WorldWideScience

Sample records for hexavalent oxidation state

  1. Photo-oxidation. Of the system chrome hexavalent-4-chlorophenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil Pavas, Edison; Cabrera Limpias, Marianela; Jaramillo Jimenez, Sergio Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    As a proposal to eliminate highly toxic chemical components derived from industrial waste, the researchers study the behavior of the compound hexavalent chromium / 4-chlorophenol system when subjected to photo degradation in a photo-reactor compound parabolic cylinder (CPC) to scale pilot. The effect is analyzed in order to determine the operation conditions to reach the highest degradation levels possible. The analyzed variables were pH, concentration of catalyst (TiO 2 ), time of recirculation and the relation of initial concentrations among polluting agents. The factor that most influences the levels of removal reached is the pH, which has a different effect for each of the pollutants. This implies that, theoretically, you cannot adopt a unique group of operation parameters to favor the degradation of both however, in the practice; high levels of degradation of both pollutants are obtained in the optimal point of operation of the chrome. It is also observed that the catalyst concentration does not influence the degradation of the polluting agents significantly, at least for the initial concentrations studied. The recirculation time is closely related to the kinetics of degradation of each polluting agent. Elevated degradation levels are reached in a short time for 4-chlorophenol, while more prolonged recirculation times are required for hexavalent chromium. The relation of initial concentrations of the polluting agents also exerts an opposite effect on the degradation levels reached for each polluting agent; the hexavalent chromium reduction is favored with high initial concentrations of 4-chlorophenol, whereas the oxidation of 4-chlorophenol is favored with high initial hexavalent chromium concentrations, which suggests some synergy between the oxidation-reduction reactions of 4-chlorophenol and hexavalent chromium. Finally, a 97% hexavalent chromium reduction and a 94.9% oxidation of 4-chlorophenol were obtained

  2. Oxidation-state maxima in plutonium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2013-01-01

    Maxima in the fractions of the trivalent and hexavalent oxidation states of plutonium are inherent in the algebra of its disproportionation reactions. The maxima do not support overall disproportionation equations as satisfactory representations of aqueous plutonium. (author)

  3. Reduction of hexavalent chromium collected on PVC filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Y C; Paik, N W

    2000-01-01

    Chromium exists at various valences, including elemental, trivalent, and hexavalent chromium, and undergoes reduction-oxidation reactions in the environment. Since hexavalent chromium is known as a human carcinogen, it is most important to evaluate the oxidation-reduction characteristics of the hexavalent chromium species. Although hexavalent chromium can be reduced to trivalent state, the detailed information on this in workplace environments is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate hexavalent chromium reduction in time in various conditions. A pilot chrome plating operation was prepared and operated in a laboratory for this study. There was evidence that the hexavalent chromium was reduced by time after mist generation. The percentage ratio (with 95% confidence intervals in parentheses) of hexavalent chromium to total chromium was almost 100% (99.1 approximately 102.3) immediately after mist generation, and was reduced to 87.4% (84.8 approximately 89.9) at 1 hour and 81.0% (78.3 approximately 83.5) at 2 hours, respectively. Another test indicated that hexavalent chromium collected on PVC filters was also reduced by time after sampling. Hexavalent chromium was reduced to 90.8% (88.2 approximately 93.3) at 2 hours after sampling. It also was found that hexavalent chromium was reduced during storage in air. It is recommended that air samples of hexavalent chromium be protected against reduction during storage.

  4. Hexavalent chromium causes the oxidation of thioredoxin in human bronchial epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Judith M.; Antholine, William E.; Myers, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] species such as chromates are cytotoxic. Inhalational exposure is a primary concern in many Cr-related industries and their immediate environments, and bronchial epithelial cells are directly exposed to inhaled Cr(VI). Chromates are readily taken up by cells and are reduced to reactive Cr species which may also result in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The thioredoxin (Trx) system has a key role in the maintenance of cellular thiol redox balance and is essential for cell survival. Cells normally maintain the cytosolic (Trx1) and mitochondrial (Trx2) thioredoxins largely in the reduced state. Redox Western blots were used to assess the redox status of the thioredoxins in normal human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) incubated with soluble Na 2 CrO 4 or insoluble ZnCrO 4 for different periods of time. Both chromates caused a dose- and time-dependent oxidation of Trx2 and Trx1. Trx2 was more susceptible in that it could all be converted to the oxidized form, whereas a small amount of reduced Trx1 remained even after prolonged treatment with higher Cr concentrations. Only one of the dithiols, presumably the active site, of Trx1 was oxidized by Cr(VI). Cr(VI) did not cause significant GSH depletion or oxidation indicating that Trx oxidation does not result from a general oxidation of cellular thiols. With purified Trx and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) in vitro, Cr(VI) also resulted in Trx oxidation. It was determined that purified TrxR has pronounced Cr(VI) reducing activity, so competition for electron flow from TrxR might impair its ability to reduce Trx. The in vitro data also suggested some direct redox interaction between Cr(VI) and Trx. The ability of Cr(VI) to cause Trx oxidation in cells could contribute to its cytotoxic effects, and could have important implications for cell survival, redox-sensitive cell signaling, and the cells' tolerance of other oxidant insults

  5. Plutonium disproportionation. Hydrolysis and local oxidation-state maxima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2014-01-01

    Local maxima in the fractions of the trivalent and hexavalent oxidation states are inherent in the algebra of Pu disproportionation reactions. A new method predicts the pH and the oxidation-state fractions at maximum. Tabulated results illustrate the effects of the Pu oxidation number and Pu(IV) hydrolysis on the maxima. This method suggests a new laboratory approach for discovering Pu oxidation-state maxima. (author)

  6. Biomarkers of oxidative stress in electroplating workers exposed to hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chih-Hong; Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Lai, Ching-Huang

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluates levels of biomarkers of oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in 105 male workers at 16 electroplating companies who had been exposed to hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). The study participants were 230 non-smoking male workers, comprising 105 electroplating workers who had been exposed to chromium and 125 control subjects who performed office tasks. Personal air samples, spot urine samples, hair samples, fingernail samples and questionnaires were used to quantify exposure to Cr(VI), oxidative DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and environmental pollutants. Both the geometric mean personal concentrations of Cr(VI) of the Cr-exposed workers and the total Cr concentrations in the air to which they were exposed significantly exceeded those for the control subjects. The geometric mean concentrations of Cr in urine, hair and fingernails, and the urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the Cr(VI) exposed workers exceeded those in the control subjects. Daily cumulative Cr(VI) exposure and urinary Cr were significantly correlated with urinary 8-OHdG levels following adjustments for covariates. A ten-fold increase in urinary Cr level was associated with a 1.73-fold increase in urinary 8-OHdG level. Daily cumulative Cr(VI) exposure and urinary Cr level were significantly correlated with urinary MDA level following adjustments for covariates. A ten-fold increase in urinary Cr was associated with a 1.45-fold increase in urinary MDA. Exposure to Cr(VI) increased oxidative DNA injury and the oxidative deterioration of lipids in electroplating workers.

  7. Teaching the Properties of Chromium's Oxidation States with a Case Study Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdilek, Zehra

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how a mixed-method case study affects pre-service science teachers' awareness of hexavalent chromium pollution and content knowledge about the properties of chromium's different oxidation states. The study was conducted in Turkey with 55 sophomores during the fall semester of 2013-2014. The students…

  8. Controlling Hexavalent Americium – A Centerpiece to a Compact Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer/Braley, Jenifer; Nash, Kenneth L; Lumetta, Gregg; McCann, Kevin; Sinkov, Sergey I

    2014-10-01

    Closing the nuclear fuel cycle could be simplified by recovering the actinides U through Am as a group. This could be achieved by converting U, Np, Pu and Am to the hexavalent state. Uranium, Np and Pu are readily oxidized to the hexavalent state. Generation of hexavalent Am in acidic solutions is more difficult, as the standard reduction potential of the Am(VI) /Am(III) couple (+1.68 V in 1 M HClO4) is well outside of the electrochemical stability window of water. While the oxidation and separation of Am has been demonstrated under laboratory conditions, several issues could plague scale up and implementation of this separation with used fuel. Two primary concerns are considered. The first issue concerns the stability of the oxidized Am. The second involves the undesirable co-extraction of tetravalent f-elements with the hexavalent actinides. To address the first concern regarding Am redox instability, Am reduction will be monitored under a variety of different conditions to establish the means of improving the stability of Am(VI) in the organic phase. Identifying the components contributing most significantly to its reduction will allow thoughtful modification of the process. To address the second concern, we propose to apply branched chain extractants to separate hexavalent actinides from tetravalent f-elements. Both branched monoamide and organophosphorus extractants have demonstrated significant selectivity for UO22+ versus Th4+, with separation factors generally on the order of 100. The efforts of this two-pronged research program should represent a significant step forward in the development of aqueous separations approaches designed to recover the U-Am actinides based on the availability of the hexavalent oxidation state. For the purposes of this proposal, separations based on this approach will be called SAn(VI) separations, indicating the Separation of An(VI).

  9. Higher Americium Oxidation State Research Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Law, Jack D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Goff, George S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burns, Jon D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sinkov, Sergey I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shehee, Thomas C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hobbs, David T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-12-18

    The partitioning of hexavalent Am from dissolved nuclear fuel requires the ability to efficiently oxidize Am(III) to Am(VI) and to maintain that oxidation state for a length of time sufficient to perform the separation. Several oxidants have been, or are being developed. Chemical oxidants include Ag-catalyzed ozone, Ag-catalyzed peroxydisulfate, Cu(III) periodate, and sodium bismuthate. Hexavalent americium has also now successfully been prepared by electrolysis, using functionalized electrodes. So-called auto-reduction rates of Am(VI) are sufficiently slow to allow for separations. However, for separations based on solvent extraction or ion exchange using organic resins, the high valence state must be maintained under the reducing conditions of the organic phase contact, and a holding oxidant is probably necessary. Until now, only Cu(III) periodate and sodium bismuthate oxidation have been successfully combined with solvent extraction separations. Bismuthate oxidation provided the higher DAm, since it acts as its own holding oxidant, and a successful hot test using centrifugal contactors was performed. For the other oxidants, Ag-catalyzed peroxydisulfate will not oxidize americium in nitric acid concentrations above 0.3 M, and it is not being further investigated. Peroxydisulfate in the absence of Ag catalysis is being used to prepare Am(V) in ion exchange work, discussed below. Preliminary work with Ag-catalyzed ozone has been unsuccessful for extractions of Am(VI) from 6.5 M HNO3, and only one attempt at extraction, also from 6.5 M HNO3, using the electrolytic oxidation has been attempted. However, this high acid concentration was based on the highest Am extraction efficiency using the bismuthate oxidant; which is only sparingly soluble, and thus the oxidation yield is based on bismuthate solubility. Lower acid concentrations may be sufficient with alternative oxidants and work with Ag-ozone, Cu(III) and electrolysis is on-going. Two non

  10. Effective Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solutions Using Ionic Liquid Modified Graphene Oxide Sorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nasrollahpour

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquid modified reduced graphene oxide (IL-rGO was prepared and examined for chromate removal. The sorbent was characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption measurement (BET, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis. The sorption behavior of chromate on the ionic liquid modified reduced graphene oxide sorbent from an aqueous medium was studied by varying the parameters such as contact time, initial chromate concentration, pH, and agitation speed. The results showed that sorption kinetics of chromate by IL-rGO follows the pseudo second order, which indicates that the sorption mechanism is both chemical and physical interaction. The sorption isotherm studies revealed that Langmuir model provided the best fit to all the experimental data with an adsorption capacity of 232.55 mg g–1 for IL-rGO. Thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy (–2.85 kJ mol–1 at 298 K, enthalpy (55.41 kJ mol–1, and entropy (11.64 J mol–1 K–1 of sorption of the chromate on ionic liquid modified reduced graphene oxide was evaluated, and it was found that the reaction was spontaneous and endothermic in nature.

  11. Biotransformation of hexavalent chromium into extracellular chromium(III) oxide nanoparticles using Schwanniomyces occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, Pallavi T; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Zinjarde, Smita S

    2016-03-01

    To demonstrate biotransformation of toxic Cr(VI) ions into Cr2O3 nanoparticles by the yeast Schwanniomyces occidentalis. Reaction mixtures containing S. occidentalis NCIM 3459 and Cr(VI) ions that were initially yellow turned green after 48 h incubation. The coloration was due to the synthesis of chromium (III) oxide nanoparticles (Cr2O3NPs). UV-Visible spectra of the reaction mixtures showed peaks at 445 and 600 nm indicating (4)A2g → (4)T1g and (4)A2g → (4)T2g transitions in Cr2O3, respectively. FTIR profiles suggested the involvement of carboxyl and amide groups in nanoparticle synthesis and stabilization. The Cr2O3NPs ranged between 10 and 60 nm. Their crystalline nature was evident from the selective area electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction patterns. Energy dispersive spectra confirmed the chemical composition of the nanoparticles. These biogenic nanoparticles could find applications in different fields. S. occidentalis mediated biotransformation of toxic Cr(VI) ions into crystalline extracellular Cr2O3NPs under benign conditions.

  12. Groundwater remediation of hexavalent chromium along the Columbia River at the Hanford site in Washington state, USA - 59030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foss, Dyan L.; Charboneau, Briant L.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site, formerly used for nuclear weapons production, encompasses 1500 square kilometers in southeast Washington State along the Columbia River. A principle threat to the river are the groundwater plumes of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), which affect approximately 9.8 square kilometers, and 4.1 kilometers of shoreline. Cleanup goals are to stop Cr(VI) from entering the river by the end of 2012 and remediate the groundwater plumes to the drinking water standards by the end of 2020. Five groundwater pump-and-treat systems are currently in operation for the remediation of Cr(VI). Since the 1990's, over 13.6 billion L of groundwater have been treated; over 1, 435 kg of Cr(VI) have been removed. This paper describes the unique aspects of the site, its environmental setting, hydrogeology, groundwater-river interface, riverine hydraulic effects, remediation activities completed to date, a summary of the current and proposed pump-and-treat operations, the in situ redox manipulation barrier, and the effectiveness of passive barriers, resins, and treatability testing results of calcium polysulfide, bio-stimulation, and electrocoagulation, currently under evaluation. (authors)

  13. Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Logistics 4 Initiative - DoD Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Non- Chrome Primer IIEXAVAJ ENT CHRO:M I~UMI CHROMIUM (VII Oil CrfVli.J CANCEfl HAnRD CD...Management Office of the Secretary of Defense Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188...00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  14. Hexavalent Chromium Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about chromium, exposure to which can increase your risk of lung cancer and cancer of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. Hexavalent chromium compounds have been used as corrosion inhibitors in a wide variety of products and processes.

  15. Oxidation of Cr(III)-Fe(III) Mixed-phase Hydroxides by Chlorine: Implications on the Control of Hexavalent Chromium in Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebeir, Michelle; Liu, Haizhou

    2018-05-17

    The occurrence of chromium (Cr) as an inorganic contaminant in drinking water is widely reported. One source of Cr is its accumulation in iron-containing corrosion scales of drinking water distribution systems as Cr(III)-Fe(III) hydroxide, i.e., FexCr(1-x)(OH)3(s), where x represents the Fe(III) molar content and typically varies between 0.25 and 0.75. This study investigated the kinetics of inadvertent hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) formation via the oxidation of FexCr(1-x)(OH)3(s) by chlorine as a residual disinfectant in drinking water, and examined the impacts of Fe(III) content and drinking water chemical parameters including pH, bromide and bicarbonate on the rate of Cr(VI) formation. Data showed that an increase in Fe(III) molar content resulted in a significant decrease in the stoichiometric Cr(VI) yield and the rate of Cr(VI) formation, mainly due to chlorine decay induced by Fe(III) surface sites. An increase in bicarbonate enhanced the rate of Cr(VI) formation, likely due to the formation of Fe(III)-carbonato surface complexes that slowed down the scavenging reaction with chlorine. The presence of bromide significantly accelerated the oxidation of FexCr(1-x)(OH)3(s) by chlorine, resulting from the catalytic effect of bromide acting as an electron shuttle. A higher solution pH between 6 and 8.5 slowed down the oxidation of Cr(III) by chlorine. These findings suggested that the oxidative conversion of chromium-containing iron corrosion products in drinking water distribution systems can lead to the occurrence of Cr(VI) at the tap, and the abundance of iron, and a careful control of pH, bicarbonate and bromide levels can assist the control of Cr(VI) formation.

  16. Preparation of hexavalent plutonium and its determination in the presence of tetravalent plutonium; Preparation de plutonium hexavalent et dosage en presence de plutonium tetravalent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corpel, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Corpel, J [Institut du Radium, 75 - Paris (France)

    1958-07-01

    In order to study the eventual reduction of plutonium from the VI-valent state to the IV-valent state, in sulphuric medium, under the influence of its own {alpha} radiation or of the {gamma}-rays from a cobalt-60 source, we have developed a method for preparing pure hexavalent plutonium and two methods for determining solutions containing tetravalent and hexavalent plutonium simultaneously. Hexavalent plutonium was prepared by anodic oxidation at a platinum electrode. Study of the oxidation yield as a function of various factors has made it possible to define experimental conditions giving complete oxidation. For concentrations in total plutonium greater than 1.5 x 10{sup -3} M, determination of the two valencies IV and VI was carried out by spectrophotometry at two wavelengths. For lower concentrations, the determination was done by counting, after separation of the tetravalent plutonium in the form of fluoride in the presence of a carrier. (author) [French] Afin d'etudier l'eventuelle reduction du plutonium de l'etat de valence VI a l'etat de valence IV, en milieu sulfurique sous l'influence de son propre rayonnement {alpha} ou des rayons {gamma} d'une source de cobalt-60, nous avons mis au point une methode de preparation de plutonium hexavalent pur et deux methodes de dosage des solutions contenant simultanement du plutonium tetravalent et du plutonium hexavalent. Nous avons prepare le plutonium hexavalent par oxydation anodique au contact d'une electrode de platine. L'etude de rendement de l'oxydation en fonction des divers facteurs nous a permis de definir des conditions experimentales donnant une oxydation complete. Pour des concentrations en plutonium total superieures a 1,5.10{sup -3} M, le dosage des deux valences IV et VI a ete realise par spectrophotometrie a deux longueurs d'onde. Pour des concentrations inferieures, le dosage a ete effectue par comptage apres separation du plutonium tetravalent sous la forme du fluorure en presence d'un entraineur

  17. Natural occurrence of hexavalent chromium in a sedimentary aquifer in Urânia, State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Bourotte

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous concentrations of hexavalent chromium have been detected in ground-water of the Adamantina Aquifer inat least 54 municipalities located in the northwestern region of the State of São Paulo, southeast Brazil, occasionallyexceeding the permitted limit for human consumption (0.05 mg.L-1. An investigation was conducted in the municipality of Urânia, where the highest concentrations of chromium were detected regionally. It was defined that the originof this contamination is natural, since high concentrations of chromium were detected in aquifer sandstones (averageof 221 ppm and also in pyroxenes (6000 ppm, one of the main heavy minerals found in the sediments. Besides, noother possible diffuse or point sources of contamination were observed in the study area. Stratification of ground-waterquality was observed and the highest concentrations of Cr6+ were detected at the base of the aquifer (0.12 mg.L-1,where ground-water shows elevated values for redox potential (472.5 mV and pH (8.61. The origin of Cr6+ in water may be associated with the weathering of pyroxene (augite, followed by the oxidation of Cr3+ by manganese oxides. The highest concentrations of Cr6+ are probably related to desorption reactions, due to the anomalous alkaline pHfound in ground-water at the base of the aquifer.Concentrações anômalas de cromo hexavalente foram detectadas em águas subterrâneas do Aqüífero Adamantina em pelo menos 54 municipalidades localizadas na região noroeste do Estado de São Paulo, sudeste do Brasil, algumas vezes ultrapassando o limite máximo permitido para consumo humano (0,05 mg.L-1. Um estudo foi realizado no município de Urânia, onde as mais elevadas concentrações de cromo da região foram detectadas. A origem da contaminação foi definida como natural, pois foram detectadas concentrações de cromonos arenitos do aqüífero (média 221 ppm e em piroxênios (6000 ppm, um dos principais minerais pesados encontrados nos sedimentos

  18. Hexavalent Chromium Substitution Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    Hexavalent Chromium Substitution Projects Date (12 May 2011) Gene McKinley ASC/WNV (937) 255-3596 Gene.McKinley@wpafb.af.mil Aeronautical Systems...valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 12 MAY 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hexavalent ...A-10) – AETC (T-6, T-38 and T1A) • Both Cr Primers & Non-Cr primers as well as Cr Surface Treatment – F-22 8 Non- Chrome Tie-coat & touch-up

  19. OXIDATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.L.

    1959-02-17

    A method is reported for oxidizing neptunium or plutonium in the presence of cerous values without also oxidizing the cerous values. The method consists in treating an aqueous 1N nitric acid solution, containing such cerous values together with the trivalent transuranic elements, with a quantity of hydrogen peroxide stoichiometrically sufficient to oxidize the transuranic values to the hexavalent state, and digesting the solution at room temperature.

  20. Ni(III) - a new oxidant for the potentiometric determination of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinath, N.; Rama Rao, G.A.; Natarajan, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    Ni(III) was employed as an oxidant for the quantitative oxidation of plutonium to its hexavalent state and this makes possible to determine plutonium concentrations potentiometrically by the Fe(II)-dichromate redox titration method. The unreacted oxidant is completely reduced by sulphamic acid prior to the determination of plutonium. (author)

  1. Fleet Readiness Center - Southeast Technology Development Program (Cadmium & Hexavalent Chromium Reduction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Fleet Readiness Center - Southeast TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (Cadmium & Hexavalent Chromium Reduction) Jack Benfer Senior Materials...Development Program (Cadmium & Hexavalent Chromium Reduction) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...Rinse Black Oxide Rinse CRES Passivation Chrome Plating Cadmium Plating Cadmium Brush Plating Class N (TRL 9) Class N (TRL 7) Class N (TRL 6

  2. Hexavalent Chromium Free Coatings Projects for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    laboratory qualification of a total hexavalent chrome free coating systems for use on magnesium transmission housings. This project will leverage... hexavalent chrome free coating system by utilizing a hexavalent chrome free topcoat, primer, and pretreatment for magnesium parts used on Army...of the hexavalent chrome free conversion coatings. Hexavalent Chromium Free Coating System for Magnesium Housings on Aviation Systems Desert

  3. Electrochemical determination of the oxidation potentials and the thermodynamic stability of the valence states of the transuranium elements in aqueous alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretrukhin, V.F.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation potentials of neptunium, plutonium, and americium in the valance states from (III) to (VII) have been determined experimentally in 0.1-15 M NaOH. Heptavalent plutonium and americium are thermodynamically able to oxidize water with the evolution of oxygen in 0.1-15 M NaOH, neptunium(VII) in 0.1-7 M NaOH. All valance states of plutonium resist disproportionation in alkaline solutions; in the case of neptunium and americium only one disproportionation reaction is possible; of the hexavalent state in to penta- and heptavalent states. The degree of completion of the reaction can be calculated accurately from the oxidation potentials determined

  4. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmitt, Nicholas C [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  5. Size-separated particle fractions of stainless steel welding fume particles - A multi-analytical characterization focusing on surface oxide speciation and release of hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, N; Belleville, L; Cha, Y; Olofsson, U; Odnevall Wallinder, I; Persson, K-A; Hedberg, Y S

    2018-01-15

    Welding fume of stainless steels is potentially health hazardous. The aim of this study was to investigate the manganese (Mn) and chromium (Cr) speciation of welding fume particles and their extent of metal release relevant for an inhalation scenario, as a function of particle size, welding method (manual metal arc welding, metal arc welding using an active shielding gas), different electrodes (solid wires and flux-cored wires) and shielding gases, and base alloy (austenitic AISI 304L and duplex stainless steel LDX2101). Metal release investigations were performed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.3, 37°, 24h. The particles were characterized by means of microscopic, spectroscopic, and electroanalytical methods. Cr was predominantly released from particles of the welding fume when exposed in PBS [3-96% of the total amount of Cr, of which up to 70% as Cr(VI)], followed by Mn, nickel, and iron. Duplex stainless steel welded with a flux-cored wire generated a welding fume that released most Cr(VI). Nano-sized particles released a significantly higher amount of nickel compared with micron-sized particle fractions. The welding fume did not contain any solitary known chromate compounds, but multi-elemental highly oxidized oxide(s) (iron, Cr, and Mn, possibly bismuth and silicon). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermodynamic Ground States of Complex Oxide Heterointerfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunkel, F.; Hoffmann-Eifert, S.; Heinen, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    The formation mechanism of 2-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at heterointerfaces between nominally insulating oxides is addressed with a thermodynamical approach. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the thermodynamic ground states of various 2DEG systems directly probed in high temperature...

  7. Ammonium carbonate and/or bicarbonate plus alkaline chlorate oxidant for recovery of uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, uranium values are extracted from materials containing uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state by contacting the materials containing uranium with an aqueous alkaline leach solution containing an alkaline chlorate in an amount sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state to its hexavalent state. In a further embodiment of the present invention, the alkaline leach solution is an aqueous solution of a carbonate selected from the group consisting of ammonium carbonate, ammonium bicarbonate and mixtures thereof. In yet another embodiment of the present invention, at least one catalytic compound of a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, cobalt, iron, nickel, chromium and mixtures thereof adapted to assure the presence of the ionic species Cu ++ , Co ++ , Fe +++ , Ni ++ , Cr +++ and mixtures thereof, respectively, during the contacting of the material containing uranium with the alkaline leach solution and in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of at least a portion of the uranium in its lower valence states to its hexavalent state, is present

  8. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives - Pretreatments with Primers Screening Final Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J.; Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (hex chrome or Cr(VI)) is a widely used element within applied coating systems because of its self-healing and corrosion-resistant properties. The replacement of hex chrome in the processing of aluminum for aviation and aerospace applications remains a goal of great significance. Aluminum is the major manufacturing material of structures and components in the space flight arena. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) are engaged in a collaborative effort to test and evaluate alternatives to hexavalent chromium containing corrosion coating systems. NASA and ESA share common risks related to material obsolescence associated with hexavalent chromium used in corrosion-resistant coatings. In the United States, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) studies have concluded that hexavalent chromium is carcinogenic and poses significant risk to human health. On May 5, 2011, amendments to the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) were issued in the Federal Register. Subpart 223.73 prohibits contracts from requiring hexavalent chromium in deliverables unless certain exceptions apply. Subpart 252.223-7008 provides the contract clause prohibiting contractors and subcontractors from using or delivering hexavalent chromium in a concentration greater than 0.1 percent by weight for all new contracts associated with supplies, maintenance and repair services, and construction materials. ESA faces its own increasingly stringent regulations within European directives such as Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical (REACH) substances and the Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive (RoHS) which have set a mid-2017 sunset date for hexavalent chromium. NASA and ESA continue to search for an alternative to hexavalent chromium in coatings applications that meet their performance requirements in corrosion protection, cost, operability, and health and

  9. Hexavalent Chromium IV-Free Primer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, Michael J.; Buck, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Primer materials provide corrosion protection for metal parts as well as an increased adhesion between metallic substrates and thermal protection systems (TPSs). Current primers for use in cryogenic applications contain hexavalent chromium. This hexavalent chromium provides excellent corrosion protection even in a cryogenic environment, but it is a carcinogen that requires special equipment and waste control procedures to use. The hazardous nature of hexavalent chromium makes it an obsolescence risk in the future. This study included two phases of evaluation. Thirteen primers were initially identified as candidates and twelve of those primers were tested in phase 1. Four of the best performing candidates from phase 1 continued into phase 2 testing. Phase 1 testing consisted mostly of liquid constituent and physical property testing. Cryoflex and salt fog testing were included in phase 1 because of their importance to the overall success of a candidate material. Phase 2 consisted of physical, thermal, and mechanical properties for nominally processed and fabricated specimens.

  10. Photochemical oxidants: state of the science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kley, D; Kleinmann, M; Sanderman, H; Krupa, S

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric photochemical processes resulting in the production of tropospheric ozone (O(3)) and other oxidants are described. The spatial and temporal variabilities in the occurrence of surface level oxidants and their relationships to air pollution meteorology are discussed. Models of photooxidant formation are reviewed in the context of control strategies and comparisons are provided of the air concentrations of O(3) at select geographic locations around the world. This overall oxidant (O(3)) climatology is coupled to human health and ecological effects. The discussion of the effects includes both acute and chronic responses, mechanisms of action, human epidemiological and plant population studies and briefly, efforts to establish cause-effect relationships through numerical modeling. A short synopsis is provided of the interactive effects of O(3) with other abiotic and biotic factors. The overall emphasis of the paper is on identifying the current uncertainties and gaps in our understanding of the state of the science and some suggestions as to how they may be addressed.

  11. A new method in estimation of total hexavalent chromium in Portland pozzolan cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.; Sharma, D.

    2017-01-01

    Variamine blue was used first time for the detection of hexavalent chromium from cement samples. In present method, cement was treated sequentially with water, sulphate and carbonate buffer to extract soluble, sparingly soluble and insoluble hexavalent chromium respectively. Extracted Cr (VI) was determined using variamine blue as chromogenic reagent. The determination is based on the reaction of hexavalent chromium with potassium iodide in an acid medium to liberate iodine. This oxidizes variamine blue to form a violet coloured species having an absorption to maximum at 556 nm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) confirmed the complete extraction of hexavalent chromium by sequential extraction process. SRM 2701 (Reference material from NIST, USA) was used for revalidating the results. The percentage of recovery for proposed and reference method (diphelycarbazide method) varied from 98.5 to 101 and 97.5 to 100.5. Whereas, their relative error percentage varied from -1.5 to 0.33 and -2.5 to 0.5. [es

  12. Combination of synchrotron radiation X-ray microprobe and nuclear microprobe for chromium and chromium oxidation states quantitative mapping in single cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, Richard; Deves, Guillaume; Fayard, Barbara; Salome, Murielle; Susini, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium compounds are established carcinogens but their mechanism of cell transformation has not been elucidated yet. In this study, chromium oxidation state distribution maps in cells exposed to soluble (Na 2 CrO 4 ), or insoluble (PbCrO 4 ), Cr(VI) compounds have been obtained by use of the ESRF ID-21 X-ray microscope. In addition, the quantitative maps of element distributions in cells have been determined using the nuclear microprobe of Bordeaux-Gradignan. Nuclear microprobe quantitative analysis revealed interesting features on chromium, and lead, cellular uptake. It is suggested that cells can enhance PbCrO 4 solubility, resulting in chromium, but not lead uptake. The differential carcinogenic potential of soluble and insoluble Cr(VI) compounds is discussed with regard to chromium intracellular quantitative distribution

  13. Correlation between ionic size and valence state of tetra, penta and hexavalent B-site substitution with solubility limit, phase transformation and multiferroic properties of Bi0.875Eu0.125FeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtaz, Fiza; Jaffari, G. Hassnain; Hassan, Qadeer ul; Shah, S. Ismat

    2018-06-01

    We present detailed comparative study of effect of isovalent i.e. Eu+3 substitution at A-site and tetra (Ti+4, Zr+4), penta (V+5) and hexavalent (W+6) substitutions at B-site in BiFeO3. Eu+3 substitution led to phase transformation and exhibited mixed phases i.e. rhombohedral and orthorhombic, while tetravalent substituents (Ti+4 and Zr+4) led to stabilization of cubic phase. In higher valent (i.e. V+5 and W+6) cases solubility limit was significantly reduced where orthorhombic phase was observed as in the case of parent compound. Phase transformation as a consequence of increase in microstrain and chemical pressure induced by the substituent has been discussed. Solubility limit of different B-site dopants i.e. Zr, W and V was extracted to 5%, 2% and 2%, respectively. Extra phases in various cases were Bi2Fe4O9, Bi25FeO40, Bi14W2O27, and Bi23V4O44.5 and their fractional amount have been quantified. Ti was substituted up to 15% and has been observed to be completely soluble in the parent compound. Solubility limits depends on ionic radii mismatch and valance difference of Fe+3 and dopant, in which valance difference plays more dominant role. Solubility limit and phase transformation has been explained in terms of change in bond strength and tolerance factor induced by incorporation of dopant which depend on its size and valence state. Detail optical, dielectric, ferroelectric, magnetic and transport properties of Eu and Ti co-doped samples and selected low concentration B-site doped compositions (i.e. 2%) have presented and discussed. Two d-d transitions and three charge transfer transitions were observed within UV-VIS range. Both change in cell volume for the same phase and transformation in crystal structure affects the band gap. Increase in room temperature dielectric constant and saturation polarization was also found to increase in case of Eu-Ti co-doped samples with increasing concentration of Ti. Substitution of Eu at A-site and Ti at B-site led to

  14. Origin of hexavalent chromium in groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazakis, N.; Kantiranis, N.; Kalaitzidou, K.

    2017-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium constitutes a serious deterioration factor for the groundwater quality of several regions around the world. High concentrations of this contaminant have been also reported in the groundwater of the Sarigkiol hydrological basin (near Kozani city, NW Greece). Specific interest w...

  15. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    be used again to adsorb heavy metal ions. ... Among these heavy metals are chromium, copper and ... poisoning can result from high exposure to hexavalent chromium [2]. Most of the ..... At low pH, the sorbent is positively charged because of.

  16. The survey of biological absorption of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by Wastewater stabilization pond algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nourisepehr

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contamination of aquatic habitats due to toxicity and accumulation of heavy metals leading to serious damage to organisms and their advance to the food chain. Chrome is one of these heavy metals for the three and six-valence oxides used in industry. Health risks such as carcinogenic hexavalent chromium have been For this reason, removal and reduction of environment is essential. Target of this study hexavalent chromium biosorption by waste stabilization pond algae is of the aquatic environment. Methods: This study was a fundamental applied; In this batch reactor, variables Was investigated pH(3,5,7,9,11, Contact time(30,60,120,180,240,300min, The concentration of hexavalent chromium(0.5,1,5mg And the concentration of algae(0.25, 0.5, 1, 3g. Liquid mixed municipal wastewater treatment stabilization pond was used for insemination. For the investigate the effects of variables pH, contact time, the concentration of hexavalent chromium values in a 250 ml Erlenmeyer flask prepared and various amounts of dried algae (0.25-0.5-1- 3 g were added to it. Then became the shakers. After mixing, the filter paper was passed. The lab temperature was centrifuged for min10-5 rpm 2700 rpm. Then it was read at a wavelength absorbed by 540 nm. . Then collected was data to Excel and SPSS software. Finally was used for hexavalent chromium adsorption isotherm model equation of Langmuir and Freundlich. Results: This study shows that PH, contact time, the concentration of hexavalent chromium and chromium concentrations of algae optimal absorption by algae concentrations, respectively, in5 mg / l, min 120, 0.5 mg / l and is 1gr. Average maximum absorption of chromium Wastewater stabilization ponds by algae 97/2%, respectively. Correlation coefficients absorption curves of these models showed that Cr (VI adsorption isotherm on wastewater stabilization pond algae follows (= R.  Conclusion: The results showed that wastewater stabilization pond algae as a

  17. Mechanisms of hexavalent chromium resistance and removal by microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joutey, Nezha Tahri; Sayel, Hanane; Bahafid, Wifak; El Ghachtouli, Naïma

    2015-01-01

    Chromium has been and is extensively used worldwide in multiple industrial processes and is routinely discharged to the environment from such processes. Therefore, this heavy metal is a potential threat to the environment and to public health, primarily because it is non-biodegradable and environmentally persistent. Chromium exists in several oxidation states, the most stable of which are trivalent Cr(Ill) and hexavalent Cr(VI) species. Each species possesses its own individual chemical characteristics and produces its own biological effects. For example, Cr (Ill) is an essential oligoelement for humans, whereas Cr(VI) is carcinogenic and mutagenic. Several chemical methods are used to remove Cr(VI) from contaminated sites. Each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages. Currently, bioremediation is often the preferred method to deal with Cr contaminated sites, because it is eco-friendly, cost-effective and is a "natural" technology. Many yeast, bacterial and fungal species have been assessed for their suitability to reduce or remove Cr(VI) contamination. The mechanisms by which these microorganisms resist and reduce Cr(VI) are variable and are species dependent. There are several Cr-resistance mechanisms that are displayed by microorganisms. These include active efflux of Cr compounds, metabolic reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr (ill), and either intercellular or extracellular prec1p1tation. Microbial Cr (VI) removal typically involves three stages: binding of chromium to the cell surface, translocation of chromium into the cell, and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr (ill). Cr(VI) reduction by microorganisms may proceed on the cell surface, outside the cell, or intracellularly, either directly via chromate reductase enzymes, or indirectly via metabolite reduction of Cr(VI). The uptake of chromium ions is a biphasic process. The primary step is known as biosorption, a metabolic energyindependent process. Thereafter, bioaccumulation occurs, but is much slower, and is

  18. Electrochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium in ground water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Electrochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup +6}) to its trivalent state (Cr{sup +3}) is showing promising results in treating ground water at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Main Site. An electrolytic cell using stainless-steel and brass electrodes has been found to offer the most efficient reduction while yielding the least amount of precipitate. Trials have successfully lowered concentrations of Cr{sup +6} to below 11 parts per billion (micrograms/liter), the California state standard. We ran several trials to determine optimal voltage for running the cell; each trial consisted of applying a voltage between 6V and 48V for ten minutes through samples obtained at Treatment Facility C(TFC). No conclusive data has been obtained yet.

  19. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Rhizopus Oryzae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    reduction data and the specific growth rate constant value was calculated as 0.082 and the ... Key words: Hexavalent chromium, Rhizopus Oryzae, leather tanning, Monod and Haldane models. ... composition; Glucose 1 g; K2HPO4 0.5 g; NaCl 0.5 g; MgCl2 1.0 g; ... ficantly, because of the inhibitor role of high concentration.

  20. Hexavalent Chromium reduction by Trichoderma inhamatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Battera, L.; Cristiani-Urbina, E.

    2009-07-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] is a useful and attractive process for remediation of ecosystems and industrial effluents contaminated with Cr(VI). Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(II) can be achieved by both chemical and biological methods; however, the biological reduction is more convenient than the chemical one since costs are lower, and sludge is generated in smaller amounts. (Author)

  1. [New perspectives in biomonitoring of metallic elements: the example of hexavalent chromium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutti, A; De Palma, G; Goldoni, M

    2012-01-01

    Plating industry is an important productive sector in all the national territory, because of its contribution to a high number of industrial products and crafts. In the chrome plating sector there is a specific chemical risk due to the exposure to compounds containing hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)]. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has been used to study both acute and long term exposure to Cr(VI) in chrome plating workers. Cr-EBC correlates with specific oxidative stress biomarkers. Moreover, both total Cr and its hexavalent fraction can be measured in EBC, which therefore is a promising biological fluid to assess the absorbed dose at the target organ level, the pulmonary reduction kinetics of Cr(VI) and in general its local pneumotoxic effects. EBC collection and analysis could give additional information to the traditional measures performed during biomonitoring.

  2. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Asgari ، F. Vaezi ، S. Nasseri ، O. Dördelmann ، A. H. Mahvi ، E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Removal of chromium can be accomplished by various methods but none of them is cost-effective in meeting drinking water standards. For this study, granular ferric hydroxide was used as adsorbent for removal of hexavalent chromium. Besides, the effects of changing contact time, pH and concentrations of competitive anions were determined for different amounts of granular ferric hydroxide. It was found that granular ferric hydroxide has a high capacity for adsorption of hexavalent chromium from water at pH≤7 and in 90 min contact time. Maximum adsorption capacity was determined to be 0.788 mg Cr+6/g granular ferric hydroxide. Although relatively good adsorption of sulfate and chloride had been specified in this study, the interfering effects of these two anions had not been detected in concentrations of 200 and 400 mg/L. The absorbability of hexavalent chromium by granular ferric hydroxide could be expressed by Freundlich isotherm with R2>0.968. However, the disadvantage was that the iron concentration in water was increased by the granular ferric hydroxide. Nevertheless, granular ferric hydroxide is a promising adsorbent for chromium removal, even in the presence of other interfering compounds, because granular ferric hydroxide treatment can easily be accomplished and removal of excess iron is a simple practice for conventional water treatment plants. Thus, this method could be regarded as a safe and convenient solution to the problem of chromium-polluted water resources.

  3. Carbon monoxide oxidation over three different states of copper: Development of a model metal oxide catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jernigan, Glenn Geoffrey [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-10-01

    Carbon monoxide oxidation was performed over the three different oxidation states of copper -- metallic (Cu), copper (I) oxide (Cu2O), and copper (II) oxide (CuO) as a test case for developing a model metal oxide catalyst amenable to study by the methods of modern surface science and catalysis. Copper was deposited and oxidized on oxidized supports of aluminum, silicon, molybdenum, tantalum, stainless steel, and iron as well as on graphite. The catalytic activity was found to decrease with increasing oxidation state (Cu > Cu2O > CuO) and the activation energy increased with increasing oxidation state (Cu, 9 kcal/mol < Cu2O, 14 kcal/mol < CuO, 17 kcal/mol). Reaction mechanisms were determined for the different oxidation states. Lastly, NO reduction by CO was studied. A Cu and CuO catalyst were exposed to an equal mixture of CO and NO at 300--350 C to observe the production of N2 and CO2. At the end of each reaction, the catalyst was found to be Cu2O. There is a need to study the kinetics of this reaction over the different oxidation states of copper.

  4. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications: Joint Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgeb, Matt; Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of the Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications project is to evaluate and test pretreatments not containing hexavalent chrome in avionics and electronics housing applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing strong performing coating systems from prior NASA and DoD testing or new coating systems as determined by the stakeholders.

  5. 76 FR 71926 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium Policy to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... 0750-AH39 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium... the use of materials containing hexavalent chromium. DATES: Comment Date: Comments on the proposed... human health and environmental risks related to the use of hexavalent chromium. Hexavalent chromium is a...

  6. The effects of water rock interaction and the human activities on the occurrence of hexavalent chromium in waters. The case study of the Psachna basin, Central Euboea, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiou, Eleni; Perraki, Maria; Stamatis, George; Gartzos, Efthimios

    2014-05-01

    High concentrations of heavy metals, particularly of the toxic hexavalent chromium, are recorded in surface and ground waters in many areas, and constitute one of the most severe environmental problems nowadays. The natural genesis of chromium is associated with the geological environment (peridotites and serpentintites). Chromium is structured in many minerals, mainly in spinel (e.g. chromite), in silicate minerals such as phyllosilicate serpentine minerals, chlorite, talc and chain-silicate minerals of pyroxene and amphibole group. Chromium is found in two forms in soils, waters and rocks, the hexavalent and the trivalent one. The relation between Cr(III) and Cr(VI) strongly depends on pH and oxidative properties of the area; however, in most cases, Cr(III) is the dominating variant. The natural oxidation of trivalent to hexavalent chromium can be achieved by manganese oxides, H2O2, O2 gas and oxy-hydroxides of trivalent iron. Anthropogenic factors may also cause the process of chromium's oxidation. In the Psachna basin, Central Euboea, Greece, high concentrations of hexavalent chromium were recently measured in spring- and drill- waters. In this work, we study the effect of the geological environment and of the anthropogenic activities on the water quality with emphasis on chromium. A detailed geochemical, petrological and mineralogical study of rocks and soils was carried out by means of optical microscopy, XRF, XRD and SEM/EDS. Ground and surface water samples were physically characterized and hydrochemically studied by means of ICP and AAF. Combined result evaluation indicates a natural source for the trivalent chromium in waters, attributed to the alteration of Cr-bearing minerals of the ultramafic rocks. However the oxidation of trivalent to hexavalent chromium results from anthropogenic activities, mainly from intensive agricultural activities and the extensive use of fertilizers and pesticides causing nitrate pollution in groundwater. It has been shown

  7. Action of copper (3) in periodate complex on hexavalent neptunium and plutonium in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatokhina, O.B.; Alekseeva, D.P.; Peretrukhin, B.F.; Krot, N.N.

    1977-01-01

    A complex of trivalent copper connected with periodate has been studied in order to determine its possible use for oxidizing hexavalent transuranium elements. Proceeding from the dependence of formal potentials of the pairs Cusup((3))-Cusup((2)), Npsup((7))-Npsup((6)), Pusup((7))-Pusup((6)) on alkali concentration, it has been established that beginning with concentration 1M the potential of the pair Cusup((3))-Cusup((2)) is higher than that of the pair Npsup((7))-Npsup((6)) by approximately 50 mV. This means that a rather complete oxidation of hexavalent neptunium to heptavalent is possible by the action of copper (3) excess on neptunium (6) when KOH concentration is 1M and higher. Oxidation close to quantitative is attained in 1M KOH when excess of copper(3) is used and the ratio Npsup((6)): Cusup((3)) is 1:4 and higher. When KOH concentration is more than 1M a sufficiently complete oxidation (96-97%) of neptunium (6) is attained at Npsup((6)):Cusup((3))=1:2 or 1:3. Optimum conditions for oxidizing plutonium are 11M KOH and 2-3-fold excess of copper (3) reagent. At 9M KOH and a ratio Pusup((6)):Cusup((3))=1:2 the yield of Pu (7) is 33 %

  8. The controlled-potential coulometric determination of plutonium based upon cerium oxidation and the Pu022+/Pu4+ valency change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, G.; Crossley, D.; Venkataramana, P.

    1977-09-01

    Conditions have been established enabling plutonium to be oxidised quantitatively to the hexavalent state in the working compartment of a controlled-potential coulometric cell using electrogenerated ceric ion or excess ceric nitrate. The excess ceric ion is reduced in situ electrochemically without reduction of the hexavalent plutonium. The plutonium is then determined controlled-potential coulometrically by reduction to Pu 3+ followed by oxidation to Pu 4+ . The first oxidation step is conducted in molar nitric acid solution containing sulphamic acid but the coulometric determination step is conducted in molar sulphuric acid solution. The results obtained in the coulometric determination step were less satisfactory following oxidation with electrogenerated ceric ion rather than with chemically added ceric nitrate. Using the recommended conditions, 6 mg quantities of plutonium can be determined with an accuracy of 100.06% and a precision of 0.12% (coefficient of variation). The behaviour of chromium, manganese and vanadium impurity is reported. (author)

  9. Electrodeposited tungsten-nickel-boron: A replacement for hexavalent chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-04-01

    Chromium, deposited from acidic solutions of its hexavalent ion, has been the rule for wear resistant, corrosion resistant coatings for many years. Although chromium coatings are durable, the plating process generates air emissions, effluent rinse waters, and process solutions that are toxic, suspected carcinogens, and a risk to human health and the environment. Tungsten-nickel-boron (W-Ni-B) alloy deposition is a potential substitute for hexavalent chrome. It has excellent wear, corrosion, and mechanical properties and also may be less of an environmental risk. This study examines the electroplating process and deposit properties of W-Ni-B and compares them with those of hexavalent chrome

  10. Non-equilibrium oxidation states of zirconium during early stages of metal oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Wen; Yildiz, Bilge; Herbert, F. William; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.

    2015-01-01

    The chemical state of Zr during the initial, self-limiting stage of oxidation on single crystal zirconium (0001), with oxide thickness on the order of 1 nm, was probed by synchrotron x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the Zr 3d spectrum by the spectrum reconstruction method demonstrated the formation of Zr 1+ , Zr 2+ , and Zr 3+ as non-equilibrium oxidation states, in addition to Zr 4+ in the stoichiometric ZrO 2 . This finding resolves the long-debated question of whether it is possible to form any valence states between Zr 0 and Zr 4+ at the metal-oxide interface. The presence of local strong electric fields and the minimization of interfacial energy are assessed and demonstrated as mechanisms that can drive the formation of these non-equilibrium valence states of Zr

  11. Removal of chromium hexavalent of residual water from tannery using hydrotalcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez G, S.; Martinez, V.; Bulbulian, S.

    2000-01-01

    One of the main problems of leather tanned is the treatment that must be give to the waste water polluted with chrome which stays in trivalent form, but it is easily oxidated at chromium hexavalent. This work pretends to find an elimination media for chromium (VI) from water using the original synthetic hydrotalcite and calcined as sorbent by its anion exchange and memory effect properties. The tannery water was characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, specific surface and infrared spectroscopy. (Author)

  12. Effective bioreduction of hexavalent chromium–contaminated water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING ... Evaluation after reactor termination with SEM-EDX and XRD confirmed the ... Keywords: Bioreduction, fixed-film reactor, hexavalent chromium, microbial diversity ...

  13. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (Peer Review Plan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hexavalent chromium that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  14. Oxidatively generated DNA/RNA damage in psychological stress states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    age-related somatic disorders. The overall aim of the PhD project was to investigate the relation between psychopathology, psychological stress, stress hormone secretion and oxidatively generated DNA and RNA damage, as measured by the urinary excretion of markers of whole-body DNA/RNA oxidation (8...... between the 24 h urinary cortisol excretion and the excretion of 8-oxodG/8-oxoGuo, determined in the same samples. Collectively, the studies could not confirm an association between psychological stress and oxidative stress on nucleic acids. Systemic oxidatively generated DNA/RNA damage was increased......Both non-pathological psychological stress states and mental disorders are associated with molecular, cellular and epidemiological signs of accelerated aging. Oxidative stress on nucleic acids is a critical component of cellular and organismal aging, and a suggested pathogenic mechanism in several...

  15. Charge state of oxide layer of SIMOX-structures

    CERN Document Server

    Askinazi, A Y; Dmitriev, V A; Miloglyadova, L V

    2001-01-01

    The charge state of the oxide layer of the SIMOX-structures, obtained in the course of forming the oxide layers, bricked up in the silicon volume, through the oxygen ions implantation into the Si, is studied. The charge state of the given structures is studied through the method of the layer-by-layer profiling, which makes it possible to obtain the dependence of the plane zones potential on the oxide layer thickness. It is established, that during the process of the SIMOX-structures formation in the oxide layer near the boundary with the Si there appear defects, responsible for the charge. The radiation from the near-the-ultraviolet (NUV) area without the applied electric field neutralizes the given charge. The simultaneous impact of the NUV-radiation and electric field leads to the formation of significantly positive charge

  16. RDT&E Progress and Plansfor Hexavalent Chromium (Cr6+)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    RDT&E Progress and Plans for Hexavalent Chromium (Cr6+) Bruce Sartwell Weapons Systems and Platforms Program Manager E2S2 Conference May 12, 2011...2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RDT&E Progress and Plansfor Hexavalent Chromium (Cr6+) 5a...Development of Accelerated Corrosion Test Protocols Alternatives to Hex Chrome and Cadmium Plating Alternatives to Hex Chrome Pretreatments

  17. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quaternized wood as sorbent for hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, K S; Lee, C K; Lee, C Y

    2001-01-01

    The potential of quaternized wood (QW) chips in removing hexavalent chromium from synthetic solution and chrome waste under both batch and continuous-flow conditions was investigated. Sorption was found to be dependent on pH, metal concentration, and temperature. QW chips provide higher sorption capacity and wider pH range compared with untreated wood chips. The equilibrium data could be fitted into the Langmuir isotherm model, and maximum sorption capacities were calculated to be 27.03 and 25.77 mg/g in synthetic chromate solution and chrome waste, respectively. The presence of sulfate in high concentration appeared to suppress the uptake of chromium by QW chips. Column studies showed that bed depth influenced the breakthrough time greatly whereas flow rate of influent had little effect on its sorption on the column.

  19. NASA TEERM Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt; Rothgeb, Matt

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the NASA project to select an alternative to hexavalent chrome in the aerospace industry. Included is a recent historic testing and research that the Agency has performed on (1) the external tank, (2) the shuttle orbiter, (3) the Shuttle Rocket Booster, and (4) the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Other related Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation (TEERM) projects are reviewed. The Phase I process of the project performed testing of alternatives the results are shown in a chart for different coating systems. International collaboration was also reviewed. Phase II involves further testing of pretreatment and primers for 6 and 12 months of exposure to conditions at Launch Pad and the beach. Further test were performed to characterize the life cycle corrosion of the space vehicles. A new task is described as a joint project with the Department of Defense to identify a Hex Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics.

  20. Hexavalent chrome: threshold concept for carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R E

    1990-03-01

    Certain hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) compounds when administered via inhalation at high doses have the potential to induce lung tumors in humans and experimental animals. Trivalent chromium (Cr3+) is an essential human and animal nutrient at levels of 50 to 200 micrograms/day. Recent data have shown that the human body is able to reduce Cr6+ to Cr3+. This reduction occurs in bodily fluids such as gastric juice, epithelial lining fluid of the respiratory tract, blood, and other fluids. Secondary reduction occurs at the cellular level by the cytosol, mitochondria, and microsomes. Thus, at low levels of exposure hexavalent chromium ions are reduced before the 6+ ions can interact with DNA unless the dose is sufficient to overwhelm the body's reduction capacity. This paper summarizes the available data concerning the reducing ability of the body and formulates the steps in the mechanism of cancer induction. These steps include: (1) only certain Cr6+ compounds have the capacity to interact with cellular components; (2) Cr6+ is reduced by body fluids and excess Cr6+ enters the cell (Cr3+ is poorly absorbed across membranes); (3) cellular organelles and the cytoplasm reduce Cr6+ to Cr3+; (4) excess Cr6+ can enter the nucleus; (5) Cr6+ reduction through 5+ and 4+ to 3+ has a potential to interact with the DNA molecule; and (6) if unrepaired, this DNA damage can lead to cancer induction. On the basis of current evidence Cr6+ has a threshold for carcinogenic potential in humans that is greater than the current TLV.

  1. Effect of microorganisms on the plutonium oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukšienė, Benedikta; Druteikienė, Rūta; Pečiulytė, Dalia; Baltrūnas, Dalis; Remeikis, Vidmantas; Paškevičius, Algimantas

    2012-01-01

    Particular microbes from substrates at the low-level radioactive waste repository in the Ignalina NPP territory were exposed to 239 Pu (IV) at low pH under aerobic conditions. Pu(III) and Pu(IV) were separated and quantitatively evaluated using the modified anion exchange method and alpha spectrometry. Tested bacteria Bacillus mycoides and Serratia marcescens were more effective in Pu reduction than Rhodococcus fascians. Fungi Paecillomyces lilacinus and Absidia spinosa var. spinosa as well as bacterium Rhodococcus fascians did not alter the plutonium oxidation state. - Highlights: ► Particular microbes from low-level radioactive waste repository were exposed to Pu (IV). ► Some tested bacteria induced slight Pu (IV) reduction at low pH under aerobic conditions. ► Tested fungi did not show peculiarities to alter Pu oxidation state. ► The modified radiochemical method was applied to differentiate Pu oxidation states.

  2. Effect of microorganisms on the plutonium oxidation states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luksiene, Benedikta, E-mail: bena@ar.fi.lt [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu ave 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Druteikiene, Ruta [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu ave 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Peciulyte, Dalia [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos street 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Baltrunas, Dalis; Remeikis, Vidmantas [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu ave 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Paskevicius, Algimantas [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos street 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2012-03-15

    Particular microbes from substrates at the low-level radioactive waste repository in the Ignalina NPP territory were exposed to {sup 239}Pu (IV) at low pH under aerobic conditions. Pu(III) and Pu(IV) were separated and quantitatively evaluated using the modified anion exchange method and alpha spectrometry. Tested bacteria Bacillus mycoides and Serratia marcescens were more effective in Pu reduction than Rhodococcus fascians. Fungi Paecillomyces lilacinus and Absidia spinosa var. spinosa as well as bacterium Rhodococcus fascians did not alter the plutonium oxidation state. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Particular microbes from low-level radioactive waste repository were exposed to Pu (IV). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some tested bacteria induced slight Pu (IV) reduction at low pH under aerobic conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tested fungi did not show peculiarities to alter Pu oxidation state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The modified radiochemical method was applied to differentiate Pu oxidation states.

  3. On the removal of hexavalent chromium from a Class F fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, F E; Rezaee, M; Honaker, R Q; Hower, J C

    2016-05-01

    Coarse and fine samples of a Class F fly ash obtained from commercial combustion of Illinois bituminous coal have been exposed to two long-term leaching tests designed to simulate conditions in waste impoundments. ICP-AES analysis indicated that the coarse and fine fly ash samples contained 135 and 171mg/kg Cr, respectively. Measurements by XAFS spectroscopy showed that the ash samples originally contained 5 and 8% of the chromium, respectively, in the hexavalent oxidation state, Cr(VI). After exposure to water for more than four months, the percentage of chromium as Cr(VI) in the fly-ash decreased significantly for the coarse and fine fly-ash in both tests. Combining the XAFS data with ICP-AES data on the concentration of chromium in the leachates indicated that, after the nineteen-week-long, more aggressive, kinetic test on the coarse fly ash, approximately 60% of the Cr(VI) had been leached, 20% had been reduced to Cr(III) and retained in the ash, and 20% remained as Cr(VI) in the ash. In contrast, during the six-month-long baseline test, very little Cr was actually leached from either the coarse or the fine fly-ash (ash was retained in the ash in that form, while the remainder, 34% and 80%, respectively, was reduced and retained in the ash as Cr(III). The results are interpreted as indicating that Cr(VI) present in Class F fly-ash can be reduced to Cr(III) when in contact with water and that such chemical reduction can compete with physical removal of Cr(VI) from the ash by aqueous leaching. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Shifts in oxidation states of cerium oxide nanoparticles detected inside intact hydrated cells and organelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymanski, Craig J.; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Mihai, Cosmin; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Gilles, Marry K.; Tyliszczak, T.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Orr, Galya

    2015-09-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) have been shown to induce diverse biological effects, ranging from toxic to beneficial. The beneficial effects have been attributed to the potential antioxidant activity of CNPs via certain redox reactions, depending on their oxidation state or Ce3+/Ce4+ ratio. However, this ratio is strongly dependent on the environment and age of the nanoparticles and it is unclear whether and how the complex intracellular environment impacts this ratio and the possible redox reactions of CNPs. To identify any changes in the oxidation state of CNPs in the intracellular environment and better understand their intracellular reactions, we directly quantified the oxidation states of CNPs outside and inside intact hydrated cells and organelles using correlated scanning transmission x-ray and super resolution fluorescence microscopies. By analyzing hundreds of small CNP aggregates, we detected a shift to a higher Ce3+/Ce4+ ratio in CNPs inside versus outside the cells, indicating a net reduction of CNPs in the intracellular environment. We further found a similar ratio in the cytoplasm and in the lysosomes, indicating that the net reduction occurs earlier in the internalization pathway. Together with oxidative stress and toxicity measurements, our observations identify a net reduction of CNPs in the intracellular environment, which is consistent with their involvement in potentially beneficial oxidation reactions, but also point to interactions that can negatively impact the health of cells.

  5. The effect of oxidation state on the absorption of ingested or inhaled plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, M.F.; Gorham, L.S.; Ryan, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Rats received plutonium nitrate (as 239 Pu(IV) or 239 Pu(VI) by gavage or nose-only exposure. Some of the animals were deprived of food before and/or after exposure. Results obtained indicate that there was increased retention of plutonium after exposure to 239 Pu(VI) in comparison with 239 Pu(IV). The absence of food either before and/or after inhalation exposure had no effect on the amount of 239 Pu retained by the liver and carcass. It was concluded that plutonium in its hexavalent state may under certain conditions be more readily absorbed from the GI tract, but that these conditions are unlikely to occur in human exposure. (H.K.)

  6. Relationships among oxidation-reduction and acid-base properties of the actinides in high oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morss, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    The first chemical identification of plutonium, its subsequent isolation on the macroscopic scale, and more recent chemical separation schemes were achieved by taking advantage of the differences among the oxidation states of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium. Many acid-base properties modify the relative stabilities of oxidation states of the actinides. In the solid state, strongly basic compounds such as Cs 2 O yield complex oxides with oxidation states of Np(VII), Pu(VI), and Am(VI) whereas more acidic compounds such as CsF yield complex fluorides with lower oxidation states. In aqueous solution, high basicity and strongly covalent complexes favor high oxidation states. In nonaqueous solvent systems, high acidity generally favors low oxidation states. This paper elucidates and attempts to interpret the effects of these acid-base properties in a systematic fashion

  7. 75 FR 18041 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Minimizing Use of Hexavalent Chromium (DFARS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ...-AG35 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Minimizing Use of Hexavalent Chromium (DFARS... Regulation Supplement (DFARS) to address requirements for minimizing the use of hexavalent chromium in... of items containing hexavalent chromium under DoD contracts unless an exception applies. DATES...

  8. Field screening for hexavalent chromium in soil: A fast-turnaround field method based on water extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCain, R.G.; Baechler, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    Sodium dichromate has been identified as a contaminant of concern at several waste sites on the Hanford Site. Although chromium standards for soil are typically stated in terms of total chrome, much of the toxicity and carcinogenicity are attributed to the hexavalent state, which typically exists as a relatively mobile anion. Investigation and removal of crushed drums potentially containing residual sodium dichromate required a field test for hexavalent chromium to support characterization and remediation activities. Previous experience with a commercially available field test kit had been unsuccessful. This stimulated an effort to determine potential sources of error in the field test and led to a number of modifications that significantly improved the reliability of the test

  9. NASA TEERM Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.; Rothgeb, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The overall objective of the Hex Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics project is to evaluate and test pretreatment coating systems not containing hexavalent chrome in avionics and electronics housing applications. This objective will be accomplished by testing strong performing coating systems from prior NASA and DoD testing or new coating systems as determined by the stakeholders. The technical stakeholders have agreed that this protocol will focus specifically on Class 3 coatings. Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), depots, and support contractors have to be prepared to deal with an electronics supply chain that increasingly provides parts with lead-free finishes, some labeled no differently and intermingled with their SnPb counterparts. Allowance of lead-free components presents one of the greatest risks to the reliability of military and aerospace electronics. The introduction of components with lead-free terminations, termination finishes, or circuit boards presents a host of concerns to customers, suppliers, and maintainers of aerospace and military electronic systems such as: 1. Electrical shorting due to tin whiskers 2. Incompatibility of lead-free processes and parameters (including higher melting points of lead-free alloys) with other materials in the system 3. Unknown material properties and incompatibilities that could reduce solder joint reliability

  10. Oxidative Stress and Heart Failure in Altered Thyroid States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Mishra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased or reduced action of thyroid hormone on certain molecular pathways in the heart and vasculature causes relevant cardiovascular derangements. It is well established that hyperthyroidism induces a hyperdynamic cardiovascular state, which is associated with a faster heart rate, enhanced left ventricular systolic and diastolic function whereas hypothyroidism is characterized by the opposite changes. Hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism represent opposite clinical conditions, albeit not mirror images. Recent experimental and clinical studies have suggested the involvement of ROS tissue damage under altered thyroid status. Altered-thyroid state-linked changes in heart modify their susceptibility to oxidants and the extent of the oxidative damage they suffer following oxidative challenge. Chronic increase in the cellular levels of ROS can lead to a catastrophic cycle of DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, further ROS generation and cellular injury. Thus, these cellular events might play an important role in the development and progression of myocardial remodeling and heart failure in altered thyroid states (hypo- and hyper-thyroidism. The present review aims at elucidating the various signaling pathways mediated via ROS and their modulation under altered thyroid state and the possibility of antioxidant therapy.

  11. Evolution of the Oxidation State of the Earth's Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Keller, L.; Christoffersen, E.; Rahman, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation state of the Earth's mantle during formation remains an unresolved question, whether it was constant throughout planetary accretion, transitioned from reduced to oxidized, or from oxidized to reduced. We investigate the stability of Fe3(+) at depth, in order to constrain processes (water, late accretion, dissociation of FeO) which may reduce or oxidize the Earth's mantle. In our previous experiments on shergottite compositions, variable fO2, T, and P less than 4 GPa, Fe3(+)/sigma Fe decreased slightly with increasing P, similar to terrestrial basalt. For oxidizing experiments less than 7GPa, Fe3(+)/sigma Fe decreased as well, but it's unclear from previous modelling whether the deeper mantle could retain significant Fe3(+). Our current experiments expand our pressure range deeper into the Earth's mantle and focus on compositions and conditions relevant to the early Earth. Preliminary multi-anvil experiments with Knippa basalt as the starting composition were conducted at 5-7 GPa and 1800 C, using a molybdenum capsule to set the fO2 near IW, by buffering with Mo-MoO3. TEM and EELS analyses revealed the run products quenched to polycrystalline phases, with the major phase pyroxene containing approximately equal to Fe3(+)/2(+). Experiments are underway to produce glassy samples that can be measured by EELS and XANES, and are conducted at higher pressures.

  12. Corrosion-product transport, oxidation state and remedial measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, J.A.; Brett, M.E.; Tapping, R.L.

    1998-10-01

    The issues associated with monitoring and controlling corrosion-product transport (CPT) in the balance-of-plant (BOP) and steam generators (SG) of CANDU stations are briefly reviewed. Efforts are focused on minimizing corrosion of carbon steel, which is used extensively in the CANDU primary and secondary systems. Emphasis is placed on the corrosion-product oxidation state as a monitor of water chemistry effectiveness and as a monitor of system corrosion effects. The discussion is based mostly on the results of observations from Ontario Hydro plants, and their comparisons with pressurized-water reactors. The effects of low oxygen and elevated hydrazine chemistry are reviewed, as well as the effects of layup and various startup conditions. Progress in monitoring electrochemical potential (ECP) at Ontario Hydro plants and its relationship to the oxidation state of corrosion products is reviewed. Observations on CPT on the primary side of SGs are also discussed. (author)

  13. Corrosion-product transport, oxidation state and remedial measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, J.A.; Brett, M.E.; Tapping, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    The issues associated with monitoring and controlling corrosion-product transport (CPT) in the balance-of-plant (BOP) and steam generators (SG) of CANDU stations are briefly reviewed. The efforts are focused on minimizing corrosion of carbon steel, which is used extensively in the CANDU primary and secondary systems. Emphasis is placed on the corrosion-product oxidation state as a monitor of water chemistry effectiveness, and as a monitor of system corrosion effects. The discussion is based mostly on the results and observations from Ontario Hydro plants, and their comparisons with PWRs. The effects of low oxygen and elevated hydrazine chemistry are reviewed, as well as the effects of lay-up and various start-up conditions. Progress in monitoring electrochemical potential (ECP) at Ontario Hydro plants and its relationship to the oxidation state of corrosion products is reviewed. Observations on corrosion-product transport on the primary side of steam generators are also discussed. (author)

  14. Influence of oxidation state on the pH dependence of hydrous iridium oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steegstra, Patrick; Ahlberg, Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    Many electrochemical reactions taking place in aqueous solution consume or produce protons. The pH in the diffusion layer can therefore be significantly altered during the reaction and there is a need for in situ pH measurements tracing this near surface pH. In the present paper the rotating ring disc technique was used to measure near surface pH changes during oxygen reduction, utilising hydrous iridium oxide as the pH sensing probe. Before such experiments a good understanding of the pH sensing properties of these films is required and the impact of the oxidation state of the film on the pH sensing properties was investigated as well as the influence of solution redox species. The pH sensitivity (depicted by dE/dpH) was found to depend on the average oxidation state of the film in a manner resembling the cyclic voltammetry response. In all cases the pH response is “supernernstian” with more than one proton per electron. The origin of this behaviour is discussed in the context of acid-base properties of the film and the existence of both hydrous and anhydrous oxide phases. The pH response depends also on the redox properties of the solution but can be optimised for various purposes by conditioning the film at different potentials. This was clearly illustrated by adding hydrogen peroxide, an intermediate in the oxygen reduction reaction, to the solution. It was shown that hydrous iridium oxide can be used as a reliable in situ pH sensor provided that care is taken to optimise the oxidation state of the film.

  15. Americium-curium separation by means of selective extraction of hexavalent americium using a centrifugal contactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musikas, C.; Germain, M.; Bathellier, A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper deals with Am (VI) - Cm (III) separation in nitrate media. The kinetics of oxidation of Am (III) by sodium persulfate in the presence of Ag + ions were reinvestigated by studying the effect of additions of small amounts of reagents which do not drastically change the distribution coefficients of Am (VI) or Cm (III) ions. Organo phosphorus solvents were selected because they are radiation resistant, possess weak reductant properties and that their affinity for hexavalent ion is high. The operating procedure was selected by consideration of the results of the two previous investigations. This can be done by using a centrifugal contactor enabling in to set organic-aqueous phase contact time in accordance with the kinetics of extraction of Am (VI), oxidation of Am (III) in aqueous phase, and reduction of Am (VI) in organic phase

  16. Pentavalent Uranium Chemistry - Synthetic Pursuit Of A Rare Oxidation State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    This feature article presents a comprehensive overview of pentavalent uranium systems in non-aqueous solution with a focus on the various synthetic avenues employed to access this unusual and very important oxidation state. Selected characterization data and theoretical aspects are also included. The purpose is to provide a perspective on this rapidly evolving field and identify new possibilities for future developments in pentavalent uranium chemistry.

  17. Study of uranium oxidation states in geological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidchenko, I; Salminen-Paatero, S; Rothe, J; Suksi, J

    2013-10-01

    A wet chemical method to determine uranium (U) oxidation states in geological material has been developed and tested. The problem faced in oxidation state determinations with wet chemical methods is that U redox state may change when extracted from the sample material, thereby leading to erroneous results. In order to quantify and monitor U redox behavior during the acidic extraction in the procedure, an analysis of added isotopic redox tracers, (236)U(VI) and (232)U(IV), and of variations in natural uranium isotope ratio ((234)U/(238)U) of indigenous U(IV) and U(VI) fractions was performed. Two sample materials with varying redox activity, U bearing rock and U-rich clayey lignite sediment, were used for the tests. The Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox-pair of the mineral phases was postulated as a potentially disturbing redox agent. The impact of Fe(III) on U was studied by reducing Fe(III) with ascorbic acid, which was added to the extraction solution. We observed that ascorbic acid protected most of the U from oxidation. The measured (234)U/(238)U ratio in U(IV) and U(VI) fractions in the sediment samples provided a unique tool to quantify U oxidation caused by Fe(III). Annealing (sample heating) to temperatures above 500 °C was supposed to heal ionizing radiation induced defects in the material that can disturb U redox state during extraction. Good agreement between two independent methods was obtained for DL-1a material: an average 38% of U(IV) determined by redox tracer corrected wet chemistry and 45% for XANES. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Presentation on the NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings project. Project is in response to a Memorandum of Understanding between NASA and ESA Concerning Cooperation in the Field of Space Transportation - signed September 11, 2009. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) have expressed mutual interest in pursuing cooperation in the areas of evaluating hexavalent chrome-free coatings, environmentally-preferable coatings for maintenance of launch facilities and ground support equipment, citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys.

  19. GSDO Program Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives: Final Pretreatments Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chrome free pretreatments should be considered for use on Ground Support Equipment (OSE) and Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EOSE). Both of the hexavalent chrome free pretreatments (Metalast TCP HF and SurTec 650C) evaluated by this project met, and in some instances exceeded, the requirements ofMIL-DTL-5541 "Chemical Conversion Coatings on Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys". For DC resistance measurements, both Metalast TCP HF and SurTec (!50C met initial requirements following assembly and in many cases continued to maintain passing readings for the duration of testing.

  20. Genotoxicity of Tri- and Hexavalent Chromium Compounds In Vivo and Their Modes of Action on DNA Damage In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhijia; Zhao, Min; Zhen, Hong; Chen, Lifeng; Shi, Ping; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Chromium occurs mostly in tri- and hexavalent states in the environment. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are extensively used in diverse industries, and trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] salts are used as micronutrients and dietary supplements. In the present work, we report that they both induce genetic mutations in yeast cells. They both also cause DNA damage in both yeast and Jurkat cells and the effect of Cr(III) is greater than that of Cr(VI). We further show that Cr(III) and Cr(VI) cause DNA damage through different mechanisms. Cr(VI) intercalates DNA and Cr(III) interferes base pair stacking. Based on our results, we conclude that Cr(III) can directly cause genotoxicity in vivo. PMID:25111056

  1. Studies of the Tc oxidation states in humic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bo; Liu Dejun; Yao Jun

    2010-01-01

    The oxidation state is an important aspect of the speciation of Tc in groundwater that contained organic substances due to it control the precipitation, complexation, sorption and colloid formation behavior of the Tc under HWL geological disposal conditions. In present work, the oxidation states of Tc were investigated using the LaCl 3 coagulation method and solution extraction method in aqueous solutions in which the humic acid concentration range is from 0 to 20 mg L -1 and the Tc (Ⅶ) concentration range is about 10 -8 mol l -1 . The radiocounting of 99 Tc was determined using liquid scintillation spectrometry. The humic acid will influence the radiocounting ratio of 99 Tc apparently, however, the quenching effect can be restrained once keep the volume of the cocktail to about twenty times of the sample volume. The LaCl 3 coagulation methods were carried out for the investigation of Tc oxidation states in humic acid aqueous systems at about pH 8. The tetraphenylarsonium chloride (IPA)-chloroform extraction method was used also simultaneously to investigation the concentrations of Tc (Ⅳ) and Tc (Ⅶ) for the availability of the LaCl 3 precipitation method, and the experimental results demonstrate that tetravalent technetium and pertechnetate concentrations are well agreement with the LaCl 3 precipitation method. These two experimental results demonstrated that Tc (Ⅶ) is very stable in the Tc (Ⅶ)-humic acid system during a 350 days experimental period, and the Tc (Ⅳ) concentrations are very lower, that is indicate that there didn't oxidizing reactions between the Fluka humic acid and Tc (Ⅶ) in aqueous solutions under anaerobic conditions. That is means the presence of humic acids even in anaerobic groundwater is disadvantage for the retardance of radionuclides. (authors)

  2. Studies of Tc oxidation states in humic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bo; Liu Dejun; Yao Jun

    2011-01-01

    The oxidation state of Tc is an important aspect of the speciation in groundwater which contained organic substances due to it control the precipitation, complexation, sorption and colloid formation behavior of the Tc under HWL geological disposal conditions. In present work, the oxidation states of Tc were investigated using the LaCl 3 coagulation method and solution extraction method in aqueous solutions in which the humic acid concentration range is from 0 to 20 mg/L and the Tc (VII) concentration is about 10 -8 mol/L. The radiocounting of 99 Tc was determined using liquid scintillation spectrometry. The humic acid will influence the radiocounting ratio of 99 Tc apparently, however, the quenching effect can be restrained once keep the volume of the cocktail to about twenty times of the sample volume. The LaCl 3 coagulation method was carried out for the investigation of Tc oxidation states in humic acid aqueous systems at about pH 8. The tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPA)-chloroform extraction method was used also simultaneously to investigation the concentrations of Tc (IV) and Tc (VII) for the availability of the LaCl 3 precipitation method, and the experimental results demonstrate that tetravalent technetium and pertechnetate concentration are well agreement with the LaCl 3 precipitation method. These two experimental results demonstrated that Tc (VII) is very stable in the Tc (VII)-humic acid system during a 350 days experimental period, and the Tc (IV) concentrations are very lower, that is indicate that there didn't oxidizing reactions between the Fluka humic acid and Tc (VII) in aqueous solutions under anaerobic conditions. That means the presence of humic acids even in anaerobic groundwater is disadvantage for the retardance of radionuclides. (authors)

  3. Study on the solid state chemistry of ternary uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Toshiyuki

    1988-03-01

    With the increase of burnup of uranium oxide fuels, various kinds of fission products are formed, and the oxygen atoms combined with the consumed heavy atoms are freed. The solid state chemical and/or thermodynamic properties of these elements at high temperatures are complex, and have not been well clarified. In the present report, an approach was taken that the chemical interactions between UO 2 and these fission products can be regarded as causing overlapped effects of composing ternary uranium oxides, and formation reactions and phase behavior were studied for several ternary uranium oxides with typical fission product elements such as alkaline earth metals and rare earth elements. Precise determination methods for the composition of ternary uranium oxides were developed. The estimated accuracies for x and y values in M y U 1-y O 2+x were ± 0.006 and ± 0.004, respectively. The thermodynamic properties and the lattice parameters of the phases in the Ca-U-O and Pr-U-O systems were discussed in relation to the composition determined by the methods. Crystal structure analyses of cadmium monouranates were made with X-ray diffraction method. (author) 197 refs

  4. Optoelectronic properties of valence-state-controlled amorphous niobium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozato, Takaki; Katase, Takayoshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Katayama, Shota; Matsushima, Koichi; Itagaki, Naho; Yoshida, Hisao; Ohta, Hiromichi

    2016-06-01

    In order to understand the optoelectronic properties of amorphous niobium oxide (a-NbO x ), we have investigated the valence states, local structures, electrical resistivity, and optical absorption of a-NbO x thin films with various oxygen contents. It was found that the valence states of Nb ion in a-NbO x films can be controlled from 5+  to 4+  by reducing oxygen pressure during film deposition at room temperature, together with changing the oxide-ion arrangement around Nb ion from Nb2O5-like to NbO2-like local structure. As a result, a four orders of magnitude reduction in the electrical resistivity of a-NbO x films was observed with decreasing oxygen content, due to the carrier generation caused by the appearance and increase of an oxygen-vacancy-related subgap state working as an electron donor. The tunable optoelectronic properties of a-NbO x films by valence-state-control with oxygen-vacancy formation will be useful for potential flexible optoelectronic device applications.

  5. Predicting spent fuel oxidation states in a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.; Woodley, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project (NNWSI) is studying the suitability of the tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain as a waste repository for spent fuel disposal. The oxidation state of the LWR spent fuel in the moist air environment of a tuff repository could be a significant factor in determining its leaching and dissolution characteristics. Predictions as to which oxidation states would be present are important in analyzing such a repository and thus the present study was undertaken. A set of TGA (thermogravimetric analysis) tests were conducted on well-controlled samples of irradiated PWR fuel with time and temperature as the only variables. The tests were conducted between 140 and 225 0 C for a duration up to 2200 hours. The weight gain curves were analyzed in terms of diffusion through a layer of U 3 O 7 , diffusion into the grains to form a solid solution, a simplified empirical representation of a combination of grain boundary diffusion and bulk grain oxidation. Reaction rate constants were determined in each case, but analysis of these data could not establish a definitive mechanism. 21 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  6. The oxidation state of sulfur in apatite: A new oxybarometer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiege, A.; Konecke, B.; Kim, Y.; Simon, A. C.; Becker, U.; Parat, F.

    2016-12-01

    Oxygen fugacity (fO2) of magmatic and hydrothermal systems influences, for instance, crystallization and degassing processes as well as metal solubilities in melts and fluids. Apatite is a ubiquitous mineral in magmatic and hydrothermal environments that can record and preserve volatile zonation. It can contain several thousand μg/g of the redox sensitive element sulfur (S), making S-in-apatite a potential fO2 sensor. Despite the polyvalent properties of S (e.g., S2-, S4+, S6+), the oxidation state and incorporation mechanisms of S in the apatite structure are poorly understood. In this study, the oxidation state of S-in-apatite as a function of fO2 is investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structures (XANES) spectroscopy at the S K-edge. Apatites crystallized from lamproitic melts at 1000°C, 300 MPa and over a broad range of fO2 and sulfur fugacities (fS2) were measured. Peaks corresponding to S6+ ( 2482 eV), S4+ ( 2478 eV) and S2- ( 2470 eV) were identified in apatite. The integrated S6+/STotal (STotal = S6+ + S4+ + S2-) peak area ratios show a distinct positive correlation with fO2, increasing from 0.17 at FMQ+0 to 0.96 at FMQ+3. Ab-initio calculations were performed to further understand the energetics and geometry of incorporation of S6+, S4+ and S2- into the apatite (F-, Cl-, OH-) end-members. The results confirm that apatite can contain three different oxidations states of S (S6+, S4+, S2-) as a function of fO2. This makes apatite probably the first geologically relevant mineral to incorporate reduced (S2-), intermediate (S4+), and oxidized (S6+) S in variable proportions. We emphasize that the strong dependence of the S oxidation state in apatite as a function of fO2 is also coupled with changing S content of apatite and co-existing melt (i.e., with changing fS2), resulting in a complex correlation between [1] apatite-melt (or fluid) partitioning, [2] redox conditions and [3] the melt and/or fluid composition, making the application of previously

  7. Chelation and stabilization of berkelium in oxidation state +IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deblonde, Gauthier J.-P.; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Rupert, Peter B.; An, Dahlia D.; Illy, Marie-Claire; Ralston, Corie Y.; Brabec, Jiri; de Jong, Wibe A.; Strong, Roland K.; Abergel, Rebecca J.

    2017-09-01

    Berkelium (Bk) has been predicted to be the only transplutonium element able to exhibit both +III and +IV oxidation states in solution, but evidence of a stable oxidized Bk chelate has so far remained elusive. Here we describe the stabilization of the heaviest 4+ ion of the periodic table, under mild aqueous conditions, using a siderophore derivative. The resulting Bk(IV) complex exhibits luminescence via sensitization through an intramolecular antenna effect. This neutral Bk(IV) coordination compound is not sequestered by the protein siderocalin—a mammalian metal transporter—in contrast to the negatively charged species obtained with neighbouring trivalent actinides americium, curium and californium (Cf). The corresponding Cf(III)-ligand-protein ternary adduct was characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. Combined with theoretical predictions, these data add significant insight to the field of transplutonium chemistry, and may lead to innovative Bk separation and purification processes.

  8. [Occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium during aircraft painting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherardi, M; Gatto, M P; Gordiani, A; Paci, E; Proietto, A

    2007-01-01

    Hygienists are interested in hexavalent chromium due to its genotoxic and carcinogenic effect on humans. The use of products containing hexavalent chromium is decreasing in many industrial fields because of the substitution with less-toxic compounds. In the aeronautical industry, however, the chromate are added to primer paint as a corrosion inhibitor of aircrafts surfaces: so hexavalent chromium compounds are available in many primers with a composition ranging from 10% to 13%. The application of these primers by using electrostatic guns potentially exposes painting and coating workers at high concentrations of aerosols containing Cr(VI). The aim of the present study is the evaluation of professional exposure to hexavalent chromium during aircraft painting, by adopting both environmental personal sampling and biological monitoring. To valuate workers exposure levels the personal measurements results have been compared with the exposure limit values (TLV-TWA) and the urinary chromium contents with the biological exposure indices (IBE). Moreover the strategy of coupling environmental sampling with biological monitoring seems to be a useful instrument to measure the validity of the individual protection devices.

  9. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by graphite–chitosan binary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Graphite chitosan binary (GCB) composite was prepared for hexavalent chromium adsorption from studied water. GCB was characterized by TGA, FTIR, SEM and X-ray diffraction techniques.Wide porous sorptive surface of 3.89 m 2 g − 1 and absorptive functionalities of GCB was due to 20% (w/w) graphite support on ...

  10. Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solutions using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hexavalent chromium exists in aquatic media as water soluble complex anions and persist. These are concentrated in industrial waste water especially from the tannery industries and release of effluents from industries adversely affects the environment. The removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions is carried ...

  11. Review article. Adverse hematological effects of hexavalent chromium: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Rina Rani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Workers of tanneries, welding industries, factories manufacturing chromate containing paints are exposed to hexavalent chromium that increas¬es the risk of developing serious adverse health effects. This review elucidates the mode of action of hexavalent chromium on blood and its adverse effects. Both leukocyte and erythrocyte counts of blood sharply decreased in Swiss mice after two weeks of intraperitoneal treatment with Cr (VI, with the erythrocytes transforming into echinocytes. The hexavalent chromium in the blood is readily reduced to trivalent form and the reductive capacity of erythrocytes is much greater than that of plasma. Excess Cr (VI, not reduced in plasma, may enter erythrocytes and lymphocytes and in rodents it induces microcytic anemia. The toxic effects of chromium (VI include mitochondrial injury and DNA damage of blood cells that leads to carcinogenicity. Excess Cr (VI increases cytosolic Ca2+ activity and ATP depletion thereby inducing eryptosis. Se, vitamin C, and quercetin are assumed to have some protective effect against hexavalent chromium induced hematological disorders.

  12. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by graphite–chitosan binary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hexavalent chromium; graphite–chitosan composite; adsorption kinetics. 1. Introduction ... [2], while Cr(III) is less toxicity and relatively innocuous. Cr(VI) generates in ..... Human Environments (New York: Wiley Inter-Science) p 3. [4] U.S. EPA ...

  13. Synthesis and characterization of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meublat, L.

    1989-10-01

    The synthesis of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states was attempted from dioxide RuO 2 and tetroxide RuO 4 . Three fluorinating agents were used: fluorine, chlorine trifluoride and krypton difluoride. The reactions were achieved in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride at room temperature. Thus, the reaction of RuO 4 with CIF 3 enabled us to prepare chloryl hexafluororuthenate (V), CIO 2 + RuF 6 - , a new compound well identified by vibrational spectroscopy (infra-red and Raman), the structure of which was determined. The reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 4 gave the oxide tetrafluoride RuOF 4 , the previously published syntheses and properties of which were not in agreement with each other. This compound was definitely characterized here by chemical analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The product of thermal decomposition (70 0 C) of RuOF 4 is presumably RuF 4 since only oxygen is liberated during this decomposition. At last, the reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 2 probably leads to the formation of the new oxide fluoride RuO 2 F 4 . Indeed, no oxygen is given off during this reaction, the chemical analysis of the red-orange coloured solid residue is almost in agreement with the one proposed and its infra-red absorption spectrum indicates the presence of ruthenium-oxygen and ruthenium-terminal and bridging fluorine bonds [fr

  14. Synthesis and characterization of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meublat, L.

    1989-01-01

    The synthesis of ruthenium fluorides and oxide fluorides with high oxidation states was attempted from dioxide RuO 2 and tetroxide RuO 4 . Three fluorinating agents were used: fluorine, chlorine trifluoride and krypton difluoride. The reactions were achieved in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride at room temperature. Thus, the reaction of RuO 4 with CIF 3 enabled us to prepare chloryl hexafluororuthenate (V), ClO 2 + RuF 6 - , a new compound well idendified by vibrational spectroscopy (infra-red and Raman), the structure of which was determined. The reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 4 gave the oxide tetrafluoride RuOF 4 , the previously published syntheses and properties of which were not in agreement with each other. This compound was definitely characterized here by chemical analysis, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The product of thermal decomposition (70 0 C) of RuOF 4 is presumably RuF 4 since only oxygen is liberated during this decomposition. At last, the reaction of KrF 2 with RuO 2 probably leads to the formation of the new oxide fluoride RuO 2 F 4 . Indeed, no oxygen is given off during this reaction, the chemical analysis of the red-orange coloured solid residue is almost in agreement with the one proposed and its infra-red absorption spectrum indicates the presence of ruthenium-oxygen and ruthenium-terminal and bridging fluorine bonds [fr

  15. Intestinal Oxidative State Can Alter Nutrient and Drug Bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faria Ana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic cations (OCs are substances of endogenous (e.g., dopamine, choline or exogenous (e.g., drugs like cimetidine origin that are positively charged at physiological ph. since many of these compounds can not pass the cell membrane freely, their transport in or out of cells must be mediated by specific transport systems. Transport by organic cation transporters (OCTs can be regulated rapidly by altering their trafficking and/or affinities in response to stimuli. However, for example, a specific disease could lead to modifications in the expression of OCTs. Chronic exposure to oxidative stress has been suggested to alter regulation and functional activity of proteins through several pathways. According to results from a previous work, oxidation-reduction pathways were thought to be involved in intestinal organic cation uptake modulation. The present work was performed in order to evaluate the influence of oxidative stressors, especially glutathione, on the intestinal organic cation absorption. For this purpose, the effect of compounds with different redox potential (glutathione, an endogenous antioxidant, and procyanidins, diet antioxidants was assessed on MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium iodide uptake in an enterocyte cell line (Caco-2. Caco-2 cells were subcultured with two different media conditions (physiological: 5 mM glucose, referred as control cells; and high-glucose: 25 mM glucose, referred as HG cells. In HG cells, the uptake was significantly lower than in control cells. Redox changing interventions affected Mpp+ uptake, both in control and in high-glucose Caco-2 cells. Cellular glutathione levels could have an important impact on membrane transporter activity. The results indicate that modifications in the cellular oxidative state modulate MPP+ uptake by Caco-2 cells. Such modifications may reflect in changes of nutrient and drug bioavailability.

  16. Persistence of oxidation state III of gold in thione coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Sirpa; Koskinen, Laura; Kultamaa, Matti; Haukka, Matti; Hirva, Pipsa

    2017-05-01

    Ligands N,N'-tetramethylthiourea and 2-mercapto-1-methyl-imidazole form stable Au(III) complexes [AuCl3(N,N'-tetramethylthiourea)] (1) and [AuCl3(2-mercapto-1-methyl-imidazole)] (2) instead of reducing the Au(III) metal center into Au(I), which would be typical for the attachment of sulfur donors. Compounds 1 and 2 were characterized by spectroscopic methods and by X-ray crystallography. The spectroscopic details were explained by simulation of the UV-Vis spectra via the TD-DFT method. Additionally, computational DFT studies were performed in order to find the reason for the unusual oxidation state in the crystalline materials. The preference for Au(III) can be explained via various weak intra- and intermolecular interactions present in the solid state structures. The nature of the interactions was further investigated by topological charge density analysis via the QTAIM method.

  17. Thermodynamics of synergistic extraction of hexavalent plutonium with HPMBP and neutral donors: monodentate versus bidentate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohithakshan, K.V.; Mithapara, P.D.; Pai, S.A.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Jain, H.C.

    1996-01-01

    Synergistic extraction of hexavalent plutonium was studied from HNO 3 medium (0.05 M) with 1-phnyl, 3-methyl, 4-benzoyl, pyrazolone-5 (HPMBP) and different monodentate neutral donors viz. diphenyl sulphoxide (DPSO), tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) using benzene as a diluent. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) evaluated by performing the experiments at various fixed temperatures (288 K to 318 K) were compared with those reported previously for the bidentate neutral donors (DBDECMP, DHDECMP and CMPO). The net enthalpy changes were negative and comparable. The monodentate neutral donors, however, showed a larger decrease in the entropy values. Further, the negative values of enthalpy and entropy changes indicated that the organic adduct formation is an addition reaction as reported ealier for the bidentate donors. (orig.)

  18. Proteomic indicators of oxidation and hydration state in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Dick

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New integrative approaches are needed to harness the potential of rapidly growing datasets of protein expression and microbial community composition in colorectal cancer. Chemical and thermodynamic models offer theoretical tools to describe populations of biomacromolecules and their relative potential for formation in different microenvironmental conditions. The average oxidation state of carbon (ZC can be calculated as an elemental ratio from the chemical formulas of proteins, and water demand per residue ( ${\\overline{n}}_{{\\mathrm{H}}_{2}\\mathrm{O}}$ n ¯ H 2 O is computed by writing the overall formation reactions of proteins from basis species. Using results reported in proteomic studies of clinical samples, many datasets exhibit higher mean ZC or ${\\overline{n}}_{{\\mathrm{H}}_{2}\\mathrm{O}}$ n ¯ H 2 O of proteins in carcinoma or adenoma compared to normal tissue. In contrast, average protein compositions in bacterial genomes often have lower ZC for bacteria enriched in fecal samples from cancer patients compared to healthy donors. In thermodynamic calculations, the potential for formation of the cancer-related proteins is energetically favored by changes in the chemical activity of H2O and fugacity of O2 that reflect the compositional differences. The compositional analysis suggests that a systematic change in chemical composition is an essential feature of cancer proteomes, and the thermodynamic descriptions show that the observed proteomic transformations in host tissue could be promoted by relatively high microenvironmental oxidation and hydration states.

  19. Composition and oxidation state of sulfur in atmospheric particulate matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Longo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemical and physical speciation of atmospheric sulfur was investigated in ambient aerosol samples using a combination of sulfur near-edge x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (S-NEXFS and X-ray fluorescence (XRF microscopy. These techniques were used to determine the composition and oxidation state of sulfur in common primary emission sources and ambient particulate matter collected from the greater Atlanta area. Ambient particulate matter samples contained two oxidation states: S0 and S+VI. Ninety-five percent of the individual aerosol particles (> 1 µm analyzed contain S0. Linear combination fitting revealed that S+VI in ambient aerosol was dominated by ammonium sulfate as well as metal sulfates. The finding of metal sulfates provides further evidence for acidic reactions that solubilize metals, such as iron, during atmospheric transport. Emission sources, including biomass burning, coal fly ash, gasoline, diesel, volcanic ash, and aerosolized Atlanta soil, and the commercially available bacterium Bacillus subtilis, contained only S+VI. A commercially available Azotobacter vinelandii sample contained approximately equal proportions of S0 and S+VI. S0 in individual aerosol particles most likely originates from primary emission sources, such as aerosolized bacteria or incomplete combustion.

  20. Oxidation states of Fe and Ti in blue sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wongrawang, P; Wongkokua, W; Monarumit, N; Thammajak, N; Wathanakul, P

    2016-01-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) can be used to study the oxidation state of a dilute system such as transition metal defects in solid-state samples. In blue sapphire, Fe and Ti are defects that cause the blue color. Inter-valence charge transfer (IVCT) between Fe 2+ and Ti 4+ has been proposed to describe the optical color’s origin. However, the existence of divalent iron cations has not been thoroughly investigated. Fluorescent XANES is therefore employed to study K-edge absorptions of Fe and Ti cations in various blue sapphire samples including natural, synthetic, diffused and heat-treated sapphires. All the samples showed an Fe absorption edge at 7124 eV, corresponding to the Fe 3+ state; and Ti at 4984 eV, corresponding to Ti 4+ . From these results, we propose Fe 3+ -Ti 4+ mixed acceptor states located at 1.75 eV and 2.14 eV above the valence band of corundum, that correspond to 710 nm and 580 nm bands of UV–vis absorption spectra, to describe the cause of the color of blue sapphire. (paper)

  1. Determination of the oxidation states of metals and metalloids: An analytical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.

    2013-12-01

    The hazard of many heavy metals/metalloids in the soil depends on their oxidation state. The problem of determining the oxidation state has been solved due to the use of synchrotron radiation methods with the analysis of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The determination of the oxidation state is of special importance for some hazardous heavy elements (arsenic, antimony, selenium, chromium, uranium, and vanadium). The mobility and hazard of each of these elements depend on its oxidation state. The mobilities are higher at lower oxidation states of As, Cr, V, and Se and at higher oxidation states of Sb and U. The determination of the oxidation state of arsenic has allowed revealing its fixation features in the rhizosphere of hydrophytes. The known oxidation states of chromium and uranium are used for the retention of these elements on geochemical barriers. Different oxidation states have been established for vanadium displacing iron in goethite. The determination of the oxidation state of manganese in the rhizosphere and the photosynthetic apparatus of plants is of special importance for agricultural chemists.

  2. seasonal variation in chromium hexavalent and copper

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    Seasonal variation in heavy metal contamination of groundwater in the Jimeta- Yola area ... animal feedlots, industrial waste and food processing ...... and conservation of groundwater quality; a) ... significant role of hydrous Mn and Fe oxides.

  3. Influence of vanadium oxidation states on the performance of V-Mg-Al mixed-oxide catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schacht, L.; Navarrete, J.; Schacht, P.; Ramirez, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    V-Mg-Al mixed-oxide catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane were prepared by thermal decomposition of Mg-Al-layered double hydroxides with vanadium interlayer doping. The obtained catalysts were tested for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane, obtaining good results in catalytic activity (conversion 16.55 % and selectivity 99.97 %) Results indicated that catalytic performance of these materials depends on how vanadium is integrated in the layered structure, which is determined by the Mg/Al ratio. Vanadium interlayer doping modifies the oxidation state of vanadium and consequently catalytic properties. Surface properties were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and diffuse reflectance, UV-visible spectroscopy, and temperature programmed reduction. The analyses provided information about the oxidation state, before and after the reaction. From these results, it is suggested that selectivity to propylene and catalytic activity depend mainly of vanadium oxidation state. (Author)

  4. Influence of vanadium oxidation states on the performance of V-Mg-Al mixed-oxide catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schacht, L. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Av. IPN s/n, Edificio 9, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Navarrete, J.; Schacht, P.; Ramirez, M. A., E-mail: pschacha@imp.m [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, 07730 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    V-Mg-Al mixed-oxide catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane were prepared by thermal decomposition of Mg-Al-layered double hydroxides with vanadium interlayer doping. The obtained catalysts were tested for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane, obtaining good results in catalytic activity (conversion 16.55 % and selectivity 99.97 %) Results indicated that catalytic performance of these materials depends on how vanadium is integrated in the layered structure, which is determined by the Mg/Al ratio. Vanadium interlayer doping modifies the oxidation state of vanadium and consequently catalytic properties. Surface properties were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and diffuse reflectance, UV-visible spectroscopy, and temperature programmed reduction. The analyses provided information about the oxidation state, before and after the reaction. From these results, it is suggested that selectivity to propylene and catalytic activity depend mainly of vanadium oxidation state. (Author)

  5. Manganese oxidation state mediates toxicity in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaney, S.H.; Smith, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    The role of the manganese (Mn) oxidation state on cellular Mn uptake and toxicity is not well understood. Therefore, undifferentiated PC12 cells were exposed to 0-200 μM Mn(II)-chloride or Mn(III)-pyrophosphate for 24 h, after which cellular manganese levels were measured along with measures of cell viability, function, and cytotoxicity (trypan blue exclusion, medium lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), 8-isoprostanes, cellular ATP, dopamine, serotonin, H-ferritin, transferrin receptor (TfR), Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), and copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) protein levels). Exposures to Mn(III) >10 μM produced 2- to 5-fold higher cellular manganese levels than equimolar exposures to Mn(II). Cell viability and ATP levels both decreased at the highest Mn(II) and Mn(III) exposures (150-200 μM), while Mn(III) exposures produced increases in LDH activity at lower exposures (≥50 μM) than did Mn(II) (200 μM only). Mn(II) reduced cellular dopamine levels more than Mn(III), especially at the highest exposures (50% reduced at 200 μM Mn(II)). In contrast, Mn(III) produced a >70% reduction in cellular serotonin at all exposures compared to Mn(II). Different cellular responses to Mn(II) exposures compared to Mn(III) were also observed for H-ferritin, TfR, and MnSOD protein levels. Notably, these differential effects of Mn(II) versus Mn(III) exposures on cellular toxicity could not simply be accounted for by the different cellular levels of manganese. These results suggest that the oxidation state of manganese exposures plays an important role in mediating manganese cytotoxicity

  6. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications: Joint Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Regardless of the corrosivity of the environment, all metals require periodic maintenance activity to guard against the insidious effects of corrosion and thus ensure that alloys meet or exceed design or performance life. The standard practice for protecting metallic substrates is the application of a coating system. Applied coating systems work via a variety of methods (barrier, galvanic, and/or inhibitor) and adhere to the substrate through a combination of chemical and physical bonds. For years hexavalent chromium has been a widely used element within applied coating systems because of its self healing and corrosion resistant properties. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) studies have concluded that hexavalent chromium (hex chrome) is carcinogenic and poses significant risk to human health. On May 5, 2011 amendments to the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) were issued in the Federal Register. Subpart 223.73 prohibits contracts from requiring hexavalent chromium in deliverables unless certain exceptions apply. These exceptions include authorization from a general or flag officer and members of the Senior Executive Service from a Program Executive Office, and unmodified legacy systems. Otherwise, Subpart 252.223-7008 provides the contract clause prohibiting contractors from using or delivering hexavalent chromium in a concentration greater than 0.1 percent by weight for all new contracts and to be included down to subcontractors for supplies, maintenance and repair services, and construction materials. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Department of Defense (DoD), and industry stakeholders continue to search for alternatives to hex chrome in coatings applications that meet their performance requirements in corrosion protection, cost, operability, and health and safety, while typically specifying that performance must be equal to or greater than existing systems.

  7. Removal and transformation of hexavalent chromium in sequencing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the efficiency of removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and to ascertain the fate of Cr(VI) in the treatment process. An SBR was operated with the FILL, REACT, SETTLE, DRAW and IDLE periods in the time ratio of 2:12:2:1.5:6.5 for a cycle ...

  8. Hexavalent Chromium Is Cytotoxic and Genotoxic to American Alligator Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, Catherine; Xie, Hong; Guillette, Louis J.; Zhu, Cairong; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-01-01

    Metals are a common pollutant in the aquatic ecosystem. With global climate change, these levels are anticipated to rise as lower pH levels allow sediment bound metals to be released. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is an apex predator in the aquatic ecosystem and is considered a keystone species; as such it serves as a suitable monitor for localized pollution. One metal of increasing concern is hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). It is present in the aquatic environment and is ...

  9. Hexavalent chromium induces chromosome instability in human urothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Sandra S. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Liou, Louis [Department of Pathology, Boston University School of Medicine, 670 Albany St., Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Adam, Rosalyn M. [Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Wise, John Pierce Sr., E-mail: john.wise@louisville.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Cr(VI) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24 h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer, specifically, and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer, in general. - Highlights: • Hexavalent chromium is genotoxic to human urothelial cells. • Hexavalent chromium induces aneuploidy in human urothelial cells. • hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells model the effects seen in primary urothelial cells. • Hexavalent chromium has a strong likelihood of being carcinogenic for bladder tissue.

  10. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockaday, W.C.; Masiello, C.A.; Randerson, J.T.; Smernik, R.J.; Baldock, J.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowground carbon pools associated with decadal timescale disturbances (e.g., land use change and fire). The OR of aboveground pools can be measured using conventional approaches including elemental analysis. However, measuring the OR of soil carbon pools is technically challenging, and few soil OR data are available. In this paper we test three solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for measuring soil OR, all based on measurements of the closely related parameter, organic carbon oxidation state (Cox). Two of the three techniques make use of a molecular mixing model which converts NMR spectra into concentrations of a standard suite of biological molecules of known C ox. The third technique assigns Cox values to each peak in the NMR spectrum. We assess error associated with each technique using pure chemical compounds and plant biomass standards whose Cox and OR values can be directly measured by elemental analyses. The most accurate technique, direct polarization solid-state 13C NMR with the molecular mixing model, agrees with elemental analyses to ??0.036 Cox units (??0.009 OR units). Using this technique, we show a large natural variability in soil Cox and OR values. Soil Cox values have a mean of -0.26 and a range from -0.45 to 0.30, corresponding to OR values of 1.08 ?? 0.06 and a range from 0.96 to 1.22. We also estimate the OR of the carbon flux from a boreal forest fire. Analysis of soils from nearby intact soil profiles imply that soil carbon losses associated

  11. The problem of oxidation state stabilisation and some regularities of a Periodic system of the elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, Yurii M; Tretyakov, Yuri D

    1999-01-01

    The general principles of the concept of oxidation state stabilisation are formulated. Problems associated with the preparation and provision of the highest valent forms of transition elements are considered. The empirical data concerning the synthesis of new compounds of rare-earth elements and d elements in unusually high oxidation states are analysed. The possibility of occurrence of the oxidation states + 9 and + 10 for some elements (for example, for iridium and platinum in tetraoxo ions) are discussed. Approaches to the realisation of these states are outlined and it is demonstrated that solid phases or matrices containing alkali metal cations are the most promising systems for the stabilisation of these high oxidation states. Selected thermodynamic features typical of metal halides and oxides and the regularities of the changes in the extreme oxidation states of d elements are considered. The bibliography includes 266 references.

  12. Effect of particle size on iron nanoparticle oxidation state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Lysaght, Andrew C.; Goberman, Daniel G.; Chiu, Wilson K.S.

    2012-01-01

    Selecting catalyst particles is a very important part of carbon nanotube growth, although the properties of these nanoscale particles are unclear. In this article iron nanoparticles are analyzed through the use of atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in order to understand how the size affects the chemical composition of nanoparticles and thus their physical structure. Initially, atomic force microscopy was used to confirm the presence of iron particles, and to determine the average size of the particles. Next an analytical model was developed to estimate particle size as a function of deposition time using inputs from atomic force microscopy measurement. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was then performed with a focus on the spectra relating to the 2p Fe electrons to study the chemical state of the particles as a function of time. It was shown that as the size of nanoparticles decreased, the oxidation state of the particles changed due to a high proportion of atoms on the surface.

  13. Laboratory Validation and Demonstrations of Non-Hexavalent Chromium Conversion Coatings for Steel Substrates (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    UNCLASSIFIED: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Laboratory Validation and Demonstrations of Non- Hexavalent Chromium Conversion...00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Laboratory Validation and Demonstrations of Non- Hexavalent Chromium Conversion Coatings for Steel Substrates 5a...to MRAP II Acquisition Pretreatment /conversion coatings omitted: • Hex- chrome pretreatments prohibited for new ground vehicles • Hydrogen

  14. Quantum confinement-induced tunable exciton states in graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwook; Seo, Jiwon; Zhu, Xi; Lee, Jiyoul; Shin, Hyeon-Jin; Cole, Jacqueline M; Shin, Taeho; Lee, Jaichan; Lee, Hangil; Su, Haibin

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide has recently been considered to be a potential replacement for cadmium-based quantum dots due to its expected high fluorescence. Although previously reported, the origin of the luminescence in graphene oxide is still controversial. Here, we report the presence of core/valence excitons in graphene-based materials, a basic ingredient for optical devices, induced by quantum confinement. Electron confinement in the unreacted graphitic regions of graphene oxide was probed by high resolution X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Using experiments and simulations, we were able to tune the core/valence exciton energy by manipulating the size of graphitic regions through the degree of oxidation. The binding energy of an exciton in highly oxidized graphene oxide is similar to that in organic electroluminescent materials. These results open the possibility of graphene oxide-based optoelectronic device technology.

  15. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of hexavalent chromium-induced lung cancer: an updated perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, A M; Ferreira, L M R; Alpoim, M C

    2012-03-01

    For over a century, chromium (Cr) has found widespread industrial and commercial use, namely as a pigment, in the production of stainless steel and in chrome plating. The adverse health effects to the skin and respiratory tract of prolonged exposure to Cr have been known or suspected for a long time, but it was much more recently that the toxicity of this element was unequivocally attributed to its hexavalent state. Based on the combined results of extensive epidemiological studies, animal carcinogenicity studies and several types of other relevant data, authoritative regulatory agencies have found sufficient evidence to classify hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds as encountered in the chromate production, chromate pigment production and chromium plating industries as carcinogenic to humans. Crucial for the development of novel strategies to prevent, detect and/or treat Cr(VI)-induced cancers is a detailed knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these pathologies. Unfortunately, in spite of a considerable research effort, crucial facets of these mechanisms remain essentially unknown. This review is intended to provide a concise, integrated and critical perspective of the current state of knowledge concerning multiple aspects of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis. It will present recent theories of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis and will include aspects not traditionally covered in other reviews, such as the possible involvement of the energy metabolism in this process. A brief discussion on the models that have been used in the studies of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenicity will also be included, due to the impact of this parameter on the relevance of the results obtained.

  16. Solid state solubility of copper oxides in hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zykin, Mikhail A.; Vasiliev, Alexander V.; Trusov, Lev A.; Dinnebier, Robert E.; Jansen, Martin; Kazin, Pavel E.

    2018-06-01

    Samples containing copper oxide doped hydroxyapatite with the composition Ca10(PO4)6(CuxOH1-x-δ)2, x = 0.054 - 0.582, in the mixture with CuO/Cu2O were prepared by a solid-state high-temperature treatment at varying annealing temperatures and at different partial water vapor and oxygen pressures. The crystal structures of the apatite compounds were refined using powder X-ray diffraction patterns and the content of copper ions x in the apatite was determined. Copper ions enter exclusively into the apatite trigonal channels formally substituting protons of OH-groups and the hexagonal cell parameters grow approximately linearly with x, the channel volume mostly expanding while the remaining volume of the crystal lattice changing only slightly. The equilibrium copper content in the apatite increases drastically, by almost a factor of 10 with the annealing temperature rising from 800° to 1200°C. The reduction of the water partial pressure leads to a further increase of x, while the dependence of x on the oxygen partial pressure exhibits a maximum. The observed relations are consistent with the proposed chemical reactions implying the copper introduction is followed by the release of a considerable quantity of gaseous products - water and oxygen. The analysis of interatomic distances suggests that the maximum content of copper ions in the channel cannot exceed 2/3.

  17. Stabilization of actinides and lanthanides in unusually high oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eller, P.G.; Penneman, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical environments can be chosen which stabilize actinides and lanthanides in unusually high or low oxidation states and in unusual coordination. In many cases, one can rationalize the observed species as resulting from strong charge/size influences provided by specific sites in host lattices (e.g., Tb(IV) in BaTbO 3 or Am(IV) in polytungstate anions). In other cases, the unusual species can be considered from an acid-base viewpoint (e.g., U(III) in AsF 5 /HF solution or Pu(VII) in Li 5 PuO 6 ). In still other cases, an interplay of steric and redox effects can lead to interesting comparisons (e.g., instability of double fluoride salts of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) relative to U, Np, and Am analogues). Generalized ways to rationalize compounds containing actinides and lanthanides in unusual valences (particularly high valences), including the above and numerous other examples, will form the focus of this paper. Recently developed methods for synthesizing high valent f-element fluorides using superoxidizers and superacids at low temperatures will also be described. 65 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs

  18. The Behavior of the Ru-bda Water Oxidation Catalysts at Low Oxidation States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheu, Roc; Ghaderian, Abolfazl; Francas, Laia; Chernev, Petko; Ertem, Mehmed; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Batista, Victor; Haumann, Michael; Gimbert-Suriñach, Carolina; Sala, Xavier; Llobet, Antoni

    2018-06-13

    The Ru complex [RuII(bda-κ-N2O2)(N-NH2)2], 1, (bda2- = (2,2'-bipyridine)-6,6'-dicarboxylate; N-NH2 = 4-(pyridin-4-yl)aniline) is used as a synthetic intermediate to prepare Ru-bda complexes that contain the NO+, acetonitrile (MeCN) or H2O ligands at oxidation states II and III. Complex 1 reacts with excess NO+ to form a Ru complex where the aryl amine ligands N-NH2 in 1 are transformed into diazonium salts (N-N2+ = 4-(pyridin-4-yl)benzenediazonium)) together with the formation of a new Ru-NO group at the equatorial zone, to generate [RuII(bda-κ-N2O)(NO)(N-N2)2]3+, 23+. Similarly, complex 1 can also react with a coordinating solvent, such as MeCN, at room temperature leading to complex [RuII(bda-κ-N2O)(MeCN)(N-NH2)2], 3. Finally in acidic aqueous solutions solvent water coordinates the Ru center forming {[RuII(bda-κ-(NO)3)(H2O)(N-NH3)2](H2O)n}2+, 42+, that is strongly hydrogen bonded with additional water molecules at the second coordination sphere. We have additionally characterized the one electron oxidized complex {[RuIII(bda-κ-(NO)3.5)(H2O)(N-NH3)2](H2O)n}3+, 53+. The coordination mode of the complexes has been studied both in the solid state and in solution through single-crystal XRD, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, variable-temperature NMR and DFT calculations. While the κ-N2O is the main coordination mode for 23+ and 3, an equilibrium that involves isomers with κ-N2O and κ-NO2 coordination modes and neighboring hydrogen bonded water molecules is observed for 42+ and 53+. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. An evaluation of in vivo models for toxicokinetics of hexavalent chromium in the stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasso, A.F., E-mail: sasso.alan@epa.gov; Schlosser, P.M., E-mail: schlosser.paul@epa.gov

    2015-09-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6) is a drinking water contaminant that has been detected in most of the water systems throughout the United States. In 2-year drinking water bioassays, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) found clear evidence of carcinogenic activity in male and female rats and mice. Because reduction of Cr6 to trivalent chromium (Cr3) is an important detoxifying step in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract prior to systemic absorption, models have been developed to estimate the extent of reduction in humans and animals. The objective of this work was to use a revised model of ex vivo Cr6 reduction kinetics in gastric juice to analyze the potential reduction kinetics under in vivo conditions for mice, rats and humans. A published physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was adapted to incorporate the new reduction model. This paper focuses on the toxicokinetics of Cr6 in the stomach compartment, where most of the extracellular Cr6 reduction is believed to occur in humans. Within the range of doses administered by the NTP bioassays, neither the original nor revised models predict saturation of stomach reducing capacity to occur in vivo if applying default parameters. However, both models still indicate that mice exhibit the lowest extent of reduction in the stomach, meaning that a higher percentage of the Cr6 dose may escape stomach reduction in that species. Similarly, both models predict that humans exhibit the highest extent of reduction at low doses. - Highlights: • We outline a new in vivo model for hexavalent chromium reduction in the stomach. • We examine in vivo reduction for mice, rats, and humans under varying conditions. • Species differences in toxicokinetics may explain susceptibility. • We show that a simplified stomach reduction model is adequate for extrapolation. • Internal dose uncertainties still exist.

  20. A microbial-mineralization-inspired approach for synthesis of manganese oxide nanostructures with controlled oxidation states and morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oba, Manabu; Oaki, Yuya; Imai, Hiroaki [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2010-12-21

    Manganese oxide nanostructures are synthesized by a route inspired by microbial mineralization in nature. The combination of organic molecules, which include antioxidizing and chelating agents, facilitates the parallel control of oxidation states and morphologies in an aqueous solution at room temperature. Divalent manganese hydroxide (Mn(OH){sub 2}) is selectively obtained as a stable dried powder by using a combination of ascorbic acid as an antioxidizing agent and other organic molecules with the ability to chelate to manganese ions. The topotactic oxidation of the resultant Mn(OH){sub 2} leads to the selective formation of trivalent manganese oxyhydroxide ({beta}-MnOOH) and trivalent/tetravalent sodium manganese oxide (birnessite, Na{sub 0.55}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4}.1.5H{sub 2}O). For microbial mineralization in nature, similar synthetic routes via intermediates have been proposed in earlier works. Therefore, these synthetic routes, which include in the present study the parallel control over oxidation states and morphologies of manganese oxides, can be regarded as new biomimetic routes for synthesis of transition metal oxide nanostructures. As a potential application, it is demonstrated that the resultant {beta}-MnOOH nanostructures perform as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Electrochemical removal of hexavalent chromium from wastewater using Platinum-Iron/Iron-carbon nanotubes and bipolar Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshyar Hossini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent decades, electrocoagulation (EC has engrossed much attention as an environmental-friendly and effectiveness process. In addition, the EC process is a potential suitable way for treatment of wastewater with concern to costs and environment. The object of this study was electrochemical evaluation of chromium removal from industrial wastewater using Platinum and carbon nanotubes electrodes. Materials and Methods: The effect of key variables including pH (3–9, hexavalent chromium concentration (50–300 mg/l, supporting electrolyte (NaCl, KCl, Na2CO3 and KNO3 and its dosage, Oxidation-Reduction variations, sludge generation rate and current density (2–20 mA/cm2 was determined. Results: Based on experimental data, optimum conditions were determined in 20, 120 min, pH 3, NaCl 0.5% and 100 mg/L initial concentration of chromium. Conclusions: Removal of hexavalent chromium from the wastewater could be successfully performanced using Platinum-Iron/Iron-carbon nanotubes and bipolar Electrodes.

  2. Hexavalent chromium reduction by a hypocrea tawa fungal strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales-Battera, L.; Guillen-Jimenez, F. M.; Cristiani-Urbina, E.

    2009-01-01

    Microbial transformation of the highly toxic, water-soluble and mobile hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], to the less toxic, insoluble and immobile trivalent chromium [Cr(III)], is an economically feasible alternative for the treatment of wastewaters contaminated with Cr(VI). The main purpose of this work was to isolate, identify and characterize a microbial strain water by batch enrichment culture techniques, and further identified as Hypocrea tawa by its D1/D2 domain sequence of the 26S rRNA gene with 99,44% similarity. (Author)

  3. Chemical states of molybdenum in radioactive waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Kawanishi, Nobuo; Nagaki, Hiroshi; Naito, Aritsune

    1982-01-01

    In order to confirm an expectation that the chemical state of molybdenum in glass reflects the phase separation tendency of the yellow solid from the melt of borosilicate glass, simulated waste glasses were prepared, and ESCA analysis was performed using a commercially available electron spectrometer (PHI550 E) with an excitation source consisting of Mg Kα-ray. The effects of the concentration of Mo and FE 2 O 3 and the melting atmosphere (oxidizing or reducing) in which the samples were prepared on the chemical state of Mo and the solubility of MoO 3 were examined. From the observation of Mo spectra, it was shown that Mo in waste glass had several valencies, e.g., Mo(3), Mo(4), Mo(5) and Mo(6), while Mo in the yellow solid separated from the melts exhibited hexa-valent state, the peak intensity of higher valencies increased relatively with the increase of MoO 3 concentration, but the chemical state of Mo did not change remarkably around the solubility limit of MoO 3 , the melting atmosphere influenced on the Mo state in the waste glass, the peak intensity of Mo(6) increased relatively with the increasing Fe 2 O 3 concentration, and Mo in devitrified glass exhibited hexa-valent state. (Yoshitake, I.)

  4. Oxidation under electron bombardment. A tool for studying the initial states of silicon oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carriere, B.; Deville, J.P.; El Maachi, A.

    1987-06-01

    The exciting beam of an Auger electron spectrometer has been used to monitor the oxidation of silicon single crystals at room temperature and very low pressures of oxygen (approx. 10/sup -7/ Torr). This process allows us to build ultra-thin layers of silica on silicon (down to 30 A) but it is mostly used to investigate the mechanisms of the initial stages of oxidation. Auger spectra recorded continuously during the oxidation process provide information on (1) the nature of the silicon-oxygen chemical bonds which are interpreted through fine structure in the Auger peak, and (2) the kinetics of oxide formation which are deduced from curves of Auger signal versus time. An account is given of the contribution of these Auger studies to the description of the intermediate oxide layer during the reaction between silicon and oxygen and the influence of surface structural disorder, induced mainly by argon-ion bombardment, is discussed in terms of reactivity and oxide coverage.

  5. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-06-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and COD(Cr) of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms.

  6. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-01-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and CODCr of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms. PMID:15909347

  7. [Hexavalent chromium pollution and exposure level in electroplating workplace].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-hui; Zhang, Xuan; Yang, Zhang-ping; Jiang, Cai-xia; Ren, Xiao-bin; Wang, Qiang; Zhu, Yi-min

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the pollution of hexavalent chromium in the electroplating workplace and screen the biomarkers of chromium exposure. Field occupational health investigation was conducted in 25 electroplating workplaces. 157 electroplating workers and 93 healthy unexposed controls were recruited. The epidemiological information was collected with face to face interview. Chromium in erythrocytes was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The median of short-term exposure concentration of chromium in the air at electroplating workplace was 0.06 mg/m(3) (median) and ranging from 0.01 (detect limit) to 0.53 mg/m(3)). The median concentration of Cr (VI) in erythrocytes in electroplating workers was 4.41 (2.50 ∼ 5.29) µg/L, which was significantly higher than that in control subjects [1.54 (0.61 ∼ 2.98) µg/L, P electroplating workers and control subjects, except for the subjects of age less than 30 years old (P = 0.11). There was hexavalent chromium pollution in electroplating workplace. Occupational hazards prevention measures should be taken to control the chromium pollution hazards.

  8. Interface Controlled Oxidation States in Layered Cobalt Oxide Nanoislands on Gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, Alexander; Fester, Jakob; Bajdich, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Layered cobalt oxides have been shown to be highly active catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER; half of the catalytic “water splitting” reaction), particularly when promoted with gold. However, the surface chemistry of cobalt oxides and in particular the nature of the synergistic effect...

  9. Voltametric determination of O:U relation in uranium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, F.M.S. de; Abrao, A.

    1988-07-01

    Uranium oxide samples are dissolved in hot concentrated H 3 PO 4 - H 2 SO 4 mixture and the solution diluted with 1M H 2 SO 4 . One aliquot of such solution (A) is used to record the first voltamogram which gives the U(VI) content. To a second aliquot HNO 3 and H 2 O 2 is added to oxidise uranium to the hexavalent state (B) and the second voltamogram is recorded from 0.0 to 0.4 V X SCE. The O:U ratio in the original sample is calculated by the expression: O/U = 2.000 + [U (VI) soln.A/% U(VI) soln. B]. The method provides an accurate means for determining O to U ratios in high-purity uranium dioxide, fuel pellets and a variety of oxides prepared for developmental work on ceramic fuel materials. (author) [pt

  10. A gravimetric method for the determination of oxygen in uranium oxides and ternary uranium oxides by addition of alkaline earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, Takeo; Tagawa, Hiroaki; Adachi, Takeo; Hashitani, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    A simple gravimetric determination of oxygen in uranium oxides and ternary uranium oxides is described. In alkaline earth uranates which are formed by heating in air at 800-1100 0 C, uranium is in the hexavalent state over certain continuous ranges of alkaline earth-to-uranium ratios. Thus, if an alkaline earth uranate or a compound containing an alkaline earth element, e.g. MgO, is mixed with the oxide sample and heated in air under suitable conditions, oxygen can be determined from the weight change before and after the reaction. The standard deviation of the O:U ratio for a UOsub(2+x) test sample is +-0.0008-0.001, if a correction is applied for atmospheric moisture absorbed during mixing. (Auth.)

  11. Origin of interface states and oxide charges generated by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, C.T.

    1976-01-01

    The randomly located trivalent silicon atoms are shown to account for the thermally generated interface states at the SiO 2 -Si interface. The interface state density is greatly reduced in water containing ambients at low temperatures (450 0 C) by forming trivalent silicon hydroxide bonds. Interface states are regenerated when the /triple bond/Si-OH bonds are broken by ionizing radiation and the OH ions are drifted away. In the bulk of the oxide film, the trivalent silicon and the interstitial oxygen donor centers are shown to be responsible for the heat and radiation generated positive space charge build-up (oxide charge) in thermally grown silicon oxide

  12. Sampling and analysis considerations for the determination of hexavalent chromium in workplace air; Reflexions sur le prelevement et l'analyse du chrome hexavalent dans l'air des lieux de travail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, K.E. [CDC/NIOSH, Cincinnati, Ohio (United States); Howe, A.M. [HSL, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Demange, M. [INRS - Centre de Lorraine, Departement Metrologie des polluants, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Nygren, O. [NIWL, Umea (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    Airborne hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is a known human respiratory carcinogen and allergen. Workers in a variety of industries may be exposed to airborne hexavalent chromium, with exposures frequently occurring via inhalation and/or dermal contact. Analytical methods for the measurement of Cr(VI) compounds in workplace samples, rather than for the determination of total elemental chromium in workplace air, are often desired because exposure limit values for Cr(VI) compounds are much lower than for total Cr. For years, sampling and analytical test methods for airborne Cr(VI) have been investigated so as to provide means for occupational exposure assessment to this highly toxic species. Inter-conversion of trivalent chromium Cr(III) and Cr(VI) can sometimes occur during sampling and sample preparation, and efforts to minimize unwanted redox reactions involving these chromium valences have been sought. Because of differences in toxicity, there is also interest in the ability to differentiate between water soluble and insoluble forms of Cr(VI), and procedures that provide solubility information concerning Cr(VI) compounds have been developed. This paper reviews the state of the art concerning the measurement of airborne Cr(VI) compounds in workplace aerosols and related samples. (authors)

  13. Towards a Predictive Thermodynamic Model of Oxidation States of Uranium Incorporated in Fe (hydr) oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagus, Paul S. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)

    2013-01-01

    -Level Excited States: Consequences For X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy”, J. Elec. Spectros. and Related Phenom., 200, 174 (2015) describes our first application of these methods. As well as applications to problems and materials of direct interest for our PNNL colleagues, we have pursued applications of fundamental theoretical significance for the analysis and interpretation of XPS and XAS spectra. These studies are important for the development of the fields of core-level spectroscopies as well as to advance our capabilities for applications of interest to our PNNL colleagues. An excellent example is our study of the surface core-level shifts, SCLS, for the surface and bulk atoms of an oxide that provides a new approach to understanding how the surface electronic of oxides differs from that in the bulk of the material. This work has the potential to lead to a new key to understanding the reactivity of oxide surfaces. Our theoretical studies use cluster models with finite numbers of atoms to describe the properties of condensed phases and crystals. This approach has allowed us to focus on the local atomistic, chemical interactions. For these clusters, we obtain orbitals and spinors through the solution of the Hartree-Fock, HF, and the fully relativistic Dirac HF equations. These orbitals are used to form configuration mixing wavefunctions which treat the many-body effects responsible for the open shell angular momentum coupling and for the satellites of the core-level spectra. Our efforts have been in two complementary directions. As well as the applications described above, we have placed major emphasis on the enhancement and extension of our theoretical and computational capabilities so that we can treat complex systems with a greater range of many-body effects. Noteworthy accomplishments in terms of method development and enhancement have included: (1) An improvement in our treatment of the large matrices that must be handled when many-body effects are treated. (2

  14. Ion bombardment effects on surface states in selected oxide systems: rutile and alkaline earth titanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper, the nature of the surface states of n-type TiO 2 and SrTiO 3 is discussed and the role of ion bombardment in modifying the properties of these states is elucidated. Insofar as possible, the interrelationships between oxide nonstoichiometry, surface states, ion bombardment effects and photoelectrolysis are explored

  15. Oxidation Kinetics of Copper: An Experiment in Solid State Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisuzaki, Y.; Sanborn, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics in metals and the role defects play in diffusion-controlled reactions are discussed as background for a junior/senior-level experiment in the physical or inorganic chemistry laboratory. Procedures used and typical data obtained are provided for the experiment. (JN)

  16. Removal of chromium hexavalent of residual water from tannery using hydrotalcite; Remocion de cromo hexavalente de aguas residuales de teneria utilizando hidrotalcita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez G, S.; Martinez, V.; Bulbulian, S. [Instituto nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, C.P. 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    One of the main problems of leather tanned is the treatment that must be give to the waste water polluted with chrome which stays in trivalent form, but it is easily oxidated at chromium hexavalent. This work pretends to find an elimination media for chromium (VI) from water using the original synthetic hydrotalcite and calcined as sorbent by its anion exchange and memory effect properties. The tannery water was characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, specific surface and infrared spectroscopy. (Author)

  17. Plutonium uptake by Scenedesmus obliquus as a function of isotope and oxidation state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkacik, M.F.; Giesy, J.P.; Wilhite, E.L.; Corey, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Uptake of 238 Pu 4+ , 238 Pu 6+ , 239 Pu 4+ and 239 Pu 6+ by the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus (Turp) Kutz was studied to determine whether isotope or oxidation state differences affect Pu uptake from aqueous medium by algal cells. At equivalent 238 Pu and 239 PU concentrations, even when initial oxidation states differed, accumulations of these isotopes by S.obliquus were not significantly (p>0.05) different. Plutonium accumulation by S.obliquus was log-linear. (author)

  18. Application of dolochar in the removal of cadmium and hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, L. [Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Das, B., E-mail: bdas@immt.res.in [Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Rao, D.S.; Mishra, B.K. [Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India)

    2011-08-30

    Graphical abstract: Dolochar - a waste material from sponge iron industry, is put to test as an adsorbent for removal of cadmium and hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solutions. The sample consists of lots of voids and pores. Batch adsorption experiments have indicated that, higher pH and temperature enhances sorption for cadmium ions. The adsorption for chromium is found better at acidic pH in comparison to alkaline pH. The adsorption is well fitted to Langmuir isotherm model compared to the Freundlich model indicating monolayer adsorption. The kinetics of adsorption better fit to pseudo second order model.. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Dolochar, a waste material is generated during the production of sponge iron. {yields} Dolochar consists of metallic iron, carbon, and lime bearing phases along with lots of voids and pores. {yields} It was found to be an good adsorbent for the removal of cadmium and hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solutions. {yields} The adsorption follows Langmuir isotherm and kinetics of adsorption better fit of pseudo second order model. - Abstract: Dolochar, a waste material generated in sponge iron industry, is processed and put to test as an adsorbent for removal of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. The dolochar samples were characterised to determine the different phases and their distribution by reflection microscopy. The analysis indicated that the sample consists of metallic iron, fused carbon, and Ca-Mg bearing phases (Ca-Mg-silicate-oxide) along with lots of voids and pores. The fixed carbon (FC) content of the material is 13.8% with a Langmuir surface area of 81.6 m{sup 2}/g and micropore area of 34.1 m{sup 2}/g. Batch adsorption experiments have been conducted to study the sorption behaviour of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) ions on dolochar as a function of particle size, contact time, adsorbent dosages, pH and temperature. It is observed that higher pH and temperature enhances sorption of Cd(II) ions. In contrast

  19. Application of dolochar in the removal of cadmium and hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panda, L.; Das, B.; Rao, D.S.; Mishra, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Dolochar - a waste material from sponge iron industry, is put to test as an adsorbent for removal of cadmium and hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solutions. The sample consists of lots of voids and pores. Batch adsorption experiments have indicated that, higher pH and temperature enhances sorption for cadmium ions. The adsorption for chromium is found better at acidic pH in comparison to alkaline pH. The adsorption is well fitted to Langmuir isotherm model compared to the Freundlich model indicating monolayer adsorption. The kinetics of adsorption better fit to pseudo second order model.. Display Omitted Highlights: → Dolochar, a waste material is generated during the production of sponge iron. → Dolochar consists of metallic iron, carbon, and lime bearing phases along with lots of voids and pores. → It was found to be an good adsorbent for the removal of cadmium and hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solutions. → The adsorption follows Langmuir isotherm and kinetics of adsorption better fit of pseudo second order model. - Abstract: Dolochar, a waste material generated in sponge iron industry, is processed and put to test as an adsorbent for removal of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. The dolochar samples were characterised to determine the different phases and their distribution by reflection microscopy. The analysis indicated that the sample consists of metallic iron, fused carbon, and Ca-Mg bearing phases (Ca-Mg-silicate-oxide) along with lots of voids and pores. The fixed carbon (FC) content of the material is 13.8% with a Langmuir surface area of 81.6 m 2 /g and micropore area of 34.1 m 2 /g. Batch adsorption experiments have been conducted to study the sorption behaviour of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) ions on dolochar as a function of particle size, contact time, adsorbent dosages, pH and temperature. It is observed that higher pH and temperature enhances sorption of Cd(II) ions. In contrast, the adsorption for Cr

  20. Generalized molybdenum oxide surface chemical state XPS determination via informed amorphous sample model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas, E-mail: job314@lehigh.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University, B336 Iacocca Hall, 111 Research Drive, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); PhotoCatalytic Synthesis group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Meander 229, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Mendoza-Sanchez, Beatriz [CRANN, Chemistry School, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Fernandez, Vincent [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Veenstra, Rick [PhotoCatalytic Synthesis group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Meander 229, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Dukstiene, Nijole [Department of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, Kaunas University of Technology, Radvilenu pl. 19, LT-50254 Kaunas (Lithuania); Roberts, Adam [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Trafford Wharf Road, Wharfside, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Fairley, Neal [Casa Software Ltd, Bay House, 5 Grosvenor Terrace, Teignmouth, Devon TQ14 8NE (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • We analyzed and modeled spectral envelopes of complex molybdenum oxides. • Molybdenum oxide films of varying valence and crystallinity were synthesized. • MoO{sub 3} and MoO{sub 2} line shapes from experimental data were created. • Informed amorphous sample model (IASM) developed. • Amorphous molybdenum oxide XPS envelopes were interpreted. - Abstract: Accurate elemental oxidation state determination for the outer surface of a complex material is of crucial importance in many science and engineering disciplines, including chemistry, fundamental and applied surface science, catalysis, semiconductors and many others. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is the primary tool used for this purpose. The spectral data obtained, however, is often very complex and can be subject to incorrect interpretation. Unlike traditional XPS spectra fitting procedures using purely synthetic spectral components, here we develop and present an XPS data processing method based on vector analysis that allows creating XPS spectral components by incorporating key information, obtained experimentally. XPS spectral data, obtained from series of molybdenum oxide samples with varying oxidation states and degree of crystallinity, were processed using this method and the corresponding oxidation states present, as well as their relative distribution was elucidated. It was shown that monitoring the evolution of the chemistry and crystal structure of a molybdenum oxide sample due to an invasive X-ray probe could be used to infer solutions to complex spectral envelopes.

  1. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE DELPHI SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann; Gail Geiger; Kevin Keegan; John Noetzel; Larry Chick

    2003-12-08

    The objective of Phase I under this project is to develop a 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with the option of piped-in water (Demonstration System A). Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This technical progress report covers work performed by Delphi from January 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003, under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks: Task 1 System Design and Integration; Task 2 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3 Reformer Developments; Task 4 Development of Balance of Plant (BOP) Components; Task 5 Manufacturing Development (Privately Funded); Task 6 System Fabrication; Task 7 System Testing; Task 8 Program Management; and Task 9 Stack Testing with Coal-Based Reformate.

  2. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics: Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding Effectiveness (SE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Determine the suitability of trivalent chromium conversion coatings that meet the requirements of MIL-DTL-5541, Type II, for use in applications where high-frequency electrical performance is important. Evaluate the ability of hexavalent chrome free pretreated aluminum to form adequate EMI seals, and maintain that seal while being subjected to harsh environmental conditions. Assess the performance of trivalent chromium pretreatments against a known control hexavalent chrome pretreatment before and after they have been exposed to a set of environmental conditions. It is known that environmental testing causes a decrease in shielding effectiveness when hexavalent chrome pretreatments are used (Alodine 1200s). Need to determine how shielding effectiveness will be affected with the use of hexavalent chrome free pretreatments. Performance will be assessed by evaluating shielding effectiveness (SE) test data from a variety of test samples comprised of different aluminum types and/or conversion coatings. The formation of corrosion will be evaluated between the mating surfaces and gasket to assess the corrosion resistant properties of the pretreatments, comparing the hexavalent control to the hexavalent chrome free pretreatments.

  3. Iron oxides nanoparticles for heavy metals removing from industrial waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SORA, Sergiu; Mariana, Ion Rodica [Valahia University, Targoviste (Russian Federation); Raluca, Van-Staden; Jacobus-Frederick, Van-Staden [Laboratory of Electrochemistry and PATLAB Bucharest, National Institute of Research for Electrochemistry and Condensed Matter, Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-07-01

    In the environment, the iron oxides may be useful for depollution process by means of a wide range of redox reactions. Hexavalent chromium (CrVI) is a toxic form of chromium, whereas the trivalent form is not. Reduction of CrVI to CrIII is, thus, a detoxifying process and takes place in soils and sediments under anoxic conditions. Hexavalent Cr reacts with magnetite to form CrIII. The reaction yields to a surficial transformation of magnetite into maghemite. Substitution of a large range of cations can be easily induced in magnetite and maghemite because tetrahedral as well as octahedral positions are available. Dissolution curves indicated that Co, Ni and Zn were randomly distributed within the structure and replaced octahedral Fe. In contrast, Cu, Mn and Cd appear to be concentrated near the surface of the crystals. Trace amounts of chromate ions adsorbed on magnetite are reduced to Cr (III) at the surface of Fe ions. A solid state reaction in which the surface layers of magnetite are converted into maghemite appears to be involved: as more chromate is adsorbed, further reduction is halted. Key words: magnetite nanoparticles.

  4. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  5. Use of Cork Waste as Biosorbent for Hexavalent Chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sfaksi, Z.; Azzouz, N.; Abdelwahab, A.

    2011-01-01

    The biosorption by cork powder is considered as a new method for heavy metal removal from industrial waste waters such as chromium tanning factories. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency extent of this method using a cork powder as biosorbent for hexavalent chromium Cr(VI). The Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis permits to distinguish the type of functional groups likely to participate in metal binding. A linear form of BET isotherms for all the three used temperatures (25, 35 and 45 0 C) and a pseudo-second-order Lagergren equation of adsorption kinetics are obtained. Other experimental results highlight the meaningful influence of parameters such as contact time, pH and concentrations of the solution, on chromium adsorption rate that reach a 97% value under definite conditions particularly a pH of 2-3 values. (author)

  6. Isolation of Electrogenic Microorganisms with Potential to Reduce Hexavalent Chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mora Collazos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of cultivable microorganisms was made from the biofilm formed on the anode of a microbial fuel cell put into operation for 30 days; isolated microorganisms were evaluated for their ability to produce energy and reduce the hexavalent chromium Cr (VI. Five microorganisms were isolated, which were characterized by analysis of 16S rRNA gene, placing them in four bacterial genera: Exiguobacterium (CrMFC1, Acinetobacter (CrMFC2, Aeromonas (CrMFC3 and CrMFC5 and Serratia (CrMFC4. All isolates showed electrogenic activity and ability to reduce hexavalent chromium; the Acinetobacter CrMFC1 strain showed the best electrochemical performance registering a maximum power density of 18.61 mW/m2; the other strains showed values of maximum power density between 4.6 mW/m2and 7.1 mW/m2. Strains Aeromonas CrMFC5 and Exiguobacterium CrMFC1 showed the best rates of chromium reduction being able to reduce 100 % of the Cr (VI in less than 24 hours, the Aeromonas CrMFC5 strain was the most efficient, reducing 100 % of Cr (VI in 10 hours; the other strains reduced 100% of the contaminant after 28 to 30 hours. The microorganisms isolated in this study are hardly known for their electrogenic capacity and for reducing Cr (VI; however, show promise for their use in combined systems involving energy production system coupled to bioremediation of chromium contaminated water.

  7. On the valency state of radiogenic lead in zircon and its consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramers, J.; Frei, Robert; Newville, M.

    2009-01-01

    nucleus comes to rest. Further, a zircon grain, being small, should remain highly oxidizing in its interior by the constant loss of ß-particles, maintaining the 4+ state of radiogenic Pb. From its effective ion radius, similar to that of Zr4+, and its charge, Pb4+ has to be compatible in the zircon...... not resemble that of PbO2. The arguments why radiogenic Pb should be tetravalent are based on analogies with studies relating to the tetravalent state of 234Th and the hexavalent state of 234U, which show that a-recoil in silicates generates a strongly oxidizing environment at the site where the recoiling......-recoil damaged sites could be leached out by any electrolyte solution that reduces it to the divalent state, making it both incompatible and soluble. Thus, discordia can be generated in weathering. The curious observation that discordant Archaean zircon suites generally define trends to lower intercepts at up...

  8. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE DELPHI SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann; Gail Geiger; Kevin Keegan; Larry Chick

    2004-05-07

    The objective of this project is to develop a 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with the option of piped-in water (Demonstration System A). Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This technical progress report covers work performed by Delphi from July 1, 2003 to December 31, 2003, under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks: Task 1 System Design and Integration; Task 2 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3 Reformer Developments; Task 4 Development of Balance of Plant (BOP) Components; Task 5 Manufacturing Development (Privately Funded); Task 6 System Fabrication; Task 7 System Testing; Task 8 Program Management; Task 9 Stack Testing with Coal-Based Reformate; and Task 10 Technology Transfer from SECA CORE Technology Program. In this reporting period, unless otherwise noted Task 6--System Fabrication and Task 7--System Testing will be reported within Task 1 System Design and Integration. Task 8--Program Management, Task 9--Stack Testing with Coal Based Reformate, and Task 10--Technology Transfer from SECA CORE Technology Program will be reported on in the Executive Summary section of this report.

  9. Approaches to Determining the Oxidation State of Nitrogen and Carbon Atoms in Organic Compounds for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurowski, Kamil; Krzeczkowska, Malgorzata Krystyna; Jurowska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The concept of oxidation state (or oxidation number) and related issues have always been difficult for students. In addition, there are misunderstandings and obscurities, which can cause improper balancing of the chemical equations (mostly in organic reactions). In particular, these problems are related to determination of the oxidation state of…

  10. Phase Behavior and Equations of State of the Actinide Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidester, B.; Pardo, O. S.; Panero, W. R.; Fischer, R. A.; Thompson, E. C.; Heinz, D. L.; Prescher, C.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    The distribution of the long-lived heat-producing actinide elements U and Th in the deep Earth has important implications for the dynamics of the mantle and possibly the energy budget of Earth's core. The low shear velocities of the Large Low-Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) on the core-mantle boundary suggests that these regions are at least partially molten and may contain concentrated amounts of the radioactive elements, as well as other large cations such as the rare Earth elements. As such, by exploring the phase behavior of actinide-bearing minerals at extreme conditions, some insight into the mineralogy, formation, and geochemical and geodynamical effects of these regions can be gained. We have performed in situ high-pressure, high-temperature synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments and calculations on two actinide oxide materials, UO2 and ThO2, to determine their phase behavior at the extreme conditions of the lower mantle. Experiments on ThO2 reached 60 GPa and 2500 K, and experiments on UO2 reached 95 GPa and 2500 K. We find that ThO2 exists in the fluorite-type structure to 20 GPa at high temperatures, at which point it transforms to the high-pressure cotunnite-type structure and remains thus up to 60 GPa. At room temperature, an anomalous expansion of the fluorite structure is observed prior to the transition, and may signal anion sub-lattice disorder. Similarly, UO2 exists in the fluorite-type structure at ambient conditions and up to 28 GPa at high temperatures. Above these pressures, we have observed a previously unidentified phase of UO2 with a tetragonal structure as the lower-temperature phase and the cotunnite-type phase at higher temperatures. Above 78 GPa, UO2 undergoes another transition or possible dissociation into two separate oxide phases. These phase diagrams suggest that the actinides could exist as oxides in solid solution with other analogous phases (e.g. ZrO2) in the cotunnite-type structure throughout much of Earth's lower mantle.

  11. On matrix stabilisation of d- and f-transition metal ions in unstable oxidation states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiselev, Yurii M [Department of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-01-31

    The state-of-the-art in matrix stabilisation of d- and f-transition metal ions in unstable oxidation states is analysed. Main aspects of this problem concerning the genealogy of appropriate matrix systems are classified. Relevant examples are given and the data that contradict the scheme proposed are discussed. The thermodynamics of the matrix stabilisation effect is considered using the concept of isomorphic miscibility. The influence of defects and non-equilibrium on the matrix stabilisation effect is discussed. The problem of identification of the oxidation states in matrix systems is examined and various types of matrix systems are considered.

  12. On matrix stabilisation of d- and f-transition metal ions in unstable oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, Yurii M

    2009-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in matrix stabilisation of d- and f-transition metal ions in unstable oxidation states is analysed. Main aspects of this problem concerning the genealogy of appropriate matrix systems are classified. Relevant examples are given and the data that contradict the scheme proposed are discussed. The thermodynamics of the matrix stabilisation effect is considered using the concept of isomorphic miscibility. The influence of defects and non-equilibrium on the matrix stabilisation effect is discussed. The problem of identification of the oxidation states in matrix systems is examined and various types of matrix systems are considered.

  13. Adsorption properties versus oxidation states of rutile TiO2(110)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Umberto; Hammer, Bjørk

    2011-01-01

    Using density functional theory we have studied the adsorption properties of different atoms and molecules deposited on a stoichiometric, reduced, and oxidized rutile TiO2(110) surface. Depending on the oxidation state of the surface, electrons can flow from or to the substrate and, therefore...... of the charge flow depends on the oxidation state of the rutile surface and on the adsorption site. Generally, the charging effect leads to more stable complexes. However, the increase in the binding energy of the adsorbates is highly dependent on the electronic states of the surface prior to the adsorption...... event. In this work we have analyzed in details these mechanisms and we have also established a direct correlation between the enhanced binding energy of the adsorbates and the induced gap states...

  14. Microanalysis of iron oxidation state in iron oxides using X Ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, S. R.; Delaney, J.; Bajt, S.; Rivers, M. L.; Smith, J. V.

    1993-01-01

    An exploratory application of x ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis using the synchrotron x ray microprobe was undertaken to obtain Fe XANES spectra on individual sub-millimeter grains in conventional polished sections. The experiments concentrated on determinations of Fe valence in a suite of iron oxide minerals for which independent estimates of the iron speciation could be made by electron microprobe analysis and x ray diffraction.

  15. Hexavalent uranium reduction from solid phase by thermophilic bacterium Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khijniak, T.V.; Slobodkin, A.I.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E.A.; Medvedeva-Lyalikova, N.N.; Coker, V.; Lloyd, J.R.; Birkeland, N.K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: It has been reported that in uranium-contaminated sites, solid-phase U(VI) present in sediments is resistant to microbial reduction. Also, it was demonstrated that mesophilic iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria can reduce hexavalent uranium and sulphate-reducing bacteria were able to grow via uranium reduction. Among thermophilic microorganisms reduction of hexavalent uranium has been demonstrated only for cell suspensions of two genera: Pyrobaculum and Thermus. In the present study, Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens was tested for reduction of U(VI), a thermophilic, gram-positive anaerobic bacterium capable for growth with the reduction of various electron acceptors including Fe(III). Kinetic of bacterial growth, uranium reduction and influence of different uranium concentrations were investigated at 65 deg. C. Due to presence of phosphate in the basal medium yellow uranium phosphate precipitate was formed after addition of uranyl acetate. After 68 h of incubation control tubes without bacteria were contained yellow precipitate whereas in presence of bacteria precipitate turned to the grey color. In the control tubes uranium phosphates and other elements formed a uniform mixture of crystals, but in presence of bacteria the round shape particles, containing uranium, were found by Environmental Scan Electron Microscopy of air-dried or frozen samples. To determine valent state speciation spectroscopic investigations were performed also. Initial yellow uranium phosphate precipitate was separated and identified as uramphite - (NH 4 )(UO 2 )(PO 4 )*3H 2 O by X-Ray Powder Diffraction. Grey precipitate, which was formed by bacterial reduction, was identified as ningyoite - CaU(PO 4 ) 2 *H 2 O. The fact that final grey precipitate contain U(IV) was also confirmed by EXAFS investigation. High concentration of uranium has toxic effect. 1 and 2.5 mM of uranium (VI) support bacterial growth and bacterial biomass was accumulated, but if 5 or 10

  16. The oxidation states of elements in pure and Ca-doped BiCuSeO thermoelectric oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Chun-Lung; Qi, Xiaoding

    2016-01-01

    Bi 1−x Ca x CuSeO (x = 0–0.3) was synthesized at 650 °C in an air-tight system flowing with pure argon. The Ca doping resulted in an increase in the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) as the consequence of increased carrier concentration. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was carried out to check the oxidation states in Bi 1−x Ca x CuSeO. The results indicated that in addition to the expected Bi 3+ and Cu 1+ , there existed Bi 2+ and Cu 2+ in the undoped BiCuSeO, whereas in the Ca-doped BiCuSeO, Bi 4+ , Cu 3+ and Cu 2+ were observed. The Ca dopant was confirmed to be in the 2+ oxidation state. Two broad peaks centered at 54.22 and 58.59 eV were recorded in the vicinity around the binding energy of Se 3d. The former is often observed in the Se-containing intermetallics while the latter is often found in the Se-containing oxides, indicating that along with the expected Se–Cu bonding, a bonding between Se and O may also exist. Based on the XPS results, the charge compensation mechanisms were proposed for Bi 1−x Ca x CuSeO, which may shed some light on the origins of charge carriers. BiCuSeO based oxides have recently be discovered to have a large ZT comparable to the best alloys currently in use, because of the large Seebeck coefficient and small thermal conductivity. However, their electrical conductivity is lower compared to the best thermoelectrics. This work may provide some hints for the further improvement of ZT in BiCuSeO based oxides. - Graphical abstract: The oxidation states, charge compensation mechanisms, and origins of charge carriers in Bi 1−x Ca x CuSeO thermoelectrics. Display Omitted

  17. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of aqueous solution of nitric oxide in different formal oxidation states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venâncio, Mateus F.; Rocha, Willian R.

    2015-10-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the early chemical events involved in the dynamics of nitric oxide (NOrad), nitrosonium cation (NO+) and nitroxide anion (NO-) in aqueous solution. The NO+ ion is very reactive in aqueous solution having a lifetime of ∼4 × 10-13 s, which is shorter than the value of 3 × 10-10 s predicted experimentally. The NO+ reacts generating the nitrous acid as an intermediate and the NO2- ion as the final product. The dynamics of NOrad revealed the reversibly formation of a transient anion radical species HONOrad -.

  18. 99Tc and Re incorporated into metal oxide polyoxometalates: oxidation state stability elucidated by electrochemistry and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Donna; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P; Mbomekalle, Israel M; Aparicio, Pablo A; Romo, Susanna; López, Xavier; Poblet, Josep M; Francesconi, Lynn C

    2012-08-20

    The radioactive element technetium-99 ((99)Tc, half-life = 2.1 × 10(5) years, β(-) of 253 keV), is a major byproduct of (235)U fission in the nuclear fuel cycle. (99)Tc is also found in radioactive waste tanks and in the environment at National Lab sites and fuel reprocessing centers. Separation and storage of the long-lived (99)Tc in an appropriate and stable waste-form is an important issue that needs to be addressed. Considering metal oxide solid-state materials as potential storage matrixes for Tc, we are examining the redox speciation of Tc on the molecular level using polyoxometalates (POMs) as models. In this study we investigate the electrochemistry of Tc complexes of the monovacant Wells-Dawson isomers, α(1)-P(2)W(17)O(61)(10-) (α1) and α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61)(10-) (α2) to identify features of metal oxide materials that can stabilize the immobile Tc(IV) oxidation state accessed from the synthesized Tc(V)O species and to interrogate other possible oxidation states available to Tc within these materials. The experimental results are consistent with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Electrochemistry of K(7-n)H(n)[Tc(V)O(α(1)-P(2)W(17)O(61))] (Tc(V)O-α1), K(7-n)H(n)[Tc(V)O(α(2)-P(2)W(17)O(61))] (Tc(V)O-α2) and their rhenium analogues as a function of pH show that the Tc-containing derivatives are always more readily reduced than their Re analogues. Both Tc and Re are reduced more readily in the lacunary α1 site as compared to the α2 site. The DFT calculations elucidate that the highest oxidation state attainable for Re is VII while, under the same electrochemistry conditions, the highest oxidation state for Tc is VI. The M(V)→ M(IV) reduction processes for Tc(V)O-α1 are not pH dependent or only slightly pH dependent suggesting that protonation does not accompany reduction of this species unlike the M(V)O-α2 (M = (99)Tc, Re) and Re(V)O-α1 where M(V/IV) reduction process must occur hand in hand with protonation of the terminal M═O to

  19. Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Kroll, Jesse H.; Donahue, Neil M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Altieri, Katye E.; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Mysak, Erin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2010-11-05

    A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations, and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that organics play in human health, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state (OSC), a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of OSC , using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number (nC).

  20. Oxidation state analyses of uranium with emphasis on chemical speciation in geological media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ervanne, H.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis focuses on chemical methods suitable for the determination of uranium redox species in geological materials. Nd-coprecipitation method was studied for the determination of uranium oxidation states in ground waters. This method is ideally suited for the separation of uranium oxidation states in the field, which means that problems associated with the instability of U(IV) during transport are avoided. An alternative method, such as ion exchange, is recommended for the analysis of high saline and calcium- and iron-rich ground waters. U(IV)/Utot was 2.8-7.2% in ground waters in oxidizing conditions and 60-93% in anoxic conditions. From thermodynamic model calculations applied to results from anoxic ground waters it was concluded that uranium can act as redox buffer in granitic ground waters. An ion exchange method was developed for the analysis of uranium oxidation states in different solid materials of geological origin. These included uranium minerals, uraniumbearing minerals, fracture coatings and bulk rock. U(IV)/Utot was 50-70% in uraninites, 5.8-8.7% in secondary uranium minerals, 15-49% in different fracture coatings and 64- 77% in samples from deep bedrock. In the uranium-bearing minerals, U(IV)/Utot was 33-43% (allanites), 5.9% (fergusonite) and 93% (monazite). Although the ion exchange method gave reliable results, there is a risk for the conversion of uranium oxidation states during analysis of heterogeneous samples due to the redox reactions that take place in the presence of some iron compounds. This risk was investigated in a study of several common iron-bearing minerals. The risk for conversion of uranium oxidation states can be screened by sample selection and minimized with use of a redox buffer compound such as polyacrylic acid (PAA). In studies of several carboxylic acids, PAA was found to be the most suitable for extending the application of the method. The stability of uranium oxidation states during analysis and the selectivity

  1. Treatment of hexavalent chrome by bacteria. Saikin ni yoru rokka kuromu no shori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otake, H [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1993-08-01

    A biological reduction method in which hazardous hexavalent chrome is reduced by bacteria is explained as one of the bioremediation technologies. Those bacteria are separated from active sludge in the urban sewage treatment plant. The hexavalent chrome-reducing bacteria were isolated by cultivating the sludge. They were Enterobacter cloacae which are intestinal bacteria. Then, they were named HO1 stock. As a result of analyzing the reduction mechanism, it was made clear that the function is localized in the cellular endosporium and that the reduction is made by utilizing the electronic transfer system of endosporium. Under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, they convert the hexavalent chrome into the trivalent chrome outside the cells. As a result of test, it was known that 5mM hexavalent chrome can be treated in one day. A quick reduction was confirmed also through an experiment in which carbon source was added to the industrial wastewater. If used for the treatment of sludge/water contaminated by hexavalent chrome, the present reduction by bacteria has the following advantages: The highest reduction rate is given near pH=7 at ordinary temperatures. It is not necessary to add chemicals. Energy is not needed. It is a disadvantageous fact that the present bacteria, if exposed to oxygen, become inactive. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Oxidation of extracellular cysteine/cystine redox state in bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Smita S; Ramirez, Allan M; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Torres-Gonzalez, Edilson; Roser-Page, Susanne; Mora, Ana L; Brigham, Kenneth L; Jones, Dean P; Roman, Jesse; Rojas, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that depletion of glutathione (GSH), a critical thiol antioxidant, is associated with the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, GSH synthesis depends on the amino acid cysteine (Cys), and relatively little is known about the regulation of Cys in fibrosis. Cys and its disulfide, cystine (CySS), constitute the most abundant low-molecular weight thiol/disulfide redox couple in the plasma, and the Cys/CySS redox state (E(h) Cys/CySS) is oxidized in association with age and smoking, known risk factors for IPF. Furthermore, oxidized E(h) Cys/CySS in the culture media of lung fibroblasts stimulates proliferation and expression of transitional matrix components. The present study was undertaken to determine whether bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis is associated with a decrease in Cys and/or an oxidation of the Cys/CySS redox state and to determine whether these changes were associated with changes in E(h) GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG). We observed distinct effects on plasma GSH and Cys redox systems during the progression of bleomycin-induced lung injury. Plasma E(h) GSH/GSSG was selectively oxidized during the proinflammatory phase, whereas oxidation of E(h) Cys/CySS occurred at the fibrotic phase. In the epithelial lining fluid, oxidation of E(h) Cys/CySS was due to decreased food intake. Thus the data show that decreased precursor availability and enhanced oxidation of Cys each contribute to the oxidation of extracellular Cys/CySS redox state in bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis.

  3. DetOx: a program for determining anomalous scattering factors of mixed-oxidation-state species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Karim J; Barnett, Sarah A; Christensen, Kirsten E; Nowell, Harriott; Thompson, Amber L; Allan, David R; Cooper, Richard I

    2013-01-01

    Overlapping absorption edges will occur when an element is present in multiple oxidation states within a material. DetOx is a program for partitioning overlapping X-ray absorption spectra into contributions from individual atomic species and computing the dependence of the anomalous scattering factors on X-ray energy. It is demonstrated how these results can be used in combination with X-ray diffraction data to determine the oxidation state of ions at specific sites in a mixed-valance material, GaCl(2).

  4. Studies of surface states in zinc oxide nanopowders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Raul Mugabe

    The surface of ZnO semiconductor nanosystems is a key performance-defining factor in numerous applications. In this work we present experimental results for the surface defect-related properties of ZnO nanoscale systems. Surface photovoltage spectroscopy was used to determine the defect level energies within the band gap, the conduction vs. valence band nature of the defect-related transitions, and to probe key dynamic parameters of the surface on a number of commercially available ZnO nanopowders. In our experimental setup, surface photovoltage characterization is conducted in high vacuum in tandem with in situ oxygen remote plasma treatments. Surface photovoltage investigations of the as-received and plasma-processed samples revealed a number of common spectral features related to surface states. Furthermore, we observed significant plasma-induced changes in the surface defect properties. Ex situ positron annihilation and photoluminescence measurements were performed on the studied samples and correlated with surface photovoltage results. The average positron lifetimes were found to be substantially longer than in a bulk single crystalline sample, which is consistent with the model of grains with defect-rich surface and subsurface layers. Compression of the powders into pellets yielded reduction of the average positron lifetimes. Surface photovoltage, positron annihilation, and photoluminescence spectra consistently showed sample-to-sample differences due to the variation in the overall quality of the nanopowders, which partially obscures observation of the scaling effects. However, the results demonstrated that our approach is efficient in detecting specific surface states in nanoscale ZnO specimens and in elucidating their nature.

  5. Conformational Toggling of Yeast Iso-1-Cytochrome c in the Oxidized and Reduced States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongzheng; Zhu, Jing; Ying, Tianlei; Jiang, Xianwang; Zhang, Xu; Wu, Houming; Liu, Maili; Tan, Xiangshi; Cao, Chunyang; Huang, Zhong-Xian

    2011-01-01

    To convert cyt c into a peroxidase-like metalloenzyme, the P71H mutant was designed to introduce a distal histidine. Unexpectedly, its peroxidase activity was found even lower than that of the native, and that the axial ligation of heme iron was changed to His71/His18 in the oxidized state, while to Met80/His18 in the reduced state, characterized by UV-visible, circular dichroism, and resonance Raman spectroscopy. To further probe the functional importance of Pro71 in oxidation state dependent conformational changes occurred in cyt c, the solution structures of P71H mutant in both oxidation states were determined. The structures indicate that the half molecule of cyt c (aa 50–102) presents a kind of “zigzag riveting ruler” structure, residues at certain positions of this region such as Pro71, Lys73 can move a big distance by altering the tertiary structure while maintaining the secondary structures. This finding provides a molecular insight into conformational toggling in different oxidation states of cyt c that is principle significance to its biological functions in electron transfer and apoptosis. Structural analysis also reveals that Pro71 functions as a key hydrophobic patch in the folding of the polypeptide of the region (aa 50–102), to prevent heme pocket from the solvent. PMID:22087268

  6. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to American alligator cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S; Wise, Catherine; Xie, Hong; Guillette, Louis J; Zhu, Cairong; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-02-01

    Metals are a common pollutant in the aquatic ecosystem. With global climate change, these levels are anticipated to rise as lower pH levels allow sediment bound metals to be released. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is an apex predator in the aquatic ecosystem and is considered a keystone species; as such it serves as a suitable monitor for localized pollution. One metal of increasing concern is hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). It is present in the aquatic environment and is a known human carcinogen and reproductive toxicant. We measured the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Cr(VI) in American alligator cells derived from scute tissue. We found that particulate and soluble Cr(VI) are both cytotoxic and genotoxic to alligator cells in a concentration-dependent manner. These data suggest that alligators may be used as a model for assessing the effects of environmental Cr(VI) contamination as well as for other metals of concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Lipid peroxidation in workers exposed to hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y L; Chen, C Y; Sheu, J Y; Chuang, I C; Pan, J H; Lin, T H

    1999-02-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether exposure to hexavalent chromium induces lipid peroxidation in human. This study involved 25 chrome-plating factory workers and a reference group of 28 control subjects. The whole-blood and urinary chromium concentrations were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Malondialdehyde (MDA), the product of lipid peroxidation, was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the activities of protective enzymes were measured by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. In the chrome-plating workers, the mean concentrations of chromium in blood and urine were 5.98 microg/L and 5.25 microg/g creatinine, respectively; the mean concentrations of MDA in blood and urine were 1.7 micromol/L and 2.24 micromol/g creatinine. The concentrations of both chromium and MDA in blood and urine were significantly higher in the chromium-exposed workers. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and catalase (CAT) were not markedly different between control and exposed workers. Data suggest that MDA may be used as a biomarker for occupational chromium exposure. Antioxidant enzymic activities are not a suitable marker for chromium exposure.

  8. Treatment of hexavalent chromium Cr (VI) in tanning effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, I.; Ali, S.

    1999-01-01

    Most common chemical used in chrome tanning is basic chromium sulphate (BCS). Manufacturing of BCS involves many steps producing liquid waste. Waste generated at every stage contains Cr (VI), which must be reduced to Cr (III) before being disposed to the environment. Different methods were studied for the reduction of toxic Cr (III). Pickle liquor (waste of electroplating industry) can also be used for the reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr (vi) along with other reducing materials / chemicals. In an electroplating process metal is treated with HCl or H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ to remove scales and rust, the pickled items are then washed with water, washing contains FeCl/sub 2/ or fees/sub 4/ respectively called pickle liquor. During waste treatment pH adjustment to 6.0 - 9.0 and settling the sludge, is discharged to the lagoon. The sludge obtained is dried and disposed off in landfills. Other reducing agents like sodium bisulphite and sulfur dioxide were also studied, but pickle liquor was found to be more effective and economical. (author)

  9. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Using Sorbaria sorbifolia Aqueous Leaf Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Prabha Dubey

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous plant leaves extract (PLE of an abundant shrub, Sorbaria sorbifolia, was explored for the reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI, to trivalent chromium, Cr(III. The effect of contact time, pH, PLE quantity, ionic strength, hardness, temperature and effective initial Cr(VI ion concentration were tested; Cr(VI reduction followed the pseudo-first order rate kinetics and maximum reduction was observed at pH 2. Significantly, Cr(VI reduction efficacies varied from 97 to 66% over the pH range of 2 to 10, which bodes well for PLE to be used for the reduction of Cr(VI also at a higher pH. PLE-mediated Cr(VI reduction displays considerable efficiency at various ionic strengths; however, hardness strongly affects the reduction ability. Higher temperature significantly enhances the Cr(VI reduction. This study reveals the potential use of PLE as a green reducing agent in aqueous extract for the efficient reduction of Cr(VI to Cr(III.

  10. The Impact of Environmental Factors in Influencing Epigenetics Related to Oxidative States in the Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Angelini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative states exert a significant influence on a wide range of biological and molecular processes and functions. When their balance is shifted towards enhanced amounts of free radicals, pathological phenomena can occur, as the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in tissue microenvironment or in the systemic circulation can be detrimental. Epidemic chronic diseases of western societies, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes correlate with the imbalance of redox homeostasis. Current advances in our understanding of epigenetics have revealed a parallel scenario showing the influence of oxidative stress as a major regulator of epigenetic gene regulation via modification of DNA methylation, histones, and microRNAs. This has provided both the biological link and a potential molecular explanation between oxidative stress and cardiovascular/metabolic phenomena. Accordingly, in this review, we will provide current insights on the physiological and pathological impact of changes in oxidative states on cardiovascular disorders, by specifically focusing on the influence of epigenetic regulation. A special emphasis will highlight the effect on epigenetic regulation of human’s current life habits, external and environmental factors, including food intake, tobacco, air pollution, and antioxidant-based approaches. Additionally, the strategy to quantify oxidative states in humans in order to determine which biological marker could best match a subject’s profile will be discussed.

  11. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives: Pretreatments Only Final Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (hex chrome or CR(VI)) is a widely used element within applied coating systems because of its self-healing and corrosion-resistant properties. The replacement of hex chrome in the processing of aluminum for aviation and aerospace applications remains a goal of great significance. Aluminum is the major manufacturing material of structures and components in the space flight arena. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) are engaged in a collaborative effort to test and evaluate alternatives to hexavalent chromium containing corrosion coating systems. NASA and ESA share common risks related to material obsolescence associated with hexavalent chromium used in corrosion-resistant coatings.

  12. Development of a hexavalent chromium ISFET sensor with a polymeric membrane including tributylphosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zazoua, A. [Universite de Annaba, BP 12, El-Hadjar, Annaba (Algeria); Zougar, S. [Universite de Annaba, BP 12, El-Hadjar, Annaba (Algeria); Kherrat, R. [Universite de Annaba, BP 12, El-Hadjar, Annaba (Algeria); Samar, M.H. [Universite de Annaba, BP 12, El-Hadjar, Annaba (Algeria); Jaffrezic-Renault, N. [CEGELY-UMR 5005 CNRS, Ecole centrale de Lyon, 69134 Ecully cedex (France)]. E-mail: Nicole.Jaffrezic@ec-lyon.fr; Errachid, A. [Center of Reference for Bioengineering in Catalonia (CREBEC), Laboratory of Nanobioengineering, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Universidad de Barcelona C/ Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Abbaci, A. [Universite de Annaba, BP 12, El-Hadjar, Annaba (Algeria)

    2006-03-15

    This paper presents a first report on chromium ISFET (ion-sensitive field effect transistor) based on a polymeric membrane (siloprene) including an ionophore (tributylphosphate) sensitive for hexavalent chromium. The sensor sensitivity as a function of the pH was studied; its value is minimum in a pH interval from 5.5 to 7.5. The sensitivity for hexavalent chromium was found to be 15 mV/loga {sub Cr{sup 6+}} in the range of 10{sup -4} to 10{sup -2} M. The detection limit was found to be 10{sup -5} M. The studied interfering ions are Pb(II) and Cd(II) that do not represent a great perturbation upon the response for hexavalent chromium.

  13. Development of a hexavalent chromium ISFET sensor with a polymeric membrane including tributylphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zazoua, A.; Zougar, S.; Kherrat, R.; Samar, M.H.; Jaffrezic-Renault, N.; Errachid, A.; Abbaci, A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a first report on chromium ISFET (ion-sensitive field effect transistor) based on a polymeric membrane (siloprene) including an ionophore (tributylphosphate) sensitive for hexavalent chromium. The sensor sensitivity as a function of the pH was studied; its value is minimum in a pH interval from 5.5 to 7.5. The sensitivity for hexavalent chromium was found to be 15 mV/loga Cr 6+ in the range of 10 -4 to 10 -2 M. The detection limit was found to be 10 -5 M. The studied interfering ions are Pb(II) and Cd(II) that do not represent a great perturbation upon the response for hexavalent chromium

  14. Oxidation states of Fe in LaNi1-xFexO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeta, A.E.; Falcon, H.; Carbonio, R.

    1994-01-01

    The distribution of oxidation states in perovskites of the type LaA 1-x B x O 3 (A and B transition metal ions) can be ''tailored'' by x variation. In particular, in LaNiO 3 it has been shown that Fe substitution for Ni foces some Ni 3+ into Ni 2+ , while some Fe 3+ changes into the unusual Fe 4+ state. In addition, the existence of mixed oxidation states of Fe and/or Ni in LaNi 1-x Fe x O 3 has been related to its catalytic activity in hydrogen peroxide decomposition. The Fe 4+ population, obtained using Moessbauer spectroscopy, was found to be constant for all the analyzed annealing temperatures for x = 0.25 concentration, where the isomer shift difference for both states is the highest and the catalytic activity is maximum. (orig.)

  15. Remediation of hexavalent chromium spiked soil by using synthesized iron sulfide particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yujie; Wang, Wanyu; Zhou, Liqiang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Mirza, Zakaria A; Lin, Xiang

    2017-02-01

    Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilized microscale iron sulfide (FeS) particles were synthesized and applied to remediate hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) spiked soil. The effects of parameters including dosage of FeS particles, soil moisture, and natural organic matter (NOM) in soil were investigated with comparison to iron sulfate (FeSO 4 ). The results show that the stabilized FeS particles can reduce Cr(VI) and immobilize Cr in soil quickly and efficiently. The soil moisture ranging from 40% to 70% and NOM in soil had no significant effects on Cr(VI) remediation by FeS particles. When molar ratio of FeS to Cr(VI) was 1.5:1, about 98% of Cr(VI) in soil was reduced by FeS particles in 3 d and Cr(VI) concentration decreased from 1407 mg kg -1 to 16 mg kg -1 . The total Cr and Cr(VI) in Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) leachate were reduced by 98.4% and 99.4%, respectively. In FeS particles-treated soil, the exchangeable Cr fraction was mainly converted to Fe-Mn oxides bound fraction because of the precipitation of Cr(III)-Fe(III) hydroxides. The physiologically based extraction test (PBET) bioaccessibility of Cr was decreased from 58.67% to 6.98%. Compared to FeSO 4 , the high Cr(VI) removal and Cr immobilization efficiency makes prepared FeS particles a great potential in field application of Cr(VI) contaminated soil remediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Facile solid-state synthesis of oxidation-resistant metal nanoparticles at ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu Hyung; Jung, Hyuk Joon; Lee, Ju Hee; Kim, Kyungtae; Lee, Byeongno; Nam, Dohyun; Kim, Chung Man; Jung, Myung-Hwa; Hur, Nam Hwi

    2018-05-01

    A simple and scalable method for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles in the solid-state was developed, which can produce nanoparticles in the absence of solvents. Nanoparticles of coinage metals were synthesized by grinding solid hydrazine and the metal precursors in their acetates and oxides at 25 °C. The silver and gold acetates converted completely within 6 min into Ag and Au nanoparticles, respectively, while complete conversion of the copper acetate to the Cu sub-micrometer particles took about 2 h. Metal oxide precursors were also converted into metal nanoparticles by grinding alone. The resulting particles exhibit distinctive crystalline lattice fringes, indicating the formation of highly crystalline phases. The Cu sub-micrometer particles are better resistant to oxidation and exhibit higher conductivity compared to conventional Cu nanoparticles. This solid-state method was also applied for the synthesis of platinum group metals and intermetallic Cu3Au, which can be further extended to synthesize other metal nanoparticles.

  17. How different oxidation states of crystalline myoglobin are influenced by X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersleth, Hans-Petter; Andersson, K Kristoffer

    2011-06-01

    X-ray induced radiation damage of protein crystals is well known to occur even at cryogenic temperatures. Redox active sites like metal sites seem especially vulnerable for these radiation-induced reductions. It is essential to know correctly the oxidation state of metal sites in protein crystal structures to be able to interpret the structure-function relation. Through previous structural studies, we have tried to characterise and understand the reactions between myoglobin and peroxides. These reaction intermediates are relevant because myoglobin is proposed to take part as scavenger of reactive oxygen species during oxidative stress, and because these intermediates are similar among the haem peroxidases and oxygenases. We have in our previous studies shown that these different myoglobin states are influenced by the X-rays used. In this study, we have in detail investigated the impact that X-rays have on these different oxidation states of myoglobin. An underlying goal has been to find a way to be able to determine mostly unreduced states. We have by using single-crystal light absorption spectroscopy found that the different oxidation states of myoglobin are to a different extent influenced by the X-rays (e.g. ferric Fe(III) myoglobin is faster reduced than ferryl Fe(IV)═O myoglobin). We observe that the higher oxidation states are not reduced to normal ferrous Fe(II) or ferric Fe(III) states, but end up in some intermediate and possibly artificial states. For ferric myoglobin, it seems that annealing of the radiation-induced/reduced state can reversibly more or less give the starting point (ferric myoglobin). Both scavengers and different dose-rates might influence to which extent the different states are affected by the X-rays. Our study shows that it is essential to do a time/dose monitoring of the influence X-rays have on each specific redox-state with spectroscopic techniques like single-crystal light absorption spectroscopy. This will determine to which

  18. Templated electrodeposition of Ag7NO11 nanowires with very high oxidation states of silver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodijk, E.J.B.; Maijenburg, A.W.; Maas, M.G.; Blank, David H.A.; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2011-01-01

    The templated electrodeposition of 200 nm diameter nanowires of the argentic oxynitrate Ag(Ag3O4)2NO3 phase is reported. Their high surface-to-volume ratio and the high average oxidation state of Ag make these wires promising candidates for nanoscale redox processes in which both a high volumetric

  19. Investigation of the oxidation states of Pu isotopes in a hydrochloric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.H. [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P. O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: mhlee@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, J.Y.; Kim, W.H.; Jung, E.C.; Jee, K.Y. [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P. O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The characteristics of the oxidation states of Pu in a hydrochloric acid solution were investigated and the results were applied to a separating of Pu isotopes from IAEA reference soils. The oxidation states of Pu(III) and Pu(IV) were prepared by adding hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sodium nitrite to a Pu stock solution, respectively. Also, the oxidation state of Pu(VI) was adjusted with concentrated HNO{sub 3} and HClO{sub 4}. The stability of the various oxidation states of plutonium in a HCl solution with elapsed time after preparation were found to be in the following order: Pu(III){approx}Pu(VI)>Pu(IV)>Pu(V). The chemical recoveries of Pu(IV) in a 9 M HCl solution with an anion exchange resin were similar to those of Pu(VI). This method for the determination of Pu isotopes with an anion exchange resin in a 9 M HCl medium was applied to IAEA reference soils where the activity concentrations of {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 238}Pu in IAEA-375 and IAEA-326 were consistent with the reference values reported by the IAEA.

  20. The Effect of Precursor Ligands and Oxidation State in the Synthesis of Bimetallic Nano-Alloys

    KAUST Repository

    LaGrow, Alec P.; Knudsen, Kristian; AlYami, Noktan; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Bakr, Osman

    2015-01-01

    of variables on the characteristics of bimetallic nanomaterials are not completely understood. In this study, we used a continuous-flow synthetic strategy to explore the effects of the ligands and the oxidation state of a metal precursor in a shape

  1. Regulation of Ca2+ release from mitochondria by the oxidation-reduction state of pyridine nucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehninger, Albert L.; Vercesi, Anibal; Bababunmi, Enitan A.

    1978-01-01

    Mitochondria from normal rat liver and heart, and also Ehrlich tumor cells, respiring on succinate as energy source in the presence of rotenone (to prevent net electron flow to oxygen from the endogenous pyridine nucleotides), rapidly take up Ca2+ and retain it so long as the pyridine nucleotides are kept in the reduced state. When acetoacetate is added to bring the pyridine nucleotides into a more oxidized state, Ca2+ is released to the medium. A subsequent addition of a reductant of the pyridine nucleotides such as β-hydroxybutyrate, glutamate, or isocitrate causes reuptake of the released Ca2+. Successive cycles of Ca2+ release and uptake can be induced by shifting the redox state of the pyridine nucleotides to more oxidized and more reduced states, respectively. Similar observations were made when succinate oxidation was replaced as energy source by ascorbate oxidation or by the hydrolysis of ATP. These and other observations form the basis of a hypothesis for feedback regulation of Ca2+-dependent substrate- or energy-mobilizing enzymatic reactions by the uptake or release of mitochondrial Ca2+, mediated by the cytosolic phosphate potential and the ATP-dependent reduction of mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides by reversal of electron transport. Images PMID:25436

  2. Measurements of the oxidation state and concentration of plutonium in interstitial waters of the Irish Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.M.; Lovett, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The question of plutonium movement in interstitial waters resulting from diffusion along concentration gradients or from advective flow is addressed. The results of measurements of both the concentration and the oxidation state of plutonium in interstitial water collected from sediments near the Windscale discharge, in the solid phases of these sediments and in seawater and suspended solids collected at the coring locations are discussed

  3. The electrochemical aspect of the corrosion of austenitic stainless steels, in nitric acid and in the presence of hexavalent chromium (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coriou, H.; Hure, J.; Plante, G.

    1961-01-01

    The corrosion of austenitic stainless steels in boiling nitric acid markedly increases when the medium contains hexavalent chromium ions. Because of several redox phenomena, the potential of the steel generally changes in course of time. Measurements show a relation between the weight loss and the potential of specimens. Additions of Mn(VII) and Ce(IV) are compared with that of Cr(VI), and show that the relation is a general one. The attack cf the metal in oxidizing media is largely intergranular, leading to exfoliation of the grains, although the steel studied is not sensitive to the classical Huey and Strauss tests. Also even in the absence of any other oxidizing reaction, the current density observed when the steel is anodically polarized under potentiostatic conditions does not correspond to the actual weight loss of the metal. (authors) [fr

  4. Heterogeneous Oxidation of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol: Kinetics of Changes to the Amount and Oxidation State of Particle-Phase Organic Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Jesse H; Lim, Christopher Y; Kessler, Sean H; Wilson, Kevin R

    2015-11-05

    Atmospheric oxidation reactions are known to affect the chemical composition of organic aerosol (OA) particles over timescales of several days, but the details of such oxidative aging reactions are poorly understood. In this study we examine the rates and products of a key class of aging reaction, the heterogeneous oxidation of particle-phase organic species by the gas-phase hydroxyl radical (OH). We compile and reanalyze a number of previous studies from our laboratories involving the oxidation of single-component organic particles. All kinetic and product data are described on a common basis, enabling a straightforward comparison among different chemical systems and experimental conditions. Oxidation chemistry is described in terms of changes to key ensemble properties of the OA, rather than to its detailed molecular composition, focusing on two quantities in particular, the amount and the oxidation state of the particle-phase carbon. Heterogeneous oxidation increases the oxidation state of particulate carbon, with the rate of increase determined by the detailed chemical mechanism. At the same time, the amount of particle-phase carbon decreases with oxidation, due to fragmentation (C-C scission) reactions that form small, volatile products that escape to the gas phase. In contrast to the oxidation state increase, the rate of carbon loss is nearly uniform among most systems studied. Extrapolation of these results to atmospheric conditions indicates that heterogeneous oxidation can have a substantial effect on the amount and composition of atmospheric OA over timescales of several days, a prediction that is broadly in line with available measurements of OA evolution over such long timescales. In particular, 3-13% of particle-phase carbon is lost to the gas phase after one week of heterogeneous oxidation. Our results indicate that oxidative aging represents an important sink for particulate organic carbon, and more generally that fragmentation reactions play a major

  5. Influence of microorganisms on the oxidation state distribution of multivalent actinides under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Donald Timothy; Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Ams, David; Richmann, M.K.; Khaing, H.; Swanson, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    The fate and potential mobility of multivalent actinides in the subsurface is receiving increased attention as the DOE looks to cleanup the many legacy nuclear waste sites and associated subsurface contamination. Plutonium, uranium and neptunium are the near-surface multivalent contaminants of concern and are also key contaminants for the deep geologic disposal of nuclear waste. Their mobility is highly dependent on their redox distribution at their contamination source as well as along their potential migration pathways. This redox distribution is often controlled, especially in the near-surface where organic/inorganic contaminants often coexist, by the direct and indirect effects of microbial activity. Under anoxic conditions, indirect and direct bioreduction mechanisms exist that promote the prevalence of lower-valent species for multivalent actinides. Oxidation-state-specific biosorption is also an important consideration for long-term migration and can influence oxidation state distribution. Results of ongoing studies to explore and establish the oxidation-state specific interactions of soil bacteria (metal reducers and sulfate reducers) as well as halo-tolerant bacteria and Archaea for uranium, neptunium and plutonium will be presented. Enzymatic reduction is a key process in the bioreduction of plutonium and uranium, but co-enzymatic processes predominate in neptunium systems. Strong sorptive interactions can occur for most actinide oxidation states but are likely a factor in the stabilization of lower-valent species when more than one oxidation state can persist under anaerobic microbiologically-active conditions. These results for microbiologically active systems are interpreted in the context of their overall importance in defining the potential migration of multivalent actinides in the subsurface.

  6. Origin of deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide: Chemically disordered coordination of oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallis, S.; Williams, D. S.; Butler, K. T.; Walsh, A.; Quackenbush, N. F.; Junda, M.; Podraza, N. J.; Fischer, D. A.; Woicik, J. C.; White, B. E.; Piper, L. F. J.

    2014-01-01

    The origin of the deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO), whether intrinsic to the amorphous structure or not, has serious implications for the development of p-type transparent amorphous oxide semiconductors. We report that the deep subgap feature in a-IGZO originates from local variations in the oxygen coordination and not from oxygen vacancies. This is shown by the positive correlation between oxygen composition and subgap intensity as observed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also demonstrate that the subgap feature is not intrinsic to the amorphous phase because the deep subgap feature can be removed by low-temperature annealing in a reducing environment. Atomistic calculations of a-IGZO reveal that the subgap state originates from certain oxygen environments associated with the disorder. Specifically, the subgap states originate from oxygen environments with a lower coordination number and/or a larger metal-oxygen separation.

  7. Origin of deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide: Chemically disordered coordination of oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallis, S.; Williams, D. S. [Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Butler, K. T.; Walsh, A. [Center for Sustainable Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Quackenbush, N. F. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Junda, M.; Podraza, N. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States); Fischer, D. A.; Woicik, J. C. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); White, B. E.; Piper, L. F. J., E-mail: lpiper@binghamton.edu [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States)

    2014-06-09

    The origin of the deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO), whether intrinsic to the amorphous structure or not, has serious implications for the development of p-type transparent amorphous oxide semiconductors. We report that the deep subgap feature in a-IGZO originates from local variations in the oxygen coordination and not from oxygen vacancies. This is shown by the positive correlation between oxygen composition and subgap intensity as observed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also demonstrate that the subgap feature is not intrinsic to the amorphous phase because the deep subgap feature can be removed by low-temperature annealing in a reducing environment. Atomistic calculations of a-IGZO reveal that the subgap state originates from certain oxygen environments associated with the disorder. Specifically, the subgap states originate from oxygen environments with a lower coordination number and/or a larger metal-oxygen separation.

  8. Structural oxidation state studies of the manganese cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Wenchuan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed on Photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes prepared from spinach to explore: (1) the correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the Mn cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in the S2 state; and (2) the oxidation state changes of the Mn cluster in the flash-induced S-states. The structure of the Mn cluster in the S2 state with the g~4 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal (S2-g4 state) was compared with that in the S2 state with multiline signal (S2-MLS state) and the S1 state. The S2-g4 state has a higher XAS inflection point energy than that of the S1 state, indicating the oxidation of Mn in the advance from the S1 to the S2-g4 state. Differences in the edge shape and in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S2-g4 state is different from that in the S2-MLS or the S1 state. In the S2-g4 state, the second shell of backscatterers from the Mn absorber contains two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 Å and 2.85 Å. Very little distance disorder exists in the second shell of the S1 or S2-MLS states. The third shell of the S2-g4 state at about 3.3 Å also contains increased heterogeneity relative to that of the S2-MLS or the S1 state. Various S-states were prepared at room-temperature by saturating, single-turnover flashes. The flash-dependent oscillation in the amplitude of the MLS was used to characterize the S-state composition and to construct "pure" S-state Mn K-edge spectra. The edge position shifts to higher energy by 1.8 eV upon the S1 → S2 transition.

  9. Exposure to Particulate Hexavalent Chromium Exacerbates Allergic Asthma Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Brent C.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Patierno, Steven R.; Jurjus, Rosalyn A.; Ceryak, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne hexavalent chromate, Cr(VI), has been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as a possible health threat in urban areas, due to the carcinogenic potential of some of its forms. Particulate chromates are produced in many different industrial settings, with high levels of aerosolized forms historically documented. Along with an increased risk of lung cancer, a high incidence of allergic asthma has been reported in workers exposed to certain inhaled particulate Cr(VI) compounds. However, a direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma has not been established. We recently showed that inhaled particulate Cr(VI) induces an innate neutrophilic inflammatory response in BALB/c mice. In the current studies we investigated how the inflammation induced by inhaled particulate Cr(VI) might alter the pathology of an allergic asthmatic response. We used a well-established mouse model of allergic asthma. Groups of ovalbumin protein (OVA)-primed mice were challenged either with OVA alone, or with a combination of OVA and particulate zinc chromate, and various parameters associated with asthmatic responses were measured. Co-exposure to particulate Cr(VI) and OVA mediated a mixed form of asthma in which both eosinophils and neutrophils are present in airways, tissue pathology is markedly exacerbated, and airway hyperresponsiveness is significantly increased. Taken together these findings suggest that inhalation of particulate forms of Cr(VI) may augment the severity of ongoing allergic asthma, as well as alter its phenotype. Such findings may have implications for asthmatics in settings in which airborne particulate Cr(VI) compounds are present at high levels. PMID:22178736

  10. Exposure to particulate hexavalent chromium exacerbates allergic asthma pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Brent C.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Patierno, Steven R.; Jurjus, Rosalyn A.; Ceryak, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Airborne hexavalent chromate, Cr(VI), has been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as a possible health threat in urban areas, due to the carcinogenic potential of some of its forms. Particulate chromates are produced in many different industrial settings, with high levels of aerosolized forms historically documented. Along with an increased risk of lung cancer, a high incidence of allergic asthma has been reported in workers exposed to certain inhaled particulate Cr(VI) compounds. However, a direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma has not been established. We recently showed that inhaled particulate Cr(VI) induces an innate neutrophilic inflammatory response in BALB/c mice. In the current studies we investigated how the inflammation induced by inhaled particulate Cr(VI) might alter the pathology of an allergic asthmatic response. We used a well-established mouse model of allergic asthma. Groups of ovalbumin protein (OVA)-primed mice were challenged either with OVA alone, or with a combination of OVA and particulate zinc chromate, and various parameters associated with asthmatic responses were measured. Co-exposure to particulate Cr(VI) and OVA mediated a mixed form of asthma in which both eosinophils and neutrophils are present in airways, tissue pathology is markedly exacerbated, and airway hyperresponsiveness is significantly increased. Taken together these findings suggest that inhalation of particulate forms of Cr(VI) may augment the severity of ongoing allergic asthma, as well as alter its phenotype. Such findings may have implications for asthmatics in settings in which airborne particulate Cr(VI) compounds are present at high levels. -- Highlights: ► Allergic asthma correlated with exposure to certain inhaled particulate chromates. ► Direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma not established. ► Cr exacerbated pathology and airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-challenged mouse. ► Particulate Cr

  11. Exposure to particulate hexavalent chromium exacerbates allergic asthma pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Brent C. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Constant, Stephanie L. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Patierno, Steven R. [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); GW Cancer Institute, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Jurjus, Rosalyn A. [Department of Anatomy and Regenerative Biology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Ceryak, Susan M., E-mail: phmsmc@gwumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Airborne hexavalent chromate, Cr(VI), has been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as a possible health threat in urban areas, due to the carcinogenic potential of some of its forms. Particulate chromates are produced in many different industrial settings, with high levels of aerosolized forms historically documented. Along with an increased risk of lung cancer, a high incidence of allergic asthma has been reported in workers exposed to certain inhaled particulate Cr(VI) compounds. However, a direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma has not been established. We recently showed that inhaled particulate Cr(VI) induces an innate neutrophilic inflammatory response in BALB/c mice. In the current studies we investigated how the inflammation induced by inhaled particulate Cr(VI) might alter the pathology of an allergic asthmatic response. We used a well-established mouse model of allergic asthma. Groups of ovalbumin protein (OVA)-primed mice were challenged either with OVA alone, or with a combination of OVA and particulate zinc chromate, and various parameters associated with asthmatic responses were measured. Co-exposure to particulate Cr(VI) and OVA mediated a mixed form of asthma in which both eosinophils and neutrophils are present in airways, tissue pathology is markedly exacerbated, and airway hyperresponsiveness is significantly increased. Taken together these findings suggest that inhalation of particulate forms of Cr(VI) may augment the severity of ongoing allergic asthma, as well as alter its phenotype. Such findings may have implications for asthmatics in settings in which airborne particulate Cr(VI) compounds are present at high levels. -- Highlights: ► Allergic asthma correlated with exposure to certain inhaled particulate chromates. ► Direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma not established. ► Cr exacerbated pathology and airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-challenged mouse. ► Particulate Cr

  12. Influence of attrition scrubbing, ultrasonic treatment, and oxidant additions on uranium removal from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timpson, M.E.; Elless, M.P.; Francis, C.W.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration Project being conducted by the US Department of Energy, bench-scale investigations of selective leaching of uranium from soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project site in Ohio were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Two soils (storage pad soil and incinerator soil), representing the major contaminant sources at the site, were extracted using carbonate- and citric acid-based lixiviants. Physical and chemical processes were used in combination with the two extractants to increase the rate of uranium release from these soils. Attrition scrubbing and ultrasonic dispersion were the two physical processes utilized. Potassium permanganate was used as an oxidizing agent to transform tetravalent uranium to the hexavalent state. Hexavalent uranium is easily complexed in solution by the carbonate radical. Attrition scrubbing increased the rate of uranium release from both soils when compared with rotary shaking. At equivalent extraction times and solids loadings, however, attrition scrubbing proved effective only on the incinerator soil. Ultrasonic treatments on the incinerator soil removed 71% of the uranium contamination in a single extraction. Multiple extractions of the same sample removed up to 90% of the uranium. Additions of potassium permanganate to the carbonate extractant resulted in significant changes in the extractability of uranium from the incinerator soil but had no effect on the storage pad soil

  13. Method of isolation of traces of americium by using the +6 oxidation state properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwinta, Jean; Michel, Jean-Jacques

    1969-05-01

    The authors present a method to separate traces of americium from a solution containing fission products and actinides. This method comprises the following steps: firstly, the oxidation of americium at the +6 state by ammonium persulfate and carrying over of actinides and III and IV lanthanides by lanthanum fluoride; secondly, the reduction by hydrazine of the oxidized americium and carrying over of the reduced americium by lutetium fluoride; and thirdly, the americium-lutetium separation by selective extractions either with di 2 ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, or by fractionated elution on an anionic resin column by a mixture of nitric acid and methanol [fr

  14. Extracellular redox state: refining the definition of oxidative stress in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dean P

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress in aging can result from an imbalance of prooxidants and antioxidants with excessive, destructive free radical chemistry. Thiol systems are important in the control of these processes, both by protecting against damage and serving in redox signaling mechanisms to sense danger and repair the damage. Studies by a number of research groups in collaboration with the Emory Clinical Biomarkers Laboratory show that the redox state of the central tissue antioxidant, glutathione (GSH), can be measured in human plasma and provides a quantitative systemic indicator of oxidative stress. Plasma GSH/GSSG redox in humans becomes oxidized with age, in response to chemotherapy, as a consequence of cigarette smoking, and in association with common age-related diseases (e.g., type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease). However, the GSH/GSSG redox is not equilibrated with the larger plasma cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS) pool, and the Cys/CySS redox varies with age in a pattern that is distinct from that of GSH/GSSG redox. Furthermore, in vitro studies show that variation in Cys/CySS redox over the range found in vivo affects signaling pathways, which control cell proliferation and oxidant-induced apoptosis. The results point to the conclusion that free radical scavenging antioxidants are of increased importance when thiol/disulfide redox states are oxidized. Because thiol/disulfide redox states, per se, function in redox signaling and control as well as antioxidant protection, GSH/GSSG and Cys/CySS redox states may provide central parameters to link environmental influences and progression of changes associated with aging.

  15. Thermochemistry of rare earth doped uranium oxides LnxU1-xO2-0.5x+y (Ln = La, Y, Nd)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-10-01

    Lanthanum, yttrium, and neodymium doped uranium dioxide samples in the fluorite structure have been synthesized, characterized in terms of metal ratio and oxygen content, and their enthalpies of formation measured by high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. For oxides doped with 10-50 mol % rare earth (Ln) cations, the formation enthalpies from constituent oxides (LnO1.5, UO2 and UO3 in a reaction not involving oxidation or reduction) become increasingly exothermic with increasing rare earth content, while showing no significant dependence on the varying uranium oxidation state. The oxidation enthalpy of LnxU1-xO2-0.5x+y is similar to that of UO2 to UO3 for all three rare earth doped systems. Though this may suggest that the oxidized uranium in these systems is energetically similar to that in the hexavalent state, thermochemical data alone can not constrain whether the uranium is present as U5+, U6+, or a mixture of oxidation states. The formation enthalpies from elements calculated from the calorimetric data are generally consistent with those from free energy measurements.

  16. General regularity of the oxidation potential variations and high oxidation states in the second half of the actinide series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Vokhmin, V.G.; Ionova, G.V.; Pershina, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    Oxidation potentials (OP) PHI(4/3), PHI(5/3), PHI(6/3), PHI(5/4) and PHI(6/5) are calculated for the members of the actinide series. A semiemperic relation combining OP with explicit terms for ground level energies of actinide ions in Russell-Saunders approximation as well as known values of formal OP relative to the normal hydrogen electrode potential are used as an extrapolation function. It is shown that an increase of PHI(4/3) OP which occurs after Bsub(k) explains a low stability of the oxidation state 4 in solutions for actinides of the second half of the series. PHI(5/3) and PHI(5/4) OP in the section starting with Cm have the minimum at Cf. PHI(6/3) OP for Cm, Bk, Cf and Es are practically the same but for Cm, Bk and Es they are smaller than PHI(5/3) OP. A principle possibility of Bk(6), Cf(6) and Es(6) preparation is shown

  17. In situ oxidation state profiling of nickel hexacyanoferrate derivatized electrodes using line-imaging Raman spectroscopy and multivariate calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, S.M.; Schwartz, D.T.

    1999-01-01

    Metal hexacyanoferrate compounds show promise as electrochemically switchable ion exchange materials for use in the cleanup of radioactive wastes such as those found in storage basins and underground tanks at the Department of Energy's Hanford Nuclear Reservation. Reported is the use of line-imaging Raman spectroscopy for the in situ determination of oxidation state profiles in nickel hexacyanoferrate derivatized electrodes under potential control in an electrochemical cell. Line-imaging Raman spectroscopy is used to collect 256 contiguous Raman spectra every ∼5 microm from thin films (ca. 80 nm) formed by electrochemical derivatization of nickel electrodes. The cyanide stretching region of the Raman spectrum of the film is shown to be sensitive to iron oxidation state and is modeled by both univariate and multivariate correlations. Although both correlations fit the calibration set well, the multivariate (principle component regression or PCR) model's predictions of oxidation state are less sensitive to noise in the spectrum, yielding a much smoother oxidation state profile than the univariate model. Oxidation state profiles with spatial resolution of approximately 5 microm are shown for a nickel hexacyanoferrate derivatized electrode in reduced, intermediate, and oxidized states. In situ oxidation state profiles indicate that the 647.1 nm laser illumination photo-oxidizes the derivatized electrodes. This observation is confirmed using photoelectrochemical methods

  18. Coupled interactions between volatile activity and Fe oxidation state during arc crustal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Madeleine C.S.; Brooker, R; Fraser, D.C.; Burgisser, A; Mangan, Margaret T.; McCammon, C

    2015-01-01

    Arc magmas erupted at the Earth’s surface are commonly more oxidized than those produced at mid-ocean ridges. Possible explanations for this high oxidation state are that the transfer of fluids during the subduction process results in direct oxidation of the sub-arc mantle wedge, or that oxidation is caused by the effect of later crustal processes, including protracted fractionation and degassing of volatile-rich magmas. This study sets out to investigate the effect of disequilibrium crustal processes that may involve coupled changes in H2O content and Fe oxidation state, by examining the degassing and hydration of sulphur-free rhyolites. We show that experimentally hydrated melts record strong increases in Fe3+/∑Fe with increasing H2O concentration as a result of changes in water activity. This is relevant for the passage of H2O-undersaturated melts from the deep crust towards shallow crustal storage regions, and raises the possibility that vertical variations in fO2 might develop within arc crust. Conversely, degassing experiments produce an increase in Fe3+/∑Fe with decreasing H2O concentration. In this case the oxidation is explained by loss of H2 as well as H2O into bubbles during decompression, consistent with thermodynamic modelling, and is relevant for magmas undergoing shallow degassing en route to the surface. We discuss these results in the context of the possible controls on fO2 during the generation, storage and ascent of magmas in arc settings, in particular considering the timescales of equilibration relative to observation as this affects the quality of the petrological record of magmatic fO2.

  19. An assessment of the environmental toxicity of hexavalent chromium in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putte, van der I.

    1981-01-01

    At present chromium is a common contaminant in surface waters in many countries. In water the metal may be present in the trivalent form (CrIII) or in the hexavalent form (CrVI), the latter of which is more toxic to aquatic organisms.
    The investigations presented in this thesis

  20. Radiation oxidation of polypropylene: A solid-state 13C NMR study using selective isotopic labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowery, Daniel M.; Assink, Roger A.; Derzon, Dora K.; Klamo, Sara B.; Bernstein, Robert; Clough, Roger L.

    2007-01-01

    Polypropylene samples, in which the three different carbon atoms along the chain were selectively labeled with carbon-13, were subjected to radiation under inert and air atmospheres, and to post-irradiation exposure in air at various temperatures. By using solid-state 13 C NMR measurements at room temperature, we have been able to identify and quantify the oxidation products. The isotopic labeling provides insight into chemical reaction mechanisms, since oxidation products can be traced back to their positions of origin on the macromolecule. The major products include peroxides and alcohols, both formed at tertiary carbon sites along the chain. Other products include methyl ketones, acids, esters, peresters, and hemiketals formed from reaction at the tertiary carbon, together with in-chain ketones and esters from reaction at the secondary chain carbon. No evidence is found of products arising from reactions at the methyl side chain. Significant temperature-dependent differences are apparent; for example much higher yields of chain-end methyl ketones, which are the indicator product of chain scission, are generated for both elevated temperature irradiation and for post-irradiation treatment at elevated temperatures. Time-dependent plots of yields of the various oxidation products have been obtained under a wide range of conditions, including the post-irradiation oxidation of a sample at room temperature in air that has been monitored for 2 years. Radiation-oxidation products of polypropylene are contrasted to products measured for 13 C-labeled polyethylene in an earlier investigation: the peroxides formed in irradiated polypropylene are remarkably longer lived, the non-peroxidic products are significantly different, and the overall ratios of oxidation products in polypropylene change relatively little as a function of the extent of oxidation

  1. Microbial utilization of low molecular weight organic substrates in soil depends on their carbon oxidation state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunina, Anna; Smith, Andrew; Jones, Davey; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    Removal of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS), originating from plants and microorganisms, from soil solution is regulated by microbial uptake. In addition to the concentration of LMWOS in soil solution, the chemical properties of each substance (e.g. C oxidation state, number of C atoms, number of -COOH groups) can affect their uptake and subsequent partitioning of C within the soil microbial community. The aim of this study was to trace the initial fate of three dominant classes of LMWOS in soil (sugars, carboxylic and amino acids), including their removal from solution and utilization by microorganisms, and to reveal the effect of substance chemical properties on these processes. Soil solution, spiked at natural abundance levels with 14C-labelled glucose, fructose, malate, succinate, formate, alanine or glycine, was added to the soil and 14C was traced in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CO2, cytosol and soil organic carbon (SOC) over 24 hours. The half-life time of all LMWOS in the DOC (T1 /2-solution) varied between 0.6-5.0 min showing extremely fast initial uptake of LMWOS. The T1 /2-solution of substances was dependent on C oxidation state, indicating that less oxidized organic substances (with C oxidation state "0") were retained longer in soil solution than oxidized substances. The LMWOS-C T1 /2-fast, characterizing the half-life time of 14C in the fast mineralization pool, ranged between 30 and 80 min, with the T1 /2-fast of carboxylic acids (malic acid) being the fastest and the T1 /2-fast of amino acids (glycine) being the slowest. An absence of correlation between T1 /2-fast and either C oxidation state, number of C atoms, or number of -COOH groups suggests that intercellular metabolic pathways are more important for LMWOS transformation in soil than their basic chemical properties. The CO2 release during LMWOS mineralization accounted for 20-90% of 14C applied. Mineralization of LMWOS was the least for sugars and the greatest for

  2. Influence of steam generator surface state on corrosion and oxide formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazenc, Arnaud; Leclercq, Stephanie; Seyeux, Antoine; Galtayries, Anouk; Marcus, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    The corrosion and release of nickel-based alloy Steam Generator tubes are partly due to their surface state. Among the most important parameters influencing the corrosion, the effect of grain size and the effect of grain crystallographic orientation have been chosen to be studied. The aim of this study is to determine how these parameters have an impact on the corrosion of Steam Generator tubes. Thermal treatments (700 deg. C and 1050 deg. C) have been performed on several samples in Alloy 690 to obtain homogeneous grain sizes, varying from 25 μm to 110 μm. Two samples have been oxidised for four days in a recirculating autoclave, reproducing primary conditions. The changes of oxide composition and thickness were examined by ToF-SIMS on samples exposed to primary water conditions. The intensity profiles versus thicknesses of characteristic oxide anions, such as CrO - , NiO - or FeO - enable us to evaluate the effect of grain size and crystallographic orientation on the formation of an enriched inner chromium layer. As regards to the grain size, there was no effect on the growth, but smaller grains led to a chromium-rich oxide layer. The effect of crystallographic orientation was observed on the oxidation kinetics and the composition of oxide scales. (authors)

  3. Characterization of Interface State in Silicon Carbide Metal Oxide Semiconductor Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Wei-Chieh

    Silicon carbide (SiC) has always been considered as an excellent material for high temperature and high power devices. Since SiC is the only compound semiconductor whose native oxide is silicon dioxide (SiO2), it puts SiC in a unique position. Although SiC metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) technology has made significant progress in recent years, there are still a number of issues to be overcome before more commercial SiC devices can enter the market. The prevailing issues surrounding SiC MOSFET devices are the low channel mobility, the low quality of the oxide layer and the high interface state density at the SiC/SiO2 interface. Consequently, there is a need for research to be performed in order to have a better understanding of the factors causing the poor SiC/SiO2 interface properties. In this work, we investigated the generation lifetime in SiC materials by using the pulsed metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) capacitor method and measured the interface state density distribution at the SiC/SiO2 interface by using the conductance measurement and the high-low frequency capacitance technique. These measurement techniques have been performed on n-type and p-type SiC MOS capacitors. In the course of our investigation, we observed fast interface states at semiconductor-dielectric interfaces in SiC MOS capacitors that underwent three different interface passivation processes, such states were detected in the nitrided samples but not observed in PSG-passivated samples. This result indicate that the lack of fast states at PSG-passivated interface is one of the main reasons for higher channel mobility in PSG MOSFETs. In addition, the effect of mobile ions in the oxide on the response time of interface states has been investigated. In the last chapter we propose additional methods of investigation that can help elucidate the origin of the particular interface states, enabling a more complete understanding of the SiC/SiO2 material system.

  4. A magnetic route to measure the average oxidation state of mixed-valent manganese in manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves (OMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiong-Fei; Ding, Yun-Shuang; Liu, Jia; Han, Zhao-Hui; Budnick, Joseph I; Hines, William A; Suib, Steven L

    2005-05-04

    A magnetic route has been applied for measurement of the average oxidation state (AOS) of mixed-valent manganese in manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves (OMS). The method gives AOS measurement results in good agreement with titration methods. A maximum analysis deviation error of +/-7% is obtained from 10 sample measurements. The magnetic method is able to (1) confirm the presence of mixed-valent manganese and (2) evaluate AOS and the spin states of d electrons of both single oxidation state and mixed-valent state Mn in manganese oxides. In addition, the magnetic method may be extended to (1) determine AOS of Mn in manganese oxide OMS with dopant "diamagnetic" ions, such as reducible V5+ (3d0) ions, which is inappropriate for the titration method due to interference of redox reactions between these dopant ions and titration reagents, such as KMnO4, (2) evaluate the dopant "paramagnetic" ions that are present as clusters or in the OMS framework, and (3) determine AOS of other mixed-valent/single oxidation state ion systems, such as Mo3+(3d3)-Mo4+(3d2) systems and Fe3+ in FeCl3.

  5. Hexavalent chromium reduction under fermentative conditions with lactate stimulated native microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somenahally, Anil C; Mosher, Jennifer J; Yuan, Tong; Podar, Mircea; Phelps, Tommy J; Brown, Steven D; Yang, Zamin K; Hazen, Terry C; Arkin, Adam P; Palumbo, Anthony V; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong; Elias, Dwayne A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI)] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI) concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI)-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM) and continuously amended with Cr(VI) at 0.0 (No-Cr), 0.1 (Low-Cr) and 3.0 (High-Cr) mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI), 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%). Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

  6. Hexavalent chromium reduction under fermentative conditions with lactate stimulated native microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil C Somenahally

    Full Text Available Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM and continuously amended with Cr(VI at 0.0 (No-Cr, 0.1 (Low-Cr and 3.0 (High-Cr mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI, 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%, Methanosarcina (17% and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%. Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

  7. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction under Fermentative Conditions with Lactate Stimulated Native Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somenahally, Anil C [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Yuan, Tong [University of Oklahoma; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Hazen, Terry C [ORNL; Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D. [Oklahoma University; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI)] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI) concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI)-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM) and continuously amended with Cr(VI) at 0.0 (No-Cr), 0.1 (Low-Cr) and 3.0 (High-Cr) mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI), 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%). Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

  8. Simultaneously photocatalytic treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) using rotating reactor under solar irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Youngji; Joo, Hyunku; Her, Namguk; Yoon, Yeomin; Sohn, Jinsik; Kim, Sungpyo; Yoon, Jaekyung

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Self-rotating reactor including TiO 2 NTs is applied under solar irradiation. • Simultaneously photocatalysis of Cr(VI) and EDCs is observed to be up to 95%. • Photocatalytic reactions of Cr(VI) and EDCs are favorable under acidic pH. • Charge interaction and hole scavenge between TiO 2 and pollutants are synergy factors. - Abstract: In this study, simultaneous treatments, reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and oxidation of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), such as bisphenol A (BPA), 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and 17β-estradiol (E2), were investigated with a rotating photocatalytic reactor including TiO 2 nanotubes formed on titanium mesh substrates under solar UV irradiation. In the laboratory tests with a rotating type I reactor, synergy effects of the simultaneous photocatalytic reduction and oxidation of inorganic (Cr(VI)) and organic (BPA) pollutants were achieved. Particularly, the concurrent photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of BPA was higher under acidic conditions. The enhanced reaction efficiency of both pollutants was attributed to a stronger charge interaction between TiO 2 nanotubes (positive charge) and the anionic form of Cr(VI) (negative charge), which are prevented recombination (electron–hole pair) by the hole scavenging effect of BPA. In the extended outdoor tests with a rotating type II reactor under solar irradiation, the experiment was extended to examine the simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) in the presence of additional EDCs, such as EE2 and E2 as well as BPA. The findings showed that synergic effect of both photocatalytic reduction and oxidation was confirmed with single-component (Cr(VI) only), two-components (Cr(VI)/BPA, Cr(VI)/EE2, and Cr(VI)/E2), and four-components (Cr(VI)/BPA/EE2/E2) under various solar irradiation conditions

  9. Solid state chemistry of rare earth oxides. Final report, September 1, 1950--July 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyring, L.

    1977-07-01

    Work under Contract E(11-1)-1109 and its antecedents has been primarily for the purpose of obtaining detailed thermodynamic, kinetic and structural information on the complex rare earth oxides of praseodymium and terbium. These systems exhibit homologous series of ordered phases, order-disorder transformations, wide-range nonstoichiometric phases, chemical hysteresis in two-phase regions and many other solid state reaction phenomena. Fluorite-related materials of importance to ERDA occur as nuclear fuels, radiation power sources, insulators and solid electrolytes. The rare earth oxides serve directly as model systems for such similar materials and, in a more general sense, they serve as models of solids in general since they exhibit nearly the full range of solid state properties

  10. Solid State Electrochemical Sensors for Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Detection in Lean Exhaust Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Rheaume, Jonathan Michael

    2010-01-01

    Solid state electrochemical sensors that measure nitrogen oxides (NOx) in lean exhaust have been investigated in order to help meet future on-board diagnostic (OBD) regulations for diesel vehicles. This impedancemetric detection technology consists of a planar, single cell sensor design with various sensing electrode materials and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte. No reference to ambient air is required. An impedance analysis method yields a signal that is proportional to t...

  11. Quantitative evaluation of the effect of H2O degassing on the oxidation state of magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, R. A.; Waters, L.

    2014-12-01

    The extent to which degassing of the H2O component affects the oxidation state of hydrous magmas is widely debated. Several researchers have examined how degassing of mixed H-C-O-S-Cl fluids may change the Fe3+/FeT ratio of various magmas, whereas our focus is on the H2O component. There are two ways that degassing of H2O by itself may cause oxidation: (1) the reaction: H2O (melt) + 2FeO (melt) = H2 (fluid) + Fe2O3 (melt), and/or (2) if dissolved water preferentially enhances the activity of ferrous vs. ferric iron in magmatic liquids. In this study, a comparison is made between the pre-eruptive oxidation states of 14 crystal-poor, jet-black obsidian samples (obtained from two Fe-Ti oxides) and their post-eruptive values (analyzed with the Wilson 1960 titration method tested against USGS standards). The obsidians are from Medicine Lake (CA), Long Valley (CA), and the western Mexican arc; all have low FeOT (1.1-2.1 wt%), rendering their Fe2+/Fe3+ ratios highly sensitive to the possible effects of substantial H2O degassing. The Fe-Ti oxide thermometer/oxybarometer of Ghiorso and Evans, (2008) gave temperatures for the 14 samples that range for 720 to 940°C and ΔNNO values of -0.9 to +1.4. With temperature known, the plagioclase-liquid hygrometer was applied and show that ≤ 6.5 wt% H2O was dissolved in the melts prior to eruption. In addition, pre-eruptive Cl and S concentrations were constrained on the basis of apatite analyses (Webster et al., 2009) and sulfur concentrations needed for saturation with pyrrhotite (Clemente et al., 2004), respectively. Maximum pre-eruptive chlorine and sulfur contents are 6000 and 200 ppm, respectively. After eruption, the rhyolites lost nearly all of their volatiles. Our results indicate no detectable change between pre- and post-eruptive Fe2+ concentrations, with an average deviation of ± 0.1 wt % FeO. Although degassing of large concentrations of S and/or Cl may affect the oxidation state of magmas, at the pre-eruptive levels

  12. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the inorganic arsenic methylation phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiaxin; Waters, Stephen B.; Drobna, Zuzana; Devesa, Vicenta; Styblo, Miroslav; Thomas, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is enzymatically methylated; hence, its ingestion results in exposure to the parent compound and various methylated arsenicals. Both experimental and epidemiological evidences suggest that some of the adverse health effects associated with chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic may be mediated by these methylated metabolites. If i As methylation is an activation process, then the phenotype for inorganic arsenic methylation may determine risk associated with exposure to this metalloid. We examined inorganic arsenic methylation phenotypes and arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase genotypes in four species: three that methylate inorganic arsenic (human (Homo sapiens), rat (Rattus norwegicus), and mouse (Mus musculus)) and one that does not methylate inorganic arsenic (chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes). The predicted protein products from arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase are similar in size for rat (369 amino acid residues), mouse (376 residues), and human (375 residues). By comparison, a 275-nucleotide deletion beginning at nucleotide 612 in the chimpanzee gene sequence causes a frameshift that leads to a nonsense mutation for a premature stop codon after amino acid 205. The null phenotype for inorganic arsenic methylation in the chimpanzee is likely due to the deletion in the gene for arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase that yields an inactive truncated protein. This lineage-specific loss of function caused by the deletion event must have occurred in the Pan lineage after Homo-Pan divergence about 5 million years ago

  13. Oxidized Nitrogen Balance over 15 Months at Rural and Urban New York State Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, J. J.; Ninneman, M.; Marto, J.; Edgerton, E. S.; Blanchard, C. L.; Shaw, S. L.

    2017-12-01

    Continuous measurements of oxidized nitrogen species (NO, NO2, and HNO3), families of species (NOy, alkyl nitrates [or ANs], and peroxyacetyl nitrates [or PANs]), and particle nitrate (pNO3) were carried out for a fifteen-month period from August 2016 through October 2017 at two locations in New York State. The two sites were a rural research station at Pinnacle State Park in Addison, NY and an urban research station at Queens College in New York City. Four different chemiluminescence analyzers with various converters and denuders were employed to make these measurements. Instrumentation used for the study will be described, as well as some of the challenges created by combining data from these independent analyzers to address the oxidized nitrogen budget at the two sites. The Pinnacle State Park site often experiences quite clean air with low ppb levels of total NOy and a greater fraction of oxidized nitrogen products (NOz species). This contrasts with the urban Queens College location, which experiences stronger NOx sources. Seasonal differences in the NOx/NOy and NOz/NOy ratios, and the makeup of the NOz species, are also significant and will be explored in the presentation.

  14. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Deng; Zhao, Linduo; Marts, Amy R.; Farquhar, Erik; Tierney, David L.; Almquist, Catherine B.; Briggs, Brandon R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant progress on iron reduction by thermophilic microorganisms, studies on their ability to reduce toxic metals are still limited, despite their common co-existence in high temperature environments (up to 70 °C). In this study, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, an obligate thermophilic methanogen, was used to reduce hexavalent chromium. Experiments were conducted in a growth medium with H2/CO2 as substrate with various Cr6+ concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 1, 3, and 5 mM) in the form of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7). Time-course measurements of aqueous Cr6+ concentrations using 1,5-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method showed complete reduction of the 0.2 and 0.4 mM Cr6+ solutions by this methanogen. However, much lower reduction extents of 43.6%, 13.0%, and 3.7% were observed at higher Cr6+ concentrations of 1, 3 and 5 mM, respectively. These lower extents of bioreduction suggest a toxic effect of aqueous Cr6+ to cells at this concentration range. At these higher Cr6+ concentrations, methanogenesis was inhibited and cell growth was impaired as evidenced by decreased total cellular protein production and live/dead cell ratio. Likewise, Cr6+ bioreduction rates decreased with increased initial concentrations of Cr6+ from 13.3 to 1.9 μM h-1. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed a progressive reduction of soluble Cr6+ to insoluble Cr3+ precipitates, which was confirmed as amorphous chromium hydroxide by selected area electron diffraction pattern. However, a small fraction of reduced Cr occurred as aqueous Cr3+. Scanning and transmission electron microscope observations of M. thermautotrophicus cells after Cr6+ exposure suggest both extra- and intracellular chromium reduction mechanisms. Results of this study demonstrate the ability of M. thermautotrophicus cells to reduce toxic Cr6+ to less toxic Cr3+ and its potential application in metal bioremediation, especially at high temperature subsurface radioactive waste disposal

  15. Reduction of hexavalent chromium in water samples acidified for preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stollenwerk, K.G.; Grove, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in water samples, preserved by standard techniques, was investigated. The standard preservation technique for water samples that are to be analyzed for Cr(VI) consists of filtration through a 0.45-??m membrane, acidification to a pH plastic bottles. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of H+ concentration, NO2, temperature, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The rate of reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) increased with increasing NO2, DOC, H+, and temperature. Reduction of Cr(VI) by organic matter occurred in some samples even though the samples were unacidified. Reduction of Cr(VI) is inhibited to an extent by storing the sample at 4??C. Stability of Cr(VI) in water is variable and depends on the other constituents present in the sample. Water samples collected for the determination of Cr(VI) should be filtered (0.45-??m membrane), refrigerated, and analyzed as quickly as possible. Water samples should not be acidified. Measurement of total Cr in addition to Cr(VI) can serve as a check for Cr(VI) reduction. If total Cr is greater than Cr(VI), the possibility that Cr(VI) reduction has occurred needs to be considered.The rate of reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) increased with increasing NO//2, DOC, H** plus , and temperature. Reduction of Cr(VI) by organic matter occurred in some samples even though the samples were unacidified. Reduction of Cr(VI) is inhibited to an extent by storing the sample at 4 degree C. Stability of Cr(VI) in water is variable and depends on the other constituents present in the sample. Water samples collected for the determination of Cr(VI) should be filtered (0. 45- mu m membrane), refrigerated, and analyzed as quickly as possible. Water samples should not be acidified. Measurement of total Cr in addition to Cr(VI) can serve as a check for Cr(VI) reduction. If total Cr is greater than Cr(VI), the possibility that Cr(VI) reduction has occurred needs

  16. Single Crystal Growth of Pure Co3+ Oxidation State Material LaSrCoO4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanjie Guo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We report on the single crystal growth of the single-layer perovskite cobaltate LaSrCoO4 that was grown by the optical floating zone method using high oxygen pressures. Phase purity and single crystallinity were confirmed by X-ray diffraction techniques. The pure Co3+ oxidation state was confirmed by X-ray absorbtion spectroscopy measurements. A transition to a spin glass state is observed at ∼7 K in magnetic susceptibility and specific heat measurements.

  17. Raman spectroscopic study of the oxidation state of Eu in molten LiCl-KCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung; Yun, Jong-Il [KAIST, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Spectroscopy can provide high reliability for the quantitative analysis of such system. The molar absorptivity of Eu(II) at 325 nm is reported as about 1645 M{sup -1}cm{sup -1}, which is too high to apply to higher concentration. A high-temperature Raman spectroscopy has been set and employed for analyzing the molecular structure and coordination complex and investigating the oxidation state of europium in molten LiCl-KCl. Europium can be present in divalent state while many other lanthanides exist in trivalent state. The thermodynamic properties of europium ions have been studied using electrochemical methods, spectroscopic methods, and EPR technique. Although there has been discrepancy of the reduced amount of europium in previous works, the majority of Eu(III) is thought to be reduced to Eu(II) in molten LiCl-KCl spontaneously at relatively low concentration (< 7.5 × 10{sup -4} M). Raman spectroscopy was employed to investigate the oxidation state of EuClx in LiCl-KCl at 500 .deg. C. The Raman scattering results suggest the majority of trivalent europium is reduced to divalent state with the composition change by vaporization. The Raman bands show highly asymmetric structure, quite different from regular octahedral structure.

  18. Molecular water oxidation mechanisms followed by transition metals: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Xavier; Maji, Somnath; Bofill, Roger; García-Antón, Jordi; Escriche, Lluís; Llobet, Antoni

    2014-02-18

    One clean alternative to fossil fuels would be to split water using sunlight. However, to achieve this goal, researchers still need to fully understand and control several key chemical reactions. One of them is the catalytic oxidation of water to molecular oxygen, which also occurs at the oxygen evolving center of photosystem II in green plants and algae. Despite its importance for biology and renewable energy, the mechanism of this reaction is not fully understood. Transition metal water oxidation catalysts in homogeneous media offer a superb platform for researchers to investigate and extract the crucial information to describe the different steps involved in this complex reaction accurately. The mechanistic information extracted at a molecular level allows researchers to understand both the factors that govern this reaction and the ones that derail the system to cause decomposition. As a result, rugged and efficient water oxidation catalysts with potential technological applications can be developed. In this Account, we discuss the current mechanistic understanding of the water oxidation reaction catalyzed by transition metals in the homogeneous phase, based on work developed in our laboratories and complemented by research from other groups. Rather than reviewing all of the catalysts described to date, we focus systematically on the several key elements and their rationale from molecules studied in homogeneous media. We organize these catalysts based on how the crucial oxygen-oxygen bond step takes place, whether via a water nucleophilic attack or via the interaction of two M-O units, rather than based on the nuclearity of the water oxidation catalysts. Furthermore we have used DFT methodology to characterize key intermediates and transition states. The combination of both theory and experiments has allowed us to get a complete view of the water oxidation cycle for the different catalysts studied. Finally, we also describe the various deactivation pathways for

  19. Application of powerful oxidizers in the synthesis of new high-oxidation state actinide and related species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, S.M.

    1984-11-01

    The fluorinating and oxide scavenging ability of XeF 6 have been studied by bringing XeF 6 into interaction with oxide-fluoride compounds of the third-transition-series elements (W, Re and Os) and uranium, in their highest oxidation states. A + MOF 5 - and A + M 2 O 2 F 9 - (A = K or Cs, M = W or U) were converted to A + MF 7 - by XeF 6 , but the rhenium and osmium compounds, K + ReO 2 F 4 - and XeF 5 + OsO 3 F 3 - , resisted interaction with XeF 6 . Strong interactions between XeF 2 or KrF 2 and the solvent have been observed for their solutions in anhydrous HF. Both XeF 2 and KrF 2 are seen to be effective in breaking up the polymeric (HF)/sub n/ chains. Only weak interactions occur between cations and anions of KrF + AuF 6 - and Kr 2 F 3 + AuF 6 - in HF. The AuF 6 - anions are slightly distorted from O/sub h/ symmetry. Kr 2 F 3 + cations in HF have the same dissymmetric V-shape which occurs in crystalline salts. A low-temperature orthorhombic form, β-ReF 6 + SbF 6 - , a high-temperature rhombohedral form, α-ReF 6 + SbF 6 - , and a ReF 6 + AuF 6 - have been prepared. These compounds possess only kinetic stability at ambient temperature and at approx. 20 0 C are best represented as ReF 6 + ReF 7 MF 6 - MF 5 . Thermochemical energy evaluations indicate that the ionization potential of ReF 6 is 261 kcal mole -1 and that the fluoride-ion affinity of ReF 6 + is -214 kcal mole -1 . This is more exothermal than the corresponding process for IF 6 + (-208 kcal mole -1 ). In contrast, ReOF 5 is shown to be a better fluoro-base than IOF 5 and also is a better base than ReF 7 . ReOF 4 + MF 6 - (M = Sb, Au and As) salts are of higher thermal stability than their ReF 6 + MF 6 - analogues

  20. Synchrotron Micro-XANES Measurements of Vanadium Oxidation State in Glasses as a Function of Oxygen Fugacity: Experimental Calibration of Data Relevant to Partition Coefficient Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, J. S.; Sutton, S. R.; Newville, M.; Jones, J. H.; Hanson, B.; Dyar, M. D.; Schreiber, H.

    2000-01-01

    Oxidation state microanalyses for V in glass have been made by calibrating XANES spectral features with optical spectroscopic measurements. The oxidation state change with fugacity of O2 will strongly influence partitioning results.

  1. Chemical state analysis of oxidation products on steel surface by conversion electron Moessbauer spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujihira, Yusuke; Nomura, Kiyoshi

    1978-01-01

    The polished NT-70H steel (Fe: 95.97%, C: 0.56%, diameter: 5 cm, thickness: 0.5 cm) was immersed in deionized water or in solutions containing (0.25 -- 0.5) M of chloride, sulfate and nitrate ions. The chemical states of oxidation products of iron on the surface were identified through the analysis of conversion electron Moessbauer spectra (CEMS). CEMS of the steel surface, which had been dipped in deionized water, revealed that γ-FeOOH was formed on the surface. The thickness of γ-FeOOH layer increased with the increase of the duration of dipping. Dissolved oxygen in the solution played an essential role in the oxidation of iron to γ-FeOOH. Oxidation product of iron dipped in the 0.5 M sodium chloride solution was identified as γ-FeOOH. Amorphous paramagnetic iron (III) compound tended to form in the presence of hydrogen peroxide or ammonium ions in the solutions. The increase of alkalinity of the solution up to pH 12 suppressed the oxidation rate and assisted the formation of green rust, which was confirmed by the appearance of the quadrupole splitting peaks of the green rust. In the 0.25 M sodium sulfate solution, oxidation of the steel surface proceeded slowly and the quadrupole splitting peaks of Fe(OH) 2 were seen in the CEMS. The peak intensity of Fe(OH) 2 gradually decreased and that of γ-FeOOH increased by the extension of immersion of steel in the solution. Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) layer was developed beneath the γ-FeOOH layer, when steel was dipped in 0.5 M sodium nitrate solution. However, the peaks of Fe 3 O 4 were not seen on CEMS of steel surface immersed in 0.5 M ammonium nitrate solution. Thus, applying the feasibility of CEMS for the characterization of oxidated compounds of iron on the steel surface formed by the immersion in solutions, the oxidation mechanism of the steel surface was discussed based upon the results of chemical state analyses. (author)

  2. Antidotal impact of extra virgin olive oil against genotoxicity, cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity induced by hexavalent chromium in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samah Khalil

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An in vivo study was carried out to verify whether extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO has the potential to modulate alterations resulted from exposure to hexavalent chromium (CrVI as potassium dichromate in rats. For this purpose, CrVI was injected intraperitoneally (i.p. at a dose of 0.4 mg/kg bw/day, EVOO was given orally at a dose of 300 μl daily either a lone or co-treated with CrVI at the same doses, routes and duration (26 days. At the end of the experiment, blood and spleen samples were collected. Genotoxicity, cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity biomarkers induced by CrVI were evaluated. Also, histopathological and immunohistochemical investigations of spleen tissue were conducted. A significant increase in genotoxicity and cytotoxicity biomarkers (micronucleus frequency, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine level and lactate dehydrogenase activity were recorded in CrVI treated rats. In addition, the immunotoxicity biomarkers showed a significant decrease in phagocytic%, stimulated nitric oxide production and decrease in the serum lysozyme activity. Histopathological and immunohistochemical studies support the cytotoxicity study. Oral administration of EVOO can ameliorate those effects but not restored to control level. Thus, authors recommend that regular consumption of this oil in the diet provides a constant supply of potential antioxidants that could reduce these alterations.

  3. Room air versus carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum: effects on oxidative state, apoptosis and histology of splanchnic organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ypsilantis, Petros; Lambropoulou, Maria; Tentes, Ioannis; Chryssidou, Maria; Georgantas, Themistoklis; Simopoulos, Constantinos

    2016-04-01

    Although CO2 is the insufflation gas of choice in laparoscopic procedures, room air is usually used in natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. The aim of the present study was to compare the safety of room air versus CO2 pneumoperitoneum in terms of their effect on the oxidative state, apoptosis and tissue injury of splanchnic organs. Eighteen Wistar rats were assigned to three groups (n = 6 per group) and were subjected to 8 mm Hg room air (group Pne-Air) or CO2 pneumoperitoneum (group Pne-CO2) or sham operation for 60 min. Forty-five minutes postdeflation, tissue samples were excised from the liver, stomach, ileum and kidneys for reduced glutathione-to-glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) ratio, caspase-8 and caspase-3 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) immunohistochemical assessment and histopathologic examination. GSH/GSSG ratio substantially declined in both pneumoperitoneum groups. No change was noted in HIF-1α expression. Mild upregulation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 was noted in both pneumoperitoneum groups being less pronounced in group Pne-Air. Histopathologic score was increased in all organs studied, but the stomach, in both pneumoperitoneum groups. Pneumoperitoneum established by either room air or CO2 induced substantial oxidative stress, mild apoptosis and mild tissue injury in splanchnic organs. While air pneumoperitoneum conferred a less pronounced apoptotic effect, the oxidative state and histopathologic profile of splanchnic organs did not differ between insufflation gases.

  4. The influence of iridium chemical oxidation state on the performance and durability of oxygen evolution catalysts in PEM electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siracusano, S.; Baglio, V.; Grigoriev, S. A.; Merlo, L.; Fateev, V. N.; Aricò, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    Nanosized Ir-black (3 nm) and Ir-oxide (5 nm) oxygen evolution electrocatalysts showing high performance in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) water electrolysis based on Aquivion® short-side chain ionomer membrane are investigated to understand the role of the Ir oxidation state on the electrocatalytic activity and stability. Despite the smaller mean crystallite size, the Ir-black electrocatalyst shows significantly lower initial performance than the Ir-oxide. During operation at high current density, the Ir-black shows a decrease of cell potential with time whereas the Ir-oxide catalyst shows increasing cell potential resulting in a degradation rate of about 10 μV/h, approaching 1000 h. The unusual behaviour of the Ir-black results from the oxidation of metallic Ir to IrOx. The Ir-oxide catalyst shows instead a hydrated structure on the surface and a negative shift of about 0.5 eV for the Ir 4f binding energy after 1000 h electrolysis operation. This corresponds to the formation of a sub-stoichiometric Ir-oxide on the surface. These results indicate that a hydrated IrO2 with high oxidation state on the surface is favourable in decreasing the oxygen evolution overpotential. Modifications of the Ir chemical oxidation state during operation can affect significantly the catalytic activity and durability of the electrolysis system.

  5. Assessment of the mode of action for hexavalent chromium-induced lung cancer following inhalation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, Deborah M.; Suh, Mina; Campleman, Sharan L.; Thompson, Chad M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • No published or well recognized MOA for Cr(VI)-induced lung tumors exists. • MOA analysis for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer was conducted to inform risk assessment. • Cr(VI) epidemiologic, toxicokinetic, toxicological, mechanistic data were evaluated. • Weight of evidence does not support a mutagenic MOA for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer. • Non-linear approaches should be considered for evaluating Cr(VI) lung cancer risk. - Abstract: Inhalation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is associated with increased lung cancer risk among workers in several industries, most notably chromate production workers exposed to high concentrations of Cr(VI) (≥100 μg/m 3 ), for which clear exposure–response relationships and respiratory irritation and tissue damage have been reported. Data from this industry are used to assess lung cancer risk associated with environmental and current occupational exposures, occurring at concentrations that are significantly lower. There is considerable uncertainty in the low dose extrapolation of historical occupational epidemiology data to assess risk at current exposures because no published or well recognized mode of action (MOA) for Cr(VI)-induced lung tumors exists. We conducted a MOA analysis for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer evaluating toxicokinetic and toxicological data in humans and rodents and mechanistic data to assess plausibility, dose–response, and temporal concordance for potential MOAs. Toxicokinetic data support that extracellular reduction of Cr(VI), which limits intracellular absorption of Cr(VI) and Cr(VI)-induced toxicity, can be overwhelmed at high exposure levels. In vivo genotoxicity and mutagenicity data are mostly negative and do not support a mutagenic MOA. Further, both chronic bioassays and the epidemiologic literature support that lung cancer occurs at exposures that cause tissue damage. Based on this MOA analysis, the overall weight of evidence supports a MOA involving deposition and accumulation

  6. Adsorption and desorption for dynamics transport of hexavalent chromium Cr(Ⅵ) in soil column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, J.

    2017-12-01

    Batch experiments have been carried out to study the adsorption of heavy metals in soils, and the migration and transformation of hexavalent chromium Cr(Ⅵ) in the soil of a vegetable base were studied by dynamic adsorption and desorption soil column experiments. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of initial concentration and pH value on the adsorption process of Cr(Ⅵ). Breakthrough curve were used to evaluate the capacity of Cr(Ⅵ) adsorption in soil columns. The results show that the higher the initial concentration, the worse the adsorption capacity of Cr(Ⅵ). The adsorption of Cr(Ⅵ) was strongly sensitive to pH value. The capacity of Cr(Ⅵ) adsorption is maximized at very low pH value. This may be due to changes in pH that cause a series of complex reactions in Cr(Ⅵ). In a strongly acidic environment, the reaction of Cr(Ⅵ) with hydrogen ions is accompanied by the formation of Cr3+, which reacts with the soil free iron-aluminum oxide to produce hydroxide in the soil. The results of the desorption experiments indicate that Cr(Ⅵ) is more likely to leach from this soil, but if the eluent is strong acid solution, the leaching process will be slow and persistent. The program CXTFIT was used to fit the breakthrough curve to estimate parameters. The results of the calculation of the dispersion coefficient (D) can be obtained by this program. The two-site model fit the breakthrough curve data of Cr(Ⅵ) well, and the parameters calculated by CXTFIT can be used to explain the behavior of Cr(Ⅵ) migration and transformation in soil columns. When pH=2, the retardation factor (R) reach at 79.71 while the value of the R is generally around 10 in other experiments. The partitioning coefficient β shows that more than half of the adsorption sites are rate-limited in this adsorption process and non-equilibrium effects the Cr(Ⅵ) transport process in this soil.

  7. Diversity of Chemical Bonding and Oxidation States in MS4 Molecules of Group 8 Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Jiang, Ning; Schwarz, W H Eugen; Yang, Ping; Li, Jun

    2017-08-04

    The geometric and electronic ground-state structures of 30 isomers of six MS 4 molecules (M=Group 8 metals Fe, Ru, Os, Hs, Sm, and Pu) have been studied by using quantum-chemical density functional theory and correlated wavefunction approaches. The MS 4 species were compared to analogous MO 4 species recently investigated (W. Huang, W.-H. Xu, W. H. E. Schwarz, J. Li, Inorg. Chem. 2016, 55, 4616). A metal oxidation state (MOS) with a high value of eight appeared in the low-spin singlet T d geometric species (Os,Hs)S 4 and (Ru,Os,Hs)O 4 , whereas a low MOS of two appeared in the high-spin septet D 2d species Fe(S 2 ) 2 and (slightly excited) metastable Fe(O 2 ) 2 . The ground states of all other molecules had intermediate MOS values, with S 2- , S 2 2- , S 2 1- (and O 2- , O 1- , O 2 2- , O 2 1- ) ligands bonded by ionic, covalent, and correlative contributions. The known tendencies toward lower MOS on going from oxides to sulfides, from Hs to Os to Ru, and from Pu to Sm, and the specific behavior of Fe, were found to arise from the different atomic orbital energies and radii of the (n-1)p core and (n-1)d and (n-2)f valence shells of the metal atoms in row n of the periodic table. The comparative results of the electronic and geometric structures of the MO 4 and MS 4 species provides insight into the periodicity of oxidation states and bonding. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Visible light photoreactivity from hybridization states between carbon nitride bandgap states and valence states in Nb and Ti oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hosik, E-mail: hosiklee@gmail.com [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Unist-gil 100 Eonyang-eup, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Ohno, Takahisa, E-mail: OHNO.Takahisa@nims.go.jp [Global Research Center for Environment and Energy based on Nanomaterials Science (GREEN), National Institute for Material Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba (Japan); Computational Materials Science Unit (CMSU), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Origin of bandgap reduction for visible photoreactivity is suggested. ► Carbon nitride adsorption in interlayer space can induce the bandgap reduction. ► The electronic structures are studied by density functional theory calculations. - Abstract: For better efficiency as photocatalysts, N-doping for visible light reactivity has been intensively studied in Lamellar niobic and titanic solid acids (HNb{sub 3}O{sub 8}, H{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}), and its microscopic structures have been debated in this decade. We calculate the layered solid acids’ structures and bandgaps. Bandgap reduction by carbon nitride adsorption in interlayer space is observed computationally. It originates from localized nitrogen states which form delocalized top-valence states by hybridizing with the host oxygen states and can contribute to photo-current.

  9. Introducing a Simple Equation to Express Oxidation States as an Alternative to Using Rules Associated with Words Alone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkiewicz, Piotr; Darewicz, Malgorzata; Iwaniak, Anna

    2018-01-01

    A simple equation to calculate the oxidation states (oxidation numbers) of individual atoms in molecules and ions may be introduced instead of rules associated with words alone. The equation includes two of three categories of bonds, classified as proposed by Goodstein: number of bonds with more electronegative atoms and number of bonds with less…

  10. Homogeneity of Continuum Model of an Unsteady State Fixed Bed Reactor for Lean CH4 Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subagjo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the homogeneity of the continuum model of a fixed bed reactor operated in steady state and unsteady state systems for lean CH4 oxidation is investigated. The steady-state fixed bed reactor system was operated under once-through direction, while the unsteady-state fixed bed reactor system was operated under flow reversal. The governing equations consisting of mass and energy balances were solved using the FlexPDE software package, version 6. The model selection is indispensable for an effective calculation since the simulation of a reverse flow reactor is time-consuming. The homogeneous and heterogeneous models for steady state operation gave similar conversions and temperature profiles, with a deviation of 0.12 to 0.14%. For reverse flow operation, the deviations of the continuum models of thepseudo-homogeneous and heterogeneous models were in the range of 25-65%. It is suggested that pseudo-homogeneous models can be applied to steady state systems, whereas heterogeneous models have to be applied to unsteady state systems.

  11. Investigation of alternative phosphating treatments for nickel and hexavalent chromium elimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jazbinsek, Luiz Antonio Rossi

    2014-01-01

    The phosphating processes are widely used in industry as surface treatments for metals, especially for low thickness plates, improving the adhesion between the metallic surface and the paint coating, and increasing the durability of paint systems against corrosion attacks. The tricationic phosphates containing zinc, nickel and manganese are commonly applied on steel. There is much discussion about the replacement of nickel by another element in order to have an environmentally friendly phosphating process. Niobium as a replacement for nickel has been evaluated. The most significant environmental impacts of phosphating processes are related to the presence of nickel and hexavalent chromium used in the process, this last as a passivation treatment. Nickel and hexavalent chromium are harmful to human and environment leading to contamination of water and soil. In the present study phosphate layers containing zinc, manganese and niobium have been evaluated and characterized on galvanized steel, and the results were compared with phosphates containing zinc, manganese and nickel, or a bicationic phosphate layer with zinc and manganese. Although the use of hexavalent chromium is not recommended worldwide, it is still used in processes for sealing the porosity of phosphate layers. This element is carcinogenic and has been associated with various diseases. Due to the passivation characteristics of niobium, this study also evaluated the tricationic bath containing niobium ammonium oxalate as a passivation treatment. The results showed that it could act as a replacement for the hexavalent chromium. The results of the present study showed that formulations containing niobium are potential replacements for hexavalent chromium and similar corrosion protection was obtained for the phosphate containing nickel or that with niobium. The morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy, gravimetric tests, porosity and adhesion evaluation results indicated that the phosphate

  12. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE (SECA) SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Minh; Jim Powers

    2003-10-01

    This report summarizes the work performed for April 2003--September 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid oxide Fuel Cell Program''. During this reporting period, the conceptual system design activity was completed. The system design, including strategies for startup, normal operation and shutdown, was defined. Sealant and stack materials for the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack were identified which are capable of meeting the thermal cycling and degradation requirements. A cell module was tested which achieved a stable performance of 0.238 W/cm{sup 2} at 95% fuel utilization. The external fuel processor design was completed and fabrication begun. Several other advances were made on various aspects of the SOFC system, which are detailed in this report.

  13. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE (SECA) SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2003-06-01

    This report summarizes the progress made during the September 2001-March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program''. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate a modular SOFC system that can be configured to create highly efficient, cost-competitive, and environmentally benign power plants tailored to specific markets. When fully developed, the system will meet the efficiency, performance, life, and cost goals for future commercial power plants.

  14. Surface State Capture Cross-Section at the Interface between Silicon and Hafnium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Chien Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial properties between silicon and hafnium oxide (HfO2 are explored by the gated-diode method and the subthreshold measurement. The density of interface-trapped charges, the current induced by surface defect centers, the surface recombination velocity, and the surface state capture cross-section are obtained in this work. Among the interfacial properties, the surface state capture cross-section is approximately constant even if the postdeposition annealing condition is changed. This effective capture cross-section of surface states is about 2.4 × 10−15 cm2, which may be an inherent nature in the HfO2/Si interface.

  15. Control of lipid oxidation during exercise: role of energy state and mitochondrial factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahlin, K; Harris, R C

    2008-01-01

    Despite considerable progress during recent years our understanding of how lipid oxidation (LOx) is controlled during exercise remains incomplete. This review focuses on the role of mitochondria and energy state in the control of LOx. LOx increases in parallel with increased energy demand up...... to an exercise intensity of about 50-60% of VO(2max) after which the contribution of lipid decreases. The switch from lipid to carbohydrate (CHO) is of energetic advantage due to the increased ATP/O(2) yield. In the low-intensity domain (energy state will stimulate both LOx...... during high-intensity exercise. Another potential mechanism, suggested in this review, is that Acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS), an initial step in LCFA catabolism, functions as a regulator of LOx. ACS activity is suggested to be under control of CoASH and energy state. Furthermore, evidence exists...

  16. Optically induced bistable states in metal/tunnel-oxide/semiconductor /MTOS/ junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, S. K.; Dressendorfer, P. V.; Ma, T. P.; Barker, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    A new switching phenomenon in metal-oxide semiconductor tunnel junction has been discovered. With a sufficiently large negative bias applied to the electrode, incident visible light of intensity greater than about 1 microW/sq cm causes the reverse-biased junction to switch from a low-current to a high-current state. It is believed that hot-electron-induced impact ionization provides the positive feedback necessary for switching, and causes the junction to remain in its high-current state after the optical excitation is removed. The junction may be switched back to the low-current state electrically. The basic junction characteristics have been measured, and a simple model for the switching phenomenon has been developed.

  17. Evolution of the Oxidation State of the Earth's Mantle: Challenges of High Pressure Quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Keller, L.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation state of the Earth's mantle during formation remains an unresolved question, whether it was constant throughout planetary accretion, transitioned from reduced to oxidized, or from oxidized to reduced. We investigate the stability of Fe3+ at depth, in order to constrain processes (water, late accretion, dissociation of FeO) which may reduce or oxidize the Earth's mantle. Experiments of more mafic compositions and at higher pressures commonly form a polyphase quench intergrowth composed primarily of pyroxenes, with interstitial glass which hosts nearly all of the more volatile minor elements. In our previous experiments on shergottite compositions, variable fO2, T, and P is less than 4 GPa, Fe3+/TotFe decreased slightly with increasing P, similar to terrestrial basalt. For oxidizing experiments less than 7GPa, Fe3+/TotFe decreased as well, but it's unclear from previous modelling whether the deeper mantle could retain significant Fe3+. Our current experiments expand our pressure range deeper into the Earth's mantle and focus on compositions and conditions relevant to the early Earth. Experiments with Knippa basalt as the starting composition were conducted at 1-8 GPa and 1800 C, using a molybdenum capsule to set the fO2 near IW, by buffering with Mo-MoO3. TEM and EELS analyses revealed the run products from 7-8 GPa quenched to polycrystalline phases, with the major phase pyroxene containing approximately equal Fe3+/2+. A number of different approaches have been employed to produce glassy samples that can be measured by EELS and XANES. A more intermediate andesite was used in one experiment, and decompression during quenching was attempted after, but both resulted in a finer grained polyphase texture. Experiments are currently underway to test different capsule materials may affect quench texture. A preliminary experiment using liquid nitrogen to greatly enhance the rate of cooling of the assembly has also been attempted and this technique will be

  18. Determination of Model Kinetics for Forced Unsteady State Operation of Catalytic CH4 Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effendy Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic oxidation of methane for abating the emission vented from coal mine or natural gas transportation has been known as most reliable method. A reverse flow reactor operation has been widely used to oxidize this methane emission due to its capability for autothermal operation and heat production. The design of the reverse flow reactor requires a proper kinetic rate expression, which should be developed based on the operating condition. The kinetic rate obtained in the steady state condition cannot be applied for designing the reactor operated under unsteady state condition. Therefore, new approach to develop the dynamic kinetic rate expression becomes indispensable, particularly for periodic operation such as reverse flow reactor. This paper presents a novel method to develop the kinetic rate expression applied for unsteady state operation. The model reaction of the catalytic methane oxidation over Pt/-Al2O3 catalyst was used with kinetic parameter determined from laboratory experiments. The reactor used was a fixed bed, once-through operation, with a composition modulation in the feed gas. The switching time was set at 3 min by varying the feed concentration, feed flow rate, and reaction temperature. The concentrations of methane in the feed and product were measured and analysed using gas chromatography. The steady state condition for obtaining the kinetic rate expression was taken as a base case and as a way to judge its appropriateness to be applied for dynamic system. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction rate model was developed. The time period during one cycle was divided into some segments, depending on the ratio of CH4/O2. The experimental result shows that there were kinetic regimes occur during one cycle: kinetic regime controlled by intrinsic surface reaction and kinetic regime controlled by external diffusion. The kinetic rate obtained in the steady state operation was not appropriate when applied for unsteady state operation

  19. Quantitative chemical state XPS analysis of first row transition metals, oxides and hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biesinger, M C; Payne, B P; McIntryre, N S [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Hart, B R; Lau, L Wm [Surface Science Western, Room G1, Western Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Grosvenor, A P [Department of Chemistry, Gunning/Lemieux Chemistry Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G2 (Canada); Smart, R StC [ACeSSS, Applied Centre for Structural and Synchrotron Studies, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia)], E-mail: biesingr@uwo.ca

    2008-03-15

    Practical quantitative chemical state X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of first row transition metals, oxides and hydroxides is challenging due to the complexity of their M 2p spectra. Complex multiplet splitting, shake-up and plasmon loss structure can play a role in the interpretation of the chemical states present. This paper will show practical curve fitting procedures for the quantitative measurement of different chemical states for metal oxides and hydroxides from a survey of transition metals. It will also discuss some of the limitations and pitfalls present as well as give practical examples of their successful use. These curve-fitting procedures are based on 1) standard spectra from quality reference samples, 2) a survey of appropriate literature databases and/or a compilation of literature references, 3) fitting of multiplet split spectra based on spectra of numerous reference materials and theoretical modelling, 4) spectral subtractions routines, again using reference spectra, and 5) specific literature references where fitting procedures are available.

  20. Quantitative chemical state XPS analysis of first row transition metals, oxides and hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biesinger, M C; Payne, B P; McIntryre, N S; Hart, B R; Lau, L Wm; Grosvenor, A P; Smart, R StC

    2008-01-01

    Practical quantitative chemical state X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of first row transition metals, oxides and hydroxides is challenging due to the complexity of their M 2p spectra. Complex multiplet splitting, shake-up and plasmon loss structure can play a role in the interpretation of the chemical states present. This paper will show practical curve fitting procedures for the quantitative measurement of different chemical states for metal oxides and hydroxides from a survey of transition metals. It will also discuss some of the limitations and pitfalls present as well as give practical examples of their successful use. These curve-fitting procedures are based on 1) standard spectra from quality reference samples, 2) a survey of appropriate literature databases and/or a compilation of literature references, 3) fitting of multiplet split spectra based on spectra of numerous reference materials and theoretical modelling, 4) spectral subtractions routines, again using reference spectra, and 5) specific literature references where fitting procedures are available

  1. Development of Surface Complexation Models of Cr(VI) Adsorption on Soils, Sediments and Model Mixtures of Kaolinite, Montmorillonite, γ-Alumina, Hydrous Manganese and Ferric Oxides and Goethite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koretsky, Carla [Western Michigan University

    2013-11-29

    Hexavalent chromium is a highly toxic contaminant that has been introduced into aquifers and shallow sediments and soils via many anthropogenic activities. Hexavalent chromium contamination is a problem or potential problem in the shallow subsurface at several DOE sites, including Hanford, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE, 2008). To accurately quantify the fate and transport of hexavalent chromium at DOE and other contaminated sites, robust geochemical models, capable of correctly predicting changes in chromium chemical form resulting from chemical reactions occurring in subsurface environments are needed. One important chemical reaction that may greatly impact the bioavailability and mobility of hexavalent chromium in the subsurface is chemical binding to the surfaces of particulates, termed adsorption or surface complexation. Quantitative thermodynamic surface complexation models have been derived that can correctly calculate hexavalent chromium adsorption on well-characterized materials over ranges in subsurface conditions, such pH and salinity. However, models have not yet been developed for hexavalent chromium adsorption on many important constituents of natural soils and sediments, such as clay minerals. Furthermore, most of the existing thermodynamic models have been developed for relatively simple, single solid systems and have rarely been tested for the complex mixtures of solids present in real sediments and soils. In this study, the adsorption of hexavalent chromium was measured as a function of pH (3-10), salinity (0.001 to 0.1 M NaNO3), and partial pressure of carbon dioxide(0-5%) on a suite of naturally-occurring solids including goethite (FeOOH), hydrous manganese oxide (MnOOH), hydrous ferric oxide (Fe(OH)3), γ-alumina (Al2O3), kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4), and montmorillonite (Na3(Al, Mg)2Si4O10(OH)2-nH2O). The results show that all of these materials can bind substantial quantities of

  2. Removal of hexavalent chromium using chitosan prepared from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    oxidation, adsorption, coagulation/flocculation, chemical precipitation, electrochemical reaction, electro dialysis, reverse osmosis ... solution at ambient temperature. A magnetic ... attained (that is pH 7) and then it was washed with ethanol. The.

  3. Solid-state electrochromic cell with anodic iridium oxide film electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dautremont-Smith, W.C.; Beni, G.; Schiavone, L.M.; Shay, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    A new solid-state electrochromic cell has been fabricated using an anodic iridium oxide film (AIROF) display electrode. The cell has the symmetric sandwich structure AIROFvertical-barNafionvertical-barAIROF, with the Nafion solid electrolyte opacified by an in situ precipitation technique. A symmetric square-wave voltage of 1.5 V amplitude produces clearly perceivable color changes from pale to dark blue-gray in approx. =1 sec when viewed in diffuse reflection. Good open-circuit optical memory is exhibited:

  4. Laboratory and field evaluations of a methodology for determining hexavalent-chromium emissions from stationary sources. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, A.C.

    1991-10-01

    The study was initiated to determine whether chromium emissions should be regulated under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP). To support stationary source regulations, it is important that (1) the sampling procedure not change the chromium valence state during sampling and (2) an analytical technique for measuring low concentration levels of chromium be available. These goals are achieved with the current EPA 'Draft Method for Sampling and Analysis of Hexavalent Chromium at Stationary Sources.' The draft method utilizes a recirculating system to flush impinger reagent into the sampling nozzle during sample collection. Immediate contact of the stack gas with impinger reagent 'fixes' the chromium valence state. Ion chromatography coupled with post column derivatization and ultraviolet visible detector is used to analyze Cr(VI) in the parts per trillion range. Field tests were conducted at metal plating facilities, industrial cooling towers, municipal waste incinerators, sewage sludge incinerators, and hazardous waste incinerators. It was at the hazardous waste facility that the new method was proven to have acceptable precision and essentially no conversion in the sample train

  5. Soil humic acids may favour the persistence of hexavalent chromium in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leita, Liviana; Margon, Alja; Pastrello, Arnold; Arcon, Iztok; Contin, Marco; Mosetti, Davide

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between hexavalent chromium Cr(VI), as K 2 CrO 4 , and standard humic acids (HAs) in bulk solution was studied using three complementary analytical methods: UV-Visible spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and differential pulse stripping voltammetry. The observed UV-Vis and X-ray absorption spectra showed that, under our experimental conditions, HAs did not induce reduction of Cr(VI) to its trivalent chemical form. The interaction between Cr(VI) and HAs has rather led to the formation of Cr(VI)-HAs micelles via supramolecular chemical processes. The reported results could contribute towards explaining the relative persistence of ecotoxic hexavalent chromium in soils. - Humic acids (HAs) did not induce reduction of Cr(VI) to its trivalent chemical form, as the interaction between Cr(VI) and HAs rather led to the formation of Cr(VI)-HAs micelles via supramolecular chemical processes.

  6. N-Oxide-N-oxide interactions and Cl...Cl halogen bonds in pentachloropyridine N-oxide: the many-body approach to interactions in the crystal state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wzgarda-Raj, Kinga; Rybarczyk-Pirek, Agnieszka J; Wojtulewski, Sławomir; Palusiak, Marcin

    2018-02-01

    Pentachloropyridine N-oxide, C 5 Cl 5 NO, crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2 1 /c. In the crystal structure, molecules are linked by C-Cl...Cl halogen bonds into infinite ribbons extending along the crystallographic [100] direction. These molecular aggregates are further stabilized by very short intermolecular N-oxide-N-oxide interactions into herringbone motifs. Computations based on quantum chemistry methods allowed for a more detailed description of the N-oxide-N-oxide interactions and Cl...Cl halogen bonds. For this purpose, Hirshfeld surface analysis and the many-body approach to interaction energy were applied.

  7. Evaluating chemical extraction techniques for the determination of uranium oxidation state in reduced aquifer sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Campbell, Kate M.; Fox, Patricia M.; Singer, David M.; Kaviani, Nazila; Carey, Minna; Peck, Nicole E.; Barger, John R.; Kent, Douglas B.; Davis, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Extraction techniques utilizing high pH and (bi)carbonate concentrations were evaluated for their efficacy in determining the oxidation state of uranium (U) in reduced sediments collected from Rifle, CO. Differences in dissolved concentrations between oxic and anoxic extractions have been proposed as a means to quantify the U(VI) and U(IV) content of sediments. An additional step was added to anoxic extractions using a strong anion exchange resin to separate dissolved U(IV) and U(VI). X-ray spectroscopy showed that U(IV) in the sediments was present as polymerized precipitates similar to uraninite and/or less ordered U(IV), referred to as non-uraninite U(IV) species associated with biomass (NUSAB). Extractions of sediment containing both uraninite and NUSAB displayed higher dissolved uranium concentrations under oxic than anoxic conditions while extractions of sediment dominated by NUSAB resulted in identical dissolved U concentrations. Dissolved U(IV) was rapidly oxidized under anoxic conditions in all experiments. Uraninite reacted minimally under anoxic conditions but thermodynamic calculations show that its propensity to oxidize is sensitive to solution chemistry and sediment mineralogy. A universal method for quantification of U(IV) and U(VI) in sediments has not yet been developed but the chemical extractions, when combined with solid-phase characterization, have a narrow range of applicability for sediments without U(VI).

  8. No hexavalent half-arc-transitive graphs of order twice a prime ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mi-Mi Zhang

    2018-03-19

    Mar 19, 2018 ... Wang and Feng (Discrete. Math. 310 (2010) 1721–1724) proved that there exists no tetravalent half-arc-transitive graphs of order 2p2. In this paper, we extend this result to prove that no hexavalent half-arc-transitive graphs of order 2p2 exist. Keywords. Half-arc-transitive; bi-Cayley graph; vertex transitive; ...

  9. Nanoscale probing of bandgap states on oxide particles using electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qianlang [School for the Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, 85287 AZ (United States); March, Katia [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Bâtiment 510, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Crozier, Peter A., E-mail: CROZIER@asu.edu [School for the Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, 85287 AZ (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Surface and near-surface electronic states were probed with nanometer spatial resolution in MgO and TiO{sub 2} anatase nanoparticles using ultra-high energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) coupled to a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). This combination allows the surface electronic structure determined with spectroscopy to be correlated with nanoparticle size, morphology, facet etc. By acquiring the spectra in aloof beam mode, radiation damage to the surface can be significantly reduced while maintaining the nanometer spatial resolution. MgO and TiO{sub 2} showed very different bandgap features associated with the surface/sub-surface layer of the nanoparticles. Spectral simulations based on dielectric theory and density of states models showed that a plateau feature found in the pre-bandgap region in the spectra from (100) surfaces of 60 nm MgO nanocubes is consistent with a thin hydroxide surface layer. The spectroscopy shows that this hydroxide species gives rise to a broad filled surface state at 1.1 eV above the MgO valence band. At the surfaces of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, pronounced peaks were observed in the bandgap region, which could not be well fitted to defect states. In this case, the high refractive index and large particle size may make Cherenkov or guided light modes the likely causes of the peaks. - Highlights: • Bandgap states detected with aloof beam monochromated EELS on oxide nanoparticle surfaces. • Dielectric theory applied to simulate the spectra and interpret surface structure. • Density of states models also be employed to understand the surface electronic structure. • In MgO, one states associate with water species was found close to the valence band edge. • In anatase, two mid-gap states associated with point defects were found.

  10. Adsorption of CO, CO2, H2, and H2O on titania surfaces with different oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raupp, G.B.; Dumesic, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The adsorptive properties of titania surfaces with different oxidation states were proved by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO, H 2 , CO 2 , and H 2 O. Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that vacuum annealing an oxidized titanium foil at temperatures from 300 to 800 K was an effective means of systematically varying the average surface oxidation state from Ti 4+ to Ti 2+ . Carbon monoxide weakly adsorbed (desorption energy of 44-49 kJ x mol -1 ) in a carbonyl fashion on coordinatively unsaturated cation sites. Titania surfaces were inert with respect to H 2 adsorption and dissociation. Carbon dioxide adsorbed in a linear molecular fashion. Water adsorbed both molecularly and dissociatively. Results are discussed in terms of the role of titania oxidation state in CO hydrogenation over titania-supported metal catalysts. 74 references, 7 figures

  11. Characterization and recovery of hexavalent chromium salts of an environmental liability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel C, A. A.; Isarain C, E.; Maldonado V, M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a diverse group of washing solutions for its use in the recovery of the industrial waste hexavalent chromium, in compliance with the Mexican regulation NOM-147-SEMARNAT/SSA1-2004. The recovery process consisted of a simple random sampling and a physical-chemical characterization with consideration to the high solubility of hexavalent chromium compounds. A test was performed which implemented five different washing solutions (water, sulfuric acid, citric acid, sodium hydroxide, calcium and hydroxide). This was followed by a factorial experimental design to optimize resources with a removal efficiency of 80% and hence a recovery of 33 g/kg as CaCrO 4 (calcium chromate). Chromium hexavalent concentration in the leachate was quantified using UV-Vis spectrometry at a wavelength λ = 540 nm, while the salts recovered by evaporation were characterized using X-ray fluorescence analysis, leading to the conclusion that precipitate can be used as raw material, the main elements are Cr, Ca, Fe and Mg, and their concentration depends on the washing solution. (Author)

  12. Development of a site-specific water quality criterion for hexavalent chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, D.O.; Sticko, J.P.; Reash, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The effluent of treated fly ash from a coal-fired power plant located on the Ohio River periodically exceeds its NPDES acute permit limit for hexavalent chromium of 15 microg/L. The increased levels of hexavalent chromium in the effluent are a recent occurrence which are likely due to changes in coal blends burned in the generating units. Ohio EPA determined the use designation of the receiving stream (Limited Resource Water) was being attained and a one-year biomonitoring program of the effluent detected no acute toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia or Daphnia magna. The water-effect ratio (WER) procedure was selected to develop a site-specific criterion maximum concentration for hexavalent chromium for the effluent's receiving stream. WER procedures followed those described in EPA's ''Interim Guidance on Determination and Use of Water-Effect Ratios for Metals'' (1994). Site water used in the WER determinations was undiluted effluent since the receiving stream originates at the discharge point of the outfall. 48-hour acute D. magna and 96-hour acute fathead minnow toxicity tests were selected as the primary and secondary tests, respectively for use in three seasonal WER determinations. The results of the three WER determinations and the status of the regulatory process will be presented

  13. Biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) in wastewater using Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. bacterial strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qasim, Muhammad [Department of Chemical Engineering, American University of Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)

    2013-07-01

    The recovery of toxic metal compounds is a deep concern in all industries. Hexavalent chromium is particularly worrying because of its toxic influence on human health. In this paper, biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) present in wastewater has been studied using two different bacterial strains; Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. A chemostat (with and without recycle of cells) with 10 L liquid culture volume was used to study the substrate and the biomass cell concentrations with time. Also, the degree of substrate conversion was studied by the varying the dilution rate as an independent parameter. The dilution rate (ratio of feed flow rate to the culture volume) was varied by varying the feed volumetric rate from 110-170 mL/h for inlet hexavalent chromium concentrations of 70 mg/dm3. The results show that a chemostat with recycle gives a better performance in terms of substrate conversion than a chemostat without a recycle. Moreover, the degree of substrate conversion decreases as the dilution rate is increased. Also, Bacillus sp. was found to give higher conversions compared to pseudomonas sp.

  14. The effect of interfaces on solid-state reactions between oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.T.; Carter, C.B.

    1998-01-01

    A thin-film geometry has been used to study fundamental solid-state reaction processes occurring at interfaces in two spinel-forming oxide systems. In the first system, NiO/Al 2 O 3 , epitactic NiO films were deposited on various orientations of single-crystal α-Al 2 O 3 . In this case, the reaction kinetics were studied and correlated with the interfacial structure (or substrate orientation). In the second, In 2 O 3 /MgO, solid-state reactions were studied under the influence of an electric field. The electric field provides a driving force for mass transport that affects both the reaction process and the morphological stability of an interface

  15. Chemical states of fission products in irradiated uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Ken; Uno, Masayoshi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    1999-01-01

    The chemical states of fission products (FPs) in irradiated uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for the light water reactor (LWR) were estimated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations on system of fuel and FPs by using ChemSage program. A stoichiometric MOX containing 6.1 wt. percent PuO 2 was taken as a loading fuel. The variation of chemical states of FPs was calculated as a function of oxygen potential. Some pieces of information obtained by the calculation were compared with the results of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) of UO 2 fuel. It was confirmed that the multicomponent and multiphase thermodynamic equilibrium calculation between fuel and FPs system was an effective tool for understanding the behavior of FPs in fuel. (author)

  16. Origin of major donor states in In–Ga–Zn oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Motoki; Oota, Masashi; Ishihara, Noritaka; Nonaka, Yusuke; Hirohashi, Takuya; Takahashi, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Shunpei [Semiconductor Energy Laboratory Co., Ltd., 398 Hase, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0036 (Japan); Obonai, Toshimitsu; Hosaka, Yasuharu; Koezuka, Junichi [Advanced Film Device Inc., 161-2 Masuzuka, Tsuga-machi, Tochigi, Tochigi 328-0114 (Japan)

    2014-12-07

    To clarify the origin of the major donor states in indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO), we report measurement results and an analysis of several physical properties of IGZO thin films. Specifically, the concentration of H atoms and O vacancies (V{sub O}), carrier concentration, and conductivity are investigated by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy, and Hall effect measurements. The results of these experiments suggest that the origin of major donor states is H occupancy of V{sub O} sites. Furthermore, we use first-principles calculations to investigate the influence of the coexistence of V{sub O} and H in crystalline InGaO{sub 3}(ZnO){sub m} (m = 1). The results indicate that when H is trapped in V{sub O}, a stable complex is created that serves as a shallow-level donor.

  17. Solid-State Electrochromic Device Consisting of Amorphous WO3 and Various Thin Oxide Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizukuishi, Makoto; Shimizu, Isamu; Inoue, Eiichi

    1980-11-01

    A mixed oxide containing Cr2O3 was introduced into an amorphous WO3 solid-state electrochromic device (ECD) in order to improve its colour memory effect. The electrochromic characteristics were greatly affected by the chemical constituents of a dielectric layer on the a-WO3 layer. Particularly, long memory effect and low power dissipation were attained in a solid-state ECD consisting of a-WO3 and Cr2O3\\cdotV2O5(50 wt.%). Some electrochromic characteristics of the a-WO3/Cr2O3\\cdotV2O5 ECD and the role of V2O5 were investigated.

  18. Long-living positron and positronium states in zeolites and microcrystalline oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajcsos, Zs.; Liszkay, L.; Varga, L.; Lohonyai, L.; Lazar, K.

    1995-01-01

    Positron annihilation (PA) investigation were performed on zeolites (X, Y and ZSM-5) and on microcrystalline MgO, Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 , providing long lifetime components attributed to o-Ps atoms. In addition to the positron lifetime (LT) measurements, the energy distribution (ED) of the annihilation gamma radiation spectrum was recorded in the 30 keV - 1.5 MeV range for different samples and was compared to reference distributions for Si and GaAs samples, where no long-living Ps states are formed. Apart from the strong correlation with the water content in the samples, the positron data collected testify much more pronounced positronium hosting features for powders of the mentioned oxides than for zeolites. Positron LT spectroscopy combined with recording of the ED of the annihilation radiation provides reliable information on the forming of long living 3γ states. (author) 15 refs.; 4 figs

  19. The state of itinerant charge carriers and thermoelectric effects in correlated oxide metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzemsky, A.L.; Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste

    2000-10-01

    We analyzed the physics of transport processes and, in particular, the thermoelectric power in the mercurocuprates and other cuprates to get a better insight into the state of the carriers in these compounds. The actual problems related to the complicated mechanisms of carriers scattering above Tc are discussed. The experimental studies of thermoelectric power showed that the state of carriers in cuprates can be influenced by many complicated scattering processes, however the underlying mechanism for the linear decreasing of the TEP with increasing the temperature for most hole-doped HTSC cuprates is still not yet known. The actual problems related to the complicated mechanisms of carriers scattering above Tc are discussed for a few models of charge transport. A comparison between the analytical and experimental results is also made. It is concluded that the crucial factor for the understanding of the transport properties of correlated oxide metals is the nature of itinerant charge carriers, i.e. renormalized quasiparticles. (author)

  20. Probing the transition state region in catalytic CO oxidation on Ru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrom, H. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Oberg, H. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Xin, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); LaRue, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Beye, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Dell' Angela, M. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Gladh, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Ng, M. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sellberg, J. A. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kaya, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Mercurio, G. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Nordlund, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hantschmann, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Hieke, F. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Kuhn, D. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Schlotter, W. F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Dakovski, G. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Turner, J. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Minitti, M. P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Mitra, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Moeller, S. P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fohlisch, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Univ. Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany); Wolf, M. [Fritz-Haber Institute of the Max-Planck-Society, Berlin (Germany); Wurth, W. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY Photon Science, Hamburg (Germany); Persson, M. [The Univ. of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Norskov, J. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Abild-Pedersen, F. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Ogasawara, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Pettersson, L. G. M. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Nilsson, A. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-12

    Femtosecond x-ray laser pulses are used to probe the CO oxidation reaction on ruthenium (Ru) initiated by an optical laser pulse. On a time scale of a few hundred femtoseconds, the optical laser pulse excites motions of CO and O on the surface, allowing the reactants to collide, and, with a transient close to a picosecond (ps), new electronic states appear in the O K-edge x-ray absorption spectrum. Density functional theory calculations indicate that these result from changes in the adsorption site and bond formation between CO and O with a distribution of OC–O bond lengths close to the transition state (TS). After 1 ps, 10% of the CO populate the TS region, which is consistent with predictions based on a quantum oscillator model.

  1. Oxidative stress markers in hypertensive states of pregnancy: preterm and term disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesia Olha Kurlak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Discussion continues as to whether de novo hypertension in pregnancy with significant proteinuria (pre-eclampsia; PE and non-proteinuric new hypertension (gestational hypertension; GH are parts of the same disease spectrum or represent different conditions. Non-pregnant hypertension, pregnancy and PE are all associated with oxidative stress. We have established a 6 weeks post-partum clinic for women who experienced a hypertensive pregnancy. We hypothesized that PE and GH could be distinguished by markers of oxidative stress; thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and antioxidants (ferric ion reducing ability of plasma; FRAP. Since the severity of PE and GH is greater pre-term, we also compared pre-term and term disease. Fifty-eight women had term PE, 23 pre-term PE, 60 had term GH and 6 pre-term GH, 11 pre-existing (essential hypertension (EH without PE. Limited data were available from normotensive pregnancies (n=7 and non-pregnant controls (n=14. There were no differences in postpartum TBARS or FRAP between hypertensive states; TBARS (P=0.001 and FRAP (P=0.009 were lower in plasma of non-pregnant controls compared to recently-pregnant women. Interestingly FRAP was higher in preterm than term GH (P=0.013. In PE and GH, TBARS correlated with low density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol (P=0.036; this association strengthened with inclusion of EH ((P=0.011. The 10 year Framingham index for cardiovascular risk was positively associated with TBARS (P=0.003.Oxidative stress profiles do not differ between hypertensive states but appear to distinguish between recently-pregnant and non-pregnant states. This suggests that pregnancy may alter vascular integrity with changes remaining 6 weeks postpartum. LDL-cholesterol is a known determinant of oxidative stress in cardiovascular disease and we have shown this association to be present in hypertensive pregnancy further emphasizing that such a pregnancy may be revealing a pre-existing cardiovascular

  2. Efficiencies and Optimization of Weak Base Anion Ion-Exchange Resin for Groundwater Hexavalent Chromium Removal at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesham, Dean O.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Hanson, James P.; Miller, Charles W.; Meyers, P.; Jaschke, Naomi M.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) contractor, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, has successfully converted a series of groundwater treatment facilities to use a new treatment resin that is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiency in treating groundwater contamination at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. During the production era, the nuclear reactors at the Hanford Site required a continuous supply of high-quality cooling water during operations. Cooling water consumption ranged from about 151,417 to 378,541 L/min (40,000 to 100,000 gal/min) per reactor, depending on specific operating conditions. Water from the Columbia River was filtered and treated chemically prior to use as cooling water, including the addition of sodium dichromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Hexavalent chromium was the primary component of the sodium dichromate and was introduced into the groundwater at the Hanford Site as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from the reactors starting in 1944. Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other contaminants related to nuclear reactor operations resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated, leading to the use of pump-and-treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21K, a regenerable, strong-base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which was performed offsite. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion for the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. As a result, CH2M HILL performed testing at the Hanford Site in 2009 and 2010 to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at different waste sites. The testing demonstrated that a weak-base anion, single-use resin, specifically ResinTech SIR-700 ®, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher

  3. Theoretical studies of positron states and annihilation characteristics at the oxidized Cu(100) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazleev, N. G. [Department of Physics, Box 19059, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington Texas 76019 (United States) and Institute of Physics, Kazan Federal University, Kremlevskaya18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Weiss, A. H. [Department of Physics, Box 19059, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington Texas 76019 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    In this work we present the results of theoretical studies of positron surface and bulk states and annihilation probabilities of surface-trapped positrons with relevant core electrons at the oxidized Cu(100) surface under conditions of high oxygen coverage. An ab-initio study of the electronic properties of the Cu(100) missing row reconstructed surface at various on surface and sub-surface oxygen coverages has been performed on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT) using the Dmol3 code and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Surface structures in calculations have been constructed by adding oxygen atoms to various surface hollow and sub-surface octahedral sites of the 0.5 monolayer (ML) missing row reconstructed phase of the Cu(100) surface with oxygen coverages ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 ML. The charge redistribution at the surface and variations in atomic structure and chemical composition of the topmost layers associated with oxidation and surface reconstruction have been found to affect the spatial extent and localization of the positron surface state wave function and annihilation probabilities of surface trapped positrons with relevant core electrons. Theoretical results are compared with experimental data obtained from studies of oxidation of the Cu(100) surface using positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES). It has been shown that positron annihilation probabilities with Cu 3s and 3p core electrons decrease when total (on-surface and sub-surface) oxygen coverage of the Cu(100) surface increases up to 1 ML. The calculations show that for high oxygen coverage when total oxygen coverage is 1. 5 ML the positron is not bound to the surface.

  4. Obesity-Associated Oxidative Stress: Strategies Finalized to Improve Redox State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Gasperi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity represents a major risk factor for a plethora of severe diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and cancer. It is often accompanied by an increased risk of mortality and, in the case of non-fatal health problems, the quality of life is impaired because of associated conditions, including sleep apnea, respiratory problems, osteoarthritis, and infertility. Recent evidence suggests that oxidative stress may be the mechanistic link between obesity and related complications. In obese patients, antioxidant defenses are lower than normal weight counterparts and their levels inversely correlate with central adiposity; obesity is also characterized by enhanced levels of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. Inadequacy of antioxidant defenses probably relies on different factors: obese individuals may have a lower intake of antioxidant- and phytochemical-rich foods, such as fruits, vegetables, and legumes; otherwise, consumption of antioxidant nutrients is normal, but obese individuals may have an increased utilization of these molecules, likewise to that reported in diabetic patients and smokers. Also inadequate physical activity may account for a decreased antioxidant state. In this review, we describe current concepts in the meaning of obesity as a state of chronic oxidative stress and the potential interventions to improve redox balance.

  5. Obesity-Associated Oxidative Stress: Strategies Finalized to Improve Redox State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Isabella; Catani, Maria Valeria; Evangelista, Daniela; Gasperi, Valeria; Avigliano, Luciana

    2013-01-01

    Obesity represents a major risk factor for a plethora of severe diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and cancer. It is often accompanied by an increased risk of mortality and, in the case of non-fatal health problems, the quality of life is impaired because of associated conditions, including sleep apnea, respiratory problems, osteoarthritis, and infertility. Recent evidence suggests that oxidative stress may be the mechanistic link between obesity and related complications. In obese patients, antioxidant defenses are lower than normal weight counterparts and their levels inversely correlate with central adiposity; obesity is also characterized by enhanced levels of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. Inadequacy of antioxidant defenses probably relies on different factors: obese individuals may have a lower intake of antioxidant- and phytochemical-rich foods, such as fruits, vegetables, and legumes; otherwise, consumption of antioxidant nutrients is normal, but obese individuals may have an increased utilization of these molecules, likewise to that reported in diabetic patients and smokers. Also inadequate physical activity may account for a decreased antioxidant state. In this review, we describe current concepts in the meaning of obesity as a state of chronic oxidative stress and the potential interventions to improve redox balance. PMID:23698776

  6. Oxidation state of sulfur, iron and tin at the surface of float glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagarde, P; Flank, A-M; Jupille, J; Montigaud, H

    2009-01-01

    Sulfur is an important element of glasses, not because of its amount, always very low (less than 0.4 % in weight of SO 3 ), but because of its role since it actively participates to the refinement process and, combined to other elements, it can be responsible for the coloration of the glass. Iron is also of a major importance in most of the glasses. In the case of the float glass, the two faces, because of the fabrication process, are different in terms of composition (presence of Sn for one face) and also in terms of oxidation state of these minority elements (Fe, Sn, S). There should be a subtle interplay between the concentrations and the oxidation states of these different minority elements, and anyway these variations occur over a thickness of the order of few micrometers below the surface. Using the high intensity and the focusing properties (3 x 3 μm 2 ) of the x-ray beam from the Lucia beamline, we have therefore studied the speciation of iron and sulfur near the face of a float glass in relation with the behavior of tin. This has been obtained by combining elemental x-ray fluorescence cartography and x-ray micro-absorption at the different K-edges.

  7. Oxidation state of sulfur, iron and tin at the surface of float glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagarde, P; Flank, A-M [Synchrotron SOLEIL, l' Orme des Merisiers, BP 48 91192 Gif/Yvette cedex (France); Jupille, J [IMPMC, Universite P. and M. Curie, Campus de Boucicaut, 140 rue de Lourmel 75015 Paris (France); Montigaud, H [Saint-Gobain Recherche 39, quai Lucien Lefranc, BP 135 93303 Aubervilliers Cedex (France)

    2009-11-15

    Sulfur is an important element of glasses, not because of its amount, always very low (less than 0.4 % in weight of SO{sub 3}), but because of its role since it actively participates to the refinement process and, combined to other elements, it can be responsible for the coloration of the glass. Iron is also of a major importance in most of the glasses. In the case of the float glass, the two faces, because of the fabrication process, are different in terms of composition (presence of Sn for one face) and also in terms of oxidation state of these minority elements (Fe, Sn, S). There should be a subtle interplay between the concentrations and the oxidation states of these different minority elements, and anyway these variations occur over a thickness of the order of few micrometers below the surface. Using the high intensity and the focusing properties (3 x 3 {mu}m{sup 2}) of the x-ray beam from the Lucia beamline, we have therefore studied the speciation of iron and sulfur near the face of a float glass in relation with the behavior of tin. This has been obtained by combining elemental x-ray fluorescence cartography and x-ray micro-absorption at the different K-edges.

  8. Towards the improvement of the oxidation resistance of Nb-silicides in situ composites: A solid state diffusion approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, S.; Knittel, S.; François, M.; Portebois, L.; Mathieu, S.; Vilasi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Local equilibrium is attained during oxidation at phase boundaries (steady state conditions). •A solid state diffusion model explains the oxidation mechanism of Nb-silicides composites. •The Nb ss fraction is not the only parameters governing the oxidation rate of Nb-silicides. •Aluminium increases the thermodynamic activity of Si in the Nb-silicides composites. •The results indicate the need to develop a Nb–Ti–Hf–Al–Cr–Si thermodynamic database. -- Abstract: The present study focuses on the oxidation mechanism of Nb-silicide composites and on the effect of the composition on the oxidation rate at 1100 °C. A theoretical approach is proposed based on experimental results and used to optimise the oxidation resistance. The growth model based on multiphase diffusion was experimentally tested and confirmed by manufacturing seven composites with different compositions. It was also found that the effect of the composition has to be evaluated at 1100 °C within a short time duration (50 h), where the oxide scale and the internal oxidation zone both grow according to parabolic kinetics

  9. Effect of surface state on the oxidation behavior of welded 308L in simulated nominal primary water of PWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Hongliang; Zhang, Zhiming; Wang, Jiazhen; Zhu, Ruolin; Ding, Jie; Wang, Jianqiu; Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The oxidation behavior of 308L weld metal (WM) with different surface state in the simulated nominal primary water of pressurized water reactor (PWR) was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyzer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). After 480 h immersion, a duplex oxide film composed of a Fe-rich outer layer (Fe3O4, Fe2O3 and a small amount of NiFe2O4, Ni(OH)2, Cr(OH)3 and (Ni, Fe)Cr2O4) and a Cr-rich inner layer (FeCr2O4 and NiCr2O4) can be formed on the 308L WM samples with different surface state. The surface state has no influence on the phase composition of the oxide films but obviously affects the thickness of the oxide films and the morphology of the oxides (number & size). With increasing the density of dislocations and subgrain boundaries in the cold-worked superficial layer, the thickness of the oxide film, the number and size of the oxides decrease.

  10. Cellulose nanofibril/reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube hybrid aerogels for highly flexible and all-solid-state supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qifeng Zheng; Zhiyong Cai; Zhenqiang Ma; Shaoqin Gong

    2015-01-01

    A novel type of highly flexible and all-solid-state supercapacitor that uses cellulose nanofibril (CNF)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrid aerogels as electrodes and H2SO4 poly (vinyl alcohol) PVA gel as the electrolyte was developed and is reported here. These flexible solid-state supercapacitors...

  11. Moessbauer effect study of oxidation and coordination states of iron in some sodium borate glasse:;

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissa, N.A.; Sanad, A.M.; Youssef, S.M.; El-Henawii, S.A.; Gomaa, S.Sh.; Mostafa, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    A structural study of some sodium borate glasses containing iron was carried out applying ME spectroscopy. Both oxidation and coordination states of iron were investigated under the effect of gradual replacing of sodium carbonate by sodium nitrate in the glass batches. The glasses were melted in porcelain crucibles using an electrically heated furnace at 1000+-10 deg C, then were quenched on a steel plate at room temperature (R.T.). The ME source was 20 mCi radioactive Co-57 in chromium. The obtained ME spectra indicated that at lower sodium nitrate content both Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ are present in these glasses. At moderate concentrations some Fe 3+ ions were separated in a crystalline phase and the rest of the iron ions appeared as ferric ions in glassy state. At high sodium nitrate content only Fe 3+ ions in glassy state were detected. The values of the ME parameters for all iron ions indicated that all of them are in the octahedral coordination state. The density measurements confirm the separation of a crystalline phase at moderate sodium nitrate content. (author)

  12. Investigations on the nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity of trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartsch, P C; Hildenbrand, S; Kimmel, R; Schmahl, F W

    1998-09-01

    In contrast to trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) compounds, hexavalent chromium ((Cr(VI)) compounds are oxidizing agents capable of directly inducing tissue damage and possessing carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic potency. After oral or dermal absorption of Cr(VI), the kidney is the main target organ for chromium accumulation, which might result in acute tubular necrosis in humans. In contrast, an acute toxic effect of Cr(VI) on the liver has not yet been described. Therefore, we used two established epithelial cell lines from the kidney (Opossum kidney cells) and the liver (Hep G2 cells) to design an in vitro-assay which is able to examine acute toxic effects of chromium compounds. Cells of both cell lines were treated with various concentrations of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ranging from 0.01 micromol/l to 1 mmol/l for 24 h. Thereafter, cell morphology, organization of the intracellular cytoskeleton, number of viable cells and mean cell volume were examined. The results show that Cr(VI), but not Cr(III), has an acute cytotoxic effect and causes a dose-dependent loss in cell viability. The effective dose that caused 50% of cell death was 5 micromol/l for kidney epithelial cells and 50 micromol/l for liver epithelial cells. This means that kidney epithelial cells are 10 times more sensitive towards Cr(VI) treatment than liver epithelial cells and this might explain the known nephrotoxicity in vivo. The loss in cell viability was accompanied by a rounding and detachment of the cells and a marked reduction of intracellular F-actin-containing stress fibers. Microtubules and intermediate-sized filaments were observed to be unaffected. Only in the case of kidney epithelial cells, a dose-dependent cell volume increase was observed after Cr(VI) treatment at concentrations up to 50 micromol/l. At higher concentrations, the cell volume decreased due to the high number of cells undergoing lysis and the appearance of cellular fragments. Various chloride channel blockers with

  13. The electrochemical aspect of the corrosion of austenitic stainless steels, in nitric acid and in the presence of hexavalent chromium (1961); Aspect electrochimique de la corrosion d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu nitrique et en presence de chrome hexavalent (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coriou, H; Hure, J; Plante, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The corrosion of austenitic stainless steels in boiling nitric acid markedly increases when the medium contains hexavalent chromium ions. Because of several redox phenomena, the potential of the steel generally changes in course of time. Measurements show a relation between the weight loss and the potential of specimens. Additions of Mn(VII) and Ce(IV) are compared with that of Cr(VI), and show that the relation is a general one. The attack cf the metal in oxidizing media is largely intergranular, leading to exfoliation of the grains, although the steel studied is not sensitive to the classical Huey and Strauss tests. Also even in the absence of any other oxidizing reaction, the current density observed when the steel is anodically polarized under potentiostatic conditions does not correspond to the actual weight loss of the metal. (authors) [French] La corrosion d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu nitrique bouillant augmente notablement quand le milieu contient des ions chrome a l'etat hexavalent. Par suite de divers phenomenes d'oxydo-reduction, le potentiel de l'acier evolue generalement au cours du temps. Les mesures effectuees permettent d'etablir une relation entre les pertes de poids et le potentiel des echantillons. L'addition de Mn(VI) et Ce(IV) est compare a celle de Cr(VI) et montre que la relation precedente s'applique de facon generale. L'attaque du metal en milieu oxydant est en grande, partie due a une corrosion intergranulaire conduisant a un dechaussement des grains bien que l'acier etudie ne soit pas sensible aux tests classiques de Huey et de Strauss. Aussi, meme en l'absence de toute autre reaction d'oxydation l'intensite qu l'on observerait en soumettant l'acier a un potentiel anodique dans un montage potentiostatique ne correspondrait pas a la perte de poids reelle du metal. (auteurs)

  14. Quantum State-Resolved Collision Dynamics of Nitric Oxide at Ionic Liquid and Molten Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutz, Amelia Marie

    Detailed molecular scale interactions at the gas-liquid interface are explored with quantum state-to-state resolved scattering of a jet-cooled beam of NO(2pi1/2; N = 0) from ionic liquid and molten metal surfaces. The scattered distributions are probed via laser-induced fluorescence methods, which yield rotational and spin-orbit state populations that elucidate the dynamics of energy transfer at the gas-liquid interface. These collision dynamics are explored as a function of incident collision energy, surface temperature, scattering angle, and liquid identity, all of which are found to substantially affect the degree of rotational, electronic and vibrational excitation of NO via collisions at the liquid surface. Rotational distributions observed reveal two distinct scattering pathways, (i) molecules that trap, thermalize and eventually desorb from the surface (trapping-desorption, TD), and (ii) those that undergo prompt recoil (impulsive scattering, IS) prior to complete equilibration with the liquid surface. Thermally desorbing NO molecules are found to have rotational temperatures close to, but slightly cooler than the surface temperature, indicative of rotational dependent sticking probabilities on liquid surfaces. Nitric oxide is a radical with multiple low-lying electronic states that serves as an ideal candidate for exploring nonadiabatic state-changing collision dynamics at the gas-liquid interface, which induce significant excitation from ground (2pi1/2) to excited (2pi 3/2) spin-orbit states. Molecular beam scattering of supersonically cooled NO from hot molten metals (Ga and Au, Ts = 300 - 1400 K) is also explored, which provide preliminary evidence for vibrational excitation of NO mediated by thermally populated electron-hole pairs in the hot, conducting liquid metals. The results highlight the presence of electronically nonadiabatic effects and build toward a more complete characterization of energy transfer dynamics at gas-liquid interfaces.

  15. Origin of stabilization and destabilization in solid-state redox reaction of oxide ions for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Nakayama, Masanobu; Takeuchi, Mitsue; Komaba, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Yu; Mukai, Takahiro; Shiiba, Hiromasa; Sato, Kei; Kobayashi, Yuki; Nakao, Aiko; Yonemura, Masao; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Mitsuhara, Kei; Ohta, Toshiaki

    2016-12-23

    Further increase in energy density of lithium batteries is needed for zero emission vehicles. However, energy density is restricted by unavoidable theoretical limits for positive electrodes used in commercial applications. One possibility towards energy densities exceeding these limits is to utilize anion (oxide ion) redox, instead of classical transition metal redox. Nevertheless, origin of activation of the oxide ion and its stabilization mechanism are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that the suppression of formation of superoxide-like species on lithium extraction results in reversible redox for oxide ions, which is stabilized by the presence of relatively less covalent character of Mn 4+ with oxide ions without the sacrifice of electronic conductivity. On the basis of these findings, we report an electrode material, whose metallic constituents consist only of 3d transition metal elements. The material delivers a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g -1 based on solid-state redox reaction of oxide ions.

  16. Origin of stabilization and destabilization in solid-state redox reaction of oxide ions for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Nakayama, Masanobu; Takeuchi, Mitsue; Komaba, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Yu; Mukai, Takahiro; Shiiba, Hiromasa; Sato, Kei; Kobayashi, Yuki; Nakao, Aiko; Yonemura, Masao; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Mitsuhara, Kei; Ohta, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Further increase in energy density of lithium batteries is needed for zero emission vehicles. However, energy density is restricted by unavoidable theoretical limits for positive electrodes used in commercial applications. One possibility towards energy densities exceeding these limits is to utilize anion (oxide ion) redox, instead of classical transition metal redox. Nevertheless, origin of activation of the oxide ion and its stabilization mechanism are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that the suppression of formation of superoxide-like species on lithium extraction results in reversible redox for oxide ions, which is stabilized by the presence of relatively less covalent character of Mn4+ with oxide ions without the sacrifice of electronic conductivity. On the basis of these findings, we report an electrode material, whose metallic constituents consist only of 3d transition metal elements. The material delivers a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g−1 based on solid-state redox reaction of oxide ions. PMID:28008955

  17. Role of the oxidation state of cerium on the ceria surfaces for silicate adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jihoon [WCD Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Jinok [WCD Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Clean/CMP Technology Team, Memory, Samsung Electronics, Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joo Hyun; Lee, Kangchun [WCD Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Junha [WCD Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Materials R& D Center, K.C.Tech, Anseong (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Heesung [WCD Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Dong Kee, E-mail: vitalis@mju.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Myongji University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Ungyu, E-mail: upaik@hanyang.ac.kr [WCD Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • We investigated the role of Ce oxidation state (Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+}) on the CeO{sub 2} surfaces for the silicate adsorption. • As the Ce{sup 3+} concentration increased from 19.3 to 27.6%, the surface density of −OH group increased from 0.34 to 0.72 OH/nm{sup 2}. • The Freundlich constant for the relative adsorption capacity (K{sub F}) and adsorption intensity (1/n) indicated that CeO{sub 2} NPs with high Ce{sup 3+} concentration show higher adsorption affinity with silicate ions. - Abstract: In this study, we have investigated the role of the Ce oxidation state (Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+}) on the CeO{sub 2} surfaces for silicate adsorption. In aqueous medium, the Ce{sup 3+} sites lead to the formation of −OH groups at the CeO{sub 2} surface through H{sub 2}O dissociation. Silicate ions can adsorb onto the CeO{sub 2} surface through interaction with the −OH groups (−Ce−OH− + −Si−O{sup −} ↔ −Ce−O−Si− + OH{sup −}). As the Ce{sup 3+} concentration increased from 19.3 to 27.6%, the surface density of −OH group increased from 0.34 to 0.72 OH/nm{sup 2}. To evaluate the adsorption behaviors of silicate ions onto CeO{sub 2} NPs, we carried out an adsorption isothermal analysis, and the adsorption isotherm data followed the Freundlich model. The Freundlich constant for the relative adsorption capacity (K{sub F}) and adsorption intensity (1/n) indicated that CeO{sub 2} NPs with high Ce{sup 3+} concentration show higher adsorption affinity with silicate ions. As a result, we have demonstrated that the Ce oxidation state (Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+}) on the CeO{sub 2} surface can have a significant influence on the silicate adsorption.

  18. Electronic state of ruthenium deposited onto oxide supports: An XPS study taking into account the final state effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larichev, Yurii V.; Moroz, Boris L.; Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I.

    2011-01-01

    The electronic state of ruthenium in the supported Ru/EO x (EO x = MgO, Al 2 O 3 or SiO 2 ) catalysts prepared by with the use of Ru(OH)Cl 3 or Ru(acac) 3 (acac = acetylacetonate) and reduced with H 2 at 723 K is characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in the Ru 3d, Cl 2p and O 1s regions. The influence of the final state effects (the differential charging and variation of the relaxation energy) on the binding energy (BE) of Ru 3d 5/2 core level measured for supported Ru nanoparticles is estimated by comparison of the Fermi levels and the modified Auger parameters determined for the Ru/EO x samples with the corresponding characteristics of the bulk Ru metal. It is found that the negative shift of the Ru 3d 5/2 peak which is observed in the spectrum of ruthenium deposited onto MgO (BE = 279.5-279.7 eV) with respect to that of Ru black (BE = 280.2 eV) or ruthenium supported on γ-Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 (BE = 280.4 eV) is caused not by the transfer of electron density from basic sites of MgO, as considered earlier, but by the differential charging of the supported Ru particles compared with the support surface. Correction for the differential charging value reveals that the initial state energies of ruthenium in the Ru/EO x systems are almost identical (BE = 280.5 ± 0.1 eV) irrespectively of acid-base properties of the support, the mean size of supported Ru crystallites (within the range of 2-10 nm) and the surface Cl content. The results obtained suggest that the difference in ammonia synthesis activity between the Ru catalysts supported on MgO and on the acidic supports is accounted for by not different electronic state of ruthenium on the surface of these oxides but by some other reasons.

  19. Solid-state ionics: Studies of lithium-conducting sulfide glasses and a superconducting oxide compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byung Tae.

    1989-01-01

    The first part of this work studies lithium-conducting sulfide glasses for battery applications, while the second part studies the thermodynamic properties of a superconducting oxide compound by using an oxide electrolyte. Lithium conducting glasses based on the SiS 2 -Li 2 S system are possible solid electrolytes for high-energy-density lithium batteries. The foremost requirement for solid electrolytes is that they should have high ionic conductivities. Unfortunately, most crystalline lithium conductors have low ionic conductivities at room temperature. However, glass ionic conductors show higher ionic conductivities than do crystalline forms of the same material. In addition to higher ionic conductivities, glasses appear to have several advantages over crystalline materials. These advantages include isotropic conductivity, absence of grain boundary effects, ease of glass forming, and the potential for a wide range of stability to oxidizing and reducing conditions. Using pyrolitic graphite-coated quartz ampoules, new ternary compounds and glasses in the SiS 2 -Li 2 S system were prepared. Several techniques were used to characterize the materials: powder x-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and AC impedance spectroscopy. The measured lithium conductivity of the sulfide glasses was one of the highest among the known solid lithium conductors. Measuring the equilibrium open circuit voltages assisted in determining the electrochemical stabilities of the ternary compounds and glasses with respect to pure Li. A solid-state ionic technique called oxygen coulometric titration was used to measure the thermodynamic stability, the oxygen stoichiometry, and the effects of the oxygen stoichiometry, and the effects of the oxygen stoichiometry and the cooling rate on superconductivity of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x compound were investigated

  20. Effect of charge state and stoichiometry on the structure and reactivity of nickel oxide clusters with CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Reilly, Nelly M.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    2009-02-01

    The collision induced fragmentation and reactivity of cationic and anionic nickel oxide clusters with carbon monoxide were studied experimentally using guided-ion-beam mass spectrometry. Anionic clusters with a stoichiometry containing one more oxygen atom than nickel atom (NiO2-, Ni2O3-, Ni3O4- and Ni4O5-) were found to exhibit dominant products resulting from the transfer of a single oxygen atom to CO, suggesting the formation of CO2. Of these four species, Ni2O3- and Ni4O5- were observed to be the most reactive having oxygen transfer products accounting for approximately 5% and 10% of the total ion intensity at a maximum pressure of 15 mTorr of CO. Our findings, therefore, indicate that anionic nickel oxide clusters containing an even number of nickel atoms and an odd number of oxygen atoms are more reactive than those with an odd number of nickel atoms and an even number of oxygen atoms. The majority of cationic nickel oxides, in contrast to anionic species, reacted preferentially through the adsorption of CO onto the cluster accompanied by the loss of either molecular O2 or nickel oxide units. The adsorption of CO onto positively charged nickel oxides, therefore, is exothermic enough to break apart the gas-phase clusters. Collision induced dissociation experiments, employing inert xenon gas, were also conducted to gain insight into the structural properties of nickel oxide clusters. The fragmentation products were found to vary considerably with size and stoichiometry as well as ionic charge state. In general, cationic clusters favored the collisional loss of molecular O2 while anionic clusters fragmented through the loss of both atomic oxygen and nickel oxide units. Our results provide insight into the effect of ionic charge state on the structure of nickel oxide clusters. Furthermore, we establish how the size and stoichiometry of nickel oxide clusters influences their ability to oxidize CO, an important reaction for environmental pollution abatement.

  1. Remote Sensing the Thermosphere's State Using Emissions From Carbon Dioxide and Nitric Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, D. R.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Doornbos, E.

    2017-12-01

    Measurements of emissions from nitric oxide and carbon dioxide in the thermosphere have strong correlations with properties that are very useful to the determination of thermospheric densities. We have compared emissions measured with the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite with neutral density measurements from the Challenging Mini-satellite Payload (CHAMP), the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), the Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE), and the three Swarm satellites, spanning a time period of over 15 years. It has been found that nitric oxide emissions match changes in the exospheric temperatures that have been derived from the densities through use of the Naval Reasearch Laboratory Mass Spectrometer, Incoherent Scatter Radar Extended Model (NRLMSISE-00) thermosphere model. Similarly, our results indicate that the carbon dioxide emissions have annual and semiannual oscillations that correlate with changes in the amount of oxygen in the thermosphere, also determined by use of the NRLMSISE-00 model. These annual and semi-annual variations are found to have irregular amplitudes and phases, which make them very difficult to accurately predict. Prediction of exospheric temperatures through the use of geomagnetic indices also tends to be inexact. Therefore, it would be possible and very useful to use measurements of the thermosphere's infrared emissions for real-time tracking of the thermosphere's state, so that more accurate calculations of the density may be obtained.

  2. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Minh

    2006-07-31

    This report summarizes the work performed for Phase I (October 2001 - August 2006) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled 'Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program'. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. During Phase I of the program significant progress has been made in the area of SOFC technology. A high-efficiency low-cost system was designed and supporting technology developed such as fuel processing, controls, thermal management, and power electronics. Phase I culminated in the successful demonstration of a prototype system that achieved a peak efficiency of 41%, a high-volume cost of $724/kW, a peak power of 5.4 kW, and a degradation rate of 1.8% per 500 hours. . An improved prototype system was designed, assembled, and delivered to DOE/NETL at the end of the program. This prototype achieved an extraordinary peak efficiency of 49.6%.

  3. Determination of oxidation state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czapla-Masztafiak, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland); Lis, G.J.; Gajda, M.; Jasek, E. [Department of Histology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kopernika 7, 31-034 Kraków (Poland); Czubek, U. [Department of Coronary Disease, Jagiellonian University Medical College, John Paul II Hospital, Prądnicka 80, 31-202 Kraków (Poland); Bolechała, F. [Department of Forensic Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Grzegórzecka 16, 31-531 Kraków (Poland); Borca, C. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kwiatek, W.M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    In order to investigate changes in chemical state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves X-ray absorption spectroscopy was applied. Since Fe is suspected to play detrimental role in aortic valve stenosis pathogenesis the oxidation state of this element has been determined. The experimental material consisted of 10 μm sections of valves excised during routine surgery and from autopsies. The experiment was performed at the MicroXAS beamline of the SLS synchrotron facility in Villigen (Switzerland). The Fe K-edge XANES spectra obtained from tissue samples were carefully analyzed and compared with the spectra of reference compounds containing iron in various chemical structures. The analysis of absorption edge position and shape of the spectra revealed that both chemical forms of iron are presented in valve tissue but Fe{sup 3+} is the predominant form. Small shift of the absorption edge toward higher energy in the spectra from stenotic valve samples indicates higher content of the Fe{sup 3+} form in pathological tissue. Such a phenomenon suggests the role of Fenton reaction and reactive oxygen species in the etiology of aortic valve stenosis. The comparison of pre-edge regions of XANES spectra for control and stenotic valve tissue confirmed no differences in local symmetry or spin state of iron in analyzed samples.

  4. The effect of cerium valence states at cerium oxide nanoparticle surfaces on cell proliferation

    KAUST Repository

    Naganuma, Tamaki

    2014-05-01

    Understanding and controlling cell proliferation on biomaterial surfaces is critical for scaffold/artificial-niche design in tissue engineering. The mechanism by which underlying integrin ligates with functionalized biomaterials to induce cell proliferation is still not completely understood. In this study, poly-l-lactide (PL) scaffold surfaces were functionalized using layers of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs), which have recently attracted attention for use in therapeutic application due to their catalytic ability of Ce4+ and Ce3+ sites. To isolate the influence of Ce valance states of CNPs on cell proliferation, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and osteoblast-like cells (MG63) were cultured on the PL/CNP surfaces with dominant Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions. Despite cell type (hMSCs and MG63 cells), different surface features of Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions clearly promoted and inhibited cell spreading, migration and adhesion behavior, resulting in rapid and slow cell proliferation, respectively. Cell proliferation results of various modified CNPs with different surface charge and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, indicate that Ce valence states closely correlated with the specific cell morphologies and cell-material interactions that trigger cell proliferation. This finding suggests that the cell-material interactions, which influence cell proliferation, may be controlled by introduction of metal elements with different valence states onto the biomaterial surface. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Investigating the capability of ToF-SIMS to determine the oxidation state of Ce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed Ahmed, H. A. A.; Swart, H. C.; Kroon, R. E.

    2018-04-01

    The capability of time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to determine the oxidation state of Ce ions doped in a phosphor was investigated. Two samples of SiO2:Ce (4 mol%) with known Ce3+/Ce4+ relative concentrations were subjected to ToF-SIMS measurements. The spectra were very similar and no significant differences in the relative peak intensities were observed that would readily allow one to distinguish Ce3+ from Ce4+. Although ToF-SIMS was therefore not useful to distinguish the charge state of Ce ions doped in this phosphor material, the idea in principle was also tested on two other samples, namely CeF3 and CeF4 These contain Ce as part of the host (i.e. much higher concentration) and are fluorides, which is significant because ToF-SIMS has previously been reported to be able to distinguish Eu2+ from Eu3+ in Eu doped Sr5(PO4)3F phosphor. The spectrum of CeF4 contained a small peak related to Ce4+ which was not observed in the CeF3 spectrum, yet the peak related to the Ce3+ ions was found to be much more intense in the spectrum of CeF4 than CeF3, showing that the ToF-SIMS signals cannot be directly interpreted as retaining the charge state of the ions in the original material. Nevertheless, the significant differences in the Ce-related peaks in the ToF-SIMS spectra from CeF3 and CeF4 show that the charge state of Ce may be distinguished. This study shows that while in principle ToF-SIMS may be used to distinguish the charge state of Ce ions, this depends on the sample and it would not be easy to interpret the spectra without a standard or reference.

  6. Coherent diffractive imaging of solid state reactions in zinc oxide crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, Steven J.; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian K.

    2011-11-01

    We investigated the doping of zinc oxide (ZnO) microcrystals with iron and nickel via in situ coherent x-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI) in vacuum. Evaporated thin metal films were deposited onto the ZnO microcrystals. A single crystal was selected and tracked through annealing cycles. A solid state reaction was observed in both iron and nickel experiments using CXDI. A combination of the shrink wrap and guided hybrid-input-output phasing methods were applied to retrieve the electron density. The resolution was 33 nm (half order) determined via the phase retrieval transfer function. The resulting images are nevertheless sensitive to sub-angstrom displacements. The exterior of the microcrystal was found to degrade dramatically. The annealing of ZnO microcrystals coated with metal thin films proved an unsuitable doping method. In addition the observed defect structure of one crystal was attributed to the presence of an array of defects and was found to change upon annealing.

  7. Oxidation-state distribution of plutonium in surface and subsurface waters at Thule, northwest Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMahon, C.A.; Vintró, L.L.; Mitchell, P.I.

    2000-01-01

    (V, VI) (mean, 68 +/- 6%; n = 6), with little if any distinction apparent between surface and bottom waters. Further, the oxidation state distribution at stations close to the accident site is similar to that measured at Upernavik, remote from this site. It is also similar to the distribution observed...... in shelf waters at midlatitudes, suggesting that the underlying processes controlling plutonium speciation are insensitive to temperature over the range 0-25 degrees C. Measurements using tangential-flow ultrafiltration indicate that virtually all of the plutonium (including the fraction in a reduced...... chemical form) is present as fully dissolved species. Most of this plutonium would seem to be of weapons fallout origin, as the mean Pu-238/Pu-239,Pu-240 activity ratio in the water column (dissolved phase) at Thule (0.06 +/- 0.02; n = 10) is similar to the global fallout ratio at this latitude...

  8. State-of-the-art technologies of gallium oxide power devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiwaki, Masataka; Kuramata, Akito; Murakami, Hisashi; Kumagai, Yoshinao

    2017-08-01

    Gallium oxide (Ga2 O3 ) has gained increased attention for power devices due to its superior material properties and the availability of economical device-quality native substrates. This review illustrates recent advances in Ga2 O3 device technologies, beginning with an overview of the social circumstances that motivate the development of new-generation switching devices. Following an introduction to the material properties of Ga2 O3 from the viewpoint of power electronics, growth technologies of Ga2 O3 bulk single crystals and epitaxial thin films are discussed. The fabrication and performance of state-of-the-art Ga2 O3 transistors and diodes are then described. We conclude by identifying the directions and challenges of Ga2 O3 power device development in the near future.

  9. Coordination and Oxidation States of Iron Incorporated in Mesoporous MCM41

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazar, K.; Pal-Borbely, G.; Szegedi, A.; Beyer, H. K.

    2002-01-01

    Mesoporous Fe-MCM41 samples (Si/Fe=25) were synthesized and characterized under evacuation and reducing/oxidizing treatments by in situ FTIR and Moessbauer spectroscopies. Both Fe(II) and Fe(III) located in low coordination states in top layers of pore walls exhibit Lewis acidity and may participate in Fe(III) ↔ Fe(II) processes at low temperatures (570 K). Furthermore, Fe(III) ↔ Fe(II) cycles can be achieved and repeated with participation of the full amount of iron at higher temperatures (670 K). The accompanying formation of oxygen vacancies and restoration of the structure in the reverse process does not result in extended damages; the MCM41 structure retains its stability under the conditions applied.

  10. Oxidation State of Iron in the Izu-Bonin Arc Initial Magma and Its Influence Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Arculus, R. J.; Brandl, P. A.; Hamada, M.; Savov, I. P.; Zhu, S.; Hickey-Vargas, R.; Tepley, F. J., III; Meffre, S.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; McCarthy, A.; Barth, A. P.; Kanayama, K.; Kusano, Y.; Sun, W.

    2014-12-01

    The redox state of mantle-derived magmas is a controversial issue, especially whether island arc basalts are more oxidized than those from mid-ocean ridges. Usually, arc magmas have higher Fe3+/Fe2+ and calculated oxygen fugacity (fO2) than mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). It is the high fO2 of arc magma that apparently delays onset of sulfide fractionation and sequestration of precious/base metals thereby facilitating the formation of many giant gold-copper deposits typically associated with subduction zones. But due to a paucity of Fe3+/Fe2+ data for primary mantle-derived arc magmas, the cause for high fO2 of these magma types is still controversial; causes may include inter alia subduction-released oxidized material addition to the mantle wedge source of arc magma, partial melting of subducted slab, and redox changes occurring during ascent of the magma. Fortunately, IODP expedition 351 drilling at IODP Site U1438 in the Amami-Sankaku Basin of the northwestern Philipine Sea, adjacent to the proto-Izu-Bonin Arc at the Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR), recovered not only volcaniclastics derived from the inception of Izu-Bonin Mariana (IBM) arc in the Eocene, but also similar materials for the Arc's subsequent evolution through to the Late Oligocene and abandonment of the KPR as a remnant arc. Samples of the pre-Arc oceanic crustal basement were also recovered enabling us to determine the fO2of the mantle preceding arc inception. As the oxidation state of iron in basaltic glass directly relates to the fO2 , the Fe3+/∑Fe ratio [Fe3+/(Fe3++ Fe2+)] of basaltic glass are quantified by synchrotron-facilitated micro X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy to reflect its fO2. Fe K-edge µ-XANES spectra were recorded in fluorescence mode at Beamline 15U1, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). Synthetic silicate glass with known Fe3+/∑Fe ratio was used in data handling. The experimental results as well as preliminary data from IODP Expedition 351

  11. A new method in estimation of total hexavalent chromium in Portland pozzolan cement; Un nuevo método en la determinación del cromo hexavalente total en cemento Portland puzolánico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R.; Sharma, D.

    2017-07-01

    Variamine blue was used first time for the detection of hexavalent chromium from cement samples. In present method, cement was treated sequentially with water, sulphate and carbonate buffer to extract soluble, sparingly soluble and insoluble hexavalent chromium respectively. Extracted Cr (VI) was determined using variamine blue as chromogenic reagent. The determination is based on the reaction of hexavalent chromium with potassium iodide in an acid medium to liberate iodine. This oxidizes variamine blue to form a violet coloured species having an absorption to maximum at 556 nm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) confirmed the complete extraction of hexavalent chromium by sequential extraction process. SRM 2701 (Reference material from NIST, USA) was used for revalidating the results. The percentage of recovery for proposed and reference method (diphelycarbazide method) varied from 98.5 to 101 and 97.5 to 100.5. Whereas, their relative error percentage varied from -1.5 to 0.33 and -2.5 to 0.5. [Spanish] El azul de variamina se utilizó por primera vez para la detección de cromo hexavalente en muestras de cemento. En el presente método, el cemento se trató secuencialmente con agua, y tampones sulfato y carbonato para extraer el cromo hexavalente soluble, poco soluble e insoluble, respectivamente. El Cr (VI) extraído se determinó utilizando azul de variamina como reactivo cromógeno, por reacción del cromo hexavalente con yoduro de potasio en un medio ácido para liberar yodo. Esto oxida al azul de variamina para formar una especie de color violeta con una absorción máxima a 556 nm. El análisis por energía dispersiva de rayos X (EDX) y la espectroscopía de infrarrojos (IR) confirmaron la extracción completa de cromo hexavalente mediante el proceso de extracción secuencial. Se utilizó SRM 2701 (material de referencia de NIST, EE.UU.) para validar los resultados. El porcentaje de recuperación para el m

  12. The oxidation state of Fe in glasses from the Kerguelen Large Igneous Province: Evidence for the changing oxidation state of the Indian Ocean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, M. E.; Stolper, E.; Brounce, M. N.; Eiler, J. M.; Wallace, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    Oxygen fugacity (ƒO2) is a thermodynamic property of silicate magmas that can be influenced by volcanic processes such as melting, crystal fractionation, and degassing. Lavas erupted as part of large igneous provinces (LIPs) may reflect the impingement of mantle plumes on the lithosphere, and thus could provide constraints on the ƒO2 of plumes responsible for generation of LIPs. The Kerguelen plateau was emplaced during the break up of Gondwana and the initial opening of the Indian Ocean. Elevated 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb ratios at low 206Pb/204Pb suggests that continental lithosphere from Gondwana is present in the asthenosphere of this region. The Sr-Nd-Pb-He isotopic compositions of the Kerguelen lavas are variable and have been used to infer that the mantle sources of these lavas reflect contributions from the depleted upper mantle, a common plume component, and the EM1 mantle component (perhaps recycled lower continental crust; e.g. Frey et al., 2002). The ƒO2 of the lavas of the Kerguelen LIP may thus reflect mixing of the upper mantle (i.e., near QFM), the plume component, and continental crust. We present new μ-XANES measurements of Fe3+/ΣFe ratios in a suite of 21 submarine glasses from Kerguelen. Over a narrow range in MgO (6.5-7.5 wt%), these glasses have Fe3+/ΣFe ratios of 0.16-0.18, corresponding to an ƒO2 of QFM+0.23 to +0.38 (at 1 atm, 1200°C). The H2O/Ce and Cl/K ratios of these glasses suggest that they did not assimilate significant amounts of altered oceanic crust. Also, S-FeOT variations indicate that the magmas are near sulfide saturation. These lavas were erupted in 1000 m of water, precluding significant loss of S to a vapor phase. At a given MgO content, samples from Kerguelen have similar to higher Fe3+/ΣFe ratios than the average values found in samples from along the Indian mid-ocean ridge, which could indicate a more oxidized mantle source. In addition, increases in Fe3+/ΣFe ratios of the Kerguelen samples, over a narrow

  13. Ultrathin reduced graphene oxide films as transparent top-contacts for light switchable solid-state molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Tao; Jevric, Martyn; Hauptmann, Jonas Rahlf

    2013-01-01

    A new type of solid-state molecular junction is introduced, which employs reduced graphene oxide as a transparent top contact that permits a self-assembled molecular monolayer to be photoswitched in situ, while simultaneously enabling charge-transport measurements across the molecules. The electr......A new type of solid-state molecular junction is introduced, which employs reduced graphene oxide as a transparent top contact that permits a self-assembled molecular monolayer to be photoswitched in situ, while simultaneously enabling charge-transport measurements across the molecules...

  14. Reactivity of biogenic manganese oxide for metal sequestration and photochemistry: Computational solid state physics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, K.D.; Sposito, G.

    2010-02-01

    Many microbes, including both bacteria and fungi, produce manganese (Mn) oxides by oxidizing soluble Mn(II) to form insoluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, a kinetically much faster process than abiotic oxidation. These biogenic Mn oxides drive the Mn cycle, coupling it with diverse biogeochemical cycles and determining the bioavailability of environmental contaminants, mainly through strong adsorption and redox reactions. This mini review introduces recent findings based on quantum mechanical density functional theory that reveal the detailed mechanisms of toxic metal adsorption at Mn oxide surfaces and the remarkable role of Mn vacancies in the photochemistry of these minerals.

  15. Comparative Study of Portland Cement-based and Zeolite-based Concretes in Terms of Hexavalent Chromium Leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oravec Jozef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the leaching study of Portland cement-based and zeolite-based concretes regarding water soluble hexavalent chromium. Three leaching water media (distilled water, rain water, and Britton-Robinson buffer of various pH values were under investigation. The correlation between pH and leached-out concentrations of chromium was not confirmed. The content of hexavalent water-soluble chromium in leachates of zeolite-based concretes was found to be higher than that in leachates of Portland cement-based samples.

  16. Detoxification of hexavalent chromium by Leucobacter sp. uses a reductase with specificity for dihydrolipoamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Abhipsa; Krishnan, Chandraraj

    2016-02-01

    Leucobacter sp. belongs to the metal stressed community and possesses higher tolerance to metals including chromium and can detoxify toxic hexavalent chromium by reduction to less toxic trivalent chromium. But, the mechanism of reduction of hexavalent chromium by Leucobacter sp. has not been studied. Understanding the enzyme catalyzing reduction of chromium is important to improve the species for application in bioremediation. Hence, a soluble reductase catalyzing the reduction of hexavalent chromium was purified from a Leucobacter sp. and characterized. The pure chromate reductase was obtained from the cell-free extract through hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration column chromatographic methods. It was a monomeric enzyme and showed similar molecular weights in both gel filtration (∼68 KDa) and SDS-PAGE (64 KDa). It reduced Cr(VI) using both NADH and NADPH as the electron donor, but exhibited higher activity with NADH. The optimal activity was found at pH 5.5 and 30 °C. The K(m) and V(max) for Cr(VI) reduction with NADH were 46.57 μM and 0.37 μmol min(-1) (mg protein) (-1), respectively. The activity was inhibited by p-hydroxy mercury benzoate, Ag(2+) and Hg(2+) indicating the role of thiol groups in the catalysis. The spectrophotometric analysis of the purified enzyme showed the absence of bound flavin in the enzyme. The N-terminal amino acid sequence and LC/MS analysis of trypsin digested purified enzyme showed similarity to dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase. The purified enzyme had dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase activity with dihydrolipoamide as the substrate, which suggested that Leucobacter sp. uses reductase with multiple substrate specificity for reduction of Cr(VI) detoxification. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Solid state oxidation of phenols to quinones with sodium perborate on wet montmorillonite K10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemi, Mohammed M.; Eftekhari-Sis, Bagher; Khalili, Behzad; Karimi-Jaberi, Zahed [Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry]. E-mail: mhashemi@sharif.edu

    2005-09-15

    Phenols were oxidized to quinones using sodium perborate (SPB) on wet montmorillonite as oxidant. The reaction was carried out at ambient temperature on the solid phase under solvent free conditions. (author)

  18. Solid state oxidation of phenols to quinones with sodium perborate on wet montmorillonite K10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, Mohammed M.; Eftekhari-Sis, Bagher; Khalili, Behzad; Karimi-Jaberi, Zahed

    2005-01-01

    Phenols were oxidized to quinones using sodium perborate (SPB) on wet montmorillonite as oxidant. The reaction was carried out at ambient temperature on the solid phase under solvent free conditions. (author)

  19. Study on Leaching of Hexavalent Chromium from Hardened Concretes Using Tank Leaching Test

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Shigeru; Sakai, Etsuo; Sugiyama, Takafumi

    2007-01-01

    Tank leaching tests were carried out to investigate the behavior of leaching trace elements from monolith samples. This study consists of two series, and the trace element used was hexavalent chromium. In Series I, the influence of the leachant/surface area of the specimen (L/S ratio) on the leaching amount was investigated. The leaching amount was found to increase with the amount of worked water. This shows that any L/S ratio can be selected in the tank leaching test. In Series II, th...

  20. Genesis and transport of hexavalent chromium in the system ophiolitic rocks - groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchegolikhina, Anastasia; Guadagnini, Laura; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Our study aims at contributing to the quantification and characterization of chromium transport processes from host rocks and soil matrices to groundwater. We focus on dissolved hexavalent chromium detected in groundwaters of geological regions with ophiolitic rocks (ophiolites and serpentinites) inclusions due to its critical ecological impact. (Oze et al., 2004). Despite the large number of analyses on the occurrence of high concentrations of hazardous hexavalent chromium ions in natural waters, only few studies were performed with the objective of identifying and investigating the geochemical reactions which could occur in the natural system rock - groundwater - dissolved chromium (Fantoni et al., 2002, Stephen and James, 2004, Lelli et al., 2013). In this context, there is a need for integration of results obtained from diverse studies in various regions and settings to improve our knowledge repository. Our theoretical analyses are grounded and driven by practical scenarios detected in subsurface reservoirs exploited for civil and industrial use located in the Emilia-Romagna region (Italy). Available experimental datasets are complemented with data from other international regional-scale settings (Altay mountains region, Russia). Modeling of chromium transformation and migration particularly includes characterization of the multispecies geochemical system. A key aspect of our study is the analysis of the complex competitive sorption processes governing heavy metal evolution in groundwater. The results of the research allow assessing the critical qualitative features of the mechanisms of hexavalent chromium ion mobilization from host rocks and soils and the ensuing transformation and migration to groundwater under the influence of diverse environmental factors. The study is then complemented by the quantification of the main sources of uncertainty associated with prediction of heavy metal contamination levels in the groundwater system explored. Fantoni, D

  1. Oxidation of an aluminium-magnesium alloy in liquid state. Methodology of determination of mechanisms from not necessarily repeatable experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surla, Karine

    1998-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the oxidation of an aluminium-5 pc magnesium alloy in its liquid state in an oxygen environment, using thermogravimetric analysis and that of magnesium in its solid state. In a first part, the author reports a thermodynamic and bibliographical study on magnesium transformation in its solid state (Mg/O 2 and Mg/H 2 O systems, transformation with dry and humid synthetic air, oxidation inhibitors) and on Al-Mg alloy transformation in presence of oxygen (thermodynamic properties of aluminium-rich Al-Mg alloys, Al-Mg/O 2 /N 2 and Al-Mg/O 2 /N 2 /H 2 O systems). The next parts address the selection of reaction systems for the different cases (oxidation of solid magnesium in oxygen, oxidation of the Al-Mg alloy in oxygen), the modelling of the formation of magnesia from solid magnesium and from the Al-Mg alloy, and the modelling of the liquid Al-Mg A5182 alloy oxidation in oxygen [fr

  2. Hydrophobic matrix-free graphene-oxide composites with isotropic and nematic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wåhlander, Martin; Nilsson, Fritjof; Carlmark, Anna; Gedde, Ulf W.; Edmondson, Steve; Malmström, Eva

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a novel route to synthesise hydrophobic matrix-free composites of polymer-grafted graphene oxide (GO) showing isotropic or nematic alignment and shape-memory effects. For the first time, a cationic macroinitiator (MI) has been immobilised on anionic GO and subsequently grafted with hydrophobic polymer grafts. Dense grafts of PBA, PBMA and PMMA with a wide range of average graft lengths (MW: 1-440 kDa) were polymerised by surface-initiated controlled radical precipitation polymerisation from the statistical MI. The surface modification is designed similarly to bimodal graft systems, where the cationic MI generates nanoparticle repulsion, similar to dense short grafts, while the long grafts offer miscibility in non-polar environments and cohesion. The state-of-the-art dispersions of grafted GO were in the isotropic state. Transparent and translucent matrix-free GO-composites could be melt-processed directly using only grafted GO. After processing, birefringence due to nematic alignment of grafted GO was observed as a single giant Maltese cross, 3.4 cm across. Permeability models for composites containing aligned 2D-fillers were developed, which were compared with the experimental oxygen permeability data and found to be consistent with isotropic or nematic states. The storage modulus of the matrix-free GO-composites increased with GO content (50% increase at 0.67 wt%), while the significant increases in the thermal stability (up to 130 °C) and the glass transition temperature (up to 17 °C) were dependent on graft length. The tuneable matrix-free GO-composites with rapid thermo-responsive shape-memory effects are promising candidates for a vast range of applications, especially selective membranes and sensors.We demonstrate a novel route to synthesise hydrophobic matrix-free composites of polymer-grafted graphene oxide (GO) showing isotropic or nematic alignment and shape-memory effects. For the first time, a cationic macroinitiator (MI) has been

  3. Kinetics of tetravalent plutonium oxidation by cerium (4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitina, G P; Shumakov, V G; Egorova, V P

    1975-01-01

    Stoichiometry and kinetics of the Pu(4) + Ce(4) reaction is studied by spectrophotometric method at 5-30 deg C in nitric acid solutions (..mu..=(HNO/sub 3/)+(NaNO/sub 3/) = 1.0 - 5.7; (Ce(4)) = 5.10/sup -5/ - 1.2.10/sup -3/ g-ion/1, (Pu(4)) =1.10/sup -5/ - 8.5.10/sup -4/ g-ion/1. Oxidation of one Pu(4) ion to a hexavalent state requires two Ce(4) ions. The plutonium oxidation is not complicated by by-processes. Reverse Ce(3) + PuO/sub 2//sup +/ reaction does not contribute essentially to the process at (Ce(3)) 2.6.10/sup -2/ g-ion/1. The reaction rate obeys the kinetic equation - d(Pu(4))/dt = ksub(eff)(Pu(4))(Ce(4))/a sub(+-HNO/sub 3/). The thermodynamical activation parameters are found for solutions at the varied nitric acid concentrations:..delta..Gsup(not equal) = 17.0+-0.2 and ..delta..Hsup(not equal) = 21.8+-2 kcal/mole(..mu..=1.0); ..delta..Gsup(not equal) = 19.1+-0.1 and ..delta..Hsup(not equal) = 23.1+-1 kcal/mole(..mu..=4.9). The reaction mechanism is discussed in terms of the theory of absolute reaction rates and the model of long-range charge transfer.

  4. The Effect of Precursor Ligands and Oxidation State in the Synthesis of Bimetallic Nano-Alloys

    KAUST Repository

    LaGrow, Alec P.

    2015-05-12

    The characteristics of bimetallic nanomaterials are dictated by their size, shape and elemental distribution. Solution synthesis is widely utilized to form nanomaterials, such as nanoparticles, with controlled size and shape. However, the effects of variables on the characteristics of bimetallic nanomaterials are not completely understood. In this study, we used a continuous-flow synthetic strategy to explore the effects of the ligands and the oxidation state of a metal precursor in a shape-controlled synthesis on the final shape of the nanomaterials and the elemental distribution within the alloy. We demonstrate that this strategy can tune the size of monodisperse PtM (M=Ni or Cu) alloy nanocrystals ranging from 3 to 16 nm with an octahedral shape using acetylacetonate or halide precursors of Pt(II), Pt(IV) and Ni or Cu (II). The nanoparticles formed from halide precursors showed an enrichment of platinum on their surfaces, and the bromides could oxidatively etch the nanoparticles during synthesis with the O2/Br- pair. The two nanocrystal precursors can be uti-lized independently and can control the size with a trend of Pt(acac)2

  5. Electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of some less stable oxidation states of selected lanthanide and actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobart, D.E.

    1981-06-01

    Simultaneous observation of electrochemical and spectroscopic properties (spectroelectrochemistry) at optically transparent electrodes (OTE's) was used to study some less stable oxidation states of selected lanthanide and actinide elements. Cyclic voltammetry at microelectrodes was used in conjunction with spectroelectrochemistry for the study of redox couples. Additional analytical techniques were used. The formal reduction potential (E 0 ') values of the M(III)/M(II) redox couples in 1 M KCl at pH 6 were -0.34 +- 0.01 V for Eu, -1.18 +- 0.01 V for Yb, and -1.50 +- 0.01 V for Sm. Spectropotentiostatic determination of E 0 ' for the Eu(III)/Eu(II) redox couple yielded a value of -0.391 +- 0.005 V. Spectropotentiostatic measurement of the Ce(IV)/Ce(III) redox couple in concentrated carbonate solution gave E 0 ' equal to 0.051 +- 0.005 V, which is about 1.7 V less positive than the E 0 ' value in noncomplexing solution. This same difference in potential was observed for the E 0 ' values of the Pr(IV)/Pr(III) and Tb(IV)/Tb(III) redox couples in carbonate solution, and thus Pr(IV) and Tb(IV) were stabilized in this medium. The U(VI)/U(V)/U(IV) and U(IV)/U(III) redox couples were studied in 1 M KCl at OTE's. Spectropotentiostatic measurement of the Np(VI)/Np(V) redox couple in 1 M HClO 4 gave an E 0 ' value of 1.140 +- 0.005 V. An E 0 ' value of 0.46 +- 0.01 V for the Np(VII)/Np(VI) couple was found by voltammetry. Oxidation of Am(III) was studied in concentrated carbonate solution, and a reversible cyclic voltammogram for the Am(IV)/Am(III) couple yielded E 0 ' = 0.92 +- 0.01 V in this medium; this value was used to estimate the standard reduction potential (E 0 ) of the couple as 2.62 +- 0.01 V. Attempts to oxidize Cm(III) in concentrated carbonate solution were not successful which suggests that the predicted E 0 value for the Cm(IV)/Cm(III) redox couple may be in error

  6. Chromium III histidinate exposure modulates antioxidant gene expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    While the toxicity of hexavalent chromium is well established, trivalent Cr (Cr(III)) is an essential nutrient involved in insulin and glucose homeostasis. Recently, antioxidant effects of chromium (III) histidinate (Cr(III)His) were reported in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress...

  7. The effect on phase separation of the oxidation state of molybdenum in a Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Y.; Clemens, K.; Tomozawa, M.; Warden, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of oxidation state on phase separation was studied for 13Na 2 O, 49B 2 O 3 , 38SiO 2 (mol%) glasses containing 1 mol% Mo oxide. The glasses were melted under various conditions to vary the oxidation states of Mo ions. The oxidation states of Mo ions were determined by chemical analysis and ESR. The crystallisation tendency, the immiscibility temperature, and the phase separation morphology of the glasses were examined by DTA, x-ray diffraction, opalescence method, and replica electron microscopy. Glasses containing Mo 4+ ions have a great tendency to precipitate MoO 2 crystals. The immiscibility temperature of glass goes through a minimum when the oxidation states of Mo ions are changed. It was suggested that there is an optimum oxidation state to prevent crystallisation and to suppress the phase separation tendency of this system. (author)

  8. Operando XAS Study of the Surface Oxidation State on a Monolayer IrOx on RuOx and Ru Oxide Based Nanoparticles for Oxygen Evolution in Acidic Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Filsøe; Escribano, Maria Escudero; Sebok, Bela

    2018-01-01

    that the average Ir oxidation state change is strongly affected by the coverage of atomic O. The observed shifts in oxidation state suggest that the surface has a high coverage of O at potentials just below the potential where oxygen evolution is exergonic in free energy. This observation is consistent...

  9. Effect of high doses of L-ascorbic acid on the antioxidative/oxidative state in the rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemiec, T.; Sawosz, E.; Chwalibog, André

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of mega-doses of vitamin C (0.3, 0.6 and 0.9% of diet) as a dietary supplement for rats on selected indices of the antioxidative/oxidative state in 40 growing Wistar rats (4x10). It was found that L-ascorbic acid and Total Antioxidative State...... (TAS) in plasma did not increase with increasing vitamin C supply. The results indicate that high doses of L-ascorbic acid (0.3 and 0.9 but not 0.6%) increased the concentration of this antioxidant in plasma. Supplementation of vitamin C above 0.3% to the diets had pro-oxidative effects on lipid...... structures, while application of 0.9% promoted oxidative degradation of rat livers....

  10. The intracellular redox stress caused by hexavalent chromium is selective for proteins that have key roles in cell survival and thiol redox control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Judith M.; Antholine, William E.; Myers, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds (e.g. chromates) are strong oxidants that readily enter cells where they are reduced to reactive Cr intermediates that can directly oxidize some cell components and can promote the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Inhalation is a major route of exposure which directly exposes the bronchial epithelium. Previous studies with non-cancerous human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) demonstrated that Cr(VI) treatment results in the irreversible inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and the oxidation of thioredoxins (Trx) and peroxiredoxins (Prx). The mitochondrial Trx/Prx system is somewhat more sensitive to Cr(VI) than the cytosolic Trx/Prx system, and other redox-sensitive mitochondrial functions are subsequently affected including electron transport complexes I and II. Studies reported here show that Cr(VI) does not cause indiscriminant thiol oxidation, and that the Trx/Prx system is among the most sensitive of cellular protein thiols. Trx/Prx oxidation is not unique to BEAS-2B cells, as it was also observed in primary human bronchial epithelial cells. Increasing the intracellular levels of ascorbate, an endogenous Cr(VI) reductant, did not alter the effects on TrxR, Trx, or Prx. The peroxynitrite scavenger MnTBAP did not protect TrxR, Trx, Prx, or the electron transport chain from the effects of Cr(VI), implying that peroxynitrite is not required for these effects. Nitration of tyrosine residues of TrxR was not observed following Cr(VI) treatment, further ruling out peroxynitrite as a significant contributor to the irreversible inhibition of TrxR. Cr(VI) treatments that disrupt the TrxR/Trx/Prx system did not cause detectable mitochondrial DNA damage. Overall, the redox stress that results from Cr(VI) exposure shows selectivity for key proteins which are known to be important for redox signaling, antioxidant defense, and cell survival.

  11. Short review of high-pressure crystal growth and magnetic and electrical properties of solid-state osmium oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaura, Kazunari, E-mail: YAMAURA.Kazunari@nims.go.jp [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, North 10 West 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    High-pressure crystal growth and synthesis of selected solid-state osmium oxides, many of which are perovskite-related types, are briefly reviewed, and their magnetic and electrical properties are introduced. Crystals of the osmium oxides, including NaOsO{sub 3}, LiOsO{sub 3}, and Na{sub 2}OsO{sub 4}, were successfully grown under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions at 6 GPa in the presence of an appropriate amount of flux in a belt-type apparatus. The unexpected discovery of a magnetic metal–insulator transition in NaOsO{sub 3}, a ferroelectric-like transition in LiOsO{sub 3}, and high-temperature ferrimagnetism driven by a local structural distortion in Ca{sub 2}FeOsO{sub 6} may represent unique features of the osmium oxides. The high-pressure and high-temperature synthesis and crystal growth has played a central role in the development of solid-state osmium oxides and the elucidation of their magnetic and electronic properties toward possible use in multifunctional devices. - Graphical Abstract: Flux-grown crystals of NaOsO{sub 3} under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions in a belt-type apparatus. The crystal shows a magnetically driven metal–insulator transition at a temperature of 410 K. - Highlights: • Short review of high-pressure crystal growth of solid-state osmium oxides. • Wide variety of magnetic properties of solid-state osmium oxides. • Perovskite and related dense structures stabilized at 3–17 GPa.

  12. Pu oxidation state distributions in suspensions of the Mont Terri Opalinus Clay isolate Sporomusa sp. MT-2.99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moll, Henry [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry; Cherkouk, Andrea [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). HZDR Young Investigator Group; Bok, Frank [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes

    2017-06-01

    The time-dependent {sup 242}Pu oxidation state distribution in the presence of Sporomusa sp. cells as a function of pH with or without Na-pyruvate was analyzed. In all cases, the presence of bacterial cells enhanced removal of Pu from solution and accelerated Pu interaction reactions, e.g. biosorption and bioreduction.

  13. Pu oxidation state distributions in suspensions of the Mont Terri Opalinus Clay isolate Sporomusa sp. MT-2.99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, Henry; Cherkouk, Andrea; Bok, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The time-dependent "2"4"2Pu oxidation state distribution in the presence of Sporomusa sp. cells as a function of pH with or without Na-pyruvate was analyzed. In all cases, the presence of bacterial cells enhanced removal of Pu from solution and accelerated Pu interaction reactions, e.g. biosorption and bioreduction.

  14. Arsenic K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy to determine oxidation states of arsenic of a coastal aquifer–aquitard system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ya; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Zhu, Sanyuan; Li, Yiliang

    2013-01-01

    Determination of oxidation states of solid-phase arsenic in bulk sediments is a valuable step in the evaluation of its bioavailability and environmental fate in deposits, but is difficult when the sediments have low arsenic contents and heterogeneous distribution of arsenic species. As K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) was used to determine quantitatively the oxidation states of arsenic in sediments collected from different depths of boreholes in the Pearl River Delta, China, where the highest aquatic arsenic concentration is 161.4 μg/L, but the highest solid arsenic content only 39.6 mg/kg. The results demonstrated that XANES is efficient in determining arsenic oxidation states of the sediments with low arsenic contents and multiple arsenic species. The study on the high-resolution vertical variations of arsenic oxidation states also indicated that these states are influenced strongly by groundwater activities. With the help of geochemical data, solid arsenic speciation, toxicity and availability were further discussed. -- Highlights: •XANES is efficient in determining arsenic oxidation states of the bulk sediments. •Distribution of arsenic oxidation states is consistent with geochemical conditions. •Arsenic oxidation states are influenced strongly by groundwater activities. -- As K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy is efficient in determining arsenic oxidation states of the bulk sediments with low arsenic contents and heterogeneous distribution of arsenic species

  15. Visualizing chemical states and defects induced magnetism of graphene oxide by spatially-resolved-X-ray microscopy and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y F; Singh, Shashi B; Limaye, Mukta V; Shao, Y C; Hsieh, S H; Chen, L Y; Hsueh, H C; Wang, H T; Chiou, J W; Yeh, Y C; Chen, C W; Chen, C H; Ray, Sekhar C; Wang, J; Pong, W F; Takagi, Y; Ohigashi, T; Yokoyama, T; Kosugi, N

    2015-10-20

    This investigation studies the various magnetic behaviors of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) and elucidates the relationship between the chemical states that involve defects therein and their magnetic behaviors in GO sheets. Magnetic hysteresis loop reveals that the GO is ferromagnetic whereas photo-thermal moderately reduced graphene oxide (M-rGO) and heavily reduced graphene oxide (H-rGO) gradually become paramagnetic behavior at room temperature. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and corresponding X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy were utilized to investigate thoroughly the variation of the C 2p(π*) states that are bound with oxygen-containing and hydroxyl groups, as well as the C 2p(σ*)-derived states in flat and wrinkle regions to clarify the relationship between the spatially-resolved chemical states and the magnetism of GO, M-rGO and H-rGO. The results of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism further support the finding that C 2p(σ*)-derived states are the main origin of the magnetism of GO. Based on experimental results and first-principles calculations, the variation in magnetic behavior from GO to M-rGO and to H-rGO is interpreted, and the origin of ferromagnetism is identified as the C 2p(σ*)-derived states that involve defects/vacancies rather than the C 2p(π*) states that are bound with oxygen-containing and hydroxyl groups on GO sheets.

  16. Oxidative Stress State Is Associated with Left Ventricular Mechanics Changes, Measured by Speckle Tracking in Essential Hypertensive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Antonio Moreno-Ruíz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative stress state is characterized by an increase in oxygen reactive species that overwhelms the antioxidant defense; we do not know if these pathological changes are correlated with alterations in left ventricular mechanics. The aim was correlating the oxidative stress state with the left ventricular global longitudinal strain (GLS and the left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP. Twenty-five patients with essential hypertension and 25 controls paired by age and gender were studied. All of the participants were subjected to echocardiography and biochemical determination of oxidative stress markers. The hypertensive patients, compared with control subjects, had significantly (p<0.05 higher levels of oxidized proteins (5.03±1.05 versus 4.06±0.63 nmol/mg, lower levels of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD activity (0.045±0.02 versus 0.082±0.02 U/mg, higher LVEDP (16.2±4.5 versus 11.3±1.6 mm Hg, and lower GLS (−12% versus −16%. Both groups had preserved ejection fraction and the results showed a positive correlation of oxidized proteins with GLS (r=0.386, p=0.006 and LVEDP (r=0.389, p=0.005; we also found a negative correlation of EC-SOD activity with GLS (r=-0.404, p=0.004 and LVEDP (r=-0.347, p=0.014.

  17. System Tb-Fe-O: thermodynamic properties of ternary oxides using solid-state electrochemical cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakshit, S.K.; Parida, S.C.; Dash, S.; Singh, Ziley; Prasad, R.; Venugopal, V.

    2003-01-01

    The standard molar Gibbs free energies of formation of TbFeO 3 (s) and Tb 3 Fe 5 O 12 (s) have been determined using solid-state electrochemical cell employing different solid electrolytes. The reversible emfs of the following solid-state electrochemical cells have been measured in the temperature range 1050≤T/K≤1250. Cell (I):(-)Pt/{TbFeO 3 (s)+Tb 2 O 3 (s)+Fe(s)}//YDT/CSZ//{Fe(s)+Fe 0.95 O(s)}/Pt(+))) (Cell (II):(-)Pt/{Fe(s)+Fe 0.95 O(s)}//CSZ//{TbFeO 3 (s)+Tb 3 Fe 5 O 12 (s)+Fe 3 O 4 (s)}/Pt(+) The oxygen chemical potentials corresponding to the three-phase equilibria involving the ternary oxides have been computed from the emf data. The standard molar Gibbs free energies of formation of solid TbFeO 3 and Tb 3 Fe 5 O 12 calculated by the least-squares regression analysis of the data obtained in the present study are given by {Δ f G compfn m (TbFeO 3 ,s)/(kJ·mol -1 )±3.2}=-1357.5+0.2531·(T/K); (1050≤T/K≤1548);))and({Δ f G compfn m (Tb 3 Fe 5 O 12 ,s)/(kJ·mol -1 )±3.5}=-4901.7+ 0.9997·(T/K); (1050≤T/K≤1250).)) The uncertainty estimates for Δ f G compfn m include the standard deviation in the emf and uncertainty in the data taken from the literature. Based on the thermodynamic information, oxygen potential diagram and chemical potential diagrams were computed for the system Tb-Fe-O at T=1250 K

  18. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium and Detection of Chromate Reductase (ChrR in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Baldiris

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available An Gram negative strain of S. maltophilia, indigenous to environments contaminated by Cr(VI and identified by biochemical methods and 16S rRNA gene analysis, reduced chromate by 100%, 98–99% and 92% at concentrations in the 10–70, 80–300, and 500 mg/L range, respectively at pH 7 and temperature 37 °C. Increasing concentrations of Cr(VI in the medium lowered the growth rate but could not be directly correlated with the amount of Cr(VI reduced. The strain also exhibited multiple resistance to antibiotics and tolerance and resistance to various heavy metals (Ni, Zn and Cu, with the exception of Hg. Hexavalent chromium reduction was mainly associated with the soluble fraction of the cell evaluated with crude cell-free extracts. A protein of molecular weight around 25 kDa was detected on SDS-PAGE gel depending on the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the medium (0, 100 and 500 mg/L. In silico analysis in this contribution, revealed the presence of the chromate reductase gene ChrR in S. maltophilia, evidenced through a fragment of around 468 bp obtained experimentally. High Cr(VI concentration resistance and high Cr(VI reducing ability of the strain make it a suitable candidate for bioremediation.

  19. Studi On Oxidation State Of U In Ba2NdUO6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firman Windarto, Hendri

    1996-01-01

    Ba 2 NdUO 6 is not of the important compounds that is formed from a solidification process for high level liquid waste using super high temperature method Ba 2 NdUO 6 has ordered perovskite structure. The objective of this study is to investigate oxidation state of U in Ba 2 NdUO 6 . The properties of Ba 2 NdUO 6 were observed by using Faraday-type torsion magnetometer and X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer (XPS). The magnetic susceptibility measured in the temperature range of 4K to room temperature showed that the Ba 2 NdUO 6 is paramagnetism that obeys the Curie-Weiss law. The effective moment of Ba 2 NdUO 6 is 3.04 μB. The results of xPs spectrum showed that the peaks of U4f for Ba 2 NdUO 6 appeared exactly between binding energy of UO 2 and UO 3 . It can be concluded that Ba 2 NdUO 6 has binding energy peaks corresponding to pentavalent uranium

  20. Petrology of chromite in ureilites: Deconvolution of primary oxidation states and secondary reduction processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Cyrena Anne; Harlow, George E.; Van Orman, James A.; Sutton, Stephen R.; Jercinovic, Michael J.; Mikouchi, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    Ureilites are ultramafic achondrites thought to be residues of partial melting on a carbon-rich asteroid. They show a trend of FeO-variation (olivine Fo from ∼74 to 95) that suggests variation in oxidation state. Whether this variation was established during high-temperature igneous processing on the ureilite parent body (UPB), or preserved from nebular precursors, is a subject of debate. The behavior of chromium in ureilites offers a way to assess redox conditions during their formation and address this issue, independent of Fo. We conducted a petrographic and mineral compositional study of occurrences of chromite (Cr-rich spinel) in ureilites, aimed at determining the origin of the chromite in each occurrence and using primary occurrences to constrain models of ureilite petrogenesis. Chromite was studied in LEW 88774 (Fo 74.2), NWA 766 (Fo 76.7), NWA 3109 (Fo 76.3), HaH 064 (Fo 77.5), LAP 03587 (Fo 74.9), CMS 04048 (Fo 76.4), LAP 02382 (Fo 78.6) and EET 96328 (Fo 85.2). Chromite occurs in LEW 88774 (∼5 vol.%), NWA 766 (event involved initial elevation of T (to 1300-1400 °C), followed by rapid decompression and drop in T (to exclusively in low-Fo samples supports the interpretation that the ureilite FeO-variation was established during igneous processing on the UPB.

  1. Waste management state-of-the-art review for mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodsum, H.C.; Goodman, J.

    1977-11-01

    This report provides a state-of-the-art review of the waste management for mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facilities. The intent of this report is to focus on those processes and regulatory issues which have a direct bearing on existing and anticipated future management of transuranic (TRU) wastes from a commercial MOX fuel fabrication faciity. Recent government agency actions are reviewed with regard to their impact on existing and projected waste management regulations; and it is concluded that acceleration in the development of regulations, standards, and criteria is one of the most important factors in the implementation of improved MOX plant waste management techniques. ERDA development programs pertaining to the management of TRU wastes have been reviewed and many promising methods for volume reduction of both solid and liquid wastes are discussed. For solid wastes, these methods include compaction, shredding and baling, combustion, acid digestion, and decontamination by electropolishing or by electrolytic treatment. For liquid wastes, treatment options include evaporation, drying, calcination, flocculation, ion exchange, filtration, reverse osmosis, combustion (of combustible organics), and bioprocessing. Based on this review, it is recommended that ERDA continue with its combustible solid waste volume reduction program and complete these development activities by 1979. Following this, a critical evaluation of solid waste volume reduction techniques should be made to select the most promising systems for a commercial MOX fuel facility

  2. Oxidation state of uranium in metamict and annealed zircon: near-infrared spectroscopic quantitative analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Ming; Ewing, R C

    2003-01-01

    Radiation and thermally induced changes in the oxidation state of uranium in metamict zircon have been systematically analysed, for the first time, using polarized near-infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that in damaged zircon U ions in crystalline domains exhibited relatively sharp, anisotropic signals from tetravalent and pentavalent U ions in crystalline domains (U sub c sub r sub y sub s sub t sub a sub l sup 4 sup + and U sub c sub r sub y sub s sub t sub a sub l sup 5 sup +). The linewidths and peak positions of the 4834 cm sup - sup 1 band (U sub c sub r sub y sub s sub t sub a sub l sup 4 sup + , E || c) and the 6668 cm sup - sup 1 band (U sub c sub r sub y sub s sub t sub a sub l sup 5 sup + , E perp. c) are a non-linear function of the self-radiation dose. They reach nearly constant values at doses greater than approx 3.5 x 10 sup 1 sup 8 alpha-events g sup - sup 1. Quantitative analysis of U sub c sub r sub y sub s sub t sub a sub l sup 4 sup + and U sub c sub r sub y sub s sub t sub a sub l...

  3. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden–Popper layered oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-01-01

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden–Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure. PMID:27578622

  4. Atomic scale imaging of competing polar states in a Ruddlesden-Popper layered oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Greg; Ophus, Colin; Birol, Turan; Ciston, Jim; Lee, Che-Hui; Wang, Ke; Fennie, Craig J; Schlom, Darrell G; Alem, Nasim; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-08-31

    Layered complex oxides offer an unusually rich materials platform for emergent phenomena through many built-in design knobs such as varied topologies, chemical ordering schemes and geometric tuning of the structure. A multitude of polar phases are predicted to compete in Ruddlesden-Popper (RP), An+1BnO3n+1, thin films by tuning layer dimension (n) and strain; however, direct atomic-scale evidence for such competing states is currently absent. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with sub-Ångstrom resolution in Srn+1TinO3n+1 thin films, we demonstrate the coexistence of antiferroelectric, ferroelectric and new ordered and low-symmetry phases. We also directly image the atomic rumpling of the rock salt layer, a critical feature in RP structures that is responsible for the competing phases; exceptional quantitative agreement between electron microscopy and density functional theory is demonstrated. The study shows that layered topologies can enable multifunctionality through highly competitive phases exhibiting diverse phenomena in a single structure.

  5. Carbonate-linked poly(ethylene oxide) polymer electrolytes towards high performance solid state lithium batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Weisheng; Cui, Zili; Liu, Xiaochen; Cui, Yanyan; Chai, Jingchao; Zhou, Xinhong; Liu, Zhihong; Cui, Guanglei

    2017-01-01

    The classic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) based solid polymer electrolyte suffers from poor ionic conductivity of ambient temperature, low lithium ion transference number and relatively narrow electrochemical window (<4.0 V vs. Li + /Li). Herein, the carbonate-linked PEO solid polymer such as poly(diethylene glycol carbonate) (PDEC) and poly(triethylene glycol carbonate) (PTEC) were explored to find out the feasibility of resolving above issues. It was proven that the optimized ionic conductivity of PTEC based electrolyte reached up to 1.12 × 10 −5 S cm −1 at 25 °C with a decent lithium ion transference number of 0.39 and a wide electrochemical window about 4.5 V vs. Li + /Li. In addition, the PTEC based Li/LiFePO 4 cell could be reversibly charged and discharged at 0.05 C-rates at ambient temperature. Moreover, the higher voltage Li/LiFe 0.2 Mn 0.8 PO 4 cell (cutoff voltage 4.35 V) possessed considerable rate capability and excellent cycling performance even at ambient temperature. Therefore, these carbonate-linked PEO electrolytes were demonstrated to be fascinating candidates for the next generation solid state lithium batteries simultaneously with high energy and high safety.

  6. 3 and 4 oxidation state element solubilities in borosilicate glasses. Implement to actinides in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachia, J.N.

    2005-12-01

    In order to ensure optimal radionuclides containment, the knowledge of the actinide loading limits in nuclear waste glasses and also the comprehension of the solubilization mechanisms of these elements are essential. A first part of this manuscript deals with the study of the differences in solubility of the tri and tetravalent elements (actinides and surrogates) particularly in function of the melting temperature. The results obtained indicate that trivalent elements (La, Gd, Nd, Am, Cm) exhibit a higher solubility than tetravalent elements (Hf, Th, Pu). Consequently, it was planned to reduce plutonium at the oxidation state (III), the later being essentially tetravalent in borosilicate glasses. An innovating reduction process of multi-valent elements (cerium, plutonium) using silicon nitride has been developed in a second part of this work. Reduced plutonium-bearing glasses synthesized by Si 3 N 4 addition made it possible to double the plutonium solubility from 2 to 4 wt% at 1200 deg C. A structural approach to investigate the differences between tri and tetravalent elements was finally undertaken. These investigations were carried out by X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (EXAFS) and NMR. Trivalent rare earth and actinide elements seem to behave as network modifiers while tetravalent elements rather present true intermediaries' behaviour. (author)

  7. Combined nano-biotechnology for in-situ remediation of mixed contamination of groundwater by hexavalent chromium and chlorinated solvents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němeček, J.; Pokorný, P.; Lhotský, O.; Knytl, V.; Najmanová, P.; Steinová, J.; Černík, M.; Filipová, Alena; Filip, J.; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 563, SEP 1 (2016), s. 822-834 ISSN 0048-9697 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020218 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Chlorinated solvents * Hexavalent chromium * NZVI Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.900, year: 2016

  8. The Survey of Melia Azaderach L. ash in Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Synthetic Electroplating Industry Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MT Ghaneian

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: Melia azedarach ash is an effective adsorbent in removal of hexavalent chromium from synthetic electroplating industries wastewater. In addition, the use of this biosorbent in preparation and application aspects is simple and cheap compared to many other natural and man-made adsorbent.

  9. Nanoscale zero-valent iron application for in situ reduction of hexavalent chromium and its effects on indigenous microorganism populations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němeček, J.; Lhotský, O.; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    485-486, č. 2 (2014), s. 739-747 ISSN 0048-9697 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020218; GA MŠk ED0005/01/01; GA TA ČR TA01021792 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : nanoparticles * hexavalent chromium * bioremediation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.099, year: 2014

  10. Oral ingestion of hexavalent chromium through drinking water and cancer mortality in an industrial area of Greece - An ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoltidis Melina

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen when inhaled, but its carcinogenic potential when orally ingested remains controversial. Water contaminated with hexavalent chromium is a worldwide problem, making this a question of significant public health importance. Methods We conducted an ecological mortality study within the Oinofita region of Greece, where water has been contaminated with hexavalent chromium. We calculated gender, age, and period standardized mortality ratios (SMRs for all deaths, cancer deaths, and specific cancer types of Oinofita residents over an 11-year period (1999 - 2009, using the greater prefecture of Voiotia as the standard population. Results A total of 474 deaths were observed. The SMR for all cause mortality was 98 (95% CI 89-107 and for all cancer mortality 114 (95% CI 94-136. The SMR for primary liver cancer was 1104 (95% CI 405-2403, p-value Conclusions Elevated cancer mortality in the Oinofita area of Greece supports the hypothesis of hexavalent chromium carcinogenicity via the oral ingestion pathway of exposure. Further studies are needed to determine whether this association is causal, and to establish preventive guidelines and public health recommendations.

  11. Potentiometric determination of hexavalent uranium in uranium silicide samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlegui, Oscar

    1999-01-01

    The Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission's Department of Nuclear Materials has among its projects the production of fuels elements for nuclear reactors, and, therefore, the Chemical Analysis Laboratory must have a rapid and reliable method for uranium analysis, to control the uranium concentration during each stage of the production process. For this reason the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission's Chemical Analysis Laboratory has validated a potentiometric method, which is a modification of the Davies and Gray method proposed by A.R. Eberle. This method uses the Potentiometric Titration Technique and is based on the direct and rapid reduction of uranium (VI) to Uranium (IV), in a concentrated phosphoric acid medium, with excess iron (II) used as a reducing agent. In this medium the excess iron (II) selectively oxidizes to iron (III) with nitric acid, using molybdenum (IV) as a catalyzer, the nitrous acid that is produced is eliminated by adding amidosulfuric acid. The solution is diluted with 1M sulfuric acid and the uranium (IV) obtained is titrated potentiometrically with potassium dichromate in the presence of vanadilic sulfate to obtain a better defined final titration point. The samples were softened with hydrochloric acid and nitric acid and later 50 ml were estimated in a 20% sulfuric acid medium. The analytical method was validated by comparing it with Certified Reference Material (C.R.M.) from the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), Metallic Uranium, CRM 112-A. The F Test and the T Test show that the value calculated is less than the tabulated value so the result is traceable to the reference material. The quantification limit, sensitivity, precision and accuracy were quantified for the method

  12. Ferrous sulphate mono and heptahydrate reduction of hexavalent chromium in cement: effectiveness and storability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valverde, J. L.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In Community legislation, substances containing hexavalent chromium are classified as carcinogenic, mutagenic and sensitizing. In cement, hexavalent chromium intensifies sensitization and may set off severe allergic reactions in workers in routine contact with the product, whether in the factory or on construction sites. The allergic or contact dermatitis causes is a very painful disease that may lead to permanent worker disability. According to Directive 2003/53/EC of the European Parliament and the Council, Governments of all member countries will be required to prohibit the marketing and use, as of 17 January 2005, of any cement or cement preparation containing more than 2 ppm of chromium (VI. Hexavalent chromium can be reduced with ferrous sulphate to trivalent chromium, which is water-insoluble and therefore innocuous to the skin. The present paper reports the effects of adding ferrous sulphate mono- or heptahydrate to a commercial cement and the storage time of the mix on the concentration of hexavalent chromium. The salts studied were found to effectively reduce hexavalent chromium in cement for at least three months.

    Las sustancias que contienen cromo hexavalente están clasificadas en la legislación comunitaria como sustancias carcinogénicas, mutagénicas y sensibilizantes. El cromo hexavalente del cemento potencia la sensibilización y provoca graves reacciones alérgicas que sufren bastante a menudo los trabajadores que lo manipulan habitualmente, ya sea en fábrica o en el sector de la construcción. La dermatitis alérgica o de contacto que produce es muy dolorosa y puede dejar a los trabajadores en estado de discapacidad. La Directiva 2003/53/CE del Parlamento Europeo y del Consejo, exige a los Gobiernos de los países miembros, que a partir del 17 de enero de 2005, prohiban el uso y la comercialización de todos aquellos cementos y preparados que contengan cemento, cuyo contenido en cromo (VI soluble, una vez hidratados

  13. Study by mass spectrometry of the formation of cluster ions generated by laser ablation/ionization of inorganic compounds: application to the differentiation of trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubriet, Frederic

    1999-01-01

    The introduction of new ionization techniques allows a fast growth of mass spectrometry applications in an increasing number of fields. More particularly, the introduction of laser ablation/ionization process and the design of new instruments (laser microprobes), has been very important for a better knowledge of inorganic compound mass spectrometry. The purposes of this work were mainly focussed firstly in the understanding of cluster ions formation process by laser ablation/ionization and secondly in the development of a new mass spectrometry technique for the speciation between trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds. We show that cluster ion formation are multiple. The difficulty to identify clearly the processes involved is due to the superposition of many mechanisms. Mostly, these processes are representative of the complexity of the gas-phase chemistry between the various species generated by laser ablation/ionization. Thus, four mechanisms for the cluster ion formation have been highlighted. The most frequently met correspond to aggregative processes of neutral molecules on precursor ions. The knowledge of the processes of cluster ion formation allows us to explain why it is possible to distinguish the oxidation number of chromium. The organigram of chromium valence speciation proposed is based on the calculation of the ratio of negative cluster ion intensities after systematic analysis of nearly twenty chromium reference compounds using the same instrumental conditions. The examination of mixtures between 1) calcium. silicon, trivalent iron or zinc oxides and 2) the standard chromium compound allows us to observe the influence of these oxides on the fingerprints of the pure chromium compounds and to determine up to which point and with which limitations, the methodology suggested, could be applied to the analysis of trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds in complex and polyphasic matrices

  14. Exploratory Characterization of Phenolic Compounds with Demonstrated Anti-Diabetic Activity in Guava Leaves at Different Oxidation States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elixabet Díaz-de-Cerio

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Psidium guajava L. is widely used like food and in folk medicine all around the world. Many studies have demonstrated that guava leaves have anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic activities, among others, and that these activities belong mainly to phenolic compounds, although it is known that phenolic composition in guava tree varies throughout seasonal changes. Andalusia is one of the regions in Europe where guava is grown, thus, the aim of this work was to study the phenolic compounds present in Andalusian guava leaves at different oxidation states (low, medium, and high. The phenolic compounds in guava leaves were determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-QTOF-MS. The results obtained by chromatographic analysis reported that guava leaves with low degree of oxidation had a higher content of flavonols, gallic, and ellagic derivatives compared to the other two guava leaf samples. Contrary, high oxidation state guava leaves reported the highest content of cyanidin-glucoside that was 2.6 and 15 times higher than guava leaves with medium and low oxidation state, respectively. The QTOF platform permitted the determination of several phenolic compounds with anti-diabetic properties and provided new information about guava leaf phenolic composition that could be useful for nutraceutical production.

  15. Exploratory Characterization of Phenolic Compounds with Demonstrated Anti-Diabetic Activity in Guava Leaves at Different Oxidation States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-de-Cerio, Elixabet; Verardo, Vito; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-05-11

    Psidium guajava L. is widely used like food and in folk medicine all around the world. Many studies have demonstrated that guava leaves have anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic activities, among others, and that these activities belong mainly to phenolic compounds, although it is known that phenolic composition in guava tree varies throughout seasonal changes. Andalusia is one of the regions in Europe where guava is grown, thus, the aim of this work was to study the phenolic compounds present in Andalusian guava leaves at different oxidation states (low, medium, and high). The phenolic compounds in guava leaves were determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-QTOF-MS. The results obtained by chromatographic analysis reported that guava leaves with low degree of oxidation had a higher content of flavonols, gallic, and ellagic derivatives compared to the other two guava leaf samples. Contrary, high oxidation state guava leaves reported the highest content of cyanidin-glucoside that was 2.6 and 15 times higher than guava leaves with medium and low oxidation state, respectively. The QTOF platform permitted the determination of several phenolic compounds with anti-diabetic properties and provided new information about guava leaf phenolic composition that could be useful for nutraceutical production.

  16. Exploratory Characterization of Phenolic Compounds with Demonstrated Anti-Diabetic Activity in Guava Leaves at Different Oxidation States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-de-Cerio, Elixabet; Verardo, Vito; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Psidium guajava L. is widely used like food and in folk medicine all around the world. Many studies have demonstrated that guava leaves have anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic activities, among others, and that these activities belong mainly to phenolic compounds, although it is known that phenolic composition in guava tree varies throughout seasonal changes. Andalusia is one of the regions in Europe where guava is grown, thus, the aim of this work was to study the phenolic compounds present in Andalusian guava leaves at different oxidation states (low, medium, and high). The phenolic compounds in guava leaves were determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-QTOF-MS. The results obtained by chromatographic analysis reported that guava leaves with low degree of oxidation had a higher content of flavonols, gallic, and ellagic derivatives compared to the other two guava leaf samples. Contrary, high oxidation state guava leaves reported the highest content of cyanidin-glucoside that was 2.6 and 15 times higher than guava leaves with medium and low oxidation state, respectively. The QTOF platform permitted the determination of several phenolic compounds with anti-diabetic properties and provided new information about guava leaf phenolic composition that could be useful for nutraceutical production. PMID:27187352

  17. The protonation state around TyrD/TyrD• in photosystem II is reflected in its biphasic oxidation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöholm, Johannes; Ho, Felix; Ahmadova, Nigar; Brinkert, Katharina; Hammarström, Leif; Mamedov, Fikret; Styring, Stenbjörn

    2017-02-01

    The tyrosine residue D2-Tyr160 (Tyr D ) in photosystem II (PSII) can be oxidized through charge equilibrium with the oxygen evolving complex in PSII. The kinetics of the electron transfer from Tyr D has been followed using time-resolved EPR spectroscopy after triggering the oxidation of pre-reduced Tyr D by a short laser flash. After its oxidation Tyr D is observed as a neutral radical (Tyr D • ) indicating that the oxidation is coupled to a deprotonation event. The redox state of Tyr D was reported to be determined by the two water positions identified in the crystal structure of PSII [Saito et al. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 7690]. To assess the mechanism of the proton coupled electron transfer of Tyr D the oxidation kinetics has been followed in the presence of deuterated buffers, thereby resolving the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of Tyr D oxidation at different H/D concentrations. Two kinetic phases of Tyr D oxidation - the fast phase (msec-sec time range) and the slow phase (tens of seconds time range) were resolved as was previously reported [Vass and Styring (1991) Biochemistry 30, 830]. In the presence of deuterated buffers the kinetics was significantly slower compared to normal buffers. Furthermore, although the kinetics were faster at both high pH and pD values the observed KIE was found to be similar (~2.4) over the whole pL range investigated. We assign the fast and slow oxidation phases to two populations of PSII centers with different water positions, proximal and distal respectively, and discuss possible deprotonation events in the vicinity of Tyr D . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Rapid Synthesis of Lead Oxide Nanorods by One-step Solid-state Chemical Reaction at Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO, Ya-Li(曹亚丽); JIA, Dian-Zeng(贾殿赠); LIU, Lang(刘浪); LUO, Jian-Min(骆建敏)

    2004-01-01

    A simple and facile method was reported to synthesize lead oxide nanorods. Nanorods of lead oxide were obtained directly from grinding solid metal salt and sodium hydroxide in agate mortar with the assistance of a suitable nonionic surfactant in only one step, which is different from the result of hydroxide in solution. The product has been characterized by XRD, TEM and SEM. The formation mechanism of rod-like morphology is discussed and the surfactant plays an important soft-template role in modifying the interface of solid-state reaction and according process of rod-formation.

  19. Investigation of electrochemical behaviour and structure of oxide films on Ni60Nb40 alloy in amorphous and crystalline states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashov, N.D.; Skvortsova, I.B.; Gorodetskij, A.E.; Bogomolov, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Electrochemical properties of Ni 60 Nb 40 alloy in amorphous and crystalline states as well as structure of oxide films forming during anode polarization in electrolytes on the surface of this alloy in both its states are investigated. It is stated that increased passive ability of Ni 60 Nb 40 alloys in amorphous state and high efficiency of chlorine evolution (2 n NaCl+HCl up to pH=0) anode process in comparison with crystalline state are defined by increased homogeneity and uniformity of passive films forming on amorphous alloy and their increased electron conductivity, that is in direct dependence on different structure of passive films forming on alloys in amorphous and crystalline states

  20. Assigning Oxidation States to Organic Compounds via Predictions from X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy: A Discussion of Approaches and Recommended Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipul; Ganegoda, Hasitha; Engelhard, Mark H.; Terry, Jeff; Linford, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    The traditional assignment of oxidation states to organic molecules is problematic. Accordingly, in 1999, Calzaferri proposed a simple and elegant solution that is based on the similar electronegativities of carbon and hydrogen: hydrogen would be assigned an oxidation state of zero when bonded to carbon. Here, we show that X-ray photoelectron…

  1. Sulfur diffusion in dacitic melt at various oxidation states: Implications for volcanic degassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lierenfeld, Matthias Bernhard; Zajacz, Zoltán; Bachmann, Olivier; Ulmer, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The diffusivity of S in a hydrous dacitic melt (4.5-6.0 wt.% H2O) has been investigated in the temperature (T) and pressure (P) range of 950 °C to 1100 °C and 200 to 250 MPa, respectively. Three series of experiments were conducted at relatively low oxygen fugacity (fO2) conditions [0.8 log units below fayalite-magnetite-quartz equilibrium (FMQ -0.8); referred to as "low fO2"] and high fO2 conditions (FMQ +2.5; referred to as "high fO2") to determine if the diffusivity of S is affected by its oxidation state and speciation. Sulfur concentration profiles were measured by electron microprobe and the diffusion coefficient (D) was calculated by fitting these profiles. Sulfur diffusion is approximately one order of magnitude faster when S is dominantly present as sulfide species (low fO2) in comparison to the sulfate dominated experiments (high fO2). The following Arrhenian equations were obtained for high and low fO2 conditions at 200 MPa: high fO2: D = 10-5.92±0.86 * exp ({-137.3±21.5 kJ/mol}/{RT}) low fO2: D = 10-5.18±1.39 * exp ({-125.7±34.4 kJ/mol}/{RT}) where D is the average diffusion coefficient in m2 s-1, R is the gas constant in 8.3144 J mol-1 K-1 and T is the temperature in K. Our results demonstrate for the first time in natural melts that S diffusion is strongly sensitive to fO2. Our S diffusivities under low fO2 conditions are only slightly slower of those found for H2O, suggesting that S can be rather efficiently purged from reduced dacitic melts during volcanic eruptions. However, for more oxidized systems (e.g. subduction zones), S diffusion will be much slower and will hinder equilibrium syn-eruptive degassing during rapid decompression. Therefore, we conclude that the "excess" measured during many explosive volcanic eruptions in arcs is dominantly derived from S-rich bubble accumulation in the eruptible portion of the magma reservoir.

  2. Determination of oxygen in ternary uranium oxides by a gravimetric alkaline earth addition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, T.; Tagawa, H.

    1979-01-01

    The applicability of a gravimetric method based on alkaline earth metal addition for the determination of oxygen in ternary uranium oxides of the tupe M-U-O (M=La, Ce and Th) is described. The oxide sample is mixed with MgO or Basub(2.8)UOsub(5.8) and heated in air under suitable conditions. Because uranium is completely oxidized to the hexavalent state during the reaction, oxygen can be determined from the weight change. Oxygen in Lasub(y)Usub(1-y)Osub(2+x) is determined up to y = 0.8 with a standard deviation for x of +- 0.006 with MgO. For Thsub(y)Usub(1-y)Osub(2+x) the value of x is determined with Basub(2.8)UOsub(5.8) with a standard deviation of +- 0.01 at y = 0.8. For Cesub(y)Usub(1-y)Osub(2+x), the method can be applied only for low cerium concentrations where y = 0-0.2; the value for x with Basub(2.8)UOsub(5.8) at y = 0.2 showed a standard deviation of +- 0.002. (Auth.)

  3. Triplet-State Dissolved Organic Matter Quantum Yields and Lifetimes from Direct Observation of Aromatic Amine Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Markus; Erickson, Paul R; McNeill, Kristopher

    2017-11-21

    Excited triplet state chromophoric dissolved organic matter ( 3 CDOM*) is a short-lived mixture of excited-state species that plays important roles in aquatic photochemical processes. Unlike the study of the triplet states of well-defined molecules, which are amenable to transient absorbance spectroscopy, the study of 3 CDOM* is hampered by it being a complex mixture and its low average intersystem crossing quantum yield (Φ ISC ). This study is an alternative approach to investigating 3 CDOM* using transient absorption laser spectroscopy. The radical cation of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD), formed through oxidation by 3 CDOM*, was directly observable by transient absorption spectroscopy and was used to probe basic photophysical properties of 3 CDOM*. Quenching and control experiments verified that TMPD •+ was formed from 3 CDOM* under anoxic conditions. Model triplet sensitizers with a wide range of excited triplet state reduction potentials and CDOM oxidized TMPD at near diffusion-controlled rates. This gives support to the idea that a large cross-section of 3 CDOM* moieties are able to oxidize TMPD and that the complex mixture of 3 CDOM* can be simplified to a single signal. Using the TMPD •+ transient, the natural triplet lifetime and Φ ISC for different DOM isolates and natural waters were quantified; values ranged from 12 to 26 μs and 4.1-7.8%, respectively.

  4. The Oxidation State of Fe in Glasses from the Galapagos Archipelago: Variable Oxygen Fugacity as a Function of Mantle Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, M. E.; Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.; Saal, A. E.; Kurz, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation state of the mantle plays an intrinsic role in the magmatic evolution of the Earth. Here we present new μ-XANES measurements of Fe3+/ΣFe ratios (a proxy for ƒO2) in a suite of submarine glasses from the Galapagos Archipelago. Using previously presented major, trace, and volatile elements and isotopic data for 4 groups of glass that come from distinct mantle sources (depleted upper mantle, 2 recycled, and a primitive mantle source) we show that Fe3+/ΣFe ratios vary both with the influence of shallow level processes and with variations in mantle source. Fe3+/ΣFe ratios increase with differentiation (i.e. decreasing MgO), but show a large variation at a given MgO. Progressive degassing of sulfur accompanies decreasing Fe3+/ΣFe ratios, while assimilation of hydrothermally altered crust (as indicated by increasing Sr/Sr*) is shown to increase Fe3+/ΣFe ratios. After taking these processes into account, there is still variability in the Fe3+/ΣFe ratios of the isotopically distinct sample suites studied, yielding a magmatic ƒO2 that ranges from ΔQFM = +0.16 to +0.74 (error ITE = enriched Sr and Pb isotopes) shows evidence of mixing between oxidized and reduced sources (ITE oxidized end-member = 0.177). This suggests that mantle sources in the Galapagos that are thought to contain recycled components (i.e., WD and ITE groups) have distinct oxidation states. The high 3He/4He Fernandina samples (HHe group) are shown to be the most oxidized (ave. 0.175 ± 0.006). With C/3He ratios an order of magnitude greater than MORB this suggests that the primitive mantle is a more carbonated and oxidized source than the depleted upper mantle.

  5. Oxidation-state distribution of plutonium in surface and subsurface waters at Thule, northwest Greenland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, C.A.; Leon Vintro, L.; Mitchell, P.I.; Dahlgaard, H.

    2000-01-01

    The speciation of plutonium in Arctic waters sampled on the northwest Greenland shelf in August 1997 is discussed in this paper. Specifically, we report the results of analyses carried out on seawater sampled (a) close to the Thule air base where, in 1968, a US military aircraft carrying four nuclear weapons crashed on sea ice, releasing kilogram quantities of plutonium to the snow pack and underlying seabed sediments, and (b) at a reference station (Upernavik) located ∼400 km to the south. The data show that most of the plutonium in the dissolved phase at Thule is in the form of Pu(V, VI) (mean: 68±6%; n=6), with little if any distinction apparent between surface and bottom waters. Further, the oxidation state distribution at stations close to the accident site is similar to that measured at Upernavik, remote from this site. It is also similar to the distribution observed in shelf waters at mid-latitudes, suggesting that the underlying processes controlling plutonium speciation are insensitive to temperature over the range 0-25 deg. C. Measurements using tangential-flow ultrafiltration indicate that virtually all of the plutonium (including the fraction in a reduced chemical form) is present as fully dissolved species. Most of this plutonium would seem to be of weapons fallout origin, as the mean 238 Pu/ 239,240 Pu activity ratio in the water column (dissolved phase) at Thule (0.06±0.02; n=10) is similar to the global fallout ratio at this latitude (∼0.04). Thus, there is little evidence of weapons-grade plutonium in the water column at Thule at the present time

  6. The changing face of lower tropospheric sulfur oxides in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Hidy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sulfur oxides, sulfur dioxide and airborne sulfate, SOx, are short-lived species in the troposphere whose concentrations in air and precipitation have changed dramatically in association with fossil fuel combustion. The historic rise in concentration is coincident with the era of the so-called “Anthropocene.” Unlike concentrations of long-lived species such as carbon dioxide, atmospheric SOx in the United States (US peaked between 1970 and 2005 then declined. The rise and fall of SOx is traced by comparing national data on emission changes, ambient concentrations, and precipitation sulfate from prior to World War II to the present. Surface SOx concentrations and precipitation sulfate have decreased with emissions in most parts of the US after the late 1970s. Continued reduction toward a natural “background” condition has depended on aggressive management of anthropogenic emission sources. Annual average ambient concentrations of SO2 and SO4 have become more uniform across the US at levels of 1–3 ppbv and 0.3–3 µg/m3, respectively. Precipitation SO4 has a nominal concentration generally less than 0.5 mg/L. The effective lifetime of SOx in the troposphere is a few days. This duration limits the spatial extent of emission source influence of SOx to regional scales, wherein spatial gradients in species concentrations lead to variations in human exposure and impacts on vulnerable terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The effects of domestic emission reductions on SOx levels are moderated by intra- and intercontinental transport of SOx from Canada, Mexico, Asia and elsewhere. The trends in tropospheric SOx concentrations illustrate the results of more than a century of rising public awareness and action to progressively reduce a US environmental risk, accomplished with advances in energy production technology that have maintained economic well-being.

  7. Global analysis of genetic variation in human arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihara, Junko; Soejima, Mikiko; Yasuda, Toshihiro; Koda, Yoshiro; Agusa, Tetsuro; Kunito, Takashi; Tongu, Miki; Yamada, Takaya; Takeshita, Haruo

    2010-01-01

    Human arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is known to catalyze the methylation of arsenite. The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of the AS3MT gene at the global level. The distribution of 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in AS3MT was performed in 827 individuals from 10 populations (Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Mongolian, Tibetans, Sri Lankan Tamils, Sri Lankan Sinhalese, Nepal Tamangs, Ovambo, and Ghanaian). In the African populations, the A allele in A6144T was not observed; the allele frequencies of C35587 were much lower than those in other populations; the allele frequencies of A37616 and C37950 were relatively higher than those in other populations. Among Asian populations, Mongolians showed a different genotype distribution pattern. A lower C3963 and T6144 frequencies were observed, and, in the C37616A and T37950C polymorphism, the Mongolian population showed higher A37616 and C37950 allele frequencies than other Asian populations, similarly to the African populations. A total of 66 haplotypes were observed in the Ovambo, 48, in the Ghanaian, 99, in the Japanese, 103, in the Korean, 103, in the South Chinese, 20, in the Sri Lankan Tamil, 12, in the Sri Lankan Sinhalese, 21, in the Nepal Tamang, 50, in the Tibetan, and 45, in the Mongolian populations. The D' values between the SNP pairs were extremely high in the Sri Lankan Sinhalese population. Relatively higher D' values were observed in Mongolian and Sri Lankan Tamil populations. Network analysis showed two clusters that may have different origins, African and Asians (Chinese and/or Japanese). The present study is the first to demonstrate the existence of genetic heterogeneity in a world wide distribution of 18 SNPs in AS3MT.

  8. Metabolomic profiles of arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase knockout mice: Effect of sex and arsenic exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Madelyn C.; Douillet, Christelle; Su, Mingming; Zhou, Kejun; Wu, Tao; Chen, Wenlian; Galanko, Joseph A.; Drobná, Zuzana; Saunders, R. Jesse; Martin, Elizabeth; Fry, Rebecca C.; Jia, Wei; Stýblo, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) is the key enzyme in the pathway for methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs). Altered As3mt expression and AS3MT polymorphism have been linked to changes in iAs metabolism and in susceptibility to iAs toxicity in laboratory models and in humans. As3mt-knockout mice have been used to study the association between iAs metabolism and adverse effects of iAs exposure. However, little is known about systemic changes in metabolism of these mice and how these changes lead to their increased susceptibility to iAs toxicity. Here, we compared plasma and urinary metabolomes of male and female wild-type (WT) and As3mt-KO (KO) C57BL6 mice and examined metabolomic shifts associated with iAs exposure in drinking water. Surprisingly, exposure to 1 ppm As elicited only small changes in the metabolite profiles of either WT or KO mice. In contrast, comparisons of KO mice with WT mice revealed significant differences in plasma and urinary metabolites associated with lipid (phosphatidylcholines, cytidine, acyl-carnitine), amino acid (hippuric acid, acetylglycine, urea), and carbohydrate (L-sorbose, galactonic acid, gluconic acid) metabolism. Notably, most of these differences were sex-specific. Sex-specific differences were also found between WT and KO mice in plasma triglyceride and lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Some of the differentially changed metabolites (phosphatidylcholines, carnosine, and sarcosine) are substrates or products of reactions catalyzed by other methyltransferases. These results suggest that As3mt KO alters major metabolic pathways in a sex-specific manner, independent of iAs treatment, and that As3mt may be involved in other cellular processes beyond iAs methylation. PMID:26883664

  9. Determination of Pu Oxidation states in the HCl Media Using with UV-Visible Absorption Spectroscopic Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Ho; Suh, Mu Yeol; Park, Kyoung Kyun; Park, Yeong Jae; Kim, Won Ho

    2006-01-01

    The spectroscopic characteristics of Pu (III, IV, V, VI) in the HCl media were investigated by measuring Pu oxidation states using a UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer (400-1200 nm) after adjusting Pu oxidation states with oxidation/reduction reagents. Pu in stock solution was reduced to Pu(III) with NH 2 OH · HCl, and oxidized to Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) with NaNO 2 and HCIO 4 , respectively. Also, Pu(V) was adjusted in the Pu(VI) solution with NH 2 OH · HCl. The major absorption peaks of Pu (IV) and Pu(III) were measured in the 470 nm and 600 nm, respectively. The major absorption peaks of Pu (VI) and Pu(V) were measured in the 830 nm and 1135 nm, respectively. There was not found to be significant changes of UV-V is absorption spectra for Pu(III), Pu(IV) and Pu(VI) with aging time, except that an unstable Pu(V) immediately reduced to Pu(III).

  10. V6O13 films by control of the oxidation state from aqueous precursor to crystalline phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peys, Nick; Ling, Yun; Dewulf, Daan; Gielis, Sven; De Dobbelaere, Christopher; Cuypers, Daniel; Adriaensens, Peter; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; De Gendt, Stefan; Hardy, An; Van Bael, Marlies K

    2013-01-28

    An aqueous deposition process for V(6)O(13) films is developed whereby the vanadium oxidation state is continuously controlled throughout the entire process. In the precursor stage, a controlled wet chemical reduction of the vanadium(V) source with oxalic acid is achieved and monitored by (51)Vanadium Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((51)V-NMR) and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. The resulting vanadium(IV) species in the aqueous solution are identified as mononuclear citrato-oxovanadate(IV) complexes by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy. This precursor is successfully employed for the deposition of uniform, thin films. The optimal deposition and annealing conditions for the formation of crystalline V(6)O(13), including the control of the vanadium oxidation state, are determined through an elaborate study of processing temperature and O(2) partial pressure. To ensure a sub 100 nm adjustable film thickness, a non-oxidative intermediate thermal treatment is carried out at the end of each deposition cycle, allowing maximal precursor decomposition while still avoiding V(IV) oxidation. The resulting surface hydrophilicity, indispensable for the homogeneous deposition of the next layer, is explained by an increased surface roughness and the increased availability of surface vanadyl groups. Crystalline V(6)O(13) with a preferential (002) orientation is obtained after a post deposition annealing in a 0.1% O(2) ambient for thin films with a thickness of 20 nm.

  11. A Semi-Analytical Extraction Method for Interface and Bulk Density of States in Metal Oxide Thin-Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weifeng; Wu, Weijing; Zhou, Lei; Xu, Miao; Wang, Lei; Ning, Honglong; Peng, Junbiao

    2018-03-11

    A semi-analytical extraction method of interface and bulk density of states (DOS) is proposed by using the low-frequency capacitance-voltage characteristics and current-voltage characteristics of indium zinc oxide thin-film transistors (IZO TFTs). In this work, an exponential potential distribution along the depth direction of the active layer is assumed and confirmed by numerical solution of Poisson's equation followed by device simulation. The interface DOS is obtained as a superposition of constant deep states and exponential tail states. Moreover, it is shown that the bulk DOS may be represented by the superposition of exponential deep states and exponential tail states. The extracted values of bulk DOS and interface DOS are further verified by comparing the measured transfer and output characteristics of IZO TFTs with the simulation results by a 2D device simulator ATLAS (Silvaco). As a result, the proposed extraction method may be useful for diagnosing and characterising metal oxide TFTs since it is fast to extract interface and bulk density of states (DOS) simultaneously.

  12. A Semi-Analytical Extraction Method for Interface and Bulk Density of States in Metal Oxide Thin-Film Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A semi-analytical extraction method of interface and bulk density of states (DOS is proposed by using the low-frequency capacitance–voltage characteristics and current–voltage characteristics of indium zinc oxide thin-film transistors (IZO TFTs. In this work, an exponential potential distribution along the depth direction of the active layer is assumed and confirmed by numerical solution of Poisson’s equation followed by device simulation. The interface DOS is obtained as a superposition of constant deep states and exponential tail states. Moreover, it is shown that the bulk DOS may be represented by the superposition of exponential deep states and exponential tail states. The extracted values of bulk DOS and interface DOS are further verified by comparing the measured transfer and output characteristics of IZO TFTs with the simulation results by a 2D device simulator ATLAS (Silvaco. As a result, the proposed extraction method may be useful for diagnosing and characterising metal oxide TFTs since it is fast to extract interface and bulk density of states (DOS simultaneously.

  13. Non steady-state model for dry oxidation of nuclear wastes metallic containers in long term interim storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, Nathalie; Desgranges, Clara; Poquillon, Dominique; Monceau, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    oxidation tests. In a second step, in order to increase the reliability of the long term extrapolations from basic models, a non-steady state numerical model able to take into account several elementary steps is built. The aim is to get a more reliable tool to describe mechanisms that control oxide scale growth in this specific low temperature range. The paper has the following contains: Experimental results; Growth kinetics; Scale morphology; A basic model for kinetics of oxidation; Conclusion of the experimental study; EKINOX: Estimation KINetics OXidation: an advanced model; General description; Equations in the model; Results; Future developments; Conclusion. To summarize, the basic model consists in some extrapolations of available experimental data in the temperature range of interest following simple analytical laws deduced from classical oxidation theories. This leads to a very small oxide scale and thus to the loss of very small amounts of metal even for extrapolations to over 100 years. However, the reliability of this kind of basic models is very poor since it is based on the assumption that a single elementary process controls the oxidation rate. Indeed in the temperature range concerned by long term interim deposit of waste containers, several mechanisms can control the oxidation rate. A numerical model able to take in consideration several growth mechanisms is now in progress. At this stage of development, the originality of the proposed advanced model consists in explicitly calculating the vacancy profiles and treating these as non-conservative species. It is based on an original numerical treatment to correctly and easily describe elimination of vacancies at the metal/oxide interface and thus relative motion between the substrate lattice and the oxide one, even for non-stationary states. It can treat Wagner's model but without the quasi-steady state 'hypothesis or also take into account a partial control of the oxidation process by interfacial reaction. In

  14. Hexavalents in spermatocytes of Robertsonian heterozygotes between Mus m. domesticus 2n=26 from the Vulcano and Lipari Islands (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berríos, Soledad; Fernández-Donoso, Raúl; Page, Jesús; Ayarza, Eliana; Capanna, Ernesto; Solano, Emanuela; Castiglia, Riccardo

    2018-02-20

    The size and shape of the chromosomes, as well as the chromosomal domains that compose them, are determinants in the distribution and interaction between the bivalents within the nucleus of spermatocytes in prophase I of meiosis. Thus the nuclear architecture characteristic of the karyotype of a species can be modified by chromosomal changes such as Rb chromosomes. In this study we analysed the meiotic prophase nuclear organization of the heterozygous spermatocytes from Mus musculus domesticus 2n=26, and the synaptic configuration of the hexavalent formed by the dependent Rb chromosomes Rbs 6.16, 16.10, 10.15, 15.17 and the telocentric chromosomes 6 and 17. Spreads of 88 pachytene spermatocytes from two males were studied and in all of them five metacentric bivalents, four telocentric bivalents, one hexavalent and the XY bivalent were observed. About 48% of the hexavalents formed a chain or a ring of synapsed chromosomes, the latter closed by synapsis between the short arms of telocentric chromosomes 6 and 17.  About 52% of hexavalents formed an open chain of 10 synapsed chromosomal arms belonging to 6 chromosomes.  In about half of the unsynapsed hexavalents one of the telocentric chromosome short arms appears associated with the X chromosome single axis, which was otherwise normally paired with the Y chromosome.  The cluster of pericentromeric heterochromatin mostly determines the hexavalent's nuclear configuration, dragging the centromeric regions and all the chromosomes towards the nuclear envelope similar to an association of five telocentric bivalents. These reiterated encounters between these chromosomes restrict the interactions with other chromosomal domains and might favour eventual rearrangements within the metacentric, telocentric or hexavalent chromosome subsets. The unsynapsed short arms of telocentric chromosomes frequently bound to the single axis of the X chromosome could further complicate the already complex segregation of hexavalent

  15. A Novel Early Warning System Based on a Sediment Microbial Fuel Cell for In Situ and Real Time Hexavalent Chromium Detection in Industrial Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuai; Liu, Pu; Niu, Yongyan; Chen, Zhengjun; Khan, Aman; Zhang, Pengyun; Li, Xiangkai

    2018-02-22

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a well-known toxic heavy metal in industrial wastewater, but in situ and real time monitoring cannot be achieved by current methods used during industrial wastewater treatment processes. In this study, a Sediment Microbial Fuel Cell (SMFC) was used as a biosensor for in situ real-time monitoring of Cr(VI), which was the organic substrate is oxidized in the anode and Cr(VI) is reduced at the cathode simultaneously. The pH 6.4 and temperature 25 °C were optimal conditions for the operation. Under the optimal conditions, linearity (R² = 0.9935) of the generated voltage was observed in the Cr(VI) concentration range from 0.2 to 0.7 mg/L. The system showed high specificity for Cr(VI), as other co-existing ions such as Cu 2+ , Zn 2+ , and Pb 2+ did not interfere with Cr(VI) detection. In addition, when the sediment MFC-based biosensor was applied for measuring Cr(VI) in actual wastewater samples, a low deviation (real time in situ detection of Cr(VI) in industrial wastewaters.

  16. Hexavalent chromium, a lung carcinogen, confers resistance to thermal stress and interferes with heat shock protein expression in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Patrícia L; Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Ferreira, Leonardo M R; Urbano, Ana M

    2018-03-16

    Exposure to hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], a lung carcinogen, triggers several types of cellular stresses, namely oxidative, genotoxic and proteotoxic stresses. Given the evolutionary character of carcinogenesis, it is tempting to speculate that cells that survive the stresses produced by this carcinogen become more resistant to subsequent stresses, namely those encountered during neoplastic transformation. To test this hypothesis, we determined whether pre-incubation with Cr(VI) increased the resistance of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B cells) to the antiproliferative action of acute thermal shock, used here as a model for stress. In line with the proposed hypothesis, it was observed that, at mildly cytotoxic concentrations, Cr(VI) attenuated the antiproliferative effects of both cold and heat shock. Mechanistically, Cr(VI) interfered with the expression of two components of the stress response pathway: heat shock proteins Hsp72 and Hsp90α. Specifically, Cr(VI) significantly depleted the mRNA levels of the former and the protein levels of the latter. Significantly, these two proteins are members of heat shock protein (Hsp) families (Hsp70 and Hsp90, respectively) that have been implicated in carcinogenesis. Thus, our results confirm and extend previous studies showing the capacity of Cr(VI) to interfere with the expression of stress response components.

  17. Investigation of the Mode of Action Underlying the Tumorigenic Response Induced in B6C3F1 Mice Exposed Orally to Hexavalent Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chad M.; Proctor, Deborah M.; Haws, Laurie C.; Hébert, Charles D.; Grimes, Sheila D.; Shertzer, Howard G.; Kopec, Anna K.; Hixon, J.Gregory; Zacharewski, Timothy R.; Harris, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic ingestion of high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water induces intestinal tumors in mice. To investigate the mode of action (MOA) underlying these tumors, a 90-day drinking water study was conducted using similar exposure conditions as in a previous cancer bioassay, as well as lower (heretofore unexamined) drinking water concentrations. Tissue samples were collected in mice exposed for 7 or 90 days and subjected to histopathological, biochemical, toxicogenomic, and toxicokinetic analyses. Described herein are the results of toxicokinetic, biochemical, and pathological findings. Following 90 days of exposure to 0.3–520 mg/l of sodium dichromate dihydrate (SDD), total chromium concentrations in the duodenum were significantly elevated at ≥ 14 mg/l. At these concentrations, significant decreases in the reduced-to-oxidized glutathione ratio (GSH/GSSG) were observed. Beginning at 60 mg/l, intestinal lesions were observed including villous cytoplasmic vacuolization. Atrophy, apoptosis, and crypt hyperplasia were evident at ≥ 170 mg/l. Protein carbonyls were elevated at concentrations ≥ 4 mg/l SDD, whereas oxidative DNA damage, as assessed by 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, was not increased in any treatment group. Significant decreases in the GSH/GSSG ratio and similar histopathological lesions as observed in the duodenum were also observed in the jejunum following 90 days of exposure. Cytokine levels (e.g., interleukin-1β) were generally depressed or unaltered at the termination of the study. Overall, the data suggest that Cr(VI) in drinking water can induce oxidative stress, villous cytotoxicity, and crypt hyperplasia in the mouse intestine and may underlie the MOA of intestinal carcinogenesis in mice. PMID:21712504

  18. Solid-phase extraction of plutonium in various oxidation states from simulated groundwater using N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perevalov, S.A.; Malofeeva, G.I.; Kuzovkina, E.V.; Spivakov, B.Ya.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction of plutonium in different individual and mixed oxidation states from simulated groundwater (pH 8.5) was studied. The extraction of plutonium species was carried out in a dynamic mode using DIAPAK C16 cartridges modified by N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine (BPHA). It was shown that the extent of recovery depends on the oxidation state of plutonium. The extraction of Pu(IV) was at the level of 98-99% regardless of the volume and flow-rate of the sample solution. Pu(V) was extracted by 90-95% and 75-80% from 10- and 100-mL aliquots of the samples, respectively, whereas the extraction of Pu(VI) did not exceed 45-50%. An equimolar mixture of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) was extracted by 74%. The distribution coefficients (K d ) and kinetic exchange capacities (S) of plutonium in various oxidation states were measured. It was found that during the sorption process, Pu(V) was reduced to Pu(IV) by 80-90% after an hour-long contact with the solid phase. Pu(VI) is reduced to Pu(V) by 34% and to Pu(IV) by 55%. In the case of mixed-valent solution of plutonium, only Pu(V) and Pu(IV) were found in the effluents. (author)

  19. Homoleptic Ce(III) and Ce(IV) Nitroxide Complexes: Significant Stabilization of the 4+ Oxidation State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogart, Justin A.; Lewis, Andrew J.; Medling, Scott A.; Piro, Nicholas A.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Booth, Corwin H.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2014-06-25

    Electrochemical experiments performed on the complex Ce-IV[2-((BuNO)-Bu-t)py](4), where [2-((BuNO)-Bu-t)py](-) = N-tert-butyl-N-2-pyridylnitroxide, indicate a 2.51 V stabilization of the 4+ oxidation state of Ce compared to [(Bu4N)-Bu-n](2)[Ce(NO3)(6)] in acetonitrile and a 2.95 V stabilization compared to the standard potential for the ion under aqueous conditions. Density functional theory calculations suggest that this preference for the higher oxidation state is a result of the tetrakis(nitroxide) ligand framework at the Ce cation, which allows for effective electron donation into, and partial covalent overlap with, vacant 4f orbitals with delta symmetry. The results speak to the behavior of CeO2 and related solid solutions in oxygen uptake and transport applications, in particular an inherent local character of bonding that stabilizes the 4+ oxidation state. The results indicate a cerium(IV) complex that has been stabilized to an unprecedented degree through tuning of its ligand-field environment.

  20. High-Pressure Reactivity of Kr and F2—Stabilization of Krypton in the +4 Oxidation State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Kurzydłowski

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the synthesis of the first krypton compound, several other Kr-bearing connections have been obtained. However, in all of them krypton adopts the +2 oxidation state, in contrast to xenon which forms numerous compounds with an oxidation state as high as +8. Motivated by the possibility of thermodynamic stabilization of exotic compounds with the use of high pressure (exceeding 1 GPa = 10 kbar, we present here theoretical investigations into the chemistry of krypton and fluorine at such large compression. In particular we focus on krypton tetrafluoride, KrF4, a molecular crystal in which krypton forms short covalent bonds with neighboring fluorine atoms thus adopting the +4 oxidation state. We find that this hitherto unknown compound can be stabilized at pressures below 50 GPa. Our results indicate also that, at larger compressions, a multitude of other KrmFn fluorides should be stable, among them KrF which exhibits covalent Kr–Kr bonds. Our results set the stage for future high-pressure synthesis of novel krypton compounds.

  1. Effects of Vanadium Ions in Different Oxidation States on Myosin ATPase Extracted from the Solitary Ascidian, Halocynthia roretzi (Drasche) : Biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    HITOSHI, MICHIBATA; YUTAKA, ZENKO; KENJI, YAMADA; MASATO, HASEGAWA; TATSURO, TERADA; TAKAHARU, NUMAKUANI; Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, Toyama University; Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, Toyama University; Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, Toyama University; Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, Toyama University; Department of Chemistry, Toyama College of Technology; Marine Biological Station, Tohoku University

    1989-01-01

    Some ascidians are known to accumulate vanadium ion within their tissues by 10^6-fold as that in sea water and store the metal ion in its reduced tetravalent and/or trivalent states. It is also well known that phosphoenzymes are inhibited by pentavalent vanadium ion over a range of 10nM to 1mM. In the present experiment we have therefore examined the effects of vanadium ions in different oxidation states on the activity of myosin ATPase extracted from the mantle of the ascidian, Halocynthia r...

  2. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitrogen oxides (NO x ), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment

  3. Plutonium uptake by the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus (Turp) Kutz, as a function of isotope and oxidation state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkacik, M.F.

    1977-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of plutonium chemical valence state on the availability of small concentrations of /sup 238/Pu and /sup 239/Pu to algae. The uptake experiments involved the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus, grown in batch cultures. Plutonium concentrations accumulated by this alga were linearly related to plutonium concentrations. There was no significant difference (rho = 0.05) in algal plutonium accumulations, on a mass basis, of either /sup 238/Pu or /sup 239/Pu in either Pu/sup +4/ or Pu/sup +6/ oxidation state at the concentrations studied.

  4. Plutonium uptake by the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus (Turp) Kutz, as a function of isotope and oxidation state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkacik, M.F.

    1977-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of plutonium chemical valence state on the availability of small concentrations of 238 Pu and 239 Pu to algae. The uptake experiments involved the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus, grown in batch cultures. Plutonium concentrations accumulated by this alga were linearly related to plutonium concentrations. There was no significant difference (rho = 0.05) in algal plutonium accumulations, on a mass basis, of either 238 Pu or 239 Pu in either Pu +4 or Pu +6 oxidation state at the concentrations studied

  5. Assessment of Hexavalent Chromium Natural Attenuation for the Hanford Site 100 Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Szecsody, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sahajpal, Rahul [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhong, Lirong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawter, Amanda R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) plumes are present in the 100 Area at the Hanford Site. Remediation efforts are under way with objectives of restoring the groundwater to meet the drinking-water standard (48 µg/L) and protecting the Columbia River by ensuring that discharge of groundwater to the river is below the surface-water quality standard (10 µg/L). Current remedies include application of Pump-and-Treat (P&T) at the 100-D, 100-H, and 100-K Areas and Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) at the 100-F/IU Area. Remedy selection is still under way at the other 100 Areas. Additional information about the natural attenuation processes for Cr(VI) is important in all of these cases. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to demonstrate and quantify natural attenuation mechanisms using 100 Area sediments and groundwater conditions.

  6. Photocatalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Induced by Photolysis of Ferric/tartrate Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xianghua; Ding, Shimin; Zhang, Lixian [Yangtze Normal Univ., Fuling (China)

    2012-11-15

    Photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in ferric-tartrate system under irradiation of visible light was investigated. Effects of light resources, initial pH value and initial concentration of various reactants on Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction were studied. Photoreaction kinetics was discussed and a possible photochemical pathway was proposed. The results indicate that Fe(III)-tartrate system is able to rapidly and effectively photocatalytically reduce Cr(VI) utilizing visible light. Initial pH variations results in the concentration changes of Fe(III)-tartrate complex in this system, and pH at 3.0 is optimal for Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction. Efficiency of Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction increases with increasing initial concentrations of Cr(VI), Fe(III) and tartrate. Kinetics analysis indicates that initial Fe(III) concentration affects Cr(VI) photoreduction most significantly.

  7. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics; Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding Effectiveness (SE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this testing is to determine the suitability of trivalent chromium conversion coatings that meet the requirements of MIL-DTL-5541, Type II, for use in applications where high-frequency electrical performance is important. This project will evaluate the ability of coated aluminum to form adequate EMI seals. Testing will assess performance of the trivalent chromium coatings against the known control hexavalent chromium MIL-DTL-5541 Type I Class 3 before and after they have been exposed to a set of environmental conditions. Performance will be assessed by evaluating shielding effectiveness (SE) test data from a variety of test samples comprised of different aluminum types and/or conversion coatings.

  8. Chronic occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium causes DNA damage in electroplating workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-Hui; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Xu-Chu; Jin, Li-Fen; Yang, Zhang-Ping; Jiang, Cai-Xia; Chen, Qing; Ren, Xiao-Bin; Cao, Jian-Zhong; Wang, Qiang; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2011-04-12

    Occupational exposure to chromium compounds may result in adverse health effects. This study aims to investigate whether low-level hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) exposure can cause DNA damage in electroplating workers. 157 electroplating workers and 93 control subjects with no history of occupational exposure to chromium were recruited in Hangzhou, China. Chromium levels in erythrocytes were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. DNA damage in peripheral lymphocytes was evaluated with the alkaline comet assay by three parameters: Olive tail moment, tail length and percent of DNA in the comet tail (tail DNA%). Urinary 8-OHdG levels were measured by ELISA. Chromium concentration in erythrocytes was about two times higher in electroplating workers (median: 4.41 μg/L) than that in control subjects (1.54 μg/L, P electroplating workers. Low-level occupational chromium exposure induced DNA damage.

  9. Photocatalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Induced by Photolysis of Ferric/tartrate Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xianghua; Ding, Shimin; Zhang, Lixian

    2012-01-01

    Photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in ferric-tartrate system under irradiation of visible light was investigated. Effects of light resources, initial pH value and initial concentration of various reactants on Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction were studied. Photoreaction kinetics was discussed and a possible photochemical pathway was proposed. The results indicate that Fe(III)-tartrate system is able to rapidly and effectively photocatalytically reduce Cr(VI) utilizing visible light. Initial pH variations results in the concentration changes of Fe(III)-tartrate complex in this system, and pH at 3.0 is optimal for Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction. Efficiency of Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction increases with increasing initial concentrations of Cr(VI), Fe(III) and tartrate. Kinetics analysis indicates that initial Fe(III) concentration affects Cr(VI) photoreduction most significantly

  10. Characterization of TBP containing polysiloxane membrane/insulator/semiconductor structures for hexavalent chromium detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zazoua, A. [Universite de Jijel, BP 98, Ouled Aissa, 18000 Jijel (Algeria); Universite de Annaba, BP 12, El-Hadjar, Annaba (Algeria); Kherrat, R.; Samar, M.H. [Universite de Annaba, BP 12, El-Hadjar, Annaba (Algeria); Errachid, A. [Laboratori de Nanobioenginyeria-IBEC, CIBER, Parc Cientific de Barcelona (PCB)-Departament d' Electronica. Universitat de Barcelona, C/Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jaffrezic-Renault, N. [LSA - UMR 5180 CNRS - Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)], E-mail: nicole.jaffrezic@univ-lyon1.fr; Bessueille, F.; Leonard, D. [LSA - UMR 5180 CNRS - Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    A hexavalent chromium-sensitive EMIS sensor (electrolyte membrane insulator semiconductor sensor) is prepared by deposition of a tributylphosphate (TBP) ionophore-containing siloprene membrane on a Si/SiO{sub 2}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} structure. The developed EMIS sensor was studied by means of impedance spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and FT-IR spectroscopy. From the flat-band shift of the EMIS structure, the nersntian response to the anionic species Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup -} was demonstrated. The linear range of detection is 10{sup -4} M to 10{sup -1} M and the detection limit is 10{sup -5} M. Sulfate and chloride anions are shown not to be interfering whereas carbonate ions present a pK{sup pot} equal to 0.19.

  11. Thermochemistry of rare earth doped uranium oxides Ln{sub x}U{sub 1−x}O{sub 2−0.5x+y} (Ln = La, Y, Nd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei; Navrotsky, Alexandra, E-mail: anavrotsky@ucdavis.edu

    2015-10-15

    Lanthanum, yttrium, and neodymium doped uranium dioxide samples in the fluorite structure have been synthesized, characterized in terms of metal ratio and oxygen content, and their enthalpies of formation measured by high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. For oxides doped with 10–50 mol % rare earth (Ln) cations, the formation enthalpies from constituent oxides (LnO{sub 1.5}, UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 3} in a reaction not involving oxidation or reduction) become increasingly exothermic with increasing rare earth content, while showing no significant dependence on the varying uranium oxidation state. The oxidation enthalpy of Ln{sub x}U{sub 1−x}O{sub 2−0.5x+y} is similar to that of UO{sub 2} to UO{sub 3} for all three rare earth doped systems. Though this may suggest that the oxidized uranium in these systems is energetically similar to that in the hexavalent state, thermochemical data alone can not constrain whether the uranium is present as U{sup 5+}, U{sup 6+}, or a mixture of oxidation states. The formation enthalpies from elements calculated from the calorimetric data are generally consistent with those from free energy measurements. - Highlights: • We synthesize, characterize Ln{sub x}U{sub 1−x}O{sub 2−0.5x+y} solid solutions (Ln = La, Y, Nd). • Formation enthalpies become more exothermic with increasing rare earth content. • Oxidation enthalpy of Ln{sub x}U{sub 1−x}O{sub 2−0.5x+y} is similar to that of UO{sub 2} to UO{sub 3}. • Direct calorimetric measurements are in good agreement with free energy data.

  12. Shock compression of strongly correlated oxides: A liquid-regime equation of state for cerium(IV) oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Cochrane, Kyle R.; Root, Seth; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Shulenburger, Luke; Carpenter, John H.; Sjostrom, Travis; Mattsson, Thomas R.; Vogler, Tracy J.

    2018-03-01

    The shock Hugoniot for full-density and porous CeO2 was investigated in the liquid regime using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations with Erpenbeck's approach based on the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. The phase space was sampled by carrying out NVT simulations for isotherms between 6000 and 100 000 K and densities ranging from ρ =2.5 to 20 g /cm3 . The impact of on-site Coulomb interaction corrections +U on the equation of state (EOS) obtained from AIMD simulations was assessed by direct comparison with results from standard density functional theory simulations. Classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations were also performed to model atomic-scale shock compression of larger porous CeO2 models. Results from AIMD and CMD compression simulations compare favorably with Z-machine shock data to 525 GPa and gas-gun data to 109 GPa for porous CeO2 samples. Using results from AIMD simulations, an accurate liquid-regime Mie-Grüneisen EOS was built for CeO2. In addition, a revised multiphase SESAME-type EOS was constrained using AIMD results and experimental data generated in this work. This study demonstrates the necessity of acquiring data in the porous regime to increase the reliability of existing analytical EOS models.

  13. The electrochemical aspect of the corrosion of austenitic stainless steels, in nitric acid and in the presence of hexavalent chromium (1961); Aspect electrochimique de la corrosion d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu nitrique et en presence de chrome hexavalent (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coriou, H.; Hure, J.; Plante, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The corrosion of austenitic stainless steels in boiling nitric acid markedly increases when the medium contains hexavalent chromium ions. Because of several redox phenomena, the potential of the steel generally changes in course of time. Measurements show a relation between the weight loss and the potential of specimens. Additions of Mn(VII) and Ce(IV) are compared with that of Cr(VI), and show that the relation is a general one. The attack cf the metal in oxidizing media is largely intergranular, leading to exfoliation of the grains, although the steel studied is not sensitive to the classical Huey and Strauss tests. Also even in the absence of any other oxidizing reaction, the current density observed when the steel is anodically polarized under potentiostatic conditions does not correspond to the actual weight loss of the metal. (authors) [French] La corrosion d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu nitrique bouillant augmente notablement quand le milieu contient des ions chrome a l'etat hexavalent. Par suite de divers phenomenes d'oxydo-reduction, le potentiel de l'acier evolue generalement au cours du temps. Les mesures effectuees permettent d'etablir une relation entre les pertes de poids et le potentiel des echantillons. L'addition de Mn(VI) et Ce(IV) est compare a celle de Cr(VI) et montre que la relation precedente s'applique de facon generale. L'attaque du metal en milieu oxydant est en grande, partie due a une corrosion intergranulaire conduisant a un dechaussement des grains bien que l'acier etudie ne soit pas sensible aux tests classiques de Huey et de Strauss. Aussi, meme en l'absence de toute autre reaction d'oxydation l'intensite qu l'on observerait en soumettant l'acier a un potentiel anodique dans un montage potentiostatique ne correspondrait pas a la perte de poids reelle du metal. (auteurs)

  14. Signatures of Quantized Energy States in Solution-Processed Ultrathin Layers of Metal-Oxide Semiconductors and Their Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Labram, John G.

    2015-02-13

    Physical phenomena such as energy quantization have to-date been overlooked in solution-processed inorganic semiconducting layers, owing to heterogeneity in layer thickness uniformity unlike some of their vacuum-deposited counterparts. Recent reports of the growth of uniform, ultrathin (<5 nm) metal-oxide semiconductors from solution, however, have potentially opened the door to such phenomena manifesting themselves. Here, a theoretical framework is developed for energy quantization in inorganic semiconductor layers with appreciable surface roughness, as compared to the mean layer thickness, and present experimental evidence of the existence of quantized energy states in spin-cast layers of zinc oxide (ZnO). As-grown ZnO layers are found to be remarkably continuous and uniform with controllable thicknesses in the range 2-24 nm and exhibit a characteristic widening of the energy bandgap with reducing thickness in agreement with theoretical predictions. Using sequentially spin-cast layers of ZnO as the bulk semiconductor and quantum well materials, and gallium oxide or organic self-assembled monolayers as the barrier materials, two terminal electronic devices are demonstrated, the current-voltage characteristics of which resemble closely those of double-barrier resonant-tunneling diodes. As-fabricated all-oxide/hybrid devices exhibit a characteristic negative-differential conductance region with peak-to-valley ratios in the range 2-7.

  15. Electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol by the [Ru3O(OAc6(py2(CH3OH]3+cluster: improving the metal-ligand electron transfer by accessing the higher oxidation states of a multicentered system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique E. Toma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The [Ru3O(Ac6(py2(CH3OH]+ cluster provides an effective electrocatalytic species for the oxidation of methanol under mild conditions. This complex exhibits characteristic electrochemical waves at -1.02, 0.15 and 1.18 V, associated with the Ru3III,II,II/Ru3III,III,II/Ru 3III,III,III /Ru3IV,III,III successive redox couples, respectively. Above 1.7 V, formation of two RuIV centers enhances the 2-electron oxidation of the methanol ligand yielding formaldehyde, in agreement with the theoretical evolution of the HOMO levels as a function of the oxidation states. This work illustrates an important strategy to improve the efficiency of the oxidation catalysis, by using a multicentered redox catalyst and accessing its multiple higher oxidation states.

  16. Control of anode supported SOFCs (solid oxide fuel cells): Part I. mathematical modeling and state estimation within one cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amedi, Hamid Reza; Bazooyar, Bahamin; Pishvaie, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a 3-dimensional mathematical model for one cell of an anode-supported SOFC (solid oxide fuel cells) is presented. The model is derived from the partial differential equations representing the conservation laws of ionic and electronic charges, mass, energy, and momentum. The model is implemented to fully characterize the steady state operation of the cell with countercurrent flow pattern of fuel and air. The model is also used for the comparison of countercurrent with concurrent flow patterns in terms of thermal stress (temperature distribution) and quality of operation (current density). Results reveal that the steady-state cell performance curve and output of simulations qualitatively match experimental data of the literature. Results also demonstrate that countercurrent flow pattern leads to an even distribution of temperature, more uniform current density along the cell and thus is more enduring and superior to the concurrent flow pattern. Afterward, the thorough 3-dimensional model is used for state estimation instead of a real cell. To estimate states, the model is simplified and changed to a 1-dimensional model along flow streams. This simplified model includes uncertainty (because of simplifying assumptions of the model), noise, and disturbance (because of measurements). The behaviors of extended and ensemble Kalman filter as an observer are evaluated in terms of estimating the states and filtering the noises. Results demonstrate that, like extended Kalman filter, ensemble Kalman filter properly estimates the states with 20 sets. - Highlights: • A 3-dimensional model for one cell of SOFC (solid oxide fuel cells) is presented. • Higher voltages and thermal stress in countercurrent than concurrent flow pattern. • State estimation of the cell is examined by ensemble and extended Kalman filters. • Ensemble with 20 sets is as good as extended Kalman filter.

  17. Electrode-Impregnable and Cross-Linkable Poly(ethylene oxide)-Poly(propylene oxide)-Poly(ethylene oxide) Triblock Polymer Electrolytes with High Ionic Conductivity and a Large Voltage Window for Flexible Solid-State Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jae Hee; Lee, Jang Yong; Suh, Dong Hack; Hong, Young Taik; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2017-10-04

    We present cross-linkable precursor-type gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) that have large ionic liquid uptake capability, can easily penetrate electrodes, have high ion conductivity, and are mechanically strong as high-performance, flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors (SC). Our polymer precursors feature a hydrophilic-hydrophobic poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) triblock main-chain structure and trifunctional silane end groups that can be multi-cross-linked with each other through a sol-gel process. The cross-linked solid-state electrolyte film with moderate IL content (200 wt %) shows a well-balanced combination of excellent ionic conductivity (5.0 × 10 -3 S cm -1 ) and good mechanical stability (maximum strain = 194%). Moreover, our polymer electrolytes have various advantages including high thermal stability (decomposition temperature > 330 °C) and the capability to impregnate electrodes to form an excellent electrode-electrolyte interface due to the very low viscosity of the precursors. By assembling our GPE-impregnated electrodes and solid-state GPE film, we demonstrate an all-solid-state SC that can operate at 3 V and provides an improved specific capacitance (112.3 F g -1 at 0.1 A g -1 ), better rate capability (64% capacity retention until 20 A g -1 ), and excellent cycle stability (95% capacitance decay over 10 000 charge/discharge cycles) compared with those of a reference SC using a conventional PEO electrolyte. Finally, flexible SCs with a high energy density (22.6 W h kg -1 at 1 A g -1 ) and an excellent flexibility (>93% capacitance retention after 5000 bending cycles) can successfully be obtained.

  18. State of dog's metabolism in the remote period after the oxide tritium influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalistratova, V.S.; Tishchenko, G.S.; Bortnik, L.A.; Nisimov, P.G.; Romanova, I.B.

    2000-01-01

    Influence of tritium oxide on the metabolism by some indices of lipid metabolism (common lipids, β-lipoproteins, cholesterin), protein metabolism (cholinesterase) and carbohydrate metabolism (blood sugar) was studied. It was established that the introduction into organism of tritium oxide in the quantities, which could form lethal and sublethal doses of internal radiation, provoked the main changes of values of mentioned indices of metabolism. The character of metabolism changes in the remote period allows to judge about the development of sclerosis processes which can be the result of radiation-stipulated acceleration of organism aging [ru

  19. Enhanced catalytic hydrogenation activity of Ni/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite prepared by a solid-state method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yizhao; Cao, Yali; Jia, Dianzeng

    2018-01-01

    A simple solid-state method has been applied to synthesize Ni/reduced graphene oxide (Ni/rGO) nanocomposite under ambient condition. Ni nanoparticles with size of 10-30 nm supported on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets are obtained through one-pot solid-state co-reduction among nickel chloride, graphene oxide, and sodium borohydride. The Ni/rGO nanohybrid shows enhanced catalytic activity toward the reduction of p-nitrophenol (PNP) into p-aminophenol compared with Ni nanoparticles. The results of kinetic research display that the pseudo-first-order rate constant for hydrogenation reaction of PNP with Ni/rGO nanocomposite is 7.66 × 10-3 s-1, which is higher than that of Ni nanoparticles (4.48 × 10-3 s-1). It also presents superior turnover frequency (TOF, 5.36 h-1) and lower activation energy ( E a, 29.65 kJ mol-1) in the hydrogenation of PNP with Ni/rGO nanocomposite. Furthermore, composite catalyst can be magnetically separated and reused for five cycles. The large surface area and high electron transfer property of rGO support are beneficial for good catalytic performance of Ni/rGO nanocomposite. Our study demonstrates a simple approach to fabricate metal-rGO heterogeneous nanostructures with advanced functions.

  20. PHOTOCATALYTIC REMOVAL OF TR I- AND HEXA-VALENT CHROMIUM IONS FROM CHROME-ELECTROPL ATING WASTEWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puangrat Kajitvichyanukul

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel technique based on photocatalysis was applied to eliminate chromium ions, a toxic hazardous environmental pollutant. The photoreduction of each species of chromium (total, hexavalent, and trivalent chromiums from chrome-electroplating wastewater was investigated using a titanium dioxide suspension under irradiation by a low-pressure mercury lamp. The initial concentration of total chromium was 300 mg/l. The applied conditions were the direct photocatalytic reduction process at pH 3.65 and the indirect photocatalytic reduction with added hole scavengers at the same solution pH. Results from both processes were comparatively discussed. Result show that chromium was not efficiently removed by direct photoreduction. In contrast, with the adding of hole scavengers, which were formate ions, the photoreduction of chromium was very favorable. Both hexavalent and trivalent chromiums were efficiently removed. The photocatalytic mechanism is purposed in this study.

  1. The state-of-the-art and prospects of the oxidation titration method for the determination of uranium in geological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jiayan

    1986-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of the oxidation titration method for the determination of uranium in geological samples is reviewed in some respects such as the prereduction of U(VI), oxidation of U(IV) and the detection of the end-point. Comments are also made on the prospects of further improvements of this method

  2. Example of uranium(IV) insertion within a macrocyclic crown ether with coexistence of the metal in two oxidation states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombieri, G; De Paoli, G [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Padua (Italy). Lab. di Chimica e Tecnologia dei Radioelementi; Immirzi, A

    1978-01-01

    Reaction of UCl/sub 4/ with 18-crown-6 in tetrahydrofuran yields (UCl/sub 4/)/sub 3/ (18-crown-6)/sub 2/ which on recrystallization in nitromethane, gives a partially oxidized and hydrolyzed product whose structure has been investigated by X-ray diffraction. The compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system. The cell contains eight UCl/sub 3//sup +/ cations each inserted within a crown molecule and four (UO/sub 2/Cl/sub 3/(OH)(H/sub 2/O))/sup 2 -/anions having a pentagonal bipyramidal structure. Four solvated nitromethane molecules are also present. The compound represents one of the very few examples in which uranium exists in two oxidation states, and the first example in which its insertion within a crown macrocycle has been proved by an X-ray diffraction study.

  3. Remote mixed oxide fabrication facility development. Volume 2. State-of-the-art review of remote maintenance system technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horgos, R.M.; Masch, M.L.

    1979-06-01

    This report provides a state-of-the-art review of remote systems technology, which includes manipulators, process connectors, vision systems and specialized process systems. A proposed mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility was reviewed and evaluated for identification of major remote maintenance and repair tasks. The technological areas were evaluated on the basis of their suitability or applicability for remote maintenance and repair of a proposed fully remote operating mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility. A technological base exists from which the design criteria for a reliable, remote operating facility can be established. Commercially available systems and components, along with those remote technologies now in development, will require modifications to adapt them to specific plant designs and requirements

  4. Elevated Frequencies of Micronuclei and other Nuclear Abnormalities of Chrome Plating Workers Occupationally Exposed to Hexavalent Chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Sudha, S; Kripa, SK; Shibily, P; Shyn, J

    2011-01-01

    Background Biomonitoring provides a useful tool to estimate the genetic risk from exposure to genotoxic agents. The aim of this study was to assess the potential cytogenetic damage associated with occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium by using micronuclei (MN) as a biomarker. Methods This was a cross-sectional study and all participants were males. Both the exposed and control individuals were selected from Coimbatore, Southern India. Exfoliated buccal cells from 44 chrome plating work...

  5. PHOTOCATALYTIC REMOVAL OF TR I- AND HEXA-VALENT CHROMIUM IONS FROM CHROME-ELECTROPL ATING WASTEWATER

    OpenAIRE

    Puangrat Kajitvichyanukul; Chulaluck Changul

    2017-01-01

    A novel technique based on photocatalysis was applied to eliminate chromium ions, a toxic hazardous environmental pollutant. The photoreduction of each species of chromium (total, hexavalent, and trivalent chromiums) from chrome-electroplating wastewater was investigated using a titanium dioxide suspension under irradiation by a low-pressure mercury lamp. The initial concentration of total chromium was 300 mg/l. The applied conditions were the direct photocatalytic reduction process at pH 3.6...

  6. Synergistic extraction of hexavalent plutonium by HTTA and HPMBP using mono- and bi- functional neutral donors: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohithakshan, K.V.; Mithapara, P.D.; Pai, S.A.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    Thermodynamics and synergistic extraction of hexavalent plutonium were studied from HNO 3 medium (0.05M) with HTTA and HPMBP and various neutral donors viz. DPSO, TBP, TOPO (monofunctional) and DBDECMP, DHDECMP, CMPO (bifunctional) using benzene as a diluent. The net enthalpy and entropy changes were interpreted in terms of different organic phase adduct formation reaction mechanisms i.e. substitution in HTTA vs addition in HPMBP. (author). 4 refs., 2 figs

  7. Electrochemistry and time dependent DFT study of a (vinylenedithio)-TTF derivative in different oxidation states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halpin, Yvonne; Schulz, Martin; Brooks, Andrew C.; Browne, Wesley R.; Wallis, John D.; Gonzalez, Leticia; Day, Peter; Vos, Johannes G.

    2013-01-01

    The electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical properties of a bis-pyrid-4-yl functionalised vinylenedithio-TFF derivative, 1, in solution are reported. The compound was immobilised on a Pt electrode and the resulting layers formed were investigated using electrochemical techniques. Two oxidation

  8. The state of permanganate with relation to in situ chemical oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronda, Brenda; Dingens, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    In Situ Chemical Oxidation (ISCO) with permanganate had its beginnings over 10 years ago. Since that time, many sites have been successfully treated for organic compounds including chlorinated ethenes (perchloroethylene, trichloroethylene, etc.) phenols, explosives such as RDX, and many other organics. The successful application of ISCO with permanganate requires the integration of many site-specific factors into the remedial design. ISCO with permanganate is an effective technology, not only for its oxidative properties and persistence, but also for its application flexibility to remediate soil and groundwater. The merits of any type of treatment technology can be assessed in terms of effectiveness, ease of use, reaction rate, and cost. The use of permanganate for in situ chemical oxidation results in the complete mineralization of TCE and PCE and can result in treatment levels below detection limits. Permanganate is a single component oxidizer, which is easily handled, mixed and distributed to the subsurface. Permanganate is also inexpensive to design and implement as compared to other technologies. This presentation will provide a general overview of the application and safety aspects of ISCO with permanganate. This paper will discuss the advantages and limitations of this technology, typical cost ranges, site evaluation and application technologies. (authors)

  9. Influence of Structure and Charge State on the Mechanism of CO Oxidation on Gold Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Grant; Burgel, Christian; Reilly, Nelly; Mitric, Roland; Kimble, Michele; Tyo, Eric; Castleman, A. W.; Bonacic-Koutecky, Vlasta

    2008-05-01

    Gas-phase reactivity experiments and high level theoretical calculations have been employed to study the interaction of both positively and negatively charged gold oxide clusters with carbon monoxide (CO). We demonstrate that for negatively charged clusters CO is oxidized to CO2 by an Eley-Ridel-like (ER-) mechanism involving the attack of CO on oxygen rather than gold. In contrast, for positively charged clusters, the oxidation reaction may also occur by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-like (LH-) mechanism involving the initial binding of CO to a gold atom followed by subsequent migration to an oxygen site. The LH mechanism is made possible through the large energy gain associated with the adsorption of two CO molecules onto cationic gold clusters. Structure-reactivity relationships are also established which demonstrate that terminally bound oxygen atoms are the most active sites for CO oxidation. Bridge bonded oxygen atoms and molecularly bound O2 units are shown to be inert. We also establish an inverse relationship between the binding energy of CO to gold clusters and the energy of the clusters lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO).

  10. A study of relaxation mechanisms in the A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} state of nitric oxide by time resolved double resonant polarization spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampanoni-Panariello, A; Bombach, R; Hemmerling, B; Hubschmid, W [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Double resonant polarization labeling spectroscopy is applied to detect nitric oxide in flames and to characterize rotational energy transfer and orientation changing collisions in its first excited electronic state. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  11. Transient gestational exposure to drinking water containing excess hexavalent chromium modifies insulin signaling in liver and skeletal muscle of rat progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobana, Navaneethabalakrishnan; Aruldhas, Mariajoseph Michael; Tochhawng, Lalmuankimi; Loganathan, Ayyalu; Balaji, Sadhasivam; Kumar, Mani Kathiresh; Banu, Liaquat Alikhan Sheerin; Navin, Ajit Kumar; Mayilvanan, Chinnaiyan; Ilangovan, Ramachandran; Balasubramanian, Karundevi

    2017-11-01

    Chromium (Cr), an essential micronutrient potentiates insulin action, whereas excess hexavalent Cr (CrVI) acts as an endocrine disruptor. Pregnant mothers living in areas abutting industries using the metal and chromite ore dumps are exposed to ground water contaminated with Cr. Nevertheless, the impact of prenatal exposure to excess CrVI on insulin signaling in the progeny remains obscure. We tested the hypothesis "transient gestational exposure to drinking water containing excess CrVI may modify insulin signaling during postnatal life". Pregnant Wistar rats were given drinking water containing 50, 100 and 200 ppm CrVI (K 2 Cr 2 O 7 ) from gestational day 9-14 encompassing the period of organogenesis; the male progenies were tested at postnatal day 60. Neither fasting blood glucose nor oral glucose tolerance was altered in CrVI treated progeny. Nevertheless, western blot detection pointed out attenuated expression level of insulin receptor (IR), its downstream signaling molecules (IRS-1, pIRS-1 Tyr632 , Akt and pAkt Ser473 ) and organ specific glucose transporters (GLUT2 in liver and GLUT4 in gastrocnemius muscle), along with a significant increase in serum insulin level in male progenies exposed to CrVI. While 14 C-2-deoxy glucose uptake increased in the liver, the same decreased in the skeletal muscle whereas, 14 C-glucose oxidation recorded a consistent decrease in both tissues of CrVI exposed rats. These findings support our hypothesis and suggest that transient gestational exposure to excess CrVI may affect insulin signaling and glucose oxidation in the progeny, predictably rendering them vulnerable to insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute toxicity of sodium chloride, pentachlorophenol, Guthion, and hexavalent chromium to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelman, I.R.; Smith, L.L. Jr.; Siesennop, G.D.

    1976-02-01

    The 96-h LC50's for sodium chloride were 7650 and 7341 mg/liter, for pentachlorophenol 0.21 and 0.22 mg/liter, for Guthion 1.9 and 2.4 mg/liter, and for hexavalent chromium 48 and 120 mg/liter, for fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and goldfish (Carassius auratus), respectively. Threshold LC50's were reached in 6 days for sodium chloride (7650 and 7322 mg/liter for fathead minnows and goldfish, respectively), and pentachlorophenol (0.21 and 0.21 mg/liter), but were not attained in 11 days (termination of testing) with Guthion (0.76 and 0.80 mg/liter) and hexavalent chromium (18 and 33 mg/liter). With pentachlorophenol and Guthion goldfish were initially more resistant, but by termination there was no significant difference in LC50's between the two species. With hexavalent chromium the goldfish were more resistant throughout the 11-day test, and with sodium chloride goldfish were initially more resistant but at attainment of a threshold LC50 were less resistant. Use of toxicity curves for assessment of acute mortality permits interpretation not possible in 96-h tests where LC50's are computed at 24-h intervals.

  13. The determination of hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) in electronic and electrical components and products to comply with RoHS regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, L.; Chan, Y.C.; Wu, Y.P.; Wu, B.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Toxicity of hexavalent chromium (Cr 6+ ) was focused on with a publication of EU RoHS directive, a novel method to determine hexavalent chromium is developed. It is a combination of energy dispersion X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF), spot test, alkali digestion and UV-vis spectrophotometric analysis. First, by EDXRF screening, the presence or absence of element Cr was established. Spot test was followed to identify the valent state of chromium because Cr 6+ and Cr 3+ normally coexist. After alkali digestion, Cr(VI) was separated without an undersired Cr(VI)-Cr(III) interconversions. With a color reagent (DPC) to chelated with Cr(VI), the solution was finally detected by a UV-vis spectrophotometer at a wavelength of 540 nm which is the basis of analyzing Cr(VI) quantitatively. Some parameters affecting analyses were studied. It was found that when pH in the final solution was 2.0, the extraction time was 60 min, the extraction temperature was 90 deg. C, pH during the extraction process was 7.5-8.5, and a mixed buffer solution (0.5 M K 2 HPO 4 /0.5 M KH 2 PO 4 ) was added up to 1 ml, colorimetric reagent was added to 2 ml, it is optimal for extraction. Under this condition, interferences from Fe 3+ , Pb 2+ , Ag + , etc., were overcome. It was also found that the curves are rectilinear in the range of 0-500 μg l -1 , the correlation coefficient is up to 0.999924, and the recovery rates are more than 85%, the Cr(III)-DPCO complex can be kept stable for 24 h with a relative humidity (RH) range of 60-90%, and a temperature range of 5-40 deg. C. So it can be concluded that the proposed method has a good sensitivity and high precision. It is a more convincing and reliable method due to its relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) <1% after six replicate determinations of Cr(VI) in an Fe-Ni alloy sample

  14. Hexavalents in spermatocytes of Robertsonian heterozygotes between Mus m. domesticus 2n 26 from the Vulcano and Lipari Islands (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berríos, Soledad; Fernández-Donoso, Raúl; Page, Jesús; Ayarza, Eliana; Capanna, Ernesto; Solano, Emanuela; Castiglia, Riccardo

    2018-01-01

    The size and shape of the chromosomes, as well as the chromosomal domains that compose them, are determinants in the distribution and interaction between the bivalents within the nucleus of spermatocytes in prophase I of meiosis. Thus the nuclear architecture characteristic of the karyotype of a species can be modified by chromosomal changes such as Robertsonian (RB) chromosomes. In this study we analysed the meiotic prophase nuclear organization of the heterozygous spermatocytes from Mus musculus domesticus 2n=26, and the synaptic configuration of the hexavalent formed by the dependent Rb chromosomes Rbs 6.16, 16.10, 10.15, 15.17 and the telocentric chromosomes 6 and 17. Spreads of 88 pachytene spermatocytes from two males were studied and in all of them five metacentric bivalents, four telocentric bivalents, one hexavalent and the XY bivalent were observed. About 48% of the hexavalents formed a chain or a ring of synapsed chromosomes, the latter closed by synapsis between the short arms of telocentric chromosomes 6 and 17. About 52% of hexavalents formed an open chain of 10 synapsed chromosomal arms belonging to 6 chromosomes. In about half of the unsynapsed hexavalents one of the telocentric chromosome short arms appears associated with the X chromosome single axis, which was otherwise normally paired with the Y chromosome. The cluster of pericentromeric heterochromatin mostly determines the hexavalent’s nuclear configuration, dragging the centromeric regions and all the chromosomes towards the nuclear envelope similar to an association of five telocentric bivalents. These reiterated encounters between these chromosomes restrict the interactions with other chromosomal domains and might favour eventual rearrangements within the metacentric, telocentric or hexavalent chromosome subsets. The unsynapsed short arms of telocentric chromosomes frequently bound to the single axis of the X chromosome could further complicate the already complex segregation of

  15. Hexavalents in spermatocytes of Robertsonian heterozygotes between Mus m. domesticus 2n=26 from the Vulcano and Lipari Islands (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Berríos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The size and shape of the chromosomes, as well as the chromosomal domains that compose them, are determinants in the distribution and interaction between the bivalents within the nucleus of spermatocytes in prophase I of meiosis. Thus the nuclear architecture characteristic of the karyotype of a species can be modified by chromosomal changes such as Rb chromosomes. In this study we analysed the meiotic prophase nuclear organization of the heterozygous spermatocytes from Mus musculus domesticus 2n=26, and the synaptic configuration of the hexavalent formed by the dependent Rb chromosomes Rbs 6.16, 16.10, 10.15, 15.17 and the telocentric chromosomes 6 and 17. Spreads of 88 pachytene spermatocytes from two males were studied and in all of them five metacentric bivalents, four telocentric bivalents, one hexavalent and the XY bivalent were observed. About 48% of the hexavalents formed a chain or a ring of synapsed chromosomes, the latter closed by synapsis between the short arms of telocentric chromosomes 6 and 17.  About 52% of hexavalents formed an open chain of 10 synapsed chromosomal arms belonging to 6 chromosomes.  In about half of the unsynapsed hexavalents one of the telocentric chromosome short arms appears associated with the X chromosome single axis, which was otherwise normally paired with the Y chromosome.  The cluster of pericentromeric heterochromatin mostly determines the hexavalent’s nuclear configuration, dragging the centromeric regions and all the chromosomes towards the nuclear envelope similar to an association of five telocentric bivalents. These reiterated encounters between these chromosomes restrict the interactions with other chromosomal domains and might favour eventual rearrangements within the metacentric, telocentric or hexavalent chromosome subsets. The unsynapsed short arms of telocentric chromosomes frequently bound to the single axis of the X chromosome could further complicate the already complex segregation

  16. A detailed study on the transition from the blocked to the superparamagnetic state of reduction-precipitated iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, K.; Bodnar, W.; Mix, T.; Schell, N.; Fulda, G.; Woodcock, T.G.; Burkel, E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by salt-assisted solid-state chemical precipitation method with alternating fractions of the ferric iron content. The physical properties of the precipitated nanoparticles mainly consisting of magnetite were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy, high energy X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy. With particle sizes ranging from 16.3 nm to 2.1 nm, a gradual transition from the blocked state to the superparamagnetic state was observed. The transition was described as a dependence of the ferric iron content used during the precipitation. Composition, mean particle size, coercivity, saturation polarisation, as well as hyperfine interaction parameters and their evolution were studied systematically over the whole series of iron oxide nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Study of superparamagnetic transition of magnetite varying ferric iron content. • Coercivity is mainly influenced by the particle size. • Saturation polarisation influenced by the goethite content and the particle size. • Number of vacancies tend to increase with increasing ferric iron content. • Fe 3 O 4 B-sites are stronger effected by the reduction of particle size than A-sites.

  17. All-solid-state flexible microsupercapacitors based on reduced graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiling; Xu, Jianhua; He, Xin; Yang, Wenyao; Yang, Yajie; Xu, Lu; Zhao, Yuetao; Zhou, Yujiu

    2018-03-01

    All-solid-state flexible microsupercapacitors have been intensely investigated in order to meet the rapidly growing demands for portable microelectronic devices. Herein, we demonstrate a facile, readily scalable and cost-effective laser induction process for preparing reduced graphene oxide/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite, which can be used as the interdigital electrodes in microsupercapacitors. The obtained composite exhibits high volumetric capacitance about 49.35 F cm-3, which is nearly 5 times higher than that of the pristine reduced graphene oxide film in aqueous 1.0 M H2SO4 solution (measured at a current density of 5 A cm-3 in a three-electrode testing). Additionally, an all-solid-state flexible microsupercapacitor employing these composite electrodes with PVA/H3PO4 gel electrolyte delivers high volumetric energy density of 6.47 mWh cm-3 at 10 mW cm-3 under the current density of 20 mA cm-3 as well as achieve excellent cycling stability retaining 88.6% of its initial value and outstanding coulombic efficiency after 10,000 cycles. Furthermore, the microsupercapacitors array connected in series/parallel can be easily adjusted to achieve the demands in practical applications. Therefore, this work brings a promising new candidate of prepare technologies for all-solid-state flexible microsupercapacitors as miniaturized power sources used in the portable and wearable electronics.

  18. Effect of charged deep states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the behavior of iron oxides nanoparticles deposited on its surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmucova, Katarina; Weis, Martin; Nadazdy, Vojtech; Capek, Ignac; Satka, Alexander; Chitu, Livia; Cirak, Julius; Majkova, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Langmuir-Blodgett technique has been used for the deposition of ordered two-dimensional arrays of iron oxides (Fe 3 O 4 /Fe 2 O 3 ) nanoparticles onto the photovoltaic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film. Electric field at the a-Si:H/iron oxides nanoparticles interface was directly in the electrochemical cell modified by light soaking and bias voltage (negative or positive) pretreatment resulting in the change of the dominant type of charged deep states in the a-Si:H layer. Induced reversible changes in the nanoparticle redox behavior have been observed. We suggest two possible explanations of the data obtained, both of them are needed to describe measured electrochemical signals. The first one consists in the electrocatalytical effect caused by the defect states (negatively or positively charged) in the a-Si:H layer. The second one consists in the possibility to manipulate the nanoparticle cores in the prepared structure immersed in aqueous solution via the laser irradiation under specific bias voltage. In this case, the nanoparticle cores are assumed to be covered with surface clusters of heterovalent complexes created onto the surface regions with prevailing ferrous or ferric valency. Immersed in the high viscosity surrounding composed of the wet organic nanoparticle envelope these cores are able to perform a field-assisted pivotal motion. The local electric field induced by the deep states in the a-Si:H layer stabilizes their 'orientation ordering' in an energetically favourable position

  19. Hemoglobin redux: combining neutron and X-ray diffraction with mass spectrometry to analyse the quaternary state of oxidized hemoglobins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueser, Timothy C., E-mail: timothy.mueser@utoledo.edu; Griffith, Wendell P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Kovalevsky, Andrey Y. [Bioscience Division, MS M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Guo, Jingshu; Seaver, Sean [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Langan, Paul [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Bioscience Division, MS M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hanson, B. Leif [Department of Chemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of cyanomethemoglobin are being used to evaluate the structural waters within the dimer–dimer interface involved in quaternary-state transitions. Improvements in neutron diffraction instrumentation are affording the opportunity to re-examine the structures of vertebrate hemoglobins and to interrogate proton and solvent position changes between the different quaternary states of the protein. For hemoglobins of unknown primary sequence, structural studies of cyanomethemoglobin (CNmetHb) are being used to help to resolve sequence ambiguity in the mass spectra. These studies have also provided additional structural evidence for the involvement of oxidized hemoglobin in the process of erythrocyte senescence. X-ray crystal studies of Tibetan snow leopard CNmetHb have shown that this protein crystallizes in the B state, a structure with a more open dyad, which possibly has relevance to RBC band 3 protein binding and erythrocyte senescence. R-state equine CNmetHb crystal studies elaborate the solvent differences in the switch and hinge region compared with a human deoxyhemoglobin T-state neutron structure. Lastly, comparison of histidine protonation between the T and R state should enumerate the Bohr-effect protons.

  20. Nitric oxide in plants: an assessment of the current state of knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mur, Luis A J; Mandon, Julien; Persijn, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims After a series of seminal works during the last decade of the 20th century nitric oxide (NO) is now firmly placed in the pantheon of plant signals. NO acts in plant-microbe interactions, responses to abiotic stress, stomatal regulation and a range of developmental processes...... of NO production from DEANO (diethylamine nitric oxide), S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) following infiltration of tobacco leaves which could aid workers in their experiments. Further, based on current data it is difficult to define a bespoke plant NO signalling pathway, but rather....... By considering the recent advances in plant NO biology, this review will highlight certain key aspects that require further attention. Scope and conclusions The following questions will be considered. Whilst cytosolic nitrate reductase is an important source of NO, the contributions of other mechanisms...

  1. The discrimination of the oxidation states of neptunium in sodium hydroxide solutions by means of chromatography on alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiokawa, Yoshinobu; Yamana, Hajimu; Sato, Akiko; Suzuki, Shin

    1982-01-01

    A method of discriminating the oxidation states of Np in a NaOH solution by means of chromatography on alumina is proposed. In a NaOH solution of 0.5 - 1.7 M (1 M = 1 mol dm - 3 ), the separation of Np (VI) from Np (VII) can be made effectively by means of chromatography on alumina. Only a little Np (VI) is adsorbed on alumina the Np (VII) adsorbed to some extent, and the Np (V), strongly, under the same conditions. By applying this chromatographic method, the method of preparing Np (VI) and Np (VII) of a tracer quantity in 1 M NaOH is established. (author)

  2. Coprecipitation of aluminium with hydroxides of tetra-, penta- and hexavalent actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusov, A.B.; Budantseva, N.A.; Anan'ev, A.V.; Fedoseev, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    By the methods of IR spectroscopy and powder x-ray diffractometry precipitates formed in alkaline medium by actinide (4, 5, 6) in the presence of aluminium are studied. It is shown that in studied conditions formation of actinide aluminates not occurs. In the same time in the process of precipitation interaction of aluminium hydroxocomplexes with U(6) and Th(4) ions probably takes place. Hypothesis is expressed that possibility of aluminium hydroxocomplexes interaction with actinides in different oxidation state is depended on peculiarities of hydrolytic behaviour of the lasts [ru

  3. Titanium dioxide–gold nanocomposite materials embedded in silicate sol–gel film catalyst for simultaneous photodegradation of hexavalent chromium and methylene blue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandikumar, Alagarsamy; Ramaraj, Ramasamy

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Aminosilicate sol–gel supported TiO 2 –Au nanocomposite material photocatalyst was prepared by deposition–precipitation method and used for the simultaneous oxidation and reduction of methyelene blue dye and Cr(VI) ions. Highlights: ► The EDAS/(TiO 2 –Au) nps is used to design the solid-phase thin film photocatalyst. ► Au promotes the interfacial electron transfer from TiO 2 to Cr(VI) to form Cr(III). ► The holes produced at the TiO 2 oxidize the MB dye. ► The EDAS/(TiO 2 –Au) nps film was used for the simultaneous oxidation and reduction of toxic molecules. ► The photoinduced simultaneous redox process provides dual benefit for the environment remediation. - Abstract: Aminosilicate sol–gel supported titanium dioxide–gold (EDAS/(TiO 2 –Au) nps ) nanocomposite materials were synthesized by simple deposition–precipitation method and characterized. The photocatalytic oxidation and reduction activity of the EDAS/(TiO 2 –Au) nps film was evaluated using hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and methylene blue (MB) dye under irradiation. The photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) was studied in the presence of hole scavengers such as oxalic acid (OA) and methylene blue (MB). The photocatalytic degradation of MB was investigated in the presence and absence of Cr(VI). Presence of Au nps on the (TiO 2 ) nps surface and its dispersion in the silicate sol-gel film (EDAS/(TiO 2 –Au) nps ) improved the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of MB due to the effective interfacial electron transfer from the conduction band of the TiO 2 to Au nps by minimizing the charge recombination process when compared to the TiO 2 and (TiO 2 –Au) nps in the absence of EDAS. The EDAS/(TiO 2 –Au) nps nanocomposite materials provided beneficial role in the environmental remediation and purification process through synergistic photocatalytic activity by an advanced oxidation–reduction processes.

  4. Solid-state Water-mediated Transport Reduction of Nanostructured Iron Oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Vladimir M.; Povarov, Vladimir G.; Voronkov, Gennadii P.; Semenov, Valentin G.; Murin, Igor' V.; Gittsovich, Viktor N.; Sinel'nikov, Boris M.

    2001-01-01

    The Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ ratio in two-dimensional iron oxide nanosructures (nanolayers with a thickness of 0.3-1.5 nm on silica surface) may be precisely controlled using the transport reduction (TR) technique. The species ≡-O-Fe(OH) 2 and (≡Si-O-) 2 -FeOH forming the surface monolayer are not reduced at 400-600 deg. C because of their covalent bonding to the silica surface, as demonstrated by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Iron oxide microparticles (microstructures) obtained by the impregnation technique, being chemically unbound to silica, are subjected to reduction at T ≥ 500 deg. C with formation of metallic iron in the form of α-Fe. Transport reduction of supported nanostructures (consisting of 1 or 4 monolayers) at T ≥ 600 deg. C produces bulk iron(II) silicate and metallic iron phases. The structural-chemical transformations occurring in transport reduction of supported iron oxide nanolayers are proved to be governed by specific phase processes in the nanostructures themselves

  5. Constitutively elevated salicylic acid levels alter photosynthesis and oxidative state but not growth in transgenic populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Liang-Jiao; Guo, Wenbing; Yuan, Yinan; Anino, Edward O; Nyamdari, Batbayar; Wilson, Mark C; Frost, Christopher J; Chen, Han-Yi; Babst, Benjamin A; Harding, Scott A; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2013-07-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has long been implicated in plant responses to oxidative stress. SA overproduction in Arabidopsis thaliana leads to dwarfism, making in planta assessment of SA effects difficult in this model system. We report that transgenic Populus tremula × alba expressing a bacterial SA synthase hyperaccumulated SA and SA conjugates without negative growth consequences. In the absence of stress, endogenously elevated SA elicited widespread metabolic and transcriptional changes that resembled those of wild-type plants exposed to oxidative stress-promoting heat treatments. Potential signaling and oxidative stress markers azelaic and gluconic acids as well as antioxidant chlorogenic acids were strongly coregulated with SA, while soluble sugars and other phenylpropanoids were inversely correlated. Photosynthetic responses to heat were attenuated in SA-overproducing plants. Network analysis identified potential drivers of SA-mediated transcriptome rewiring, including receptor-like kinases and WRKY transcription factors. Orthologs of Arabidopsis SA signaling components NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 and thioredoxins were not represented. However, all members of the expanded Populus nucleoredoxin-1 family exhibited increased expression and increased network connectivity in SA-overproducing Populus, suggesting a previously undescribed role in SA-mediated redox regulation. The SA response in Populus involved a reprogramming of carbon uptake and partitioning during stress that is compatible with constitutive chemical defense and sustained growth, contrasting with the SA response in Arabidopsis, which is transient and compromises growth if sustained.

  6. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of niobium oxides by solid/liquid state oxygen source and lithium assisted metal-halide chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellekamp, M. Brooks; Greenlee, Jordan D.; Shank, Joshua C.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2015-09-01

    In order to consistently grow high quality niobium oxides and lithium niobium oxides, a novel solid/liquid state oxygen source, LiClO4, has been implemented in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system. LiClO4 is shown to decompose into both molecular and atomic oxygen upon heating. This allows oxidation rates similar to that of molecular oxygen but at a reduced overall beam flux, quantified by in situ Auger analysis. LiClO4 operation is decomposition limited to less than 400 °C, and other material limitations are identified. The design of a custom near-ambient NbCl5 effusion cell is presented, which improves both short and long term stability. Films of Nb oxidation state +2, +3, and +5 are grown using these new tools, including the multi-functional sub-oxide LiNbO2.

  7. Determination of the specific surface energy of oxides and glasses in the solid-state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andryushechkin, S.; Karpman, M.

    2000-01-01

    The production and application of coatings on glasses are used widely in technology. The coatings on glass are used for the regulation of optical, decorative, conducting and other technological and physical properties of glass. In particular, it is important to mention the application of glass fibres for the development of composite materials. However, the specific surface energy of glass and, consequently, its adhesion characteristics are relatively low. The values of these characteristics can be changed by the application of different metallic and nonmetallic coatings is characterised by high surface energy. To produce metallic coatings with the required adhesion strength of glass, it is necessary to have information on the specific surface energy of inorganic glass of different chemical composition. The determination of the relationships between the properties and composition of glass is one of the fundamental problems. At present, a large amount of investigations have been carried out into the investigations of the properties of glass in relation to its composition. However, the problem of establishment of relationships between the properties and composition of glass are especially difficult when examining multicomponent systems (technical glass). It is therefore, in to analyse in each case the properties of not the entire system has a whole but the variation of the properties with temperature of the individual components included in the system, the subsequent application of the additivity principle. The large majority of the glasses represent combinations of oxides of the elements of groups I-III and oxides of the transition metals, forming the mixtures, solid solutions of chemical compounds in the glass production process. Thus, analysis of the characteristics of oxides of the alkali, alkali-earth and transition metals makes it possible to obtain initial data for the evaluation of the surface energy, density, molecular mass of glass containing these oxides

  8. Iron oxides as pedoenvironmental indicators: state of the art, answers and questions (Philippe Duchaufour Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, J.

    2012-04-01

    The colour and magnetic properties of soils largely reflect the content and mineralogy of their iron oxides, which in turn relate to the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the soil environment. For more than 50 years, soil mineralogists and chemists have collected data for iron oxides in soils formed in widely different environments and tried to understand the complex nature of the different suites and formation pathways for these minerals via laboratory experiments. The discovery of ferrihydrite —the poorly crystalline precursor of most Fe oxides— in 1971, and the recognition of its common presence in soils, raised interest in deciphering the environmental factors that affect its transformation into goethite and hematite, the two most abundant crystalline iron oxides in soil. Field observations were consistent with laboratory experiments in which temperature, water activity, pH, foreign ions and organic matter were found to play a key role in the crystallization of ferrihydrite. Thus, the hematite/(hematite + goethite) ratio increased with increasing temperature and also with the likelihood of seasonal soil drying. Exploiting this ratio as a (pedo)environment indicator is, however, not devoid of problems derived from insufficient knowledge of the interactions between the influential chemical variables, difficulties in quantifying the two minerals and changes brought about by reductive dissolution. Soil formation usually leads to magnetic enhancement as a result of the production of magnetite and/or maghemite, which are ferrimagnetic iron oxides, and, possibly, an ordered ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite, as suggested by recent laboratory experiments. The concentration of pedogenic ferrimagnets as estimated via proxies such as magnetic susceptibility or frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility has been found to relate to climate variables [particularly (paleo)rainfall] in many studies reported over the last 30 years. However, extracting accurate

  9. Analyzer for measurement of nitrogen oxide concentration by ozone content reduction in gas using solid state chemiluminescent sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelibanov, V. P.; Ishanin, G. G.; Isaev, L. N.

    2014-05-01

    Role of nitrogen oxide in ambient air is described and analyzed. New method of nitrogen oxide concentration measurement in gas phase is suggested based on ozone concentration measurement with titration by nitrogen oxide. Research of chemiluminescent sensor composition is carried out on experimental stand. The sensor produced on the base of solid state non-activated chemiluminescent composition is applied as ozone sensor. Composition is put on the surface of polymer matrix with developed surface. Sensor compositions includes gallic acid with addition of rodamine-6G. Model of interaction process between sensor composition and ozone has been developed, main products appeared during reaction are identified. The product determining the speed of luminescense appearance is found. This product belongs to quinone class. Then new structure of chemiluminescent composition was suggested, with absence of activation period and with high stability of operation. Experimental model of gas analyzer was constructed and operation algorithm was developed. It was demonstrated that developed NO measuring instrument would be applied for monitoring purposes of ambient air. This work was partially financially supported by Government of Russian Federation, Grant 074-U01

  10. Evaluation of extraction methods for hexavalent chromium determination in dusts, ashes, and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Ruth E.; Wilson, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the difficulties in performing speciation analyses on solid samples is finding a suitable extraction method. Traditional methods for extraction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in soils, such as SW846 Method 3060A, can be tedious and are not always compatible with some determination methods. For example, the phosphate and high levels of carbonate and magnesium present in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Method 3060A digestion for Cr(VI) were found to be incompatible with the High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) detection method used by our laboratory. Modification of Method 3060A by eliminating the use of the phosphate buffer provided improved performance with the detection method, however dilutions are still necessary to achieve good chromatographic separation and detection of Cr(VI). An ultrasonic extraction method using a 1 mM Na2CO3 - 9 mM NaHCO3 buffer solution, adapted from Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Method ID215, has been used with good results for the determination of Cr(VI) in air filters. The average recovery obtained for BCR-545 - Welding Dust Loaded on Filter (IRMM, Belgium) using this method was 99 percent (1.2 percent relative standard deviation) with no conversion of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) during the extraction process. This ultrasonic method has the potential for use with other sample matrices, such as ashes and soils. Preliminary investigations using NIST 2701 (Hexavalent Chromium in Contaminated Soil) loaded onto quartz filters showed promising results with approximately 90 percent recovery of the certified Cr(VI) value. Additional testing has been done using NIST 2701 and NIST 2700 using different presentation methods. Extraction efficiency of bulk presentation, where small portions of the sample are added to the bottom of the extraction vessel, will be compared with supported presentation, where small portions of the sample are loaded onto a

  11. Mitigation of Hexavalent Chromium in Storm Water Resulting from Demolition of Large Concrete Structure at the East Tennessee Technology Park - 12286

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britto, Ronnie; Brown, Bridget; Hale, Timothy B.; Hensley, Janice L.; Johnson, Robert T.; Patel, Madhu [Tetra Tech, Inc. (United States); Emery, Jerry A. [Energy Solutions, Inc. (United States); Gaston, Clyde [LATA-SHARP Remediation Services - LSRS (United States); Queen, David C. [U.S. DOE-ORO (United States)

    2012-07-01

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding was provided to supplement the environmental management program at several DOE sites, including the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Demolition of the ETTP K-33 Building, the largest building to be demolished to date in Oak Ridge, was awarded to LSRS in FY-2010 under the ARRA program. The K-33 building was an 82 foot tall 2-story structure covering approximately 32 acres. Once this massive building was brought down to the ground, the debris was segregated and consolidated into piles of concrete rubble and steel across the remaining pad. The process of demolishing the building, tracking across concrete debris with heavy equipment, and stockpiling the concrete rubble caused it to become pulverized. During and after storm events, hexavalent chromium leached from the residual cement present in the large quantities of concrete. Storm water control measures were present to preclude migration of contaminants off-site, but these control measures were not designed to control hexavalent chromium dissolved in storm water from reaching nearby receiving water. The following was implemented to mitigate hexavalent chromium in storm water: - Steel wool was distributed around K-33 site catch basins and in water pools as an initial step in addressing hexavalent chromium. - Since the piles of concrete were too massive and unsafe to tarp, they were placed into windrows in an effort to reduce total surface area. - A Hach colorimetric field meter was acquired by the K-33 project to provide realtime results of hexavalent chromium in site surface water. - Three hexavalent chromium treatment systems were installed at three separate catch basins that receive integrated storm water flow from the K-33 site. Sodium bisulfite is being used as a reducing agent for the immobilization of hexavalent chromium while also assisting in lowering pH. Concentrations initially were 310 - 474 ppb of hexavalent chromium in

  12. Oxidation states by X-ray fluorescence and electron probe microanalysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Cristina; Riveros, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Many years ago, several studies showed the effect of a chemical state in X-ray spectra. The effect, however, has rarely been utilized in quantitative chemical analysis. The purpose of this work is to show observed shifts due to different chemical states in iron compounds. (Author) [es

  13. State-of-the-art Sn2+-based ternary oxides as photocatalysts for water splitting: electronic structures and optoelectronic properties

    KAUST Repository

    Noureldine, Dalal

    2016-09-19

    Developing visible light responsive metal oxide photocatalysts is a challenge that must be conquered to achieve high efficiency for water splitting or hydrogen evolution reactions. Valence band engineering is possible by forming ternary oxides using the combination of a metal cation with an s2d10 electronic configuration and a transition metal oxide with a d0 configuration. Many (Sn2+, Bi3+, Pb2+)-based ternary metal oxide photocatalysts have been reported for hydrogen and/or oxygen evolution under visible irradiation. Sn2+-based materials have attracted particular attention because tin is inexpensive, abundant and more environmentally friendly than lead or bismuth. In this review, we provide a fruitful library for Sn2+-based photocatalysts that have been reported to evolve hydrogen using sacrificial reagents, including SnNb2O6, Sn2Nb2O7, SnTaxNb2−xO6, SnTa2O6, Sn2Ta2O7, SnWO4 (α and β phases), SnSb2O6·nH2O, and Sn2TiO4. The synthesis method used in the literature and the resultant morphology and crystal structure of each compound are discussed. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the electronic structure and density of states are provided, and the consequent optoelectronic properties such as band gap, nature of the bandgap, dielectric constant, and effective masses are summarized. This review will help highlight the main challenges for Sn2+-based materials.

  14. State-of-the-art Sn2+-based ternary oxides as photocatalysts for water splitting: electronic structures and optoelectronic properties

    KAUST Repository

    Noureldine, Dalal; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Developing visible light responsive metal oxide photocatalysts is a challenge that must be conquered to achieve high efficiency for water splitting or hydrogen evolution reactions. Valence band engineering is possible by forming ternary oxides using the combination of a metal cation with an s2d10 electronic configuration and a transition metal oxide with a d0 configuration. Many (Sn2+, Bi3+, Pb2+)-based ternary metal oxide photocatalysts have been reported for hydrogen and/or oxygen evolution under visible irradiation. Sn2+-based materials have attracted particular attention because tin is inexpensive, abundant and more environmentally friendly than lead or bismuth. In this review, we provide a fruitful library for Sn2+-based photocatalysts that have been reported to evolve hydrogen using sacrificial reagents, including SnNb2O6, Sn2Nb2O7, SnTaxNb2−xO6, SnTa2O6, Sn2Ta2O7, SnWO4 (α and β phases), SnSb2O6·nH2O, and Sn2TiO4. The synthesis method used in the literature and the resultant morphology and crystal structure of each compound are discussed. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the electronic structure and density of states are provided, and the consequent optoelectronic properties such as band gap, nature of the bandgap, dielectric constant, and effective masses are summarized. This review will help highlight the main challenges for Sn2+-based materials.

  15. Correlation of Mn charge state with the electrical resistivity of Mn doped indium tin oxide thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, S. R. Sarath; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Alshareef, Husam N.; Kasiviswanathan, S.

    2010-01-01

    Correlation of charge state of Mn with the increase in resistivity with Mn concentration is demonstrated in Mn-doped indium tin oxide films. Bonding analysis shows that Mn 2p3/2 core level can be deconvoluted into three components corresponding to Mn2+ and Mn4+ with binding energies 640.8 eV and 642.7 eV, respectively, and a Mn2+ satellite at ∼5.4 eV away from the Mn2+ peak. The presence of the satellite peak unambiguously proves that Mn exists in the +2 charge state. The ratio of concentration of Mn2+ to Mn4+ of ∼4:1 suggests that charge compensation occurs in the n-type films causing the resistivity increase.

  16. Correlation of Mn charge state with the electrical resistivity of Mn doped indium tin oxide thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, S. R. Sarath

    2010-09-15

    Correlation of charge state of Mn with the increase in resistivity with Mn concentration is demonstrated in Mn-doped indium tin oxide films. Bonding analysis shows that Mn 2p3/2 core level can be deconvoluted into three components corresponding to Mn2+ and Mn4+ with binding energies 640.8 eV and 642.7 eV, respectively, and a Mn2+ satellite at ∼5.4 eV away from the Mn2+ peak. The presence of the satellite peak unambiguously proves that Mn exists in the +2 charge state. The ratio of concentration of Mn2+ to Mn4+ of ∼4:1 suggests that charge compensation occurs in the n-type films causing the resistivity increase.

  17. Chemical state analysis of oxide thin films using a high resolution double crystal X-ray fluorescence spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Hirohisa; Morinaga, Kenji; Ohta, Yoshio.

    1995-01-01

    The chemical state analysis of r.f.-sputtered amorphous oxide thin films was determined by a high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer with double crystals. The polymerization degree of silicate anions in the silicate film was as same as a target (α-Quartz). The oxygen coordination number of Al 3+ ions in the aluminate film was different from a target (α-Al 2 O 3 ), and it was a mixture of 4 and 6 in a spinel-like structure. In CaO-SiO 2 and CaO-Al 2 O 3 films, when the film thickness is thin at the beginning of sputtering, the composition of films are in the shortage of CaO. But when the film thickness become thicker, the composition of films become as same as the target. From the results above, the chemical state of films and their variations with film thickness can be clarified by using the apparatus. (author)

  18. Study of the oxidation state of arsenic and uranium in individual particles from uranium mine tailings, Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsecz, A.; Osan, J.; Palfalvi, J.; Torok, Sz.; Sajo, I.; Mathe, Z.; Simon, R.; Falkenberg, G.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium ore mining and milling have been terminated in the Mecsek Mountains (southwest Hungary) in 1997. Mine tailings ponds are located between two important water bases, which are resources of the drinking water of the city of Pecs and the neighbouring villages. The average U concentration of the tailings material is 71.73 μg/g, but it is inhomogeneous. Some microscopic particles contain orders of magnitude more U than the rest of the tailings material. Other potentially toxic elements are As and Pb of which chemical state is important to estimate mobility, because in mobile form they can risk the water basis and the public health. Individual U-rich particles were selected with solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) and after localisation the particles were investigated by synchrotron radiation based microanalytical techniques. The distribution of elements over the particles was studied by micro beam X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) and the oxidation state of uranium and arsenic was determined by micro X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) spectroscopy. Some of the measured U-rich particles were chosen for studying the heterogeneity with μ-XRF tomography. Arsenic was present mainly in As(V) and uranium in U(VI) form in the original uranium ore particles, but in the mine tailings samples uranium was present mainly in the less mobile U(IV) form. Correlation was found between the oxidation state of As and U in the same analyzed particles. These results suggest that dissolution of uranium is not expected in short term period. (authors)

  19. An unusual high-spin ground state of Co3+ in octahedral coordination in brownmillerite-type cobalt oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, S Ya; Tyablikov, O A; Kazakov, S M; Antipov, E V; Kurbakov, A I; Tsirlin, A A; Hollmann, N; Chin, Y Y; Lin, H-J; Chen, C T; Tanaka, A; Tjeng, L H; Hu, Z

    2015-06-21

    The crystal and magnetic structures of brownmillerite-like Sr(2)Co(1.2)Ga(0.8)O(5) with a stable Co(3+) oxidation state at both octahedral and tetrahedral sites are refined using neutron powder diffraction data collected at 2 K (S.G. Icmm, a = 5.6148(6) Å, b = 15.702(2) Å, c = 5.4543(6) Å; R(wp) = 0.0339, R(p) = 0.0443, χ(2) = 0.775). The very large tetragonal distortion of CoO(6) octahedra (1.9591(4) Å for Co-O(eq) and 2.257(6) Å for Co-O(ax)) could be beneficial for the stabilization of the long-sought intermediate-spin state of Co(3+) in perovskite-type oxides. However, the large magnetic moment of octahedral Co(3+) (3.82(7)μ(B)) indicates the conventional high-spin state of Co(3+) ions, which is further supported by the results of a combined theoretical and experimental soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy study at the Co-L(2,3) edges on Sr(2)Co(1.2)Ga(0.8)O(5). A high-spin ground state of Co(3+) in Sr(2)Co(1.2)Ga(0.8)O(5) resulted in much lower in comparison with a LaCoO(3) linear thermal expansion coefficient of 13.1 ppm K(-1) (298-1073 K) determined from high-temperature X-ray powder diffraction data collected in air.

  20. Electronic States of High-k Oxides in Gate Stack Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chiyu

    In this dissertation, in-situ X-ray and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy have been employed to study the interface chemistry and electronic structure of potential high-k gate stack materials. In these gate stack materials, HfO2 and La2O3 are selected as high-k dielectrics, VO2 and ZnO serve as potential channel layer materials. The gate stack structures have been prepared using a reactive electron beam system and a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition system. Three interrelated issues represent the central themes of the research: 1) the interface band alignment, 2) candidate high-k materials, and 3) band bending, internal electric fields, and charge transfer. 1) The most highlighted issue is the band alignment of specific high-k structures. Band alignment relationships were deduced by analysis of XPS and UPS spectra for three different structures: a) HfO2/VO2/SiO2/Si, b) HfO 2-La2O3/ZnO/SiO2/Si, and c) HfO 2/VO2/ HfO2/SiO2/Si. The valence band offset of HfO2/VO2, ZnO/SiO2 and HfO 2/SiO2 are determined to be 3.4 +/- 0.1, 1.5 +/- 0.1, and 0.7 +/- 0.1 eV. The valence band offset between HfO2-La2O3 and ZnO was almost negligible. Two band alignment models, the electron affinity model and the charge neutrality level model, are discussed. The results show the charge neutrality model is preferred to describe these structures. 2) High-k candidate materials were studied through comparison of pure Hf oxide, pure La oxide, and alloyed Hf-La oxide films. An issue with the application of pure HfO2 is crystallization which may increase the leakage current in gate stack structures. An issue with the application of pure La2O3 is the presence of carbon contamination in the film. Our study shows that the alloyed Hf-La oxide films exhibit an amorphous structure along with reduced carbon contamination. 3) Band bending and internal electric fields in the gate stack structure were observed by XPS and UPS and indicate the charge transfer during the growth and process. The oxygen

  1. Influence of oxidation state on the absorption of plutonium from the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, M.F.; Ryan, J.L.; Gorham, L.S.; McFadden, K.M.

    1979-01-01

    Rats and guinea pigs treated intragastrically with either IV- or VI-valent 238 Pu showed no appreciable difference in absorption. Nitric acid solutions of 239 Pu (pH 2) were also administered to fasted and fed rats. When an oxidant (K 2 Cr 2 O 7 ) was present in the solution gavaged to fasted rats, absorption increased 34-fold. However, when 239 Pu VI was administered to fed rats in the absence of dichromate, there was no appreciable difference between the absorption of 239 Pu VI and 239 Pu IV

  2. Micro-XANES measurements on experimental spinels and the oxidation state of vanadium in coexisting spinel and silicate melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Righter, K.; Sutton, S.R.; Newville, M.; Le, L.; Schwandt, C.S.

    2006-01-01

    We show that experimental spinels coexisting with silicate melt always have lower valence vanadium, and that spinels typically have 3+, whereas the coexisting melt has 4+ or 5+. Implications of these results for planetary basalts will be discussed. Spinel can be a significant host phase for V which has multiple oxidation states V 2+ , V 3+ , V 4+ or V 5+ at oxygen fugacities relevant to natural systems. The magnitude of D(V) spinel/melt is known to be a function of composition, temperature and fO 2 , but the uncertainty of the oxidation state under the range of natural conditions has made elusive a thorough understanding of D(V) spinel/melt. For example, V 3+ is likely to be stable in spinels, based on exchange with Al in experiments in the CaO-MgO-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 system. On the other hand, it has been argued that V 4+ will be stable across the range of natural oxygen fugacities in nature. In order to build on our previous work in more oxidized systems, we have carried out experiments at relatively reducing conditions from the FMQ buffer to 2 log fO 2 units below the IW buffer. These spinel-melt pairs, where V is present in the spinel at natural levels (∼300 ppm V), were analyzed using an electron microprobe at NASA-JSC and mi-cro-XANES at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The new results will be used together with previous results to understand the valence of V in spinel-melt systems across 12 orders of magnitude of oxygen fugacity, and with application to natural systems.

  3. Solid-state voltammetry-based electrochemical immunosensor for Escherichia coli using graphene oxide-Ag nanoparticle composites as labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaochun; Chen, Kun; Wang, Jing; Shao, Kang; Fu, Tao; Shao, Feng; Lu, Donglian; Liang, Jiangong; Foda, M Frahat; Han, Heyou

    2013-06-21

    A new electrochemical immunosensor based on solid-state voltammetry was fabricated for the detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) by using graphene oxide-Ag nanoparticle composites (P-GO-Ag) as labels. To construct the platform, Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) were first self-assembled on an Au electrode surface through cysteamine and served as an effective matrix for antibody (Ab) attachment. Under a sandwich-type immunoassay format, the analyte and the probe (P-GO-Ag-Ab) were successively captured onto the immunosensor. Finally, the bonded AgNPs were detected through a solid-state redox process in 0.2 M of KCl solution. Combining the advantages of the high-loading capability of graphene oxide with promoted electron-transfer rate of AuNPs, this immunosensor produced a 26.92-fold signal enhancement compared with the unamplified protocol. Under the optimal conditions, the immunosensor exhibited a wide linear dependence on the logarithm of the concentration of E. coli ranging from 50 to 1.0 × 10(6) cfu mL(-1) with a detection limit of 10 cfu mL(-1). Moreover, as a practical application, the proposed immunosensor was used to monitor E. coli in lake water with satisfactory results.

  4. Chromium Oxidation State in Planetary Basalts: Oxygen Fugacity Indicator and Critical Variable for Cr-Spinel Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A. S.; Burger, P. V.; Le, Loan; Papike, J. J.; Jone, J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2014-01-01

    Cr is a ubiquitous and relatively abundant minor element in basaltic, planetary magmas. At the reduced oxidation states (oxidation state of Cr in in silicate melts. Here we present a series of 1-bar gas mixing experiments performed with a Fe-rich basaltic melt in which have determined the Cr redox ratio of the melt at over a range of fO2 values by measuring this quantity in olivine with X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). The measured Cr redox ratio of the olivine phenocrysts can be readily converted to the ratio present in the conjugate melt via the ratio of crystal-liquid partition coefficients for Cr3+ and Cr2+. We have applied these results to modeling Cr spinel stability and Cr redox ratios in a primitive, iron-rich martian basalt.

  5. Oxidation of tertiary amines by cytochrome p450-kinetic isotope effect as a spin-state reactivity probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunsen; Wu, Wei; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Shaik, Sason

    2009-08-24

    Two types of tertiary amine oxidation processes, namely, N-dealkylation and N-oxygenation, by compound I (Cpd I) of cytochrome P450 are studied theoretically using hybrid DFT calculations. All the calculations show that both N-dealkylation and N-oxygenation of trimethylamine (TMA) proceed preferentially from the low-spin (LS) state of Cpd I. Indeed, the computed kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for the rate-controlling hydrogen abstraction step of dealkylation show that only the KIE(LS) fits the experimental datum, whereas the corresponding value for the high-spin (HS) process is much higher. These results second those published before for N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA), and as such, they further confirm the conclusion drawn then that KIEs can be a sensitive probe of spin state reactivity. The ferric-carbinolamine of TMA decomposes most likely in a non-enzymatic reaction since the Fe-O bond dissociation energy (BDE) is negative. The computational results reveal that in the reverse reaction of N-oxygenation, the N-oxide of aromatic amine can serve as a better oxygen donor than that of aliphatic amine to generate Cpd I. This capability of the N-oxo derivatives of aromatic amines to transfer oxygen to the heme, and thereby generate Cpd I, is in good accord with experimental data previously reported.

  6. Identification of the iron oxidation state and coordination geometry in iron oxide- and zeolite-based catalysts using pre-edge XAS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubnov, Alexey; Lichtenberg, Henning; Mangold, Stefan; Grunwaldt, Jan Dierk

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of the oxidation state and coordination geometry using pre-edge analysis is attractive for heterogeneous catalysis and materials science, especially for in situ and time-resolved studies or highly diluted systems. In the present study, focus is laid on iron-based catalysts. First a systematic investigation of the pre-edge region of the Fe K-edge using staurolite, FePO4, FeO and α-Fe2O3 as reference compounds for tetrahedral Fe(2+), tetrahedral Fe(3+), octahedral Fe(2+) and octahedral Fe(3+), respectively, is reported. In particular, high-resolution and conventional X-ray absorption spectra are compared, considering that in heterogeneous catalysis and material science a compromise between high-quality spectroscopic data acquisition and simultaneous analysis of functional properties is required. Results, which were obtained from reference spectra acquired with different resolution and quality, demonstrate that this analysis is also applicable to conventionally recorded pre-edge data. For this purpose, subtraction of the edge onset is preferentially carried out using an arctangent and a first-degree polynomial, independent of the resolution and quality of the data. For both standard and high-resolution data, multiplet analysis of pre-edge features has limitations due to weak transitions that cannot be identified. On the other hand, an arbitrary empirical peak fitting assists the analysis in that non-local transitions can be isolated. The analysis of the oxidation state and coordination geometry of the Fe sites using a variogram-based method is shown to be effective for standard-resolution data and leads to the same results as for high-resolution spectra. This method, validated by analysing spectra of reference compounds and their well defined mixtures, is finally applied to track structural changes in a 1% Fe/Al2O3 and a 0.5% Fe/BEA zeolite catalyst during reduction in 5% H2/He. The results, hardly accessible by other techniques, show that Fe(3+) is

  7. Identification of different oxygen species in oxide nanostructures with 17O solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Wu, Xin-Ping; Zheng, Sujuan; Zhao, Li; Li, Lei; Shen, Li; Gao, Yuxian; Xue, Nianhua; Guo, Xuefeng; Huang, Weixin; Gan, Zhehong; Blanc, Frédéric; Yu, Zhiwu; Ke, Xiaokang; Ding, Weiping; Gong, Xue-Qing; Grey, Clare P.; Peng, Luming

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured oxides find multiple uses in a diverse range of applications including catalysis, energy storage, and environmental management, their higher surface areas, and, in some cases, electronic properties resulting in different physical properties from their bulk counterparts. Developing structure-property relations for these materials requires a determination of surface and subsurface structure. Although microscopy plays a critical role owing to the fact that the volumes sampled by such techniques may not be representative of the whole sample, complementary characterization methods are urgently required. We develop a simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategy to detect the first few layers of a nanomaterial, demonstrating the approach with technologically relevant ceria nanoparticles. We show that the 17O resonances arising from the first to third surface layer oxygen ions, hydroxyl sites, and oxygen species near vacancies can be distinguished from the oxygen ions in the bulk, with higher-frequency 17O chemical shifts being observed for the lower coordinated surface sites. H217O can be used to selectively enrich surface sites, allowing only these particular active sites to be monitored in a chemical process. 17O NMR spectra of thermally treated nanosized ceria clearly show how different oxygen species interconvert at elevated temperature. Density functional theory calculations confirm the assignments and reveal a strong dependence of chemical shift on the nature of the surface. These results open up new strategies for characterizing nanostructured oxides and their applications. PMID:26601133

  8. Influence of de-hulled rapeseed roasting on the physicochemical composition and oxidative state of oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rękas, A.; Siger, A.; Wroniak, M.; Ścibisz, I.; Derewiaka, D.; Anders, A.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of roasting time on the contents of bioactive compounds (tocopherols, phytosterols, phenolic compounds), antioxidant capacity and physicochemical properties of rapeseed oil pressed from de-hulled seeds was investigated. The de-hulled seeds were roasted at a temperature of 165 °C for 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 min. The results of this study show that a roasting pre-treatment led to a gradual increase in canolol content (from 1.34 to 117.33 mg/100 g), total phytosterols (from 573.51 to 609.86 mg/100 g) and total carotenoids (0.82 to 2.41 mg/100 g), while only slight changes in the contents of tocopherols were noted. With the increase in roasting time a gradual increase in oxidative stability (from 4.27 to 6.85 h), and antioxidant capacity, seen mainly in the hydrophilic fraction of oil (from 0.32 to 2.30 mmol TEAC/l) was found. Although roasting resulted in the formation of primary and secondary oxidation products, the quality parameters of oils were within Codex Alimentarius limits. [es

  9. Elevated oxidative stress monitored via the albumin-thiol redox state is correlated with matrix metalloproteinase-3 elevation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizaki, Kazuha; Yoshizumi, Yusuke; Takahashi, Teppei; Era, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) and oxidative stress contribute to joint destruction. However, little is known about the relationship between MMP-3 and oxidative stress in RA. We measured the albumin-thiol redox state as a marker of oxidative stress, MMP-3, and the DAS-28 score calculated using CRP values among forty-seven patients (9 males and 38 females) with RA. According to the serum MMP-3 levels, they were divided into two groups (group A: within normal ranges of 36.9-121.0 ng/mL for men and 17.3-59.7 ng/mL for women; group B: above normal ranges). The albumin-thiol redox state in group B was significantly oxidized compared with that in group A (p < 0.01). The percentage of oxidized albumin-thiol showed a positive correlation with serum MMP-3 (r = 0.52). DAS-28 and CRP were also correlated with the percentage of oxidized albumin-thiol (r = 0.46, r = 0.44). The albumin-thiol redox state was significantly oxidized in correlation with serum MMP-3 elevation in RA.

  10. Spiral spin state in high-temperature copper-oxide superconductors: Evidence from neutron scattering measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    2005-01-01

    An effective spiral spin phase ground state provides a new paradigm for the high-temperature superconducting cuprates. It accounts for the recent neutron scattering observations of spin excitations regarding both the energy dispersion and the intensities, including the "universal" rotation by 45...... model. The form of the exchange interaction function reveals the effects of the Fermi surface, and the unique shape predicts large quantum spin fluctuations in the ground state....

  11. Correlation of the oxidation state of cerium in sol-gel glasses as a function of thermal treatment via optical spectroscopy and XANES studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefa, Zerihun; Haire, R G; Caulder, D L; Shuh, D K

    2004-07-01

    Sol-gel glass matrices containing lanthanides have numerous technological applications and their formation involves several chemical facets. In the case of cerium, its ability to exist in two different oxidation states or in mixed valence state provides additional complexities for the sol-gel process. The oxidation state of cerium present during different facets of preparation of sol-gel glasses, and also as a function of the starting oxidation state of cerium added, were studied both by optical spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near-edge structures (XANES). The findings acquired by each approach were compared. The primary focus was on the redox chemistries associated with sample preparation, gelation, and thermal treatment. When Ce3+ is introduced into the starting sols, the trivalent state normally prevails in the wet and room temperature-dried gels. Heating in air at >100 degrees C can generate a light yellow coloration with partial oxidation to the tetravalent state. Above 200 degrees C and up to approximately 1000 degrees C, cerium is oxidized to its tetravalent state. In contrast, when tetravalent cerium is introduced into the sol, both the wet and room temperature-dried gels lose the yellow-brown color of the initial ceric ammonium nitrate solution. When the sol-gel is heated to 110 degrees C it turns yellowish as the cerium tends to be re-oxidized. The yellow color is believed to represent the effect of oxidation and oligomerization of the cerium-silanol units in the matrix. The luminescence properties are also affected by these changes, the details of which are reported herein.

  12. Strategies to reduce mass and photons transfer limitations in heterogeneous photocatalytic processes: Hexavalent chromium reduction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Belisa A; Cristóvão, Raquel O; Djellabi, Ridha; Caseiro, Ana; Miranda, Sandra M; Loureiro, José M; Boaventura, Rui A R; Dias, Madalena M; Lopes, José Carlos B; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2018-07-01

    The current work presents different approaches to overcome mass and photon transfer limitations in heterogeneous photocatalytic processes applied to the reduction of hexavalent chromium to its trivalent form in the presence of a sacrificial agent. Two reactor designs were tested, a monolithic tubular photoreactor (MTP) and a micro-meso-structured photoreactor (NETmix), both presenting a high catalyst surface area per reaction liquid volume. In order to reduce photon transfer limitations, the tubular photoreactor was packed with transparent cellulose acetate monolithic structures (CAM) coated with the catalyst by a dip-coating method. For the NETmix reactor, a thin film of photocatalyst was uniformly deposited on the front glass slab (GS) or on the network of channels and chambers imprinted in the back stainless steel slab (SSS) using a spray system. The reaction rate for the NETmix photoreactor was evaluated for two illumination sources, solar light or UVA-LEDs, using the NETmix with the front glass slab or/and back stainless steel slab coated with TiO 2 -P25. The reusability of the photocatalytic films on the NETmix walls was also evaluated for three consecutive cycles using fresh Cr(VI) solutions. The catalyst reactivity in combination with the NETmix-SSS photoreactor is almost 70 times superior to one obtained with the MTP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble hexavalent chromium in leatherback sea turtle lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Rachel M; Wise, Catherine F; Young, Jamie L; Aboueissa, AbouEl-Makarim; Martin Bras, Mark; Barandiaran, Mike; Bermúdez, Erick; Márquez-D'Acunti, Lirio; Wise, John Pierce

    2018-05-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a marine pollution of concern as recent studies show it has a global distribution, with some regions showing high Cr concentrations in marine animal tissue, and it is extensively used. Leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) are an endangered marine species that may experience prolonged exposures to environmental contaminants including Cr(VI). Human activities have led to global Cr(VI) contamination of the marine environment. While Cr(VI) has been identified as a known human carcinogen, the health effects in marine species are poorly understood. In this study, we assessed the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of particulate and soluble Cr(VI) in leatherback sea turtle lung cells. Both particulate and soluble Cr(VI) induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity. Next, using a chromosome aberration assay, we assessed the genotoxic effects of Cr(VI) in leatherback sea turtle lung cells. Particulate and soluble Cr(VI) induced a concentration-dependent increase in clastogenicity in leatherback sea turtle lung cells. These data indicate that Cr(VI) may be a health concern for leatherback sea turtles and other long-lived marine species. Additionally, these data provide foundational support to use leatherback sea turtles as a valuable model species for monitoring the health effects of Cr(VI) in the environment and possibly as an indicator species to assess environmental human exposures and effects. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Two fold modified chitosan for enhanced adsorption of hexavalent chromium from simulated wastewater and industrial effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahu, S S; Shekhawat, A; Saravanan, D; Jugade, R M

    2016-08-01

    Ionic solid (Ethylhexadecyldimethylammoniumbromide) impregnated phosphated chitosan (ISPC) was synthesized and applied for enhanced adsorption of hexavalent chromium from industrial effluent. The compound obtained was extensively characterized using instrumental techniques like FT-IR, TGA-DTA, XRD, SEM, BET and EDX. ISPC showed high adsorption capacity of 266.67mg/g in accordance with Langmuir isotherm model at pH 3.0 due to the presence of multiple sites which contribute for ion pair and electrostatic interactions with Cr(VI) species. The sorption kinetics and thermodynamic studies revealed that adsorption of Cr(VI) followed pseudo-second-order kinetics with exothermic and spontaneous behaviour. Applicability of ISPC for higher sample volumes was discerned through column studies. The real chrome plating industry effluent was effectively treated with total chromium recovery of 94%. The used ISPC was regenerated simply by dilute ammonium hydroxide treatment and tested for ten adsorption-desorption cycles with marginal decrease in adsorption efficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Removal of hexavalent chromium from wastewater using a new composite chitosan biosorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddu, Veera M; Abburi, Krishnaiah; Talbott, Jonathan L; Smith, Edgar D

    2003-10-01

    A new composite chitosan biosorbent was prepared by coating chitosan, a glucosamine biopolymer, onto ceramic alumina. The composite bioadsorbent was characterized by high-temperature pyrolysis, porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Batch isothermal equilibrium and continuous column adsorption experiments were conducted at 25 degrees C to evaluate the biosorbent for the removal of hexavalent chromium from synthetic as well as field samples obtained from chrome plating facilities. The effect of pH, sulfate, and chloride ion on adsorption was also investigated. The biosorbent loaded with Cr(VI) was regenerated using 0.1 M sodium hydroxide solution. A comparison of the results of the present investigation with those reported in the literature showed that chitosan coated on alumina exhibits greater adsorption capacity for chromium(VI). Further, experimental equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms, and values of the parameters of the isotherms are reported. The ultimate capacity obtained from the Langmuir model is 153.85 mg/g chitosan.

  16. Preparation of Silk Sericin/Lignin Blend Beads for the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Hyo Won; Shin, Munju; Yun, Haesung; Lee, Ki Hoon

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, novel adsorbents having high adsorption capability and reusability were prepared using agricultural by-products: silk sericin and lignin. Silk sericin and lignin blend beads were successfully prepared using simple coagulation methods for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from aqueous solution. A 1 M lithium chloride (LiCl)/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent system successfully dissolved both sericin and lignin and had sufficient viscosity for bead preparation. Compared to the conventional sericin bead adsorbent, sericin/lignin blend beads showed higher Cr(VI) adsorption capacity. The amount of lignin added to the adsorbent greatly affected the adsorption capacity of the beads, and a 50:50 sericin/lignin blend ratio was optimal. Adsorption behavior followed the Freundlich isotherm, which means the adsorption of Cr(VI) occurred on the heterogeneous surface. Cr(VI) adsorption capability increased with temperature because of thermodynamic-kinetic effects. In addition, over 90% of Cr(VI) ions were recovered from the Cr(VI) adsorbed sericin/lignin beads in a 1 M NaOH solution. The adsorption-desorption recycling process was stable for more than seven cycles, and the recycling efficiency was 82%. It is expected that the sericin/lignin beads could be successfully applied in wastewater remediation especially for hazardous Cr(VI) ions in industrial wastewater. PMID:27598142

  17. Lung injury, inflammation and Akt signaling following inhalation of particulate hexavalent chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaver, Laura M.; Stemmy, Erik J.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Schwartz, Arnold; Little, Laura G.; Gigley, Jason P.; Chun, Gina; Sugden, Kent D.

    2009-01-01

    Certain particulate hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are human respiratory carcinogens that release genotoxic soluble chromate, and are associated with fibrosis, fibrosarcomas, adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. We postulate that inflammatory processes and mediators may contribute to the etiology of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis, however the immediate (0-24 h) pathologic injury and immune responses after exposure to particulate chromates have not been adequately investigated. Our aim was to determine the nature of the lung injury, inflammatory response, and survival signaling responses following intranasal exposure of BALB/c mice to particulate basic zinc chromate. Factors associated with lung injury, inflammation and survival signaling were measured in airway lavage fluid and in lung tissue. A single chromate exposure induced an acute immune response in the lung, characterized by a rapid and significant increase in IL-6 and GRO-α levels, an influx of neutrophils, and a decline in macrophages in lung airways. Histological examination of lung tissue in animals challenged with a single chromate exposure revealed an increase in bronchiolar cell apoptosis and mucosal injury. Furthermore, chromate exposure induced injury and inflammation that progressed to alveolar and interstitial pneumonitis. Finally, a single Cr(VI) challenge resulted in a rapid and persistent increase in the number of airways immunoreactive for phosphorylation of the survival signaling protein Akt, on serine 473. These data illustrate that chromate induces both survival signaling and an inflammatory response in the lung, which we postulate may contribute to early oncogenesis

  18. Removal of hexavalent chromium by using red mud activated with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Deliang; Ding, Ying; Li, Lingling; Chang, Zhixian; Rao, Zhengyong; Lu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    The removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solution by using red mud activated with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was studied. The optimum operation parameters, such as CTAB concentration, pH values, contact time, and initial Cr(VI) concentration, were investigated. The best concentration of CTAB for modifying red mud was found to be 0.50% (mCTAB/VHCl,0.6 mol/L). The lower pH (mud activated with CTAB can greatly improve the removal ratio of Cr(VI) as high as four times than that of original red mud. Adsorption equilibrium was reached within 30 min under the initial Cr(VI) concentration of 100 mg L(-1). The isotherm data were analysed using Langmuir and Freundlich models. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on activated red mud fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm model, and the maximum adsorption capacity was estimated as 22.20 mg g(-1) (Cr/red mud). The adsorption process could be well described using the pseudo-second-order model. The result shows that activated red mud is a promising agent for low-cost water treatment.

  19. The Growth of Gypsum in the Presence of Hexavalent Chromium: A Multiscale Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Morales

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of dissolved inorganic pollutants into the structure of minerals is an important process that controls the mobility and fate of these pollutants in the Earth’s crust. It also modifies the surface structure and composition of the host mineral, affecting its crystallization kinetics. Here, we investigate the effect of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI, on the nucleation and growth of gypsum by conducting two types of experiments: (i in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM observations of the growth of gypsum {010} surfaces in the presence of Cr(VI and (ii gypsum precipitation experiments by mixing aqueous solutions containing variable amounts of Cr(VI. Gypsum precipitation is progressively delayed when occurring from solutions bearing increasing Cr(VI concentrations. Chemical analyses of gypsum precipitates show that gypsum incorporates small Cr(VI amounts that correlate with the content of this ion in the aqueous solution. Gypsum cell parameters variation reflects this incorporation. At the molecular scale, Cr(VI induces a slowdown of step advance rates on gypsum {010} surfaces accompanied by the roughening of nanostep edges and the so-called “template effect”. This effect involves the reproduction of the original nanotopography after the completion of individual advancing monolayers and appears as a general nanoscale phenomenon occurring during growth of solid solutions from aqueous solutions even in the case of compositionally-restricted solid solutions.

  20. Investigation of Hexavalent Chromium Flux to Groundwater at the 100-C-7:1 Excavation Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Horner, Jacob A.; Johnson, Christian D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2012-11-16

    Deep excavation of soil has been conducted at the 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1 waste sites within the 100-BC Operable Unit at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) contamination with the excavations reaching to near the water table. Soil sampling showed that Cr(VI) contamination was still present at the bottom of the 100-C-7:1 excavation. In addition, Cr(VI) concentrations in a downgradient monitoring well have shown a transient spike of increased Cr(VI) concentration following initiation of excavation. Potentially, the increased Cr(VI) concentrations in the downgradient monitoring well are due to Cr(VI) from the excavation site. However, data were needed to evaluate this possibility and to quantify the overall impact of the 100-C-7:1 excavation site on groundwater. Data collected from a network of aquifer tubes installed across the floor of the 100-C-7:1 excavation and from temporary wells installed at the bottom of the entrance ramp to the excavation were used to evaluate Cr(VI) releases into the aquifer and to estimate local-scale hydraulic properties and groundwater flow velocity.

  1. Chronic occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium causes DNA damage in electroplating workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Xiao-Bin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occupational exposure to chromium compounds may result in adverse health effects. This study aims to investigate whether low-level hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI exposure can cause DNA damage in electroplating workers. Methods 157 electroplating workers and 93 control subjects with no history of occupational exposure to chromium were recruited in Hangzhou, China. Chromium levels in erythrocytes were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. DNA damage in peripheral lymphocytes was evaluated with the alkaline comet assay by three parameters: Olive tail moment, tail length and percent of DNA in the comet tail (tail DNA%. Urinary 8-OHdG levels were measured by ELISA. Results Chromium concentration in erythrocytes was about two times higher in electroplating workers (median: 4.41 μg/L than that in control subjects (1.54 μg/L, P P P P Conclusion The findings in this study indicated that there was detectable chromium exposure in electroplating workers. Low-level occupational chromium exposure induced DNA damage.

  2. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Using L-Cysteine Capped Nickel Nanocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razium Ali Soomro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reduce the highly toxic hexavalent chromium Cr(VI into less toxic chromium Cr(III species by using nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs as catalysts in order to provide safety to the aqueous environment. In the first phase Ni NPs were synthesized in ethylene glycol and capped with l-cysteine by a modified microwave irradiation method using NaOH as the accelerator. The formed Ni NPs were characterized by various techniques such as UV-Visible spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. In the second phase the formed Ni NPs were immobilized on glass surfaces and employed as catalyst for the reduction of Cr(VI ions. According to observations, 99% reduction of Cr(VI ions was achieved in the presence of 0.5 mg of Ni NPs catalyst in just five minutes as compared to nickel powder that showed only 16% reduction in 15 minutes. The study has a great impact on the aqueous pollution control of Cr(VI especially caused by the discharge of waste water from several industries utilizing Cr(VI containing salt as one of the essential gradients.

  3. INFLUENCE OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM INITIAL CONCENTRATION ON RETARDATION FACTOR AND CONTAMINANT VELOCITY IN A SOIL MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. SHIVA PRASHANTH KUMAR

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sources of soil and ground water contamination are many and include many folds of accidental spills and leaks of toxic and hazardous chemicals. Preparation of ground water contamination model needs good understanding of the behavior of contaminant transport through soil media for predicting the level of contamination of ground water in the near future at the intended site conditions. Sorption is a natural process; due to its presence, the contaminant can move slowly as compared to the ground water and hence the effects of sorption must be taken into consideration while predicting the travel time of the contaminant to reach the ground water sources. This paper discusses the results of column test studies carried out in the laboratory under controlled conditions about the spreading of contaminant (Hexavalent chromium, Cr (VI through the clay mixed red soil at two different initial concentrations (800 mg/L and 4200 mg/L. The variations of the contaminant flow velocity and retardation factor for two different initial concentrations of contaminant were brought out and discussed. The contaminant flow velocity drastically coming down for a relative concentration of 0 to 0.2 and beyond this range, the contaminant flow velocity value is decreasing in a slow rate for both the lower and higher initial contaminant concentrations tested. At the lower relative concentration, the higher retardation factor was observed and it may be due to slowly filling the available sorption sites in the soil column.

  4. Punica granatum L. protects mice against hexavalent chromium-induced genotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Ivan de Ávila

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the chemoprotective effects of Punica granatum L. (Punicaceae fruits alcoholic extract (PGE on mice exposed to hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI]. Animals were pretreated with PGE (25, 50 or 75 mg/kg/day for 10 days and subsequently exposed to a sub-lethal dose of Cr(VI (30 mg/kg. The frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow was investigated and the Cr(VI levels were measured in the kidneys, liver and plasm. For the survival analysis, mice were previously treated with PGE for 10 days and exposed to a single lethal dose of Cr(VI (50 mg/kg. Exposure to a sub-lethal dose of Cr(VI induced a significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated cells. However, the prophylactic treatment with PGE led to a reduction of 44.5% (25 mg/kg, 86.3% (50 mg/kg and 64.2% (75 mg/kg in the incidence of micronuclei. In addition, the 50 mg/kg dose of PGE produced a higher chemoprotective effect, since the survival rate was 90%, when compared to that of the non-treated group. In these animals, reduced amounts of chromium were detected in the biological materials, in comparison with the other groups. Taken together, the results demonstrated that PGE exerts a protective effect against Cr(VI-induced genotoxicity.

  5. Early renal effects of occupational exposure to low-level hexavalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaya, Teruo (Dept. of Public Health, Gifu Univ. School of Medicine, Tsukasa-machi (Japan)); Ishikawa, Noriko (Occupational Hygiene Center, Gifu Labour Standards Association, Hikie (Japan)); Hata, Hideo (Occupational Hygiene Center, Gifu Labour Standards Association, Hikie (Japan)); Takahashi, Akemi (Gifu-shi Central Public Health Center, Miyako-dori (Japan)); Yoshida, Izumi (Gifu-shi Central Public Health Center, Miyako-dori (Japan)); Okamoto, Yoshinari (Gifu-shi Central Public Health Center, Miyako-dori (Japan))

    1994-05-01

    To detect early renal effects of occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr), urinary total proteins (U-TP), urinary albumin (U-Alb) and urinary retinol-binding protein (U-RBP) were determined in 166 male Cr platers and 106 male controls. The mean employment time in Cr plating for the platers was 12.6 years. Urinary Cr (U-Cr), which was determined as an index of Cr exposure, ranged from ''not detected'' to 19.91 [mu]g/g creatinine in the platers. The U-Cr level was lower than those in other previous studies. Age-adjusted U-TP, U-Alb or U-RBP levels were not different between the platers and the controls. In the platers, a significant positive correlation was found between age-adjusted U-TP and U-Cr, but U-Cr had no significant relation to age-adjusted U-Alb or U-RBP level. Employment time had no effect on any age-adjusted urinary proteins. The Cr exposure may have been too low to induce definite renal dysfunction. Early renal effects of low-level Cr exposure may be mild, and may not be specific to renal function. (orig.)

  6. Hexavalent chromium reduction by bacterial consortia and pure strains from an alkaline industrial effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñón-Castillo, H A; Brito, E M S; Goñi-Urriza, M; Guyoneaud, R; Duran, R; Nevarez-Moorillon, G V; Gutiérrez-Corona, J F; Caretta, C A; Reyna-López, G E

    2010-12-01

    To characterize the bacterial consortia and isolates selected for their role in hexavalent chromium removal by adsorption and reduction. Bacterial consortia from industrial wastes revealed significant Cr(VI) removal after 15 days when incubated in medium M9 at pH 6·5 and 8·0. The results suggested chromium reduction. The bacterial consortia diversity (T-RFLP based on 16S rRNA gene) indicated a highest number of operational taxonomic units in an alkaline carbonate medium mimicking in situ conditions. However, incubations under such conditions revealed low Cr(VI) removal. Genomic libraries were obtained for the consortia exhibiting optimal Cr(VI) removal (M9 medium at pH 6·5 and 8·0). They revealed the dominance of 16S rRNA gene sequences related to the genera Pseudomonas/Stenotrophomonas or Enterobacter/Halomonas, respectively. Isolates related to Pseudomonas fluorescens and Enterobacter aerogenes were efficient in Cr(VI) reduction and adsorption to the biomass. Cr(VI) reduction was better at neutral pH rather than under in situ conditions (alkaline pH with carbonate). Isolated strains exhibited significant capacity for Cr(VI) reduction and adsorption. Bacterial communities from chromium-contaminated industrial wastes as well as isolates were able to remove Cr(VI). The results suggest a good potential for bioremediation of industrial wastes when optimal conditions are applied. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology. No claim to Mexican Government works.

  7. Biosorption of hexavalent Chromium by the agricultural wastes of the cotton and barberry plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najme Boosaeidi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium, a highly toxic metal ion employed in industrial activities, is considered as a first priority pollutant. In this study, the capsule walls of the boll of cotton (cotton waste, CW and the waste obtained from pruning barberry bushes (barberry waste, BW were investigated as cheap and locally available adsorbents for Cr (VI removal. The adsorption behavior, equilibrium, and kinetic properties have been studied through batch experiments. Specifically, the sample pH showed a significant effect and an initial pH of 2.0 was most favorable for the effective removal of chromium. The equilibrium adsorption data were well fitted to the Langmuir adsorption equation with the maximum adsorption capacities of 20.7and 15.5mg/gfor CW and BW, respectively. The kinetic evaluations showed a rapid rate of adsorption (within 10 min that followed the pseudo-second order kinetic model. In competitive adsorption tests, Cl̶ had the least effect on the adsorption efficiency of Cr (VI, especially for CW. The results indicate the potential for the application of the studied agricultural wastes as adsorbents to reduce Cr (VI concentration in aqueous samples.

  8. Preparation of Silk Sericin/Lignin Blend Beads for the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Won Kwak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, novel adsorbents having high adsorption capability and reusability were prepared using agricultural by-products: silk sericin and lignin. Silk sericin and lignin blend beads were successfully prepared using simple coagulation methods for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI from aqueous solution. A 1 M lithium chloride (LiCl/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO solvent system successfully dissolved both sericin and lignin and had sufficient viscosity for bead preparation. Compared to the conventional sericin bead adsorbent, sericin/lignin blend beads showed higher Cr(VI adsorption capacity. The amount of lignin added to the adsorbent greatly affected the adsorption capacity of the beads, and a 50:50 sericin/lignin blend ratio was optimal. Adsorption behavior followed the Freundlich isotherm, which means the adsorption of Cr(VI occurred on the heterogeneous surface. Cr(VI adsorption capability increased with temperature because of thermodynamic-kinetic effects. In addition, over 90% of Cr(VI ions were recovered from the Cr(VI adsorbed sericin/lignin beads in a 1 M NaOH solution. The adsorption-desorption recycling process was stable for more than seven cycles, and the recycling efficiency was 82%. It is expected that the sericin/lignin beads could be successfully applied in wastewater remediation especially for hazardous Cr(VI ions in industrial wastewater.

  9. In-situ preparation of poly(ethylene oxide)/Li3PS4 hybrid polymer electrolyte with good nanofiller distribution for rechargeable solid-state lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaojie; Wang, Junye; Zhang, Zhihua; Wu, Linbin; Yao, Lili; Wei, Zhenyao; Deng, Yonghong; Xie, Dongjiu; Yao, Xiayin; Xu, Xiaoxiong

    2018-05-01

    Nano-sized fillers in a polymer matrix with good distribution can play a positive role in improving polymer electrolytes in the aspects of ionic conductivity, mechanical property and electrochemical performance of Li-ion cells. Herein, polyethylene oxide (PEO)/Li3PS4 hybrid polymer electrolyte is prepared via a new in-situ approach. The ionic conductivities of the novel hybrid electrolytes with variable proportions are measured, and the optimal electrolyte of PEO-2%vol Li3PS4 presents a considerable ionic conductivity of 8.01 × 10-4 S cm-1 at 60 °C and an electrochemical window up to 5.1 V. The tests of DSC and EDXS reveal that the Li3PS4 nanoparticles with better distribution, as active fillers scattering in the PEO, exhibit a positive effect on the transference of lithium ion and electrochemical interfacial stabilities. Finally, the assembled solid-state LiFePO4/Li battery presents a decent cycling performance (80.9% retention rate after 325 cycles at 60 °C) and excellent rate capacities with 153, 143, 139 and 127 mAh g-1 at the discharging rate of 0.1 C, 0.2 C, 0.5 C and 1 C at 60 °C. It is fully proved that it is an advanced strategy to preparing the new organic/inorganic hybrid electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries applications.

  10. Autophagy and oxidative stress in non-communicable diseases: A matter of the inflammatory state?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Oyarzun, Daniel; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Diaz-Vega, Alexis; Aleman, Larissa; Chiong, Mario; Garcia, Lorena; Bambs, Claudia; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Cifuentes, Mariana; Morselli, Eugenia; Ferreccio, Catterina; Quest, Andrew F G; Criollo, Alfredo; Lavandero, Sergio

    2018-05-30

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), also known as chronic diseases, are long-lasting conditions that affect millions of people around the world. Different factors contribute to their genesis and progression; however they share common features, which are critical for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. A persistently altered inflammatory response is typically observed in many NCDs together with redox imbalance. Additionally, dysregulated proteostasis, mainly derived as a consequence of compromised autophagy, is a common feature of several chronic diseases. In this review, we discuss the crosstalk among inflammation, autophagy and oxidative stress, and how they participate in the progression of chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, obesity and type II diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Brain oxidative metabolism of the newborn dog: correlation between 31P NMR spectroscopy and pyridine nucleotide redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayevsky, A; Nioka, S; Subramanian, V H; Chance, B

    1988-04-01

    The effects of both anoxia and short- and long-term hypoxia on brain oxidative metabolism were studied in newborn dogs. Oxidative metabolism was evaluated by two independent measures: in vivo continuous monitoring of mitochondrial NADH redox state and energy stores as calculated from the phosphocreatine (PCr)/Pi levels measured by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The hemodynamic response to low oxygen supply was further evaluated by measuring the changes in the reflected light intensity at 366 nm (the excitation wavelength for NADH). The animal underwent surgery and was prepared for monitoring of the two signals (NADH and PCr/Pi). It was then placed inside a Phosphoenergetics 260-80 NMR spectrometer magnet with a 31-cm bore. Each animal (1-21 days old) was exposed to short-term anoxia or hypoxia as well as to long-term hypoxia (1-2 h). The results can be summarized as follow: (a) In the normoxic brain, the ratio between PCr and Pi was greater than 1 (1.2-1.4), while under hypoxia or asphyxia a significant decrease that was correlated to the FiO2 levels was recorded. (b) A clear correlation was found between the decrease in PCr/Pi values and the increased NADH redox state developed under decreased O2 supply to the brain. (c) Exposing the animal to moderately long-term hypoxia led to a stabilized low-energy state of the brain with a good recovery after rebreathing normal air. (d) Under long-term and severe hypoxia, the microcirculatory autoregulatory mechanism was damaged and massive vasoconstriction was optically recorded simultaneously with a significant decrease in PCr/Pi values.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Decadal changes in summertime reactive oxidized nitrogen and surface ozone over the Southeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyi; Mao, Jingqiu; Fiore, Arlene M.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Crounse, John D.; Teng, Alex P.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Lee, Ben H.; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Thornton, Joel A.; Peischl, Jeff; Pollack, Ilana B.; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Veres, Patrick; Roberts, James M.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Nowak, John B.; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Hanisco, Thomas F.; Fried, Alan; Singh, Hanwant B.; Dibb, Jack; Paulot, Fabien; Horowitz, Larry W.

    2018-02-01

    Widespread efforts to abate ozone (O3) smog have significantly reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) over the past 2 decades in the Southeast US, a place heavily influenced by both anthropogenic and biogenic emissions. How reactive nitrogen speciation responds to the reduction in NOx emissions in this region remains to be elucidated. Here we exploit aircraft measurements from ICARTT (July-August 2004), SENEX (June-July 2013), and SEAC4RS (August-September 2013) and long-term ground measurement networks alongside a global chemistry-climate model to examine decadal changes in summertime reactive oxidized nitrogen (RON) and ozone over the Southeast US. We show that our model can reproduce the mean vertical profiles of major RON species and the total (NOy) in both 2004 and 2013. Among the major RON species, nitric acid (HNO3) is dominant (˜ 42-45 %), followed by NOx (31 %), total peroxy nitrates (ΣPNs; 14 %), and total alkyl nitrates (ΣANs; 9-12 %) on a regional scale. We find that most RON species, including NOx, ΣPNs, and HNO3, decline proportionally with decreasing NOx emissions in this region, leading to a similar decline in NOy. This linear response might be in part due to the nearly constant summertime supply of biogenic VOC emissions in this region. Our model captures the observed relative change in RON and surface ozone from 2004 to 2013. Model sensitivity tests indicate that further reductions of NOx emissions will lead to a continued decline in surface ozone and less frequent high-ozone events.

  13. Decadal changes in summertime reactive oxidized nitrogen and surface ozone over the Southeast United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Widespread efforts to abate ozone (O3 smog have significantly reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx over the past 2 decades in the Southeast US, a place heavily influenced by both anthropogenic and biogenic emissions. How reactive nitrogen speciation responds to the reduction in NOx emissions in this region remains to be elucidated. Here we exploit aircraft measurements from ICARTT (July–August 2004, SENEX (June–July 2013, and SEAC4RS (August–September 2013 and long-term ground measurement networks alongside a global chemistry–climate model to examine decadal changes in summertime reactive oxidized nitrogen (RON and ozone over the Southeast US. We show that our model can reproduce the mean vertical profiles of major RON species and the total (NOy in both 2004 and 2013. Among the major RON species, nitric acid (HNO3 is dominant (∼ 42–45 %, followed by NOx (31 %, total peroxy nitrates (ΣPNs; 14 %, and total alkyl nitrates (ΣANs; 9–12 % on a regional scale. We find that most RON species, including NOx, ΣPNs, and HNO3, decline proportionally with decreasing NOx emissions in this region, leading to a similar decline in NOy. This linear response might be in part due to the nearly constant summertime supply of biogenic VOC emissions in this region. Our model captures the observed relative change in RON and surface ozone from 2004 to 2013. Model sensitivity tests indicate that further reductions of NOx emissions will lead to a continued decline in surface ozone and less frequent high-ozone events.

  14. Hexavalent Chromium: Analysis of the Mechanism of Groundwater Contamination in a Former Industrial Site in the Province of Vicenza (Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Accoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study consisted in the analysis of the mobilization mechanisms of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI into groundwater from a decommissioned contaminated factory. The site is located in the Province of Vicenza and formerly was a chrome-plating plant. The subsoil consists predominantly of gravelly deposits with a thickness of at least one hundred meters. An unconfined aquifer is present with water table at about 23 m depth bgl. During the seven years of monitoring (2008-2014, the fluctuation of groundwater level was more than 6 m; hydraulic conductivity is about 1.0E-03 m/s and groundwater seepage velocity about 12 m/day. At the area of the source of contamination, the unsaturated soil is contaminated by hexavalent chromium throughout the thickness: concentrations range from 200 to 500 mg/kg. At the bottom of zone of groundwater level fluctuation, the hexavalent chromium concentration decreases to below the detection limit. The available data (e.g. hexavalent chromium concentrations in groundwater, groundwater level, local rainfall give the opportunity to assess the effects, on the magnitude of groundwater contamination, of the effective infiltration versus the fluctuation of groundwater level. The main analysis was performed on a statistical basis, in order to find out which of the two factors was most likely related to the periodic peaks of hexavalent chromium concentration in groundwater. Statistical analysis results were verified by a mass balance. Data show that at the site both the effective infiltration through the unsaturated zone and the leaching of soil contaminated by groundwater, when it exceeds a certain piezometric level, lead to peak concentrations of hexavalent chromium, even if with characteristics and effects different.

  15. Air oxidation of Zr65Cu17.5Ni10Al7.5 in its amorphous and supercooled liquid states, studied by thermogravimetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhawan, A.; Sharma, S.K.; Raetzke, K.; Faupel, F.

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation behaviour of the bulk amorphous alloy Zr 65 Cu 17.5 Ni 10 Al 7.5 was studied in air at various temperatures in the temperature range 591-732 K using a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA). The oxidation kinetics of the alloy obeys the parabolic rate law showing two different linear regions (in the plots of mass gain versus square root of oxidation time) which are attributed to the amorphous and the supercooled liquid states of the alloy. The value of the activation energy Q for the amorphous state as calculated from the temperature dependence of the rate constants is found to be 1.80±0.1 eV and the corresponding value obtained for the supercooled liquid state is 1.20±0.1 eV. It is suggested that the rate controlling process during oxidation of the amorphous state is the back-diffusion of Ni, and possibly Cu also, while the oxidation in the supercooled liquid state is dominated by the inward diffusion of oxygen. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Speciation of the oxidation states of plutonium in aqueous solutions by UV/Vis spectroscopy, CE-ICP-MS and CE-RIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerger, S.; Banik, N.L.; Buda, R.A.; Kratz, J.V.; Kuczewski, B.; Trautmann, N.

    2007-01-01

    For the speciation of the plutonium oxidation states in aqueous solutions, the online coupling of capillary electrophoresis (CE) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been developed. Depending on the radius/electrical charge ratio, the oxidation states III, IV, V, and VI of plutonium are separated by CE, based on the different migration times through the capillary and are detected by ICP-MS. The detection limit is 20 ppb, i.e. 10 9 -10 10 atoms (10 -12 -10 -13 g) for one oxidation state with an uncertainty of the reproducibility of the migration times of ≤ 1% and ≤ 5% for the peak area. The redox kinetics of the different plutonium oxidation states in the presence of humic substances (humic and fulvic acid) have been studied. A relatively rapid reduction of Pu(VI) (10 to 1000 h) in contact with Gorleben fulvic or Aldrich humic acid could be observed, depending on the pH of the solution. Furthermore, at pH=1, a reduction to Pu(III) and Pu(IV) in a mixture of all four oxidation states in contact with Gorleben fulvic acid after one month has been observed. In order to improve the sensitivity of the CE method, the offline coupling of CE to resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) has been explored. First applications of this new speciation method are presented. (orig.)

  17. Tin Oxide Nanowires: The Influence of Trap States on Ultrafast Carrier Relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zervos Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have studied the optical properties and carrier dynamics in SnO2nanowires (NWs with an average radius of 50 nm that were grown via the vapor–liquid solid method. Transient differential absorption measurements have been employed to investigate the ultrafast relaxation dynamics of photogenerated carriers in the SnO2NWs. Steady state transmission measurements revealed that the band gap of these NWs is 3.77 eV and contains two broad absorption bands. The first is located below the band edge (shallow traps and the second near the center of the band gap (deep traps. Both of these absorption bands seem to play a crucial role in the relaxation of the photogenerated carriers. Time resolved measurements suggest that the photogenerated carriers take a few picoseconds to move into the shallow trap states whereas they take ~70 ps to move from the shallow to the deep trap states. Furthermore the recombination process of electrons in these trap states with holes in the valence band takes ~2 ns. Auger recombination appears to be important at the highest fluence used in this study (500 μJ/cm2; however, it has negligible effect for fluences below 50 μJ/cm2. The Auger coefficient for the SnO2NWs was estimated to be 7.5 ± 2.5 × 10−31 cm6/s.

  18. SURFACE AND LIGHTNING SOURCES OF NITROGEN OXIDES OVER THE UNITED STATES: MAGNITUDES, CHEMICAL EVOLUTION, AND OUTFLOW

    Science.gov (United States)

    We use observations from two aircraft during the ICARTT campaign over the eastern United States and North Atlantic during summer 2004, interpreted with a global 3-D model of tropospheric chemistry (GEOS-Chem) to test current understanding of regional sources, chemical evolution...

  19. Nanoscale probing of bandgap states on oxide particles using electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qianlang; March, Katia; Crozier, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Surface and near-surface electronic states were probed with nanometer spatial resolution in MgO and TiO 2 anatase nanoparticles using ultra-high energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) coupled to a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). This combination allows the surface electronic structure determined with spectroscopy to be correlated with nanoparticle size, morphology, facet etc. By acquiring the spectra in aloof beam mode, radiation damage to the surface can be significantly reduced while maintaining the nanometer spatial resolution. MgO and TiO 2 showed very different bandgap features associated with the surface/sub-surface layer of the nanoparticles. Spectral simulations based on dielectric theory and density of states models showed that a plateau feature found in the pre-bandgap region in the spectra from (100) surfaces of 60nm MgO nanocubes is consistent with a thin hydroxide surface layer. The spectroscopy shows that this hydroxide species gives rise to a broad filled surface state at 1.1eV above the MgO valence band. At the surfaces of TiO 2 nanoparticles, pronounced peaks were observed in the bandgap region, which could not be well fitted to defect states. In this case, the high refractive index and large particle size may make Cherenkov or guided light modes the likely causes of the peaks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of additions of cerium, lanthanum, and zirconium on the state of plantinum and the activity of aluminoplatinum catalysts for the complete oxidation of hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdov, V.A.; Davydov, A.A.; Popovskii, V.V.; Tsyrul'nikov, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown from an analysis of the diffuse reflectance spectra that additions of cerium, lanthanum or zirconium to aluminoplatinum catalyst stabilize the platinum in an oxidized state. This leads to a change in the specific catalytic activity (SCA) towards the total oxidation of methane and butane. The SCA of modified, reduced samples is greater than the SCA of samples that were calcined in air. This is because of the greater activity of metallic platinum compared to the ionic form

  1. Mn K-edge XANES spectroscopy of photosynthetic water oxidation enzyme in the S0-, S1-, S2- and S3-states induced by flash excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Taka-aki; Noguchi, Takumi; Inoue, Yorinao; Kusunoki, Masami; Matsushita, Tadashi; Oyanagi, Hiroyuki.

    1993-01-01

    Electronic and structural rearrangement of the Mn-cluster during the four step oxidation of water in photosynthetic oxygen evolution was studied by XANES spectroscopy. The Mn K-edge energy of the spectrum was changed with flash number to show a clear quadruple oscillation, indicating a periodic change in oxidation and electronic state of the Mn-cluster depending on Joliot and Kok's oxygen clock. (author)

  2. Electroencephalogram, cognitive state, psychological disorders, clinical symptom, and oxidative stress in horticulture farmers exposed to organophosphate pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrami, Mansour; Hashemi, Touraj; Malekirad, Ali Akbar; Ashayeri, Hassan; Faraji, Fardin; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the toxicity of organophosphate (OP) pesticides in exposed farmers for electroencephalography, cognitive state, psychological disorders, clinical symptom, oxidative stress, acetylcholinesterase, and DNA damage. A comparative cross-sectional analysis was carried out in 40 horticulture farmers who were exposed to OPs in comparison to a control group containing 40 healthy subjects with the same age and sex and education level. Lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase, DNA damage, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total thiol molecules, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were measured in the blood of subjects. Clinical examination and complete blood test were undertaken in order to record any abnormal sign or symptoms. Cognitive function, psychological symptoms, and psychological distress were examined and recorded. Comparing with controls, the farmers showed higher blood levels of SOD and LPO while their TAC decreased. Farmers showed clinical symptoms such as eczema, breathing muscle weakness, nausea, and saliva secretion. Regarding cognitive function, the orientation, registration, attention and calculation, recall, and language were not significantly different in farmers and controls. Among examinations for psychological distress, only labeled somatization was significantly higher in farmers. The present findings indicate that oxidative stress and inhibition of AChE can be seen in chronically OP-exposed people but incidence of neuropsychological disorders seems a complex multivariate phenomenon that might be seen in long-term high-dose exposure situations. Use of supplementary antioxidants would be useful in the treatment of farmers.

  3. Steady-state oxidation of cholesterol catalyzed by cholesterol oxidase in lipid bilayer membranes on platinum electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Devadoss, Anando; Palencsar, Mariela S.; Burgess, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase is immobilized in electrode-supported lipid bilayer membranes. Platinum electrodes are initially modified with a self-assembled monolayer of thiolipid. A vesicle fusion method is used to deposit an outer leaflet of phospholipids onto the thiolipid monolayer forming a thiolipid/lipid bilayer membrane on the electrode surface. Cholesterol oxidase spontaneously inserts into the electrode-supported lipid bilayer membrane from solution and is consequently immobilized to the electrode surface. Cholesterol partitions into the membrane from buffer solutions containing cyclodextrin. Cholesterol oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of cholesterol by molecular oxygen, forming hydrogen peroxide as a product. Amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide for continuous solution flow experiments are presented, where flow was alternated between cholesterol solution and buffer containing no cholesterol. Steady-state anodic currents were observed during exposures of cholesterol solutions ranging in concentration from 10 to 1000 μM. These data are consistent with the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model for oxidation of cholesterol as catalyzed by cholesterol oxidase immobilized in the lipid bilayer membrane. The cholesterol detection limit is below 1 μM for cholesterol solution prepared in buffered cyclodextrin. The response of the electrodes to low density lipoprotein solutions is increased upon addition of cyclodextrin. Evidence for adsorption of low density lipoprotein to the electrode surface is presented

  4. Nickel Oxide (NiO nanoparticles prepared by solid-state thermal decomposition of Nickel (II schiff base precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Dehno Khalaji

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, plate-like NiO nanoparticles were prepared by one-pot solid-state thermal decomposition of nickel (II Schiff base complex as new precursor. First, the nickel (II Schiff base precursor was prepared by solid-state grinding using nickel (II nitrate hexahydrate, Ni(NO32∙6H2O, and the Schiff base ligand N,N′-bis-(salicylidene benzene-1,4-diamine for 30 min without using any solvent, catalyst, template or surfactant. It was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and elemental analysis (CHN. The resultant solid was subsequently annealed in the electrical furnace at 450 °C for 3 h in air atmosphere. Nanoparticles of NiO were produced and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD at 2θ degree 0-140°, FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The XRD and FT-IR results showed that the product is pure and has good crystallinity with cubic structure because no characteristic peaks of impurity were observed, while the SEM and TEM results showed that the obtained product is tiny, aggregated with plate-like shape, narrow size distribution with an average size between 10-40 nm. Results show that the solid state thermal decomposition method is simple, environmentally friendly, safe and suitable for preparation of NiO nanoparticles. This method can also be used to synthesize nanoparticles of other metal oxides.

  5. Diversity of Chemical Bonding and Oxidation States in MS 4 Molecules of Group 8 Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wei [Department of Chemistry and Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics & Molecular Engineering of the Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 P.R. China; Jiang, Ning [Department of Chemistry and Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics & Molecular Engineering of the Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 P.R. China; Schwarz, W. H. Eugen [Department of Chemistry and Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics & Molecular Engineering of the Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 P.R. China; Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, University of Siegen, Siegen 57068 Germany; Yang, Ping [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico 87545 USA; Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 953002 USA; Li, Jun [Department of Chemistry and Key Laboratory of Organic Optoelectronics & Molecular Engineering of the Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 P.R. China; Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 953002 USA

    2017-07-11

    The geometric and electronic ground-state structures of six MS4 molecules (M = group-8 metals Fe, Ru, Os, Hs, Sm, and Pu) have been studied by using quantum-chemical density-functional and correlated wave-function approaches. The MS4 species are compared to analogous MO4 species recently investi-gated (Inorg. Chem. 2016, 55: 4616). Metal oxidation state (MOS) of high value VIII appears in low- spin singlet Td geometric species (Os,Hs)S4 and (Ru,Os,Hs)O4, whereas low MOS=II appears in high- spin septet D2d species Fe(S2)2 and (slightly excited) metastable Fe(O2)2. The ground states of all other molecules have intermediate MOS values, containing S2-, S22-, S21- (and resp. O2--, O1-, O22-, O21-) ligands, bonded by ionic, covalent and correlative contributions.

  6. A Singular Perturbation Problem for Steady State Conversion of Methane Oxidation in Reverse Flow Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aang Nuryaman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The governing equations describing the methane oxidation process in reverse flow reactor are given by a set of convective-diffusion equations with a nonlinear reaction term, where temperature and methane conversion are dependent variables. In this study, the process is assumed to be one-dimensional pseudo homogeneous model and takes place with a certain reaction rate in which the whole process of reactor is still workable. Thus, the reaction rate can proceed at a fixed temperature. Under this condition, we restrict ourselves to solve the equations for the conversion only. From the available data, it turns out that the ratio of the diffusion term to the reaction term is small. Hence, this ratio is considered as small parameter in our model and this leads to a singular perturbation problem. In the vicinity of small parameter in front of higher order term, the numerical difficulties will be found. Here, we present an analytical solution by means of matched asymptotic expansions. Result shows that, up to and including the first order of approximation, the solution is in agreement with the exact and numerical solutions of the boundary value problem.

  7. Simulation of the steady-state behaviour of a new design of a single planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pianko-Oprych Paulina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to develop a mathematical model for computing the steady-state voltage – current characteristics of a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and to determine the performance of a new SOFC design. The design involves cross-flow bipolar plates. Each of the bipolar plates has an air channel system on one side and a fuel channel system on the other side. The proposed model was developed using the ANSYS-Fluent commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software supported by additional Fuel Cell module. The results confirm that the model can well simulate the diagonal current path. The effects of temperature and gas flow through the channels and a Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA structure were taken into account. It was shown that a significant increase of the MEA temperature at high current density can lead to hot spots formation and hence electrode damage.

  8. All-solid-state flexible supercapacitors based on highly dispersed polypyrrole nanowire and reduced graphene oxide composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chenfei; Ma, Peipei; Zhou, Xi; Wang, Anqi; Qian, Tao; Wu, Shishan; Chen, Qiang

    2014-10-22

    Highly dispersed polypyrrole nanowires are decorated on reduced graphene oxide sheets using a facile in situ synthesis route. The prepared composites exhibit high dispersibility, large effective surface area, and high electric conductivity. All-solid-state flexible supercapacitors are assembled based on the prepared composites, which show excellent electrochemical performances with a specific capacitance of 434.7 F g(-1) at a current density of 1 A g(-1). The as-fabricated supercapacitor also exhibits excellent cycling stability (88.1% capacitance retention after 5000 cycles) and exceptional mechanical flexibility. In addition, outstanding power and energy densities were obtained, demonstrating the significant potential of prepared material for flexible and portable energy storage devices.

  9. Eco-friendly wood-based solid-state flexible supercapacitors from wood transverse section slice and reduced graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Shaoyi; Fu, Feng; Wang, Siqun; Huang, Jingda; Hu, La

    2015-07-01

    An interesting wood-based all-solid-state supercapacitor is produced using reduced graphene oxide (RGO) coated on wood transverse section slice (WTSS) as electrode material by means of a low-cost, eco-friendly, and simple method for the first time. The RGO-coated WTSS electrode has a porous 3D honeycomb framework due to the hierarchical cellular structure of the WTSS substrate and can function as an electrolyte reservoir. This special construction endows this novel electrode with good areal capacitance (102 mF cm-2) and excellent cyclic stability (capacitance retention of 98.9% after 5000 cycles). In addition, the supercapacitors exhibit good mechanical flexibility and preserve almost constant capacitive behavior under different bending conditions. Our study introduces a new and eco-friendly material design for electrodes in future flexible energy storage devices that closely resemble natural materials. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Synthesis and Electrochemistry of Li3MnO4: Mn in the +5 OxidationState

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint, Juliette.A.; Doeff, Marca M.; Reed, John

    2007-06-19

    Computational and experimental work directed at exploringthe electrochemical properties of tetrahedrally coordinated Mn in the +5oxidation state is presented. Specific capacities of nearly 700 mAh/g arepredicted for the redox processes of LixMnO4 complexes based on twotwo-phase reactions. One is topotactic extractionof Li from Li3MnO4 toform LiMnO4 and the second is topotactic insertion of Li into Li3MnO4 toform Li5MnO4. In experiments, it is found that the redox behavior ofLi3MnO4 is complicated by disproportionation of Mn5+ in solution to formMn4+ and Mn7+ and byother irreversible processes; although an initialcapacity of about 275 mAh/g in lithiumcells was achieved. Strategiesbased on structural considerations to improve the electrochemicalproperties of MnO4n- complexes are given.

  11. Influence of Battery Parametric Uncertainties on the State-of-Charge Estimation of Lithium Titanate Oxide-Based Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroe, Ana-Irina; Meng, Jinhao; Stroe, Daniel-Ioan

    2018-01-01

    to describe the battery dynamics. The SOC estimation method proposed in this paper is based on an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and nonlinear battery model which was parameterized using extended laboratory tests performed on several 13 Ah lithium titanate oxide (LTO)-based lithium-ion batteries. The developed......State of charge (SOC) is one of the most important parameters in battery management systems, as it indicates the available battery capacity at every moment. There are numerous battery model-based methods used for SOC estimation, the accuracy of which depends on the accuracy of the model considered...... a sensitivity analysis it was showed that the SOC and voltage estimation error are only slightly dependent on the variation of the battery model parameters with the SOC....

  12. Interval training in the fed or fasted state improves body composition and muscle oxidative capacity in overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, Jenna B; Percival, Michael E; Ludzki, Alison; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Gibala, Martin J

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the effects of low-volume high-intensity interval training (HIT) performed in the fasted (FAST) versus fed (FED) state on body composition, muscle oxidative capacity, and glycemic control in overweight/obese women. Sixteen women (27 ± 8 years, BMI: 29 ± 6 kg/m(2) , VO2peak : 28 ± 3 ml/kg/min) were assigned to either FAST or FED (n = 8 each) and performed 18 sessions of HIT (10× 60-s cycling efforts at ∼90% maximal heart rate, 60-s recovery) over 6 weeks. There was no significant difference between FAST and FED for any measured variable. Body mass was unchanged following training; however, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry revealed lower percent fat in abdominal and leg regions as well as the whole body level (main effects for time, P ≤ 0.05). Fat-free mass increased in leg and gynoid regions (P ≤ 0.05). Resting muscle biopsies revealed a training-induced increase in mitochondrial capacity as evidenced by increased maximal activities of citrate synthase and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (P ≤ 0.05). There was no change in insulin sensitivity, although change in insulin area under the curve was correlated with change in abdominal percent fat (r = 0.54, P ≤ 0.05). Short-term low-volume HIT is a time-efficient strategy to improve body composition and muscle oxidative capacity in overweight/obese women, but fed- versus fasted-state training does not alter this response. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  13. Magnetotransport investigations of the two-dimensional metallic state in silicon metal-oxid-semiconductor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinz, A.

    2002-03-01

    For more than two decades it was the predominant view among the physical community that the every two-dimensional (2D) disordered electron system becomes insulating as the temperature approaches the absolute zero temperature (0 Kelvin or -273.15 o C). Two-dimensional means that the movement of the charge carriers is confined in one direction by a potential so that the carriers can move freely only perpendicular to the confinement. The most famous physical realization of a 2D system is the silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (Si-MOSFET). It is one of the basic elements of most electronic devices in our daily life. The working principle is very simple. Charges are attracted to the semiconductor-oxide interface by an electric field applied between the metallic gate and the semiconductor, so that a 2D conductive channel is formed. The charge density can be adjusted by the voltage from zero up to 10 13 cm -2 . In 1994 Kravchenko and coworkers made a very important discovery. They studied high mobility Si-MOSFETs and found that for densities below a certain critical value, nc, the resistivity increases as the temperature is decreased below 2 K, whereas for densities above $n c $ the resistivity decreases unexpectedly. The transition from insulating to metallic behavior, known as metal-insulator transition (MIT), was obviously a contradiction to the commonly accepted theories which predict insulating behavior for any density. The insulating behavior is a consequence of the wave properties of electrons which leads to interference in disordered media and thus to enhanced backscattering. In the subsequent years, experimental studies were performed on a variety of 2D systems, which qualitatively showed a similar behavior. All the investigated samples had one thing in common. The interaction energy between the carriers was considerable higher than their mean kinetic energy due to their movement in the 2D plane. Since the electron-electron interaction was

  14. The oxidation state of Fe in MORB glasses and the oxygen fugacity of the upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Elizabeth; Kelley, Katherine A.

    2011-05-01

    Micro-analytical determination of Fe3+/∑Fe ratios in mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glasses using micro X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) spectroscopy reveals a substantially more oxidized upper mantle than determined by previous studies. Here, we show that global MORBs yield average Fe3+/∑Fe ratios of 0.16 ± 0.01 (n = 103), which trace back to primary MORB melts equilibrated at the conditions of the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) buffer. Our results necessitate an upward revision of the Fe3+/∑Fe ratios of MORBs, mantle oxygen fugacity, and the ferric iron content of the mantle relative to previous wet chemical determinations. We show that only 0.01 (absolute, or Co-variations of Fe3+/∑Fe ratios in global MORB with indices of low-pressure fractional crystallization are consistent with Fe3+ behaving incompatibly in shallow MORB magma chambers. MORB Fe3+/∑Fe ratios do not, however, vary with indices of the extent of mantle melting (e.g., Na2O(8)) or water concentration. We offer two hypotheses to explain these observations: The bulk partition coefficient of Fe3+ may be higher during peridotite melting than previously thought, and may vary with temperature, or redox exchange between sulfide and sulfate species could buffer mantle melting at ~ QFM. Both explanations, in combination with the measured MORB Fe3+/∑Fe ratios, point to a fertile MORB source with greater than 0.3 wt.% Fe2O3.

  15. Thermodynamic properties of ternary oxides in the system Ba-Fe-O using solid-state electrochemical cells with oxide and fluoride ion conducting electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakshit, S. K.; Parida, S. C.; Singh, Ziley; Prasad, R.; Venugopal, V.

    2004-04-01

    The standard molar Gibbs energy of formations of BaFe 12O 19(s), BaFe 2O 4(s), Ba 2Fe 2O 5(s), Ba 3Fe 2O 6(s) and Ba 5Fe 2O 8(s) have been determined using solid-state electrochemical technique employing CaF 2(s) as an electrolyte. The reversible e.m.f. values have been measured in the temperature range from 970 to 1151 K. The oxygen chemical potential corresponding to three phase equilibria involving technologically important compound BaFe 12O 19(s) has been determined using solid-state electrochemical technique employing CSZ as an electrolyte from 1048 to 1221 K. The values of Δ fGm0( T) for the above ternary oxides are given by ΔfG m0( BaFe12O19, s)/ kJ mol -1(±0.6)=-5431.3+1.5317 (T/ K) (970⩽T/ K⩽1151) ΔfG m0( BaFe2O4, s)/ kJ mol -1(±1.3)=-1461.4+0.3745 (T/ K) (970⩽T/ K⩽1151) ΔfG m0( Ba2Fe2O5, s)/ kJ mol -1(±1.4)=-2038.3+0.4433 (T/ K) (970⩽T/ K⩽1149) ΔfG m0( Ba3Fe2O6, s)/ kJ mol -1(±1.5)=-2700.1+0.6090 (T/ K) (969⩽T/ K⩽1150) and ΔfG m0( Ba5Fe2O8, s)/ kJ mol -1(±1.6)=-3984.1+0.9300 (T/ K) (973⩽T/ K⩽1150) The uncertainty estimates for Δ fGm0 includes the standard deviation in the e.m.f. and uncertainty in the data taken from the literature. An isothermal oxygen potential diagram for the system Ba-Fe-O was constructed at 1100 K based on the thermodynamic data obtained in this study.

  16. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to hawksbill sea turtle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Sandra S., E-mail: sandra.wise@maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Xie, Hong, E-mail: hongxie@usm.maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Fukuda, Tomokazu, E-mail: tomofukuda009@gmail.com [Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Tohoku University, Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Second Research Building, Rm 112, 1-1 Amamiyamachi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Douglas Thompson, W., E-mail: dougt@usm.maine.edu [Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); and others

    2014-09-01

    Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7% relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36% of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3% relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29% of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general. - Highlights: • Particulate Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Soluble Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Cr(VI) may be a risk factor for hawksbill sea turtle health.

  17. Recovery of hexavalent chromium from water using photoactive TiO2-montmorillonite under sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Djellabi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium was removed from water under sunlight using a synthesized TiO2-montmorillonite (TiO2-M employing tartaric acid as a hole scavenger. Cr(VI species was then reduced to Cr(III species by electrons arising from TiO2 particles. After that, the produced Cr(III species  was transferred to montmorillonite  due to electrostatic attractions leading to  set free TiO2 particles for a further Cr(VI species reduction. Furthermore, produced Cr(III, after Cr(VI reduction, does not  penetrate into the solution. The results indicate that no dark adsorption of Cr(VI species on TiO2-M is present, however, the reduction of Cr(VI species under sunlight increased strongly as a function of tartaric acid concentration up to 60 ppm, for which the extent of reduction is maximum within 3 h. On the other hand, the reduction extent of Cr(VI species is maximum with an initial concentration of Cr(VI species lower than 30 ppm by the use of 0.2 g/L of TiO2-M. Nevertheless, the increase of the Cr(VI initial concentration led to increase the amount of Cr(VI species reduced (capacity of reduction until a Cr(VI concentration of 75 and 100 ppm, for which  it remained constant at around 221 mg/g. For comparison, the increase of Cr(VI species concentration in the case of the commercial TiO2 P25 under the same conditions exhibited its deactivation when the reduced amount decreased from 198.1 to 157.6 mg/g as the concentration increased from 75 to 100 ppm.

  18. Modulation of histone methylation and MLH1 gene silencing by hexavalent chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hong; Zhou Xue; Chen Haobin; Li Qin; Costa, Max

    2009-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a mutagen and carcinogen, and occupational exposure can lead to lung cancers and other adverse health effects. Genetic changes resulting from DNA damage have been proposed as an important mechanism that mediates chromate's carcinogenicity. Here we show that chromate exposure of human lung A549 cells increased global levels of di- and tri-methylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) and lysine 4 (H3K4) but decreased the levels of tri-methylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) and di-methylated histone H3 arginine 2 (H3R2). Most interestingly, H3K9 dimethylation was enriched in the human MLH1 gene promoter following chromate exposure and this was correlated with decreased MLH1 mRNA expression. Chromate exposure increased the protein as well as mRNA levels of G9a a histone methyltransferase that specifically methylates H3K9. This Cr(VI)-induced increase in G9a may account for the global elevation of H3K9 dimethylation. Furthermore, supplementation with ascorbate, the primary reductant of Cr(VI) and also an essential cofactor for the histone demethylase activity, partially reversed the H3K9 dimethylation induced by chromate. Thus our studies suggest that Cr(VI) may target histone methyltransferases and demethylases, which in turn affect both global and gene promoter specific histone methylation, leading to the silencing of specific tumor suppressor genes such as MLH1.

  19. Regeneration of pilot-scale ion exchange columns for hexavalent chromium removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korak, Julie A; Huggins, Richard; Arias-Paic, Miguel

    2017-07-01

    Due to stricter regulations, some drinking water utilities must implement additional treatment processes to meet potable water standards for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), such as the California limit of 10 μg/L. Strong base anion exchange is effective for Cr(VI) removal, but efficient resin regeneration and waste minimization are important for operational, economic and environmental considerations. This study compared multiple regeneration methods on pilot-scale columns on the basis of regeneration efficiency, waste production and salt usage. A conventional 1-Stage regeneration using 2 N sodium chloride (NaCl) was compared to 1) a 2-Stage process with 0.2 N NaCl followed by 2 N NaCl and 2) a mixed regenerant solution with 2 N NaCl and 0.2 N sodium bicarbonate. All methods eluted similar cumulative amounts of chromium with 2 N NaCl. The 2-Stage process eluted an additional 20-30% of chromium in the 0.2 N fraction, but total resin capacity is unaffected if this fraction is recycled to the ion exchange headworks. The 2-Stage approach selectively eluted bicarbonate and sulfate with 0.2 N NaCl before regeneration using 2 N NaCl. Regeneration approach impacted the elution efficiency of both uranium and vanadium. Regeneration without co-eluting sulfate and bicarbonate led to incomplete uranium elution and potential formation of insoluble uranium hydroxides that could lead to long-term resin fouling, decreased capacity and render the resin a low-level radioactive solid waste. Partial vanadium elution occurred during regeneration due to co-eluting sulfate suppressing vanadium release. Waste production and salt usage were comparable for the 1- and 2-Stage regeneration processes with similar operational setpoints with respect to chromium or nitrate elution. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Hexavalent Chromium Is Cytotoxic and Genotoxic to Hawksbill Sea Turtle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S.; Xie, Hong; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Thompson, W. Douglas; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm2 lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7 percent relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm2 lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36 percent of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3 percent relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29 percent of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general. PMID:24952338

  1. Removal of hexavalent chromium upon interaction with biochar under acidic conditions: mechanistic insights and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Bharat; Paul, Debajyoti; Singh, Abhas; Gupta, Tarun

    2017-07-01

    Chromium pollution of soil and water is a serious environmental concern due to potential carcinogenicity of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] when ingested. Eucalyptus bark biochar (EBB), a carbonaceous black porous material obtained by pyrolysis of biomass at 500 °C under oxygen-free atmosphere, was used to investigate the removal of aqueous Cr(VI) upon interaction with the EBB, the dominant Cr(VI) removal mechanism(s), and the applicability to treat Cr(VI)-contaminated wastewater. Batch experiments showed complete removal of aqueous Cr(VI) at pH 1-2; sorption was negligible at pH 1, but ~55% of total Cr was sorbed onto the EBB surface at pH 2. Detailed investigations on unreacted and reacted EBB through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) indicate that the carboxylic groups in biochar played a dominant role in Cr(VI) sorption, whereas the phenolic groups were responsible for Cr(VI) reduction. The predominance of sorption-reduction mechanism was confirmed by XPS studies that indicated ~82% as Cr(III) and ~18% as Cr(VI) sorbed on the EBB surface. Significantly, Cr(VI) reduction was also facilitated by dissolved organic matter (DOM) extracted from biochar. This reduction was enhanced by the presence of biochar. Overall, the removal of Cr(VI) in the presence of biochar was affected by sorption due to electrostatic attraction, sorption-reduction mediated by surface organic complexes, and aqueous reduction by DOM. Relative dominance of the aqueous reduction mechanism depended on a critical biochar dosage for a given electrolyte pH and initial Cr(VI) concentration. The low-cost EBB developed here successfully removed all Cr(VI) in chrome tanning acidic wastewater and Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater after pH adjustment, highlighting its potential applicability in effective Cr(VI) remediation.

  2. Origin of hexavalent chromium in groundwater: The example of Sarigkiol Basin, Northern Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakis, N; Kantiranis, N; Kalaitzidou, K; Kaprara, E; Mitrakas, M; Frei, R; Vargemezis, G; Tsourlos, P; Zouboulis, A; Filippidis, A

    2017-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium constitutes a serious deterioration factor for the groundwater quality of several regions around the world. High concentrations of this contaminant have been also reported in the groundwater of the Sarigkiol hydrological basin (near Kozani city, NW Greece). Specific interest was paid to this particular study area due to the co-existence here of two important factors both expected to contribute to Cr(VI) presence and groundwater pollution; namely the area's exposed ophiolitic rocks and its substantial fly ash deposits originating from the local lignite burning power plant. Accordingly, detailed geochemical, mineralogical, hydro-chemical, geophysical and hydrogeological studies were performed on the rocks, soils, sediments and water resources of this basin. Cr(VI) concentrations varied in the different aquifers, with the highest concentration (up to 120μgL -1 ) recorded in the groundwater of the unconfined porous aquifer situated near the temporary fly ash disposal site. Recharge of the porous aquifer is related mainly to precipitation infiltration and occasional surface run-off. Nevertheless, a hydraulic connection between the porous and neighboring karst aquifers could not be delineated. Therefore, the presence of Cr(VI) in the groundwater of this area is thought to originate from both the ophiolitic rock weathering products in the soils, and the local leaching of Cr(VI) from the diffused fly ash located in the area surrounding the lignite power plant. This conclusion was corroborated by factor analysis, and the strongly positively fractionated Cr isotopes (δ 53 Cr up to 0.83‰) recorded in groundwater, an ash leachate, and the bulk fly ash. An anthropogenic source of Cr(VI) that possibly influences groundwater quality is especially apparent in the eastern part of the Sarigkiol basin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Comparative Survey on Parameters Influencing on Hexavalent Chromium Measurement as an Occupational Carcinogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tirgar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Hexavalent chromium, Cr+6, is a very harmful pollutant and a relatively unstable compound that is present in many industries. It is a known human respiratory carcinogen and occupational exposure to this chemical is associated with different health hazards. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of four parameters including: type of sampling head, sampling height from the surface of electroplating solution, sampling duration, and sample storage duration on Cr+6 mist monitoring.Materials & Methods: To evaluate the influence of the main parameters as an experimental study, the 24 factorial design was applied at constant electroplating condition. A chromium electroplating bath with the ability to produce homogenous mist was used to create Cr+6 mist in laboratory setting. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH method 7600 was used to determine the Cr+6 concentration. Results: The results of 48 Cr+6 mist samples showed that Cr+6 concentration was higher: (1 for sampling by closed-face filter cassettes than for sampling by open-face filter cassettes (P<0.001; (2 for samples collected at 35 cm above the electroplating solution surface than for samples collected at 50 cm (P <0.001; (3 for sampling duration of 30 minutes than for sampling duration of 180 minutes (P <0.001; and, (4 for samples extracted immediately after sampling than for samples with delayed extraction (24 hours after sampling (P <0.001. Conclusion: It is concluded that the accuracy of Cr+6 mist sampling in electroplating shops will be enhanced when: (1 a closed-face filter cassette is used to prevent liquid splash contamination; (2 the sampling height is suitable as determined by further research; (3 the sampling duration is short (approximately 30 minutes; and, (4 the extraction of the Cr+6 sample is performed as soon as the sampling is completed.

  4. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to hawksbill sea turtle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, Sandra S.; Xie, Hong; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Douglas Thompson, W.

    2014-01-01

    Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm 2 lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7% relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm 2 lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36% of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3% relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29% of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general. - Highlights: • Particulate Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Soluble Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Cr(VI) may be a risk factor for hawksbill sea turtle health

  5. Prolonged Particulate Hexavalent Chromium Exposure Suppresses Homologous Recombination Repair in Human Lung Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Cynthia L; Qin, Qin; Kelly, Deborah F; Prakash, Rohit; Vanoli, Fabio; Jasin, Maria; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-09-01

    Genomic instability is one of the primary models of carcinogenesis and a feature of almost all cancers. Homologous recombination (HR) repair protects against genomic instability by maintaining high genomic fidelity during the repair of DNA double strand breaks. The defining step of HR repair is the formation of the Rad51 nucleofilament, which facilitates the search for a homologous sequence and invasion of the template DNA strand. Particulate hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), a human lung carcinogen, induces DNA double strand breaks and chromosome instability. Since the loss of HR repair increases Cr(VI)-induced chromosome instability, we investigated the effect of extended Cr(VI) exposure on HR repair. We show acute (24 h) Cr(VI) exposure induces a normal HR repair response. In contrast, prolonged (120 h) exposure to particulate Cr(VI) inhibited HR repair and Rad51 nucleofilament formation. Prolonged Cr(VI) exposure had a profound effect on Rad51, evidenced by reduced protein levels and Rad51 mislocalization to the cytoplasm. The response of proteins involved in Rad51 nuclear import and nucleofilament formation displayed varying responses to prolonged Cr(VI) exposure. BRCA2 formed nuclear foci after prolonged Cr(VI) exposure, while Rad51C foci formation was suppressed. These results suggest that particulate Cr(VI), a major chemical carcinogen, inhibits HR repair by targeting Rad51, causing DNA double strand breaks to be repaired by a low fidelity, Rad51-independent repair pathway. These results further enhance our understanding of the underlying mechanism of Cr(VI)-induced chromosome instability and thus, carcinogenesis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Optimization of factors affecting hexavalent chromium removal from simulated electroplating wastewater by synthesized magnetite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataabadi, Mitra; Hoodaji, Mehran; Tahmourespour, Arezoo; Kalbasi, Mahmoud; Abdouss, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a mutagen and carcinogen that is of significant concern in water and wastewater. In the present study, magnetite nanoparticles (n-Mag) were investigated as a potential remediation technology for the decontamination of Cr (VI)-contaminated wastewater. Synthesized n-Mag was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and BET-N2 technology. To screen and optimize the factors affecting Cr (VI) removal efficiency by synthesized nanoparticles, Plackett-Burman (PB) and Taguchi experimental designs were used respectively. The crystalline produced n-Mag was in the size range of 60-70 nm and had a specific surface area (SSA) of 31.55 m(2) g(-1). Results of PB design showed that the most significant factors affecting Cr (VI) removal efficiency were initial Cr (VI) concentration, pH, n-Mag dosage, and temperature. In a pH of 2, 20 mg L(-1) of Cr (VI) concentration, 4 g L(-1)of n-Mag, temperature of 40 °C, 220 rpm of shaking speed, and 60 min of contact time, the complete removal efficiency of Cr (VI) was achieved. Batch experiments revealed that the removal of Cr (VI) by n-Mag was consistent with pseudo-second order reaction kinetics. The competition from common coexisting ions such as NO₃(-), SO₄(2-), and Cl(-) were not considerable, unless in the higher concentration of SO₄(2-). These results indicated that the readily synthesized magnetite nanoparticles have promising applications for the removal of Cr (VI) from aqueous solution.

  7. A cohort study to evaluate persistence of hepatitis B immunogenicity