961 by Sullivan et al., many researchers have worked on this using different techniques like optical spectroscopy and potentiometry. However, there is almost no report, in recent times, on this interesting subject using an electrochemical technique. In the present work, we set out to use simple cyclic voltammetry (CV) as a probe to study this phenomenon in the case of Np(V)-U(VI) in nitric acid medium. Accordingly, cyclic voltammograms were recorded individually for Np(V) , U(VI) in 4M HNO 3 and for solutions resulting from a titration of Np(V) with incremental additions of U(VI) in the same medium. These experiments were carried out using AutoLab 30 with three solid electrode system. Ag/AgCl was the reference electrode while Pt wires were used as working and counter electrode. The paper gives the part of CVs for successive additions of only U(VI) (1.4M) at fixed scan rate and room temperature. It can be seen that that the reduction peak shifts only slightly towards left with increased aliquots of U(VI). In contrast, the paper also gives the part of CVs for only U(VI) and for a titration mixture of fixed concentration of Np(V) and successive volume aliquot-additions of U(VI). It can be seen that there was no appreciable shift in the cathodic peak (∼ -0.15V) for additions of 1225μL of only U(VI) and 3225 μL of U(VI) in presence of Np. This showed that no change occurred till this composition. But with the addition of next aliquot of 4225μL of U(VI), there was an appreciable shift in the peak. This signified the formation of a new complex which can be attributed to the cation-cation interaction envisaged for Np(V)-U(VI). With further addition of an aliquot of 4725 μL of U(VI), it can be seen that again there was no appreciable shift in the cathodic peak position which probably underlined that the formation of the complex was complete

  18. Uranium fate in wetland mesocosms: Effects of plants at two ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small-scale continuous flow wetland mesocosms (~0.8 L) were used to evaluate how plant roots under different iron loadings affect uranium (U) mobility. When significant concentrations of ferrous iron (Fe) were present at circumneutral pH values, U concentrations in root exposed sediments were an order of magnitude greater than concentrations in root excluded sediments. Micro X-ray absorption near-edge structure (µ-XANES) spectroscopy indicated that U was associated with the plant roots primarily as U(VI) or U(V), with limited evidence of U(IV). Micro X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) of plant roots suggested that for high iron loading at circumneutral pH, U was co-located with Fe, perhaps co-precipitated with root Fe plaques, while for low iron loading at a pH of ~4 the correlation between U and Fe was not significant, consistent with previous observations of U associated with organic matter. Quantitative PCR analyses indicated that the root exposed sediments also contained elevated numbers of Geobacter spp., which are likely associated with enhanced iron cycling, but may also reduce mobile U(VI) to less mobile U(IV) species. There are significant uncertainties regarding the environmental fate of uranium (U) and efforts to minimize U exposures require understanding of its mobility in environmental systems. Much research has focused on sequestering U as solids within groundwater aquifers, where localized risks can be controlled.1 Subsurface sequestration limits t

  19. Development of flow injection analysis technique for uranium estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paranjape, A.H.; Pandit, S.S.; Shinde, S.S.; Ramanujam, A.; Dhumwad, R.K.

    1991-01-01

    Flow injection analysis is increasingly used as a process control analytical technique in many industries. It involves injection of the sample at a constant rate into a steady flowing stream of reagent and passing this mixture through a suitable detector. This paper describes the development of such a system for the analysis of uranium (VI) and (IV) and its gross gamma activity. It is amenable for on-line or automated off-line monitoring of uranium and its activity in process streams. The sample injection port is suitable for automated injection of radioactive samples. The performance of the system has been tested for the colorimetric response of U(VI) samples at 410 nm in the range of 35 to 360mg/ml in nitric acid medium using Metrohm 662 Photometer and a recorder as detector assembly. The precision of the method is found to be better than +/- 0.5%. This technique with certain modifications is used for the analysis of U(VI) in the range 0.1-3mg/ailq. by alcoholic thiocynate procedure within +/- 1.5% precision. Similarly the precision for the determination of U(IV) in the range 15-120 mg at 650 nm is found to be better than 5%. With NaI well-type detector in the flow line, the gross gamma counting of the solution under flow is found to be within a precision of +/- 5%. (author). 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  1. Temperature effect on the retention of U(VI) by SrTiO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Rosales, G.

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this research was the study of the interaction mechanisms between U(VI) ions and SrTiO 3 surfaces versus pH and temperature: 25, 50, 75 and 90 C. Firstly, a physicochemical characterization was realized (DRX, MEB, FTIR) and the surface site density was determined. The potentiometric titration data were simulated, for each temperature, using the constant capacitance model and taking into account bath protonation of the ≡Sr-OH surface sites and deprotonation of the ≡Ti-OH ones (one pK a model). Both enthalpy and entropy changes, corresponding to the surface acid-base reactions, were evaluated using the van't Hoff relation. U(VI) was sorbed onto SrTiO 3 powder in the pH range 0.5-5.0 with an U(VI) initial concentration 1.10 -4 M. By TRLIFS two U(VI) complexes were detected associated with two lifetime values (60 ± 5 and 12 ± 2 μs at 25 C). The sorption edges were simulated using FITEQL 4.0 software. The surface complexation constants of the system SrTiO 3 /U(VI) between 25 and 90 C temperature range were thus obtained with the constant capacitance model considering two reactive surface sites. It reveals that two types of surface complex, namely [(≡SrOH)(≡TiOH)UO 2 ] 2+ and [(≡TiOH)(≡TiO)UO 2+ ] 2+ , are needed to properly describe the experimental observations. By application of the van't Hoff equation, Delta R S 0 and Delta R H 0 were obtained, which indicated an endothermic sorption process. Finally, an energy transfer study was realised by TRLIFS. The energy transfer between Tb 3+ and Eu 3+ ions sorbed onto SrTiO 3 powders were investigated. The results showed that the energy transfer between Tb 3+ and Eu 3+ is a non-radiative process and follows a dipole-dipole type interaction. A formalism based on the Dexter and the Inokuti-Hirayama theories was used to calculate the distances (2,7-3,4 Angstroms between Tb 3+ and Eu 3+ onto SrTiO 3 surface. (author)

  2. Microbial reduction of uranium(VI) in sediments of different lithologies collected from Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newsome, Laura; Morris, Katherine; Trivedi, Divyesh; Atherton, Nick; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • U(VI) (aq) mobility can be controlled by stimulating biogeochemical interactions. • Indigenous microbes in varied sediments reduced U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). • Sediment cell numbers and amount of bioavailable Fe(III) could limit this process. - Abstract: The presence of uranium in groundwater at nuclear sites can be controlled by microbial processes. Here we describe the results from stimulating microbial reduction of U(VI) in sediment samples obtained from a nuclear-licensed site in the UK. A variety of different lithology sediments were selected to represent the heterogeneity of the subsurface at a site underlain by glacial outwash deposits and sandstone. The natural sediment microbial communities were stimulated via the addition of an acetate/lactate electron donor mix and were monitored for changes in geochemistry and molecular ecology. Most sediments facilitated the removal of 12 ppm U(VI) during the onset of Fe(III)-reducing conditions; this was reflected by an increase in the proportion of known Fe(III)- and U(VI)-reducing species. However U(VI) remained in solution in two sediments and Fe(III)-reducing conditions did not develop. Sequential extractions, addition of an Fe(III)-enrichment culture and most probable number enumerations revealed that a lack of bioavailable iron or low cell numbers of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria may be responsible. These results highlight the potential for stimulation of microbial U(VI)-reduction to be used as a bioremediation strategy at UK nuclear sites, and they emphasise the importance of both site-specific and borehole-specific investigations to be completed prior to implementation

  3. Kinetics and equilibrium modeling of uranium(VI) sorption by bituminous shale from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortaboy, Sinem; Atun, Gülten

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Oil shales are sedimentary rocks containing a polymeric matter in a mineral matrix. • Sorption potential of bituminous shale (BS) for uranium recovery was investigated. • U(VI) sorption increased with decreasing pH and increasing temperature. • Kinetic data were analyzed based on single and two resistance diffusion models. • The results fit well to the McKay equation assuming film and intraparticle diffusion. - Abstract: Sorption of U(VI) onto a bituminous shale (BS) from a nuclear power plant project site in Black Sea region was investigated for potential risk assessment when it releases into the environment with contaminated ground and surface water. The sorption characteristics of the BS for U(VI) recovery were evaluated as a function of contact time, adsorbent dosage, initial concentration, pH and temperature. Kinetic results fit better with pseudo-second-order model rather than pseudo-first-order. The possibility of diffusion process was analyzed based on Weber–Morris intra-particle diffusion model. The McKay equation assuming film- and intraparticle diffusion better predicted the data than the Vermeulen approximation presuming surface diffusion. Equilibrium sorption data were modeled according to the Langmuir, Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R) and Freundlich isotherm equations. Sorption capacity increased from 0.10 to 0.15 mmol g −1 in 298–318 K temperature range. FT-IR analysis and pH dependent sorption studies conducted in hydroxide and carbonate media revealed that U(VI) species were sorbed in uranyl and its hydroxo forms on the BS. Desorption studies showed that U(VI) leaching with Black Sea water was negligible from the loaded BS. The activation parameters (E a , ΔH ∗ and ΔG ∗ ) estimated from diffusion coefficients indicated the presence of an energy barrier in the sorption system. However, thermodynamic functions derived from sorption equilibrium constants showed that overall sorption process was spontaneous in nature

  4. Uranium loans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    When NUEXCO was organized in 1968, its founders conceived of a business based on uranium loans. The concept was relatively straightforward; those who found themselves with excess supplies of uranium would deposit those excesses in NUEXCO's open-quotes bank,close quotes and those who found themselves temporarily short of uranium could borrow from the bank. The borrower would pay interest based on the quantity of uranium borrowed and the duration of the loan, and the bank would collect the interest, deduct its service fee for arranging the loan, and pay the balance to those whose deposits were borrowed. In fact, the original plan was to call the firm Nuclear Bank Corporation, until it was discovered that using the word open-quotes Bankclose quotes in the name would subject the firm to various US banking regulations. Thus, Nuclear Bank Corporation became Nuclear Exchange Corporation, which was later shortened to NUEXCO. Neither the nuclear fuel market nor NUEXCO's business developed quite as its founders had anticipated. From almost the very beginning, the brokerage of uranium purchases and sales became a more significant activity for NUEXCO than arranging uranium loans. Nevertheless, loan transactions have played an important role in the international nuclear fuel market, requiring the development of special knowledge and commercial techniques

  5. Adsorption of uranium from aqueous solution by PAMAM dendron functionalized styrene divinylbenzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaiyaraja, P., E-mail: chemila07@gmail.com [Radiological Safety Division, Radiological Safety and Environmental Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India); Singha Deb, Ashish Kumar; Sivasubramanian, K. [Radiological Safety Division, Radiological Safety and Environmental Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India); Ponraju, D. [Safety Engineering Division, Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India); Venkatraman, B. [Radiological Safety Division, Radiological Safety and Environmental Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► A new chelating resin PAMAMG{sub 3} -SDB has been synthesized for uranium adsorption. ► The maximum adsorption capacity was determined to be 130.25 mg g{sup −1} at pH 5.5. ► Adsorption capacity increases linearly with increasing dendron generation. ► The adsorbed uranium shall be easily desorbed by simply adjusting the pH < 3. ► Quantitative adsorption of uranium was observed even at high ionic strength. -- Abstract: A new polymeric chelating resin was prepared by growing third generation poly(amido)amine (PAMAMG{sub 3}) dendron on the surface of styrene divinylbenzene (SDB) and characterized by FTIR, TGA and SEM. The ideal branching of dendron in the chelating resin was determined from potentiometric titration. Adsorption of uranium (VI) from aqueous solution using PAMAMG{sub 3}-SDB chelating resin was studied in a series of batch experiments. Effect of contact time, pH, ionic strength, adsorbent dose, initial U(VI) concentration, dendron generation and temperature on adsorption of U(VI) were investigated. Kinetic experiments showed that U(VI) adsorption on PAMAMG{sub 3}-SDB followed pseudo-second-order kinetics model appropriately and equilibrium data agreed well with the Langmuir isotherm model. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH°, ΔS°, ΔG°) were evaluated from temperature dependent adsorption data and the uranium adsorption on PAMAMG{sub 3}-SDB was found to be endothermic and spontaneous in nature. The sticking probability value (5.303 × 10{sup −9}), kinetic and isotherm data reveal the chemisorption of uranium on PAMAMG{sub 3}-SDB and adsorption capacity of the chelating resin was estimated to be 130.25 mg g{sup −1} at 298 K. About 99% of adsorbed U(VI) can be desorbed from PAMAMG{sub 3}-SDB by a simple acid treatment suggesting that the chelating resin is reusable.

  6. Uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskorin, B.N.; Golynko, Z.Sh.

    1981-01-01

    The process of uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores in the South Africa is considered. Flowsheets of reprocessing gold-uranium conglomerates, pile processing and uranium extraction from the ores are presented. Continuous counter flow ion-exchange process of uranium extraction using strong-active or weak-active resins is noted to be the most perspective and economical one. The ion-exchange uranium separation with the succeeding extraction is also the perspective one.

  7. Application of insoluble tannin to recovery of uranium, TRU and heavy metals elements form radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Kazuhiko; Shirato, Wataru; Nakamura, Yasuo; Matsumura, Tatsuro; Takeshita, Kenji; Nakano, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    Mitsubishi Nuclear Fuel Co., Ltd. (MNF) has developed a new adsorbent, TANNIX (tread mark), for the recovery of uranium, TRU and heavy metal elements in the liquid waste, in which TANNIX derived from a natural tannin polymer. TANNIX has same advantages that handling is easier than that of standard IX-resin, and that the volume of secondary waste is reduced by burning the used TANNIX. We have replaced its radioactive liquid waste treatment system from the conventional co-precipitation process to adsorption process by using TANNIX. TANNIX was founded to be more effective for the recovery of Pu, TRU, and hexavalent chromium Cr-(VI) as well as Uranium. (author)

  8. Acetate availability and its influence on sustainable bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Davis, James A.; Wilkins, Michael J.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Steefel, Carl I.; Yang, Li; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Spane, Frank A.; Kerkhof, L.; McGuinness, L.; Dayvault, Richard; Lovley, Derek

    2011-01-01

    Field biostimulation experiments at the U.S. Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, Colorado, have demonstrated that uranium concentrations in groundwater can be decreased to levels below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) drinking water standard (0.126 (micro)M). During successive summer experiments - referred to as 'Winchester' (2007) and 'Big Rusty' (2008) - acetate was added to the aquifer to stimulate the activity of indigenous dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria capable of reductively immobilizing uranium. The two experiments differed in the length of injection (31 vs. 110 days), the maximum concentration of acetate (5 vs. 30 mM), and the extent to which iron reduction ('Winchester') or sulfate reduction ('Big Rusty') was the predominant metabolic process. In both cases, rapid removal of U(VI) from groundwater occurred at calcium concentrations (6 mM) and carbonate alkalinities (8 meq/L) where Ca-UO2-CO3 ternary complexes constitute >90% of uranyl species in groundwater. Complete consumption of acetate and increased alkalinity (>30 meq/L) accompanying the onset of sulfate reduction corresponded to temporary increases in U(VI); however, by increasing acetate concentrations in excess of available sulfate (10 mM), low U(VI) concentrations (0.1-0.05 (micro)M) were achieved for extended periods of time (>140 days). Uniform delivery of acetate during 'Big Rusty' was impeded due to decreases in injection well permeability, likely resulting from biomass accumulation and carbonate and sulfide mineral precipitation. Such decreases were not observed during the short-duration 'Winchester' experiment. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes demonstrated that Geobacter sp. and Geobacter-like strains dominated the groundwater community profile during iron reduction, with 13C stable isotope probing (SIP) results confirming these strains were actively utilizing acetate to

  9. Uranium extremophily is an adaptive, rather than intrinsic, feature for extremely thermoacidophilic Metallosphaera species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arpan; Wheaton, Garrett H.; Blum, Paul H.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoacidophilic archaea are found in heavy metal-rich environments, and, in some cases, these microorganisms are causative agents of metal mobilization through cellular processes related to their bioenergetics. Given the nature of their habitats, these microorganisms must deal with the potentially toxic effect of heavy metals. Here, we show that two thermoacidophilic Metallosphaera species with nearly identical (99.99%) genomes differed significantly in their sensitivity and reactivity to uranium (U). Metallosphaera prunae, isolated from a smoldering heap on a uranium mine in Thüringen, Germany, could be viewed as a “spontaneous mutant” of Metallosphaera sedula, an isolate from Pisciarelli Solfatara near Naples. Metallosphaera prunae tolerated triuranium octaoxide (U3O8) and soluble uranium [U(VI)] to a much greater extent than M. sedula. Within 15 min following exposure to “U(VI) shock,” M. sedula, and not M. prunae, exhibited transcriptomic features associated with severe stress response. Furthermore, within 15 min post-U(VI) shock, M. prunae, and not M. sedula, showed evidence of substantial degradation of cellular RNA, suggesting that transcriptional and translational processes were aborted as a dynamic mechanism for resisting U toxicity; by 60 min post-U(VI) shock, RNA integrity in M. prunae recovered, and known modes for heavy metal resistance were activated. In addition, M. sedula rapidly oxidized solid U3O8 to soluble U(VI) for bioenergetic purposes, a chemolithoautotrophic feature not previously reported. M. prunae, however, did not solubilize solid U3O8 to any significant extent, thereby not exacerbating U(VI) toxicity. These results point to uranium extremophily as an adaptive, rather than intrinsic, feature for Metallosphaera species, driven by environmental factors. PMID:23010932

  10. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The economic and environmental sustainability of uranium mining has been analysed by Monash University researcher Dr Gavin Mudd in a paper that challenges the perception that uranium mining is an 'infinite quality source' that provides solutions to the world's demand for energy. Dr Mudd says information on the uranium industry touted by politicians and mining companies is not necessarily inaccurate, but it does not tell the whole story, being often just an average snapshot of the costs of uranium mining today without reflecting the escalating costs associated with the process in years to come. 'From a sustainability perspective, it is critical to evaluate accurately the true lifecycle costs of all forms of electricity production, especially with respect to greenhouse emissions, ' he says. 'For nuclear power, a significant proportion of greenhouse emissions are derived from the fuel supply, including uranium mining, milling, enrichment and fuel manufacture.' Dr Mudd found that financial and environmental costs escalate dramatically as the uranium ore is used. The deeper the mining process required to extract the ore, the higher the cost for mining companies, the greater the impact on the environment and the more resources needed to obtain the product. I t is clear that there is a strong sensitivity of energy and water consumption and greenhouse emissions to ore grade, and that ore grades are likely to continue to decline gradually in the medium to long term. These issues are critical to the current debate over nuclear power and greenhouse emissions, especially with respect to ascribing sustainability to such activities as uranium mining and milling. For example, mining at Roxby Downs is responsible for the emission of over one million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year and this could increase to four million tonnes if the mine is expanded.'

  11. Novel Insights Into Microbial Uranium Reduction and Immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, F. E.; Fletcher, K.; Thomas, S.; Kemner, K. M.; Boyanov, M.; Sanford, R.

    2010-12-01

    Many ferric iron- and manganese oxide-reducing bacteria affect the oxidation state and complexation of toxic radionuclides in subsurface environments. Relevant to uranium (U) speciation are bacteria that reduce predominantly water-soluble and mobile U(VI) to U(IV), which has reduced solubility and typically forms the uraninite (UO2) mineral. Gram-negative model organisms including Shewanella spp., Geobacter spp., and more recently Anaeromyxobacter spp. use U(VI) as growth-supporting electron acceptor; however, the biomass yields are lower than predicted based on the theoretical free energy changes associated with U(VI)-to-U(IV) reduction. Recent findings demonstrated that U(VI) reduction is not limited to Gram-negative bacteria, and members of the genus Desulfitobacterium, which are commonly found in soil and subsurface environments, share the ability to reduce U(VI). Interestingly, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis demonstrated that the U(IV) produced in cultures of five Desulfitobacterium spp. was not UO2 but rather a phase or mineral composed of mononuclear U(IV) atoms. Since the properties of the reduced product influence U(IV) fate, knowledge of the diversity of U reduction mechanisms and the stability of the end products is desirable for controlling and predicting U fate. For example, UO2 is susceptible to reoxidation by oxidants, and oxic/anoxic interface processes are controlling the stability of the precipitated material. In other words, metal reducers that thrive at the oxic/anoxic interface are likely key players affecting long-term U fate. Anaeromyxobacter spp. are facultative microaerophiles and grow with oxygen as electron acceptor at partial pressures equal to or below 0.18 atm. Thus, Anaeromyxobacter are uniquely adapted to life at the oxic-anoxic interface where they consume oxygen and take advantage of oxidized metal species including U(VI) as electron acceptors. The application of 16S rRNA gene-targeted qPCR approaches

  12. PHASE ANALYSES OF URANIUM BEARING MINERALS FROM THE HIGH GRADE ORE, NOPAL I, PENA BLANCA, MEXICO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, M.; Goodell, P.; Kelts, A.; Anthony, E.Y.; Fayek, M.; Fan, C.; Beshears, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Nopal I uranium deposit is located in the Pena Blanca district, approximately 40 miles north of Chihuahua City, Mexico. The deposit was formed by hydrothermal processes within the fracture zone of welded silicic volcanic tuff. The ages of volcanic formations are between 35 to 44 m.y. and there was secondary silicification of most of the formations. After the formation of at least part of the uranium deposit, the ore body was uplifted above the water table and is presently exposed at the surface. Detailed petrographic characterization, electron microprobe backscatter electron (BSE) imagery, and selected x-ray maps for the samples from Nopal I high-grade ore document different uranium phases in the ore. There are at least two stages of uranium precipitation. A small amount of uraninite is encapsulated in silica. Hexavalent uranium may also have been a primary precipitant. The uranium phases were precipitated along cleavages of feldspars, and along fractures in the tuff. Energy dispersive spectrometer data and x-ray maps suggest that the major uranium phases are uranophane and weeksite. Substitutions of Ca and K occur in both phases, implying that conditions were variable during the mineralization/alteration process, and that compositions of the original minerals have a major influence on later stage alteration. Continued study is needed to fully characterize uranium behavior in these semi-arid to arid conditions

  13. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, H.K.; Melvin, J.G.

    1988-06-01

    Canada is the world's largest producer and exporter of uranium, most of which is enriched elsewhere for use as fuel in LWRs. The feasibility of a Canadian uranium-enrichment enterprise is therefore a perennial question. Recent developments in uranium-enrichment technology, and their likely impacts on separative work supply and demand, suggest an opportunity window for Canadian entry into this international market. The Canadian opportunity results from three particular impacts of the new technologies: 1) the bulk of the world's uranium-enrichment capacity is in gaseous diffusion plants which, because of their large requirements for electricity (more than 2000 kW·h per SWU), are vulnerable to competition from the new processes; 2) the decline in enrichment costs increases the economic incentive for the use of slightly-enriched uranium (SEU) fuel in CANDU reactors, thus creating a potential Canadian market; and 3) the new processes allow economic operation on a much smaller scale, which drastically reduces the investment required for market entry and is comparable with the potential Canadian SEU requirement. The opportunity is not open-ended. By the end of the century the enrichment supply industry will have adapted to the new processes and long-term customer/supplier relationships will have been established. In order to seize the opportunity, Canada must become a credible supplier during this century

  14. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives - Pretreatments with Primers Screening Final Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J.; Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (hex chrome or Cr(VI)) is a widely used element within applied coating systems because of its self-healing and corrosion-resistant properties. The replacement of hex chrome in the processing of aluminum for aviation and aerospace applications remains a goal of great significance. Aluminum is the major manufacturing material of structures and components in the space flight arena. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) are engaged in a collaborative effort to test and evaluate alternatives to hexavalent chromium containing corrosion coating systems. NASA and ESA share common risks related to material obsolescence associated with hexavalent chromium used in corrosion-resistant coatings. In the United States, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) studies have concluded that hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic and poses significant risk to human health. On May 5, 2011, amendments to the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) were issued in the Federal Register. Subpart 223.73 prohibits contracts from requiring hexavalent chromium in deliverables unless certain exceptions apply. Subpart 252.223-7008 provides the contract clause prohibiting contractors and subcontractors from using or delivering hexavalent chromium in a concentration greater than 0.1 percent by weight for all new contracts associated with supplies, maintenance and repair services, and construction materials. ESA faces its own increasingly stringent regulations within European directives such as Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical (REACH) substances and the Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive (RoHS) which have set a mid-2017 sunset date for hexavalent chromium. NASA and ESA continue to search for an alternative to hexavalent chromium in coatings applications that meet their performance requirements in corrosion protection, cost, operability, and health and

  15. Treatment of hexavalent chrome by bacteria. Saikin ni yoru rokka kuromu no shori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otake, H [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1993-08-01

    A biological reduction method in which hazardous hexavalent chrome is reduced by bacteria is explained as one of the bioremediation technologies. Those bacteria are separated from active sludge in the urban sewage treatment plant. The hexavalent chrome-reducing bacteria were isolated by cultivating the sludge. They were Enterobacter cloacae which are intestinal bacteria. Then, they were named HO1 stock. As a result of analyzing the reduction mechanism, it was made clear that the function is localized in the cellular endosporium and that the reduction is made by utilizing the electronic transfer system of endosporium. Under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, they convert the hexavalent chrome into the trivalent chrome outside the cells. As a result of test, it was known that 5mM hexavalent chrome can be treated in one day. A quick reduction was confirmed also through an experiment in which carbon source was added to the industrial wastewater. If used for the treatment of sludge/water contaminated by hexavalent chrome, the present reduction by bacteria has the following advantages: The highest reduction rate is given near pH=7 at ordinary temperatures. It is not necessary to add chemicals. Energy is not needed. It is a disadvantageous fact that the present bacteria, if exposed to oxygen, become inactive. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Comparative EXAFS study of uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) sorption onto kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, T.; Amayri, S.; Reich, Ta.; Jermolajev, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: We investigated the surface sorption process of U(VI) and Np(V) on kaolinite by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy in the 10 μM concentration range. Batch experiments with kaolinite in CO 2 -equilibrated systems showed that the adsorption edge of U(VI) occurs at pH 5.5, i.e., near the pH PZC of kaolinite. The adsorption edge of Np(V) occurs well above the pH PZC value at pH 8.5. This may indicate that the bonds between Np(V) and the surface functional groups of kaolinite are not as strong as in the case of U(VI). U(VI) and Np(V) have in common that the amount which is adsorbed decreases when the pH is increased beyond the absorption maximum. This behavior can be attributed to the formation of U(VI) and Np(V) carbonato complexes in the aqueous solutions. The aim of this comparative EXAFS study was to investigate the reason for the different affinities of U(VI) and Np(V) for kaolinite by measuring their local environments at the clay surface. Samples were prepared from 4 g/L kaolinite, 0.1 M NaClO 4 , pH 3.0 - 10.5, presence and absence of ambient CO 2 . The U L 3 - and Np L 2 -edge EXAFS spectra of the wet paste samples were measured at room temperature in fluorescence mode at the Rossendorf Beamline (ROBL) at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The measured U-O and U-Al/Si distances indicate inner-sphere sorption of U(VI) on kaolinite. There was no evidence of uranium neighbors in the EXAFS spectra, suggesting that the adsorbed U(VI) complexes were predominantly monomeric. The average distance between uranium and its equatorial oxygen atoms, O eq , increased from 2.32 to 2.38 Angstrom in the presence of atmospheric CO 2 when the pH was increased from 5.0 to 8.5. In the CO 2 -free system, the U-O eq distance was independent from pH and equal to 2.32 Angstrom. The lengthening of the average U-O eq distance in the presence of carbonate (or bicarbonate) suggests the formation of ternary U

  17. Uranium update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is about the current uranium mining situation, especially that in Saskatchewan. Canada has a unique advantage with the Saskatchewan uranium deposits. Making the most of this opportunity is important to Canada. The following is reviewed: project development and the time and capital it takes to bring a new project into production; the supply and demand situation to show where the future production fits into the world market; and our foreign competition and how we have to be careful not to lose our opportunity. (author)

  18. Determination of kinetic coefficients for the reduction and removal of uranium from water by the Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, M.D.; Barton, L.L.; Thomson, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium contamination of groundwater and surface water from abandoned uranium mill tailings piles is a serious concern in many areas of the western United States. U(VI) is soluble in water and, as a result, is relatively mobile in the environment. U(IV), however, is generally insoluble in water and, therefore, is not subject to aqueous transport. In recent years, researchers have discovered that certain microorganisms, such as the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desuffiovibrio desulfricans, can mediate the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by anaerobic respiration. Although the ability of this microorganism to reduce U(VI) has been studied in some detail by previous researchers, the kinetics of the reaction have not been characterized. The purpose of this research was to perform kinetic studies on Desuffiovibrio desulfricans during simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium and to determine the mineral phase of uranium after it has been reduced. The studies were conducted in a laboratory-scale chemostat under substrate-limited growth conditions with pyruvate as the substrate. The maximum rate of substrate utilization (k) was determined to be 4.70 days -1 while the half-velocity constant (Ks) was 140 mg CODA. The yield coefficient (Y) was determined to be 0. 17 mg cells/mg COD while the endogenous decay coefficient (kd) was found to be 0.072 days -1 . After reduction, U(IV) precipitated from solution in the uraninite (UO 2 ) phase as predicted by thermodynamics. Uranium removal efficiency as high as 90% was achieved in the chemostat

  19. Proof of U(VI) sorption on Acidovorax facilis by TRLFS and EF-TEM/EELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawczyk-Baersch, Evelyn; Gerber, Ulrike [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Biogeochemistry; Steudtner, Robin [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Surface Processes

    2016-07-01

    In EF-TEM/EELS studies it was shown that U(VI) is sorbed mainly on the outer membrane of Acidovorax facilis. The results are supported by TRLFS measurements, which were performed on the pellet of the cells. In comparison to reference spectra of some cell membrane components, the measured emission spectra of the A. facilis pellet show the best agreement with those of the Uranyl-lipopolysaccharide-complex. Hence, it can be concluded that phosphoryl groups may be the main binding sites for uranyl, located in the lipopolysaccharide unit in the outer membrane.

  20. Interaction of Cucurbit(5)uril with U(VI) in formic acid water medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, Neetika; Kar, Aishwarya; Tomar, B.S.; Nayak, S.K.; Mohapatra, M.

    2015-01-01

    Cucurbit(n)urils (CBn) are a new class of macrocyclic cage compounds capable of binding organic and inorganic species, owing to their unique pumpkin like structure comprising of both hydrophobic cavity and hydrophilic portal. Complexation of U(VI) with Cucurbit(5)uril (CB5) in 50 wt% formic acid medium has been studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy. In order to understand the species formed, the interaction of formic acid with CB5 was studied by monitoring fluorescence of CB5. Formic was found to form 1:1 species with interaction constant (K) 17.4 M -1 . (author)

  1. Modeling of the Enceladus water vapor jets for interpreting UVIS star and solar occultation observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Esposito, Larry W.; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Hansen, Candice J.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most spectacular discoveries of the Cassini mission is jets emitting from the southern pole of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. The composition of the jets is water vapor and salty ice grains with traces of organic compounds. Jets, merging into a wide plume at a distance, are observed by multiple instruments on Cassini. Recent observations of the visible dust plume by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) identified as many as 98 jet sources located along “tiger stripes” [Porco et al. 2014]. There is a recent controversy on the question if some of these jets are “optical illusion” caused by geometrical overlap of continuous source eruptions along the “tiger stripes” in the field of view of ISS [Spitale et al. 2015]. The Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed occultations of several stars and the Sun by the water vapor plume of Enceladus. During the solar occultation separate collimated gas jets were detected inside the background plume [Hansen et al., 2006 and 2011]. These observations directly provide data about water vapor column densities along the line of sight of the UVIS instrument and could help distinguish between the presence of only localized or also continuous sources. We use Monte Carlo simulations and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to model the plume of Enceladus with multiple (or continuous) jet sources. The models account for molecular collisions, gravitational and Coriolis forces. The models result in the 3-D distribution of water vapor density and surface deposition patterns. Comparison between the simulation results and column densities derived from UVIS observations provide constraints on the physical characteristics of the plume and jets. The specific geometry of the UVIS observations helps to estimate the production rates and velocity distribution of the water molecules emitted by the individual jets.Hansen, C. J. et al., Science 311:1422-1425 (2006); Hansen, C. J. et al, GRL 38:L11202 (2011

  2. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to American alligator cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S; Wise, Catherine; Xie, Hong; Guillette, Louis J; Zhu, Cairong; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-02-01

    Metals are a common pollutant in the aquatic ecosystem. With global climate change, these levels are anticipated to rise as lower pH levels allow sediment bound metals to be released. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is an apex predator in the aquatic ecosystem and is considered a keystone species; as such it serves as a suitable monitor for localized pollution. One metal of increasing concern is hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). It is present in the aquatic environment and is a known human carcinogen and reproductive toxicant. We measured the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Cr(VI) in American alligator cells derived from scute tissue. We found that particulate and soluble Cr(VI) are both cytotoxic and genotoxic to alligator cells in a concentration-dependent manner. These data suggest that alligators may be used as a model for assessing the effects of environmental Cr(VI) contamination as well as for other metals of concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipid peroxidation in workers exposed to hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y L; Chen, C Y; Sheu, J Y; Chuang, I C; Pan, J H; Lin, T H

    1999-02-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether exposure to hexavalent chromium induces lipid peroxidation in human. This study involved 25 chrome-plating factory workers and a reference group of 28 control subjects. The whole-blood and urinary chromium concentrations were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Malondialdehyde (MDA), the product of lipid peroxidation, was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the activities of protective enzymes were measured by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. In the chrome-plating workers, the mean concentrations of chromium in blood and urine were 5.98 microg/L and 5.25 microg/g creatinine, respectively; the mean concentrations of MDA in blood and urine were 1.7 micromol/L and 2.24 micromol/g creatinine. The concentrations of both chromium and MDA in blood and urine were significantly higher in the chromium-exposed workers. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and catalase (CAT) were not markedly different between control and exposed workers. Data suggest that MDA may be used as a biomarker for occupational chromium exposure. Antioxidant enzymic activities are not a suitable marker for chromium exposure.

  4. Treatment of hexavalent chromium Cr (VI) in tanning effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, I.; Ali, S.

    1999-01-01

    Most common chemical used in chrome tanning is basic chromium sulphate (BCS). Manufacturing of BCS involves many steps producing liquid waste. Waste generated at every stage contains Cr (VI), which must be reduced to Cr (III) before being disposed to the environment. Different methods were studied for the reduction of toxic Cr (III). Pickle liquor (waste of electroplating industry) can also be used for the reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr (vi) along with other reducing materials / chemicals. In an electroplating process metal is treated with HCl or H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ to remove scales and rust, the pickled items are then washed with water, washing contains FeCl/sub 2/ or fees/sub 4/ respectively called pickle liquor. During waste treatment pH adjustment to 6.0 - 9.0 and settling the sludge, is discharged to the lagoon. The sludge obtained is dried and disposed off in landfills. Other reducing agents like sodium bisulphite and sulfur dioxide were also studied, but pickle liquor was found to be more effective and economical. (author)

  5. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Using Sorbaria sorbifolia Aqueous Leaf Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Prabha Dubey

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous plant leaves extract (PLE of an abundant shrub, Sorbaria sorbifolia, was explored for the reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI, to trivalent chromium, Cr(III. The effect of contact time, pH, PLE quantity, ionic strength, hardness, temperature and effective initial Cr(VI ion concentration were tested; Cr(VI reduction followed the pseudo-first order rate kinetics and maximum reduction was observed at pH 2. Significantly, Cr(VI reduction efficacies varied from 97 to 66% over the pH range of 2 to 10, which bodes well for PLE to be used for the reduction of Cr(VI also at a higher pH. PLE-mediated Cr(VI reduction displays considerable efficiency at various ionic strengths; however, hardness strongly affects the reduction ability. Higher temperature significantly enhances the Cr(VI reduction. This study reveals the potential use of PLE as a green reducing agent in aqueous extract for the efficient reduction of Cr(VI to Cr(III.

  6. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures

  7. Surface complexation modeling of U(VI) sorption on GMZ bentonite in the presence of fulvic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jie [Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Laboratory; Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Guangzhou (China). The 5th Electronics Research Inst.; Luo, Daojun [Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Guangzhou (China). The 5th Electronics Research Inst.; Qiao, Yahua; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Chunming [Ministry of Environmental Protection, Beijing (China). Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center; Wu, Wangsuo [Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Laboratory; Ye, Yuanlv [Ministry of Environmental Protection, Beijing (China). Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center; Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Laboratory

    2017-03-01

    In this work, experiments and modeling for the interactions between uranyl ion and GMZ bentonite in the presence of fulvic acid are presented. The results demonstrated that FA is strongly bound to GMZ bentonite, and these molecules have a very large effect on the U(VI) sorption. The results also demonstrated that U(VI) sorption to GMZ bentonite in the presence and absence of sorbed FA can be well predicted by combining SHM and DLM. According to the model calculations, the nature of the interactions between FA with U(VI) at GMZ bentonite surface is mainly surface complex. The first attempt to simulate clay interaction with humus by the SHM model.

  8. Selective separation of uranium using alizarin red S (ARS)-modified anion-exchange resin or by flotation of U-ARS chelate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalifa, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    An alizarin red S (ARS)-modified anion exchange resin was prepared by a simple reaction of ARS with the anion exchange Doulite A101 and used for the efficient sorption of uranium from aqueous media. The effect of various parameters on the sorption of U(VI) (pH effect, sorption kinetics, resin capacity and breakthrough curves) was investigated. The modified resin sorbs U(VI) over a wide range of pH (2.8--5) with a maximum sorption capacity of 0.68 mmol/g at pH 3.2 to 4.0. Iron(III), Zr(IV), Ti(IV), Cu(II), and Th(IV) ions are also sorbed to different extents, but Be(II), Bi(III), Ca(II), Mg(II), Pb(II), Hg(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Al(III), Mn(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) are not sorbed; thus, conditions for separating U(VI) from these metal ions have been identified. For eluting U(VI) from the resin, 0.2 mol/L HCl was used and the recovery recorded was as high as 99.9%. The use of ARS is extended to float uranium quantitatively and selectively from aqueous media at pH ∼ 4 by using oleic acid as a surfactant. The different parameters affecting the flotation process have also been investigated. Uranium(VI) has been effectively separated from natural water samples and certified uranium ores using both procedures

  9. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives: Pretreatments Only Final Tes