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Sample records for hexavalent chromium species

  1. Groundwater contaminant by hexavalent chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium has been investigated as a function of total manganese in soils as well as various incubation conditions. Chromium and manganese contents were analyzed by atomic absorption (graphite furnace and flame emission respectively) following acid digestion. Total hexavalent chromium generation capacity was determined by addition of 0.001 M CrCL3, incubation, and analysis by s-diphenyl carbazide. Samples were then leached with CaSO{sub 4} and MgSO{sub 4} and incubated in various environments (oven, freeze-drier, field moist, ultrafreeze) to test for geogenic generation of Cr(IV). The degree of geogenic generation of hexavalent chromium was compared with total Mn and Cr content as well as hexavalent generational capacity.

  2. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium in a tannery industry wastewater using fungi species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sivakumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The isolated fungi species of different kinds from chromium contaminated soil sites located in Nagalkeni, Chennai were used for reducing chromium(VI in a tannery industry wastewater of Nagalkeni, Chennai.  The experiments were conducted to know biosorption potential of isolated fungi species for removing chromium(VI in a tannery industry wastewater against the different pH, fungi biomass and chromium(VI concentration (dilution ratio.  The results of this study indicated that the order of maximum removal of chromium(VI by an isolated fungi species at an optimum pH of 3, fungi biomass of 4g andan initial chromium(VI concentration of 18.125 mg/L (dilution ratio 4is A. niger > A. flavus > A. fumigatus > A. nidulans > A. heteromorphus > A. foetidus > A. viridinutans.  This study found that the maximum removal of chromium(VI was achieved by Aspergillus niger (96.3 % than other fungi species at chromium(VI concentration of 18.125 mg/Lin a tannery industry wastewater. The chromium removal from tannery industry wastewater was validated by checking chromium removal in an aqueous solution and by checking the removal efficiency of other parameters in a tannery industry wastewater using same isolated A. niger.  Biosorption model was proposed to simulate the experimental condition for removing chromium(VI in a tannery industry wastewater by all isolated fungi species. The R2 and  values of the proposed model predicted that the proposed biosorption model is very much useful for predicting the trend of reduction potential of chromium(VI in a tannery industry wastewater by all isolated fungi species.  This study suggested that one could select the type of fungi species, ion concentration level, selection of treatment period, quantity of biomass to be used, and pH level of the medium, to achieve the highest reduction of any toxic metals from any contaminated water, wastewater and soil environment.

  3. Chromium isotopes as indicators of hexavalent chromium reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Thomas M.

    2012-03-20

    This is the final report for a university research project which advanced development of a new technology for identifying chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium contamination in groundwater systems. Reduction renders mobile and toxic hexavalent chromium immobile and less toxic. The new method uses stable isotope ratio measurements, which are made using multicollector ICP-mass spectrometry. The main objectives of this project were completed during the project period and two peer-reviewed articles were published to disseminate the information gained.

  4. Aberration of mitosis by hexavalent chromium in some Fabaceae members is mediated by species-specific microtubule disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P; Michalopoulou, Vasiliki A; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S

    2015-05-01

    Because the detrimental effects of chromium (Cr) to higher plants have been poorly investigated, the present study was undertaken to verify the toxic attributes of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to plant mitotic microtubules (MTs), to determine any differential disruption of MTs during mitosis of taxonomically related species and to clarify the relationship between the visualized chromosomal aberrations and the Cr(VI)-induced MT disturbance. For this purpose, 5-day-old uniform seedlings of Vicia faba, Pisum sativum, Vigna sinensis and Vigna angularis, all belonging to the Fabaceae family, were exposed to 250 μM Cr(VI) supplied as potassium dichromate (K₂Cr₂O₇) for 24, 72 and 120 h and others in distilled water serving as controls. Root tip samples were processed for tubulin immunolabelling (for MT visualization) and DNA fluorescent staining (for chromosomal visualization). Microscopic preparations of cell squashes were then examined and photographed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Cr(VI) halted seedling growth turning roots brown and necrotic. Severe chromosomal abnormalities and differential disturbance of the corresponding MT arrays were found in all mitotic phases. In particular, in V. faba MTs were primarily depolymerized and replaced by atypical tubulin conformations, whereas in P. sativum, V. sinensis and V. angularis they became bundled in a time-dependent manner. In P. sativum, the effects were milder compared to those of the other species, but in all cases MT disturbance adversely affected the proper aggregation of chromosomes on the metaphase plate, their segregation at anaphase and organization of the new nuclei at telophase. Cr(VI) is very toxic to seedling growth. The particular effect depends on the exact stage the cell is found at the time of Cr(VI) entrance and is species-specific. Mitotic MT arrays are differentially deranged by Cr(VI) in the different species examined, even if they are taxonomically related, while their

  5. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions.

  6. Origin of hexavalent chromium in groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazakis, N.; Kantiranis, N.; Kalaitzidou, K.

    2017-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium constitutes a serious deterioration factor for the groundwater quality of several regions around the world. High concentrations of this contaminant have been also reported in the groundwater of the Sarigkiol hydrological basin (near Kozani city, NW Greece). Specific interest....... Accordingly, detailed geochemical, mineralogical, hydro-chemical, geophysical and hydrogeological studies were performed on the rocks, soils, sediments and water resources of this basin. Cr(VI) concentrations varied in the different aquifers, with the highest concentration (up to 120 μg L− 1) recorded...

  7. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition during oncogenic transformation induced by hexavalent chromium involves reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanism in lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Song-Ze, E-mail: dingsongze@hotmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Wei-Wu Road, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000 (China); Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Yang, Yu-Xiu; Li, Xiu-Ling [Department of Internal Medicine, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Wei-Wu Road, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000 (China); Michelli-Rivera, Audrey [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Han, Shuang-Yin [Department of Internal Medicine, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Wei-Wu Road, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000 (China); Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Xin; Lu, Jian; Yin, Yuan-Qin; Budhraja, Amit; Hitron, Andrew J. [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is an important human carcinogen associated with pulmonary diseases and lung cancer. Exposure to Cr(VI) induces DNA damage, cell morphological change and malignant transformation in human lung epithelial cells. Despite extensive studies, the molecular mechanisms remain elusive, it is also not known if Cr(VI)-induced transformation might accompany with invasive properties to facilitate metastasis. We aimed to study Cr(VI)-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion during oncogenic transformation in lung epithelial cells. The results showed that Cr(VI) at low doses represses E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression, enhances mesenchymal marker vimentin expression and transforms the epithelial cell into fibroblastoid morphology. Cr(VI) also increases cell invasion and promotes colony formation. Further studies indicated that Cr(VI) uses multiple mechanisms to repress E-cadherin expression, including activation of E-cadherin repressors such as Slug, ZEB1, KLF8 and enhancement the binding of HDAC1 in E-cadherin gene promoter, but DNA methylation is not responsible for the loss of E-cadherin. Catalase reduces Cr(VI)-induced E-cadherin and vimentin protein expression, attenuates cell invasion in matrigel and colony formation on soft agar. These results demonstrate that exposure to a common human carcinogen, Cr(VI), induces EMT and invasion during oncogenic transformation in lung epithelial cells and implicate in cancer metastasis and prevention. - Graphical abstract: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition during oncogenic transformation induced by hexavalent chromium involves reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanisms in lung epithelial cells. - Highlights: • We study if Cr(VI) might induce EMT and invasion in epithelial cells. • Cr(VI) induces EMT by altering E-cadherin and vimentin expression. • It also increases cell invasion and promotes oncogenic transformation. • Catalase reduces Cr(VI)-induced EMT, invasion and

  8. Quantification of total chromium and hexavalent chromium in UHT milk by ETAAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameiras, J; Soares, M E; Bastos, M L; Ferreira, M

    1998-10-01

    Procedures for the quantification of total chromium and hexavalent chromium in UHT milk samples are presented. Total chromium was determined directly in milk with the addition of a surfactant and a mixture of Pd and Mg as a chemical modifier. For the selective separation of hexavalent chromium, the sample pre-treatment consisted in precipitation of proteins and elution of the supernatant through a Chromabond NH2 column. The metal was eluted with nitric acid. Both total chromium and hexavalent chromium were evaluated by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization using the same instrumental conditions. The detection limits were 0.2 and 0.15 microgram l-1 for total chromium and hexavalent chromium, respectively. The linearity ranges under the optimized conditions were 0.2-20 and 0.15-50 micrograms l-1. For total chromium the precision was 4.9 and 5.7% for the analytical and the over-all procedure, respectively, and for hexavalent chromium 4.3 and 4.9%, respectively. The validation of both procedures was performed by the standard additions method and the recoveries were higher than 93% in all cases. For total chromium, a certified reference material was also used to validate the methodology. The methods were applied to the determination of total chromium and hexavalent chromium in 60 UHT milk samples.

  9. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium onto sisal pulp/polypyrrole composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Y. Y.; Wei, C.; Gong, Y. Y.; Du, L. L.

    2017-02-01

    Sisal pulp/polypyrrole composites(SP/PPy) utilized for the removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from wastewater, were prepared via in-situ chemical oxidation polymerization approach. The structure and morphology of the SP/PPy were analyzed by polarizing optical microscopy (POM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM)), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the results indicated SP could be efficient dispersion of PPy. The hexavalent chromium adsorption results indicate adsorption capacity of the SP/PPy were dependent on the initial pH, with an optimum pH of 2.0. The sorption kinetic data fitted well to the pseudo-second order model and isotherm data fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity determined from the Langmuir isotherm is 336.70 mg/g at 25° C.

  10. Biodegradation of the metallic carcinogen hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) by an indigenously isolated bacterial strain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Das, Alok Prasad; Mishra, Susmita

    2010-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], a potential mutagen and carcinogen, is regularly introduced into the environment through diverse anthropogenic activities, including electroplating, leather tanning, and pigment manufacturing...

  11. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  12. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yan-bin; XIAO Hua-hua; SUN Shui-yu

    2005-01-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and CODCr ofwastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L,the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms.

  13. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-06-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and COD(Cr) of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms.

  14. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-01-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and CODCr of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms. PMID:15909347

  15. ADVANCES IN HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL AT HANFORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NESHEM DO; RIDDELLE J

    2012-01-30

    At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for

  16. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium*

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yan-Bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-01-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and CODCr of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment ...

  17. Biological groundwater treatment for chromium removal at low hexavalent chromium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Kavallari, Ioanna; Nyktari, Eleni; Kaldis, Apostolos; Panousi, Eleni; Nikitopoulos, George; Antoniou, Kornilia; Nasioka, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium reduction and total chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range. Three lab-scale units operated, as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) under aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic conditions. All systems received groundwater with a Cr(VI) content of 200 μg/L. In order to support biological growth, groundwater was supplemented with milk, liquid cheese whey or a mixture of sugar and milk to achieve a COD concentration of 200 mg/L. The results demonstrate that a fully anaerobic system or an anaerobic-aerobic system dosed with simple or complex external organic carbon sources can lead to practically complete Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III). The temperature dependency of maximum Cr(VI) removal rates can be described by the Arrhenius relationship. Total chromium removal in the biological treatment systems was not complete because a significant portion of Cr(III) remained in solution. An integrated system comprising of an anaerobic SBR followed by a sand filter achieved more than 95% total chromium removal thus resulting in average effluent total and dissolved chromium concentrations of 7 μg/L and 3 μg/L, respectively.

  18. DANGER OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Roy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Some metals as micronutrients have a major role in the life and growth process of plants and animals. However, certain forms of some metals may also act as toxic material even in relatively small quantities. Chromium is such a metal, whose concentration above a certain limit may cause a serious problem to the health of living organisms. Chromium (Cr may occur in several chemical forms in organic and inorganic systems. In biological systems only Cr (III and Cr (VI are significant. Among these two states, trivalent chromium (Cr-III is considered as an essential component, while hexavalent Chromium (Cr-VI in biological system has been detected as responsible for so many diseases, even some specific forms of cancer. This paper intends to present the adverse effect of Cr(VI on environment as well as on human beings and also try to find a way out to dissolve the problem by a newly developed efficient and cost effective technique.

  19. Hexavalent chromium induces energy metabolism disturbance and p53-dependent cell cycle arrest via reactive oxygen species in L-02 hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fang; Feng, Xiaotao; Zeng, Ming; Guan, Lan; Hu, Qingqing; Zhong, Caigao

    2012-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] has become a non-negligible pollutant in the world. Cr(VI) exposure leads to severe damage to the liver, but the mechanisms involved in Cr(VI)-mediated toxicity in the liver are unclear. The present study aimed to explore whether Cr(VI) induces energy metabolism disturbance and cell cycle arrest in human L-02 hepatocytes. We showed that Cr(VI) inhibited state 3 respiration, respiratory control rate (RCR), and subsequently induced energy metabolism disturbance with decreased ATP production. Interestingly, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry and protein expression analysis by western blotting revealed that low dose of Cr(VI) (4 uM) exposure induced S phase cell cycle arrest with decreased mediator of replication checkpoint 1 (Mrc1) and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), while higher doses of Cr(VI) (16, 32 uM) exposure resulted in G2/M phase arrest with decreased budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles-related 1 (BubR1) and cell division cycle 25 (CDC25). Mechanism study revealed that Cr(VI) decreased the activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex (MRCC) I and II, thus leading to ROS accumulation. Moreover, inhibiting ROS production by antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) rescued Cr(VI)-induced ATP depletion and cell cycle arrest. ROS-mediated p53 activation was found to involve in Cr(VI)-induced cell cycle arrest, and p53 inhibitor Pifithrin-α (PFT-α) rescued Cr(VI)-induced reduction of check point proteins Mrc1 and BubR1, thus inhibiting cell cycle arrest. In summary, the present study provides experimental evidence that Cr(VI) leads to energy metabolism disturbance and p53-dependent cell cycle arrest via ROS in L-02 hepatocytes.

  20. 40 CFR 749.68 - Hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals in cooling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hexavalent chromium-based water treatment chemicals in cooling systems. 749.68 Section 749.68 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT WATER TREATMENT CHEMICALS Air Conditioning and Cooling Systems § 749.68 Hexavalent...

  1. Electrochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium in ground water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Electrochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup +6}) to its trivalent state (Cr{sup +3}) is showing promising results in treating ground water at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Main Site. An electrolytic cell using stainless-steel and brass electrodes has been found to offer the most efficient reduction while yielding the least amount of precipitate. Trials have successfully lowered concentrations of Cr{sup +6} to below 11 parts per billion (micrograms/liter), the California state standard. We ran several trials to determine optimal voltage for running the cell; each trial consisted of applying a voltage between 6V and 48V for ten minutes through samples obtained at Treatment Facility C(TFC). No conclusive data has been obtained yet.

  2. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by graphite–chitosan binary composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAJENDRA S DONGRE

    2016-06-01

    Graphite chitosan binary (GCB) composite was prepared for hexavalent chromium adsorption from studied water. GCB was characterized by TGA, FTIR, SEM and X-ray diffraction techniques.Wide porous sorptive surface of 3.89 m$^2$ g$^{−1}$ and absorptive functionalities of GCB was due to 20% (w/w) graphite support on chitosan evidenced from FTIR and SEM that impart maximum adsorption at pH 4, agitation with 200 rpm for 180 min. Adsorption studies revealed intraparticle diffusion models and best-fitted kinetics was pseudo 2nd order one. A wellfitted Langmuir isotherm model suggested monolayer adsorption with an adsorption capacity ($q_m$) of 105.6 mg g$^{−1}$ and $R^2 = 0.945$. Sorption mechanisms based on metal ionic interactions, intrusion/diffusion and chemisorptions onto composite. This graphite chitosan binary composite improve sorbent capacity for Cr(VI).

  3. Microbial reduction of hexavalent chromium by landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yarong; Low, Gary K-C; Scott, Jason A; Amal, Rose

    2007-04-02

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in municipal landfill leachates (MLL) and a non-putrescible landfill leachate (NPLL) was investigated. Complete Cr(VI) reduction was achieved within 17 days in a MLL when spiked with 100 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) or less. In the same period, negligible Cr(VI) reduction was observed in NPLL. In MLL, Cr(VI) reduction was demonstrated to be a function of initial Cr(VI) concentration and bacterial biomass and organic matter concentrations. The bacteria were observed to tolerate 250 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) in MLL and had an optimal growth activity at pH 7.4 in a growth medium. The MLL also possessed an ability to sequentially reduce Cr(VI) over three consecutive spiking cycles.

  4. Polyaniline coating with various substrates for hexavalent chromium removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Bin; Xu, Cuixia; Sun, Dezhi; Wang, Qiang; Gu, Hongbo; Zhang, Xin; Weeks, Brandon L.; Hopper, Jack; Ho, Thomas C.; Guo, Zhanhu; Wei, Suying

    2015-04-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) contamination is increasingly serious in surface water and groundwater, therefore, its removal attracts increasing attention due to its highly toxic to human health. The cost effective and sustainable adsorbents are urgently needed for the remediation of Cr(VI) pollution. Polyanline (PANI), a conductive polymer, has demonstrated a great performance on Cr(VI) removal. But the recycling is the challenge for its application due to its small size. The PANI coating with various substrates is an effective approach to solve this problem. The synthesis methods and applications of the PANI coated magnetic Fe3O4, carbon fabric and cellulose composites for the Cr(VI) removal were reviewed. Finally, this review analyzed the Cr(VI) removal mechanisms by the PANI composites considering the substrate and the PANI coating.

  5. Investigation of hexavalent chromium sorption in serpentine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpouras, Thanasis; Chrysochoou, Maria; Dermatas, Dimitris

    2017-02-01

    In this study the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr6 +) by serpentine sediments was investigated in order to delineate Cr6 + sorption behavior in aquifers with ultramafic geologic background. Batch experiments were conducted in order to determine the influence of several parameters on Cr6 + removal, including the pH of the sediment solution, mineralogy, sediment's particle size and Cr6 + initial concentration. The results showed that Cr6 + removal was due to both adsorption and reduction phenomena. Reduction was attributed to the presence of a magnetic fraction in the sediment, mostly related to magnetite, which contributed almost 50% of the total removal in the pH range 3-7. Adsorption behavior was dominated by the finer sediment fraction (d transport modeling.

  6. Effective Management of Hexavalent Chromium (Cr+6) in DoD Organic and Inorganic Coatings Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-19

    Vinay V. Gadkari Battelle gadkariv@battelle.org 614-424-5751 Effective Management of Hexavalent Chromium (Cr+6) in DoD Organic and Inorganic...Coatings Operations Enhancing worker safety by minimizing health risks in hexavalent chromium environment 1 11/19/2014 John T. Stropki Battelle ...ADDRESS(ES) Battelle ,505 King Avenue,Columbus,OH,43201 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES

  7. Fabrication of Unique Magnetic Bionanocomposite for Highly Efficient Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yunlei; Qiu, Xun; Chen, Dongyun; Li, Najun; Xu, Qingfeng; Li, Hua; He, Jinghui; Lu, Jianmei

    2016-08-01

    Biotreatment of hexavalent chromium has attracted widespread interest due to its cost effective and environmental friendliness. However, the difficult separation of biomass from aqueous solution and the slow hexavalent chromium bioreduction rate are bottlenecks for biotechnology application. In this approach, a core-shell structured functional polymer coated magnetic nanocomposite was prepared for enriching the hexavalent chromium. Then the nanocomposite was connected to the bacteria via amines on bacterial (Bacillus subtilis ATCC-6633) surface. Under optimal conditions, a series of experiments were launched to degrade hexavalent chromium from the aqueous solution using the as-prepared bionanocomposite. Results showed that B. subtilis@Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (BFSM) can degrade hexavalent chromium from the water more effectively (a respectable degradation efficiency of about 94%) when compared with pristine B. subtilis and Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (FSM). Moreover, the BFSM could be separated from the wastewater by magnetic separation technology conveniently due to the Fe3O4 core of FSM. These results indicate that the application of BFSM is a promising strategy for effective treating wastewater containing hexavalent chromium.

  8. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Using Sorbaria sorbifolia Aqueous Leaf Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Prabha Dubey

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous plant leaves extract (PLE of an abundant shrub, Sorbaria sorbifolia, was explored for the reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI, to trivalent chromium, Cr(III. The effect of contact time, pH, PLE quantity, ionic strength, hardness, temperature and effective initial Cr(VI ion concentration were tested; Cr(VI reduction followed the pseudo-first order rate kinetics and maximum reduction was observed at pH 2. Significantly, Cr(VI reduction efficacies varied from 97 to 66% over the pH range of 2 to 10, which bodes well for PLE to be used for the reduction of Cr(VI also at a higher pH. PLE-mediated Cr(VI reduction displays considerable efficiency at various ionic strengths; however, hardness strongly affects the reduction ability. Higher temperature significantly enhances the Cr(VI reduction. This study reveals the potential use of PLE as a green reducing agent in aqueous extract for the efficient reduction of Cr(VI to Cr(III.

  9. Natural and induced reduction of hexavalent chromium in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leita, Liviana; Margon, Alja; Sinicco, Tania; Mondini, Claudio; Valentini, Massimiliano; Cantone, Pierpaolo

    2013-04-01

    Even though naturally elevated levels of chromium can be found naturally in some soils, distressing amounts of the hexavalent form (CrVI) are largely restricted to sites contaminated by anthropogenic activities. In fact, the widespread use of chromium in various industries and the frequently associated inadequate disposal of its by-products and wastes have created serious environmental pollution problems in many parts of the world. CrVI is toxic to plants, animals and humans and exhibits also mutagenic effects. However, being a strong oxidant, CrVI can be readily reduced to the much less harmful trivalent form (CrIII) when suitable electron donors are present in the environment. CrIII is relatively insoluble, less available for biological uptake, and thus definitely less toxic for web-biota. Various electron donors in soil can be involved in CrVI reduction in soil. The efficiency of CrVI reducing abiotic agents such as ferrous iron and sulphur compounds is well documented. Furthermore, CrVI reduction is also known to be significantly enhanced by a wide variety of cell-produced monosaccharides, including glucose. In this study we evaluated the dynamics of hexavalent chromium (CrVI) reduction in contaminated soil amended or not with iron sulphate or/and glucose and assessed the effects of CrVI on native or glucose-induced soil microbial biomass size and activity. CrVI negatively affected both soil microbial activity and the size of the microbial biomass. During the incubation period, the concentration of CrVI in soil decreased over time whether iron sulphate or/and glucose was added or not, but with different reduction rates. Soil therefore displayed a natural attenuation capacity towards chromate reduction. Addition of iron sulphate or/and glucose, however, increased the reduction rate by both abiotic and biotic mechanisms. Our data suggest that glucose is likely to have exerted an indirect role in the increased rate of CrVI reduction by promoting growth of

  10. An evaluation of in vivo models for toxicokinetics of hexavalent chromium in the stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasso, A.F., E-mail: sasso.alan@epa.gov; Schlosser, P.M., E-mail: schlosser.paul@epa.gov

    2015-09-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6) is a drinking water contaminant that has been detected in most of the water systems throughout the United States. In 2-year drinking water bioassays, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) found clear evidence of carcinogenic activity in male and female rats and mice. Because reduction of Cr6 to trivalent chromium (Cr3) is an important detoxifying step in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract prior to systemic absorption, models have been developed to estimate the extent of reduction in humans and animals. The objective of this work was to use a revised model of ex vivo Cr6 reduction kinetics in gastric juice to analyze the potential reduction kinetics under in vivo conditions for mice, rats and humans. A published physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was adapted to incorporate the new reduction model. This paper focuses on the toxicokinetics of Cr6 in the stomach compartment, where most of the extracellular Cr6 reduction is believed to occur in humans. Within the range of doses administered by the NTP bioassays, neither the original nor revised models predict saturation of stomach reducing capacity to occur in vivo if applying default parameters. However, both models still indicate that mice exhibit the lowest extent of reduction in the stomach, meaning that a higher percentage of the Cr6 dose may escape stomach reduction in that species. Similarly, both models predict that humans exhibit the highest extent of reduction at low doses. - Highlights: • We outline a new in vivo model for hexavalent chromium reduction in the stomach. • We examine in vivo reduction for mice, rats, and humans under varying conditions. • Species differences in toxicokinetics may explain susceptibility. • We show that a simplified stomach reduction model is adequate for extrapolation. • Internal dose uncertainties still exist.

  11. Microcalorimetric study the toxic effect of hexavalent chromium on microbial activity of Wuhan brown sandy soil: an in vitro approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Tian, Lin; Wang, Yanxin; Djah, Atakora; Wang, Fei; Chen, Huilun; Su, Chunli; Zhuang, Rensheng; Zhou, Yong; Choi, Martin M F; Bramanti, Emilia

    2008-02-01

    A multi-channel thermal activity monitor was applied to study soil microbial activity in Wuhan brown sandy soil in the presence of different concentrations of hexavalent chromium (K(2)Cr(2)O(7)). In order to stimulate the soil microbial activity, 5.0mg of glucose and 5.0mg of ammonium sulfate were added to a 1.20-g soil sample under a controlled humidity of 35%. The results show that the poisonous species of K(2)Cr(2)O(7) at an half inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value of 4.27 microg mL(-1) against soil microbe, and an increase of the amount of hexavalent chromium is associated to a decrease in the microbial activity of the soil, probably due to an increase in the toxicity of hexavalent chromium, affecting strongly the life in this soil microbial environment. Our work also suggests that microcalorimetry is a fast, simple and more sensitive method that can be easily performed to study the toxicity of different species of heavy metals on microorganism compared to other biological methods.

  12. Replacement for Cadmium Plating and Hexavalent Chromium on Fasteners and Electrical Connectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    radioactive materials, hexavalent chromium, (electroplating and coatings), cadmium (electroplating), mercury, or other highly toxic or carcinogenic...eliminate both UNCLASSIFIED: Dist A. Approved for public release Background - Alternative Choices • Numerous alternatives – Zinc nickel (Zn/Ni) – Tin...Plating • Aluminum Corrosion Performance –equivalent at same thickness • Heat Resistance – Trivalent Chrome protects up to about 400 F; Hexavalent

  13. Microbial reduction of hexavalent chromium under vadose zone conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Douglas S; Brockman, Fred J; Bowman, Robert S; Kieft, Thomas L

    2003-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a common contaminant associated with nuclear reactors and fuel processing. Improper disposal at facilities in and and semiarid regions has contaminated underlying vadose zones and aquifers. The objectives of this study were to assess the potential for immobilizing Cr(VI) using a native microbial community to reduce soluble Cr(VI) to insoluble Cr(III) under conditions similar to those in the vadose zone, and to evaluate the potential for enhancing biological Cr(VI) reduction through nutrient addition. Batch microcosm and unsaturated flow column experiments were performed. Native microbial communities in subsurface sediments with no prior Cr(VI) exposure were shown to be capable of Cr(VI) reduction. In both the batch and column experiments, Cr(VI) reduction and loss from the aqueous phase were enhanced by adding high levels of both nitrate (NO3-) and organic C (molasses). Nutrient amendments resulted in up to 87% reduction of the initial 67 mg L(-1) Cr(VI) in an unsaturated batch experiment. Molasses and nitrate additions to 15 cm long unsaturated flow columns receiving 65 mg L(-1) Cr(VI) resulted in microbially mediated reduction and immobilization of 10% of the Cr during a 45-d experiment. All of the immobilized Cr was in the form of Cr(III), as shown by XANES analysis. This suggests that biostimulation of microbial Cr(VI) reduction in vadose zones by nutrient amendment is a promising strategy, and that immobilization of close to 100% of Cr contamination could be achieved in a thick vadose zone with longer flow paths and longer contact times than in this experiment.

  14. Microbial reduction of hexavalent Chromium under vadose zone conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, D S.(unknown); Brockman, Fred J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Bowman, Robert (VISITORS); Kieft, Thomas L.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2003-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium[Cr(VI)] is a common constituent of wastes associated with nuclear reactor operation and fuel processing. Improper disposal at facilities in arid and semi-arid regions has led to contamination of underlying vadose zones and aquifers. The objectives of this study were to assess the potential for immobilizing Cr(VI) contamination using a native microbial community to reduce soluble Cr(VI) to insoluble Cr(III) under conditions similar to those found in the vadose zone, and to evaluate the potential for enhancing biological reduction of Cr(VI) through the addition of nutrients. Batch microcosm and unsaturated flow column experiments were performed. Native microbial communities in subsurface sediments with no prior Cr(VI) exposure were shown to be capable of Cr(VI) reduction. In both the batch and column experiments, Cr(VI) reduction and loss from the aqueous phase were enhanced by adding high levels of both nitrate (NO3-) and organic carbon (molasses). Nutrient amendments resulted in up to 87% Cr(VI) reduction in unsaturated batch experiments. Molasses and nitrate additions to 15-cm length unsaturated flow columns receiving 65 mg L-1 Cr(VI) resulted in microbially mediated reduction and immobilization of 10% of the Cr during a 45-day experiment. All of the immobilized Cr was in the form of Cr (III), as shown by XANES analysis. This suggests that biostimulation of microbial Cr(VI) reduction in vadose zones by nutrient amendment is a promising strategy; and that immobilization of close to 100% of Cr contamination could be achieved in a thick vadose zone with longer flow paths and longer contact times than in this experiment.

  15. Effect of some non functional surfactants and electrolytes on the hexavalent chromium reduction by glycerol. A mechanistic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, A.; Ghosh, S.K.; Saha, R.; Nandi, R.; Saha, B. [Burdwan Univ., WB (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Gosh, T. [A.B.N. Seal College, Coochbehar, WB (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-11-15

    Hexavalent chromium is a widespread environmental contaminant and a known human carcinogen. Kinetics of reduction of hexavalent chromium by bio-molecule glycerol in micellar media have been studied spectrophotometrically. The cytoplasmic reduction of hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium occurs in micro-heterogeneous systems. In vitro, the micelles are considered to mimic the cellular membranes. The electron transfer processes occurring in the micellar systems is considered as model to obtain insight into the electron transport process prevailing in biological systems. Micellar media is also a probe to establish the mechanistic paths of reduction of hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium. Effects of electrolytes common to biological system are studied to establish the proposed reaction mechanism strongly. (orig.)

  16. Effect of acclimatization on hexavalent chromium reduction in a biocathode microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiayuan; Zhu, Xujun; Song, Tianshun; Zhang, Lixiong; Jia, Honghua; Wei, Ping

    2015-03-01

    A simple acclimatization method for the reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) at a biocathode by first enriching an exoelectrogenic biofilm on a microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode, followed by direct inversion of the anode to function as the biocathode, has been established. This novel method significantly enhanced the Cr(VI) reduction efficiency of the MFC, which was mainly attributed to the higher microbial density and less resistive Cr(III) precipitates on the cathode when compared with a common biocathode acclimatization method (control). The biocathode acclimatization period was shortened by 19days and the Cr(VI) reduction rate was increased by a factor of 2.9. Microbial community analyses of biocathodes acclimatized using different methods further verified the feasibility of this electrode inversion method, indicating similar dominant bacteria species in biofilms, which mainly consist of Gamma-proteobacteria and Bacteria.

  17. Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron in continuous-flow system. Part 2: Effect of scrap iron shape and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheju, M; Balcu, I

    2010-10-15

    Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron has the advantage that two wastes are treated simultaneously. The reduction of hexavalent chromium by scrap iron was investigated in continuous system, using as reducing agent the following scrap iron shapes and sizes: (1) spiral fibers, (2) shavings, and (3) powder. The shape and size of scrap iron were found to have a significant influence on chromium and iron species concentration in column effluent, on column effluent pH and on Cr(VI) reduction mechanism. While for large scrap iron particles (spiral fibers) homogeneous reduction is the dominant Cr(VI) reduction process, for small scrap iron particles (powder) heterogeneous reduction appears to be the dominant reaction contributing to Cr(VI) reduction. All three shapes and sizes investigated in this work have both advantages and disadvantages. If found in sufficient quantities, scrap iron powder seem to be the optimum shape and size for the continuous reduction of Cr(VI), due to the following advantages: (1) the greatest reduction capacity, (2) the most important pH increase in column effluent (up to 6.3), (3) no chromium was detected in the column effluent during the first 60 h of the experiment, and (4) the lowest steady-state Cr(VI) concentration observed in column effluent (3.7 mg/L). But, despite of a lower reduction capacity in comparison with powder particles, spiral fibers and shavings have the advantage to result in large quantities from the mechanic processing of steel.

  18. Isolation, identification and characterization of indigenous fungi for bioremediation of hexavalent chromium, nickel and cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernahadini, Nelis; Suhandono, Sony; Choesin, Devi N.; Chaerun, Siti K.; Kadarusman, Ade

    2014-03-01

    Waste from nickel mining of Sorowako in South Sulawesi contains hexavalent chromium, nickel and cobalt metals in high concentration and may have a negative impact to the environment. Common waste treatment systems such as chemical treatment using a reducing reagent may still have a negative impact. Bioremediation using fungi or bacteria becomes more popular because it is an environmentally friendly alternative. The purposes of this study are to isolate and identify indigenous fungi that are resistant to heavy metals (hexavalent chromium, nickel, and cobalt) and are capable of reducing the concentration of metals in mining wastes. Ten fungal isolates were successfully isolated from the soils and pond sediments in the area of nickel mining in Sorowako. Selection of superior isolate was carried out by growing all the isolates on PDA medium, which contained all of the three metals. One superior isolate was identified to be able to grow on medium with concentrations of 6400 ppm hexavalent chromium, 200 ppm nickel and 50 ppm cobalt. Molecular identification and phylogenetic studies of the isolate using fungal PCR primers developed to amplify the ITS (internal transcribed spacer) region showed that the isolate sequence was very close to Trichoderma atroviride with 99.8% similarity. Optimum incubation time for the uptake of hexavalent chromium was 3 days, nickel and cobalt was 5 days, respectively, with an optimum pH of 4.

  19. An assessment of the environmental toxicity of hexavalent chromium in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putte, van der I.

    1981-01-01

    At present chromium is a common contaminant in surface waters in many countries. In water the metal may be present in the trivalent form (CrIII) or in the hexavalent form (CrVI), the latter of which is more toxic to aquatic organisms.The investigations presented in this thesis were aimed at a thorou

  20. An assessment of the environmental toxicity of hexavalent chromium in fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putte, van der I.

    1981-01-01

    At present chromium is a common contaminant in surface waters in many countries. In water the metal may be present in the trivalent form (CrIII) or in the hexavalent form (CrVI), the latter of which is more toxic to aquatic organisms.
    The investigations presented in this thesis

  1. Investigation of total and hexavalent chromium in filtered and unfiltered groundwater samples at the Tucson International Airport Superfund Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Fred; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Hermosillo, Edyth

    2016-01-01

    Potential health effects from hexavalent chromium in groundwater have recently become a concern to regulators at the Tucson International Airport Area Superfund site. In 2016, the U.S. Geological Survey sampled 46 wells in the area to characterize the nature and extent of chromium in groundwater, to understand what proportion of total chromium is in the hexavalent state, and to determine if substantial differences are present between filtered and unfiltered chromium concentrations. Results indicate detectable chromium concentrations in all wells, over 75 % of total chromium is in the hexavalent state in a majority of wells, and filtered and unfiltered results differ substantially in only a few high-turbidity total chromium samples.

  2. Hexavalent chromium exposure and control in welding tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, John D; Susi, Pam; Flynn, Michael R

    2010-11-01

    Studies of exposure to the lung carcinogen hexavalent chromium (CrVI) from welding tasks are limited, especially within the construction industry where overexposure may be common. In addition, despite the OSHA requirement that the use of engineering controls such as local exhaust ventilation (LEV) first be considered before relying on other strategies to reduce worker exposure to CrVI, data on the effectiveness of LEV to reduce CrVI exposures from welding are lacking. The goal of the present study was to characterize breathing zone air concentrations of CrVI during welding tasks and primary contributing factors in four datasets: (1) OSHA compliance data; (2) a publicly available database from The Welding Institute (TWI); (3) field survey data of construction welders collected by the Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR); and (4) controlled welding trials conducted by CPWR to assess the effectiveness of a portable LEV unit to reduce CrVI exposure. In the OSHA (n = 181) and TWI (n = 124) datasets, which included very few samples from the construction industry, the OSHA permissible exposure level (PEL) for CrVI (5 μg/m(3)) was exceeded in 9% and 13% of samples, respectively. CrVI concentrations measured in the CPWR field surveys (n = 43) were considerably higher, and 25% of samples exceeded the PEL. In the TWI and CPWR datasets, base metal, welding process, and LEV use were important predictors of CrVI concentrations. Only weak-to-moderate correlations were found between total particulate matter and CrVI, suggesting that total particulate matter concentrations are not a good surrogate for CrVI exposure in retrospective studies. Finally, in the controlled welding trials, LEV reduced median CrVI concentrations by 68% (p = 0.02). In conclusion, overexposure to CrVI in stainless steel welding is likely widespread, especially in certain operations such as shielded metal arc welding, which is commonly used in construction. However, exposure could be

  3. An evaluation of in vivo models for toxicokinetics of hexavalent chromium in the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, A F; Schlosser, P M

    2015-09-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6) is a drinking water contaminant that has been detected in most of the water systems throughout the United States. In 2-year drinking water bioassays, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) found clear evidence of carcinogenic activity in male and female rats and mice. Because reduction of Cr6 to trivalent chromium (Cr3) is an important detoxifying step in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract prior to systemic absorption, models have been developed to estimate the extent of reduction in humans and animals. The objective of this work was to use a revised model of ex vivo Cr6 reduction kinetics in gastric juice to analyze the potential reduction kinetics under in vivo conditions for mice, rats and humans. A published physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was adapted to incorporate the new reduction model. This paper focuses on the toxicokinetics of Cr6 in the stomach compartment, where most of the extracellular Cr6 reduction is believed to occur in humans. Within the range of doses administered by the NTP bioassays, neither the original nor revised models predict saturation of stomach reducing capacity to occur in vivo if applying default parameters. However, both models still indicate that mice exhibit the lowest extent of reduction in the stomach, meaning that a higher percentage of the Cr6 dose may escape stomach reduction in that species. Similarly, both models predict that humans exhibit the highest extent of reduction at low doses.

  4. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Using L-Cysteine Capped Nickel Nanocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razium Ali Soomro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reduce the highly toxic hexavalent chromium Cr(VI into less toxic chromium Cr(III species by using nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs as catalysts in order to provide safety to the aqueous environment. In the first phase Ni NPs were synthesized in ethylene glycol and capped with l-cysteine by a modified microwave irradiation method using NaOH as the accelerator. The formed Ni NPs were characterized by various techniques such as UV-Visible spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. In the second phase the formed Ni NPs were immobilized on glass surfaces and employed as catalyst for the reduction of Cr(VI ions. According to observations, 99% reduction of Cr(VI ions was achieved in the presence of 0.5 mg of Ni NPs catalyst in just five minutes as compared to nickel powder that showed only 16% reduction in 15 minutes. The study has a great impact on the aqueous pollution control of Cr(VI especially caused by the discharge of waste water from several industries utilizing Cr(VI containing salt as one of the essential gradients.

  5. Genesis and transport of hexavalent chromium in the system ophiolitic rocks - groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchegolikhina, Anastasia; Guadagnini, Laura; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Our study aims at contributing to the quantification and characterization of chromium transport processes from host rocks and soil matrices to groundwater. We focus on dissolved hexavalent chromium detected in groundwaters of geological regions with ophiolitic rocks (ophiolites and serpentinites) inclusions due to its critical ecological impact. (Oze et al., 2004). Despite the large number of analyses on the occurrence of high concentrations of hazardous hexavalent chromium ions in natural waters, only few studies were performed with the objective of identifying and investigating the geochemical reactions which could occur in the natural system rock - groundwater - dissolved chromium (Fantoni et al., 2002, Stephen and James, 2004, Lelli et al., 2013). In this context, there is a need for integration of results obtained from diverse studies in various regions and settings to improve our knowledge repository. Our theoretical analyses are grounded and driven by practical scenarios detected in subsurface reservoirs exploited for civil and industrial use located in the Emilia-Romagna region (Italy). Available experimental datasets are complemented with data from other international regional-scale settings (Altay mountains region, Russia). Modeling of chromium transformation and migration particularly includes characterization of the multispecies geochemical system. A key aspect of our study is the analysis of the complex competitive sorption processes governing heavy metal evolution in groundwater. The results of the research allow assessing the critical qualitative features of the mechanisms of hexavalent chromium ion mobilization from host rocks and soils and the ensuing transformation and migration to groundwater under the influence of diverse environmental factors. The study is then complemented by the quantification of the main sources of uncertainty associated with prediction of heavy metal contamination levels in the groundwater system explored. Fantoni, D

  6. Recovery of hexavalent chromium from water using photoactive TiO2-montmorillonite under sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Djellabi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium was removed from water under sunlight using a synthesized TiO2-montmorillonite (TiO2-M employing tartaric acid as a hole scavenger. Cr(VI species was then reduced to Cr(III species by electrons arising from TiO2 particles. After that, the produced Cr(III species  was transferred to montmorillonite  due to electrostatic attractions leading to  set free TiO2 particles for a further Cr(VI species reduction. Furthermore, produced Cr(III, after Cr(VI reduction, does not  penetrate into the solution. The results indicate that no dark adsorption of Cr(VI species on TiO2-M is present, however, the reduction of Cr(VI species under sunlight increased strongly as a function of tartaric acid concentration up to 60 ppm, for which the extent of reduction is maximum within 3 h. On the other hand, the reduction extent of Cr(VI species is maximum with an initial concentration of Cr(VI species lower than 30 ppm by the use of 0.2 g/L of TiO2-M. Nevertheless, the increase of the Cr(VI initial concentration led to increase the amount of Cr(VI species reduced (capacity of reduction until a Cr(VI concentration of 75 and 100 ppm, for which  it remained constant at around 221 mg/g. For comparison, the increase of Cr(VI species concentration in the case of the commercial TiO2 P25 under the same conditions exhibited its deactivation when the reduced amount decreased from 198.1 to 157.6 mg/g as the concentration increased from 75 to 100 ppm.

  7. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction under Fermentative Conditions with Lactate Stimulated Native Microbial Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Somenahally, Anil C.; Mosher, Jennifer J; Tong Yuan; Mircea Podar; Phelps, Tommy J.; Brown, Steven D.; Yang, Zamin K.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Joy D Van Nostrand; Jizhong Zhou; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI)] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI) concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI)-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to ...

  8. Exploring Bioelectrochemical Systems for Removal and Recovery of Hexavalent Chromium or Nutrients

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BES) is a platform technology that is able to realize versatile engineering functions and recover valuable resources in an energy-efficient manner. One of the potential applications of BES is to remove and recover nutrients simultaneously from nutrient-rich wastewater, such as digested manure from livestock. A four-chamber BES was developed and used in this study to explore the potential to remove and recover hexavalent Chromium from synthetic wastewater, and ammon...

  9. Optimization and Modeling of Hexavalent Chromium Removal from Aqueous Solution Via Adsorption on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Gholipour

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium and its derivatives are potential pollutant due to their mortal affects. Therefore, It is essential to remove these components from wastewaters before disposal. Adsorption can be effective and versatile method for removing of hexavalent chromium. In this article, removal of hexavalent chromium via adsorption on multiwalled carbon nanotubes was investigated as a function of adsorbent dosage, initial solution pH, initial Cr(VI concentrations, contact time and temperature. The batch experiments were conducted at 3 different temperatures (17, 27 and 37ºC and shows that Cr (VI removal obeys pseudo-second order rate equation. Rate constant (K values in 3 temperatures, pre-exponential factor and adsorption activation energy (E was also obtained. The sorption data fitted well with Freundlich isotherm adsorption model. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy (ΔGº, enthalpy (ΔHº and entropy (ΔSº for Cr(VI adsorption were estimated and Results suggest that the adsorption process is a spontaneous and endothermic.

  10. Biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) in wastewater using Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. bacterial strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qasim, Muhammad [Department of Chemical Engineering, American University of Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)

    2013-07-01

    The recovery of toxic metal compounds is a deep concern in all industries. Hexavalent chromium is particularly worrying because of its toxic influence on human health. In this paper, biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) present in wastewater has been studied using two different bacterial strains; Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. A chemostat (with and without recycle of cells) with 10 L liquid culture volume was used to study the substrate and the biomass cell concentrations with time. Also, the degree of substrate conversion was studied by the varying the dilution rate as an independent parameter. The dilution rate (ratio of feed flow rate to the culture volume) was varied by varying the feed volumetric rate from 110-170 mL/h for inlet hexavalent chromium concentrations of 70 mg/dm3. The results show that a chemostat with recycle gives a better performance in terms of substrate conversion than a chemostat without a recycle. Moreover, the degree of substrate conversion decreases as the dilution rate is increased. Also, Bacillus sp. was found to give higher conversions compared to pseudomonas sp.

  11. HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY PLEUROTUS OSTREATUS SPENT BIOMASS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.CAROL

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pleurotus ostreatus spent biomass after the harvest, is a waste which was used as a potential sorbent after coating it with chitosan an deacetylated derivative from chitin the most abundant carbohydratesecond to cellulose .The study is an attempt to elaborate and justify the optional utility of Spent Pleurotus ostreatus biomass for hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous industrial effluents. The effect of experimental parameters such as pH, biosorbent dosage, biosorbent dosage, initial metal concentration, temperature and sorption time is very striking from the obtained results .The Freundlich isotherm and Langmuir isotherm fitted well to the data of Cr (VI sorption capacity of Spent Pleurotus biomass. The intraparticle diffusion plot suggest that the sorption process proceeds by surface adsorption alone in case of activated spentbiomass but when coated with chitosan the process is sorption along with intra particle diffusion or pore diffusion. The overall adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous innature.EDX analysis indicated the presence of hexavalent chromium ions on the surface of chitosan coated spent Pleurotus biomass. The resultssuggest that the enhanced spent biomass could be employed as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of hexavalent chromium from industrial effluents as well as from contaminated water sources.

  12. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution using Cassava peel (Manihot Esculenta: column experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ricardo Albis Arrieta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hexavalent chromium is a highly toxic metal and it is considered one of the contaminants with the highest environmental impact. Bioadsorbents have been considered as a viable option for chromium removal, leading to the necessity to study the behavior of these adsorbents in unit operations similar to the ones employed in the industry. Objective: To study the potential of cassava peels as bio-sorbent in the adsorption of hexavalent chromium in a semi-continuous process in fixed bed columns. Methodology: The effect of parameters such as feed flow rate, initial concentration and bed column height on the response variables rupture time and removal capacity was analyzed using a laboratory scale experimental set-up. Results: Low feed flow rates, low initial concentrations, and higher bed height produce the best conditions for chromium removal. Additionally, three classical models for removal on the packed column were used to fit the dynamic behavior of this process and to obtain significantly physical parameters. However, the best fitting was obtained using the model of the response surface. Conclusions: The concentration of chromium in the feed stream is the experimental factor that has the most influence on removal capacity and rupture time in fixed bed columns packed with cassava peel.

  13. Hexavalent chromium removal from wastewater using aniline formaldehyde condensate coated silica gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P Albino; Ray, Manabendra; Chakraborty, Saswati

    2007-05-08

    A resinous polymer, aniline formaldehyde condensate (AFC) coated on silica gel was used as an adsorbent in batch system for removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by considering the effects of various parameters like reaction pH, dose of AFC coated silica gel, initial Cr(VI) concentration and aniline to formaldehyde ratio in AFC synthesis. The optimum pH for total chromium [Cr(VI) and Cr(III)] adsorption was observed as 3. Total chromium adsorption was second order and equilibrium was achieved within 90-120 min. Aniline to formaldehyde ratio of 1.6:1 during AFC synthesis was ideal for chromium removal. Total chromium adsorption followed Freundlich's isotherm with adsorption capacity of 65 mg/g at initial Cr(VI) 200mg/L. Total chromium removal was explained as combinations of electrostatic attraction of acid chromate ion by protonated AFC, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and bond formation of Cr(III) with nitrogen atom of AFC. Almost 40-84% of adsorbed chromium was recovered during desorption by NaOH, EDTA and mineral acids. AFC coated silica gel can be effectively used for treatment of chromium containing wastewaters as an alternative.

  14. Anticlastogenic Effect of Redistilled Cow's Urine Distillate in Human Peripheral Lymphocytes Challenged With Manganese Dioxide and Hexavalent Chromium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DIPANWITA DUTTA; S.SARAVANA DEVI; K. KRISHNAMURTHI; T. CHAKRABARTI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the anticlastogenic effect of redistilled cow's urine distillate (RCUD) in human peripheral lymphocytes (HLC) challenged with manganese dioxide and hexavalent chromium. Methods The anticlastogenic activity of redistilled cow's urine distillate was studied in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (HPNLs) and human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro challenged with manganese dioxide and hexavalent chromium as established genotoxicants and clastogens which could cause induction of DNA strand break, chromosomal aberration and micronucleus. Three different levels of RCUD: 1 μL/mL, 50 μL/mL and 100μL/mL, were used in the study. Results Manganese dioxide and hexavalent chromium caused statistically significant DNA strand break, chromosomal aberration and micronucleus formation, which could be protected by redistilled cow's urine distillate. Conclusion The redistilled cow's urine distillate posseses strong antigenotoxic and anticlastogenic properties against HPNLs and HLC treated with Cr+6 and MnO2. This property is mainly due to the antioxidants present in RCUD.

  15. Hexavalent chromium affects sperm motility by influencing protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the midpiece of boar spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Linqing; Wang, Lirui; Fu, Jieli; Li, Yuhua; Zhao, Na; Li, Xinhong

    2016-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium reportedly induces reproductive toxicity and further inhibits male fertility in mammals. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which hexavalent chromium affects motility signaling in boar spermatozoa in vitro. The results indicated that Cr(VI) decreased sperm motility, protein phosphorylation, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and metabolic enzyme activity starting at 4μmol/mL following incubation for 1.5h. Notably, all parameters were potently inhibited by 10μmol/mL Cr, while supplementation with the dibutyryl-cAMP (dbcAMP) and the 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) prevented the inhibition of protein phosphorylation. Interestingly, high concentrations of Cr (>10μmol/mL) increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of some high-molecular-weight proteins in the principle piece but decreased that in the middle piece associated with an extreme reduction of sperm motility. These results suggest that chromium affects boar sperm motility by impairing tyrosine phosphorylation in the midpiece of sperm by blocking the cAMP/PKA pathway in boar sperm in vitro.

  16. Hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions by a novel powder prepared from Colocasia esculenta leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakkeeran, E; Saranya, N; Giri Nandagopal, M S; Santhiagu, A; Selvaraju, N

    2016-08-01

    In this study, batch removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by powdered Colocasia esculenta leaves was investigated. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of adsorption of Cr(VI) at different pH values, initial concentrations, agitation speeds, temperatures, and contact times. The biosorbent was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer analysis. The biosorptive capacity of the adsorbent was dependent on the pH of the chromium solution in which maximum removal was observed at pH 2. The adsorption equilibrium data were evaluated for various adsorption isotherm models, kinetic models, and thermodynamics. The equilibrium data fitted well with Freundlich and Halsey models. The adsorption capacity calculated was 47.62 mg/g at pH 2. The adsorption kinetic data were best described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thus, Colocasia esculenta leaves can be considered as one of the efficient and cheap biosorbents for hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions.

  17. Toxic hexavalent chromium reduction by Bacillus pumilis, Cellulosimicrobium cellulans and Exiguobacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Fatima; Faisal, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    Three bacterial strains Bacillus pumilis, Cellulosimicrobium cellulans and Exiguobacterium were investigated when grown in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium at 500 μg/mL Cr(VI). The hexavalent chromium reduction was measured by growing the strains in DeLeo and Ehrlich (1994) medium at 200 and 400 μg/mL K2CrO4. The optimal Cr (VI) reduction by strains B. pumilis, Exigubacterium and C. cellulans was 51%, 39%, and 41%, respectively, at an initial K2CrO4 concentration of 200 μg/mL at pH 3 and temperature 37°C. At an initial chromate concentration of 400 μg/mL, the Cr(VI) reduction by strains B. pumilis, Exigubacterium and C. cellulans was 24%, 19%, and 18%, respectively at pH 3 at 37°C after 24 h. These strains have ability to reduce toxic hexavalent chromium to the less mobile trivalent chromium at a wide range of different environmental conditions and can be useful for the treatment of contaminated wastewater and soils.

  18. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to hawksbill sea turtle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Sandra S., E-mail: sandra.wise@maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Xie, Hong, E-mail: hongxie@usm.maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Fukuda, Tomokazu, E-mail: tomofukuda009@gmail.com [Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Tohoku University, Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Second Research Building, Rm 112, 1-1 Amamiyamachi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Douglas Thompson, W., E-mail: dougt@usm.maine.edu [Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); and others

    2014-09-01

    Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7% relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36% of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3% relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29% of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general. - Highlights: • Particulate Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Soluble Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Cr(VI) may be a risk factor for hawksbill sea turtle health.

  19. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to hawksbill sea turtle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S; Xie, Hong; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Douglas Thompson, W; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-09-01

    Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5μg/cm(2) lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7% relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5μg/cm(2) lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36% of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5μM sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3% relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29% of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5μM sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general.

  20. Adsorption and Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium on the Surface of Vivianite at Acidic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    HA, S.; Hyun, S. P.; Lee, W.

    2016-12-01

    Due to the rapid increase of chemical use in industrial activities, acid spills have frequently occurred in Korea. The acid spill causes soil and water acidification and additional problems such as heavy metal leaching from the soil. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is relatively mobile in the environment and toxic and mutagenic. Monoclinic octa-hydrated ferrous phosphate, vivianite, is one of commonly found iron-bearing soil minerals occurring in phosphorous-enriched reducing environments. We have investigated reductive sorption of Cr(VI) on the vivianite surfaces using batch experimental tests under diverse groundwater conditions. Cr(VI) (5 mg/L) was added in 6.5 g/L vivianite suspension buffered at pH 5, 7, and 9, using 0.05 M HEPES or tris buffer solution, to check the effect of pH on the reductive sorption of Cr(VI) on the vivianite surface. The aqueous Cr(VI) removal was fastest at pH 5, followed by pH 7, and pH 9. The effect of ionic strength on the removal kinetics of Cr(VI) was negligible. It could be subsequently removed via sorption and reduction on the surface of vivianite of which reactive chemical species could be aqueous Fe(II), iron oxides, and metavivianite. Adsorption test was conducted using the same amount of Cr(III) to check the selectivity of chromium species on the vivianite surface for the reductive adsorption. Through Cr extraction test, amount of strong-bound Cr to vivianite is similar for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) injection but amount of weak-bound Cr is bigger for Cr(VI) injection. Reaction mechanism for the sorption and reductive transformation of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) species at reactive sites of vivianite surface are discussed based on surface complexation modeling and K-edge Fe X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) results. Since vivianite is reacted with Cr(VI), two smooth peaks of absorption edge changed to one sharp peak. Pre-edge that contains 1s-3d transition information tends to show high peak when reaction time is increased and pH is

  1. MODELING THE RATE-CONTROLLED SORPTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, D.B.; Stollenwerk, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption of chromium VI on the iron-oxide- and hydroxide-coated surface of alluvial material was numerically simulated with rate-controlled reactions. Reaction kinetics and diffusional processes, in the form of film, pore, and particle diffusion, were simulated and compared with experimental results. The use of empirically calculated rate coefficients for diffusion through the reacting surface was found to simulate experimental data; pore or particle diffusion is believed to be a possible rate-controlling mechanism. The use of rate equations to predict conservative transport and rate- and local-equilibrium-controlled reactions was shown to be feasible.

  2. Exposure to particulate hexavalent chromium exacerbates allergic asthma pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Brent C. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Constant, Stephanie L. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Patierno, Steven R. [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); GW Cancer Institute, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Jurjus, Rosalyn A. [Department of Anatomy and Regenerative Biology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Ceryak, Susan M., E-mail: phmsmc@gwumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Airborne hexavalent chromate, Cr(VI), has been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency as a possible health threat in urban areas, due to the carcinogenic potential of some of its forms. Particulate chromates are produced in many different industrial settings, with high levels of aerosolized forms historically documented. Along with an increased risk of lung cancer, a high incidence of allergic asthma has been reported in workers exposed to certain inhaled particulate Cr(VI) compounds. However, a direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma has not been established. We recently showed that inhaled particulate Cr(VI) induces an innate neutrophilic inflammatory response in BALB/c mice. In the current studies we investigated how the inflammation induced by inhaled particulate Cr(VI) might alter the pathology of an allergic asthmatic response. We used a well-established mouse model of allergic asthma. Groups of ovalbumin protein (OVA)-primed mice were challenged either with OVA alone, or with a combination of OVA and particulate zinc chromate, and various parameters associated with asthmatic responses were measured. Co-exposure to particulate Cr(VI) and OVA mediated a mixed form of asthma in which both eosinophils and neutrophils are present in airways, tissue pathology is markedly exacerbated, and airway hyperresponsiveness is significantly increased. Taken together these findings suggest that inhalation of particulate forms of Cr(VI) may augment the severity of ongoing allergic asthma, as well as alter its phenotype. Such findings may have implications for asthmatics in settings in which airborne particulate Cr(VI) compounds are present at high levels. -- Highlights: ► Allergic asthma correlated with exposure to certain inhaled particulate chromates. ► Direct causal association between Cr(VI) and allergic asthma not established. ► Cr exacerbated pathology and airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-challenged mouse. ► Particulate Cr

  3. Ferrous sulphate mono and heptahydrate reduction of hexavalent chromium in cement: effectiveness and storability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valverde, J. L.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In Community legislation, substances containing hexavalent chromium are classified as carcinogenic, mutagenic and sensitizing. In cement, hexavalent chromium intensifies sensitization and may set off severe allergic reactions in workers in routine contact with the product, whether in the factory or on construction sites. The allergic or contact dermatitis causes is a very painful disease that may lead to permanent worker disability. According to Directive 2003/53/EC of the European Parliament and the Council, Governments of all member countries will be required to prohibit the marketing and use, as of 17 January 2005, of any cement or cement preparation containing more than 2 ppm of chromium (VI. Hexavalent chromium can be reduced with ferrous sulphate to trivalent chromium, which is water-insoluble and therefore innocuous to the skin. The present paper reports the effects of adding ferrous sulphate mono- or heptahydrate to a commercial cement and the storage time of the mix on the concentration of hexavalent chromium. The salts studied were found to effectively reduce hexavalent chromium in cement for at least three months.

    Las sustancias que contienen cromo hexavalente están clasificadas en la legislación comunitaria como sustancias carcinogénicas, mutagénicas y sensibilizantes. El cromo hexavalente del cemento potencia la sensibilización y provoca graves reacciones alérgicas que sufren bastante a menudo los trabajadores que lo manipulan habitualmente, ya sea en fábrica o en el sector de la construcción. La dermatitis alérgica o de contacto que produce es muy dolorosa y puede dejar a los trabajadores en estado de discapacidad. La Directiva 2003/53/CE del Parlamento Europeo y del Consejo, exige a los Gobiernos de los países miembros, que a partir del 17 de enero de 2005, prohiban el uso y la comercialización de todos aquellos cementos y preparados que contengan cemento, cuyo contenido en cromo (VI soluble, una vez hidratados

  4. Hexavalent Chromium Removal by Litchi chinensis Sonn Peel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Acosta-Rodriguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: We studied the Chromium (VI removal capacity in aqueous solution by the litchi peel. Approach: We use the diphenylcarbazide method to evaluate the metal concentration. Results: The highest biosorption of the metal (50 mg L-1 occurs within 6 min, at pH of 1 and 28°C. According to temperature, the highest removal was observed at 40 and 50°C, in 45 min, when the metal (1 g L-1 was completely adsorbed. At the analyzed concentrations of Cr (VI, litchi peel, showed excellent removal capacity, besides it removes efficiently the metal in situ (100% removal, 5 days of incubation, 5 and 10 g of biomass. After 1 h of incubation the studied biomass reduces 1.0 g of Cr (VI with the simultaneous production of Cr (III. Conclusion: The shell can be used to eliminate it from industrial wastewater."

  5. Kinetics of hexavalent chromium reduction by iron metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huijing QIAN; Yanjun WU; Yong LIU; Xinhua XU

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction to Cr(Ⅲ) by metallic iron (Fe0) was studied in batch reactors for a range of reactant concentrations, pH and temperatures. Nearly 86.8% removal efficiency for Cr(Ⅵ) was achieved when Fe0 concentration was 6 g/L (using commercial iron powder (200 mesh) I n 120 min). The reduction ofhexavalent chro-mium took place on the surface of the iron particles following pseudo-first order kinetics. The rate of Cr(Ⅵ) reduction increased with increasing Fe0 addition and temperature but inversely with initial pH. The pseudo-first-order rate coeffi-cients (kobs) were determined as 0.0024, 0.010, 0.0268 and 0.062 8 min-1 when iron powder dosages were 2, 6, 10 and 14 g/L at 25℃ and pH 5.5, respectively. According to the Arrehenius equation, the apparent activation energy of 26.5 kJ/mol and pre-exponential factor of 3 330 min-1 were obtained at the temperature range of 288-308 K. Different Fe0 types were compared in this study. The reactivity was in the order starch-stabilized Fe0 nanoparticlesFe0 nano-particlesFe0 powderFe0 filings. Electrochemical analysis of the reaction process showed that Cr(Ⅲ) and Fe(Ⅲ) hydroxides should be the dominant final products.

  6. Treatment of Wastewater Containing Hexavalent Chromium Using Zeolite Ceramic Adsorbent in Adsorption Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuty Emilia Agustina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural Zeolites in powdered form have commonly used as adsorbent and one of the most crucial compound in water treatment plant, in filter system of petrochemicals or other processes under environmentally, physically and chemically conditions.  But in the form of powder, zeolites are easily washed out in liquid or gas stream. Therefore, a modification would be necessary to solve this problem. Zeolites and clay were modified into ceramic adsorbent to adsorb heavy metal pollutant that is hexavalent chromium Cr (VI contained in electroplating industrial effluents. Zeolite and clay were mixed evenly and molded into small balls with 5-6 mm diameter and dried at 1000oC for 48 hrs. This adsorbent was activated with HCl 32% solution for 1 hr to enhance its adsorption potential. Ten samples with various ratios of zeolite:clay (3:37-12:28 with the total adsorbent mass of 1000 g was examined.  Cr (VI uptake in liquid wastewater was studied by varying contact time and the ratio of zeolite and clay. The effect of activation treatment with HCl 32% solution on adsorption performance of zeolite ceramic adsorbent was also investigated. Analysis of wastewater output indicates a reduction of hexavalent chromium concentration reaches 99.45% at contact time 10 h with 12:28 ratio of activated adsorbent. This shown that the process of adsorption had greatly reduced the contamination of Cr (VI and may have been a solution for environment problem regarding wastewater containing Cr (VI. 

  7. The Survey of Melia Azaderach L. ash in Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Synthetic Electroplating Industry Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MT Ghaneian

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: Melia azedarach ash is an effective adsorbent in removal of hexavalent chromium from synthetic electroplating industries wastewater. In addition, the use of this biosorbent in preparation and application aspects is simple and cheap compared to many other natural and man-made adsorbent.

  8. Survey of Nano filtration Performance for Hexavalent Chromium Removal fromWater Containing Sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh.R Moussavi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available "n "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Geological situation and/or anthropogenic contamination contain an increased concentration of ions such as hexavalent chromium as well as some other dissolved components such as sulfate in the upper of the establishedMCLs (50µg/L. In this paper, simultaneous removal of Cr (VI and sulfate from water was investigated using nanofiltration as a promising method for reaching drinking water standards."nMaterials and Methods: For varying pressure, pH , anion and cation solution effect, Sulfate and Cr (VI concentration which have chosen were levels found in drinking water sources (Cr=0.1- 0.5mg/L and (SO4-2= 100-800mg/L.Experiments were performed using NaCl, Na2SO4,K2 Cr2O7and anhydrous CrCl3. 6H2O which prepared with de mineralized water on procedure detailed in standard methods. All salts were purchased from Merck Corporation with purity over 99'."nResults: The results for hexavalent chromium experiments showed that when the concentration decreases, the chromate anions were given a better retention to 4 bars (96'. But when the concentration increases, concentration polarization led to increased removal of Cr (VI (98'. For Cr (III the influences of the ionic strength as well as the concentrations were strongly dependant on rejection but operating pressure were found weak. In addition, with increasing total dissolved solids, perfect rejection of chromium was seen. The effect of pH showed that better retention was obtained at natural and basic pH."nConclusion: This study indicates that the nature of anions and cations, driven pressure and pH have significant effect on nano filtration operation. Research findings show that it seems nano filtration is a very good promising method of simultaneous removal of Cr (VI and sulfate from water.

  9. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Trivalent and Hexavalent Chromium Based on Ingestion and Inhalation of Soluble Chromium Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    be largely Cr(III) although some Cr(VI) exposure probably also occurs. Stainless-steel welders are exposed to nickel as well as to chromium compounds...welders are equivocal with respect to involvement of chromium, particularly since nickel in some chemical forms is an established lung carcinogen (Stern...microglobulin (Lindberg and Vesterberg, 1983), retinol-binding protein (Franchini and Mutti , 1988), B-glucuronidase ( Mutti et al., 1979), and kidney brush border

  10. Microbial reduction of chromium from the hexavalent to divalent state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daulton, Tyrone L.; Little, Brenda J.; Jones-Meehan, Joanne; Blom, Douglas A.; Allard, Lawrence F.

    2007-02-01

    We demonstrate that Shewanella oneidensis, a metal-reducing bacteria species with cytoplasmic-membrane-bound reductases and remarkably diverse respiratory capabilities, reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(II) in anaerobic cultures where chromate was the sole terminal electron acceptor. Individual cell microanalysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) demonstrates Cr(II) concentrated near the cytoplasmic membrane, suggesting the terminal reduction pathway is intracellularly localized. Further, estimated cellular Cr(II) concentrations are relatively high at upwards of 0.03-0.09 g Cr/g bacterium. Accumulation of Cr(II) is observed in S. oneidensis cells prior to the formation of submicron-sized precipitates of insoluble Cr(III) on their surfaces. Furthermore, under anaerobic conditions, Cr(III) precipitates that encrust cells are shown to contain Cr(II) that is likely bound in the net negatively charged extracellular biopolymers which can permeate the surfaces of the precipitates. In otherwise nearly identical incubations, Cr(III) precipitate formation was observed in cultures maintained anaerobic with bubbled nitrogen but not in three replicate cultures in an anaerobic chamber.

  11. AN IN-SITU PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR THE TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN GROUNDWATER: VOLUME 3 MULTICOMPONENT REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive transport modeling has been conducted to describe the performance of the permeable reactive barrier at the Coast Guard Support Center near Elizabeth City, NC. The reactive barrier was installed to treat groundwater contaminated by hexavalent chromium and chlorinated org...

  12. Application of modified bentonite using sulfuric acid for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Moradi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Environmental contamination by chromium (Cr has become an important issue due to its adverse effects on human health and environment. This study was done to evaluate the application of modified bentonite using sulfuric acid as an adsorbent in the removal of hexavalent Cr from aqueous solution. Methods: Adsorbent features were determined using x-ray diffraction (XRD, fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscope (SEM techniques. Thereafter, the effect of pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage and different concentrations of Cr was investigated. The experimental data was fitness in terms of kinetic and equilibrium adsorption processes. Results: The maximum capacity (Qm of Cr(VI according to Langmuir model was obtained at 4.21 mg/g. The experimental data properly obeyed the Longmuir and pseudo-second-order models. The highest percentage of Cr(VI adsorption was observed at pH = 3 and the process after 60 minutes reached the equilibrium state. Conclusion: In Langmuir expression, the dimensionless constant separation term (RL values for the adsorption of Cr onto the modified bentonite was in the range of 0-1, indicating that the adsorption is a favorable process and the modified bentonite has good potential in removing hexavalent Cr using sulfuric acid.

  13. Assessment of Hexavalent Chromium Natural Attenuation for the Hanford Site 100 Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Szecsody, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sahajpal, Rahul [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhong, Lirong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawter, Amanda R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) plumes are present in the 100 Area at the Hanford Site. Remediation efforts are under way with objectives of restoring the groundwater to meet the drinking-water standard (48 µg/L) and protecting the Columbia River by ensuring that discharge of groundwater to the river is below the surface-water quality standard (10 µg/L). Current remedies include application of Pump-and-Treat (P&T) at the 100-D, 100-H, and 100-K Areas and Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) at the 100-F/IU Area. Remedy selection is still under way at the other 100 Areas. Additional information about the natural attenuation processes for Cr(VI) is important in all of these cases. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to demonstrate and quantify natural attenuation mechanisms using 100 Area sediments and groundwater conditions.

  14. The role of EDTA in phytoextraction of hexavalent and trivalent chromium by two willow trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2008-04-01

    Effects of the synthetic chelator ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA) on uptake and internal translocation of hexavalent and trivalent chromium by plants were investigated. Two different concentrations of EDTA were studied for enhancing the uptake and translocation of Cr from the hydroponic solution spiked with K(2)CrO(4) or CrCl(3) maintained at 24.0 +/- 1 degrees C. Faster removal of Cr(3+) than Cr(6+) by hybrid willows (Salix matsudana Koidz x Salix alba L.) from the plant growth media was observed. Negligible effect of EDTA on the uptake of Cr(6+) was found, but significant decrease of the Cr concentration in roots was measured. Although the translocation of Cr(6+) within plant materials was detected in response to EDTA concentration, the amount of Cr(6+) translocated to the lower stems was considerably small. EDTA in the nutrient media showed a negative effect on the uptake of Cr(3+ )by hybrid willows; the removal rates of Cr(3+ )were significantly decreased. Translocation of Cr(3+) into the stems and leaves was undetectable, but roots were the exclusive sink for Cr(3+) accumulation. Weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) showed lower removal rates for both chemical forms of Cr than hybrid willows. Although EDTA had a minor effect on Cr(6+ )uptake by weeping willows, positive effect on Cr(6+ )translocation within plant materials was observed. It was also determined that EDTA in plant growth media significantly decreased the amount of Cr(3+) taken up by plants, but significantly increased Cr(3+) mobilization from roots to stems. Results indicated that EDTA was unable to increase the uptake of Cr(6+) by both plant species, but translocation of Cr(6+)-EDTA within plant materials was possible. Addition of EDTA in the nutrient media showed a strong influence on the uptake and translocation of Cr(3+) in both willows. Cr(3+)-EDTA in tissues of weeping willows was more mobile than that in hybrid willows. The information has important implications for the use of metal

  15. Quantification of total and hexavalent chromium in lager beers: variability between styles and estimation of daily intake of chromium from beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Elsa; Soares, M Elisa; Kozior, Marta; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O; Bastos, M Lourdes

    2014-09-17

    A survey of the presence of total and hexavalent chromium in lager beers was conducted to understand the variability between different styles of lager beer packaged in glass or cans and to estimate daily intake of total Cr and hexavalent chromium from beer. Graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy using validated methodologies was applied. Selective extraction of hexavalent chromium was performed using a Chromabond NH2/500 mg column and elution with nitric acid. The detection limits were 0.26 and 0.68 μg L(-1) for total Cr and Cr(VI), respectively. The mean content of total Cr ranged between 1.13 μg L(-1) in canned pale lager and 4.32 μg L(-1) in low-alcohol beers, whereas the mean content of Cr(VI) was beer, beer consumption can contribute approximately 2.28-8.64 and 1.6-6.17% of the recommended daily intake of chromium for women and men, respectively.

  16. Diffusion of hexavalent chromium in chromium-containing slag as affected by microbial detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunyan; Yang, Zhihui; Chai, Liyuan; Zhao, Kun

    2009-09-30

    An electrochemical method was used to determine the diffusion coefficient of chromium(VI) in chromium-containing slag. A slag plate was prepared from the original slag or the detoxified slag by Achromobacter sp. CH-1. The results revealed that the apparent diffusion coefficient of Cr(VI) was 4.4 x 10(-9)m(2)s(-1) in original slag and 2.62 x 10(-8)m(2)s(-1) in detoxified slag. The results implied that detoxification of chromium-containing slag by Achromobacter sp. CH-1 could enhance Cr(VI) release. Meanwhile, the results of laboratory experiment showed that the residual total Cr(VI) in slag decreased from an initial value of 6.8 mg g(-1) to 0.338 mg g(-1) at the end of the detoxification process. The Cr(VI) released from slag was also reduced by Achromobacter sp. CH-1 strain since water soluble Cr(VI) in the leachate was not detected after 4 days. Therefore, Achromobacter sp. CH-1 has potential application for the bio-detoxification of chromium-containing slag.

  17. Equilibrium and dynamic study on hexavalent chromium adsorption onto activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Natale, F; Erto, A; Lancia, A; Musmarra, D

    2015-01-08

    In this work, the results of equilibrium and dynamic adsorption tests of hexavalent chromium, Cr (VI), on activated carbon are presented. Adsorption isotherms were determined at different levels of pH and temperature. Dynamic tests were carried out in terms of breakthrough curves of lab-scale fixed bed column at different pH, inlet concentration and flow rate. Both the adsorption isotherms and the breakthrough curves showed non-linear and unconventional trends. The experimental results revealed that chromium speciation played a key role in the adsorption process, also for the occurrence of Cr(VI)-to-Cr(III) reduction reactions. Equilibrium tests were interpreted in light of a multi-component Langmuir model supported by ion speciation analysis. For the interpretation of the adsorption dynamic tests, a mass transfer model was proposed. Dynamic tests at pH 11 were well described considering the external mass transfer as the rate controlling step. Differently, for dynamic tests at pH 6 the same model provided a satisfying description of the experimental breakthrough curves only until a sorbent coverage around 1.6mgg(-1). Above this level, a marked reduction of the breakthrough curve slope was observed in response to a transition to an inter-particle adsorption mechanism.

  18. Hexavalent Chromium Removal by a Paecilomyces sp. Fungal Strain Isolated from Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Cárdenas-González

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A resistant and capable fungal strain in removing hexavalent chromium was isolated from an environment near of Chemical Science Faculty, located in the city of San Luis Potosí, Mexico. The strain was identified as Paecilomyces sp., by macro- and microscopic characteristics. Strain resistance of the strain to high Cr (VI concentrations and its ability to reduce chromium were studied. When it was incubated in minimal medium with glucose, another inexpensive commercial carbon source like unrefined and brown sugar or glycerol, in the presence of 50 mg/L of Cr (VI, the strain caused complete disappearance of Cr (VI, with the concomitant production of Cr (III in the growth medium after 7 days of incubation, at 28∘C, pH 4.0, 100 rpm, and an inoculum of 38 mg of dry weight. Decrease of Cr (VI levels from industrial wastes was also induced by Paecilomyces biomass. These results indicate that reducing capacity of chromate resistant filamentous fungus Cr (VI could be useful for the removal of Cr (VI pollution.

  19. Effects of hexavalent chromium on performance and microbial community of an aerobic granular sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zichao; Gao, Mengchun; She, Zonglian; Jin, Chunji; Zhao, Yangguo; Yang, Shiying; Guo, Liang; Wang, Sen

    2015-03-01

    The performance and microbial community of an aerobic granular sequencing batch reactor (GSBR) were investigated at different hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) concentrations. The COD and NH4 (+)-N removal efficiencies decreased with the increase in Cr(VI) concentration from 0 to 30 mg/L. The specific oxygen utilization rate (SOUR) decreased from 34.86 to 12.18 mg/(g mixed liquor suspended sludge (MLSS)·h) with the increase in Cr(VI) concentration from 0 to 30 mg/L. The specific ammonium oxidation rate (SAOR), specific nitrite oxidation rate (SNOR), and specific nitrate reduction rate (SNRR) decreased with the increase in Cr(VI) concentration, whereas the SNRR was always higher than the sum of SAOR and SNOR at 0-30 mg/L Cr(VI). The scanning electron micrographs (SEM) showed some undefined particles on the surface of filamentous bacteria that might be the chelation of chromium and macromolecular organics at 30 mg/L Cr(VI). The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles revealed that some microorganisms adapting to high Cr(VI) concentration gradually became the predominant bacteria, while others without Cr(VI)-tolerance capacity tended to deplete or weaken. Some bacteria could tolerate the toxicity of high Cr(VI) concentration in the aerobic GSBR, such as Propionibacteriaceae bacterium, Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Micropruina glycogenica.

  20. Hexavalent chromium removal in contaminated water using reticulated chitosan micro/nanoparticles from seafood processing wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, Jimena Bernadette; Sequeiros, Cynthia; Zaritzky, Noemi E

    2015-12-01

    Chitosan particles (CH) were obtained from seafood processing wastes (shrimp shells) and physicochemically characterized; deacetylation degree of CH was measured by Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and potentiometric titration; polymer molecular weight was determined by intrinsic viscosity measurements. Reticulated micro/nanoparticles of chitosan (MCH) with an average diameter close to 100nm were synthesized by ionic gelation of chitosan using tripolyphosphate (TPP), and characterized by SEM, size distribution and Zeta-potential. Detoxification capacities of CH and MCH were tested analyzing the removal of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) from contaminated water, at different initial chromium concentrations. The effect of pH on adsorption capacity of CH and MCH was experimentally determined and analyzed considering the Cr(VI) stable complexes (anions) formed, the presence of protonated groups in chitosan particles and the addition of the reticulating agent (TPP). Chitosan crosslinking was necessary to adsorb Cr(VI) at pHremoved from the solution was reduced and bound to the MCH as Cr(III). The reduction of toxic Cr(VI) to the less or nontoxic Cr(III) by the reticulated chitosan micro/nanoparticles can be considered a very efficient detoxification technique for the treatment of Cr(VI) contaminated water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Utility of Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 in a Microbial Fuel Cell as an Early Warning Device for Hexavalent Chromium Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Guey-Horng Wang; Chiu-Yu Cheng; Man-Hai Liu; Tzu-Yu Chen; Min-Chi Hsieh; Ying-Chien Chung

    2016-01-01

    Fast hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) determination is important for environmental risk and health-related considerations. We used a microbial fuel cell-based biosensor inoculated with a facultatively anaerobic, Cr(VI)-reducing, and exoelectrogenic Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 to determine the Cr(VI) concentration in water. The results indicated that O. anthropi YC152 exhibited high adaptability to pH, temperature, salinity, and water quality under anaerobic conditions. The stable performance of t...

  2. Low temperature reduction of hexavalent chromium by a microbial enrichment consortium and a novel strain of Arthrobacter aurescens

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson Vicki S; Apel William A; Horton Rene' N; Sheridan Peter P

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Chromium is a transition metal most commonly found in the environment in its trivalent [Cr(III)] and hexavalent [Cr(VI)] forms. The EPA maximum total chromium contaminant level for drinking water is 0.1 mg/l (0.1 ppm). Many water sources, especially underground sources, are at low temperatures (less than or equal to 15 Centigrade) year round. It is important to evaluate the possibility of microbial remediation of Cr(VI) contamination using microorganisms adapted to these l...

  3. On the removal of hexavalent chromium from a Class F fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, F E; Rezaee, M; Honaker, R Q; Hower, J C

    2016-05-01

    Coarse and fine samples of a Class F fly ash obtained from commercial combustion of Illinois bituminous coal have been exposed to two long-term leaching tests designed to simulate conditions in waste impoundments. ICP-AES analysis indicated that the coarse and fine fly ash samples contained 135 and 171mg/kg Cr, respectively. Measurements by XAFS spectroscopy showed that the ash samples originally contained 5 and 8% of the chromium, respectively, in the hexavalent oxidation state, Cr(VI). After exposure to water for more than four months, the percentage of chromium as Cr(VI) in the fly-ash decreased significantly for the coarse and fine fly-ash in both tests. Combining the XAFS data with ICP-AES data on the concentration of chromium in the leachates indicated that, after the nineteen-week-long, more aggressive, kinetic test on the coarse fly ash, approximately 60% of the Cr(VI) had been leached, 20% had been reduced to Cr(III) and retained in the ash, and 20% remained as Cr(VI) in the ash. In contrast, during the six-month-long baseline test, very little Cr was actually leached from either the coarse or the fine fly-ash (ash was retained in the ash in that form, while the remainder, 34% and 80%, respectively, was reduced and retained in the ash as Cr(III). The results are interpreted as indicating that Cr(VI) present in Class F fly-ash can be reduced to Cr(III) when in contact with water and that such chemical reduction can compete with physical removal of Cr(VI) from the ash by aqueous leaching.

  4. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Its Distribution in the Cell and Medium by Chromium Resistant Fusarium solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, batch biosorption of Cr(VI was studied using the fungal strain isolated from soil. The fungal strain was characterized as Fusarium solani. The total Cr distribution in the biomass (fungus and in the media obtained from the experiment conducted at 500 mg l -1 initial Cr(VI concentration and pH 5.0. The results indicated both intracellular and extracellular accumulation and enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI and this was supported by the Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM observation at the same Cr(VI concentration and pH value. Chromium elution from Fusarium solani containing Cr was then tried out using a number of chromium eluting reagents and a maximum Cr could be eluted using 0.5N sodium hydroxide solution without destructing the biomass structure. The total Cr was recovered by pH adjustment from both biomass and media was found to be 44% of the initial Cr(VI concentration (500 mg l-1.

  5. Evaluation of extraction methods for hexavalent chromium determination in dusts, ashes, and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Ruth E.; Wilson, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the difficulties in performing speciation analyses on solid samples is finding a suitable extraction method. Traditional methods for extraction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in soils, such as SW846 Method 3060A, can be tedious and are not always compatible with some determination methods. For example, the phosphate and high levels of carbonate and magnesium present in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Method 3060A digestion for Cr(VI) were found to be incompatible with the High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) detection method used by our laboratory. Modification of Method 3060A by eliminating the use of the phosphate buffer provided improved performance with the detection method, however dilutions are still necessary to achieve good chromatographic separation and detection of Cr(VI). An ultrasonic extraction method using a 1 mM Na2CO3 - 9 mM NaHCO3 buffer solution, adapted from Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Method ID215, has been used with good results for the determination of Cr(VI) in air filters. The average recovery obtained for BCR-545 - Welding Dust Loaded on Filter (IRMM, Belgium) using this method was 99 percent (1.2 percent relative standard deviation) with no conversion of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) during the extraction process. This ultrasonic method has the potential for use with other sample matrices, such as ashes and soils. Preliminary investigations using NIST 2701 (Hexavalent Chromium in Contaminated Soil) loaded onto quartz filters showed promising results with approximately 90 percent recovery of the certified Cr(VI) value. Additional testing has been done using NIST 2701 and NIST 2700 using different presentation methods. Extraction efficiency of bulk presentation, where small portions of the sample are added to the bottom of the extraction vessel, will be compared with supported presentation, where small portions of the sample are loaded onto a

  6. Mitigation of Hexavalent Chromium in Storm Water Resulting from Demolition of Large Concrete Structure at the East Tennessee Technology Park - 12286

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britto, Ronnie; Brown, Bridget; Hale, Timothy B.; Hensley, Janice L.; Johnson, Robert T.; Patel, Madhu [Tetra Tech, Inc. (United States); Emery, Jerry A. [Energy Solutions, Inc. (United States); Gaston, Clyde [LATA-SHARP Remediation Services - LSRS (United States); Queen, David C. [U.S. DOE-ORO (United States)

    2012-07-01

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding was provided to supplement the environmental management program at several DOE sites, including the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Demolition of the ETTP K-33 Building, the largest building to be demolished to date in Oak Ridge, was awarded to LSRS in FY-2010 under the ARRA program. The K-33 building was an 82 foot tall 2-story structure covering approximately 32 acres. Once this massive building was brought down to the ground, the debris was segregated and consolidated into piles of concrete rubble and steel across the remaining pad. The process of demolishing the building, tracking across concrete debris with heavy equipment, and stockpiling the concrete rubble caused it to become pulverized. During and after storm events, hexavalent chromium leached from the residual cement present in the large quantities of concrete. Storm water control measures were present to preclude migration of contaminants off-site, but these control measures were not designed to control hexavalent chromium dissolved in storm water from reaching nearby receiving water. The following was implemented to mitigate hexavalent chromium in storm water: - Steel wool was distributed around K-33 site catch basins and in water pools as an initial step in addressing hexavalent chromium. - Since the piles of concrete were too massive and unsafe to tarp, they were placed into windrows in an effort to reduce total surface area. - A Hach colorimetric field meter was acquired by the K-33 project to provide realtime results of hexavalent chromium in site surface water. - Three hexavalent chromium treatment systems were installed at three separate catch basins that receive integrated storm water flow from the K-33 site. Sodium bisulfite is being used as a reducing agent for the immobilization of hexavalent chromium while also assisting in lowering pH. Concentrations initially were 310 - 474 ppb of hexavalent chromium in

  7. Electrochemical removal of hexavalent chromium from wastewater using Platinum-Iron/Iron-carbon nanotubes and bipolar Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshyar Hossini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent decades, electrocoagulation (EC has engrossed much attention as an environmental-friendly and effectiveness process. In addition, the EC process is a potential suitable way for treatment of wastewater with concern to costs and environment. The object of this study was electrochemical evaluation of chromium removal from industrial wastewater using Platinum and carbon nanotubes electrodes. Materials and Methods: The effect of key variables including pH (3–9, hexavalent chromium concentration (50–300 mg/l, supporting electrolyte (NaCl, KCl, Na2CO3 and KNO3 and its dosage, Oxidation-Reduction variations, sludge generation rate and current density (2–20 mA/cm2 was determined. Results: Based on experimental data, optimum conditions were determined in 20, 120 min, pH 3, NaCl 0.5% and 100 mg/L initial concentration of chromium. Conclusions: Removal of hexavalent chromium from the wastewater could be successfully performanced using Platinum-Iron/Iron-carbon nanotubes and bipolar Electrodes.

  8. Removal of hexavalent chromium upon interaction with biochar under acidic conditions: mechanistic insights and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Bharat; Paul, Debajyoti; Singh, Abhas; Gupta, Tarun

    2017-07-01

    Chromium pollution of soil and water is a serious environmental concern due to potential carcinogenicity of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] when ingested. Eucalyptus bark biochar (EBB), a carbonaceous black porous material obtained by pyrolysis of biomass at 500 °C under oxygen-free atmosphere, was used to investigate the removal of aqueous Cr(VI) upon interaction with the EBB, the dominant Cr(VI) removal mechanism(s), and the applicability to treat Cr(VI)-contaminated wastewater. Batch experiments showed complete removal of aqueous Cr(VI) at pH 1-2; sorption was negligible at pH 1, but ~55% of total Cr was sorbed onto the EBB surface at pH 2. Detailed investigations on unreacted and reacted EBB through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) indicate that the carboxylic groups in biochar played a dominant role in Cr(VI) sorption, whereas the phenolic groups were responsible for Cr(VI) reduction. The predominance of sorption-reduction mechanism was confirmed by XPS studies that indicated ~82% as Cr(III) and ~18% as Cr(VI) sorbed on the EBB surface. Significantly, Cr(VI) reduction was also facilitated by dissolved organic matter (DOM) extracted from biochar. This reduction was enhanced by the presence of biochar. Overall, the removal of Cr(VI) in the presence of biochar was affected by sorption due to electrostatic attraction, sorption-reduction mediated by surface organic complexes, and aqueous reduction by DOM. Relative dominance of the aqueous reduction mechanism depended on a critical biochar dosage for a given electrolyte pH and initial Cr(VI) concentration. The low-cost EBB developed here successfully removed all Cr(VI) in chrome tanning acidic wastewater and Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater after pH adjustment, highlighting its potential applicability in effective Cr(VI) remediation.

  9. A Comparative Survey on Parameters Influencing on Hexavalent Chromium Measurement as an Occupational Carcinogen

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    A. Tirgar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Hexavalent chromium, Cr+6, is a very harmful pollutant and a relatively unstable compound that is present in many industries. It is a known human respiratory carcinogen and occupational exposure to this chemical is associated with different health hazards. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of four parameters including: type of sampling head, sampling height from the surface of electroplating solution, sampling duration, and sample storage duration on Cr+6 mist monitoring.Materials & Methods: To evaluate the influence of the main parameters as an experimental study, the 24 factorial design was applied at constant electroplating condition. A chromium electroplating bath with the ability to produce homogenous mist was used to create Cr+6 mist in laboratory setting. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH method 7600 was used to determine the Cr+6 concentration. Results: The results of 48 Cr+6 mist samples showed that Cr+6 concentration was higher: (1 for sampling by closed-face filter cassettes than for sampling by open-face filter cassettes (P<0.001; (2 for samples collected at 35 cm above the electroplating solution surface than for samples collected at 50 cm (P <0.001; (3 for sampling duration of 30 minutes than for sampling duration of 180 minutes (P <0.001; and, (4 for samples extracted immediately after sampling than for samples with delayed extraction (24 hours after sampling (P <0.001. Conclusion: It is concluded that the accuracy of Cr+6 mist sampling in electroplating shops will be enhanced when: (1 a closed-face filter cassette is used to prevent liquid splash contamination; (2 the sampling height is suitable as determined by further research; (3 the sampling duration is short (approximately 30 minutes; and, (4 the extraction of the Cr+6 sample is performed as soon as the sampling is completed.

  10. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by Macadamia nutshell powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakade, Vusumzi Emmanuel; Ntuli, Themba Dominic; Ofomaja, Augustine Enakpodia

    2016-04-01

    Macadamia nutshell biosorbents treated in three different activating agents [raw Macadamia nutshell powder (RMN), acid-treated Macadamia nutshell (ATMN) and base-treated Macadamia nutshell (BTMN)] were investigated for the adsorption of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra of free and Cr(VI)-loaded sorbents as well as thermogravimetric analysis revealed that the acid and base treatments modified the surface properties of the sorbent. Surface characteristics were also evaluated by the scanning electron microscopy and surface area analyzer. The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Cr(VI) by sorbents were pH 2, contact time 10 h, adsorbent mass 0.2 g and concentration 100 mg L-1. The equilibrium data were fitted into the Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Sips isotherms, and no single model could clearly explain the sorption mechanism. Maximum binding capacities of 45.23, 44.83 and 42.44 mg g-1 for RMN, ATMN and BTMN, respectively, were obtained. The kinetic data were analyzed using the pseudo-first, pseudo-second and Elovich kinetic models, and it was observed that the pseudo-second-order model produced the best fit for the experimental data. Macadamia nutshell sorbents showed potential as low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution.

  11. The Growth of Gypsum in the Presence of Hexavalent Chromium: A Multiscale Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Morales

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of dissolved inorganic pollutants into the structure of minerals is an important process that controls the mobility and fate of these pollutants in the Earth’s crust. It also modifies the surface structure and composition of the host mineral, affecting its crystallization kinetics. Here, we investigate the effect of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI, on the nucleation and growth of gypsum by conducting two types of experiments: (i in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM observations of the growth of gypsum {010} surfaces in the presence of Cr(VI and (ii gypsum precipitation experiments by mixing aqueous solutions containing variable amounts of Cr(VI. Gypsum precipitation is progressively delayed when occurring from solutions bearing increasing Cr(VI concentrations. Chemical analyses of gypsum precipitates show that gypsum incorporates small Cr(VI amounts that correlate with the content of this ion in the aqueous solution. Gypsum cell parameters variation reflects this incorporation. At the molecular scale, Cr(VI induces a slowdown of step advance rates on gypsum {010} surfaces accompanied by the roughening of nanostep edges and the so-called “template effect”. This effect involves the reproduction of the original nanotopography after the completion of individual advancing monolayers and appears as a general nanoscale phenomenon occurring during growth of solid solutions from aqueous solutions even in the case of compositionally-restricted solid solutions.

  12. Biodegradation of the metallic carcinogen hexavalent chromium Cr(VI by an indigenously isolated bacterial strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Alok

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI], a potential mutagen and carcinogen, is regularly introduced into the environment through diverse anthropogenic activities, including electroplating, leather tanning, and pigment manufacturing. Human exposure to this toxic metal ion not only causes potential human health hazards but also affects other life forms. The World Health Organization, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and the Environmental Protection Agency have determined that Cr(VI compounds are known human carcinogens. The Sukinda valley in Jajpur District, Orissa, is known for its deposit of chromite ore, producing nearly 98% of the chromite ore in India and one of the prime open cast chromite ore mines in the world (CES, Orissa Newsletter. Materials and Methods: Our investigation involved microbial remediation of Cr(VI without producing any byproduct. Bacterial cultures tolerating high concentrations of Cr were isolated from the soil sample collected from the chromite-contaminated sites of Sukinda, and their bioaccumulation properties were investigated. Strains capable of growing at 250 mg/L Cr(VI were considered as Cr resistant. Results: The experimental investigation showed the maximum specific Cr uptake at pH 7 and temperature 30oC. At about 50 mg/L initial Cr(VI concentrations, uptake of the selected potential strain exceeded 98% within 12 h of incubation. The bacterial isolate was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Brevebacterium casei. Conclusion: Results indicated promising approach for microbial remediation of effluents containing elevated levels of Cr(VI.

  13. Soil microbial community response to hexavalent chromium in planted and unplanted soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipsilantis, Ioannis; Coyne, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    Theories suggest that rapid microbial growth rates lead to quicker development of metal resistance. We tested these theories by adding hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to soil, sowing Indian mustard (Brassica juncea), and comparing rhizosphere and bulk soil microbial community responses. Four weeks after the initial Cr(VI) application we measured Cr concentration, microbial biomass by fumigation extraction and soil extract ATP, tolerance to Cr and growth rates with tritiated thymidine incorporation, and performed community substrate use analysis with BIOLOG GN plates. Exchangeable Cr(VI) levels were very low, and therefore we assumed the Cr(VI) impact was transient. Microbial biomass was reduced by Cr(VI) addition. Microbial tolerance to Cr(VI) tended to be higher in the Cr-treated rhizosphere soil relative to the non-treated systems, while microorganisms in the Cr-treated bulk soil were less sensitive to Cr(VI) than microorganisms in the non-treated bulk soil. Microbial diversity as measured by population evenness increased with Cr(VI) addition based on a Gini coefficient derived from BIOLOG substrate use patterns. Principal component analysis revealed separation between Cr(VI) treatments, and between rhizosphere and bulk soil treatments. We hypothesize that because of Cr(VI) addition there was indirect selection for fast-growing organisms, alleviation of competition among microbial communities, and increase in Cr tolerance in the rhizosphere due to the faster turnover rates in that environment.

  14. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by a novel Ochrobactrum sp. - microbial characteristics and reduction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayani, M; Vidya Shetty, K

    2014-04-01

    A Gram negative hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) reducing bacteria, Ochrobactrum sp. Cr-B4 (genbank accession number: JF824998) was isolated from the aerator water of an activated sludge process of a wastewater treatment facility of a dye and pigment based specialty chemical industry. It showed a resistance for 1000 mg L(-1) Cr(VI). It exhibited resistance against other heavy metal ions like Ni(2+) (900 mg L(-1) ), Cu(2+) (500 mg L(-1) ), Pb(2+) (800 mg L(-1) ), and Cd(2+) (250 mg L(-1) ), Zn(2+) (700 mg L(-1) ), Fe(3+) (800 mg L(-1) ), and against selected antibiotics. Cr-B4 could efficiently reduce 200 mg L(-1) Cr(VI) completely in nutrient and LB media and could convert Cr(VI) to Cr(III) efficiently. Cr(VI) reduction in nutrient media followed allosteric enzyme kinetics with Km values of 59.39 mg L(-1) and Vmax values of 47.03 mg L(-1)  h(-1) . The reduction in LB media followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with Km values of 99.52 mg L(-1) and Vmax of 77.63 mg L(-1)  h(-1) . Scanning electron micrograms revealed the presence of extracellular polymeric secretions.

  15. Hexavalent chromium reduction and energy recovery by using dual-chambered microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadharan, Praveena; Nambi, Indumathi M

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology is utilized to treat hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from wastewater and to generate electricity simultaneously. The Cr(VI) is bioelectrochemically reduced to non-toxic Cr(III) form in the presence of an organic electron donor in a dual-chambered MFC. The Cr(VI) as catholyte and artificial wastewater inoculated with anaerobic sludge as anolyte, Cr(VI) at 100 mg/L was completely removed within 48 h (initial pH value 2.0). The total amount of Cr recovered was 99.87% by the precipitation of Cr(III) on the surface of the cathode. In addition to that 78.4% of total organic carbon reduction was achieved at the anode chamber within 13 days of operation. Furthermore, the maximum power density of 767.01 mW/m² (2.08 mA/m²) was achieved by MFCs at ambient conditions. The present work has successfully demonstrated the feasibility of using MFCs for simultaneous energy production from wastewater and reduction of toxic Cr(VI) to non-toxic Cr(III).

  16. Investigation of Hexavalent Chromium Flux to Groundwater at the 100-C-7:1 Excavation Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Horner, Jacob A.; Johnson, Christian D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2012-11-16

    Deep excavation of soil has been conducted at the 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1 waste sites within the 100-BC Operable Unit at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to remove hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) contamination with the excavations reaching to near the water table. Soil sampling showed that Cr(VI) contamination was still present at the bottom of the 100-C-7:1 excavation. In addition, Cr(VI) concentrations in a downgradient monitoring well have shown a transient spike of increased Cr(VI) concentration following initiation of excavation. Potentially, the increased Cr(VI) concentrations in the downgradient monitoring well are due to Cr(VI) from the excavation site. However, data were needed to evaluate this possibility and to quantify the overall impact of the 100-C-7:1 excavation site on groundwater. Data collected from a network of aquifer tubes installed across the floor of the 100-C-7:1 excavation and from temporary wells installed at the bottom of the entrance ramp to the excavation were used to evaluate Cr(VI) releases into the aquifer and to estimate local-scale hydraulic properties and groundwater flow velocity.

  17. The Photocatalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Controllable Mesoporous Anatase TiO2 Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorrada Loryuenyong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Titania (TiO2 nanoparticles with periodical mesopore size (up to 150 Å have successfully been synthesized by sol-gel template method, using titanium(IV tetraisopropoxide as a starting precursor and isopropanol as a solvent. Different quantities of activated carbon (0%, 5%, and 10% by weight were used as templates to control the porosity and particle size of titania nanoparticles. The templates were completely removed during the calcination in air at 500°C for 3 hr. The results showed that the specific surface area of titania is increased with increasing activated carbon content. The optical bandgap of synthesized titania exhibits a blue shift by 0.3–0.6 eV when compared to the reported value for the bulk anatase and rutile phases. The photocatalytic activity of porous titania is determined with its reduction efficiency of hexavalent chromium (Cr6+. The reduction efficiency is optimized under ultraviolet illumination.

  18. Removal of hexavalent chromium by using red mud activated with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Deliang; Ding, Ying; Li, Lingling; Chang, Zhixian; Rao, Zhengyong; Lu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    The removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solution by using red mud activated with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was studied. The optimum operation parameters, such as CTAB concentration, pH values, contact time, and initial Cr(VI) concentration, were investigated. The best concentration of CTAB for modifying red mud was found to be 0.50% (mCTAB/VHCl,0.6 mol/L). The lower pH (Red mud activated with CTAB can greatly improve the removal ratio of Cr(VI) as high as four times than that of original red mud. Adsorption equilibrium was reached within 30 min under the initial Cr(VI) concentration of 100 mg L(-1). The isotherm data were analysed using Langmuir and Freundlich models. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on activated red mud fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm model, and the maximum adsorption capacity was estimated as 22.20 mg g(-1) (Cr/red mud). The adsorption process could be well described using the pseudo-second-order model. The result shows that activated red mud is a promising agent for low-cost water treatment.

  19. INFLUENCE OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM INITIAL CONCENTRATION ON RETARDATION FACTOR AND CONTAMINANT VELOCITY IN A SOIL MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. SHIVA PRASHANTH KUMAR

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sources of soil and ground water contamination are many and include many folds of accidental spills and leaks of toxic and hazardous chemicals. Preparation of ground water contamination model needs good understanding of the behavior of contaminant transport through soil media for predicting the level of contamination of ground water in the near future at the intended site conditions. Sorption is a natural process; due to its presence, the contaminant can move slowly as compared to the ground water and hence the effects of sorption must be taken into consideration while predicting the travel time of the contaminant to reach the ground water sources. This paper discusses the results of column test studies carried out in the laboratory under controlled conditions about the spreading of contaminant (Hexavalent chromium, Cr (VI through the clay mixed red soil at two different initial concentrations (800 mg/L and 4200 mg/L. The variations of the contaminant flow velocity and retardation factor for two different initial concentrations of contaminant were brought out and discussed. The contaminant flow velocity drastically coming down for a relative concentration of 0 to 0.2 and beyond this range, the contaminant flow velocity value is decreasing in a slow rate for both the lower and higher initial contaminant concentrations tested. At the lower relative concentration, the higher retardation factor was observed and it may be due to slowly filling the available sorption sites in the soil column.

  20. Reduction and immobilization of hexavalent chromium by microbially reduced Fe-bearing clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10, 20, and 30 °C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10 °C, though at 30 °C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly

  1. Hexavalent Chromium: Analysis of the Mechanism of Groundwater Contamination in a Former Industrial Site in the Province of Vicenza (Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Accoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study consisted in the analysis of the mobilization mechanisms of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI into groundwater from a decommissioned contaminated factory. The site is located in the Province of Vicenza and formerly was a chrome-plating plant. The subsoil consists predominantly of gravelly deposits with a thickness of at least one hundred meters. An unconfined aquifer is present with water table at about 23 m depth bgl. During the seven years of monitoring (2008-2014, the fluctuation of groundwater level was more than 6 m; hydraulic conductivity is about 1.0E-03 m/s and groundwater seepage velocity about 12 m/day. At the area of the source of contamination, the unsaturated soil is contaminated by hexavalent chromium throughout the thickness: concentrations range from 200 to 500 mg/kg. At the bottom of zone of groundwater level fluctuation, the hexavalent chromium concentration decreases to below the detection limit. The available data (e.g. hexavalent chromium concentrations in groundwater, groundwater level, local rainfall give the opportunity to assess the effects, on the magnitude of groundwater contamination, of the effective infiltration versus the fluctuation of groundwater level. The main analysis was performed on a statistical basis, in order to find out which of the two factors was most likely related to the periodic peaks of hexavalent chromium concentration in groundwater. Statistical analysis results were verified by a mass balance. Data show that at the site both the effective infiltration through the unsaturated zone and the leaching of soil contaminated by groundwater, when it exceeds a certain piezometric level, lead to peak concentrations of hexavalent chromium, even if with characteristics and effects different.

  2. Double shroud delivery of silica precursor for reducing hexavalent chromium in welding fume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Kalivoda, Mark; Guan, Jianying; Theodore, Alexandros; Sharby, Jessica; Wu, Chang-Yu; Paulson, Kathleen; Es-Said, Omar

    2012-01-01

    The welding process yields a high concentration of nanoparticles loaded with hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)), a known human carcinogen. Previous studies have demonstrated that using tetramethylsilane (TMS) as a shielding gas additive can significantly reduce the Cr(6+) concentration in welding fume particles. In this study, a novel insulated double shroud torch (IDST) was developed to further improve the reduction of airborne Cr(6+) concentration by separating the flows of the primary shielding gas and the TMS carrier gas. Welding fumes were collected from a welding chamber in the laboratory and from a fixed location near the welding arc in a welding facility. The Cr(6+) content was analyzed with ion chromatography and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results from the chamber sampling demonstrated that the addition of 3.2 ≈ 5.1% of TMS carrier gas to the primary shielding gas resulted in more than a 90% reduction of airborne Cr(6+) under all shielding gas flow rates. The XPS result confirmed complete elimination of Cr(6+) inside the amorphous silica shell. Adding 100 ≈ 1000 ppm of nitric oxide or carbon monoxide to the shielding gas could also reduce Cr(6+) concentrations up to 57% and 35%, respectively; however, these reducing agents created potential hazards from the release of unreacted agents. Results of the field test showed that the addition of 1.6% of TMS carrier gas to the primary shielding gas reduced Cr(6+) concentration to the limitation of detection (1.1 μg/m(3)). In a worst-case scenario, if TMS vapor leaked into the environment without decomposition and ventilation, the estimated TMS concentration in the condition of field sampling would be a maximum 5.7 ppm, still well below its flammability limit (1%). Based on a previously developed cost model, the use of TMS increases the general cost by 3.8%. No visual deterioration of weld quality caused by TMS was found, although further mechanical testing is necessary.

  3. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction under Fermentative Conditions with Lactate Stimulated Native Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somenahally, Anil C [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Yuan, Tong [University of Oklahoma; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Hazen, Terry C [ORNL; Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D. [Oklahoma University; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI)] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI) concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI)-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM) and continuously amended with Cr(VI) at 0.0 (No-Cr), 0.1 (Low-Cr) and 3.0 (High-Cr) mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI), 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%). Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

  4. Hexavalent chromium reduction under fermentative conditions with lactate stimulated native microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somenahally, Anil C; Mosher, Jennifer J; Yuan, Tong; Podar, Mircea; Phelps, Tommy J; Brown, Steven D; Yang, Zamin K; Hazen, Terry C; Arkin, Adam P; Palumbo, Anthony V; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong; Elias, Dwayne A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI)] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI) concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI)-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM) and continuously amended with Cr(VI) at 0.0 (No-Cr), 0.1 (Low-Cr) and 3.0 (High-Cr) mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI), 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%). Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

  5. Hexavalent chromium reduction under fermentative conditions with lactate stimulated native microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil C Somenahally

    Full Text Available Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM and continuously amended with Cr(VI at 0.0 (No-Cr, 0.1 (Low-Cr and 3.0 (High-Cr mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI, 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%, Methanosarcina (17% and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%. Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

  6. About the performance of Sphaerotilus natans to reduce hexavalent chromium in batch and continuous reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravelli, Alejandro H., E-mail: alejandrocaravelli@hotmail.com [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Criotecnologia de Alimentos (CIDCA), CCT - CONICET - La Plata. Fac., Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 47 y 116 La Plata (1900) (Argentina); Zaritzky, Noemi E., E-mail: zaritzky@ing.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Criotecnologia de Alimentos (CIDCA), CCT - CONICET - La Plata. Fac., Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 47 y 116 La Plata (1900) (Argentina); Fac. de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 48 y 115 La Plata (1900) (Argentina)

    2009-09-15

    The hexavalent chromium biological reduction constitutes a safe and economical detoxification procedure of wastewaters containing Cr(VI). However, little research has been done to evaluate Cr(VI) tolerance and reduction capacity of microbial cultures under different growth conditions. The aims of this work were (a) to evaluate the capacity of Sphaerotilus natans to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in a continuous system limited in carbon and energy source or in nitrogen source, (b) to evaluate the toxic effect of Cr(VI) on this microorganism, (c) to carry out a complete analysis of Cr(VI) reduction by S. natans not only in continuous regime but also in batch system, and (d) to model the obtained results mathematically. S. natans exhibited great resistance to Cr(VI) (19-78 mg l{sup -1}) and optimal growth in continuous and batch systems using a mineral medium supplemented only with citric acid as organic substrate. In carbon- and energy-limited continuous systems, a maximum percentual decrease in Cr(VI) by 13% was reached for low influent Cr(VI) concentration (4.3-5.32 mgCr(VI) l{sup -1}); the efficiency of the process did not notoriously increase as the length of cellular residence time was increased from 4.16 to 50 h. A nitrogen-limited continuous operation with a cellular residence time of 28.5 h resulted in a Cr(VI) decrease of approximately 26-32%. In batch system, a mathematical model allowed to predict the Cr(VI) concentration as a function of time and the ratio between the initial Cr(VI) concentration and that of the biomass. High concentrations of initial Cr(VI) and biomass produced the highest performance of the process of Cr(VI) reduction reached in batch system, aspects which should be considered in detoxification strategies of wastewaters.

  7. Remediation of hexavalent chromium spiked soil by using synthesized iron sulfide particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yujie; Wang, Wanyu; Zhou, Liqiang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Mirza, Zakaria A; Lin, Xiang

    2017-02-01

    Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilized microscale iron sulfide (FeS) particles were synthesized and applied to remediate hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) spiked soil. The effects of parameters including dosage of FeS particles, soil moisture, and natural organic matter (NOM) in soil were investigated with comparison to iron sulfate (FeSO4). The results show that the stabilized FeS particles can reduce Cr(VI) and immobilize Cr in soil quickly and efficiently. The soil moisture ranging from 40% to 70% and NOM in soil had no significant effects on Cr(VI) remediation by FeS particles. When molar ratio of FeS to Cr(VI) was 1.5:1, about 98% of Cr(VI) in soil was reduced by FeS particles in 3 d and Cr(VI) concentration decreased from 1407 mg kg(-1) to 16 mg kg(-1). The total Cr and Cr(VI) in Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) leachate were reduced by 98.4% and 99.4%, respectively. In FeS particles-treated soil, the exchangeable Cr fraction was mainly converted to Fe-Mn oxides bound fraction because of the precipitation of Cr(III)-Fe(III) hydroxides. The physiologically based extraction test (PBET) bioaccessibility of Cr was decreased from 58.67% to 6.98%. Compared to FeSO4, the high Cr(VI) removal and Cr immobilization efficiency makes prepared FeS particles a great potential in field application of Cr(VI) contaminated soil remediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fixed-bed column study for hexavalent chromium removal and recovery by short-chain polyaniline synthesized on jute fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Potsangbam Albino; Chakraborty, Saswati

    2009-03-15

    Fixed-bed column studies were conducted to evaluate performance of a short-chain polymer, polyaniline, synthesized on the surface of jute fiber (PANI-jute) for the removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in aqueous environment. Influent pH, column bed depth, influent Cr(VI) concentrations and influent flow rate were variable parameters for the present study. Optimum pH for total chromium removal was observed as 3 by electrostatic attraction of acid chromate ion (HCrO(4)(-)) with protonated amine group (NH(3)(+)) of PANI-jute. With increase in column bed depth from 40 to 60 cm, total chromium uptake by PANI-jute increased from 4.14 to 4.66 mg/g with subsequent increase in throughput volume from 9.84 to 12.6L at exhaustion point. The data obtained for total chromium removal were well described by BDST equation till 10% breakthrough. Adsorption rate constant and dynamic bed capacity at 10% breakthrough were observed as 0.01 L/mgh and 1069.46 mg/L, respectively. Adsorbed total chromium was recovered back from PANI-jute as non-toxic Cr(III) after ignition with more than 97% reduction in weight, minimizing the problem of solid waste disposal.

  9. Cytotoxicity and genome-wide microarray analysis of intestinal smooth muscle cells in response to hexavalent chromium induction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Fang JIN; Yuan-Yuan WANG; Zi-Dong ZHANG; Yi-Meng YUAN; Yi-Rui HU; Yang-Feng WEI; Jian NI

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ingestion of high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(Ⅵ)] in drinking water induces intestinal tumors in mice; however,information on its toxicity on intestinal smooth muscle cells is limited.The present study aimed to assess the in vitro and in vivo toxicological effects of Cr(Ⅵ) on intestinal smooth muscle cells.Human intestinal smooth muscle cells (HISM cells) were cultured with different concentrations of Cr(Ⅵ) to evaluate effects on cell proliferation ability,oxidative stress levels,and antioxidant system.Furthermore,tissue sections in Cr(Ⅵ) exposed rabbits were analyzed to evaluate toxicity on intestinal muscle cells in vivo.Gene chips were utilized to assess differential gene expression profiles at the genome-wide level in 1 μmol/L Cr(Ⅵ) treated cells.Intestinal tissue biopsy results showed that Cr(Ⅵ) increased the incidences of diffuse epithelial hyperplasia in intestinal jejunum but caused no obvious damage to the structure of the muscularis.Cell proliferation analysis revealed that high concentrations (≥64 μmol/L) but not low concentrations of Cr(Ⅵ) (≤16 μmol/L) significantly inhibited the growth of HISM cells.For oxidative stress levels,the expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) was elevated at high concentrations (≥64 μmol/L) but not at low concentrations of Cr(Ⅵ) (≤ 16 μmol/L).In addition,dose-dependent increases in the activity of oxidized glutathione (GSSH)/total-glutathione (T-GSH) were also observed.Gene chip screened 491 differentially expressed genes including genes associated with cell apoptosis,oxidations,and cytoskeletons.Some of these differentially expressed genes may be unique to smooth muscle cells in response to Cr(Ⅵ) induction.

  10. Low temperature reduction of hexavalent chromium by a microbial enrichment consortium and a novel strain of Arthrobacter aurescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Vicki S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromium is a transition metal most commonly found in the environment in its trivalent [Cr(III] and hexavalent [Cr(VI] forms. The EPA maximum total chromium contaminant level for drinking water is 0.1 mg/l (0.1 ppm. Many water sources, especially underground sources, are at low temperatures (less than or equal to 15 Centigrade year round. It is important to evaluate the possibility of microbial remediation of Cr(VI contamination using microorganisms adapted to these low temperatures (psychrophiles. Results Core samples obtained from a Cr(VI contaminated aquifer at the Hanford facility in Washington were enriched in Vogel Bonner medium at 10 Centigrade with 0, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 1000 mg/l Cr(VI. The extent of Cr(VI reduction was evaluated using the diphenyl carbazide assay. Resistance to Cr(VI up to and including 1000 mg/l Cr(VI was observed in the consortium experiments. Reduction was slow or not observed at and above 100 mg/l Cr(VI using the enrichment consortium. Average time to complete reduction of Cr(VI in the 30 and 60 mg/l Cr(VI cultures of the consortium was 8 and 17 days, respectively at 10 Centigrade. Lyophilized consortium cells did not demonstrate adsorption of Cr(VI over a 24 hour period. Successful isolation of a Cr(VI reducing organism (designated P4 from the consortium was confirmed by 16S rDNA amplification and sequencing. Average time to complete reduction of Cr(VI at 10 Centigrade in the 25 and 50 mg/l Cr(VI cultures of the isolate P4 was 3 and 5 days, respectively. The 16S rDNA sequence from isolate P4 identified this organism as a strain of Arthrobacter aurescens, a species that has not previously been shown to be capable of low temperature Cr(VI reduction. Conclusion A. aurescens, indigenous to the subsurface, has the potential to be a predominant metal reducer in enhanced, in situ subsurface bioremediation efforts involving Cr(VI and possibly other heavy metals and radionuclides.

  11. Chronic exposure to sublethal hexavalent chromium affects organ histopathology and serum cortisol profile of a teleost, Channa punctatus (Bloch)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Ashish K. [Department of Zoology, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India); Mohanty, Banalata, E-mail: drbana_mohanty@rediffmail.com [Department of Zoology, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 (India)

    2009-09-01

    Effects of chronic exposures (one and two months) to sublethal doses of hexavalent chromium (2 and 4 mg/L potassium dichromate) on organ histopathology and serum cortisol profile were investigated and their overall impact on growth and behavior of a teleost fish, Channa punctatus was elucidated. Histopathological lesions were distinct in the vital organs gill, kidney and liver. The gill lamellae became lifted, fused, and showed oedema. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of lamellar epithelial cells were distinct with desquamation. Hypertrophy of epithelial cells of renal tubules and reduction in tubular lumens were observed in the trunk kidney. The atrophy of the head kidney interrenal cells and decreased serum cortisol level indicated exhaustion of interrenal activity. Hepatocyte vacuolization and shrinkage, nuclear pyknosis and increase of sinusoidal spaces were observed in the liver. Abnormal behavioral patterns and reduced growth rate were also noticed in the exposed fish. The chronic hexavalent chromium exposure thus by affecting histopathology of gill, kidney (including interrenal tissue) and liver could impair the vital functions of respiration, excretion, metabolic regulation and maintenance of stress homeostasis which in the long-run may pose serious threat to fish health and affect their population.

  12. Chronic exposure to sublethal hexavalent chromium affects organ histopathology and serum cortisol profile of a teleost, Channa punctatus (Bloch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ashish K; Mohanty, Banalata

    2009-09-01

    Effects of chronic exposures (one and two months) to sublethal doses of hexavalent chromium (2 and 4 mg/L potassium dichromate) on organ histopathology and serum cortisol profile were investigated and their overall impact on growth and behavior of a teleost fish, Channa punctatus was elucidated. Histopathological lesions were distinct in the vital organs gill, kidney and liver. The gill lamellae became lifted, fused, and showed oedema. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of lamellar epithelial cells were distinct with desquamation. Hypertrophy of epithelial cells of renal tubules and reduction in tubular lumens were observed in the trunk kidney. The atrophy of the head kidney interrenal cells and decreased serum cortisol level indicated exhaustion of interrenal activity. Hepatocyte vacuolization and shrinkage, nuclear pyknosis and increase of sinusoidal spaces were observed in the liver. Abnormal behavioral patterns and reduced growth rate were also noticed in the exposed fish. The chronic hexavalent chromium exposure thus by affecting histopathology of gill, kidney (including interrenal tissue) and liver could impair the vital functions of respiration, excretion, metabolic regulation and maintenance of stress homeostasis which in the long-run may pose serious threat to fish health and affect their population.

  13. TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN CHROMITE ORE PROCESSING SOLID WASTE USING A MIXED REDUCTANT SOLUTION OF FERROUS SULFATE AND SODIUM DITHIONITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed a method for disseminating ferrous iron in the subsurface to enhance chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in a chromite ore processing solid waste derived from the production of ferrochrome alloy. The method utilizes ferrous sulfate (FeSO4) in combinati...

  14. AN IN SITU PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR THE TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN GROUNDWATER:VOLUME 2 PERFORMANCE MONITORING

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 46 m long, 7.3 m deep, and 0.6 m wide permeable subsurface reactive wall was installed at the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Support Center, near Elizabeth City, North Carolina, in June 1996. The reactive wall was designed to remediate hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] contaminated ground ...

  15. AN IN-SITU PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR THE TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN GROUND WATER: VOLUME 1 DESIGN AND INSTALLATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 46 m long, 7.3 m deep, and 0.6 m wide permeable subsurface reactive wall was installed at the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Support Center, near Elizabeth City, North Carolina, in June 1996. The reactive wall was designed to remediate hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] contaminated ground ...

  16. Adsorption characteristics of hexavalent chromium on HCB/TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Yonggang, E-mail: 13502182420@163.com

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sol–gel method was adopted to prepare HCB/TiO{sub 2}. • Its adsorption performance of Cr(VI) was investigated. • The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was at 27.33 mg g{sup −1} in an acidic medium. • The value is worth comparable with other low-cost adsorbents. - Abstract: Sol–gel method was adopted to prepare HCB/TiO{sub 2} and its adsorption ability of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), and removal from aqueous solution were investigated. The samples were characterized by Power X-ray diffraction (XRD) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) which showed that the TiO{sub 2} was deposited on the surface of HCB. FTIR was used to identify the changes of the surface functional groups before and after adsorption. Potentiometric titration method was used to characterize the zero charge (pH{sub pzc}) characteristics of the surface of HCB/TiO{sub 2} which showed more acidic functional groups containing. Batch experiments showed that initial pH, absorbent dosage, contact time and initial concentration of Cr(VI) were important parameters for the Cr(VI) adsorption studies. The Freundlich isotherm model better reflected the experimental data better. Cr(VI) adsorption process followed the pseudo-second order kinetic model, which illustrated chemical adsorption. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy (ΔG), changes in enthalpy change (ΔH) and changes in entropy change (ΔS) were also evaluated. Negative value of free energy occurred at temperature range of 25–45 °C, so Cr(VI) adsorption by HCB/TiO{sub 2} is spontaneous. Desorption results showed that the adsorption capacity could maintain 80% after five cycles. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was at 27.33 mg g{sup −1} in an acidic medium, of which the value is worth comparable with other low-cost adsorbents.

  17. Cancer mortality in a Chinese population exposed to hexavalent chromium in drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, J.J.; Sedman, R.M.; Reynolds, S.D.; Sherman, C.D.; Li, L.-H.; Howd, R.A.; Sandy, M.S.; Zeise, L.; Alexeeff, G.V.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 1987, investigators in Liaoning Province, China, reported that mortality rates for all cancer, stomach cancer, and lung cancer in 1970-1978 were higher in villages with hexavalent chromium (Cr)-contaminated drinking water than in the general population. The investigators reported rates, but did not report statistical measures of association or precision. METHODS: Using reports and other communications from investigators at the local Jinzhou Health and Anti-Epidemic Station, we obtained data on Cr contamination of groundwater and cancer mortality in 9 study regions near a ferrochromium factory. We estimated:(1) person-years at risk in the study regions, based on census and population growth rate data, (2) mortality counts, based on estimated person-years at risk and previously reported mortality rates, and (3) rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: The all-cancer mortality rate in the combined 5 study regions with Cr-contaminated water was negligibly elevated in comparison with the rate in the 4 combined study regions without contaminated water (rate ratio = 1.13; 95% confidence interval = 0.86-1.46), but was somewhat more elevated in comparison with the whole province (1.23; 0.97-1.53). Stomach cancer mortality in the regions with contaminated water was more substantially elevated in comparison with the regions without contaminated water (1.82; 1.11-2.91) and the whole province (1.69; 1.12-2.44). Lung cancer mortality was slightly elevated in comparison with the unexposed study regions (1.15; 0.62-2.07), and more strongly elevated in comparison with the whole province (1.78; 1.03-2.87). Mortality from other cancers combined was not elevated in comparison with either the unexposed study regions (0.86; 0.53-1.36) or the whole province (0.92; 0.58-1.38). CONCLUSIONS: While these data are limited, they are consistent with increased stomach cancer risk in a population exposed to Cr in drinking water. ?? 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  18. Equilibrium and kinetics study on hexavalent chromium adsorption onto diethylene triamine grafted glycidyl methacrylate based copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksin, Danijela D., E-mail: dmaksin@vinca.rs [University of Belgrade, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade (Serbia); Nastasovic, Aleksandra B., E-mail: anastaso@chem.bg.ac.rs [University of Belgrade, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, Njegoseva 12, Belgrade (Serbia); Milutinovic-Nikolic, Aleksandra D., E-mail: snikolic@nanosys.ihtm.bg.ac.rs [University of Belgrade, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, Njegoseva 12, Belgrade (Serbia); Surucic, Ljiljana T., E-mail: ljilja_m@yahoo.com [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Forestry, Kneza Viseslava 1, Belgrade (Serbia); Sandic, Zvjezdana P., E-mail: zvjezdana.sandic@gmail.com [Faculty of Science, Mladena Stojanovica 2, Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Hercigonja, Radmila V., E-mail: radah@ffh.bg.ac.rs [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Physical Chemistry, Studentski trg 12-16, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Onjia, Antonije E., E-mail: onjia@vinca.rs [University of Belgrade, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methacrylate based copolymers grafted with diethylene triamine as Cr(VI) sorbents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemisorption and pore diffusion are characteristics of this sorption system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Langmuir isotherm provided best fit and maximum adsorption capacity was 143 mg g{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr(VI) sorption onto amino-functionalized copolymer was endothermic and spontaneous. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simple, efficient and cost-effective hexavalent chromium removal method. - Abstract: Two porous and one non-porous crosslinked poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) [abbreviated PGME] were prepared by suspension copolymerization and functionalized with diethylene triamine [abbreviated PGME-deta]. Samples were characterized by elemental analysis, mercury porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption by PGME-deta were investigated in batch static experiments, in the temperature range 25-70 Degree-Sign C. Sorption was rapid, with the uptake capacity higher than 80% after 30 min. Sorption behavior and rate-controlling mechanisms were analyzed using five kinetic models (pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich, intraparticle diffusion and Bangham model). Kinetic studies showed that Cr(VI) adsorption adhered to the pseudo-second-order model, with definite influence of pore diffusion. Equilibrium data was tested with Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin adsorption isotherm models. Langmuir model was the most suitable indicating homogeneous distribution of active sites on PGME-deta and monolayer sorption. The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir model, Q{sub max}, at pH 1.8 and 25 Degree-Sign C was 143 mg g{sup -1} for PGME2-deta (sample with the highest amino group concentration) while at 70 Degree-Sign C Q{sub max} reached the high value of 198

  19. Modeling hexavalent chromium reduction in groundwater in field-scale transport and laboratory batch experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedly, J.C.; Davis, J.A.; Kent, D.B.

    1995-01-01

    A plausible and consistent model is developed to obtain a quantitative description of the gradual disappearance of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from groundwater in a small-scale field tracer test and in batch kinetic experiments using aquifer sediments under similar chemical conditions. The data exhibit three distinct timescales. Fast reduction occurs in well-stirred batch reactors in times much less than 1 hour and is followed by slow reduction over a timescale of the order of 2 days. In the field, reduction occurs on a timescale of the order of 8 days. The model is based on the following hypotheses. The chemical reduction reaction occurs very fast, and the longer timescales are caused by diffusion resistance. Diffusion into the secondary porosity of grains causes the apparent slow reduction rate in batch experiments. In the model of the field experiments, the reducing agent, heavy Fe(II)-bearing minerals, is heterogeneously distributed in thin strata located between larger nonreducing sand lenses that comprise the bulk of the aquifer solids. It is found that reducing strata of the order of centimeters thick are sufficient to contribute enough diffusion resistance to cause the observed longest timescale in the field. A one-dimensional advection/dispersion model is formulated that describes the major experimental trends. Diffusion rates are estimated in terms of an elementary physical picture of flow through a stratified medium containing identically sized spherical grains. Both reduction and sorption reactions are included. Batch simulation results are sensitive to the fraction of reductant located at or near the surface of grains, which controls the amount of rapid reduction, and the secondary porosity, which controls the rate of slow reduction observed in batch experiments. Results of Cr(VI) transport simulations are sensitive to the thickness and relative size of the reducing stratum. Transport simulation results suggest that nearly all of the reductant must be

  20. Application of ICP-MS and HPLC-ICP-MS for diagnosis and therapy of a severe intoxication with hexavalent chromium and inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitland, Peter; Blohm, Martin; Breuer, Christian; Brinkert, Florian; Achilles, Eike Gert; Pukite, Ieva; Köster, Helmut Dietrich

    2017-05-01

    ICP-MS and HPLC-ICP-MS were applied for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in a severe intoxication with a liquid containing hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and inorganic arsenic (iAs). In this rare case a liver transplantation of was considered as the only chance of survival. We developed and applied methods for the determination of Cr(VI) in erythrocytes and total chromium (Cr) and arsenic (As) in blood, plasma, urine and liver tissue by ICP-MS. Exposure to iAs was diagnosed by determination of iAs species and their metabolites in urine by anion exchange HPLC-ICP-MS. Three days after ingestion of the liquid the total Cr concentrations were 2180 and 1070μg/L in whole blood and plasma, respectively, and 4540μg/L Cr(VI) in erythrocytes. The arsenic concentration in blood was 206μg/L. The urinary As species concentrations were <0.5, 109, 115, 154 and 126μg/L for arsenobetaine, As(III), As(V), methylarsonate (V) and dimethylarsinate (V), respectively. Total Cr and As concentrations in the explanted liver were 11.7 and 0.9mg/kg, respectively. Further analytical results of this case study are tabulated and provide valuable data for physicians and toxicologists. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  1. A revised model of ex-vivo reduction of hexavalent chromium in human and rodent gastric juices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlosser, Paul M., E-mail: schlosser.paul@epa.gov; Sasso, Alan F.

    2014-10-15

    Chronic oral exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr-VI) in drinking water has been shown to induce tumors in the mouse gastrointestinal (GI) tract and rat oral cavity. The same is not true for trivalent chromium (Cr-III). Thus reduction of Cr-VI to Cr-III in gastric juices is considered a protective mechanism, and it has been suggested that the difference between the rate of reduction among mice, rats, and humans could explain or predict differences in sensitivity to Cr-VI. We evaluated previously published models of gastric reduction and believe that they do not fully describe the data on reduction as a function of Cr-VI concentration, time, and (in humans) pH. The previous models are parsimonious in assuming only a single reducing agent in rodents and describing pH-dependence using a simple function. We present a revised model that assumes three pools of reducing agents in rats and mice with pH-dependence based on known speciation chemistry. While the revised model uses more fitted parameters than the original model, they are adequately identifiable given the available data, and the fit of the revised model to the full range of data is shown to be significantly improved. Hence the revised model should provide better predictions of Cr-VI reduction when integrated into a corresponding PBPK model. - Highlights: • Hexavalent chromium (Cr-VI) reduction in gastric juices is a key detoxifying step. • pH-dependent Cr-VI reduction rates are explained using known chemical speciation. • Reduction in rodents appears to involve multiple pools of electron donors. • Reduction appears to continue after 60 min, although more slowly than initial rates.

  2. N-acetylcysteine attenuates hexavalent chromium-induced hypersensitivity through inhibition of cell death, ROS-related signaling and cytokine expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsuan Lee

    Full Text Available Chromium hypersensitivity (chromium-induced allergic contact dermatitis is an important issue in occupational skin disease. Hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI can activate the Akt, Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB, and Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways and induce cell death, via the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Recently, cell death stimuli have been proposed to regulate the release of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-1 (IL-1. However, the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules and cytotoxicity involved in Cr(VI-induced hypersensitivity have not yet been fully demonstrated. N-acetylcysteine (NAC could increase glutathione levels in the skin and act as an antioxidant. In this study, we investigated the effects of NAC on attenuating the Cr(VI-triggered ROS signaling in both normal keratinocyte cells (HaCaT cells and a guinea pig (GP model. The results showed the induction of apoptosis, autophagy and ROS were observed after different concentrations of Cr(VI treatment. HaCaT cells pretreated with NAC exhibited a decrease in apoptosis and autophagy, which could affect cell viability. In addition, Cr (VI activated the Akt, NF-κB and MAPK pathways thereby increasing IL-1α and TNF-α production. However, all of these stimulation phenomena could be inhibited by NAC in both of in vitro and in vivo studies. These novel findings indicate that NAC may prevent the development of chromium hypersensitivity by inhibiting of ROS-induced cell death and cytokine expression.

  3. Mesoporous BaTiO₃@SBA-15 derived via solid state reaction and its excellent adsorption efficiency for the removal of hexavalent chromium from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Vandana; Sasidharan, Manickam; Bhaumik, Asim

    2015-01-28

    We report the synthesis of a barium-titanate/mesoporous silica nanocomposite material BaTiO3@SBA-15 via aerosol assisted solid state reaction using SBA-15 as a hard template. Hexavalent chromium is one of the most harmful contaminants of industrial waste-water. We have used BaTiO3@SBA-15 nanocomposite as an adsorbent for the removal of chromium(vi)-contaminated water and it showed an adsorption capacity of 98.2 wt% within only 40 min contact time in a batch reactor. This mesoporous composite has retained this excellent adsorption efficiency of hexavalent chromium for several repetitive cycles, suggesting its future potential for the remediation of water contaminated with Cr(vi).

  4. Effect of hexavalent chromium on proliferation and differentiation to adipocytes of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Claudia N; Brandani, Javier N; Gabrielli, Matías; Vila, María del C

    2014-06-01

    Heavy metals contamination has become an important risk factor for public health and the environment. Chromium is a frequent industrial contaminant and is also used in orthopaedic joint replacements made from cobalt-chromium-alloy. Since hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was reported as genotoxic and carcinogenic in different mammals, to further evaluate its cytotoxicity, we investigated the effect of this heavy metal in the proliferation and differentiation to adipocytes of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts. These cells, after the addition of a mixture containing insulin, dexamethasone and methylisobutylxanthine, first proliferate, a process known as mitotic clonal expansion (MCE), and then differentiate to adipocytes. In this differentiation process a key transcription factor is induced: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma). We found that treatment of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts with potassium chromate inhibited proliferation in exponentially growing cells and MCE as well as differentiation. A decrease in PPAR gamma content, evaluated by western blot and immunofluorescence, was found in cells differentiated in the presence of chromium. On the other hand, after inhibition of differentiation with chromium, when the metal was removed, differentiation was recovered, which indicates that this may be a reversible effect. We also found an increase in the number of micronucleated cells after treatment with Cr(VI) which is associated with genotoxic effects. According to our results, Cr(VI) is able to inhibit proliferation and differentiation to adipocytes of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and to increase micronucleated cells, which are all indicative of alterations in cellular physiology and therefore, contributes to further elucidate the cytotoxic effects of this heavy metal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hexavalent chromium reduction in contaminated soil: A comparison between ferrous sulphate and nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Palma, L; Gueye, M T; Petrucci, E

    2015-01-01

    Iron sulphate (FeSO4) and colloidal nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) as reducing agents were compared, with the aim of assessing their effectiveness in hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal from a contaminated industrial soil. Experiments were performed on soil samples collected from an industrial site where a nickel contamination, caused by a long-term productive activity, was also verified. The influence of reducing agents amount with respect to chromium content and the effectiveness of deoxygenation of the slurry were discussed. The soil was fully characterized before and after each test, and sequential extractions were performed to assess chemico-physical modifications and evaluate metals mobility induced by washing. Results show that both the reducing agents successfully lowered the amount of Cr(VI) in the soil below the threshold allowed by Italian Environmental Regulation for industrial reuse. Cr(VI) reduction by colloidal nZVI proved to be faster and more effective: the civil reuse of soil [Cr(VI)hydroxide fraction, thus confirming a mechanism of chromium-iron hydroxides precipitation. In addition, a decrease of nickel (Ni) and lead (Pb) content in soil was also observed when acidic conditions were established.

  6. Differential uptake and transport of trivalent and hexavalent chromium by tumbleweed (Salsola kali).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardea-Torresdey, J L; de la Rosa, G; Peralta-Videa, J R; Montes, M; Cruz-Jimenez, G; Cano-Aguilera, I

    2005-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the differential absorption of Cr species by tumbleweed (Salsola kali) as well as the effect of this heavy metal on plant growth and nutrient uptake. Tumbleweed seeds were grown in an agar-based media containing different concentrations of either Cr(III) or Cr(VI). The results demonstrated that the uptake of Cr was influenced by the Cr concentration in the growth medium and the speciation of this heavy metal. When supplied in the hexavalent form, the concentration of Cr in the different plant parts (2900, 790, and 600 mg kg(-1) for roots, stems, and leaves, respectively) was between 10 and 20 times higher than the amounts found when Cr was supplied in the trivalent form. In addition, it was found that in most of the experiments, Cr(III) exhibited more toxic effects on tumbleweed plants than Cr(VI). The size of roots of plants grown in 20 mg L(-1) Cr(III) were significantly smaller (p < 0.05) than those grown in 20 mg L(-1) Cr(VI). Plants exposed to 20 mg L(-1) Cr(III) produced shoots significantly shorter (p < 0.05) compared with the size of control plants and with those grown in 20 mg L(-1) Cr(VI). In addition, the absorption of macronutrients and microelements was in general lower when the plants were grown in the medium containing Cr(III). The amounts of Cr concentrated in the aerial plant parts under experimental conditions may indicate tumbleweed as a new option for the phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated soil.

  7. Removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solutions by the diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peng; Liu, Dong; Fan, Mingde; Yang, Dan; Zhu, Runliang; Ge, Fei; Zhu, JianXi; He, Hongping

    2010-01-15

    Diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation and hydrosol methods, and characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, elemental analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The average sizes of the unsupported and supported magnetite nanoparticles are around 25 and 15 nm, respectively. The supported magnetite nanoparticles exist on the surface or inside the pores of diatom shells, with better dispersing and less coaggregation than the unsupported ones. The uptake of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] on the synthesized magnetite nanoparticles was mainly governed by a physico-chemical process, which included an electrostatic attraction followed by a redox process in which Cr(VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium [Cr(III)]. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was highly pH-dependent and the kinetics of the adsorption followed a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption data of diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite fit well with the Langmuir isotherm equation. The supported magnetite showed a better adsorption capacity per unit mass of magnetite than unsupported magnetite, and was more thermally stable than their unsupported counterparts. These results indicate that the diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles are readily prepared, enabling promising applications for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution.

  8. Assessment of Tri- and Hexavalent Chromium Phytotoxicity on Oats (Avena sativa L.) Biomass and Content of Nitrogen Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyszkowski, Mirosław; Radziemska, Maja

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of soil contamination with tri- and hexavalent chromium and soil application of compost, zeolite, and CaO on the mass of oats and content of nitrogen compounds in different organs of oats. The oats mass and content of nitrogen compounds in the crop depended on the type and dose of chromium and alleviating substances incorporated to soil. In the series without neutralizing substances, Cr(VI), unlike Cr(III), had a negative effect on the growth and development of oats. The highest doses of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) stimulated the accumulation of total nitrogen but depressed the content of N-NO3(-) in most of organs of oats. Among the substances added to soil in order to alleviate the negative impact of Cr (VI) on the mass of plants, compost had a particularly beneficial effect on the growth and development of oats. The application of compost, zeolite, and CaO to soil had a stronger effect on the content of nitrogen compounds in grain and straw than in roots. Soil enrichment with either of the above substances usually raised the content of nitrogen compounds in oats grain and straw, but decreased it in roots.

  9. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium by raw and acid-treated green alga Oedogonium hatei from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, V.K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 (India)], E-mail: vinodfcy@iitr.ernet.in; Rastogi, A. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 (India)

    2009-04-15

    The hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), biosorption by raw and acid-treated Oedogonium hatei were studied from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments were conducted to determine the biosorption properties of the biomass. The optimum conditions of biosorption were found to be: a biomass dose of 0.8 g/L, contact time of 110 min, pH and temperature 2.0 and 318 K respectively. Both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations could fit the equilibrium data. Under the optimal conditions, the biosorption capacities of the raw and acid-treated algae were 31 and 35.2 mg Cr(VI) per g of dry adsorbent, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of Cr(VI) onto algal biomass was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic under studied conditions. The pseudo-first-order kinetic model adequately describe the kinetic data in comparison to second-order model and the process involving rate-controlling step is much complex involving both boundary layer and intra-particle diffusion processes. The physical and chemical properties of the biosorbent were determined and the nature of biomass-metal ions interactions were evaluated by FTIR analysis, which showed the participation of -COOH, -OH and -NH{sub 2} groups in the biosorption process. Biosorbents could be regenerated using 0.1 M NaOH solution, with up to 75% recovery. Thus, the biomass used in this work proved to be effective materials for the treatment of chromium bearing aqueous solutions.

  10. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium by raw and acid-treated green alga Oedogonium hatei from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, V K; Rastogi, A

    2009-04-15

    The hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), biosorption by raw and acid-treated Oedogonium hatei were studied from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments were conducted to determine the biosorption properties of the biomass. The optimum conditions of biosorption were found to be: a biomass dose of 0.8 g/L, contact time of 110 min, pH and temperature 2.0 and 318 K respectively. Both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations could fit the equilibrium data. Under the optimal conditions, the biosorption capacities of the raw and acid-treated algae were 31 and 35.2 mg Cr(VI) per g of dry adsorbent, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of Cr(VI) onto algal biomass was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic under studied conditions. The pseudo-first-order kinetic model adequately describe the kinetic data in comparison to second-order model and the process involving rate-controlling step is much complex involving both boundary layer and intra-particle diffusion processes. The physical and chemical properties of the biosorbent were determined and the nature of biomass-metal ions interactions were evaluated by FTIR analysis, which showed the participation of -COOH, -OH and -NH(2) groups in the biosorption process. Biosorbents could be regenerated using 0.1 M NaOH solution, with up to 75% recovery. Thus, the biomass used in this work proved to be effective materials for the treatment of chromium bearing aqueous solutions.

  11. Assessment of the mutagenic potential of hexavalent chromium in the duodenum of big blue® rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chad M; Young, Robert R; Dinesdurage, Harshini; Suh, Mina; Harris, Mark A; Rohr, Annette C; Proctor, Deborah M

    2017-09-01

    A cancer bioassay on hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in drinking water reported increased incidences of duodenal tumors in B6C3F1 mice at exposures of 30-180ppm, and oral cavity tumors in F344 rats at 180ppm. A subsequent transgenic rodent (TGR) in vivo mutation assay in Big Blue® TgF344 rats found that exposure to 180ppm Cr(VI) in drinking water for 28days did not increase cII transgene mutant frequency (MF) in the oral cavity (Thompson et al., 2015). Herein, we extend our analysis to the duodenum of these same TgF344 rats. At study termination, duodenum chromium levels were below either the limit of detection or quantification in control rats, but were 24.6±3.8μg/g in Cr(VI)-treated rats. The MF in control (23.2×10(-6)) and Cr(VI)-treated rats (22.7×10(-6)) were nearly identical. In contrast, the MF in the duodenum of rats exposed to 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea for six days (study days 1, 2, 3, 12, 19, 26) increased 24-fold to 557×10(-6). These findings indicate that mutagenicity is unlikely an early initiating event in Cr(VI)-induced intestinal carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Removal of chromium hexavalent of residual water from tannery using hydrotalcite; Remocion de cromo hexavalente de aguas residuales de teneria utilizando hidrotalcita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez G, S.; Martinez, V.; Bulbulian, S. [Instituto nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, C.P. 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    One of the main problems of leather tanned is the treatment that must be give to the waste water polluted with chrome which stays in trivalent form, but it is easily oxidated at chromium hexavalent. This work pretends to find an elimination media for chromium (VI) from water using the original synthetic hydrotalcite and calcined as sorbent by its anion exchange and memory effect properties. The tannery water was characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, specific surface and infrared spectroscopy. (Author)

  13. Airborne exposure to inhalable hexavalent chromium in welders and other occupations: Estimates from the German MEGA database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Beate; Kendzia, Benjamin; Hauptmann, Kristin; Van Gelder, Rainer; Stamm, Roger; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Zschiesche, Wolfgang; Behrens, Thomas; Weiss, Tobias; Siemiatycki, Jack; Lavoué, Jerome; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Brüning, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to estimate occupational exposure to inhalable hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) using the exposure database MEGA. The database has been compiling Cr(VI) concentrations and ancillary data about measurements at German workplaces. We analysed 3659 personal measurements of inhalable Cr(VI) collected between 1994 and 2009. Cr(VI) was determined spectrophotometrically at 540 nm after reaction with diphenylcarbazide. We assigned the measurements to pre-defined at-risk occupations using the information provided about the workplaces. Two-thirds of the measurements were below the limit of quantification (LOQ) and multiply imputed according to the distribution above LOQ. The 75th percentile value was 5.2 μg/m(3) and the 95th percentile was 57.2 μg/m(3). We predicted the geometric mean for 2h sampling in the year 2000, and the time trend of Cr(VI) exposure in these settings with and without adjustment for the duration of measurements. The largest dataset was available for welding (N = 1898), which could be further detailed according to technique. The geometric means were above 5 μg/m(3) in the following situations: spray painting, shielded metal arc welding, and flux-cored arc welding if applied to stainless steel. The geometric means were between 1 μg/m(3) and 5 μg/m(3) for gas metal arc welding of stainless steel, cutting, hard-chromium plating, metal spraying and in the chemical chromium industry. The exposure profiles described here are useful for epidemiologic and industrial health purposes. Exposure to Cr(VI) varies not only between occupations, but also within occupations as shown for welders. In epidemiologic studies, it would be desirable to collect exposure-specific information in addition to the job title.

  14. Characterization and recovery of hexavalent chromium salts of an environmental liability; Caracterizacion y recuperacion de sales de cromo hexavalente de un pasivo ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel C, A. A.; Isarain C, E. [Centro de Innovacion Aplicada en Tecnologias Competitivas, Omega 201, Fracc. Industrial Delta, 37545 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Maldonado V, M., E-mail: r.cordova.alexander@gmail.com [Hospital Regional de Alta Especialidad del Bajio, Bulevard Milenio No. 130, San Carlos la Roncha, 37660 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a diverse group of washing solutions for its use in the recovery of the industrial waste hexavalent chromium, in compliance with the Mexican regulation NOM-147-SEMARNAT/SSA1-2004. The recovery process consisted of a simple random sampling and a physical-chemical characterization with consideration to the high solubility of hexavalent chromium compounds. A test was performed which implemented five different washing solutions (water, sulfuric acid, citric acid, sodium hydroxide, calcium and hydroxide). This was followed by a factorial experimental design to optimize resources with a removal efficiency of 80% and hence a recovery of 33 g/kg as CaCrO{sub 4} (calcium chromate). Chromium hexavalent concentration in the leachate was quantified using UV-Vis spectrometry at a wavelength λ = 540 nm, while the salts recovered by evaporation were characterized using X-ray fluorescence analysis, leading to the conclusion that precipitate can be used as raw material, the main elements are Cr, Ca, Fe and Mg, and their concentration depends on the washing solution. (Author)

  15. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ferrous iron: A process of chromium isotope fractionation and its relevance to natural environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Dideriksen, Knud; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2011-01-01

    Stable chromium (Cr) isotopes can be used as a tracer for changing redox conditions in modern marine systems and in the geological record. We have investigated isotope fractionation during reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq. Reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq in batch experiments leads to significa...

  16. Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron in continuous-flow system Part 1: effect of feed solution pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheju, M; Iovi, A; Balcu, I

    2008-05-01

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium by scrap iron was investigated in continuous system, using long-term column experiments, for aqueous Cr(VI) solutions having low buffering capacities, over the pH range of 2.00-7.30. The results showed that the initial pH of Cr(VI) solution significantly affects the reduction capacity of scrap iron. The highest reduction capacity was determined to be 19.2 mg Cr(VI)/g scrap iron, at pH 2.50, and decreased with increasing the initial pH of Cr(VI) solution. A considerable decrease in scrap iron reduction capacity (25%) was also observed at pH 2.00, as compared to pH 2.50, due to the increased contribution of H(+) ions to the corrosion of scrap iron, which leads to a rapid decrease in time of the scrap iron volume. Over the pH range of 2.50-7.30, hexavalent chromium concentration increases slowly in time after its breakthrough in column effluent, until a steady-state concentration was observed; similarly, over the same pH range, the amount of solubilized Cr(III) in treated column effluent decreases in time, until a steady-state concentration was observed. The steady-state concentration in column effluent decreased for Cr(VI) and increased for Cr(III) with decreasing the initial pH of Cr(VI) solution. No steady-state Cr(VI) or Cr(III) concentrations in column effluent were observed at pH 2.00. Over the entire studied pH range, the amount of Fe(total) in treated solution increases as the initial pH of column influent is decreased; the results show also a continuously decrease in time of Fe(total) concentration, for a constant initial pH, due to a decrease in time of iron corrosion rate. Cr(III) concentration in column effluent also continuously decreased in time, for a constant initial pH, over the pH range of 2.50-7.30. This represents an advantage, because the amount of precipitant agent used to remove Fe(total) and Cr(III) from the column effluent will also decrease in time. The optimum pH for Cr(VI) reduction with scrap iron in

  17. Carbothermal synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbon-supported nano zero-valent iron with enhanced stability and activity for hexavalent chromium reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Hu, Yuchen; Jiang, Baojiang; Zou, Jinlong; Tian, Guohui; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-15

    Composites of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) and ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) are prepared by using simultaneous carbothermal reduction methods. The reactivity and stability of nZVI are expected to be enhanced by embedding it in the ordered pore channels. The structure characteristics of nZVI/OMC and the removal pathway for hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) by nZVI/OMC are investigated. Results show that nZVI/OMC with a surface area of 715.16 m(2) g(-1) is obtained at 900 °C. nZVI with particle sizes of 20-30 nm is uniformly embedded in the OMC skeleton. The stability of nZVI is enhanced by surrounding it with a broad carbon layer and a little γ-Fe is derived from the passivation of α-Fe. Detection of ferric state (Fe 2p3/2, around 711.2eV) species confirms that part of the nZVI on the outer surface is inevitably oxidized by O2, even when unused. The removal efficiency of Cr(VI) (50 mg L(-1)) by nZVI/OMC is near 99% within 10 min through reduction (dominant mechanism) and adsorption. nZVI/OMC has the advantage in removal efficiency and reusability in comparison to nZVI/C, OMC and nZVI. This study suggests that nZVI/OMC has the potential for remediation of heavy metal pollution in water.

  18. Enhanced adsorption of hexavalent chromium by a biochar derived from ramie biomass (Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaud.) modified with β-cyclodextrin/poly(L-glutamic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Luhua; Liu, Shaobo; Liu, Yunguo; Zeng, Guangming; Guo, Yiming; Yin, Yicheng; Cai, Xiaoxi; Zhou, Lu; Tan, Xiaofei; Huang, Xixian

    2017-08-29

    This paper explored biochar modification to enhance biochar's ability to adsorb hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. The ramie stem biomass was pyrolyzed and then treated by β-cyclodextrin/poly(L-glutamic acid) which contained plentiful functional groups. The pristine and modified biochar were characterized by FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, specific surface area, and zeta potential measurement. Results indicated that the β-cyclodextrin/poly(L-glutamic acid) was successfully bound to the biochar surface. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the kinetics, isotherm, thermodynamics, and adsorption/desorption of Cr(VI). Adsorption capacities of CGA-biochar were significantly higher than that of the untreated biochar, and its maximum adsorption capacity could reach up to 197.21 mg/g at pH 2.0. Results also illustrated that sorption performance depended on initial solution pH; in addition, acidic condition was beneficial to the Cr(VI) uptake. Furthermore, the Cr(VI) uptake was significantly affected by the ion strength and cation species. This study demonstrated that CGA-biochar could be a potential adsorbent for Cr(VI) pollution control.

  19. Reevaluation and Classification of Duodenal Lesions in B6C3F1 Mice and F344 Rats from 4 Studies of Hexavalent Chromium in Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, John M; Ward, Jerrold M; Thompson, Chad M

    2016-02-01

    Thirteen-week and 2-year drinking water studies conducted by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) reported that hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) induced diffuse epithelial hyperplasia in the duodenum of B6C3F1 mice but not F344 rats. In the 2-year study, Cr(VI) exposure was additionally associated with duodenal adenomas and carcinomas in mice only. Subsequent 13-week Cr(VI) studies conducted by another group demonstrated non-neoplastic duodenal lesions in B6C3F1 mice similar to those of the NTP study as well as mild duodenal hyperplasia in F344 rats. Because intestinal lesions in mice are the basis for proposed safety standards for Cr(VI), and the histopathology data are relevant to the mode of action, consistency (an important Hill criterion for causality) was assessed across the aforementioned studies. Two veterinary pathologists applied uniform diagnostic criteria to the duodenal lesions in rats and mice from the 4 repeated-dose studies. Comparable non-neoplastic intestinal lesions were evident in mice and rats from all 4 studies; however, the incidence and severity of intestinal lesions were greater in mice than rats. These findings demonstrate consistency across studies and species and highlight the importance of standardized nomenclature for intestinal pathology. The differences in the severity of non-neoplastic lesions also likely contribute to the differential tumor response.

  20. Loss of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase induces glycolysis and promotes apoptosis resistance of cancer stem-like cells: an important role in hexavalent chromium-induced carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jin; Ji, Yanli; Wang, Wei; Kim, Donghern; Fai, Leonard Yenwong; Wang, Lei; Luo, Jia; Zhang, Zhuo

    2017-09-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) compounds are confirmed human carcinogens for lung cancer. Our previous studies has demonstrated that chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low dose of Cr(VI) causes malignant cell transformation. The acquisition of cancer stem cell-like properties is involved in the initiation of cancers. The present study has observed that a small population of cancer stem-like cells (BEAS-2B-Cr-CSC) exists in the Cr(VI)-transformed cells (BEAS-2B-Cr). Those BEAS-2B-Cr-CSC exhibit extremely reduced capability of generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis resistance. BEAS-2B-Cr-CSC are metabolic inactive as evidenced by reductions in oxygen consumption, glucose uptake, ATP production, and lactate production. Most importantly, BEAS-2B-Cr-CSC are more tumorigenic with high levels of cell self-renewal genes, Notch1 and p21. Further study has found that fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP1), an rate-limiting enzyme driving glyconeogenesis, was lost in BEAS-2B-Cr-CSC. Forced expression of FBP1 in BEAS-2B-Cr-CSC restored ROS generation, resulting in increased apoptosis, leading to inhibition of tumorigenesis. In summary, the present study suggests that loss of FBP1 is a critical event in tumorigenesis of Cr(VI)-transformed cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Toxic and genotoxic effects of hexavalent chromium in environment and its bioremediation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sandhya; Bharagava, Ram Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Chromium is one of the major inorganic environmental pollutants, which is added in the environment through various natural and anthropogenic activities and exists mainly in two forms: Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Cr(VI) is considered to be more toxic than Cr(III) due to its high solubility and mobility. It is a well-reported occupational carcinogen associated with lung, nasal, and sinus cancers. Thus, this review article provides the detailed information on the occurrence, sources of chromium contamination in the environment and their toxicological effects in human, animal, plants as well as in microorganisms, and bioremediation strategies to minimize the toxic effects.

  2. Formaldehyde-Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements (FAIRE analysis uncovers broad changes in chromatin structure resulting from hexavalent chromium exposure.

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    Jerald L Ovesen

    Full Text Available The ability of chromatin to switch back and forth from open euchromatin to closed heterochromatin is vital for transcriptional regulation and genomic stability, but its dynamic structure is subject to disruption by exposure to environmental agents such as hexavalent chromium. Cr(VI exposure disrupts chromatin remodeling mechanisms and causes chromosomal damage through formation of free radicals, Cr-DNA adducts, and DNA-Cr-protein cross-links. In addition, acute, high-concentration, and chronic, low-concentration exposures to Cr(VI lead to significantly different transcriptional and genomic stability outcomes. We used mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells to investigate how transcriptional responses to chromium treatment might correlate with structural chromatin changes. We used Formaldehyde-Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements (FAIRE analysis coupled with deep sequencing to identify regions of the genome that may switch between open and closed chromatin in response to exposure to varying Cr(VI concentrations. At either Cr(VI concentration, chromatin domains surrounding binding sites for AP-1 transcription factors become significantly open, whereas BACH2 and CTCF binding sites are open solely at the low and high concentrations, respectively. Parallel gene expression profiling using RNA-seq indicates that the structural chromatin changes caused by Cr(VI affect gene expression levels in the target areas that vary depending on Cr(VI concentration, but show no correlation between global changes in the overall transcriptional response and Cr(VI concentration. Our results suggest that FAIRE may be a useful technique to map chromatin elements targeted by DNA damaging agents for which there is no prior knowledge of their specificity, and to identify subsequent transcriptomic changes induced by those agents.

  3. Chi-square analysis of the reduction of ATP levels in L-02 hepatocytes by hexavalent chromium

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    Yang Yuan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the reduction of adenosine triphosphate (ATP levels in L-02 hepatocytes by hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI using chi-square analysis. Cells were treated with 2, 4, 8, 16, or 32 μM Cr(VI for 12, 24, or 36 h. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT experiments and measurements of intracellular ATP levels were performed by spectrophotometry or bioluminescence assays following Cr(VI treatment. The chi-square test was used to determine the difference between cell survival rate and ATP levels. For the chi-square analysis, the results of the MTT or ATP experiments were transformed into a relative ratio with respect to the control (%. The relative ATP levels increased at 12 h, decreased at 24 h, and increased slightly again at 36 h following 4, 8, 16, 32 μM Cr(VI treatment, corresponding to a "V-shaped" curve. Furthermore, the results of the chi-square analysis demonstrated a significant difference of the ATP level in the 32-μM Cr(VI group (P < 0.05. The results suggest that the chi-square test can be applied to analyze the interference effects of Cr(VI on ATP levels in L-02 hepatocytes. The decreased ATP levels at 24 h indicated disruption of mitochondrial energy metabolism and the slight increase of ATP levels at 36 h indicated partial recovery of mitochondrial function or activated glycolysis in L-02 hepatocytes.

  4. Chi-square analysis of the reduction of ATP levels in L-02 hepatocytes by hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yang; Peng, Li; Gong-Hua, Hu; Lu, Dai; Xia-Li, Zhong; Yu, Zhou; Cai-Gao, Zhong

    2012-06-01

    This study explored the reduction of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels in L-02 hepatocytes by hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) using chi-square analysis. Cells were treated with 2, 4, 8, 16, or 32 μM Cr(VI) for 12, 24, or 36 h. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) experiments and measurements of intracellular ATP levels were performed by spectrophotometry or bioluminescence assays following Cr(VI) treatment. The chi-square test was used to determine the difference between cell survival rate and ATP levels. For the chi-square analysis, the results of the MTT or ATP experiments were transformed into a relative ratio with respect to the control (%). The relative ATP levels increased at 12 h, decreased at 24 h, and increased slightly again at 36 h following 4, 8, 16, 32 μM Cr(VI) treatment, corresponding to a "V-shaped" curve. Furthermore, the results of the chi-square analysis demonstrated a significant difference of the ATP level in the 32-μM Cr(VI) group (P ATP levels in L-02 hepatocytes. The decreased ATP levels at 24 h indicated disruption of mitochondrial energy metabolism and the slight increase of ATP levels at 36 h indicated partial recovery of mitochondrial function or activated glycolysis in L-02 hepatocytes.

  5. Hexavalent Chromium Removal from Model Water and Car Shock Absorber Factory Effluent by Nanofiltration and Reverse Osmosis Membrane

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    Amine Mnif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanofiltration and reverse osmosis are investigated as a possible alternative to the conventional methods of Cr(VI removal from model water and industrial effluent. The influences of feed concentration, water recovery, pH, and the coexisting anions were studied. The results have shown that retention rates of hexavalent chromium can reach 99.7% using nanofiltration membrane (NF-HL and vary from 85 to 99.9% using reverse osmosis membrane (RO-SG depending upon the composition of the solution and operating conditions. This work was also extended to investigate the separation of Cr(VI from car shock absorber factory effluent. The use of these membranes is very promising for Cr(VI water treatment and desalting industry effluent. Spiegler-Kedem model was applied to experimental results in the aim to determine phenomenological parameters, the reflection coefficient of the membrane (σ, and the solute permeability coefficient (Ps. The convective and diffusive parts of the mass transfer were quantified with predominance of the diffusive contribution.

  6. Hexavalent Chromium Removal from Model Water and Car Shock Absorber Factory Effluent by Nanofiltration and Reverse Osmosis Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Imen; Mouelhi, Meral; Hamrouni, Béchir

    2017-01-01

    Nanofiltration and reverse osmosis are investigated as a possible alternative to the conventional methods of Cr(VI) removal from model water and industrial effluent. The influences of feed concentration, water recovery, pH, and the coexisting anions were studied. The results have shown that retention rates of hexavalent chromium can reach 99.7% using nanofiltration membrane (NF-HL) and vary from 85 to 99.9% using reverse osmosis membrane (RO-SG) depending upon the composition of the solution and operating conditions. This work was also extended to investigate the separation of Cr(VI) from car shock absorber factory effluent. The use of these membranes is very promising for Cr(VI) water treatment and desalting industry effluent. Spiegler-Kedem model was applied to experimental results in the aim to determine phenomenological parameters, the reflection coefficient of the membrane (σ), and the solute permeability coefficient (Ps). The convective and diffusive parts of the mass transfer were quantified with predominance of the diffusive contribution. PMID:28819360

  7. Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI]: a health survey and clinical examination of community inhabitants (Kanpur, India.

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    Priti Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We assessed the health effects of hexavalent chromium groundwater contamination (from tanneries and chrome sulfate manufacturing in Kanpur, India. METHODS: The health status of residents living in areas with high Cr (VI groundwater contamination (N = 186 were compared to residents with similar social and demographic features living in communities having no elevated Cr (VI levels (N = 230. Subjects were recruited at health camps in both the areas. Health status was evaluated with health questionnaires, spirometry and blood hematology measures. Cr (VI was measured in groundwater samples by diphenylcarbazide reagent method. RESULTS: Residents from communities with known Cr (VI contamination had more self-reports of digestive and dermatological disorders and hematological abnormalities. GI distress was reported in 39.2% vs. 17.2% males (AOR = 3.1 and 39.3% vs. 21% females (AOR = 2.44; skin abnormalities in 24.5% vs. 9.2% males (AOR = 3.48 and 25% vs. 4.9% females (AOR = 6.57. Residents from affected communities had greater RBCs (among 30.7% males and 46.1% females, lower MCVs (among 62.8% males and less platelets (among 68% males and 72% females than matched controls. There were no differences in leucocytes count and spirometry parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Living in communities with Cr (VI groundwater is associated with gastrointestinal and dermatological complaints and abnormal hematological function. Limitations of this study include small sample size and the lack of long term follow-up.

  8. Utility of Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 in a Microbial Fuel Cell as an Early Warning Device for Hexavalent Chromium Determination

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    Guey-Horng Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fast hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI determination is important for environmental risk and health-related considerations. We used a microbial fuel cell-based biosensor inoculated with a facultatively anaerobic, Cr(VI-reducing, and exoelectrogenic Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 to determine the Cr(VI concentration in water. The results indicated that O. anthropi YC152 exhibited high adaptability to pH, temperature, salinity, and water quality under anaerobic conditions. The stable performance of the microbial fuel cell (MFC-based biosensor indicated its potential as a reliable biosensor system. The MFC voltage decreased as the Cr(VI concentration in the MFC increased. Two satisfactory linear relationships were observed between the Cr(VI concentration and voltage output for various Cr(VI concentration ranges (0.0125–0.3 mg/L and 0.3–5 mg/L. The MFC biosensor is a simple device that can accurately measure Cr(VI concentrations in drinking water, groundwater, and electroplating wastewater in 45 min with low deviations (<10%. The use of the biosensor can help in preventing the violation of effluent regulations and the maximum allowable concentration of Cr(VI in water. Thus, the developed MFC biosensor has potential as an early warning detection device for Cr(VI determination even if O. anthropi YC152 is a possible opportunistic pathogen.

  9. Effect of NaX zeolite-modified graphite felts on hexavalent chromium removal in biocathode microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiayuan; Tong, Fei; Yong, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Lixiong; Jia, Honghua; Wei, Ping

    2016-05-05

    Two kinds of NaX zeolite-modified graphite felts were used as biocathode electrodes in hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI))-reducing microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The one was fabricated through direct modification, and the other one processed by HNO3 pretreatment of graphite felt before modification. The results showed that two NaX zeolite-modified graphite felts are excellent bio-electrode materials for MFCs, and that a large NaX loading mass, obtained by HNO3 pretreatment (the HNO3-NaX electrode), leads to a superior performance. The HNO3-NaX electrode significantly improved the electricity generation and Cr(VI) removal of the MFC. The maximum Cr(VI) removal rate increased to 10.39±0.28 mg/L h, which was 8.2 times higher than that of the unmodified control. The improvement was ascribed to the strong affinity that NaX zeolite particles, present in large number on the graphite felt, have for microorganisms and Cr(VI) ions.

  10. Effects of Dentifrice Containing Hydroxyapatite on Dentinal Tubule Occlusion and Aqueous Hexavalent Chromium Cations Sorption: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Hou, Yarong; Zhu, Manqun; Huang, Jiansheng; Xu, Pingping

    2012-01-01

    In order to endow environmental protection features to dentifrice, hydroxyapatite (HA) was added to ordinary dentifrice. The effects on dentinal tubule occlusion and surface mineralization were compared after brushing dentine discs with dentifrice with or without HA. The two types of dentifrice were then added to 100 µg/ml of hexavalent chromium cation (Cr6+) solution in order to evaluate their capacities of adsorbing Cr6+ from water. Our results showed that the dentifrice containing HA was significantly better than the ordinary dentifrice in occluding the dentinal tubules with a plugging rate greater than 90%. Moreover, the effect of the HA dentifrice was persistent and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) revealed that the atomic percentages of calcium and phosphorus on the surface of dentine discs increased significantly. Adding HA to ordinary dentifrice significantly enhanced the ability of dentifrice to adsorb Cr6+ from water with the removal rate up to 52.36%. In addition, the sorption was stable. Our study suggests that HA can be added to ordinary dentifrice to obtain dentifrice that has both relieving dentin hypersensitivity benefits and also helps to control environmental pollution. PMID:23300511

  11. Application of Fe-Cu binary oxide nanoparticles for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saif Ullah; Zaidi, Rumman; Hassan, Saeikh Z; Farooqi, I H; Azam, Ameer

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption process has been used as an effective technique for the removal of metal ions from aqueous solutions. Groundwater remediation by nanoparticles has received interest in recent years. In the present study, a binary metal oxide of Fe-Cu was prepared and used for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were performed to investigate the effects of initial Cr (VI) concentration, dose of adsorbent, and pH of solution on the removal efficiency of Cr (VI). The prepared nanostructured Fe-Cu binary oxides were able to reduce the concentration of Cr (VI) in aqueous solution. Binary metal oxides nanoparticle exhibited an outstanding ability to remove Cr (VI) due to high surface area, low particle size, and high inherent activity. The percentage removal efficiency of Cr (VI) increased with nanoparticles doses (0.1 g L(-1)-2.5 g L(-1)), whereas it decreased with initial Cr (VI) concentration (1 mg L(-1)-25 mg L(-1)) and with pH (3-9). The Freundlich model was found to be the better fit for adsorption isotherm. The prepared nanomaterial was characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy. It showed that the Fe-Cu binary oxides were formed in single phase. SEM micrograph showed aggregates with many nano-sized particles. UV-visible spectroscopy showed quantum confinement effect.

  12. Utility of Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 in a Microbial Fuel Cell as an Early Warning Device for Hexavalent Chromium Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guey-Horng; Cheng, Chiu-Yu; Liu, Man-Hai; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Hsieh, Min-Chi; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2016-08-16

    Fast hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) determination is important for environmental risk and health-related considerations. We used a microbial fuel cell-based biosensor inoculated with a facultatively anaerobic, Cr(VI)-reducing, and exoelectrogenic Ochrobactrum anthropi YC152 to determine the Cr(VI) concentration in water. The results indicated that O. anthropi YC152 exhibited high adaptability to pH, temperature, salinity, and water quality under anaerobic conditions. The stable performance of the microbial fuel cell (MFC)-based biosensor indicated its potential as a reliable biosensor system. The MFC voltage decreased as the Cr(VI) concentration in the MFC increased. Two satisfactory linear relationships were observed between the Cr(VI) concentration and voltage output for various Cr(VI) concentration ranges (0.0125-0.3 mg/L and 0.3-5 mg/L). The MFC biosensor is a simple device that can accurately measure Cr(VI) concentrations in drinking water, groundwater, and electroplating wastewater in 45 min with low deviations (<10%). The use of the biosensor can help in preventing the violation of effluent regulations and the maximum allowable concentration of Cr(VI) in water. Thus, the developed MFC biosensor has potential as an early warning detection device for Cr(VI) determination even if O. anthropi YC152 is a possible opportunistic pathogen.

  13. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions using micro zero-valent iron supported by bentonite layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Waseem; Ebadi, Taghi; Fahimifar, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is of particular environmental concern due to its toxicity, mobility, and challenging removal from industrial wastewater. It is a strong oxidizing agent that is carcinogenic and mutagenic and diffuses quickly through soil and aquatic environments. Moreover, it does not form insoluble compounds in aqueous solutions; therefore, separation by precipitation is not feasible. While Cr(VI) oxyanions are very mobile and toxic in the environment, trivalent Cr(III) cations are the opposite and, like many metal cations, Cr(III) forms insoluble precipitates. Thus, reducing Cr(VI)-Cr(III) simplifies its removal from effluent and also reduces its toxicity and mobility. Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) with zero-valent iron (ZVI) have been used to remediate contaminated groundwater with metals, but using ZVI in remediation of contaminated groundwater or wastewater is limited due to its lack of stability, easy aggregation, and difficulty in separation of iron from the treated solution. Thus, the technology used in the present study is developed to address these problems by placing a layer of bentonite after the PRB layer to remove iron from the treated water. The removal rates of Cr(VI) under different values of pH were investigated, and the results indicated the highest adsorption capacity at low pH.

  14. Precursor preparation for Ca-Al layered double hydroxide to remove hexavalent chromium coexisting with calcium and magnesium chlorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Lihua; He, Xiaoman; Qu, Jun; Li, Xuewei; Lei, Zhiwu; Zhang, Qiwu; Liu, Xinzhong

    2017-01-01

    Al(OH)3 and Ca(OH)2 powders are co-ground to prepare a precursor which hydrates into a layered double hydroxide (LDH) phase by agitation in aqueous solution with target hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) at room temperature, to achieve an obvious improvement in removal efficiency of Cr(VI) through an easy incorporation into the structure. Although the prepared precursor transforms into LDH phases also when agitated in the solutions of calcium and magnesium chlorides, it incorporates Cr(VI) preferentially to the chloride salts when they coexist. The adsorption isotherm and kinetic studies show that the phenomena occurring on the Al-Ca precursor fit a pseudo-second-order kinetics with a Langmuir adsorption capacity of 59.45 mg/g. Besides, characterizations of the prepared precursor and the samples after adsorption are also performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Transmission electron microscope (TEM) to understand the reason of the preferential incorporation of Cr(VI) to the coexisting chloride salts during the LDH phase formation.

  15. Biological reduction of hexavalent chromium and mechanism analysis of detoxification by enterobacter sp. HT1 isolated from tannery effluents, Mongolia

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    N Marjangul

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterobacter sp. HT1, Cr (VI resistant bacterial strain was isolated from the wastewater sample of the tannery in Mongolia. Batch experiments on hexavalent chromium removal was carried out at 10, 20, and 30 mg/L of Cr (VI added as potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7, at pH 7 and temperature of 30 °C using pure culture of Enterobacter sp. HT1 as inoculum.  The isolated HT1 is capable of reduction nearly 100% of Cr (VI resulting in the decrease of Cr (VI from 10 to 0.2 mg/L within 20 hours. When the concentration of Cr (VI increased to 20 and 30mg/L, almost complete reduction of Cr (VI could achieve after 72 and 96 hours, respectively.DOI: http://doi.dx.org/10.5564/mjc.v15i0.322 Mongolian Journal of Chemistry 15 (41, 2014, p47-52

  16. Analysis of hexavalent chromium in Colla corii asini with on-line sample pretreatment valve-switching ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuling; He, Jie; Huang, Zhongping; Zhong, Naifei; Zhu, Zuoyi; Jiang, Renyu; You, Jinghua; Lu, Xiuyang; Zhu, Yan; He, Shiwei

    2013-08-30

    An ion chromatography (IC) system with on-line sample pretreatment using valve-switching technique was developed for the determination of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in Colla corii asini. Colla corii asini is a complicated sample with organics as main matrix. In this work, a polymer-based reversed-phase column was used as a pretreatment column. Via valve-switching technique, sample solution with target ions were eluted from a collection loop to analytical columns, with matrix eliminated on-line. Under the optimized separation conditions, the method showed good linearity (r=0.9998) in the range of 0.004-1.0mg/L and satisfactory repeatability (RSD<3%, n=6). The limit of detection (LOD) was 1.4μg/L (S/N=3). The average spiked recoveries of Cr(VI) were 93.4-102.0%. The result showed that the on-line sample pretreatment IC system was convenient and practical for the determination of trace Cr(VI) in Colla corii asini samples.

  17. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Liu, Xu; Chen, Yijiao; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Heng

    2016-05-01

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 500 mg/L initial concentration of Cr(VI), respectively. Results indicated that the metal removal was dependent on dosage of adsorbent, particle diameter and treatment time. The experimental data obtained from the biosorption process was successfully correlated with Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic study indicated the endothermic nature of the process. The results confirmed that self-assembly modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material could be applied for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater in continuous fluidized bed process.

  18. Hexavalent chromium reduction by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria indigenous to chromite mine overburden

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    Dey Satarupa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbiological analysis of overburden samples collected from chromite mining areas of Orissa, India revealed that they are rich in microbial density as well as diversity and dominated by Gramnegative (58% bacteria. The phenotypically distinguishable bacterial isolates (130 showed wide degree of tolerance to chromium (2-8 mM when tested in peptone yeast extract glucose agar medium. Isolates (92 tolerating 2 mM chromium exhibited different degrees of Cr+6 reducing activity in chemically defined Vogel Bonner (VB broth and complex KSC medium. Three potent isolates, two belonging to Arthrobacter spp. and one to Pseudomonas sp. were able to reduce more than 50 and 80% of 2 mM chromium in defined and complex media respectively. Along with Cr+6 (MIC 8.6-17.8 mM, the isolates showed tolerance to Ni+2, Fe+3, Cu+2 and Co+2 but were extremely sensitive to Hg+2 followed by Cd+2, Mn+2 and Zn+2. In addition, they were resistant to antibiotics like penicillin, methicillin, ampicillin, neomycin and polymyxin B. During growth under shake-flask conditions, Arthrobacter SUK 1201 and SUK 1205 showed 100% reduction of 2 mM Cr+6 in KSC medium with simultaneous formation of insoluble precipitates of chromium salts. Both the isolates were also equally capable of completely reducing the Cr+6 present in mine seepage when grown in mine seepage supplemented with VB concentrate.

  19. Chemical and microbial remediation of hexavalent chromium from contaminated soil and mining/metallurgical solid waste: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhal, B; Thatoi, H N; Das, N N; Pandey, B D

    2013-04-15

    Chromium is a highly toxic non-essential metal for microorganisms and plants, and its occurrence is rare in nature. Lower to higher chromium containing effluents and solid wastes released by activities such as mining, metal plating, wood preservation, ink manufacture, dyes, pigments, glass and ceramics, tanning and textile industries, and corrosion inhibitors in cooling water, induce pollution and may cause major health hazards. Besides, natural processes (weathering and biochemical) also contribute to the mobility of chromium which enters in to the soil affecting the plant growth and metabolic functions of the living species. Generally, chemical processes are used for Cr- remediation. However, with the inference derived from the diverse Cr-resistance mechanism displayed by microorganisms and the plants including biosorption, diminished accumulation, precipitation, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), and chromate efflux, bioremediation is emerging as a potential tool to address the problem of Cr(VI) pollution. This review focuses on the chemistry of chromium, its use, and toxicity and mobility in soil, while assessing its concentration in effluents/wastes which becomes the source of pollution. In order to conserve the environment and resources, the chemical/biological remediation processes for Cr(VI) and their efficiency have been summarised in some detail. The interaction of chromium with various microbial/bacterial strains isolated and their reduction capacity towards Cr(VI) are also discussed.

  20. A plan for study of hexavalent chromium, CR(VI) in groundwater near a mapped plume, Hinkley, California, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicki, John A.; Groover, Krishangi

    2016-01-22

    The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) Hinkley compressor station, in the Mojave Desert 80 miles northeast of Los Angeles, is used to compress natural gas as it is transported through a pipeline from Texas to California. Between 1952 and 1964, cooling water used at the compressor station was treated with a compound containing chromium to prevent corrosion. After cooling, the wastewater was discharged to unlined ponds, resulting in contamination of soil and groundwater in the underlying alluvial aquifer (Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board, 2013). Since 1964, cooling-water management practices have been used that do not contribute chromium to groundwater.In 2007, a PG&E study of the natural background concentrations of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in groundwater estimated average concentrations in the Hinkley area to be 1.2 micrograms per liter (μg/L), with a 95-percent upper-confidence limit of 3.1 μg/L (CH2M-Hill, 2007). The 3.1 μg/L upper-confidence limit was adopted by the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) as the maximum background concentration used to map the plume extent. In response to criticism of the study’s methodology, and an increase in the mapped extent of the plume between 2008 and 2011, the Lahontan RWQCB (Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board, 2012) agreed that the 2007 PG&E background-concentration study be updated.The purpose of the updated background study is to evaluate the presence of natural and man-made Cr(VI) near Hinkley, Calif. The study also is to estimate natural background Cr(VI) concentrations in the aquifer upgradient and downgradient from the mapped Cr(VI) contamination plume, as well as in the plume and near its margins. The study was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with a technical working group (TWG) composed of community members, the Independent Review Panel (IRP) Manager (Project Navigator, Ltd.), the Lahontan RWQCB, PG&E, and consultants for PG&E.&E.

  1. Evaluation of consortia of microorganisms for efficient removal of hexavalent chromium from industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneer, Bushra; Rehman, Abdul; Shakoori, Farah R; Shakoori, Abdul R

    2009-05-01

    The Chromium (Cr) uptake ability of Cr-resistant bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis, yeast Candida etschellsii, and a protozoan Stylonychia mytilus, isolated from industrial waste water, was evaluated individually and in different combinations. It was found that the three types of microorganisms grown together in a culture medium could collectively uptake 90% of Cr(6+) from the culture medium as against 82% by bacterium + protozoan or yeast + protozoan combined culture, each. Consortium of bacterium, yeast and ciliates therefore could make much more efficient inoculum for remediation of Cr-contaminated industrial waste water.

  2. Simulation on reduction of hexavalent chromium from groundwater using zero valent iron%Fe0去除地下水中六价铬的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雅; 张增强; 唐次来; 易磊

    2011-01-01

    为了研究零价铁去除水中Cr(Ⅵ)的效果及影响因素.在实验室条件下,通过批试验,考察了铁粉预处理、铁粉用量、初始pH及阳离子对六价铬去除的影响.结果表明:零价铁能够有效、快速的去除污染水体中的六价铬,机理为氧化还原和共沉淀;其去除率受铁粉预处理、铁粉投加量、初始pH及阳离子的影响;在酸性条件下,Fe2+浓度可以作为六价铬是否完全去除的指示剂.%In order to provide guidance for practical application in the remediation of groundwater pollution, the influencing factors of reduction of hexavalent chromium from solution were studied by batch experiment at laboratory scale, such as pretreated, amount of iron, initial pH and cation. The results showed that hexavalent chromium was removed quickly and effectively by zero valent iron, removal mechanism was redox and coprecipitation;the removal ratio was effected by the pretreatment with acid and nickelaqe,the amount of iron,initial pH and cation;Fe2+ could be used as an indicator for complete reduction of hexavalent chromium in the acidic condition.

  3. Inhibition of CO poisoning on Pt catalyst coupled with the reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium in a dual-functional fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Hyoung-il; Chung, Young-Hoon; Lee, Myeong Jae; Yoo, Sung Jong; Bokare, Alok D; Choi, Wonyong; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2014-12-12

    We propose a method to enhance the fuel cell efficiency with the simultaneous removal of toxic heavy metal ions. Carbon monoxide (CO), an intermediate of methanol oxidation that is primarily responsible for Pt catalyst deactivation, can be used as an in-situ reducing agent for hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) with reactivating the CO-poisoned Pt catalyst. Using electro-oxidation measurements, the oxidation of adsorbed CO molecules coupled with the concurrent conversion of Cr (VI) to Cr (III) was confirmed. This concept was also successfully applied to a methanol fuel cell to enhance its performance efficiency and to remove toxic Cr (VI) at the same time.

  4. Simultaneously photocatalytic treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) using rotating reactor under solar irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youngji [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Laboratory, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 134 Shinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Hyunku [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Laboratory, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Her, Namguk [Korea Army Academy at Young-Cheon, Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, 135-1 Changhari, Kokyungmeon, Young-cheon, Gyeongbuk 770-849 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Yeomin [University of South Carolina, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Sohn, Jinsik [Kookmin University, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 77 Jeongneung-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sungpyo [Korea University, Department of Environmental Engineering, Sejong 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jaekyung, E-mail: jyoon@kier.re.kr [Korea Institute of Energy Research, New and Renewable Energy Research Division, Hydrogen Laboratory, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Self-rotating reactor including TiO{sub 2} NTs is applied under solar irradiation. • Simultaneously photocatalysis of Cr(VI) and EDCs is observed to be up to 95%. • Photocatalytic reactions of Cr(VI) and EDCs are favorable under acidic pH. • Charge interaction and hole scavenge between TiO{sub 2} and pollutants are synergy factors. - Abstract: In this study, simultaneous treatments, reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and oxidation of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), such as bisphenol A (BPA), 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and 17β-estradiol (E2), were investigated with a rotating photocatalytic reactor including TiO{sub 2} nanotubes formed on titanium mesh substrates under solar UV irradiation. In the laboratory tests with a rotating type I reactor, synergy effects of the simultaneous photocatalytic reduction and oxidation of inorganic (Cr(VI)) and organic (BPA) pollutants were achieved. Particularly, the concurrent photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of BPA was higher under acidic conditions. The enhanced reaction efficiency of both pollutants was attributed to a stronger charge interaction between TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (positive charge) and the anionic form of Cr(VI) (negative charge), which are prevented recombination (electron–hole pair) by the hole scavenging effect of BPA. In the extended outdoor tests with a rotating type II reactor under solar irradiation, the experiment was extended to examine the simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) in the presence of additional EDCs, such as EE2 and E2 as well as BPA. The findings showed that synergic effect of both photocatalytic reduction and oxidation was confirmed with single-component (Cr(VI) only), two-components (Cr(VI)/BPA, Cr(VI)/EE2, and Cr(VI)/E2), and four-components (Cr(VI)/BPA/EE2/E2) under various solar irradiation conditions.

  5. Chromate Reductase YieF from Escherichia coli Enhances Hexavalent Chromium Resistance of Human HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI is a serious environmental pollutant and human toxicant. Mammalian cells are very sensitive to chromate as they lack efficient chromate detoxifying strategy, e.g., chromate-reducing genes that are widely present in prokaryotes. To test whether introduction of prokaryotic chromate-reducing gene into mammalian cells could render higher chromate resistance, an Escherichia coli chromate-reducing gene yieF was transfected into human HepG2 cells. The expression of yieF was measured in stably transfected cells HepG2-YieF by quantitative RT-PCR and found up-regulated by 3.89-fold upon Cr(VI induction. In chromate-reducing ability test, HepG2-YieF cells that harbored the reductase showed significantly higher reducing ability of Cr(VI than HepG2 control cells. This result was further supported by the evidence of increased Cr(VI-removing ability of crude cell extract of HepG2-YieF. Moreover, HepG2-YieF demonstrated 10% higher viability and decreased expression of GSH synthesizing enzymes under Cr(VI stress. Subcellular localization of YieF was determined by tracing GFP-YieF fusion protein that was detected in both nucleus and cytoplasm by laser confocal microscopy. Altogether, this study successfully demonstrated that the expression of a prokaryotic Cr(VI-reducing gene yieF endowed mammalian cell HepG2 with enhanced chromate resistance, which brought new insight of Cr(VI detoxification in mammalian cells.

  6. Chromate Reductase YieF from Escherichia coli Enhances Hexavalent Chromium Resistance of Human HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan; Wu, Gaofeng; Zhang, Yanli; Wu, Dan; Li, Xiangkai; Liu, Pu

    2015-05-26

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a serious environmental pollutant and human toxicant. Mammalian cells are very sensitive to chromate as they lack efficient chromate detoxifying strategy, e.g., chromate-reducing genes that are widely present in prokaryotes. To test whether introduction of prokaryotic chromate-reducing gene into mammalian cells could render higher chromate resistance, an Escherichia coli chromate-reducing gene yieF was transfected into human HepG2 cells. The expression of yieF was measured in stably transfected cells HepG2-YieF by quantitative RT-PCR and found up-regulated by 3.89-fold upon Cr(VI) induction. In chromate-reducing ability test, HepG2-YieF cells that harbored the reductase showed significantly higher reducing ability of Cr(VI) than HepG2 control cells. This result was further supported by the evidence of increased Cr(VI)-removing ability of crude cell extract of HepG2-YieF. Moreover, HepG2-YieF demonstrated 10% higher viability and decreased expression of GSH synthesizing enzymes under Cr(VI) stress. Subcellular localization of YieF was determined by tracing GFP-YieF fusion protein that was detected in both nucleus and cytoplasm by laser confocal microscopy. Altogether, this study successfully demonstrated that the expression of a prokaryotic Cr(VI)-reducing gene yieF endowed mammalian cell HepG2 with enhanced chromate resistance, which brought new insight of Cr(VI) detoxification in mammalian cells.

  7. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld, and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr(6+). GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer, Regulated Metal Deposition, Cold Metal Transfer, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr(6+) ranged from 50-7800 µg/min, and Cr(6+) generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1-270 µg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13-330 µg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50-300 µg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4-140 µg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as five times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes in this

  8. Hexavalent chromium reduction by Acinetobacter haemolyticus isolated from heavy-metal contaminated wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakaria, Zainul Akmar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Zakaria, Zainoha [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Surif, Salmijah [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Ahmad, Wan Azlina [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)]. E-mail: azlina@kimia.fs.utm.my

    2007-07-19

    Possible application of a locally isolated environmental isolate, Acinetobacter haemolyticus to remediate Cr(VI) contamination in water system was demonstrated. Cr(VI) reduction by A. haemolyticus seems to favour the lower concentrations (10-30 mg/L). However, incomplete Cr(VI) reduction occurred at 70-100 mg/L Cr(VI). Initial specific reduction rate increased with Cr(VI) concentrations. Cr(VI) reduction was not affected by 1 or 10 mM sodium azide (metabolic inhibitor), 10 mM of PO{sub 4} {sup 3-}, SO{sub 4} {sup 2-}, SO{sub 3} {sup 2-}, NO{sub 3} {sup -} or 30 mg/L of Pb(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) ions. However, heat treatment caused significant dropped in Cr(VI) reduction to less than 20% only. A. haemolyticus cells loses its shape and size after exposure to 10 and 50 mg Cr(VI)/L as revealed from TEM examination. The presence of electron-dense particles in the cytoplasmic region of the bacteria suggested deposition of chromium in the cells.

  9. Coals as sorbents for the removal and reduction of hexavalent chromium from aqueous waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, J.; Brown, S.D.; Snape, C.E. [University of Miskolc, Miskolc (Hungary). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the potential of coals as a low-cost reactive barrier material for environmental protection applications, with the ability to prevent leaching of toxic Cr(VI) and other transition metals. Depending upon the type of ion and the surface functionalities, the uptake can involve ion sorption, ion exchange, chelation and redox mechanisms with the surface functionalities being considered as partners in electron transfer processes. The capacity for Cr(VI) uptake of low rank coals and oxidized bituminous coals has been found to lie within the range 02-0.6 mM g{sup -1}. Air oxidation of bituminous coals can increase their Cr(VI) removal capacities. The effect of air oxidation of coals on uptake capacity was more pronounced for Cr(VI) than Cr(III) but less than for Hg(II) and the other ions (Ca{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2}) investigated. As previously found for Hg(II), redox mechanisms plays an important role in Cr(VI) uptake, with resultant Cr(III) is exchanged back into solution by hydrogen ions, but some of the sorbed chromium is irreversibly bound to the coal. The reduction of Cr(VI) alone is often considered a satisfactory solution in view of Cr(III) being essentially nontoxic. 56 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Determination of hexavalent chromium in exhaled breath condensate and environmental air among chrome plating workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldoni, Matteo [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention, Research Centre at University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Caglieri, Andrea [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Poli, Diana [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention, Research Centre at University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Vettori, Maria Vittoria [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention, Research Centre at University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Corradi, Massimo [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention, Research Centre at University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Apostoli, Pietro [Laboratory of Industrial Hygiene, Department of Experimental and Applied Medicine, University of Brescia (Italy); Mutti, Antonio [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy)]. E-mail: antonio.mutti@unipr.it

    2006-03-15

    Chromium speciation has attracted attention because of the different toxicity of Cr(III), which is considered relatively non-toxic, and Cr(VI), which can cross cell membranes mainly as a chromate anion and has been classified as a class I human carcinogen. The aims of the present study were to measure soluble Cr(VI) levels in environmental samples, to develop a simple method of quantifying Cr(VI) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), and to follow the kinetics of EBC Cr(VI) in chrome plating workers. Personal air samples were collected from 10 chrome platers; EBC was collected from the same workers immediately after the work shift on Tuesday and before the work shift on the following Wednesday. Environmental and EBC Cr(VI) levels were determined by means of colorimetry and electrothermal absorption atomic spectrometry, respectively. The method of detecting Cr(VI) in environmental air was based on the extraction of the Cr(VI)-diphenylcarbazide (Cr(VI)-DPC) complex in 1-butanol, whereas EBC Cr(VI) was determined using a solvent extraction of Cr(VI) as an ion pair with tetrabutylammonium ion, and subsequent direct determination of the complex (Cr(VI)-DPC) in EBC. Kinetic data showed that airborne Cr(VI) was reduced by 50% in airway lining fluid sampled at the end of exposure and that there was a further 50% reduction after about 15 h. The persistence of Cr(VI) in EBC supports the use of EBC in assessing target tissue levels of Cr(VI)

  11. Characterization of chromium species in urban runoff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederkvist, Karin; Jensen, Marina Bergen; Holm, Peter Engelund

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the presence of the element Cr in its toxic hexavalent form Cr(VI) in stormwater runoff from urban areas. Most studies report only total Cr concentration, i.e., including also the nontoxic Cr(III) molecular form. The objective of this study was to evaluate a field method bas...

  12. Natural occurrence of hexavalent chromium in serpentinite hosted spring waters from Western Tuscany (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarantini, Laura; Agostini, Samuele; Baneschi, Ilaria; Guidi, Massimo; Natali, Claudio; Tonarini, Sonia

    2013-04-01

    , able to rapid oxidise Cr(III) into Cr (VI ), implies that local presence of Cr (VI) in waters have to be ascribed to other processes. Some serpentinites contain significant amount of Fe-rich brucite and show evidences of its dissolution during surface weathering. This process could lead to the formation of both of hydrous magnesium carbonates and of Mg-rich members of "layered double hydroxide" group, which can contain high contents of Cr(III) that can be easily oxidized and mobilized during weathering reactions (Langone et al., in press). Cr isotopes analyses, able to record any occurrence of Cr redox reactions, are analysed in order to better understand which are the mineralogical, chemical and thermodynamic parameters responsible for Cr(III)-Cr(VI) oxidation during water-rock interactions. Langone A., Baneschi I., Boschi C., Dini A., Guidi M, and Cavallo A., (in press), Serpentinite-water interaction and chromium (VI) release in spring waters: examples from Tuscan ophiolites, Ofioliti.

  13. Influence of plants on the reduction of hexavalent chromium in wetland sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zazo, Juan A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, 28049 (Spain)], E-mail: juan.zazo@uam.es; Paull, Jeffery S.; Jaffe, Peter R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    This work addresses the effect that plants (Typha latifolia and Carex lurida) have on the reduction of Cr(VI) in wetland sediments. Experiments were carried out using tubular microcosms, where chemical species were monitored along the longitudinal flow axis. Cr(VI) removal was enhanced by the presence of plants. This is explained by a decrease in the redox potential promoted by organic root exudates released by plants. Under these conditions sulfate reduction is enhanced, increasing the concentration of sulfide species in the sediment pore water, which reduce Cr(VI). Evapotranspiration induced by plants also contributed to enhance the reduction of Cr(VI) by concentrating all chemical species in the sediment pore water. Both exudates release and evapotranspiration have a diurnal component that affects Cr(VI) reduction. Concentration profiles were fitted to a kinetic model linking sulfide and Cr(VI) concentrations corrected for evapotranspiration. This expression captures both the longitudinal as well as the diurnal Cr(VI) concentration profiles. - The presence of plants enhances the reduction of Cr(VI) in wetland sediments by modifying the governing biogeochemical cycle.

  14. Comparison of the effects of hexavalent chromium in the alimentary canal of F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice following exposure in drinking water: implications for carcinogenic modes of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chad M; Proctor, Deborah M; Suh, Mina; Haws, Laurie C; Hébert, Charles D; Mann, Jill F; Shertzer, Howard G; Hixon, J Gregory; Harris, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) in drinking water is reported to induce oral mucosa tumors in F344 rats and intestinal tumors in B6C3F1 mice. To investigate the modes of action underlying these tumors, 90-day drinking water studies (with interim necropsy at day 8) were conducted with concentrations of 0.1-182 mg/l Cr(VI), administered as 0.3-520 mg/l sodium dichromate dihydrate. Blood and tissue samples were analyzed for chromium content, oxidative stress, iron levels, and gross and microscopic lesions. Results for the F344 rats are described herein and compared with results from B6C3F1 mice published previously. After 90 days of exposure, total chromium concentrations in the rat and mouse oral mucosae were comparable, yet significant dose-dependent decreases in the reduced-to-oxidized glutathione ratio (GSH/GSSG) were observed only in rats. In the duodenum, changes in GSH/GSSG were only observed in mice. Levels of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine were not increased in the oral or duodenal mucosae of either species. Glutathione levels were increased in the duodenum but decreased in the jejunum of both species, indicating potential differential responses in the intestinal segments. Histiocytic infiltration was observed in the duodenum of both species, yet duodenal cytokines were repressed in mice but increased in rats. Serum and bone marrow iron levels were more decreased in rats than mice. Collectively, these data suggest that Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis in the rodent alimentary canal involves oxidative stress; however, differences in histopathology, cytokines, and iron status suggest potential contributions from other factors as well.

  15. Automated Ground-Water Sampling and Analysis of Hexavalent Chromium using a “Universal” Sampling/Analytical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Venedam

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The capabilities of a “universal platform” for the deployment of analyticalsensors in the field for long-term monitoring of environmental contaminants were expandedin this investigation. The platform was previously used to monitor trichloroethene inmonitoring wells and at groundwater treatment systems (1,2. The platform was interfacedwith chromium (VI and conductivity analytical systems to monitor shallow wells installedadjacent to the Columbia River at the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site, Washington. Agroundwater plume of hexavalent chromium is discharging into the Columbia River throughthe gravels beds used by spawning salmon. The sampling/analytical platform was deployedfor the purpose of collecting data on subsurface hexavalent chromium concentrations atmore frequent intervals than was possible with the previous sampling and analysis methodsemployed a the Site.

  16. Stabilisation of nanoscale zero-valent iron with biochar for enhanced transport and in-situ remediation of hexavalent chromium in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huijie; Fang, Zhanqiang; Tsang, Pokeung Eric; Fang, Jianzhang; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a biochar-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI@BC) material was used for in situ remediation of hexavalent chromium-contaminated soil. Sedimentation tests and column experiments were used to compare the stability and mobility of nZVI@BC and bare-nZVI. The immobilisation efficiency of chromium, toxic effect of chromium and the content of iron were assessed through leaching tests and pot experiments. Sedimentation tests and transport experiments indicated that nZVI@BC with nZVI to BC mass ratio of 1:1 exhibited better stability and mobility than that of bare-nZVI. The immobilisation efficiency of Cr(VI) and Crtotal was 100% and 92.9%, respectively, when the soil was treated with 8 g/kg of nZVI@BC for 15 days. Moreover, such remediation effectively reduced the leachability of Fe caused by bare-nZVI. In addition, pot experiments showed that such remediation reduced the phytotoxicity of Cr and the leachable Fe and was favourable for plant growth.

  17. Short-term toxicity of hexavalent-chromium to epipsammic diatoms of a microtidal estuary (Río de la Plata): responses from the individual cell to the community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licursi, M; Gómez, N

    2013-06-15

    Diatoms are an integral and often dominant component of the benthic microalgal assemblage in estuarine and shallow coastal environments. Different toxic substances discharged into these ecosystems persist in the water, sediments, and biota for long periods. Among these pernicious agents, the toxicity in diatoms by metal is linked to different steps in the transmembrane and internal movements of the toxicant, causing perturbations in the normal structural and functional cellular components. These changes constitute an early, nontaxonomic warning signal that could potentially serve as an indicator of this type of pollution. The aim of this work was to study the environment-reflecting short-term responses at different levels of organization of epipsammic diatoms from the Río de la Plata estuary, Argentina that had been exposed to hexavalent chromium within experimental microcosms. To this end we monitored: (i) changes in the proportion of the diatoms in relation to other algal groups at the biofilm community level; (ii) shifts in species composition at the diatom-assemblage level; (iii) projected changes in the densities of the most representative species at the population level through comparison of relative growth rates and generation times; and (iv) the cytological changes at the cellular and subcellular levels as indicated by the appearance of teratological effects on individuals and nuclear alterations. The epipsammic biofilms were exposed for 96 h to chromium at a concentration similar to that measured in highly impacted sites along the coast (80 μg L⁻¹). Chromium pollution, at this concentration and short exposure time did not affect the algal biomass and density of these mature biofilms. The biofilm composition, however, did change, as reflected in a decline in cyanophytes and an increment in the proportions of diatoms and chlorophytes; with Hippodonta hungarica, Navicula novaesiberica, Nitzschia palea, and Sellaphora pupula being the most frequent and

  18. The protective and toxic effects of rhubarb tannins and anthraquinones in treating hexavalent chromium-injured rats: the Yin/Yang actions of rhubarb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ling-na; Ma, Zhi-jie; Zhao, Yan-ling; Zhang, Lin-dong; Li, Rui-sheng; Wang, Jia-bo; Zhang, Ping; Yan, Dan; Li, Qi; Jiang, Bing-qian; Pu, Shi-biao; Lü, Yang; Xiao, Xiao-he

    2013-02-15

    Chromium nephrotoxicity (CrNT) is thought to occur through the oxidant lesion mechanism. There is still a lack of specific remedies against CrNT. We primarily screened Chinese herbal medicines with a potential protective effect against CrNT, e.g., rhubarb (Rheum palmatum L.). However, the active constituents in rhubarb and its mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, the total rhubarb extract (TR) was successively separated into three parts: total anthraquinone extract (TA), total tannin extract (TT) and remaining component extract (RC). The effects of each extract on the potassium dichromate (K(2)Cr(2)O(7))-induced nephrotoxicity in rats were comparatively assessed. The results showed that only the administration of TT protected the kidney function in K(2)Cr(2)O(7)-injured rats. Besides, TT showed significant activity to scavenge hydroxyl radicals, which is considered to be the dominant lesion product generated by hexavalent chromium. TT also showed a reduced ability to transform toxic high valence chromium ions into non-toxic low valence ions. And TT was able to further precipitate chromium ions. These results suggested that rhubarb tannins treat CrNT as a free radical scavenger, reductant, and metal precipitant. The multiple protective routes of the plant tannins reveal a superior option for development into a promising natural remedy against CrNT. In addition, the opposite effects of rhubarb anthraquinones in treating CrNT were observed compared to rhubarb tannins, which suggested the duo-directional effects (Yin and Yang) of herbal medicines should be addressed.

  19. Synthesis, physical properties and application of the zero-valent iron/titanium dioxide heterocomposite having high activity for the sustainable photocatalytic removal of hexavalent chromium in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petala, Eleni; Baikousi, Maria; Karakassides, Michael A; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Filip, Jan; Tuček, Jiří; Vasilopoulos, Konstantinos C; Pechoušek, Jiří; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-04-21

    A magnetic photocatalytic material composed of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) homogeneously distributed over a mesoporous nanocrystalline TiO2 matrix has been prepared by a multistage chemical process, including sol-gel technique, wet impregnation, and chemical reduction. X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used for the structural and chemical characterization of the magnetic photocatalyst, while bulk magnetization measurements and scanning/transmission electron microscopy were employed to determine the physical and textural properties of the photocatalyst. The synthesized nZVI@TiO2 photocatalyst shows very high efficiency in the removal of hexavalent chromium, Cr(vi), from water. The degradation rate follows a pseudo-first-order kinetic model. Most importantly, the remarkable efficiency of the photocatalyst is found to be due to the synergistic contributions of both counterparts, nZVI and TiO2, as validated by comparative experiments with neat TiO2 and nZVI@TiO2 under UV-C irradiation and without irradiation. New insights into the mechanism of synergistic degradation of chromium(vi) and suppressed oxidation of nZVI particles in the composite material are proposed and therein discussed.

  20. Pilot Scale Production of Activated Carbon Spheres Using Fluidized Bed Reactor and Its Evaluation for the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Nagesh Kumar; Sathe, Manisha

    2017-06-01

    Large scale production of activated carbon is need of ongoing research due to its excellent adsorption capacity for removal of heavy metals from contaminated solutions. In the present study, polymeric precursor polystyrene beads [Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) surface area, 46 m2/g; carbon content, 40.64%; crushing strength, 0.32 kg/sphere] were used to produce a new variant of activated carbon, Activated Carbon Spheres (ACS) in a pilot scale fluidized bed reactor. ACS were prepared by carbonization of polymeric precursor at 850 °C followed by activation of resultant material with steam. Prepared ACS were characterized using scanning electron microscope, CHNS analyzer, thermogravimetric analyzer, surface area analyzer and crushing strength tester. The produced ACS have 1009 m2/g BET surface area, 0.89 cm3/g total pore volume, 92.32% carbon content and 1.1 kg/sphere crushing strength with less than 1% of moisture and ash content. The ACS were also evaluated for its potential to remove hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated solutions. The chromium removal is observed to be 99.1% at initial concentration 50 mg/l, pH 2, ACS dose 1 g/l, contact time 2 h, agitation 120 rpm and temperature 30 °C. Thus ACS can be used as an adsorbent material for the removal of Cr(VI) from contaminated solutions.

  1. Comparative cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate hexavalent chromium in human and hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jamie L; Wise, Sandra S; Xie, Hong; Zhu, Cairong; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-12-01

    Chromium is both a global marine pollutant and a known human health hazard. In this study, we compare the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of both soluble and particulate chromate in human and hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) skin fibroblasts. Our data show that both soluble and particulate Cr(VI) induce concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular Cr ion concentrations in both human and hawksbill sea turtle fibroblasts. Based on administered concentration, particulate and soluble Cr(VI) were more cytotoxic and clastogenic to human cells than sea turtle cells. When the analysis was based on the intracellular concentration of Cr, the data showed that the response of both species was similar. The one exception was the cytotoxicity of intracellular Cr ions from soluble Cr(VI), which caused more cytotoxicity in sea turtle cells (LC50=271μM) than that of human cells (LC50=471μM), but its clastogenicity was similar between the two species. Thus, adjusting for differences in uptake indicated that the explanation for the difference in potency was mostly due to uptake rather than differently affected mechanisms. Overall these data indicate that sea turtles may be a useful sentinel for human health responses to marine pollution.

  2. Hexavalent chromium recovery by liquid–liquid extraction with 2-octylaminopyridine from acidic chloride media and its sequential separation from other heavy toxic metal ions

    OpenAIRE

    C.P. Mane; S.V. Mahamuni; S. S. Kolekar; Han, S. H.; M. A. ANUSE

    2016-01-01

    A systematic study of extraction of chromium(VI) with 2-octylaminopyridine (2-OAP) in xylene at room temperature has been conducted. Quantitative extraction of chromium(VI) was observed in the 0.4–0.8 M concentration range of hydrochloric acid. From the extracted complex species in the organic phase, chromium(VI) was back extracted with 7 N ammonia (3 × 10 mL), and was determined by spectrophotometric method. Various parameters such as 2-OAP concentration, equilibrium period, effect of variou...

  3. On-line dynamic extraction and automated determination of readily bioavailable hexavalent chromium in solid substrates using micro-sequential injection bead-injection lab-on-valve hyphenated with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Xiangbao; Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2006-01-01

    A novel and miniaturized micro-sequential injection bead injection lab-on-valve (μSI-BI-LOV) fractionation system was developed for in-line microcolumn soil extraction under simulated environmental scenarios and accurate monitoring of the content of easily mobilisable hexavalent chromium in soil...... environments at the sub-low parts-per-million level. The flow system integrates dynamic leaching of hexavalent chromium using deionized water as recommended by the German Standard DIN 38414-S4 method; on-line pH adjustment of the extract by a 0.01 mol L-1 Tris-HNO3 buffer solution; isolation of the chromate......). The effect of simulated acidic rain on the accessibility of chromate forms for plant uptake was also investigated. The proposed approach offers several advantages over conventional speciation/fractionation protocols in the batch mode, including immediate separation with concomitant preconcentration...

  4. Ailanthus Altissima and Phragmites Australis for chromium removal from a contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Ezio; Fratino, Umberto; Petrella, Andrea; Torretta, Vincenzo; Rada, Elena Cristina

    2016-08-01

    The comparative effectiveness for hexavalent chromium removal from irrigation water, using two selected plant species (Phragmites australis and Ailanthus altissima) planted in soil contaminated with hexavalent chromium, has been studied in the present work. Total chromium removal from water was ranging from 55 % (Phragmites) to 61 % (Ailanthus). After 360 days, the contaminated soil dropped from 70 (initial) to 36 and 41 mg Cr/kg (dry soil), for Phragmites and Ailanthus, respectively. Phragmites accumulated the highest amount of chromium in the roots (1910 mg Cr/kg(dry tissue)), compared with 358 mg Cr/kg(dry tissue) for Ailanthus roots. Most of chromium was found in trivalent form in all plant tissues. Ailanthus had the lowest affinity for Cr(VI) reduction in the root tissues. Phragmites indicated the highest chromium translocation potential, from roots to stems. Both plant species showed good potentialities to be used in phytoremediation installations for chromium removal.

  5. Simultaneous speciation of arsenic, selenium, and chromium: species, stability, sample preservation, and analysis of ash and soil leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Ruth E.; Morman, Suzette A.; Hageman, Philip L.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical method using high-performance liquid chromatography separation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection previously developed for the determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) has been adapted to allow the determination of As(III), As(V), Se(IV), Se(VI), Cr(III), and Cr(VI) under the same chromatographic conditions. Using this method, all six inorganic species can be determined in less than 3 min. A dynamic reaction cell (DRC)-ICP-MS system was used to detect the species eluted from the chromatographic column in order to reduce interferences. A variety of reaction cell gases and conditions may be utilized with the DRC-ICP-MS, and final selection of conditions is determined by data quality objectives. Results indicated all starting standards, reagents, and sample vials should be thoroughly tested for contamination. Tests on species stability indicated that refrigeration at 10° C was preferential to freezing for most species, particularly when all species were present, and that sample solutions and extracts should be analyzed as soon as possible to eliminate species instability and interconversion effects. A variety of environmental and geological samples, including waters and deionized water [leachates] and simulated biological leachates from soils and wildfire ashes have been analyzed using this method. Analytical spikes performed on each sample were used to evaluate data quality. Speciation analyses were conducted on deionized water leachates and simulated lung fluid leachates of ash and soils impacted by wildfires. These results show that, for leachates containing high levels of total Cr, the majority of the chromium was present in the hexavalent Cr(VI) form. In general, total and hexavalent chromium levels for samples taken from burned residential areas were higher than those obtained from non-residential forested areas. Arsenic, when found, was generally in the more oxidized As(V) form. Selenium (IV) and (VI) were present

  6. Simultaneous speciation of arsenic, selenium, and chromium: Species stability, sample preservation, and analysis of ash and soil leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, R.E.; Morman, S.A.; Hageman, P.L.; Hoefen, T.M.; Plumlee, G.S.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical method using high-performance liquid chromatography separation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection previously developed for the determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) has been adapted to allow the determination of As(III), As(V), Se(IV), Se(VI), Cr(III), and Cr(VI) under the same chromatographic conditions. Using this method, all six inorganic species can be determined in less than 3 min. A dynamic reaction cell (DRC)-ICP-MS system was used to detect the species eluted from the chromatographic column in order to reduce interferences. A variety of reaction cell gases and conditions may be utilized with the DRC-ICP-MS, and final selection of conditions is determined by data quality objectives. Results indicated all starting standards, reagents, and sample vials should be thoroughly tested for contamination. Tests on species stability indicated that refrigeration at 10 ??C was preferential to freezing for most species, particularly when all species were present, and that sample solutions and extracts should be analyzed as soon as possible to eliminate species instability and interconversion effects. A variety of environmental and geological samples, including waters and deionized water [leachates] and simulated biological leachates from soils and wildfire ashes have been analyzed using this method. Analytical spikes performed on each sample were used to evaluate data quality. Speciation analyses were conducted on deionized water leachates and simulated lung fluid leachates of ash and soils impacted by wildfires. These results show that, for leachates containing high levels of total Cr, the majority of the chromium was present in the hexavalent Cr(VI) form. In general, total and hexavalent chromium levels for samples taken from burned residential areas were higher than those obtained from non-residential forested areas. Arsenic, when found, was generally in the more oxidized As(V) form. Selenium (IV) and (VI) were present

  7. Hexavalent chromium recovery by liquid–liquid extraction with 2-octylaminopyridine from acidic chloride media and its sequential separation from other heavy toxic metal ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Mane

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A systematic study of extraction of chromium(VI with 2-octylaminopyridine (2-OAP in xylene at room temperature has been conducted. Quantitative extraction of chromium(VI was observed in the 0.4–0.8 M concentration range of hydrochloric acid. From the extracted complex species in the organic phase, chromium(VI was back extracted with 7 N ammonia (3 × 10 mL, and was determined by spectrophotometric method. Various parameters such as 2-OAP concentration, equilibrium period, effect of various diluents, aqueous: organic volume ratio, acidity and diverse ions were studied. The extraction reaction proceeds with ion-pair formation and the stoichiometry of extracted species was found to be [(2OAPH+ CrO3Cl−](org. The separation and determination of chromium(VI from associated and toxic metals in binary, ternary and multicomponent mixture were carried out. The method permits the sequential separation of chromium(VI from other toxic metals and has been used to separate and determine chromium(VI from alloys, and effluent water samples from tannery industries.

  8. Influence of pH Value on the Determination of Hexavalent Chromium by Diphenylcarbazide Spectrophotometry%pH值对二苯碳酰二肼分光光度法测定六价铬的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海云; 李敏锐; 廖涛; 谭飞帆; 邓杰

    2012-01-01

    Based on the 1,5 -diphenylcarbazide spectrophotometry, we researched on the influence of pH value on the determination of hexavalent chromium. By adding different amounts of acid into two water samples with different volumes and concentrations, we measured the absorbances of the solutions so as to determine the hexavalent chromium. Through analysis by EXCEL on the measured data, we found that the absorbance reduced with the decrease of pH value. In the presence of high acidity, which means small pH value, the measured hexavalent chromium was smaller than the original value before adding acid. Therefore, the variation of pH value had an impact on the measurement of hexavalent chromium. Moreover, we employed the gray system model GM( 1,1) to process the experimental data, and derived a linear equation for the absorbance under different acidities. Through t test and F test, no significant difference was found between calculated absorbance and measured absorbance. This research is helpful to quantitatively looking into the influence of pH value on hexavalent chromium determination.%为获得不同pH值对测定六价铬(Cr(Ⅵ))的影响,以标准分析方法二苯碳酰二肼(C13H14N4O)分光光度法为基础,选用2种体积浓度的水样,分别加入不同的酸量,测定吸光度.经EXCEL软件对实测数据分析,得出加酸量与吸光度具有紧密的相关性,发现吸光度随着溶液pH值的减小而减小,酸度偏大,测定的实际结果比真实值小,pH值的不同对Cr(Ⅵ)测定结果具有影响.采用灰色系统模型GM(1,1)对实验数据进行处理,推导出不同酸度下的吸光度直线方程式.经t检验和F检验证明,计算出的吸光度值与测定值不存在显著性差异,可帮助定量掌握不同酸度条件下对测定Cr(Ⅵ)产生影响具有一定的作用.

  9. Recovery and reuse of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by a hybrid technique of electrodialysis and ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayathri, R. [Sengunthar Engineering College, Tiruchengode (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering], e-mail: gay3civil@gmail.com; Senthil Kumar, P. [SSN College of Engineering, Chennai (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering], E-mail: senthilkumarp@ssn.edu.in

    2010-01-15

    The chrome plating industry is one of the highly polluting industries whose effluent mainly consists of chromium(VI). This compound is highly toxic to aquatic life and human health. The rinse water constituents reflect the chrome plating bath characteristics; generally dead tank wash water contains about 1% of the plating bath concentration. Other metals and metal compounds usually considered as toxic can be precipitated out by suitably adjusting the pH of the wastewaters. However, Cr(VI) is soluble in almost all pH ranges and therefore an efficient treatment is required for the removal and recovery of chromium, and also for the reuse of wastewaters. The present study aims to recover the chromium by a hybrid technique of electrodialysis and ion exchange for the removal and concentration of chromate ions from the effluent. The different modes of operation like batch recirculation process, batch recirculation process with continuous dipping and continuous process were carried out to remove and recover the chromium from the effluent and the percentage reductions of chromium were found to be 98.69%, 99.18% and 100%, respectively. (author)

  10. Inhibition effect on the Allium cepa L. root growth when using hexavalent chromium-doped river waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Quiñones, F R; Szymanski, N; Palácio, S M; Módenes, A N; Rizzutto, M A; Silva, F G; Oliveira, A P; Oro, A C P; Martin, N

    2009-06-01

    The effect of Cr(6+) on Allium cepa root length was studied using both clean and polluted river waters. Seven series of Cr(6+)-doped polluted and non-polluted river waters were used to grow onions. Chromium concentration (Cr(6+)) of 4.2 mg L(-1)(EC(50) value), doped in clean river water caused a 50% reduction of root length, while in organically polluted samples similar root growth inhibition occurred at 12.0 mg Cr(6+) L(-1). The results suggested that there was a dislocation to higher values in toxic chromium concentration in polluted river water due to the eutrophization level of river water.

  11. Escherichia coli NemA is an efficient chromate reductase that can be biologically immobilized to provide a cell free system for remediation of hexavalent chromium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J Robins

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium is a serious and widespread environmental pollutant. Although many bacteria have been identified that can transform highly water-soluble and toxic Cr(VI to insoluble and relatively non-toxic Cr(III, bacterial bioremediation of Cr(VI pollution is limited by a number of issues, in particular chromium toxicity to the remediating cells. To address this we sought to develop an immobilized enzymatic system for Cr(VI remediation. To identify novel Cr(VI reductase enzymes we first screened cell extracts from an Escherichia coli library of soluble oxidoreductases derived from a range of bacteria, but found that a number of these enzymes can reduce Cr(VI indirectly, via redox intermediates present in the crude extracts. Instead, activity assays for 15 candidate enzymes purified as His6-tagged proteins identified E. coli NemA as a highly efficient Cr(VI reductase (k(cat/K(M= 1.1×10(5 M(-1 s(-1 with NADH as cofactor. Fusion of nemA to the polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase gene phaC from Ralstonia eutropha enabled high-level biosynthesis of functionalized polyhydroxyalkanoate granules displaying stable and active NemA on their surface. When these granules were combined with either Bacillus subtilis glucose dehydrogenase or Candida boidinii formate dehydrogenase as a cofactor regenerating partner, high levels of chromate transformation were observed with only low initial concentrations of expensive NADH cofactor being required, the overall reaction being powered by consumption of the cheap sacrificial substrates glucose or formic acid, respectively. This system therefore offers promise as an economic solution for ex situ Cr(VI remediation.

  12. Apparatus and method for time-integrated, active sampling of contaminants in fluids demonstrated by monitoring of hexavalent chromium in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Isaac B; Driver, Erin M; Halden, Rolf U

    2016-06-15

    Annual U.S. expenditures of $2B for site characterization invite the development of new technologies to improve data quality while reducing costs and minimizing uncertainty in groundwater monitoring. This work presents a new instrument for time-integrated sampling of environmental fluids using in situ solid-phase extraction (SPE). The In Situ Sampler (IS2) is an automated submersible device capable of extracting dissolved contaminants from water (100s-1000smL) over extended periods (hours to weeks), retaining the analytes, and rejecting the processed fluid. A field demonstration of the IS2 revealed 28-day average concentration of hexavalent chromium in a shallow aquifer affected by tidal stresses via sampling of groundwater as both liquid and sorbed composite samples, each obtained in triplicate. In situ SPE exhibited 75±6% recovery and an 8-fold improvement in reporting limit. Relative to use of conventional methods (100%), beneficial characteristics of the device and method included minimal hazardous material generation (2%), transportation cost (10%), and associated carbon footprint (2%). The IS2 is compatible with commercial SPE resins and standard extraction methods, and has been certified for more general use (i.e., inorganics and organics) by the Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) of the U.S. Department of Defense.

  13. Control of exposure to hexavalent chromium and ozone in gas metal arc welding of stainless steels by use of a secondary shield gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, John H; French, Michael J; Hewitt, Peter J; Mortazavi, Seyed B; Redding, Christopher A J

    2002-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that the shield gas composition in gas metal arc welding can have a considerable effect on hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] concentration in the fume and on ozone concentrations near the arc. Normally a single shield gas is used. This paper describes a double shroud torch that allows used of concentric shield gases of different compositions. A solid stainless steel wire was used for welding. The double shroud torch used secondary shield gases containing small amounts of the reducing agents NO and C2H4. The Cr(VI) concentration in the fume and ozone concentration at a fixed point relative to the arc were measured and compared with results when using a single shield gas. Use of the reducing agents in secondary shielding using the double shroud torch was found to offer advantages for ozone concentration reduction compared with use in a conventional torch, but this was not found to be an advantage for reducing Cr(VI) concentrations.

  14. Large scale groundwater flow and hexavalent chromium transport modeling under current and future climatic conditions: the case of Asopos River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokou, Zoi; Karagiorgi, Vasiliki; Karatzas, George P; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos P; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, high concentrations of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), have been observed in the groundwater system of the Asopos River Basin, raising public concern regarding the quality of drinking and irrigation water. The work described herein focuses on the development of a groundwater flow and Cr(VI) transport model using hydrologic, geologic, and water quality data collected from various sources. An important dataset for this goal comprised an extensive time series of Cr(VI) concentrations at various locations that provided an indication of areas of high concentration and also served as model calibration locations. Two main sources of Cr(VI) contamination were considered in the area: anthropogenic contamination originating from Cr-rich industrial wastes buried or injected into the aquifer and geogenic contamination from the leaching process of ophiolitic rocks. The aquifer's response under climatic change scenario A2 was also investigated for the next two decades. Under this scenario, it is expected that rainfall, and thus infiltration, will decrease by 7.7 % during the winter and 15 % during the summer periods. The results for two sub-scenarios (linear and variable precipitation reduction) that were implemented based on A2 show that the impact on the study aquifer is moderate, resulting in a mean level decrease less than 1 m in both cases. The drier climatic conditions resulted in higher Cr(VI) concentrations, especially around the industrial areas.

  15. Automated Ground-Water Sampling and Analysis of Hexavalent Chromium using a “Universal” Sampling/Analytical System

    OpenAIRE

    Venedam, Richard J.; Hartman, Mary J.; Hoffman, Dave A.; Scott R. Burge

    2005-01-01

    The capabilities of a “universal platform” for the deployment of analytical sensors in the field for long-term monitoring of environmental contaminants were expanded in this investigation. The platform was previously used to monitor trichloroethene in monitoring wells and at groundwater treatment systems (1,2). The platform was interfaced with chromium (VI) and conductivity analytical systems to monitor shallow wells installed adjacent to the Columbia River at the 100-D Area of the Hanford Si...

  16. Supercritical CO2 Assisted Synthesis of EDTA-Fe3O4 Nanocomposite with High Adsorption Capacity for Hexavalent Chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Bisht

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of EDTA functionalized nanoparticles in adsorption of chromium (VI from water was investigated in this study. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs were synthesized by a simple chemical coprecipitation route and EDTA coating onto IONPs was attained via supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc CO2, a technology with green sustainable properties. The obtained nanoparticles were then characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and vibrating magnetometric analysis (VSM. The synthesized nanoparticle and its modified variant were evaluated as adsorbent for chromium (VI removal from water through batch adsorption technique and the effect of analytic concentration; contact time and adsorbent concentration were studied at pH 2. The results showed higher removal efficiency for modified magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONPs (i.e., 99.9% than their nonmodified variant IONPs, that is, 34.06% for the same concentration after 18 hours of incubation. Also maximum adsorption capacity (qe = 452.26 mg/g of MIONPs attained can be related to their preparation in Sc CO2 as qe calculated from IONPs, that is, 170.33 mg/g, is lower than that of MIONPs. The adsorption data fit well with Freundlich isotherm equation while kinetic adsorption studies of chromium (VI were modeled by pseudo-second-order model.

  17. IN-VIVO EVALUATION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM INDUCED DNA DAMAGE BY ALKALINE COMET ASSAY AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CATLA CATLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantha Deivi Arunachalam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the acute toxicity of Chromium in fingerlings of Catla catla, an Indian major carp, was evaluated with renewal bioassay method. In vivo studies were designed to assess the extent of Micronucleus Assay, Comet Assay under the exposure of common heavy-metal compounds, namely, Chromium Nitrate, using Catla catla (2n = 20, as a test model. The laboratory acclimatized fishes were divided into four groups. Group I served as positive control and the other three as exposed groups for three different time durations of 7, 14 and 21 days and were subjected to uninterrupted sub lethal concentrations (50% of 96 h LC50. The experiments were planned in such a way that fish from all the groups were sacrificed on the same day. The frequencies of micronuclei and bi-nuclei were evaluated comparatively in peripheral erythrocytes. As a result, it was observed that, the fishes and different tissues showed differential sensitivity to the heavy-metal treatment. A significant increase in the frequencies of micronucleated and binucleated cells and percentage increase in DNA tail (pCatla catla during sub lethal toxicity study was also calculated.

  18. Physicochemical and biological quality of soil in hexavalent chromium-contaminated soils as affected by chemical and microbial remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yingping; Min, Xiaobo; Yang, Zhihui; Chai, Liyuan; Zhang, Shujuan; Wang, Yangyang

    2014-01-01

    Chemical and microbial methods are the main remediation technologies for chromium-contaminated soil. These technologies have progressed rapidly in recent years; however, there is still a lack of methods for evaluating the chemical and biological quality of soil after different remediation technologies have been applied. In this paper, microbial remediation with indigenous bacteria and chemical remediation with ferrous sulphate were used for the remediation of soils contaminated with Cr(VI) at two levels (80 and 1,276 mg kg(-1)) through a column leaching experiment. After microbial remediation with indigenous bacteria, the average concentration of water-soluble Cr(VI) in the soils was reduced to less than 5.0 mg kg(-1). Soil quality was evaluated based on 11 soil properties and the fuzzy comprehensive assessment method, including fuzzy mathematics and correlative analysis. The chemical fertility quality index was improved by one grade using microbial remediation with indigenous bacteria, and the biological fertility quality index increased by at least a factor of 6. Chemical remediation with ferrous sulphate, however, resulted in lower levels of available phosphorus, dehydrogenase, catalase and polyphenol oxidase. The result showed that microbial remediation with indigenous bacteria was more effective for remedying Cr(VI)-contaminated soils with high pH value than chemical remediation with ferrous sulphate. In addition, the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method was proven to be a useful tool for monitoring the quality change in chromium-contaminated soils.

  19. Determination of hexavalent chromium concentration in industrial waste incinerator stack gas by using a modified ion chromatography with post-column derivatization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yuichi; Tokumura, Masahiro; Iwazaki, Yuta; Wang, Qi; Amagai, Takashi; Horii, Yuichi; Otsuka, Hideyuki; Tanikawa, Noboru; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Oguchi, Masahiro

    2017-06-16

    An ion chromatography with post-column derivatization with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (IC-DPC) analytical method was modified to enable measurement of trace-level hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in air. One of the difficulties in determining trace levels of Cr(VI) in air with conventional IC-DPC methods is co-elution of the solvent and ion peaks due to high concentrations of ionic compounds in the extract. However, by using gradient elution rather than isocratic elution we were able to fully resolve the Cr(VI) ion peak from the solvent peak without the need for diluting the extract, which would have reduced the minimum quantifiable level of the method. With this method, we were able to detect Cr(VI) in air at concentrations of 5.3ng/m(3) (assuming a sampling volume of 1m(3) and a final solution volume of 10mL). Recovery tests at three different concentrations of Cr(VI) (50, 250, 1000ng) were performed with or without fly ash; recovery rates at all the concentrations of Cr(VI), with or without fly ash, ranged from 68% to 110% (mean±relative standard deviation, 96%±11%), and there were no differences in recovery rates with respect to the presence or absence of fly ash. Finally, we used the developed method to determine the concentration of Cr(VI) in stack gases collected from eight industrial waste incinerators located in Japan. The concentration of Cr(VI) in the stack gases ranged from below the method quantification limit to 3100ng/m(3). The highest concentrations of Cr(VI) detected in the stack gases were two to three orders of magnitude higher than that in ambient air in Japan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Methylation levels of P16 and TP53 that are involved in DNA strand breakage of 16HBE cells treated by hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guiping; Li, Ping; Li, Yang; Wang, Tiancheng; Gao, Xin; Zhang, Wenxiao; Jia, Guang

    2016-05-13

    The correlations between methylation levels of p16 and TP53 with DNA strand breakage treated by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] remain unknown. In this research, Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE cells) in vitro and bioinformatics analysis were used to analyze the epigenetic role in DNA damage and potential biomarkers. CCK-8 and single cell gel electrophoresis assay were chosen to detect the cellular biological damage. MALDI-TOF-MS was used to detect the methylation levels of p16 and TP53. qRT-PCR was used to measure their expression levels in different Cr(VI) treatment groups. The transcription factors with target sequences of p16 and TP53 were predicted using various bioinformatics software. The findings showed that the cellular toxicity and DNA strand damage were Cr(VI) concentration dependent. The hypermethylation of CpG1, CpG31 and CpG32 of p16 was observed in Cr(VI) treated groups. There was significant positive correlation between the CpG1 methylation level of p16 and cell damage. In Cr(VI) treated groups, the expression level of p16 was lower than that in control group. The expression level of TP53 increased when the Cr(VI)concentration above 5μM. About p16, there was significant negative correlation between the CpG1 methylation levels with its expression level. A lot of binding sites for transcription factors existed in our focused CpG islands of p16. All the results suggested that the CpG1 methylation level of p16 could be used as a biomarker of epigenetic effect caused by Cr(VI) treatment, which can enhance cell damage by regulating its expression or affecting some transcription factors to combine with their DNA strand sites.

  1. Use of RSM modeling for optimizing decolorization of simulated textile wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZM130 capable of simultaneous removal of reactive dyes and hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Zahid; Hussain, Sabir; Ahmad, Tanvir; Nadeem, Habibullah; Imran, Muhammad; Khalid, Azeem; Abid, Muhammad; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2016-06-01

    Remediation of colored wastewater loaded with dyes and metal ions is a matter of interest nowadays. In this study, 220 bacteria isolated from textile wastewater were tested for their potential to decolorize each of the four reactive dyes (reactive red-120, reactive black-5, reactive yellow-2, and reactive orange-16) in the presence of a mixture of four different heavy metals (Cr, Zn, Pb, Cd) commonly found in textile effluents. Among the tested bacteria, the isolate ZM130 was found to be the most efficient in decolorizing reactive dyes in the presence of the mixture of heavy metals and was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZM130 by 16S rRNA gene analysis. The strain ZM130 was highly effective in simultaneously removing hexavalent chromium (25 mg L(-1)) and the azo dyes (100 mg L(-1)) from the simulated wastewater even in the presence of other three heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Cd). Simultaneous removal of chromium and azo dyes ranged as 76.6-98.7 % and 51.9-91.1 %, respectively, after 180 h incubation. On the basis of quadratic polynomial equation and response surfaces given by the response surface methodology (RSM), optimal salt content, pH, carbon co-substrate content, and level of multi-metal mixtures for decolorization of reactive red-120 in a simulated textile wastewater by the strain ZM130 were predicted to be 19.8, 7.8, and 6.33 g L(-1) and a multi-metal mixture (Cr 13.10 mg L(-1), Pb 26.21 mg L(-1), Cd 13.10 mg L(-1), Zn 26.21 mg L(-1)), respectively. Moreover, the strain ZM130 also exhibited laccase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced)-dichlorophenolindophenol reductase (NADH-DCIP reductase) activity during the decolorization of reactive red-120. However, the laccase activity was found to be maximum in the presence of 300 mg L(-1) of the dye as compared to other concentrations. Hence, the isolation of this strain might serve as a potential bio-resource required for developing the strategies aiming at bioremediation of the

  2. Aerosol-Assisted Self-Assembly of Reticulated N-Doped Carbonaceous Submicron Spheres for Effective Removal of Hexavalent Chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiawei; Long, Yuan; Wang, Yiyan; Wei, Chaoliang; Zhan, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    This Research Article described a facile one-step method to prepare reticulated N-doped carbonaceous submicron spheres. Through a simple aerosol-assisted technology, glucosamine sulfate used as a carbon source was aerosolized and carbonized to functionalized carbonaceous submicron spheres. The electrostatic attraction between protonated amino groups and sulfate in the aerosol droplets induced a self-assembly and led to the formation of reticular structure, avoiding the use of templates. Compared to bare carbonaceous materials produced from glucose, reticulated N-doped carbonaceous spheres exhibit higher efficiency in the removal of Cr(VI), where the doping of element nitrogen led to electrostatic attraction between protonated nitrogen and chromium ions, and reticulated structure created relatively higher surface area and pore volume, facilitating materials to contact with Cr(VI) ions. XPS characterization proved these novel N-doped carbonaceous materials could effectively transform Cr(VI) to less toxic Cr(III) because of the surface reducing groups. For the practical application, several factors including the initial pH, materials dosage and recycle numbers on the removal performance were studied.

  3. Natural occurrence of hexavalent chromium in a sedimentary aquifer in Urânia, State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Bourotte

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous concentrations of hexavalent chromium have been detected in ground-water of the Adamantina Aquifer inat least 54 municipalities located in the northwestern region of the State of São Paulo, southeast Brazil, occasionallyexceeding the permitted limit for human consumption (0.05 mg.L-1. An investigation was conducted in the municipality of Urânia, where the highest concentrations of chromium were detected regionally. It was defined that the originof this contamination is natural, since high concentrations of chromium were detected in aquifer sandstones (averageof 221 ppm and also in pyroxenes (6000 ppm, one of the main heavy minerals found in the sediments. Besides, noother possible diffuse or point sources of contamination were observed in the study area. Stratification of ground-waterquality was observed and the highest concentrations of Cr6+ were detected at the base of the aquifer (0.12 mg.L-1,where ground-water shows elevated values for redox potential (472.5 mV and pH (8.61. The origin of Cr6+ in water may be associated with the weathering of pyroxene (augite, followed by the oxidation of Cr3+ by manganese oxides. The highest concentrations of Cr6+ are probably related to desorption reactions, due to the anomalous alkaline pHfound in ground-water at the base of the aquifer.Concentrações anômalas de cromo hexavalente foram detectadas em águas subterrâneas do Aqüífero Adamantina em pelo menos 54 municipalidades localizadas na região noroeste do Estado de São Paulo, sudeste do Brasil, algumas vezes ultrapassando o limite máximo permitido para consumo humano (0,05 mg.L-1. Um estudo foi realizado no município de Urânia, onde as mais elevadas concentrações de cromo da região foram detectadas. A origem da contaminação foi definida como natural, pois foram detectadas concentrações de cromonos arenitos do aqüífero (média 221 ppm e em piroxênios (6000 ppm, um dos principais minerais pesados encontrados nos sedimentos

  4. Titanium dioxide-gold nanocomposite materials embedded in silicate sol-gel film catalyst for simultaneous photodegradation of hexavalent chromium and methylene blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandikumar, Alagarsamy [Centre for Photoelectrochemistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021 (India); Ramaraj, Ramasamy, E-mail: ramarajr@yahoo.com [Centre for Photoelectrochemistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625021 (India)

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Aminosilicate sol-gel supported TiO{sub 2}-Au nanocomposite material photocatalyst was prepared by deposition-precipitation method and used for the simultaneous oxidation and reduction of methyelene blue dye and Cr(VI) ions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps} is used to design the solid-phase thin film photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Au promotes the interfacial electron transfer from TiO{sub 2} to Cr(VI) to form Cr(III). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The holes produced at the TiO{sub 2} oxidize the MB dye. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps} film was used for the simultaneous oxidation and reduction of toxic molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photoinduced simultaneous redox process provides dual benefit for the environment remediation. - Abstract: Aminosilicate sol-gel supported titanium dioxide-gold (EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps}) nanocomposite materials were synthesized by simple deposition-precipitation method and characterized. The photocatalytic oxidation and reduction activity of the EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps} film was evaluated using hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and methylene blue (MB) dye under irradiation. The photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) was studied in the presence of hole scavengers such as oxalic acid (OA) and methylene blue (MB). The photocatalytic degradation of MB was investigated in the presence and absence of Cr(VI). Presence of Au{sub nps} on the (TiO{sub 2}){sub nps} surface and its dispersion in the silicate sol-gel film (EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps}) improved the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of MB due to the effective interfacial electron transfer from the conduction band of the TiO{sub 2} to Au{sub nps} by minimizing the charge recombination process when compared to the TiO{sub 2} and (TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps} in the absence of EDAS. The EDAS/(TiO{sub 2}-Au){sub nps} nanocomposite materials provided

  5. Hexavalent chromium at low concentration alters Sertoli cell barrier and connexin 43 gap junction but not claudin-11 and N-cadherin in the rat seminiferous tubule culture model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carette, Diane [INSERM U 1065, Team 5 “Physiopathology of Germ Cell Control: Genomic and Non Genomic Mechanisms” C3M, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Perrard, Marie-Hélène, E-mail: marie-helene.durand@ens-lyon.fr [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I, CNRS, INRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Prisant, Nadia [University of Versailles/St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Gilleron, Jérome; Pointis, Georges [INSERM U 1065, Team 5 “Physiopathology of Germ Cell Control: Genomic and Non Genomic Mechanisms” C3M, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Segretain, Dominique [University of Versailles/St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Durand, Philippe [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I, CNRS, INRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Kallistem SAS Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to toxic metals, specifically those belonging to the nonessential group leads to human health defects and among them reprotoxic effects. The mechanisms by which these metals produce their negative effects on spermatogenesis have not been fully elucidated. By using the Durand's validated seminiferous tubule culture model, which mimics the in vivo situation, we recently reported that concentrations of hexavalent chromium, reported in the literature to be closed to that found in the blood circulation of men, increase the number of germ cell cytogenetic abnormalities. Since this metal is also known to affect cellular junctions, we investigated, in the present study, its potential influence on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins present at this level such as connexin 43, claudin-11 and N-cadherin. Cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers expressed the three junctional proteins and ZO-1 for at least 12 days. Exposure to low concentrations of chromium (10 μg/l) increased the trans-epithelial resistance without major changes of claudin-11 and N-cadherin expressions but strongly delocalized the gap junction protein connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells. The possibility that the hexavalent chromium-induced alteration of connexin 43 indirectly mediates the effect of the toxic metal on the blood–testis barrier dynamic is postulated. - Highlights: ► Influence of Cr(VI) on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins ► Use of cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers ► Low concentrations of Cr(VI) (10 μg/l) altered the trans-epithelial resistance. ► Cr(VI) did not alter claudin-11 and N-cadherin. ► Cr(VI) delocalized connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells.

  6. Biosynthesized iron nanoparticles in aqueous extracts of Eichhornia crassipes and its mechanism in the hexavalent chromium removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yufen; Fang, Zhanqiang; Zheng, Liuchun; Tsang, Eric Pokeung

    2017-03-01

    Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth), a species of invasive weeds has caused serious ecological damage due to its extraordinary fertility and growth rate. However, it has not yet been exploited for use as a resource. This paper reported the synthesis and characterization of amorphous iron nanoparticles (Ec-Fe-NPs) from Fe(III) salts in aqueous extracts of Eichhornia crassipes. The nanoparticles were characterized by SEM, EDS, TEM, XPS, FTIR, DLS and the zeta potential methods. The characterization results confirmed the successful synthesis of amorphous iron nanoparticles with diameters of 20-80 nm. Moreover, the nanoparticles were mainly composed of zero valent iron nanoparticles which were coated with various organic matters in the extracts as a capping or stabilizing agents. Batch experiments showed that 89.9% of Cr(VI) was removed by the Ec-Fe-NPs much higher than by the extracts alone (20.4%) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (47.3%). Based on the kinetics study and the XPS analysis, a removal mechanism dominated by adsorption and reduction with subsequently co-precipitation was proposed.

  7. Effect of pH and chloride concentration on the removal of hexavalent chromium in a batch electrocoagulation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo, M.G. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Perez-Herranz, V., E-mail: vperez@iqn.upv.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Montanes, M.T.; Garcia-Anton, J.; Guinon, J.L. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2009-09-30

    In this work, the effect of pH and chloride ions concentration on the removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater by batch electrocoagulation using iron plate electrodes has been investigated. The initial solution pH was adjusted with different concentrations of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The presence of chloride ions enhances the anode dissolution due to pitting corrosion. Fe{sup 2+} ions formed during the anode dissolution cause the reduction of Cr(VI) to form Cr(III), which are co-precipitated with Fe{sup 3+} ions at relatively low pH. The reduction degree of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and the solubility of metal hydroxide species (both chromic and iron hydroxides) depend on pH. At higher concentrations of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by Fe{sup 2+} ions is preferred, but the coagulation of Fe{sup 3+} and Cr(III) is favoured at the lower H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentrations.

  8. Development of analytical procedures for the determination of hexavalent chromium in corrosion prevention coatings used in the automotive industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séby, F; Castetbon, A; Ortega, R; Guimon, C; Niveau, F; Barrois-Oudin, N; Garraud, H; Donard, O F X

    2008-05-01

    The European directive 2000/53/EC limits the use of Cr(VI) in vehicle manufacturing. Although a maximum of 2 g of Cr(VI) was authorised per vehicle for corrosion prevention coatings of key components, since July 2007 its use has been prohibited except for some particular applications. Therefore, the objective of this work was to develop direct analytical procedures for Cr(VI) determination in the different steel coatings used for screws. Instead of working directly with screws, the optimisation of the procedures was carried out with metallic plates homogeneously coated to improve the data comparability. Extraction of Cr(VI) from the metallic parts was performed by sonication. Two extraction solutions were tested: a direct water extraction solution used in standard protocols and an ammonium/ammonia buffer solution at pH 8.9. The extracts were further analysed for Cr speciation by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic emission spectrometry or HPLC ICP mass spectrometry depending on the concentration level. When possible, the coatings were also directly analysed by solid speciation techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure, XANES) for validation of the results. Very good results between the different analytical approaches were obtained for the sample of coating made up of a heated paint containing Zn, Al and Cr when using the extracting buffer solution at pH 8.9. After a repeated four-step extraction procedure on the same portion test, taking into account the depth of the surface layer reached, good agreement with XPS and XANES results was obtained. In contrast, for the coatings composed of an alkaline Zn layer where Cr(VI) and Cr(III) are deposited, only the extraction procedure using water allowed the detection of Cr(VI). To elucidate the Cr(VI) reduction during extraction at pH 8.9, the reactivity of Cr(VI) towards different species of Zn generally present in the

  9. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intern Med 1991;115:917-24. Abraham AS, Brooks BA, Eylath U. The effects of chromium supplementation on serum glucose and lipids in patients with and without non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Metabolism 1992;41:768-71. Hermann J, Arquitt A. ...

  10. NAVAIR Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Adhesion, filiform, humidity, and fluid resistance properties Policy and Technology Drivers • Environmental Regulatory – – OSHA PEL, RoHS,  WEEE ... Silver ” Standard – MIL‐DTL‐5541 Type II/MIL‐PRF‐23377 Type I – – Most applications covered – 95+% solution – Next Gen Primer needed...NESDI – Current “ silver ‐standard” approach – support DEM/VAL  – Best available technology, limited/lower risk implementation • ESTCP WP 0731

  11. Study of Removal of Hexavalent Chromium in Textile Wastewater of Phragmites Australis Wetland%芦苇湿地去除印染污水铬离子的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋惠娟

    2013-01-01

      研究了芦苇人工湿地对印染污水中铬离子的去除和吸附作用,采用了意大利城市普拉托用芦苇人工湿地对印染工业废水处理厂排出的废水进行后处理的净化过程的近10年的研究数据,结果表明:六价铬离子和三价铬离子的去除率分别达到72%和26%,这是一个投入实际使用并且可持续发展方案。%This article studies the removal of chromium ions in textile wastewater in a wetland and analyzes in details based on the data collected from a ten -year study in a full -scale subsurface horizontal flow con-structed wetland planted with Phragmites australis in the city of Prato (Italy) .The results show that the re-moval rate of hexavalent and trivalent chromium reach 72% and 26% ,respectively ,w hich prove that it is a applicable and sustainable method ..

  12. A study on treatment of hexavalent chromium containing wastewater by reduction-flocculation process%还原絮凝法处理废水中Cr6+的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪洋; 刘淼; 刘南; 陈嵩岳

    2011-01-01

    利用阴阳离子聚合物与Na2S和FeSO4结合共同处理含有Cr6+的废水.选择Na2S和FeSO4作为还原剂,明胶、PAM作为絮凝剂.运用正交实验设计方法处理数据,最终得出最佳反应条件:当Cr6+初始浓度为20 mg/L时,Na2S投加反应浓度为24.70 mg/L,FeSO4投加反应浓度为25 mg/L,明胶投加反应浓度为100 mg/L,PAM投加反应浓度为10.0 mg/L;pH值为9.0时,处理后Cr6+浓度可达到0.28 mg/L,去除率为98.6%.%Utilize anionic polymers and cationic polymers combine with sodium sulfide(Na2S) and ferrous sulfate(FeSO4) to deal with hexavalent chromium containing wastewater. Na2S and FeSO4 are selected as reductant while gelatin and PAM are used for sedimentation. As to the data analysis, orthogonal experiments are used to design the whole research. Optimal treatment conditions for wastewater containing hexavalent chromium are determined through this process. The Cr6+ removal rate maintained 98. 6% and the concentration was 0.28 mg/L when experimental conditions were as follows:inlet concentration of Cr6+ was 20 mg/L,Na2S was 24. 70 mg/L,FeSO4 was 25 mg/L,gelatin was 100 mg/L,PAM was 10. 0 mg/L,pH was 9.0.

  13. Effect of Ionic and Chelate Assisted Hexavalent Chromium on Mung Bean Seedlings (Vigna radiata L. wilczek. var k-851 During Seedling Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanty, Monalisa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Cr+6 with and without chelating agents were assessed in mung bean seedlings grown hydroponically. It was noted that the growth parameters showed a declining trend with increasing Cr+6 concentrations without chelate application. Among the seedlings grown with chelated chromium complexes, Cr+6–DTPA (10µM showed highest growth rate of roots as well as shoots. At higher concentration of Chromium i.e. Cr+6 (100µM, there exhibited high chlorophyll content in mung bean leaves where the seedlings showed stunted growth. The seedlings treated without and with chelated chromium complexes showed increased proline content as compared to control. The enzymatic study showed that, the catalase activity was maximum in shoots as compared to roots and the reverse is true in the case of peroxidase activity i.e. the roots showed higher value than that of the shoots.

  14. Preconcentration and Determination of Chromium Species Using Octadecyl Silica Membrane Disks and Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MOGHIMI Ali; SABER-TEHRANI Mohammad; WAQIF-HUSAIN Syed; MOHAMMADHOSSEINI Majid

    2007-01-01

    A novel and selective method for the fast determination of trace amounts of chromium species in water samples has been developed.The procedure is based on the selective formation of chromium diethyldithiocarbamate complexes at different pH in the presence of Mn(Ⅱ) as an enhancement agent of chromium signals followed by elutionwith organic eluents and determination by atomic flame absorption spectrometry.The maximum capacity of the employed disks was found to be (3964±3) μg and (376±2) μg for Cr(Ⅲ) and Cr(Ⅵ),respectively.The detection limit of the proposed method is 49 and 43 ng·L-1 for Cr(Ⅲ) and Cr(Ⅵ),respectively.The proposed method was successfully applied for determination of chromium species Cr(Ⅲ) and Cr(Ⅵ) in different water samples.

  15. Antigenotoxic and Apoptotic Activity of Green Tea Polyphenol Extracts on Hexavalent Chromium-Induced DNA Damage in Peripheral Blood of CD-1 Mice: Analysis with Differential Acridine Orange/Ethidium Bromide Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen García-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the modulating effects of green tea polyphenols on genotoxic damage and apoptotic activity induced by hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI] in CD-1 mice. Animals were divided into the following groups: (i injected with vehicle; (ii treated with green tea polyphenols (30 mg/kg via gavage; (iii injected with CrO3 (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally; (iv treated with green tea polyphenols in addition to CrO3. Genotoxic damage was evaluated by examining micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCEs obtained from peripheral blood at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment. Induction of apoptosis and cell viability were assessed by differential acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB staining. Treatment of green tea polyphenols led to no significant changes in the MN-PCEs. However, CrO3 treatment significantly increased MN-PCEs at 24 and 48 h after injection. Green tea polyphenols treatment prior to CrO3 injection led to a decrease in MN-PCEs compared to the group treated with CrO3 only. The average of apoptotic cells was increased at 48 h after treatment compared to control mice, suggesting that apoptosis could contribute to eliminate the DNA damaged cells induced by Cr (VI. Our findings support the proposed protective effects of green tea polyphenols against the genotoxic damage induced by Cr (VI.

  16. Determination of Trace Hexavalent Chromium in Carrageenan Vacant Capsules by Tributyl Phosphate Extracting and Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy%磷酸三丁酯萃取-石墨炉原子吸收分光光度法测定海藻多糖空心胶囊中痕量六价铬

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张毅; 郭盈杉

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish a method of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy for quantitative determination of trace hexavalent chromium in Carrageenan Vacant Capsules. Methods The sample was extracted with Tributly Phosphate(TBP)and digested by the microwave dissolution system. The trace hexavalent chromium in Carrageenan Vacant Capsules was determined by the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. Results The sample concentration of chromium within the range of 0 ~ 40 ng / mL showed the good linear relation with the absorbance( r = 0. 999 7)and the average recovery rate was 88. 08% ,RSD = 0. 78%( n = 9). Conclusion This method is accurate,reliable,easy to operate,highly sensitive and suitable for the quality control of hexavalent chromium in Car-rageenan Vacant Capsules.%目的:建立海藻多糖空心胶囊中痕量六价铬的定量测定方法。方法采用磷酸三丁酯(TBP)萃取、微波消解、石墨炉原子吸收分光光度法,测定海藻多糖空心胶囊中的痕量六价铬。结果铬进样质量浓度在0~40 ng / mL 范围内与吸光度呈良好的线性关系(r =0.9997),平均回收率为88.08%,RSD =0.78%(n =9)。结论该方法定量准确可靠,方法操作简便、灵敏度高,适用于海藻多糖空心胶囊的六价铬质量控制。

  17. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  18. The effect of chromium on the hemoglobin concentration of Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri (Oligochaeta: Tubificidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Tena, F J; Martínez-Tabchet, L

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the toxic effects of polluted sediments, mainly chromium, the El Niagara reservoir (Aguascalientes, Mexico) on a benthic oligochaete species. Acute toxicity tests with hexavalent chromium in an artificial sediment-water system resulted in 24-, 48-, and 96-h LC50 values of 49.53, 22.81, and 5.11 mg available chromium/kg dry sediment, respectivley, in Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri. The uptake of chromium by tubificids from artificial and polluted reservoir sediments was found to increase with metal concentration in sediments and exposure time. The increase was higher in experiments with artificial sediment. Cr concentration in worms was related to hemoglobin content, which decreased significantly when Cr concentrations were above 1.0 microg/g dry weight. Bioavailable chromium in the El Niágara reservoir sediments may be an important factor limiting the benthic species in this ecosystem.

  19. The electrochemical aspect of the corrosion of austenitic stainless steels, in nitric acid and in the presence of hexavalent chromium (1961); Aspect electrochimique de la corrosion d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu nitrique et en presence de chrome hexavalent (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coriou, H.; Hure, J.; Plante, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The corrosion of austenitic stainless steels in boiling nitric acid markedly increases when the medium contains hexavalent chromium ions. Because of several redox phenomena, the potential of the steel generally changes in course of time. Measurements show a relation between the weight loss and the potential of specimens. Additions of Mn(VII) and Ce(IV) are compared with that of Cr(VI), and show that the relation is a general one. The attack cf the metal in oxidizing media is largely intergranular, leading to exfoliation of the grains, although the steel studied is not sensitive to the classical Huey and Strauss tests. Also even in the absence of any other oxidizing reaction, the current density observed when the steel is anodically polarized under potentiostatic conditions does not correspond to the actual weight loss of the metal. (authors) [French] La corrosion d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu nitrique bouillant augmente notablement quand le milieu contient des ions chrome a l'etat hexavalent. Par suite de divers phenomenes d'oxydo-reduction, le potentiel de l'acier evolue generalement au cours du temps. Les mesures effectuees permettent d'etablir une relation entre les pertes de poids et le potentiel des echantillons. L'addition de Mn(VI) et Ce(IV) est compare a celle de Cr(VI) et montre que la relation precedente s'applique de facon generale. L'attaque du metal en milieu oxydant est en grande, partie due a une corrosion intergranulaire conduisant a un dechaussement des grains bien que l'acier etudie ne soit pas sensible aux tests classiques de Huey et de Strauss. Aussi, meme en l'absence de toute autre reaction d'oxydation l'intensite qu l'on observerait en soumettant l'acier a un potentiel anodique dans un montage potentiostatique ne correspondrait pas a la perte de poids reelle du metal. (auteurs)

  20. Ecophysiological responses of young mangrove species Rhizophora apiculata (Blume) to different chromium contaminated environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim Linh; Nguyen, Hoang Anh; Richter, Otto; Pham, Minh Thinh; Nguyen, Van Phuoc

    2017-01-01

    Many mangrove forests have suffered from the contaminated environments near industrial areas. This study addresses the question how these environments influence the renewal of mangrove forests. To this end ecophysiological responses of the young mangrove species Rhizophora apiculata (Blume) grown under combinations of the factors heavy metals (here chromium), nutrition and soil/water environment were analyzed. We tested the hypothesis that soil/water conditions and nutrient status of the soil strongly influence the toxic effect of chromium. Seedlings of R. apiculata were grown in three different soil/water environments (natural saline soil with brackish water, salt-leached soil with fresh water and salt-leached-sterilized soil with fresh water) treated with different levels of chromium and NPK fertilizer. The system was inundated twice a day as similar to natural tidal condition in the mangrove wetland in the south of Vietnam. The experiments were carried out for 6months. Growth data of root, leaf and stem, root cell number and stomata number were recorded and analyzed. Results showed that growth of R. apiculata is slower in natural saline soil/water condition. The effect of chromium and of nutrients respectively depends on the soil/water condition. Under high concentrations of chromium, NPK fertilizer amplifies the toxic effect of chromium. Stomata density increases under chromium stress and is largest under the combination of chromium and salty soil/water condition. From the data a nonlinear multivariate regression model was derived capturing the toxicity threshold of R. apiculata under different treatment combinations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Microcalorimetric Study on Effect of Chromium(Ⅲ) and Chromium(Ⅵ) Species on the Growth of Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO,Jun; WANG,Yan-Xin; TIAN,Lin; WANG,Fei; CHEN,Hui-Lun; XU,Chao-Qian; SU,Chun-Li; CAI,Ming-Fa; MASKOW,Thomas; ZARAY,Gyula

    2008-01-01

    The effects of Cr(Ⅲ) and Cr(Ⅵ) species ( Cr2O2-7, CrO2-4 and Cr3+) on the growth of Escherichia coli (E.coli) have been investigated in detail by microcalorimetry at 37 ℃. Parameters including the growth rate constant (k),inhibitory ratio (Ⅰ), half-inhibitory concentration (IC50), total heat output (Qtotal), time of the maximum heat production (tlog) in the log phase have been obtained. The results showed that Cr(Ⅵ) and Cr(Ⅲ) had the inhibition effect on the growth of E. coli in aquatic environment; however, the inhibitory ratio of Cr(Ⅲ) to E. coli was smaller than that of Cr(Ⅵ). The k values of E. coli in the presence of Cr(Ⅵ) and at high concentrations of Cr(Ⅲ) were decreased with increasing the concentrations of these chromium species. Among the three chromium species investigated,Cr2O2-7 was found to be the most poisonous species against E. coli with an IC50 value of 35.52 μg·mL-1. CrO42- exhibited moderate toxicity on E. coli with an IC50 of 50.24 μg·mL-1, and Cr3+ had the lowest toxicity with an IC50 of 84.30 μg·mL-1. Microcalorimetry can provide a convenient, sensitive and reliable method to study the effect of various metal species on the growth of bacteria or other microorganisms.

  2. Research Progress on Remediation of Hexavalent Chromium Contaminated Soil by Nano-materials%纳米材料修复铬污染土壤的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭凯璇; 冀文文; 尚中博; 种瑞峰; 李德亮; 丁颖

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of urban industrialization,environmental problems become more and more serious,and the situation of soil pollution is not optimistic.As an important industrial raw material,chromate has been used for the production of various products,while it brings serious chromium pollution.Therefore,a lot of works have been carried out on the decontamination of chromium contaminated soil.The nanomaterials have become a hot research topic because of their unique structures and good performance.Such nano-materials could be divided into six categories, that is, nano-zero-valent metals, carbonaceous nanomaterials, nano-metal oxide (sulfur ) compounds, nano-semiconductors, nano-clay minerals, and nano-polymers. This paper summarized the achievements and the applications of such materials in remediating Cr-contaminated soil at home and abroad.It showed that the nano-zero-valent metals and nano-metal oxide (sulfur)compounds are mainly used for the treatment of hexavalent chromium contaminated soil,while other materials are relatively less.Compared with common iron powder,the reaction rate and efficiency of nanoscaled zero-valent iron are higher,although it is not stable in air.The efficiency of nanometer bimetallic is superior to zero-valent iron with high reactivity and little secondary pollution, but the cost is relatively high.The supported nanoscaled iron has the advantages of the aforementioned materials, such as high efficiency,low cost,high stability,and easy reusability,except the complicated synthesis procedure. Carbonaceous nano-materials possess high adsorption capacities,while they easily cause secondary pollution and high cost.Though nano-metal oxide (sulfur) compounds,with stable chemical properties,have certain adsorption capacities towards Cr(Ⅵ),the types of them are still few.Moreover,the fields of their application are yet narrow. The photocatalytic activities of nano-semiconductors are high,however,the photocatalysts are always high

  3. Chromium(VI) but not chromium(III) species decrease mitoxantrone affinity to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Anna M; Stojek, Zbigniew; Hepel, Maria

    2013-01-31

    Binding of mitoxantrone (MXT) to double-stranded DNA has been investigated as a model drug-DNA binding system to evaluate the effects of various forms of chromium on the binding properties. We have found that Cr(III), which binds strongly to DNA, does not affect the MXT affinity to DNA. In contrast, Cr(VI), in the form of chromate ions CrO(4)(2-), decreases the MXT affinity to DNA despite electrostatic repulsions with phosphate-deoxyribose chains of DNA. The MXT-DNA binding constant was found to decrease from (1.96 ± 0.005) × 10(5) to (0.77 ± 0.018) × 10(5) M(-1) for Cr(VI) concentration changing from 0 to 30 μM. The influence of Cr(VI) on MXT-DNA binding has been attributed to the oxidation of guanine residue, thus interrupting the intercalation of MXT into the DNA double helix at the preferential CpG intercalation site. This supposition is corroborated by the observed increase in the MXT binding site size from 2 bp (base pairs) to 4-6 bp in the presence of Cr(VI). The measurements of the MXT-DNA binding constant and the MXT binding site size on a DNA molecule have been carried out using spectroscopic, voltammetric, and nanogravimetric techniques, providing useful information on the mechanism of the interactions.

  4. A simple route to synthesize conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole nanocomposite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties and their performance for removal of hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Hasan; Rahman, Mohammad Mostafizar; Ali, Mohammad Azgar; Minami, Hideto; Tauer, Klaus; Gafur, Mohammad Abdul; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubor

    2016-08-01

    A combination of maghemite polypyrrole (PPy/γ-Fe2O3) and stimuli-responsive properties in the same hydrogel microspheres is expected to enhance their application potential in various fields such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, biosensors, biomedical applications and removal of heavy metals from waste water, catalysis etc. In this investigation a simple two step process is used to prepare conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole (PPy) composite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties. Poly(styrene-methacrylic acid-N-isopropylacrylamide-polyethelene glycol methacrylate) or P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles are first prepared by soap-free precipitation copolymerization. The copolymer hydrogel particles exhibited both temperature- and pH-responsive volume phase transition. Conductive P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA)/PPy/γ-Fe2O3 nanocomposite hydrogel particles are then prepared by seeded chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole in the presence of P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles using FeCl3 as a oxidant and p-toluene sulfonic acid (p-TSA) as a dopant. In the reaction system FeCl3 functioned as a source of Fe(III) for the formation of γ-Fe2O3. This reaction also requires the initial presence of Fe(II) provided by the addition of FeCl2. The size and size distribution, surface structure, and morphology of the prepared conductive composite hydrogel particles are confirmed by FTIR, electron micrographs, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-visible spectroscopy. The performance of nanocomposite hydrogel particles has been evaluated for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr) ions from water.

  5. Development of analytical procedures for determination of total chromium by quadrupole ICP-MS and high-resolution ICP-MS, and hexavalent chromium by HPLC-ICP-MS, in different materials used in the automotive industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séby, F; Gagean, M; Garraud, H; Castetbon, A; Donard, O F X

    2003-10-01

    A European directive was recently adopted limiting the use of hazardous substances such as Pb, Hg, Cd, and Cr(VI) in vehicle manufacturing. From July 2003 a maximum of 2 g Cr(VI) will be authorised per vehicle in corrosion-preventing coatings of key components. As no standardised procedures are available to check if produced vehicles are in agreement with this directive, the objective of this work was to develop analytical procedures for total chromium and Cr(VI) determination in these materials. The first step of this study was to optimise digestion procedures for total chromium determination in plastic and metallic materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). High resolution (HR) ICP-MS was used to examine the influence of polyatomic interferences on the detection of the (52)Cr(+) and (53)Cr(+) isotopes. If there was strong interference with m/ z 52 for plastic materials, it was possible to use quadrupole ICP-MS for m/ z 53 if digestions were performed with HNO(3)+H(2)O(2). This mixture was also necessary for digestion of chromium from metallic materials. Extraction procedures in alkaline medium (NH(4)(+)/NH(3) buffer solution at pH 8.9) assisted by sonication were developed for determining Cr(VI) in four different corrosion-preventing coatings by HPLC-ICP-MS. After optimisation and validation with the only solid reference material certified for its Cr(VI) content (BCR 545; welding dusts), the efficiency of this extraction procedure for screw coatings was compared with that described in the EN ISO 3613 standard generally used in routine laboratories. For coatings comprising zinc and aluminium passivated in depth with chromium oxides the extraction procedure developed herein enabled determination of higher Cr(VI) concentrations. This was also observed for the screw covered with a chromium passivant layer on zinc-nickel. For coating comprising a chromium passivant layer on alkaline zinc the standardized extraction procedure was more efficient

  6. Improvement on simultaneous determination of chromium species in aqueous solution by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Liao, Y.P.; Jons, O.

    1997-01-01

    sulphite, whereupon both species were detected by use of the luminol-hydrogen peroxide chemiluminescence system. Parameters affecting retention times and resolution of the separator columns, such as eluent pH, eluent composition, reductant pH and concentration, and flow rates were optimized. Furthermore...... was 1.4% for chromium(III) and 2.5% for chromium(VI), respectively. The accuracy of the chromium(III) determination was determined by analysis of the NIST standard reference material 1643c, Trace elements in water with the result 19.1 +/- 1.0 mu g Cr(III) l(-1) (certified value 19.0 +/- 0.6 mu g Cr...

  7. Thermodynamic studies of chromium adsorption on iron species generated by electrocoagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parga, J.R.; Vazquez, V.; Gonzalez, G.; Cisneros, M.M. [Metallurgy and Materials Science Department, Institute Technology of Saltillo (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    The protection of the global environment and in particular, the provision of a sustainable source of clean water is a necessity for human survival. Specifically, large quantities of chromium containing compounds are being discharged into the environment. This study has been carried out to determine the feasibility of chromium adsorption on iron species by an Electrocoagulation (EC) process using the Langmuir Isotherm. The full potential of EC with air injection as an alternative wastewater treatment technique to remove chromium from well water shows more than 99 % removal without the addition of any chemical reagents. In this study, X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Moessbauer Spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy are used to characterize the solid products that reveal the expected crystalline iron oxides, i.e., lepidocrocite, magnetite, gohetite, and iron oxide. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Quantification of the toxic hexavalent chromium content in an organic matrix by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-low-angle microtomy (ULAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greunz, Theresia; Duchaczek, Hubert; Sagl, Raffaela; Duchoslav, Jiri; Steinberger, Roland; Strauß, Bernhard; Stifter, David

    2017-02-01

    Cr(VI) is known for its corrosion inhibitive properties and is, despite legal regulations, still a potential candidate to be added to thin (1-3 μm) protective coatings applied on, e.g., electrical steel as used for transformers, etc. However, Cr(VI) is harmful to the environment and to the human health. Hence, a reliable quantification of it is of decisive interest. Commonly, an alkaline extraction with a photometric endpoint detection of Cr(VI) is used for such material systems. However, this procedure requires an accurate knowledge on sample parameters such as dry film thickness and coating density that are occasionally associated with significant experimental errors. We present a comprehensive study of a coating system with a defined Cr(VI) pigment concentration applied on electrical steel. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to resolve the elemental chromium concentration and the chemical state. Turning to the fact that XPS is extremely surface sensitive (purpose a special sample preparation step performed on an ultra-microtome was required prior to analysis. Since a temperature increase leads to a reduction of Cr(VI) we extend our method on samples, which were subjected to different curing temperatures. We show that our proposed approach now allows to determine the elemental and Cr(VI) concentration and distribution inside the coating.

  9. Effects of Simulated Acid Rain on the Migration and Transformation of Hexavalent Chromium in a Water Spinach-soil System%模拟酸雨对空心菜-土壤系统中六价铬迁移转化的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈桂葵; 李志鹏; 陈恋; 刘明中; 黎华寿

    2013-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of acid rain on the distribution, migration and transformation of hexavalent chromium in a water spinach(Ipomoea aquatica) soil system. Results showed that the amount of total chromium in water spinach treated with simulated acid rain was significantly higher than those without acid rain. The content of chromium in the underground part of water spinach was significantly higher than it in the aboveground part in treatments with simulated acid rain. While water spinach could survive and grow normally in soil with 100 mg·kg-1 chromium, they couldn't survive in soil with chromium up to 200 mg·kg-1. Valences of more than 97.0% added hexavalent chromium was changed. The majority portion of the chromium was remained in soil. Only very small portion was absorbed by water spinach. The simulated acid rain could significantly enhance the absorption rate of chromium by water spinach. The amount of absorbed chromium in treatments with acid rain was 2.6 to 5 times as those in the treatments without acid rain. The chromium enrichment coefficients were 2.2 and 4.6 for the aboveground part and the underground part of water spinach respectively by comparing the treatments with and without acid rain. The research result shows that acid rain increases the risk of crop grown in soil contaminated by chromium especially through the absorption of chromium by root system. Hence, agricultural food safety problem in chromium polluted area will be enhanced by acid rain.%通过盆栽试验,研究了模拟酸雨条件下六价铬在土壤和空心菜之间的分布、迁移和转化规律.结果发现,酸雨处理显著提高了空心菜体内铬的含量,其中空心菜地下部的铬含量显著高于其地上部;空心菜在100 mg·kg-1的铬处理下仍然可以正常生长,但当土壤中的铬达到200 mg· kg-1时,空心菜生长数天后即全部死亡;添加到土壤中的六价铬97.0%以上已经转化成其他形态而留

  10. Interactions of chromium with microorganisms and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, C; Campos-García, J; Devars, S; Gutiérrez-Corona, F; Loza-Tavera, H; Torres-Guzmán, J C; Moreno-Sánchez, R

    2001-05-01

    Chromium is a highly toxic non-essential metal for microorganisms and plants. Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium (Cr) has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The hexavalent form of the metal, Cr(VI), is considered a more toxic species than the relatively innocuous and less mobile Cr(III) form. The presence of Cr in the environment has selected microbial and plant variants able to tolerate high levels of Cr compounds. The diverse Cr-resistance mechanisms displayed by microorganisms, and probably by plants, include biosorption, diminished accumulation, precipitation, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), and chromate efflux. Some of these systems have been proposed as potential biotechnological tools for the bioremediation of Cr pollution. In this review we summarize the interactions of bacteria, algae, fungi and plants with Cr and its compounds.

  11. A simple route to synthesize conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole nanocomposite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties and their performance for removal of hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Hasan, E-mail: samarhass@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh); Rahman, Mohammad Mostafizar; Ali, Mohammad Azgar [Department of Chemistry, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh); Minami, Hideto [Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Tauer, Klaus [Max Planck Institute of Colloid and Interfaces, Am Mühlenberg, 14476 Golm (Germany); Gafur, Mohammad Abdul [Pilot Plant and Process Development Centre, BCSIR, Dhaka 1205 (Bangladesh); Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubor [Department of Chemistry, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh)

    2016-08-15

    A combination of maghemite polypyrrole (PPy/γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and stimuli-responsive properties in the same hydrogel microspheres is expected to enhance their application potential in various fields such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, biosensors, biomedical applications and removal of heavy metals from waste water, catalysis etc. In this investigation a simple two step process is used to prepare conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole (PPy) composite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties. Poly(styrene-methacrylic acid-N-isopropylacrylamide-polyethelene glycol methacrylate) or P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles are first prepared by soap-free precipitation copolymerization. The copolymer hydrogel particles exhibited both temperature- and pH-responsive volume phase transition. Conductive P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA)/PPy/γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite hydrogel particles are then prepared by seeded chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole in the presence of P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles using FeCl{sub 3} as a oxidant and p-toluene sulfonic acid ( p-TSA) as a dopant. In the reaction system FeCl{sub 3} functioned as a source of Fe(III) for the formation of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This reaction also requires the initial presence of Fe(II) provided by the addition of FeCl{sub 2}. The size and size distribution, surface structure, and morphology of the prepared conductive composite hydrogel particles are confirmed by FTIR, electron micrographs, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV–visible spectroscopy. The performance of nanocomposite hydrogel particles has been evaluated for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr) ions from water. - Highlights: • P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel particles were prepared. • P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA)/PPy/γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite hydrogel particles were prepared. • Oxidative polymerization of pyrrole and precipitation of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3

  12. Determination of Total Chromium and Chromium Species in Kombolcha Tannery Wastewater, Surrounding Soil, and Lettuce Plant Samples, South Wollo, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilahun Belayneh Asfaw

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper deals with the determination of total chromium (total Cr, Cr(III, and Cr(VI in Kombolcha leather industrial wastewater and the surrounding (soil and lettuce plant samples where the wastewater flows. The levels of total Cr, Cr(VI, and Cr(III in wastewater, soil, and lettuce plant samples were determined by FAAS, UV/Vis spectrophotometer, and difference (Cr(VI from total Cr, respectively. Among all samples taken, the maximum amounts of total Cr, Cr(III, and Cr(VI were obtained at the discharging point and the minimum amounts of total Cr and Cr(III were found downstream (400 m from the junction of Kombolcha leather industrial wastewater. On the other hand, the minimum concentration of Cr(VI was obtained in lettuce plant sample. The amounts of total Cr in all samples except soil sample were above the permissible limit as set by WHO/FAO. The concentrations of Cr(III in all wastewater samples were above the permissible level, whereas the concentration of Cr(VI in wastewater was above the permissible level except 400 m from the junction. The result showed that a remarkable elimination of total Cr and Cr species has not been achieved by this leather industry as its level was not much decreased when entered into the water systems. Therefore, effective treatment methods should be applied to the wastewater for the wellbeing of the surroundings.

  13. Highly efficient and recyclable triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 photocatalysts for degradation of organic pollutants and reduction of hexavalent chromium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jianwei; Zhang, Yunxia; Xu, Sichao; Wang, Shuan; Ding, Hualin; Pan, Shusheng; Wang, Guozhong; Li, Guanghai; Zhao, Huijun

    2014-04-01

    Herein, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of the well-defined triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 nanospheres with burr-shaped hierarchical structures, in which the multiple distinct functional components are integrated wonderfully into a single nanostructure. In comparison with commercial TiO2 (P25), pure TiO2 microspheres, Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 and annealed Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 nanocomposites, the as-obtained amorphous triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 hierarchical nanospheres exhibit a markedly enhanced visible light or sunlight photocatalytic activity towards the photodegradation of methylene blue and photoreduction of hexavalent chromium ions in wastewater. The outstanding photocatalytic activities of the plasmonic photocatalyst are mainly due to the enhanced light harvesting, reduced transport paths for both mass and charge transport, reduced recombination probability of photogenerated electrons/holes, near field electromagnetic enhancement and efficient scattering from the plasmonic nanostructure, increased surface-to-volume ratio and active sites in three dimensional (3D) hierarchical porous nanostructures, and improved photo/chemical stability. More importantly, the hierarchical nanostructured Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 photocatalysts could be easily collected and separated by applying an external magnetic field and reused at least five times without any appreciable reduction in photocatalytic efficiency. The enhanced photocatalytic activity and excellent chemical stability, in combination with the magnetic recyclability, make these multifunctional nanostructures promising candidates to remediate aquatic contaminants and meet the demands of future environmental issues.Herein, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of the well-defined triple-shelled Ag@Fe3O4@SiO2@TiO2 nanospheres with burr-shaped hierarchical structures, in which the multiple distinct functional components are integrated wonderfully into a single nanostructure. In comparison with commercial TiO2

  14. Chromium speciation in human blood samples based on acetyl cysteine by dispersive liquid-liquid biomicroextraction and in-vitro evaluation of acetyl cysteine/cysteine for decreasing of hexavalent chromium concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkhanloo, Hamid; Ghazaghi, Mehri; Mousavi, Hassan Z

    2016-01-25

    A rapid and efficient method based on ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid biomicroextraction (IL-DLLBME) was used for speciation and preconcentration of Chromium (III, VI) in human blood samples before determination by electro-thermal atomic absorption spectrometer (ET-AAS). In this method, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate as a ionic liquid was dissolved in acetone as a dispersant solvent and then the binary solution was rapidly injected by a syringe into the blood samples containing Cr(III), which have already complexed by acetyl cysteine (NAC) at optimized pH. Under the optimal conditions, the linear range (LR), limit of detection (LOD) and preconcentration factor (PF) were obtained 0.03-4.4 μg L(-1), 0.005 μg L(-1) and 10 respectively (RSD cysteine (Cys) as a prodrug of NAC can decrease the concentration of Cr(VI) in blood samples and human body. Validation of methodology was confirmed by standard reference material (SRM).

  15. Use of modified sorbent for the separation and preconcentration of chromium species from industrial waste water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memon, Jamil-ur-Rahman [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro (Pakistan); Memon, Saima Q. [Hi-Tech Central Resources Lab., University of Sindh, Jamshoro (Pakistan)], E-mail: msaima77@gmail.com; Bhanger, M.I. [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro (Pakistan); Khuhawar, M.Y. [Hi-Tech Central Resources Lab., University of Sindh, Jamshoro (Pakistan)

    2009-04-30

    A simple and sensitive method based on solid phase extraction (SPE) on acetyl acetone modified XAD-16 has been established for separation of Cr (III) and Cr (VI) from and industrial water samples. Two forms of chromium showed different exchange capacities at different pH values, viz. Cr (III) selectively retained at pH 5-7 whereas Cr (VI) retained at pH 1. Hence complete separation of the two forms of chromium is possible. Retained species were eluted with 5 mL of 2 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} and 2 mol L{sup -1} NaOH. The detection limit of 0.02 and 0.014 {mu}g mL{sup -1} was achieved for Cr (III) and Cr (VI), respectively, with an enrichment factor of 100 and 140. Various kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were also determined. The metal ion concentration was measured by atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The possible retention mechanism is also discussed. The method was successfully applied for the speciation of chromium in industrial water samples.

  16. Use of modified sorbent for the separation and preconcentration of chromium species from industrial waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Jamil-ur-Rahman; Memon, Saima Q; Bhanger, M I; Khuhawar, M Y

    2009-04-30

    A simple and sensitive method based on solid phase extraction (SPE) on acetyl acetone modified XAD-16 has been established for separation of Cr (III) and Cr (VI) from and industrial water samples. Two forms of chromium showed different exchange capacities at different pH values, viz. Cr (III) selectively retained at pH 5-7 whereas Cr (VI) retained at pH 1. Hence complete separation of the two forms of chromium is possible. Retained species were eluted with 5 mL of 2 mol L(-1) HNO(3) and 2 mol L(-1) NaOH. The detection limit of 0.02 and 0.014 microg mL(-1) was achieved for Cr (III) and Cr (VI), respectively, with an enrichment factor of 100 and 140. Various kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were also determined. The metal ion concentration was measured by atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The possible retention mechanism is also discussed. The method was successfully applied for the speciation of chromium in industrial water samples.

  17. Bioaccumulation kinetics of hexavalent chromium in the tissues of Exopalaemon carinicauda and Portunus trituberculatus%六价铬离子在脊尾白虾和三疣梭子蟹体内的富集动力学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李磊; 沈新强; 李超; 王云龙; 蒋玫; 吴庆元; 牛俊翔; 许高鹏

    2015-01-01

    通过15 d的富集以及之后15 d的清水释放实验,应用双箱动力学模型拟合获得了六价铬离子[ C r (Ⅵ)]在脊尾白虾( Exopalaemon carinicauda)和三疣梭子蟹( Portunus trituberculatus)体内的富集与释放动力学参数,同时分析探讨其动力学参数的变化特征及差异.拟合结果表明:脊尾白虾和三疣梭子蟹对Cr(Ⅵ )的吸收速率常数k1范围分别为3.37~20.65和4.36~12.44,平均值分别为11.00和7.70;释放速率常数 k2范围分别为0.058~0.121和0.115~0.154,平均值分别为0.089和0.131;生物富集因子( bioaccumulation factor ,BCF)范围分别为58.10~171.00和37.91~80.81,平均值分别为110.13和56.53;在平衡状态下2种海洋生物体内C r (Ⅵ )含量( CAmax )范围分别为8.55~290.52和4.85~56.87 mg/kg ,平均值分别为116.57和25.66 mg/kg ;生物半衰期(B1/2)范围为5.74~11.95和4.50~6.03d,平均分别为8.50和5.38d.2种海洋生物对Cr(Ⅵ )质量的吸收速率常数 k1、释放速率常数 k2和BCF均随外部水体中Cr(Ⅵ )质量浓度的增大而减少,CAmax和 B1/2随外部水体中Cr(Ⅵ)浓度的增大而增大.脊尾白虾对Cr(Ⅵ)的富集能力高于三疣梭子蟹,富集速率前期高于后期;而其对Cr(Ⅵ)的释放能力弱于三疣梭子蟹,且释放主要集中在前期.%Summary Chromium ( Cr) is considered to be one of the major heavy metal pollutants in marine environment , and in existence of two valence states :hexavalent chromium [Cr( Ⅵ )] and trivalent chromium [Cr( Ⅲ )] . The source of Cr pollution in marine environment was mainly from discharge of effluents by a variety of industries . Cr( Ⅵ) is considered as the most toxic form of Cr , whereas Cr ( Ⅲ ) is much less toxic . Cr ( Ⅵ ) is non‐biodegradable and can rapidly accumulate in creatures and reach toxic levels in short periods of time . Although the bioaccumulation of heavy metals in many creatures has been well studied , details on mechanisms and

  18. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    due to high temperature carbonisation adopted for CAC in preparation than PPFSC. Commercial ... The FTIR spectra of PPFSC and CAC are presented in Figure 3 (a) PPFSC and (b) CAC. ..... Adsorption of Cr(VI) was highly pH dependent.

  19. Determination of cadmium, chromium, lead and vanadium in six fish species from the Adriatic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepe, A; Ciaralli, L; Ciprotti, M; Giordano, R; Funari, E; Costantini, S

    2003-06-01

    Concentrations of cadmium, chromium, lead and vanadium were determined in samples of six fish species collected along the coast of the Adriatic Sea. The concentrations of the elements studied were generally low, often below the detection limits of the analytical methods. The highest values (microg x kg(-1) fresh weight) were observed, mainly in the central area of the Adriatic Sea, for anchovy (Cd 20.2, Cr 82.9, Pb 45.9, V 89.9), red mullet (Cd 3.1, Cr 31.0, Pb 36.0, V 79.1) and mackerel (Cd 7.7, Cr 28.0, Pb 11.4, V 43.5). The concentrations of cadmium and lead in all the species examined were below the maximum levels indicated by the European Community for these two elements in seafood, and also would lead to exposure levels lower than the provisional tolerable daily intakes suggested by the FAO/WHO for Cd (420 microg x week(-1) for a 60-kg person) and Pb (1500 microg x week(-1) for a 60-kg person). The concentration of chromium was lower than the recommended daily amount (50-200 microg x day(-1) for a 60-kg person) indicated by the US National Research Council. An 11-34% contribution to the daily vanadium ingestion with fish was calculated for the population of the Adriatic coast.

  20. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications: Joint Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Regardless of the corrosivity of the environment, all metals require periodic maintenance activity to guard against the insidious effects of corrosion and thus ensure that alloys meet or exceed design or performance life. The standard practice for protecting metallic substrates is the application of a coating system. Applied coating systems work via a variety of methods (barrier, galvanic, and/or inhibitor) and adhere to the substrate through a combination of chemical and physical bonds. For years hexavalent chromium has been a widely used element within applied coating systems because of its self healing and corrosion resistant properties. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) studies have concluded that hexavalent chromium (hex chrome) is carcinogenic and poses significant risk to human health. On May 5, 2011 amendments to the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) were issued in the Federal Register. Subpart 223.73 prohibits contracts from requiring hexavalent chromium in deliverables unless certain exceptions apply. These exceptions include authorization from a general or flag officer and members of the Senior Executive Service from a Program Executive Office, and unmodified legacy systems. Otherwise, Subpart 252.223-7008 provides the contract clause prohibiting contractors from using or delivering hexavalent chromium in a concentration greater than 0.1 percent by weight for all new contracts and to be included down to subcontractors for supplies, maintenance and repair services, and construction materials. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Department of Defense (DoD), and industry stakeholders continue to search for alternatives to hex chrome in coatings applications that meet their performance requirements in corrosion protection, cost, operability, and health and safety, while typically specifying that performance must be equal to or greater than existing systems.

  1. A Comprehensive Review on Nickel (II And Chromium VI Toxicities - Possible Antioxidant (Allium Sativum Linn Defenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusal K.Das

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity associated with nickel (II and chromium (VI is mainly due to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS with subsequent oxidative deterioration of biological macromolecules. Both nickel and chromium can generate free radicals (FR directly from molecular oxygen in a two step process to produce superoxide anion and in continued process, produce highly toxic hydroxyl radical. The pro-oxidative effects are compounded by fact that they also inhibit antioxidant enzymes and deplete intracellular glutathione. Garlic (Allium sativum has played an important dietary and medicinal role throughout the history of mankind. Garlic has the potential to enhance the endogenous antioxidant status in nickel as well as hexavalent chromium induced lipid peroxidation in normal and diabetic rats.

  2. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium (chromium (VI) ion from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    taye

    2015-04-01

    Apr 1, 2015 ... countries for industrial waste water varies from 0.05 to. 0.1 mg/l (Bansal et .... different methods of treatment by physically, chemically and organically .... hydrogen ion concentration is influenced by biological activities. Beside ...

  3. Cr(Ⅵ)干涉VDAC1 mRNA表达与细胞内ATP水平的联系%Interference of hexavalent chromium on VDAC1 mRNA expression or ATP level and their potential association

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨渊; 邹悦; 李鹏; 罗磊; 戴璐; 钟才高

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨Cr(Ⅵ)对细胞内电压依赖性离子通道(VDAC1) mRNA表达和三磷酸腺苷(ATP)水平的干涉效应及其之间的联系.方法 实验共分成6个处理组,分别用O、2、4、8、16和32μmol/L Cr(Ⅵ)染毒处理12、24和36 h,然后用逆转录荧光定量聚合酶链反应(RT-qPCR)和荧光素生物发光法分别检测细胞内VDAC1mRNA和能量ATP水平.结果 (1)细胞内VDACl mRNA表达在12h明显低于对照组水平,在24h表达水平有所增加,染毒36h后,各剂量组均明显增加,平均增加至对照组的2.65倍;(2)细胞内ATP含量在12h增高,高剂量组(2μmol/L)尤为明显,在24h后细胞内ATP水平明显下降,染毒36h后,低剂量(2μmol/L和4μmol/L)组ATP含量又回升至对照水平,在高浓度(8、16和32μ mol/L)组,ATP仍处较低水平;(3)相关分析显示,细胞内VDAC1 mRNA表达与ATP水平之间呈中度负相关(r=0.604,P<0.05).结论 Cr(Ⅵ)对细胞内ATP水平的干涉效应与VDAC1 mRNA表达异常有关,VDAC1 mRNA表达增加是Cr(Ⅵ)诱导细胞内能量ATP水平降低的分子机制之一.%Objective To explore the interference of hexavalent chromium-Cr( VI) on voltage-dependent anion channel ( VDAC1) mRNA expression and intracellular adenosine triphosphate( ATP) level in cells and their potential association. Methods Cultured L-02 hepatocytes were treated with 2,4,8,16 and 32n,mol/L of Cr(VI)for 12,24 and 36 hours (h).The expression of VDAC1 mRNA was measured by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction ( RT-qPCR ) , whereas the levels of intracellular ATP was determined by an ATP-specific bioluminescence assay. Results ( 1 ) The expression of VDAC1 mRNA in cells of treated groups was less than that of control group at 12h,and then showed slight increase at 24h,and increased significantly after 36 h of treatment. (2) After being treated by Cr(VI)for 12 h,ATP level in cells increased, especially in higher dose groups, and the ATP level then decreased significantly at

  4. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  5. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics: Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding Effectiveness (SE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Determine the suitability of trivalent chromium conversion coatings that meet the requirements of MIL-DTL-5541, Type II, for use in applications where high-frequency electrical performance is important. Evaluate the ability of hexavalent chrome free pretreated aluminum to form adequate EMI seals, and maintain that seal while being subjected to harsh environmental conditions. Assess the performance of trivalent chromium pretreatments against a known control hexavalent chrome pretreatment before and after they have been exposed to a set of environmental conditions. It is known that environmental testing causes a decrease in shielding effectiveness when hexavalent chrome pretreatments are used (Alodine 1200s). Need to determine how shielding effectiveness will be affected with the use of hexavalent chrome free pretreatments. Performance will be assessed by evaluating shielding effectiveness (SE) test data from a variety of test samples comprised of different aluminum types and/or conversion coatings. The formation of corrosion will be evaluated between the mating surfaces and gasket to assess the corrosion resistant properties of the pretreatments, comparing the hexavalent control to the hexavalent chrome free pretreatments.

  6. Phytoremediation potential of chromium-containing tannery effluent-contaminated soil by native Indian timber-yielding tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Muthu; Kannan, Vijayaraghavan; Mahalingam, Kanimozhi; Vimala, A; Chun, Sechul

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-six native Indian tree species that are used for the enhanced tree cover program of the forest department (Government of Tamilnadu, India) were screened for phytoremediation of tannery effluent-contaminated soil containing high chromium content. Out of 26 tree species tested, 10 timber-yielding tree species were selected for further phytoremediation monitoring. After a series of treatments with tannery effluent sludge, the chromium content was measured in the plant parts. The saplings of Acacia auriculiformis, Azadirachta indica, Albizzia lebbeck, Dalbergia sisso, and Thespesia populnea were identified as efficient bioaccumulators of chromium from Cr-contaminated soil. Acacia auriculiformis accumulates higher amounts of Cr in both the root and stem. Dalbergia sisso and T. populnea were found to accumulate higher quantity of Cr in the roots, whereas A. indica, A. richardiana, and A. lebbeck accumulate Cr in their stem. The stress response of the plant species was assessed by quantifying the antioxidative enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and DHAR. Activity of all the enzymes was observed to gradually increase following treatment with tannery effluent sludge.

  7. A novel method for fast enrichment and monitoring of hexavalent and trivalent chromium at the ppt level with modified silica MCM-41 and its determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganjali Mohammad Reza

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium(III at the ng L-1 level was extracted using partially silylated MCM-41 modified by a tetraazamacrocyclic compound (TAMC and determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emision spectrometry (ICP OES. The extraction time and efficiency, pH and flow rate, type and minimum amount of stripping acid, and break- through volume were investigated. The method's enrichment factor and detection limit are 300 and 45.5 pg mL-1, respectively. The maximum capacity of the 10 mg of modified silylated MCM-41 was found to be 400.5?4.7 µg for Cr(III. The method was applied to the determination of Cr(III and Cr(VI in the wastewater of the chromium electroplating industry and in environmental and biological samples (black tea, hot and black pepper.

  8. Mechanisms of bacterial resistance to chromium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Díaz-Pérez, César; Vargas, Eréndira; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Campos-García, Jesús; Cervantes, Carlos

    2008-06-01

    Chromium is a non-essential and well-known toxic metal for microorganisms and plants. The widespread industrial use of this heavy metal has caused it to be considered as a serious environmental pollutant. Chromium exists in nature as two main species, the trivalent form, Cr(III), which is relatively innocuous, and the hexavalent form, Cr(VI), considered a more toxic species. At the intracellular level, however, Cr(III) seems to be responsible for most toxic effects of chromium. Cr(VI) is usually present as the oxyanion chromate. Inhibition of sulfate membrane transport and oxidative damage to biomolecules are associated with the toxic effects of chromate in bacteria. Several bacterial mechanisms of resistance to chromate have been reported. The best characterized mechanisms comprise efflux of chromate ions from the cell cytoplasm and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Chromate efflux by the ChrA transporter has been established in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Cupriavidus metallidurans (formerly Alcaligenes eutrophus) and consists of an energy-dependent process driven by the membrane potential. The CHR protein family, which includes putative ChrA orthologs, currently contains about 135 sequences from all three domains of life. Chromate reduction is carried out by chromate reductases from diverse bacterial species generating Cr(III) that may be detoxified by other mechanisms. Most characterized enzymes belong to the widespread NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein family of reductases. Several examples of bacterial systems protecting from the oxidative stress caused by chromate have been described. Other mechanisms of bacterial resistance to chromate involve the expression of components of the machinery for repair of DNA damage, and systems related to the homeostasis of iron and sulfur.

  9. Peat and coconut fiber as biofilters for chromium adsorption from contaminated wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henryk, Kołoczek; Jarosław, Chwastowski; Witold, Żukowski

    2016-01-01

    Batch adsorption experiments were performed for the removal of chromium (III) and chromium (VI) ions from aqueous solutions using Canadian peat and coconut fiber. The Langmuir model was used to describe the adsorption isotherm. The maximum adsorption for peat reached 18.75 mg/g for Cr(III) and 8.02 mg/g for Cr(VI), whereas the value for fiber was slightly higher and reached 19.21 mg/g for Cr(III) and 9.54 mg/g for Cr(VI). Both chromium forms could be easily eluted from the materials. The adsorption of chromium forms to organic matter could be explained in terms of formation of donor-acceptor chemical covalent bound with hydroxyl groups as ligands and chromium as the central atom in the formed complex. The chromate-reducing activities were monitored with the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results showed that both adsorption and reduction occurred simultaneously and the maximum adsorption capacity of hexavalent chromium being equal to 95% for fiber and 92% for peat was obtained at pH 1.5. The reduction of Cr(VI) in wastewaters began immediately and disappeared after 20 h. Both materials contained yeast and fungi species which can be responsible for reduction of chromium compounds, due to their enzymatic activity (Chwastowski and Koloczek (Acta Biochim Pol 60: 829-834, 2013)). The reduction of Cr(VI) is a two-phase process, the first phase being rapid and based on chemical reaction and the second phase having biological features. After the recovery step, both types of organic materials can be used again for chromium adsorption without any loss in the metal uptake. Both of the materials could be used as biofilters in the wastewater treatment plants.

  10. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients...... with chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  11. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B;

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  12. CHROMIUM INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN BLACKGRAM (VIGNA MUNGO L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chidambaram ، P. Sundaramoorthy ، A. Murugan ، K. Sankar Ganesh ، L. Baskaran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium is known to be highly toxic to biological systems. This study was designed to determine the mutagenic effects of different concentrations (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of hexavalent chromium on root tip cells of blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper. The blackgram seeds were equi-spacially arranged in sterilized petriplates lined with filter paper and they were treated with different concentrations of chromium solution. In germination studies, the morphological growth parameters such as germination percentage, root length, shoot length fresh weight and dry weight of blackgram seedlings were decreased with increasing dose of chromium concentrations. No germination of blackgram seeds was recorded at 300mg/l chromium concentration. Chromosome aberration assay was used to determine the mitotic indices and rate of chromosome aberration in blackgram root tip cells due to chromium treatment. The results showed that the mitotic indices were complicated due to different concentrations of chromium. However, the increase in chromium concentration has led to a gradual increase in the percentage of chromosomal aberration and mitotic index. The chromosome length, absolute chromosome length and average chromosome lengths were gradually found to decrease. There was no considerable change in 2n number of chromosome with the increase in chromium concentrations. It is concluded that the hexavalent chromium has significant mutagenic effect on the root tip cells of blackgram.

  13. Method of trivalent chromium concentration determination by atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheulishvili, Aleksandre N [Tbilisi, 0183, GE; Tsibakhashvili, Neli Ya [Tbilisi, 0101, GE

    2006-12-12

    A method is disclosed for determining the concentration of trivalent chromium Cr(III) in a sample. The addition of perchloric acid has been found to increase the atomic chromium spectrometric signal due to Cr(III), while leaving the signal due to hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) unchanged. This enables determination of the Cr(III) concentration without pre-concentration or pre-separation from chromium of other valences. The Cr(III) concentration may be measured using atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry or atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  14. Environmental biochemistry of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losi, M E; Amrhein, C; Frankenberger, W T

    1994-01-01

    Chromium is a d-block transitional element with many industrial uses. It occurs naturally in various crustal materials and is discharged to the environment as industrial waste. Although it can occur in a number of oxidation states, only 3+ and 6+ are found in environmental systems. The environmental behavior of Cr is largely a function of its oxidation state. Hexavalent Cr compounds (mainly chromates and dichromates) are considered toxic to a variety of terrestrial and aquatic organisms and are mobile in soil/water systems, much more so than trivalent Cr compounds. This is largely because of differing chemical properties: Hexavalent Cr compounds are strong oxidizers and highly soluble, while trivalent Cr compounds tend to form relatively inert precipitates at near-neutral pH. The trivalent state is generally considered to be the stable form in equilibrium with most soil/water systems. A diagram of the Cr cycle in soils and water is given in Fig. 6 (Bartlett 1991). This illustration provides a summary of environmentally relevant reactions. Beginning with hexavalent Cr that is released into the environment as industrial waste, there are a number of possible fates, including pollution of soil and surface water and leaching into groundwater, where it may remain stable and, in turn, can be taken up by plants or animals, and adsorption/precipitation, involving soil colloids and/or organic matter. Herein lies much of the environmental concern associated with the hexavalent form. A portion of the Cr(VI) will be reduced to the trivalent form by inorganic electron donors, such as Fe2+ and S2-, or by bioprocesses involving organic matter. Following this conversion, Cr3+ can be expected to precipitate as oxides and hydroxides or to form complexes with numerous ligands. This fraction includes a vast majority of global Cr reserves. Soluble Cr3+ complexes, such as those formed with citrate, can undergo oxidation when they come in contact with manganese dioxide, thus reforming

  15. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  16. Vortex-assisted ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for assessment of chromium species in artificial saliva extract of different chewing tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Asma; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Talpur, Farah Naz; Khan, Noman; Bilal, Muhammad; Khan, Mustafa

    2016-12-01

    A novel dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (ILDLLμE) method using an extracting solvent (ionic liquid) and dispersant (Triton X-114) was developed for the separation and preconcentration of hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) in artificial saliva extract (ASE) of chewing tobacco products, gutkha, and mainpuri (n = 23). In the proposed method, the extraction of Cr(6+) was accomplished by using ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) as complexing agent and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C4MIM] [PF6] as extracting solvent. The tiny droplet of metal chelate was then dispersed into TX-114 emulsion, using vortex mixer. Various parameters such as concentration of APDC, pH of the solution, volume of [C4MIM] [PF6], and TX-114 as well as extraction time were studied. Under the most favorable conditions, the limit of detection was found to be 0.068 μg/L with the relative standard deviation carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic risks. Estimated daily intake of Cr via chewing 10 g/day of gutkha and mainpuri was found to be below the maximum tolerable daily intake, whereas the calculated risk of cancer for Cr was observed in the acceptable range of 10E(-6)-10E(-4), except some brands of gutkha. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Isobutane dehydrogenation over chromia alumina catalysts prepared from MIL-101:Insight into chromium species on activity and selectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huahua Zhao; Huanling Song; Zhichao Miao; Lingjun Chou

    2014-01-01

    Various mesoporous chromia alumina catalysts were prepared by five different methods based on a metal-organic framework MIL-101 and their catalytic performances over isobutane dehydrogenation were investigated. The highly dispersed chromium species were produced on catalyst KCrAl-I1 with largest specific surface area of 198 m2·g−1 prepared with aluminium isopropoxide (Al(i-OC3H7)3) by ultrasonic im-pregnation method. However, the catalyst KCrAl-I2 synthesized by stirring impregnation possessed crystallineα-Cr2O3 phase, which was poorly dispersed. Two types of Cr-rich and Al-rich CrxAl2−xO3 solid solutions, designated as CrAl-I and CrAl-II phase, were formed over the catalysts KCrAl-I3 (prepared by Al(i-OC3H7)3 with nitric acid regulation), KCrAl-C4 (prepared by aluminium chloride hexahydrate) and KCrAl-N5 (prepared by aluminium nitrate nonahydrate). Catalytic evaluation results revealed that KCrAl-I1 exhibited the high isobutane con-version due to its highly dispersed chromium species. However, KCrAl-I3, KCrAl-C4 and KCrAl-N5 showed the higher isobutene selectivity (95.2%−96.4%) on account of the formation of chromia alumina solid solutions in the catalysts. Moreover, the solid solution over the chromia alumina catalysts could greatly suppress the coke formation.

  18. Chromium III histidinate exposure modulates antioxidant gene expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    While the toxicity of hexavalent chromium is well established, trivalent Cr (Cr(III)) is an essential nutrient involved in insulin and glucose homeostasis. Recently, antioxidant effects of chromium (III) histidinate (Cr(III)His) were reported in HaCaT human keratinocytes exposed to oxidative stress...

  19. Sonoassisted microbial reduction of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiravan, Mathur Nadarajan; Karthick, Ramalingam; Muthu, Naggapan; Muthukumar, Karuppan; Velan, Manickam

    2010-04-01

    This study presents sonoassisted microbial reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) using Bacillus sp. isolated from tannery effluent contaminated site. The experiments were carried out with free cells in the presence and absence of ultrasound. The optimum pH and temperature for the reduction of Cr(VI) by Bacillus sp. were found to be 7.0 and 37 degrees C, respectively. The Cr(VI) reduction was significantly influenced by the electron donors and among the various electron donors studied, glucose offered maximum reduction. The ultrasound-irradiated reduction of Cr(VI) with Bacillus sp. showed efficient Cr(VI) reduction. The percent reduction was found to increase with an increase in biomass concentration and decrease with an increase in initial concentration. The changes in the functional groups of Bacillus sp., before and after chromium reduction were observed with FTIR spectra. Microbial growth was described with Monod and Andrews model and best fit was observed with Andrews model.

  20. Investigate of atmospheric arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury levels in moss species found around Zilkale, by EDXRF Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akçay, Nilay, E-mail: nilay.akcay@erdogan.edu.tr [Recep Tayyip Erdoğan University, Faculty of Art and Science, Department of Physics, Rize (Turkey); Batan, Nevzat, E-mail: nbatan@ktu.edu.tr [Karadeniz Technical University, Maçka Vocational School, Trabzon (Turkey); Çinar, Yunus, E-mail: yunus.cinar@erdogan.edu.tr [Recep Tayyip Erdoğan University, Vocational School of Technical Studies, Rize (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Zilkale is a castle located in Fırtına Valley and it is one of the most important historical structures in Çamlihemşin district of Rize Province in the Black Sea Region of Turkey. The castle surrounded by very high mountains that poke up into the clouds, and it rains here all year round. Tourism businesses or industrial plants are not so much there yet. In recent years, Zilkale region has begun the attract tourist, people on treaking holidays in the Kaçkar. But many domestic and foreign tourists come to this region by own car or tour buses. The aim of this study is to investigate the atmospheric concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury levels in five different moss species collected around Zilkale by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometry. The average concentrations of heavy metals in moss samples ranged from 0.79-4.63 ppm for arsenic, 54.47-143.39 ppm for chromium, 39.97-81.03 ppm for lead. The values of cadmium and mercury were found below the detection limit. This study has shown that Hypnum cupressiforme, Abietinella abietina, Rhytidium rugosum, Plagiomnium undulate, and Thuidium tamariscinum samples collected around Zilkale were used to assess the potential contamination of atmospheric As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg contamination in the region and made important contributions toward the understanding of atmospheric As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg baseline data can be used for identification of changes in the levels of these heavy metals in the studied area.

  1. Investigate of atmospheric arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury levels in moss species found around Zilkale, by EDXRF Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçay, Nilay; Batan, Nevzat; Ćinar, Yunus

    2016-04-01

    Zilkale is a castle located in Fırtına Valley and it is one of the most important historical structures in Çamlihemşin district of Rize Province in the Black Sea Region of Turkey. The castle surrounded by very high mountains that poke up into the clouds, and it rains here all year round. Tourism businesses or industrial plants are not so much there yet. In recent years, Zilkale region has begun the attract tourist, people on treaking holidays in the Kaçkar. But many domestic and foreign tourists come to this region by own car or tour buses. The aim of this study is to investigate the atmospheric concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury levels in five different moss species collected around Zilkale by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometry. The average concentrations of heavy metals in moss samples ranged from 0.79-4.63 ppm for arsenic, 54.47-143.39 ppm for chromium, 39.97-81.03 ppm for lead. The values of cadmium and mercury were found below the detection limit. This study has shown that Hypnum cupressiforme, Abietinella abietina, Rhytidium rugosum, Plagiomnium undulate, and Thuidium tamariscinum samples collected around Zilkale were used to assess the potential contamination of atmospheric As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg contamination in the region and made important contributions toward the understanding of atmospheric As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg baseline data can be used for identification of changes in the levels of these heavy metals in the studied area.

  2. Microbial biotechnology for remediation of aquatic habitats polluted with chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Viorica Coşier; I. Valentin Petrescu-Mag

    2008-01-01

    Chromium may occur in nine different forms of oxidation ranging from ?II to +VI, with forms II, III and VI as the most commonly encountered. In Cluj county, chromium pollution dates well back in time and has caused important dysfunction to the mechanical-biological wastewater purification station of the city of Cluj (Coşier & Diţă 1996). The purpose of this study was to develop one microbial method able to reduce hexavalent chromium (mobile, permeable to cell membrane, carcinogenic and mutage...

  3. Application of the Stopped Flow Technique to the TiO₂-Heterogeneous Photocatalysis of Hexavalent Chromium in Aqueous Suspensions: Comparison with O₂ and H₂O₂ as Electron Acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meichtry, Jorge M; Dillert, Ralf; Bahnemann, Detlef W; Litter, Marta I

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of the transfer of electrons stored in TiO2 nanoparticles to Cr(VI) in aqueous solution have been investigated using the stopped flow technique. TiO2 nanoparticles were previously irradiated under UV light in the presence of formic acid, and trapped electrons (e(trap)(-)) were made to react with Cr(VI) as acceptor species; other common acceptor species such as O2 and H2O2 were also tested. The temporal evolution of the number of trapped electrons was followed by the decrease in the absorbance at 600 nm, and the kinetics of the electron-transfer reaction was modeled. Additionally, the rate of formation of the surface complex between Cr(VI) and TiO2 was determined with the stopped flow technique by following the evolution of the absorbance at 400 nm of suspensions of nonirradiated TiO2 nanoparticles and Cr(VI) at different concentrations. An approximately quadratic relationship was observed between the maximum absorbance of the surface complex and the concentration of Cr(VI), suggesting that Cr(VI) adsorbs onto the TiO2 surface as dichromate. The kinetic analyses indicate that the electron transfer from TiO2 to Cr(VI) does not require the previous formation of the Cr(VI)-TiO2 surface complex, at least the complex detected here through the stopped flow experiments. When previously irradiated TiO2 was used to follow the evolution of the Cr(VI)-TiO2 complex, an inhibition of the formation of the complex was observed, which can be related to the TiO2 deactivation caused by Cr(III) deposition.

  4. Research Progress on Principles and Applications of Microbial Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium%Cr(Ⅵ)的微生物还原去除机理与应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季梦兰; 严俊; 林华; 李海翔

    2015-01-01

    重点分析了Cr (Ⅵ)的微生物还原去除研究现状,包括报道发现的部分Cr (Ⅵ)还原菌种类及特性、微生物还原Cr (Ⅵ)的机理(电子供体、碳源、还原途径等)以及微生物还原在Cr (Ⅵ)污染水体治理中的应用研究进展,进一步探讨了该领域今后的研究热点与方向。%The research status of Cr (Ⅵ) removal by microbial reduction has been analyzed ,including the Cr(Ⅵ) reduc-tion bacterial species and their characteristics ,microbial reduction mechanism of Cr (Ⅵ) (electron donor ,carbon source , reduction pathways ,etc .) ,and the application research progress of Cr (Ⅵ ) polluted water treatment by microbial reduc-tion .The future key research aspects and directions in this field are also proposed .

  5. Advances in Functional Trivalent Chromium Electroplating%功能三价铬镀铬的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李家柱; 毛祖国; 孙宁

    2012-01-01

    介绍了最近美国关于功能性Cr(Ⅲ)电镀代替Cr(Ⅵ)硬铬电镀的科研进展.Cr(Ⅵ)电镀用于提供硬度高、抗磨损和耐腐蚀的镀层.但是,Cr(Ⅵ)槽液毒性大,对环境和人身有危害,已经得到严格的控制和监督.Cr(Ⅲ)电镀铬已经取得了可以和Cr(Ⅵ)电镀相比美的功能性,对Cr(Ⅲ)镀铬镀层的厚度、均匀性、结合力、孔隙率和抗腐蚀性能方面进行了讨论.%The latest development of functional trivalent chromium plating for replacing hexavalent chromium plating in USA was introduced. The hexavalent chromium plating has been used to provide hard and durable coatings with excellent wear and corrosion resistance. But this hexavalent chromium plating was strictly supervised due to its toxic nature,harmful effect to the environment and human health. Until now, the trivalent chromium plating has the comparable properties with hexavalent chromium plating and been successfully applied in the undercarriage of airplane. Finally,the thickness, uniformity, bonding strength, porosity and corrosion resistance of trivalent chromium plating were discussed.

  6. Developed Fungal-Bacterial Biofilms as A Novel Tool for Bioremoval of Hexavelant Chromium from Wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herath, Lasantha; Rajapaksha, R. M. A. U.; Vithanage, M.;

    2014-01-01

    Remediation measures for hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] are required for a safe environment. As a recent development in microbiology, bacterial biofilms are being studied as effective bioremediation agents. When bacteria are in fungal surface-attached biofilm mode, they are called fungal-bacterial ......Remediation measures for hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] are required for a safe environment. As a recent development in microbiology, bacterial biofilms are being studied as effective bioremediation agents. When bacteria are in fungal surface-attached biofilm mode, they are called fungal...

  7. Hexavalent chromium removal by chitosan modified-bioreduced nontronite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Li; Rengasamy, Karthikeyan

    2017-08-01

    Recent efforts have focused on structural Fe(II) in chemically or biologically reduced clay minerals to immobilize Cr(VI) from aqueous solution, but the coulombic repulsion between the negatively charged clay surface and the polyanionic form of Cr(VI), e.g., dichromate, can hinder the effectiveness of this process. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficiency and mechanism of Cr(VI) removal by a charge-reversed nontronite (NAu-2), an Fe-rich smectite. Chitosan, a linear polysaccharide derived from chitin found in soil and groundwater, was used to reverse the charge of NAu-2. Intercalation of chitosan into NAu-2 interlayer increased the basal d-spacing of NAu-2 from 1.23 nm to 1.83 nm and zeta potential from -27.17 to +34.13 mV, with the amount of increase depending on chitosan/NAu-2 ratio. Structural Fe(III) in chitosan-exchanged NAu-2 was then biologically reduced by an iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 in bicarbonate buffer with lactate as the sole electron donor, with and without electron shuttle, AQDS. Without AQDS, the extent of Fe(III) reduction increased from the lowest (∼9%) for the chitosan-free NAu-2 to the highest (∼12%) for the highest chitosan loaded NAu-2 (3:1 ratio). This enhancement of Fe(III) reduction was likely due to the attachment of negatively charged bacterial cells to charge-reversed (e.g., positively charged) NAu-2 surfaces, facilitating the electron transfer between cells and structural Fe(III). With AQDS, Fe(III) reduction extent doubled relative to those without AQDS, but the enhancement effect was similar across all chitosan loadings, suggesting that AQDS was more important than chitosan in enhancing Fe(III) bioreduction. Chitosan-exchanged, biologically reduced NAu-2 was then utilized for removing Cr(VI) in batch experiments with three consecutive spikes of 50 μM Cr. With the first Cr spike, the rate of Cr(VI) removal by charged-reversed NAu-2 that was bioreduced without and with AQDS was ∼1.5 and ∼6 μmol g-1 h-1, respectively. However, the capacity of these clays to remove Cr(VI) was progressively exhausted upon addition of subsequent Cr spikes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the reduction product of Cr(VI) by chitosan-exchanged-bioreduced NAu-2 was Cr(III), possibly in the form of Cr(OH)3. In summary, our results demonstrated that the combined effects of sorption and redox reactions by charge-reversed bioreduced nontronite may offer a feasible in-situ approach for remediating Cr(VI) polluted soil and groundwater.

  8. Removal of hexavalent chromium using chitosan prepared from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    shrimp shells and the characterization of the prepared chitosan by field emission scanning electron microscopy .... for non-conductive materials, the Nova Nano SEM is unique in .... A novel chitosan functional gel included with multiwall carbon.

  9. Microbial Reduction of Chromium from the Hexavalent to Divalent State

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    1987, 1989) and the tendency of dissolved Cr(III) to be adsorbed by organic carbon (Fukushima et al., 1995) as well as mineral surfaces (Griffin et al...Neal et al., 2002; Kalabegishvili et al., 1987, 1989) and their soluble organo complexes et al., 2003). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) mea- (Puzon... mineral chemistry has not been rigorously character- whether the Cr was concentrated as precipitates on cell sur- ized. Similar to Cr(OH) 3-nH 2 0

  10. RDT&E Progress and Plansfor Hexavalent Chromium (Cr6+)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    Inhibitors Function (Project WP-1620) Project Team – Main Performers ● Dr. Gerald S. Frankel and Dr. Rudolph G. Buchheit Fontana Corrosion Center, The...qualification ● Dr. Joseph Osborne, The Boeing Company  Co-PI, coating system integration, coating and surface prep development, Cr and Cd replacement

  11. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics; Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding Effectiveness (SE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this testing is to determine the suitability of trivalent chromium conversion coatings that meet the requirements of MIL-DTL-5541, Type II, for use in applications where high-frequency electrical performance is important. This project will evaluate the ability of coated aluminum to form adequate EMI seals. Testing will assess performance of the trivalent chromium coatings against the known control hexavalent chromium MIL-DTL-5541 Type I Class 3 before and after they have been exposed to a set of environmental conditions. Performance will be assessed by evaluating shielding effectiveness (SE) test data from a variety of test samples comprised of different aluminum types and/or conversion coatings.

  12. Over-accumulation of putrescine induced by cyclohexylamine interferes with chromium accumulation and partially restores pollen tube growth in Actinidia deliciosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoccianti, Valeria; Iacobucci, Marta; Speranza, Anna; Antognoni, Fabiana

    2013-09-01

    Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium, i.e., Cr(III) and Cr(VI), respectively, were previously demonstrated to affect in vitro germination and ultrastructure of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) pollen. In the present work, the response to chromium in germinating pollen was evaluated in terms of changes in the polyamine profile. Slight, though significant, increases in free spermidine and spermine occurred after exposure to Cr(III), while the levels remained almost unchanged after Cr(VI) treatment. The spermidine synthase inhibitor cyclohexylamine (CHA) caused a dramatic increase in free putrescine in both chromium-treated and untreated samples, while spermidine content was not affected. Interestingly, CHA positively affected the performance of chromium-treated pollen by partially, though significantly, restoring pollen tube growth. The major growth recovery was registered with 1 mM CHA in the presence of Cr(VI), concomitant with a considerable reduction in uptake of the metal. Conversely, endogenous calcium levels were more heavily affected in Cr(III)-treated pollen. The effect of CHA on production of reactive oxygen species also varied depending on the chromium species. The response of pollen to the CHA-induced putrescine excess was compared with that exerted by an exogenous supply of the same diamine. Results show that in Cr(III)-treated pollen, putrescine over-accumulation induced by CHA exerted similar effects as exogenous putrescine, while this was not true in the Cr(VI) treatment. It appears that the diamine was able to improve pollen tolerance to metal stress through different mechanisms, mostly depending upon the chromium species, namely via reduced metal uptake or by substituting for calcium.

  13. Can quinoa, a salt-tolerant Andean crop species, be used for phytoremediation of chromium-polluted soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Karina B.; Cicatelli, Angela; Guarino, Francesco; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik; Biondi, Stefania; Castiglione, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd), an ancient Andean halophytic seed crop, exhibits exceptional resistance to salinity, drought, and cold. Consistent with the notion that such a resilient plant is likely to tolerate toxic levels of heavy metals as well and could, therefore, be employed for the clean-up of polluted soil (via phytoextraction or phytostabilization), the species' ability to take up, translocate, and tolerate chromium (CrIII) was investigated in a greenhouse pot experiment. A cultivar adapted to European conditions (cv. Titicaca) was grown on soil spiked with 500 mg kg-1 DW of Cr(NO3)3•9H2O, combined (or not) with 150 mM NaCl, or on soil grown with 150 mM NaCl alone. Plants were grown up to maturity (four months after sowing), and then plant biomass and concentrations of Na, Cr, and other elements (e.g., Fe and P) were evaluated in the plant organs. Soil Cr content (total and available fractions) was analysed at the start of the experiment, one week after the last addition of Cr and/or NaCl, and at the end of the trial. No visible toxic effects were observed under the different culture conditions. Results revealed that Cr was mainly accumulated in roots, while Na+ was translocated to the aerial parts. In order to compare plant stress responses under the different treatments (Cr, NaCl, Cr+NaCl), expression levels of several stress-related genes, together with those of a potential Cr transporter, were determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR.

  14. Oxidative stress and antioxidant responses to increasing concentrations of trivalent chromium in the Andean crop species Chenopodium quinoa Willd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoccianti, Valeria; Bucchini, Anahi E; Iacobucci, Marta; Ruiz, Karina B; Biondi, Stefania

    2016-11-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd), an ancient Andean seed crop, exhibits exceptional nutritional properties and resistance to abiotic stress. The species' tolerance to heavy metals has, however, not yet been investigated nor its ability to take up and translocate chromium (Cr). This study aimed to investigate the metabolic adjustments occurring upon exposure of quinoa to several concentrations (0.01-5mM) of CrCl3. Young hydroponically grown plants were used to evaluate Cr uptake, growth, oxidative stress, and other biochemical parameters three and/or seven days after treatment. Leaves accumulated the lowest amounts of Cr, while roots and stems accumulated the most at low and at high metal concentrations, respectively. Fresh weight and photosynthetic pigments were reduced only by the higher Cr(III) doses. Substantially increased lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide, and proline levels were observed only with 5mM Cr(III). Except for a significant decrease at day 7 with 5mM Cr(III), total polyphenols and flavonoids maintained control levels in Cr(III)-treated plants, whereas antioxidant activity increased in a dose-dependent manner. Maximum polyamine accumulation was observed in 1mM CrCl3-treated plants. Even though α- and γ-tocopherols also showed enhanced levels only with the 1mM concentration, tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT, EC 2.6.1.5) activity increased under Cr(III) treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Taken together, results suggest that polyamines, tocopherols, and TAT activity could contribute to tolerance to 1mM Cr(III), but not to the highest concentration that, instead, generated oxidative stress.

  15. The risk implications of the distribution of chromium forms in environmental media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, L.A.; Petroff, D.M.; Batey, J.C. [Eckenfelder Inc., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Chromium exhibits multiple oxidation (valence) states, ranging from ({minus}2) to (+6). Under natural conditions, however, chromium typically exists in the Cr(III) (trivalent) and/or Cr(VI) (hexavalent) form, with the hexavalent form exhibiting higher solubility and much greater toxicity than the trivalent form. Due to the large differences in toxicity, the distribution of chromium oxidation states (Cr(III) and Cr(VI)) in site media is potentially of great importance to the calculation of site risk levels, and thus ultimately to cleanup activities. Despite its importance, chromium oxidation states are often not available for media samples collected at waste sites. Typical assumptions regarding the chromium distribution in site media are presented. Actual chromium distribution data from media from baseline investigations of several waste sites are also presented for groundwater, surface water, and soil and compared in terms of background chromium levels and the nature of site wastes. The differences in toxicity of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are briefly discussed. Risk estimates and risk-based cleanup levels generated using different assumptions for the distribution of chromium in site media for a selected example site are then given. These risk-based cleanup levels are compared to various state regulatory limits, MCLs, and Practical Quantitation Limits (PQLs) for chromium.

  16. New technology for comprehensive utilization of aluminum-chromium residue from chromium salts production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-bin; QI Tian-gui; JIANG Xin-min; ZHOU Qiu-sheng; LIU Gui-hua; PENG Zhi-hong; HAN Deng-lun; ZHANG Zhong-yuan; YANG Kun-shan

    2008-01-01

    Colloidal aluminum-chromium residue(ACR) was mass-produced in chromate production process, and the large energy consumption and high recovery cost existed in traditional methods of utilizing such ACR. To overcome those problems, a new comprehensive method was proposed to deal with the ACR, and was proven valid in industry. In the new process, the chromate was separated firstly from the colloidal ACR by ripening and washing with additives, by which more than 95% hexavalent chromium was recovered. The chromium-free aluminum residue(CFAR), after properly dispersed, was digested at 120-130 ℃ and more than 90% alumina can be recovered. And then the pregnant aluminate solution obtained from digestion was seeded to precipitate aluminum hydroxide. This new method can successfully recover both alumina and sodium chromate, and thus realize the comprehensive utilization of ACR from chromate industry.

  17. Hexavalent-Chrome Free Coatings Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The replacement of hexavalent chrome [Cr (VI)] in the processing of aluminum for high-reliability electronics applications in the aviation and aerospace sector...

  18. Chromium Toxicity Test for Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Using Hanford Site Groundwater: Onsite Early Life-Stage Toxicity Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, Gregory W.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Chamness, Michele A.; Abernethy, Cary S.; McKinstry, Craig A.

    2001-07-10

    The objective of this study was to evaluate site-specific effects for early life-stage (eyed eggs to free swimming juveniles) fall chinook salmon that might be exposed to hexavalent chromium from Hanford groundwater sources. Our exposure conditions included hexavalent chromium obtained from Hanford groundwater wells near the Columbia River, Columbia River water as the diluent, and locally adapted populations of fall chinook salmon. This report describes both a 96-hr pretest using rainbow trout eggs and an early life-stage test beginning with chinook salmon eggs.

  19. Biochemical Changes under Chromium Stress on Germinating Seedlings of Vigna radiata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavin SUTHAR

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalant chromium is considered the most toxic form because of its high solubility in water. Cr is known to induce production of elevated concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS resulted in macromolecule damage. Plants are having unique mechanisms to overcome ROS induced damage by accumulation of proline, ascorbate and glutathione and increasing the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione reductase (GR, and ascorbate peroxidaes (APX, peroxidise (POX. In the present investigation effects of chromium on seed germination of Mung bean (Vigna radiata 'Gujarat Mung-4’ were studied. Seeds were treated with different Cr concentrations (50, 100, 150 and 200 4M for seven days. On 7th day root and shoot length was measured and activities of antioxidant enzyme SOD, APX, POX, CAT and GR were checked along with protein, proline and lipid peroxidation. It was observed that there is gradual decrease in shoot and root length with respect to the increase in Cr concentration. Level of lipid peroxidation significantly increased along with proline and antioxidant enzyme activity at higher Cr concentration. Lipid peroxidation is an indication of membrane damage due to elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. To combat oxidative damage by ROS antioxidant enzyme activity increased significantly, which indicates that antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, APX and GR play a crucial role during Cr stress during germination of V. radiata.

  20. Isolation and characterization of a chromium-resistant bacterium Serratia sp. Cr-10 from a chromate-contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kundi; Li, Fuli [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao (China). Qingdao Inst. of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology

    2011-05-15

    A novel bacterium, Cr-10, was isolated from a chromium-contaminated site and capable of removing toxic chromium species from solution by reducing hexavalent chromium to an insoluble precipitate. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene of strain Cr-10 showed that it was most closely related to Serratia rubidaea JCM 1240{sup T} (97.68%). Physiological and chemotaxonomic data also supported that strain Cr-10 was identified as Serratia sp., a genus which was never specially reported chromate-resistant before. Serratia sp., Cr-10 was tolerant to a concentration of 1,500 mg Cr(VI) L{sup -1}, which was the highest level reported until now. The optimum pH and temperature for reduction of Cr(VI) by Serratia sp. Cr-10 were found to be 7.0 and 37 C, respectively. The Cr(VI) reduction was significantly influenced by additional carbon sources, and among them fructose and lactose offered maximum reduction, with a rate of 0.28 and 0.25 mg Cr(VI) L{sup -1} h{sup -1}, respectively. The cell-free extracts and filtrate of the culture were able to reduce Cr(VI) while concentration of total chromium remained stable in the process, indicating that the enzyme-catalyzed mechanism was applied in Cr(VI) reduction by the isolate. Additionally, it was found that there was hardly any chromium on the cell surface of the strain, further supporting that reduction, rather than bioadsorption, plays a major role in the Cr(VI) removal. (orig.)

  1. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to different chromium compounds at various valency states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutti, A.; Pedroni, C.; Arfini, G.; Franchini, I.; Minoia, C.; Micoli, G.; Baldi, C.

    1984-01-01

    Chromium concentrations in the air were measured in seven different workroom environments, where exposure to water soluble hexavalent or trivalent compounds was expected. Urinary excretion of chromium was measured before and after the same arbitrarily chosen working day. End-of-shift urinary chromium and its increase above pre-exposure levels were closely related to the concentration of water soluble chromium (VI) in the air. The values corresponding to 50 micrograms m-3 in the air, which is the current threshold limit value in most countries, were 29.8 and 12.2 micrograms g-1 of creatinine, respectively. Urinary chromium in workers exposed to water insoluble chromates or to water soluble chromic (III) sulphate was definitely higher than that observed in subjects not occupationally exposed to chromium compounds, but it cannot be recommended as short-term exposure test for evaluation of the job-related hazard.

  2. Influence of detergent washing powders on minimal eliciting patch test concentrations of nickel and chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenby, C F; Goodwin, B F

    1983-11-01

    Minimum eliciting levels of nickel have been estimated in 25 nickel-sensitive subjects, and of chromium in 14 chromium-sensitive subjects by patch tests with aqueous solutions of the respective metals. The minimum level of each metal required to provoke a patch test reaction was considerably greater than that found in fabric washing powder solutions and was in the majority of patients tested of the order of 112 ppm nickel (0.05% nickel sulphate) or 885 ppm hexavalent chromium (0.25% potassium dichromate). One nickel-sensitive subject and one chromium-sensitive subject reacted to 1 ppm of the respective metal. Fabric washing powder did not significantly alter the patch test reaction to nickel sulphate or provoke reactions in nickel- or chromium-sensitive subjects. EDTA significantly reduced the number and severity of patch test reactions to nickel sulphate but not those to potassium dichromate or trivalent chromium.

  3. Insights into synergistic effect of chromium oxides and ceria supported on Ti-PILC for NO oxidation and their surface species study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Lei; Cai, Wei; Yu, Yang; Zhong, Qin

    2015-01-01

    The insights of synergistic effect between chromium oxides and ceria supported on Ti-PILC were studied for NO oxidation. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of chromium oxides and ceria and their synergistic effect in textural properties, redox performance and surface species over the Cr1-xCex/TP catalysts. These catalysts were investigated in detail by means of Brunauer-Emmertt-Teller (BET) surface area analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), temperature-programmed reduction of H2 (H2-TPR), temperature-programmed desorption (NO-TPD, O2-TPD), photoluminescence spectra (PL), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (in situ DRIFTS). It has been found that CrOx were beneficial to adsorb and activate NO to form NO+ and then generate nitrates while ceria were inclined to activate O2 via oxygen vacancies to produce nitrates. Besides, the results of in situ DRIFTS further demonstrated that surface species were associated with not only reaction atmosphere but also reaction temperature. Hence, a possible reaction model was tentatively proposed.

  4. Isolation of Cr(Ⅵ) reducing bacteria from industrial effluents and their potential use in bioremediation of chromium containing wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed Zahoor; Abdul Rehman

    2009-01-01

    The present study is aimed at assessing the ability of Bacillus sp.JDM-2-1 and Staphylococcus capitis to reduce hexavalent chromium into its trivalent form.Bacillus sp.JDM-2-1 could tolerate Cr(Ⅵ) (4800 μg/mL) and S.capitis could tolerate Cr(Ⅵ) (2800 μg/mL).Both organisms were able to resist Cd2+ (50 μg/mL),Cu2+ (200 μg/mL),Pb2+ (800 μg/mL),Hg2+ (50 μg/mL) and Ni2+ (4000 μg/mL).S.capitis resisted Zn2+ at 700 μg/mL while Bacillus sp.JDM-2-1 only showed resistance up to 50 μg/mL.Bacillus sp.JDM-2-1 and S.capitis showed optimum growth at pH 6 and 7,respectively,while both bacteria showed optimum growth at 37℃.Bacillus sp.JDM-2-1 and S.capitis could reduce 85% and 81% of hexavalent chromium from the medium after 96 h and were also capable of reducing hexavalent chromium 86% and 89%,respectively,from the industrial effluents after 144 h.Cell free extracts of Bacillus sp.JDM-2-1 and S.capitis showed reduction of 83% and 70% at concentration of 10 μg Cr(Ⅵ)/mL,respectively.The presence of an induced protein having molecular weight around 25 kDa in the presence of chromium points out a possible role of this protein in chromium reduction.The bacterial isolates can be exploited for bioremediation of hexavalent chromium containing wastes,since they seem to have the potential to reduce the toxic hexavalent form to its nontoxic trivalent form.

  5. Monitoring the species of arsenic, chromium and nickel in milled coal, bottom ash and fly ash from a pulverized coal-fired power plant in western Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, F; Huggins, F E

    2001-02-01

    The concentration of As, Cr and Ni and their speciation (As3+;5+, Cr3+;6+ and Ni0;2+) in milled coal, bottom ash and ash collected by electrostatic precipitator (ESP) from a coal fired-power plant in western Canada were determined using HGAAS, ICP-AES and XANES. The chemical fractionation of these elements was also determined by a sequential leaching procedure, using deionized water, NH4OAC and HCI as extracting agents. The leachate was analyzed by ICP-AES. Arsenic in the milled coal is mostly associated with organic matter, and 67% of this arsenic is removed by ammonium acetate. This element is totally removed from milled coal after extraction with HCI. Arsenic occurs in both the As3+ and the As5+ oxidation states in the milled coal, while virtually all (>90%) of the arsenic in bottom ash and fly ash appears to be in the less toxic arsenate (As5+) form. Both Ni and Cr in the milled coal are extracted by HCI, indicating that water can mobilize Ni and Cr in an acidic environment. The chromium is leached by water from fly ash as a result of the high pH of the water, which is induced during the leaching. Ammonium acetate removes Ni from bottom ash through an ion exchange process. Chromium in milled coal is present entirely as Cr3+, which is an essential human trace nutrient. The Cr speciation in bottom ash is a more accentuated version of the milled coal and consists mostly of the Cr3+ species. Chromium in fly ash is mostly Cr3+, with significant contamination by stainless-steel from the installation itself.

  6. AQUIFER TESTING AND REBOUND STUDY IN SUPPORT OF THE 100-H DEEP CHROMIUM INVESTIGATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMOOT JL

    2010-11-05

    The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) second Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) 5-year review (DOEIRL-2006-20, The Second CERCLA Five-Year Review Report for the Hanford Site) set a milestone to conduct an investigation of deep hexavalent chromium contamination in the sediments of the Ringold upper mud (RUM) unit, which underlies the unconfined aquifer in the 100-H Area. The 5-year review noted that groundwater samples from one deep well extending below the aquitard (i.e., RUM) exceeded both the groundwater standard of 48 parts per billion (ppb) (Ecology Publication 94-06, Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup Statute and Regulation) and the federal drinking water standard of 100 {mu}g/L for hexavalent chromium. The extent of hexavalent chromium contamination in this zone is not well understood. Action 12-1 from the 5-year review is to perform additional characterization of the aquifer below the initial aquitard. Field characterization and aquifer testing were performed in the Hanford Site's 100-H Area to address this milestone. The aquifer tests were conducted to gather data to answer several fundamental questions regarding the presence of the hexavalent chromium in the deep sediments of the RUM and to determine the extent and magnitude of deeper contamination. The pumping tests were performed in accordance with the Description of Work for Aquifer Testing in Support of the 100-H Deep Chromium Investigation (SGW-41302). The specific objectives for the series of tests were as follows: (1) Evaluate the sustainable production of the subject wells using step-drawdown and constant-rate pumping tests. (2) Collect water-level data to evaluate the degree of hydraulic connection between the RUM and the unconfined (upper) aquifer (natural or induced along the well casing). (3) Evaluate the hydraulic properties of a confined permeable layer within the RUM.; (4) Collect time-series groundwater samples during testing to

  7. Sampling and Analysis Instruction for Evaluation of Residual Chromium Contamination in the Subsurface Soil at 100-C-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. S. Thompson

    2007-02-15

    This sampling and analysis instruction (SAI) provides the requirements for sample collection and laboratory analysis to evaluate the extent of hexavalent chromium contamination present in the soil below the 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1 remedial action waste site excavations.

  8. Insights into synergistic effect of chromium oxides and ceria supported on Ti-PILC for NO oxidation and their surface species study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Lei [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Nanjing AIREP Environmental Protection Technology Co., Ltd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210091 (China); Cai, Wei; Yu, Yang [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Nanjing AIREP Environmental Protection Technology Co., Ltd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210091 (China); Zhong, Qin, E-mail: zq304@mail.njust.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Nanjing AIREP Environmental Protection Technology Co., Ltd., Nanjing, Jiangsu 210091 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synergistic effect between CrO{sub x} and ceria supported on TP were studied for NO oxidation. • TPD results indicated NO and O{sub 2} were activated by CrO{sub x} and ceria, respectively. • H{sub 2}-TPR analysis suggested that CrO{sub x} undertook the main function in catalysis. • The nature and stability of surface-bound species were investigated by in situ DRIFTS. - Abstract: The insights of synergistic effect between chromium oxides and ceria supported on Ti-PILC were studied for NO oxidation. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of chromium oxides and ceria and their synergistic effect in textural properties, redox performance and surface species over the Cr{sub 1−x}Ce{sub x}/TP catalysts. These catalysts were investigated in detail by means of Brunauer–Emmertt–Teller (BET) surface area analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), temperature-programmed reduction of H{sub 2} (H{sub 2}-TPR), temperature-programmed desorption (NO-TPD, O{sub 2}-TPD), photoluminescence spectra (PL), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (in situ DRIFTS). It has been found that CrO{sub x} were beneficial to adsorb and activate NO to form NO{sup +} and then generate nitrates while ceria were inclined to activate O{sub 2} via oxygen vacancies to produce nitrates. Besides, the results of in situ DRIFTS further demonstrated that surface species were associated with not only reaction atmosphere but also reaction temperature. Hence, a possible reaction model was tentatively proposed.

  9. Highly integrated flow assembly for automated dynamic extraction and determination of readily bioaccessible chromium(VI) in soils exploiting carbon nanoparticle-based solid-phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosende, Maria; Miro, Manuel; Cerda, Victor [University of the Balearic Islands, Department of Chemistry, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Segundo, Marcela A.; Lima, Jose L.F.C. [University of Porto, REQUIMTE, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Porto (Portugal)

    2011-06-15

    An automated dynamic leaching test integrated in a portable flow-based setup is herein proposed for reliable determination of readily bioaccessible Cr(VI) under worst-case scenarios in soils containing varying levels of contamination. The manifold is devised to accommodate bi-directional flow extraction followed by processing of extracts via either in-line clean-up/preconcentration using multi-walled carbon nanotubes or automatic dilution at will, along with Cr(VI) derivatization and flow-through spectrophotometric detection. The magnitude of readily mobilizable Cr(VI) pools was ascertained by resorting to water extraction as promulgated by current standard leaching tests. The role of carbon nanomaterials for the uptake of Cr(VI) in soil leachates and the configuration of the packed column integrated in the flow manifold were investigated in detail. The analytical performance of the proposed system for in vitro bioaccessibility tests was evaluated in chromium-enriched soils at environmentally relevant levels and in a standard reference soil material (SRM 2701) with a certified value of total hexavalent chromium. The automated method was proven to afford unbiased assessment of water-soluble Cr(VI) in soils as a result of the minimization of the chromium species transformation. By combination of the kinetic leaching profile and a first-order leaching model, the water-soluble Cr(VI) fraction in soils was determined in merely 6 h against >24 h taken in batchwise steady-state standard methods. (orig.)

  10. Simultaneous determination of dissolved inorganic chromium species in wastewater/natural waters by surfactant sensitized catalytic kinetic spectrophotometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Gürkan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple, rapid, highly accurate and sensitive kinetic method is proposed for determining chromium(VI. The method is based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of Celestine blue (CB+ by H2O2 in the presence of 2,2′-bipyridyl (Bipyr and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC at pH 6.50. The reaction was monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the absorbance of indicator dye at 645 nm. The analytical variables, which have influences on the sensitivity, were investigated and the optimum conditions were established. The optimized conditions made it possible to determine and speciate chromium in a linear range of 5–200 μg L−1 with a detection limit of 0.65 μg L−1. The recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSDs for the determination of 10, 25, 75 and 150 μg L−1 Cr(VI (n: 5 were in the range of 99.0–99.8% and 0.2–3.5%, respectively. The selectivity was also studied and greatly enhanced by adding a suitable masking mixture. The method was successfully applied to the simultaneous analysis of Cr(III and Cr(VI in natural water and waste water samples with a recovery changing in the range of 95–103% for Cr(III and 100–104% for Cr(VI. Its accuracy was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials with good agreement between certified and found values.

  11. Maximum availability and mineralogical control of chromium released from AOD slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junguo; Liu, Bao; Zeng, Yanan; Wang, Ziming; Gao, Zhiyuan

    2017-03-01

    AOD (argon oxygen decarburization) slag is the by-product in the stainless steel refining process. Chromium existing in AOD slag can leach out and probably poses a serious threat to the environment. To assess the leaching toxicity of chromium released from AOD slag, the temperature-dependent maximum availability leaching test was performed. To determine the controlling mineralogical phases of chromium released from AOD slag, a Visual MINTEQ simulation was established based on Vminteq30 and the FactSage 7.0 database. The leaching tests indicated that the leaching availability of chromium was slight and mainly consisted of trivalent chromium. Aging of AOD slag under the atmosphere can oxidize trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium, which could be leached out by rainwater. According to the simulation, the chromium concentration in leachates was controlled by the freely soluble pseudo-binary phases in the pH = 7.0 leaching process and controlled by the Cr2O3 phase in the pH = 4.0 leaching process. Chromium concentrations were underestimated when the controlling phases were determined to be FeCr2O4 and MgCr2O4. Facilitating the generation of the insoluble spinel-like phases during the cooling and disposal process of the molten slag could be an effective approach to decreasing the leaching concentration of chromium and its environmental risk.

  12. Speciation of arsenic, selenium, and chromium in wildfire impacted soils and ashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Ruth E.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Hageman, Philip L.; Morman, Suzette A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    In 2007-09, California experienced several large wildfires that damaged large areas of forest and destroyed many homes and buildings. The U.S. Geological Survey collected samples from the Harris, Witch, Grass Valley, Ammo, Santiago, Canyon, Jesusita, and Station fires for testing to identify any possible characteristics of the ashes and soils from burned areas that may be of concern for their impact on water quality, human health, and endangered species. The samples were subjected to analysis for bulk chemical composition for 44 elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after acid digestion and de-ionized water leach tests for pH, alkalinity, conductivity, and anions. Water leach tests generated solutions ranging from pH 10-12, suggesting that ashes can generate caustic alkalinity in contact with rainwater or body fluids (for example, sweat and fluids in the respiratory tract). Samples from burned residential areas in the 2007 fires had elevated levels for several metals, including: As, Pb, Sb, Cu, Zn, and Cr. In some cases, the levels found were above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) preliminary remediation goals (PRG) for soils. Speciation analyses were conducted on de-ionized water and simulated lung fluid leachates for As(III), As(V), Se(IV), Se(VI), Cr(III), and Cr(VI). All species were determined in the same analytical run using an ion-pairing HPLC-ICP-MS method. For leachates containing high levels of total Cr, the majority of the chromium was present in the hexavalent, Cr(VI), form. Higher total and hexavalent chromium levels were observed for samples collected from burned residential areas. Arsenic was also generally present in the more oxidized, As(V), form. Selenium (IV) and (VI) were present, but typically at levels below 2 ppb for most samples. Stability studies of leachate solutions under different storage conditions were performed and the suitability of different sample preservation methods for speciation

  13. Hexavalent Americium Recovery Using Copper(III) Periodate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, Kevin; Brigham, Derek M.; Morrison, Samuel; Braley, Jenifer C.

    2016-11-21

    Separation of americium from the lanthanides is considered one of the most difficult separation steps in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. One approach to this separation could involve oxidizing americium to the hexavalent state to form a linear dioxo cation while the lanthanides remain as trivalent ions. This work considers aqueous soluble Cu3+ periodate as an oxidant under molar nitric acid conditions to separate hexavalent Am with diamyl amylphosphonate (DAAP) in n-dodecane. Initial studies assessed the kinetics of Cu3+ periodate auto-reduction in acidic media to aid in development of the solvent extraction system. Following characterization of the Cu3+ periodate oxidant, solvent extraction studies optimized the recovery of Am from varied nitric acid media and in the presence of other fission product, or fission product surrogate, species. Short aqueous/organic contact times encouraged successful recovery of Am (distribution values as high as 2) from nitric acid media in the absence of redox active fission products. In the presence of a post-PUREX simulant aqueous feed, precipitation of tetravalent species (Ce, Ru, Zr) occurred and the distribution values of 241Am were suppressed, suggesting some oxidizing capacity of the Cu3+ periodate is significantly consumed by other redox active metals in the simulant. The manuscript demonstrates Cu3+ periodate as a potentially viable oxidant for Am oxidation and recovery and notes the consumption of oxidizing capacity observed in the presence of the post-PUREX simulant feed will need to be addressed for any approach seeking to oxidize Am for separations relevant to the nuclear fuel cycle.

  14. Laboratory scale studies on removal of chromium from industrial wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chromium being one of the major toxic pollutants is discharged from electroplating and chrome tanning processes and is also found in the effluents of dyes, paint pigments, manufacturing units etc. Chromium exists in aqueous systems in both trivalent (Cr 3+) and hexavalent (Cr 6+) forms. The hexavalent form is carcinogenic and toxic to aquatic life, whereas Cr3+ is however comparatively less toxic. This study was undertaken to investigate the total chromium removal from industrial effluents by chemical means in order to achieve the Pakistan NEQS level of 1 mg/L by the methods of reduction and precipitation. The study was conducted in four phases.In phase I, the optimum pH and cost effective reducing agent among the four popular commercial chemicals was selected. As a result, pH of 2 was found to be most suitable and sodium meta bisulfate was found to be the most cost effective reducing agent respectively. Phase II showed that lower dose of sodium meta bisulfate was sufficient to obtain 100 % efficiency in reducing Cr6+ to Cr3+, and it was noted that reaction time had no significance in the whole process. A design curve for reduction process was established which can act as a tool for treatment of industrial effluents.Phase III studies indicated the best pH was 8.5 for precipitation of Cr 3+ to chromium hydroxide by using lime. An efficiency of 100 % was achievable and a settling time of 30 minutes produced clear effluent. Finally in Phase IV actual waste samples from chrome tanning and electroplating industries, when precipitated at pH of 12 gave 100 % efficiency at a settling time of 30 minutes and confirmed that chemical means of reduction and precipitation is a feasible and viable solution for treating chromium wastes from industries.

  15. Chromium(III) -- chromium(VI) interconversions in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijden, C.H. van der; Reith, M.

    1982-01-01

    The stable form of dissolved chromium in oxygenated seawater is Cr(VI). But Cr(III)-species are also present at an analytically significant level. It is shown that Cr(III) is oxidized only slowly by dissolved oxygen, and that manganese oxide is a strong catalyst for such oxidation. However, the low

  16. Microbial interactions with chromium: basic biological processes and applications in environmental biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Corona, J F; Romo-Rodríguez, P; Santos-Escobar, F; Espino-Saldaña, A E; Hernández-Escoto, H

    2016-12-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a highly toxic metal for microorganisms as well as plants and animal cells. Due to its widespread industrial use, Cr has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The hexavalent form of the metal, Cr(VI), is considered a more toxic species than the relatively innocuous and less mobile Cr(III) form. The study of the interactions between microorganisms and Cr has been helpful to unravel the mechanisms allowing organisms to survive in the presence of high concentrations of Cr(VI) and to detoxify and remove the oxyanion. Various mechanisms of interactions with Cr have been identified in diverse species of bacteria and fungi, including biosorption, bioaccumulation, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), and chromate efflux. Some of these systems have been proposed as potential biotechnological tools for the bioremediation of Cr pollution using bioreactors or by in situ treatments. In this review, the interactions of microorganisms with Cr are summarised, emphasising the importance of new research avenues using advanced methodologies, including proteomic, transcriptomic, and metabolomic analyses, as well as the use of techniques based on X-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  17. Effect of chromium on the fatty acid composition of two strains of Euglena gracilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocchetta, Iara [Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biologia Experimental, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: rocchetta@bg.fcen.uba.ar; Mazzuca, Marcia [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad de Patagonia, Comodoro Rivadavia, Chubut (Argentina); Conforti, Visitacion [Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biologia Experimental, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ruiz, Laura [Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biologia Experimental, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Balzaretti, Vilma [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad de Patagonia, Comodoro Rivadavia, Chubut (Argentina); Rios de Molina, Maria del Carmen [Departamento de Quimica Biologica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pab. II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2006-05-15

    The effect of hexavalent chromium on fatty acid composition was studied in two strains of Euglena gracilis; UTEX 753 (from the Culture Collection of Algae of Texas University, USA) and MAT (isolated from a highly polluted River). Both were grown in photoauxotrophic and photoheterotrophic conditions and exposed to two metal concentrations, one below and one above IC{sub 5}. The high malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (3 to 7-fold) obtained with chromium concentration above IC{sub 5}, suggested the existence of metal-induced lipid peroxidation. Total lipid content increased only with concentration below IC{sub 5}, whereas it was inhibited by higher metal concentration. Photoheterotrophic control strains exhibited a significantly higher proportion of saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Polyunsaturated acids were most affected by chromium, especially those related to chloroplast structures. Ultra-structure studies showed clear thylakoid disorganization in all treated cells. The results indicate that hexavalent chromium affects levels of fatty acids, especially those related to photosynthetic activity. - Fatty acid evaluation in the presence of chromium in Euglena gracilis grown in different culture conditions.

  18. Chromium Salen Mediated Alkene Epoxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Norrby, Per-Ola; Daly, Adrian M.;

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of alkene epoxidation by chromium(v) oxo salen complexes has been studied by DFT and experimental methods. The reaction is compared to the closely related Mn-catalyzed process in an attempt to understand the dramatic difference in selectivity between the two systems. Overall......, the studies show that the reactions have many similarities, but also a few critical differences. In agreement with experiment, the chromium system requires a change from low- to high-spin in the catalytic cycle, whereas the manganese system can proceed either with spin inversion or entirely on the high......-spin surface. The low-spin addition of metal oxo species to an alkene leads to an intermediate which forms epoxide either with a barrier on the low-spin surface or without a barrier after spin inversion. Supporting evidence for this intermediate was obtained by using vinylcyclopropane traps. The chromium...

  19. Predictive approach for simultaneous biosorption of hexavalent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-04

    Jul 4, 2011 ... Key words: Bacillus cereus, Biosorption, Chromium, Heavy metals, Pentachlorophenol. ..... walls are negatively charged under acidic pH conditions and the cell wall ... high affinity for metal ions in solution (Collins and Stotzky,.

  20. The effectiveness of Mendong plant (Fimbrystilis globulosa as a phytoremediator of soil contaminated with chromium of industrial waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pungky Ferina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The textile industry produces sideline output in the form of dangerous waste. The textile industrial waste containing heavy metal, one of which is Chromium (Cr.  Chromium is very dangerous metal for environment, especially chromium hexavalent that has properties of soluble, carcinogenic, and toxic. The pollution of chromium in soil is a problem that the action to be taken with the technology of bioremediation. Phytoremediation of soil contaminated with chromium using Mendong plant (Fimbrystilis globulosa, combined with association of microorganisms Agrobacterium sp I3 and compost. This study was conducted in field experiment plots using a completely randomized block design. Data were analyzed using Anova followed by Duncan and correlation tests. The results showed that the Mendong plant was an effective phytoremediator of soil contaminated with chromium and it can be used as a chromium accumulator plant. The highest decrease of soil chromium content of 58.39% was observed on the combined artificial fertilizer, Agrobacterium sp I3 and Mendong plant treatment (P1B1T1. Removal effectiveness of chromium at the treatments using Mendong plant was higher than without the Mendong plant. Chromium uptake in shoots was higher than in roots of Mendong plant. Bioremediation increased the total bacterial colonies, decreased soil pH, and increased cation exchange capacity of the soil. The growth of the Mendong plant was in a good condition during the process of bioremediation.

  1. Removal of chromium from synthetic plating waste by zero-valent iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Saumyen; Bhargava, Puja

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential of zero-valent iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) for reduction and removal of chromium from synthetic electroplating waste. The zero-valent iron shows promising results as a reductant of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) to trivalent chromium (Cr+3), capable of 100% reduction. The required iron concentration was a function of chromium concentration in the waste stream. Removal of Cr+3 by adsorption or precipitation on iron leads to complete removal of chromium from the waste and was a slower process than the reduction of Cr+6. Presence SRB in a completely mixed batch reactor inhibited the reduction of Cr+6. In a fixed-bed column reactor, SRB enhanced chromium removal and showed promising results for the treatment of wastes with low chromium concentrations. It is proposed that, for waste with high chromium concentration, zero-valent iron is an efficient reductant and can be used for reduction of Cr+6. For low chromium concentrations, a SRB augmented zero-valent iron and sand column is capable of removing chromium completely.

  2. Noncarcinogenic effects of chromium: Update to health-assessment document. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victery, W.; Lee, S.D.; Mushak, P.; Piscator, M.

    1990-04-01

    The document updates the 1984 Health Assessment Document for Chromium by addressing issues regarding noncarcinogenic health effects of chromium: oxidation states and persistence of these states in the environment, sampling and analytical methodology to differentiate these oxidation states and amounts at submicrogram ambient air levels, the degree of human exposure to chromium in the environment, both short-term and long-term, in vivo reduction of Cr (VI) to Cr (III), and effects from environmentally relevant levels on pulmonary function and renal function. Trivalent chromium is chemically stable; Cr (VI) is readily reduced to Cr (III). Oxidation state of chromium in ambient air depends on proximity to sources emitting one form over the other. Reliable monitoring methods to speciate oxidation states at ambient air levels below 1 microgram/cu m are not available. Ambient levels of total chromium (obtained from EPA's National Air Data Branch) range from a high of 0.6 microgram/cu m to below the detection limit of 0.005 microgram/cu m. Reduction of hexavalent chromium in vivo occurs in several organ systems and therefore, small amounts of inhaled Cr (VI) will be reduced before systemic absorption can occur. Trivalent chromium is an essential trace metal which potentiates actions of insulin-mediated glucose transport.

  3. Distribution of soluble and precipitated iron and chromium products generated by anodic dissolution of 316L stainless steel and alloy C-22: final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estill, J; Farmer, J; Gordon, S; King, K; Logotetta, L; Silberman, D

    1999-08-11

    At near neutral pH and at applied potentials above the threshold potential for localized breakdown of the passive film, virtually all of the dissolved chromium appeared to be in the hexavalent oxidation state (Cr(VI)). In acidic environments, such as crevice solutions formed during the crevice corrosion of 316L and C-22 samples in 4 M NaCl, virtually all of the dissolved chromium appeared to be in the trivalent oxidation state (Cr(III)). These general observations appear to be consistent with the Pourbaix diagram for chromium (Pourbaix 1974), pp. 307-321. At high pH and high anodic polarization (pH {approximately} 8 and 800 mV vs. SHE), the predominate species is believed to be the soluble chromate anion (CrO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}). At the same pH, but lower polarization (pH {approximately} 8 and 0 mV vs. SHE), the predominate species are believed to be precipitates such as trivalent Cr(OH){sub 3} {center_dot} n(H{sub 2}O) and hexavalent Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In acidified environments such as those found in crevices (pH < 3), soluble Cr{sup 3+} is expected to form over a wide range of potential extending from 400 mV vs. SHE to approximately 1200 mV vs. SHE. Again, this is consistent with the observations from the creviced samples. In earlier studies by the principal investigator, it has been found that low-level chromium contamination in ground water is usually in the hexavalent oxidation state (Farmer et al. 1996). In general, dissolved iron measured during the crevice experiments appears to be Fe(II) in acidic media and Fe(III) in near-neutral and alkaline solutions (table 3). In the case of cyclic polarization measurements, the dissolved iron measured at the end of some cyclic polarization measurements with C-22 appeared to be in the Fe(III) state. This is probably due to the high electrochemical potential at which these species were generated during the potential scan. Note that the reversal potential was approximately 1200 mV vs. Ag/AgCl during these scans. These

  4. Biosorption of aqueous chromium(VI) by Tamarindus indica seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, G S; Bhuptawat, Hitendra Kumar; Chaudhari, Sanjeev

    2006-05-01

    The effectiveness of low cost agro-based materials namely, Tamarindus indica seed (TS), crushed coconut shell (CS), almond shell (AS), ground nut shell (GS) and walnut shell (WS) were evaluated for Cr(VI) removal. Batch test indicated that hexavalent chromium sorption capacity (q(e)) followed the sequence q(e)(TS) > q(e)(WS) > q(e)(AS) > q(e)(GS) > q(e)(CS). Due to high sorptive capacity, tamarind seed was selected for detailed sorption studies. Sorption kinetic data followed first order reversible kinetic fit model for all the sorbents. The equilibrium conditions were achieved within 150 min under the mixing conditions employed. Sorption equilibria exhibited better fit to Freundlich isotherms (R>0.92) than Langmuir isotherm (R approximately = 0.87). Hexavalent chromium sorption by TS decreased with increase in pH, and slightly reduced with increase in ionic strength. Cr(VI) removal by TS seems to be mainly by chemisorption. Desorption of Cr(VI) from Cr(VI) laden TS was quite less by distilled water and HCl. Whereas with NaOH, maximum desorption achieved was about 15.3%. When TS was used in downflow column mode, Cr(VI) removal was quite good but head loss increased as the run progressed and was stopped after 200 h.

  5. Chromium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    The best source of chromium is brewer's yeast. However, many people do not use brewer's yeast because it causes bloating ( abdominal distention ) and nausea . Other good sources of chromium include ...

  6. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dheeba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zea mays (maize and Vigna radiata (green gram are found to be the chromium (Cr tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and different fertilizer amendments and the yield of both plants were affected by Cr. We conclude that metal accumulation of seeds of green gram was higher than corn and the application of single fertilizer either farm yard manure (FYM or nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium (NPK enhances the growth and yield of both the tolerant and sensitive plants in the mixed crop cultivations.

  7. Oxidising alternative species to chromium VI in zinc-galvanised steel surface treatment. Part 2. An electrochemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, E. [Inst. Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial, Lisbon (Portugal); Fedrizzi, L. [Material Engineering Department, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Diamantinio, T.C. [Inst. Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial, Lisbon (Portugal)]|[Instituto do Ambiente e Vida, Departamento de Zoologia, Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal)

    1998-06-05

    In the first part of this work, the authors present the main results and conclusions of a morphological and chemical study carried out on zinc conversion layers (ZCLs) obtained with oxidising alternative passivation baths, that includes molybdates, permanganates, vanadates and tungstates. A good chromate-based bath was used as reference. In this second part of the work, the authors present the main results obtained on selected zinc conversion layers (ZCLs), using a.c. electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results obtained were correlated with the morphological and chemical data obtained with the same ZCLs in the first part of this work. Finally, it is concluded that the alternative ZCLs studied, does not seem to be as efficient as that obtained with a chromate-based passivation bath used as reference. It is believed that a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the ZCL`s formation, can be useful for studying, in the very near future, possible synergetic effects between molybdates and other chemical species. (orig.) 24 refs.

  8. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-c

  9. Microbial biotechnology for remediation of aquatic habitats polluted with chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Coşier

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromium may occur in nine different forms of oxidation ranging from ?II to +VI, with forms II, III and VI as the most commonly encountered. In Cluj county, chromium pollution dates well back in time and has caused important dysfunction to the mechanical-biological wastewater purification station of the city of Cluj (Coşier & Diţă 1996. The purpose of this study was to develop one microbial method able to reduce hexavalent chromium (mobile, permeable to cell membrane, carcinogenic and mutagenic (Ishikawa et al 1994 to the trivalent form (insoluble and an essential element for humans (Song et al 2006. Different sources of chromium-reducing bacteria and many sources of carbon and energy added to the Kvasnikov mineral basal medium (Komori et al 1990 with increasing amount of chromate (200- 1000 mg/l were tested. Two bacterial strains, able to reduce even 1000 mg chromate/l, were isolated in pure culture. For one of these bacterial strains, we determined the optimum conditions for the reduction of Cr (VI.

  10. Solid waste removes toxic liquid waste: adsorption of chromium(VI) by iron complexed protein waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, Nishtar Nishad; Aravindhan, Rathinam; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2005-04-15

    The leather processing industry generates huge amounts of wastes, both in solid and liquid form. Fleshing from animal hides/skins is one such waste that is high in protein content. In this study, raw fleshing has been complexed with iron and is used for removal of chromium(VI). The effect of pH and the initial concentration of chromium(VI) on the removal of Cr(IV) by iron treated fleshing is presented. Iron treatment is shown to greatly improve adsorption of the fleshing for hexavalent chromium. The ultimate adsorption capacity of iron treated fleshing is 51 mg of chromium(VI) per gram of fleshing. That of untreated fleshing is 9 mg/g such that iron treatment increases the adsorption capacity of fleshing by 10-fold. The measured adsorption kinetics is well described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The uptake of chromium(VI) by fleshing is best described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) studies show that the iron is incorporated into the protein matrix. Shifts in XPS spectra suggest that dichromate binding occurs with iron at active adsorption sites and that iron treated fleshing removes chromium(VI) without reducing it to chromium(III).

  11. Effect of chromium oxide (III) nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species and photosystem II activity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Cristina Henning da [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Perreault, François [School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-3005 (United States); Oukarroum, Abdallah [Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec in Montréal, 2101, Jeanne Mance Street, Station Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H2X 2J6 (Canada); Melegari, Sílvia Pedroso [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Center of Marine Studies, Federal University of Parana, Beira-mar Avenue, 83255-976, Pontal do Parana, PR (Brazil); Popovic, Radovan [Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec in Montréal, 2101, Jeanne Mance Street, Station Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H2X 2J6 (Canada); Matias, William Gerson, E-mail: william.g.matias@ufsc.br [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    With the growth of nanotechnology and widespread use of nanomaterials, there is an increasing risk of environmental contamination by nanomaterials. However, the potential implications of such environmental contamination are hard to evaluate since the toxicity of nanomaterials if often not well characterized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of a chromium-based nanoparticle, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP, used in a wide diversity of industrial processes and commercial products, on the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The deleterious impacts of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP were characterized using cell density measurements, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), esterase enzymes activity, and photosystem II electron transport as indicators of toxicity. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP exposure inhibited culture growth and significantly lowered cellular Chlorophyll a content. From cell density measurements, EC50 values of 2.05 ± 0.20 and 1.35 ± 0.06 g L{sup −1} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP were obtained after 24 and 72 h of exposure, respectively. In addition, ROS levels were increased to 160.24 ± 2.47% and 59.91 ± 0.15% of the control value after 24 and 72 h of exposition to 10 g L{sup −1} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP. At 24 h of exposure, the esterase activity increased to 160.24% of control value, revealing a modification of the short-term metabolic response of algae to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP exposure. In conclusion, the metabolism of C. reinhardtii was the most sensitive to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP after 24 h of treatment. - Highlights: • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles are unstable and form large aggregates in the medium. • EC50 for growth inhibition of C. reinhardtii is 1.35 g L{sup −1} at 72 h. • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles increase ROS levels at 10 g L{sup −1}. • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles affect photosynthetic electron transport.

  12. Chromium Isotopes Record Fluctuations in Precambrian Biospheric Oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, R.; Gaucher, C.; Poulton, S. W.; Canfield, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    There is a direct relationship between life, oxygen, and the surface chemistry of the Earth. Geochemical data suggest that oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two broad steps, near the beginning and the end of the Proterozoic Eon (2500 to 542 million years ago), but the details of this history are unclear. The geochemical behaviour of chromium (Cr) is highly sensitive to the redox state of the surface environment as oxidative weathering processes produce the oxidised hexavalent [Cr(VI)] form. Oxidation of reduced trivaltent [Cr(III)] chromium on land is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation, leading to enrichment of the mobile hexavalent form in the heavier isotope. The fractionated Cr isotope signature is then tranfered by riverine transport to the sea. Here, we use Cr stable isotopes from banded iron formations (BIFs) to track the presence of Cr(VI) in Precambrian oceans, providing a time-resolved picture of the oxygenation history of Earth’s atmosphere-hydrosphere system. Fractionated Cr isotopes indicate the accumulation of Cr(VI) in ocean surface waters ~2.8 to 2.6 billion years (Gyr) ago and a likely transient elevation in atmospheric and surface ocean oxygen prior to the first great rise of oxygen 2.45-2.2 Gyr ago (the Great Oxidation Event; GOE). In contrast, Cr isotopes in ~1.88 Gyr old BIFs are not fractionated, indicating a major decline in atmospheric oxygen and demonstrating that the GOE did not lead to a unidirectional stepwise increase in atmospheric oxygen. In the late Neoproterozoic, ~800 to 542 million years (Myr) ago, we observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (δ53Cr up to +4.9 ‰) providing independent support for increased surface oxygenation at this time. This may have stimulated rapid evolution of macroscopic multicellular life. Our chromium isotope data thus provide new insights into the oxygenation history of the Earth, and highlight its use as a powerful redox tracer in aquatic systems.

  13. Mechanistic insight into chromium(VI) reduction by oxalic acid in the presence of manganese(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrobel, Katarzyna; Corrales Escobosa, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez Ibarra, Alan Alexander; Mendez Garcia, Manuel; Yanez Barrientos, Eunice; Wrobel, Kazimierz, E-mail: kazimier@ugto.mx

    2015-12-30

    Over the past few decades, reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) has been studied in many physicochemical contexts. In this research, we reveal the mechanism underlying the favorable effect of Mn(II) observed during Cr(VI) reduction by oxalic acid using liquid chromatography with spectrophotometric diode array detector (HPLC–DAD), nitrogen microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometry (HPLC–MP-AES), and high resolution mass spectrometry (ESI–QTOFMS). Both reaction mixtures contained potassium dichromate (0.67 mM Cr(VI)) and oxalic acid (13.3 mM), pH 3, one reaction mixture contained manganese sulfate (0.33 mM Mn(II)). In the absence of Mn(II) only trace amounts of reaction intermediates were generated, most likely in the following pathways: (1) Cr(VI) → Cr(IV) and (2) Cr(VI) + Cr(IV) → 2Cr(V). In the presence of Mn(II), the active reducing species appeared to be Mn(II) bis-oxalato complex (J); the proposed reaction mechanism involves a one-electron transfer from J to any chromium compound containing Cr=O bond, which is reduced to Cr−OH, and the generation of Mn(III) bis-oxalato complex (K). Conversion of K to J was observed, confirming the catalytic role of Mn(II). Since no additional acidification was required, the results obtained in this study may be helpful in designing a new, environmentally friendly strategy for the remediation of environments contaminated with Cr(VI).

  14. TREATABILITY TEST REPORT FOR THE REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM FROM GROUNDWATER AT 100-D AREA USING ELECTROCOAGULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-09-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to accelerate cleanup of contaminated groundwater along the Columbia River. The current treatment approach was driven by a series of Interim Action Records of Decision (IAROD) issued in the mid-1990s. Part of the approach for acceleration involves increasing the rate of groundwater extraction for the chromium plume north of the 100-D Reactor and injecting the treated water in strategic locations to hydraulically direct contaminated groundwater toward the extraction wells. The current treatment system uses ion exchange for Cr(VI) removal, with off-site regeneration of the ion exchange resins. Higher flow rates will increase the cost and frequency of ion exchange resin regeneration; therefore, alternative technologies are being considered for treatment at high flow rates. One of these technologies, electrocoagulation (EC), was evaluated through a pilot-scale treatability test. The primary purpose of the treatability study was to determine the effectiveness of Cr(VI) removal and the robustness/implementability of an EC system. Secondary purposes of the study were to gather information about derivative wastes and to obtain data applicable to scaling the process from the treatability scale to full-scale. The treatability study work plan identified a performance objective and four operational objectives. The performance objective for the treatability study was to determine the efficiency (effectiveness) of hexavalent chromium removal from the groundwater, with a desired concentration of {le} 20 micrograms per liter ({micro}g/L) Cr(VI) in the effluent prior to re-injection. Influent and effluent total chromium and hexavalent chromium data were collected using a field test kit for multiple samples per week, and from off-site laboratory analysis of samples collected approximately monthly. These data met all data quality requirements. Two of three effluent chromium samples analyzed in the off-site (that is, fixed) laboratory

  15. Reductive activation with cysteine represents a chromium(III)-dependent pathway in the induction of genotoxicity by carcinogenic chromium(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitkovich, Anatoly; Quievryn, George; Messer, Joseph; Motylevich, Zhanna

    2002-10-01

    Induction of DNA damage by carcinogenic hexavalent chromium compounds [Cr(VI)] results from its reduction to lower oxidation states. Reductive metabolism of Cr(VI) generates intermediate Cr(V/IV)species, organic radicals, and finally Cr(III), which forms stable complexes with many biological ligands, including DNA. To determine the biological significance of different reaction products, we examined genotoxic responses and the formation of DNA damage during reduction of Cr(VI) by its biological reducer, cysteine. We have found that cysteine-dependent activation of Cr(VI) led to the formation of Cr-DNA and cysteine-Cr-DNA adducts as well as interstrand DNA cross-links. The yield of binary and ternary DNA adducts was relatively constant at different concentrations of Cr(VI) and averaged approximately 54 and 45%, respectively. Interstrand DNA cross-links accounted on average for 1% of adducts, and their yield was even less significant at low Cr(VI) concentrations. Reduction of Cr(VI) in several commonly used buffers did not induce detectable damage to the sugar-phosphate backbone of DNA. Replication of Cr(VI)-modified plasmids in intact human fibroblasts has shown that cysteine-dependent metabolism of Cr(VI) resulted in the formation of mutagenic and replication-blocking DNA lesions. Selective elimination of Cr-DNA adducts from Cr(VI)-treated plasmids abolished all genotoxic responses, indicating that nonoxidative, Cr(III)-dependent reactions were responsible for the induction of both mutagenicity and replication blockage by Cr(VI). The demonstration of the mutagenic potential of Cr-DNA adducts suggests that these lesions can be explored in the development of specific and mechanistically important biomarkers of exposure to toxic forms of Cr.

  16. GSDO Program Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives: Final Pretreatments Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chrome free pretreatments should be considered for use on Ground Support Equipment (OSE) and Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EOSE). Both of the hexavalent chrome free pretreatments (Metalast TCP HF and SurTec 650C) evaluated by this project met, and in some instances exceeded, the requirements ofMIL-DTL-5541 "Chemical Conversion Coatings on Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys". For DC resistance measurements, both Metalast TCP HF and SurTec (!50C met initial requirements following assembly and in many cases continued to maintain passing readings for the duration of testing.

  17. A novel cloud point extraction approach using cationic surfactant for the separation and pre-concentration of chromium species in natural water prior to ICP-DRC-MS determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeravali, Noorbasha N; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen

    2009-11-15

    A novel cloud point phase separation of cationic surfactant, Aliquat-336 and capabilities of its reactive solubilizing sites for selective extraction of chromium species at ultra trace levels was examined in natural water. The phase separation behavior of Aliquat-336 is studied with various additives. The nonionic surfactant, Triton X-114 was found to induce the cloud point phase separation of Aliquat-336. The separation of anionic Cr(VI) was enabled by the formation of ion associate with quaternary ammonium head group of Aliquat-336 at pH 2, and the recovery of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) were 101.4+/-1.4% and 2.2+/-0.4%, respectively at 0.5-1 ng mL(-1), Total Cr was pre-concentrated as Cr-APDC species using the hydrophobic tail group at pH 6.5. The Cr(III) concentration was obtained by subtracting Cr(VI) from total Cr. The recovery of total Cr was 99.5+/-1.2%. Parameters affecting extraction were assessed. The procedure was applied to NIST 1643c and NIST 1643d waters, and the sum of individual species obtained was compared with the certified chromium values. The method was also applied to various natural waters with limits of detection and pre-concentration factor of 0.010 and 0.025 ng mL(-1); 10 and 10, respectively, for Cr(VI) and Cr(III)-APDC using ICP-MS operated in DRC mode.

  18. Fluctuations in Precambrian atmospheric oxygenation recorded by chromium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Robert; Gaucher, Claudio; Poulton, Simon W.; Canfield, Don E.

    2009-09-01

    Geochemical data suggest that oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two broad steps. The first rise in atmospheric oxygen is thought to have occurred between ~2.45 and 2.2Gyr ago, leading to a significant increase in atmospheric oxygen concentrations and concomitant oxygenation of the shallow surface ocean. The second increase in atmospheric oxygen appears to have taken place in distinct stages during the late Neoproterozoic era (~800-542Myr ago), ultimately leading to oxygenation of the deep ocean ~580Myr ago, but details of the evolution of atmospheric oxygenation remain uncertain. Here we use chromium (Cr) stable isotopes from banded iron formations (BIFs) to track the presence of Cr(VI) in Precambrian oceans, providing a time-resolved picture of the oxygenation history of the Earth's atmosphere-hydrosphere system. The geochemical behaviour of Cr is highly sensitive to the redox state of the surface environment because oxidative weathering processes produce the oxidized hexavalent [Cr(VI)] form. Oxidation of reduced trivalent [Cr(III)] chromium on land is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation, leading to enrichment of the mobile hexavalent form in the heavier isotope. Our fractionated Cr isotope data indicate the accumulation of Cr(VI) in ocean surface waters ~2.8 to 2.6Gyr ago and a likely transient elevation in atmospheric and surface ocean oxygenation before the first great rise of oxygen 2.45-2.2Gyr ago (the Great Oxidation Event). In ~1.88-Gyr-old BIFs we find that Cr isotopes are not fractionated, indicating a decline in atmospheric oxygen. Our findings suggest that the Great Oxidation Event did not lead to a unidirectional stepwise increase in atmospheric oxygen. In the late Neoproterozoic, we observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (δ53Cr up to +4.9‰), providing independent support for increased surface oxygenation at that time, which may have stimulated rapid evolution of macroscopic multicellular life.

  19. Effective bioleaching of chromium in tannery sludge with an enriched sulfur-oxidizing bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jing; Gou, Min; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Guo-Ying; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Kida, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a sulfur-oxidizing community was enriched from activated sludge generated in tannery wastewater treatment plants. Bioleaching of tannery sludge containing 0.9-1.2% chromium was investigated to evaluate the effectiveness of the enriched community, the effect of chromium binding forms on bioleaching efficiency, and the dominant microbes contributing to chromium bioleaching. Sludge samples inoculated with the enriched community presented 79.9-96.8% of chromium leaching efficiencies, much higher than those without the enriched community. High bioleaching efficiencies of over 95% were achieved for chromium in reducible fraction, while 60.9-97.9% were observed for chromium in oxidizable and residual fractions. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, the predominant bacteria in the enriched community, played an important role in bioleaching, whereas some indigenous heterotrophic species in sludge might have had a supporting role. The results indicated that A. thiooxidans-dominant enriched microbial community had high chromium bioleaching efficiency, and chromium binding forms affected the bioleaching performance.

  20. Dissociation of Hexavalent Chromium from Sanded Paint Particles into a Simulated Lung Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIV OF HEALTH SCIENC REPORT NUMBER C104-1857 9. SPONSORING...12 2.4.4 Paint M atrix ................................................................................. 13 2.5 Health Effects...A., & Hill, R. L. (1977). Purification,Composition, Molecular Weight and subunit structure of ovine submaxillary Mucin. Journal of Biological

  1. Enhancing the hexavalent chromium bioremediation potential of Acinetobacter junii VITSUKMW2 using statistical design experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulimi, Mrudula; Jamwal, Subika; Samuel, Jastin; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2012-12-01

    The Cr(VI) removal capability of Acinetobacter junii VITSUKMW2 isolated from the Sukinda chromite mine site was evaluated and enhanced using statistical design techniques. The removal capacity was evaluated at different pH values (5-11) and temperatures (30-40 degrees C) and with various carbon and nitrogen sources. Plackett- Burman design was used to select the operational parameters for bioremediation of Cr(VI). Three parameters (molasses, yeast extract, and Cr(VI) concentration) were chosen for further optimization using central composite design. The optimal combination of parameters was found to be 14.85 g/l molasses, 4.72 g/l yeast extract, and 54 mg/l initial Cr(VI), with 99.95% removal of Cr(VI) in 12 h. A. junii VITSUKMW2 was shown to have significant potential for removal of Cr(VI).

  2. Evaluation of sustained release polylactate electron donors for removal of hexavalent chromium from contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, E.L.; Joyner, D. C.; Faybishenko, B.; Conrad, M. E.; Rios-Velazquez, C.; Mork, B.; Willet, A.; Koenigsberg, S.; Herman, D.; Firestone, M. K.; Hazen, T. C.; Malave, Josue; Martinez, Ramon

    2011-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater at the Department of Energy Hanford site, we conducted a series of microcosm experiments using a range of commercial electron donors with varying degrees of lactate polymerization (polylactate). These experiments were conducted using Hanford Formation sediments (coarse sand and gravel) immersed in Hanford groundwater, which were amended with Cr(VI) and several types of lactate-based electron donors (Hydrogen Release Compound, HRC; primer-HRC, pHRC; extended release HRC) and the polylactate-cysteine form (Metal Remediation Compound, MRC). The results showed that polylactate compounds stimulated an increase in bacterial biomass and activity to a greater extent than sodium lactate when applied at equivalent carbon concentrations. At the same time, concentrations of headspace hydrogen and methane increased and correlated with changes in the microbial community structure. Enrichment of Pseudomonas spp. occurred with all lactate additions, and enrichment of sulfate-reducing Desulfosporosinus spp. occurred with almost complete sulfate reduction. The results of these experiments demonstrate that amendment with the pHRC and MRC forms result in effective removal of Cr(VI) from solution most likely by both direct (enzymatic) and indirect (microbially generated reductant) mechanisms.

  3. Zeolite Coating System for Corrosion Control to Eliminate Hexavalent Chromium from DoD Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    channel successfu stem  step) low te sition is imp he substrate t with the s dilute aque netrate conf f complex fast; the sh 5 minutes to an oven...Power-law phenomena in adhesive de-bonding. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, 1997 . 458(Interfacial Engineering for Optimized

  4. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution using polypyrrole-polyaniline nanofibers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bhaumik, M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available of Cr(VI) and temperature. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on the nanofibers surface was highly pH dependent and the kinetics of the adsorption followed the Pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption isotherm data fitted well to the Langmuir isothermal model...

  5. Cathodic reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] coupled with electricity generation in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Huang, Liping; Zhang, Yifeng

    2008-11-01

    A novel approach to Cr(VI)-contaminated wastewater treatment was investigated using microbial fuel cell technologies in fed-batch mode. By using synthetic Cr(VI)-containing wastewater as catholyte and anaerobic microorganisms as anodic biocatalyst, Cr(VI) at 100 mg/l was completely removed during 150 h (initial pH 2). The maximum power density of 150 mW/m(2) (0.04 mA/cm(2)) and the maximum open circuit voltage of 0.91 V were generated with Cr(VI) at 200 mg/l as electron acceptor. This work verifies the possibility of simultaneous electricity production and cathodic Cr(VI) reduction.

  6. Enhancement of hexavalent chromium reduction and electricity production from a biocathode microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liping; Chen, Jingwen; Quan, Xie; Yang, Fenglin

    2010-10-01

    Enhancement of Cr (VI) reduction rate and power production from biocathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was achieved using indigenous bacteria from Cr (VI)-contaminated site as inoculum and MFC architecture with a relatively large cathode-specific surface area of 340-900 m2 m(-3). A specific Cr (VI) reduction rate of 2.4 ± 0.2 mg g(-1)VSS h(-1) and a power production of 2.4 ± 0.1 W m(-3) at a current density of 6.9 A m(-3) were simultaneously achieved at an initial Cr (VI) concentration of 39.2 mg L(-1). Initial Cr (VI) concentration and solution conductivity affected Cr (VI) reduction rate, power production and coulombic efficiency. These findings demonstrate the importance of inoculation and MFC architecture in the enhancement of Cr (VI) reduction rate and power production. This study is a beneficial attempt to improve the efficiency of biocathode MFCs and provide a good candidate of bioremediation process for Cr (VI)-contaminated sites.

  7. Influence of hexavalent chromium on lactate-enriched Hanford groundwater microbial communities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somenahally, Anil C [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Yuan, Tong [University of Oklahoma; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Hazen, Terry C [ORNL; Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction and immobilization of chromate (Cr(VI)) is a plausible bioremediation strategy. However, higher Cr(VI) concentrations may impose stress on native Cr-reducing communities. We sought to determine if Cr(VI) would influence the lactate enriched native microbial community structure and function in groundwater from the Cr contaminated site at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were amended with lactate and Cr(VI) (0.0, 0.1 and 3.0 mg/L). Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI) concentrations, 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition in bioreactors were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and some differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) was reduced in the bioreactors. With lactate enrichment, the native communities did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. Native bacterial communities were diverse, whereas after lactate enrichment, Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., were the most predominant groups in all bioreactors. Similarly, the Archaea diversity significantly decreased from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%), Halobacteriales (12%), Methanoregula (8%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%) after lactate enrichment. Composition of several key functional genes was distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant probes (chrA), Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result the 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not appear to give chromate reducing strains a competitive advantage for proliferation or for increasing Cr-reduction.

  8. Microbial community response to addition of polylactate compounds to stimulate hexavalent chromium reduction in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Eoin L; Joyner, Dominique C; Faybishenko, Boris; Conrad, Mark E; Rios-Velazquez, Carlos; Malave, Josue; Martinez, Ramon; Mork, Benjamin; Willett, Anna; Koenigsberg, Steven; Herman, Donald J; Firestone, Mary K; Hazen, Terry C

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater at the Department of Energy Hanford site, we conducted a series of microcosm experiments using a range of commercial electron donors with varying degrees of lactate polymerization (polylactate). These experiments were conducted using Hanford Formation sediments (coarse sand and gravel) immersed in Hanford groundwater, which were amended with Cr(VI) and several types of lactate-based electron donors (Hydrogen Release Compound, HRC; primer-HRC, pHRC; extended release HRC) and the polylactate-cysteine form (Metal Remediation Compound, MRC). The results showed that polylactate compounds stimulated an increase in bacterial biomass and activity to a greater extent than sodium lactate when applied at equivalent carbon concentrations. At the same time, concentrations of headspace hydrogen and methane increased and correlated with changes in the microbial community structure. Enrichment of Pseudomonas spp. occurred with all lactate additions, and enrichment of sulfate-reducing Desulfosporosinus spp. occurred with almost complete sulfate reduction. The results of these experiments demonstrate that amendment with the pHRC and MRC forms result in effective removal of Cr(VI) from solution most likely by both direct (enzymatic) and indirect (microbially generated reductant) mechanisms.

  9. A MIXED CHEMICAL REDUCTANT FOR TREATING HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN A CHROMITE ORE PROCESSING SOLID WASTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated a method for delivering ferrous iron into the subsurface to enhance chemical reduction of Cr(VI) in a chromite ore processing solid waste (COPSW). The COPSW is characterized by high pH (8.5 -11.5), high Cr(VI) concentrations in the solid phase (up to 550 mg kg-1) and...

  10. Cytogenomics of hexavalent chromium (Cr6+ exposed cells: A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha Nigam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The altered cellular gene expression profile is being hypothesized as the possible molecular basis navigating the onset or progress of various morbidities. This hypothesis has been evaluated here in respect of Cr 6+ induced toxicity. Several studies using gene microarray show selective and strategic dysregulations of cellular genes and pathways induced by Cr 6+ . Relevant literature has been reviewed to unravel these changes in different test systems after exposure to Cr 6+ and also to elucidate association if any, of the altered cytogenomics with Cr 6+ induced toxicity or carcinogenicity. The aim was to verify the hypothesis for critical role of altered cytogenomics in onset of Cr 6+ induced biological / clinical effects by identifying genes modulated commonly by the toxicant irrespective of test system or test concentrations / doses, and by scrutinizing their importance in regulation of the flow of mechanistically linked events crucial for resultant morbidities. Their probability as biomarkers to monitor the toxicant induced biological changes is speculative. The modulated genes have been found to cluster under the pathways that manage onset of oxidative stress, DNA damage, apoptosis, cell-cycle regulation, cytoskeleton, morphological changes, energy metabolism, biosynthesis, oncogenes, bioenergetics, and immune system critical for toxicity. In these studies, the identity of genes has been found to differ remarkably; albeit the trend of pathways′ dysregulation has been found to remain similar. We conclude that the intensity of dysregulation of genes or pathways involved in mechanistic events forms a sub-threshold or threshold level depending upon the dose and type (including speciation of the toxicant, duration of exposure, type of target cells, and niche microenvironment of cells, and the intensity of sub-threshold or threshold level of the altered cytogenomics paves way in toxicant exposed cells eventually either to opt for reversal to differentiation and growth, or to result in toxicity like dedifferentiation and apoptosis, respectively.

  11. Effects of hexavalent chromium on development of crabs, Rhithropanopeus harrisii and Callinectes sapidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bookhout, C.G.; Monroe, R.J.; Forward, R.B. Jr.; Costlow, J.D. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Survival of Rhithropanopeus harrisii larvae from hatching to first crab stage occurred in Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ concentrations from 1.1 to 29.1 ppm. Estimated LC50 for complete zoeal development was 17.8 ppm Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ and it was 13.7 ppm for development to first crab stage. A concentration of 1.1 ppm Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ was nontoxic, while Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ concentrations of 7.2 and 14.5 ppm were sublethal and concentrations of 29.1 to 58.1 ppm were acutely toxic. Low concentrations of Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ concentrations of Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ caused an increase in swimming speed and high concentrations caused a decline. Survival of Callinectes sapidus larvae occurred in Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ concentrations from 1.1 to 4.7 ppm. The LC50 for complete zoeal development was estimated to be 2.9 ppm Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/ and the LC50 for development to first crab stage was estimated to be 1.0 ppm Na/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/. The total Cr in sodium chromate is 32% by weight, hence, the total Cr concentrations tested were 32% of the Cr salts given above. Statistical analyses of the data on survival, duration and mortality of larvae are presented.

  12. 75 FR 18041 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Minimizing Use of Hexavalent Chromium (DFARS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... platforms due to its corrosion protection properties. On April 8, 2009, the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology and Logistics) issued a memorandum establishing policy for the minimization...

  13. A new cation-exchange method for accurate field speciation of hexavalent chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J.W.; McCleskey, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    A new method for field speciation of Cr(VI) has been developed to meet present stringent regulatory standards and to overcome the limitations of existing methods. The method consists of passing a water sample through strong acid cation-exchange resin at the field site, where Cr(III) is retained while Cr(VI) passes into the effluent and is preserved for later determination. The method is simple, rapid, portable, and accurate, and makes use of readily available, inexpensive materials. Cr(VI) concentrations are determined later in the laboratory using any elemental analysis instrument sufficiently sensitive to measure the Cr(VI) concentrations of interest. The new method allows measurement of Cr(VI) concentrations as low as 0.05 ??g 1-1, storage of samples for at least several weeks prior to analysis, and use of readily available analytical instrumentation. Cr(VI) can be separated from Cr(III) between pH 2 and 11 at Cr(III)/Cr(VI) concentration ratios as high as 1000. The new method has demonstrated excellent comparability with two commonly used methods, the Hach Company direct colorimetric method and USEPA method 218.6. The new method is superior to the Hach direct colorimetric method owing to its relative sensitivity and simplicity. The new method is superior to USEPA method 218.6 in the presence of Fe(II) concentrations up to 1 mg 1-1 and Fe(III) concentrations up to 10 mg 1-1. Time stability of preserved samples is a significant advantage over the 24-h time constraint specified for USEPA method 218.6.

  14. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium Part 2: Human, Toxicokinetic, and Mechanistic Studies (Preliminary Assessment Materials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In August 2014, EPA released the second part of draft literature searches and associated search strategies, evidence tables, and exposure response arrays for Cr(VI) to obtain input from stakeholders and the public prior to developing the draft IRIS assessment. Specifically, EPA w...

  15. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium Part 1: Experimental Animal Studies (Preliminary Assessment Materials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In April 2014, EPA released the draft literature searches and associated search strategies, evidence tables, and exposure response arrays for Cr(VI) to obtain input from stakeholders and the public prior to developing the draft IRIS assessment. Specifically, EPA was interested in...

  16. 76 FR 71926 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium Policy to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    .... Williams, OUSD (AT&L) DPAP/DARS, Room 3B855, 3060 Defense Pentagon, Washington, DC 20301-3060. Comments... submitted by mail). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Amy G. Williams, telephone 703- 602-0328... operations, or other military operations or exercises designated by the Combatant Commander. (d)...

  17. Effective removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by adsorption on mesoporous carbon microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianguo; Wang, Yuefeng; Wang, Jitong; Qiao, Wenming; Long, Donghui; Ling, Licheng

    2016-01-15

    High-surface-area mesoporous carbon microspheres were successfully synthesized by a spraying method with the purpose of removing Cr(VI) from waste water. Various factors influencing the adsorption of Cr(VI), including pH, adsorption temperature, and contact time were studied. As the adsorption process was pH dependent, it showed maximum removal efficiency of Cr(VI) at pH 3.0. Pseudo-second-order model was found to best represent the kinetics of Cr(VI) adsorption. The adsorption parameters were determined using both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, and Qm value was as high as 165.3mg/g. The thermodynamic parameters including standard Gibb's free energy (ΔG(0)), standard enthalpy (ΔH(0)) and standard entropy (ΔS(0)) were investigated for predicting the nature of adsorption, which suggested the adsorption was an endothermic and a spontaneous thermodynamically process. Furthermore, Fe3O4-loaded MCMs were prepared to rapidly separate the adsorbent from the solution by a simple magnetic process. Fe3O4-loaded MCMs had a high adsorption capacity of 156.3mg/g, and a good regeneration ability with a capacity of 123.9mg/g for the fifth adsorption-desorption cycle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A screening method for detection of hexavalent chromium levels in soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora V Franco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid and low cost method to determine Cr(VI in soils based upon alkaline metal extraction at room temperature is proposed as a semi-quantitative procedure to be performed in the field. A color comparison with standards with contents of Cr(VI in the range of 10 to 150 mg kg-1 was used throughout. For the different types of soils studied, more than 75% of the fortified soluble Cr(VI were recovered for all levels of spike tested for both the proposed and standard methods. Recoveries of 83 and 99% were obtained for the proposed and the standard methods, respectively, taking into account the analysis of a heavily contaminated soil sample.

  19. Synthesis, Characterization and Hexavalent Chromium Adsorption Characteristics of Aluminum- and Sucrose-Incorporated Tobermorite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguang Zhao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tobermorites were synthesized from the lime-quartz slurries with incorporations of aluminum and sucrose under hydrothermal conditions, and then used for adsorption of Cr(VI. The chemical components, and structural and morphological properties of tobermorite were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermogravimetric-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS and N2 adsorption–desorption measurements. The formation and crystallinity of tobermorite could be largely enhanced by adding 2.3 wt.% aluminum hydroxide or 13.3 wt.% sucrose. Sucrose also played a significantly positive role in increasing the surface area. The adsorption performances for Cr(VI were tested using a batch method taking into account the effects of pH, the adsorption kinetics, and the adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacities of the aluminum- and sucrose-incorporated tobermorites reached up to 31.65 mg/g and 28.92 mg/g, respectively. Thus, the synthesized tobermorites showed good adsorption properties for removal of Cr(VI, making this material a promising candidate for efficient bulk wastewater treatment.

  20. 75 FR 60454 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ..., full address and contact information). When you register, please indicate if you will need audio-visual equipment (e.g., laptop computer and slide projector). In general, each presentation should be no more than... your presentation. The following are instructions for registering: To attend or present comments at...

  1. 76 FR 20349 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... Peer Review Workshop. SUMMARY: EPA is announcing that Eastern Research Group, Inc., an EPA contractor for external scientific peer review, will convene an independent panel of experts and organize and... peer review workshop for comments from the public. Please inform Eastern Research Group, Inc. if...

  2. Semi-continuous detection of toxic hexavalent chromium using a sulfur-oxidizing bacteria biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Anup; Oh, Sang-Eun; Kim, Ki Duck; Shin, Beom-Soo

    2012-09-15

    Toxicity testing is becoming a useful tool for environmental risk assessment. A biosensor based on the metabolic properties of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) has been applied for the detection of toxic chemicals in water. The methodology exploits the ability of SOB to oxidize elemental sulfur to sulfuric acid under aerobic conditions. The reaction results in an increase in electrical conductivity (EC) and a decrease in pH. Five hours after Cr(6+) was added to the SOB biosensor operated in semi-continuous mode (1 min rapid feeding and 29 min batch reaction), a decrease in effluent EC and an increase in pH (from 2-3 to 6) were detected due to Cr(6+) toxicity to SOB. The SOB biosensor is simple; it can detect toxic levels of Cr(6+) on the order of minutes to hours, a useful time scale for early warning detection systems designed to protect the environment from further degradation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effective Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solutions Using Ionic Liquid Modified Graphene Oxide Sorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nasrollahpour

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquid modified reduced graphene oxide (IL-rGO was prepared and examined for chromate removal. The sorbent was characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption measurement (BET, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis. The sorption behavior of chromate on the ionic liquid modified reduced graphene oxide sorbent from an aqueous medium was studied by varying the parameters such as contact time, initial chromate concentration, pH, and agitation speed. The results showed that sorption kinetics of chromate by IL-rGO follows the pseudo second order, which indicates that the sorption mechanism is both chemical and physical interaction. The sorption isotherm studies revealed that Langmuir model provided the best fit to all the experimental data with an adsorption capacity of 232.55 mg g–1 for IL-rGO. Thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy (–2.85 kJ mol–1 at 298 K, enthalpy (55.41 kJ mol–1, and entropy (11.64 J mol–1 K–1 of sorption of the chromate on ionic liquid modified reduced graphene oxide was evaluated, and it was found that the reaction was spontaneous and endothermic in nature.

  4. Effect of Set Potential on Hexavalent Chromium Reduction and Electricity Generation from Biocathode Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Liping

    2011-06-01

    Setting a biocathode potential at ?300 mV improved the subsequent performance of an MFC for Cr(VI) reduction compared to a control (no set potential). With this set potential, the startup time was reduced to 19 days, the reduction of Cr(VI) was improved to 19.7 mg/L d, and the maximum power density was increased to 6.4 W/m3 compared to the control (26 days, 14.0 mg/L d and 4.1 W/m3). Set potentials of ?150 mV and ?300 mV also improved system performance and led to similarly higher utilization of metabolic energy gained (PMEG) than set potentials of +200 mV and ?450 mV. We observed putative pili at ?150 and ?300 mV potentials, and aggregated precipitates on bacterial surfaces in both poised and nonpoised controls. These tests show that there are optimal potentials that can be set for developing a Cr(VI) biocathode. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  5. Fleet Readiness Center - Southeast Technology Development Program (Cadmium & Hexavalent Chromium Reduction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    power consumption) • Bath is Stable Nanovate™ CR EHC Deposition Method Electrodeposition (Pulse) Electrodeposition (DC) Part Geometries LOS and...remain 25 Cold Spray Metallization  AERMIP Funded  National Team (PAX)  Brush Cadmium Alternative  Dem/Val F/A-18 Bomb Rack  Modifying

  6. Competition of Chromium on Iron binding sites in the biological system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *F. S. Rehmani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium is mutagenic and neurotoxic. Trivalent Chromium is involved in the enzymes of glucose metabolism. Chromium is generally found in +3 oxidation state and sometimes it competes for the binding sites of iron in the biological system, when the concentration of chromium exceeds above the normal, it inhibits the absorption of iron and iron deficiency leads diseases such as anemia, tinnitus and depression. Salicylicdhydroxamic acid a hydroxamate type siderophore is used as a drug in the chelation therapy of iron overload patients. The complex formation of Cr(III and Fe(III with salicyclic hydroxamate were studied potentiometrically at different temperatures and data was subjected to computer programs. The stability constant (log beta values and thermodynamic stabilities were calculated. It was found that salicyclic hydroxamate forms 1:1 complex at pH 3 and 1:2 complex at pH 4 with Cr(III and Fe(III, respectively. The stability constant (Log beta and thermodynamic stabilities of Cr(III Salicyclic hydroxamate complexes are close to Fe(III Salicyclic hydroxamate complexes. It was observed from the stability constant values that after chelating therapy the concentration of chromium become low and deficiency symptoms appear resulting diabetes.

  7. Removal of chromium and toxic ions present in mine drainage by Ectodermis of Opuntia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Hector [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon interseccion Paseo Tollocan S/N, C.P. 50120, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Urena-Nunez, Fernando [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P.18-1027, Col. Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bilyeu, Bryan [University of North Texas, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 305310, Denton, TX 76203-5310 (United States); Barrera-Diaz, Carlos [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon interseccion Paseo Tollocan S/N, C.P. 50120, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: cbarrera@uaemex.mx

    2006-08-25

    This work presents conditions for hexavalent and trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions using natural, protonated and thermally treated Ectodermis of Opuntia. A removal of 77% of Cr(VI) and 99% of Cr(III) can be achieved. The sorbent material is characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, before and after the contact with the chromium containing aqueous media. The results obtained from the characterization techniques indicate that the metal ion remains on the surface of the sorbent material. The percentage removal is found to depend on the initial chromium concentration and pH. The Cr(VI) and Cr(III) uptake process is maximum at pH 4, using 0.1 g of sorbent per liter of aqueous solution. The natural Ectodermis of Opuntia showed a chromium adsorption capacity that was adequately described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Finally, an actual mine drainage sample that contained Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe Zn, Ni and Pb was tested under optimal conditions for chromium removal and Ectodermis of Opuntia was found to be a suitable sorbent material. The use of this waste material for the treatment of metal-containing aqueous solutions as well as mine drainage is effective and economical.

  8. Spectroscopic analysis of chromium bioremediation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, C.; Nico, P. S.; Yang, L.; Marcus, M. A.; Steefel, C.; Larsen, J. T.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Remediation of chromium contamination frequently involves reducing the toxic and soluble hexavalent form, Cr(VI), to the relatively harmless and mostly immobile trivalent state, Cr(III). The objective of this study is to identify the biogeochemical reactions that control in situ chromium reduction in the presence of different dominant electron acceptors, i.e., NO3-, Fe(III), and SO42-. It was hypothesized that indirect, abiotic reduction of Cr(VI) by reduced metabolic products [Fe(II) and sulfides] would dominate over direct enzymatic reduction by denitrifying, iron-reducing, or sulfate-reducing bacteria. It is further hypothesized that the enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI) would produce relatively pure chromium hydroxide precipitates, whereas indirect reduction would result in mixed Cr-Fe hydroxide solid phases. Flow-through columns containing homogenized sediments from the 100H site at Hanford, WA were subjected to nitrate-, sulfate- or iron-reducing conditions in the presence of 5 µM Cr(VI) and 5 mM lactate. Cr(VI) was depleted in the effluent solutions from the nitrate- and sulfate-reducing columns; however only a small amount of Cr(VI) was removed under iron-reducing conditions. Preliminary analysis of micro X-ray absorption spectra indicate that the untreated and iron-reducing column sediments contained pre-existing Cr in the form of primary minerals, e.g. chromite and/or Cr-bearing micas. However, there was an increase in the relative abundance of mixed-phase Cr-Fe hydroxides, i.e., Cr1-xFex(OH)3 in the nitrate- and sulfate-treated columns. A possible explanation for the observations is that the production of Fe(II) was enhanced under the nitrate- and sulfate- reducing conditions, and was most likely sulfide-driven in the latter case. The Fe(II) was subsequently available for reduction of Cr(VI) resulting in the mixed-phase precipitates. The results from the spectroscopic analysis support the hypothesis that Fe(II)-mediated Cr reduction prevails over direct

  9. Stabilization of chromium ore processing residue (COPR) with nanoscale iron particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiasheng; Zhang, Wei-Xian

    2006-05-20

    Laboratory batch experiments were conducted on heavily contaminated groundwater and chromium ore processing residue (COPR) samples to determine the rate and extent of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] reduction and immobilization by nanoscale iron particles. Laboratory synthesized nanoscale iron particles (iron particles was 0.157 +/- 0.018 mg m(-2) min(-1), about 25 times greater than that by iron powders (100 mesh). One gram of nanoparticles can reduce 84.4-109.3mg Cr(VI) in the groundwater and 69.3-72.7 mg Cr(VI) in the COPR. This reduction capacity is 50-70 times greater than that of iron powders under the same experimental conditions.

  10. PIXE analysis of chromium phytoaccumulation by the aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Quiñones, F. R.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.; Módenes, A. N.; Palácio, S. M.; Silva, E. A.; Rossi, F. L.; Martin, N.; Szymanski, N.

    2009-04-01

    The uptake of hexavalent chromium in free living floating aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes cultivated in non-toxic chromium-doped hydroponic solutions is presented. A Cr-uptake bioaccumulation experiment was carried out using healthy macrophytes grown in a temperature controlled greenhouse. Six samples of nutrient media and plants were collected during the 23 day experiment. Roots and leaves were acid digested with the addition of an internal Gallium standard, for thin film sample preparation and quantitative Cr analysis by PIXE method. The Cr 6+ mass uptake by the macrophytes reached up to 70% of the initial concentration, comparable to former results and literature data. The Cr-uptake data were described using a non-structural first order kinetic model. Due to low cost and high removal efficiency, living aquatic macrophytes E. crassipes are a viable biosorbent in an artificial wetland of a water effluent treatment plant.

  11. PIXE analysis of chromium phytoaccumulation by the aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza-Quinones, F.R. [Department of Chemical Engineering - Postgraduate Program - NBQ, West Parana State University, Rua da Faculdade, 645, Jardim Santa Maria, 85903-000 Toledo, Parana (Brazil)], E-mail: f.espinoza@terra.com.br; Rizzutto, M.A.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M.H. [Physics Institute, University of Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao s/n, Travessa R 187, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Modenes, A.N.; Palacio, S.M.; Silva, E.A.; Rossi, F.L.; Martin, N.; Szymanski, N. [Department of Chemical Engineering - Postgraduate Program - NBQ, West Parana State University, Rua da Faculdade, 645, Jardim Santa Maria, 85903-000 Toledo, Parana (Brazil)

    2009-04-15

    The uptake of hexavalent chromium in free living floating aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes cultivated in non-toxic chromium-doped hydroponic solutions is presented. A Cr-uptake bioaccumulation experiment was carried out using healthy macrophytes grown in a temperature controlled greenhouse. Six samples of nutrient media and plants were collected during the 23 day experiment. Roots and leaves were acid digested with the addition of an internal Gallium standard, for thin film sample preparation and quantitative Cr analysis by PIXE method. The Cr{sup 6+} mass uptake by the macrophytes reached up to 70% of the initial concentration, comparable to former results and literature data. The Cr-uptake data were described using a non-structural first order kinetic model. Due to low cost and high removal efficiency, living aquatic macrophytes E. crassipes are a viable biosorbent in an artificial wetland of a water effluent treatment plant.

  12. Accidental potassium dichromate poisoning. Toxicokinetics of chromium by ICP-MS-CRC in biological fluids and in hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goullé, J P; Saussereau, E; Grosjean, J; Doche, C; Mahieu, L; Thouret, J M; Guerbet, M; Lacroix, C

    2012-04-10

    Intoxications by chromium (Cr) compounds are very life threatening and often lethal. After oral ingestion of 2 or 3g of hexavalent Cr (Cr(VI)), gastrointestinal injury, but also hepatic and renal failure, often occurs which each leads to a fatal outcome in most patients. Cellular toxicity is associated with mitochondrial and lysosomal injury by biologically Cr(VI) reactive intermediates and reactive oxygen species. After Cr(VI) has been absorbed, there is not much that can be done except to control the main complications as the treatment is only symptomatic. The biotransformation of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) reduces the toxicity because the trivalent form does not cross cellular membranes as rapidly. In fact, more than 80% of Cr(VI) is cleared in urine as Cr(III). We report the case of a 58-year-old male patient who was admitted to hospital after accidental oral ingestion of a 30 g/L potassium dichromate (the estimated amount of ingested Cr is about 3g). ICP-MS equipped with a collision/reaction cell (CRC) and validated methods were used to monitor plasma (P), red blood cells (RBCs), urine (U) and hair chromium. For urine the results were expressed per gram of creatinine. After 7 days in the intensive care unit, the patient was discharged without renal or liver failure. P, RBC and U were monitored during 49 days. During this period Cr decreased respectively from 2088 μg/L to 5 μg/L, 631 μg/L to 129 μg/L and 3512 μg/g to 10 μg/g. The half-life was much shorter in P than in RBC as the poison was more quickly cleared from the P than from the RBC, suggesting a cellular trapping of the metal. Hair was collected 2 months after the intoxication. We report a very rare case of survival after accidental Cr poisoning which has an extremely poor prognosis and usually leads to rapid death. For the first time, this toxicokinetic study highlights a sequestration of chromium in the RBC and probably in all the cells.

  13. Bioaccumulation of mercury, cadmium, zinc, chromium, and lead in muscle, liver, and spleen tissues of a large commercially valuable catfish species from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio P. Arantes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing amounts of heavy metals entering aquatic environments can result in high accumulation levels of these contaminants in fish and their consumers, which pose a serious risk to ecosystems and human health. We investigated the concentrations of mercury (Hg, cadmium (Cd, zinc (Zn, chromium (Cr, and lead (Pb in muscle, liver, and spleen tissues of Pseudoplatystoma corruscans specimens collected from two sites on the Paraopeba River, Brazil. The level of heavy metals concentrations in the tissues was often higher in viscera (i.e. liver and spleen than in muscle, and thus, the viscera should not be considered for human consumption. Correlations between metal concentrations and fish size were not significant. Although the levels of muscle bioaccumulation of Hg, Cd, Zn, Cr, and Pb, generally do not exceed the safe levels for human consumption, the constant presence of heavy metals in concentrations near those limits considered safe for human consumption, is a reason for concern, and populations who constantly consume fish from polluted rivers should be warned. Our findings also indicate that in a river network where certain areas are connected to other areas with high rates of environmental pollutants, people should be cautious about the regular consumption of fish, even when the fish consumed are caught in stretches of the basin where contamination levels are considered low, since many of the freshwater fish with high commercial value, such as the catfish surubim, are migratory.

  14. Bioconcentration of chromium in edible mushrooms: influence of environmental and genetic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M A; Alonso, J; Melgar, M J

    2013-08-01

    Chromium concentrations were determined in 167 samples of wild edible mushrooms, collected from three different sites (urban, traffic and pastureland areas) in Lugo (NW Spain). The hymenophore (H) and the rest of the fruiting body (RFB) were analysed separately. The analyses were performed using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The highest mean chromium levels (mg/kg dry weight) of 3.5 and 8.0, 4.5 and 6.2, and 6.2 and 4.3 were found in Lycoperdon utriforme, Coprinus comatus and Agaricus campestris in H and RFB, respectively. The highest concentrations of chromium were observed in terrestrial saprophytic species in relation to mycorrhizal species. With respect to the underlying substrates, chromium concentration was lowest in the pastureland area (24.6 mg/kg dw). All mushroom species were bioexclusors of chromium (BCFmushrooms harvested from the areas investigated poses no toxicological risk to human health due to chromium.

  15. Chromium-isotope signatures in scleractinian corals from the Rocas Atoll, Tropical South Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, N S; Voegelin, A R; Paulukat, C; Sial, A N; Ferreira, V P; Frei, R

    2016-01-01

    Chromium-isotope compositions (expressed as δ(53) Cr) of recent and ancient skeletal and non-skeletal carbonates are currently explored as a (paleo-) redox-proxy for shallow seawater. The idea behind this approach is that biogenic and non-biogenic carbonates could potentially be used as archives recording the Cr-isotope composition of seawater in which they formed, and with this contribute to the reconstruction of past paleo-environmental changes in the marine realm, and potentially to climate changes on land. However, investigations addressing the behavior and uptake mechanism of Cr, and the potential isotope fractionations between seawater and biogenic carbonates are scarce. Here, we present a study of Cr-isotope variations in three species of corals and contemporary seawater from the Rocas Atoll, NE, Brazil. Cr-isotope values of the studied coral species (Siderastrea stellata, Porites sp., and Montastrea cavernosa) vary from -0.5 to +0.33‰ and point to significant isotopic disequilibrium with coexisting seawater characterized by a Cr-isotope value of +0.92 ± 0.2‰. This isotopic offset requires reduction of hexavalent Cr(VI) in the sequestration process of all the studied coral species. Cr-isotope values in a profile across an S. stellata colony returned homogeneous, slightly positively fractioned δ(53) Cr values of +0.07 ± 0.08‰ (n = 8, 2σ), which we interpret to reflect a constant reductive uptake during the 20-year growth period recorded in this coral. In contrast, samples across a 12-year growth profile from Porites sp. display rather heterogeneous Cr-isotope values with δ(53) Cr varying from -0.50 to +0.10‰, indicating Cr incorporation under changing redox processes during its growth intervals. We propose a mechanism whereby initial photoreduction of isotopically heavy Cr(VI) to isotopically lighter Cr(III) in the endodermal layer of corals must be followed by efficient and effective re-oxidation of reduced Cr species to favor subsequent

  16. Chromium(VI) transport and fate in unsaturated zone and aquifer: 3D Sandbox results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingmin; Sobecky, Patricia A; Zhao, Lanpo; Crawford, Patrice; Li, Mingtang

    2016-04-01

    The simulation of Cr(VI) behavior in an unsaturated zone and aquifer, using a 3D experimental set-up were performed to illustrate the distribution, transport and transformation of Cr(VI), and further to reveal the potential harm of Cr(VI) after entering the groundwater. The result indicated that chromium(VI) was transported in the vertical direction, meanwhile, was transported in the horizontal direction under the influence of groundwater flow. The direction and distance away from the pollution source zone had great effect on the chromium(VI) concentration. At the sampling sites near the pollution source zone, there was a sudden increase of chromium(VI) concentration. The concentration of chromium(III) concentration in some random effluent samples was not detected. Chromium had not only transported but also had fraction and specie transformation in the unsaturated zone and aquifer. The relative concentration of residue fraction chromium was decreased with time. The content of Fe-Mn oxide fraction chromium was increased with time. The relative content of exchangeable and carbonate-bound fraction chromium was lower and the content variations were not obvious. Chromium(VI) (91-98%) was first reduced to chromium(III) rapidly. The oxidation reaction occurred later and the relative content of chromium(VI) was increased again. The presence of manganese oxides under favorable soil conditions can promote the reoxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI).

  17. Evaluating trivalent chromium toxicity on wild terrestrial and wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, A O; Boutin, C; Rowland, O; Carpenter, D J

    2016-11-01

    Elevated chromium levels in soil from mining can impact the environment, including plants. Mining of chromium is concentrated in South Africa, several Asian countries, and potentially in Northern Ontario, Canada, raising concerns since chromium toxicity to wild plants is poorly understood. In the first experiment, concentration-response tests were conducted to evaluate effects of chromium on terrestrial and wetland plants. Following established guidelines using artificial soil, seeds of 32 species were exposed to chromium (Cr(3+)) at concentrations simulating contamination (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). This study found that low levels of chromium (250 mg kg(-1)) adversely affected the germination of 22% of species (33% of all families), while higher levels (500 and 1000 mg kg(-1)) affected 69% and 94% of species, respectively, from 89% of the families. Secondly, effects on seedbanks were studied using soil collected in Northern Ontario and exposed to Cr(3+) at equivalent concentrations (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). Effects were less severe in the seedbank study with significant differences only observed at 1000 mg kg(-1). Seeds exposed to Cr(3+) during stratification were greatly affected. Seed size was a contributing factor as was possibly the seed coat barrier. This study represents an initial step in understanding Cr(3+) toxicity on wild plants and could form the basis for future risk assessments. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Redox Equilibria of Chromium in Calcium Silicate Base Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzayousef-Jadid, A.-M.; Schwerdtfeger, Klaus

    2009-08-01

    The oxidation state of chromium has been determined at 1600 °C in CaO-SiO2-CrO x melts with CaO/SiO2 ratios (mass pct) of 0.66, 0.93, and 1.10, and 0.15 to 3.00 pct Cr2O3 (initial). A few experiments were also carried out with CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-CrO x melts at 1430 °C. The slag samples were equilibrated with gas phases of controlled oxygen pressure. Two techniques were applied to determine the oxidation state: thermogravimetry and quenching of the samples with subsequent wet chemical analysis. In the low-oxygen pressure range, the chromium is mainly divalent. In the high-oxygen pressure range, it is trivalent and hexavalent. It was found that the Cr3+/Cr2+ and Cr6+/Cr3+ ratios depend on oxygen pressure at a constant CaO/SiO2 ratio and a constant content of total chromium, according to the ideal law of mass action. According to the respective chemical reactions, these ratios change proportional to p_{{{text{O}}2 }}{}^{1/4} or p_{{{text{O}}_{ 2} }}{}^{3/4}, respectively. They also increase with increasing basicity. The data are used to compute the fractions of the different ions in the melt. There is a certain range of oxygen pressure in which all three valence states, Cr2+, Cr3+, and Cr6+, coexist. The color of the solidified slag samples is described and is explained with the help of transmission spectra.

  19. Chromium removal from electroplating wastewater by coir pith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksabye, Parinda; Thiravetyan, Paitip; Nakbanpote, Woranan; Chayabutra, Supanee

    2007-03-22

    Coir pith is a by-product from padding used in mattress factories. It contains a high amount of lignin. Therefore, this study investigated the use of coir pith in the removal of hexavalent chromium from electroplating wastewater by varying the parameters, such as the system pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and temperature. The maximum removal (99.99%) was obtained at 2% (w/v) dosage, particle size <75microm, at initial Cr(VI) 1647mgl(-1), system pH 2, and an equilibrium time of 18h. The adsorption isotherm of coir pith fitted reasonably well with the Langmuir model. The maximum Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of coir pith at 15, 30, 45 and 60 degrees C was 138.04, 197.23, 262.89 and 317.65mgCr(VI)g(-1) coir pith, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters indicated an endothermic process and the adsorption process was favored at high temperature. Desorption studies of Cr(VI) on coir pith and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) suggested that most of the chromium bound on the coir pith was in Cr(III) form due to the fact that the toxic Cr(VI) adsorbed on the coir pith by electrostatic attraction was easily reduced to less toxic Cr(III). Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry analysis indicated that the carbonyl (CO) groups and methoxy (O-CH(3)) groups from the lignin structure in coir pith may be involved in the mechanism of chromium adsorption. The reduced Cr(III) on the coir pith surface may be bound with CO groups and O-CH(3) groups through coordinate covalent bonding in which a lone pair of electrons in the oxygen atoms of the methoxy and carbonyl groups can be donated to form a shared bond with Cr(III).

  20. Chromium removal from electroplating wastewater by coir pith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suksabye, Parinda [The Joint School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 91 Pracha-Utit Road, Bangmod, Thungkru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Thiravetyan, Paitip [Division of Biotechnology, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 83 Moo. 8 Thakham, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand)]. E-mail: paitip.thi@kmutt.ac.th; Nakbanpote, Woranan [Pilot Plant Development and Training Institute, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 83 Moo. 8 Thakham, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Chayabutra, Supanee [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Silpaorn University, 6 Rajamankhanai Road, Amphoe Muang, Nakorn Pathom Province, Bangkok 73000 (Thailand)

    2007-03-22

    Coir pith is a by-product from padding used in mattress factories. It contains a high amount of lignin. Therefore, this study investigated the use of coir pith in the removal of hexavalent chromium from electroplating wastewater by varying the parameters, such as the system pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and temperature. The maximum removal (99.99%) was obtained at 2% (w/v) dosage, particle size <75 {mu}m, at initial Cr(VI) 1647 mg l{sup -1}, system pH 2, and an equilibrium time of 18 h. The adsorption isotherm of coir pith fitted reasonably well with the Langmuir model. The maximum Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of coir pith at 15, 30, 45 and 60 deg. C was 138.04, 197.23, 262.89 and 317.65 mg Cr(VI) g{sup -1} coir pith, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters indicated an endothermic process and the adsorption process was favored at high temperature. Desorption studies of Cr(VI) on coir pith and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) suggested that most of the chromium bound on the coir pith was in Cr(III) form due to the fact that the toxic Cr(VI) adsorbed on the coir pith by electrostatic attraction was easily reduced to less toxic Cr(III). Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry analysis indicated that the carbonyl (C=O) groups and methoxy (O-CH{sub 3}) groups from the lignin structure in coir pith may be involved in the mechanism of chromium adsorption. The reduced Cr(III) on the coir pith surface may be bound with C=O groups and O-CH{sub 3} groups through coordinate covalent bonding in which a lone pair of electrons in the oxygen atoms of the methoxy and carbonyl groups can be donated to form a shared bond with Cr(III)

  1. The prospective protective effect of selenium nanoparticles against chromium-induced oxidative and cellular damage in rat thyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanin KMA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kamel MA Hassanin,1 Samraa H Abd El-Kawi,2 Khalid S Hashem1 1Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 2Department of Histology, Faculty of Medicine, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef, Egypt Background: Nanotechnology has enabled researchers to synthesize nanosize particles that possess increased surface areas. Compared to conventional microparticles, it has resulted in increased interactions with biological targets. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the protective ability of selenium nanoparticles against hexavalent chromium-induced thyrotoxicity. Design: Twenty male rats were used in the study, and arbitrarily assigned to four groups. Group 1 was the control group, and was given phosphate-buffered saline. Group 2 was the chromium-treated group and was given K2Cr2O7 60 µg/kg body weight intraperitoneally as a single dose on the third day of administration. Group 3 was the nano-selenium-treated group and was given selenium nanoparticles (size 3–20 nm 0.5 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally daily for 5 consecutive days. Group 4 was the nano-selenium chromium-treated group, which received selenium nanoparticles for 5 days and a single dose of K2Cr2O7 on the third day of administration. Materials and methods: Blood samples were collected from rats for measuring thyroid hormones (free triiodothyronine [T3] and free thyroxine [T4] and oxidative and antioxidant parameters (malondialdehyde [MDA], reduced glutathione [GSH], catalase, and superoxide dismutase [SOD]. Upon dissection, thyroid glands were taken for histopathological examination by using paraffin preparations stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E and Masson’s trichrome. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for detecting cellular proliferation using Ki67 antibodies. Results: The present study shows that K2Cr2O7 has a toxic effect on the thyroid gland as a result of inducing a marked oxidative damage and release of reactive oxygen species

  2. Dimensionally Controlled Lithiation of Chromium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fister, Tim T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hu, Xianyi [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Esbenshade, Jennifer [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Chen, Xiao [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Wu, Jinsong [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dravid, Vinayak [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Bedzyk, Michael [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Long, Brandon [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gewirth, Andrew A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Shi, Bing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schlepütz, Christian M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fenter, Paul [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Oxide conversion reactions are an alternative approach for high capacity lithium ion batteries but are known to suffer from structural irreversibility associated with the phase separation and reconstitution of reduced metal species and Li2O. In particular, the morphology of the reduced metal species is thought to play a critical role in the electrochemical properties of a conversion material. Here we use a model electrode with alternating layers of chromium and chromium oxide to better understand and control these phase changes in real-time and at molecular length scales. Despite lacking crystallinity at the atomic scale, this superstructure is observed (with X-ray reflectivity, XR) to lithiate and delithiate in a purely one-dimensional manner, preserving the layered structure. The XR data show that the metal layers act as nucleation sites for the reduction of chromium in the conversion reaction. Irreversibility during delithiation is due to the formation of a ternary phase, LiCrO2, which can be further delithiated at higher potentials. The results reveal that the combination of confining lithiation to nanoscale sheets of Li2O and the availability of reaction sites in the metal layers in the layered structure is a strategy for improving the reversibility and mass transport properties that can be used in a wide range of conversion materials.

  3. Effects of chromium(III and VI) on spring barley and maize biomass yield and content of nitrogenous compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyszkowski, Mirosław; Radziemska, Maja

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to (1) determine the effects of trivalent Cr(III) or hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) soil contamination on biomass yield and nitrogenous compound content of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) as the main crop and subsequently maize (Zea mays L.) grown successively, and (2) examine whether the neutralizing additives applied (compost, zeolite, and calcium oxide) may be effective in reducing adverse impact of chromium (Cr) on crops. Spring barley yield was markedly decreased by Cr compounds, particularly Cr(VI). In contrast, maize yield was significantly increased by Cr(VI). Hexavalent Cr exerted a greater effect than the Cr(III) form on nitrogen levels in spring barley. Chromium significantly increased ammonia nitrogen content in maize. The accumulation of NO(3)(-)-N in plants treated with Cr(VI) was lower than in controls. The application of compost, zeolite, and calcium oxide onto the soil increased yield of maize only in pots containing Cr(III). Neutralizing additives exerted a positive, increased effect on the N-total content of maize but not spring barley, which was apparent with calcium oxide. Accumulation of NH(4)(+)-N in maize in pots with Cr(VI) was increased by all additives applied. The content of nitrate nitrogen in spring barley was predominantly affected by addition of compost and calcium oxide into the soil, producing a significant rise in NO(3)(-)-N content. Chromium, especially Cr(VI), used at doses of 100 and 150 mg/kg soil exerted adverse effects in treated plants, particularly spring barley.

  4. Fluctuations in Precambrian atmospheric oxygenation recorded by chromium isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Robert; Gaucher, Claudio; Poulton, Simon W; Canfield, Don E

    2009-09-10

    Geochemical data suggest that oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere occurred in two broad steps. The first rise in atmospheric oxygen is thought to have occurred between approximately 2.45 and 2.2 Gyr ago, leading to a significant increase in atmospheric oxygen concentrations and concomitant oxygenation of the shallow surface ocean. The second increase in atmospheric oxygen appears to have taken place in distinct stages during the late Neoproterozoic era ( approximately 800-542 Myr ago), ultimately leading to oxygenation of the deep ocean approximately 580 Myr ago, but details of the evolution of atmospheric oxygenation remain uncertain. Here we use chromium (Cr) stable isotopes from banded iron formations (BIFs) to track the presence of Cr(VI) in Precambrian oceans, providing a time-resolved picture of the oxygenation history of the Earth's atmosphere-hydrosphere system. The geochemical behaviour of Cr is highly sensitive to the redox state of the surface environment because oxidative weathering processes produce the oxidized hexavalent [Cr(VI)] form. Oxidation of reduced trivalent [Cr(III)] chromium on land is accompanied by an isotopic fractionation, leading to enrichment of the mobile hexavalent form in the heavier isotope. Our fractionated Cr isotope data indicate the accumulation of Cr(VI) in ocean surface waters approximately 2.8 to 2.6 Gyr ago and a likely transient elevation in atmospheric and surface ocean oxygenation before the first great rise of oxygen 2.45-2.2 Gyr ago (the Great Oxidation Event). In approximately 1.88-Gyr-old BIFs we find that Cr isotopes are not fractionated, indicating a decline in atmospheric oxygen. Our findings suggest that the Great Oxidation Event did not lead to a unidirectional stepwise increase in atmospheric oxygen. In the late Neoproterozoic, we observe strong positive fractionations in Cr isotopes (delta(53)Cr up to +4.9 per thousand), providing independent support for increased surface oxygenation at that time, which may

  5. Non-chromatographic speciation of chromium at sub-ppb levels using cloud point extraction in the presence of unmodified silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, Ignacio; Vicente-Martínez, Yesica; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The cloud point extraction (CPE) of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by Triton X-114 allows chromium (III) ions to be transferred to the surfactant-rich phase, where they can be measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Using 20 mL sample and 50 μL Triton X-114 (30% w/v), the enrichment factor was 1150, and calibration graphs were obtained in the 5-100 ng L(-1) chromium range in the presence of 5 µg L(-1) AgNPs. Speciation of trivalent and hexavalent chromium was achieved by carrying out two CPE experiments, one of them in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetate. While in the first experiment, in absence of the complexing agent, the concentration of total chromium was obtained, the analytical signal measured in the presence of this chemical allowed the chromium (VI) concentration to be measured, being that of chromium (III) calculated by difference. The reliability of the procedure was verified by using three standard reference materials before applying to water, beer and wine samples.

  6. Removal of toxic chromium from aqueous solution, wastewater and saline water by marine red alga Pterocladia capillacea and its activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed El Nemr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pterocladia capillacea, a red marine macroalgae, was tested for its ability to remove toxic hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. A new activated carbon obtained from P. capillacea via acid dehydration was also investigated as an adsorbent for toxic chromium. The experiments were conducted to study the effect of important parameters such as pH, chromium concentration and adsorbent weight. Batch equilibrium tests at different pH conditions showed that at pH 1.0, a maximum chromium uptake was observed for both inactivated dried red alga P. capillacea and its activated carbon. The maximum sorption capacities for dried red alga and its activated carbon were about 12 and 66 mgg−1, respectively, as calculated by Langmuir model. The ability of inactivated red alga P. capillacea and developed activated carbon to remove chromium from synthetic sea water, natural sea water and wastewater was investigated as well. Different isotherm models were used to analyze the experimental data and the models parameters were evaluated. This study showed that the activated carbon developed from red alga P. capillacea is a promising activated carbon for removal of toxic chromium.

  7. Electrothermal Vaporization-QQQ-ICP-MS for Determination of Chromium in Mainstream Cigarette Smoke Particulate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresquez, Mark R; Gonzalez-Jimenez, Nathalie; Gray, Naudia; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Watson, Clifford H; Pappas, R Steven

    2017-05-01

    Chromium is transported in mainstream tobacco smoke at very low concentrations. However, when chromium is deposited too deeply in the lungs for mucociliary clearance, or is in a particle that is too large to pass directly through tissues, it bioaccumulates in the lungs of smokers. It is important to determine the concentrations of chromium that are transported in mainstream smoke. Several reliable studies have resulted in reports of chromium concentrations in smoke particulate that were below limits of detection (LODs) for the instruments and methods employed. In this study, electrothermal vaporization-triple quad-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ETV-QQQ-ICP-MS) was chosen for determination of chromium concentrations in mainstream smoke because of the high sensitivity of ETV combined with QQQ-ICP-MS. The smoke from five reference, quality control, and commercial cigarettes was analyzed using ETV-QQQ-ICP-MS with isotope dilution for quantitative determination of chromium. The method LOD was sufficiently low that chromium concentrations in mainstream smoke could indeed be determined. The chromium concentrations in the smoke particulate were between 0.60 and 1.03 ng/cigarette. The range of chromium concentrations was at or below previously reported LODs. Determination of the oxidation state of the chromium transported in mainstream smoke would also be important, in consideration of the fact that both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) oxidation states cause inhalation toxicity, but chromium(VI) is also a carcinogen. It was possible to separate the oxidation states using ETV-QQQ-ICP-MS. However, determination of individual species at the levels found in mainstream smoke particulate matter was not possible with the present method. Published by Oxford University Press 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  8. Influence of bioaccessibility on the toxicity of heavy metal (nickel, chromium, cadmium and lead) species; Einfluss der Resorptionsverfuegbarkeit auf die Toxizitaet von Verbindungen der Schwermetalle Nickel, Chrom, Cadmium und Blei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.; Oltmanns, J.; Kalberlah, F. [FoBiG Forschungs- und Beratungsinstitut Gefahrstoffe GmbH, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Voss, J.U. [Toxikologische Beratung, Chemikalienbewertung - Risikoabschaetzung, Muellheim (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The risk assessment of heavy metals at hazardous waste sites is based on total elemental concentrations in the soil without differentiation of metal species. This literature study investigates the correlation between bioaccessibility and toxicity of compounds of the heavy metals nickel, chromium, cadmium and lead with low water solubility. Chronic oral toxicity studies for sparsely soluble species are generally lacking. Only for chromic oxide (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) derivation of a tolerable daily dose is possible based on chronic toxicity studies. The chronic oral toxicity of water-soluble chromium-III-compounds can be assessed by comparing effective doses with well-studied, highly toxic Cr-VI-compounds. In general, lower water-solubility is correlated with lower bioaccessibility and lower toxicity in case of the sulfides of nickel, lead and cadmium (and also with nickel oxide and lead chromate). However, some carbonates, oxides and hydroxides (lead oxide, lead carbonate, cadmium oxide, cadmium carbonate, nickel carbonate, nickel hydroxide) show a better solubility in biological media and higher toxicity than expected based solely on poor water solubility. This can be explained by a higher solubility of these compounds in acid environments. Compounds with poor water solubility like nickel oxide and cadmium sulfide are absorbed only to a minor extent from the respiratory tract after inhalation. However, absorption in the respiratory tract is not strictly correlated with bioaccessibility in the gastrointestinal tract. The influence of absorption on respiratory toxicity and on lung carcinogenicity of the heavy metals differs. For example, nickel sulfate, a compound with high water solubility, was toxic in the respiratory tract by inhalation, but not carcinogenic, whereas nickel subsulfide, a compound with lower water solubility, induced lung tumours. For the risk assessment of hazardous waste sites this means that results of in vitro digestive models (for the

  9. Chromium related degradation of solid oxide fuel cells; Chrom-bezogene Degradation von Festoxid-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Anita

    2011-05-04

    operating point but no significant degradation in ASR. Operation interruption produced a regeneration of the ASR. This regeneration only occurred when the cell had already reached the phase of strong degradation and consisted mostly of a change in the limiting current density. Continuation of operation canceled the regeneration within a brief period ot time. Interaction of chromium species with LSM cathodes led to chromium deposition within the current collector as well as in the cathode layer in the form of chromium manganese spinels. Without a chromium source the current collector contained pure manganese oxide phases. Was a chromium source present during operation, these phases reacted with gaseous chromium species to form chromium manganese spinels. Chromium deposition in the cathode layer was only observed when a chromium source was combined with a non-zero current load during operation. Chromium deposits in the cathode layer were limited to an area close to the electrolyte, whereas the density of deposits decreased with the distance to the electrolyte. Chromium deposits in the cathode layer were always accompanied by microstructural coarsening of the LSM matrix. But cathode coarsening could only be clearly observed when the cell head already reached the phase of strong degradation. The overall chromium content increased with operation time for all chromium sources. But the coating combination of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and LCC10 diminished the overall chromium content by about an order of magnitude in comparison to the uncoated chromium source. Only minor dependency of the current density on the overall chromium content was observed. However, chromium residue that can be decidedly assigned to the cathode layer showed a stronger dependence on the current density. Based on these results three interaction mechanisms of chromium species with LSM were identified: - Gaseous chromium species react with manganese oxide phases in the current collector to form chromium manganese

  10. Lead, chromium and manganese removal by in vitro root cultures of two aquatic macrophytes species: Typha latifolia L. and Scirpus americanus pers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Díaz, María del Socorro; Barrón-Cruz, María del Carmen

    2011-07-01

    The ability of in vitro roots cultures of Typha latifolia and Scirpus americanus to remove metals was studied. Roots were cultivated on Murashige-Skoog medium with 15 microg L(-1) Cr 11, 60 microg L(-1) Pb II or 1.8 mg L(-1) Mn II. Adsorbed metal to root surface was removed by washing with 0.042% HNO3. T. latifolia roots were able to uptake 68.8 microg Pb g(-1), 22.1 microg Cr g(-1) and 1680 microg Mn g(-1), while the S. americanus roots removed 148.3 microg Pb g(-1), 40.7 microg Cr g(-1) and 4037 microg Mn g(-1). About 80-90% of Pb and Cr were absorbed in both cultures. On the contrary, the Mn removal was due mainly to an adsorption process (82-86%). In comparison to the T. latifolia cultures, S. americanus cultures were twofold more efficient to remove Pb and Cr, and threefold more efficient to remove Mn. Both plant species capture metals in the following order: Cr >Pb >Mn. This investigation confirms that in vitro roots cultures could be an alternative as a phytoremediation approach for contaminated water with heavy metals.

  11. Chromium(VI)-induced Production of Reactive Oxygen Species, Change of Plasma Membrane Potential and Dissipation of Mitochondria Membrane Potential in Chinese Hamster Lung Cell Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To examine whether Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) is generated, and whether plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential are depolarized in Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cell lines exposed to Cr (VI). Methods CHL cells were incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 μmol/L, 2.5 μmol/L, 0.65 μmol/L for 3 and 6 hours, respectively. The production of ROS was performed by using 2,7_dichlorofluorescin diacetate; The changes in plasma membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent cationic dye DiBAC4; And the changes in mitochondria membrane potential were estimated using fluorescent dye Rhodamine 123. Results The ROS levels in CHL cells increased in all treated groups compared with the control group (P<0.01); The plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cells dissipated after incubated with Cr(VI) at 10 μmol/L for 3 hours and 6 hours (P<0.01), at 2.5 μmol/L for 6 hours (P<0.01 or 0.05). Conclusion Cr(VI) causes the dissipation of plasma membrane potential and mitochondrial membrane potential in CHL cell cultures, and Cr(VI)_induced ROS may play a role in the injuries.

  12. Chromium-doped DLC for implants prepared by laser-magnetron deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Zemek, Josef; Mikšovský, Jan; Kubinová, Šárka; Remsa, Jan; Kopeček, Jaromir; Jurek, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films are frequently used for coating of implants. The problem of DLC layers lies in bad layer adhesion to metal implants. Chromium is used as a dopant for improvement of adhesion of DLC films. DLC and Cr-DLC layers were deposited on silicon, Ti6Al4V and CoCrMo substrates by a hybrid technology using combination of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and magnetron sputtering. The topology of layers was studied using SEM, AFM and mechanical profilometer. Carbon and chromium content and concentration of trivalent and toxic hexavalent chromium bonds were determined by XPS and WDS. It follows from the scratch tests that Cr doping improved adhesion of DLC layers. Ethylene glycol, diiodomethane and deionized water were used to measure the contact angles. The surface free energy (SFE) was calculated. The antibacterial properties were studied using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The influence of SFE, hydrophobicity and surface roughness on antibacterial ability of doped layers is discussed.

  13. Bioremediation of Chromium (VI from Textile Industry’s Effluent and Contaminated Soil Using Pseudomonas putida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nine bacterial colonies were screened for the Cr(VI removal efficiency and out of these three bacterial strains Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus sp. were isolated from soil and used to remove Cr(VI from aqueous solution. The effect of time and concentrations on the removal rate of hexavalent chromium were studied using batch experiment. Maximum Cr (VI removal was noted 75.0% by Bacillus sp. at 10mg/l, 69.70% by Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 40mg/l and 90.88% by Pseudomonas putida at 10mg/l of synthetic solution, during 96 hours. Among these three bacteria, the maximum Cr(VI removal was reported by Pseudomonas putida on lower concentration. On the basis of highest removal rate, Pseudomonas putida was selected and used for further chromium removal from samples. It was found to be removed the highest Cr(VI by 82.92%, from effluent and 74.41% from soil during 96 hours. The present study depicts that bacteria removes chromium efficiently and this could be used for industrial waste management and other environmental contaminants.

  14. Health effects of arsenic and chromium in drinking water: recent human findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Allan H; Steinmaus, Craig M

    2009-01-01

    Even at high concentrations, arsenic-contaminated water is translucent, tasteless, and odorless. Yet almost every day, studies report a continually increasing plethora of toxic effects that have manifested in exposed populations throughout the world. In this article we focus on recent findings, in particular those associated with major contributions since 2006. Early life exposure, both in utero and in childhood, has been receiving increased attention, and remarkable increases in consequent mortality in young adults have been reported. New studies address the dose-response relationship between drinking-water arsenic concentrations and skin lesions, and new findings have emerged concerning arsenic and cardiovascular disease. We also review the increasing epidemiological evidence that the first step of methylation of inorganic arsenic to monomethylated arsenic (MMA) is actually an activation step rather than the first step in detoxification, as once thought. Hexavalent chromium differs from arsenic in that it discolors water, turning the water yellow at high concentrations. A controversial issue is whether chromium causes cancer when ingested. A recent publication supports the original findings in China of increased cancer mortality in a population where well water turned yellow with chromium.

  15. Use of adsorption using granular activated carbon (GAC) for the enhancement of removal of chromium from synthetic wastewater by electrocoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivek Narayanan, N; Ganesan, Mahesh

    2009-01-15

    The present work deals with removal of hexavalent chromium from synthetic effluents in a batch stirred electrocoagulation cell with iron-aluminium electrode pair coupled with adsorption using granular activated carbon (GAC). Several working parameters such as pH, current density, adsorbent concentration and operating time were studied in an attempt to achieve higher removal capacity. Results obtained with synthetic wastewater revealed that most effective removal capacities of chromium (VI) could be achieved when the initial pH was near 8. The removal of chromium (VI) during electrocoagulation, is due to the combined effect of chemical precipitation, coprecipitation, sweep coagulation and adsorption. In addition, increasing current density in a range of 6.7-26.7mA/cm2 and operating time from 20 to 100min enhanced the treatment rate to reduce metal ion concentration below admissible legal levels. The addition of GAC as adsorbent resulted in remarkable increase in the removal rate of chromium at lower current densities and operating time, than the conventional electrocoagulation process. The method was found to be highly efficient and relatively fast compared to existing conventional techniques.

  16. On texture formation of chromium electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Leisner, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure, texture and hardness of electrodeposited hard, direct current (DC) chromium and pulsed reversed chromium has been investigated. These investigations suggest that the growth and texture of hard chromium is controlled by inhibition processes and reactions. Further, it has been...... established that codeposition of Cr2O3 nanoparticles is a general feature of DC chromium electrodeposition....

  17. Microbial exudate promoted dissolution and transformation of chromium containing minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, E. M.; Sun, J.; Tang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Because of its utility in many industrial processes, chromium has become the second most common metal contaminant in the United States. The two most common oxidation states of chromium in nature are Cr(III), which is highly immobile, and Cr(VI), which is highly mobile and toxic. In both natural and engineered environments, the most common remediation of Cr(VI) is through reduction, which results in chromium sequestration in the low solubility mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide phases. Consequently, the stability of these minerals must be examined to assess the fate of chromium in the subsurface. We examined the dissolution of mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides in the presence of common microbial exudates, including the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB; a common organic ligand secreted by most microbes with high affinity for ferric iron and other trivalent metal ions) and oxalate (a common organic acid produced by microbes). The solids exhibited incongruent dissolution with preferential leaching of Fe from the solid phase. Over time, this leads to a more Cr rich mineral, which is known to be more soluble than the corresponding mixed mineral phase. We are currently investigating the structure of the reacted mineral phases and soluble Cr(III) species, as well as the potential oxidation and remobilization of the soluble Cr species. Results from this study will provide insights regarding the long term transport and fate of chromium in the natural environment in the presence of microbial activities.

  18. A possible role for chromium(III) in genotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, E.T. (New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo (United States))

    1991-05-01

    Chromium is found in the environment in two major forms: reduced Cr{sup III} and Cr{sup VI}, or chromate. Chromate, the most biologically active species, is readily taken up by living cells and reduced intracellularly, via reactive intermediates, to stable Cr{sup III} species. Cr{sup III}, the most abundant form of chromium in the environment, does not readily cross cell membranes and is relatively inactive in vivo. However, intracellular Cr{sup III} can react slowly with both nucleic acids and proteins and can be genotoxic. The authors have investigated the genotoxicity of Cr{sup III} in vitro using a DNA replication assay and in vivo by CaCl{sub 2}-mediated transfection of chromium-treated DNA into Escherichia coli. These results suggest that Cr{sup III} alters the interaction between the DNA template and the polymerase such that the binding strength of the DNA polymerase is increased and the fidelity of DNA replication is decreased. These interactions may contribute to the mutagenicity of chromium ions in vivo and suggest that Cr{sup III} can contribute to chromium-mediated carcinogenesis.

  19. Study of reduction of chromium (VI by calcium polysulfide using spectrophotometric method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batukhan Tatykaev

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents  the results of the study on reduction  of  Cr2O72-   to   Cr3 +  by aqueous solution of calcium polysulfide  using spectrophotometric method. Concentrations  of Cr (VI were determined on the basis of the absorption spectrum at the wavelength range 350 - 372 nm. The change of the concentration of Cr (VI during on reduction by calcium polysulfide has been shown.  The influence of pH on the rate of reducing of Cr (VI to Cr (III was considered: the rate of reducing of hexavalent chromium decreases with increasing pH. The data obtained show that recycling Cr (VI in industrial scale potentially effective at  the pH = 5.

  20. Chromium removal by zeolite-rich materials obtained from an exhausted FCC catalyst: Influence of chromium incorporation on the sorbent structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Maximiliano R; Pereyra, Andrea M; Torres Sánchez, Rosa M; Basaldella, Elena I

    2013-10-15

    A spent FCC catalyst was converted into a zeolitic mixture, and the product obtained was afterward used as trapping material for Cr(III) species frequently found in aqueous solutions. Eventual changes in the sorbent structure produced by Cr incorporation were studied by different characterization techniques such as point of zero charge determinations (PZC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and infrared absorption (FTIR). The XRD and FTIR analyses indicated that chromium incorporation produces an amorphization of the material, and PZC measurements show no surface adsorption of charged chromium species. SEM and EDX analyses clearly show that after chromium sorption, the initial microspheroidal catalyst morphology was maintained, and the presence of chromium species was mainly detected in the outer microsphere surface, where the zeolite crystals were hydrothermally grown.

  1. Enhanced chromium adsorption capacity via plasma modification of natural zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagomoc, Charisse Marie D.; Vasquez, Magdaleno R., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Natural zeolites such as mordenite are excellent adsorbents for heavy metals. To enhance the adsorption capacity of zeolite, sodium-exchanged samples were irradiated with 13.56 MHz capacitively coupled radio frequency (RF) argon gas discharge. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] was used as the test heavy metal. Pristine and plasma-treated zeolite samples were soaked in 50 mg/L Cr solution and the amount of adsorbed Cr(VI) on the zeolites was calculated at predetermined time intervals. Compared with untreated zeolite samples, initial Cr(VI) uptake was 70% higher for plasma-treated zeolite granules (50 W 30 min) after 1 h of soaking. After 24 h, all plasma-treated zeolites showed increased Cr(VI) uptake. For a 2- to 4-month period, Cr(VI) uptake increased about 130% compared with untreated zeolite granules. X-ray diffraction analyses between untreated and treated zeolite samples revealed no major difference in terms of its crystal structure. However, for plasma-treated samples, an increase in the number of surface defects was observed from scanning electron microscopy images. This increase in the number of surface defects induced by plasma exposure played a crucial role in increasing the number of active sorption sites on the zeolite surface.

  2. 络合-超滤脱除稀土永磁材料生产废水中六价铬的研究%Study on complexation-ultrafiltration to remove the six chromium from wastewater produced by rare earth permanent magnetic material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟常明; 王有贤; 邓书妍; 余夏静; 许振良

    2015-01-01

    采用聚乙烯亚胺(PEI)络合超滤脱除稀土永磁材料生产废水中的六价铬,研究了pH值、聚合物/金属离子装载比(P/M)、操作压差(△P)、运行时间和温度等因素对稀土永磁材料生产废水中六价铬截留率和膜通量的影响。结果表明:在一定的操作压力下,控制络合pH=7,P/M=7时,六价铬截留率可达86%以上。膜通量随着操作压差的增加而增高,六价铬截留率随操作压差的变化不大;超滤装置运行20 min后,膜通量和六价铬截留率达到稳定;在15~40℃的温度范围内,膜通量和六价铬截留率有明显的变化。%The experiment, using PEI as complexing agents to remove the six chromium from wastewater by rare earth permanent magnetic materials, investigated the effects of pH value, the polymer / metal ion loading ratio (P/M), operation pressure difference (△P), factors that affect the running time and temperature on the retention rate of hexavalent chromium and membrane flux. The results showed that under △P of a constant, pH=7 and P/M=7, the retention rate of hexavalent chromium can reach more than 86 %. Membrane flux increased with the increase of operating pressure, while the retention rate of hexavalent chromium did not change much;the membrane flux and the retention rate of hexavalent chromium remained unchanged when ultrafiltration device was running after 20 min; the membrane flux and the retention rate of hexavalent chromium changed significantly in the temperature range of 15 ℃to 40℃.

  3. REACH Compliant Hexavalent Chrome Replacement for Corrosion Protection (HITEA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    is September 2017. 2 Engine Guide Vane Actuator Aluminium Housing •Forged / Make from Solid •Chromic acid anodised (CAA) externally. Aluminium Piston...Chromic Acid mocftsed Aluminium -~am skins ;and structures Hard Chromium-~Qrriace, Tnn:smis:sion and Rotors Epoxy resin constituents (Rotor bbdes

  4. TREATABILITY TEST REPORT FOR THE REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM FROM GROUNDWATER AT 100-D AREA USING ELECTROCOAGULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-09-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to accelerate cleanup of contaminated groundwater along the Columbia River. The current treatment approach was driven by a series of Interim Action Records of Decision (IAROD) issued in the mid-1990s. Part of the approach for acceleration involves increasing the rate of groundwater extraction for the chromium plume north of the 100-D Reactor and injecting the treated water in strategic locations to hydraulically direct contaminated groundwater toward the extraction wells. The current treatment system uses ion exchange for Cr(VI) removal, with off-site regeneration of the ion exchange resins. Higher flow rates will increase the cost and frequency of ion exchange resin regeneration; therefore, alternative technologies are being considered for treatment at high flow rates. One of these technologies, electrocoagulation (EC), was evaluated through a pilot-scale treatability test. The primary purpose of the treatability study was to determine the effectiveness of Cr(VI) removal and the robustness/implementability of an EC system. Secondary purposes of the study were to gather information about derivative wastes and to obtain data applicable to scaling the process from the treatability scale to full-scale. The treatability study work plan identified a performance objective and four operational objectives. The performance objective for the treatability study was to determine the efficiency (effectiveness) of hexavalent chromium removal from the groundwater, with a desired concentration of {le} 20 micrograms per liter ({micro}g/L) Cr(VI) in the effluent prior to re-injection. Influent and effluent total chromium and hexavalent chromium data were collected using a field test kit for multiple samples per week, and from off-site laboratory analysis of samples collected approximately monthly. These data met all data quality requirements. Two of three effluent chromium samples analyzed in the off-site (that is, fixed) laboratory

  5. [Measured and Predicted Aquatic Life Criteria and Risk Assessment of Chromium (VI) in Liaohe River].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-nan; Yan, Zhen-guang; Liu, Zheng-tao; Zhang, Cong; Wang, Wei-li

    2015-07-01

    In this study, toxicity data of aquatic species in Liaohe River for heavy metal chromium (VI) was collected and selected. The aquatic life criteria for chromium (VI) in Liaohe River was derived based on these toxicity data. Moreover, water samples of 25 sites in Liaohe River were collected, and the concentrations of chromium (VI) in these samples were analyzed. Finally, ecological risk assessment of chromium (VI) in Liaohe River was performed. Moreover, interspecies correlation estimation method (ICE) established by US EPA was used to predict the acute toxicity of species in Liaohe River, and aquatic life criteria based on predicted toxicity data was derived. The results showed that: the measured CMC (criteria maximum concentration), measured CCC (criteria continuous concentration) and the predicted CMC were 17. 73, 12. 15 and 13. 97 µg . L -1, respectively. Therefore, the ICE method could be used to predict the aquatic life criteria, because the predicted criteria value was very similar to the measured criteria value. Analysis of chromium (V) showed that the chromium (VI) concentrations of the 25 sites in Liaohe River were all below Class I or Class II water quality standards (GB 3838-2002), and the water quality was in good condition. However, for the potential risk of chromium (VI) exposure to the aquatic life of Liaohe River, the result of ecological risk assessment showed that chromium (V) concentrations in 7 sites exceeded the CCC in July, and chromium (VI) concentrations in 6 sites exceeded the CCC in December. Therefore, unacceptable effect on aquatic species caused by chromium (VI) exposure might have occurred in some sites of Liaohe River.

  6. CHROMIUM STATUS IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshavarz

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Fasting serum chromium, total cholesterol HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triacytglycerot and blood sugar were determined in fifty two diabetic patients with no other organic diseases anil compared with those obtained from a control group including fourty two healthy volunteers matched for age, sex ami body mass irutex (BMI. Fasting serum chromium and HDL-cholesterol were significantly lower in patients than in controls (p<0.0001 and p<0.001 respectively, but the mean triacytglycerot concentration was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p<002. Mean total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol values were not significantly different in the two groups. Mean intake of energy, proteins, fats and chromium, estimated by the 24 hr dietary recall method were not significantly different in the two groups. We demonstrated that despite an adequate intake of chromium, the fasting serum chromium was lower in diabetic patients than in control subjects. Chromium deficiency in diabetic patients may act as a contributing factor in aggravating the disease's complications.

  7. Galvanic cells including cobalt-chromium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerdet, N R

    1980-01-01

    Galvanic cells may be created when dentures made of cobalt-chromium alloys are placed on teeth with metallic restorations. The power of such cells was evaluated in an in vitro galvanic using amalgams, gold alloy, and nickel-chromium alloys. The amalgams and one of the nickel-chromium alloys revealed high corrosion currents when placed in contact with cobalt-chromium alloy, the conventional amalgam showing the highest values. The gold alloy and another nickel-chromium alloy exhibited low corrosion currents and they were noble with respect to cobalt-chromium.

  8. Spectroscopic study for a chromium-adsorbed montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurtay, Maidina ·; Tuersun, Maierdan ·; Cai, Yuanfeng; Açıkgöz, Muhammed; Wang, Hongtao; Pan, Yuguan; Zhang, Xiaoke; Ma, Xiaomei

    2017-02-01

    Samples of purified montmorillonite with trace amounts of quartz were subjected to different concentrations of chromium sulphate solutions for one week to allow cation exchange. The chromium-bearing montmorillonites were verified and tested using powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry and Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to explore the occupation sites of the chromium. The ESR spectra recorded before and after the chromium exchange show clear differences: a strong and broad resonance with two shoulders at the lower magnetic field side was present to start, and its intensity as well as that of the ferric iron resonance, increased with the concentration of added chromium. The signals introduced by the chromium, for example at g = 1.975 and 2.510 etc., suggested that the chromium had several occupational sites. The ESR peak with g = 2.510 in the second derivative spectrum suggested that Cr3+ was weakly bounded to TOT with the form of [Cr(H2O)3]3+ in hexagonal cavities. This was verified by comparing the FTIR spectra of the pure and modified montmorillonite. The main resonance centred at g = 1.975 indicated that the majority of Cr3+ occupied the interlayer region as [Cr(H2O)6]3+. The substitution of Ca2 + by Cr3+ also greatly affected the vibration of the hydrogens associate to water, ranged from 3500 to 2600 cm-1 in FTIR. Furthermore, the presence of two diffraction lines in the XRD results (specifically those with d-values of 1.5171 and 1.2673 nm) and the calculations of the size of the interlayer space suggested the presence of two types of montmorillonite with different hydration cations in the sample exposed to 0.2 M chromium sulphate. The two diffraction lines were assigned to [Cr(H2O)6]3+ and [Cr(H2O)3O3]3+, respectively. This also suggested that the species of hydration cation was constrained by the concentration of the chromium solution.

  9. Microbial Diversity of Chromium-Contaminated Soils and Characterization of Six Chromium-Removing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiguo; Hu, Yuting; Yin, Zhen; Hu, Yuehua; Zhong, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Three soil samples obtained from different sites adjacent to a chromium slag heap in a steel alloy factory were taken to examine the effect of chromium contamination on soil bacterial diversity as determined by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries and sequencing of selected clones based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results revealed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria occurred in all three soil samples, although the three samples differed in their total diversity. Sample 1 had the highest microbial diversity covering 12 different classes, while Sample 3 had the lowest microbial diversity. Strains of six different species were successfully isolated, one of which was identified as Zobellella denitrificans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain belonging to the genus Zobellella able to resist and reduce chromium. Among all isolates studied, Bacillus odysseyi YH2 exhibited the highest Cr(VI)-reducing capability, with a total removal of 23.5 % of an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 350 mg L-1.

  10. Chromium behavior during cement-production processes: A clinkerization, hydration, and leaching study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinyoung, Suthatip [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon [Synchrotron Light Research Institute, PO Box 93 Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 (Thailand); School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 (Thailand); Asavapisit, Suwimol, E-mail: suwimol_s@hotmail.com [Environmental Technology, School of Energy and Materials, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat, E-mail: puangratk@nu.ac.th [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, 65000 (Thailand)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} Behavior of chromium during cement-production processes. {yields} Formation of new chromium compounds in clinker with chromium oxidation states of +3, +4.6, +5, and +6. {yields} Addition of chromium altered the composition of the clinker phases, setting time, and compressive strength of hydrated mixes. {yields} Cr{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 6} were leached during leaching tests, whereas other species remained in the mortar. - Abstract: The behavior of chromium during the production of cement clinker, during the hydration of cement and during the leaching of cement mortars was investigated. The microstructures of clinker and mortar properties were investigated using free lime, XRD, SEM/EDS, and TG/DTA techniques. Chromium was found to be incorporated in the clinker phase. The formation of new chromium compounds such as Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 4}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 15}, Ca{sub 5}Cr{sub 3}O{sub 12}, Ca{sub 5}Cr{sub 2}SiO{sub 12}, and CaCr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, with chromium oxidation states of +3, +4.6, +5, and +6, respectively, was detected. After the hydration process, additional chromium compounds were identified in the mortar matrix, including Ca{sub 5}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 3}OH, CaCrO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O, and Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 4}CrO{sub 4}, with chromium oxidation states of +4.6, +6, and +6, respectively. Additionally, some species of chromium, such as Cr{sup 3+} from Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 4}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 15} and Cr{sup 6+} from CaCr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, CaCrO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O, and Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 4}CrO{sub 4}, were leached during leaching tests, whereas other species remained in the mortar. The concentrations of chromium that leached from the mortar following U.S. EPA Method 1311 and EA NEN 7375:2004 leaching tests were higher than limits set by the U.S. EPA and the Environment Agency of England and Wales related to hazardous waste disposal in landfills. Thus, waste containing chromium should not be allowed to mix with raw materials in the cement manufacturing process.

  11. Chromium related degradation of solid oxide fuel cells; Chrom-bezogene Degradation von Festoxid-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Anita

    2011-05-04

    operating point but no significant degradation in ASR. Operation interruption produced a regeneration of the ASR. This regeneration only occurred when the cell had already reached the phase of strong degradation and consisted mostly of a change in the limiting current density. Continuation of operation canceled the regeneration within a brief period ot time. Interaction of chromium species with LSM cathodes led to chromium deposition within the current collector as well as in the cathode layer in the form of chromium manganese spinels. Without a chromium source the current collector contained pure manganese oxide phases. Was a chromium source present during operation, these phases reacted with gaseous chromium species to form chromium manganese spinels. Chromium deposition in the cathode layer was only observed when a chromium source was combined with a non-zero current load during operation. Chromium deposits in the cathode layer were limited to an area close to the electrolyte, whereas the density of deposits decreased with the distance to the electrolyte. Chromium deposits in the cathode layer were always accompanied by microstructural coarsening of the LSM matrix. But cathode coarsening could only be clearly observed when the cell head already reached the phase of strong degradation. The overall chromium content increased with operation time for all chromium sources. But the coating combination of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and LCC10 diminished the overall chromium content by about an order of magnitude in comparison to the uncoated chromium source. Only minor dependency of the current density on the overall chromium content was observed. However, chromium residue that can be decidedly assigned to the cathode layer showed a stronger dependence on the current density. Based on these results three interaction mechanisms of chromium species with LSM were identified: - Gaseous chromium species react with manganese oxide phases in the current collector to form chromium manganese

  12. Graphene/biofilm composites for enhancement of hexavalent chromium reduction and electricity production in a biocathode microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tian-Shun; Jin, Yuejuan; Bao, Jingjing; Kang, Dongzhou; Xie, Jingjing

    2016-11-05

    In this study, a simple method of biocathode fabrication in a Cr(VI)-reducing microbial fuel cell (MFC) is demonstrated. A self-assembling graphene was decorated onto the biocathode microbially, constructing a graphene/biofilm, in situ. The maximum power density of the MFC with a graphene biocathode is 5.7 times that of the MFC with a graphite felt biocathode. Cr(VI) reduction was also enhanced, resulting in 100% removal of Cr(VI) within 48h, at 40mg/L Cr(VI), compared with only 58.3% removal of Cr(VI) in the MFC with a graphite felt biocathode. Cyclic voltammogram analyses showed that the graphene biocathode had faster electron transfer kinetics than the graphite felt version. Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) analysis revealed a possible adsorption-reduction mechanism for Cr(VI) reduction via the graphene biocathode. This study attempts to improve the efficiency of the biocathode in the Cr(VI)-reducing MFC, and provides a useful candidate method for the treatment of Cr(VI) contaminated wastewater, under neutral conditions.

  13. Comparison of potentiality of Zinc oxide nanoparticles and hydrogen peroxide in removal of hexavalent chromium from polluted water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anvar Asadi

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that H2O2 as a cheap and available agent and also UV/ZnO, as a friendly and without residual environmental treatment process, can be used for effective reduction of Cr(VI to yield Cr(III.

  14. U.S. Army Toxic Metal Reduction Program: Demonstrating Alternatives to Hexavalent Chromium and Cadmium in Surface Finishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-18

    oxide , rare earth (Ce), silanes GSE (immersion): ANAD, LEAD, Tobyhanna Army Depot  Zirconium oxide , rare earth (Cerium) and silanes Leverage...Demonstration projects initiated  October: 1st TTA signed by PEO Aviation, CCAD Hazardous Plating Shop Processes Chromic acid anodizing of aluminum ... Aluminum conversion coatings* Hard chrome plating* Magnesium anodizing* Sealers and rinses* Stripping of anodizing and platings* Passivation of stainless

  15. Assessment of heavy metal tolerance and hexavalent chromium reducing potential of Corynebacterium paurometabolum SKPD 1204 isolated from chromite mine seepage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Kanti Paul

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium paurometabolum SKPD 1204 (MTCC 8730, a heavy metal tolerant and chromate reducing bacterium isolated from chromite mine seepage of Odisha, India has been evaluated for chromate reduction under batch culture. The isolate was found to tolerate metals like Co(II, Cu(II, Ni(II, Mn(II, Zn(II, Fe(III and Hg(II along with Cr(VI and was resistant to different antibiotics as evaluated by disc-diffusion method. The isolate, SKPD 1204 was found to reduce 62.5% of 2 mM Cr(VI in Vogel Bonner broth within 8 days of incubation. Chromate reduction capability of SKPD 1204 decreased with increase in Cr(VI concentration, but increased with increase in cell density and attained its maximum at 1010 cells/mL. Chromate reducing efficiency of SKPD 1204 was promoted in the presence of glycerol and glucose, while the highest reduction was recorded at pH 7.0 and 35 °C. The reduction process was inhibited by divalent cations Zn(II, Cd(II, Cu(II, and Ni(II, but not by Mn(II. Anions like nitrate, phosphate, sulphate and sulphite was found to be inhibitory to the process of Cr(VI reduction. Similarly, sodium fluoride, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, sodium azide and N, N,-Di cyclohexyl carboiimide were inhibitory to chromate reduction, while 2,4-dinitrophenol appeared to be neither promotive nor inhibitory to the process.

  16. Rapid and efficient photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium by using “water dispersible” TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei; Kang, Shi-Zhao, E-mail: kangsz@sit.edu.cn; Li, Xiangqing; Qin, Lixia; Yan, Hao; Mu, Jin, E-mail: mujin@sit.edu.cn

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, “water dispersible” TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were prepared, and meanwhile, their photocatalytic activity was systematically tested for the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) ions. It is found that the as-prepared “water dispersible” TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are a highly efficient photocatalyst for the reduction of Cr(VI) ions in water under UV irradiation, and suitable for the remediation of Cr(VI) ions wastewater with low concentration. Compared with commercial TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (P25), the “water dispersible” TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibit 3.8-fold higher photocatalytic activity. 100% Cr (VI) ions can be reduced into Cr(III) ions within 10 min when the Cr (VI) ions initial concentration is 10 mg L{sup −1}. Moreover, the electrical energy consumption can be obviously decreased using the “water dispersible” TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. These results suggest that the “water dispersible” TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are a promising photocatalyst for rapid removal of Cr (VI) in environmental therapy. - Highlights: • “Water dispersible” TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with high photocatalytic activity. • 100% Cr (VI) (10 mg L{sup −1}) can be reduced within 10 min. • Obvious decrease of electrical energy consumption.

  17. Nitrification inhibition by hexavalent chromium Cr(VI)--Microbial ecology, gene expression and off-gas emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Mo; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the responses in the physiology, microbial ecology and gene expression of nitrifying bacteria to imposition of and recovery from Cr(VI) loading in a lab-scale nitrification bioreactor. Exposure to Cr(VI) in the reactor strongly inhibited nitrification performance resulting in a parallel decrease in nitrate production and ammonia consumption. Cr(VI) exposure also led to an overall decrease in total bacterial concentrations in the reactor. However, the fraction of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) decreased to a greater extent than the fraction of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). In terms of functional gene expression, a rapid decrease in the transcript concentrations of amoA gene coding for ammonia oxidation in AOB was observed in response to the Cr(VI) shock. In contrast, transcript concentrations of the nxrA gene coding for nitrite oxidation in NOB were relatively unchanged compared to Cr(VI) pre-exposure levels. Therefore, Cr(VI) exposure selectively and directly inhibited activity of AOB, which indirectly resulted in substrate (nitrite) limitation to NOB. Significantly, trends in amoA expression preceded performance trends both during imposition of and recovery from inhibition. During recovery from the Cr(VI) shock, the high ammonia concentrations in the bioreactor resulted in an irreversible shift towards AOB populations, which are expected to be more competitive in high ammonia environments. An inadvertent impact during recovery was increased emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO), consistent with recent findings linking AOB activity and the production of these gases. Therefore, Cr(VI) exposure elicited multiple responses on the microbial ecology, gene expression and both aqueous and gaseous nitrogenous conversion in a nitrification process. A complementary interrogation of these multiple responses facilitated an understanding of both direct and indirect inhibitory impacts on nitrification.

  18. Electrochemically enhanced reduction of hexavalent chromium in contaminated clay: Kinetics, energy consumption, and application of pulse current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tian Ran; Pamukcu, Sibel; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemically enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in clay medium is a technique based on inputting extra energy into the clay to drive the favorable redox reaction. In this study, the reducing reagent Fe(II) was transported into Cr(VI) spiked kaolinite clay by direct current to investigate the depen......Electrochemically enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in clay medium is a technique based on inputting extra energy into the clay to drive the favorable redox reaction. In this study, the reducing reagent Fe(II) was transported into Cr(VI) spiked kaolinite clay by direct current to investigate......,Fe)(OH)3] precipitates. XRD analysis suggested that the [(Cr,Fe)(OH)3] formed at the clay surface and grew into the pore fluid. SEM-EDX results indicated that the overall Fe(III):Cr(III) ratio of the precipitates was approximately 1.26:1. Application of pulse current decreased the non-productive energy...

  19. Bioremediation of Hexavalent Chromium Pollution by Sporosarcina saromensis M52 Isolated from Offshore Sediments in Xiamen, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ran; WANG Bi; CAI Qing Tao; LI Xiao Xia; LIU Min; HU Dong; GUO Dong Bei; WANG Juan; FAN Chun

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveCr(VI) removal from industrial effluents and sediments has attracted the attention of environmental researchers. In the present study, we aimed to isolate bacteria for Cr(VI) bioremediation from sediment samples and to optimize parameters of biodegradation. MethodsStrains with the ability to tolerate Cr(VI) were obtained by serial dilution and spread plate methods and characterized by morphology, 16S rDNA identification, and phylogenetic analysis. Cr(VI) was determined using the 1,5-diphenylcarbazide method, and the optimum pH and temperature for degradation were studied using a multiple-factor mixed experimental design. Statistical analysis methods were used to analyze the results. ResultsFifty-five strains were obtained, and one strain (Sporosarcina saromensisM52; patent application number: 201410819443.3) having the ability to tolerate 500 mg Cr(VI)/L wasselected to optimize the degradation conditions. M52 was found be able to efficiently remove 50-200 mg Cr(VI)/L in 24 h, achieving the highest removal efficiency at pH 7.0-8.5 and 35°C. Moreover, M52 could completely degrade 100 mg Cr(VI)/L at pH 8.0 and35 °C in 24 h. The mechanism involved in the reduction of Cr(VI) was considered to be bioreduction rather than absorption. ConclusionThe strong degradation ability ofS. saromensis M52 and its advantageous functional characteristics support the potential use of this organism for bioremediation ofheavy metal pollution.

  20. Sampling Instruction: Investigation of Hexavalent Chromium Flux to Groundwater at the 100-C-7:1 Excavation Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.

    2012-05-01

    Several types of data are needed to assess the flux of Cr(VI) from the excavation into the groundwater. As described in this plan, these data include (1) temporal Cr(VI) data in the shallow groundwater beneath the pit; (2) hydrologic data to interpret groundwater flow and contaminant transport; (3) hydraulic gradient data; and (4) as a contingency action if necessary, vertical profiling of Cr(VI) concentrations in the shallow aquifer beyond the depth possible with aquifer tubes.

  1. Comparative evaluation of five plant extracts and juices for nanoiron synthesis and application for hexavalent chromium reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mystrioti, C; Xanthopoulou, T D; Tsakiridis, P; Papassiopi, N; Xenidis, A

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of five plant extracts and juices, i.e. extracts of Camellia sinensis (green tea, GT), Syzygium aromaticum (clove, CL), Mentha spicata (spearmint, SM), Punica granatum juice (pomegranate, PG) and Red Wine (RW), for the production of nanoiron suspensions and their application for Cr(VI) reduction was investigated. Polyphenols contained in extracts act as reducing agents for iron ions in aqueous solutions, forming thus iron nanoparticles, and stabilize the nanoparticles produced from further oxidation and agglomeration. The maximum amount of polyphenols extracted per g of herbs was obtained at herb mass to water volume ratio varying from 10 to 20g/L. Suspensions of nanoparticles with sizes below 60nm were produced by mixing iron chloride solution with the plant extracts and juices investigated. The maximum concentration of nanoiron in suspensions was estimated to 22mM, obtained using RW and PG at a mixing ratio of iron solution to extract equal to 2. Lower concentrations, up to 18mM, were achieved using GT and CL extracts. Therefore, PG juice and RW were considered as more effective for nanoiron production, and, together with GT extracts, they were selected for the production of nanoiron suspensions, which have been proven effective for Cr(VI) reduction, reaching removal capacity as high as 500mg Cr(VI) per g of iron in nanoparticles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrafine cobalt nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxide: Efficient catalyst for fast reduction of hexavalent chromium at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Xue, Jinjuan; Zhang, Xiaolei; He, Guangyu; Chen, Haiqun

    2017-04-01

    A novel composite ultrafine cobalt nanoparticles-reduced graphene oxide (Co-RGO) was firstly synthesized through a modified one-step solvothermal method with Co(OH)2 as the precursor. The prepared low-cost Co-RGO composite exhibited excellent catalytic activity for the reduction of highly toxic Cr(VI) to nontoxic Cr(III) at room temperature when formic acid (HCOOH) was employed as the reductant, and its catalytic performance was even comparable with that of noble metal-based catalysts in the same reduction reaction. Moreover, Co-RGO composite could be readily recovered under an external magnetic field and efficiently participated in recycled reaction for Cr(VI) reduction.

  3. Graphene/biofilm composites for enhancement of hexavalent chromium reduction and electricity production in a biocathode microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tian-shun [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Jiangsu Branch of China Academy of Science & Technology Development, Nanjing (China); Jin, Yuejuan; Bao, Jingjing [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Kang, Dongzhou, E-mail: kangdz@ybu.edu.cn [College of Pharmacy, Yanbian University, Yanji 133002 (China); Xie, Jingjing, E-mail: xiej@njtech.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Jiangsu Branch of China Academy of Science & Technology Development, Nanjing (China); College of Pharmacy, Yanbian University, Yanji 133002 (China); Jiangsu National Synergetic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials (SICAM), Nanjing 211816 (China)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Graphene/biofilm was microbially fabricated to cathode of a Cr(VI)-reducing MFC. • High Cr(VI) reduction rate was generated by self-assembled graphene biocathode MFC. • Graphene biocathode improves the electricity production of Cr(VI)-reducing MFC. • High surface area of the graphene provides more adsorption sites for Cr(VI). • Graphene biocathode improves the electron transfer rate in the MFC. - Abstract: In this study, a simple method of biocathode fabrication in a Cr(VI)-reducing microbial fuel cell (MFC) is demonstrated. A self-assembling graphene was decorated onto the biocathode microbially, constructing a graphene/biofilm, in situ. The maximum power density of the MFC with a graphene biocathode is 5.7 times that of the MFC with a graphite felt biocathode. Cr(VI) reduction was also enhanced, resulting in 100% removal of Cr(VI) within 48 h, at 40 mg/L Cr(VI), compared with only 58.3% removal of Cr(VI) in the MFC with a graphite felt biocathode. Cyclic voltammogram analyses showed that the graphene biocathode had faster electron transfer kinetics than the graphite felt version. Energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) analysis revealed a possible adsorption-reduction mechanism for Cr(VI) reduction via the graphene biocathode. This study attempts to improve the efficiency of the biocathode in the Cr(VI)-reducing MFC, and provides a useful candidate method for the treatment of Cr(VI) contaminated wastewater, under neutral conditions.

  4. Investigation of the adsorption-reduction mechanisms of hexavalent chromium by ramie biochars of different pyrolytic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lu; Liu, Yunguo; Liu, Shaobo; Yin, Yicheng; Zeng, Guangming; Tan, Xiaofei; Hu, Xi; Hu, Xinjiang; Jiang, Luhua; Ding, Yang; Liu, Shaoheng; Huang, Xixian

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between Cr(VI) adsorption mechanisms and physio-chemical properties of biochar, ramie residues were oxygen-limited pyrolyzed under temperature varying from 300 to 600°C. Batch adsorption experiments indicated that higher pyrolysis temperature limits Cr(VI) sorption in terms of capacity and affinity due to a higher aromatic structure and fewer polar functional groups in biochar. Both electrostatic (physical) and ionic (chemical) interactions were involved in the Cr(VI) removal. For low-temperature biochar, the simple physical adsorption was limited and the significant improvement in Cr(VI) sorption was attributed to abundant carboxyl and hydroxyl groups. The adsorption-reduction mechanisms could be concluded that Cr(VI) ions were electrostatically attracted by the positively charged biochar surface and reduced to Cr(III), and then the converted Cr(III) was retained or discharged into the solution. The study demonstrates ramie residues can be converted into biochar as a low-cost and effective sorbent for Cr(VI) removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Removal combined with reduction of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by Fe-ethylene glycol complex microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Xing; Jia, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional Fe-ethylene glycol (Fe-EG) complex microspheres were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method, and were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The adsorption as well as reduction properties of the obtained Fe-EG complex microspheres towards Cr(VI) ions were studied. The experiment data of adsorption kinetic and isotherm were fitted by nonlinear regression approach. In neutral condition, the maximum adsorption capacity was 49.78 mg g-1 at room temperature, and was increased with the increasing of temperature. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy, standard enthalpy and standard entropy revealed that adsorption of Cr(VI) was a feasible, spontaneous and endothermic process. Spectroscopic analysis revealed the adsorption of Cr(VI) was a physical adsorption process. The adsorbed CrO42- ions were partly reduced to Cr(OH)3 by Fe(II) ions and the organic groups in the Fe-EG complex.

  6. Combined nano-biotechnology for in-situ remediation of mixed contamination of groundwater by hexavalent chromium and chlorinated solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Němeček, Jan; Pokorný, Petr; Lhotský, Ondřej; Knytl, Vladislav; Najmanová, Petra; Steinová, Jana; Černík, Miroslav; Filipová, Alena; Filip, Jan; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2016-09-01

    The present report describes a 13month pilot remediation study that consists of a combination of Cr(VI) (4.4 to 57mg/l) geofixation and dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes (400 to 6526μg/l), achieved by the sequential use of nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles and in situ biotic reduction supported by whey injection. The remediation process was monitored using numerous techniques, including physical-chemical analyses and molecular biology approaches which enabled both the characterization of the mechanisms involved in pollutant transformation and the description of the overall background processes of the treatment. The results revealed that nZVI was efficient toward Cr(VI) by itself and completely removed it from the groundwater (LOQ 0.05mg/l) and the subsequent application of whey resulted in a high removal of chlorinated ethenes (97 to 99%). The persistence of the reducing conditions, even after the depletion of the organic substrates, indicated a complementarity between nZVI and the whey phases in the combined technology as the subsequent application of whey phase partially assisted the microbial regeneration of the spent nZVI by promoting its reduction into Fe(II), which further supported remediation conditions at the site. Illumina sequencing and the detection of functional vcrA and bvcA genes documented a development in the reducing microbes (iron-reducing, sulfate-reducing and chlororespiring bacteria) that benefited under the conditions of the site and that was probably responsible for the high dechlorination and/or Cr(VI) reduction. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility and high efficiency of the combined nano-biotechnological approach of nZVI and whey application in-situ for the removal of Cr(VI) and chlorinated ethenes from the groundwater of the contaminated site.

  7. Polyacrylonitrile/polyaniline core/shell nanofiber mat for removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution: mechanism and applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jianqiang

    2013-01-01

    Polyacrylonitrile/polyaniline core/shell nanofibers were prepared via electrospinning followed by in situ polymerization of aniline. Nanofibers with different morphology were obtained by changing the polymerization temperature. When used as absorbent for Cr(vi) ions, the core/shell nanofiber mats exhibit excellent adsorption capability. The equilibrium capacity is 24.96, 37.24, and 52.00 mg g-1 for 105, 156, and 207 mg L-1 initial Cr(vi) solution, respectively, and the adsorption capacity increases with temperature. The adsorption follows a pseudo second order kinetics model and is best fit using the Langmuir isotherm model. The mats show excellent selectivity towards Cr(vi) ions in the presence of competing ions albeit a small decrease in adsorption is observed. The mats can be regenerated and reused after treatment with NaOH making them promising candidates as practical adsorbents for Cr(vi) removal. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  8. Soil retention of hexavalent chromium released from construction and demolition waste in a road-base-application scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butera, Stefania; Trapp, Stefan; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    depth. However, in rigid climates and with high water infiltration through the road pavement, the reduction reaction could be so slow that Cr(VI) might migrate as deep as 200 cm under the road. The reaction parameters and the model can form the basis for systematically assessing under which scenarios Cr...

  9. Soil retention of hexavalent chromium released from construction and demolition waste in a road-base-application scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, Stefania; Trapp, Stefan; Astrup, Thomas F; Christensen, Thomas H

    2015-11-15

    We investigated the retention of Cr(VI) in three subsoils with low organic matter content in laboratory experiments at concentration levels relevant to represent leachates from construction and demolition waste (C&DW) reused as unbound material in road construction. The retention mechanism appeared to be reduction and subsequent precipitation as Cr(III) on the soil. The reduction process was slow and in several experiments it was still proceeding at the end of the six-month experimental period. The overall retention reaction fit well with a second-order reaction governed by actual Cr(VI) concentration and reduction capacity of the soil. The experimentally determined reduction capacities and second-order kinetic parameters were used to model, for a 100-year period, the one-dimensional migration of Cr(VI) in the subsoil under a layer of C&DW. The resulting Cr(VI) concentration would be negligible below 7-70 cm depth. However, in rigid climates and with high water infiltration through the road pavement, the reduction reaction could be so slow that Cr(VI) might migrate as deep as 200 cm under the road. The reaction parameters and the model can form the basis for systematically assessing under which scenarios Cr(VI) from C&DW could lead to an environmental issue for ground- and receiving surface waters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Microbial Detoxification of Hexavalent Chromium from Chromium-Containing Slag%铬渣中6价铬的微生物解毒研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何德文; 刘欢; 蒋崇文; 段浩鹏; 刘蕾

    2013-01-01

    详细研究了微生物处理铬渣中6价铬Cr(Ⅵ)及其回收Cr(Ⅲ)的方法.研究成果表明,来自铬渣场的一株名为Ch-1的细菌能有效地加速Cr(Ⅵ)浸出和去除;此外,通过扫描电子扫描电镜(SEM)和X射线仪器(EDX)观察,Ch-1细菌能有效改变浸出后铬渣的结构,这有利于铬渣中Cr(Ⅵ)浸出及其解毒为毒性低的Cr(Ⅲ);最后经浸出毒性试验,淋溶渣的毒性为3.3 μg/g,远低于国家标准5μg/g,且6价铬Cr(Ⅵ)的回收率高达90%以上.

  11. Reduction of chromium (VI by the indirect action of Thiobacillus thioparus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Donati

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The microbial reduction of chromium(VI to chromium(III has been one of the most widely studied forms of metal bioremediation. Recently, we have found that Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans, growing on elemental sulphur, can indirectly promote chromium(VI reduction by producing reducing agents such as sulphite and thiosulphate, which abiotically reduce chromium(VI. Those species of Thiobacillus are acidophilic bacteria which grow optimally at pH values lower than 4. However, most of those reducing agents are stabilised at higher pH values. Thus, the present paper reports on the ability to reduce chromium(VI using another specie of Thiobacilli, Thiobacillus thioparus, which is able to grow at pH close to 7.0. T. thioparus cultures were carried out in a fermentation vessel containing medium and sulphur as the sole energy source and maintained at 30ºC and 400 rpm. The pH was adjusted to 6.0, 7.0 or 8.0 and maintained with the automatic addition of KOH. Our results show high chromium (VI reduction values (close to 100% at the end of bacterial growth at the three pH values. The results of these experiments are very promising for development of a microbiological process to be used in the detoxification of chromium(VI-polluted effluents.

  12. Effect of microbial activity on the mobility of chromium in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardin, V; Bayard, R; Huck, N; Manceau, A; Gourdon, R

    2002-01-01

    The effect of microbial activity on the chemical state of chromium, in a contaminated soil located in the Rhĵne-Alpes region (France), has been investigated. This soil contained 4,700 mg kg(-1) Cr, with about 40% present in the soluble hexavalent form. Indigenous microbial activity was found to significantly reduce Cr(VI) to the less mobile form (III) when the soil was incubated at 30 degrees C in an aqueous medium containing glucose and nutrients. A Cr(VI)-reducing strain of Streptomyces thermocarboxydus was isolated from the contaminated soil. The strain was found to metabolize Cr(VI) in a similar manner as an exogenous inoculum of Pseudomonas fluorescens LB300, and to precipitate chromium as a Cr oxyhydroxide with a gammaCrOOH-like local structure. The Cr(VI)-reducing activity of S. thermocarboxydus was induced, or significantly accelerated, by the aggregation of bacterial cells or their adhesion to suspended solid particles, and was stimulated in pure culture by glycerol and chromate.

  13. Exposure of soil microbial communities to chromium and arsenic alters their diversity and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheik, Cody S; Mitchell, Tyler W; Rizvi, Fariha Z; Rehman, Yasir; Faisal, Muhammad; Hasnain, Shahida; McInerney, Michael J; Krumholz, Lee R

    2012-01-01

    Extensive use of chromium (Cr) and arsenic (As) based preservatives from the leather tanning industry in Pakistan has had a deleterious effect on the soils surrounding production facilities. Bacteria have been shown to be an active component in the geochemical cycling of both Cr and As, but it is unknown how these compounds affect microbial community composition or the prevalence and form of metal resistance. Therefore, we sought to understand the effects that long-term exposure to As and Cr had on the diversity and structure of soil microbial communities. Soils from three spatially isolated tanning facilities in the Punjab province of Pakistan were analyzed. The structure, diversity and abundance of microbial 16S rRNA genes were highly influenced by the concentration and presence of hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) and arsenic. When compared to control soils, contaminated soils were dominated by Proteobacteria while Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria (which are generally abundant in pristine soils) were minor components of the bacterial community. Shifts in community composition were significant and revealed that Cr (VI)-containing soils were more similar to each other than to As contaminated soils lacking Cr (VI). Diversity of the arsenic resistance genes, arsB and ACR3 were also determined. Results showed that ACR3 becomes less diverse as arsenic concentrations increase with a single OTU dominating at the highest concentration. Chronic exposure to either Cr or As not only alters the composition of the soil bacterial community in general, but affects the arsenic resistant individuals in different ways.

  14. Role of Iron Anode Oxidation on Transformation of Chromium by Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarahney, Hussam; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in contaminated water and formation of a stable precipitate by Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) anode electrolysis is evaluated in separated electrodes system. Oxidation of iron electrodes produces ferrous ions causing the development of a reducing environment in the anolyte, chemical reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and formation of stable iron-chromium precipitates. Cr(VI) transformation rates are dependent on the applied electric current density. Increasing the electric current increases the transformation rates; however, the process is more efficient under lower volumetric current density (for example 1.5 mA L−1 in this study). The transformation follows a zero order rate that is dependent on the electric current density. Cr(VI) transformation occurs in the anolyte when the electrodes are separated as well as when the electrolytes (anolyte/catholyte) are mixed, as used in electrocoagulation. The study shows that the transformation occurs in the anolyte as a result of ferrous ion formation and the product is a stable Fe15Cr5(OH)60 precipitate. PMID:23284182

  15. Role of Iron Anode Oxidation on Transformation of Chromium by Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarahney, Hussam; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2012-12-30

    The potential for chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in contaminated water and formation of a stable precipitate by Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) anode electrolysis is evaluated in separated electrodes system. Oxidation of iron electrodes produces ferrous ions causing the development of a reducing environment in the anolyte, chemical reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and formation of stable iron-chromium precipitates. Cr(VI) transformation rates are dependent on the applied electric current density. Increasing the electric current increases the transformation rates; however, the process is more efficient under lower volumetric current density (for example 1.5 mA L(-1) in this study). The transformation follows a zero order rate that is dependent on the electric current density. Cr(VI) transformation occurs in the anolyte when the electrodes are separated as well as when the electrolytes (anolyte/catholyte) are mixed, as used in electrocoagulation. The study shows that the transformation occurs in the anolyte as a result of ferrous ion formation and the product is a stable Fe(15)Cr(5)(OH)(60) precipitate.

  16. Chromium at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    Chromium has long served as the archetype of spin density wave magnetism. Recently, Jaramillo and collaborators have shown that Cr also serves as an archetype of magnetic quantum criticality. Using a combination of x-ray diffraction and electrical transport measurements at high pressures and cryogenic temperatures in a diamond anvil cell, they have demonstrated that the N'eel transition (TN) can be continuously suppressed to zero, with no sign of a concurrent structural transition. The order parameter undergoes a broad regime of exponential suppression, consistent with the weak coupling paradigm, before deviating from a BCS-like ground state within a narrow but accessible quantum critical regime. The quantum criticality is characterized by mean field scaling of TN and non mean field scaling of the transport coefficients, which points to a fluctuation-induced reconstruction of the critical Fermi surface. A comparison between pressure and chemical doping as means to suppress TN sheds light on different routes to the quantum critical point and the relevance of Fermi surface nesting and disorder at this quantum phase transition. The work by Jaramillo et al. is broadly relevant to the study of magnetic quantum criticality in a physically pure and theoretically tractable system that balances elements of weak and strong coupling. [4pt] [1] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. Wang & T. F. Rosenbaum. Signatures of quantum criticality in pure Cr at high pressure. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 13631 (2010). [0pt] [2] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. C. Lang, Z. Islam, G. Srajer, P. B. Littlewood, D. B. McWhan & T. F. Rosenbaum. Breakdown of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer ground state at a quantum phase transition. Nature 459, 405 (2009).

  17. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-25

    formulations. Disposal of the resulting aluminum and chromium-rich streams are different at the two sites, with vitrification into Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass at Hanford, and solidification in Saltstone at SRS. Prior to disposal, the leachate solutions must be treated to remove radionuclides, resulting in increased operating costs and extended facility processing schedules. Interim storage of leachate can also add costs and delay tank closure. Recent projections at Hanford indicate that up to 40,000 metric tons of sodium would be needed to dissolve the aluminum and maintain it in solution, which nearly doubles the amount of sodium in the entire current waste tank inventory. This underscores the dramatic impact that the aluminum leaching can have on the entire system. A comprehensive view of leaching and the downstream impacts must therefore be considered prior to implementation. Many laboratory scale tests for aluminum and chromium dissolution have been run on Hanford wastes, with samples from 46 tanks tested. Three samples from SRS tanks have been tested, out of seven tanks containing high aluminum sludge. One full-scale aluminum dissolution was successfully performed on waste at SRS in 1982, but generated a very large quantity of liquid waste ({approx}3,000,000 gallons). No large-scale tests have been done on Hanford wastes. Although the data to date give a generally positive indication that aluminum dissolution will work, many issues remain, predominantly because of variable waste compositions and changes in process conditions, downstream processing, or storage limitations. Better approaches are needed to deal with the waste volumes and limitations on disposal methods. To develop a better approach requires a more extensive understanding of the kinetics of dissolution, as well as the factors that effect rates, effectiveness, and secondary species. Models of the dissolution rate that have been developed are useful, but suffer from limitations on applicable compositional

  18. Chromium behavior during cement-production processes: a clinkerization, hydration, and leaching study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyoung, Suthatip; Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon; Asavapisit, Suwimol; Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat

    2011-07-15

    The behavior of chromium during the production of cement clinker, during the hydration of cement and during the leaching of cement mortars was investigated. The microstructures of clinker and mortar properties were investigated using free lime, XRD, SEM/EDS, and TG/DTA techniques. Chromium was found to be incorporated in the clinker phase. The formation of new chromium compounds such as Ca(6)Al(4)Cr(2)O(15), Ca(5)Cr(3)O(12), Ca(5)Cr(2)SiO(12), and CaCr(2)O(7), with chromium oxidation states of +3, +4.6, +5, and +6, respectively, was detected. After the hydration process, additional chromium compounds were identified in the mortar matrix, including Ca(5)(CrO(4))(3)OH, CaCrO(4)·2H(2)O, and Al(2)(OH)(4)CrO(4), with chromium oxidation states of +4.6, +6, and +6, respectively. Additionally, some species of chromium, such as Cr(3+) from Ca(6)Al(4)Cr(2)O(15) and Cr(6+) from CaCr(2)O(7), CaCrO(4)·2H(2)O, and Al(2)(OH)(4)CrO(4), were leached during leaching tests, whereas other species remained in the mortar. The concentrations of chromium that leached from the mortar following U.S. EPA Method 1311 and EA NEN 7375:2004 leaching tests were higher than limits set by the U.S. EPA and the Environment Agency of England and Wales related to hazardous waste disposal in landfills. Thus, waste containing chromium should not be allowed to mix with raw materials in the cement manufacturing process.

  19. Equilibrium and kinetic study on chromium (VI removal from simulated waste water using gooseberry seeds as a novel biosorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Aravind

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gooseberry seed (Phyllanthus acidus was used as an adsorbent to determine its feasibility for the removal of Cr(VI. Various parameters such as pH, temperature, contact time, initial metal concentration and adsorbent dosage were investigated to determine the biosorption performance. Equilibrium was attained within 60 minutes and maximum removal of 96% was achieved under the optimum conditions at pH 2. The adsorption phenomenon demonstrated here was monolayer represented by Langmuir isotherm with R2 value of 0.992 and the Langmuir constants k and q0 was found to be 0.0061 (L/mg and 19.23 (mg/g. The adsorption system obeyed Pseudo second order kinetics with R2 value of 0.999. The results of the present study indicated that gooseberry seed powder can be employed as adsorbent for the effective removal of hexavalent chromium economically.

  20. Chromium in drinking water: sources, metabolism, and cancer risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2011-10-17

    Drinking water supplies in many geographic areas contain chromium in the +3 and +6 oxidation states. Public health concerns are centered on the presence of hexavalent Cr that is classified as a known human carcinogen via inhalation. Cr(VI) has high environmental mobility and can originate from anthropogenic and natural sources. Acidic environments with high organic content promote the reduction of Cr(VI) to nontoxic Cr(III). The opposite process of Cr(VI) formation from Cr(III) also occurs, particularly in the presence of common minerals containing Mn(IV) oxides. Limited epidemiological evidence for Cr(VI) ingestion is suggestive of elevated risks for stomach cancers. Exposure of animals to Cr(VI) in drinking water induced tumors in the alimentary tract, with linear and supralinear responses in the mouse small intestine. Chromate, the predominant form of Cr(VI) at neutral pH, is taken up by all cells through sulfate channels and is activated nonenzymatically by ubiquitously present ascorbate and small thiols. The most abundant form of DNA damage induced by Cr(VI) is Cr-DNA adducts, which cause mutations and chromosomal breaks. Emerging evidence points to two-way interactions between DNA damage and epigenetic changes that collectively determine the spectrum of genomic rearrangements and profiles of gene expression in tumors. Extensive formation of DNA adducts, clear positivity in genotoxicity assays with high predictive values for carcinogenicity, the shape of tumor-dose responses in mice, and a biological signature of mutagenic carcinogens (multispecies, multisite, and trans-sex tumorigenic potency) strongly support the importance of the DNA-reactive mutagenic mechanisms in carcinogenic effects of Cr(VI). Bioavailability results and kinetic considerations suggest that 10-20% of ingested low-dose Cr(VI) escapes human gastric inactivation. The directly mutagenic mode of action and the incompleteness of gastric detoxification argue against a threshold in low

  1. The use of trivalent chromium bath to obtain a solar selective black chromium coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Survilienė, S.; Češūnienė, A.; Juškėnas, R.; Selskienė, A.; Bučinskienė, D.; Kalinauskas, P.; Juškevičius, K.; Jurevičiūtė, I.

    2014-06-01

    Black chromium coatings were electrodeposited from a trivalent chromium bath using a ZnO additive as a second main component. Black chromium was electrodeposited on steel and copper plates and substrates plated with bright nickel prior to black chromium electrodeposition. The black chromium coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM. The XRD data suggest that the phase structure of black chromium may be defined as a zinc solid solution in chromium or a chromium solid solution in zinc depending on the chromium/zinc ratio in the deposit. The role of substrate finish was evaluated through the corrosion resistance and reflectance of black chromium. According to corrosion tests the samples plated with bright nickel prior to black chromium deposition have shown the highest corrosion resistance. The electrodeposited black chromium possesses good optical properties for the absorption of solar energy. The absorption coefficient of black chromium was found to be over 0.99 for the samples obtained without the Ni undercoat and below 0.99 for those obtained with the use of Ni undercoat. However, the use of nickel undercoat before black chromium plating is recommended because it remarkably improves the corrosion resistance of samples.

  2. Application of artificial neural network (ANN in Biosorption modeling of Chromium (VI from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Mohammadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: In this work, biosorption of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with excess municipal sludge was studied. Moreover, the performance of neural networks to predict the biosorption rate was investigated. Materials and Methods: The effect of operational parameters including initial metal concentration, initial pH, agitation speed, adsorbent dosage, and agitation time on the biosorption of chromium was assessed in a batch system. A part of the experimental results was modeled using Feed-Forward Back propagation Neural Network (FFBP-ANN. Another part of the test results was simulated to assess the model accuracy. Transfer function in the hidden layers and output layers and the number of neurons in the hidden layers were optimized. Results: The maximum removal of chromium obtained from batch studies was more than 96% in 90 mg/L initial concentration, pH 2, agitation speed 200 rpm and adsorbent dosage 4 g/L. Maximum biosorption capacity was 41.69 mg/g. Biosorption data of Cr(VI are described well by Freundlich isotherm model and adsorption kinetic followed pseudo-second order model.  Tangent sigmoid function determined was the most appropriate transfer function in the hidden and output layer. The optimal number of neurons in hidden layers was 13. Predictions of model showed excellent correlation (R=0.984 with the target vector. Simulations performed by the developed neural network model showed good agreement with experimental results. Conclusion: Overall, it can be concluded that excess municipal sludge performs well for the removal of Cr ions from aqueous solution as a biological and low cost biosorbent. FFBP-ANN is an appropriate technique for modeling, estimating, and prediction of biosorption process If the Levenberg-Marquardt training function, tangent sigmoid transfer function in the hidden and output layers and the number of neurons is between 1.6 to 1.8 times the input data, proper predication results could be

  3. Environmental Factors Affecting Chromium-Manganese Oxidation-Reduction Reactions in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.O.P.TREBIEN; L.BORTOLON; M.J.TEDESCO; C.A.BISSANI; F.A.O.CAMARGO

    2011-01-01

    Disposal of chromium (Cr) hexavalent form, Cr(Ⅵ), in soils as additions in organic fertilizers, liming materials or plant nutrient sources can be dangerous since Cr(Ⅵ) can be highly toxic to plants, animals, and humans. In order to explore soil conditions that lead to Cr(Ⅵ) generation, this study were performed using a Paleudult (Dystic Nitosol) from a region that has a high concentration of tannery operations in the Rio Grande do Sul State, southern Brazil. Three laboratory incubation experiments were carried out to examine the influences of soil moisture content and concentration of cobalt and organic matter additions on soil Cr(Ⅵ) formation and release and manganese (Mn) oxide reduction with a salt of chromium chloride (CrCl3) and tannery sludge as inorganic and organic sources of Cr(Ⅲ), respectively. The amount of Cr(Ⅲ) oxidation depended on the concentration of easily reducible Mn oxides and the oxidation was more intense at the soil water contents in which Mn(Ⅲ/Ⅳ) oxides were more stable. Soluble organic compounds in soil decreased Cr(Ⅵ) formation due to Cr(Ⅲ) complexation. This mechanism also resulted in the decrease in the oxidation of Cr(Ⅲ) due to the tannery sludge additions. Chromium(Ⅲ) oxidation to Cr(Ⅵ) at the solid/solution interface involved the following mechanisms:the formation of a precursor complex on manganese (Mn) oxide surfaces, followed by electron transfer from Cr(Ⅲ) to Mn(Ⅲ or Ⅳ),the formation of a successor complex with Mn(Ⅱ) and Cr(Ⅵ), and the breakdown of the successor complex and release of Mn(Ⅱ) and Cr(Ⅵ) into the soil solution.

  4. Removal of chromium from electroplating industry effluents by ion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, Sofia A; Fernandes, Sandra; Quina, Margarida M; Ferreira, Licínio M

    2007-06-18

    Effluent discharged from the chromium electroplating industry contains a large number of metals, including chromium, copper, nickel, zinc, manganese and lead. The ion exchange process is an alternative technique for application in the treatment of industrial wastewater containing heavy metals and indeed it has proven to be very promising in the removal and recovery of valuable species. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate the performance of commercial ion exchange resins for removing chromium trivalent from industrial effluents, and for this purpose two resins were tested: a chelating exchange resin (Diaion CR11) and a weak cationic resin (Amberlite IRC86). In order to evaluate the sorption capacity of the resins some equilibrium experiments were carried out, being the temperature and pH the main variables considered. The chromium solutions employed in the experiments were synthetic solutions and industrial effluents. In addition, a transient test was also performed as an attempt to understand the kinetic behaviour of the process.

  5. Arsenic and chromium in drinking water promote tumorigenesis in a mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model and the potential mechanism is ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Mandal, Ardhendu K. [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Saito, Hiroshi [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Pulliam, Joseph F.; Lee, Eun Y. [Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke, Zun-Ji; Lu, Jian; Ding, Songze [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Li, Li [Department of Family Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas [Markey Cancer Control Program, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40504 (United States); Evers, B. Mark [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Exposure to carcinogenic metals, such as trivalent arsenic [As(III)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with various cancers. However, the mechanism of their carcinogenicity remains unclear. In this study, we used azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-induced mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model to investigate their tumorigenesis. Our results demonstrate that exposure to As(III) or Cr(VI), alone or in combination, together with AOM/DSS pretreatment has a promotion effect, increasing the colorectal tumor incidence, multiplicity, size, and grade, as well as cell inflammatory response. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that As(III) or Cr(VI) treatment alone significantly changed the density of proteins. The expression of β-catenin and phospho-GSK was increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Concomitantly, the expression of NADPH oxidase1 (NOX1) and the level of 8-OHdG were also increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, were decreased. Similarly, in an in vitro system, exposure of CRL-1807 to carcinogenic metals increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the expression of β-catenin, phospho-GSK, and NOX1. Inhibition of ROS generation by addition of SOD or catalase inhibited β-catenin expression and activity. Our study provides a new animal model to study the carcinogenicity of As(III) and Cr(VI) and suggests that As(III) and Cr(VI) promote colorectal cancer tumorigenesis, at least partly, through ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Carcinogenic metals in drinking water promote colorectal tumor formation in vivo. ► Carcinogenic metals induce β-catenin activation in vivo and in vitro. ► ROS generation induced by carcinogenic metals mediated β-catenin activation.

  6. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both...

  7. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  8. Seawater and Chromium Isotopes - a Link to Atmospheric Weathering on Land?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, R.; Poire, D.; Gaucher, C.

    2013-12-01

    The chromium (Cr) isotope system is currently being developed as a sensitive tracer to record redox fluctuations in seawater, via assessing, in first instance, the record contained in marine chemical sediments (carbonates, banded iron formations). Understanding of the cycling of Cr is vital in this respect, if the ultimate goal is to somehow establish a link between seawater signatures and processes which mobilize Cr from the continents into riverine systems, and finally into seawater. We have investigated the transport pathway of Cr in Misiones (Argentina), a subtropical region, where weathering of Cretaceous flood basalts of the Paraná province is extensive, leading to deep laterite weathering profiles, and where respective riverine catchments can be sampled and followed into the Paraná River and onwards until its delta in the Atlantic Ocean. The Rio Paraná with its tributaries creates a massive watershed that spreads throughout much of the south central part of the South American continent. The studied weathering profiles in the province of Misiones show up to 30% loss of chromium, accompanied by negatively fractionated (average (δ53Cr ~-0.35 ‰) weathering products (bulk soils), and this is compatible with the expected atmospheric oxidation of trivalent Cr(III) and mobilization of portions of the respective hexavalent Cr(VI) pool into the riverine systems. The isotopic composition of total Cr in the different catchments varies (δ53Cr = -0.23 to +0.31 ‰). Lowering of the isotope compositions is attributed to the extremely finely suspended load (<0.23 μm) of the heavily suspend-loaded creeks and rivers with likely negatively fractionated (δ53Cr values reflecting the weathered soils. Samples from along the Paraná River, including a sample from the estuary, are all positively fractionated (δ53Cr 0 +0.12 - +0.45 ‰) and closely approach the first values measured by us for contemporaneous seawater (δ53Cr = +0.2 - +0.5 ‰). Our results indicate that

  9. Chromium redistribution in thermally aged and irradiated ferritic-martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camus, E.; Wanderka, N.; Welzel, S.; Wollenberger, H. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany); Materna-Morris, E. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1998-07-15

    Ferritic-martensitic steels containing 8-12 at.% chromium are considered as structural materials for spallation sources and fusion reactors. Materials will be subjected to intense damage rates, e.g. 50-100 dpa per year at full power. Therefore, the behavior under irradiation of these steels must be investigated. Our earlier dual-beam irradiation results on the DIN 1.4914 steel showed a decomposition into chromium-enriched and chromium-depleted regions. The mean concentration of the chromium-depleted regions was found to be 5.19{+-}0.32 at.% after irradiation at 500 C to a fluence of 50 dpa, as measured by atom probe field-ion microscopy. The chromium distribution in the matrix of the DIN 1.4914 steel after thermal ageing at temperatures between 400 and 600 C has been investigated for times up to 17000 h. The carbides were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy and extraction replicas. The concentrations of the constituents of the matrix were measured by means of atom probe. The mean chromium concentrations in the matrix are found to be 8.66{+-}0.32, 4.5{+-}0.3, and 7.2{+-}0.4 at.%, after ageing at 400, 500, and 600 C, respectively. The matrix contains virtually no carbon. The results are discussed in terms of phase decomposition and species segregation. (orig.) 15 refs.

  10. Analysis of the bioavailability of Cr(III and Cr(VI based on the determination of chromium in Mentha piperita by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SVETLANA ĐOGO

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mentha piperita L. (Lamiaceae was cultivated under the controlled laboratory conditions in the presence of varying levels of trivalent and hexavalent chromium in order to determine its capacity to control chromium uptake and its tolerance limit. The plants were grown in pots at 25 °C with controlled soil moisture (about 80 % of the water retention capacity. The soil was treated with increasing concentrations of Cr(NO33 (40, 80, 120, and 200 mg kg-1 and K2Cr2O7 (2.5, 5, 10, and 15 mg kg-1. A control group of plants was grown without the addition of chromium to the soil. For each concentration, three acidity levels were tested: natural, one pH unit below and one above the natural acidity of the soil (pH2 6, pH1 5 and pH3 7. The plant samples were digested according to the standard procedure and chromium content was determined by GFAAS. For all plants, the transportation index was calculated and the results (expressed in mg kg-1 at pH1, pH2 and pH3, respectively, were: 0.21–0.80, 0.06–1.06 and 0.04–0.52. The recoveries were good (72.73–115.3 % as evidenced by the analysis of certified reference materials (NIST SRM 8433 – Corn Bran and NIST SRM 1547 – Peach Leaves. The mobility of chromium through the plants tissues is discussed in regard to its competition with iron and manganese for transport binding sites; hence Mn and Fe were also determined.

  11. Electrodeposition of chromium from trivalent chromium urea bath containing sulfate and chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The reduction of Cr( Ⅲ) to Cr( Ⅱ ) on copper electrode in trivalent chromium urea bath containing chromium sulfate and chromium chloride as chromium source has been investigated by potentiodynamic sweep. The transfer coefficient α for reduction of Cr( Ⅲ ) to Cr( Ⅱ ) on copper electrode was calculated as 0.46. The reduction is a quasi-reversible process. J-t responses at different potential steps showed that the generation and adsorption characteristics of carboxylate bridged oligomer are relevant to cathode potential. The interface behavior between electrode and solution for Cr( Ⅲ ) complex is a critical factor influencing sustained electrode position of chromium. The hypotheses of the electro-inducing polymerization of Cr( Ⅲ ) was proposed. The potential scope in which sustained chromium deposits can be prepared is from- 1.3 V to- 1.7 V (vs SCE) in the urea bath. Bright chromium deposits with thickness of 30 μm can be prepared in the bath.

  12. The influence of Chromium supplied by tanning and wet finishing processes on the formation of cr(vi in leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Fuck

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromium used in leather manufacturing can be oxidized from the trivalent to the hexavalent state, causing environmental concerns. In this study, the influence of Cr(III from tanning, deacidification pH, fatliquors, chrome retanning and vegetable retanning on the formation of Cr(VI in leather was analyzed by comparing natural and aged samples. In wet-blue leather, even after aging and in fatliquored leathers that did not suffer the aging process, the presence of Cr(VI was always below the detection limit of 3 mg/kg. Considering the presence of Cr(VI, the supply of chromium during the retanning step had a more significant effect than during the tanning. In the fatliquoring process with sulfites, fish and synthetic fatliquor leather samples contained Cr(VI when aged, and the highest concentration detected was 26.7 mg/kg. The evaluation of Cr(VI formation led to recommendations for regulation in the leather industry.

  13. Influence of pH on the survival of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides populations living in aquatic environments highly contaminated with chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, María; Bartolomé, M Carmen; Sánchez-Fortún, Sebastián

    2013-12-01

    The accommodation of photosynthetic organisms to adverse conditions, such as pH changes in the aquatic environment, and their response to aquatic pollutants is essential to develop future biosensors. The present study reports the ability of both Cr(VI)-sensitive and tolerant Dyctiosphaerium chlorelloides strains to live in aqueous solutions highly contaminated with hexavalent chromium under varying ranges of pH, by the determination of chromium toxic effects on these strains. Studies of cell growth, photosynthetic quantum yield and gross photosynthesis rate show that both D. chlorelloides strains are able to survive in alkaline and moderately acidified (pH 4.25) aquatic environments. Below this pH value cell populations from both strains exposed for short periods of time to Cr(VI) showed alterations in the three parameters studied. There were no significant differences comparing the response of both strains at pH change in the culture medium. However, Cr(VI)-tolerant strain exhibits a better fit to maintain cell growth than Cr(VI)-sensitive strain when both were subjected to pH 4.25 in the culture medium. The absence of significant differences in photosynthetic activity results for both strains suggests that the lower sensitivity exhibited by Cr(VI)-tolerant strain would be due to cellular morphological changes rather than changes in cellular activity. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin ulceration, or nasal septum perforation; and... is present or is likely to be present from skin or eye contact with chromium (VI), the employer shall... cleaned in a manner that minimizes skin or eye contact with chromium (VI) and effectively prevents...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system dysfunction; any history of asthma, dermatitis, skin ulceration, or nasal septum perforation; and... is present or is likely to be present from skin or eye contact with chromium (VI), the employer shall... cleaned in a manner that minimizes skin or eye contact with chromium (VI) and effectively prevents...

  16. Chromium Contamination in Army Face Masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    containing carbon particles by inhalation when wearing face masks. Other potential health effects are chrome allergies and nonneoplastic lesions of...chronic inflammation—have been reported in chrome -platers and other workers exposed to aerosols of chromium (VI) compounds. Chronic pharyngitis...monochromates and dichromates of sodium, potassium , ammonium, lithium, cesium, and rubidium. ACGIH includes chromium in its list of known human

  17. Performance of high-velocity oxy-fuel-sprayed chromium carbide-nickel chromium coating in an actual boiler environment of a thermal power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, T.S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R.D. [Industrial Technology Institute, Roorkee (India)

    2007-09-15

    The present study aims to evaluate the performance of a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr (chromium carbide-nickel chromium) coating on a nickel-based super-alloy in an actual industrial environment of a coal-fired boiler, with the objective to protect the boiler super-heater and reheater tubes from hot corrosion. The tests were performed in the platen super heater zone of a coal-fired boiler for 1,000 h at 900 degrees C under cyclic conditions. The Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coating imparted the necessary protection to the nickel-based super alloy in the given environment. The dense and flat splat structure of the coating, and the formation of oxides of chromium and nickel and their spinels, might have protected the substrate super alloy from the inward permeation of corrosive species.

  18. Effect of Chromium on Oxidative Damage and Antioxidant Capacity of Ctenopharyngodon idellus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting GUO; Yuanyuan MA; Peng TIAN; Yan LIU; Lunqiang YUAN

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to investigate the effect of chromium on ox- idative damage and antioxidant capacity of Ctenopharyngodon idellus (grass carp). [Method] The grass carps were treated with hexavalent chromium (Cr^6+) solution at concentrations of 0, 7.23, 14.47, 28.94 mg/L, and then the content of malondialde- hyde (MDA), the level of total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC) and the activity of gtu- tathione-S-transferase (GST) in the hepatopancreas of grass carp were determined after 96 hours in different treatment groups. [Result] The content of MDA presented increasing trend with the increase of exposure Cr^6+ concentrations. The activity of T-AOC increased firstly, then decreased with the increasing Cr^6+ exposure concentra- tions, showing that the level of T-AOC was induced in tow and medium concentrat ions (7.23 and 14.47 mg/L), but inhibited in high concentrations (28.94 mg/L). Among the exposure groups, the level of T-AOC in medium concentration group (14.47 mg/L) was significantly higher than the control (P〈0.05). Except the low concentration groups (7.23 mg/L) of which the GST activity was slightly induced, the GST activities of the other groups all showed downward trend with increasing Cr^6+ levels, and the activity of GST in 28.94 mg/L group was significantly lower than the control group (P〈0.05). [Conclusion] Cr^6+ could cause large oxidative damage in the hepatopancreas of grass carp, thus poisoning it, and Cr^6+ may further damage the organizational structure and physiological function of grass carp.

  19. Exposure of soil microbial communities to chromium and arsenic alters their diversity and structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody S Sheik

    Full Text Available Extensive use of chromium (Cr and arsenic (As based preservatives from the leather tanning industry in Pakistan has had a deleterious effect on the soils surrounding production facilities. Bacteria have been shown to be an active component in the geochemical cycling of both Cr and As, but it is unknown how these compounds affect microbial community composition or the prevalence and form of metal resistance. Therefore, we sought to understand the effects that long-term exposure to As and Cr had on the diversity and structure of soil microbial communities. Soils from three spatially isolated tanning facilities in the Punjab province of Pakistan were analyzed. The structure, diversity and abundance of microbial 16S rRNA genes were highly influenced by the concentration and presence of hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI and arsenic. When compared to control soils, contaminated soils were dominated by Proteobacteria while Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria (which are generally abundant in pristine soils were minor components of the bacterial community. Shifts in community composition were significant and revealed that Cr (VI-containing soils were more similar to each other than to As contaminated soils lacking Cr (VI. Diversity of the arsenic resistance genes, arsB and ACR3 were also determined. Results showed that ACR3 becomes less diverse as arsenic concentrations increase with a single OTU dominating at the highest concentration. Chronic exposure to either Cr or As not only alters the composition of the soil bacterial community in general, but affects the arsenic resistant individuals in different ways.

  20. The shifts of sediment microbial community phylogenetic and functional structures during chromium (VI) reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhengsheng; He, Zhili; Tao, Xuanyu; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhao, Mengxin; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zheng, Zhe; Yuan, Tong; Liu, Pu; Chen, Yong; Nolan, Virgo; Li, Xiangkai

    2016-12-01

    The Lanzhou reach of the Yellow River, located at the upstream of Lanzhou, has been contaminated by heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons over a long-time. We hypothesized that indigenous microbial communities would remediate those contaminants and some unique populations could play an important role in this process. In this study, we investigated the sediment microbial community structure and function from the Lanzhou reach. Sediment samples were collected from two nearby sites (site A and site B) in the Lanzhou reach along the Yellow River. Sediment geochemical property data showed that site A sediment samples contained significantly (p < 0.05) higher heavy metals than site B, such as chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), and copper (Cu). Both site A and B samples were incubated with or without hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) for 30 days in the laboratory, and Cr (VI) reduction was only observed in site A sediment samples. After incubation, MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons revealed that the phylogenetic composition and structure of microbial communities changed in both samples, and especially Proteobacteria, as the most abundant phylum increased from 45.1 % to 68.2 % in site A, and 50.1 % to 71.3 % in site B, respectively. Some unique OTUs and populations affiliated with Geobacter, Clostridium, Desulfosporosinus and Desulfosporosinus might be involved in Cr (VI) reduction in site A. Furthermore, GeoChip 4.0 (a comprehensive functional gene array) data showed that genes involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling and metal resistance significantly (p < 0.05) increased in site A sediment samples. All the results indicated that indigenous sediment microbial communities might be able to remediate contaminants like Cr (VI), and this information provides possible strategies for future bioremediation of the Lanzhou reach.

  1. [Bioremediation of chromium (VI) contaminated site by reduction and microbial stabilization of chromium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia-Chuan; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Liu, Xi-Wen; Xu, Qian; Shi, Wei-Lin

    2014-10-01

    Chromium (VI) contaminated soil samples were collected from a chemical plant in Suzhou. Firstly, the reduced soil was prepared by adding reagent (Stone-sulfure reagent) into polluted soil to transfer most chromium (VI) into chromium (III), then a nutrient solution was introduced into the reduced soil, and the stabilized soil was obtained after 60 days culturing. The chromium (VI) content of the three kinds of soil was analyzed. The results showed that the chromium (VI) content in toxicity characteristic leaching liquid (TCLL) dropped by 96. 8% (from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 0.26 mg · L(-1)), and the total chromium content dropped by 95.7% (from 14.66 mg · L(-1) to 0.63 mg · L(-1)) after bioremediation in 5% nutrient solution. Additionally, the durability of chromium stabilization was tested by potassium permanganate oxidation and sterilization of microbe-treated soil. After oxidation, the chromium (VI) content in TCLL of the reduced soil was increased from 8.26 mg · L(-1) to 14.68 mg · L(-1). However, the content after bioremediation was decreased to 2.68 mg · L(-1). The results of sterilization demonstrated that the death of microbe had no significant effect on the stabilization of chromium. Consequently, the research in this paper demonstrated the feasibility of bioremediation of chromium (VI) polluted soil through reduction followed by stabilization/soilidification, and provided a technique with low cost but high efficiency.

  2. Chromium speciation in solid matrices and regulation: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unceta, N. [University of the Basque Country, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain); Seby, F. [Ultra Traces Analyses Aquitaine (UT2A), Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, Pau (France); Malherbe, J.; Donard, O.F.X. [Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, IPREM, UMR CNRS 5254, Pau (France)

    2010-06-15

    In recent years, the extensive use of chromium in industrial processes has led to the promotion of several directives and recommendations by the European Union, that try to limit and regulate the presence of Cr(VI) in the environment and to protect industrial workers using chromium and end-users of manufactured products. As a consequence, new standard methods and analytical procedures have been published at the EU level for Cr(VI) determination in soil, sludge, sediment, and similar waste materials, workplace atmospheres, cement, packaging materials, industrially produced samples, and corrosion-protection layers on some components of vehicles and electrical and electronic equipment. The objective of this article is to summarize the different directives and recommendations and to critically review the currently existing standard methods and the methods published in the literature for chromium speciation in the above mentioned solid matrices, putting the emphasis on the different extraction procedures which have been developed for each matrix. Particular attention has been paid to Cr(III) and Cr(VI) inter-conversions that can occur during extraction and efforts to minimize these unwanted reactions. Although the use of NaOH-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions with hot plate extraction seems to be the more widespread procedure, species transformation can still occur and several studies suggest that speciated isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS) could be a suitable tool for correction of these interconversions. Besides, recent studies have proved the role of Cr(III) in chromium toxicology. As a consequence, the authors suggest an update of standard methods in the near future. (orig.)

  3. A novel solid phase extraction procedure on Amberlite XAD-1180 for speciation of Cr(III), Cr(VI) and total chromium in environmental and pharmaceutical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narin, Ibrahim; Kars, Ayse; Soylak, Mustafa

    2008-01-31

    Due to the toxicity of chromium, species depend on their chemical properties and bioavailabilities, speciation of chromium is very important in environmental samples. A speciation procedure for chromium(III), chromium(VI) and total chromium in environmental samples is presented in this work, prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of chromium. The procedure is based on the adsorption of Cr(III)-diphenylcarbazone complex on Amberlite XAD-1180 resin. After oxidation of Cr(III), the developed solid phase extraction system was applied to determinate the total chromium. Cr(III) was calculated as the difference between the total Cr content and the Cr(VI) content. The analytical conditions for the quantitative recoveries of Cr(VI) on Amberlite XAD-1180 resin were investigated. The effects of some alkaline, earth alkaline, metal ions and also some anions were also examined. Preconcentration factor was found to be 75. The detection limits (LOD) based on three times sigma of the blank (N: 21) for Cr(VI) and total chromium were 7.7 and 8.6 microg/L, respectively. Satisfactory results for the analysis of total chromium in the stream sediment (GBW7310) certified reference material for the validation of the presented method was obtained. The procedure was applied to food, water and pharmaceutical samples successfully.

  4. Manganese(II)-catalyzed and clay-minerals-mediated reduction of chromium(VI) by citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Binoy; Naidu, Ravi; Krishnamurti, Gummuluru S R; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2013-01-01

    Unlike lower valent iron (Fe), the potential role of lower valent manganese (Mn) in the reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in soil is poorly documented. In this study, we report that citrate along with Mn(II) and clay minerals (montmorillonite and kaolinite) reduce Cr(VI) both in aqueous phase and in the presence of dissolved organic carbon (SDOC) extracted from a forest soil. The reduction was favorable at acidic pH (up to pH 5) and followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The citrate (10 mM) + Mn(II) (182.02 μM) + clay minerals (3% w/v) system in SDOC accounted for complete reduction of Cr(VI) (192.32 μM) in about 72 h at pH 4.9. In this system, citrate was the reductant, Mn(II) was a catalyst, and the clay minerals acted as an accelerator for both the reductant and catalyst. The clay minerals also serve as a sink for Cr(III). This study reveals the underlying mechanism of the Mn(II)-induced reduction of Cr(VI) by organic ligand in the presence of clay minerals under certain environmental conditions.

  5. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  6. Synthesis of Chromium (Ⅲ) 5-aminosalicylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; HAO Er-jun; JIANG Yu-qin

    2004-01-01

    As we all known that diabetes is a chronic disease with major health consequences.Research has revealed that the occurrence of diabetes have great thing to do with the chromium deficient. Almost 40 years after the first report of glucose tolerance factor(GTF) [1], no conclusive evidence for an isolable ,biologically active form of chromium exited. Three materials have been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium: "glucose tolerance factor", chromium Picolinate and low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LWMCr) [2] . So there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs .5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is identified as an active component in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis . The therapeutic action of 5-ASA is believed to be coupled to its ability to act as a free radical scavenger [3-4],acting locally on the inflamed colonic mucosa [5-7]. However, the clinical use of 5-ASA is limited, since orally administered 5-ASA is rapidly and completely absorbed from the upper gastrointestinal tract and therefore the local therapeutic effects of 5-ASA in the colon is hardly expected.In this paper, we report the synthesis of chromium(Ⅲ)5-aminosalicylate from 5-ASA and CrCl3. 6H2O.The synthesis route is as follow:The complex has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra, X-ray powder diffractionand TG-DTA . They indicate that the structure is tris(5-ASA) Chromium . Experiments show that thecomplex has a good activity for supplement tiny dietary chromium, lowering blood glucose levels,lowering serum lipid levels and in creasing lean body mass .

  7. Study of the mechanism of chromium cluster formation by laser microprobe mass spectrometry. Correlation with theoretical computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachimi, A.; Poitevin, E.; Krier, G.; Muller, J. F.; Ruiz-Lopez, M. F.

    1995-05-01

    Different stoichiometries of micrometric particles of powdered chromium oxides and salts are examined by time-of-flight laser microprobe mass spectrometry (TOF-LMMS). The negative cluster ion distributions show a good correlation with the stoichiometry of the chromium in the oxide. We have noticed a great spectral similarity between chromium(VI) oxide and hydrated chromium(III), salts leading to difficulties in differentiating these two kinds of compounds and determining the valency of chromium. The formation of CrO4- ions could be associated with product hydration, and could modify the fingerprint spectra of the chromium oxides and salts. We demonstrate that the CrO4- ion arises from collision between molecules present in the plasma generated by laser ablation. The mechanism of cluster formation is closely associated with the presence of neutral or ionized species (water, sulfate, nitrate, etc.). In particular, the hydration effect is very marked in the initial chromium salt. To confirm these results, an FT ion cyclotron MS investigation has been carried out, which allowed determination of the laser power dependence and relative stability of CrO-, CrO-2 and CrO3-. Results from a theoretical study of these types of cluster ions are presented and compared with the experimental data.

  8. Leaching of chromium from chromium contaminated soil: Speciation study and geochemical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Darko H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of chromium between soil and leachate was monitored. A natural process of percolating rainwater through the soil was simulated in the laboratory conditions and studied with column leaching extraction. Migration of chromium in the soil is conditioned by the level of chromium soil contamination, the soil organic matter content, and rainwater acidity. Chromium (III and chromium(VI were determined by spectrophotometric method with diphenilcarbazide in acidic media. Comparing the results of chromium speciation in leachate obtained by experimental model systems and geochemical modelling calculations using Visual MINTEQ model, a correlation was observed regarding the influence of the tested parameters. Leachate solutions showed that the concentration of Cr depended on the organic matter content. The influence of pH and soil organic matter content is in compliance after its definition through experimental and theoretical way. The computer model - Stockholm Humic Model used to evaluate the leaching results corresponded rather well with the measured values.

  9. Thermal stability and corrosion resistance of electroplated black chromium solar selective absorber%电镀黑铬太阳能选择性吸收器的热稳定性及耐蚀性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAYATI M R.; JANGHORBAN K.; SHARIAT M H

    2009-01-01

    黑铬作为最具吸引力的太阳能选择性吸收材料之一,已得到实验证实并用于太阳能收集器.本文评价了黑铬太阳能选择性吸收器的热稳定性和耐蚀性.采用三价铬镀液,在铜基体上电沉积了黑铬镀层.另外,采用六价铬镀液制备了六价铬黑铬镀层作为对比.根据ISO/CD 12592.2标准,评价了热处理循环前后镀层的太阳能吸收,发射性能和热稳定性.分别采用扫描电镜和X射线衍射,表征了镀层的微观结构和化学组成.采用分光光度法测量了镀层的吸收率和发射率.结果表明,镀液中的配位剂对镀层的热稳定性有显著影响.与六价铬镀层相比,三价铬镀层具有更优异的热稳定性和耐蚀性.%Black chromium is one of the most attractive solar selective absorbers passed laboratory experiments and has practically been used in solar thermal collectors. The aim of this research is to evaluate the thermal stability and corrosion resistance of black chromium solar selective absorbers. Black chromium layers were electroplated on copper substrates from a bath containing trivalent and hexavalent chromium ions, respectively. Solar absorption and emission were measured by spectrophotometry before and after heat treatment cycles and the thermal stability of the deposited layers was evaluated according to ISO/CD 12592.2 standard. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were employed to characterize microstructure and chemical composition of the layers, respectively. It was found that complexing agent in the electroplating bath has a significant effect on thermal stability of the deposited absorber layers. It was also revealed that the trivalent chromium coating has superior thermal stability and corrosion resistance to the hexavalent chromium coating.

  10. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strength and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelainfused- to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metalceramic samples were made from nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C, according to the manufactures manuals and instructions from ISO 9693: 1996. Three-point bending test was performed up to the ceramic fracture. The fracture load was measured on an universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464, with cross-head speed of 0,05mm/min. Results. The results of this study confirmed the significant differences between the metal-ceramic bond strength (p < 0.01 and elastic modulus (p < 0.001 of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys, where cobalt-chromium alloys showed higher values for both tested parameters. Conclusion. Cobalt-chromium metal-ceramic alloys can successfully replace nickel-chromium alloys, especially for fabrication of long-span metal-ceramic bridges due to the great flexural strength.

  11. Chromium (VI) adsorption on boehmite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados-Correa, F. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: fgc@nuclear.inin.mx; Jimenez-Becerril, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-03-15

    Boehmite was synthesized and characterized in order to study the adsorption behavior and the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions as a function of contact time, initial pH solution, amount of adsorbent and initial metal ion concentration, using batch technique. Adsorption data of Cr(VI) on the boehmite were analyzed according to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption models. Thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption system were determinated at 293, 303, 313 and 323 K temperatures. The kinetic values and thermodynamic parameters from the adsorption process show that the Cr(VI) ions adsorption on boehmite is an endothermic and spontaneous process. These results show that the boehmite could be considered as a potential adsorbent for chromium ions in aqueous solutions.

  12. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    composition of contemporaneous seawater. Marine carbonates are ubiquitous throughout Earth’s rock record rendering them a particularly interesting archive for constraining past changes in ocean chemistry. This thesis includes an investigation of the fractionation behavior of Cr isotopesduring coprecipitation......Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past...... related to the rise of oxygen and the evolution of the biosphere. However, before the Cr isotopesystem can be applied to faithfully delineate paleo-environmental changes, careful assessment of the signal robustness and a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes is necessary...

  13. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    composition of contemporaneous seawater. Marine carbonates are ubiquitous throughout Earth’s rock record rendering them a particularly interesting archive for constraining past changes in ocean chemistry. This thesis includes an investigation of the fractionation behavior of Cr isotopesduring coprecipitation......Chromium (Cr) is a redox sensitive element potentially capable of tracing fine-scale fluctuations of the oxygenation of Earth’s early surface environments and seawater. The Cr isotope composition of carbonates could perhaps be used as paleo-redox proxy to elucidate changes in the geological past...... related to the rise of oxygen and the evolution of the biosphere. However, before the Cr isotopesystem can be applied to faithfully delineate paleo-environmental changes, careful assessment of the signal robustness and a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes is necessary...

  14. Selective and sensitive detection of chromium(VI) in waters using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldy, Effie; Wolff, Chloe; Miao, Zhixin; Chen, Hao

    2013-09-01

    From 2000 through 2011, there were 14 criminal cases of violations of the Clean Water Act involving the discharge of chromium, a toxic heavy metal, into drinking and surface water sources. As chromium(VI), a potential carcinogen present in the environment, represents a significant safety concern, it is currently the subject of an EPA health risk assessment. Therefore, sensitive and selective detection of this species is highly desired. This study reports the analysis of chromium(VI) in water samples by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) following its reduction and complexation with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). The reduction and subsequent complexation produce a characteristic [Cr(III)O]-PDC complex which can be detected as a protonated ion of m/z 507 in the positive ion mode. The detection is selective to chromium(VI) under acidic pH, even in the presence of chromium(III) and other metal ions, providing high specificity. Different water samples were examined, including deionized, tap, and river waters, and sensitive detection was achieved. In the case of deionized water, quantification over the concentration range of 3.7 to 148ppb gave an excellent correlation coefficient of 0.9904 using the enhanced MS mode scan. Using the single-reaction monitoring (SRM) mode (monitoring the characteristic fragmentation of m/z 507 to m/z 360), the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.25ppb. The LOD of chromium(VI) for both tap and river water samples was determined to be 2.0ppb. A preconcentration strategy using simple vacuum evaporation of the aqueous sample was shown to further improve the ESI signal by 15 fold. This method, with high sensitivity and selectivity, should provide a timely solution for the real-world analysis of toxic chromium(VI).

  15. Application of fish cell lines for evaluating the chromium induced cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taju, G; Abdul Majeed, S; Nambi, K S N; Sahul Hameed, A S

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, we hypothesize that cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress play a key role in chromium induced toxicity in SISS, SISK, IEE, IEK, IEG, SICH and ICG cell lines after 24 h exposure. Three fish species namely Lates calcarifer, Etroplus suratensis and Catla catla were exposed to the concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mg/L of chromium for 96 h under static conditions for conducting acute toxicity tests. LC50 was then calculated. The percentage cell survival was assessed by multiple endpoints such as MTT, NR, AB and CB assays in the seven fish cell lines exposed to different concentrations of chromium and EC50 values of all the four endpoints were calculated. High significances were noted in the correlations between each in vitro cytotoxicity assays and in vivo mortality data. Cell shrinkage, cell detachment, vacuolations and cell swelling at the highest concentration of chromium (50 mg/L) were seen on microscopic examination of cell morphology. Comet assay and Hoechst staining were carried out to assess DNA damage and nuclear fragmentation in the seven fish lines exposed to chromium. The results of antioxidant parameters obtained indicate a significant reduction in the level of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase and Glutathione peroxidase, and increased level of lipid peroxidation in all the cell lines exposed to chromium. These results confirm that fish cell lines could be used as an alternative to whole fish for cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress assessment in chromium toxicity studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bio-reduction of Cr(VI) by exopolysaccharides (EPS) from indigenous bacterial species of Sukinda chromite mine, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, R; Samuel, Jastin; Mishra, R; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, A

    2012-07-01

    Chrome mining activity has contributed intensively towards pollution of hexavalent chromium around Sukinda Valley, Orissa, India. In an attempt to study the specific contribution of exopolysaccharides (EPS) extracted from indigenous isolates towards Cr(VI) reduction, three chromium (VI) tolerant strains were isolated from the effluent mining sludge. Based on the tolerance towards Cr(VI) and EPS production capacity, one of them was selected for further work. The taxonomic identity of the selected strain was confirmed to be Enterobacter cloacae (showing 98% similarity in BLAST search to E. cloacae) through 16S rRNA analysis. The EPS production was observed to increase with increasing Cr(VI) concentration in the growth medium, highest being 0.078 at 100 mg/l Cr(VI). The extracted EPS from Enterobacter cloacae SUKCr1D was able to reduce 31.7% of Cr(VI) at 10 mg/l concentration, which was relevant to the prevailing natural concentrations at Sukinda mine effluent sludge. The FT-IR spectral studies confirmed the surface chemical interactions of hexavalent chromium with EPS.

  17. Contribution to the study of the biological properties of compounds labeled with radio-chromium {sup 51}Cr; Contribution a l'etude des proprietes biologiques des composes marques au radiochrome {sup 51}Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingrand, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-15

    Among the radioisotopes commonly used in biology and medicine which are controlled Individually in the Radioelement Departement of the Saclay Nuclear Research Centre before being sent to the users, the author has chosen chromium 51 incorporated in inorganic salts or in organic substrates for a study of the biological properties of the compounds. In the first part, he has compared the pathways followed by the radioactive sodium chromate and chromic chloride mixed with blood or given to the whole animal, the object being to determine whether a reduction of hexavalent chromium occurs, both in vitro and in vivo. In the second part, the author has tried to show the validity of using, various substrates labeled with chromium 51, red cells, haemoglobin, plasma proteins and cytochrome c. The results obtained have contributed to underline the interest of using such compounds for biological applications. (author) [French] Parmi les radioisotopes d'utilisation courants en biologie et en medecine qui sont l'objet d'un controle particulier dans le Departement des Radioelements du Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay avant leur diffusion aux utilisateurs, l'auteur a choisi le chrome 51 incorpore a des sels mineraux ou a des substrats organiques, afin d'en etudier les proprietes biologiques. Dans la premiere partie, il a compare le sort du chromate de sodium et du chlorure chromique radioactifs melanges a du sang ou administres a l'animal entier en s'efforcant de mettre en evidence une reduction du chrome hexavalent aussi bien in vitro qu'in vivo. Dans la deuxieme partie, il a cherche a etablir la validite de l'emploi de differents substrats marques au chrome 51, l'hematie, l'hemoglobine, les proteines plasmatiques et le cytochrome c. Les resultats obtenus ont permis de souligner le reel interet des applications biologiques des composes marques par le radioisotope. (auteur)

  18. The effect of selective oxidation of chromium on the creep strength of alloy 617

    OpenAIRE

    Ennis, P.; Quadakkers, W.; H. Schuster

    1993-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect on creep strength of the selective oxidation of chromium which causes the formation of a carbide-fi-ee subsurface zone, specimens of Ni22Cr12Co9Mo1Al (Alloy 617) were subjected to heat treatments to simulate a long-term service exposure of a thin-walled heat exchanger tube operating at high temperatures. In creep tests carried out at 900°C, specimens with extensive chromium-depleted and carbide-free subsurface zones exhibited higher creep strength than speci...

  19. CHROMIUM CONCENTRATION IN TEHRAN ELECTROPLATING PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghiasseddin

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available Hazards of soluable hexa and trivalent chromium have been documented by many investigators. But there was no information regarding safety of about 5000 workers at exposure risk to chromium in 600 primitive electroplating work shops of Tehran. During this study more than 70% of work shops were inactive due to some of their own problems. Out of active plants those that were relatively more cooperative 43 manual and 3 semi automatic were investigated for chromium concentration both by personal and environmental Sampling. The Samples were analyzed by AAS and cholormetry. In 30% of personal and 40% of environmental samples both total and Cr+6 were higher than ACGIH’S TLV. In one of semiautomatic plant Cr=6 was as high as 0.71 mg/m.3.Regarding injuries, following observations were made: Nasal wound 85%, skin irritation 73% , Dermatitis 35% and some other chromium related injuries including 2 cases of Septum perforations.

  20. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  1. Localized Corrosion of Chromium Coated Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Beentjes, P.; Mol, A.; Terryn, H.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the studies of the local corrosion behaviour of chromium-coated ultra low carbon steel in NaCl solution using polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and SVET.

  2. AEROSOL BEHAVIOR IN CHROMIUM WASTE INCINERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyuan Yu

    2003-01-01

    Cr2O3 is considered as the dominant incineration product during the combustion disposal of chromium waste. A hydrogen/air diffusion flame was employed to simulate the industrial process of incineration. Cr2O3 aerosols were generated inside the flame by the gas phase reaction of chromium and oxygen. Chromium came from the rapid decomposition of chromium hexacarbonyl (Cr(CO)6) at room temperature and was carried into the combustion chamber by hydrogen. Aerosol and clusters can then be easily formed in the flame by nucleation and coagulation. A two dimensional Discrete-Sectional Model (DSM) was adopted to calculate the Cr2O3 aerosol behavior. The experimental measurement method was Dynamic Light Scattering. The numerically predicted results agreed well with those of the experimental measurement. Both results show that the Cr2O3 aerosol size reached about 70 nanometers at the flame top.

  3. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium Alloy Plate, Sheet, and Strip

  4. Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    Standard Specification for Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium, Low-Carbon Nickel-Molybdenum-Chromium-Tantalum, Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Copper, and Low-Carbon Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Tungsten Alloy Rod

  5. Attenuation of chromium toxicity by bioremediation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Monalisa; Patra, Hemanta Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Chromium is an important toxic environmental pollutant. Chromium pollution results largely from industrial activities, but other natural and anthropogenic sources also contribute to the problem. Plants that are exposed to environmental contamination by chromium are affected in diverse ways, including a tendency to suffer metabolic stress. The stress imposed by Cr exposure also extends to oxidative metabolic stress in plants that leads to the generation of active toxic oxygen free radicals. Such active free radicals degrade essential biomolecules and distort plant biological membranes. In this chapter, we describe sources of environmental chromium contamination, and provide information about the toxic impact of chromium on plant growth and metabolism. In addition, we address different phytoremediation processes that are being studied for use worldwide, in contaminated regions, to address and mitigate Cr pollution. There has been a long history of attempts to successfully mitigate the toxic effects of chromium-contaminated soil on plants and other organisms. One common approach, the shifting of polluted soil to landfills, is expensive and imposes environmental risks and health hazards of its own. Therefore, alternative eco-friendly bioremediation approaches are much in demand for cleaning chromium-polluted areas. To achieve its cleaning effects, bioremediation utilizes living organisms (bacteria, algae, fungi, and plants) that are capable of absorbing and processing chromium residues in ways which amend or eliminate it. Phytoremediation (bioremediation with plants) techniques are increasingly being used to reduce heavy metal contamination and to minimize the hazards of heavy metal toxicity. To achieve this, several processes, viz., rhizofiltration, phytoextraction, phytodetoxification, phytostabilization, and phytovolatilization, have been developed and are showing utility in practice, or promise. Sources of new native hyperaccumulator plants for use at contaminated

  6. Reduction of Health Risks Due to Chromium(VI)Using Mesquite: A Potential Cr Phytoremediator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.; Aldrich, Mary V.; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Parsons, Jason G.

    2004-03-29

    Chromium is a transition metal extensively used in industry. Cr mining and industrial operations account for chromium wastes at Superfund sites in the United States. A study was performed to investigate the possibility of using mesquite (Prosopis spp.), which is an indigenous desert plant species, to remove Cr from contaminated sites. In this study, mesquite plants were grown in an agar-based medium containing 75 mg L-1 and 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI). The Cr content of leaf tissue (992 mg kg-1 of dry weight, from 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI)) indicated that mesquite could be classified as a chromium hyperaccumulator. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies performed to experimental samples showed that mesquite roots absorbed some of the supplied Cr(VI). However, the data analyses of plant tissues demonstrated that the absorbed Cr(VI) was fully reduced to Cr(III) in the leaf tissue.

  7. Thermodynamics of chromium in UO{sub 2} fuel: A solubility model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riglet-Martial, Ch., E-mail: chantal.martial@cea.fr [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Direction de l’Energie Nucléaire, Département d’Etudes des Combustibles, Centre d’Etudes de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Martin, Ph. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Direction de l’Energie Nucléaire, Département d’Etudes des Combustibles, Centre d’Etudes de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Testemale, D. [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Sabathier-Devals, C.; Carlot, G.; Matheron, P.; Iltis, X.; Pasquet, U.; Valot, C. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Direction de l’Energie Nucléaire, Département d’Etudes des Combustibles, Centre d’Etudes de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Delafoy, C. [AREVA NP SAS, 10 rue Juliette Recamier, 69456 Lyon Cedex 06 (France); Largenton, R. [EDF R and D, Mechanics and Material Component Department, Avenue des Renardières, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France)

    2014-04-01

    The solubility and speciation of chromium in doped uranium oxide are measured in carefully controlled temperature and oxygen potential conditions using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM). The examination of the samples by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) provides evidence that (i) chromium is soluble in the UO{sub 2} matrix under the +3 oxidation state only regardless of the sintering conditions which is in accordance with a soluble species of type CrO{sub 3/2} and (ii) soluble chromium exhibits octahedral symmetry with 6 atoms of oxygen forming CrO{sub 6} patterns in the UO{sub 2} structure. In consistency with all available experimental information including previously published data, the solubility of chromium in UO{sub 2} corresponding to each two-phase field with either Cr, CrO and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} may be described in the ranges 1500 °C < T < 2000 °C and −460 < μ{sub O2} < −360 kJ/mol using the standard thermodynamic equations governing solubility equilibria. The characteristic parameters of the solubility laws in UO{sub 2} for the three chromium phases are derived.

  8. 富铬蚁巢伞(鸡(土从)菌)液体培养%Submerged culture of chromium-enriched Termitomyces albuminosus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡忠策; 郑晓冬; 陈新爱; 郑裕国

    2008-01-01

    A species of mushroom, Termitomyces albuminosus, was cultured in liquid medium for production of chromium-enriched mycelium. The influence of chromium (Ⅲ) on mycelial growth of T. albuminosus was investigated. An optimum medium composed of 5.6g/L yeast extract, 51.6g/L hydrolyzed rice, 2g/L KH2PO4,and 20mg/L chromium(Ⅲ) with initial pH of 4.5 was obtained by using method of central composite design (CCD). After incubation of 84h, the maximal biomass of chromium-enriched mycelia reached 24.23g DMW(dried mycelial weight)/L with 272μg/g DMW chromium content in 500mL flasks containing 100mL medium with an inoculum of 8% on a shaker of 100r/min under an optimized cultivation condition at 28℃.

  9. Detection of hexavalent uranium with inline and field-portable immunosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melton, Scott J.; Yu, Haini; Ali, Mehnaaz F.; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J.; Long, Philip E.; Blake, Diane A.

    2008-10-02

    An antibody that recognizes a chelated form of hexavalent uranium was used in the development of two different immunosensors for uranium detection. Specifically, these sensors were utilized for the analysis of groundwater samples collected during a 2007 field study of in situ bioremediation in a aquifer located at Rifle, CO. The antibody-based sensors provided data comparable to that obtained using Kinetic Phosphorescence Analysis (KPA). Thus, these novel instruments and associated reagents should provide field researchers and resource managers with valuable new tools for on-site data acquisition.

  10. Adsorption of basic chromium sulfate used in the tannery industries by calcined hydrotalcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez M, B. E.; Rivera R, R.; Iturbe G, J. L.; Olguin G, M. T., E-mail: beatriz.lopez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    The sorption behavior of the chemical species of Cr(III) from aqueous solutions by hydrotalcite calcined products was investigated considering the equilibrium ph (5.0 to 8.9) and the chromium concentration in aqueous solution (from 10.6 to 430.0 mmol/L) to obtain the corresponding isotherms. Each solution was prepared from basic Cr(III) sulphate which is a primary tanning agent used in the tannery industries. In this work no previous oxidation treatment was done to form Cr(vi) in order to remove the chromium from aqueous solutions by hydrotalcite. The amount of chromium in the remaining solutions after the sorption processes in a batch system by visible spectroscopy (Vis) was determined. The calcined hydrotalcite before and after the contact with the chromium(III) solutions by X-ray power diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, were characterized. The specific are by Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (Bet) method of each sample was also evaluated. It was found that under the experimental conditions of this work hydrolyzed species of Cr(III) are precipitated on the surface of the calcined hydrotalcite instead other adsorption mechanism, and the sulfate ions were the responsible to regenerated the crystalline structure of hydrotalcite, therefore the results are discussed in terms of both Cr(III) and sulfate chemical species. (Author)

  11. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated.

  12. The Key Technique of Manufacture of Dense Chromium Sesquioxide Refractories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIMaoqiang; ZHANGShuying; 等

    1998-01-01

    Dense chromium sesquioxide refractories have widely been used in the kilns for making alkai-free and anti-alkali glass fibers due to their excellent re-sistance to molten glasses.Densifications of chromium sesquioxide during sintering can be blocked by evaporation of chromium trioxide derived from oxidation at high temperature,In this paper the mech-anism of sintering chromium oxide and the process-ing technique for making dense chromium sesquiox-ide refractories are discussed .A process in laboratory scale for making dense chromium sesquioxide bricks is demonstrated.

  13. Degradation process of lead chromate in paintings by Vincent van Gogh studied by means of spectromicroscopic methods. Part 5. Effects of nonoriginal surface coatings into the nature and distribution of chromium and sulfur species in chrome yellow paints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monico, Letizia; Janssens, Koen; Vanmeert, Frederik; Cotte, Marine; Brunetti, Brunetto Giovanni; Van der Snickt, Geert; Leeuwestein, Margje; Salvant Plisson, Johanna; Menu, Michel; Miliani, Costanza

    2014-11-04

    The darkening of lead chromate yellow pigments, caused by a reduction of the chromate ions to Cr(III) compounds, is known to affect the appearance of several paintings by Vincent van Gogh. In previous papers of this series, we demonstrated that the darkening is activated by light and depends on the chemical composition and crystalline structure of the pigments. In this work, the results of Part 2 are extended and complemented with a new study aimed at deepening the knowledge of the nature and distribution of Cr and S species at the interface between the chrome yellow paint and the nonoriginal coating layer. For this purpose, three microsamples from two varnished paintings by Van Gogh and a waxed low relief by Gauguin (all originally uncoated) have been examined. Because nonoriginal coatings are often present in artwork by Van Gogh and contemporaries, the understanding of whether or not their application has influenced the morphological and/or physicochemical properties of the chrome yellow paint underneath is relevant in view of the conservation of these masterpieces. In all the samples studied, microscopic X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) investigations showed that Cr(III)-based alteration products are present in the form of grains inside the coating (generally enriched of S species) and also homogeneously widespread at the paint surface. The distribution of Cr(III) species may be explained by the mechanical friction caused by the coating application by brush that picked up and redistributed the superficial Cr compounds, likely already present in the reduced state as result of the photodegradation process. The analysis of the XANES profiles allowed us to obtain new insights into the nature of the Cr(III) alteration products, that were identified as sulfate-, oxide-, organo-metal-, and chloride-based compounds. Building upon the knowledge acquired through the examination of original paint samples and from the

  14. Evaluating Foraminifera as an Archive for Seawater Chromium Isotopic Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Planavsky, N.; Hull, P. M.; Tripati, A.; Reinhard, C.; Zou, H.; Elder, L. E.; Henehan, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years there has been growing interest in using chromium isotopes (δ53Cr) as a proxy to investigate the redox evolution of Earth's ocean-atmosphere system throughout geological history. Potential archives for seawater δ53Cr that have been identified to date include iron formations and organic-rich siliciclastic sediments. However, these types of sediments are not common and they are discontinuous over geologic time. As a result, alternative types of archives are needed. Here we evaluate the utility of foraminifera tests as a recorder of seawater δ53Cr. Core-tops used were from different ocean basins. Mono-specific samples of Globigerinoides sacculifer, Orbulina universa, Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, Globoratalia crassula-crassaformis, Globoratalia truncatulinoides, and Globigerinella siphonifera were isolated to investigate inter-species isotope fractionation. Chromium concentrations were measured by isotope dilution method to be 0.1-0.3 μg/g. The δ53Cr values of these species range from 0.2‰ to 2.4‰, with an analytical uncertainty of 0.3‰ (95% confidence). Despite the high analytical uncertainty due to the extremely low levels of Cr present, there is still large detectable variation in foraminiferal δ53Cr values, which overlap presently available seawater values (Bonnand et al., 2013; Scheiderich et al., 2015). Possible explanations for such variations in foraminiferal δ53Cr values include heterogeneity of seawater δ53Cr in the modern oceans, and/or photobiochemical redox cycling of Cr in the surface oceans. Therefore, care should be taken when using foraminifera to reconstruct past seawater δ53Cr values. ReferencesBonnand, P., James, R., Parkinson, I., Connelly, D., Fairchild, I., 2013. The chromium isotopic composition of seawater and marine carbonates. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 382: 10-20. Scheiderich, K., Amini, M., Holmden, C., Francois, R., 2015. Global variability of chromium isotopes in seawater demonstrated by Pacific

  15. Synthesis of a new complex Chromium (Ⅲ) 2-mercaptonicotinate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; HAO Er-jun; JIANG Yu-qin

    2004-01-01

    Chromium is an essential trace element for mammals[1-3].Diabetes is a chronic disease with major health consequence. Studies show that the occurrence of diabetes have great thing to do with the chromium deficient. Almost 40 years after the first report of glucose tolerance factor(GTF)[4]no conclusive evidence for an isolable ,biologically active form of chromium exited. Three materials have been proposed to be the biologically active form of chromium: "glucose tolerance factor", chromium Picolinate and low-molecular-weight chromium-binding substance (LWMCr)[5]So there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs[6].Chromium compounds have been used in medicine for centuries and there is potential for the design of new chromium drugs.2-Mercaptonicotinic acid(MN) displays the interesting biological activity. Chromium( Ⅲ )2-mercaptonicotinate is a common and effective biologically active form of Chromium. The test of biological activity indicated that may be useful in treating of diabetes. In this paper, we reported the T