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Sample records for heterotrophic microalga chlorella

  1. Nitrate concentration-shift cultivation to enhance protein content of heterotrophic microalga Chlorella vulgaris: Over-compensation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tonghui; Xia, Yun; Zeng, Yu; Li, Xingrui; Zhang, Yongkui

    2017-02-27

    Protein production from microalgae requires both high cell density during cultivation and high protein content in cells. Heterotrophic microalgae can achieve high cell density, and yet are confronted with the problem of low protein content. Based on over-compensation strategy, a new concentration-shift method was proposed to cultivate heterotrophic Chlorella vulgaris, aiming to increase protein content. With a prior starvation period, microalgae utilized more nitrate and accumulated more proteins compared to one-stage cultivation. Considering the convenience of operation, nitrate-added culture was adopted for producing heterotrophic microalgae, rather than sterile centrifugal culture. Operating parameters including nitrate concentration in N-deficient medium, N-starved time and nitrate concentration in N-rich medium were optimized, which were 0.18gl(-1), 38h and 2.45gl(-1), respectively. Under the optimized conditions, protein content in heterotrophic Chlorella reached 44.3%. Furthermore, the heterotrophic microalga was suggested to be a potential single-cell protein source according to the amino acid composition.

  2. Application of sweet sorghum for biodiesel production by heterotrophic microalga Chlorella protothecoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Chunfang; Zhai, Yan; Ding, Yi; Wu, Qingyu [School of Life Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-03-15

    Microalga Chlorella protothecoides can grow heterotrophically with glucose as the carbon source and accumulate high proportion of lipids. The microalgal lipids are suitable for biodiesel production. To further increase lipid yield and reduce biodiesel cost, sweet sorghum juice was investigated as an alternative carbon source to glucose in the present study. When the initial reducing sugar concentration was 10 g L{sup -1} in the culture medium, the dry cell yield and lipid content were 5.1 g L{sup -1} and 52.5% using enzymatic hydrolyzates of sweet sorghum juice as the carbon source after 120 h-culture in flasks. The lipid yield was 35.7% higher than that using glucose. When 3.0 g L{sup -1} yeast extract was added to the medium, the dry cell yield and lipid productivity was increased to 1.2 g L{sup -1} day{sup -1} and 586.8 mg L{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Biodiesel produced from the lipid of C. protothecoides through acid catalyzed transesterification was analyzed by GC-MS, and the three most abundant components were oleic acid methyl ester, cetane acid methyl ester and linoleic acid methyl ester. The results indicate that sweet sorghum juice could effectively enhance algal lipid production, and its application may reduce the cost of algae-based biodiesel. (author)

  3. The Effect of Aluminium on Antibacterial Properties and the Content of Some Fatty Acids in Microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris Beijernick, under Heterotrophic and Autotrophic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Abbaspour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are a group of organisms, which have a significant potential for industrial applications. These algae contain large amounts of lipids compounds that are beneficial to health, have antibacterial properties, and their extracted oil can be used for biofuel. In this study, microalgae Chlorella vulgaris Beijernick was grown in the culture medium BG-11 containing aluminium (AlCl3 under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. In each case, survival and growth, dry weight, internal aluminium content of the sample, antibacterial properties, the content of fatty acids accumulated in the algae and secreted into the culture medium in the logarithmic growth phase were studied. Aluminium significantly increased (P < .05 growth and dry weight in autotrophic treatment compared to the heterotrophic one. Most antibacterial properties were observed in methanol extracts of heterotrophic treatments containing 0.05% glucose. Aluminium also decreased fatty acids accumulation in the algae and increased fatty acids excretion into the culture medium in heterotrophic treatment compared to the autotrophic treatment. Survival of the sample was maintained in heterotrophic conditions and showed growth without lag phase, which is indicative of rapid acclimation of organisms in heterotrophic conditions. It seems that the mentioned characteristics make the single-celled green algae Chlorella vulgaris more efficient in different ways.

  4. Effect of pH on growth and lipid accumulation kinetics of the microalga Chlorella vulgaris grown heterotrophically under sulfur limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakarika, Myrsini; Kornaros, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the pH range that can support the growth of C. vulgaris, and, more specifically, to identify the optimal pH for the microalga's growth, under heterotrophic conditions. Furthermore, the effect of pH on the accumulation of intracellular lipids was studied. A wide range of pH values was tested using the respective buffer solutions. The optimal pH for biomass growth and lipid accumulation under sulfur limitation was found to be 7.5, resulting in maximum specific growth rate of 0.541days(-1) and maximum total lipid content of 53.43%ggDW(-1). The fatty acid composition of C. vulgaris was found to be unrelated to pH, as the lipid content did not present significant variations in the pH values tested. The fatty acid profile was mainly composed of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) with the dominant one being oleic acid (C18:1). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Autotrophic and heterotrophic microalgae and cyanobacteria cultivation for food and feed: life cycle assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Sergiy; Sandmann, Michael; Rohn, Sascha; Pleissner, Daniel; Heinz, Volker

    2017-08-20

    The lack of protein sources in Europe could be reduced with onsite production of microalgae with autotrophic and heterotrophic systems, owing the confirmation of economic and environmental benefits. This study aimed at the life cycle assessment (LCA) of microalgae and cyanobacteria cultivation (Chlorella vulgaris and Arthrospira platensis) in autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions on a pilot industrial scale (in model conditions of Berlin, Germany) with further biomass processing for food and feed products. The comparison of analysis results with traditional benchmarks (protein concentrates) indicated higher environmental impact of microalgae protein powders. However high-moisture extrusion of heterotrophic cultivated C. vulgaris resulted in more environmentally sustainable product than pork and beef. Further optimization of production with Chlorella pyrenoidosa on hydrolyzed food waste could reduce environmental impact in 4.5 times and create one of the most sustainable sources of proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Food waste as nutrient source in heterotrophic microalgae cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleissner, Daniel; Lam, Wan Chi; Sun, Zheng; Lin, Carol Sze Ki

    2013-06-01

    Glucose, free amino nitrogen (FAN), and phosphate were recovered from food waste by fungal hydrolysis using Aspergillus awamori and Aspergillus oryzae. Using 100g food waste (dry weight), 31.9 g glucose, 0.28 g FAN, and 0.38 g phosphate were recovered after 24h of hydrolysis. The pure hydrolysate has then been used as culture medium and nutrient source for the two heterotrophic microalgae Schizochytrium mangrovei and Chlorella pyrenoidosa, S. mangrovei and C. pyrenoidosa grew well on the complex food waste hydrolysate by utilizing the nutrients recovered. At the end of fermentation 10-20 g biomass were produced rich in carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Results of this study revealed the potential of food waste hydrolysate as culture medium and nutrient source in microalgae cultivation.

  7. Enhanced accumulation of starch and total carbohydrates in alginate-immobilized Chlorella spp. induced by Azospirillum brasilense: II. Heterotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choix, Francisco J; de-Bashan, Luz E; Bashan, Yoav

    2012-10-10

    The effect of the bacterium Azospirillum brasilense jointly immobilized with Chlorella vulgaris or C. sorokiniana in alginate beads on total carbohydrates and starch was studied under dark and heterotrophic conditions for 144 h in synthetic growth medium supplemented with either d-glucose or Na-acetate as carbon sources. In all treatments, enhanced total carbohydrates and starch content per culture and per cell was obtained after 24h; only jointly immobilized C. vulgaris growing on d-glucose significantly increased total carbohydrates and starch content after 96 h. Enhanced accumulation of carbohydrate and starch under jointly immobilized conditions was variable with time of sampling and substrate used. Similar results occurred when the microalgae was immobilized alone. In both microalgae growing on either carbon sources, the bacterium promoted accumulation of carbohydrates and starch; when the microalgae were immobilized alone, they used the carbon sources for cell multiplication. In jointly immobilized conditions with Chlorella spp., affinity to carbon source and volumetric productivity and yield were higher than when Chlorella spp. were immobilized alone; however, the growth rate was higher in microalgae immobilized alone. This study demonstrates that under heterotrophic conditions, A. brasilense promotes the accumulation of carbohydrates in two strains Chlorella spp. under certain time-substrate combinations, producing mainly starch. As such, this bacterium is a biological factor that can change the composition of compounds in microalgae in dark, heterotrophic conditions.

  8. Bioremediation of Agro-industrial Effluents Using Chlorella Microalgae

    OpenAIRE

    Viegas, Catarina; Gonçalves, Margarida; Soares, Liliana; Mendes, Benilde

    2016-01-01

    Part 15: Bio-energy; International audience; Two microalgae species (Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella protothecoides) were tested at lab scale in order to select the optimal conditions for biomass production and the efficient remediation of effluents from poultry and pig industries. Both microalgae showed biomass productivities in the agro-industrial effluents that were comparable to the Chlorella synthetic medium used as control. C. protothecoides presented the higher productivities both for...

  9. Investigation of mixotrophic, heterotrophic, and autotrophic growth of Chlorella vulgaris under agricultural waste medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Mirzaie, M A; Kalbasi, M; Mousavi, S M; Ghobadian, B

    2016-01-01

    Growth of Chlorella vulgaris and its lipid production were investigated under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic conditions. Cheap agricultural waste molasses and corn steep liquor from industries were used as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Chlorella vulgaris grew remarkably under this agricultural waste medium, which resulted in a reduction in the final cost of the biodiesel production. Maximum dry weight of 2.62 g L(-1) was obtained in mixotrophic growth with the highest lipid concentration of 0.86 g L(-1). These biomass and lipid concentrations were, respectively, 140% and 170% higher than autotrophic growth and 300% and 1200% higher than heterotrophic growth. In mixotrophic growth, independent or simultaneous occurrence of autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolisms was investigated. The growth of the microalgae was observed to take place first heterotrophically to a minimum substrate concentration with a little fraction in growth under autotrophic metabolism, and then the cells grew more autotrophically. It was found that mixotrophic growth was not a simple combination of heterotrophic and autotrophic growth.

  10. Differential lipid and fatty acid profiles of photoautotrophic and heterotrophic Chlorella zofingiensis: assessment of algal oils for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Junchao; Sun, Zheng; Zhong, Yujuan; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to document and compare the lipid class and fatty acid composition of the green microalga Chlorella zofingiensis cultivated under photoautotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. Compared with photoautotrophic cells, a 900% increase in lipid yield was achieved in heterotrophic cells fed with 30 g L(-1) of glucose. Furthermore heterotrophic cells accumulated predominantly neutral lipids (NL) that accounted for 79.5% of total lipids with 88.7% being triacylglycerol (TAG); whereas photoautotrophic cells contained mainly the membrane lipids glycolipids (GL) and phospholipids (PL). Together with the much higher content of oleic acid (C18:1) (35.2% of total fatty acids), oils from heterotrophic C. zofingiensis appear to be more feasible for biodiesel production. Our study highlights the possibility of using heterotrophic algae for producing high quality biodiesel.

  11. Enhanced production of lutein in heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides by oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Dong; CHEN Feng; CHEN Gu; ZHANG XueWu; LIU LongJun; ZHANG Hao

    2008-01-01

    The fast growing unicellular green microalgae Chlorella protothecoides has attracted interest as a promising organism for commercial production of a high-value carotenoid, lutein, by heterotrophic fermentation. Effects of two oxidant-forming reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the biomass concentration, and yield and content of lutein in batch culture of heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides were investigated in this study. The addition of 0.1 mmol/L H2O2 and 0.01 mmol/L NaClO plus 0.5 mmol/L Fe2+ to the culture led to the generation of OH and enhanced the lutein content from 1.75 to 1.90 and 1.95 mg/g, respectively. The lutein content further increased to 1.98 mg/g when 0.01 mmol/L H2O2 and 0.5 mmol/L NaClO were added to generate 1O2. The maximum yield of lutein (28.5, 29.8 and 31.4 mg/L) and a high biomass concentration (15.0, 15.3 and 15.9 g/L) were also achieved through the above treatments. The results indicated that 1O2 could promote lutein formation and enhance lutein production in heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides. Moreover, 1O2 produced from the reaction of H2O2 and NaClO was more effective in enhancing lutein production and reducing biomass loss than OH from the reaction of H2O2 or NaClO plus Fe2+.

  12. Enhanced production of lutein in heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides by oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The fast growing unicellular green microalgae Chlorella protothecoides has attracted interest as a promising organism for commercial production of a high-value carotenoid, lutein, by heterotrophic fermentation. Effects of two oxidant-forming reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the biomass concen-tration, and yield and content of lutein in batch culture of heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides were investigated in this study. The addition of 0.1 mmol/L H2O2 and 0.01 mmol/L NaClO plus 0.5 mmol/L Fe2+ to the culture led to the generation of ·OH and enhanced the lutein content from 1.75 to 1.90 and 1.95 mg/g, respectively. The lutein content further increased to 1.98 mg/g when 0.01 mmol/L H2O2 and 0.5 mmol/L NaClO were added to generate 1O2. The maximum yield of lutein (28.5, 29.8 and 31.4 mg/L) and a high biomass concentration (15.0, 15.3 and 15.9 g/L) were also achieved through the above treatments. The results indicated that 1O2 could promote lutein formation and enhance lutein production in hetero-trophic Chlorella protothecoides. Moreover, 1O2 produced from the reaction of H2O2 and NaClO was more effective in enhancing lutein production and reducing biomass loss than ·OH from the reaction of H2O2 or NaClO plus Fe2+.

  13. Kinetic modeling of growth and lipid body induction in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under heterotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Neha; Kumar, G Dinesh; Gupta, Ravi Prakash; Mathur, Anshu Shankar; Manikandan, B; Basu, Biswajit; Tuli, Deepak Kumar

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop a mathematical model to describe the biomass and (total) lipid productivity of Chlorella pyrenoidosa NCIM 2738 under heterotrophic conditions. Biomass growth rate was predicted by Droop's cell quota model, while changes observed in cell quota (utilization) under carbon excess conditions were used for the modeling and predicting the lipid accumulation rate. The model was simulated under non-limiting (excess) carbon and limiting nitrate concentration and validated with experimental data for the culture grown in batch (flask) mode under different nitrate concentrations. The present model incorporated two modes (growth and stressed) for the prediction of endogenous lipid synthesis/induction and aimed to predict the effect and response of the microalgae under nutrient starvation (stressed) conditions. MATLAB and Genetic Algorithm were employed for the prediction and validation of the model parameters.

  14. A study of the growth for the microalga Chlorella vulgaris by photo-bio-calorimetry and other on-line and off-line techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patino, R.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Stockar, von U.

    2007-01-01

    Calorimetry and other on-line techniques are used for the first time as complement to the traditional off-line methods in order to follow the growth of the green Chlorella vulgaris microalgae. A 2-L photo-bio-reactor was adapted from a commercial calorimeter used previously to study heterotrophic mi

  15. A study of the growth for the microalga Chlorella vulgaris by photo-bio-calorimetry and other on-line and off-line techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patino, R.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Stockar, von U.

    2007-01-01

    Calorimetry and other on-line techniques are used for the first time as complement to the traditional off-line methods in order to follow the growth of the green Chlorella vulgaris microalgae. A 2-L photo-bio-reactor was adapted from a commercial calorimeter used previously to study heterotrophic

  16. Nutrient and media recycling in heterotrophic microalgae cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrey, Joshua; Armenta, Roberto E; Brooks, Marianne S

    2016-02-01

    In order for microalgae-based processes to reach commercial production for biofuels and high-value products such as omega-3 fatty acids, it is necessary that economic feasibility be demonstrated at the industrial scale. Therefore, process optimization is critical to ensure that the maximum yield can be achieved from the most efficient use of resources. This is particularly true for processes involving heterotrophic microalgae, which have not been studied as extensively as phototrophic microalgae. An area that has received significant conceptual praise, but little experimental validation, is that of nutrient recycling, where the waste materials from prior cultures and post-lipid extraction are reused for secondary fermentations. While the concept is very simple and could result in significant economic and environmental benefits, there are some underlying challenges that must be overcome before adoption of nutrient recycling is viable at commercial scale. Even more, adapting nutrient recycling for optimized heterotrophic cultures presents some added challenges that must be identified and addressed that have been largely unexplored to date. These challenges center on carbon and nitrogen recycling and the implications of using waste materials in conjunction with virgin nutrients for secondary cultures. The aim of this review is to provide a foundation for further understanding of nutrient recycling for microalgae cultivation. As such, we outline the current state of technology and practical challenges associated with nutrient recycling for heterotrophic microalgae on an industrial scale and give recommendations for future work.

  17. Astaxanthin production by freshwater microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana and marine microalgae Tetraselmis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Rinugah; Mohamad, Shaza Eva

    2012-12-15

    There are numerous commercial applications of microalgae nowadays owing to their vast biotechnological and economical potential. Indisputably, astaxanthin is one of the high value product synthesized by microalgae and is achieving commercial success. Astaxanthin is a keto-carotenoid pigment found in many aquatic animals including microalgae. Astaxanthin cannot be synthesized by animals and provided in the diet is compulsory. In this study, the production of astaxanthin by the freshwater microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana and marine microalgae Tetraselmis sp. were studied. The relationship between growth and astaxanthin production by marine and freshwater microalgae cultivated under various carbon sources and concentrations, environmental conditions and nitrate concentrations was investigated in this study. Inorganic carbon source and low nitrate concentration favored the growth and production of astaxanthin by the marine microalgae Tetraselmis sp. and the freshwater microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana. Outdoor cultivation enhanced the growth of microalgae, while indoor cultivation promoted the formation of astaxanthin. The results indicated that supplementation of light, inorganic carbon and nitrate could be effectively manipulated to enhance the production of astaxanthin by both microalgae studied.

  18. Thermogravimetric analysis of the gasification of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Camila Emilia; Moreira, Paulo Firmino; Giudici, Reinaldo

    2015-12-01

    The gasification of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris under an atmosphere of argon and water vapor was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The data were interpreted by using conventional isoconversional methods and also by the independent parallel reaction (IPR) model, in which the degradation is considered to happen individually to each pseudo-component of biomass (lipid, carbohydrate and protein). The IPR model allows obtaining the kinetic parameters of the degradation reaction of each component. Three main stages were observed during the gasification process and the differential thermogravimetric curve was satisfactorily fitted by the IPR model considering three pseudocomponents. The comparison of the activation energy values obtained by the methods and those found in the literature for other microalgae was satisfactory. Quantification of reaction products was performed using online gas chromatography. The major products detected were H2, CO and CH4, indicating the potential for producing fuel gas and syngas from microalgae.

  19. Implication of Industrial Waste for Biomass and Lipid Production in Chlorella minutissima Under Autotrophic, Heterotrophic, and Mixotrophic Grown Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Kashyap Kumar; Kumar, Sudhir; Dixit, Deepak; Kumar, Punit; Kumar, Dhirendra; Jawed, Arshad; Haque, Shafiul

    2015-07-01

    Following the diminishing hopes from the first and second generation biofuels, mainly due to the limitations of land availability, feed stock requirements, and complicated pre-treatments, third generation biofuels from microalgae are becoming a priority in the current scenario. The present study focuses on comparison and optimization of lipid accumulation efficiency in algal strain Chlorella minutissima grown under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic modes of nutrition, employing various carbon sources obtained from cheap industrial wastes such as glucose, acetate, and glycerol. Other pertinent factors such as the effect of various nitrogen sources, effect of salinity on the cell growth, and lipid accumulations in the algal cells were also studied. The results suggested that C. minutissima can grow efficiently under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic modes of nutrition. C. minutissima cells were capable of utilizing other non-popular carbon sources such as glycerol and acetate collected as waste products from different industries along with commonly used glucose. The maximum biomass concentration (8.9 g/L) and lipid content (36.19 %) were found in heterotrophic mode of nutrition. Our findings indicated that C. minutissima can efficiently utilize these cheaper carbon sources from industrial waste products for its growth and the production cost of various bioenergy sources can be reduced significantly.

  20. Biochemical System Analysis of Lutein Production by Heterotrophic Chlorella pyrenoidosa in a Fermentor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Yun Wu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorella is a promising alternative source of lutein, as it can be cultivated heterotrophically with high efficiency. In this study, the carotenoids in Chlorella pyrenoidosa heterotrophically cultivated in a 19-litre fermentor have been analyzed and determined by using HPLC and HPLC-MS. A biochemical system theory (BST model was developed for understanding the regulatory features of carotenoid metabolism during the batch cultivation. Factors that influence lutein production by C. pyrenoidosa were discussed based on the model. It shows that low flux for lycopene formation is the major bottleneck for lutein production, while by-product syntheses and inhibitions affect the cellular lutein content much less. However, with further increase of the cellular lutein content, the inhibition on lycopene formation by lutein may become a limiting factor. Although speculative, these results may provide useful information for further elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms of carotenoid biosynthesis in Chlorella and modifying its metabolic network to enhance lutein production.

  1. High productivity cultivation of a heat-resistant microalga Chlorella sorokiniana for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Zheng, Yubin; Yu, Liang; Chen, Shulin

    2013-03-01

    To augment biomass and lipid productivities of heterotrophic cultured microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana, the influence of environmental temperature and medium factors, such as carbon source, nitrogen source, and their initial concentrations was investigated in this study. The microalga C. sorokiniana could tolerate up to 42°C and showed the highest growth rate of 1.60d(-1) at 37°C. The maximum dry cell weight (DCW) and corresponding lipid concentration was obtained with 80gL(-1) of initial glucose and 4gL(-1) of initial KNO3 at 37°C. In 5-L batch fermentation, the DCW increased dramatically from 0.9gL(-1) to 37.6gL(-1) in the first 72h cultivation, with the DCW productivity of 12.2gL(-1)d(-1). The maximum lipid content of 31.5% was achieved in 96h and the lipid productivity was 2.9gL(-1)d(-1). The results showed C. sorokiniana could be a promising strain for biofuel production.

  2. Genome-based metabolic mapping and 13C flux analysis reveal systematic properties of an oleaginous microalga Chlorella protothecoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-02-01

    Integrated and genome-based flux balance analysis, metabolomics, and (13)C-label profiling of phototrophic and heterotrophic metabolism in Chlorella protothecoides, an oleaginous green alga for biofuel. The green alga Chlorella protothecoides, capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth with rapid lipid synthesis, is a promising candidate for biofuel production. Based on the newly available genome knowledge of the alga, we reconstructed the compartmentalized metabolic network consisting of 272 metabolic reactions, 270 enzymes, and 461 encoding genes and simulated the growth in different cultivation conditions with flux balance analysis. Phenotype-phase plane analysis shows conditions achieving theoretical maximum of the biomass and corresponding fatty acid-producing rate for phototrophic cells (the ratio of photon uptake rate to CO2 uptake rate equals 8.4) and heterotrophic ones (the glucose uptake rate to O2 consumption rate reaches 2.4), respectively. Isotope-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry reveals higher metabolite concentrations in the glycolytic pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in heterotrophic cells compared with autotrophic cells. We also observed enhanced levels of ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), reduced, acetyl-Coenzyme A, and malonyl-Coenzyme A in heterotrophic cells consistently, consistent with a strong activity of lipid synthesis. To profile the flux map in experimental conditions, we applied nonstationary (13)C metabolic flux analysis as a complementing strategy to flux balance analysis. The result reveals negligible photorespiratory fluxes and a metabolically low active tricarboxylic acid cycle in phototrophic C. protothecoides. In comparison, high throughput of amphibolic reactions and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with no glyoxylate shunt activities were measured for heterotrophic cells. Taken together, the metabolic network modeling assisted by experimental metabolomics and (13)C

  3. Mild disintegration of the green microalgae Chlorella vulgaris using bead milling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, P.R.; Miron, T.L.; Olivieri, G.; Barbosa, M.J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Eppink, M.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the mild disintegration of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris for the release of intracellular products has been studied. By means of bead milling the microalgae suspensions were successfully disintegrated at different biomass concentrations (25–145 gDW kg-1) over a range of agitator sp

  4. Effective harvesting of the microalgae Chlorella protothecoides via bioflocculation with cationic starch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Letelier Gordo, Carlos Octavio; Holdt, Susan Løvstad; De Francisci, Davide

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, the flocculation efficiency of cationic starch (Greenfloc 120) was tested on the fresh water microalga Chlorella protothecoides under different conditions (pH and flocculant concentrations). Different concentrations of Greenfloc 120 (0, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40mgL-1) were screened...... to use, efficient and cost-effective flocculant for harvesting of microalgae....

  5. Mild disintegration of the green microalgae Chlorella vulgaris using bead milling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, P.R.; Miron, T.L.; Olivieri, G.; Barbosa, M.J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Eppink, M.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the mild disintegration of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris for the release of intracellular products has been studied. By means of bead milling the microalgae suspensions were successfully disintegrated at different biomass concentrations (25–145 gDW kg-1) over a range of agitator

  6. Cell-wall disruption and lipid/astaxanthin extraction from microalgae: Chlorella and Haematococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Yeon; Vijayan, Durairaj; Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Han, Jong-In; Lee, Kyubock; Park, Ji-Yeon; Chang, Won-Seok; Lee, Jin-Suk; Oh, You-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, biofuels and nutraceuticals produced from microalgae have emerged as major interests, resulting in intensive research of the microalgal biorefinery process. In this paper, recent developments in cell-wall disruption and extraction methods are reviewed, focusing on lipid and astaxanthin production from the biotechnologically important microalgae Chlorella and Haematococcus, respectively. As a common, critical bottleneck for recovery of intracellular components such as lipid and astaxanthin from these microalgae, the composition and structure of rigid, thick cell-walls were analyzed. Various chemical, physical, physico-chemical, and biological methods applied for cell-wall breakage and lipid/astaxanthin extraction from Chlorella and Haematococcus are discussed in detail and compared based on efficiency, energy consumption, type and dosage of solvent, biomass concentration and status (wet/dried), toxicity, scalability, and synergistic combinations. This report could serve as a useful guide to the implementation of practical downstream processes for recovery of valuable products from microalgae including Chlorella and Haematococcus.

  7. Biosynthesis of high yield fatty acids from Chlorella vulgaris NIES-227 under nitrogen starvation stress during heterotrophic cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-Fei; Chu, Fei-Fei; Lam, Paul K S; Zeng, Raymond J

    2015-09-15

    In this study the heterotrophic cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris NIES-227 fed with glucose was investigated systematically using six media types; combinations of nitrogen repletion/depletion and phosphorus repletion/limitation/depletion. It was found that a high yield of fatty acids (0.88 of fed glucose-COD) and a high content of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) (89% of dry weight) were obtained under nitrogen starved conditions. To our knowledge it is the first report on such high COD conversion yield and FAME content in microalgae. The dominant fatty acid (>50%) was methyl oleate (C18:1), a desirable component for biodiesel synthesis. FAME content under nitrogen starved conditions was significantly higher than under nitrogen sufficient conditions, while phosphorus had no significant influence, indicating that nitrogen starvation was the real "fatty acids trigger" in heterotrophic cultivation. These findings could simplify the downstream extraction process, such as the extrusion of oil from soybeans, and could reduce operating costs by improving the fatty acid yield from waste COD.

  8. Accumulation fatty acids of in Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic conditions in relation to activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, temperature, and co-immobilization with Azospirillum brasilense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, Luis A.; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E.

    2014-10-01

    The relation between fatty acid accumulation, activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and consequently lipid accumulation was studied in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris co-immobilized with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense under dark heterotrophic conditions with Na acetate as a carbon source. In C. vulgaris immobilized alone, cultivation experiments for 6 days showed that ACC activity is directly related to fatty acid accumulation, especially in the last 3 days. In co-immobilization experiments, A. brasilense exerted a significant positive effect over ACC activity, increased the quantity in all nine main fatty acids, increased total lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris, and mitigated negative effects of nonoptimal temperature for growth. No correlation between ACC activity and lipid accumulation in the cells was established for three different temperatures. This study demonstrated that the interaction between A. brasilense and C. vulgaris has a significant effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation in the microalgae.

  9. Accumulation of fatty acids in Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic conditions in relation to activity of acetyl-CoAcarboxylase, temperature, and co-immobilization with Azospirillum brasilense [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, Luis A; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2014-10-01

    The relation between fatty acid accumulation, activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and consequently lipid accumulation was studied in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris co-immobilized with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense under dark heterotrophic conditions with Na acetate as a carbon source. In C. vulgaris immobilized alone, cultivation experiments for 6 days showed that ACC activity is directly related to fatty acid accumulation, especially in the last 3 days. In co-immobilization experiments, A. brasilense exerted a significant positive effect over ACC activity, increased the quantity in all nine main fatty acids, increased total lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris, and mitigated negative effects of nonoptimal temperature for growth. No correlation between ACC activity and lipid accumulation in the cells was established for three different temperatures. This study demonstrated that the interaction between A. brasilense and C. vulgaris has a significant effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation in the microalgae.

  10. Screening, growth medium optimisation and heterotrophic cultivation of microalgae for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zongchao; Liu, Ying; Daroch, Maurycy; Geng, Shu; Cheng, Jay J

    2014-08-01

    This article presents a study on screening of microalgal strains from the Peking University Algae Collection and heterotrophic cultivation for biodiesel production of a selected microalgal strain. Among 89 strains, only five were capable of growing under heterotrophic conditions in liquid cultures and Chlorella sp. PKUAC 102 was found the best for the production of heterotrophic algal biodiesel. Composition of the growth medium was optimised using response surface methodology and optimised growth conditions were successfully used for cultivation of the strain in a fermentor. Conversion of algal lipids to fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) showed that the lipid profile of the heterotrophically cultivated Chlorella sp. PKUAC 102 contains fatty acids suitable for biodiesel production.

  11. Fatty acid rich effluent from acidogenic biohydrogen reactor as substrate for lipid accumulation in heterotrophic microalgae with simultaneous treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Mohan, S; Prathima Devi, M

    2012-11-01

    Acid-rich effluent generated from acidogenic biohydrogen production process was evaluated as substrate for lipid synthesis by integrating with heterotrophic cultivation of mixed microalgae. Experiments were performed both with synthetic volatile fatty acids (SVFA) and fermented fatty acids (FFA) from biohydrogen producing reactor. Fatty acid based platform evidenced significant influence on algal growth as well as lipid accumulation by the formation of triglycerides through fatty acid synthesis. Comparatively FFA documented higher biomass and lipid productivity (1.42mg/ml (wet weight); 26.4%) than SVFAs ((HAc+HBu+HPr), 0.60mg/ml; 23.1%). Lipid profiles varied with substrates and depicted 18 types of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with wide fuel and food characteristics. The observed higher concentrations of Chl b over Chl a supports the biosynthesis of triacylglycerides. Microalgae diversity visualized the presence of lipid accumulating species viz., Scenedesmus sp. and Chlorella sp. Integration of microalgae cultivation with biohydrogen production showed lipid productivity for biodiesel production along with additional treatment.

  12. Assessment of photosynthesis regulation in mixotrophically cultured microalga Chlorella sorokiniana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tingting; Kirchhoff, Helmut; Gargouri, Mahmoud; Feng, Jie; Cousins, Asaph B.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Gang, David R.; Chen, Shulin

    2016-11-01

    Mixotrophic growth of microalgae offers great potential as an efficient strategy for biofuel production. In this study, photosynthetic regulation of mixotrophically cultured Chlorella sorokiniana cells was systematically evaluated. Mixotrophic cells in the exponential growth phase showed the highest photosynthetic activity, where maximum photosynthetic O2 evolution was approximately 3- and 4-fold higher than cells in the same phase grown photoautotrophically in 1% CO2 (in air) and air, respectively. Additionally, characteristic chlorophyll fluorescence parameters demonstrated that no limitation in electron transport downstream of PSII was detected in mixotrophic cells. Up-regulation of photosynthetic activity was associated with high total ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) carboxylase activity and expression level of phosphoribulokinase (PRK). After 3 days, photosynthetic O2 evolution of mixotrophic cells that went to the stationary phase, was strongly reduced, with reduced photochemical efficiency and reorganization of the PSII complex. Simultaneously, enzymatic activity for Rubisco carboxylase and mRNA levels of Rubisco and PRK diminished. Importantly, there was almost no non-photochemical quenching for mixotrophic cells, whether grown in log or stationary phase. A decline in the quantum efficiency of PSII and an oxidized plastoquinone pool (PQ pool) was observed under N-depleted conditions during mixotrophic growth. These results demonstrate that photosynthesis is regulated differently in mixotrophically cultured C. sorokiniana cells than in cells grown under photoautotrophic conditions, with a particularly strong impact by nitrogen levels in the cells.

  13. Fuel Property of Biodiesel Made from Microalgae (Chlorella Sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kelaiya,

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae chlorella is an organism capable of photosynthesis that is less than 2mm in diameter. The biodiesel extracted from algae using chloroform/methanol extraction solvent system then undergone three different transesterification processes based on three different catalysts viz. Alkali catalyst, Acid catalyst and Enzymatic catalyst with two temperature (50°C and 60 °C and with 1:5 methanol to bio-oil ratio. After transesterification using different catalysts, the fuel properties were measured. All the properties were compared with standard value of ASTM D 6751 standards. Alkali catalyst yield highest biodiesel (92 % at 60 °C temperature. Also, the closest value of different fuel properties found at par with standard value of ASTM D 6751 standards viz. moisture content, carbon residue, calorific value, specific gravity, acid value, flash point, viscosity, density, viscosity were found to be 0.01%, 0.04%, 40.41 MJ/kg, 0.83, 0.23 mg KOH/g, 143.67 °C, 5.16 mm2/s, 0.83 g/cm3 respectively in the biodiesel which was yield by transesterification done using Alkali catalyst (0.56 % NaOH at 60 °C temperature.

  14. Regulation of lipid metabolism in the green microalga Chlorella protothecoides by heterotrophy-photoinduction cultivation regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuqin; Xu, Hua; Han, Fangxin; Mu, Jinxiu; Chen, Di; Feng, Bo; Zeng, Hongyan

    2015-09-01

    Proteomics in conjunction with biochemical strategy was employed to unravel regulation of lipid metabolism in the green microalga Chlorella protothecoides by heterotrophy-photoinduction cultivation regime (HPC). Interestingly, HPC triggered transiently synthesis of starch followed by substantial lipid accumulation. And a marked decrease in intracellular protein and chlorophyll contents was also observed after 12h of photo-induction. The highest lipid content of 50.5% was achieved upon the photo-induction stage, which represented 69.3% higher than that of the end of heterotrophic cultivation. Results suggested that turnover of carbon-nitrogen-rich compounds such as starch, protein, and chlorophyll might provide carbon or energy for lipid accumulation. The proteomics analysis indicated that several pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, β-oxidation of fatty acids, Calvin cycle, photosynthesis, energy and transport, protein biosynthesis, regulate and defense were involved in the lipid biosynthesis. Malate dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase were suggested as key regulatory factors in enhancing lipid accumulation.

  15. Influence of tryptophan and indole-3-acetic acid on starch accumulation in the synthetic mutualistic Chlorella sorokiniana-Azospirillum brasilense system under heterotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Oskar A; Choix, Francisco J; Bashan, Yoav; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2016-06-01

    This study measured the relations between tryptophan production, the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and the metabolism and accumulation of starch during synthetic mutualism between the microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana and the microalgae growth-promoting bacteria Azospirillum brasilense, created by co-immobilization in alginate beads. Experiments used two wild-type A. brasilense strains (Cd and Sp6) and an IAA-attenuated mutant (SpM7918) grown under nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-starved conditions tested under dark, heterotrophic and aerobic growth conditions. Under all incubating conditions, C. sorokiniana, but not A. brasilense, produced tryptophan. A significant correlation between IAA-production by A. brasilense and starch accumulation in C. sorokiniana was found, since the IAA-attenuated mutant was not producing increased starch levels. The highest ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) activity, starch content and glucose uptake were found during the interaction of A. brasilense wild type strains with the microalgae. When the microalgae were grown alone, they produced only small amounts of starch. Supplementation with synthetic IAA to C. sorokiniana grown alone enhanced the above parameters, but only transiently. Activity of α-amylase decreased under nitrogen-replete conditions, but increased under nitrogen-starved conditions. In summary, this study demonstrated that, during synthetic mutualism, the exchange of tryptophan and IAA between the partners is a mechanism that governs several changes in starch metabolism of C. sorokiniana, yielding an increase in starch content.

  16. Batch anaerobic co-digestion of waste activated sludge and microalgae (Chlorella sorokiniana) at mesophilic temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, Carolina; Jeison, David; Fermoso, Fernando G; Borja, Rafael

    2016-08-23

    The microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana are used as co-substrate for waste activated sludge (WAS) anaerobic digestion. The specific objective of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of improving methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS in co-digestion with this microalga, based on an optimized mixture percentage. Thus, the anaerobic co-digestion of both substrates aims to overcome the drawbacks of the anaerobic digestion of single WAS, simultaneously improving its management. Different co-digestion mixtures (0% WAS-100% microalgae; 25% WAS-75% microalgae; 50% WAS-50% microalgae; 75% WAS-25% microalgae; 100% WAS-0% microalgae) were studied. The highest methane yield (442 mL CH4/g VS) was obtained for the mixture with 75% WAS and 25% microalgae. This value was 22% and 39% higher than that obtained in the anaerobic digestion of the sole substrates WAS and microalgae, respectively, as well as 16% and 25% higher than those obtained for the co-digestion mixtures with 25% WAS and 75% microalgae and 50% WAS and 50% microalgae, respectively. The kinetic constant of the process increased 42%, 42% and 12%, respectively, for the mixtures with 25%, 50% and 75% of WAS compared to the substrate without WAS. Anaerobic digestion of WAS, together with C. sorokiniana, has been clearly improved by ensuring its viability, suitability and efficiency.

  17. Pulsed Electric Field for protein release of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Neochloris oleoabundans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, 't Gerard; Postma, P.R.; Fernandes, D.A.; Timmermans, R.A.H.; Vermuë, M.H.; Barbosa, M.J.; Eppink, M.H.; Wijffels, R.H.; Olivieri, G.

    2017-01-01

    Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) is currently discussed as promising technology for mild and scalable cell disintegration of microalgae. In this study Chlorella vulgaris and Neochloris oleoabundans have been subjected to batch and continuous PEF treatments under a wide range of operating conditions

  18. Analysis of autophagy genes in microalgae: Chlorella as a potential model to study mechanism of autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microalgae, with the ability to mitigate CO(2 emission and produce carbohydrates and lipids, are considered one of the most promising resources for producing bioenergy. Recently, we discovered that autophagy plays a critical role in the metabolism of photosynthetic system and lipids production. So far, more than 30-autophagy related (ATG genes in all subtypes of autophagy have been identified. However, compared with yeast and mammals, in silico and experimental research of autophagy pathways in microalgae remained limited and fragmentary. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this article, we performed a genome-wide analysis of ATG genes in 7 microalgae species and explored their distributions, domain structures and evolution. Eighteen "core autophagy machinery" proteins, four mammalian-specific ATG proteins and more than 30 additional proteins (including "receptor-adaptor" complexes in all subtypes of autophagy were analyzed. Data revealed that receptor proteins in cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting and mitophagy seem to be absent in microalgae. However, most of the "core autophagy machinery" and mammalian-specific proteins are conserved among microalgae, except for the ATG9-cycling system in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the second ubiquitin-like protein conjugation complex in several algal species. The catalytic and binding residues in ATG3, ATG5, ATG7, ATG8, ATG10 and ATG12 are also conserved and the phylogenetic tree of ATG8 coincides well with the phylogenies. Chlorella contains the entire set of the core autophagy machinery. In addition, RT-PCR analysis verified that all crucial ATG genes tested are expressed during autophagy in both Chlorella and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Finally, we discovered that addition of 3-Methyladenine (a PI3K specific inhibitor could suppress the formation of autophagic vacuoles in Chlorella. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, Chlorella may represent a potential model organism to investigate autophagy pathways in

  19. Comparative analyses of three Chlorella species in response to light and sugar reveal distinctive lipid accumulation patterns in the Microalga C. sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Julian N; Kobayashi, Naoko; Barnes, Austin; Noel, Eric A; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Oyler, George A

    2014-01-01

    While photosynthetic microalgae, such as Chlorella, serve as feedstocks for nutritional oils and biofuels, heterotrophic cultivation can augment growth rates, support high cell densities, and increase triacylglycerol (TAG) lipid content. However, these species differ significantly in their photoautotrophic and heterotrophic characteristics. In this study, the phylogeny of thirty Chlorella strains was determined in order to inform bioprospecting efforts and detailed physiological assessment of three species. The growth kinetics and lipid biochemistry of C. protothecoides UTEX 411, C. vulgaris UTEX 265, and C. sorokiniana UTEX 1230 were quantified during photoautotrophy in Bold's basal medium (BBM) and heterotrophy in BBM supplemented with glucose (10 g L-1). Heterotrophic growth rates of UTEX 411, 265, and 1230 were found to be 1.5-, 3.7-, and 5-fold higher than their respective autotrophic rates. With a rapid nine-hour heterotrophic doubling time, Chlorella sorokiniana UTEX 1230 maximally accumulated 39% total lipids by dry weight during heterotrophy compared to 18% autotrophically. Furthermore, the discrete fatty acid composition of each strain was examined in order to elucidate lipid accumulation patterns under the two trophic conditions. In both modes of growth, UTEX 411 and 265 produced 18:1 as the principal fatty acid while UTEX 1230 exhibited a 2.5-fold enrichment in 18:2 relative to 18:1. Although the total lipid content was highest in UTEX 411 during heterotrophy, UTEX 1230 demonstrated a two-fold increase in its heterotrophic TAG fraction at a rate of 28.9 mg L(-1) d(-1) to reach 22% of the biomass, corresponding to as much as 90% of its total lipids. Interestingly, UTEX 1230 growth was restricted during mixotrophy and its TAG production rate was suppressed to 18.2 mg L-1 d-1. This constraint on carbon flow raises intriguing questions about the impact of sugar and light on the metabolic regulation of microalgal lipid biosynthesis.

  20. Comparative analyses of three Chlorella species in response to light and sugar reveal distinctive lipid accumulation patterns in the Microalga C. sorokiniana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian N Rosenberg

    Full Text Available While photosynthetic microalgae, such as Chlorella, serve as feedstocks for nutritional oils and biofuels, heterotrophic cultivation can augment growth rates, support high cell densities, and increase triacylglycerol (TAG lipid content. However, these species differ significantly in their photoautotrophic and heterotrophic characteristics. In this study, the phylogeny of thirty Chlorella strains was determined in order to inform bioprospecting efforts and detailed physiological assessment of three species. The growth kinetics and lipid biochemistry of C. protothecoides UTEX 411, C. vulgaris UTEX 265, and C. sorokiniana UTEX 1230 were quantified during photoautotrophy in Bold's basal medium (BBM and heterotrophy in BBM supplemented with glucose (10 g L-1. Heterotrophic growth rates of UTEX 411, 265, and 1230 were found to be 1.5-, 3.7-, and 5-fold higher than their respective autotrophic rates. With a rapid nine-hour heterotrophic doubling time, Chlorella sorokiniana UTEX 1230 maximally accumulated 39% total lipids by dry weight during heterotrophy compared to 18% autotrophically. Furthermore, the discrete fatty acid composition of each strain was examined in order to elucidate lipid accumulation patterns under the two trophic conditions. In both modes of growth, UTEX 411 and 265 produced 18:1 as the principal fatty acid while UTEX 1230 exhibited a 2.5-fold enrichment in 18:2 relative to 18:1. Although the total lipid content was highest in UTEX 411 during heterotrophy, UTEX 1230 demonstrated a two-fold increase in its heterotrophic TAG fraction at a rate of 28.9 mg L(-1 d(-1 to reach 22% of the biomass, corresponding to as much as 90% of its total lipids. Interestingly, UTEX 1230 growth was restricted during mixotrophy and its TAG production rate was suppressed to 18.2 mg L-1 d-1. This constraint on carbon flow raises intriguing questions about the impact of sugar and light on the metabolic regulation of microalgal lipid biosynthesis.

  1. Response of Marine Microalgae, Heterotrophic Bacteria and Their Relationship to Enhanced UV-B Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Wenli; TANG Xuexi; XIAO Hui; WANG You; WANG Renjun

    2009-01-01

    Ozone depletion in the stratosphere has enhanced solar UV-B radiation reaching the Earth surface and has brought about significant effects to marine ecosystems. The effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on marine microalgae, heterotrophic bacteria and the interaction between them are discussed. The effects on marine microalgae have been proved to occur at molecular, cellular and population levels. Enhanced UV-B radiation increases microalgal flavonoid content but decreases their chlorophyll content and pho-tosynthesis rate; this rachation induces genetic change and results in DNA damage and change of protein content. There have been fewer studies on the effects of UV-B radiation on marine heterotrophic bacteria. Establishment of a nucroalgal ecological dynamic model at population and community levels under UV-B radiation has gradually become a hotspot. The effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on microalgae communities, heterotrophic bacterial populations and interaction between them will become a focus in the near future. This paper will make an overview on the studies concerning the effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on marine microal-gae and heterotrophic bacteria and the interaction between them.

  2. Heterotrophic microalgae cultivation to synergize biodiesel production with waste remediation: progress and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Mohan, S; Rohit, M V; Chiranjeevi, P; Chandra, Rashmi; Navaneeth, B

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae are inexhaustible feedstock for synthesis of biodiesel rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and valuable bioactive compounds. Their cultivation is critical in sustaining the global economy in terms of human consumption of food and fuel. When compared to autotrophic cultivation, heterotrophic systems are more suitable for producing high cell densities of microalgae for accumulation of large quantities of lipids (triacylglycerols) which can be converted into biodiesel. Consorted efforts are made in this communication to converge recent literature on heterotrophic cultivation systems with simultaneous wastewater treatment and algal oil production. Challenges faced during large scale production and limiting factors which hinder the microalgae growth are enumerated. A strategic deployment of integrated closed loop biorefinery concept with multi-product recovery is proposed to exploit the full potential of algal systems. Sustainable algae cultivation is essential to produce biofuels leading to green future.

  3. Potential use of duckweed based anaerobic digester effluent as a feed source for heterotrophic growth of micro-algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, L.; Dupont, R.

    2013-12-01

    Finding an alternative source of energy for the growing world's demand is a challenging task being considered by many scientists. Various types of renewable energy alternatives are being investigated by researchers around the world. The abundance of duckweed (i.e., Lemna and Wolfia sp.) in wetlands and wastewater lagoons, their rapid growth, and their capacity for nutrient, metal and other contaminant removal from wastewater suggests their potential as an inexpensive source of biomass for biofuel production. Another source of biomass for biofuel and energy production is micro-algae. The large-scale growth of micro-algae can potentially be achieved in a smaller footprint and at a higher rate and lower cost via heterotrophic growth compared to autotrophic growth for specific species that can grow under both conditions. Here we describe two types of research. First, two lab-scale, 5 L anaerobic digesters containing municipal raw wastewater that were set up, maintained and monitored over the course of 6 months using duckweed as the feed source. The pH, salinity, amount of gas production and gas composition were measured on a daily basis. The results from these measurements show that duckweed can be used as a good source of biofuel production in the form of methane gas. The second set of reactors consisted of two 1 L batch fed reactors containing algae (Chlorella vulgaris) grown in the lab environment heterotrophically. The pH and DO were monitored on a daily basis in order to investigate their effect on algae growth. Lipid analysis of the harvested algal biomass was done to investigate the efficiency of harvestable biofuel products. A nutrient solution containing glucose as an energy source was used as the initial feed solution, and the potential substitution of the glucose solution with the organic carbon residue from the duckweed digester effluent was investigated. Methane production, carbon stabilization, and gas composition results from the duckweed fed anaerobic

  4. Discoloration of wastewater from a paint industry by the microalgae Chlorella sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Angulo M

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Decoloring wastewater from a paint factory making use of Chlorella sp., microalgae as a biological way of treatment. Materials and methods. Samples of this microalgae previously cultivated with nourishing fertilizer under photoperiods of light and darkness were taken to test the microalgae Chlorella sp., initial concentration effect in the bioremoval process. For this purpose, it was cultivated in 0.10, 0.20 and 0.30 units of absorbance in bioreactors with 200 mL wastewater with and without nutrients. The biotest with the best rate of colour removal was chosen and the DBO5 and DQO were marked out. The immobilized Chlorella sp., in kappa carrageenan was also tested. Results. In the tests colour decrease percentage were 81.7, 69.7 and 58.3% without nutrients in the initial concentrations of 0.10, 0.20 and 0.30 units of absorbance respectively and 72.6, 69.0 and 86.8% for 0.10, 0.20 and 0.30 units of absorbance with nutrients respectively in the day of maximum growth. The immobilized microalgae score were 72.60% and 78.36% of color removal for 0.4 and 1.6 units of absorbance respectively. The higher colour removal test score was that with nutrients at 0.30 units of absorbance with several changes in DBO5 and DQO values. Conclusion. The biological wastewater treatment making use of Chlorella sp., microalgae can be considered as an effective choice in decolorating wastewater.

  5. Sustainable Hydrogen Photoproduction by Phosphorus-Deprived Marine Green Microalgae Chlorella sp.

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    Khorcheska Batyrova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously it has been shown that green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is capable of prolonged H2 photoproduction when deprived of sulfur. In addition to sulfur deprivation (-S, sustained H2 photoproduction in C. reinhardtii cultures can be achieved under phosphorus-deprived (-P conditions. Similar to sulfur deprivation, phosphorus deprivation limits O2 evolving activity in algal cells and causes other metabolic changes that are favorable for H2 photoproduction. Although significant advances in H2 photoproduction have recently been realized in fresh water microalgae, relatively few studies have focused on H2 production in marine green microalgae. In the present study phosphorus deprivation was applied for hydrogen production in marine green microalgae Chlorella sp., where sulfur deprivation is impossible due to a high concentration of sulfates in the sea water. Since resources of fresh water on earth are limited, the possibility of hydrogen production in seawater is more attractive. In order to achieve H2 photoproduction in P-deprived marine green microalgae Chlorella sp., the dilution approach was applied. Cultures diluted to about 0.5–1.8 mg Chl·L−1 in the beginning of P-deprivation were able to establish anaerobiosis, after the initial growth period, where cells utilize intracellular phosphorus, with subsequent transition to H2 photoproduction stage. It appears that marine microalgae during P-deprivation passed the same stages of adaptation as fresh water microalgae. The presence of inorganic carbon was essential for starch accumulation and subsequent hydrogen production by microalgae. The H2 accumulation was up to 40 mL H2 gas per 1iter of the culture, which is comparable to that obtained in P-deprived C. reinhardtii culture.

  6. Impact of light quality on biomass production and fatty acid content in the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultberg, Malin; Jönsson, Helene Larsson; Bergstrand, Karl-Johan; Carlsson, Anders S

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris was exposed to monochromatic light at six different wavelengths in order to study the effect on biomass productivity and fatty acid content. A significantly higher amount of biomass by produced in the treatments with yellow, red and white light compared with blue, green and purple light. There were also significant differences in total lipid content and fatty acid profile between the treatments. The green light regime gave the lowest concentration of lipids, but increased the concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Thus it can be concluded that light quality significantly affects biomass productivity, total lipid concentration and fatty acid profile in the microalga C. vulgaris.

  7. Improving cell growth and lipid accumulation in green microalgae Chlorella sp. via UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuyu; Zhao, Yueping; Liu, Li; Ao, Xiyong; Ma, Liyan; Wu, Minghong; Ma, Fang

    2015-04-01

    Microalgae with high biomass and high lipid content are the ideal feedstock for biodiesel production. To obtain such microalgae, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was applied to Chlorella sp. to induce mutagenesis. The growth characteristics, total nitrogen (TN), and biochemical compositions of the control and UV mutation strains were analyzed. Compared to the control strain, the biomass for the UV mutation strain was 7.6 % higher and it presented a higher growth rate. The lipid content of the UV mutation strain showed different levels of increase and reached the maximum value of 28.1 % on day 15. Furthermore, the lipid productivity of the UV mutation strain showed a desired increase. The nitrogen consumption and Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) activity contributed to the lipid production by UV. All these results indicate that UV mutagenesis is an efficient method to improve probability for using Chlorella sp. as the potential raw material for biodiesel production.

  8. Characterization of the flocculating agent from the spontaneously flocculating microalga Chlorella vulgaris JSC-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Asraful; Wan, Chun; Guo, Suo-Lian; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Huang, Zih-You; Yang, Yu-Liang; Chang, Jo-Shu; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2014-07-01

    High cost of biomass recovery is one of the bottlenecks for developing cost-effective processes with microalgae, particularly for the production of biofuels and bio-based chemicals through biorefinery, and microalgal biomass recovery through cell flocculation is a promising strategy. Some microalgae are naturally flocculated whose cells can be harvested by simple sedimentation. However, studies on the flocculating agents synthesized by microalgae cells are still very limited. In this work, the cell flocculation of a spontaneously flocculating microalga Chlorella vulgaris JSC-7 was studied, and the flocculating agent was identified to be cell wall polysaccharides whose crude extract supplemented at low dosage of 0.5 mg/L initiated the more than 80% flocculating rate of freely suspended microalgae C. vulgaris CNW11 and Scenedesmus obliquus FSP. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis revealed a characteristic absorption band at 1238 cm(-1), which might arise from PO asymmetric stretching vibration of [Formula: see text] phosphodiester. The unique cell wall-associated polysaccharide with molecular weight of 9.86×10(3) g/mol, and the monomers consist of glucose, mannose and galactose with a molecular ratio of 5:5:2. This is the first time to our knowledge that the flocculating agent from C. vulgaris has been characterized, which could provide basis for understanding the cell flocculation of microalgae and breeding of novel flocculating microalgae for cost-effective biomass harvest.

  9. Elevated CO2 concentration impacts cell wall polysaccharide composition of green microalgae of the genus Chlorella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y-S; Labavitch, J M; VanderGheynst, J S

    2015-01-01

    The effect of CO2 concentration on the relative content of starch, lipid and cell wall carbohydrates in microalgal biomass was investigated for the four following Chlorella strains: C. vulgaris (UTEX 259), C. sorokiniana (UTEX 2805), C. minutissima (UTEX 2341) and C. variabilis (NC64A). Each strain had a different response to CO2 concentration. The starch content was higher in UTEX259 and NC64A cultured with 2% CO2 in the air supply than in cells cultured with ca. 0·04% CO2 (ambient air), while starch content was not affected for UTEX 2805 and UTEX 2341. The lipid content was higher in Chlorella minutissima UTEX 2341 cultured in 2% CO2 than in cells cultured in ambient air, but was unchanged for the other three strains. All four Chlorella strains tended to have a higher percentage of uronic acids and lower percentage of neutral sugars in their cell wall polysaccharide complement when grown with 2% CO2 supply. Although the percentage of neutral sugars in the cell walls varied with CO2 concentration, the relative proportions of different neutral sugar constituents remained constant for both CO2 conditions. The results demonstrate the importance of considering the effects of CO2 on the cell wall carbohydrate composition of microalgae. Microalgae have the potential to produce products that will reduce society's reliance on fossil fuels and address challenges related to food and feed production. An overlooked yet industrially relevant component of microalgae are their cell walls. Cell wall composition affects cell flocculation and the recovery of intracellular products. In this study, we show that increasing CO2 level results in greater cell wall polysaccharide and uronic acid content in the cell walls of three strains of microalgae. The results have implications on the management of systems for the capture of CO2 and production of fuels, chemicals and food from microalgae. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Increment of carbohydrate concentration of Chlorella minutissima microalgae for bioethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Freitas Margarites

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae, like any other microorganism react to changes in the external environment with changes in their intracellular environment. Thus, the manipulation of cultivation conditions, especially the presence or absence of certain nutrients, stimulates the biosynthesis of compounds of interest. Their carbohydrates can be used to produce bioethanol. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the medium and the concentrations of nitrogen and phosphate components used in the culture medium of the microalgae Chlorella minutissima in the carbohydrate concentration of the same. Box-Behnken Planning was used, totaling 15 trials. The cultivations were carried out until early stationary phase of growth of the microalgae in closed 2 L reactors. At the end of the cultivation, the carbohydrate concentrations of dry biomass (% and yield in carbohydrates (g.L-1 .d-1 were determined. According to the analysis of effects, the microalgae Chlorella minutissima cultivated in Basal medium, with the addition of 0.125 gL-1 of the nitrogenized component (KNO3 and without addition of phosphatized components (K2HPO4 and KH2PO4 had a higher yield in carbohydrates in the cultivation (0,030 ± 0.002 g.L-1 .d-1 .

  11. Analysis of Autophagy Genes in Microalgae: Chlorella as a Potential Model to Study Mechanism of Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiao; Zhao, Li; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2012-01-01

    Background Microalgae, with the ability to mitigate CO2 emission and produce carbohydrates and lipids, are considered one of the most promising resources for producing bioenergy. Recently, we discovered that autophagy plays a critical role in the metabolism of photosynthetic system and lipids production. So far, more than 30-autophagy related (ATG) genes in all subtypes of autophagy have been identified. However, compared with yeast and mammals, in silico and experimental research of autophagy pathways in microalgae remained limited and fragmentary. Principal Findings In this article, we performed a genome-wide analysis of ATG genes in 7 microalgae species and explored their distributions, domain structures and evolution. Eighteen “core autophagy machinery” proteins, four mammalian-specific ATG proteins and more than 30 additional proteins (including “receptor-adaptor” complexes) in all subtypes of autophagy were analyzed. Data revealed that receptor proteins in cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting and mitophagy seem to be absent in microalgae. However, most of the “core autophagy machinery” and mammalian-specific proteins are conserved among microalgae, except for the ATG9-cycling system in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the second ubiquitin-like protein conjugation complex in several algal species. The catalytic and binding residues in ATG3, ATG5, ATG7, ATG8, ATG10 and ATG12 are also conserved and the phylogenetic tree of ATG8 coincides well with the phylogenies. Chlorella contains the entire set of the core autophagy machinery. In addition, RT-PCR analysis verified that all crucial ATG genes tested are expressed during autophagy in both Chlorella and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Finally, we discovered that addition of 3-Methyladenine (a PI3K specific inhibitor) could suppress the formation of autophagic vacuoles in Chlorella. Conclusions Taken together, Chlorella may represent a potential model organism to investigate autophagy pathways in photosynthetic

  12. Characterization and optimization of carbohydrate production from an indigenous microalga Chlorella vulgaris FSP-E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shih-Hsin; Huang, Shu-Wen; Chen, Chun-Yen; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2013-05-01

    In this study, three indigenous microalgae isolates were examined for their ability to produce carbohydrates. Among them, Chlorella vulgaris FSP-E displayed relatively high cell growth rate and carbohydrate content. The carbohydrate productivity of C. vulgaris FSP-E was further improved by using engineering strategies. The results show that using an appropriate light intensity and inoculum size could effectively promote cell growth and carbohydrate productivity. Nitrogen starvation triggered the accumulation of carbohydrates in the microalga, achieving a carbohydrate content of 51.3% after 4-day starvation. Under the optimal conditions, the highest biomass and carbohydrate productivity were 1.437 and 0.631 g L(-1) d(-1), respectively. This performance is better than that reported in most related studies. Since glucose accounted for nearly 93% of the carbohydrates accumulated in C. vulgaris FSP-E, the microalga is an excellent feedstock for bioethanol fermentation.

  13. Regulation of starch and lipid accumulation in a microalga Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Gargouri, Mahmoud; Feng, Jie; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gao, Difeng; Miao, Chao; Dong, Tao; Gang, David R; Chen, Shulin

    2015-03-01

    Microalgae have attracted growing attention due to their potential in biofuel feedstock production. However, current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms for lipid biosynthesis and storage in microalgae is still limited. This study revealed that the microalga Chlorella sorokiniana showed sequential accumulation of starch and lipids. When nitrogen was replete and/or depleted over a short period, starch was the predominant carbon storage form with basal levels of lipid accumulation. After prolonged nitrogen depletion, lipid accumulation increased considerably, which was partially due to starch degradation, as well as the turnover of primary metabolites. Lipid accumulation is also strongly dependent on the linear electron flow of photosynthesis, peaking at lower light intensities. Collectively, this study reveals a relatively clear regulation pattern of starch and lipid accumulation that is basically controlled by nitrogen levels. The mixotrophic growth of C. sorokiniana shows promise for biofuel production in terms of lipid accumulation in the final biomass.

  14. Characterization of growth and lipid production by Chlorella sp. PCH90, a microalga native to Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Ahmed Elsayed Mohamed; Ghosh, Dipankar; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2014-03-01

    Microalgae are being investigated as potential candidates for biodiesel production since they can be grown without competition with food production, have an inherently fast growth rate, and can have a high lipid content under different nutrient limiting conditions. However, large scale production will best be carried out with indigenous strains, well adapted to local conditions. This study reports on the characterization of the novel microalga Chlorella sp. PCH90, isolated in Quebec. Its molecular phylogeny was established and lipid production studies as a function of the initial concentrations of nitrate, phosphate, and sodium chloride were carried out using response surface methodology. Under the appropriate conditions this microalga could produce up to 36% lipid and grew well in both synthetic medium and secondary effluent from a wastewater treatment plant at both 22 and 10°C. Thus, this strain is promising for further development as a potential biofuels producer under local climatic conditions.

  15. Simultaneously concentrating and pretreating of microalgae Chlorella spp. by three-phase partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhubo; Jiang, Feifei; Li, Ya; Zhang, Xu; Tan, Tianwei

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a recent simple separation technique, three-phase partitioning (TPP), was used for concentrating microalgae Chlorella spp. for the first time. More than 91.7% of the biomass precipitated in the interlayer of the system in 10 min. Temperature, initial concentration and ratio of ethanol to dipotassium hydrogen phosphate (DKP) were observed to negatively correlate with concentration factor while pH showed no significant influences. Using this method, biomass could be concentrated with much lower energy consumption and concentrated biomass could be conveniently collected. Besides, together with concentrating, TPP concentrated microalgae cells showed 26.3% increase in lipid extraction yield. Additionally, similarities in fatty acid profile indicated the avoidance of influence on lipid quality from chemicals. This study demonstrated the feasibility of TPP for microalgae biodiesel production.

  16. Cultivation Of Microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris For Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blinová Lenka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Production of biofuel from renewable sources is considered to be one of the most sustainable alternatives to petroleum sourced fuels. Biofuels are also viable means of environmental and economic sustainability. Biofuels are divided into four generations, depending on the type of biomass used for biofuels production. At present, microalgae are presented as an ideal third generation biofuel feedstock because of their rapid growth rate. They also do not compete with food or feed crops, and can be produced on non-arable land. Cultivation conditions (temperature, pH, light, nutrient quantity and quality, salinity, aerating are the major factors that influence photosynthesis activity and behaviour of the microalgae growth rate. In this paper, we present an overview about the effect of cultivation conditions on microalgae growth.

  17. Cultivation Of Microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) For Biodiesel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinová, Lenka; Bartošová, Alica; Gerulová, Kristína

    2015-06-01

    Production of biofuel from renewable sources is considered to be one of the most sustainable alternatives to petroleum sourced fuels. Biofuels are also viable means of environmental and economic sustainability. Biofuels are divided into four generations, depending on the type of biomass used for biofuels production. At present, microalgae are presented as an ideal third generation biofuel feedstock because of their rapid growth rate. They also do not compete with food or feed crops, and can be produced on non-arable land. Cultivation conditions (temperature, pH, light, nutrient quantity and quality, salinity, aerating) are the major factors that influence photosynthesis activity and behaviour of the microalgae growth rate. In this paper, we present an overview about the effect of cultivation conditions on microalgae growth.

  18. Novel protocol for lutein extraction from microalga Chlorella vulgaris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Este, Martina; De Francisci, Davide; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-01-01

    Lutein is a pigment generally extracted from marigold flowers. However, lutein is also found in considerable amounts in microalgae. In this study a novel method was developed to improve the extraction efficiency of lutein from microalga C. vulgaris. Differently from conventional methods, ethanol...... was used instead of water in the saponification step, which was conducted simultaneously to the solvent extraction, performed using dichloromethane. The amount of lutein extracted from C. vulgaris dried biomass increased more than threefold, from 0.20 ± 0.00 mgLutein/gDM to 0.69 ± 0.08 mgLutein/gDM. Lutein...

  19. Effects of cultivation conditions and media composition on cell growth and lipid productivity of indigenous microalga Chlorella vulgaris ESP-31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Kuei-Ling; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2012-02-01

    The growth and lipid productivity of an isolated microalga Chlorella vulgaris ESP-31 were investigated under different media and cultivation conditions, including phototrophic growth (NaHCO(3) or CO(2), with light), heterotrophic growth (glucose, without light), photoheterotrophic growth (glucose, with light) and mixotrophic growth (glucose and CO(2), with light). C. vulgaris ESP-31 preferred to grow under phototrophic (CO(2)), photoheterotrophic and mixotrophic conditions on nitrogen-rich medium (i.e., Basal medium and Modified Bristol's medium), reaching a biomass concentration of 2-5 g/l. The growth on nitrogen-limiting MBL medium resulted in higher lipid accumulation (20-53%) but slower growth rate. Higher lipid content (40-53%) and higher lipid productivity (67-144 mg/l/d) were obtained under mixotrophic cultivation with all the culture media used. The fatty acid composition of the microalgal lipid comprises over 60-68% of saturated fatty acids (i.e., palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0)) and monounsaturated acids (i.e., oleic acid (C18:1)). This lipid composition is suitable for biodiesel production.

  20. Microalgae Harvest through Fungal Pelletization—Co-Culture of Chlorella vulgaris and Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarman Oktovianus Gultom

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae harvesting is a labor- and energy-intensive process and new approaches to harvesting microalgae need to be developed in order to decrease the costs. In this study; co-cultivatation of filamentous fungus (Aspergillus niger and microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris to form cell pellets was evaluated under different conditions, including organic carbon source (glucose; glycerol; and sodium acetate concentration; initial concentration of fungal spores and microalgal cells and light. Results showed that 2 g/L of glucose with a 1:300 ratio of fungi to microalgae provided the best culturing conditions for the process to reach >90% of cell harvest efficiency. The results also showed that an organic carbon source was required to sustain the growth of fungi and form the cell pellets. The microalgae/fungi co-cultures at mixotrophic conditions obtained much higher total biomass than pure cultures of each individual strains; indicating the symbiotic relationship between two strains. This can benefit the microbial biofuel production in terms of cell harvest and biomass production.

  1. Combined Extraction Processes of Lipid from Chlorella vulgaris Microalgae: Microwave Prior to Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Chemat

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Extraction yields and fatty acid profiles from freeze-dried Chlorella vulgaris by microwave pretreatment followed by supercritical carbon dioxide (MW-SCCO2 extraction were compared with those obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction alone (SCCO2. Work performed with pressure range of 20–28 Mpa and temperature interval of 40–70 °C, gave the highest extraction yield (w/w dry weight at 28 MPa/40 °C. MW-SCCO2 allowed to obtain the highest extraction yield (4.73% compared to SCCO2 extraction alone (1.81%. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of microalgae oil showed that palmitic, oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acid were the most abundant identified fatty acids. Oils obtained by MW-SCCO2 extraction had the highest concentrations of fatty acids compared to SCCO2 extraction without pretreatment. Native form, and microwave pretreated and untreated microalgae were observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM. SEM micrographs of pretreated microalgae present tearing wall agglomerates. After SCCO2, microwave pretreated microalgae presented several micro cracks; while native form microalgae wall was slightly damaged.

  2. Direct Biodiesel Production from Wet Microalgae Biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa through In Situ Transesterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hechun Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A one-step process was applied to directly converting wet oil-bearing microalgae biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa containing about 90% of water into biodiesel. In order to investigate the effects of water content on biodiesel production, distilled water was added to dried microalgae biomass to form wet biomass used to produce biodiesel. The results showed that at lower temperature of 90°C, water had a negative effect on biodiesel production. The biodiesel yield decreased from 91.4% to 10.3% as water content increased from 0% to 90%. Higher temperature could compensate the negative effect. When temperature reached 150°C, there was no negative effect, and biodiesel yield was over 100%. Based on the above research, wet microalgae biomass was directly applied to biodiesel production, and the optimal conditions were investigated. Under the optimal conditions of 100 mg dry weight equivalent wet microalgae biomass, 4 mL methanol, 8 mL n-hexane, 0.5 M H2SO4, 120°C, and 180 min reaction time, the biodiesel yield reached as high as 92.5% and the FAME content was 93.2%. The results suggested that biodiesel could be effectively produced directly from wet microalgae biomass and this effort may offer the benefits of energy requirements for biodiesel production.

  3. Combined extraction processes of lipid from Chlorella vulgaris microalgae: microwave prior to supercritical carbon dioxide extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejoye, Céline; Vian, Maryline Abert; Lumia, Guy; Bouscarle, Christian; Charton, Frederic; Chemat, Farid

    2011-01-01

    Extraction yields and fatty acid profiles from freeze-dried Chlorella vulgaris by microwave pretreatment followed by supercritical carbon dioxide (MW-SCCO(2)) extraction were compared with those obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction alone (SCCO(2)). Work performed with pressure range of 20-28 Mpa and temperature interval of 40-70 °C, gave the highest extraction yield (w/w dry weight) at 28 MPa/40 °C. MW-SCCO(2) allowed to obtain the highest extraction yield (4.73%) compared to SCCO(2) extraction alone (1.81%). Qualitative and quantitative analyses of microalgae oil showed that palmitic, oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acid were the most abundant identified fatty acids. Oils obtained by MW-SCCO(2) extraction had the highest concentrations of fatty acids compared to SCCO(2) extraction without pretreatment. Native form, and microwave pretreated and untreated microalgae were observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). SEM micrographs of pretreated microalgae present tearing wall agglomerates. After SCCO(2), microwave pretreated microalgae presented several micro cracks; while native form microalgae wall was slightly damaged.

  4. Chlorella protothecoides Microalgae as an Alternative Fuel for Tractor Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddam H. Al-lwayzy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel has attracted a great deal attention recently as an alternative fuel due to increasing fuel prices and the imperative to reduce emissions. Among a wide range of biodiesel resources, microalgae are a promising alternative fuel source because of the high biomass, lipid productivity and environmentally friendliness. Microalgae is also a non-edible food, therefore, there will be no impact on the human food supply chain. In this work, petroleum diesel (PD and biodiesel from the microalgae Chlorella protothecoides (MCP-B20 blend have been used to examine the performance and the emission of a 25.8 kW agriculture tractor engine. Two engine speeds at maximum power take off (PTO power and torque have been selected for analysis using analysis of variance (ANOVA. The results showed that there is no significant difference between the engine performance when microalgae biodiesel blend (MCP-B20 and PD were used. However, a significant reduction in CO, CO2 and NO emissions was found when MCP-B20 was used. These outcomes give strong indication that microalgae can be successfully used in tractors as alternative fuel.

  5. Direct Biodiesel Production from Wet Microalgae Biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa through In Situ Transesterification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hechun; Zhang, Zhiling; Wu, Xuwen; Miao, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    A one-step process was applied to directly converting wet oil-bearing microalgae biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa containing about 90% of water into biodiesel. In order to investigate the effects of water content on biodiesel production, distilled water was added to dried microalgae biomass to form wet biomass used to produce biodiesel. The results showed that at lower temperature of 90°C, water had a negative effect on biodiesel production. The biodiesel yield decreased from 91.4% to 10.3% as water content increased from 0% to 90%. Higher temperature could compensate the negative effect. When temperature reached 150°C, there was no negative effect, and biodiesel yield was over 100%. Based on the above research, wet microalgae biomass was directly applied to biodiesel production, and the optimal conditions were investigated. Under the optimal conditions of 100 mg dry weight equivalent wet microalgae biomass, 4 mL methanol, 8 mL n-hexane, 0.5 M H2SO4, 120°C, and 180 min reaction time, the biodiesel yield reached as high as 92.5% and the FAME content was 93.2%. The results suggested that biodiesel could be effectively produced directly from wet microalgae biomass and this effort may offer the benefits of energy requirements for biodiesel production. PMID:24195081

  6. Direct biodiesel production from wet microalgae biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa through in situ transesterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hechun; Zhang, Zhiling; Wu, Xuwen; Miao, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    A one-step process was applied to directly converting wet oil-bearing microalgae biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa containing about 90% of water into biodiesel. In order to investigate the effects of water content on biodiesel production, distilled water was added to dried microalgae biomass to form wet biomass used to produce biodiesel. The results showed that at lower temperature of 90°C, water had a negative effect on biodiesel production. The biodiesel yield decreased from 91.4% to 10.3% as water content increased from 0% to 90%. Higher temperature could compensate the negative effect. When temperature reached 150°C, there was no negative effect, and biodiesel yield was over 100%. Based on the above research, wet microalgae biomass was directly applied to biodiesel production, and the optimal conditions were investigated. Under the optimal conditions of 100 mg dry weight equivalent wet microalgae biomass, 4 mL methanol, 8 mL n-hexane, 0.5 M H2SO4, 120°C, and 180 min reaction time, the biodiesel yield reached as high as 92.5% and the FAME content was 93.2%. The results suggested that biodiesel could be effectively produced directly from wet microalgae biomass and this effort may offer the benefits of energy requirements for biodiesel production.

  7. INMOVILIZACIÓN DE LAS MICROALGAS Scenedesmus ovalternus (Scenedesmaceae) Y Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorellaceae) EN ESFERAS DE ALGINATO DE CALCIO

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Andres Forero-Cujiño; Luis Carlos Montenegro Ruiz; Gabriel Antonio Pinilla-Agudelo; Luz Marina Melgarejo-Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    En este trabajo se describe la técnica de inmovilización de microalgas en esferas de alginato de calcio. Se emplearon las especies Scenedesmus ovalternus y Chlorella vulgaris, se determinó la estabilidad de las esferas, la cinética de crecimiento y la concentración de las microalgas en el interior de las esferas. Chlorella vulgaris alcanzó mayores densidades poblacionales y tasas de crecimiento más altas cuando se inmovilizó en concentraciones del 10 % v/v con el alginato (1,31*106 cél/ml). P...

  8. Cultivation of Microalgae Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp. as a Potentional Biofuel Feedstock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. dr. Violeta Makareviciene

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The growth of two robust algae strains Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp. growing in Lithuanian lakes was investigated with the aim to obtain optimum conditions for biomass cultivation for biofuel production in the Lithuanian environment. Samples were taken from different nitrogen sources and of different concentrations, with addition of various concentrations of CO2 and in the presence of salt. The best biomass productivity was achieved using urea as a nitrogen source or modified growing medium BG11 with decreased concentration of NaNO3. The positive impact on the growth of biomass was achieved by aeration with CO2 (especially with concentration of 24%. Additional research into the removal of pollutants, such inorganic salts of nitrogen and phosphorus and organic materials from wastewater using microalgae has revealed good possibilities of using both algae strains in wastewater treatment plants. A content of oil in Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp. has suggested their potential use as biodiesel feedstock.

  9. Assessing the effect of leachate of copper slag from the ISASMELT process on cell growth and proximate components in microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris (Beijerinck)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Harish, V.; Sreepada, R.A.; Suryavanshi, U.; Shanmuganathan, P.; Sumathy, A.

    flasks) in an autotrophic medium (Liang, Sarkany, and Cui 2009) (filtered double distilled water, 1000 ml; NaCl 0.025 g; NaNO 3 0.25 g, K 2 HPO 4 0.175 g, MgSO 4 0.075g, NH 4 Cl 0.05 g, CaCl 2 0.025 g, FeCl 3 0.003 g, final pH 7) with continuous... testing using micro-organisms vol. II CRC Press, Inc., Boca Raton, 79–100. Xu, H., X.L. Miao, and Q.Y. Wu. 2006. High quality biodiesel production from a microalga Chlorella protothecoides by heterotrophic growth in fermenters. Journal of Biotechnology...

  10. Optimization of culture media for large-scale lutein production by heterotrophic Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin Young; Kwon, Ji-Sue; Kang, Soon Tae; Kim, Bo-Ra; Jung, Yuchul; Han, Jae Gap; Park, Joon Hyun; Hwang, Jae Kwan

    2014-01-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid with a purported role in protecting eyes from oxidative stress, particularly the high-energy photons of blue light. Statistical optimization was performed to growth media that supports a higher production of lutein by heterotrophically cultivated Chlorella vulgaris. The effect of media composition of C. vulgaris on lutein was examined using fractional factorial design (FFD) and central composite design (CCD). The results indicated that the presence of magnesium sulfate, EDTA-2Na, and trace metal solution significantly affected lutein production. The optimum concentrations for lutein production were found to be 0.34 g/L, 0.06 g/L, and 0.4 mL/L for MgSO4 ·7H2 O, EDTA-2Na, and trace metal solution, respectively. These values were validated using a 5-L jar fermenter. Lutein concentration was increased by almost 80% (139.64 ± 12.88 mg/L to 252.75 ± 12.92 mg/L) after 4 days. Moreover, the lutein concentration was not reduced as the cultivation was scaled up to 25,000 L (260.55 ± 3.23 mg/L) and 240,000 L (263.13 ± 2.72 mg/L). These observations suggest C. vulgaris as a potential lutein source.

  11. PRODUCTIVITY OF MICROALGAE CHLORELLA VULGARIS IN LABORATORY CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Patyna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Algae biomass is increasingly regarded as a potential resource that could be used to produce biofuels, electricity and heat. Algae contain a lot of nutrients, so they can be used as food for humans and livestock. Because of their valuable composition (many nutrients they are used as supplements of balanced diet, in turn taking into account their biosorption abbility they are used to detoxification of human body. Algae cultivation does not demand large areas of land to expose cells to sunlight, so their production rate is higher than vascular plants. Moreover algae cultivation lets to achieve high biomass concentration. Important cultivation factors are: illumination (light intensity is an important factor because it drives photosynthesis, CO2 supply, culture medium and mixing. The experimental research was conducted using Chlorella vulgaris BA 002 strain. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of biomass growth in laboratory condition.

  12. Selection of microalgae for high CO2 fixation efficiency and lipid accumulation from ten Chlorella strains using municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xia; Zhou, Jiti; Liu, Guangfei; Gui, Bing

    2016-08-01

    As significant differences in cellular physiology, metabolic potential and genetics occur among strains with morphological similarity, the screening of appropriate microalgae species for effective CO2 fixation and biodiesel production is extremely critical. In this study, ten strains of Chlorella were cultivated in municipal wastewater influent (MWI) and their tolerance for MWI, CO2 fixation efficiency and lipid productivity were assessed. The results showed that the biomass concentrations of four strains (Chlorella vulgaris, Chlorella 64.01, Chlorella regularis var. minima and Chlorella sp.) were significantly higher than other strains. When the cultivation systems were aerated with 10% CO2, Chlorella sp. showed the highest CO2 fixation efficiency (35.51%), while the highest lipid accumulation (58.48%) was observed with C. vulgaris. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that the cells of both Chlorella sp. and C. vulgaris kept their normal morphologies after 15day batch culture. These findings indicated that Chlorella sp. and C. vulgaris have fairly good tolerance for MWI, and moreover, Chlorella sp. was appropriate for CO2 fixation while C. vulgaris represented the highest potential for producing biodiesel.

  13. Nitric oxide inhibitory activity of monogalactosylmonoacylglycerols from a freshwater microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banskota, Arjun H; Stefanova, Roumiana; Gallant, Pamela; Osborne, Jane A; Melanson, Ronald; O'Leary, Stephen J B

    2013-01-01

    Chemical investigation of the freshwater microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana led to the isolation of a new monogalactosylmonoacylglycerol, namely, (2S)-1-O-(7Z,10Z-hexadecadienoyl)-3-O-β-D-galactopyranosylglycerol (1) together with a known glycolipid (2S)-1-O-(7Z,10Z,13Z-hexadecatrienoyl)-3-O-β-D-galactopyranosylglycerol (2). Both monogalactosylmonoacylglycerols showed dose-dependent nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory activity against lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production in RAW264.7 macrophage cells suggesting their possible use as anti-inflammatory agents.

  14. Effective harvesting of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris via flocculation-flotation with bioflocculant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xueqian; Chen, Yao; Shao, Zongze; Chen, Zhangran; Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Jingyan; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-12-01

    In this study, bioflocculant from Cobetia marina L03 could be used for effective harvesting of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris via flocculation-flotation. A flotation efficiency of 92.7% was observed when 20 mg L(-1) bioflocculant was tested for flocculating the microalgal cells with 5mM CaCl2. The bioflocculant was stable at wide ranges of pH and temperature, which is advantageous for its application under various conditions. Chemical analysis of the bioflocculant indicated that it is composed of 31.6% total sugar and 0.2% protein (w/w). This bioflocculant has potential for the high-efficiency harvesting of microalgae and may be useful in reducing one of the barriers to microalgal biofuel production.

  15. Isolation and purification of lutein from the microalga Chlorella vulgaris by extraction after saponification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua-Bin; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2002-02-27

    A simple and efficient method for the isolation and purification of lutein from the microalga Chlorella vulgaris was developed. Crude lutein was obtained by extraction with dichloromethane from the microalga after saponification. Partition values of lutein in the two-phase system of ethanol-water-dichloromethane at different ratios were measured by HPLC so as to assist the determination of an appropriate condition for washing water-soluble impurities in the crude lutein. Partition values of lutein in another two-phase system of ethanol-water-hexane at different ratios were also measured by HPLC for determining the condition for removing fat-soluble impurities. The water-soluble impurities in the crude lutein were removed by washing with 30% aqueous ethanol, and the fat-soluble impurities were removed by extraction with hexane. The final purity of lutein obtained was 90-98%, and the yield was 85-91%.

  16. Impact of Sulfur Starvation in Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Cultures of the Extremophilic Microalga Galdieria phlegrea (Cyanidiophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carfagna, Simona; Bottone, Claudia; Cataletto, Pia Rosa; Petriccione, Milena; Pinto, Gabriele; Salbitani, Giovanna; Vona, Vincenza; Pollio, Antonino; Ciniglia, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    In plants and algae, sulfate assimilation and cysteine synthesis are regulated by sulfur (S) accessibility from the environment. This study reports the effects of S deprivation in autotrophic and heterotrophic cultures of Galdieria phlegrea (Cyanidiophyceae), a unicellular red alga isolated in the Solfatara crater located in Campi Flegrei (Naples, Italy), where H2S is the prevalent form of gaseous S in the fumarolic fluids and S is widespread in the soils near the fumaroles. This is the first report on the effects of S deprivation on a sulfurous microalga that is also able to grow heterotrophically in the dark. The removal of S from the culture medium of illuminated cells caused a decrease in the soluble protein content and a significant decrease in the intracellular levels of glutathione. Cells from heterotrophic cultures of G. phlegrea exhibited high levels of internal proteins and high glutathione content, which did not diminish during S starvation, but rather glutathione significantly increased. The activity of O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL), the enzyme synthesizing cysteine, was enhanced under S deprivation in a time-dependent manner in autotrophic but not in heterotrophic cells. Analysis of the transcript abundance of the OASTL gene supports the OASTL activity increase in autotrophic cultures under S deprivation.

  17. Biology and Industrial Applications of Chlorella: Advances and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Chlorella represents a group of eukaryotic green microalgae that has been receiving increasing scientific and commercial interest. It possesses high photosynthetic ability and is capable of growing robustly under mixotrophic and heterotrophic conditions as well. Chlorella has long been considered as a source of protein and is now industrially produced for human food and animal feed. Chlorella is also rich in oil, an ideal feedstock for biofuels. The exploration of biofuel production by Chlorella is underway. Chlorella has the ability to fix carbon dioxide efficiently and to remove nutrients of nitrogen and phosphorous, making it a good candidate for greenhouse gas biomitigation and wastewater bioremediation. In addition, Chlorella shows potential as an alternative expression host for recombinant protein production, though challenges remain to be addressed. Currently, omics analyses of certain Chlorella strains are being performed, which will help to unravel the biological implications of Chlorella and facilitate the future exploration of industrial applications.

  18. Characteristics and kinetics study of simultaneous pyrolysis of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris, wood and polypropylene through TGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Kolsoom; Keshavarz Moraveji, Mostafa; Abedini Najafabadi, Hamed

    2017-11-01

    Thermal decomposition behavior and kinetics of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris, wood and polypropylene were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Experiments were carried out at heating rates of 10, 20 and 40°C/min from ambient temperature to 600°C. The results show that pyrolysis process of C. vulgaris and wood can be divided into three stages while pyrolysis of polypropylene occurs almost totally in one step. It is shown that wood can delay the pyrolysis of microalgae while microalgae can accelerate the pyrolysis of wood. The existence of polymer during the pyrolysis of microalgae or wood will lead to two divided groups of peaks in DTG curve of mixtures. The results showed that interaction is inhibitive rather than synergistic during the decomposition process of materials. Kinetics of process is studied by the Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO). The average E values obtained from FWO and KAS methods were 131.228 and 142.678kJ/mol, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Selective extraction of intracellular components from the microalga Chlorella vulgaris by combined pulsed electric field-temperature treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, P.R.; Pataro, G.; Capitoli, M.; Barbosa, M.J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Olivieri, G.; Ferrari, G.

    2016-01-01

    The synergistic effect of temperature (25-65°C) and total specific energy input (0.55-1.11kWhkgDW -1) by pulsed electric field (PEF) on the release of intracellular components from the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris was studied. The combination of PEF with temperatures from 2

  20. Selective extraction of intracellular components from the microalga Chlorella vulgaris by combined pulsed electric field-temperature treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, P.R.; Pataro, G.; Capitoli, M.; Barbosa, M.J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Olivieri, G.; Ferrari, G.

    2016-01-01

    The synergistic effect of temperature (25-65°C) and total specific energy input (0.55-1.11kWhkgDW -1) by pulsed electric field (PEF) on the release of intracellular components from the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris was studied. The combination of PEF with temperatures from

  1. Bioremoval of the azo dye Congo Red by the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Zamora, Miriam; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Montes-Horcasitas, María del Carmen; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2015-07-01

    Discharge of dye-containing wastewater by the textile industry can adversely affect aquatic ecosystems and human health. Bioremoval is an alternative to industrial processes for detoxifying water contaminated with dyes. In this work, active and inactive biomass of the microalga Chlorella vulgaris was assayed for the ability to remove Congo Red (CR) dye from aqueous solutions. Through biosorption and biodegradation processes, Chlorella vulgaris was able to remove 83 and 58 % of dye at concentrations of 5 and 25 mg L(-1), respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity at equilibrium was 200 mg g(-1). The Langmuir model best described the experimental equilibrium data. The acute toxicity test (48 h) with two species of cladocerans indicated that the toxicity of the dye in the effluent was significantly decreased compared to the initial concentrations in the influent. Daphnia magna was the species less sensitive to dye (EC50 = 17.0 mg L(-1)), followed by Ceriodaphnia dubia (EC50 = 3.32 mg L(-1)). These results show that Chlorella vulgaris significantly reduced the dye concentration and toxicity. Therefore, this method may be a viable option for the treatment of this type of effluent.

  2. INMOVILIZACIÓN DE LAS MICROALGAS Scenedesmus ovalternus (Scenedesmaceae Y Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorellaceae EN ESFERAS DE ALGINATO DE CALCIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Andres Forero-Cujiño

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se describe la técnica de inmovilización de microalgas en esferas de alginato de calcio. Se emplearon las especies Scenedesmus ovalternus y Chlorella vulgaris, se determinó la estabilidad de las esferas, la cinética de crecimiento y la concentración de las microalgas en el interior de las esferas. Chlorella vulgaris alcanzó mayores densidades poblacionales y tasas de crecimiento más altas cuando se inmovilizó en concentraciones del 10 % v/v con el alginato (1,31*106 cél/ml. Para Scenedesmus ovalternus se observó una mayor densidad poblacional y una mayor tasa de crecimiento cuando se inmovilizó en concentraciones del 20 % v/v (7,06*105 cél/ml. Estos resultados son útiles para aplicaciones prácticas de las algas encapsuladas, tales como el biomonitoreo o la biorremediación.Immobilization of Microalgae Scenedesmus ovalternus (Scenedesmaceae and Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorellaceae in Calcium Alginate BeadsThis paper describes the immobilization technique of microalgae in calcium alginate beads. Scenedesmus ovalternus and Chlorella vulgaris species were used. The stability of beads, the kinetics of growth and the concentrations of microalgae inside the beads were determined. The higher density and the upper growth rate of Chlorella vulgaris occurred when it was immobilized in alginate at a concentration of 10 %v/v (1,31*106 cél/ml. Scenedesmus ovalternus achieved a higher population density and an elevated growth rate when it was immobilized at a concentration of 20 % v/v (7,06*105 cél/ml. These results are useful for subsequent applications of the encapsulated algae, such as biomonitoring and bioremediation.

  3. Exploration of upstream and downstream process for microwave assisted sustainable biodiesel production from microalgae Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amit Kumar; Sahoo, Pradeepta Kumar; Singhal, Shailey; Joshi, Girdhar

    2016-09-01

    The present study explores the integrated approach for the sustainable production of biodiesel from Chlorella vulgaris microalgae. The microalgae were cultivated in 10m(2) open raceway pond at semi-continuous mode with optimum volumetric and areal production of 28.105kg/L/y and 71.51t/h/y, respectively. Alum was used as flocculent for harvesting the microalgae and optimized at different pH. Lipid was extracted using chloroform: methanol (2:1) and having 12.39% of FFA. Effect of various reaction conditions such as effect of catalyst, methanol:lipid ratio, reaction temperature and time on biodiesel yields were studied under microwave irradiation; and 84.01% of biodiesel yield was obtained under optimized reaction conditions. A comparison was also made between the biodiesel productions under conventional heating and microwave irradiation. The synthesized biodiesel was characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, FTIR and GC; however, fuel properties of biodiesel were also studied using specified test methods as per ASTM and EN standards.

  4. Phospholipid metabolism in an industry microalga Chlorella sorokiniana: the impact of inoculum sizes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhuan Lu

    Full Text Available Chlorella sorokiniana is an important industry microalga potential for biofuel production. Inoculum size is one of the important factors in algal large-scale culture, and has great effects on the growth, lipid accumulation and metabolism of microalgae. As the first barrier of cell contents, membrane plays a vital role in algal inoculum-related metabolism. The knowledge of phospholipids, the main membrane component and high accumulation of phospholipids as the major content of total lipids mass in some microalgae, is necessary to understand the role of membrane in cell growth and metabolism under different inoculum density. Profiling of C. sorokiniana phospholipids with LC-MS led to the identification of 119 phospholipid species. To discover the phospholipid molecules most related to change of inoculum sizes, Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA was employed and the results revealed that inoculum sizes significantly affected phospholipid profiling. Phosphatidylglycerol (PG, phosphatidyl- ethanolamine (PE and several phosphatidylcholine (PC species might play an important role under our experimental conditions. Further analysis of these biomarkers indicated that cell membrane status of C. sorokiniana might play an important role in the adaption to the inoculum sizes. And the culture with inoculum size of 1 × 10(6 cells mL(-1 presented the best membrane status with the highest content of PC and PG, and the lowest content of PE. We discovered that the inoculum size of 1 × 10(6 cells mL(-1 might provide the best growth condition for C. sorokiniana. Also we proposed that PG, PE and several PC may play an important role in inoculum-related metabolism in C. sorokiniana, which may work through thylakoid membrane and photosynthetic pathway. Thus this study would provide more potential targets for metabolic engineering to improve biofuel production and productivity in microalgae.

  5. Development of novel conductometric biosensors based on immobilised whole cell Chlorella vulgaris microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouteau, Celine; Dzyadevych, Sergei; Chovelon, Jean-Marc; Durrieu, Claude

    2004-04-15

    A novel biosensor based on immobilised whole cell Chlorella vulgaris microalgae as a bioreceptor and interdigitated conductometric electrodes as a transducer has been developed and tested for alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) analysis. These sensors were also used for the detection of toxic compounds, namely cadmium ions, in aquatic habitats. Algae were immobilised inside bovine serum albumin (BSA) membranes cross-linked with glutaraldehyde vapours. The detection of the local conductivity variations caused by algae enzymatic reactions could be achieved. The inhibition of C. vulgaris microalgae Alkaline phosphatase activities in presence of cadmium ions was measured. These results were compared with measurements in bioassays. It finally appeared that conductometric biosensors using algae seemed more sensitive than bioassays to detect low levels of cadmium ions (the detection limit for the first experiments was 1 ppb of Cd2+). The main advantages of these alkaline phosphatase biosensors consist of their high specificity in regard to the toxic compounds they enable to detect, but also on their high stability since contrary to enzymatic biosensors, they use whole algae cells with APs on their walls.

  6. Ecotoxicity of Ag-nanoparticles on two microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazani Amal A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing application of nanotechnology highlights the need to clarify and understand it. In this work, the subacute toxicity of Ag-NPs to the fresh water microalga Chlorella vulgaris and marine microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta were assessed. The effect of Ag-NPs was induced by exposing both algae to increasing concentrations of Ag-NPs (0, 10, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L. Cellular viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS formation were determined to evaluate the toxic effect of Ag-NPs on algal growth. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and peroxidase (POD activities and lipid peroxidation (MDA levels in the algal cells varied with the concentration of Ag-NPs suspensions and exposure times (up to 8 d. As a result, 100 and 200 mg/L Ag-NPs caused a statistically significant decrease in cell viability, as well as SOD, CAT and POD activities, and a significant increase in ROS formation and MDA levels in tissues (P <0.05, suggesting that the algal cells exposed to these two concentrations of Ag-NPs suffered from oxidative stress. The extent of depletion of antioxidant enzyme activities and the elevation of MDA in Dunaliella tertiolecta was the greatest, indicating that Dunaliella tertiolecta might be the most susceptible to Ag-NP exposure. These results indicated a potential risk from Ag-NPs released into the aqueous environment.

  7. Transcriptome profiling of the microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa in response to different carbon dioxide concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xue; Shen, Jia; Bai, Fengwei; Xu, Nianjun

    2016-10-01

    To enrich our knowledge of carbon dioxide (CO2)-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in eukaryotic algae, we used high-throughput sequencing to investigate the transcriptome profiling of the microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa (Chlorophyta) response to different CO2 levels. Altogether, 53.86 million (M) and 62.10M clean short reads of 100 nucleotides (nt) were generated from this microalga cultured at 4-fold air CO2 (control) and air CO2 concentrations by Illumina sequencing. A total of 32,662 unigenes were assembled from the two pooled samples. With an E-value cut-off of 1e-5, 9590, 6782, 5954, and 9092 unigenes were annotated in NR, Gene Ontology (GO), Eukaryotic Cluster of Orthologous Groups of proteins (KOG), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases, respectively. After screening, 51 differentially expressed unigenes were up-regulated and 8 were down-regulated in the air CO2 group, relative to the control. The transcript levels of eight differentially expressed unigenes were validated by real-time quantitative PCR, which manifested that thioredoxin-like protein, laminin subunit beta-1, and chlorophyll a/b binding protein might be associated with the utilization of inorganic carbon at low CO2 levels.

  8. Optimization of Chlorella vulgaris and bioflocculant-producing bacteria co-culture: enhancing microalgae harvesting and lipid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Yang, Y; Ma, F; Xuan, L; Xu, Y; Huo, H; Zhou, D; Dong, S

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae are a sustainable bioresource, and the biofuel they produce is widely considered to be an alternative to limited natural fuel resources. However, microalgae harvesting is a bottleneck in the development of technology. Axenic Chlorella vulgaris microalgae exhibit poor harvesting, as expressed by a flocculation efficiency of 0·2%. This work optimized the co-culture conditions of C. vulgaris and bioflocculant-producing bacteria in synthetic wastewater using response surface methodology (RSM), thus aiming to enhance C. vulgaris harvesting and lipid content. Three significant process variables- inoculation ratio of bacteria and microalgae, initial glucose concentration, and co-culture time- were proposed in the RSM model. F-values (3·98/8·46) and R(2) values (0·7817/0·8711) both indicated a reasonable prediction by the RSM model. The results showed that C. vulgaris harvesting efficiency reached 45·0-50·0%, and the lipid content was over 21·0% when co-cultured with bioflocculant-producing bacteria under the optimized culture conditions of inoculation ratio of bacteria and microalgae of 0·20-0·25, initial glucose concentration of microalgae harvesting and cost-effective microalgal bioproducts, and confirmed the promising prospect of introducing bioflocculant-producing bacteria into microalgae bioenergy production. This work optimized the co-culture conditions of microalgae (C. vulgaris) and bioflocculant-producing bacteria (F2, Rhizobium radiobacter) in synthetic wastewater using response surface methodology, aiming to enhance C. vulgaris harvesting and lipid produced content. Bioflocculant-producing microbes are environmentally friendly functional materials. They avoid the negative effects of traditional chemical flocculants. This work provided new insights into microalgae harvesting and cost-effective production of microalgal bioproducts, and confirmed the promising prospect of introducing bioflocculant-producing bacteria into microalgae

  9. Bioethanol production from the nutrient stress-induced microalga Chlorella vulgaris by enzymatic hydrolysis and immobilized yeast fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Hyoun; Choi, In Seong; Kim, Ho Myeong; Wi, Seung Gon; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2014-02-01

    The microalga Chlorella vulgaris is a potential feedstock for bioenergy due to its rapid growth, carbon dioxide fixation efficiency, and high accumulation of lipids and carbohydrates. In particular, the carbohydrates in microalgae make them a candidate for bioethanol feedstock. In this study, nutrient stress cultivation was employed to enhance the carbohydrate content of C. vulgaris. Nitrogen limitation increased the carbohydrate content to 22.4% from the normal content of 16.0% on dry weight basis. In addition, several pretreatment methods and enzymes were investigated to increase saccharification yields. Bead-beating pretreatment increased hydrolysis by 25% compared with the processes lacking pretreatment. In the enzymatic hydrolysis process, the pectinase enzyme group was superior for releasing fermentable sugars from carbohydrates in microalgae. In particular, pectinase from Aspergillus aculeatus displayed a 79% saccharification yield after 72h at 50°C. Using continuous immobilized yeast fermentation, microalgal hydrolysate was converted into ethanol at a yield of 89%.

  10. Biofuels from the Fresh Water Microalgae Chlorella vulgaris (FWM-CV for Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddam H. Al-lwayzy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to investigate biofuels for diesel engines produced on a lab-scale from the fresh water microalgae Chlorella vulgaris (FWM-CV. The impact of growing conditions on the properties of biodiesel produced from FWM-CV was evaluated. The properties of FWM-CV biodiesel were found to be within the ASTM standards for biodiesel. Due to the limited amount of biodiesel produced on the lab-scale, the biomass of dry cells of FWM-CV was used to yield emulsified water fuel. The preparation of emulsion fuel with and without FWM-CV cells was conducted using ultrasound to overcome the problems of large size microalgae colonies and to form homogenized emulsions. The emulsified water fuels, prepared using ultrasound, were found to be stable and the size of FWM-CV colonies were effectively reduced to pass through the engine nozzle safely. Engine tests at 3670 rpm were conducted using three fuels: cottonseed biodiesel CS-B100, emulsified cottonseed biodiesel water fuel, water and emulsifier (CS-E20 and emulsified water containing FWM-CV cells CS-ME20. The results showed that the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC was increased by about 41% when the engine was fueled with emulsified water fuels compared to CS-B100. The engine power, exhaust gas temperature, NOx and CO2 were significantly lower than that produced by CS-B100. The CS-ME20 produced higher power than CS-E20 due to the heating value improvement as a result of adding FWM-CV cells to the fuel.

  11. Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa response to pentachlorophenol and comparison with that of the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Paulo; Stoichev, Teodor; Basto, M Clara P; Ramos, V; Vasconcelos, V M; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D

    2014-04-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) effects on a strain of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa were investigated at laboratory scale. This is the first systematic ecotoxicity study of the effects of PCP on an aquatic cyanobacterium. The microalga Chlorella vulgaris was studied in the same conditions as the cyanobacterium, in order to compare the PCP toxicity and its removal by the species. The cells were exposed to environmental levels of PCP during 10 days, in Fraquil culture medium, at nominal concentrations from 0.01 to 1000 μg L(-1), to the cyanobacterium, and 0.01 to 5000 μg L(-1), to the microalga. Growth was assessed by area under growth curve (AUC, optical density vs time) and chlorophyll a content (chla). The toxicity profiles of the two species were very different. The calculated effective concentrations EC20 and EC50 were much lower to M. aeruginosa, and its growth inhibition expressed by chla was concentration-dependent while by AUC was not concentration-dependent. The cells might continue to divide even with lower levels of chla. The number of C. vulgaris cells decreased with the PCP concentration without major impact on the chla. The effect of PCP on M. aeruginosa is hormetic: every concentration studied was toxic except 1 μg L(-1), which promoted its growth. The legal limit of PCP set by the European Union for surface waters (1 μg L(-1)) should be reconsidered since a toxic cyanobacteria bloom might occur. The study of the removal of PCP from the culture medium by the two species is an additional novelty of this work. M. aeruginosa could remove part of the PCP from the medium, at concentrations where toxic effects were observed, while C. vulgaris stabilized it.

  12. Magnesium Uptake by the Green Microalga Chlorella vulgaris in Batch Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Amor-Ben Ayed, Hela; Taidi, Behnam; Ayadi, Habib; Pareau, Dominique; Stambouli, Moncef

    2016-03-01

    The accumulation (internal and superficial distribution) of magnesium ions (Mg(2+)) by the green freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) was investigated under autotrophic culture in a stirred photobioreactor. The concentrations of the three forms of Mg(2+) (dissolved, extracellular, and intracellular) were determined with atomic absorption spectroscopy during the course of C. vulgaris growth. The proportions of adsorbed (extracellular) and absorbed (intracellular) Mg(2+) were quantified. The concentration of the most important pigment in algal cells, chlorophyll a, increased over time in proportion to the increase in the biomass concentration, indicating a constant chlorophyll/biomass ratio during the linear growth phase. The mean-average rate of Mg(2+) uptake by C. vulgaris grown in a culture medium starting with 16 mg/l of Mg(2+) concentration was measured. A clear relationship between the biomass concentration and the proportion of the Mg(2+) removal from the medium was observed. Of the total Mg(2+) present in the culture medium, 18% was adsorbed on the cell wall and 51% was absorbed by the biomass by the end of the experiment (765 h). Overall, 69% of the initial Mg(2+) were found to be removed from the medium. This study supported the kinetic model based on a reversible first-order reaction for Mg(2+) bioaccumulation in C. vulgaris, which was consistent with the experimental data.

  13. Production, extraction and stabilization of lutein from microalga Chlorella sorokiniana MB-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yen; Jesisca; Hsieh, Chienyan; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Chien-Hsiang; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2016-01-01

    The efficiencies of extraction and preservation of lutein from microalgae are critical for the success of its commercialization. In this study, lutein was produced by Chlorella sorokiniana MB-1 via semi-batch mixotrophic cultivation. The microalgal biomass with a lutein content of 5.21mg/g was pretreated by bead-beating and high pressure cell disruption methods, and the lutein content was harvested by a reduced pressure extraction method. The effect of pretreatment, pressure, solvent type, extraction time and temperature on lutein recovery was investigated. Using high pressure pretreatment followed by extraction with tetrahydrofuran (THF) as solvent resulted in high lutein recovery efficiencies of 87.0% (20min) and 99.5% (40min) at 850mbar and 25°C. In contrast, using ethanol as the solvent, 86.2% lutein recovery was achieved under 450mbar, 35°C and 40min extraction. The extracted lutein was stabilized in olive oil or sunflower oil with half-lives of 53.1 and 63.8days, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A kinetic study of pyrolysis and combustion of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris using thermo-gravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ankit; Chakraborty, Saikat

    2013-01-01

    This work uses thermo-gravimetric, differential thermo-gravimetric and differential thermal analyses to evaluate the kinetics of pyrolysis (in inert/N(2) atmosphere) and (oxidative) combustion of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris by heating from 50 to 800 °C at heating rates of 5-40 °C/min. This study shows that combustion produces higher biomass conversion than pyrolysis, and that three stages of decomposition occur in both cases, of which, the second one--consisting of two temperature zones--is the main stage of devolatization. Proteins and carbohydrates are decomposed in the first of the two zones at activation energies of 51 and 45 kJ/mol for pyrolysis and combustion, respectively, while lipids are decomposed in its second zone at higher activation energies of 64 and 63 kJ/mol, respectively. The kinetic expressions of the reaction rates in the two zones for pyrolysis and combustion have been obtained and it has been shown that increased heating rates result in faster and higher conversion.

  15. Extraction fatty acid as a source to produce biofuel in microalgae Chlorella sp. and Spirulina sp. using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Do Chiem; Hai, Dam Thi Thanh; Vinh, Nguyen Hanh; Phung, Le Thi Kim

    2016-06-01

    In this research, the fatty acids of isolated microalgae were extracted by some technologies such as maceration, Soxhlet, ultrasonic-assisted extraction and supercritical fluid extraction; and analyzed for biodiesel production using GC-MS. This work deals with the extraction of microalgae oil from dry biomass by using supercritical fluid extraction method. A complete study at laboratory of the influence of some parameters on the extraction kinetics and yields and on the composition of the oil in terms of lipid classes and profiles is proposed. Two types of microalgae were studied: Chlorella sp. and Spirulina sp. For the extraction of oil from microalgae, supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) is regarded with interest, being safer than n-hexane and offering a negligible environmental impact, a short extraction time and a high-quality final product. Whilst some experimental papers are available on the supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of oil from microalgae, only limited information exists on the kinetics of the process. These results demonstrate that supercritical CO2 extraction is an efficient method for the complete recovery of the neutral lipid phase.

  16. Cultivation factors and population size control the uptake of nitrogen by the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris when interacting with the microalgae growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Bashan, Luz E; Antoun, Hani; Bashan, Yoav

    2005-10-01

    Growth of and the capacity to take up nitrogen in the freshwater microalgae Chlorella vulgaris were studied while varying the concentrations of ammonium and nitrate, the pH and the source of carbon in a synthetic wastewater growth medium when co-immobilized in alginate beads with the microalgae growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense. Analyses of 29 independent experiments showed that co-immobilization of the microalgae with A. brasilense could result in two independent phenomena directly affected by cultivation factors, such as nitrogen species, pH and presence of a carbon source. First, growth of the microalgal population increased without an increase in the capacity of the single cells to take up nitrogen, or second, the capacity of cells to take up nitrogen increased without an increase of the total microalgal population. These phenomena were dependent on the population density of the microalgae, which was in turn affected by cultivation factors. This supports the conclusion that the size of the microalgal population controls the uptake of nitrogen in C. vulgaris cells - the higher the population (regardless the experimental parameters), the less nitrogen each cell takes up.

  17. Comparison of mixotrophic to cyclic autotrophic/heterotrophic growth strategies to optimize productivity of Chlorella sorokiniana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Wagenen, Jonathan Myerson; De Francisci, Davide; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    In addition to providing cheap or free mineral nutrients, wastewaters may contain organic carbon compounds that could increase productivity of algal cultures. This study defined a strategy for the addition of organic carbon to photobioreactors in order to improve their productivity compared...... to autotrophic growth. Chlorella sorokiniana was cultivated in medium supplemented with sodium acetate in concentrations equivalent to the volatile fatty acid concentration found in anaerobic digester effluent. Flat-panel photobioreactors were operated using 16:8 light:dark cycles, with different strategies...... in an increased efficiency of the photobioreactor....

  18. Efecto de la radiación ultravioleta B en la producción de polifenoles en la microalga marina Chlorella sp. Effect of ultraviolet B radiation on the production of polyphenols in the marine microalga Chlorella sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Copia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Las algas marinas son una fuente importante de compuestos antioxidantes (fenoles y polifenoles, generados como mecanismos de defensa frente a factores de estrés (radiación UV, temperatura, herbívora. El objetivo de este trabajo es evaluar la estrategia de adaptación al efecto de la radiación ultravioleta B (RUV-B, 280-315 nm en la microalga marina Chlorella sp. mediante la producción de polifenoles y capacidad antioxidante total. Se expusieron cultivos de Chlorella sp. fueron expuestos a radiación UV-B (470 μW cm-2 por periodo de tiempos ascendentes. Se evaluó la capacidad antioxidante total DPPH, polifenoles totales, clorofila-a y b así como la densidad celular en cultivos expuestos y no expuestos. Los resultados indicaron que la RUV-B genera una disminución de la densidad celular en los cultivos irradiados por primera vez (1ª etapa, existiendo un aumento significativo (P Marine algae are an important source of antioxidant compounds (phenols and polyphenols, generated as defense mechanisms against stress factors (UV radiation, temperature, herbivory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the strategy of adaptation to the effect of ultraviolet B radiation (UV-B, 280-315 nm in the marine microalga Chlorella sp. through, the production of polyphenols and total antioxidant capacity. Chlorella sp. cultures were exposed to UV-B radiation (470 μW cm-2 over increasing time periods. We evaluated the total antioxidant capacity DPPH, total polyphenols, chlorophyll-a and b, and cell densities in exposed and unexposed cultures. The results indicated that UV-B caused a decrease in cell density in cultures irradiated for the first time (1st stage, with a significant increment (P < 0.05, lower than the control in the 2nd and 3rd stages only through the 4th stage (day 7, corresponding to a dose of 16,920 J m-2. The production of total phenols increased significantly (P < 0.05 for the IVth extract with respect to the control, confirming that the

  19. PERFIL DE ÁCIDOS GRAXOS DAS MICROALGAS Chlorella vulgaris E Chlorella minutissima CULTIVADAS EM DIFERENTES CONDIÇÕES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. V. COSTA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Estudos recentes têm explorado o uso de microalgas para obtenção de lipídios, principalmente os de maior valor comercial como o ácido -linolênico. A microalga Chlorella possui ácidos graxos poliinsaturados, vitaminas e alto conteúdo protéico, e, além disso, possui o certificado GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar o cultivo das microalgas Chlorella vulgaris e Chlorella minutissima, a fim de verificar o perfil de ácidos graxos frente à variação de diferentes fatores físicoquímicos e nutricionais. Foi utilizado um Planejamento Fatorial Fracionário 24-1 IV para cada cepa estudada, onde foram variados os fatores temperatura, iluminância, fonte de carbono e concentração de nitrato no meio de cultivo. C. vulgaris cultivada a 35ºC, 2500 Lux, 16,8 g.L-1 de NaHCO3 e 1,0 g.L-1 de NO3 - apresentou biomassa máxima de 5,06 g.L-1 em 22 dias de cultivo. Para C. minutissima foi obtida biomassa máxima de 1,5g.L-1 em 22 dias quando cultivada a 35ºC, 1250 Lux, 16,8 g.L-1 de NaHCO3 e 0,5 g.L-1 de NO3 -. Os maiores teores de lipídios obtidos para C. vulgaris e C. minutissima foram 6,96% e 7,98%, respectivamente. A 35ºC e 2500 Lux foi obtido 7,66% de ácido linolênico.

  20. Coagulant effect of ferric chloride for separation of biomass from the microalgae Chlorella sp. of the water; Efeito coagulante do cloreto ferrico para separacao da biomassa da microalga Chlorella sp. da agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Tamara Daiane de; Mendes, Mucio Andre dos Santos Alves [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola e Ambiental], E-mail: tamara_daiane@yahoo.com.br; Matos, Antonio Teixeira de [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola; Lo Monaco, Paola Alfonsa Vieira [Instituto Federal do Espirito Santo (IFES), Santa Teresa, ES (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Vicosa (DEA/UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola

    2010-07-01

    Currently, much interest has been focused on the biotechnological potential of microalgae, mainly in the production of biofuels. For this to become viable the biomass of algae should be separated from the water and the process of coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation may be an alternative. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of ferric chloride as coagulant agent of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. Were tested five concentrations of ferric chloride in the suspension containing the microalgae: 20,0; 30,0; 40,0; 50,0 e 100,0 g L{sup -1}. The tests were performed using the Jar-test apparatus and the turbidity was measured in suspensions after 2 hours of sedimentation. Mathematical equations were adjusted by regression, relating the concentration used in the tests according to the turbidity of the suspension. There was a linear decrease in turbidity with the addition of ferric chloride, and for concentration of 100.0 g L{sup -1} was achieved a removal efficiency of turbidity of 58%. However, it is necessary to conduct further research, evaluating the economic feasibility of the technique in the separation of microalgae from the water. (author)

  1. Influence of phosphate on toxicity and bioaccumulation of arsenic in a soil isolate of microalga Chlorella sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Md Mezbaul; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the toxicity, biotransformation and bioaccumulation of arsenite and arsenate in a soil microalga, Chlorella sp., were investigated using different phosphate levels. The results indicated that arsenate was highly toxic than arsenite to the alga, and the phosphate limitation in growth media greatly enhanced arsenate toxicity. The uptake of arsenate in algal cells was more than that of arsenite, and the predominant species in the growth media was arsenate after 8 days of exposure to arsenite or arsenate, indicating arsenite oxidation by this microalga. Arsenate reduction was also observed when the alga was incubated in a phosphate-limiting growth medium. Similar to the process of biotransformation, the alga accumulated more arsenic when it was exposed to arsenate and preferably more in a phosphate-limiting condition. Although phosphate significantly influences the biotransformation and bioaccumulation of arsenic, the oxidizing ability and higher accumulation capacity of this alga have great potential for its application in arsenic bioremediation.

  2. Heterotrophic growth and lipid accumulation of Chlorella protothecoides in whey permeate, a dairy by-product stream, for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Gonzalez, Isabel; Parashar, Archana; Bressler, David C

    2014-03-01

    This study proposes a novel alternative for the utilization of whey permeate, a by-product stream from the dairy industry, as the feedstock for the biomass and lipid production of the microalgae Chlorella protothecoides. Glucose and galactose from the pre-hydrolyzed whey permeate were used as main carbon sources in a base mineral media for establishing batch and fed batch cultures. Batch cultures reached a biomass production of 9.1±0.2g/L with a total lipid accumulation of 42.0±6.6% (dry weight basis), while in the fed batch cultures 17.2±1.3g/L of biomass with 20.5±0.3% lipid accumulation (dry weight basis) were obtained. A third strategy for the direct utilization of whey permeate was investigated by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF), wherein, 7.3±1.3g/L of biomass with 49.9±3.3% lipid accumulation (dry weight basis) was obtained in batch mode using immobilized enzyme. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Improving protein production of indigenous microalga Chlorella vulgaris FSP-E by photobioreactor design and cultivation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yen; Lee, Po-Jen; Tan, Chung Hong; Lo, Yung-Chung; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Show, Pau Loke; Lin, Chih-Hung; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-06-01

    Fish meal is currently the major protein source for commercial aquaculture feed. Due to its unstable supply and increasing price, fish meal is becoming more expensive and its availability is expected to face significant challenges in the near future. Therefore, feasible alternatives to fish meal are urgently required. Microalgae have been recognized as the most promising candidates to replace fish meal because the protein composition of microalgae is similar to fish meal and the supply of microalgae-based proteins is sustainable. In this study, an indigenous microalga (Chlorella vulgaris FSP-E) with high protein content was selected, and its feasibility as an aquaculture protein source was explored. An innovative photobioreactor (PBR) utilizing cold cathode fluorescent lamps as an internal light source was designed to cultivate the FSP-E strain for protein production. This PBR could achieve a maximum biomass and protein productivity of 699 and 365 mg/L/day, respectively, under an optimum urea and iron concentration of 12.4 mM and 90 μM, respectively. In addition, amino acid analysis of the microalgal protein showed that up to 70% of the proteins in this microalgal strain consist of indispensable amino acids. Thus, C. vulgaris FSP-E appears to be a viable alternative protein source for the aquaculture industry.

  4. High yields of fatty acid and neutral lipid production from cassava bagasse hydrolysate (CBH) by heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junhui; Liu, Xiaoguang; Wei, Dong; Chen, Gu

    2015-09-01

    The fermentation process for high yields of fatty acid and neutral lipid production from cassava bagasse hydrolysate (CBH) was developed by heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides. An efficient single-step enzymatic hydrolysis of cassava bagasse (CB) by cellulase was firstly developed to produce >30 g/L of reducing sugars. The concentrated CBH was subsequently applied in a batch culture, producing 7.9 g/L of dry biomass with yield of 0.44 g/g reducing sugar and 34.3 wt% of fatty acids and 48.6 wt% of neutral lipids. Furthermore, fed-batch fermentation using CBH achieved higher yields of fatty acids (41.0 wt% and a titer of 5.83 g/L) and neutral lipids (58.4 wt% and yield of 0.22 g/g reducing sugar). Additionally, the fatty acid profile analysis showed that the intercellular lipid was suitable to prepare high-quality biodiesel. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using CBH as low-cost feedstock to produce crude algal oil for sustainable biodiesel production.

  5. Ecological role of algobacterial cenosis links (chlorella - associated microflora or associated bacteria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechurkin, N. S.

    The problems of interrelation of microalgae and bacteria in the "autotroph - heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle are discussed. The cause and mechanisms of algobacterial cenosis formation still have been explained contradictorily. This work views the results of experimental and theoretical study of algobacterial cenosis functioning by the example of microalga Chlorella vulgaris and associated microflora. The representatives of Pseudomonas mainly predominate in the Chlorella microbial complex. The experiment at non-sterile batch cultivation of Chlorella on Tamya medium showed that the biomass of microorganisms increases simultaneously with the increase of microalgal biomass. Microflora of Chlorella can use organic materials evolved by Chlorella after photosynthesis for reproduction. Moreover, microorganisms can use dying cells of Chlorella, i.e. form the "producer - reducer" biocycle. To understand the cenosis-forming role of microalgae the mathematical model of the "autotroph - heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle was constructed taking into consideration the opportunities for microorganisms of using Chlorella photosynthates, dying cells and contribution of links to the nitrogen cycle. The theoretical investigation showed that the biomass of associated bacteria growing on glucose and detritus exceeds the biomass of bacteria using only microalgal photosynthates, which is comparable with experimental data.

  6. INMOVILIZACIÓN DE LAS MICROALGAS Scenedesmus ovalternus (Scenedesmaceae Y Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorellaceae EN ESFERAS DE ALGINATO DE CALCIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Andrés FORERO-CUJIÑO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se describe la técnica de inmovilización de microalgas en esferas de alginato de calcio. Se emplearon las especies Scenedesmus ovalternus y Chlorella vulgaris , se determinó la estabilidad de las esferas, la cinética de crecimiento y la concentración de las microalgas en el interior de las esferas. Chlorella vulgaris alcanzó mayores densidades poblacionales y tasas de crecimiento más altas cuando se inmovilizó en concentraciones del 10 % v/v con el alginato (1,31*10 6 cél/ml. Para Scenedesmus ovalternus se observó una mayor densidad poblacional y una mayor tasa de crecimiento cuando se inmovilizó en concentraciones del 20 % v/v (7,06*10 5 cél/ml. Estos resultados son útiles para aplicaciones prácticas de las algas encapsuladas, tales como el biomonitoreo o la biorremediación.

  7. PROPAGACIÓN DE LA MICROALGA Chlorella sp. EN CULTIVO POR LOTE: CINÉTICA DEL CRECIMIENTO CELULAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherlys Infante

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo, se estudia el crecimiento de Chlorella sp., un alga microscópica, ampliamente distribuida en aguas marinas, con el fin de observar su comportamiento en cultivo por lote. El diseño experimental contempló la obtención de la biomasa de la microalga, utilizando un medio preparado con sales inorgánicas. Se obtuvo información acerca de la reproducibilidad de los ensayos realizados, estableciendo que se trata de un microorganismo de fácil propagación. Este resultado a su vez posibilita la aplicación de la microalga a diferentes estrategias para la remoción de sustancias nocivas presentes en los ecosistemas. El cultivo por lotes resulta adecuado para la obtención de biomasa de Chlorella sp observándose un ajuste lineal para la cinética de crecimiento. Los resultados obtenidos son una contribución al proyecto de investigación en el área de biosorción, que actualmente se desarrolla en conjunto la Universidad de Cartagena y la Universidad del Atlántico (Colombia.

  8. Enhanced performance of the microalga Chlorella sorokiniana remotely induced by the plant growth-promoting bacteria Azospirillum brasilense and Bacillus pumilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amavizca, Edgar; Bashan, Yoav; Ryu, Choong-Min; Farag, Mohamed A; Bebout, Brad M; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2017-02-01

    Remote effects (occurring without physical contact) of two plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) Azospirillum brasilense Cd and Bacilus pumilus ES4 on growth of the green microalga Chlorella sorokiniana UTEX 2714 were studied. The two PGPB remotely enhanced the growth of the microalga, up to six-fold, and its cell volume by about three-fold. In addition to phenotypic changes, both bacteria remotely induced increases in the amounts of total lipids, total carbohydrates, and chlorophyll a in the cells of the microalga, indicating an alteration of the microalga's physiology. The two bacteria produced large amounts of volatile compounds, including CO2, and the known plant growth-promoting volatile 2,3-butanediol and acetoin. Several other volatiles having biological functions in other organisms, as well as numerous volatile compounds with undefined biological roles, were detected. Together, these bacteria-derived volatiles can positively affect growth and metabolic parameters in green microalgae without physical attachment of the bacteria to the microalgae. This is a new paradigm on how PGPB promote growth of microalgae which may serve to improve performance of Chlorella spp. for biotechnological applications.

  9. Evaluation of agricultural fertilizers on the productivity of microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Margarita Silva-Benavides

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the productivity of microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana UTEX 1230 with two different foliar fertilizers used in agriculture and the comparison with the nutrient medium Kolwitz (K3.Variables assessed were cell growth, productivity, chlorophyll concentration, fluorescence (Fv/Fm, proteins, and carbohydrates. Two commercial fertilizers with NPK 20-20-20 and NPK 22-10-7 formula were used as nutrient media. The study was conducted at the Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Florence, Italy, in 2014. Each experiment was repeated five times using three replicates in each experiment under a light intensity of 150 μmol photons m2/s, temperature 28 °C and CO2/air (2:98v/v. The culture media were prepared by using the following fertilizers: 1 NPK 20-20-20 (1.00 g/l + 0.27 g/l MgSO4.7H2O, 2 NPK 22-10-7 (+2 MgO (1.00 g/l + 0.27 g/l MgSO4.7H2O, 3 NPK 22-10-7 (+2 MgO (1.00 g/l, 4 NPK 20-20-20 (1.00 g/l. The nutrient medium Kolwitz (K3 was used as a control. Higher cell concentrations, productivity, chlorophyll, fluorescence, proteins, and carbohydrates were obtained in cultures grown in the media prepared with magnesium sulfate (NPK 20-20-20 (1.00 g/l + 0.27 g/l MgSO4.7H2O, and NPK 22-10-7 (+2 MgO (1.00 g/l + 0.27 g/l MgSO4.7H2O. Lower biomass growth was obtained in cultures lacking magnesium sulfate. Sulfide and magnesium, as well as the amounts of urea and ammonia in the chemical composition of each fertilizer, had a positive effect on the culture growth and productivity. 

  10. Purifying Synthetic High-Strength Wastewater by Microalgae Chlorella Vulgaris Under Various Light Emitting Diode Wavelengths and Intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Ge

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The high-strength wastewater is now well known as a threat to the natural water since it is highly possible to arouse water eutrophication or algal blooms. The effects of various light emitting diode wavelengths and intensities on the microalgae biological wastewater treatment system was studied in this research. The various nutrient removals and economic efficiencies represented similar variation trends, and these variations under both high C and N loading treatments were similar too. The order for microalgae C. vulgaris reproduction in terms of dry weight and nutrient removal efficiency both were red > white > yellow > blue, under high carbon and nitrogen loading treatments, indicating that the red light was the optimum light wavelength. Furthermore, considering the optimal light intensity in terms of nutrient removal efficiency was 2500 and 2000 μmol/m2•s, while in terms of economic efficiency was 1000, 1500 and 2000 μmol/m2•s. Therefore, the optimum light intensity was found to be 2000 μmol/m2•s. In addition, the optimal experimental illumination time was determined as 120 h. The Chlorella vulgaris microalgae biological wastewater treatment system utilized in this research was able to purify the high-strength carbon and nitrogen wastewater effectively under optimum light wavelength and intensity.

  11. Elucidation of the defence mechanism in microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana under mercury exposure. Identification of Hg-phytochelatins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Jacinto, Verónica; García-Barrera, Tamara; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis; Garbayo-Nores, Inés; Vílchez-Lobato, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Algae and aquatic macrophytes are capable of accumulating heavy metals up to concentrations several orders of magnitude higher than those existing in their surrounding environment. Investigation of mercury toxicology in microalgae is of great interest from ecological point of view, since they could be used as bioindicator to evaluate aquatic ecosystems affected by Hg pollution. In this study, we have performed an exposure experiment focused on the biological response of microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana, a unicellular model organism, to Hg-induced toxicity. The culture was exposed to different concentrations of this element for nine days, namely 0.5, 1, 5 and 10mg L(-1) of HgCl2 (as Hg). To achieve a better understanding of the biological mechanisms triggered by Hg-induced toxicity in this alga a metallomic approach based on SEC-ICP-ORS-MS was applied to survey biomarkers of biological response to mercury contamination in surface water. In addition, the combination of RP-HPLC-ICP-ORS-MS and RP-HPLC-ESI-QqQ-TOF-MS was applied to identify, for the first time, two Hg-binding phytochelatins in this aquatic organism, using cell extracts from microalgae exposed to inorganic mercury.

  12. Teor de clorofila e perfil de sais minerais de Chlorella vulgaris cultivada em solução hidropônica residual Chlorophyll content and minerals profile in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris cultivated in hydroponic wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Cleber Bertoldi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O cultivo de microalgas representa uma potencial fonte de biomassa rica em clorofila e sais minerais como: fósforo, ferro, manganês, cobre, zinco, magnésio e cálcio. Este experimento teve como objetivo avaliar a composição de minerais, bem como determinar o teor de clorofila a e b da microalga Chlorella vulgaris cultivada em solução hidropônica residual em três diferentes concentrações comparadas com um cultivo controle. Os resultados mostraram que os teores de clorofila a e b da microalga não apresentaram diferença significativa entre os cultivos. Com relação à composição dos sais minerais, a Chlorella cultivada na solução residual mais concentrada apresentou valores superiores quando comparada com a cultivada nos demais cultivos. Dessa forma, a biomassa da Chlorella vulgaris demonstrou ser uma potencial fonte de clorofila e de sais minerais, quando cultivada em solução hidropônica residual, possibilitando a utilização desse resíduo de forma sustentável.The microalgaes cultive represents a potential source of biomass rich in chlorophyll and minerals as: P, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Mg and Ca. This research was aimed at evaluating the composition of minerals, as well as, determining the content of chlorophyll a and b from the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris cultivated in hydroponic wastewater in three different concentrations compared with the control cultive. The results showed that the contents of chlorophyll a and b of the microalgae did not show significant difference between the cultives. In relation to the composition of the minerals, the Chlorella cultivated in the most concentrated wastewater, showed higher values when compared with the one cultivated in the others cultures. In this manner, the Chlorella vulgaris biomass demonstrated to be a potential source of chlorophyll and minerals, when cultivated in hydroponic wastewater, allowing the use of this residue in a sustainable way.

  13. Enhanced performance of the microalga Chlorella sorokiniana remotely induced by the plant growth-promoting bacteria Azospirillum brasilense and Bacillus pumilus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amavizca, Edgar; Bashan, Yoav; Ryu, Choong-Min; Farag, Mohamed A.; Bebout, Brad M.; de-Bashan, Luz E.

    2017-01-01

    Remote effects (occurring without physical contact) of two plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) Azospirillum brasilense Cd and Bacilus pumilus ES4 on growth of the green microalga Chlorella sorokiniana UTEX 2714 were studied. The two PGPB remotely enhanced the growth of the microalga, up to six-fold, and its cell volume by about three-fold. In addition to phenotypic changes, both bacteria remotely induced increases in the amounts of total lipids, total carbohydrates, and chlorophyll a in the cells of the microalga, indicating an alteration of the microalga’s physiology. The two bacteria produced large amounts of volatile compounds, including CO2, and the known plant growth-promoting volatile 2,3-butanediol and acetoin. Several other volatiles having biological functions in other organisms, as well as numerous volatile compounds with undefined biological roles, were detected. Together, these bacteria-derived volatiles can positively affect growth and metabolic parameters in green microalgae without physical attachment of the bacteria to the microalgae. This is a new paradigm on how PGPB promote growth of microalgae which may serve to improve performance of Chlorella spp. for biotechnological applications. PMID:28145473

  14. Proteomics analysis for enhanced lipid accumulation in oleaginous Chlorella vulgaris under a heterotrophic-Na⁺ induction two-step regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuqin; Mu, Jinxiu; Chen, Di; Xu, Hua; Han, Fangxin; Feng, Bo; Zeng, Hongyan

    2015-05-01

    A heterotrophic-Na(+) induction (HNI) two-step regime was developed to enhance lipid accumulation in oleaginous Chlorella vulgaris. C. vulgaris was cultivated heterotrophically to a biomass of 7.8 g l(-1) in 120 h. The cells were re-suspended in fresh media supplemented with 0.5 M NaCl followed by 12 h growth to accumulate lipid to 53.4 % (w/w). The lipid productivity (625 mg l(-1) day(-1)) achieved with HNI was better than that using heterotrophy alone (405 mg l(-1) day(-1)). To promote possible applications of HNI strategy in other microalgal species, the lipid triggers and potential molecular pathways associated with lipid biosynthesis were investigated. Malic enzyme and acyl-CoA-binding protein were key metabolic checkpoints found to modulate lipid biosynthesis in cells. These results provide the foundation to develop high-lipid engineering miroalgae for industrialization of biodiesel.

  15. Three stage cultivation process of facultative strain of Chlorella sorokiniana for treating dairy farm effluent and lipid enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hena, S; Fatihah, N; Tabassum, S; Ismail, N

    2015-09-01

    Reserve lipids of microalgae are promising for biodiesel production. However, economically feasible and sustainable energy production from microalgae requires optimization of cultivation conditions for both biomass yield and lipid production of microalgae. Biomass yield and lipid production in microalgae are a contradictory problem because required conditions for both targets are different. Simultaneously, the mass cultivation of microalgae for biofuel production also depends extremely on the performance of the microalgae strains used. In this study a green unicellular microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana (DS6) isolated from the holding tanks of farm wastewater treatment plant using multi-step screening and acclimation procedures was found high-lipid producing facultative heterotrophic microalgae strain capable of growing on dairy farm effluent (DFE) for biodiesel feedstock and wastewater treatment. Morphological features and the phylogenetic analysis for the 18S rRNA identified the isolated strains. A novel three stage cultivation process of facultative strain of C. sorokiniana was examined for lipid production.

  16. Selective extraction of intracellular components from the microalga Chlorella vulgaris by combined pulsed electric field-temperature treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, P R; Pataro, G; Capitoli, M; Barbosa, M J; Wijffels, R H; Eppink, M H M; Olivieri, G; Ferrari, G

    2016-03-01

    The synergistic effect of temperature (25-65 °C) and total specific energy input (0.55-1.11 kWh kgDW(-1)) by pulsed electric field (PEF) on the release of intracellular components from the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris was studied. The combination of PEF with temperatures from 25 to 55 °C resulted in a conductivity increase of 75% as a result of cell membrane permeabilization. In this range of temperatures, 25-39% carbohydrates and 3-5% proteins release occurred and only for carbohydrate release a synergistic effect was observed at 55 °C. Above 55 °C spontaneous cell lysis occurred without PEF. Combined PEF-temperature treatment does not sufficiently disintegrate the algal cells to release both carbohydrates and proteins at yields comparable to the benchmark bead milling (40-45% protein, 48-58% carbohydrates).

  17. Kinetic characteristics and modeling of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris growth and CO2 biofixation considering the coupled effects of light intensity and dissolved inorganic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hai-Xing; Huang, Yun; Fu, Qian; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun

    2016-04-01

    Understanding and optimizing the microalgae growth process is an essential prerequisite for effective CO2 capture using microalgae in photobioreactors. In this study, the kinetic characteristics of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris growth in response to light intensity and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration were investigated. The greatest values of maximum biomass concentration (Xmax) and maximum specific growth rate (μmax) were obtained as 2.303 g L(-1) and 0.078 h(-1), respectively, at a light intensity of 120 μmol m(-2) s(-1) and DIC concentration of 17 mM. Based on the results, mathematical models describing the coupled effects of light intensity and DIC concentration on microalgae growth and CO2 biofixation are proposed. The models are able to predict the temporal evolution of C. vulgaris growth and CO2 biofixation rates from lag to stationary phases. Verification experiments confirmed that the model predictions agreed well with the experimental results.

  18. Oral administration of an enzymatic protein hydrolysate from the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris enhances the nutritional recovery of malnourished mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Humberto J; Carrillo, Olimpia V; Alonso, María E; Bermúdez, Rosa C; Almarales, Ángel; Llauradó, Gabriel; Lebeque, Yamila; Fontaine, Roberto

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the effects of oral administration of an enzymatic protein hydrolysate from green microalga Chlorella vulgaris (Cv-PH) on the nutritional recovery of malnourished Balb/c mice after a 3-day fasting period. Mice were refed with commercial diet supplemented or not supplemented with Cv-PH (500 mg/kg) for 8 days. Regardless of the diet used during refeeding, animal body weights and serum protein concentrations did not differ between groups. Mice given Cv-PH had a significant increase in hemoglobin concentrations. Most serum amino acid levels were similar in the control and Cv-PH animals. Starved mice refed with Cv-PH showed normal liver functions, as judged by liver weight, protein concentration, and the enzymatic activities of cholinesterase and arginase. Cv-PH increased DNA, protein content, and gut-mucosal weight. In addition, brush-border oligosaccharidase activities were also higher in the Cv-PH group. These findings suggest that Chlorella protein hydrolysate can be used to develop specific formulations suitable for pharmacologic nutrition.

  19. Effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on fatty acid contents and composition in the green microalga, Chlorella sp. 227.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sunja; Lee, Dukhaeng; Luong, Thao Thanh; Park, Sora; Oh, You-Kwan; Lee, Taeho

    2011-10-01

    In order to investigate and generalize the effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on the growth of and lipid production in Chlorella sp. 227, several nutritional combinations consisting of different carbon and nitrogen sources and concentrations were given to the media for cultivation of Chlorella sp. 227, respectively. The growth rate and lipid content were affected largely by concentration rather than by sources. The maximum specific growth was negatively affected by low concentrations of carbon and nitrogen. There is a maximum allowable inorganic carbon concentration (less than 500~1,000 mM bicarbonate) in autotrophic culture, but the maximum lipid content per gram dry cell weight (g DCW) was little affected by the concentration of inorganic carbon within the concentration. The lipid content per g DCW was increased when the microalga was cultured with the addition of glucose and bicarbonate (mixotrophic) at a fixed nitrogen concentration and with the lowest nitrogen concentration (0.2 mM), relatively. Considering that lipid contents per g DCW increased in those conditions, it suggests that a high ratio of carbon to nitrogen in culture media promotes lipid accumulation in the cells. Interestingly, a significant increase of the oleic acid amount to total fatty acids was observed in those conditions. These results showed the possibility to induce lipid production of high quality and content per g DCW by modifying the cultivation conditions.

  20. ROLE OF GLUTAMATE DEHYDROGENASE AND GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE IN CHLORELLA VULGARIS DURING ASSIMILATION OF AMMONIUM WHEN JOINTLY IMMOBILIZED WITH THE MICROALGAE-GROWTH-PROMOTING BACTERIUM AZOSPIRILLUM BRASILENSE(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Bashan, Luz E; Magallon, Paola; Antoun, Hani; Bashan, Yoav

    2008-10-01

    Enzymatic activities of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) participating in the nitrogen metabolism and related ammonium absorption were assayed after the microalga Chlorella vulgaris Beij. was jointly immobilized with the microalgae-growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense. At initial concentrations of 3, 6, and 10 mg · L(-1)  NH4 (+) , joint immobilization enhances growth of C. vulgaris but does not affect ammonium absorption capacity of the microalga. However, at 8 mg · L(-1)  NH4 (+) , joint immobilization enhanced ammonium absorption by the microalga without affecting the growth of the microalgal population. Correlations between absorption of ammonium per cell and per culture showed direct (negative and positive) linear correlations between these parameters and microalga populations at 3, 6, and 10 mg · L(-1)  NH4 (+) , but not at 8 mg · L(-1)  NH4 (+) , where the highest absorption of ammonium occurred. In all cultures, immobilized and jointly immobilized, having the four initial ammonium concentrations, enzymatic activities of Chlorella are affected by A. brasilense. Regardless of the initial concentration of ammonium, GS activity in C. vulgaris was always higher when jointly immobilized and determined on a per-cell basis. When jointly immobilized, only at an initial concentration of 8 mg · L(-1)  NH4 (+) was GDH activity per cell higher.

  1. Combined extraction processes of lipid from Chlorella vulgaris microalgae: microwave prior to supercritical carbon dioxide extraction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dejoye, Céline; Vian, Maryline Abert; Lumia, Guy; Bouscarle, Christian; Charton, Frederic; Chemat, Farid

    2011-01-01

    ...) allowed to obtain the highest extraction yield (4.73%) compared to SCCO(2) extraction alone (1.81%). Qualitative and quantitative analyses of microalgae oil showed that palmitic, oleic, linoleic...

  2. Optimizing the Critical Factors for Lipid Productivity during Stress Phase of Heterotrophic Microalgae Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Chiranjeevi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae-derived biodiesel/biofuel is one of the promising and sustainable processes. In order to study the influence of different factors viz., pH, temperature, salinity and carbon concentration that influences the microalgae lipids and carbohydrate productivity Taguchi orthogonal array (OA experimental design (DOE was used with variation at four levels (21×44. Experiments were performed with allegorical batch experimental matrix [16 experimental trails]. Salinity, temperature, carbon concentration and pH showed marked influence on lipid production whereas temperature and carbon concentration showed major influence on carbohydrate production. Higher lipid productivity (55% was observed with experimental condition six (pH: 6; Salinity: 1 g/l; Temperature: 20 OC; Carbon concentration: 30 g/l. FAME analysis revealed the highest number of Saturated fatty acids (SFAs (C12:0 to C24:0 was detected with experimental set up six and eight more favoring the biodiesel properties.

  3. Antioxidant activity of the microalga Chlorella vulgaris cultered on special conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, M S; Sato, S; Mancini-Filho, J

    2001-01-01

    The chemical composition of Chlorella vulgaris indicates that it has a high nutritional value to a wide range of essential nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals and proteins. Moreover, it contains other compounds such as n-3 and n-6 polynsaturated fatty acids, provitamins and phenolic compounds. In addition, this alga can be produced in large-scale systems. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of a Chlorella cultured on three differents temperatures (15 degrees C, 20 degrees C and 30 degrees C) in 3 Klux. Chlorella cultured samples were submitted to sequential extration using as solvents: ether, methanol and water. The antioxidant activity in the extracts was measured by b-carotene/linoleic acid system, at 50 degrees C and absorbances reading at 470 nm. One control with BHT, 100 ppm was used in this determination. The total phenolic compounds was determined with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent using the spectrophotometric measured at 780 nm with catechin as standard. The phenolic acid analysis were carried out using gas chromatograph equipped with a capillary column and flame ionization detector. Non conjugated and total phenolic acids were identified on the basis of the relative retention time of their derivatives compared with the standard phenolic acids. The methanolic extract from Chlorella cultured at 30 degrees C showed higher antioxidant activity (85%) quite similar of BHT (86%). By the Rancimat test (lipidic medium) two fractions from methanolic extracts showed too higher antioxidant activity with induction times > 37.50 h at 60 degrees C and 11.5 h at 100 degrees C. The total phenolic compounds were 24.95 mg in 1 g of dry alga matter from methanolic extract and five phenolic acids were identified. The phenolic compounds salicylic, trans cinnamic, synaptic, chlorogenic, chimic and caffeic acids found in the methanolic Chlorella extract may be responsible for its higher antioxidant activity.

  4. Statistical evaluation and modeling of cheap substrate-based cultivation medium of Chlorella vulgaris to enhance microalgae lipid as new potential feedstock for biolubricant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Mirzaie, M A; Kalbasi, M; Mousavi, S M; Ghobadian, B

    2016-05-18

    Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) microalga was investigated as a new potential feedstock for the production of biodegradable lubricant. In order to enhance microalgae lipid for biolubricant production, mixotrophic growth of C. vulgaris was optimized using statistical analysis of Plackett-Burman (P-B) and response surface methodology (RSM). A cheap substrate-based medium of molasses and corn steep liquor (CSL) was used instead of expensive mineral salts to reduce the total cost of microalgae production. The effects of molasses and CSL concentration (cheap substrates) and light intensity on the growth of microalgae and their lipid content were analyzed and modeled. Designed models by RSM showed good compatibility with a 95% confidence level when compared to the cultivation system. According to the models, optimal cultivation conditions were obtained with biomass productivity of 0.123 g L(-1) day(-1) and lipid dry weight of 0.64 g L(-1) as 35% of dry weight of C. vulgaris. The extracted microalgae lipid presented useful fatty acid for biolubricant production with viscosities of 42.00 cSt at 40°C and 8.500 cSt at 100°C, viscosity index of 185, flash point of 185°C, and pour point of -6°C. These properties showed that microalgae lipid could be used as potential feedstock for biolubricant production.

  5. The effects of different levels of Chlorella microalgae on blood biochemical parameters and trace mineral concentrations of laying hens reared under heat stress condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi kor, Nasroallah; Akbari, Mohsen; Olfati, Ali

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of different supplementation levels of Chlorella microalgae on serum metabolites and the plasma content of minerals in laying hens reared under heat stress condition (27.5-36.7 °C, variable). A total number of 378 (40 weeks of age, with mean body weight of 1390 ± 120 g) were randomly allocated to six treatments with seven replicates. The birds were randomly assigned to 6 treatments (C, T1, T2, T3, T4, and T5) with 7 replicate cages of 9 birds. C. microalgae at the rates of 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 ppm with water were offered to groups T1, T2, T3, T4, and T5, respectively, while group C served as a control. At 71 days of trial, blood samples (14 samples per treatment) were taken for measuring serum metabolites and at 72 days for plasma mineral analysis. The results of this experiment showed that the supplementation of 200-500 ppm C. microalgae decreased the serum content of cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL (P microalgae (300 or 400 and 500 ppm). C. microalgae at rates of 300-500 ppm caused a marked (P microalgae at high rates was beneficial on blood parameters of laying hens reared under heat stress.

  6. Utilization of carbon dioxide in industrial flue gases for the cultivation of microalga Chlorella sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chien-Ya; Chen, Tsai-Yu; Chang, Yu-Bin; Chiu, Tzai-Wen; Lin, Hsiun-Yu; Chen, Chun-Da; Chang, Jo-Shu; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2014-08-01

    The biomass and lipid productivity of Chlorella sp. MTF-15 cultivated using aeration with flue gases from a coke oven, hot stove or power plant in a steel plant of the China Steel Corporation in Taiwan were investigated. Using the flue gas from the coke oven, hot stove or power plant for cultivation, the microalgal strain obtained a maximum specific growth rate and lipid production of (0.827 d(-1), 0.688 g L(-1)), (0.762 d(-1), 0.961 g L(-1)), and (0.728 d(-1), 0.792 g L(-1)), respectively. This study demonstrated that Chlorella sp. MTF-15 could efficiently utilize the CO₂, NOX and SO₂ present in the different flue gases. The results also showed that the growth potential, lipid production and fatty acid composition of the microalgal strain were dependent on the composition of the flue gas and on the operating strategy deployed.

  7. Biomass and oil production by Chlorella vulgaris and four other microalgae - Effects of salinity and other factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangpipat, Tiyaporn; Chisti, Yusuf

    2017-09-10

    Five nominally freshwater microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris, Choricystis minor, Neochloris sp., Pseudococcomyxa simplex, Scenedesmus sp.) with a known ability to produce high-levels of lipids for possible use as fuel oils were evaluated for their ability to thrive and produce lipids in seawater and brackish water. Only C. vulgaris was found to thrive and produce lipids in full strength seawater. Seawater tolerant strains of C. vulgaris are unusual. Lipid productivity in nutrient sufficient seawater exceeded 37mgL(-1)d(-1) and was nearly 2-fold greater than in freshwater. Although other microalgae such as C. minor had higher lipid productivities (e.g. 45mgL(-1)d(-1)), they did not thrive in seawater. The lipid content of the C. vulgaris biomass was nearly 16% by dry weight. The calorific value of the seawater-grown C. vulgaris biomass exceeded 25kJg(-1). Compared to continuously illuminated cultures, a 12/12h light-dark cycle reduced lipid productivity of C. vulgaris by ∼30%, but did not affect the lipid content of the biomass. Biomass yield on phosphate was nearly 27% higher in seawater compared to in freshwater. While C. vulgaris has been extensively studied in freshwater, it has not been examined to any detail in full strength seawater. Studies in seawater are essential for any future large scale production of algal oils for biofuels: seawater is available cheaply and in large amounts whereas there is a global shortage of freshwater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Beech wood Fagus sylvatica dilute-acid hydrolysate as a feedstock to support Chlorella sorokiniana biomass, fatty acid and pigment production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miazek, Krystian; Remacle, Claire; Richel, Aurore; Goffin, Dorothee

    2017-04-01

    This work evaluates the possibility of using beech wood (Fagus sylvatica) dilute-acid (H2SO4) hydrolysate as a feedstock for Chlorella sorokiniana growth, fatty acid and pigment production. Neutralized wood acid hydrolysate, containing organic and mineral compounds, was tested on Chlorella growth at different concentrations and compared to growth under phototrophic conditions. Chlorella growth was improved at lower loadings and inhibited at higher loadings. Based on these results, a 12% neutralized wood acid hydrolysate (Hyd12%) loading was selected to investigate its impact on Chlorella growth, fatty acid and pigment production. Hyd12% improved microalgal biomass, fatty acid and pigment productivities both in light and in dark, when compared to photoautotrophic control. Light intensity had substantial influence on fatty acid and pigment composition in Chlorella culture during Hyd12%-based growth. Moreover, heterotrophic Chlorella cultivation with Hyd12% also showed that wood hydrolysate can constitute an attractive feedstock for microalgae cultivation in case of lack of light.

  9. Flashing light as growth stimulant in cultivation of green microalgae, Chlorella sp. utilizing airlift photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathurrahman, L; Hajar, A H Siti; Sakinah, D Wan Nur; Nurhazwani, Z; Ahmad, J

    2013-11-15

    One of the main limitations of productivity in photobioreactor is the inefficient conversion of the available light into biomass. Photoautotrophic cells such as microalgae only absorb a small fraction of supplied illumination due to limitation of its photosystem's (PS) absorbing rate. However, phenomenon of Flashing Light Effect (FLE) allows microalgae to utilize strong light exceptionally through intermittent exposure. Exposure of strong light at correct frequency of light and dark photoperiod would allow two pigment-protein complexes, PSI and PSII to be at the equilibrium mid-point potential to allow efficient light conversion. Narrow range of optimum frequency is crucial since overexposure to strong light would injured photosynthetic apparatus whereas longer dark period would contributed to loss of biomass due to triacylglycerol metabolism. The behaviour of microalgae towards various illumination conditions of FLE was determined at batch Photobioreactor (PBR) by varying the aeration flow rate: 16.94, 33.14 and 49.28 mL sec(-1) which yield, respectively the light exposure time of 3.99, 1.71 and 1.1 seconds per cycle. Maximum cell density in FLE-PBR was significantly higher at the exponential phase as compared to the continuously illuminated culture (p = 5.62 x 10(-5), a = 0.05) under the flow rate of 25.07 mL sec(-1). Maximum cell density yield of FLE-PBR and continuously illuminated PBR was, respectively 3.1125 x 10(7) and 2.947 x 10(7) cells mL(-1). Utilization of FLE as an innovative solution to increase the efficiency of microalgae to convert light into chemical energy would revolutionize the microalgae culture, reduce the time for cultivation and produce higher maximum biomass density.

  10. Lipase-catalyzed in-situ biosynthesis of glycerol-free biodiesel from heterotrophic microalgae, Aurantiochytrium sp. KRS101 biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keon Hee; Lee, Ok Kyung; Kim, Chul Ho; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Oh, Baek-Rock; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2016-07-01

    Heterotrophic microalgae, Aurantiochytrium sp. KRS101 had a large amount of lipid (56.8% total lipids). The cells in the culture medium were easily ruptured due to thin cell wall of Aurantiochytrium sp., which facilitated in-situ fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) production directly from biomass. The harvested biomass had a high content of free fatty acids (FFAs), which was advantageous for glycerol-free FAMEs production. FAMEs were directly produced from Aurantiochytrium sp. KRS101 biomass (48.4% saponifiable lipids) using Novozyme 435-catalyzed in-situ esterification in dimethyl carbonate (DMC). DMC was used as a lipid extraction reagent, acyl acceptor and reaction medium. A 433.09mg FAMEs/g biomass was obtained with 89.5% conversion under the optimal condition: DMC to biomass ratio of 5:1 (v/w) and enzyme to biomass ratio of 30% (w/w) at 50°C for 12h. Glycerol could not be detected in the produced FAMEs.

  11. Lipid Production of Heterotrophic Chlorella sp. from Hydrolysate Mixtures of Lipid-Extracted Microalgal Biomass Residues and Molasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongli; Ma, Xiaochen; Gao, Zhen; Wan, Yiqin; Min, Min; Zhou, Wenguang; Li, Yun; Liu, Yuhuan; Huang, He; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of lipid production of Chlorella sp. from waste materials. Lipid-extracted microalgal biomass residues (LMBRs) and molasses were hydrolyzed, and their hydrolysates were analyzed. Five different hydrolysate mixture ratios (w/w) of LMBRs/molasses (1/0, 1/1, 1/4, 1/9, and 0/1) were used to cultivate Chlorella sp. The results showed that carbohydrate and protein were the two main compounds in the LMBRs, and carbohydrate was the main compound in the molasses. The highest biomass concentration of 5.58 g/L, Y biomass/sugars of 0.59 g/g, lipid productivity of 335 mg/L/day, and Y lipids/sugars of 0.25 g/g were obtained at the hydrolysate mixture ratio of LMBRs/molasses of 1/4. High C/N ratio promoted the conversion of sugars into lipids. The lipids extracted from Chlorella sp. shared similar lipid profile of soybean oil and is therefore a potential viable biodiesel feedstock. These results showed that Chlorella sp. can utilize mixed sugars and amino acids from LMBRs and molasses to accumulate lipids efficiently, thus reducing the cost of microalgal biodiesel production and improving its economic viability.

  12. Influence of temperature in phosphate removal by microalgae in heterotrophic bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Queiroz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The removal of total dissolved phosphate by the cyanobacteria Aphanothece microscopica Nägeli cultivated heterotrophically in dairy processing wastewater was investigated in this work. The experiments were carried out in bioreactors operating in a batch mode, fed with 4.5 L of wastewater. The experimental conditions were as follows: initial cell concentration of 0.2 g/L, pH adjusted to 7.6, isothermal reactor operating at temperatures of 10, 20 and 30ºC with absence of light and continuous aeration of 1 VVM. The results showed that phosphate removal is strongly dependent on process temperature. A. microscopica Nägeli was effective in the removal phosphate achieving removal rates of 3.77 mg/L.h, which reflected in the conversion of 98.4% in hydraulic detention times of 24 h.

  13. Nitrous Oxide (N2O) production in axenic Chlorella vulgaris microalgae cultures: evidence, putative pathways, and potential environmental impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guieysse, B.; Plouviez, M.; Coilhac, M.; Cazali, L.

    2013-10-01

    Using antibiotic assays and genomic analysis, this study demonstrates nitrous oxide (N2O) is generated from axenic Chlorella vulgaris cultures. In batch assays, this production is magnified under conditions favouring intracellular nitrite accumulation, but repressed when nitrate reductase (NR) activity is inhibited. These observations suggest N2O formation in C. vulgaris might proceed via NR-mediated nitrite reduction into nitric oxide (NO) acting as N2O precursor via a pathway similar to N2O formation in bacterial denitrifiers, although NO reduction to N2O under oxia remains unproven in plant cells. Alternatively, NR may reduce nitrite to nitroxyl (HNO), the latter being known to dimerize to N2O under oxia. Regardless of the precursor considered, an NR-mediated nitrite reduction pathway provides a unifying explanation for correlations reported between N2O emissions from algae-based ecosystems and NR activity, nitrate concentration, nitrite concentration, and photosynthesis repression. Moreover, these results indicate microalgae-mediated N2O formation might significantly contribute to N2O emissions in algae-based ecosystems (e.g. 1.38-10.1 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1 in a 0.25 m deep raceway pond operated under Mediterranean climatic conditions). These findings have profound implications for the life cycle analysis of algae biotechnologies and our understanding of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle.

  14. Intensity of blue LED light: a potential stimulus for biomass and lipid content in fresh water microalgae Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, Madiha; Idris, Ani; Bukhari, Ataullah; Wahidin, Suzana

    2013-11-01

    Light quality and the intensity are key factors which render microalgae as a potential source of biodiesel. In this study the effects of various intensities of blue light and its photoperiods on the growth and lipid content of Chlorella vulgaris were investigated by using LED (Light Emitting Diode) in batch culture. C. vulgaris was grown for 13 days at three different light intensities (100, 200 and 300 μmol m(-2)s(-1)). Effect of three different light and dark regimes (12:12, 16:08 and 24:00 h Light:Dark) were investigated for each light intensity at 25°C culture temperature. Maximum lipid content (23.5%) was obtained due to high efficiency and deep penetration of 200 μmol m(-2)s(-1) of blue light (12:12 L:D) with improved specific growth (1.26 d(-1)) within reduced cultivation time of 8 days. White light could produce 20.9% lipid content in 10 days at 16:08 h L:D.

  15. Synergistic effects of oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis and microalga Chlorella vulgaris for enhancement of biomass and lipid yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiping; Ji, Hairui; Gong, Guiping; Zhang, Xu; Tan, Tianwei

    2014-07-01

    The optimal mixed culture model of oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis and microalga Chlorella vulgaris was confirmed to enhance lipid production. A double system bubble column photo-bioreactor was designed and used for demonstrating the relationship of yeast and alga in mixed culture. The results showed that using the log-phase cultures of yeast and alga as seeds for mixed culture, the improvements of biomass and lipid yields reached 17.3% and 70.9%, respectively, compared with those of monocultures. Growth curves of two species were confirmed in the double system bubble column photo-bioreactor, and the second growth of yeast was observed during 36-48 h of mixed culture. Synergistic effects of two species for cell growth and lipid accumulation were demonstrated on O2/CO2 balance, substance exchange, dissolved oxygen and pH adjustment in mixed culture. This study provided a theoretical basis and culture model for producing lipids by mixed culture in place of monoculture.

  16. Effect of nutrients on the biodegradation of tributyltin (TBT) by alginate immobilized microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, in natural river water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Jing [MOE Key Laboratory of Aquatic Product Safety, School of Marine Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Yang Lihua [MOE Key Laboratory of Aquatic Product Safety, School of Marine Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Chan, Sidney M.N. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Luan Tiangang, E-mail: cesltg@mail.sysu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Aquatic Product Safety, School of Marine Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Li Yan [MOE Key Laboratory of Aquatic Product Safety, School of Marine Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Tam, Nora F.Y., E-mail: bhntam@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2011-01-30

    The removal and degradation of tributyltin (TBT) by alginate immobilized Chlorella vulgaris has been evidenced in our previously published work. The present study was further to investigate the effect of spiked nutrient concentrations on the TBT removal capacity and degradation in the same alginate immobilized C. vulgaris. During the 14-d experiment, compared to the control (natural river water), the spiked nutrient groups (50% or 100% nutrients of the commercial Bristol medium as the reference, marked as 1/2N or 1N) showed more rapid cell proliferation of microalgae and higher TBT removal rate. Moreover, significantly more TBT was adsorbed onto the alginate matrix, but less TBT was taken up by the algal cells of the nutrient groups than that of the control. Mass balance data showed that TBT was lost as inorganic tin in the highest degree in 1N group, followed by 1/2N group and the least was in the control, but the relative abundance of the intermediate products of debutylation (dibutyltin and monobutyltin) were comparable among three groups. In conclusion, the addition of nutrients in contaminated water stimulated the growth and physiological activity of C. vulgaris immobilized in alginate beads and improved its TBT degradation efficiency.

  17. Nitrous Oxide (N2O production in axenic Chlorella vulgaris microalgae cultures: evidence, putative pathways, and potential environmental impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Guieysse

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Using antibiotic assays and genomic analysis, this study demonstrates nitrous oxide (N2O is generated from axenic Chlorella vulgaris cultures. In batch assays, this production is magnified under conditions favouring intracellular nitrite accumulation, but repressed when nitrate reductase (NR activity is inhibited. These observations suggest N2O formation in C. vulgaris might proceed via NR-mediated nitrite reduction into nitric oxide (NO acting as N2O precursor via a pathway similar to N2O formation in bacterial denitrifiers, although NO reduction to N2O under oxia remains unproven in plant cells. Alternatively, NR may reduce nitrite to nitroxyl (HNO, the latter being known to dimerize to N2O under oxia. Regardless of the precursor considered, an NR-mediated nitrite reduction pathway provides a unifying explanation for correlations reported between N2O emissions from algae-based ecosystems and NR activity, nitrate concentration, nitrite concentration, and photosynthesis repression. Moreover, these results indicate microalgae-mediated N2O formation might significantly contribute to N2O emissions in algae-based ecosystems (e.g. 1.38–10.1 kg N2O-N ha−1 yr−1 in a 0.25 m deep raceway pond operated under Mediterranean climatic conditions. These findings have profound implications for the life cycle analysis of algae biotechnologies and our understanding of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle.

  18. Effect of nutrients on the biodegradation of tributyltin (TBT) by alginate immobilized microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, in natural river water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Yang, Lihua; Chan, Sidney M N; Luan, Tiangang; Li, Yan; Tam, Nora F Y

    2011-01-30

    The removal and degradation of tributyltin (TBT) by alginate immobilized Chlorella vulgaris has been evidenced in our previously published work. The present study was further to investigate the effect of spiked nutrient concentrations on the TBT removal capacity and degradation in the same alginate immobilized C. vulgaris. During the 14-d experiment, compared to the control (natural river water), the spiked nutrient groups (50% or 100% nutrients of the commercial Bristol medium as the reference, marked as 1/2N or 1N) showed more rapid cell proliferation of microalgae and higher TBT removal rate. Moreover, significantly more TBT was adsorbed onto the alginate matrix, but less TBT was taken up by the algal cells of the nutrient groups than that of the control. Mass balance data showed that TBT was lost as inorganic tin in the highest degree in 1N group, followed by 1/2N group and the least was in the control, but the relative abundance of the intermediate products of debutylation (dibutyltin and monobutyltin) were comparable among three groups. In conclusion, the addition of nutrients in contaminated water stimulated the growth and physiological activity of C. vulgaris immobilized in alginate beads and improved its TBT degradation efficiency.

  19. Combined toxicity of two crystalline phases (anatase and rutile) of Titania nanoparticles towards freshwater microalgae: Chlorella sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iswarya, V.; Bhuvaneshwari, M.; Alex, Sruthi Ann; Iyer, Siddharth; Chaudhuri, Gouri [Centre for Nanobiotechnology, VIT University, Vellore (India); Chandrasekaran, Prathna Thanjavur [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India); Bhalerao, Gopalkrishna M.; Chakravarty, Sujoy [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam Node, Kokilamedu (India); Raichur, Ashok M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India); Chandrasekaran, N. [Centre for Nanobiotechnology, VIT University, Vellore (India); Mukherjee, Amitava, E-mail: amit.mookerjea@gmail.com [Centre for Nanobiotechnology, VIT University, Vellore (India)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Toxicity of two crystalline phases of titania NPs on freshwater microalgae studied. • (Anatase, Rutile) mixture showed additive and antagonistic effect on microalgae. • Rutile had more colloidal stability than anatase and binary mixtures. • ROS generation varied with the crystallinity of the NPs. • Ultrastructural damages observed in TEM images. - Abstract: In view of the increasing usage of anatase and rutile crystalline phases of titania NPs in the consumer products, their entry into the aquatic environment may pose a serious risk to the ecosystem. In the present study, the possible toxic impact of anatase and rutile nanoparticles (individually and in binary mixture) was investigated using freshwater microalgae, Chlorella sp. at low exposure concentrations (0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/L) in freshwater medium under UV irradiation. Reduction of cell viability as well as a reduction in chlorophyll content were observed due to the presence of NPs. An antagonistic effect was noted at certain concentrations of binary mixture such as (0.25, 0.25), (0.25, 0.5), and (0.5, 0.5) mg/L, and an additive effect for the other combinations, (0.25, 1), (0.5, 0.25), (0.5, 1), (1, 0.25), (1, 0.5), and (1, 1) mg/L. The hydrodynamic size analyses in the test medium revealed that rutile NPs were more stable in lake water than the anatase and binary mixtures [at 6 h, the sizes of anatase (1 mg/L), rutile NPs (1 mg/L), and binary mixture (1, 1 mg/L) were 948.83 ± 35.01 nm, 555.74 ± 19.93 nm, and 1620.24 ± 237.87 nm, respectively]. The generation of oxidative stress was found to be strongly dependent on the crystallinity of the nanoparticles. The transmission electron microscopic images revealed damages in the nucleus and cell membrane of algal cells due to the interaction of anatase NPs, whereas rutile NPs were found to cause chloroplast and internal organelle damages. Mis-shaped chloroplasts, lack of nucleus, and starch-pyrenoid complex were noted in binary

  20. Combined extraction processes of lipid from chlorella vulgaris microalgae: microwave prior to supercritical carbon dioxide extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Farid Chemat; Frederic Charton; Céline Dejoye; Maryline Abert Vian; Guy Lumia; Christian Bouscarle

    2011-01-01

    Extraction yields and fatty acid profiles from freeze-dried Chlorella vulgaris by microwave pretreatment followed by supercritical carbon dioxide (MW-SCCO2) extraction were compared with those obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction alone (SCCO2). Work performed with pressure range of 20–28 Mpa and temperature interval of 40–70 °C, gave the highest extraction yield (w/w dry weight) at 28 MPa/40 °C. MW-SCCO2 allowed to obtain the highest extraction yield (4.73%) compared to SCCO2 e...

  1. Combining and Comparing Coalescent, Distance and Character-Based Approaches for Barcoding Microalgaes: A Test with Chlorella-Like Species (Chlorophyta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmei Zou

    Full Text Available Several different barcoding methods of distinguishing species have been advanced, but which method is the best is still controversial. Chlorella is becoming particularly promising in the development of second-generation biofuels. However, the taxonomy of Chlorella-like organisms is easily confused. Here we report a comprehensive barcoding analysis of Chlorella-like species from Chlorella, Chloroidium, Dictyosphaerium and Actinastrum based on rbcL, ITS, tufA and 16S sequences to test the efficiency of traditional barcoding, GMYC, ABGD, PTP, P ID and character-based barcoding methods. First of all, the barcoding results gave new insights into the taxonomic assessment of Chlorella-like organisms studied, including the clear species discrimination and resolution of potentially cryptic species complexes in C. sorokiniana, D. ehrenbergianum and C. Vulgaris. The tufA proved to be the most efficient barcoding locus, which thus could be as potential "specific barcode" for Chlorella-like species. The 16S failed in discriminating most closely related species. The resolution of GMYC, PTP, P ID, ABGD and character-based barcoding methods were variable among rbcL, ITS and tufA genes. The best resolution for species differentiation appeared in tufA analysis where GMYC, PTP, ABGD and character-based approaches produced consistent groups while the PTP method over-split the taxa. The character analysis of rbcL, ITS and tufA sequences could clearly distinguish all taxonomic groups respectively, including the potentially cryptic lineages, with many character attributes. Thus, the character-based barcoding provides an attractive complement to coalescent and distance-based barcoding. Our study represents the test that proves the efficiency of multiple DNA barcoding in species discrimination of microalgaes.

  2. Combining and Comparing Coalescent, Distance and Character-Based Approaches for Barcoding Microalgaes: A Test with Chlorella-Like Species (Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Shanmei; Fei, Cong; Song, Jiameng; Bao, Yachao; He, Meilin; Wang, Changhai

    2016-01-01

    Several different barcoding methods of distinguishing species have been advanced, but which method is the best is still controversial. Chlorella is becoming particularly promising in the development of second-generation biofuels. However, the taxonomy of Chlorella-like organisms is easily confused. Here we report a comprehensive barcoding analysis of Chlorella-like species from Chlorella, Chloroidium, Dictyosphaerium and Actinastrum based on rbcL, ITS, tufA and 16S sequences to test the efficiency of traditional barcoding, GMYC, ABGD, PTP, P ID and character-based barcoding methods. First of all, the barcoding results gave new insights into the taxonomic assessment of Chlorella-like organisms studied, including the clear species discrimination and resolution of potentially cryptic species complexes in C. sorokiniana, D. ehrenbergianum and C. Vulgaris. The tufA proved to be the most efficient barcoding locus, which thus could be as potential "specific barcode" for Chlorella-like species. The 16S failed in discriminating most closely related species. The resolution of GMYC, PTP, P ID, ABGD and character-based barcoding methods were variable among rbcL, ITS and tufA genes. The best resolution for species differentiation appeared in tufA analysis where GMYC, PTP, ABGD and character-based approaches produced consistent groups while the PTP method over-split the taxa. The character analysis of rbcL, ITS and tufA sequences could clearly distinguish all taxonomic groups respectively, including the potentially cryptic lineages, with many character attributes. Thus, the character-based barcoding provides an attractive complement to coalescent and distance-based barcoding. Our study represents the test that proves the efficiency of multiple DNA barcoding in species discrimination of microalgaes.

  3. Identification of Sporopollenin as the Outer Layer of Cell Wall in Microalga Chlorella protothecoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xi; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2016-01-01

    Chlorella protothecoides has been put forth as a promising candidate for commercial biodiesel production. However, the cost of biodiesel remains much higher than diesel from fossil fuel sources, partially due to the high costs of oil extraction from algae. Here, we identified the presence of a sporopollenin layer outside the polysaccharide cell wall; this was evaluated using transmission electron microscopy, 2-aminoethanol treatment, acetolysis, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. We also performed bioinformatics analysis of the genes of the C. protothecoides genome that are likely involved in sporopollenin synthesis, secretion, and translocation, and evaluated the expression of these genes via real-time PCR. We also found that that removal of this sporopollenin layer greatly improved the efficiency of oil extraction. PMID:27446068

  4. Kinetic modeling of the light-dependent photosynthetic activity of the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yeoung-Sang; Park, Jong Moon

    2003-08-05

    Light-dependent photosynthesis of Chlorella vulgaris was investigated by using a novel photosynthesis measurement system that could cover wide ranges of incident light and cell density and reproduce accurate readings. Various photosynthesis models, which have been reported elsewhere, were classified and/or reformulated based upon the underlying hypotheses of the light dependence of the algal photosynthesis. Four types of models were derived, which contained distinct light-related variables such as the average or local photon flux density (APFD or LPFD) and the average or local photon absorption rate (APAR or LPAR). According to our experimental results, the LPFD and LPAR models could predict the experimental data more accurately although the APFD and APAR models have been widely used for the kinetic study of microalgal photosynthesis.

  5. In-field experimental verification of cultivation of microalgae Chlorella sp. using the flue gas from a cogeneration unit as a source of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastánek, Frantisek; Sabata, Stanislav; Solcová, Olga; Maléterová, Ywette; Kastánek, Petr; Brányiková, Irena; Kuthan, Karel; Zachleder, Vilém

    2010-11-01

    A complex treatment of agricultural waste including the following major steps: anaerobic fermentation of suitable waste, cogeneration of the obtained biogas and growth of microalgae consuming the CO(2) from biogas and flue gas was verified under field conditions in a pilot-scale photobioreactor. The growth kinetics of microalgae Chlorella sp. consuming mixture of air and carbon dioxide (2% (v/v) of CO(2)), or flue gas (8-10% (v/v) of CO(2)) was investigated. The results obtained in the pilot photobioreactor were compared with results previously measured in laboratory photobioreactors. The field tests were performed in a pilot-scale outdoor solar-bubbled photobioreactor located at a biogas station. The pilot-scale photobioreactor was in the shape of a flat and narrow vertical prism with a volume of 300 L. The microalgae growth rates were correlated with empirical formulas. Laboratory analyses of the produced microalgae confirmed that it meets the strict EU criteria for relevant contaminants level in foodstuffs. Utilization of flue gases from cogeneration therefore was not found to be detrimental to the quality of microalgal biomass, and may be used in these types of bioreactors.

  6. Mixed culture of oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis and microalga Chlorella vulgaris for lipid production from industrial wastes and its use as biodiesel feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheirsilp, Benjamas; Suwannarat, Warangkana; Niyomdecha, Rujira

    2011-07-01

    A mixed culture of oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis and microalga Chlorella vulgaris was performed to enhance lipid production from industrial wastes. These included effluent from seafood processing plant and molasses from sugar cane plant. In the mixed culture, the yeast grew faster and the lipid production was higher than that in the pure cultures. This could be because microalga acted as an oxygen generator for yeast, while yeast provided CO(2) to microalga and both carried out the production of lipids. The optimal conditions for lipid production by the mixed culture were as follows: ratio of yeast to microalga at 1:1; initial pH at 5.0; molasses concentration at 1%; shaking speed at 200 rpm; and light intensity at 5.0 klux under 16:8 hours light and dark cycles. Under these conditions, the highest biomass of 4.63±0.15 g/L and lipid production of 2.88±0.16 g/L were obtained after five days of cultivation. In addition, the plant oil-like fatty acid composition of yeast and microalgal lipids suggested their high potential for use as biodiesel feedstock.

  7. The effects of different levels of Chlorella microalgae on blood biochemical parameters and trace mineral concentrations of laying hens reared under heat stress condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi kor, Nasroallah; Akbari, Mohsen; Olfati, Ali

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of different supplementation levels of Chlorella microalgae on serum metabolites and the plasma content of minerals in laying hens reared under heat stress condition (27.5-36.7 °C, variable). A total number of 378 (40 weeks of age, with mean body weight of 1390 ± 120 g) were randomly allocated to six treatments with seven replicates. The birds were randomly assigned to 6 treatments (C, T1, T2, T3, T4, and T5) with 7 replicate cages of 9 birds. C. microalgae at the rates of 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 ppm with water were offered to groups T1, T2, T3, T4, and T5, respectively, while group C served as a control. At 71 days of trial, blood samples (14 samples per treatment) were taken for measuring serum metabolites and at 72 days for plasma mineral analysis. The results of this experiment showed that the supplementation of 200-500 ppm C. microalgae decreased the serum content of cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL ( P HDL content increased ( P < 0.05) in the hens supplemented with C. microalgae (300 or 400 and 500 ppm). C. microalgae at rates of 300-500 ppm caused a marked ( P < 0.05) increase in the plasma content of manganese or iodine and selenium but other minerals were not statistically different among treatments. Overall, from the results of the present experiment, it can be concluded that supplementation of C. microalgae at high rates was beneficial on blood parameters of laying hens reared under heat stress.

  8. Lipid production of microalga Chlorella sorokiniana CY1 is improved by light source arrangement, bioreactor operation mode and deep-sea water supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yen; Chang, Hsin-Yueh

    2016-03-01

    Microalgae-based biodiesel has been recognized as a sustainable and promising alternative to fossil diesel. High lipid productivity of microalgae is required for economic production of biodiesel from microalgae. This study was undertaken to enhance the growth and oil accumulation of an indigenous microalga Chlorella sorokiniana CY1 by applying engineering strategies using deep-sea water as the medium. First, the microalga was cultivated using LED as the immersed light source, and the results showed that the immersed LED could effectively enhance the oil/lipid content and final microalgal biomass concentration to 53.8% and 2.5 g/l, respectively. Next, the semi-batch photobioreactor operation with deep-sea water was shown to improve lipid content and microalgal growth over those from using batch and continuous cultures under similar operating conditions. The optimal replacement ratio was 50%, resulting in an oil/lipid content and final biomass concentration of 61.5% and 2.8 g/l, respectively. A long-term semi-batch culture utilizing 50%-replaced medium was carried out for four runs. The final biomass concentration and lipid productivity were 2.5 g/L and 112.2 mg/L/d, respectively. The fatty acid composition of the microalgal lipids was predominant by palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid, and this lipid quality is suitable for biodiesel production. This demonstrates that optimizing light source arrangement, bioreactor operation and deep-sea water supplements could effectively promote the lipid production of C. sorokiniana CY1 for the applications in microalgae-based biodiesel industry. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Effects of microalgae chlorella species crude extracts on intestinal adaptation in experimental short bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mustafa Kerem; Bulent Salman; Hatice Pasaoglu; Abdulkadir Bedirli; Murat Alper; Hikmet Katircioglu; Tahir Atici; E Ferda Pertoin; Ebru Ofluoglu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of chlorella crude extract (CCE) on intestinal adaptation in rats subjected to short bowel syndrome (SBS).METHODS: Wistar rats weighing 230-260 g were used in the study. After anesthesia a 75% small bowel resection was performed. Rats were randomized and divided into groups. Control group (n = 10): where 5% dextrose was given through a gastrostomy tube, Enteral nutrition (EN) group (n = 10): Isocaloric and isonitrogen EN (Alitraq, Abbott, USA), study group (/7 = 10): CCE was administrated through a gastrostomy tube. Rats were sacrificed on the fifteenth postoperative day and blood and tissue samples were taken. Histopathologic evaluation, intestinal mucosal protein and DNA levels,intestinal proliferation and apoptosis were determined in intestinal tissues, and total protein, albumin and citrulline levels in blood were studied.RESULTS: In rats receiving CCE, villus lengthening,crypt depth, mucosal DNA and protein levels, intestinal proliferation, and serum citrulline, protein and albumin levels were found to be significantly higher than those in control group. Apoptosis in CCE treated rats was significantly reduced when compared to EN group rats.CONCLUSION: CCE has beneficial effects on intestinala daptation in experimental SBS.

  10. Kinetic Model of Photoautotrophic Growth of Chlorella sp. Microalga, Isolated from the Setúbal Lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Josué Miguel; Irazoqui, Horacio Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a kinetic expression relating light availability in the culture medium with the rate of microalgal growth is obtained. This expression, which is valid for low illumination conditions, was derived from the reactions that take part in the light-dependent stage of photosynthesis. The kinetic expression obtained is a function of the biomass concentration in the culture, as well as of the local volumetric rate of absorption of photons, and only includes two adjustable parameters. To determine the value of these parameters and to test the validity of the hypotheses made, autotrophic cultures of the Chlorella sp. strain were carried out in a modified BBM medium at three CO2 concentrations in the gas stream, namely 0.034%, 0.34% and 3.4%. Moreover, the local volumetric rate of photon absorption was predicted based on a physical model of the interaction of the radiant energy with the suspended biomass, together with a Monte Carlo simulation algorithm. The proposed intrinsic expression of the biomass growth rate, together with the Monte Carlo radiation field simulator, are key to scale up photobioreactors when operating under low irradiation conditions, independently of the configuration of the reactor and of its light source. © 2015 The American Society of Photobiology.

  11. Co-pyrolysis characteristics of microalgae Isochrysis and Chlorella: Kinetics, biocrude yield and interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bingwei; Wang, Xin; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2015-12-01

    Co-pyrolysis characteristics of Isochrysis (high lipid) and Chlorella (high protein) were investigated qualitatively and quantitatively based on DTG curves, biocrude yield and composition by individual pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis. DTG curves in co-pyrolysis have been compared accurately with those in individual pyrolysis. An interaction has been detected at 475-500°C in co-pyrolysis based on biocrude yields, and co-pyrolysis reaction mechanism appear three-dimensional diffusion in comparison with random nucleation followed by growth in individual pyrolysis based on kinetic analysis. There is no obvious difference in the maximum biocrude yields for individual pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis, but carboxylic acids (IC21) decreased and N-heterocyclic compounds (IC12) increased in co-pyrolysis. Simulation results of biocrude yield by Components Biofuel Model and Kinetics Biofuel Model indicate that the processes of co-pyrolysis comply with those of individual pyrolysis in solid phase by and large. Variation of percentage content in co-pyrolysis and individual pyrolysis biocrude indicated interaction in gas phase.

  12. Study on the Heterotrophic Growth Characteristics of Chlorella vulgaris%小球藻(Chlorella vulgaris)的异养生长特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余若黔; 刘学铭; 梁世中; 陈子健

    2000-01-01

    小球藻(Chlorella vulgaris)可以利用葡萄糖、果糖、乙酸盐等有机碳源异养生长.在异养条件下,最适环境条件为温度30~32℃、pH 5.5~6.5.该小球藻可以利用硝酸盐、铵盐、尿素和一些结构简单的氨基酸(如甘氨酸)作为唯一氮源生长,在由铵盐和硝酸盐组成的混合氮源中生长时,优先利用铵盐.该小球藻对培养基中不同营养物的利用给培养基的pH带来不同的影响.利用葡萄糖和果糖为唯一碳源时培养基的pH值变化不大,而利用乙酸盐时可以使pH很快上升到小球藻能够耐受的pH(9.5)以上;利用硝酸盐为唯一氮源时使培养基的pH上升,利用铵盐时使pH下降,利用尿素和甘氨酸时基本不改变培养基pH.该小球藻在30℃时,摇瓶异养培养的比生长速率为0.055h-1,倍增时间为12.6 h.

  13. EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT NITROGEN SOURCES ON GROWTH AND LIPID ACCUMULATION OF A HETEROTROPHIC MICROALGAE-CHORELLA VULGARIS%不同氮源对异养小球藻生物量和油脂积累的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱义平; 宋东辉; 杨国兰

    2012-01-01

    biomass concentration and accumulation of much higher lipid content than classical photoautotrophic culture. Instead of using glucose, using low cost materials, such as starch or cellulose-hydrolyzed solution, is a good strategy to reduce the cost of culture medium and the cost of microalgae-based biofuels from heterotrophic fermentation of Chlorella. Potato starch is relatively cheap material in comparison with cornstarch or cassava starch, hence it could be an ideal carbon source for cultivating Chlorella. In a number of oil-producing microalgal species, Chlorella has the capacity of accumulating much higher proportion of fatty acids by nitrogen starvation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of various nitrogen resources on cell growth and lipid accumulation in heterotrophic Chlorella vulgaris using potato starch hydrolysate (PSH) as the sole carbon source. In order to illustrate the influence of various nitrogen sources on biomass and lipid content in C. vulgaris, the effects of these nitrogen source including inorganic and organic nitrogen source such as alanine or tyrosine on cell growth and lipid accumulation of C. vulgaris were examined. As the sole carbon source PSH was added to SE medium for algal cultivation prior to addition of all nitrogen sources. NaNO3 and alanine were added to yield starting concentrations of 1.5 mmol /L, 3.0 mmol/L and 6.0 mmol/L, respectively. Tyrosine was added to yield starting concentrations of 0.75 mmol/L, 1.5 mmol /L and 3.0 mmol/L, respectively. Continuous cultivation of C. vulgaris was carried out under dark condition for 10 days. The cell number, special growth rate, cellular chlorophyll content, neutral lipid content and total lipid content of C. vulgaris under present cultural condition were determined throughout the entire experimental period. The results showed that: (1) Higher chlorophyll content and biomass production were observed with higher nitrate-nitrogen concentration, although low

  14. Influence of Extractive Solvents on Lipid and Fatty Acids Content of Edible Freshwater Algal and Seaweed Products, the Green Microalga Chlorella kessleri and the Cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Vavra Ambrozova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Total lipid contents of green (Chlorella pyrenoidosa, C, red (Porphyra tenera, N; Palmaria palmata, D, and brown (Laminaria japonica, K; Eisenia bicyclis, A; Undaria pinnatifida, W, WI; Hizikia fusiformis, H commercial edible algal and cyanobacterial (Spirulina platensis, S products, and autotrophically cultivated samples of the green microalga Chlorella kessleri (CK and the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis (SP were determined using a solvent mixture of methanol/chloroform/water (1:2:1, v/v/v, solvent I and n-hexane (solvent II. Total lipid contents ranged from 0.64% (II to 18.02% (I by dry weight and the highest total lipid content was observed in the autotrophically cultivated cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis. Solvent mixture I was found to be more effective than solvent II. Fatty acids were determined by gas chromatography of their methyl esters (% of total FAMEs. Generally, the predominant fatty acids (all results for extractions with solvent mixture I were saturated palmitic acid (C16:0; 24.64%–65.49%, monounsaturated oleic acid (C18:1(n-9; 2.79%–26.45%, polyunsaturated linoleic acid (C18:2(n-6; 0.71%–36.38%, α-linolenic acid (C18:3(n-3; 0.00%–21.29%, γ-linolenic acid (C18:3(n-6; 1.94%–17.36%, and arachidonic acid (C20:4(n-6; 0.00%–15.37%. The highest content of ω-3 fatty acids (21.29% was determined in Chlorella pyrenoidosa using solvent I, while conversely, the highest content of ω-6 fatty acids (41.42% was observed in Chlorella kessleri using the same solvent.

  15. Evaluation of the cultivation conditions of marine microalgae Chlorella sp. to be used as feedstock in ultrasound-assisted ethanolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus S. Amaral

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 8 assays was conducted to study the influence of different variables namely, light intensity, CO2 level, NaNO3 concentration and aeration rate, on the cultivation of the marine microalgae Chlorella sp. to enhance the biomass feedstock availability for biodiesel. The experiments were designed using a Taguchi L8 experimental array set at two levels of operation, having light intensity (0.85 and 14.5 klux, CO2 (5 and 10%, NaNO3 (0.025 and 0.075 g L-1 and aeration rate (3:33 and 1.67 vvm as independent variables and considering biomass productivity and lipid content as response variables. All the experiments were performed in six photobioreactor vessels connected in series with a total volume of 8.4 L and working volumes of 2 L and 4 L, depending on the conditions assessed. The highest biomass productivity was 210.9 mg L-1day-1, corresponding to a lipid content of 8.2%. Such results were attained when the culture conditions were set at 0.85 klux light intensity, 5% CO2 and 0.075 g L-1 NaNO3. The aeration rate showed no significant influence on the biomass productivity. On the other hand, the highest lipid content was achieved when the cultures were grown using the lowest concentration of NaNO3 (0.025 g L-1 and an aeration rate of 1.67 vvm, while the other factors had no statistical significance. Under these conditions, the lipid content obtained was 19.8%, at the expense of reducing the biomass productivity to 85.9 mg L-1day-1.The fatty acid profile of the lipid material characterized by gas chromatography identified fourteen fatty acids with carbon chain ranging from C8 to C20 in which most of the fatty acids present were saturated (58.7 % and monounsaturated (36.1% fatty acids. Those obtained at higher proportions were the oleic (22.8%, palmitic (20.7% and lauric (17.7 % acids, indicating a suitable composition for fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE synthesis. This was confirmed by acid catalysis performed under ultrasound irradiations

  16. Is annual metabolic cycling in the unicellular microalgae Chlorella and textit{Isochrysis} coupled to the annual earth gravity cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, G.; Amundsen, M.; Pettersen, R.

    Uptake rates of 14C-labelled guanine by autospores of the unicellular green alga Chlorella fusca Shihira et Krauss were measured at different times over 21 months. The autospores were derived from synchronous cultures produced from stock cultures that had not been exposed to natural light the last six years before the experiments, nor during the 21 month long experimental period. The experiments were performed in Bergen, Norway (60°,23' N; 5°,20' E). Uptake rates showed distinct annual variations over the year, with lowest values during the winter and highest during the summer. The August : December : February ratios for the rates were 1.0, 0.70 and 0.43, respectively. Half saturating guanine concentration for the uptake was the same over the year, namely 0.24 μM. Growth rates of the unicellular marine flagellate Isochrysis sp. were measured in March, August and December, and the rates were distinctly different, with August : December : March ratios of 1.0, 0.41 and 0.64. The number of cells reached in the stationary phases of Isochrysis cultures showed similar time-of-the-year dependency with ratios of 1.0, 0.44 and 0.58 for August : December : March, respectively. These cells had not experienced day light for the two last years before the experiments. Our results show the existence of annual rhythms in two microalgae that had not been exposed to natural light for a long time. A persistent endogenous clock that was set when the cells lived under natural light conditions long ago may be one explanation for their behaviour; another one is a coupling to the sinusoidal and minute variation over the year of earth gravity. Hence the cells display maximal activity when gravity is at its lowest value during the summer in the Northern hemisphere, and lowest activity when the gravity is at is highest in the winter. To our knowledge our results are the first experimental work that points to the possibility that cells may be influenced by the annual cycle of earth gravity.

  17. Combined toxicity of two crystalline phases (anatase and rutile) of Titania nanoparticles towards freshwater microalgae: Chlorella sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iswarya, V; Bhuvaneshwari, M; Alex, Sruthi Ann; Iyer, Siddharth; Chaudhuri, Gouri; Chandrasekaran, Prathna Thanjavur; Bhalerao, Gopalkrishna M; Chakravarty, Sujoy; Raichur, Ashok M; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2015-04-01

    In view of the increasing usage of anatase and rutile crystalline phases of titania NPs in the consumer products, their entry into the aquatic environment may pose a serious risk to the ecosystem. In the present study, the possible toxic impact of anatase and rutile nanoparticles (individually and in binary mixture) was investigated using freshwater microalgae, Chlorella sp. at low exposure concentrations (0.25, 0.5 and 1mg/L) in freshwater medium under UV irradiation. Reduction of cell viability as well as a reduction in chlorophyll content were observed due to the presence of NPs. An antagonistic effect was noted at certain concentrations of binary mixture such as (0.25, 0.25), (0.25, 0.5), and (0.5, 0.5) mg/L, and an additive effect for the other combinations, (0.25, 1), (0.5, 0.25), (0.5, 1), (1, 0.25), (1, 0.5), and (1, 1) mg/L. The hydrodynamic size analyses in the test medium revealed that rutile NPs were more stable in lake water than the anatase and binary mixtures [at 6h, the sizes of anatase (1mg/L), rutile NPs (1mg/L), and binary mixture (1, 1mg/L) were 948.83±35.01nm, 555.74±19.93nm, and 1620.24±237.87nm, respectively]. The generation of oxidative stress was found to be strongly dependent on the crystallinity of the nanoparticles. The transmission electron microscopic images revealed damages in the nucleus and cell membrane of algal cells due to the interaction of anatase NPs, whereas rutile NPs were found to cause chloroplast and internal organelle damages. Mis-shaped chloroplasts, lack of nucleus, and starch-pyrenoid complex were noted in binary-treated cells. The findings from the current study may facilitate the environmental risk assessment of titania NPs in an aquatic ecosystem.

  18. Aminoclay-templated nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) synthesis for efficient harvesting of oleaginous microalga, Chlorella sp. KR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Young-Chul; Lee, Kyubock; Hwang, Yuhoon

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of aminoclay-templated nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) for efficient harvesting of oleaginous microalgae was demonstrated. According to various aminoclay loadings (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 aminoclay/nZVI ratios), the stability of nZVI was investigated as a function......ZVI composite (ratio 1.0) exhibited a highly positively charged surface (~+40 mV) and a ferromagnetic property (~30 emu/g). On the basis of these characteristics, oleaginous Chlorella sp. KR-1 was harvested within 3 min at a > 20 g/L loading under a magnetic field. In a scaled-up (24L) microalga harvesting...... process using magnetic rods, microalgae were successfully collected by attachment to the magnetic rods or by precipitation. It is believed that this approach, thanks to the recyclability of aminoclay-nZVI composites, can be applied in a continuous harvesting mode....

  19. Carbon-to-nitrogen ratio affects the biomass composition and the fatty acid profile of heterotrophically grown Chlorella sp. TISTR 8990 for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhasuwan, Somruethai; Choorit, Wanna; Sirisansaneeyakul, Sarote; Kokkaew, Nakhon; Chisti, Yusuf

    2015-12-20

    Chlorella sp. TISTR 8990 was cultivated heterotrophically in media with various initial carbon-to-nitrogen ratios (C/N ratio) and at different agitation speeds. The production of the biomass, its total fatty acid content and the composition of the fatty acids were affected by the C/N ratio, but not by agitation speed in the range examined. The biomass production was maximized at a C/N mass ratio of 29:1. At this C/N ratio, the biomass productivity was 0.68gL(-1)d(-1), or nearly 1.6-fold the best attainable productivity in photoautotrophic growth. The biomass yield coefficient on glucose was 0.62gg(-1) during exponential growth. The total fatty acids (TFAs) in the freeze-dried biomass were maximum (459mgg(-1)) at a C/N ratio of 95:1. Lower values of the C/N ratio reduced the fatty acid content of the biomass. The maximum productivity of TFAs (186mgL(-1)d(-1)) occurred at C/N ratios of 63:1 and higher. At these conditions, the fatty acids were mostly of the polyunsaturated type. Allowing the alga to remain in the stationary phase for a prolonged period after N-depletion, reduced the level of monounsaturated fatty acids and the level of polyunsaturated fatty acids increased. Biotin supplementation of the culture medium reduced the biomass productivity relative to biotin-free control, but had no effect on the total fatty acid content of the biomass.

  20. Light enhanced the accumulation of total fatty acids (TFA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in a newly isolated heterotrophic microalga Crypthecodinium sp. SUN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongzhe; Zhang, Zhao; Mao, Xuemei; Wu, Tao; Jiang, Yue; Liu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, light illumination was found to be efficient in elevating the total fatty acid content in a newly isolated heterotrophic microalga, Crypthecodinium sp. SUN. Under light illumination, the highest total fatty acid and DHA contents were achieved at 96h as 24.9% of dry weight and 82.8mgg(-1) dry weight, respectively, which were equivalent to 1.46-fold and 1.68-fold of those under the dark conditions. The elevation of total fatty acid content was mainly contributed by an increase of neutral lipids at the expense of starches. Moreover, light was found to alter the cell metabolism and led to a higher specific growth rate, higher glucose consumption rate and lower non-motile cell percentage. This is the first report that light can promote the total fatty acids accumulation in Crypthecodinium without growth inhibition.

  1. Nitrogen starvation strategies and photobioreactor design for enhancing lipid content and lipid production of a newly isolated microalga Chlorella vulgaris ESP-31: implications for biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Kuei-Ling; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2011-11-01

    Microalgae are recognized for serving as a sustainable source for biodiesel production. This study investigated the effect of nitrogen starvation strategies and photobioreactor design on the performance of lipid production and of CO(2) fixation of an indigenous microalga Chlorella vulgaris ESP-31. Comparison of single-stage and two-stage nitrogen starvation strategies shows that single-stage cultivation on basal medium with low initial nitrogen source concentration (i.e., 0.313 g/L KNO(3)) was the most effective approach to enhance microalgal lipid production, attaining a lipid productivity of 78 mg/L/d and a lipid content of 55.9%. The lipid productivity of C. vulgaris ESP-31 was further upgraded to 132.4 mg/L/d when it was grown in a vertical tubular photobioreactor with a high surface to volume ratio of 109.3 m(2)/m(3) . The high lipid productivity was also accompanied by fixation of 6.36 g CO(2) during the 10-day photoautotrophic growth with a CO(2) fixation rate of 430 mg/L/d. Analysis of fatty acid composition of the microalgal lipid indicates that over 65% of fatty acids in the microalgal lipid are saturated [i.e., palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0)] and monounsaturated [i.e., oleic acid (C18:1)]. This lipid quality is suitable for biodiesel production.

  2. Treatment of African catfish, Clarias gariepinus wastewater utilizing phytoremediation of microalgae, Chlorella sp. with Aspergillus niger bio-harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Nurfarahana Mohd; Bakar, Nur Syuhada Abu; Lananan, Fathurrahman; Abdul Hamid, Siti Hajar; Lam, Su Shiung; Jusoh, Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    This study focuses on the evaluation of the performance of Chlorella sp. in removing nutrient in aquaculture wastewater and its correlation with the kinetic growth of Chlorella sp. The treatment was applied with various Chlorella sp. inoculation dosage ranging from 0% to 60% (v/v) of wastewater. The optimum inoculation dosage was recorded at 30% (v/v) with effluent concentration of ammonia and orthophosphate recording at 0.012mgL(-1) and 0.647mgL(-1), respectively on Day 11. The optimum dosage for bio-flocculation process was obtained at 30mgL(-1) of Aspergillus niger with a harvesting efficiency of 97%. This type of development of phytoremediation with continuous bio-harvesting could promote the use of sustainable green technology for effective wastewater treatment.

  3. Heterotrophic Mass Cultures of Chlorella Vulgaris with Glucose Feeding in Fermenters%发酵罐葡萄糖流加大规模异养培养小球藻

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁世中; 朱明军; 孟海华; 尹建云; 陈峰

    2000-01-01

    应用流加工艺在5,50,200,800,4 000 L机械搅拌发酵罐中大规模异养培养小球藻.与间歇异养或光照自养相比,流加培养大大地提高了细胞密度和生产率.最高细胞质量浓度达到43.31 g/L,比生长速率达到0.069 h-1,细胞生产率达到0.62 g/(L·h).结果表明,利用传统的机械搅拌发酵罐大规模生产小球藻有良好的商业化前景.%Chlorella vulgaris was heterotrophically cultured in 5, 50, 200, 800, and 4 000 L stirred tank fermenters with glucose feeding,which gave significant improvement in cell density and productivity compared to batch culture. The highest cell dry weight mass concentration reached 43.31 g/L.The specific growth rate was 0.069 h-1. The cell productivity was 0.62 g/(L·h). The results suggest Chlorella vulgaris can be heterotrophically produced in stirred tank fermenters for commercial use.

  4. Simultaneous Production of Triacylglycerol and High-Value Carotenoids by the Astaxanthin-Producing Oleaginous Green Microalga Chlorella zofingiensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jin; Mao, Xuemei; Zhou, Wenguang; Guarnieri, Michael T.

    2016-08-01

    The production of lipids and astaxanthin, a high-value carotenoid, by Chlorella zofingiensis was investigated under different culture conditions. Comparative analysis revealed a good correlation between triacylglycerol (TAG) and astaxanthin accumulation in C. zofingiensis. Stress conditions promoted cell size and weight and induced the accumulation of neutral lipids, especially TAG and astaxanthin, with a concomitant decrease in membrane lipids. The highest contents of TAG and astaxanthin achieved were 387 and 4.89 mg g-1 dry weight, respectively. A semi-continuous culture strategy was developed to optimize the TAG and astaxanthin productivities, which reached 297 and 3.3 mg L-1 day-1, respectively. Additionally, astaxanthin accumulation was enhanced by inhibiting de novo fatty acid biosynthesis. In summary, our study represents a pioneering work of utilizing Chlorella for the integrated production of lipids and high-value products and C. zofingiensis has great potential to be a promising production strain and serve as an emerging oleaginous model alga.

  5. Simultaneous production of triacylglycerol and high-value carotenoids by the astaxanthin-producing oleaginous green microalga Chlorella zofingiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Mao, Xuemei; Zhou, Wenguang; Guarnieri, Michael T

    2016-08-01

    The production of lipids and astaxanthin, a high-value carotenoid, by Chlorella zofingiensis was investigated under different culture conditions. Comparative analysis revealed a good correlation between triacylglycerol (TAG) and astaxanthin accumulation in C. zofingiensis. Stress conditions promoted cell size and weight and induced the accumulation of neutral lipids, especially TAG and astaxanthin, with a concomitant decrease in membrane lipids. The highest contents of TAG and astaxanthin achieved were 387 and 4.89mgg(-1) dry weight, respectively. A semi-continuous culture strategy was developed to optimize the TAG and astaxanthin productivities, which reached 297 and 3.3mgL(-1)day(-1), respectively. Additionally, astaxanthin accumulation was enhanced by inhibiting de novo fatty acid biosynthesis. In summary, our study represents a pioneering work of utilizing Chlorella for the integrated production of lipids and high-value products and C. zofingiensis has great potential to be a promising production strain and serve as an emerging oleaginous model alga.

  6. Exploration of using stripped ammonia and ash from poultry litter for the cultivation of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis and the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markou, Giorgos; Iconomou, Dimitris; Sotiroudis, Theodore; Israilides, Cleanthes; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2015-11-01

    Herein a new approach of exploiting poultry litter (PL) is demonstrated. The suggested method includes drying of PL with simultaneously striping and recovery of ammonia, followed by the direct combustion of dried PL. The generated ash after the combustion, and the striped ammonia consequently, could be used as nutrient source for the cultivation of microalgae or cyanobacteria to produce feed additives. The present study explored the application of PL ash and recovered ammonia for the cultivation of Arthrospira platensis and Chlorella vulgaris. For a simultaneously 90% dissolution of ash potassium and phosphorus, a ratio of acid to ash of 0.02mol-H(+)/g was required. The optimum mass of ash required was 0.07-0.08g/g dry biomass, while the addition of ammoniac nitrogen of 8-9mgN per g of dry biomass per day was adequate for a satisfactory production of A. platensis and C. vulgaris. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential effects of P25 TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on freshwater green microalgae: Chlorella and Scenedesmus species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Rajdeep; Parashar, Abhinav; Bhuvaneshwari, M.; Chandrasekaran, N.; Mukherjee, Amitava, E-mail: amit.mookerjea@gmail.com

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Differential effects of P25 TiO{sub 2} NPs on Chlorella and Scenedesmus. • Concentration dependent effects in morphology and viability. • Increased ROS, catalase activity & LPO release with loss in SOD & GSH activity. • Dose dependent differential TiO{sub 2} NPs uptake affected by colonization of algae. - Abstract: P25 TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles majorly used in cosmetic products have well known detrimental effects towards the aquatic environment. In a freshwater ecosystem, Chlorella and Scenedesmus are among the most commonly found algal species frequently used to study the effects of metal oxide nanoparticles. A comparative study has been conducted herein to investigate differences in the toxic effects caused by these nanoparticles towards the two algae species. The three different concentrations of P25 TiO{sub 2} NPs (0.01, 0.1 & 1 μg/mL, i.e., 0.12, 1.25 and 12.52 μM) were selected to correlate surface water concentrations of the nanoparticles, and filtered and sterilized fresh water medium was used throughout this study. There was significant increase (p < 0.001) in hydrodynamic diameter of nanoparticles with respect to both, time (0, 24, 48 and 72 h) as well as concentration under all the exposure conditions. Although, significant dose-dependent morphological (surface area & biovolume) interspecies variations were not observed, it was evident at the highest concentration of exposure within individuals. At 1 μg/mL exposure concentration, a significant difference in toxicity was noted between Chlorella and Scenedesmus under only visible light (p < 0.001) and UVA (p < 0.01) irradiation conditions. The viability data were well supported by the results obtained for oxidative stress induced by NPs on the cells. At the highest exposure concentration, superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione activities were assessed for both the algae under all the irradiation conditions. Increased catalase activity and LPO release complemented the cytotoxic

  8. Biodiesel quality and biochemical changes of microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Scenedesmus obliquus in response to nitrate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongqin; Miao, Xiaoling

    2014-10-01

    Biodiesel quality associated with biochemical components of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Scenedesmus obliquus under different nitrate levels were investigated. The highest lipid contents of 54.5% for C. pyrenoidosa and 47.7% for S. obliquus were obtained in nitrate absence. Carbohydrate peaked at 0.3gL(-1) with values of 40.7% for C. pyrenoidosa and 42.5% for S. obliquus. Protein content seemed species dependent, which decreased substantially to 11.2% in C. pyrenoidosa and 8.8% in S. obliquus under nitrate absence in present research. Better biodiesel quality (e.g. cetane number >58, iodine value biodiesel quality.

  9. Growth and phycocyanin synthesis in the heterotrophic microalga Galdieria sulphuraria on substrates made of food waste from restaurants and bakeries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Jenni K; Jensen, Henriette Casper; Pleissner, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Galdieria sulphuraria 074G (Rhodophyta) was grown heterotrophically in defined medium and on amylolytic and proteolytic hydrolysed food waste from restaurants and bakeries. Substrate uptake, growth, and phycocyanin content were quantified in the cultures. The alga utilised carbohydrates and amino...... acids from the waste but ammonium and other inorganic nutrients were needed to stimulate phycocyanin synthesis. Highest specific phycocyanin contents (20–22 mg g−1) were observed in cells grown at 25 °C or 34 °C on the food wastes. Growth inhibition was observed when the hydrolysates were used...... in quantities resulting in glucose concentrations of 10 and 50 g L−1 for bakery and restaurant waste, respectively. Still, G. sulphuraria 074G grew and produced phycocyanin efficiently on food waste under adequate conditions and may potentially be utilised for synthesise of high-valuable products from food...

  10. Continuous cultivation of lipid rich microalga Chlorella sp. FC2 IITG for improved biodiesel productivity via control variable optimization and substrate driven pH control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palabhanvi, Basavaraj; Muthuraj, Muthusivaramapandian; Kumar, Vikram; Mukherjee, Mayurketan; Ahlawat, Saumya; Das, Debasish

    2017-01-01

    A novel two-stage continuous heterotrophic cultivation of Chlorella sp. FC2 IITG was demonstrated for enhanced lipid productivity. Initially, effect of control variable e.g. dilution rate and feed stream substrate concentrations on biomass productivity was evaluated. This showed significant variation in biomass productivity from 2.4gL(-1)day(-1) to 11.2gL(-1)day(-1). Further, these control variables were optimized by using multi-nutrient mechanistic model for maximizing the biomass productivity. Finally, continuous production of lipid rich algal biomass was demonstrated in two sequential bioreactors for enhanced lipid productivity. The biomass productivity of 92.7gL(-1)day(-1) was observed in the first reactor which was operated at model predicted optimal substrate concentrations of feed stream. The intracellular neutral lipid enrichment by acetate addition resulted in lipid productivity of 9.76gL(-1)day(-1) in the second reactor. Both the biomass and lipid productivities obtained from current study are significantly high amongst similarly reported literatures.

  11. Improvement on light penetrability and microalgae biomass production by periodically pre-harvesting Chlorella vulgaris cells with culture medium recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun; Sun, Yahui; Liao, Qiang; Fu, Qian; Xia, Ao; Zhu, Xun

    2016-09-01

    To improve light penetrability and biomass production in batch cultivation, a cultivation mode that periodically pre-harvesting partial microalgae cells from suspension with culture medium recycling was proposed. By daily pre-harvesting 30% microalgae cells from the suspension, the average light intensity in the photobioreactor (PBR) was enhanced by 27.05-122.06%, resulting in a 46.48% increase in total biomass production than that cultivated in batch cultivation without pre-harvesting under an incident light intensity of 160μmolm(-2)s(-1). Compared with the semi-continuous cultivation with 30% microalgae suspension daily replaced with equivalent volume of fresh medium, nutrients and water input was reduced by 60% in the proposed cultivation mode but with slightly decrease (12.82%) in biomass production. No additional nutrient was replenished when culture medium recycling. Furthermore, higher pre-harvesting ratios (40%, 60%) and lower pre-harvesting frequencies (every 2, 2.5days) were not advantageous for the pre-harvesting cultivation mode. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Toxicity of Arsenic Species on Growth of Green Microalgae Chlorella sp.%As(Ⅲ)和As(Ⅴ)对小球藻(Chlorella sp.)的生长影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李妍丽; 柯林

    2012-01-01

    砷是广泛存在于自然界中最常见的毒性污染物,包括土壤,沉积物,水体,大气层,甚至生物体,毒性极强.环境中砷的污染严重威胁人类的健康,已被视为一个全球性的公共卫生问题.为了研究砷对小球藻的生长影响,文章通过实验室培养方式,选取了6个不同浓度的As(Ⅲ)(0.5、1.0、2.0、5.0、10.0、20.0 mg/L)和As(Ⅴ)(1.0、5.0、10.0、20.0、50.0、100.0 mg/L)的培养处理,以在680 nm下小球藻的吸光度(OD680)作为衡量因子,对小球藻Chlorella sp.(100 ai)在不同浓度砷离子的培养液中的细胞密度进行了试验,整个实验共进行了7d.结果表明,As(Ⅲ)和As(Ⅴ)浓度分别在10.0 mg/L和20.0 mg/L以上时抑制100 ai细胞生长,导致其密度下降.用概率统计方法计算得到As(Ⅲ)对100 ai的96 h半数有效抑制浓度EC50值为25.79 mg/L.参照藻类生长抑制评价标准,As(Ⅲ)对100 ai的毒性比As(Ⅴ)大.%Arsenic as the most common toxic pollutants in environment, is existing in soil, sediment, water, atmosphere and even organism. A serious threat to human health of arsenic pollution in environment has been recognized as a global public health problem. To study the toxicity of arsenic to microalgae, the toxicity of As (Ⅲ) and As (Ⅴ) concentration on growth of Chlorella sp.(100 ai) in laboratory was studied. Series of 50mL flaks containing the prepared Chlorella sp.(100 ai) culture were incubated at 25 ℃ for 7 d under different As(Ⅲ) concentrations(0.5,1.0,2.0,5.0,10.0,20.0 mg/L)and As( Ⅴ) concentrations(1.0,5.0,10.0,20.0,50.0,100.0 mg/L). After that the biomass was determined. Results showed that As(Ⅲ) and As( Ⅴ) was significantly influenced by As(Ⅲ)(>10.0 mg/L) and As( V)(>20.0 mg/L). Higher As( Ⅲ) and As( Ⅴ) concentration would suppress its growth, resulting in a lower biomass. In the test, As( Ⅲ)'s EQo was 25.79 mg/L, and toxicity of As(Ⅲ) on 100 ai was bigger than that of As( Ⅴ).

  13. 自养、异养和混养下小球藻的生长及生化成分%Growth and Biochemical Components of Chlorella Vulgaris Under Autotrophic, Heterotrophic and Mixotrophic Cultivations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海英; 郭祀远; 郑必胜; 李存芝

    2004-01-01

    Investigated in this paper are the growth and biochemical components,such as soluble protein,soluble sugar,chlorophyll and fatty acid composition of Chlorella vulgaris,under autotrophic,heterotrophic and mixotrophic cultivations.The results show that the biomass of Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic and mixotrophic cultivations is much higher than that under autotrophic cultivation,that the specific growth rates are respectively 2.13 and 3 times that under autotrophic growth,and that the growth of cells under mixotrophic cultivation is affected by iiluminence,but the effect is not significant at the illuminances of 2.5and 4.0kix,especially in the stationary phase.Compared with autotrophic growth,the content of fat under heterotrophic cultivation obviously increases,while the contents of soluble protein and saccharide decrease,especially chlorophyll.Heterotrophic cultivation is helpful to the accumulation of linolenic acid.The adoption of light makes soluble proteins,saccharides and chlorophyll increase under mixotrophic growth,and the illuminence also has effect on the biochemical component of Chlorella vulgaris.%对小球藻在自养、异养和混养条件下的生长状况及细胞的生化成分(如可溶性蛋白、可溶性糖、叶绿素及脂肪酸组成)进行了研究.结果表明:异养和混养培养的小球藻的生物量远大于自养时的生物量;异养和混养培养的小球藻的比生长速率分别是自养时的2.13倍和3倍;光照对混养条件下的细胞生长有影响,但光照强度为2.5 klx和4.0 klx时细胞生长的差别并不明显,尤其在稳定生长期;与自养生长相比,异养过程中小球藻的脂肪含量明显增加,可溶性蛋白和可溶性糖的含量则有不同程度的降低,叶绿素含量大大减少;异养有利于亚麻酸的积累;在混养条件下,光照使可溶性蛋白、可溶性糖和叶绿素的含量增加,其强度对细胞的生化成分有影响.

  14. Studies on influence of process parameters on hydrothermal catalytic liquefaction of microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) biomass grown in wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Jayaseelan; Shreekanth, Sivaraman Jayachandran; Sahana, Ravishankar; Raghavi, Meenakshi Sundaram; Gopinath, Kannappan Panchamoorthy; Gnanaprakash, Dhakshinamoorthy

    2017-08-12

    In this study, liquefaction of Chlorella vulgaris biomass grown in photo-bioreactor using wastewater as source of nutrition was studied and influence of process parameters on the yield of bio-oil was analysed. Different biomass to water ratio (5g/200ml, 10g/200ml, 15g/200ml, and 20g/200ml) was taken and bio-oil yield at various temperatures ranging from 220 to 340°C was studied. Catalyst loading of the range 2.5-8%wt of NaOH was also studied to analyse the influence of catalyst concentration on bio-oil yield. Obtained bio-oil was characterized using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Results showed that maximum bio-oil yield of 26.67%wt was observed at operating conditions of 300°C, 15g/200ml biomass load and 2.5%wt of NaOH at 60min holding time. Fatty acids and other high carbon compounds were detected in the bio-oil obtained through liquefaction process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mapping the Fundamental Niches of Two Freshwater Microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae and Peridinium cinctum (Dinophyceae, in 5-Dimensional Ion Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence J. Evens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental niche defined by five ions, NO3 −, PO4 3−, K+, Na+, and Cl−, was mapped for Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae and Peridinium cinctum (Dinophyceae growth rates and maximum cell densities in batch cultures. A five dimensional ion-mixture experimental design was projected across a total ion concentration gradient of 1 to 30 mM to delineate the ion-based, “potential” niche space, defined as the entire n-dimensional hypervolume demarcated by the feasible ranges of the independent factors under consideration. The growth rate-based, fundamental niche volumes overlapped for ca. 94% of the ion mixtures, although the regions of maximal growth rates and cell densities were different for each alga. Both C. vulgaris and P. cinctum exhibited similar positive responses to cations and negative responses to anions. It was determined that total ion concentration for these five ions, from 1 to 30 mM, did not directly affect either growth rate or maximal cell density for either alga, although it did play an interactive role with several ions. This study is the first that we are aware of to attempt the mapping of a multivariate, ion-based, fundamental niche volume. The implications of the experimental design utilized and the potential utility of this type of approach are discussed.

  16. Optimization of phenol degradation by the microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa using Plackett-Burman Design and Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayana Priyadharshini, S; Bakthavatsalam, A K

    2016-05-01

    Statistical optimization designs were used to optimize the phenol degradation using Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The important factor influencing phenol degradation was identified by two-level Plackett-Burman Design (PBD) with five factors. PBD determined the following three factors as significant for phenol degradation viz. algal concentration, phenol concentration and reaction time. CCD and RSM were applied to optimize the significant factors identified from PBD. The results obtained from CCD indicated that the interaction between the concentration of algae and phenol, phenol concentration and reaction time and algal concentration and reaction time affect the phenol degradation (response) significantly. The predicted results showed that maximum phenol degradation of 97% could be achieved with algal concentration of 4g/L, phenol concentration of 0.8g/L and reaction time of 4days. The predicted values were in agreement with experimental values with coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.9973. The model was validated by subsequent experimentations at the optimized conditions.

  17. CO2 capture using limestone for cultivation of the freshwater microalga Chlorella sorokiniana PAZ and the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. VSJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawar, Prachi; Javalkote, Vivek; Burnap, Robert; Mahulikar, Pramod; Puranik, Pravin

    2016-12-01

    The present study reports a process wherein CO2 is captured in the form of bicarbonates using calcium oxide and photosynthetically fixed into biomass. Microalgal cultures viz. Chlorella sorokiniana PAZ and Arthrospira sp. VSJ were grown in the medium containing bicarbonates. The rate of bicarbonate utilization by C. sorokiniana PAZ was higher when CO2 trapped in the presence of 2.67mM calcium oxide than in the presence of 10mM sodium hydroxide and with direct addition of 10mM sodium bicarbonate. For Arthrospira sp. VSJ the bicarbonate utilization was 92.37%, 88.34% and 59.23% for the medium containing CaO, NaOH and NaHCO3, respectively. Illumination of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR)+ultraviolet A radiation (UVA) enhanced the yield of C. sorokiniana PAZ and Arthrospira sp. VSJ by 1.3 and 1.8 folds, respectively. FTIR analysis revealed elevation in the biosynthesis of specific metabolites in response to the UVA exposure.

  18. Light attenuates lipid accumulation while enhancing cell proliferation and starch synthesis in the glucose-fed oleaginous microalga Chlorella zofingiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianpeng; Liu, Jin; Guo, Bingbing; Ma, Xiaonian; Sun, Peipei; Liu, Bin; Chen, Feng

    2015-10-07

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of light on lipid and starch accumulation in the oleaginous green algae Chlorella zofingiensis supplemented with glucose. C. zofingiensis, when fed with 30 g/L glucose, synthesized lipids up to 0.531 g/g dry weight; while in the presence of light, the lipid content dropped down to 0.352 g/g dry weight. Lipid yield on glucose was 0.184 g/g glucose, 14% higher than that cultured with light. The light-mediated lipid reduction was accompanied by the down-regulation of fatty acid biosynthetic genes at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, light promoted cell proliferation, starch accumulation, and the starch yield based on glucose. Taken together, light may attenuate lipid accumulation, possibly through the inhibition of lipid biosynthetic pathway, leading to more carbon flux from glucose to starch. This study reveals the dual effects of light on the sugar-fed C. zofingiensis and provides valuable insights into the possible optimization of algal biomass and lipid production by manipulation of culture conditions.

  19. Effect of nitrogen concentrations on growth and protein content of heterotrophic microalgae%氮浓度对异养小球藻生长及蛋白质含量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李兴锐; 王文睿; 张永奎; 张鹏; 谢通慧; 梁斌

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the problem of low protein content of heterotrophic Chlorella vulgaris,the effects of nitrogen concentrations on growth and protein content of Chlorella vulgaris were studied.The regulations of nitrogen concentrations in different phases on the growth and protein content of Chlorella vulgaris were also studied .The results showed that protein content of Chlorella vulgaris was increased from 26.1% to 37.4% with the increase of initial nitrogen concentration from 12 to 15mmol/L.The control strategy was that firstly let Chlorella vulgaris grow under low nitrogen concentration to its exponential phase,and then transfered it to high nitrogen concentration.So we could obtaine both high biomass 3.04g/L and high protein content of 53.8% ,which reaches the protein level of Chlorella vulgaris in autotrophic culture.%为了提高异养小球藻蛋白质含量低的问题,研究了异养小球藻生长及蛋白质含量和氮浓度的关系,探究了分阶段调控氮浓度对异养小球藻生长及蛋白质含量的影响。结果表明,氮浓度在3~15mmol/L范围内,小球藻生物量及蛋白质含量随氮浓度增加而增加,生物量从0.91g/L提高到了3.02g/L,蛋白质含量从26.1%提高到了37.4%。分阶段培养小球藻,首先在低氮条件下培养至指数期前期,然后转移至高氮浓度下培养,生物量达3.04g/L,且蛋白质含量提高至53.8%,与自养培养条件下蛋白质含量相当。

  20. Photosynthetic aeration in biological wastewater treatment using immobilized microalgae-bacteria symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Prashant; Loh, Kai-Chee

    2015-12-01

    Chlorella vulgaris encapsulated in alginate beads were added into a bioreactor treating synthetic wastewater using Pseudomonas putida. A symbiotic CO2/O2 gas exchange was established between the two microorganisms for photosynthetic aeration of wastewater. During batch operation, glucose removal efficiency in the bioreactor improved from 50% in 12 h without aeration to 100% in 6 h, when the bioreactor was aerated photosynthetically. During continuous operation, the bioreactor was operated at a low hydraulic retention time of 3.3 h at feed concentrations of 250 and 500 mg/L glucose. The removal efficiency at 500 mg/L increased from 73% without aeration to 100% in the presence of immobilized microalgae. The initial microalgae concentration was critical to achieve adequate aeration, and the removal rate increased with increasing microalgae concentration. The highest removal rate of 142 mg/L-h glucose was achieved at an initial microalgae concentration of 190 mg/L. Quantification of microalgae growth in the alginate beads indicated an exponential growth during symbiosis, indicating that the bioreactor performance was limited by oxygen production rates. Under symbiotic conditions, the chlorophyll content of the immobilized microalgae increased by more than 30%. These results indicate that immobilized microalgae in symbiosis with heterotrophic bacteria are promising in wastewater aeration.

  1. 利用啤酒废水小球藻异养培养%Heterotrophic Cultivation of Chlorella for Beer brewery wastewater treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲春波; 史贤明

    2009-01-01

    [目的]利用小球藻异养培养技术处理啤酒废水,旨在为啤酒废水资源化利用和降低小球藻生产成本提供一条途径.[方法]在含有10 g/L葡萄糖的基本培养基进行异养小球藻高效藻株的筛选,并用于啤酒废水的资源化处理.[结果]从5株小球藻中得到2株适合高密度异养培养的藻株(Chlorella pyrenoidosa 15-2070和Chlorella vulgaris 15-2075),在啤酒废水的资源化处理过程中这2株小球藻得到非常接近的实验结果.利用由废水配制含10 g/L葡萄糖的基本培养液培养Chlorella pyrenoidosa 15-2070获得了5.3 g/L藻细胞;并且在此过程中,啤酒废水得到有效利用,几种主要污染物最高去除率为:CODcr,92.2%;BOD5,95.1%;NO3--N,98.5%;NH4+-N,92.3%.[结论]啤酒废水中的重要环境污染物在培养小球藻的过程中可以得到有效地清除,并从中可以获得具有商业价值的小球藻细胞.

  2. The effect of Chlorella growth and inorganic nutrients absorption by marine heterotrophic bacteria%海洋异养细菌对小球藻生长和无机营养盐吸收的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白洁; 易齐涛; 李佳霖

    2009-01-01

    The consortium of marine heterotrophic bacteria and Chlorella vulgaris was separated and six strains of bacteria were isolated,purified and analyzed by the DNA fingerprint of DGGE(denature gel gradient electrophoresis).One of the strains was found to promote the growth of the C.vulgaris,while the other five strains had no effects.Meanwhile,all of the separated strains could be observed to grow well on the DOC from the pure culture.Compared with the pure culture of C.vulgaris,the mixed culture of the consortium was observed a more efficiency of removing inorganic nitrogen.Also,the absorption of inorganic nutrients was considerably made by bacteria.%从胶州湾海洋异养细菌同小球藻(Chlorella vulgaris)的共存体系中,分离出6株形态特征差异较大的异养细菌,并做变性凝胶梯度电泳(Denature Gel Gradient Electrophoresis,DGGE)分析.其中一株对小球藻的生长有较大的促进作用,而其余菌株则没有明显的效果.6株细菌能在小球藻产生的胞外溶解有机物(Dissolved Organic Mate rials,DOM)溶液中生长良好,共存细菌对提高菌藻体系对无机营养盐的吸收具有较大的贡献.

  3. Photosynthetic light reactions increase total lipid accumulation in carbon-supplemented batch cultures of Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, Benjamin D; Mead, Rebecca L; Nichols, Courtney N; Kolling, Derrick R J

    2015-03-01

    Microalgae are an attractive biofuel feedstock because of their high lipid to biomass ratios, lipid compositions that are suitable for biodiesel production, and the ability to grow on varied carbon sources. While algae can grow autotrophically, supplying an exogenous carbon source can increase growth rates and allow heterotrophic growth in the absence of light. Time course analyses of dextrose-supplemented Chlorella vulgaris batch cultures demonstrate that light availability directly influences growth rate, chlorophyll production, and total lipid accumulation. Parallel photomixotrophic and heterotrophic cultures grown to stationary phase reached the same amount of biomass, but total lipid content was higher for algae grown in the presence of light (an average of 1.90 mg/mL vs. 0.77 mg/mL over 5 days of stationary phase growth).

  4. The mechanisms of detoxification of As(III), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and As(V) in the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja Munoz, L; Purchase, D; Jones, H; Raab, A; Urgast, D; Feldmann, J; Garelick, H

    2016-06-01

    The response of Chlorella vulgaris when challenged by As(III), As(V) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) was assessed through experiments on adsorption, efflux and speciation of arsenic (reduction, oxidation, methylation and chelation with glutathione/phytochelatin [GSH/PC]). Our study indicates that at high concentrations of phosphate (1.62mM of HPO4(2-)), upon exposure to As(V), cells are able to shift towards methylation of As(V) rather than PC formation. Treatment with As(V) caused a moderate decrease in intracellular pH and a strong increase in the concentration of free thiols (GSH). Passive surface adsorption was found to be negligible for living cells exposed to DMA and As(V). However, adsorption of As(III) was observed to be an active process in C. vulgaris, because it did not show saturation at any of the exposure periods. Chelation of As(III) with GS/PC and to a lesser extent hGS/hPC is a major detoxification mechanism employed by C. vulgaris cells when exposed to As(III). The increase of bound As-GS/PC complexes was found to be strongly related to an increase in concentration of As(III) in media. C. vulgaris cells did not produce any As-GS/PC complex when exposed to As(V). This may indicate that a reduction step is needed for As(V) complexation with GSH/PC. C. vulgaris cells formed DMAS(V)-GS upon exposure to DMA independent of the exposure period. As(III) triggers the formation of arsenic complexes with PC and homophytochelatins (hPC) and their compartmentalisation to vacuoles. A conceptual model was devised to explain the mechanisms involving ABCC1/2 transport. The potential of C. vulgaris to bio-remediate arsenic from water appeared to be highly selective and effective without the potential hazard of reducing As(V) to As(III), which is more toxic to humans.

  5. STUDY ON BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF HETEROTROPHIC MARINE MICROALGA-SCHIZOCHYTRIUM MANGROVEI PQ6 ISOLATED FROM PHU QUOC ISLAND, KIEN GIANG PROVINCE, VIETNAM(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Dang Diem; Anh, Hoang Thi Lan; Thu, Ngo Thi Hoai

    2011-08-01

    Schizochytrium sp. PQ6, a heterotrophic microalga isolated from Phu Quoc (PQ) Island in the Kien Giang province of Vietnam, contains a high amount of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3). In this study, the culture conditions are developed to maximize biomass and DHA production. Nucleotide sequence analysis of partial 18S rRNA gene from genomic DNA showed that PQ6 has a phylogenetic relationship close to Schizochytrium mangrovei Raghu-Kumar. The highest growth rate and DHA accumulation of this strain were obtained in 6.0% glucose, 1.0% yeast extract, 50% artificial seawater (ASW), and pH 7 at 28°C. In addition, carbon and nitrogen sources could be replaced by glycerol, ammonium acetate, sodium nitrate, or fertilizer N-P-K. Total lipid content reached 38.67% of dry cell weight (DCW), in which DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3) contents accounted for 43.58% and 0.75% of the total fatty acid (TFA), respectively. In 5 and 10 L fermenters, the cell density, DCW, total lipid content, and maximum DHA yield were 46.50 × 10(6)  cells · mL(-1) , 23.7 g · L(-1) , 38.56% of DCW, and 8.71 g · L(-1) (in 5 L fermenter), respectively, and 49.71 × 10(6)  cells · mL(-1) , 25.34 g · L(-1) , 46.23% of DCW, and 11.55 g · L(-1) (in 10 L fermenter), respectively. Biomass of PQ6 strain possessed high contents of Na, I, and Fe (167.185, 278.3, and 43.69 mg · kg(-1) DCW, respectively). These results serve as a foundation for the efficient production of PQ6 biomass that can be used as a food supplement for humans and aquaculture in the future.

  6. Lysine acetylsalicylate increases the safety of a paraquat formulation to freshwater primary producers: A case study with the microalga Chlorella vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltazar, Maria Teresa, E-mail: mteresabaltazar@gmail.com [REQUIMTE, Laboratory of Toxicology, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); IINFACTS-Institute of Research and Advanced Training in Health Sciences and Technologies, Department of Sciences, Advanced Institute of Health Sciences-North, CESPU, CRL, Rua Central de Gandra, 1317, 4585-116 Gandra (Portugal); Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge [REQUIMTE, Laboratory of Toxicology, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); IINFACTS-Institute of Research and Advanced Training in Health Sciences and Technologies, Department of Sciences, Advanced Institute of Health Sciences-North, CESPU, CRL, Rua Central de Gandra, 1317, 4585-116 Gandra (Portugal); Department of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Alameda Professor Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319 Porto (Portugal); CENCIFOR-Forensic Sciences Center, Largo da Sé Nova, 3000-213, Coimbra (Portugal); Martins, Alexandra [CIIMAR Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, Laboratory of Ecotoxicology and Ecology, Rua dos Bragas, 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); ICBAS-Institute of Biomedical Sciences of Abel Salazar, University of Porto, Department of Populations Studies, Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Bastos, Maria de Lourdes [REQUIMTE, Laboratory of Toxicology, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Duarte, José Alberto [CIAFEL, Faculty of Sports, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Plácido Costa, 91-4200-450 Porto (Portugal); and others

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: •The formulation has a reduced toxicity to C. vulgaris when compared to Gramoxone{sup ®}. •The highest protection was achieved at the proportion of 1:8 (PQ/LAS). •LAS conferred a protection of approximately 1.8 fold (% of inhibition of growth). •Salicylic acid is biotransformed by C. vulgaris after 48 h, and not detectable at 96 h. -- Abstract: Large amounts of herbicides are presently used in the industrialized nations worldwide, with an inexorable burden to the environment, especially to aquatic ecosystems. Primary producers such as microalgae are of especial concern because they are vital for the input of energy into the ecosystem and for the maintenance of oxygen in water on which most of other marine life forms depend on. The herbicide paraquat (PQ) is known to cause inhibition of photosynthesis and irreversible damage to photosynthetic organisms through generation of reactive oxygen species in a light-dependent manner. Previous studies have led to the development of a new formulation of PQ containing lysine acetylsalicylate (LAS) as an antidote, which was shown to prevent the mammalian toxicity of PQ, while maintaining the herbicidal effect. However, the safety of this formulation to primary producers in relation to commercially available PQ formulations has hitherto not been established. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of the PQ + LAS formulation in comparison with the PQ, using Chlorella vulgaris as a test organism. Effect criterion was the inhibition of microalgal population growth. Following a 96 h exposure to increasing concentrations of PQ, C. vulgaris growth was almost completely inhibited, an effect that was significantly prevented by LAS at the proportion used in the formulation (PQ + LAS) 1:2 (mol/mol), while the highest protection was achieved at the proportion of 1:8. In conclusion, the present work demonstrated that the new formulation with PQ + LAS has a reduced toxicity to C. vulgaris when

  7. 利用微藻处理生物丁醇废水的初步研究%The Primary Studies on Treatment of Butanol Wastewater by Microalgae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁锏文; 李智斌; 陈柏铨; 李璟

    2015-01-01

    The removal efficiency of COD by various microalgae in a butanol wastewater was investigated. The results showed that the Chlorella sorokiniana, Chlorella zofingiensis, Scenedesmus quadricauda and Spirulina platensis can effectively remove the COD in the butanol wastewater. The highest removal efficiency for COD(86. 56%) , total nitrogen (41. 39%), PO3-4 -P (86. 56%) were achieved by the heterotrophic cultivated Chlorella sorokiniana. In addition, the microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana achieved the highest removal efficiency of the main pollutants in butanol wastewater when the concentration of wastewater was 50%.%对比了8个微藻藻株对丁醇废水中COD的去除效率,结果表明小球藻Chlorella sorokiniana, Chlorella zofingiensis,四尾栅藻和钝顶螺旋藻能有效去除丁醇废水中的COD。试验发现小球藻Chlorella sorokiniana在异养培养方式下,能有效去除丁醇废水中的COD、总氮和 PO3-4-P。其中对 COD 的去除率最高为85.78%,对总氮的去除率为41.39%,对 PO3-4-P 的去除率为86.56%。此外,当废水浓度为50%时,小球藻Chlorella sorokiniana对丁醇废水中主要污染物的去除效率最高。

  8. Salt stress induced lipid accumulation in heterotrophic culture cells of Chlorella protothecoides: Mechanisms based on the multi-level analysis of oxidative response, key enzyme activity and biochemical alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Ge, Haiyan; Liu, Tingting; Tian, Xiwei; Wang, Zejian; Guo, Meijin; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping

    2016-06-20

    Salt stress as an effective stress factor that could improve the lipid content and lipid yield of glucose in the heterotrophic culture cells of Chlorella protothecoides was demonstrated in this study. The highest lipid content of 41.2% and lipid yield of 185.8mg/g were obtained when C. protothecoides was stressed under 30g/L NaCl condition at its late logarithmic growth phase. Moreover, the effects of salt and osmotic stress on lipid accumulation were comparatively analyzed, and it was found that the effects of NaCl and KCl stress had no significant differences at the same osmolarity level of 1150mOsm/kg with lipid contents of 41.7 and 40.8% as well as lipid yields of 192.9 and 186.8mg/g, respectively, whereas these results were obviously higher than those obtained under the iso-osmotic glycerol and sorbitol stresses. Furthermore, basing on the multi-level analysis of oxidative response, key enzyme activity and biochemical alteration, the superior performance of salt stress driving lipid over-synthesis was probably ascribed to the more ROS production as a result of additional ion effect besides the osmotic effect, subsequently mediating the alteration from carbohydrate storage to lipid accumulation in signal transduction process of C. protothecoides.

  9. Biotechnological applications of microalgae

    OpenAIRE

    Wan-Loy Chu

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae are important biologicalresources that have a wide range of biotechnologicalapplications. Due to their high nutritional value,microalgae such as Spirulina and Chlorella are beingmass cultured for health food. A variety of high-valueproducts including polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA),pigments such as carotenoids and phycobiliproteins, andbioactive compounds are useful as nutraceuticals andpharmaceuticals, as well as for industrial applications. Interms of environmental biotechnolo...

  10. LIPID CHARACTERISTICS AND TAXONOMIC IMPLICATION OF MARINE MICROALGAE CHLORELLA SP.1061%海洋微藻Chlorella sp.1061的脂类特征与分类探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯福应; 杨文; 林伟; 姜桂珍; 许亦农; 匡廷云

    2004-01-01

    采用生化分析方法研究了海洋微藻Chlorella sp. 1061色素、极性脂及其脂肪酸组成特点.结果表明,Chlorella sp. 1061色素、极性脂及其脂肪酸组成均与小球藻属的其它藻类存在着很大差异.绿藻纲中的主要化合物, 如叶绿素b、十六碳四烯酸[16:4(n-3)]和亚麻酸[18:3(n-3)]均未在Chlorella sp. 1061中检测到.从Chlorella sp. 1061中分离到占总极性甘油脂8mol%的甜菜碱-1,2-二酰基甘油-O-4'-(N, N, N-三甲基)高丝氨酸(DGTS),并从半乳糖脂和DGTS等极性甘油脂中检测到大量的二十碳五烯酸[20:5(n-3)] (EPA).但是一般认为,小球藻属藻类中不含这两种化合物.根据Chlorella sp. 1061的这些特点,作者认为它不应该被归到小球藻属中.由于Chlorella sp. 1061在色素、极性甘油脂及其脂肪酸组成特征方面与大眼藻纲(Eustigmatophyceae)中的拟微绿球藻(Nannochloropsis)非常相似,因此, Chlorella sp. 1061可能是Nannochloropsis中的一个种.

  11. Screening of the Gene for Chlorella Identification and Identification of Oil-producing Microalgae%小球藻鉴定基因的筛选及高产油微藻的分子鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何茹; 刘君寒; 王士安; 李福利

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to select suitable gene for Chlorella identification and to identify the oil-producing microalgae. [Method] Four candidate gene sequences, the nuclear genomic rDNA of the 18S rRNA gene, internal transcribed spacer (ITS), internal transcribed spacer Ⅱ (ITS Ⅱ ) and the chloroplast rbcL gene, were selected for Chlorella molecular identification. Through these four candidate genes, the genetic variability and distinguish ability between intra-species and inter-species was analyzed to choose the right genes for identification of the high oil-content Chlorella. On this basis, application of these gene segments were classified and identified for five fresh-water isolated Chlorella, which oil-content is more than 30%. [Result] ITS gene was a suitable gene because of its high variation and short fragment length, meanwhile its genetic distance intra-species (0.439 6 ± 0.135 9) was larger than inter-species (0.045 7 ± 0.084 3). Its sequence length varied between different species whereas highly conserved in the same species. By the application of ITS sequences, respectively, five high oil-content stains were identified as one C. Vulgaris, two strains of C. Sorokiniana and two strains of algae Chlorella sp. [ Conclusion] This study had provided reference for the establishment of identification gene pool of Chlorella.%[目的]选择合适的小球藻种属鉴定基因,对高产油微藻进行分子鉴定.[方法]从分子鉴定常用的4条基因[核基因组rDNA的18S,rRNA gene、内转录间隔区(TTS)、内转录间隔区2(ITS-2)和叶绿体rbcL基因]中筛选出最为适用的小球藻鉴定基因,并对从自然水体中分离筛选出的5株油脂含量在30%以上的小球藻(Chlorella sp.)进行了分类鉴定.[结果]ITS序列变异程度高,片段长度短,序列长度在种间变异较大,而在小球藻种内高度保守,且种间距离(0.439 6±0.135 9)远大于种内距离(0.045 7±0.084 3),适用于小球藻属内种

  12. Microalgae Nutraceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Nicoletti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Among the new entries in the food supplements sector, an important place must be assigned to nutraceuticals containing microalgae, nowadays accounting for a large and rapidly expanding market. The marketed products are mainly based on three production strains, i.e., Spirulina and Chlorella, followed at a distance by Klamath. It is a composite situation, since two of them are cyanobacteria and the second one is eukaryotic. The reality is that each presents similarities in shape and appearance concerning the marketed form and several utilizations, and peculiarities that need special attention and adequate studies. First, general information is reported about the current scientific knowledge on each microalga, in particular the nutritional value and properties in prevention and wellbeing. Second, original studies are presented concerning the quality control of marketed products. Quality control is a key argument in nutraceuticals validation. Microalgae are particular organisms that need specific approaches to confirm identity and validate properties. The proposed control of quality is based on microscopic analysis of the morphologic characteristics. The final parts of this paper are dedicated to the need for specificity in uses and claims and to considerations about the future of microalgae in food supplements.

  13. 小球藻利用工业废物产油脂的研究进展%Proceeding on Industrial Wastes as a Nutrient Supplement for Cultivation of Oil-rich Green Microalgae Chlorella sp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    占凌云; 周新虹; 王明兹; 陈必链

    2012-01-01

    近年来利用微藻生产生物柴油已成为热门话题。微藻工业化生产生物燃料最大的瓶颈就是高成本,如何有效降低成本,决定了微藻生物燃料在未来的命运。文中综述了国内外有关利用工业废物(即廉价碳源、工业废水、工业废气)培养小球藻生产油脂的研究进展,并提出小球藻利用工业废料产油脂应注意的问题。%The potential of microalgae as a source of renewable energy has received considerable interest.It is the high cost of cultivation of microalgae that became the bottleneck in its industrialization.How to cut down the cost of microalgal bio-fuel production is becoming a key issue to the destiny of bio-fuel production in the future.This review summarized some progress in using industrial wastes(low-cost carbon sources,industrial wastewater,industrial emissions) as nutrition resources for bio-fuel production by Chlorella sp.,and listed some suggestions that rose from this process.

  14. Domestication of the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana: reduction of antenna size improves light-use efficiency in a photobioreactor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cazzaniga, Stefano; Dall'Osto, Luca; Szaub, Joanna; Scibilia, Luca; Ballottari, Matteo; Purton, Saul; Bassi, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    .... Among the different microalgae, Chlorella species are of interest because of their high productivity, high lipid content, and resistance to the high light conditions typical of photobioreactors...

  15. Calorimetry and thermodynamic aspects of heterotrophic, mixotrophic, and phototrophic growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stockar, von U.; Marison, I.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Patino, R.

    2011-01-01

    A simple stoichiometric model is proposed linking the biomass yield to the enthalpy and Gibbs energy changes in chemo-heterotrophic, mixotrophic, and photo-autotrophic microbial growth. A comparison with calorimetric experiments on the algae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella sorokiniana confirmed the

  16. Calorimetry and thermodynamic aspects of heterotrophic, mixotrophic, and phototrophic growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stockar, von U.; Marison, I.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Patino, R.

    2011-01-01

    A simple stoichiometric model is proposed linking the biomass yield to the enthalpy and Gibbs energy changes in chemo-heterotrophic, mixotrophic, and photo-autotrophic microbial growth. A comparison with calorimetric experiments on the algae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella sorokiniana confirmed the

  17. Effects of L-Carnitine Supplements on Population Growth and Biochemical Composition in Micro-algae, Chlorella vulgaris%L-肉碱对普通小球藻Chlorella vulgaris种群增长和生化组成的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋丹; 孙宇; 蔺丽丽; 陈玉珂; 董婧; 陈颖; 余涛; 张东鸣

    2011-01-01

    分别以0,5,50 mg/L的L-内碱(L-carnitine)处理淡水普通小球藻(Chlorella vulgaris),以SE为培养液,培养7 d,探究L-肉碱对淡水普通小球藻种群增长、总脂和可溶性蛋白质含量的影响.结果表明:不同质量浓度的L-肉碱在不同培养时期对普通小球藻种群增长影响显著(P<0.05);高浓度L-肉碱显著降低总脂含量(P<0.05),并使可溶性蛋白质含量显著升高(P<0.05).结果提示,在培养液中添加外源L-肉碱可能通过直接作用于普通小球藻,或促进培养液中微小生物分泌活性物质间接影响普通小球藻的种群增长及总脂和可溶性蛋白质的含量.%The study was conducted to investigate the effects of L-carnitine supplements on population growth, total lipids and soluble protein in freshwater micro-algae Chlorella vulgaris. Algae were cultured with SE formulations and enriched by 3 levels of L-carnitine: 0, 5 and 50 mg/L for 7 days. The results showed that L-camitine supplements significantly ( P < 0.05) affected the population growth of enriched algae and two levels of L-camitine enrichment (5, 50 mg/L) produced different responses on population growth compared with the control during culture period. Total lipids content was significantly ( P < 0.05) lower and soluble protein content was significantly ( P < 0.05) higher in 50 mg/L L-camitine enriched group than that in the other 2 groups. The results suggest that L-camitine enrichment might affect population growth and biochemical composition in freshwater micro-algae Chlorella vulgaris in a direct or indirect way.

  18. Análise proteômica, crescimento e composição celular da microalga Chlorella vulgaris sob autotrofia, mixotrofia e heterotrofia

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Algumas espécies de microalgas podem alterar o tipo de metabolismo como uma resposta às mudanças nas condições ambientais. A Chorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) é um exemplo de microalga capaz de crescer tanto sob condições de autotrofia (com CO2 e luz), quanto heterotrofia (com glicose, sem luz, sem CO2) e mixotrofia (com glicose, CO2 e luz). Embora já existam alguns estudos acerca dos diferentes modos de crescimento citados, o conhecimento do funcionamento da célula a nível molecular ainda é li...

  19. Interaction between Chlorella vulgaris and bacteria:interference and resource competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Liang; WANG Renjun; ZHAO Peng; CHEN Ruinan; ZHOU Wenli; TANG Liuqing; TANG Xuexi

    2014-01-01

    Research of interaction mechanism between Chlorella vulgaris and two bacterial strains (Z-QD08 and Z-QS01) were conducted under laboratory conditions. Growth rates of bacteria and C. vulgaris were tested under co-culture conditions to evaluate the effects of concentrations of C. vulgaris and bacteria on their interactions. To test whether the availability of inorganic nutrients, vitamins and trace metals affects the interactions between C. vulgaris and bacteria, experiments were performed with or without the culture medium filtrate of C. vulgaris or bacteria. The results showed that the growth of C. vulgaris was promot-ed at low concentrations of bacteria (5×106 cells/ml), and expressed a positive correlation with the bacteria density, whereas opposite trend was observed for treatments with high bacteria density (10×106 cells/ml and 20×106 cells/ml). The growth rate of bacteria decreased with the increasing concentrations of C. vul-garis. The growth of bacteria Z-QD08 was inhibited by C. vulgaris through interference competition, while the mechanism for interaction between bacteria Z-QS01 and C. vulgaris was resource competition. The influence of cell density on the interaction between microalgae and bacteria was also discussed. These ex-periments confirm some elements of published theory on interactions between heterotrophic bacteria and microalgae and suggest that heterotrophic bacteria play an important role in the development of blooms in natural waters.

  20. Effect of nitrogen source on growth and lipid accumulation in Scenedesmus abundans and Chlorella ellipsoidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Garcinuño, Álvaro; Tabernero, Antonio; Sánchez-Álvarez, José Ma; Martin del Valle, Eva M; Galán, Miguel A

    2014-12-01

    Discovering microalgae strains containing a high lipid yield and adequate fatty acid composition is becoming a crucial fact in algae-oil factories. In this study, two unknown strains, named Scenedesmus abundans and Chlorella ellipsoidea, have been tested for their response to different nitrogen sources, in order to determine its influence in the production of lipids. For S. abundans, autotrophic culture with ammonium nitrate offers the maximum lipid yield, obtaining up to 3.55 mg L(-1) d(-1). For C. ellipsoidea, heterotrophic culture with ammonium nitrate has been shown to be the best condition, reaching a lipid production of 9.27 mg L(-1) d(-1). Moreover, fatty acid composition obtained from these cultures meets international biodiesel standards with an important amount of C18:1, achieving 70% of total fatty acids and thus representing a potential use of these two strains at an industrial scale.

  1. Cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris JSC-6 with swine wastewater for simultaneous nutrient/COD removal and carbohydrate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Guo, Wanqian; Yen, Hong-Wei; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Lo, Yung-Chung; Cheng, Chieh-Lun; Ren, Nanqi; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-12-01

    Swine wastewater, containing a high concentration of COD and ammonia nitrogen, is suitable for the growth of microalgae, leading to simultaneous COD/nutrients removal from the wastewater. In this study, an isolated carbohydrate-rich microalga Chlorella vulgaris JSC-6 was adopted to perform swine wastewater treatment. Nearly 60-70% COD removal and 40-90% NH3-N removal was achieved in the mixotrophic and heterotrophic culture, depending on the dilution ratio of the wastewater, while the highest removal percentage was obtained with 20-fold diluted wastewater. Mixotrophic cultivation by using fivefold diluted wastewater resulted in the highest biomass concentration of 3.96 g/L. The carbohydrate content of the microalga grown on the wastewater can reach up to 58% (per dry weight). The results indicated that the microalgae-based wastewater treatment can efficiently reduce the nutrients and COD level, and the resulting microalgal biomass had high carbohydrate content, thereby having potential applications for the fermentative production of biofuels or chemicals.

  2. Comparison and Optimization of Total Lipid Detection Methods for Microalgae Chlorella%几种小球藻油脂含量检测方法的比较及优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丛峰; 孙雪; 徐年军

    2012-01-01

    Three methods for detecting the total lipid content of the microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa, that is, bligh-dyer method, vanillin colorimetric method and nile-red method, are compared and analyzed for their efficiency and sensitivity, and the optimization method is also introduced. Test results indicate that the gravimetric method is of generic and the results from using it are accurate, but the gravimetric method is not adequately sensitive in the detection process of trace samples because of the minimum detectable amount being 100 mg. The vanillin colorimetric method and nile-red method both are simple and sensitive. The detection using the vanillin colorimetric method is limited to 10mg, and the detection range of the optimized vanillin colorimetric method is 0.5 - 3.0 mg. The detection using nile-red method is limited to the amount ranging from 0.058 8 mg.mL-1 to 0.588 mg.mL-1 algal solution. In conclusion, the lipid content of the microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa can be detected by the optimized vanillin and combined with the nile-red method, which turns out to be easier and more sensitive than the gravimetric method and can thus be used for the small amount of samples. The study provides a technical approach for the rapid detection of the lipid content of biofuel microalgae.%用Btigh—Dyer重量法、香草醛比色法和尼罗红染色法对蛋白核小球藻油脂含量进行了检测,结果表明:3种检测法中重量法结果准确,但灵敏度较低,最低检测量为100mg;香草醛比色法和尼罗红染色法简便且灵敏度高,实验中香草醛染色法最低检测量为10mg,优化的香草醛比色法可直接检测藻粉,最低检9n,4限为0.5~3.0mg.尼罗红染色法可直接检测藻液,最低检测限为200μL小球藻含量为0.0588-0.5880mg·mL。的藻液.最后建立了以香草醛比色法为主的油脂含量检测方法,和尼罗红染色法相结合可定量测定微量小球藻样品.

  3. Kinetics of nutrient removal and expression of extracellular polymeric substances of the microalgae, Chlorella sp. and Micractinium sp., in wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Kuo-Dahab, Wenye Camilla; Dolan, Sona; Park, Chul

    2014-02-01

    Two species of green algae, Chlorella sp. and Micractinium sp., were cultivated in primary effluent wastewater and high-strength wastewater (a mixture of anaerobic digestion centrate and primary effluent) to study nutrient removal and EPS (extracellular polymeric substances) expression during their growth. The high N concentration and P-limited condition in the mixed wastewater (total N=197 mg/L; N/P mass ratio=56) led to about 3 times greater specific N removal rate than the primary effluent set, indicating that algal cells growing in N-rich wastewater had N over-uptake. Both Chlorella and Micractinium grown in the high-strength wastewater also produced larger amounts of protein EPS, possibly accounting for higher N uptake in those cultivation sets. These results suggest that different types of wastewater could cause different nutrient removal kinetics and EPS expression by algae, which may subsequently influence harvesting and anaerobic digestion of their biomass. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Research on Optimization of Lipid Productivity by Chlorella sp. U4341 with Response Surface Method%响应面法优化微藻 Chlorella sp.U4341油脂产率的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵鹏; 余旭亚; 徐军伟

    2015-01-01

    为了提高微藻 Chlorella sp.U4341的油脂产率,采用响应面法对异养培养条件进行优化研究.通过单因素试验筛选出促进 Chlorella sp.U4341油脂产率的最佳碳源、氮源分别为葡萄糖、NaNO3.利用 Plackett -Burman 试验筛选出显著影响 Chlorella sp.U4341油脂产率的三个因子,通过最陡爬坡试验逼近最大油脂产率区域,运用中心组合试验及响应面分析确定了三个因子的最佳浓度:葡萄糖为24.81 g/L,NaNO3为1.68 g/L,K2 HPO4·3H2 O 为0.58 g/L.优化后的条件培养微藻 Chlorella sp.U4341的油脂产率为273.34 mg/L·d,比优化前提高了58%.%To increase the lipid productivity of microalgae Chlorella sp.U4341 ,optimization of heterotrophic cul-tivation condition is carried out by response surface method.The optimal carbon and nitrogen sources for Chlorella sp.U4341 are glucose and sodium nitrate,respectively.Three most important influencing factors for lipid produc-tivity of Chlorella sp.U4341 are screened via Plackett -Burman experiment.Subsequently,the steepest ascent ex-periment is used to guide key factors to approach the maximum lipid productivity region.Optimal concentrations of the three influencing factors are confirmed by central composite design and response surface analysis.The re-sults are 24.81 g/L of glucose,1 .68 g/L of sodium nitrate and 0.58 g/L of dipotassium phosphate trihydrate. Cultivated with the optimized condition,the lipid productivity of Chlorella sp.U4341 reaches 273.34 mg/L·d, increased by 58% compared with the original cultivation condition.

  5. Bioavailability of wastewater derived dissolved organic nitrogen to green microalgae Selenastrum capricornutum, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and Chlorella vulgaris with/without presence of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingyi; Simsek, Halis

    2017-07-01

    Effluent dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is problematic in nutrient sensitive surface waters and needs to be reduced to meet demanding total dissolved nitrogen discharge limits. Bioavailable DON (ABDON) is a portion of DON utilized by algae or algae+bacteria, while biodegradable DON (BDON) is a portion of DON decomposable by bacteria. ABDON and BDON in a two-stage trickling filter (TF) wastewater treatment plant was evaluated using three different microalgal species, Selenastrum capricornutum, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris and mixed cultured bacteria. Results showed that up to 80% of DON was bioavailable to algae or algae+bacteria inoculum while up to 60% of DON was biodegradable in all the samples. Results showed that C. reinhardtii and C. vulgaris can be used as a test species the same as S. capricornutum since there were no significant differences among these three algae species based on their ability to remove nitrogen species. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Comparison of Chlorella vulgaris biomass productivity cultivated in biofilm and suspension from the aspect of light transmission and microalgae affinity to carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun; Xiong, Wei; Liao, Qiang; Fu, Qian; Xia, Ao; Zhu, Xun; Sun, Yahui

    2016-12-01

    To investigate light transmission and cells affinity to CO2, Chlorellavulgaris was attached to microfiltration membrane that laid on the solidified BG11 medium compared to that in suspended cultivation mode in this study. The results showed that C. vulgaris showed a 30.4% higher biomass production (103gm(-2)) in attached than in suspend system. The upper layer of biofilm with a thickness of 41.31μm (the corresponding areal density of 40gm(-2)) was effectively illuminated under light intensity of 120μmolm(-2)s(-1) and more than 40% of the microalgal cells were in light even the areal density was high to 100gm(-2). While only 2.5% of the cells were effectively illuminated in the suspended cultivation system. Furthermore, microalgae cells in biofilm showed a higher affinity to CO2 compared with that in suspension, and CO2 saturation point of microalgae cells in biofilm was 1.5% but 4.5% in suspension. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Z-QS01菌株对小球藻的生态学效应及对UV-B辐射的响应%Quorum Sensing of an Associated Heterotrophic Bacteria-Z-QS01 with Chlorella Vulgaris and Response to Enhanced UV-B Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周文礼; 肖慧; 乔秀亭; 孙敬锋; 邢克智; 唐学玺

    2011-01-01

    利用生态毒理学方法研究了小球藻共栖Z-QS01菌株的生态学效应及对U V-B辐射的响应.结果表明:Z-QS01菌株通过分泌化学物质实现自我行为调节和对小球藻的抑制效应,Z-QS01菌株的密度和分泌到培养液中的化学物质的浓度是启动调节机制的必要条件;UV-B辐射增强显著影响Z-QS01菌株的群感效应,随UV-B辐射剂量的增加,Z-QS01菌株对小球藻的抑制效应降低.实验数据可为水产养殖业生态防病提供参考,并为揭示藻菌间相互作用机制提供有价值的参考资料.%An associated heterotrophic dominant single bacteria-Z-QS01 was selected to study its mechanism of quorum sensing and factors that affected quorum sensing using ecotoxicological technique in co-cultural system with Chlorella vulgaris. The results show that self-regulation and inhibitive effect of bacteria-Z-QS01 to Chlorella vulgaris could implement through excreting chemic substance. Density of bacteria-Z-QS01 and concentration of chemic substance excreted by bacteria-Z-QS01 are the necessary conditions, which decide whether the regulation mechanism could be carried out or not. The enhanced UV-B radiation could affect quorum sensing of bacteria-Z-QS01 significantly, and the inhibitive effect to Chlorella vulgaris is decreased gradually with the dose increase of UV-B radiation.

  8. Isolation of microalgae species from arid environments and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    2015-05-06

    May 6, 2015 ... made from sugar, starch, vegetable oil or animal fats using conventional technology .... Acid value conversion factors for lauric and palmitic were 2.81 and ..... fatty acid profiles of photoautotrophic and heterotrophic Chlorella.

  9. Microalgae harvesting via co-culture with filamentous fungus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gultom, Sarman Oktovianus

    Microalgae harvesting is a labor- and energy-intensive process. For instance, classical harvesting technologies such as chemical addition and mechanical separation are economically prohibiting for biofuel production. Newer approaches to harvest microalgae have been developed in order to decrease costs. Among these new methods, fungal co-pelletization seems to be a promising technology. By co-culturing filamentous fungi with microalgae, it is possible to form pellets, which can easily be separated. In this study, different parameters for the cultivation of filamentous fungus (Aspergillus niger) and microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) to efficiently form cell pellets were evaluated under heterotrophic and phototrophic conditions, including organic carbon source (glucose, glycerol and sodium acetate) concentration, pH, initial concentration of fungal spores, initial concentration of microalgal cells, concentration of ionic strength (Calcium and Magnesium) and concentration of salinity (NaCl). In addition, zeta-potential measurements were carried out in order to get a better understanding of the mechanism of attraction. It was found that 2 g/L of glucose, a fungus to microalgae ratio of 1:300, and uncontrolled pH (around 7) are the best culturing conditions for co-pelletization. Under these conditions, it was possible to achieve a high harvesting performance (>90%). In addition, it was observed that most pellets formed in the co-culture were spherical with an average diameter of 3.5 mm and in concentrations of about 5 pellets per mL of culture media. Under phototrophic conditions, co-pelletization required the addition of glucose as organic carbon source to sustain the growth of fungi and to allow the harvesting of microalgae. Zeta-potential measurements indicated that (i) both microalgae and fungi have low zeta-potential values regardless of the pH on the bulk (i.e. <-10 mV) (ii) fungi can have a positive electric charge at low pH (ie. pH=3). These values suggest that it

  10. Enhanced activity of ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase and formation of starch induced by Azospirillum brasilense in Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choix, Francisco J; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2014-05-10

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) regulates starch biosynthesis in higher plants and microalgae. This study measured the effect of the bacterium Azospirillum brasilense on AGPase activity in the freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris and formation of starch. This was done by immobilizing both microorganisms in alginate beads, either replete with or deprived of nitrogen or phosphorus and all under heterotrophic conditions, using d-glucose or Na-acetate as the carbon source. AGPase activity during the first 72h of incubation was higher in C. vulgaris when immobilized with A. brasilense. This happened simultaneously with higher starch accumulation and higher carbon uptake by the microalgae. Either carbon source had similar effects on enzyme activity and starch accumulation. Starvation either by N or P had the same pattern on AGPase activity and starch accumulation. Under replete conditions, the population of C. vulgaris immobilized alone was higher than when immobilized together, but under starvation conditions A. brasilense induced a larger population of C. vulgaris. In summary, adding A. brasilense enhanced AGPase activity, starch formation, and mitigation of stress in C. vulgaris.

  11. Flow cytometry pulse width data enables rapid and sensitive estimation of biomass dry weight in the microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Chioccioli

    Full Text Available Dry weight biomass is an important parameter in algaculture. Direct measurement requires weighing milligram quantities of dried biomass, which is problematic for small volume systems containing few cells, such as laboratory studies and high throughput assays in microwell plates. In these cases indirect methods must be used, inducing measurement artefacts which vary in severity with the cell type and conditions employed. Here, we utilise flow cytometry pulse width data for the estimation of cell density and biomass, using Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as model algae and compare it to optical density methods. Measurement of cell concentration by flow cytometry was shown to be more sensitive than optical density at 750 nm (OD750 for monitoring culture growth. However, neither cell concentration nor optical density correlates well to biomass when growth conditions vary. Compared to the growth of C. vulgaris in TAP (tris-acetate-phosphate medium, cells grown in TAP + glucose displayed a slowed cell division rate and a 2-fold increased dry biomass accumulation compared to growth without glucose. This was accompanied by increased cellular volume. Laser scattering characteristics during flow cytometry were used to estimate cell diameters and it was shown that an empirical but nonlinear relationship could be shown between flow cytometric pulse width and dry weight biomass per cell. This relationship could be linearised by the use of hypertonic conditions (1 M NaCl to dehydrate the cells, as shown by density gradient centrifugation. Flow cytometry for biomass estimation is easy to perform, sensitive and offers more comprehensive information than optical density measurements. In addition, periodic flow cytometry measurements can be used to calibrate OD750 measurements for both convenience and accuracy. This approach is particularly useful for small samples and where cellular characteristics, especially cell size, are expected to vary

  12. Examination of Triacylglycerol Biosynthetic Pathways via De Novo Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analyses in an Unsequenced Microalga

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    Examination of Triacylglycerol Biosynthetic Pathways via De Novo Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analyses in an Unsequenced Microalga Michael T...dependent upon available genomic sequence data, and the lack of these data has hindered the pursuit of such analyses for many oleaginous microalgae . In order...to examine the triacylglycerol biosynthetic pathway in the unsequenced oleaginous microalga , Chlorella vulgaris, we have established a strategy with

  13. Potential Health Effects of Enzymatic Protein Hydrolysates from Chlorella vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Chlorella vulgaris is a multi-cellular edible algal species with abundant proteins. Extraction of high value protein fractions for pharmaceutical and nutritional applications can significantly increase the commercial value of microalga biomasses. There is no known report on the anticancer peptides derived from the Chlorella vulgaris abundant protein.Materials and Methods: This study examined the antimicrobial and anticancer effects of peptides from a hydrolyzed Chlor...

  14. Suppression subtractive hybridization reveals transcript profiling of Chlorella under heterotrophy to photoautotrophy transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Fan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microalgae have been extensively investigated and exploited because of their competitive nutritive bioproducts and biofuel production ability. Chlorella are green algae that can grow well heterotrophically and photoautotrophically. Previous studies proved that shifting from heterotrophy to photoautotrophy in light-induced environments causes photooxidative damage as well as distinct physiologic features that lead to dynamic changes in Chlorella intracellular components, which have great potential in algal health food and biofuel production. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the trophic transition remain unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, suppression subtractive hybridization strategy was employed to screen and characterize genes that are differentially expressed in response to the light-induced shift from heterotrophy to photoautotrophy. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs were obtained from 770 and 803 randomly selected clones among the forward and reverse libraries, respectively. Sequence analysis identified 544 unique genes in the two libraries. The functional annotation of the assembled unigenes demonstrated that 164 (63.1% from the forward library and 62 (21.8% from the reverse showed significant similarities with the sequences in the NCBI non-redundant database. The time-course expression patterns of 38 selected differentially expressed genes further confirmed their responsiveness to a diverse trophic status. The majority of the genes enriched in the subtracted libraries were associated with energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, protein synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, and stress defense. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data presented here offer the first insights into the molecular foundation underlying the diverse microalgal trophic niche. In addition, the results can be used as a reference for unraveling candidate genes associated with the transition of Chlorella from heterotrophy to

  15. Efecto de la coinmovilización de la microalga Chlorella sorokiniana con la bacteria promotora de crecimiento vegetal Azospirillum brasilense, en el crecimiento poblacional microalgal y capacidad de remoción de amonio como uso potencial en el tratamiento..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillot Monroy Gabriel

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Se desarrollaron dos experimentos de coinmovilización de la microalga Chlorella sorokiniana con la bacteria promotora
    de crecimiento vegetal (PGPB Azospirillum brasilense en esferas de alginato, para evaluar la influencia de la bacteria en el crecimiento poblacional y en la capacidad de remoción de amonio de la microalga; con el fin de establecer el potencial que pueda tener la coinmovilización de estos microorganismos en el tratamiento terciario de aguas residuales. Los resultados revelan un significativo incremento de la población cuando C.
    sorokiniana es coinmovilizada con A. brasilense, aunque no se observó un efecto significativo en la remoción de amonio. Los resultados obtenidos en el presente trabajo, reflejan la importancia de avanzar en el estudio de un sistema coinmovilizado altamente eficiente para ser utilizado en tratamiento de aguas residuales. La coinmovilización
    de C. sorokiniana con A. brasilense, muestra la habilidad de esta bacteria para influir de manera positiva en el crecimiento y fisiología de la microalga y por lo tanto la remoción de amonio puede ser incrementada.

  16. Biotechnological applications of microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Loy Chu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are important biologicalresources that have a wide range of biotechnologicalapplications. Due to their high nutritional value,microalgae such as Spirulina and Chlorella are beingmass cultured for health food. A variety of high-valueproducts including polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA,pigments such as carotenoids and phycobiliproteins, andbioactive compounds are useful as nutraceuticals andpharmaceuticals, as well as for industrial applications. Interms of environmental biotechnology, microalgae areuseful for bioremediation of agro-industrial wastewater,and as a biological tool for assessment and monitoring ofenvironmental toxicants such as heavy metals, pesticidesand pharmaceuticals. In recent years, microalgae haveattracted much interest due to their potential use asfeedstock for biodiesel production. In Malaysia, therehas been active research on microalgal biotechnologyfor the past 30 years, tapping into the potential of ourrich microalgal resources for high-value products andapplications in wastewater treatment and assessmentof environmental toxicants. A culture collection ofmicroalgae has been established, and this serves asan important resource for microalgal biotechnologyresearch. Microalgal biotechnology should continue tobe regarded as a priority area of research in this country.

  17. Performance of Chlorella sorokiniana under simulated extreme winter conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuaresma, M.; Buffing, M.F.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Lobato, C.V.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2012-01-01

    High annual microalgae productivities can only be achieved if solar light is efficiently used through the different seasons. During winter the productivity is low because of the light and temperature conditions. The productivity and photosynthetic efficiency of Chlorella sorokiniana were assessed

  18. Application of photobioreactors to cultivation of microalgae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雷; 王光玉

    2003-01-01

    An overview of photobioreactors now in use for production of microalgae world wide is presented, andthe application of photobioreactors to the cultivation of microalgae is discussed in detail. It is pointed out thathigh cell density and industrial production of microalgae can be achieved using many kinds of closed photobiore-actors including fermentor, tubular and flat plate photobioreactors, and the cultivation of Spirulina, Chlorella,Dunaliella tertiolecta and Porphyridium cruentrim by photobioreactors can achieve higher and steadier produc-tivity than the cultivation of microalgae by an open air system. More and more researches indicate that tubularand flat plate photobioreactors are the development trend for photobioreactors with bubbles and air lift stirrers,and high bright light-emitting diodes are the most economic light source with great potential for future develop-ment of photobioreactors. Photobioreactors can also be used for the production of high-value metabolite ( EPA orDHA) using some microalgae species for energy development and environment protection.

  19. Utilization of papaya waste and oil production by Chlorella protothecoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algae derived oils have outstanding potential for use in biodiesel production. Chlorella protothecoides has been shown to accumulate lipid up to 60% of its cellular dry weight with glucose supplementation under heterotrophic growth conditions. To reduce production costs, alternative carbon feedstock...

  20. Improved lipid and biomass productivities in Chlorella vulgaris by differing the inoculation medium from the production medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrbanoo Hamedi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of biomass and lipid productivities is now one of the main concerns in commercialization of microalgae cultivation as a feedstock for algal biofuel production. Conventional photoautotrophic processes using well-studied and rich in oil strain of Chlorella vulgaris are not able to meet such demands. A new strategy of inoculating algae production medium with cells grown in a different medium from the production medium was proposed herein. More specifically, when SH4 was used as production medium and N8 was used as inoculation medium, biomass and lipid productivities increased by 2.33 folds and 1.44 fold, respectively, compared with when the production and inoculation media were the same, such as SH4. The findings of the present investigation showed that this cultivation scheme resulted in 52% increase in cell number and 54% increase in dry weight leading to improved productivities. Although by even considering this improvement, photoautotrophic cultivation of algae can hardly compete with the heterotrophic cultivation, the high cost of hydrocarbon supply required in large-scale heterotrophic processes marks the technique proposed in the present study as a promising approach for commercialization of algal biofuel production.

  1. Retraction: Hazani A, Ibrahim M, Shehata A, El-Gaaly G, Daoud M, Fouad D, Rizwana H, Moubayed N. Ecotoxicity of Ag-nanoparticles on two microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta. Arch Biol Sci. 2013;65(4:1447-1457. DOI: 10.2298/ABS1304447H

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a notice of retraction of the article: Ecotoxicity of Ag-nanoparticles on two microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta, published in the Archives of Biological Sciences in 2013, Vol. 65, Issue 4. The Editor-in-Chief has been informed that this paper is a duplicate of an earlier paper: Hazani A, Ibrahim M, Arif I, Shehata A, EL-Gaaly G, Daoud M, Fouad D, Rizwana H, Moubayed N. Ecotoxicity of Ag-Nanoparticles to Microalgae. J Pure Appl Microbiol. 2013;7(Spl. Ed.: 233-241. This claim is correct and the entire paper is a verbatim copy of the earlier one. After confirmation of this fact, the Editor-in-Chief of the Archives of Biological Sciences has decided to retract the paper immediately. We apologize to the readers of the journal that it took so many years to notice this error and to retract the paper. We request readers of the journal to directly get in touch with the editorial office and the editors of the journal for similar cases in the future, so that they can be handled promptly. Link to the retracted article 10.2298/ABS1304447H

  2. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals phenol tolerance mechanism of evolved Chlorella strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin; Cheng, Dujia; Wang, Liang; Gao, Juan; Zhao, Quanyu; Wei, Wei; Sun, Yuhan

    2017-03-01

    The growth of microalgae is inhibited by high concentration phenol due to reactive oxygen species. An evolved strain tolerated to 500mg/L phenol, Chlorella sp. L5, was obtained in previous study. In this study, comparative transcriptomic analysis was performed for Chlorella sp. L5 and its original strain (Chlorella sp. L3). The tolerance mechanism of Chlorella sp. L5 for high concentration phenol was explored on genome scale. It was identified that the up-regulations of the related genes according to antioxidant enzymes (SOD, APX, CAT and GR) and carotenoids (astaxanthin, lutein and lycopene) biosynthesis had critical roles to tolerate high concentration phenol. In addition, most of genes of PS I, PS II, photosynthetic electron transport chain and starch biosynthesis were also up-regulated. It was consistent to the experimental results of total carbohydrate contents of Chlorella sp. L3 and Chlorella sp. L5 under 0mg/L and 500mg/L phenol.

  3. Lipid releasing characteristics of microalgae species through continuous ultrasonication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Ramya; Ang, Wei Ming Russell; Chen, Xue; Voigtmann, Michael; Lau, Raymond

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the lipid releasing characteristics of several microalgae species through continuous ultrasonication was examined. Two marine microalgae species, Tetraselmis suecica and Nannochloropsis sp., and one freshwater species, Chlorella sp. were ultrasonicated directly after cultivation. The cell disruption efficiency and lipids releasing pattern from microalgae cells were measured under various ultrasonication conditions. It was found that cell disruption efficiency correlates well with ultrasonication energy consumption despite the ultrasonication conditions. Lipids in Chlorella sp. that has rigid cell walls were released to the aqueous phase after cell disruption. T. suecica and Nannochloropsis sp. that have flexible cell membranes tend to coil up and retain the membrane lipids after disruption. Continuous ultrasonication can be a potential method to release the lipids in rigid walled microalgae species without expensive dewatering steps.

  4. Chlorella zofingiensis as an Alternative Microalgal Producer of Astaxanthin: Biology and Industrial Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin (3,3′-dihydroxy-β,β-carotene-4,4′-dione, a high-value ketocarotenoid with a broad range of applications in food, feed, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical industries, has been gaining great attention from science and the public in recent years. The green microalgae Haematococcus pluvialis and Chlorella zofingiensis represent the most promising producers of natural astaxanthin. Although H. pluvialis possesses the highest intracellular astaxanthin content and is now believed to be a good producer of astaxanthin, it has intrinsic shortcomings such as slow growth rate, low biomass yield, and a high light requirement. In contrast, C. zofingiensis grows fast phototrophically, heterotrophically and mixtrophically, is easy to be cultured and scaled up both indoors and outdoors, and can achieve ultrahigh cell densities. These robust biotechnological traits provide C. zofingiensis with high potential to be a better organism than H. pluvialis for mass astaxanthin production. This review aims to provide an overview of the biology and industrial potential of C. zofingiensis as an alternative astaxanthin producer. The path forward for further expansion of the astaxanthin production from C. zofingiensis with respect to both challenges and opportunities is also discussed.

  5. Chlorella zofingiensis as an alternative microalgal producer of astaxanthin: biology and industrial potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Sun, Zheng; Gerken, Henri; Liu, Zheng; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2014-06-10

    Astaxanthin (3,3'-dihydroxy-β,β-carotene-4,4'-dione), a high-value ketocarotenoid with a broad range of applications in food, feed, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical industries, has been gaining great attention from science and the public in recent years. The green microalgae Haematococcus pluvialis and Chlorella zofingiensis represent the most promising producers of natural astaxanthin. Although H. pluvialis possesses the highest intracellular astaxanthin content and is now believed to be a good producer of astaxanthin, it has intrinsic shortcomings such as slow growth rate, low biomass yield, and a high light requirement. In contrast, C. zofingiensis grows fast phototrophically, heterotrophically and mixtrophically, is easy to be cultured and scaled up both indoors and outdoors, and can achieve ultrahigh cell densities. These robust biotechnological traits provide C. zofingiensis with high potential to be a better organism than H. pluvialis for mass astaxanthin production. This review aims to provide an overview of the biology and industrial potential of C. zofingiensis as an alternative astaxanthin producer. The path forward for further expansion of the astaxanthin production from C. zofingiensis with respect to both challenges and opportunities is also discussed.

  6. Effect of carbon source on growth and lipid accumulation in Chlorella sorokiniana GXNN01

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Hongjin; WANG Guangce

    2009-01-01

    Heterotrophic culture of microalgae to develop methods of increasing biomass productivity and storage lipids has brought new insight to commercial biodiesel production. To understand the relationship between heterotrophy and lipid production, the effects of carbon sources on the growth and lipid accumulation of Chlorella sorokiniana GXNN01 was studied. The alga exhibited an increased growth rate in response to the addition of carbon sources, which reached the stationary phase after 48 h at 30°C. In addition, glucose and NaAc had a significant effect on the lipid accumulation during the early-stationary phase. Specifically, the lipid content was 0.237±0.026 g g~(-1) cell dry weight and 0.272±0.041 g L~(-1) when glucose was used as the carbon source, whereas the lipid content reached 0.287±0.018 g g~(-1) cell dry weight and 0.288±0.008 g L~(-1) when NaAc was used as the carbon source. The neutral lipid content was found to first decrease and then increase over time during the growth phase. A glucose concentration of 20 mmol L~(-1) gave the maximal lipid yield and the optimum harvest time was the early-stationary phase.

  7. Evaluation of the simultaneous production of lutein and lipids using a vertical alveolar panel bioreactor for three Chlorella species 

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The concept of a biorefinery improves the economic efficiency of a biofuel production process from microalgae by recovering high value added compounds. Lutein is a carotenoid currently extracted from petals of Tagetes erecta with an established market in poultry and in human nutritional supplements. For the very first time, an extended study on the lipid and lutein production over three Chlorella species as well as cell disruption methods was performed. Chlorella vulgaris, Chlorella zofingien...

  8. WATER CONDITION IN CELLS OF CHLORELLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kuznetsova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The water condition in cages of the paste of chlorella was investigated by the method of thermogravimetric analysis. With increasing heating rate endothermic effect corresponding to the dehydration process is shifted towards higher temperatures. Temperature intervals of chlorella dehydration are defined at rate of heating 2 К/min - 308-368 K, 5 К/min - 323-403 K, and 10 К/min - 348-403 K. Quantitative characteristics of kinetic unequal water in chlorella have been received for each step (∆, ∆Т, a mass fraction (w, energy of activation (Еа. This process is similar to the process of the dehydration in ion exchange membranes. The derived kinetic characteristics give the possibility to define an optimum temperature interval and rate of drying microalgae for the purpose of increase of periods of storage in the form of paste or a solid substance for the further use as the bioadditive. In addition the presence of three types of water chlorella in a cell set according to NMR with pulsed magnetic field gradient. Since free water is involved in biochemical, chemical and microbiological processes, it is desirable to remove during drying of the preparation. The resulting temperature range of 323-343 K (step 2 at a heating rate of 2 K / min corresponds to a temperature range of drying the chlorella in a production environment. It should be noted that the highest number of algae in a tightly-water (the last stage. Apparently, this is determined by a unique cell structure. Temperature ranges dehydration process are not clear and vary depending on the heating rate, which is fully in line with previous studies of thermal analysis for grains, vegetables and bakery products.

  9. Cultivation of Chlorella sp. as Biofuel Sources in Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME)

    OpenAIRE

    H. Hadiyanto; Muhamad Maulana Azimatun Nur; Ganang Dwi Hartanto

    2012-01-01

    Renewable energy is essential and vital aspect for development in Indonesia especially less oil reserve for coming 15 years. Biodiesel has received much attention as renewable energy in recent years. One of potential biodiesel is produced from microalgae. Due to high content of nutrients in Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME), this waste is a potential for nutrient growth for microalgae. Chlorella is one of high potential for biodiesel since it has high lipid content (20-30%). The objective of the ...

  10. Enhanced accumulation of starch and total carbohydrates in alginate-immobilized Chlorella spp. induced by Azospirillum brasilense: I. Autotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choix, Francisco J; de-Bashan, Luz E; Bashan, Yoav

    2012-10-10

    The effect of the microalgae-growth promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense on accumulation of total carbohydrates and starch in two species of Chlorella (Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella sorokiniana), when the bacterium and each microalga were jointly immobilized in alginate beads was studied under autotrophic conditions for 144 h in synthetic medium. The interaction of the bacterium with the microalgae enhanced accumulation of total carbohydrate and starch. Cells of Chlorella accumulated the highest amounts of carbohydrate after incubation for 24h. Yet, this did not coincide with the highest affinity and volumetric productivity measured in these cultures. However, after incubation for 72 h, mainly in jointly immobilized treatments of both microalgae species, the cultures reached their highest total carbohydrate content (mainly as starch) and also the highest affinity and volumetric productivity. These results demonstrate the potential of A. brasilense to affect carbohydrates and starch accumulation in Chlorella spp. when both microorganisms are co-cultured, which can be an important tool for applications of microalgae.

  11. Horizontal or vertical photobioreactors? How to improve microalgae photosynthetic efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuaresma, M.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Vilchez, C.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    The productivity of a vertical outdoor photobioreactor was quantitatively assessed and compared to a horizontal reactor. Daily light cycles in southern Spain were simulated and applied to grow the microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana in a flat panel photobioreactor. The maximal irradiance around noon di

  12. Chlorella vulgaris: A Multifunctional Dietary Supplement with Diverse Medicinal Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Yunes; Darvishi, Behrad; Jowzi, Narges; Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris is a green unicellular microalgae with biological and pharmacological properties important for human health. C. vulgaris has a long history of use as a food source and contains a unique and diverse composition of functional macro- and micro-nutrients including proteinsChlorella vulgaris is a green unicellular microalgae with biological and pharmacological properties important for human health. C. vulgaris has a long history of use as a food source and contains a unique and diverse composition of functional macro- and micro-nutrients including proteins, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, polysaccharides, vitamins and minerals. Clinical trials have suggested that supplementation with C. vulgaris can ameliorate amelioration hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and protect against oxidative stress, cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this review, we summarize the findings on the health benefits of Chlorella supplementation and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects., omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, polysaccharides, vitamins and minerals. Clinical trials have suggested that supplementation with C. vulgaris can ameliorate amelioration hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and protect against oxidative stress, cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this review, we summarize the findings on the health benefits of Chlorella supplementation and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects.

  13. [Research status and prospect on hot water extract of Chlorella: the high value-added bioactive substance from Chlorella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiuyuan; Huang, Yingming; Zhang, Daojing; Tao, Liming; Li, Yuanguang

    2015-01-01

    Chlorella is nutritious and has been used as a functional food much earlier than the other microalgae. C. pyrenoidosa, the potential microalgae which is currently cultured and developed for the new strategic industry of biofuels production and biological CO2 fixation, is a new resource food announced by the Ministry of Health of the People's Republic of China late 2012. Accumulation of high value-added substances in C. pyrenoidosa during the cultivation for lipid makes it possible to reduce the costs for C. pyrenoidosa-based biofuels production. Among these potential substances, hot water extract of Chlorella (CE), commercially known as "Chlorella growth factor", is the unique one that makes Chlorella more precious than the other algae, and the market price of CE is high. It is believed that CE is effective in growth promotion and immunoregulation. However, there is no systematic analysis on the research status of CE and its bioactivity. The present report summarized recent research progress of CE and its bioactivity. Generally, besides the main effect on immunoregulation and tumor inhibition, CE was efficient in improving metabolic syndrome, scavenging for free radicals, protecting against ultraviolet damage, chelating heavy metals, and protecting liver and bowel. Several major challenges in CE research as well as its prospects were also analysed in the present report.

  14. Lipid profiling of some authotrophic microalgae grown on waste water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safafar, Hamed; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Møller, Per

    Microalgae can be a new source of lipids for the aquaculture industry. Moreover, their potential as natural sources of antioxidants has gained recent attention. About 40 species of microalgae are used in aquaculture worldwide. A full characterization of lipid components is critical for selecting...... the most suitable microalgae and downstream processing for food and feed production. The present study is part of a big project funded by GUDP (green development and demonstration program of ministry of agriculture and fisheries of Denmark) which aims at developing new processing technologies, so...... that microalgae-biomass can be used as an alternative valuable resource in fish feed. In this work, 10 fresh water and marine microalgae from Chlorella, Scenedesmus, Haematococcus, Nannochloropsis, Nannochloropsis and Dunialiella species grown in waste water in Kalundborg micro algal facility were harvested...

  15. A whole biodiesel conversion process combining isolation, cultivation and in situ supercritical methanol transesterification of native microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazzar, Souhir; Quesada-Medina, Joaquín; Olivares-Carrillo, Pilar; Marzouki, Mohamed Néjib; Acién-Fernández, Francisco Gabriel; Fernández-Sevilla, José María; Molina-Grima, Emilio; Smaali, Issam

    2015-08-01

    A coupled process combining microalgae production with direct supercritical biodiesel conversion using a reduced number of operating steps is proposed in this work. Two newly isolated native microalgae strains, identified as Chlorella sp. and Nannochloris sp., were cultivated in both batch and continuous modes. Maximum productivities were achieved during continuous cultures with 318mg/lday and 256mg/lday for Chlorella sp. and Nannochloris sp., respectively. Microalgae were further characterized by determining their photosynthetic performance and nutrient removal efficiency. Biodiesel was produced by catalyst-free in situ supercritical methanol transesterification of wet unwashed algal biomass (75wt.% of moisture). Maximum biodiesel yields of 45.62wt.% and 21.79wt.% were reached for Chlorella sp. and Nannochloris sp., respectively. The analysis of polyunsaturated fatty acids of Chlorella sp. showed a decrease in their proportion when comparing conventional and supercritical transesterification processes (from 37.4% to 13.9%, respectively), thus improving the quality of the biodiesel.

  16. Cultivation of Chlorella sp. as Biofuel Sources in Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Hadiyanto

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy is essential and vital aspect for development in Indonesia especially less oil reserve for coming 15 years. Biodiesel has received much attention as renewable energy in recent years. One of potential biodiesel is produced from microalgae. Due to high content of nutrients in Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME, this waste is a potential for nutrient growth for microalgae. Chlorella is one of high potential for biodiesel since it has high lipid content (20-30%. The objective of the research is to determine growth rate and biomass productivity in Chlorella Sp cultured in POME. Chlorella Sp was cultured in 20%, 50%, 70% POME using urea concentration 0.1gr/L (low nitrogen source and 1gr/l (high nitrogen source at flask disk, pH 6.8-7.2; aerated using aquarium pump and fluorescence lamp 3000-6000 lux as light. Medium was measured using spectrophotometer Optima Sp-300 OD at 680 wave length in 15 days to calculate specific growth rate. At end of cultivation, Chlorella sp was filtered and measured as dry weight. Result indicated that Chlorella sp at 50% POME 1gr/L urea showed higher specific growth rate (0.066/day. Factor affecting growth rate of microalgae is CNP ratio, POME concentration, and urea concentration.

  17. UTILIZATION OF CO2 IN SEMI-CONTINUOUS CULTIVATION OF Spirulina sp. AND Chlorella fusca AND EVALUATION OF BIOMASS COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Moreira

    Full Text Available Abstract Cultivation conditions and the process considerably influence the composition of microalgae. The objective of this study was to use CO2 as a carbon source in semi-continuous cultivation of Spirulina sp. LEB 18 and Chlorella fusca LEB 111 and to evaluate the influence of the renewal rate on the biomass composition and production of these microalgae. Spirulina sp. LEB 18 and Chlorella fusca LEB 111 were cultivated with 10% (v/v CO2. The blend concentration was 1.6 g L-1, and 20 and 40% (v/v renewal rates were studied. Spirulina sp. LEB 18 presented the best kinetic results and the maximum biomass concentration and biopolymer yield when grown with CO2 as the carbon source. Under the same conditions (10% (v/v CO2, the microalgae Spirulina sp. LEB 18 and Chlorella fusca LEB 111 exhibited maximum levels of protein, carbohydrates and lipids.

  18. Lipid accumulation from pinewood pyrolysates by rhodosporidium diobovatum and chlorella vulgaris for biodiesel production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luque, L.; Orr, V.C.A.; Chen, S.; Westerhof, R.J.M.; Oudenhoven, S.R.G; Rossum, van G.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Berruti, F.; Rehmann, L.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the suitability of pinewood pyrolysates as a carbon source for lipid production and cultivation of the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium diobovatum and the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. Thermal decomposition of pinewood and fractional condensation were used to obtain an oil rich

  19. Lipid accumulation from pinewood pyrolysates by rhodosporidium diobovatum and chlorella vulgaris for biodiesel production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luque, L.; Orr, V.C.A.; Chen, S.; Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; Oudenhoven, Stijn; van Rossum, G.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Berruti, F.; Rehmann, L.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the suitability of pinewood pyrolysates as a carbon source for lipid production and cultivation of the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium diobovatum and the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. Thermal decomposition of pinewood and fractional condensation were used to obtain an oil rich

  20. Effect of Mg2+ and Fe2+ Concentrations in Culture Medium on CGF Formation from Microalgae Chlorella Pyrenoidosa Ink and Analysis of Amino Acids by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusmiati Kusmiati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chlorella pyrenoidosa (C. pyrenoidosa contains Chlorella Growth Factor (CGF, which consists of proteins and polysaccharides. CGF is located inside the nucleus of cells and is beneficial to humans as a food supplement, an immunity booster, and an antioxidant. CGF formation of C. pyrenoidosa is influenced by medium composition. C. pyrenoidosa INK was cultured in a modified basal medium (MBM with various concentrations of Mg2+ (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 g/L and Fe2+ (3.5×10-4 and 5.0×10-4 g/L. The experiments were performed and analyzed under a completely randomized design using a 2-L bottle with three replications. The results showed that MBM with 1.0 g/L of Mg2+ and 3.5×10-4 g/L of Fe2+ yielded the optimal growth curve for C. pyrenoidosa. Analysis of protein content was carried out using the Lowry method with a spectrophotometer at λ=750 nm, and the obtained results were 0.0974 mg/mL (extract and 6.4097 mg/ml (supernatant. Furthermore, analysis of glucose content was carried out using the phenol sulfate method (λ = 490 nm, and the obtained results were 49.331 ppm (extract and 1566.911 ppm (supernatant. Analysis of amino acids in CGF using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS indicated the presence of tyrosine, proline, glutamate, alanine, valine, tryptopan, phenylalanine, methionine, and leucine-isoleucine.

  1. Biological CO2 mitigation from coal power plant by Chlorella fusca and Spirulina sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Jessica Hartwig; de Morais, Etiele Greque; Radmann, Elisângela Martha; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2017-06-01

    CO2 biofixation by microalgae and cyanobacteria is an environmentally sustainable way to mitigate coal burn gas emissions. In this work the microalga Chlorella fusca LEB 111 and the cyanobacteria Spirulina sp. LEB 18 were cultivated using CO2 from coal flue gas as a carbon source. The intermittent flue gas injection in the cultures enable the cells growth and CO2 biofixation by these microorganisms. The Chlorella fusca isolated from a coal power plant could fix 2.6 times more CO2 than Spirulina sp. The maximum daily CO2 from coal flue gas biofixation was obtained with Chlorella fusca (360.12±0.27mgL(-1)d(-1)), showing a specific growth rate of 0.17±Spirulina sp. LEB 18 potential to fix CO2 from coal flue gas, and sequential biomass production with different biotechnological destinations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pilot project at Hazira, India, for capture of carbon dioxide and its biofixation using microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Anant; Choudhary, Piyush; Atri, Neelam; Teir, Sebastian; Mutnuri, Srikanth

    2016-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to set up a small-scale pilot reactor at ONGC Hazira, Surat, for capturing CO2 from vent gas. The studies were carried out for CO2 capture by either using microalgae Chlorella sp. or a consortium of microalgae (Scenedesmus quadricauda, Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorococcum humicola). The biomass harvested was used for anaerobic digestion to produce biogas. The carbonation column was able to decrease the average 34 vol.% of CO2 in vent gas to 15 vol.% of CO2 in the outlet gas of the carbonation column. The yield of Chlorella sp. was found to be 18 g/m(2)/day. The methane yield was 386 l CH4/kg VSfed of Chlorella sp. whereas 228 l CH4/kg VSfed of the consortium of algae.

  3. Removal of nitrate and phosphate from aqueous solutions by microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Sayadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of microalgae Spirulina platensis and Chlorella vulgaris to remove nitrate and phosphate in aqueous solutions. Spirulina platensis and Chlorella vulgar is microalgae was collected in 1000 ml of municipal water and KNO3, K2HPO4 was added as sources of nitrate and phosphate in three different concentrations (0.25, 0.35 and 0.45g/L. During the growth period, the concentration of nitrate and phosphate was recorded at 1, 4, 6 and 8 days. The highest nitrate removal on the 8 day for Chlorella vulgaris was 89.80% at the treatment of 0.25g/L and for Spirulina platensis was 81.49% at the treatment of 0.25g/L. The highest phosphate removal for Spirulina platensis was 81.49% at the treatment of 0.45g/L and for Chlorella vulgaris was 88% at the treatment of 0.45g/L. The statistical results showed that the amount of phosphate and nitrate removal during different time periods by Chlorella vulgaris depicted a significant difference at P

  4. Nutrient recycle from defatted microalgae (Aurantiochytrium) with hydrothermal treatment for microalgae cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, Taku Michael; Maruta, Ryouma; Tanabe, Yuuhiko; Oshima, Minori; Nonaka, Toshiyuki; Kujiraoka, Hiroki; Kumagai, Yasuaki; Ota, Masaki; Suzuki, Iwane; Watanabe, Makoto M; Inomata, Hiroshi; Smith, Richard L

    2017-03-01

    Defatted heterotrophic microalgae (Aurantiochytrium limacinum SR21) was treated with high temperature water (175-350°C, 10-90min) to obtain nitrogen and phosphorous nutrients as a water soluble fraction (WS). Yields of nitrogen and phosphorous recovered in WS varied from 38 to 100% and from 57 to 99%, respectively. Maximum yields of nitrogen containing compounds in WS were proteins (43%), amino acids (12%) and ammonia (60%) at treatment temperatures of 175, 250 and 350°C, respectively. Maximum yield of phosphorous in WS was 99% at a treatment temperature of 250°C. Cultivation experiments of microalgae (A. limacinum SR21) using WS obtained at 200 and 250°C showed positive growth. Water soluble fractions from hydrothermal treatment of defatted microalgae are effective nitrogen and phosphorous nutrient sources for microalgae cultivation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Acidophilic algae isolated from mine-impacted environments and their roles in sustaining heterotrophic acidophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Barrie Johnson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two acidophilic algae, identified as strains of Chlorella protothecoides var. acidicola and Euglena mutabilis, were isolated in pure culture from abandoned copper mines in Spain and Wales and grown in pH- and temperature-controlled bioreactors. The Chlorella isolate grew optimally at pH 2.5 and 30 ˚C, with a corresponding culture doubling time of 9 hours. The isolates displayed similar tolerance (10-50 mM to four transition metals tested. Growth of the algae in liquid media was paralleled with increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC. Glycolic acid was identified as a significant component (12- 14% of total DOC. Protracted incubation resulted in concentrations of glycolic acid declining in both cases, and glycolic acid added to a culture of Chlorella incubated in the dark was taken up by the alga (~100% within three days. Two monosaccharides were identified in cell-free liquors of each algal isolate: fructose and glucose (Chlorella, and mannitol and glucose (Euglena. These were rapidly metabolised by acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria (Acidiphilium and Acidobacterium spp. though only fructose was utilised by the more fastidious heterotroph Acidocella aromatica. The significance of algae in promoting the growth of iron- (and sulfate- reducing heterotrophic acidophiles that are important in remediating mine-impacted waters is discussed.

  6. Extraction of antioxidants from Chlorella sp. using subcritical water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, S. M.; Mustapa Kamal, S. M.; Harun, M. R.; Omar, R.; Siajam, S. I.

    2017-06-01

    Chlorella sp. microalgae is one of the main source of natural bioactive compounds used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Subcritical water extraction is the technique that offers an efficient, non-toxic, and environmental-friendly method to obtain natural ingredients. In this work, the extracts of Chlorella sp. microalgae was evaluated in terms of: chemical composition, extraction (polysaccharides) yield and antioxidant activity, using subcritical water extraction. Extractions were performed at temperatures ranging from 100°C to 300°C. The results show that by using subcritical water, the highest yield of polysaccharides is 23.6 that obtained at 150°C. Analysis on the polysaccharides yield show that the contents were highly influenced by the extraction temperature. The individual antioxidant activity were evaluated by in vitro assay using a free radical method. In general, the antioxidant activity of the extracts obtained at different water temperatures was high, with values of 31.08-54.29 . The results indicated that extraction by subcritical water was effective and Chlorella sp. can be a useful source of natural antioxidants.

  7. The Optimizing of Growth and Quality of Chlorella vulgaris as ASUH feed supplement for Broiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvia Salvia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorella is spherical single celled freshwater micro-algae.   Chlorella  has potentials as element of ration or natural ASUH (safe, healthy, whole and halal feed supplement for it contains nutrition and active component, decreases cholesterol level and resulting darker yolk.  Chlorella vulgaris  is type of green algae   which, its economical potential need to be revealed. Variety of components of growing media is one of factors determining quality of microalgae. In terms of mass production, it is important to find correct, cheap and easy to feed nutrition for breeders. The objective of the research is to find out the optimizing of growth and quality of Chlorella vulgaris   as ASUH feed supplement for broiler. Test using sedgwick rafter method conducted to find out the optimizing of growth and quality of  Chlorella vulgaris  while AOAC method applied to test quality of its nutrition. The result shows that.  Chlorella vulgaris  grew well at technical medium 10 % of Phyto-s, crude protein 57.63%, fat  5.84%, b Carotene 6.44 mg/gram, Vitamin C 4.12 mg/gram and vitamin E 1.32 mg/gram. We can say that Chlorella vulgaris  potential to be natural and ASUH feed supplement and Phyto-s can be used as nutrition for mass production.

  8. Development of harvesting and up concentration technologies for microalgae as an ingredient in fish feed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safafar, Hamed; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Møller, Per

    2014-01-01

    andfish oil. In applications of algae in fish feed, it is essential to produce a product comparable to fish proteinand fish oil both in terms of quality and costs.Downstream processing of microalgae includes harvest, dewatering, cell rupture, fractionation and drying.The dewatering and drying which...... ingredients forfish feed. Further we evaluate the chemical composition of six different microalgae species including;Nanochloropsis limnethica, Chlorella sorokiniana, Phaeodactylum tinctorium, Dunaliella salina,Nannochloropsis salina and Nannochloropsis occulata ....

  9. Influence of temperature and nutrient content on lipid production in freshwater microalgae cultures

    OpenAIRE

    BOHNENBERGER,JULIANA E.; LUCIANE O. CROSSETTI

    2014-01-01

    The production of biomass by microalgae is considered a clean alternative compared to other plant crops that require large areas for cultivation and that generate environmental impacts. This study evaluated the influence of temperature and nutrients on lipid contents of cultured species of freshwater microalgae, with a view toward using these lipids for biodiesel production. Two strains of Monoraphidium contortum, a culture containing Chlorella vulgaris and Desmodesmus quadricauda and another...

  10. Used water resource recovery using green microalgae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta

    A paradigm shift is promoted in wastewater treatment whereby wastewater is considered as a source of nutrients, water and energy, rather than waste and it is referred to as used water. Microalgae cultivation on used water resources offers the potential to recover nitrogen, phosphorus, water...... and energy. When coupling with used water treatment, microalgae is mostly considered to produce energy through biofuel production. A novel used water resource recovery approach was presented earlier, referred to as TRENS – a fully biochemical process for the removal, recovery and reuse of used water...... as a result of their deficiencies. Some lack e.g., accounting for the storage of nitrogen and phosphorus and for the potential for microalgae to grow heterotrophic on organic carbon that are relevant processes for used water resource recovery systems. Therefore, the first objective of this thesis...

  11. Marine Microalgae Tetraselmis suecica as Flocculant Agent of Bio-flocculation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujizat Kawaroe

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae harvesting is an important part in microalgae cultivation system. Techniques for harvesting marine microalgae which are commonly used are centrifugation, filtration and flocculation. These techniques still have some disadvantages, such as not environment friendly, and high usage of energy and cost. Bio-flocculation harvesting technique using microalgae as a flocculant agent can be an alternative way to solve these problems. In this research, mixing of Tetraselmis suecica (flocculant with Chlorella sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. (non-flocculant in ratios of 1:4, 2:4, 3:4 and 4:4 (v/v has been conducted to obtain percent recovery of marine microalgae harvest. The results showed that T. suecica as flocculant agent can fasten the harvesting of Chlorella sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. It was shown by the increase of percent recovery value of Chlorella sp. from 51.14 ± 1.07% to 67.34 ± 0.67% and Nannochloropsis sp. from 20.52 ± 1.17% to 42.43 ± 0.40% during the first hour of flocculating process. Our result showed that bio-flocculation is an environment friendly technique which can be applied to harvest marine microalgae.

  12. Health Food Supplements (“Health Food” Highly Nutritious From Chlorella And Oil Catfish (Pangasius hypopthalmus

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    Syahrul Syahrul

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of microalgae as a food ingredient considered effective, because in addition to alternativefood sources also contains nutrients chlorella microalgae in particular is very good for health. This microalgaerich in protein (60.5%, fat (11%, carbohydrates (20.1%, water, dietary fiber, vitamins and minerals Besidesthese microalgae contain pigments (chlorophyll, tocopherol and the active component (antimicrobial andantioxidants. This is what underlies microalgae is very useful to be used as a source of raw materials ofhealth food supplements. Currently the health food supplements have become a necessity for people tomaintain their health in order to remain vibrant. This study aims to produce high nutritious health foodsupplements from raw material chlorella enriched with fish protein concentrate and oil catfish. The methodused in the manufacture of high nutritious health food supplement is a method of microencapsulation withdifferent formulations. The results showed that the best formulations based on the profile of amino acids,fatty acids and standards AAE per day especially essential fatty acids oleic and linoleic is formulation B(chlorella 2%, 1% fish oil and fish protein concentrate 1%.

  13. Efficacy of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Scenedesmus abundans for Nutrient Removal in Rice Mill Effluent (Paddy Soaked Water).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abinandan, S; Bhattacharya, Ribhu; Shanthakumar, S

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are product of sustainable development owing to its ability to treat variety of wastewater effluents and thus produced biomass can serve as value added product for various commercial applications. This paper deals with the cultivation of microalgae species namely Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Scenedesmus abundans in rice mill effluent (i.e., paddy soaked water) for nutrient removal. In order to investigate the nutrient removal capability, microalgae are subjected to cultivation in both raw and autoclaved samples. The maximum phosphate removal by Scenedesmus abundans and Chlorella pyrenoidosa in raw sample was 98.3% and 97.6%, respectively, whereas, the removal of ammoniacal nitrogen by Scenedesmus abundans and Chlorella pyrenoidosa in raw sample was 92% and 90.3%, respectively. The growth (measured in terms of chlorophyll content) of Scenedesmus abundans and Chlorella pyrenoidosa in raw sample was 3.88 mg/l and 5.55 mg/l, respectively. The results indicate the suitability of microalgae cultivation in rice mill effluent treatment for nutrient removal.

  14. Pertumbuhan Chlorella sp. pada beberapa konsentrasi limbah batubara (The growth rate of the Chlorella sp. at different concentrations of coal waste water

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    Zerli Selvika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlorella sp. is a single-celled microalga that mostly grows in marine waters. Chlorella sp. can grow in heavy polluted waters and therefore it has potency as a bioremediation agent. This study aimed was to analyze the effect of coal on the growth of Chlorella sp. in plant isolation media and the quality of water in plant isolation media for Chlorella sp. The complete randomized design with 4 treatments of coal concentration was used in this study. Four concentration concentrations were tested namely, 0 ppt, 1 ppt, 3 ppt and 5 ppt. The results revealed that coal with different concentrations gave no significant effect on the growth of Chlorella sp. (p> 0.05. The density among the concentrations of 0 ppt, 1 ppt, 3 ppt and 5 ppt were not significantly different. In addition, the coal concentration gave no significant effect on temperature, salinity and potential hydrogen (pH (p>0.05. The Chlorella sp. can grow in the polluted water by coal, and therefore this alga can be used as potential organisms for bioremediation of coal waste. Chlorella sp. merupakan mikroalga bersel satu yang banyak tumbuh di perairan laut. Chlorella sp. dapat tumbuh di perairan yang tercemar berat sehingga berpotensi sebagai bioremediator. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis pengaruh konsentrasi batubara terhadap pertumbuhan Chlorella sp. dan kualitas air pada media kultur Chlorella sp. Metode yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah metode eksperimen skala laboratorium. Rancangan percobaan yang digunakan adalah rancangan acak lengkap dengan 4 perlakuan konsentrasi batubara 0 ppt, 1 ppt, 3 ppt dan 5 ppt. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa batubara dengan konsentrasi yang berbeda tidak berpengaruh nyata terhadap laju pertumbuhan Chlorella sp (P>0,05. Kepadatan antara konsentrasi 0 ppt, 1 ppt, 3 ppt dan 5 ppt tidak terlalu jauh berbeda. Konsentrasi batubara juga tidak berpengaruh nyata terhadap parameter suhu, salinitas dan derajat keasaman (pH (p>0,05. Chlorella sp

  15. Perfil de ácidos graxos de microalgas cultivadas com dióxido de carbono Fatty acids profile of microalgae cultived with carbon dioxide

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    Michele Greque de Morais

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available As microalgas são consideradas fontes potenciais de diversos compostos químicos. Os ácidos graxos obtidos da biomassa podem apresentar efeitos terapêuticos em humanos e podem ser usados para produção de biodiesel. Objetivou-se, neste trabalho verificar o conteúdo lipídico e o perfil dos ácidos graxos das microalgas Spirulina sp., Scenedesmus obliquus, Chlorella kessleri e Chlorella vulgaris cultivadas em diferentes concentrações de dióxido de carbono e bicarbonato de sódio. A microalga Chlorella kessleri cultivada com 12% de CO2 apresentou a maior concentração de lipídios na biomassa seca (9,7% p/p. A máxima concentração de ácidos graxos insaturados foi 72,0% (p/p para C. vulgaris cultivada com 12% de CO2. Para os ácidos graxos saturados o maior valor encontrado foi 81,6% (p/p, quando a microalga Spirulina sp. foi cultivada com 18% de CO2 e 16,8 g.L-1 de bicarbonato de sódio.Microalgae have a great potential as a source of several chemical compounds. The fatty acids have shown therapeutic effects and used to produce biodiesel. The aim of this work was to verify the lipid contents and the fatty acids profile of the microalga Spirulina sp., Scenedesmus obliquus, Chlorella kessleri and Chlorella vulgaris cultived in different carbon dioxide and sodium bicarbonate concentrations. The microalgae Chlorella kessleri cultived with 12% CO2 showed the highest lipid content in the dry biomass (9.7% p/p. The maximum unsaturated fatty acids concentration was 72.0% (p/p to C. vulgaris in the culture with 12% CO2. The highest saturated fatty acids value was 81.6% (p/p when microalga Spirulina sp. was cultived with 18% CO2 and 16.8 g.L-1 sodium bicarbonate.

  16. The culture of Chlorella vulgaris with human urine in multibiological life support system experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Liu, Hong; Tong, Ling; Fu, Yuming; He, Wenting; Hu, Enzhu; Hu, Dawei

    The Integrative Experimental System (IES) was established as a tool to evaluate the rela-tionship of the subsystems in Bioregenerative Life Support System, and Multibiological Life Support System Experiments (MLSSE) have been conducted in the IES. The IES consists of a higher plant chamber, an animal chamber and a plate photo bioreactor (PPB) which cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), silkworm (Bombyx Mori L.) and microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris), respectively. In MLSSE, four volunteers took turns breathing the system air through a tube connected with the animal chamber periodically. According to the CO2 concentration in the IES, the automotive control system of the PPB changed the light intensity regulating the photosynthesis of Chlorella vulgaris to make CO2 /O2 in the system maintain at stable levels. Chlorella vulgaris grew with human urine by carrying certain amount of alga liquid out of the bioreactor every day with synthetic urine replenished into the system, and O2 was regenerated, at the same time human urine was purified. Results showed that this IES worked stably and Chlorella vulgaris grew well; The culture of Chlorella vulgaris could be used to keep the balance of CO2 and O2 , and the change of light intensity could control the gas composition in the IES; Microalgae culture could be used in emergency in the system, the culture of Chlorella vulgaris could recover to original state in 5 days; 15.6 ml of condensation water was obtained every day by the culture of Chlorella vulgaris; The removal efficiencies of N, P in human urine could reach to 98.2% and 99.5%.

  17. Hubungan Kemelimpahan Chlorella sp Dengan Kualitas Lingkungan Perairan Pada Skala Semi Masal di BBBPBAP Jepara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siska Aprilliyanti

    2016-10-01

      ABSTRACT Chlorella sp is one of the microalgae are often cultivated for various purposes such as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, or for alternative biodiesel Chlorella sp an agent of bioremediation good, but can live in a polluted environment can also wear a heavy metal as the metal essential for metabolism. The many benefits that will be taken if it can develop Chlorella sp on a mass scale. With the emergence of Chlorella sp author conducted research using Chlorella sp as its object. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the abundance of Chlorella sp with the quality of the water environment in the district of Jepara.Chlorella sp is cultivated outdoors with a light source coming from direct sunlight, aeration for mixing media using a blower that flowed through the hose and faucet aeration to mix media. Aeration used in this study with the aim of Chlorella sp cells can obtain nutrients evenly in cultivation media for their water circulation in the culture vessel (Amini, 2006. From the analysis of data obtained by the coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.995. This illustrates that there is a very strong relationship between the independent variables namely the five parameters of water quality (nitrates, phosphates, temperature, pH and salinity with the dependent variable abundance of Chlorella sp. Furthermore, multiple linear regression equation as follows: Y = -5323.54 -16.80 -60.78 nitrate phosphate + 111.09 + temperature; 997.26 -191.92 pH salinity. From the regression equation shows that the water quality parameters that have a unidirectional relationship (proportional is temperature and pH. While water quality parameters which have an inverse relationship, namely; nitrate, phosphate and salinity. Chlorella sp abundance relationships with water environmental quality semi massive scale strong, the results of the regression analysis obtained Adjusted R2 value of 0.995, meaning that the percentage contribution of variables influence

  18. Phylogenetic relationships and taxonomic position of Chlorella-like isolates from low pH environments (pH < 3.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto Gabriele

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about phytoplankton communities inhabiting low pH environments such as volcanic and geothermal sites or acidic waters. Only specialised organisms are able to tolerate such extreme conditions. There is, thus, low species diversity. We have characterised the previously isolated acid tolerant Chlorella-like microalgae Viridiella fridericiana and Chlorella protothecoides var. acidicola by microscopical and biomolecular methods in order to assess their phylogenetic relationships. Results Both isolates belong to the trebouxiophycean lineage of chlorophytes. 18S and ITS1 sequence data clearly confirm that Viridiella fridericiana constitutes a new genus apart from the morphologically similar and likewise acid tolerant microalga Chlorella saccharophila. Chlorella protothecoides var. acidicola on the other hand is not a variety of Chlorella protothecoides but falls within a heterogeneous cluster consisting of Nannochloris, "Chlorella" spec. Yanaqocha, and Koliella, and is most closely related to algae which were also isolated from extreme environments. Conclusions The distribution of acid tolerant strains in the 18S rRNA tree shows that acquisition of acid tolerance was unlikely a monophyletic event in green microalgae. We propose that different strains have independently adapted to extreme environments. Some of them have spread worldwide and were able to colonise other extreme habitats. Considering the problems of successfully isolating acid tolerant strains, acidic soils could represent an unsuspected source of biological diversity with high potential for biotechnological utilisations.

  19. Catalytic and Non-catalytic Supercritical Water Gasification of Microalgae and Glycerol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakinala, Anand G.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present the gasification of microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) and glycerol in supercritical water (SCW) using batch (quartz capillaries) and continuous flow reactors. Preliminary tests of algae gasification were done with quartz capillaries at varying operating conditions such as

  20. Use of Solid Waste from Thermoelectric Plants for the Cultivation of Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna da Silva Vaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of solid waste on the cultivation of the microalgae Spirulina sp. LEB 18 and Chlorella fusca LEB 111 with 0, 40, 80 and 120 ppm of mineral coal ash. The addition of the ash did not inhibit the cultivation of microalgae at the tested concentrations, showing that it could be used for the cultivation of these microalgae due to the minerals present in the ash, which might substitute the nutrients needed for their growth.

  1. Development of a biosensor for environmental monitoring based on microalgae immobilized in silica hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Yannis; Perullini, Mercedes; Jobbagy, Matias; Bilmes, Sara A; Durrieu, Claude

    2012-12-06

    A new biosensor was designed for the assessment of aquatic environment quality. Three microalgae were used as toxicity bioindicators: Chlorella vulgaris, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. These microalgae were immobilized in alginate and silica hydrogels in a two step procedure. After studying the growth rate of entrapped cells, chlorophyll fluorescence was measured after exposure to (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) (DCMU) and various concentrations of the common herbicide atrazine. Microalgae are very sensitive to herbicides and detection of fluorescence enhancement with very good efficiency was realized. The best detection limit was 0.1 µM, obtained with the strain C. reinhardtii after 40 minutes of exposure.

  2. Biodiesel production in crude oil contaminated environment using Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xaaldi Kalhor, Aadel; Mohammadi Nassab, Adel Dabbagh; Abedi, Ehsan; Bahrami, Ahmad; Movafeghi, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Biodiesel is a valuable alternative to fossil fuels and many countries choose biodiesel as an unconventional energy source. A large number of investigations have been done on microalgae as a source of oil production. In recent years, wastewater pollutions have caused many ecological problems, and therefore, wastewater phycoremediation has attracted the international attention. This paper studied the cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris in a crude oil polluted environment for biodiesel production. Intended concentrations were 10 and 20gperliter (crude oil/water) at two times. The results showed that the growth of C. vulgaris was improved in wastewater and the maximum amount of dry mass and oil was produced at the highest concentration of crude oil (0.41g and 0.15g/l, respectively). In addition, dry mass and oil yield of the microalga were significantly enhanced by increasing the experiment duration.

  3. Fatty acid profiling and molecular characterization of some freshwater microalgae from India with potential for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simrat; Sarkar, Manas; Srivastava, Ravi B; Gogoi, Hemanta K; Kalita, Mohan C

    2012-02-15

    We determined the fatty acid compositions of six species of freshwater microalgae belonging to the Chlorophyta, which were isolated from freshwater bodies in Assam, India. All six microalgae -Desmodesmus sp. DRLMA7, Desmodesmus elegans DRLMA13, Scenedesmus sp. DRLMA5, Scenedesmus sp. DRLMA9 Chlorella sp. DRLMA3 and Chlorococcum macrostigmatum DRLMA12-showed similar fatty acid profiles 16:0, 16:4, 18:1, 18:2, and 18:3 as major components. We also compared fatty acid compositions during the late exponential and stationary growth phases of D. elegans DRLMA13 and Scenedesmus sp. DRLMA9 in BG11 medium. We observed enhanced percentages of total saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids with a concomitant decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acid content upon the prolonged cultivation of both microalgae. Distinct morphological features of microalgal isolates were determined by scanning electron microscopic (SEM) studies. An ornamented cell wall was found in D. elegans DRLMA13, which is characteristic of small spineless species of Desmodesmus. The isolated microalgae were further distinguished through analysis of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) secondary structures and compensatory base changes (CBCs). Analysis of CBCs showed the relatedness of Chlorella sp. DRLMA3 with other Chlorella-like organisms, but it does not belong to the clade comprising Chlorella sensu stricto, which includes Chlorella vulgaris. The CBC count between Scenedesmus sp. DRLMA9 and other species of Scenedesmus provides evidence that this isolate represents a new species.

  4. The isolation and screening of microalgae for the production of oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilović Bojana R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The biodiesel production has gained increasing attention of the researches in recent years. Current commercial biodiesel production involves transesterification of oil derived from oil crops. Since this production is no more sustainable, the use of microalgae represents a good alternative. Microalgae have high growth rate, high oil content and can be cultured in the environment which are not suitable for agriculture. Additionally, microalgae cultivation improves the reduction of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Selection of microalgae for oil production must take into consider certain criteria which include growth rate, oil content, fatty acids profile and ease of separation. In order to analyze the possibility of the use of microalgae for the production of oil, isolation of freshwater microalgae was performed. The isolation was done by the use of traditional techniques from freshwaters near Leskovac. A total number of 6 microalgae strains were isolated and identified as the representatives of the genera Chlorococcum (1 isolate, Chlorella (1 isolate, Scenedesmus (1 isolate and Desmodesmus (3 isolates. Isolates of microalgae were screened for the growth rate, biomass and oil productivity and oil content. The highest content of biomass was 1.5 g/l and it was observed in the strains Chlorococcum sp. and Desmodesmus sp. 1. The highest value of specific growth rate was calculated during the growth of microalgae Chlorella sp., Scenedesmus sp. and Desmodesmus sp.1, while the lowest value was observed for Chlorococcum sp. Oil productivity was the highest for Chlorella sp. and Desmodesmus sp.1 (0,4 g/l and the lowest for Desmodesmus sp.2, Desmodesmus sp.3 and Chlorococcum sp. (0,2 g/l. The oil content was in the range from 15.8% (Chlorococcum sp. to 33% (Chlorella sp. Since the microalgae isolates Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp. had the highest oil productivity, high growth rate and high oil content, these strains are the most suitable for further

  5. Fatty Acid Content of Indonesian Aquatic Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TRI PRARTONO

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available High utilization of fossil fuel increases the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and results in global warming phenomenon. These things establish the world’s thought to look for the other alternative energy that can reduce the use of fossil fuel even to be replaced by the substitute. Recently, Indonesia has been doing the research of microalgae as a feedstock of an alternative biofuel. Fatty acid content that microalgae have is also high to produce biofuel. The steps used in this research is a 7 days cultivation, harvesting, extraction using hexane, and fatty acid identification using Gas Chromatography of microalgae species. Fatty acid component in some species such as Chlorella sp., Scenedesmus sp., Nannochloropsis sp., and Isochrysis sp. is between 0.21-29.5%; 0.11-25.16%; 0.30-42.32%; 2.06-37.63%, respectively, based on dry weight calculation. The high content of fatty acid in some species of microalgae showed the potential to be the feedstock of producing biofuel in overcoming the limited utilization from petroleum (fossil fuel presently.

  6. Widespread green algae Chlorella and Stichococcus exhibit polar-temperate and tropical-temperate biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodač, Ladislav; Hallmann, Christine; Spitzer, Karolin; Elster, Josef; Faßhauer, Fabian; Brinkmann, Nicole; Lepka, Daniela; Diwan, Vaibhav; Friedl, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Chlorella and Stichococcus are morphologically simple airborne microalgae, omnipresent in terrestrial and aquatic habitats. The minute cell size and resistance against environmental stress facilitate their long-distance dispersal. However, the actual distribution of Chlorella- and Stichococcus-like species has so far been inferred only from ambiguous morphology-based evidence. Here we contribute a phylogenetic analysis of an expanded SSU and ITS2 rDNA sequence dataset representing Chlorella- and Stichococcus-like species from terrestrial habitats of polar, temperate and tropical regions. We aim to uncover biogeographical patterns at low taxonomic levels. We found that psychrotolerant strains of Chlorella and Stichococcus are closely related with strains originating from the temperate zone. Species closely related to Chlorella vulgaris and Muriella terrestris, and recovered from extreme terrestrial environments of polar regions and hot deserts, are particularly widespread. Stichococcus strains from the temperate zone, with their closest relatives in the tropics, differ from strains with the closest relatives being from the polar regions. Our data suggest that terrestrial Chlorella and Stichococcus might be capable of intercontinental dispersal; however, their actual distributions exhibit biogeographical patterns.

  7. Microalgae population dynamics in photobioreactors with secondary sewage effluent as culture medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchello, Adriano E.; Lombardi, Ana T.; Dellamano-Oliveira, Maria José; de Souza, Clovis W.O.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorus present in sewage can be used for microalgae growth, possibiliting cost reduction in the production of microalgae at the same time that it decreases the eutrophication potential of the effluent. This research aimed at monitoring the native community of microalgae and coliform bacteria in a secondary effluent from anaerobic municipal sewage treatment. Two treatments (aerated and non-aerated) were performed to grow microalgae under semi-controlled conditions in semi-closed photobioreactors in a greenhouse. The results showed no significant pH and coliforms (total and Escherichia coli ) variation between treatments. Nutrient concentrations were reduced supporting microalgae growth up to 10 7 cells.mL −1 independent of aeration. Exponential growth was obtained from the first day for the non-aerated, but a 5 day lag phase of growth was obtained for the aerated. Chlorella vulgaris was the dominant microalgae (99.9%) in both treatments. In the aerated, 5 algae classes were detected (Chlorophyceae, Cyanophyceae, Chrysophyceae, Bacillariophyceae and Euglenophyceae), with 12 taxa, whereas in the non-aerated, 2 classes were identified (Chlorophyceae and Cyanophyceae), with 5 taxa. We concluded that effluent is viable for microalgae growth, especially Chlorella vulgaris, at the same time that the eutrophication potential and coliforms are decreased, contributing for better quality of the final effluent. PMID:26221091

  8. Microalgae population dynamics in photobioreactors with secondary sewage effluent as culture medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano E. Marchello

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen and phosphorus present in sewage can be used for microalgae growth, possibiliting cost reduction in the production of microalgae at the same time that it decreases the eutrophication potential of the effluent. This research aimed at monitoring the native community of microalgae and coliform bacteria in a secondary effluent from anaerobic municipal sewage treatment. Two treatments (aerated and non-aerated were performed to grow microalgae under semi-controlled conditions in semi-closed photobioreactors in a greenhouse. The results showed no significant pH and coliforms (total and Escherichia coli variation between treatments. Nutrient concentrations were reduced supporting microalgae growth up to 107 cells.mL−1independent of aeration. Exponential growth was obtained from the first day for the non-aerated, but a 5 day lag phase of growth was obtained for the aerated. Chlorella vulgaris was the dominant microalgae (99.9% in both treatments. In the aerated, 5 algae classes were detected (Chlorophyceae, Cyanophyceae, Chrysophyceae, Bacillariophyceae and Euglenophyceae, with 12 taxa, whereas in the non-aerated, 2 classes were identified (Chlorophyceae and Cyanophyceae, with 5 taxa. We concluded that effluent is viable for microalgae growth, especially Chlorella vulgaris, at the same time that the eutrophication potential and coliforms are decreased, contributing for better quality of the final effluent.

  9. Microalgae population dynamics in photobioreactors with secondary sewage effluent as culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchello, Adriano E; Lombardi, Ana T; Dellamano-Oliveira, Maria José; de Souza, Clovis W O

    2015-03-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorus present in sewage can be used for microalgae growth, possibiliting cost reduction in the production of microalgae at the same time that it decreases the eutrophication potential of the effluent. This research aimed at monitoring the native community of microalgae and coliform bacteria in a secondary effluent from anaerobic municipal sewage treatment. Two treatments (aerated and non-aerated) were performed to grow microalgae under semi-controlled conditions in semi-closed photobioreactors in a greenhouse. The results showed no significant pH and coliforms (total and Escherichia coli ) variation between treatments. Nutrient concentrations were reduced supporting microalgae growth up to 10 (7) cells.mL (-1) independent of aeration. Exponential growth was obtained from the first day for the non-aerated, but a 5 day lag phase of growth was obtained for the aerated. Chlorella vulgaris was the dominant microalgae (99.9%) in both treatments. In the aerated, 5 algae classes were detected (Chlorophyceae, Cyanophyceae, Chrysophyceae, Bacillariophyceae and Euglenophyceae), with 12 taxa, whereas in the non-aerated, 2 classes were identified (Chlorophyceae and Cyanophyceae), with 5 taxa. We concluded that effluent is viable for microalgae growth, especially Chlorella vulgaris, at the same time that the eutrophication potential and coliforms are decreased, contributing for better quality of the final effluent.

  10. Bioremediation of the textile waste effluent by Chlorella vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Yassin El-Kassas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microalgae biomass production from textile waste effluent is a possible solution for the environmental impact generated by the effluent discharge into water sources. The potential application of Chlorella vulgaris for bioremediation of textile waste effluent (WE was investigated using 22 Central Composite Design (CCD. This work addresses the adaptation of the microalgae C. vulgaris in textile waste effluent (WE and the study of the best dilution of the WE for maximum biomass production and for the removal of colour and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD by this microalga. The cultivation of C. vulgaris, presented maximum cellular concentrations Cmax and maximum specific growth rates μmax in the wastewater concentration of 5.0% and 17.5%, respectively. The highest colour and COD removals occurred with 17.5% of textile waste effluent. The results of C. vulgaris culture in the textile waste effluent demonstrated the possibility of using this microalga for the colour and COD removal and for biomass production. There was a significant negative relationship between textile waste effluent concentration and Cmax at 0.05 level of significance. However, sodium bicarbonate concentration did not significantly influence the responses of Cmax and the removal of colour and COD.

  11. Photoautotrophic Microalgae Screening for Tertiary Treatment of Livestock Wastewater and Bioresource Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yeon Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Photoautotrophic microalgae offer high promise for a tertiary treatment of livestock wastewater owing to their rapid growth and nutrient uptake. To screen better microalga for the tertiary treatment, batch photobioreactor tests were conducted using Chlorella emersonii, Chlorella sorokiniana, and Botryococcus braunii. This study evaluated their specific growth rates, CO2 utilization rates, and nutrient removal rates to provide appropriate selection guidelines. Based on statistical comparisons, results indicate that selecting the right microalgae was the key to success in the tertiary treatment since each microalga responded differently, even under the same light, temperature, and nutrient conditions. Among the tested species, Chlorella emersonii was found to present the fastest photoautotrophic growth, total inorganic carbon (TIC utilization, and nutrient removal for livestock wastewater treatment. Regression results identified that its specific growth and total nitrogen removal rates were as high as 0.51 day−1 and 0.18 day−1, respectively. Estimated TIC utilization over the supplied TIC was much higher (~34% than those of others (11%–18%. This systemic evaluation of rate-limiting factors provides a quantitative understanding of the kinetic-based selection strategy of microalgae to polish livestock wastewater with better effluent quality.

  12. Potential yields and properties of oil from the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae with different biochemical content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, P; Ross, A B

    2011-01-01

    A range of model biochemical components, microalgae and cyanobacteria with different biochemical contents have been liquefied under hydrothermal conditions at 350 °C, ∼200 bar in water, 1M Na(2)CO(3) and 1M formic acid. The model compounds include albumin and a soya protein, starch and glucose, the triglyceride from sunflower oil and two amino acids. Microalgae include Chlorella vulgaris,Nannochloropsis occulata and Porphyridium cruentum and the cyanobacteria Spirulina. The yields and product distribution obtained for each model compound have been used to predict the behaviour of microalgae with different biochemical composition and have been validated using microalgae and cyanobacteria. Broad agreement is reached between predictive yields and actual yields for the microalgae based on their biochemical composition. The yields of bio-crude are 5-25 wt.% higher than the lipid content of the algae depending upon biochemical composition. The yields of bio-crude follow the trend lipids>proteins>carbohydrates.

  13. Flocculation properties of several microalgae and a cyanobacterium species during ferric chloride, chitosan and alkaline flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Sanjaya; Muylaert, Koenraad; Karki, Tika Bahadur; Foubert, Imogen; Henderson, Rita K; Vandamme, Dries

    2016-11-01

    Flocculation holds great potential as a low-cost harvesting method for microalgae biomass production. Three flocculation methods (ferric chloride, chitosan, and alkaline flocculation) were compared in this study for the harvesting of 9 different freshwater and marine microalgae and one cyanobacterium species. Ferric chloride resulted in a separation efficiency greater than 90% with a concentration factor (CF) higher than 10 for all species. Chitosan flocculation worked generally very well for freshwater microalgae, but not for marine species. Alkaline flocculation was most efficient for harvesting of Nannochloropsis, Chlamydomonas and Chlorella sp. The concentration factor was highly variable between microalgae species. Generally, minimum flocculant dosages were highly variable across species, which shows that flocculation may be a good harvesting method for some species but not for others. This study shows that microalgae and cyanobacteria species should not be selected solely based on their productivity but also on their potential for low-cost separation.

  14. Influence of organic matter generated by Chlorella vulgaris on five different modes of flocculation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae excrete relatively large amounts of algal organic matter (AOM) that may interfere with flocculation. The influence of AOM on flocculation of Chlorella vulgaris was studied using five different flocculation methods: aluminum sulfate, chitosan, cationic starch, pH-induced flocculation and electro-coagulation–flocculation (ECF). The presence of AOM was found to inhibit flocculation for all flocculation methods resulting in an increase of dosage demand. For pH-induced flocc...

  15. Comparison of different artificial neural network architectures in modeling of Chlorella sp. flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenooz, Alireza Moosavi; Ashtiani, Farzin Zokaee; Ranjbar, Reza; Nikbakht, Fatemeh; Bolouri, Oberon

    2017-07-03

    Biodiesel production from microalgae feedstock should be performed after growth and harvesting of the cells, and the most feasible method for harvesting and dewatering of microalgae is flocculation. Flocculation modeling can be used for evaluation and prediction of its performance under different affective parameters. However, the modeling of flocculation in microalgae is not simple and has not performed yet, under all experimental conditions, mostly due to different behaviors of microalgae cells during the process under different flocculation conditions. In the current study, the modeling of microalgae flocculation is studied with different neural network architectures. Microalgae species, Chlorella sp., was flocculated with ferric chloride under different conditions and then the experimental data modeled using artificial neural network. Neural network architectures of multilayer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function architectures, failed to predict the targets successfully, though, modeling was effective with ensemble architecture of MLP networks. Comparison between the performances of the ensemble and each individual network explains the ability of the ensemble architecture in microalgae flocculation modeling.

  16. Treatment of drainage solution from hydroponic greenhouse production with microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultberg, Malin; Carlsson, Anders S; Gustafsson, Susanne

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated treatment of the drainage solution from greenhouse production with microalgae, through inoculation with Chlorella vulgaris or through growth of the indigenous microalgal community. A significant reduction in nitrogen, between 34.7 and 73.7 mg L(-1), and particularly in phosphorus concentration, between 15.4 and 15.9 mg L(-1), was observed in drainage solution collected from commercial greenhouse production. The large reduction in nutrients was achieved through growth of the indigenous microalgal community i.e., without pre-treatment of the drainage solution or inoculation with the fast growing green microalgae C. vulgaris. Analysis of the fatty acid composition of the algal biomass revealed that compared with a standard growth medium for green algae, the drainage solution was inferior for lipid production. Despite the biorefinery concept being less promising, microalgae-based treatment of drainage solution from greenhouse production is still of interest considering the urgent need for phosphorus recycling.

  17. Inhibitory effects of silver nanoparticles in two green algae, Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukarroum, Abdallah; Bras, Sébastien; Perreault, François; Popovic, Radovan

    2012-04-01

    Freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris and marine microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta were used to investigate toxic effects induced by 50 nm silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). To induce AgNPs effect, we exposed Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta for 24h to 0-10 mg/L. We showed that growth media had different effects in AgNPs agglomerates' formation. Cellular viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipids peroxidation were employed to assess the toxic effects of AgNPs. AgNPs were able to interact directly with the Chlorella vulgaris cells surface and large aggregates were observed. AgNPs have a negative effect on Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta, as manifested by a strong decrease in chlorophyll content, viable algal cells, increased ROS formation and lipids peroxidation. The variability in sensitivity of both algae towards AgNPs was observed. We conclude that AgNPs have a negative effect on aquatic algae and these alterations might have serious consequences on structure and function of aquatic plant communities.

  18. Biomass and biofuels from microalgae advances in engineering and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Moheimani, Navid Reza; de Boer, Karne; Bahri, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive book details the most recent advances in the microalgae biological sciences and engineering technologies for biomass and biofuel production in order to meet the ongoing need for new and affordable sources of food, chemicals and energy for future generations. The chapters explore new microalgae cultivation techniques, including solid (biofilm) systems, and heterotrophic production methods, while also critically investigating topics such as combining wastewater as a source of nutrients, the effect of CO2 on growth, and converting biomass to methane through anaerobi

  19. THE FEATURES OF BIOCHEMICAL INDICES OF STRAIN CHLORELLA VULGARIS IGF № С-111, GROWN IN CLOSED SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The article provides optimal concentrations of macro-and micronutrients nutrient medium for microalgae strain SPT S-111 grown as a feed additive for cattle. Utilization of proposed components in the denoted quantity allows getting suspension of chlorella with concentration of 67.2 million cells/ml on the third day of cultivation in the bioreactor gated. It is shown that chlorella grown on our nutritional medium contains is 43.7% of protein, more than 7% of mineral substances, Ca-0.3%, F-0.9%,...

  20. Fate of H2S during the cultivation of Chlorella sp. deployed for biogas upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sánchez, Armando; Posten, Clemens

    2017-04-15

    The H2S may play a key role in the sulfur cycle among the biogas production by the anaerobic digestion of wastes and the biogas upgrading by a microalgae based technology. The biogas is upgraded by contacting with slightly alkaline aqueous microalgae culture, then CO2 and H2S are absorbed. The dissolved H2S could limit or inhibit the microalgae growth. This paper evaluated the role of dissolved H2S and other sulfured byproducts under prevailing biogas upgrading conditions using a microalgal technology. At initial stages of batch cultivation the growth of Chlorella sp. was presumably inhibited by dissolved H2S. After 2 days, the sulfides were oxidized mainly by oxic chemical reactions to sulfate, which was later rapidly assimilated by Chlorella sp., allowing high growing rates. The fate of H2S during the microalgae cultivation at pH > 8.5 was assessed by a mathematical model where the pentasulfide, thiosulfate and sulfite were firstly produced and converted finally to sulfate for posterior assimilation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Effect of magnesium deficiency on photosynthetic physiology and triacylglyceride (TAG) accumulation of Chlorella vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Wei, Chang-Long; Yu, Shui-Yan; Shi, Ji-Ping; Zhang, Bao-Guo

    2014-04-01

    As an excellent biological resource, Chlorella has wide applications for production of biofuel, bioactive substances and water environment restoration. Therefore, it is very important to understand the photosynthetic physiology characteristics of Chlorella. Magnesium ions play an important role in the growth of microalgae, not only the central atom of chlorophyll, but also the cofactor of some key enzyme in the metabolic pathway. A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the effects of magnesium deficiency on several photosynthetic and physiological parameters and the triacylglyceride (TAG) accumulation of the green alga, Chlorella vulgaris, in the photoautotrophic culture process. Chlorella vulgaris biomass, protein, chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b contents decreased by 20%, 43.96%, 27.52% and 28.07% in response to magnesium deficiency, while the total oil content increased by 19.60%. Moreover, magnesium deficiency decreased the maximal photochemical efficiency F(v)/F(m) by 22.54%, but increased the non-photochemical quenching parameters qN. Our results indicated the decline of chlorophyll caused by magnesium, which affected the photosynthesis efficiency, lead to the growth inhibition of Chlorella vulgaris and affected the protein synthesis and increased the triacylglyceride (TAG) accumulation.

  2. Enhancement of Protein and Pigment Content in Two Chlorella Species Cultivated on Industrial Process Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Safafar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Chlorella vulgaris were cultivated in pre-gasified industrial process water with high concentration of ammonia representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of growth media and cultivation duration on the nutritional composition of biomass. Variations in proteins, lipid, fatty acid composition, amino acids, tocopherols, and pigments were studied. Both species grew well in industrial process water. The contents of proteins were affected significantly by the growth media and cultivation duration. Microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa produced the highest concentrations of protein (65.2% ± 1.30% DW while Chlorella vulgaris accumulated extremely high concentrations of lutein and chlorophylls (7.14 ± 0.66 mg/g DW and 32.4 ± 1.77 mg/g DW, respectively. Cultivation of Chlorella species in industrial process water is an environmentally friendly, sustainable bioremediation method with added value biomass production and resource valorization, since the resulting biomass also presented a good source of proteins, amino acids, and carotenoids for potential use in aquaculture feed industry.

  3. [Identification of Microalgae Species Using Visible/Near Infrared Transmission Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-yan; Shao, Yong-ni; Jiang, Lu-lu; Guo, An-que; Pan, Jian; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    At present, the identification and classification of the microalgae and its biochemical analysis have become one of the hot spots on marine biology research. Four microalgae species, including Chlorella vulgaris, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Nannochloropsis oculata, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, were chosen as the experimental materials. Using an established spectral acquisition system, which consists of a portable USB 4000 spectrometer having transmitting and receiving fiber bundles connected by a fiber optic probe, a halogen light source, and a computer, the Vis/NIR transmission spectral data of 120 different samples of the microalgae with different concentration gradients were collected, and the spectral curves of fourmicroalgae species were pre-processed by different pre-treatment methods (baseline filtering, convolution smoothing, etc. ). Based on the pre-treated effects, SPA was applied to select effective wavelengths (EWs), and the selected EWs were introduced as inputs to develop and compare PLS, Least Square Support Vector Machines (LS-SVM), Extreme Learning Machine (ELM)models, so as to explore the feasibility of using Vis/NIR transmission spectroscopy technology for the rapid identification of four microalgae species in situ. The results showed that: the effect of Savitzky-Golay smoothing was much better than the other pre-treatment methods. Six EWs selected in the spectraby SPA were possibly relevant to the content of carotenoids, chlorophyll in the microalgae. Moreover, the SPA-PLS model obtained better performance than the Full-Spectral-PLS model. The average prediction accuracy of three methods including SPA-LV-SVM, SPA-ELM, and SPA-PLS were 80%, 85% and 65%. The established method in this study may identify four microalgae species effectively, which provides a new way for the identification and classification of the microalgae species. The methodology using Vis/NIR spectroscopy with a portable optic probe would be applicable to a diverse range of microalgae

  4. Ammonia tolerant inocula provide a good base for anaerobic digestion of microalgae in third generation biogas process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahdy, Ahmed; Fotidis, Ioannis; Mancini, Enrico;

    2016-01-01

    ) of five different algae (Chlorella vulgaris)/manure (cattle) mixtures showed that the mixture of 80/20 (on VS basis) resulted in the highest BMP value (431 mL CH4 g VS-1), while the BMP of microalgae alone (100/0) was 415 mL CH4 g VS-1. Subsequently, anaerobic digestion of those two substrates was tested...

  5. OPTIMIZATION OF CELL DISRUPTION IN RAPHIDOCELIS SUBCAPITATA AND CHLORELLA VULGARIS FOR BIOMARKER EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeolu Aderemi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Raphidocelis subcapitata and Chlorella vulgaris are bioassay microalgae with rigid cellulosic cell wall which can hinder the release of intracellular proteins often studied as toxicity biomarkers. Since cell disruption is necessary for recovering intracellular biomolecules in these organisms, this study investigated the efficiency of ultrasonication bath; ultrasonication probe; vortexer; and bead mill in disintegrating the microalgae for anti-oxidative enzyme extraction. The extent of cell disruption was evaluated and quantified using bright field microscopy. Disrupted algae appeared as ghosts. The greatest disintegration of the microalgae (83-99.6 % was achieved using bead mill with 0.42-0.6 mm glass beads while the other methods induced little or no disruption. The degree of cell disruption using bead mill increased with exposure time, beads-solution ratio and agitation speed while larger beads caused less disruption. Findings revealed that bead milling, with specific parameters optimized, is one of the most effective methods of disintegrating the robust algal cells.

  6. Anisotropic transport of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris in microfluidic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzati Ishak, Nur; Muniandy, S. V.; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Ng, Fong-Lee; Phang, Siew-Moi

    2017-08-01

    Not Available Project supported by the Science Fund from the Ministry of Higher Education of Malaysia under the Fundamental Research Grant Scheme (Grant No. FRGS: FP057-2014A) and the Fund from the University of Malaya Research Grant (Grant No. UMRG: RP020A-14AFR).

  7. Use of orange peel extract for mixotrophic cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris: increased production of biomass and FAMEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Kun; Moon, Myounghoon; Kwak, Min-Su; Jeon, Seungjib; Choi, Gang-Guk; Yang, Ji-Won; Lee, Bongsoo

    2014-11-01

    Mass cultivation of microalgae is necessary to achieve economically feasible production of microalgal biodiesel, but the high cost of nutrients is a major limitation. In this study, orange peel extract (OPE) was used as an inorganic and organic nutrient source for the cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris OW-01. Chemical composition analysis of the OPE indicated that it contains sufficient nutrients for mixotrophic cultivation of C. vulgaris OW-01. Analysis of biomass and FAME production showed that microalgae grown in OPE medium produced 3.4-times more biomass and 4.5-times more fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) than cells cultured in glucose-supplemented BG 11 medium (BG-G). These results suggest that growth of microalgae in an OPE-supplemented medium increases lipid production and that OPE has potential for use in the mass cultivation of microalgae.

  8. Bioremediation of wastewater using microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalivendra, Saikumar

    Population expansion and industrial development has deteriorated the quality of freshwater reservoirs around the world and has caused freshwater shortages in certain areas. Discharge of industrial effluents containing toxic heavy metals such as Cd and Cr into the environment have serious impact on human, animal and aquatic life. In order to solve these problems, the present study was focused on evaluating and demonstrating potential of microalgae for bioremediation of wastewater laden with nitrogen (N) in the form of nitrates, phosphorous (P) in the form of phosphates, chromium (Cr (VI)) and cadmium (Cd (II)). After screening several microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris and algae taken from Pleasant Hill Lake were chosen as candidate species for this study. The viability of the process was demonstrated in laboratory bioreactors and various experimental parameters such as contact time, initial metal concentration, algae concentration, pH and temperature that would affect remediation rates were studied. Based on the experimental results, correlations were developed to enable customizing and designing a commercial Algae based Wastewater Treatment System (AWTS). A commercial AWTS system that can be easily customized and is suitable for integration into existing wastewater treatment facilities was developed, and capital cost estimates for system including installation and annual operating costs were determined. The work concludes that algal bioremediation is a viable alternate technology for treating wastewater in an economical and sustainable way when compared to conventional treatment processes. The annual wastewater treatment cost to remove N,P is ~26x lower and to remove Cr, Cd is 7x lower than conventional treatment processes. The cost benefit analysis performed shows that if this technology is implemented at industrial complexes, Air Force freight and other Department of Defense installations with wastewater treatment plants, it could lead to millions of dollars in

  9. Photon up-conversion increases biomass yield in Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Kavya R; Jose, Steffi; Suraishkumar, Gadi K

    2014-12-01

    Photon up-conversion, a process whereby lower energy radiations are converted to higher energy levels via the use of appropriate phosphor systems, was employed as a novel strategy for improving microalgal growth and lipid productivity. Photon up-conversion enables the utilization of regions of the solar spectrum, beyond the typical photosynthetically active radiation, that are usually wasted or are damaging to the algae. The effects of up-conversion of red light by two distinct sets of up-conversion phosphors were studied in the model microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. Up-conversion by set 1 phosphors led to a 2.85 fold increase in biomass concentration and a 3.2 fold increase in specific growth rate of the microalgae. While up-conversion by set 2 phosphors resulted in a 30% increase in biomass and 12% increase in specific intracellular neutral lipid, while the specific growth rates were comparable to that of the control. Furthermore, up-conversion resulted in higher levels of specific intracellular reactive oxygen species in C. vulgaris. Up-conversion of red light (654 nm) was shown to improve biomass yields in C. vulgaris. In principle, up-conversion can be used to increase the utilization range of the electromagnetic spectrum for improved cultivation of photosynthetic systems such as plants, algae, and microalgae.

  10. Microalgae consortia cultivation in dairy wastewater to improve the potential of nutrient removal and biodiesel feedstock production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lei; Wang, Zhongming; Sun, Yongming; Shu, Qing; Feng, Pingzhong; Zhu, Liandong; Xu, Jin; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2016-05-01

    The potential of microalgae consortia used in dairy wastewater treatment combined with microalgae biodiesel feedstock production was evaluated by comparing the nutrient removal of dairy wastewater, the growth of cells, and the lipid content and composition of biomass between monoalgae and microalgae consortia cultivation system. Our results showed that higher chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal (maximum, 57.01-62.86 %) and total phosphorus (TP) removal (maximum, 91.16-95.96 %) were achieved in almost microalgae consortia cultivation system than those in Chlorella sp. monoalgae cultivation system (maximum, 44.76 and 86.74 %, respectively). In addition, microalgae consortia cultivation except the mixture of Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus spp. reached higher biomass concentration (5.11-5.41 g L(-1)), biomass productivity (730.4-773.2 mg L(-1) day(-1)), and lipid productivity (143.7-150.6 mg L(-1) day(-1)) than those of monoalgae cultivation (4.72 g L(-1), 674.3, and 142.2 mg L(-1) day(-1), respectively) on the seventh day. Furthermore, the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles indicated the lipids produced from microalgae consortia cultivation system were more suitable for biodiesel production. The microalgae consortia display superiority in dairy wastewater treatment and the getting feedstock for biodiesel production.

  11. THE FEATURES OF BIOCHEMICAL INDICES OF STRAIN CHLORELLA VULGARIS IGF № С-111, GROWN IN CLOSED SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Flerova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article provides optimal concentrations of macro-and micronutrients nutrient medium for microalgae strain SPT S-111 grown as a feed additive for cattle. Utilization of proposed components in the denoted quantity allows getting suspension of chlorella with concentration of 67.2 million cells/ml on the third day of cultivation in the bioreactor gated. It is shown that chlorella grown on our nutritional medium contains is 43.7% of protein, more than 7% of mineral substances, Ca-0.3%, F-0.9%, and less than 5% of fat and carbohydrates in 100 g of dry matter. In 1 g of the chlorella biomass the catalase activity is 0,13 IU/g of tissue, superoxide dismutase - 24.5 IU/g of tissue. The composition of nutrients in chlorella cells indicates that the content of protein, fat and minerals comparable high protein plant products. From the standpoint of the enzyme complex (SOD and catalase chlorella biomass higher than in other types of plants used for food and medical industries. Grown on this medium chlorella slurry may be used as an additional protein rich provender in the diets to cattle without substantial cost in comparison with synthetic protein additives.

  12. COPPER STRESS ON CELLULAR CONTENTS AND FATTY ACID PROFILES IN CHLORELLA SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sibi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher photosynthetic efficiency and biomass production with rapid growth makes microalgae as potential candidates over other energy crops in many applications. Heavy metals influence the production of secondary metabolites and lipd content of microalgae in particular. A study was conducted using six Chlorella species under heavy metal exposure to evaluate the copper stress on biomass, cellular and lipid contents. Preliminary growth studies indicated the growth tolerance levels of Chlorella in the presence of copper at 4.0 mg L-1 concentration. The total chlorophyll, protein and lipid content of the isolates were 1.7-3.45%, 0.43-0.70 mg g-1 and 0.02-0.11 mg g-1 respectively. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy analysis revealed that the percent composition of fatty acids varied among the species studied and the major group of fatty acids were C16:0, C18:1 and C18:2. Highest percent of fatty acids were found in C. vulgaris, C. protothecoides and C. pyrenoidosa. Copper have an impact on Chlorella species where biomass content was directly proportional to the lipid productivity. The results reflects the fact that copper stress on Chlorella species as the evidence of lipid production in both qualitative and quantitative manner. In conclusion, Chlorella species can be used for the sustainable producion of renewable energy through copper stress and removal of copper from aqueous solutions.

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Native Microalgae from the Peruvian Amazon with Potential for Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianela Cobos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel production from microalgae triacylglycerols is growing, because this feedstock is a more sustainable and advantageous alternative. In this study, we isolated and identified fourteen strains of native microalgae from the Peruvian Amazon. These strains showed great heterogeneity in biomass productivity, lipid productivity and lipid content, and thus, three of them (Acutodesmus obliquus, Ankistrodesmus sp. and Chlorella lewinii were selected for further evaluation under culture of nitrogen-sufficient (+N and nitrogen-deficient (−N Chu medium No. 10. These microalgae species showed modifications in biomolecule content (protein, lipid and carbohydrate with a pronounced increase of lipids and carbohydrate and a decrease of protein content under stress culture. Furthermore, the fatty acid profile was peculiar for each species, and these patterns showed evident changes, particularly in the proportion of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. The results of this research suggest that the isolated native microalgae, from the Peruvian Amazon, could be suitable candidates for biodiesel production

  14. Carbon dioxide capture and nutrients removal utilizing treated sewage by concentrated microalgae cultivation in a membrane photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ryo; Boonnorat, Jarungwit; Chiemchaisri, Chart; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2012-12-01

    A highly efficient microalgae cultivation process was developed for carbon dioxide capture using nutrients from treated sewage. A submerged-membrane filtration system was installed in a photobioreactor to achieve high nutrient loading and to maintain a high concentration and production of microalgae. Chlorella vulgaris, Botryococcus braunii and Spirulina platensis were continuously cultivated with simulated treated sewage and 1%-CO(2) gas. The optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solids retention time (SRT) were explored to achieve the maximum CO(2) capture rate, nutrient removal rate and microalgae biomass productivity. The carbon dioxide capture rate and volumetric microalgae productivity were high when the reactor was operated under 1-day (HRT) and 18-days (SRT) conditions. The independent control of HRT and SRT is effective for efficient microalgae cultivation and carbon dioxide capture using treated sewage.

  15. Effect of Lignocellulose Related Compounds on Microalgae Growth and Product Biosynthesis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystian Miazek

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae contain valuable compounds that can be harnessed for industrial applications. Lignocellulose biomass is a plant material containing in abundance organic substances such as carbohydrates, phenolics, organic acids and other secondary compounds. As growth of microalgae on organic substances was confirmed during heterotrophic and mixotrophic cultivation, lignocellulose derived compounds can become a feedstock to cultivate microalgae and produce target compounds. In this review, different treatment methods to hydrolyse lignocellulose into organic substrates are presented first. Secondly, the effect of lignocellulosic hydrolysates, organic substances typically present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as well as minor co-products, on growth and accumulation of target compounds in microalgae cultures is described. Finally, the possibilities of using lignocellulose hydrolysates as a common feedstock for microalgae cultures are evaluated.

  16. Producción de Moina sp alimentada con Chlorella spp. cultivada con riles orgánicos de la industria pesquera cubana - Production of Moina sp fed with Chlorella spp. developed in organic waste waters from Cuban fishing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero Teresita de J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl incremento importante de la acuicultura cubana y la carencia de algunos fertilizantes usados para fines de cultivo fitoplantónico, que finalmente pasan a nutrir especies zooplanctónicas como el cladócero Moina sp, ha motivado el presente estudio, referido al cultivo de dicha especie con la microalga Chlorella spp. desarrollada previamente con riles orgánicos de la industria pesquera.SummarySubstantial increase of Cuban acuiculture and deficiency of some fertilizers used for the phytoplanktonic cultures, that finally feed the zooplanktonic species like cladocera Moina, provides the possibility of conducting the current study, referred to the culture of this species with microalga Chlorella spp. previously developed in waste waters of the fishing industry.

  17. Culture modes and financial evaluation of two oleaginous microalgae for biodiesel production in desert area with open raceway pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiaoning; Yang, Haijian; Hu, Chunxiang

    2016-10-01

    Cultivation modes of autotrophic microalgae for biodiesel production utilizing open raceway pond were analyzed in this study. Five before screened good microalgae were tested their lipid productivity and biodiesel quality again in outdoor 1000L ORP. Then, Chlorella sp. L1 and Monoraphidium dybowskii Y2 were selected due to their stronger environmental adaptability, higher lipid productivity and better biodiesel properties. Further scale up cultivation for two species with batch and semi-continuous culture was conducted. In 40,000L ORP, higher lipid productivity (5.15 versus 4.06gm(-2)d(-1) for Chlorella sp. L1, 5.35 versus 3.00gm(-2)d(-1) for M. dybowskii Y2) was achieved in semi-continuous mode. Moreover, the financial costs of 14.18$gal(-1) and 13.31$gal(-1) for crude biodiesel in two microalgae with semi-continuous mode were more economically feasible for commercial production on large scale outdoors.

  18. Screening of microalgae for integral biogas slurry nutrient removal and biogas upgrading by different microalgae cultivation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Bao, Keting; Cao, Weixing; Zhao, Yongjun; Hu, Chang Wei

    2017-07-14

    The microalgae-based technology has been developed to reduce biogas slurry nutrients and upgrade biogas simultaneously. In this work, five microalgal strains named Chlorella vulgaris, Scenedesmus obliquus, Selenastrum capricornutum, Nitzschia palea, and Anabaena spiroides under mono- and co-cultivation were used for biogas upgrading. Optimum biogas slurry nutrient reduction could be achieved by co-cultivating microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris, Scenedesmus obliquus, and Nitzschia palea) with fungi using the pelletization technology. In addition, the effects of different ratio of mixed LED light wavelengths applying mixed light-emitting diode during algae strains and fungi co-cultivation on CO2 and biogas slurry nutrient removal efficiency were also investigated. The results showed that the COD (chemical oxygen demand), TN (total nitrogen), and TP (total phosphorus) removal efficiency were 85.82 ± 5.37%, 83.31 ± 4.72%, and 84.26 ± 5.58%, respectively at red: blue = 5:5 under the co-cultivation of S. obliquus and fungi. In terms of biogas upgrading, CH4 contents were higher than 90% (v/v) for all strains, except the co-cultivation with S. obliquus and fungi at red: blue = 3:7. The results indicated that co-cultivation of microalgae with fungi under mixed light wavelengths treatments was most successful in nutrient removal from wastewater and biogas upgrading.

  19. OPTIMIZACION BIOTECNOLOGICA DE UN SISTEMA PRODUCTIVO PARA EL CULTIVO MASIVO DE MICROALGAS, ORIENTADO A LA OBTENCION DE PRODUCTOS DE ALTO VALOR COMERCIAL EN EL NORTE DE CHILE

    OpenAIRE

    AVILA LAGOS, MARCELA

    2009-01-01

    Los productos derivados de microalgas (Spirulina, Chlorella, Dunalliela y Haematococcus) contienen componentes bioactivos empleados en alimentación, salud humana y animal, siendo utilizados como colorantes, antioxidantes, vitaminas, provitaminas e inmunotrazadores. Sólo el mercado mundial de nutracéuticos, asciende a más de 2 billones de US$, con un crecimiento promedio anual del 7%. En Chile, dos empresas producen microalgas (principalmente Spirulina), todas ubicadas en la zona norte. El 200...

  20. Evaluation of microalgae cell disruption by ultrasonic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerde, Jose A; Montalbo-Lomboy, Melissa; Yao, Linxing; Grewell, David; Wang, Tong

    2012-12-01

    Microalgae are a promising feedstock for biofuels because of their capability to produce lipids. Cell disruption is necessary to maximize lipid extraction. Sonication conditions were evaluated for breaking heterotrophic (Schizochytrium limacinum) and autotrophic (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) microalgae cells. Cell disruption was estimated by Nile red-lipids fluorescence quantification in S. limacinum and by the release of intracellular chlorophyll and carotenoids in green microalga C. reinhardtii. In both species, approximately 800 J/10 mL was the energy input necessary to maximize cell disruption, regardless of the cell concentrations studied. Increasing sonication time produced increasing amount of free radicals, quantified by the formation of hydroxyterephthalate. Sonication energy beyond the level needed for cell disruption induced oxidation of arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid typically found in marine lipids. Careful control of sonication conditions is necessary to maximize oil extraction at the lowest operational cost and to prevent oil from free radical-induced degradation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Acclimation of microalgae to wastewater environments involves increased oxidative stress tolerance activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osundeko, Olumayowa; Dean, Andrew P; Davies, Helena; Pittman, Jon K

    2014-10-01

    A wastewater environment can be particularly toxic to eukaryotic microalgae. Microalgae can adapt to these conditions but the specific mechanisms that allow strains to tolerate wastewater environments are unclear. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the ability to acclimate microalgae to tolerate wastewater is an innate or species-specific characteristic. Six different species of microalgae (Chlamydomonas debaryana, Chlorella luteoviridis, Chlorella vulgaris, Desmodesmus intermedius, Hindakia tetrachotoma and Parachlorella kessleri) that had never previously been exposed to wastewater conditions were acclimated over an 8-week period in secondary-treated municipal wastewater. With the exception of C. debaryana, acclimation to wastewater resulted in significantly higher growth rate and biomass productivity. With the exception of C. vulgaris, total chlorophyll content was significantly increased in all acclimated strains, while all acclimated strains showed significantly increased photosynthetic activity. The ability of strains to acclimate was species-specific, with two species, C. luteoviridis and P. kessleri, able to acclimate more efficiently to the stress than C. debaryana and D. intermedius. Metabolic fingerprinting of the acclimated and non-acclimated microalgae using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was able to differentiate strains on the basis of metabolic responses to the stress. In particular, strains exhibiting greater stress response and altered accumulation of lipids and carbohydrates could be distinguished. The acclimation to wastewater tolerance was correlated with higher accumulation of carotenoid pigments and increased ascorbate peroxidase activity.

  2. Influence of organic matter generated by Chlorella vulgaris on five different modes of flocculation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae excrete relatively large amounts of algal organic matter (AOM) that may interfere with flocculation. The influence of AOM on flocculation of Chlorella vulgaris was studied using five different flocculation methods: aluminum sulfate, chitosan, cationic starch, pH-induced flocculation and electro-coagulation-flocculation (ECF). The presence of AOM was found to inhibit flocculation for all flocculation methods resulting in an increase of dosage demand. For pH-induced flocculation, the...

  3. Removal of Nitrate and Phosphate from Municipal Wastewater Sludge by Chlorella vulgaris, Spirulina platensis and Scenedesmus quadricauda

    OpenAIRE

    Jalal K.C.A; Md Zahangir Alam; Matin W. A.; Kamaruzzaman B. Y.; Akbar J.; and Tofazzel Hossain

    2011-01-01

    Nitrate and phosphorus in wastewater contribute to health and environmental threats as they are linked to illnesses as well as ecosystem disruption via algal blooms in contaminated water bodies. Based on above perspectives a comparative study was conducted on three local freshwater microalgae:Chlorella vulgaris, Spirulina platensis and Scenedesmus quadricauda to evaluate their effects on nitrate and phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater sludge (MWS). Algae performance in removing nitra...

  4. Non-photoautotrophic cultivation of microalgae: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisangela Andrade Angelo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are a heterogeneous group of microorganisms that produces biomass from which can be extracted various products such as proteins, carbohydrates, pigments and oils with profile containing saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated. These microorganisms have different forms of energetic metabolism, especially the photoautotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic photoautotrophic. Understanding these metabolic forms allows to apply microalgae strategies of cultivation aiming to increase algal biomass production, and its co-products in large scales. Traditionally, the microalgae cultivation is done by exploiting their photoautotrophic metabolism. However, studies have point out some advantages in the production of biomass of these microorganisms by using other metabolic pathways. Thus, this review aims to present an overview of the forms of non-photoautotrophic microalgae metabolism and considerations on the different systems of biomass production of these microorganisms. In the heterotrophic metabolism, sources of carbon that have stood out the most for microalgae are: glucose, glycerol and acetic acid. Nevertheless, there are several studies that present alternative sources of culture medium, such as agro-industrial and sanitary waste. The mixotrophic can be defined as the metabolism when photosynthesis and oxidation of external organic carbon take place at the same time. In the photoherotrophic metabolism is the light energy source and the organic compound is a carbon source. The non-photoautotrophic cultivation systems are high potential, mainly for increasing production with better productivity and scaling up. However, it should be noted that information about these microalgae cultivation systems on a large scale for a competitive production is scarce.

  5. Optimization of simultaneous biomass production and nutrient removal by mixotrophic Chlorella sp. using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Ru; Chen, Jen-Jeng

    2016-01-01

    The bioprospecting of potentially mixotrophic microalgae in a constructed wetland was conducted. A locally isolated microalga, Chlorella sp., was grown to determine the effect of temperature, aeration rate, and cultivation time on simultaneous biomass production and nutrient removal from piggery wastewater using central composite design (CCD). The most important variable for the biomass productivity of Chlorella sp. was aeration rate, while that for lipid content and nutrient removal efficiency was cultivation time. Total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiencies were higher than that of chemical oxygen demand (COD) from piggery wastewater. The CCD results indicate that the highest biomass productivity (79.2 mg L(-1) d(-1)) and simultaneous nutrient removal efficiency (TN 80.9%, TP 99.2%, COD 74.5%) were obtained with a cultivation temperature of 25 °C, a cultivation time of 5 days, and an air aeration rate of 1.6 L L(-1) min(-1). Palmitic acid (C16:0) and linoleic acid (C18:2) were both abundant in Chlorella sp. cells under mixotrophic cultivation with piggery wastewater.

  6. Effect of Temperature on the Fatty Acid Composition of Four Species of Marine Microalgae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wenquan; Li Qian; Liao Qibin; Chen Qinghua

    2003-01-01

    The GC analysis of fatty acid of four species of marine microalgae cultured at different temperature shows that the temperature has distinct effects on the composition and unsaturated degree of fatty acid of microalgae. The percentages of TPUFA in TFA and the number of mean double-bond of fatty acids ot Isochrysis galbana, Dunaliella salina and Phaeodactylum tricornutum decrease with the ascending temperature, while those of TMUFA and TSFA increase under the conditions of the present experiment. The content of TPUFA and the number of mean double-bonds of Chlorella sp. first decrease and then increase, with the minimum occurring at 20℃.

  7. Lipids, fatty acids composition and carotenoids of Chlorella vulgaris cultivated in hydroponic wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barcelos Oliveira, Jorge Luiz

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Alternative culture media have been evaluated for the cultivation of microalgae, among them are, industrial and agriculture wastewaters, that make residue recycling possible by bioconverting it into a rich, nourishing biomass that can be used as a feeding complement in aquaculture and in diverse areas. The objective of this research is to determine the lipid, fatty acid profile and carotenoid produced by the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris cultivated in a hydroponic wastewater, with different dilutions. The results showed that lipid contents did not present significant differences. Fatty acids were predominantly 16:0, 18:0, 18:1 and 18:3n-6. For total carotenoids, the dilution of hydroponic wastewater did not stimulate the production of these pigments. From this study, it was determined that, the use of hydroponic wastewater as an alternative culture medium for  the cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris generates good perspectives for lipid, fatty acid and carotenoid production.Medios de cultivo alternativos vienen siendo evaluados para el cultivo de microalgas, entre ellos, están los afluentes industriales y agrícolas, que posibilitan la reciclaje del residuo, bioconvirtiéndose en una biomasa enriquecida bajo el punto de vista nutricional, que puede ser utilizada como complemento alimenticio, para la acuacultura y en varias otras áreas de actuación. El presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo determinar los contenidos de lípidos, composición de ácidos grasos y carotenoides producidos por la microalga Chlorella vulgaris cultivada en solución hidropónica residual, con diferentes diluciones. Los resultados de los contenidos de lípidos totales no presentaron diferencia significativa. Los ácidos grasos predominantes fueron los 16:0, 18:0, 18:1 e 18:3n-6. Para los carotenoides totales, la dilución de la solución hidropónica residual no estimuló la producción de estos pigmentos por la microalga. La utilización de la solución hidrop

  8. Starch and lipid accumulation in eight strains of six Chlorella species under comparatively high light intensity and aeration culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Ota, Shuhei; Yamazaki, Tomokazu; Hirata, Aiko; Zachleder, Vilém; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2014-04-01

    The microalgae family Chlorella species are known to accumulate starch and lipids. Although nitrogen or phosphorous deficiencies promote starch and lipids formation in many microalgae, these deficiencies also limit their growth and productivity. Therefore, the Chlorellaceae strains were attempted to increase starch and lipids productivity under high-light-intensity conditions (600-μmol photons m(-2)s(-1)). The 12:12-h light-dark (LD) cycle conditions elicited more stable growth than the continuous light (LL) conditions, whereas the starch and lipids yields increased in LL conditions. The amount of starch and lipids per cell increased in Chlorella viscosa and Chlorella vulgaris in sulfur-deficient medium, and long-chain fatty acids with 20 or more carbon atoms accumulated in cells grown in sulfur-deficient medium. Accumulation of starch and lipids was investigated in eight strains. The accumulation was strain-dependent, and varied according to the medium and light conditions. Five of the eight Chlorella strains exhibited similar accumulation patterns.

  9. The Next Generation Feedstock of Biofuel: Jatropha or Chlorella as Assessed by Their Life-Cycle Inventories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Peng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Promising energy crops such as Jatropha curcas Linnaeus (JCL, which are planted on marginal lands, or microalgae such as Chlorella, which are cultivated in ponds located on mudflats or deserts, have been regarded with high hopes to solve the shortage of food crops and increase the amount of biodiesel (Fatty Acid Methyl Ester, FAME production. However, the annual yields of biomass and transport fuels (t/ha of both are still unclear and often exaggerated in the literature. Large portions of JCL biomass, including tree trunks and leaves, can also be used to generate electricity along with FAME, which is produced from seed lipids. Meanwhile, lipid extracted algae (LEA are composed of proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids other than glycerides which are unable to be esterified to form FAME and much more abundant in the microalgae than oil cake in the oil crops. Therefore, it has been strongly suggested that not only transesterification or esterification but also Fischer-Tropsch (FT process and bio-electricity generation should be considered as routes to produce biofuels. Otherwise, the yield of biofuel would be extremely low using either JCL or Chlorella as feedstock. The Life-Cycle Inventories (LCI of the biofuel processes with whole biomass of JCL and Chlorella were compared based on their net energy ratio (NER and CO2 emission saving (CES. It was shown that the technological improvement of irrigation, cultivation, and processing for either economic-crops or microalgae were all necessary to meet the requirements of commercial biofuel production.

  10. Benefits of oral and topical administration of ROQUETTE Chlorella sp. on skin inflammation and wound healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Lucas, Sophie; Bisson, Jean-Francois; Duffaud, Anais; Nejdi, Amine; Guerin-Deremaux, Laetitia; Baert, Blandine; Saniez-Degrave, Marie-Helene; Rozan, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    The human body is constantly exposed to the risk of traumatic lesions. Chlorella is a green microalgae enriched with nutrients, vitamins, minerals and chlorophyll. In some communities, Chlorella is a traditional medicinal plant used for the management of inflammation-related diseases. ROQUETTE Chlorella sp. (RCs) was investigated by oral administration (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) and cutaneous application (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0%) to evaluate its impact in two dermatological disorder models in mice: skin inflammation and wound healing. For skin inflammation, it was administered during 14 days starting one week before the induction of chronic skin inflammation by repeated cutaneous application of 12-Otetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). For wound healing the microalgae was administered by topical application after scarification of the skin until complete wound healing. Results indicated that oral and topical administrations of the two higher doses of RCs had significant effects on macroscopic score of skin inflammation with an efficient effect on microscopic score with cutaneous application. The microalgae had also efficient effect on healing process and duration of wound healing for both administration routes and particularly at the two highest doses of RCs. These findings suggest that administration of RCs by both oral and topical routes appeared to have beneficial effects on skin lesions.

  11. Growth of microalgae in autotrophic stationary systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cunha

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we evaluate the growth of nine marine microalgae species (Nannochloropsis oculata, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Isochrysis galbana, Tetraselmis suecica, Tetraselmis chuii, Chaetoceros muelleri, Thalassiosira fluviatilis and Isochrysis sp. and one freshwater species (Chlorella vulgaris under stationary autotrophy conditions, using erlenmeyers fl asks with 800mL of culture medium exposed to constant light intensities providing a photon flux density of about 150μmol.m-2.s-1 and 25±2oC temperature and constant air flow. The experiment was carried out in a controlled environment considering a block delineating randomized over time with three replicates. The Nannochloropsis oculata showed the highest value of maximum cellular density, but with a longer period of time and a lower growth rate. This was probably due to its tiny cell size, demanding a large number of cells per volume to attain its optimum conditions for light, nutrients, water and atmospheric carbon dioxide. In addition, in spite of showing one of the lowest values of maximum cellular density, Thalassiosira fluviatilis was the species that reached its maximum in a short period of time at the highest growth rate. Chlorella vulgaris was the only freshwater species tested and it showed the poorest performance for all the variables analyzed in the current study.

  12. Physiological and biochemical responses of Chlorella vulgaris to Congo red.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Zamora, Miriam; Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; Flores-Ortíz, César Mateo; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2014-10-01

    Extensive use of synthetic dyes in many industrial applications releases large volumes of wastewater. Wastewaters from dying industries are considered hazardous and require careful treatment prior to discharge into receiving water bodies. Dyes can affect photosynthetic activities of aquatic flora and decrease dissolved oxygen in water. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Congo red on growth and metabolic activity of Chlorella vulgaris after 96h exposure. Exposure of the microalga to Congo red reduced growth rate, photosynthesis and respiration. Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence emission showed that the donor side of photosystem II was affected at high concentrations of Congo red. The quantum yield for electron transport (φEo), the electron transport rate (ETR) and the performance index (PI) also decreased. The reduction in the ability to absorb and use the quantum energy increased non-photochemical (NPQ) mechanisms for thermal dissipation. Overall, Congo red affects growth and metabolic activity in photosynthetic organisms in aquatic environments.

  13. Effective flocculation of Chlorella vulgaris using chitosan with zeta potential measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Y. J.; Lau, S. W.

    2017-06-01

    Microalgae are considered as one promising source of third-generation biofuels due to their fast growth rates, potentially higher yield rates and wide ranges of growth conditions. However, the extremely low biomass concentration in microalgae cultures presents a great challenge to the harvesting of microalgae because a large volume of water needs to be removed to obtain dry microalgal cells for the subsequent oil extraction process. In this study, the fresh water microalgae Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) was effectively harvested using both low molecular weight (MW) and high MW chitosan flocculants. The flocculation efficiency was evaluated by physical appearance, supernatant absorbance, zeta potential and solids content after centrifugal dewatering. High flocculation efficiency of 98.0-99.0% was achieved at the optimal dosage of 30-40 mg/g with formation of large microalgae flocs. This study suggests that the polymer bridging mechanism was governing the flocculation behaviour of C. vulgaris using high MW chitosan. Besides, charge patch neutralisation mechanism prevailed at low MW chitosan where lower dosage was sufficient to reach near-zero zeta potential compared with the high MW chitosan. The amount of chitosan polymer present in the culture may also affect the mechanism of flocculation.

  14. Polishing of POME by Chlorella sp. in suspended and immobilized system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahin, F. A.; Sarbatly, R.; Suali, E.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of using suspended and immobilized growth of Chlorella sp. to treat POME was studied. Cotton and nylon ropes were used as the immobilization material in a rotating microalgae biofilm reactor. The result showed that POME treated in suspended growth system was able to remove 81.9% and 55.5% of the total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) respectively. Whereas the immobilized system showed lower removal of 77.22% and 53.02% for TN and TP. Lower performance of immobilized microalgae is due to the limited light penetration and supply of CO2 inside the immobilization materials. The rotating microalgae biofilm reactor was able to reduce the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) to 90 mg/L and chemical oxygen demand (COD) to 720 mg/L. Higher BOD and COD reading were obtained in suspended growth due to the presence of small number of microalgae cell in the samples. This study shows that suspended growth system is able to remove higher percentages of nitrogen and phosphorus. However, an efficient separation method such as membrane filtration is required to harvest the cultivated microalgae cell to avoid organic matter release into water bodies.

  15. Thermal decomposition dynamics and severity of microalgae residues in torrefaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Huang, Ming-Yueh; Chang, Jo-Shu; Chen, Chun-Yen

    2014-10-01

    To figure out the torrefaction characteristics and weight loss dynamics of microalgae residues, the thermogravimetric analyses of two microalgae (Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4 and Chlorella sorokiniana CY1) residues are carried out. A parameter of torrefaction severity index (TSI) in the range of 0-1, in terms of weight loss ratio between a certain operation and a reference operation, is defined to indicate the degree of biomass thermal degradation due to torrefaction. The TSI profiles of the two residues are similar to each other; therefore, the parameter may be used to describe the torrefaction extents of various biomass materials. The curvature of TSI profile along light torrefaction is slight, elucidating its slight impact on biomass thermal degradation. The sharp curvature along severe torrefaction in the initial pretreatment period reveals that biomass upgraded with high temperature and short duration is more effective than using low temperature with long duration.

  16. Nutritional Evaluation of Australian Microalgae as Potential Human Health Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Megan; Welladsen, Heather M.; Mangott, Arnold; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the biochemical suitability of Australian native microalgal species Scenedesmus sp., Nannochloropsis sp., Dunaliella sp., and a chlorophytic polyculture as nutritional supplements for human health. The four microalgal cultures were harvested during exponential growth, lyophilized, and analysed for proximate composition (moisture, ash, lipid, carbohydrates, and protein), pigments, and amino acid and fatty acid profiles. The resulting nutritional value, based on biochemical composition, was compared to commercial Spirulina and Chlorella products. The Australian native microalgae exhibited similar, and in several cases superior, organic nutritional properties relative to the assessed commercial products, with biochemical profiles rich in high-quality protein, nutritious polyunsaturated fats (such as α-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid), and antioxidant pigments. These findings indicate that the microalgae assessed have great potential as multi-nutrient human health supplements. PMID:25723496

  17. Evaluation of Lipid Content in Microalgae Biomass Using Palm Oil Mill Effluent (Pome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamyab, Hesam; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Din, Mohd Fadhil Md; Khademi, Tayebeh; Kumar, Ashok; Rezania, Shahabaldin

    2017-08-01

    The scope of this study is to assess the main component of palm oil mill effluent (POME) to be used as organic carbon for microalgae. The applicable parameters such as optical density, chlorophyll content, mixed liquor suspended solid, mixed liquor volatile suspended solid, cell dry weight (CDW), carbon:total nitrogen ratio and growth rate were also investigated in this study. The characteristics and morphological features of the isolates showed similarity with Chlorella. Chlorella pyrenoidosa ( CP) was found to be a dominant species in POME and Chlorella vulgaris ( CV) could grow well in POME. Furthermore, the optimal lipid production was obtained at the ratio 95:05 CDW with highest lipid production by CP compared to CV. At day 20, CDW for CV species was obtained at 193 mg/L and with lipid content at 56 mg/L. Finally, the concentration ratio at 50:50 showed a higher absorbance of chlorophyll a for both strains.

  18. Recycling of food waste as nutrients in Chlorella vulgaris cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kin Yan; Pleissner, Daniel; Lin, Carol Sze Ki

    2014-10-01

    Heterotrophic cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris was investigated in food waste hydrolysate. The highest exponential growth rate in terms of biomass of 0.8day(-1) was obtained in a hydrolysate consisting of 17.9gL(-1) glucose, 0.1gL(-1) free amino nitrogen, 0.3gL(-1) phosphate and 4.8mgL(-1) nitrate, while the growth rate was reduced in higher concentrated hydrolysates. C. vulgaris utilized the nutrients recovered from food waste for the formation of biomass and 0.9g biomass was produced per gram glucose consumed. The microalgal biomass produced in nutrient sufficient batch cultures consisted of around 400mgg(-1) carbohydrates, 200mgg(-1) proteins and 200mgg(-1) lipids. The conversion of nutrients derived from food waste and the balanced biomass composition make C. vulgaris a promising strain for the recycling of food waste in food, feed and fuel productions.

  19. Effect of pressurized liquids on extraction of antioxidants from Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kwang Hyun; Kang, Suk Woo; Kim, Chul Young; Um, Byung Hun; Na, Ye Rim; Pan, Cheol-Ho

    2010-04-28

    Chlorella vulgaris is a green microalga that contains various antioxidants, such as carotenoids and chlorophylls. In this study, antioxidants from C. vulgaris were extracted using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), which has been recently used for bioactive compound extraction. The antioxidant capacity of individual compounds in chlorella was determined by online HPLC ABTS(*+) analysis. According to the antioxidant analysis of total extracts, the extraction yield, radical scavenging activity, and phenolic compounds using PLE were relatively high compared to those obtained using maceration or ultrasound-assisted extraction. On the basis of online HPLC ABTS(*+) analysis, the 15 major antioxidants from chlorella extracts were identified as hydrophilic compounds, lutein and its isomers, chlorophylls, and chlorophyll derivatives. Using PLE at high temperature (85-160 degrees C) significantly increased antioxidant extraction from chlorella, improving the formation of hydrophilic compounds and yielding more antioxidative chlorophyll derivatives. Online HPLC ABTS(*+) analysis was a useful tool for the separation of main antioxidants from PLE extracts and allowed the simultaneous measurement of their antioxidant capacity, which clearly showed that PLE is an excellent method for extracting antioxidants from C. vulgaris.

  20. Safety evaluation of Whole Algalin Protein (WAP) from Chlorella protothecoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Nancy J; Matulka, Ray A; Chan, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    Microalgae such as Chlorella spp., were once consumed as traditional human foods; now they are being developed as ingredients for modern diets. Whole Algalin Protein (WAP) from dried milled Chlorella protothecoides was evaluated for dietary safety in a 13-week feeding trial in rodents with genotoxic potential evaluated using in vitro and in vivo assays and the likelihood of food allergy potential evaluated via human repeat-insult patch test (HRIPT). In the subchronic study, rats consumed feed containing 0, 25,000, 50,000 or 100,000 ppm WAP for 92-93 days. No treatment-related mortalities or effects in general condition, body weight, food consumption, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry, gross pathology, organ weights, and histopathology occurred. Several endpoints exhibited statistically significant effects, but none was dose-related. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) was based on the highest WAP concentration consumed by the rats and was equivalent to 4805 mg/kg/day in males and 5518 mg/kg/day in females. No mutagenicity occurred in Salmonella typhimurium or Escherichia coli tester strains (≤5000 μg/plate WAP) with or without mutagenic activation. No clastogenic response occurred in bone marrow from mice administered a single oral dose (2000 mg/kg WAP). Skin sensitization was not induced by WAP via HRIPT, indicating little potential for food allergy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Potential Health Effects of Enzymatic Protein Hydrolysates from Chlorella vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Sedighi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Chlorella vulgaris is a multi-cellular edible algal species with abundant proteins. Extraction of high value protein fractions for pharmaceutical and nutritional applications can significantly increase the commercial value of microalga biomasses. There is no known report on the anticancer peptides derived from the Chlorella vulgaris abundant protein.Materials and Methods: This study examined the antimicrobial and anticancer effects of peptides from a hydrolyzed Chlorella vulgaris protein with 62 kDa molecular weight. Protein hydrolysis was done by pepsin as a gastrointestinal protease, and was monitored through protein content measurement, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and high performance liquidchromatography measurements. Inhibitory effect of the produced peptides on Escherichia coli cells and breast cancer cell lines was assayed.Results and Conclusion: Hydrolyzed peptides induced a decrease of about 34.1% in the growth of Escherichia coli, and the peptides of 3 to 5 kDa molecular weight had strong impact on the viability of breast cancer cells with IC50 value of 50 μg μl-1. The peptide fractions demonstrating antimicrobial and anti-cancer activities have the potential for use as functional food ingredients for health benefits. These results demonstrate that inexpensive algae proteinscould be a new alternative to produce anticancer peptides.Conflict of interest: The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest.

  2. Spirulina platensis is more efficient than Chlorella homosphaera in carbohydrate productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margarites, Ana Cláudia; Volpato, Noany; Araújo, Elenara; Cardoso, Luana Garbin; Bertolin, Telma Elita; Colla, Luciane Maria; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2016-11-21

    This study aimed to compare the production of biomass with high carbohydrate content by Spirulina platensis LEB 52 and Chlorella homosphaera microalgae. The cultivation of C. homosphaera and S. platensis LEB 52 was performed in standard medium diluted at 50%, and glucose was added as a source of organic carbon for mixotrophic metabolism. The sodium nitrate concentration was increased and the nitrogen components were reduced in the media to induce the synthesis of carbohydrates. C. homosphaera and S. platensis LEB 52 produced 16.32 and 116 mg L(-1) of carbohydrates per day, respectively, when cultivated with 50% less nitrogen and 20% and 10% more sodium chloride, compared with the control. Glucose addition was an essential factor for microalgal growth, resulting in biomass increases of up to 2.79- and 3.45-fold for C. homosphaera and S. platensis LEB 52, respectively. Spirulina presented better characteristics than Chlorella with regard to the capacities of growth and carbohydrate synthesis.

  3. New Discoveries in Study on Hydrocarbons From Thermal Degradation of Heterotrophically Yellowing Algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴庆余; 殷实; 盛国英; 傅家谟

    1994-01-01

    Green autotrophic alga Chlorella protothecoides contains a very small quantity of hydrocarbons. Heterotrophic culture of this alga results in the cells yellowing, chlorophyll disappearing, protein decreasing and lipid increasing remarkably. The quantities of hydrocarbons from them directly and from the thermal degradation of the cells at or below 200℃ are very low. These hydrocarbons are characterized by predominance of high molecular weight normal alkanes with maximum at C23-C25. When these heterotrophi-cally yellowing cells are thermally degraded at 300℃ , the aliphatic hydrocarbons increase greatly, 32 times that of the green autotrophic ones at the same temperature. Meanwhile, the low molecular weight normal alkanes with C17 as the peak become predominant instead of the original ones of high molecular weight. The actual potential of microplanktonic algae in producing hydrocarbons should be much greater than what people have recognized before.

  4. Ingestion of Brachionus plicatilis under different microalgae conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Wenli; TANG Xuexi; QIAO Xiuying; WANG You; WANG Renjun; FENG Lei

    2009-01-01

    The effects of four microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris, Platymonas helgolandicavar, Isochrysis galbana, and Nitzschia closterium on the grazing and filtering rates of the marine rotifer, Brachionus plicatilis, were evaluated under laboratory conditions. The grazing rates in separate cultures of the four microalga were as follows: C. vulgaris > P. helgolandicavar > I. galbana > N. closterium. However, the filtering rates occurred in the following order: P. helgolandicavar > N. closterium > C. vulgaris > I. galbana. A mixed diets experiment revealed that P. helgolandicavar was the preferred diet of B. plicatilis. In addition, the grazing rate of B. plicatilis increased gradually as the density of the microalgae increased, until concentrations of 2.5×106 cells mL-1 for C. vulgaris and 1.5×106 cells mL-1 for I. galbana were obtained. Furthermore, the filtering rate increased slightly when the density of the microalgae was low, after which it declined as the microalgal density increased. The grazing rates of B. plicatilis were as follows during the different growth phases: stationary phase > exponential phase > lag phase > decline phase. Additionally, the filtering rates during the growth phases were: exponential phase > lag phase > stationary phase > decline phase. The results of this study provide foundational information that can be used to explore the optimal culture conditions for rotifers and to promote the development of aquaculture.

  5. Ingestion of Brachionus plicatilis under different microalgae conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenli; Tang, Xuexi; Qiao, Xiuting; Wang, You; Wang, Renjun; Feng, Lei

    2009-09-01

    The effects of four microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris, Platymonas helgolandicavar, Isochrysis galbana, and Nitzschia closterium on the grazing and filtering rates of the marine rotifer, Brachionus plicatilis, were evaluated under laboratory conditions. The grazing rates in separate cultures of the four microalga were as follows: C. vulgaris > P. helgolandicavar > I. galbana > N. closterium. However, the filtering rates occurred in the following order: P. helgolandicavar > N. closterium > C. vulgaris > I. galbana. A mixed diets experiment revealed that P. helgolandicavar was the preferred diet of B. plicatilis. In addition, the grazing rate of B. plicatilis increased gradually as the density of the microalgae increased, until concentrations of 2.5×106 cells mL-1 for C. vulgaris and 1.5×106 cells mL-1 for I. galbana were obtained. Furthermore, the filtering rate increased slightly when the density of the microalgae was low, after which it declined as the microalgal density increased. The grazing rates of B. plicatilis were as follows during the different growth phases: stationary phase > exponential phase > lag phase > decline phase. Additionally, the filtering rates during the growth phases were: exponential phase > lag phase > stationary phase > decline phase. The results of this study provide foundational information that can be used to explore the optimal culture conditions for rotifers and to promote the development of aquaculture.

  6. Microalgae as a raw material for biofuels production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Luisa; Oliveira, Ana Cristina

    2009-02-01

    Biofuels demand is unquestionable in order to reduce gaseous emissions (fossil CO(2), nitrogen and sulfur oxides) and their purported greenhouse, climatic changes and global warming effects, to face the frequent oil supply crises, as a way to help non-fossil fuel producer countries to reduce energy dependence, contributing to security of supply, promoting environmental sustainability and meeting the EU target of at least of 10% biofuels in the transport sector by 2020. Biodiesel is usually produced from oleaginous crops, such as rapeseed, soybean, sunflower and palm. However, the use of microalgae can be a suitable alternative feedstock for next generation biofuels because certain species contain high amounts of oil, which could be extracted, processed and refined into transportation fuels, using currently available technology; they have fast growth rate, permit the use of non-arable land and non-potable water, use far less water and do not displace food crops cultures; their production is not seasonal and they can be harvested daily. The screening of microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris, Spirulina maxima, Nannochloropsis sp., Neochloris oleabundans, Scenedesmus obliquus and Dunaliella tertiolecta) was done in order to choose the best one(s), in terms of quantity and quality as oil source for biofuel production. Neochloris oleabundans (fresh water microalga) and Nannochloropsis sp. (marine microalga) proved to be suitable as raw materials for biofuel production, due to their high oil content (29.0 and 28.7%, respectively). Both microalgae, when grown under nitrogen shortage, show a great increase (approximately 50%) in oil quantity. If the purpose is to produce biodiesel only from one species, Scenedesmus obliquus presents the most adequate fatty acid profile, namely in terms of linolenic and other polyunsaturated fatty acids. However, the microalgae Neochloris oleabundans, Nannochloropsis sp. and Dunaliella tertiolecta can also be used if associated with other

  7. Interactive Effects of Temperature and UV Radiation on Photosynthesis of Chlorella Strains from Polar, Temperate and Tropical Environments: Differential Impacts on Damage and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chiew-Yen; Teoh, Ming-Li; Phang, Siew-Moi; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Beardall, John

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and ozone depletion, and the resulting increase of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), have far-reaching impacts on biota, especially affecting the algae that form the basis of the food webs in aquatic ecosystems. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactive effects of temperature and UVR by comparing the photosynthetic responses of similar taxa of Chlorella from Antarctic (Chlorella UMACC 237), temperate (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 248) and tropical (Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 001) environments. The cultures were exposed to three different treatments: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), PAR plus ultraviolet-A (320-400 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A) and PAR plus UV-A and ultraviolet-B (280-320 nm) radiation (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) for one hour in incubators set at different temperatures. The Antarctic Chlorella was exposed to 4, 14 and 20°C. The temperate Chlorella was exposed to 11, 18 and 25°C while the tropical Chlorella was exposed to 24, 28 and 30°C. A pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometer was used to assess the photosynthetic response of microalgae. Parameters such as the photoadaptive index (Ek) and light harvesting efficiency (α) were determined from rapid light curves. The damage (k) and repair (r) rates were calculated from the decrease in ΦPSIIeff over time during exposure response curves where cells were exposed to the various combinations of PAR and UVR, and fitting the data to the Kok model. The results showed that UV-A caused much lower inhibition than UV-B in photosynthesis in all Chlorella isolates. The three isolates of Chlorella from different regions showed different trends in their photosynthesis responses under the combined effects of UVR (PAR + UV-A + UV-B) and temperature. In accordance with the noted strain-specific characteristics, we can conclude that the repair (r) mechanisms at higher temperatures were not sufficient to overcome damage caused by UVR in the Antarctic Chlorella strain

  8. Outdoor production of microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vree, de Jeroen H.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the production of microalgae under outdoor conditions, for this research was done at pilot scale. Microalgae are an interesting alternative to currently used sources for bulk commodities as food, feed and chemicals. Research activities within the field are shattered; different

  9. MICROALGAE AS TOCOPHEROL PRODUCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Mokrosnop

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are able to accumulate considerable amounts of tocopherols (up to 4 mg/g dry weight. The content of α-tocopherol to plant oils is low, whereas microalgae contain up to 97% of the tocochromanols that provides high bioactivity. The data about the content of tocopherols in eukaryotic microalgae Dunaliella tertiolecta, Nannochloropsis oculata, Isochrysis galbana, Euglena gracilis, Tetraselmis suecica, Diacronema vlkianum, as well as in the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis are given in the paper. The largest amounts of tocopherols are synthesized by Euglena gracilis cells at mixotrophic cultivation. The level of tocopherols in microalgae depends on cultivation conditions. Two-stage biotech cultivation techniques, limiting nutrition in some biogenic elements, the introduction of exogenous carbon sources are used to increase the yield of tocopherol from microalgae. The approaches to the genetic transformation of plants leading to higher content of active vitamin E are rewieved as well.

  10. Microalgae: biofuel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Kumari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present day, microalgae feedstocks are gaining interest in energy scenario due to their fast growth potential coupled with relatively high lipid, carbohydrate and nutrients contents. All of these properties render them an excellent source for biofuels such as biodiesel, bioethanol and biomethane; as well as a number of other valuable pharmaceutical and nutraceutical products. The present review is a critical appraisal of the commercialization potential of microalgae biofuels. The available literature on various aspects of microalgae for e.g. its cultivation, life cycle assessment, and conceptualization of an algal biorefinery, has been done. The evaluation of available information suggests the operational and maintenance cost along with maximization of oil-rich microalgae production is the key factor for successful commercialization of microalgae-based fuels.

  11. Light respiration in Chlorella sorokiniana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kliphuis, A.M.J.; Janssen, M.G.J.; End, van den E.J.; Martens, D.E.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    Respiration and photosynthesis are two important processes in microalgal growth that occur simultaneously in the light. To know the rates of both processes, at least one of them has to be measured. To be able to measure the rate of light respiration of Chlorella sorokiniana, the measurement of oxyge

  12. Optimization of cell disruption methods for efficient recovery of bioactive metabolites via NMR of three freshwater microalgae (chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Nyuk Ling; Teh, Kit Yinn; Lam, Su Shiung; Kaben, Anne Marie; Cha, Thye San

    2015-08-01

    This study demonstrates the use of NMR techniques coupled with chemometric analysis as a high throughput data mining method to identify and examine the efficiency of different disruption techniques tested on microalgae (Chlorella variabilis, Scenedesmus regularis and Ankistrodesmus gracilis). The yield and chemical diversity from the disruptions together with the effects of pre-oven and pre-freeze drying prior to disruption techniques were discussed. HCl extraction showed the highest recovery of oil compounds from the disrupted microalgae (up to 90%). In contrast, NMR analysis showed the highest intensity of bioactive metabolites obtained for homogenized extracts pre-treated with freeze-drying, indicating that homogenizing is a more favorable approach to recover bioactive substances from the disrupted microalgae. The results show the potential of NMR as a useful metabolic fingerprinting tool for assessing compound diversity in complex microalgae extracts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A state of the art of metabolic networks of unicellular microalgae and cyanobacteria for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroukh, Caroline; Muñoz-Tamayo, Rafael; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Bernard, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    The most promising and yet challenging application of microalgae and cyanobacteria is the production of renewable energy: biodiesel from microalgae triacylglycerols and bioethanol from cyanobacteria carbohydrates. A thorough understanding of microalgal and cyanobacterial metabolism is necessary to master and optimize biofuel production yields. To this end, systems biology and metabolic modeling have proven to be very efficient tools if supported by an accurate knowledge of the metabolic network. However, unlike heterotrophic microorganisms that utilize the same substrate for energy and as carbon source, microalgae and cyanobacteria require light for energy and inorganic carbon (CO2 or bicarbonate) as carbon source. This double specificity, together with the complex mechanisms of light capture, makes the representation of metabolic network nonstandard. Here, we review the existing metabolic networks of photoautotrophic microalgae and cyanobacteria. We highlight how these networks have been useful for gaining insight on photoautotrophic metabolism.

  14. First evidence of bioflocculant from Shinella albus with flocculation activity on harvesting of Chlorella vulgaris biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Xu, Yanting; Liu, Lei; Jiang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Tianling; Wang, Hailei

    2016-10-01

    Bioflocculant from Shinella albus xn-1 could be used to harvest energy-producing microalga Chlorella vulgaris biomass for the first time. In this study, we investigated the flocculation activity and mode of strain xn-1, the characteristics of bioflocculant, the effect of flocculation conditions and optimized the flocculation efficiency. The results indicated that strain xn-1 exhibited flocculation activity through secreting bioflocculant; the bioflocculant with high thermal stability, pH stability and low molecular weight was proved to be not protein and polysaccharide, and flocculation active component was confirmed to contain triple bond and cumulated double bonds; algal pH, temperature and metal ions showed great impacts on the flocculation efficiency of bioflocculant; the maximum flocculation activity of bioflocculant reached 85.65% after the response surface optimization. According to the results, the bioflocculant from S. albus xn-1 could be a good potential in applications for high-efficiency harvesting of microalgae.

  15. Power generation enhancement in novel microbial carbon capture cells with immobilized Chlorella vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Minghua; He, Huanhuan; Jin, Tao; Wang, Hongyu

    2012-09-01

    With the increasing concerns for global climate change, a sustainable, efficient and renewable energy production from wastewater is imperative. In this study, a novel microbial carbon capture cell (MCC), is constructed for the first time by the introduction of immobilized microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) into the cathode chamber of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to fulfill the zero discharge of carbon dioxide. This process can achieve an 84.8% COD removal, and simultaneously the maximum power density can reach 2485.35 mW m-3 at a current density of 7.9 A m-3 and the Coulombic efficiency is 9.40%, which are 88% and 57.7% greater than that with suspended C. vulgaris, respectively. These enhancements in performance demonstrate the feasibility of an economical and effective approach for the simultaneous wastewater treatment, electricity generation and biodiesel production from microalgae.

  16. Proteomic analysis of Chlorella vulgaris: Potential targets for enhanced lipid accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarnieri, Michael T.; Nag, Ambarish; Yang, Shihui; Pienkos, Philip T.

    2013-11-01

    Oleaginous microalgae are capable of producing large quantities of fatty acids and triacylglycerides. As such, they are promising feedstocks for the production of biofuels and bioproducts. Genetic strain-engineering strategies offer a means to accelerate the commercialization of algal biofuels by improving the rate and total accumulation of microalgal lipids. However, the industrial potential of these organisms remains to be met, largely due to the incomplete knowledgebase surrounding the mechanisms governing the induction of algal lipid biosynthesis. Such strategies require further elucidation of genes and gene products controlling algal lipid accumulation. In this study, we have set out to examine these mechanisms and identify novel strain-engineering targets in the oleaginous microalga, Chlorella vulgaris. Comparative shotgun proteomic analyses have identified a number of novel targets, including previously unidentified transcription factors and proteins involved in cell signaling and cell cycle regulation. These results lay the foundation for strain-improvement strategies and demonstrate the power of translational proteomic analysis.

  17. Influence of organic matter generated by Chlorella vulgaris on five different modes of flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Dries; Foubert, Imogen; Fraeye, Ilse; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2012-11-01

    Microalgae excrete relatively large amounts of algal organic matter (AOM) that may interfere with flocculation. The influence of AOM on flocculation of Chlorella vulgaris was studied using five different flocculation methods: aluminum sulfate, chitosan, cationic starch, pH-induced flocculation and electro-coagulation-flocculation (ECF). The presence of AOM was found to inhibit flocculation for all flocculation methods resulting in an increase of dosage demand. For pH-induced flocculation, the dosage required to achieve 85% flocculation increased only 2-fold when AOM was present, while for chitosan, this dosage increased 9-fold. For alum, ECF and cationic starch flocculation, the dosage increased 5-6-fold. Interference by AOM is an important parameter to consider in the assessment of flocculation-based harvesting of microalgae.

  18. Change in Photosystem II Photochemistry During Algal Growth Phases of Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukarroum, Abdallah

    2016-06-01

    Sensitivity of photosynthetic processes towards environmental stress is used as a bioanalytical tool to evaluate the responses of aquatic plants to a changing environment. In this paper, change of biomass density, chlorophyll a fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters during growth phases of two microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus were studied. The photosynthetic growth behaviour changed significantly with cell age and algae species. During the exponential phase of growth, the photosynthesis capacity reached its maximum and decreased in ageing algal culture during stationary phase. In conclusion, the chlorophyll a fluorescence OJIP method and the derived fluorescence parameters would be an accurate method for obtaining information on maximum photosynthetic capacities and monitoring algal cell growth. This will contribute to more understanding, for example, of toxic actions of pollutants in microalgae test.

  19. Laser reflectance measurement for the online monitoring of Chlorella sorokiniana biomass concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Expósito, Patricio; Blanco Suárez, Angeles; Negro Álvarez, Carlos

    2017-02-10

    Fast and reliable methods to determine biomass concentration are necessary to facilitate the large scale production of microalgae. A method for the rapid estimation of Chlorella sorokiniana biomass concentration was developed. The method translates the suspension particle size spectrum gathered though laser reflectance into biomass concentration by means of two machine learning modelling techniques. In each case, the model hyper-parameters were selected applying a simulated annealing algorithm. The results show that dry biomass concentration can be estimated with a very good accuracy (R(2)=0.87). The presented method seems to be suited to perform fast estimations of biomass concentration in suspensions of microalgae cultivated in moderately turbid media with tendency to aggregate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. PENGGUNAAN MEMBRAN SERAT BERONGGA SEBAGAI AERATOR DALAM SISTEM KULTIVASI UNTUK MENINGKATKAN PRODUKSI BIOMASSA DAN BIOFIKSASI CO2 DARI Chlorella vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Dianursanti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pemanasan global yang memicu terjadinya perubahan iklim, sebagian besar disebabkan karena merebaknya gas CO2.  Pemanfaatan mikroalga Chlorella sp. untuk mereduksi gas CO2 menjadi potensi yang menjanjikan. Hal ini mengingat, bahwa Chlorella dapat dengan efisien mereduksi CO2 karena mereka dapat tumbuh dengan cepat dan mudah diadaptasikan ke dalam rekayasa sistem fotobioreaktor. Dalam penelitian ini akan diupayakan pengaturan sistem aerasi berfilter untuk kultivasi Chlorella vulgaris dalam reaktor agar proses transfer massa gas CO2 dalam kultur mikroalga menjadi lebih baik. Dengan demikian nilai KLa (CO2 menjadi salah satu parameter penentu dalam peningkatan produksi biomassa Chlorella. Nilai KLa yang tinggi menunjukkan proses transfer massa CO2 yang lebih baik dalam kultur mikroalga. Namun nilai KLa (CO2 yang terlalu besar sangat mungkin menyebabkan terjadinya shear stress pada alga.Dengan menggunakan membran serat berongga sebagai aerator, permasalahan shear stress pada alga dapat dihindari. Dengan diameter pori yang sangat kecil, membran ini dapat memberikan laju alir dan transfer massa CO2 dalam kultur yang optimal, tanpa menimbulkan efek shear strees. Dengan demikian penggunaan membran ini dapat menghasilkan produktivitas Chlorella yang lebih baik serta dapat meningkatkan kemampuan biofiksasi CO2 selama proses kultivasinya. Penggunaan membran serat berongga sebagai aerator telah terbukti mampu meningkatkan produksi biomassa C. vulgaris  sebesar 27,2 %. Abstract Global warming triggering climate change is largely due to the presence of CO2. Utilization of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris to reduce CO2 gas is potential as it efficiently reduces CO2while growing quickly and adapting to the photobioreactor systems engineering. This study explored filter aeration system settings for cultivating C. vulgaris in the reactor thus mass transfer of CO2 in microalgae cultures becomes more efficient. Value of KLa (CO2 is one of the parameters in

  1. [Study of the growth and development of Chlorella on "Kosmos-1887"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychev, V N; Levinskikh, M A; Livanskaia, O G

    1989-01-01

    The growth, development and population characteristics of Chlorella cells flown for 13 days in space were investigated during their postflight cultivation. The growth rate of flown algae did not differ from that of ground-based controls in terms of increases in the cell number and biomass. All basic parameters of the specimens (generation time, number of developing autospores, time ratio of developmental phases) were ontogentically normal. Exposure of the algae to space flight as a component of the algobacterial cenosis--fish autotrophic-heterotrophic system produced no significant effect of the population or individual specimens during their postflight cultivation.

  2. Development of a Biosensor for Environmental Monitoring Based on Microalgae Immobilized in Silica Hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Durrieu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new biosensor was designed for the assessment of aquatic environment quality. Three microalgae were used as toxicity bioindicators: Chlorella vulgaris, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. These microalgae were immobilized in alginate and silica hydrogels in a two step procedure. After studying the growth rate of entrapped cells, chlorophyll fluorescence was measured after exposure to (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU and various concentrations of the common herbicide atrazine. Microalgae are very sensitive to herbicides and detection of fluorescence enhancement with very good efficiency was realized. The best detection limit was 0.1 µM, obtained with the strain C. reinhardtii after 40 minutes of exposure.

  3. Co-cultivation of microalgae and nitrifiers for higher biomass production and better carbon capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilanovic, Dragoljub; Holland, Mark; Starosvetsky, Jeanna; Armon, Robert

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study co-cultivation of nitrifiers with microalgae as a non-intrusive technique for selective removal of oxygen generated by microalgae. Biomass concentration was, at least, 23% higher in mixed-cultures where nitrifiers kept the dissolved oxygen concentration below 9.0μLL(-1) than in control Chlorella vulgaris axenic-cultures where the concentration of dissolved oxygen was higher than 10.0μLL(-1). This approach to eliminating oxygen inhibition of microalgal growth could become the basis for the development of advanced microalgae reactors for removal of CO2 from the atmosphere, and concentrated CO2 streams. CO2 sequestration would become a chemically and geologically safer and environmentally more sound technology provided it uses microalgal, or other biomass, instead of CO2, for carbon storage.

  4. Nitrogen and phosphorus removal coupled with carbohydrate production by five microalgae cultures cultivated in biogas slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fen; Wang, Zhi; Zhouyang, Siyu; Li, Heng; Xie, Youping; Wang, Yuanpeng; Zheng, Yanmei; Li, Qingbiao

    2016-12-01

    In this study, five microalgae strains were cultured for their ability to survive in biogas slurry, remove nitrogen resources and accumulate carbohydrates. It was proved that five microalgae strains adapted in biogas slurry well without ammonia inhibition. Among them, Chlorella vulgaris ESP-6 showed the best performance on carbohydrate accumulation, giving the highest carbohydrate content of 61.5% in biogas slurry and the highest ammonia removal efficiency and rate of 96.3% and 91.7mg/L/d respectively in biogas slurry with phosphorus and magnesium added. Additionally, the absence of phosphorus and magnesium that can be adverse for biomass accumulation resulted in earlier timing of carbohydrate accumulation and magnesium was firstly recognized and proved as the influence factor for carbohydrate accumulation. Microalgae that cultured in biogas slurry accumulated more carbohydrate in cell, making biogas slurry more suitable medium for the improvement of carbohydrate content, thus can be regarded as a new strategy to accumulate carbohydrate.

  5. Heavy metal removal from acid mine drainage by calcined eggshell and microalgae hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee-Jeong; Lee, Seung-Mok

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the use of calcined eggshells and microalgae for the removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage (AMD) and the simultaneous enhancement of biomass productivity. The experiment was conducted over a period of 6 days in a hybrid system containing calcined eggshells and the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. The results show that the biomass productivity increased to ~8.04 times its initial concentration of 0.367 g/L as measured by an optical panel photobioreactor (OPPBR) and had a light transmittance of 95 % at a depth of 305 mm. On the other hand, the simultaneous percent removal of Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, As, and Cd from the AMD effluent was found to be 99.47 to 100 %. These results indicate that the hybrid system with calcined eggshells and microalgae was highly effective for heavy metal removal in the AMD.

  6. LIPID PRODUCING MICROALGAE FROM SEVERAL ECOSYSTEMS IN WEST AND CENTRAL JAVA, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DWI ANDREAS SANTOSA

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to get lipid producing microalgae as feedstock for biofuel production. The microalgae were isolated from 355 collected water samples which represented many distinct ecosystems such as paddy fields, rivers, agricultural dams, ponds, swampy areas and unique ecosystem of volcano and mud-volcano craters in West- and Central Java, Indonesia. A total of 267 strains of microalgae were isolated from the samples of which 221 strains of them have capability to produce lipid. There were four promising strains that produce lipid between 14.7 – 45.7 percent dry weight in optimal condition that were identified as Chlamydomonas sp. KO-7267 and PK-7195, Chlorella sp. KS-7300 and Desmodesmus sp. BK-7291.

  7. Growth and anaerobic digestion characteristics of microalgae cultivated using various types of sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Taira; Inoue, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Tsumori, Jun

    2014-10-01

    Microalgal cultivation combined with anaerobic digestion at wastewater treatment plants is promising to recover energy. This study investigated the growth and anaerobic digestion characteristics of microalgae cultivated using nutrients in sewage. Microalgae were cultivated using primary effluent, secondary effluent, and dewatering filtrate. Microscopic observation indicated that Chlorella was cultivated using dewatering filtrate of anaerobic digestion without controlling the type of species. Batch anaerobic digestion experiments with digested sludge showed that the methane conversion ratio of the cultivated mixture was approximately 40-65%. Different cultivation time did not affect the microalgal contents. Methane recovery mass was 0.13NL-methane/L-cultivation liquor. The C/N ratio of the cultivated mixture was approximately 3-5, but the apparent ammonia release ratio was smaller than that of sewage sludge during digestion. These results proved the applicability of methane recovery from microalgae cultivated using nutrients included in anaerobically digested sludge.

  8. Isolation and application of SO{sub X} and NO{sub X} resistant microalgae in biofixation of CO{sub 2} from thermoelectricity plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radmann, Elisangela Martha; Vieira Camerini, Felipe; Duarte Santos, Thaisa [Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Food Engineering, Federal University of Rio Grande (FURG), P.O. Box 474, Rio Grande-RS 96201-900 (Brazil); Vieira Costa, Jorge Alberto, E-mail: dqmjorge@furg.br [Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Food Engineering, Federal University of Rio Grande (FURG), P.O. Box 474, Rio Grande-RS 96201-900 (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Microalgae can help reduce global warming. {yields} Synechococcus nidulans and Chlorella vulgaris were isolated in a thermoelectric plant. {yields} Microalgae were compared with Spirulina and Scenedesmus obliquus for CO{sub 2} fixation. {yields} Microalgae were exposed to CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and NO, simulating a gas from coal combustion. {yields} C. vulgaris and Spirulina sp. showed 13.43% of maximum daily fixation. - Abstract: Microalgae have been studied for their potential use in foodstuffs, agriculture, in the treatment of wastewater and, in particular, in the reduction of atmospheric carbon dioxide, the main cause of global warming. Thermoelectricity plants account for 22% of CO{sub 2} emitted into the atmosphere and native microalgae may be more tolerant to the gases emitted from burning fossil fuels. In the study presented here, microalgae were isolated from ponds next to a Thermoelectricity Plant, located in southern Brazil, and identified as Synechococcus nidulans and Chlorella vulgaris. The isolated microalgae were grown and compared with two different strains of microalgae, Spirulina sp. and Scenedesmus obliquus, for CO{sub 2} biofixation. The microalgae were exposed to 12% CO{sub 2}, 60 ppm of SO{sub 2} and 100 ppm of NO, simulating a gas from coal combustion. The C. vulgaris had similar behavior to Spirulina sp., with 13.43% of maximum daily fixation. The microalgae with the greater fixing capacity were C. vulgaris and Spirulina sp. and these can be grown in electric power plants for CO{sub 2} biofixation of the coal combustion gas, which would help reduce global warming.

  9. Physiological and ultralstructural changes of Chlorella sp. induced by UV-B radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Juan; TANG Xuexi; ZHANG Peiyu; TIAN Jiyuan; DONG Shuanglin

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanisms of enhanced UV-B radiation on algae, the effects of UV-B radiation on the physiological and ultrastructural changes of Chlorella sp. were examined. The results showed that UV-B radiation could inhibit the growth and photosynthesis of microalgae. UV-B radiation at lower doses increased the photosynthetic pigment (chlorophyll a (Chla) and carotenoid (Car)) contents, while at higher doses of UV-B radiation Chla and Car contents were decreased. The ultrastructure of Chlorella sp.without exposure to UV-B showed that the thylakoidlamellae were clear and regular, the stroma of its chloroplast was apparent and clear.The globules with photosynthetic pigments and the cristae of mitochondria were clearly seen. After exposure to UV-B radiation at dose of 2.88 kJ/m2, the thylakoid lamellae of Chlorella sp. were lost and dissolved, the globules which contained photosynthetic pigments in chloroplast were bleached; some mitochondria cristae were dissolved; slight plasmolysis was found in some Chlorella sp. cells. After exposure to 5.76 kJ/m2 UV-B radiation, the thylakoid was in disarray and disintegration, plasmolysis was found in most cells, and the cell wall was broken and began to fall out. Many blank areas were observed in cells, mitochondria were seriously deformed and most of the mitochondria cristae were dissolved. Also, globules containing photosynthetic pigments in chloroplast were bleached and some empty globules were found in chloroplast. Therefore, UV-B radiation could damage cell structure of Chlorella sp., and this damage increased with the dose of UV-B radiation they exposed to.

  10. [Study on the Visualization of the Biomass of Chlorella sp., Isochrysis galbana, and Spirulina sp. Based on Hyperspectral Imaging Technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lu-lu; Wet, Xuan; Zhao, Yan-ru; Shao, Yong-ni; Qiu, Zheng-jun; He, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Effective cultivation of the microalgae is the key issue for microalgal bio-energy utilization. In nutrient rich culture conditions, the microalge have a fast growth rate, but they are more susceptible to environmental pollution and influence. So to monitor the the growth process of microalgae is significant during cultivating. Hyperspectral imaging has the advantages of both spectra and image analysis. The spectra contain abundant material quality signal and the image contains abundant spatial information of the material about the chemical distribution. It can achieve the rapid information acquisition and access a large amount of data. In this paper, the authors collected the hyperspectral images of forty-five samples of Chlorella sp., Isochrysis galbana, and Spirulina sp., respectively. The average spectra of the region of interest (ROI) were extracted. After applying successive projection algorithm (SPA), the authors established the multiple linear regression (MLR) model with the spectra and corresponding biomass of 30 samples, 15 samples were used as the prediction set. For Chlorella sp., Isochrysis galbana, and Spirulina sp., the correlation coefficient of prediction (r(pre)) are 0.950, 0.969 and 0.961, the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) for 0.010 2, 0.010 7 and 0.007 1, respectively. Finally, the authors used the MLR model to predict biomass for each pixel in the images of prediction set; images displayed in different colors for visualization based on pseudo-color images with the help of a Matlab program. The results show that using hyperspectral imaging technique to predict the biomass of Chlorella sp. and Spirulina sp. were better, but for the Isochrysis galbana visualization needs to be further improved. This research set the basis for rapidly detecting the growth of microalgae and using the microalgae as the bio-energy.

  11. Molecular study of the chlorella algae and determining its functional features with the approach of hydrogenase gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Tayebeh Mousavi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biohydrogen production by biological processes are known as a renewable energy source. The aim of the investigation was to find and optimize the most appropriate medium for the algae growth to produce the maximum amount of hydrogen. First of all, the bioinformatics and biosystematics studies were taken for identifying the collected microalgae which was detected as Chlorella with the following features: spherical appearance, spent protozoan, Cup-shaped chloroplast with no flagella. On the other hand, the molecular analysis by PCR and 18S sequence typing of interested microalgae demonstrated 100% similarity to that well known sequences for Chlorella vulgaris. Second, we assessed some culture media including BBM, Chu10, TAP, and Sorokin and Krauss for optimum growth conditions for Chlorella vulgaris. In general, our results showed that BBM medium had the highest efficiency for producing microalgae biomass under following conditions: pH=8, temperature of 30 ° with 16 to 8 h light to darkness periods ratio.Third, we designed a more efficient photo-bioreactor apparatus toward inducing more powerful bio-hydrogen production by hydrogenase enzyme activity of our given microalgae. Then, the performance of the apparatus as well as the gene expression was scrutinized under different conditions (light, pH, sulphorous, etc.. For this, after extracting RNA and constructing cDNA, hydrogenase gene was amplified with PCR and the product was evaluated by agarose gel. However, the relative expression of the gene measured by Real Time PCR showed the influence of light, pH and sulphourous on the expression as compared with control.

  12. Evaluation of the volatile composition and sensory properties of five species of microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Durme, Jim; Goiris, Koen; De Winne, Ann; De Cooman, Luc; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2013-11-20

    Due to their high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids, antioxidants, and proteins, microalgae hold a lot of potential for nutritional applications. When microalgae are integrated into foodstuffs, the aroma is an important aspect to consider. In this study the aroma properties of microalgae were studied by correlating data on the volatile composition with sensory evaluations. Four species of marine microalgae ( Botryococcus braunii, , Rhodomonas , Tetraselmis species, and Nannochloropsis oculata ) and one fresh water microalga ( Chlorella vulgaris ) were investigated. Multivariate data processing revealed that microalgal samples having a seafood-like odor character contain high levels of sulfuric compounds (dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, and methional), diketones, α-ionone, and β-ionone. Fresh green, fruity flavors were linked with typical aldehydes such as 2,4-alkadienals and 2,4,6-alkatrienals. The presence of these compounds in fresh microalga pastes is explained by aroma formation mechanisms such as enzymatic lipid oxidation, enzymatic and chemical degradation of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (generating dimethyl sulfide), phenylalanine (generating benzaldehyde), and carotenoids (generating ionones).

  13. Synergy of flocculation and flotation for microalgae harvesting using aluminium electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenqing; Zhu, Lin; Chen, Qiuwen; Lu, Ji; Pan, Gang; Hu, Liuming; Yi, Qitao

    2017-06-01

    Microalgae are often used as feedstock for renewable biofuel production and as pollutant up-takers for wastewater treatment; however, biomass harvesting still remains a challenge in field applications. In this study, electro-flocculation using aluminium electrolysis was tested as a method to collect Chlorella vulgaris. The electrolysis products were positively charged over a wide pH range below 9.5, which gave them a flocculation potential for negatively charged microalgae. As flocculants were in-situ generated and gradually released, microalgae flocs formed in a snowballing mode, resulting in the compaction of large flocs. When higher current density was applied, microalgae could be harvested more rapidly, although there was a trade-off between a higher energy use and more residual aluminium in the culture medium. Benefits of this flocculation method are twofold: the phosphate decrease in post-harvesting could improve nutrient removal in microalgae based wastewater treatment, while the ammonium increase may favor microalgae recovery for medium recycling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chlorella: 125 years of the green survivalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krienitz, Lothar; Huss, Volker A R; Bock, Christina

    2015-02-01

    Chlorella, the archetype of unicellular green algae, is a high-performance primary producer in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Under the simple spherical morphology of Chlorella, many other 'green balls' unfolded as independent phylogenetic lineages as a result of convergent evolution. By contrast, green algae with strikingly different phenotypes were unmasked as close relatives of Chlorella by modern molecular techniques. Here, we point to the increasing impact of these diverse protists on ecology, evolution, and biotechnology in the light of integrative taxonomy.

  15. Identity and physiology of a new psychrophilic eukaryotic green alga, Chlorella sp., strain BI, isolated from a transitory pond near Bratina Island, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Kiss, R. M.; Ivanov, A.G.; Modla, S.; Czymmek, K.; Huner, N.P.A.; Priscu, J.C.; Lisle, J.T.; Hanson, T.E.

    2008-01-01

    Permanently low temperature environments are one of the most abundant microbial habitats on earth. As in most ecosystems, photosynthetic organisms drive primary production in low temperature food webs. Many of these phototrophic microorganisms are psychrophilic; however, functioning of the photosynthetic processes of these enigmatic psychrophiles (the 'photopsychrophiles') in cold environments is not well understood. Here we describe a new chlorophyte isolated from a low temperature pond, on the Ross Ice Shelf near Bratina Island, Antarctica. Phylogenetic and morphological analyses place this strain in the Chlorella clade, and we have named this new chlorophyte Chlorella BI. Chlorella BI is a psychrophilic species, exhibiting optimum temperature for growth at around 10??C. However, psychrophily in the Antarctic Chlorella was not linked to high levels of membrane-associated poly-unsaturated fatty acids. Unlike the model Antarctic lake alga, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO241, Chlorella BI has retained the ability for dynamic short term adjustment of light energy distribution between photosystem II (PS II) and photosystem I (PS I). In addition, Chlorella BI can grow under a variety of trophic modes, including heterotrophic growth in the dark. Thus, this newly isolated photopsychrophile has retained a higher versatility in response to environmental change than other well studied cold-adapted chlorophytes. ?? 2008 Springer.

  16. 不同营养方式对普通小球藻生长特性和细胞组成的影响%The Effects of Different Nutrition Modes on Growth Characteristics and Cell Components of Chlorella vulgaris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹云涛; 孔维宝; 葸玉琴; 李龙囡; 夏春谷

    2011-01-01

    The growth curves, specific growth rates and productivities of Chlorella vulgaris were analyzed under autotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic cultivation, as well as the changes of pH values and glucose consumption in medium, the contents and productivities of photosynthetic pigment, protein and lipid were investigated. The results indicated that the specific growth rate of C. vulgaris under mixotrophic was to 4.25 -4.43times than autotrophic and 0.78 - 1.00 times than heterotrophic, the productivity of C. vulgaris in mixotrophic was to 5.79 - 6.27 times than autotrophic, and 1.11 - 1.31 times than heterotrophic cultivation. The values of C. vulgaris productivities for photo- synthetic pigment (3.62 mg! L. d), protein (53.41 mg/ L. d) and lipid (44.65 mg/ L. d) were obtained under mixotrophic cultivation in per liters culture liquid, all kinds of value more than autotrophic and heterotrophic. The present paper showed that the mixotrophy be more fit for the physical environments of the microalgae growth conditions, and be suited to microalgae cultivation with high density and high content of bioactive substances.%采用自养、异养和混合培养3种营养方式对普通小球藻进行了培养,分析了3种培养方式下小球藻的生长曲线、比生长速率和产率、培养基中pH和葡萄糖的变化,测定了藻细胞的光合色素、蛋白质和油脂含量及其产率。结果表明:混合营养条件下小球藻的比生长速率为自养的4.25—4.43倍、异养的0.78—1.00倍,产率为自养的5.79~6.27倍、异养的1.11—1.31倍;混合营养条件下,单位体积小球藻培养液中总叶绿素、蛋白质和油脂的产率分别为3.62mg/(L·d)、53.41mg/(L·d)和44.65mg/(L·d),均高于自养和异养培养。研究认为,混合营养方式更加符合微藻生长的实际环境,是高密度、高含量活性物质培养微藻的理想方式,具有潜在的应用价值。

  17. Characterization of the highly branched glycogen from the thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria and comparison with other glycogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Garcia, Marta; Stuart, Marc C A; van der Maarel, Marc J E C

    2016-01-01

    The thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria synthesizes glycogen when growing under heterotrophic conditions. Structural characterization revealed that G. sulphuraria glycogen is the most highly branched glycogen described to date, with 18% of α-(1→6) linkages. Moreover, it differs fro

  18. Biofilm growth of Chlorella sorokiniana in a rotating biological contactor based photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanken, W; Janssen, M; Cuaresma, M; Libor, Z; Bhaiji, T; Wijffels, R H

    2014-12-01

    Microalgae biofilms could be used as a production platform for microalgae biomass. In this study, a photobioreactor design based on a rotating biological contactor (RBC) was used as a production platform for microalgae biomass cultivated in biofilm. In the photobioreactor, referred to as Algadisk, microalgae grow in biofilm on vertical rotating disks partially submerged in a growth medium. The objective is to evaluate the potential of the Algadisk photobioreactor with respect to the effects of disk roughness, disk rotation speed and CO2 concentration. These objectives where evaluated in relationship to productivity, photosynthetic efficiency, and long-term cultivation stability in a lab-scale Algadisk system. Although the lab-scale Algadisk system is used, operation parameters evaluated are relevant for scale-up. Chlorella Sorokiniana was used as model microalgae. In the lab-scale Algadisk reactor, productivity of 20.1 ± 0.7 g per m(2) disk surface per day and a biomass yield on light of 0.9 ± 0.04 g dry weight biomass per mol photons were obtained. Different disk rotation speeds did demonstrate minimal effects on biofilm growth and on the diffusion of substrate into the biofilm. CO2 limitation, however, drastically reduced productivity to 2-4 g per m(2) disk surface per day. Productivity could be maintained over a period of 21 weeks without re-inoculation of the Algadisk. Productivity decreased under extreme conditions such as pH 9-10, temperature above 40°C, and with low CO2 concentrations. Maximal productivity, however, was promptly recovered when optimal cultivation conditions were reinstated. These results exhibit an apparent opportunity to employ the Algadisk photobioreactor at large scale for microalgae biomass production if diffusion does not limit the CO2 supply.

  19. Techno-economical evaluation of protein extraction for microalgae biorefinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Y. W.; Sanders, J. P. M.; Bruins, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Due to scarcity of fossil feedstocks, there is an increasing demand for biobased fuels. Microalgae are considered as promising biobased feedstocks. However, microalgae based fuels are not yet produced at large scale at present. Applying biorefinery, not only for oil, but also for other components, such as carbohydrates and protein, may lead to the sustainable and economical microalgae-based fuels. This paper discusses two relatively mild conditions for microalgal protein extraction, based on alkali and enzymes. Green microalgae (Chlorella fusca) with and without prior lipid removal were used as feedstocks. Under mild conditions, more protein could be extracted using proteases, with the highest yields for microalgae meal (without lipids). The data on protein extraction yields were used to calculate the costs for producing 1 ton of microalgal protein. The processing cost for the alkaline method was € 2448 /ton protein. Enzymatic method performed better from an economic point of view with € 1367 /ton protein on processing costs. However, this is still far from industrially feasible. For both extraction methods, biomass cost per ton of produced product were high. A higher protein extraction yield can partially solve this problem, lowering processing cost to €620 and 1180 /ton protein product, using alkali and enzyme, respectively. Although alkaline method has lower processing cost, optimization appears to be better achievable using enzymes. If the enzymatic method can be optimized by lowering the amount of alkali added, leading to processing cost of € 633/ton protein product. Higher revenue can be generated when the residue after protein extraction can be sold as fuel, or better as a highly digestible feed for cattle.

  20. Carbon dioxide fixation by microalgae cultivated in open bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Centeno da Rosa, Ana Priscila; Fernandes Carvalho, Lisiane; Goldbeck, Luzia [Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Food, Federal University of Rio Grande (FURG), P.O. Box 474, Rio Grande, RS 96201-900 (Brazil); Vieira Costa, Jorge Alberto, E-mail: dqmjorge@furg.br [Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Food, Federal University of Rio Grande (FURG), P.O. Box 474, Rio Grande, RS 96201-900 (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} We studied the growth and CO{sub 2} fixation by Spirulina LEB18 and Chlorella kessleri. {yields} The maximum dailyfixation was obtained for Spirulina with an injection of 6% of CO{sub 2}. {yields} The microalgae presented growth during the 20 d of culture with up to 18% of CO{sub 2}. {yields} The use of CO{sub 2} from industrial generation decreases the cost of producing biomass. - Abstract: The biofixation of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) by microalgae has been proven to be an efficient and economical method, mainly due to the photosynthetic ability of these microorganisms to use this gas as a source of nutrients for their development. The aim of this work was to study the growth of Spirulina LEB18 and Chlorella kessleri microalgae, exposed to controlled and non-controlled conditions, with the injection of different concentrations of CO{sub 2}. The cultures was carried out in 6 L open raceway ponds, under controlled conditions at 30 {sup o}C and 39 {mu}E m{sup -2} s{sup -1} and under non-controlled conditions, protected by a tunnel of transparent film. The experiments were subjected to CO{sub 2} injections at concentrations of 0.038, 6, 12 and 18% (v/v). The highest concentration of biomass (4.95 g L{sup -1}) and maximum daily fixation (0.21 g g{sup -1} d{sup -1}) were obtained for Spirulina LEB18 in culture that was prepared in non-controlled conditions with an injection of 6% (v/v) of CO{sub 2}. C. kessleri had maximum (p < 0.0008) specific growth rate (0.84 d{sup -1}) when grown with 18% (v/v) of CO{sub 2} in non-controlled conditions of cultivation.

  1. Diverse acidogenic effluents as feedstock for microalgae cultivation: Dual phase metabolic transition on biomass growth and lipid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiranjeevi, P; Venkata Mohan, S

    2017-10-01

    In this study, a biorefinery process integrating dark fermentation with microalgae cultivation (dual phase metabolic transition) was demonstrated with real-field wastewater. Acid rich fermented effluents (distillery waste (FDW1); dairy waste (FDW2)) were used as feedstock for microalgae cultivation. Experiments were performed with FDW1 during growth phase (GP) in mixotrophic mode and FDW2 during stress phase (SP) in both mixotrophic and heterotrophic modes. Mixotrophic cultivation with FDW1 documented significantly higher biomass productivity (5.3g/l). Total lipid (TL) percentage was high in mixotrophic (34%) mode and neutral lipid (NL) was high in heterotrophic (13%) mode of cultivation during SP with FDW2. Overall, the microalgae growth is favoured with effluents containing high acetate, and low butyrate concentrations. Mixotrophic cultivation enhanced both biomass growth and lipid production along with simultaneous treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of cattle-slaughterhouse wastewater and the reuse of sludge for biodiesel production by microalgal heterotrophic bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Manzoni Maroneze

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Microalgal heterotrophic bioreactors are a potential technological development that can convert organic matter, nitrogen and phosphorus of wastewaters into a biomass suitable for energy production. The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of microalgal heterotrophic bioreactors in the secondary treatment of cattle-slaughterhouse wastewater and the reuse of microalgal sludge for biodiesel production. The experiments were performed in a bubble column bioreactor using the microalgae Phormidium sp. Heterotrophic microalgal bioreactors removed 90 % of the chemical oxygen demand, 57 % of total nitrogen and 52 % of total phosphorus. Substantial microalgal sludge is produced in the process (substrate yield coefficient of 0.43 mg sludge mg chemical oxygen demand−¹, resulting in a biomass with high potential for producing biodiesel (ester content of more than 99 %, cetane number of 55, iodine value of 73.5 g iodine 100 g−¹, unsaturation degree of ~75 % and a cold filter plugging point of 5 ºC.

  3. A Label-Free Microfluidic Biosensor for Activity Detection of Single Microalgae Cells Based on Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junsheng Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection of living microalgae cells is very important for ballast water treatment and analysis. Chlorophyll fluorescence is an indicator of photosynthetic activity and hence the living status of plant cells. In this paper, we developed a novel microfluidic biosensor system that can quickly and accurately detect the viability of single microalgae cells based on chlorophyll fluorescence. The system is composed of a laser diode as an excitation light source, a photodiode detector, a signal analysis circuit, and a microfluidic chip as a microalgae cell transportation platform. To demonstrate the utility of this system, six different living and dead algae samples (Karenia mikimotoi Hansen, Chlorella vulgaris, Nitzschia closterium, Platymonas subcordiformis, Pyramidomonas delicatula and Dunaliella salina were tested. The developed biosensor can distinguish clearly between the living microalgae cells and the dead microalgae cells. The smallest microalgae cells that can be detected by using this biosensor are 3 μm ones. Even smaller microalgae cells could be detected by increasing the excitation light power. The developed microfluidic biosensor has great potential for in situ ballast water analysis.

  4. Improved Productivity of Neutral Lipids in Chlorella sp. A2 by Minimal Nitrogen Supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junying eZhu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen starvation is an efficient environmental pressure for increasing lipid accumulation in microalgae, but it could also significantly lower the biomass productivity, resulting in lower lipid productivity. In this study, green alga Chlorella sp. A2 was cultivated by using a minimal nitrogen supply strategy under both laboratory and outdoor cultivation conditions to evaluate biomass accumulation and lipid production. Results showed that minimal nitrogen supply could promote neutral lipid accumulation of Chlorella sp. A2 without a significant negative effect on cell growth. In laboratory cultivation mode, alga cells cultured with 18 mg L-1 d-1 urea addition could generate 74% and 416% (w/w more neutral lipid productivity than cells cultured with regular BG11 and nitrogen starvation media, respectively. In outdoor cultivation mode, lipid productivity of cells cultured with 18 mg L-1 d-1 urea addition is approximately 10% and 88% higher than the one with regular BG11 and nitrogen starvation media, respectively. Notably, the results of photosynthetic analysis clarified that minimal nitrogen supply reduced the loss of photosynthetic capacity to keep CO2 fixation during photosynthesis for biomass production. The minimal nitrogen supply strategy for microalgae cultivation could promote neutral lipid accumulation without a significant negative effect on cell growth, resulting in a significant improvement in the lipid productivity.

  5. Assessment of bioavailability of heavy metal pollutants using soil isolates of Chlorella sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurti, Gummuluru S R; Subashchandrabose, Suresh R; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-06-01

    Biotests conducted with plants are presently used to estimate metal bioavailability in contaminated soils. But when plants are grown in soils, especially the plants with fine roots, root collection is easily biased and tedious. Indeed, at harvest, small amounts of soil can adhere to roots, resulting in overestimation of root metal content, and the finest roots are often discarded from the analysis because of their difficult and almost impossible recovery. This report presents a novel method for assessing the bioavailability of heavy metals in soils using microalgae. Two species of green unicellular microalgae were isolated from two highly contaminated soils and identified by phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary analyses as Chlorella sp. RBM and Chlorella sp. RHM. These two cultures were used to determine the metal uptake from metal-contaminated soils of South Australia as a novel, cost-effective, simple and rapid method for assessing the bioavailability of heavy metals in soils. The suggested method is an attempt to achieve a realistic estimate of bioavailability which overcomes the inherent drawback of root metal contamination in the bioavailability indices so far reported.

  6. Growth Characteristics of Tetraselmis sp.-1 in Phototrophic, Mixotrophic and Heterotrophic Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Jihong(沈继红); Yu Junhong; Lin Xuezheng; Li Guangyou; Liu Fayi

    2004-01-01

    Tetraselmis sp.-1 is a new microalgae strain constructed by cell fusion technique. In this paper, the growth characteristics of Tetraselmis sp.-1 under different culture conditions are investigated. The growth kinetic models are obtained, the assimilation of C and NH4+ is investigated and the assimilation efficiency of Tetraselmis sp.-1 under different culture conditions is calculated. The results show that different culture conditions do not have obvious influence on carbon absorbance, but have significant influence on nitrogen absorbance, C∶N is maximum under heterotrophic condition, while minimum under phototrophic condition. The assimilation efficiency (η) of Tetraselmis sp.-1 has the highest value in heterotrophic condition and largely higher than those in phototrophic and mixotrophic conditions.

  7. Spectral optical properties of selected photosynthetic microalgae producing biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Euntaek; Heng, Ri-Liang; Pilon, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the spectral complex index of refraction of biofuel producing photosynthetic microalgae between 400 and 750 nm. They were retrieved from their experimentally measured average absorption and scattering cross-sections. The microalgae were treated as homogeneous polydisperse spheres with equivalent diameter such that their surface area was identical to that of their actual spheroidal shape. An inverse method was developed combining Lorentz-Mie theory as the forward method and genetic algorithm. The unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain CC125 and its truncated chlorophyll antenna transformants tla1, tlaX, and tla1-CW+ as well as Botryococcus braunii, Chlorella sp., and Chlorococcum littorale were investigated. These species were selected for their ability to produce either hydrogen gas or lipids for liquid fuel production. Their retrieved real and imaginary parts of the complex index of refraction were continuous functions of wavelength with absorption peaks corresponding to those of in vivo Chlorophylls a and b. The T-matrix method was also found to accurately predict the experimental measurements by treating the microalgae as axisymmetric spheroids with the experimentally measured major and minor diameter distributions and the retrieved spectral complex index of refraction. Finally, pigment mass fractions were also estimated from the retrieved absorption index. The method and/or the reported optical properties can be used in various applications from ocean remote sensing, carbon cycle study, as well as photobiological carbon dioxide mitigation and biofuel production.

  8. Bacterial bioaugmentation for improving methane and hydrogen production from microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The recalcitrant cell walls of microalgae may limit their digestibility for bioenergy production. Considering that cellulose contributes to the cell wall recalcitrance of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris, this study investigated bioaugmentation with a cellulolytic and hydrogenogenic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum, at different inoculum ratios as a possible method to improve CH4 and H2 production of microalgae. Results Methane production was found to increase by 17?~?24% with the addition of C. thermocellum, as a result of enhanced cell disruption and excess hydrogen production. Furthermore, addition of C. thermocellum enhanced the bacterial diversity and quantities, leading to higher fermentation efficiency. A two-step process of addition of C. thermocellum first and methanogenic sludge subsequently could recover both hydrogen and methane, with a 9.4% increase in bioenergy yield, when compared with the one-step process of simultaneous addition of C. thermocellum and methanogenic sludge. The fluorescence peaks of excitation-emission matrix spectra associated with chlorophyll can serve as biomarkers for algal cell degradation. Conclusions Bioaugmentation with C. thermocellum improved the degradation of C. vulgaris biomass, producing higher levels of methane and hydrogen. The two-step process, with methanogenic inoculum added after the hydrogen production reached saturation, was found to be an energy-efficiency method for hydrogen and methane production. PMID:23815806

  9. Effect of Selenate on Viability and Selenomethionine Accumulation of Chlorella sorokiniana Grown in Batch Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vílchez, Carlos; Torronteras, Rafael; Vigara, Javier; Gómez-Jacinto, Veronica; Janzer, Nora; Gómez-Ariza, José-Luis; Márová, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of Se(+VI) on viability, cell morphology, and selenomethionine accumulation of the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana grown in batch cultures. Culture exposed to sublethal Se concentrations of 40 mg·L−1 (212 μM) decreased growth rates for about 25% compared to control. A selenate EC50 value of 45 mg·L−1 (238.2 μM) was determined. Results showed that chlorophyll and carotenoids contents were not affected by Se exposure, while oxygen evolution decreased by half. Ultrastructural studies revealed granular stroma, fingerprint-like appearance of thylakoids which did not compromise cell activity. Unlike control cultures, SDS PAGE electrophoresis of crude extracts from selenate-exposed cell cultures revealed appearance of a protein band identified as 53 kDa Rubisco large subunit of Chlorella sorokiniana, suggesting that selenate affects expression of the corresponding chloroplast gene as this subunit is encoded in the chloroplast DNA. Results revealed that the microalga was able to accumulate up to 140 mg·kg−1 of SeMet in 120 h of cultivation. This paper shows that Chlorella sorokiniana biomass can be enriched in the high value aminoacid SeMet in batch cultures, while keeping photochemical viability and carbon dioxide fixation activity intact, if exposed to suitable sublethal concentrations of Se. PMID:24688385

  10. Effect of Selenate on Viability and Selenomethionine Accumulation of Chlorella sorokiniana Grown in Batch Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živan Gojkovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of Se(+VI on viability, cell morphology, and selenomethionine accumulation of the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana grown in batch cultures. Culture exposed to sublethal Se concentrations of 40 mg·L−1 (212 μM decreased growth rates for about 25% compared to control. A selenate EC50 value of 45 mg·L−1 (238.2 μM was determined. Results showed that chlorophyll and carotenoids contents were not affected by Se exposure, while oxygen evolution decreased by half. Ultrastructural studies revealed granular stroma, fingerprint-like appearance of thylakoids which did not compromise cell activity. Unlike control cultures, SDS PAGE electrophoresis of crude extracts from selenate-exposed cell cultures revealed appearance of a protein band identified as 53 kDa Rubisco large subunit of Chlorella sorokiniana, suggesting that selenate affects expression of the corresponding chloroplast gene as this subunit is encoded in the chloroplast DNA. Results revealed that the microalga was able to accumulate up to 140 mg·kg−1 of SeMet in 120 h of cultivation. This paper shows that Chlorella sorokiniana biomass can be enriched in the high value aminoacid SeMet in batch cultures, while keeping photochemical viability and carbon dioxide fixation activity intact, if exposed to suitable sublethal concentrations of Se.

  11. Lipid extractions from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich and oleaginous Chlorella sp. biomasses by organic-nanoclays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Chul; Huh, Yun Suk; Farooq, Wasif; Chung, Jane; Han, Jong-In; Shin, Hyun-Jae; Jeong, Sang Hwa; Lee, Jin-Suk; Oh, You-Kwan; Park, Ji-Yeon

    2013-06-01

    Microalgae biorefinement has attracted in intensive academic and industrial interest worldwide for its potential to replace petrol biofuels as economically and environmentally advantageous alternatives. However, harvesting and lipid extraction remain as critical and difficult issues to be resolved. In the present study, four amino-groups functionalized organic-nano clays were prepared. Specifically, Mg or Al or Ca backboned and covalently linked with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane or 3-[2-(2-aminoethylamino)ethylamino]propyltrimethoxysilane by sol-gel reaction under ambient conditions, resulted in Mg-APTES clay, Al-APTES clay, Ca-APTES clay, and Mg-N3 clay, respectively. Each organic-nanoclay was utilized for lipid extraction from wet microalgae biomass. As a result, the lipid-extraction efficiency of paste docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich Chlorella sp. with low lipid content was high, while one of paste oleaginous Chlorella sp. with high lipid content was relatively low. Despite the low lipid-extraction efficiencies in all of the wet microalgae biomass, the conversion of the extracted lipids' fatty acids to biodiesel was nearly 100%.

  12. Tolerance and nutrients consumption of Chlorella vulgaris growing in mineral medium and real wastewater under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de Lourdes Franco Martínez

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae have the potential of consuming high amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus from wastewater; thus, avoiding the risk of eutrophication of the water bodies. Nevertheless, ammonium can usually inhibit the growth of microalgae. Tolerance to ammonium is specific of each strain; so, the development of tertiary wastewater treatment proposals, employing microalgae, has as a first step the study of its tolerance to N-NH3. In this work, the tolerance of Chlorella vulgaris to N-NH3, using mineral medium, was studied. Afterward, C. vulgaris was used to remove nitrogen and phosphorus from a real wastewater. The maximal biomass concentration was reached at 66 ppm N-NH3 (0.49 gL-1 with the complete depletion of the ammonium and a phosphorus consumption of 2 mgPi L-1d-1 in all the experiments. When C. vulgaris was grown in real wastewater, the final biomass concentration was 0.267 g L-1 and the nutrients (N and P were totally consumed after 3 days. According with these results, this strain of Chlorella has the potential for the removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from tertiary wastewater and the biomass produced in the process can be used for the production of high value products, such as pigments, proteins, carbohydrate or used for animal feed.

  13. Balance de la producción de Chlorella sp y Moina sp en la UEB PISPAVÓN, Villa Clara, Cuba (Balance of Chlorella sp and Moina sp production in the UEB PISPAVÓN, Villa Clara, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-López, Teresita de J.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl presente estudio fue implementado con la información histórica existente en los archivos de PISPAVÓN, cuantificándose la producción de Chlorella sp y Moina sp en los años 2003, 2004 y 2005, las que fueron de 7 777, 5 174 y 1 988 m3 de algas y de 4 695, 3 075 y 1 557 kg del cladócero respectivamente. Esta disminución se debió al déficit de miel y cal, así como las excesivas lluvias que azotaron laregión. Mediante los estudios efectuados se determinó que la producciónde 1 kg de Moina requiere disponibilidades de Chlorella entre 1,5 y 2,0 m3.SummaryThe present study was implement with the existing historicalinformation in the PISPAVÓN archives, quantifying the production ofChlorella sp and Moina sp in 2003, 2004 and 2005, those that were of7 777, 5 174 and 1 988 m3 of microalgae and 4 695, 3 075 and 1 557kg of the cladocera respectively. This diminishing had to the deficit of honey and lime, as well as excessive rains that whipped the region. By means of the conducted studies was determined that the production of 1 kg of Moina requires availabilities of Chlorella between 1.5 and 2.0 m3.

  14. Carbon dioxide (CO2) biofixation by microalgae and its potential for biorefinery and biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Mohd Asyraf; Meng, Tan Keang

    2017-04-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) using biological process is one of the promising approaches for CO2 capture and storage. Recently, biological sequestration using microalgae has gained many interest due to its capability to utilize CO2 as carbon source and biomass produced can be used as a feedstock for other value added product for instance biofuel and chemicals. In this study, the CO2 biofixation by two microalgae species, Chlorella sp. and Tetraselmis suecica was investigated using different elevated CO2 concentration. The effect of CO2 concentration on microalgae growth kinetic, biofixation and its chemical composition were determined using 0.04, 5, 15 and 30% CO2. The variation of initial pH value and its relationship on CO2 concentration toward cultivation medium was also investigated. The present study indicated that both microalgae displayed different tolerance toward CO2 concentration. The maximum biomass production and biofixation for Chlorella sp. of 0.64gL(-1) and 96.89mgL(-1)d(-1) was obtained when the cultivation was carried out using 5 and 15% CO2, respectively. In contrast, the maximum biomass production and CO2 biofixation for T. suecica of 0.72gL(-1) and 111.26mgL(-1)d(-1) were obtained from cultivation using 15 and 5% CO2. The pH value for the cultivation medium using CO2 was between 7.5 and 9, which is favorable for microalgal growth. The potential of biomass obtained from the cultivation as a biorefinery feedstock was also evaluated. An anaerobic fermentation of the microalgae biomass by bacteria Clostridium saccharoperbutylacenaticum N1-4 produced various type of value added product such as organic acid and solvent. Approximately 0.27 and 0.90gL(-1) of organic acid, which corresponding to acetic and butyric acid were produced from the fermentation of Chlorella sp. and T. suecica biomass. Overall, this study suggests that Chlorella sp. and T. suecica are efficient microorganism that can be used for CO2 biofixation and as a feedstock for chemical production

  15. Discovery of Bioactive Metabolites in Biofuel Microalgae That Offer Protection against Predatory Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher eBagwell

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae could become an important resource for addressing increasing global demand for food, energy, and commodities while helping to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gases. Even though Chlorophytes are generally regarded safe for human consumption, there is still much we do not understand about the metabolic and biochemical potential of microscopic algae. The aim of this study was to evaluate biofuel candidate strains of Chlorella and Scenedesmus for the potential to produce bioactive metabolites when grown under nutrient depletion regimes intended to stimulate production of triacylglycerides (TAG. Strain specific combinations of macro- and micro-nutrient restricted growth media did stimulate neutral lipid accumulation by microalgal cultures. However, cultures that were restricted for iron consistently and reliably tested positive for cytotoxicity by in vivo bioassays. The addition of iron back to these cultures resulted in the disappearance of the bioactive components by LC/MS fingerprinting and loss of cytotoxicity by in vivo bioassay. Incomplete NMR characterization of the most abundant cytotoxic fractions suggested that small molecular weight peptides and glycosides could be responsible for Chlorella cytotoxicity. Experiments were conducted to determine if the bioactive metabolites induced by Fe-limitation in Chlorella sp. cultures would elicit protection against Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus, an obligate predator of Chlorella. Introduction of V. chlorellavorus resulted in a 72% decrease in algal biomass in the experimental controls after 7 days. Conversely, only slight losses of algal biomass were measured for the iron limited Chlorella cultures (0 - 9 %. This study demonstrates a causal linkage between iron bioavailability and bioactive metabolite production in strains of Chlorella and Scenedesmus. Further study of this phenomenon could contribute to the development of new strategies to extend algal production cycles in open, outdoor

  16. Use of De Novo Transcriptome Libraries to Characterize a Novel Oleaginous Marine Chlorella Species during the Accumulation of Triacylglycerols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cresten B Mansfeldt

    Full Text Available Marine chlorophytes of the genus Chlorella are unicellular algae capable of accumulating a high proportion of cellular lipids that can be used for biodiesel production. In this study, we examined the broad physiological capabilities of a subtropical strain (C596 of Chlorella sp. "SAG-211-18" including its heterotrophic growth and tolerance to low salt. We found that the alga replicates more slowly at diluted salt concentrations and can grow on a wide range of carbon substrates in the dark. We then sequenced the RNA of Chlorella strain C596 to elucidate key metabolic genes and investigate the transcriptomic response of the organism when transitioning from a nutrient-replete to a nutrient-deficient condition when neutral lipids accumulate. Specific transcripts encoding for enzymes involved in both starch and lipid biosynthesis, among others, were up-regulated as the cultures transitioned into a lipid-accumulating state whereas photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated. Transcripts encoding for two of the up-regulated enzymes-a galactoglycerolipid lipase and a diacylglyceride acyltransferase-were also monitored by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The results of these assays confirmed the transcriptome-sequencing data. The present transcriptomic study will assist in the greater understanding, more effective application, and efficient design of Chlorella-based biofuel production systems.

  17. Use of De Novo Transcriptome Libraries to Characterize a Novel Oleaginous Marine Chlorella Species during the Accumulation of Triacylglycerols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B; Richter, Lubna V; Ahner, Beth A; Cochlan, William P; Richardson, Ruth E

    2016-01-01

    Marine chlorophytes of the genus Chlorella are unicellular algae capable of accumulating a high proportion of cellular lipids that can be used for biodiesel production. In this study, we examined the broad physiological capabilities of a subtropical strain (C596) of Chlorella sp. "SAG-211-18" including its heterotrophic growth and tolerance to low salt. We found that the alga replicates more slowly at diluted salt concentrations and can grow on a wide range of carbon substrates in the dark. We then sequenced the RNA of Chlorella strain C596 to elucidate key metabolic genes and investigate the transcriptomic response of the organism when transitioning from a nutrient-replete to a nutrient-deficient condition when neutral lipids accumulate. Specific transcripts encoding for enzymes involved in both starch and lipid biosynthesis, among others, were up-regulated as the cultures transitioned into a lipid-accumulating state whereas photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated. Transcripts encoding for two of the up-regulated enzymes-a galactoglycerolipid lipase and a diacylglyceride acyltransferase-were also monitored by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The results of these assays confirmed the transcriptome-sequencing data. The present transcriptomic study will assist in the greater understanding, more effective application, and efficient design of Chlorella-based biofuel production systems.

  18. Food commodities from microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draaisma, René B; Wijffels, René H; Slegers, P M Ellen; Brentner, Laura B; Roy, Adip; Barbosa, Maria J

    2013-04-01

    The prospect of sustainable production of food ingredients from photoautotrophic microalgae was reviewed. Clearly, there is scope for microalgal oils to replace functions of major vegetable oils, and in addition to deliver health benefits to food products. Furthermore, with a limited production surface, a substantial portion of the European Union market could be supplied with edible oils and proteins from microalgae. Yet, before microalgal ingredients can become genuinely sustainable and cost effective alternatives for current food commodities, major breakthroughs in production technology and in biorefinery approaches are required. Moreover, before market introduction, evidence on safety of novel microalgal ingredients, is needed. In general, we conclude that microalgae have a great potential as a sustainable feedstock for food commodities.

  19. Isolation and evaluation of oil-producing microalgae from subtropical coastal and brackish waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K Y Lim

    Full Text Available Microalgae have been widely reported as a promising source of biofuels, mainly based on their high areal productivity of biomass and lipids as triacylglycerides and the possibility for cultivation on non-arable land. The isolation and selection of suitable strains that are robust and display high growth and lipid accumulation rates is an important prerequisite for their successful cultivation as a bioenergy source, a process that can be compared to the initial selection and domestication of agricultural crops. We developed standard protocols for the isolation and cultivation for a range of marine and brackish microalgae. By comparing growth rates and lipid productivity, we assessed the potential of subtropical coastal and brackish microalgae for the production of biodiesel and other oil-based bioproducts. This study identified Nannochloropsis sp., Dunaniella salina and new isolates of Chlorella sp. and Tetraselmis sp. as suitable candidates for a multiple-product algae crop. We conclude that subtropical coastal microalgae display a variety of fatty acid profiles that offer a wide scope for several oil-based bioproducts, including biodiesel and omega-3 fatty acids. A biorefinery approach for microalgae would make economical production more feasible but challenges remain for efficient harvesting and extraction processes for some species.

  20. Isolation and evaluation of oil-producing microalgae from subtropical coastal and brackish waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, David K Y; Garg, Sourabh; Timmins, Matthew; Zhang, Eugene S B; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Schuhmann, Holger; Li, Yan; Schenk, Peer M

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae have been widely reported as a promising source of biofuels, mainly based on their high areal productivity of biomass and lipids as triacylglycerides and the possibility for cultivation on non-arable land. The isolation and selection of suitable strains that are robust and display high growth and lipid accumulation rates is an important prerequisite for their successful cultivation as a bioenergy source, a process that can be compared to the initial selection and domestication of agricultural crops. We developed standard protocols for the isolation and cultivation for a range of marine and brackish microalgae. By comparing growth rates and lipid productivity, we assessed the potential of subtropical coastal and brackish microalgae for the production of biodiesel and other oil-based bioproducts. This study identified Nannochloropsis sp., Dunaniella salina and new isolates of Chlorella sp. and Tetraselmis sp. as suitable candidates for a multiple-product algae crop. We conclude that subtropical coastal microalgae display a variety of fatty acid profiles that offer a wide scope for several oil-based bioproducts, including biodiesel and omega-3 fatty acids. A biorefinery approach for microalgae would make economical production more feasible but challenges remain for efficient harvesting and extraction processes for some species.

  1. Isolation and Evaluation of Oil-Producing Microalgae from Subtropical Coastal and Brackish Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, David K. Y.; Garg, Sourabh; Timmins, Matthew; Zhang, Eugene S. B.; Thomas-Hall, Skye R.; Schuhmann, Holger; Li, Yan; Schenk, Peer M.

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae have been widely reported as a promising source of biofuels, mainly based on their high areal productivity of biomass and lipids as triacylglycerides and the possibility for cultivation on non-arable land. The isolation and selection of suitable strains that are robust and display high growth and lipid accumulation rates is an important prerequisite for their successful cultivation as a bioenergy source, a process that can be compared to the initial selection and domestication of agricultural crops. We developed standard protocols for the isolation and cultivation for a range of marine and brackish microalgae. By comparing growth rates and lipid productivity, we assessed the potential of subtropical coastal and brackish microalgae for the production of biodiesel and other oil-based bioproducts. This study identified Nannochloropsis sp., Dunaniella salina and new isolates of Chlorella sp. and Tetraselmis sp. as suitable candidates for a multiple-product algae crop. We conclude that subtropical coastal microalgae display a variety of fatty acid profiles that offer a wide scope for several oil-based bioproducts, including biodiesel and omega-3 fatty acids. A biorefinery approach for microalgae would make economical production more feasible but challenges remain for efficient harvesting and extraction processes for some species. PMID:22792403

  2. Continuous production of biodiesel from microalgae by extraction coupling with transesterification under supercritical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dan; Qiao, Baoquan; Li, Gen; Xue, Song; Yin, Jianzhong

    2017-08-01

    Raw material for biodiesel has been expanded from edible oil to non-edible oil. In this study, biodiesel continuous production for two kinds of microalgae Chrysophyta and Chlorella sp. was conducted. Coupling with the supercritical carbon dioxide extraction, the oil of microalgae was extracted firstly, and then sent to the downstream production of biodiesel. The residue after decompression can be reused as the material for pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals. Results showed that the particle size of microalgae, temperature, pressure, molar ration of methanol to oil, flow of CO2 and n-hexane all have effects on the yield of biodiesel. With the optimal operation conditions: 40mesh algae, extraction temperature 60°C, flow of n-hexane 0.4ml/min, reaction temperature: 340°C, pressure: 18-20MPa, CO2 flow of 0.5L/min, molar ration of methanol to oil 84:1, a yield of 56.31% was obtained for Chrysophyta, and 63.78% for Chlorella sp. due to the higher lipid content. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Toxicological effects of chlorpyrifos on growth, enzyme activity and chlorophyll a synthesis of freshwater microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangchao; Chen, Mindong; Wang, Zhuang; Qiu, Weijian; Wang, Junfeng; Shen, Yafei; Wang, Yajun; Ge, Shun

    2016-07-01

    This paper aims to acquire the experimental data on the eco-toxicological effects of agricultural pollutants on the aquatic plants and the data can support the assessment of toxicity on the phytoplankton. The pesticide of Chlorpyrifos used as a good model to investigate its eco-toxicological effect on the different microalgae in freshwater. In order to address the pollutants derived from forestry and agricultural applications, freshwater microalgae were considered as a good sample to investigate the impact of pesticides such as Chlorpyrifos on aquatic life species. Two microalgae of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Merismopedia sp. were employed to evaluate toxicity of Chlorpyrifos in short time and long time by means of measuring the growth inhibition rate, the redox system and the content of chlorophyll a, respectively. In this study, the results showed that EC50 values ranging from 7.63 to 19.64mg/L, indicating the Chlorpyrifos had a relatively limited to the growth of algae during the period of the acute toxicity experiment. Moreover, when two kinds of algae were exposed to a medium level of Chlorpyrifos, SOD and CAT activities were importantly advanced. Therefore, the growth rate and SOD and CAT activities can be highly recommended for the eco-toxicological assessment. In addition, chlorophyll a also could be used as a targeted parameter for assessing the eco-toxicity of Chlorpyrifos on both Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Merismopedia sp. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Microalgae: a robust "green bio-bridge" between energy and environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yimin; Xu, Changan; Vaidyanathan, Seetharaman

    2017-08-01

    Microalgae are a potential candidate for biofuel production and environmental treatment because of their specific characteristics (e.g. fast growth, carbon neutral, and rich lipid accumulations). However, several primary bottlenecks still exist in current technologies, including low biomass conversion efficiency, bio-invasion from the external environment, limited or costly nutrient sources, and high energy and capital input for harvest, and stalling its industrial progression. Coupling biofuel production with environmental treatment renders microalgae a more feasible feedstock. This review focuses on microalgae biotechnologies for both bioenergy generation and environmental treatment (e.g. CO2 sequestration and wastewater reclamation). Different intelligent technologies have been developed, especially during the last decade, to eliminate the bottlenecks, including mixotrophic/heterotrophic cultivation, immobilization, and co-cultivation. It has been realized that any single purpose for the cultivation of microalgae is not an economically feasible option. Combinations of applications in biorefineries are gradually reckoned to be necessary as it provides more economically feasible and environmentally sustainable operations. This presents microalgae as a special niche occupier linking the fields of energy and environmental sciences and technologies. The integrated application of microalgae is also proven by most of the life-cycle analysis studies. This study summarizes the latest development of primary microalgal biotechnologies in the two areas that will bring researchers a comprehensive view towards industrialization with an economic perspective.

  5. Production of biodiesel from microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilović Bojana R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, more attention has been paid to the use of third generation feedstocs for the production of biodiesel. One of the most promising sources of oil for biodiesel production are microalgae. They are unicellular or colonial photosynthetic organisms, with permanently increasing industrial application in the production of not only chemicals and nutritional supplements but also biodiesel. Biodiesel productivity per hectare of cultivation area can be up to 100 times higher for microalgae than for oil crops. Also, microalgae can grow in a variety of environments that are often unsuitable for agricultural purposes. Microalgae oil content varies in different species and can reach up to 77% of dry biomass, while the oil productivity by the phototrophic cultivation of microalgae is up to 122 mg/l/d. Variations of the growth conditions and the implementation of the genetic engineering can induce the changes in the composition and productivity of microalgal oil. Biodiesel from microalgae can be produced in two ways: by transesterification of oil extracted from biomass or by direct transesterification of algal biomass (so called in situ transesterification. This paper reviews the curent status of microalgae used for the production of biodiesel including their isolation, cultivation, harvesting and conversion to biodiesel. Because of high oil productivity, microalgae will play a significant role in future biodiesel production. The advantages of using microalgae as a source for biofuel production are increased efficiency and reduced cost of production. Also, microalgae do not require a lot of space for growing and do not have a negative impact on the global food and water supplies. Disadvantages of using microalgae are more difficult separation of biomass and the need for further research to develop standardized methods for microalgae cultivation and biodiesel production. Currently, microalgae are not yet sustainable option for the commercial

  6. Comprehensive modeling and investigation of the effect of iron on the growth rate and lipid accumulation of Chlorella vulgaris cultured in batch photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concas, Alessandro; Steriti, Alberto; Pisu, Massimo; Cao, Giacomo

    2014-02-01

    Recent works have shown that specific strains of microalgae are capable to simultaneously increase their growth rate and lipid content when cultured under suitable concentrations of iron. While these results are promising in view of the exploitation of microalgae for producing biofuels, to the best of our knowledge, no mathematical model capable to describe the effect of iron on lipid accumulation in microalgae, has been so far proposed. A comprehensive mathematical model describing the effect of iron on chlorophyll synthesis, nitrogen assimilation, growth rate and lipid accumulation in a freshwater strain of Chlorella vulgaris is then proposed in this work. Model results are successfully compared with experimental data which confirm the positive effect of growing iron concentrations on lipid productivity of C. vulgaris. Thus, the proposed model might represent a useful tool to optimize iron-based strategies to improve the lipid productivity of microalgal cultures.

  7. 分次加碲法培养高富碲量小球藻及其对藻体抗氧化酶系统的影响%Culture of High Tellyrium-Enriched Chlorella Vulgaris with a Stepwise Tellurium Addition Method and its Effects on the Antioxidant Enzymes of the Microalgae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋洁; 陈填烽; 杨芳; 郑文杰

    2010-01-01

    在小球藻(Chlorella vulgaris,C.vulgaris)生长周期的第7、8、93天分次添加无机碲(Na2TeO3),维持碲剂量(XTe:以单位生物量C.vulgaris 的加碲量为碲剂量)为0.25~1.00,进行富碲培养.观察不同剂量处理组中小球藻对无机碲的富集转化及最终生物量、水溶性蛋白含量、抗氧化酶活性的变化情况.结果表明,XTe为1.00时碲产量高达67.79mg/g,其中有机碲产量为18.62 mg/g;富碲C.vulgaris 的生物量和水溶性蛋白都有明显增加,即控制剂量在1.00 以内可维持甚至促进C.vulgaris 的生长.分次加碲法是小球藻高值化处理的有效途径.

  8. Nitrogen Removal from Landfill Leachate by Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio F. L. Pereira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Landfill leachates result from the degradation of solid residues in sanitary landfills, thus presenting a high variability in terms of composition. Normally, these effluents are characterized by high ammoniacal-nitrogen (N–NH4+ concentrations, high chemical oxygen demands and low phosphorus concentrations. The development of effective treatment strategies becomes difficult, posing a serious problem to the environment. Phycoremediation appears to be a suitable alternative for the treatment of landfill leachates. In this study, the potential of Chlorella vulgaris for biomass production and nutrients (mainly nitrogen and phosphorus removal from different compositions of a landfill leachate was evaluated. Since microalgae also require phosphorus for their growth, different loads of this nutrient were evaluated, giving the following N:P ratios: 12:1, 23:1 and 35:1. The results have shown that C. vulgaris was able to grow in the different leachate compositions assessed. However, microalgal growth was higher in the cultures presenting the lowest N–NH4+ concentration. In terms of nutrients uptake, an effective removal of N–NH4+ and phosphorus was observed in all the experiments, especially in those supplied with phosphorus. Nevertheless, N–NO3− removal was considered almost negligible. These promising results constitute important findings in the development of a bioremediation technology for the treatment of landfill leachates.

  9. Nitrogen Removal from Landfill Leachate by Microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sérgio F. L.; Gonçalves, Ana L.; Moreira, Francisca C.; Silva, Tânia F. C. V.; Vilar, Vítor J. P.; Pires, José C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Landfill leachates result from the degradation of solid residues in sanitary landfills, thus presenting a high variability in terms of composition. Normally, these effluents are characterized by high ammoniacal-nitrogen (N–NH4+) concentrations, high chemical oxygen demands and low phosphorus concentrations. The development of effective treatment strategies becomes difficult, posing a serious problem to the environment. Phycoremediation appears to be a suitable alternative for the treatment of landfill leachates. In this study, the potential of Chlorella vulgaris for biomass production and nutrients (mainly nitrogen and phosphorus) removal from different compositions of a landfill leachate was evaluated. Since microalgae also require phosphorus for their growth, different loads of this nutrient were evaluated, giving the following N:P ratios: 12:1, 23:1 and 35:1. The results have shown that C. vulgaris was able to grow in the different leachate compositions assessed. However, microalgal growth was higher in the cultures presenting the lowest N–NH4+ concentration. In terms of nutrients uptake, an effective removal of N–NH4+ and phosphorus was observed in all the experiments, especially in those supplied with phosphorus. Nevertheless, N–NO3− removal was considered almost negligible. These promising results constitute important findings in the development of a bioremediation technology for the treatment of landfill leachates. PMID:27869676

  10. Nitrogen Removal from Landfill Leachate by Microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sérgio F L; Gonçalves, Ana L; Moreira, Francisca C; Silva, Tânia F C V; Vilar, Vítor J P; Pires, José C M

    2016-11-17

    Landfill leachates result from the degradation of solid residues in sanitary landfills, thus presenting a high variability in terms of composition. Normally, these effluents are characterized by high ammoniacal-nitrogen (N-NH₄⁺) concentrations, high chemical oxygen demands and low phosphorus concentrations. The development of effective treatment strategies becomes difficult, posing a serious problem to the environment. Phycoremediation appears to be a suitable alternative for the treatment of landfill leachates. In this study, the potential of Chlorella vulgaris for biomass production and nutrients (mainly nitrogen and phosphorus) removal from different compositions of a landfill leachate was evaluated. Since microalgae also require phosphorus for their growth, different loads of this nutrient were evaluated, giving the following N:P ratios: 12:1, 23:1 and 35:1. The results have shown that C. vulgaris was able to grow in the different leachate compositions assessed. However, microalgal growth was higher in the cultures presenting the lowest N-NH₄⁺ concentration. In terms of nutrients uptake, an effective removal of N-NH₄⁺ and phosphorus was observed in all the experiments, especially in those supplied with phosphorus. Nevertheless, N-NO₃(-) removal was considered almost negligible. These promising results constitute important findings in the development of a bioremediation technology for the treatment of landfill leachates.

  11. Gold nanoparticles produced in a microalga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangpipat, Tiyaporn; Beattie, Isabel R.; Chisti, Yusuf; Haverkamp, Richard G.

    2011-12-01

    An efficient biological route to production of gold nanoparticles which allows the nanoparticles to be easily recovered remains elusive. Live cells of the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris were incubated with a solution of gold chloride and harvested by centrifugation. Nanoparticles inside intact cells were identified by transmission electron microscopy and confirmed to be metallic gold by synchrotron based X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These intracellular gold nanoparticles were 40-60 nm in diameter. At a concentration of 1.4% Au in the alga, a better than 97% recovery of the gold from solution was achieved. A maximum of 4.2% Au in the alga was obtained. Exposure of C. vulgaris to solutions containing dissolved salts of palladium, ruthenium, and rhodium also resulted in the production of the corresponding nanoparticles within the cells. These were surmised to be also metallic, but were produced at a much lower intracellular concentration than achieved with gold. Iridium was apparently toxic to the alga. No nanoparticles were observed using platinum solutions. C. vulgaris provides a possible route to large scale production of gold nanoparticles.

  12. SINTESIS BIODIESEL DARI MINYAK MIKROALGA Chlorella vulgaris DENGAN REAKSI TRANSESTERIFIKASI MENGGUNAKAN KATALIS KOH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catur Rini Widyastuti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel merupakan salah satu energi alternatif yang dianggap mampu menjawab permasalahan kelangkaan bahan bakar minyak. Biodiesel dapat disintesis dari minyak nabati melalui reaksi transesterifikasi. Sumber minyak nabati yang potensial adalah mikroalga yang memiliki produktifitas minyak yang lebih tinggi per satuan luas lahan yang digunakan jika dibandingkan dengan tanaman darat. Mikroalga jenis Chlorella sp diketahui mengandung komponen lipid cukup tinggi yaitu sebesar 14-22%. Langkah-langkah penelitian yang dilakukan meliputi ekstraksi minyak mikroalga dengan n-heksana, reaksi transesterifikasi minyak mikroalga dan metanol dengan katalis KOH, dilanjutkan dengan filtrasi untuk memisahkan produk biodiesel dengan gliserol yang terbentuk. Untuk mengetahui kandungan kimia dalam bahan baku dan produk, minyak hasil ekstraksi mikroalga dan biodiesel yang dihasilkan dianalisis dengan GC-MS. Dari hasil uji GC-MS diketahui dua kandungan asam lemak terbesar dalam minyak mikroalga, yaitu Dodecanoic acid sebesar 59.52% dan n-Decanoic acid sebesar 12.64%. Dari proses transesterifikasi, yield biodiesel yang diperoleh sebesar 59.85% dengan densitas 0.88 g/cm3. Kandungan kimia biodiesel diketahui terdiri dari senyawa Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME sebesar 15.4% dan Fatty Acid Ethyl Ester (FAEE sebesar 21.14%.Biodiesel is one of the alternative energy which expected to provide a solution towards our dependence of fossil fuel. Biodiesel could be synthesized from vegetable oil through transesterification process. One of the most potential sources of vegetable oil is microalgae which is more productive than a land-based plant. One of the species of microalgae which is Chlorella sp is known for containing high lipid content from 14 to 22%. The steps of the research including extraction of microalgae oil using n-hexane, transesterification reaction between microalgae and methanol using KOH as a catalyst, and continued by filtration to separate the biodiesel product

  13. Production of methyl ester from two microalgae by two-step transesterification and direct transesterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Ramachandran; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2017-02-01

    The efficiency of oil extraction from Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp. using different cell disruption and solvent system was investigated. The ultrasound cell disruption method showed the maximum oil extraction in both algae. Oil extraction with hexane resulted in maximum oil yield for both algae. The kinetic parameters were studied and the extraction followed the first-order kinetics. The activation energy and thermodynamic activation parameters were calculated for both microalgae and the results suggested that the extraction was endothermic, irreversible and spontaneous. The methyl ester yields by two-step transesterification and direct transesterification were 95 and 96% for Scenedesmus sp. and 89 and 92% for Chlorella sp. respectively. Both methods had similar net energy consumption suitable for industrial application. The methyl ester properties were analysed in comparison with those of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D6751 standards.

  14. Ammonia tolerant inocula provide a good base for anaerobic digestion of microalgae in third generation biogas process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahdy, Ahmed; Fotidis, Ioannis; Mancini, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of an ammonia-acclimatized inoculum to digest efficiently protein-rich microalgae for continuous 3rd generation biogas production. Moreover, we investigated whether increased C/N ratio could alleviate ammonia toxicity. The biochemical methane potential (BMP......) of five different algae (Chlorella vulgaris)/manure (cattle) mixtures showed that the mixture of 80/20 (on VS basis) resulted in the highest BMP value (431 mL CH4 g VS-1), while the BMP of microalgae alone (100/0) was 415 mL CH4 g VS-1. Subsequently, anaerobic digestion of those two substrates was tested...... could be a promising approach to successfully digest protein-rich microalgae and achieve a 3rd generation biogas production....

  15. KAROTENOID DARI MAKROALGAE DAN MIKROALGAE: POTENSI KESEHATAN APLIKASI DAN BIOTEKNOLOGI [Carotenoids from Macroalgae and Microalgae: Health Potential, Application and Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leenawaty Limantara3

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Algae, both micro and macroalgae, is one of the largest producers of carotenoids. The major composition of carotenoid on algae are β-carotene, astaxanthin, luthein, zeaxanthin, cryptoxanthin, and fucoxanthin which have important roles for human health. Carotenoids were produced by several microalgae species such as Dunaliella sallina, Haemotococcus pluvialis, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Spirulina platensis, Nannnochloropsis oculata, and also from some macroalgae species such as Kappaphycus alvarezii, Sargassum sp, and Caulerpa sp. Carotenoids from algae has been proven as a powerful antioxidant and may prevent some degenerative diseases, cardiovascular, and cancer. Carotenoid also has been applied as a natural dye and dietary supplements. Biotechnology has been developed to increase the production of carotenoids from micro- and macroalgae. The large-scale cultivation of microalgae, either in open or closed system are shown to increase carotenoid production. During cultivation, some stress conditions can be specifically manipulated to optimize carotenoid production from microalgae.

  16. Functional ingredients from microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buono, S.; Langellotti, A.L.; Martello, A.; Rinna, F.; Fogliano, V.

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of natural sources are under investigation to evaluate their possible use for new functional ingredient formulation. Some records attested the traditional and ancient use of wild harvested microalgae as human food but their cultivation for different purposes started about 40 years

  17. Food commodities from microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draaisma, R.B.; Wijffels, R.H.; Slegers, P.M.; Brentner, L.B.; Roy, A.; Barbosa, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The prospect of sustainable production of food ingredients from photoautotrophic microalgae was reviewed. Clearly, there is scope for microalgal oils to replace functions of major vegetable oils, and in addition to deliver health benefits to food products. Furthermore, with a limited production surf

  18. Food commodities from microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draaisma, R.B.; Wijffels, R.H.; Slegers, P.M.; Brentner, L.B.; Roy, A.; Barbosa, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The prospect of sustainable production of food ingredients from photoautotrophic microalgae was reviewed. Clearly, there is scope for microalgal oils to replace functions of major vegetable oils, and in addition to deliver health benefits to food products. Furthermore, with a limited production

  19. Functional ingredients from microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buono, S.; Langellotti, A.L.; Martello, A.; Rinna, F.; Fogliano, V.

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of natural sources are under investigation to evaluate their possible use for new functional ingredient formulation. Some records attested the traditional and ancient use of wild harvested microalgae as human food but their cultivation for different purposes started about 40 years ago

  20. Microalgae and wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Raouf, N.; Al-Homaidan, A.A.; Ibraheem, I.B.M.

    2012-01-01

    Organic and inorganic substances which were released into the environment as a result of domestic, agricultural and industrial water activities lead to organic and inorganic pollution. The normal primary and secondary treatment processes of these wastewaters have been introduced in a growing number of places, in order to eliminate the easily settled materials and to oxidize the organic material present in wastewater. The final result is a clear, apparently clean effluent which is discharged into natural water bodies. This secondary effluent is, however, loaded with inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus and causes eutrophication and more long-term problems because of refractory organics and heavy metals that are discharged. Microalgae culture offers an interesting step for wastewater treatments, because they provide a tertiary biotreatment coupled with the production of potentially valuable biomass, which can be used for several purposes. Microalgae cultures offer an elegant solution to tertiary and quandary treatments due to the ability of microalgae to use inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus for their growth. And also, for their capacity to remove heavy metals, as well as some toxic organic compounds, therefore, it does not lead to secondary pollution. In the current review we will highlight on the role of micro-algae in the treatment of wastewater. PMID:24936135

  1. Microalgae and wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Raouf, N; Al-Homaidan, A A; Ibraheem, I B M

    2012-07-01

    Organic and inorganic substances which were released into the environment as a result of domestic, agricultural and industrial water activities lead to organic and inorganic pollution. The normal primary and secondary treatment processes of these wastewaters have been introduced in a growing number of places, in order to eliminate the easily settled materials and to oxidize the organic material present in wastewater. The final result is a clear, apparently clean effluent which is discharged into natural water bodies. This secondary effluent is, however, loaded with inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus and causes eutrophication and more long-term problems because of refractory organics and heavy metals that are discharged. Microalgae culture offers an interesting step for wastewater treatments, because they provide a tertiary biotreatment coupled with the production of potentially valuable biomass, which can be used for several purposes. Microalgae cultures offer an elegant solution to tertiary and quandary treatments due to the ability of microalgae to use inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus for their growth. And also, for their capacity to remove heavy metals, as well as some toxic organic compounds, therefore, it does not lead to secondary pollution. In the current review we will highlight on the role of micro-algae in the treatment of wastewater.

  2. Biofuels from Microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbosa, M.J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2013-01-01

    Microalgae are a promising feedstock for sustaineble production of biofuela due to their unique capacity to reach high lipid productivities. Although the promises are there, production costs and energy requirements are high and the technology is still ammature for the production of bulk products. It

  3. Comparison of Chlorella vulgaris and cyanobacterial biomass: cultivation in urban wastewater and methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Lara; Sialve, Bruno; Tomás-Pejó, Elia; Ballesteros, Mercedes; Steyer, Jean Philippe; González-Fernández, Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of microalgae is hampered by its complex cell wall. Against this background, cyanobacteria cell walls render this biomass as an ideal substrate for overcoming this drawback. The aim of the present study was to compare the growth of two cyanobacteria (Aphanizomenon ovalisporum and Anabaena planctonica) and a microalga (Chlorella vulgaris) in urban wastewater when varying the temperature (22, 27 and 32 °C). Cyanobacterial optimal growth for both strains was attained at 22 °C, while C. vulgaris did not show remarkable differences among temperatures. For all the microorganisms, ammonium removal was higher than phosphate. Biomass collected was subjected to anaerobic digestion. Methane yield of C. vulgaris was 184.8 mL CH4 g COD in(-1) while with A. ovalisporum and A. planctonica the methane production was 1.2- and 1.4-fold higher. This study showed that cyanobacteria growth rates could be comparable to microalgae while presenting the additional benefit of an increased anaerobic digestibility.

  4. Quantitative proteomic profiling reveals photosynthesis responsible for inoculum size dependent variation in Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Wang, Jiangxin; Lu, Shuhuan; Lv, Yajin; Yuan, Yingjin

    2013-03-01

    High density cultivation is essential to industrial production of biodiesel from microalgae, which involves in variations of micro-environment around individual cells, including light intensity, nutrition distribution, other abiotic stress and so on. To figure out the main limit factor in high inoculum cultivation, a quantitative proteomic analysis (iTRAQ-on-line 2-D nano-LC/MS) in a non-model green microalga, Chlorella sorokiniana, under different inoculum sizes was conducted. The resulting high-quality proteomic dataset consisted of 695 proteins. Using a cutoff of P photosynthesis (light reaction) and Calvin cycle (carbon reaction pathway) had highest expression levels under inoculum size of 1 × 10(6) cells mL(-1), and lowest levels under 1 × 10(7) cells mL(-1). Canonical correlation analysis of the photosynthesis related proteins and metabolites biomarkers showed that a good correlation existed between them (canonical coefficient was 0.987), suggesting photosynthesis process greatly affected microalgae biodiesel productivity and quality. Proteomic study of C. sorokiniana under different illuminations was also conducted to confirm light intensity as a potential limit factor of high inoculum size. Nearly two thirds of proteins showed up-regulation under the illumination of 70-110 µmol m(-2) s(-1), compared to those of 40 µmol m(-2) s(-1). This result suggested that by elegantly adjusting light conditions, high cell density cultivation and high biodiesel production might be achieved. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Enhancing lipid productivity of Chlorella vulgaris using oxidative stress by TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Nam Kyu; Lee, Bongsoo; Choi, Gang-Guk; Moon, Myounghoon; Park, Min S.; Yang, Ji-Won [Daejeon, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, JitKang [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia)

    2014-05-15

    Ability to increase the lipid production in microalgae is one of the heavily sought-after ideas to improve the economic feasibility of microalgae-derived transportation fuels for commercial applications. We used the oxidative stress by TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, a well-known photocatalyst, to induce lipid production in microalgae. Chlorella vulgaris UTEX 265 was cultivated under various concentrations of TiO{sub 2} ranging from 0.1 to 5 g/L under UV-A illumination. Maximum specific growth rate was affected in responding to TiO{sub 2} concentrations. In the presence of UV-A, chlorophyll concentration was decreased at the highest concentration of TiO{sub 2} (5 g/L TiO{sub 2}) by oxidative stress. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) composition analysis suggested that oxidative stress causes the accumulation and decomposition of lipids. The highest FAME productivity was 18.2 g/L/d under low concentrations of TiO{sub 2} (0.1 g/L) and a short induction time (two days). The controlled condition of TiO{sub 2}/UV-A inducing oxidative stress (0.1 g/L TiO{sub 2} and two days induction) could be used to increase the lipid productivity of C. vulgaris UTEX 265. Our results show the possibility of modulating the lipid induction process through oxidative stress with TiO{sub 2}/UV-A.

  6. Bionota: Bacterias promotoras de crecimiento de microalgas: una nueva aproximación en el tratamiento de aguas residuales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de-Bashan Luz E.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Las bacterias promotoras de crecimiento en plantas (PGPB del género Azospirillum son conocidas porque mejo­ran el crecimiento de numerosas cosechas agrícolas; sin embargo, el presente trabajo pretende extender el uso de estas bacterias a "bacterias promotoras de crecimiento de microalgas" (MPGB para aumentar la capacidad de las microalgas de eliminar nutrientes de aguas residuales. La inoculación deliberada de las microalgas Chlorella spp. con PGPB de origen terrestre no ha sido reportada con anterioridad, tal vez debido al origen diferente de estos dos microorganismos. Al inmovilizar de manera conjunta Chlorella vulgaris y Azospirillum brasilense Cd en esferas de alginato, se obtuvo como resultado un aumento significativo en varios parámetros de crecimiento de la microalga, como el peso fresco y seco, el número total de células, el tamaño de las colonias de microalgas dentro de la esfera, el número de organismos por colonia y la concentración de pigmentos. Además, aumenta­ron los lípidos y la variedad de ácidos grasos. La microalga combinada con la MGPB tiene una mayor capacidad de eliminar amonio y fósforo tanto en agua residual sintética como en agua residual doméstica. Actualmente se ha estado experimentando con otras PGPB (Flavobacterium sp. Azospirillum sp. y Azotobacter sp. para propósitos acuícolas; por ejemplo aumentar el crecimiento de fitoplancton utilizado en el cultivo de carpas y estabilizar cultivos masivos de microalgas marinas utilizadas como alimento para organismos marinos, todo esto con resul­tados promisorios. Si bien el efecto de las PGPB en microorganismos acuáticos aún no ha sido suficientemente explorado, proponemos que la co-inmovilización de microalgas y bacterias promotoras de crecimiento es un medio efectivo para aumentar la población microalgal y también su capacidad de limpiar aguas residuales. Palabras clave: PGPB; microalgas; biotratamiento de aguas residuales; co-inmovilización; PGPB

  7. Removal of Nitrate and Phosphate from Municipal Wastewater Sludge by Chlorella vulgaris, Spirulina platensis and Scenedesmus quadricauda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal K.C.A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate and phosphorus in wastewater contribute to health and environmental threats as they are linked to illnesses as well as ecosystem disruption via algal blooms in contaminated water bodies. Based on above perspectives a comparative study was conducted on three local freshwater microalgae:Chlorella vulgaris, Spirulina platensis and Scenedesmus quadricauda to evaluate their effects on nitrate and phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater sludge (MWS. Algae performance in removing nitrate and phosphorus was evaluated by measuring nitrate and phosphorus content of MWS incubated with the strains for 7 days. Instantaneous readings were taken every 48 hours to determine periodic levels of the nutrients phosphate and nitrate. BOD5 was also evaluated to identify the strain with the most robust growth that would demand for oxygen the most in the dark. Spirulina platensis was shown as the most efficient microalgae to reduce nitrate in MWS and the best-growing among the three strains, while Chlorella vulgaris removed phosphorus the most effectively. Thus Spirulina and Chlorella could be potential candidates by showing their intrinsic merit for the reduction of phosphate and nitrate in wastewater treatment.ABSTRAK: Nitrat dan fosforus dalam air sisa menggugat kesihatan dan mengancam alam sekitar memandangkan ia berkait dengan penyakit-penyakit serta gangguan terhadap ekosistem melalui pembiakan alga dalam air yang tercemar. Berdasarkan perspektif di atas, satu kajian perbandingan telah dijalankan terhadap tiga mikro alga air tawar tempatan : Chlorella vulgaris, Spirulina platensis dan Scenedesmus quadricauda untuk dinilai kesannya terhadap penyingkiran nitrat dan fosforus dari enap cemar air sisa bandaran (municipal wastewater sludge (MWS. Kebolehan alga dalam penyingkiran nitrat dan fosforus dikaji dengan menyukat kandungan nitrat dan fosforus dalam MWS yang dieramkan dengan strain ini selama 7 hari. Bacaan serta-merta diambil setiap 48 jam untuk

  8. Highly efficient extraction and lipase-catalyzed transesterification of triglycerides from Chlorella sp. KR-1 for production of biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ok Kyung; Kim, Young Hyun; Na, Jeong-Geol; Oh, You-Kwan; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2013-11-01

    We developed a method for the highly efficient lipid extraction and lipase-catalyzed transesterification of triglyceride from Chlorella sp. KR-1 using dimethyl carbonate (DMC). Almost all of the total lipids, approximately 38.9% (w/w) of microalgae dry weight, were extracted from the dried microalgae biomass using a DMC and methanol mixture (7:3 (v/v)). The extracted triglycerides were transesterified into fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) using Novozyme 435 as the biocatalyst in DMC. Herein, DMC was used as the reaction medium and acyl acceptor. The reaction conditions were optimized and the FAMEs yield was 293.82 mg FAMEs/g biomass in 6 h of reaction time at 60 °C in the presence of 0.2% (v/v) water. Novozyme 435 was reused more than ten times while maintaining relative FAMEs conversion that was greater than 90% of the initial FAMEs conversion.

  9. Assessing Effects and interactions among key variables affecting the growth of mixotrophic microalgae: pH, inoculum volume, and growth medium composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ale, Marcel Tutor; Pinelo, Manuel; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    A 2(3) + 3 full factorial experimental design was used to evaluate growth rate and biomass productivity of four selected, high-biomass-yielding microalgae species,namely, Chlorella vulgaris (CV), Scenedesmus acutus (SA), Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CR), and Chlamydomonas debaryana (CD), in mixtures...... of CV and CR slowed down in mixtures with high proportions of wastewater. However, the biomass productivity of SA was dependent on pH, while the growth of the other microalgae was independent of pH (7-9). When evaluating the influence of pH and proportion of medium, CD appeared most robust among...

  10. Phytoremediation of agriculture runoff by filamentous algae poly-culture for biomethane production, and nutrient recovery for secondary cultivation of lipid generating microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohutskyi, Pavlo; Chow, Steven; Ketter, Ben; Fung Shek, Coral; Yacar, Dean; Tang, Yuting; Zivojnovich, Mark; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Bouwer, Edward J

    2016-12-01

    An integrated system was implemented for water phytoremediation and biofuel production through sequential cultivation of filamentous algae followed by cultivation of lipid-producing microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana. Natural poly-culture of filamentous algae was grown in agricultural stormwater using the Algal Turf Scrubber®, harvested and subjected for lipid extraction and/or methane production using anaerobic digestion (AD). While filamentous algae lipid content was too low for feasible biodiesel production (algae poly-culture was exploited for waste nutrient capturing and biofuel feedstock generation. These nutrients were recovered and reused as a concentrated supplement for potentially high-value microalgae. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. INDUCCIÓN DE LA PRODUCCIÓN DE LÍPIDOS TOTALES EN MICROALGAS SOMETIDAS A ESTRÉS NUTRITIVO

    OpenAIRE

    Marianela Cobos Ruiz; Jae Diana Paredes Rodríguez; Juan Carlos Castro Gómez

    2016-01-01

    RESUMENSe evaluó la producción de lípidos totales en cinco especies de microalgas inducidas por la ausencia de nitrógeno. Las microalgas empleadas fueron Ankistrodesmus sp., Ankistrodesmus nannoselene, Chlorella sp., Scenedesmus sp. y Scenedesmus quadricauda. Estas especies fueron cultivadas en medio CHU10 con y sin nitrógeno. El tiempo de evaluación fue de seis días, determinándose diariamente la densidad microalgal mediante recuento en cámara de Neubahuer. Se determinó la tasa de crecimient...

  12. [Studies on chemical compounds of Chlorella sorokiniana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Liu, Ping-huai; Wu, Jiao-na; Yang, Guo-fu; Suo, Yang-yang; Luo, Ning; Chen, Chen

    2015-04-01

    Chemical constituents of Chlorella sorokiniana were isolated and purified by repeated column chromatographies, over silicagel and Sephadex LH-20. Their structures were identified on the basis of physicochemical properties and spectroscopic data analysis. Five compounds were obtained from the petroleum ether extract of Chlorella sorokiniana, and their structures were identified as (22E, 24R)-5alpha, 3beta-epidioxiergosta-6, 22-dien-3beta-ol(1),(24S)-ergosta-7-en-3beta-ol(2), loliolide(3), stigmasta-7,22-dien-3beta,5alpha,6alpha-triol(4), and 3beta-hydroxy-5alpha,6alpha-epoxy-7-megastigmen-9-one(5). The main liposoluble fractions from Chlorella sorokiniana maiuly contain fatty acids, alkyl acids and olefine acids. Components 1-5 were isolated from the genus Chlorella for the first time.

  13. Use of diluted urine for cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaatinen, Sanna; Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Rintala, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to study the biomass growth of microalga Chlorella vulgaris using diluted human urine as a sole nutrient source. Batch cultivations (21 days) were conducted in five different urine dilutions (1:25-1:300), in 1:100-diluted urine as such and with added trace elements, and as a reference, in artificial growth medium. The highest biomass density was obtained in 1:100-diluted urine with and without additional trace elements (0.73 and 0.60 g L(-1), respectively). Similar biomass growth trends and densities were obtained with 1:25- and 1:300-diluted urine (0.52 vs. 0.48 gVSS L(-1)) indicating that urine at dilution 1:25 can be used to cultivate microalgal based biomass. Interestingly, even 1:300-diluted urine contained sufficiently nutrients and trace elements to support biomass growth. Biomass production was similar despite pH-variation from < 5 to 9 in different incubations indicating robustness of the biomass growth. Ammonium formation did not inhibit overall biomass growth. At the beginning of cultivation, the majority of the biomass consisted of living algal cells, while towards the end, their share decreased and the estimated share of bacteria and cell debris increased.

  14. Kinetics of Chlorella protothecoides microalgal oil using base catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to continuous diminishing of fossil fuel resources and emission of greenhouse gases, the search for alternative fuels such as biodiesel and bioethanol has become inevitable. Biodiesel, also known as fatty acid methyl or ethyl ester, has emerged as a substitute for diesel because of similar fuel properties. Presently, biodiesel is produced from edible, non-edible and microalgal oil. Chlorella protothecoides (lipid content 14.6–57.8% is being investigated as the potential microalgae species owing to high oil content, less land area required for cultivation and faster growth rate. The present investigation shows the results of the kinetics of transesterification of C. protothecoides microalgal oil carried out at optimum conditions of catalyst concentration, reaction temperature, molar ratio and reaction time. The percentage of methyl ester yield is the only parameter chosen to carry out the optimum parameter and the kinetics of transesterification. The reaction rate constant was to be 0.0618 min−1. Furthermore, microalgal biodiesel is characterized for physico-chemical properties that are found to meet American (ASTM D6751 and Indian (IS 15607 standards, especially in cold flow properties and stability of conventional biodiesel.

  15. Metallomics and NMR-based metabolomics of Chlorella sp. reveal the synergistic role of copper and cadmium in multi-metal toxicity and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenlin; Tan, Nicole G J; Fu, Baohui; Li, Sam F Y

    2015-03-01

    Industrial wastewaters often contain high levels of metal mixtures, in which metal mixtures may have synergistic or antagonistic effects on aquatic organisms. A combination of metallomics and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR)-based metabolomics was employed to understand the consequences of multi-metal systems (Cu, Cd, Pb) on freshwater microalgae. Morphological characterization, cell viability and chlorophyll a determination of metal-spiked Chlorella sp. suggested synergistic effects of Cu and Cd on growth inhibition and toxicity. While Pb has no apparent effect on Chlorella sp. metabolome, a substantial decrease of sucrose, amino acid content and glycerophospholipid precursors in Cu-spiked microalgae revealed Cu-induced oxidative stress. Addition of Cd to Cu-spiked cultures induced more drastic metabolic perturbations, hence we confirmed that Cu and Cd synergistically influenced photosynthesis inhibition, oxidative stress and membrane degradation. Total elemental analysis revealed a significant decrease in K, and an increase in Na, Mg, Zn and Mn concentrations in Cu-spiked cultures. This indicated that Cu is more toxic to Chlorella sp. as compared to Cd or Pb, and the combination of Cu and Cd has a strong synergistic effect on Chlorella sp. oxidative stress induction. Oxidative stress is confirmed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis, which demonstrated a drastic decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio solely in Cu-spiked cultures. Interestingly, we observed Cu-facilitated Cd and Pb bioconcentration in Chlorella sp. The absence of phytochelatins and an increment of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) yields in Cu-spiked cultures suggested that the mode of bioconcentration of Cd and Pb is through adsorption of free metals onto the algal EPS rather than intracellular chelation to phytochelatins.

  16. Conteúdo lipídico e composição de ácidos graxos de microalgas expostas aos gases CO2, SO2 e NO Lipid content and fatty acids composition variation of microalgae exposed to CO2, SO2 and NO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisangela Martha Radmann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to verify the lipid content and the fatty acid composition of the microalgae Spirulina sp., Scenedesmus obliquus, Synechococcus nidulans and Chlorella vulgaris cultivated in a medium containing CO2, SO2 and NO. The microalga Scenedesmus obliquus presented the highest lipid content (6.18%. For the other microalgae the lipid content ranged from 4.56 to 5.97%. The major monounsaturated fatty acids content was 66.01% for S. obliquus. The PUFA were obtained in major amount by the microalgae Spirulina sp. (29.37% and S. nidulans (29.54%. The palmitoleic acid was in larger amount, with 41.02% concentration (Spirulina sp..

  17. The Effects of Physicochemical Factors and Cell Density on Nitrite Transformation in a Lipid-Rich Chlorella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fang; Du, Kui; Wen, Xiaobin; Luo, Liming; Geng, Yahong; Li, Yeguang

    2015-12-28

    To understand the effects of physicochemical factors on nitrite transformation by microalgae, a lipid-rich Chlorella with high nitrite tolerance was cultured with 8 mmol/l sodium nitrite as sole nitrogen source under different conditions. The results showed that nitrite transformation was mainly dependent on the metabolic activities of algal cells rather than oxidation of nitrite by dissolved oxygen. Light intensity, temperature, pH, NaHCO3 concentrations, and initial cell densities had significant effects on the rate of nitrite transformation. Single-factor experiments revealed that the optimum conditions for nitrite transformation were light intensity: 300 μmol/m(2); temperature: 30°C; pH: 7-8; NaHCO3 concentration: 2.0 g/l; and initial cell density: 0.15 g/l; and the highest nitrite transformation rate of 1.36 mmol/l/d was achieved. There was a positive correlation between nitrite transformation rate and the growth of Chlorella. The relationship between nitrite transformation rate (mg/l/d) and biomass productivity (g/l/d) could be described by the regression equation y = 61.3x (R(2) = 0.9665), meaning that 61.3 mg N element was assimilated by 1.0 g dry biomass on average, which indicated that the nitrite transformation is a process of consuming nitrite as nitrogen source by Chlorella. The results demonstrated that the Chlorella suspension was able to assimilate nitrite efficiently, which implied the feasibility of using flue gas for mass production of Chlorella without preliminary removal of NOX.

  18. CO₂ controlled flocculation of microalgae using pH responsive cellulose nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyley, Samuel; Vandamme, Dries; Lama, Sanjaya; Van den Mooter, Guy; Muylaert, Koenraad; Thielemans, Wim

    2015-09-14

    Cellulose nanocrystals were grafted with imidazole functionalities up to DS 0.06 using a one-pot functionalization strategy. The resulting nanocrystals were shown to have a pH responsive surface charge which was found to be positive below pH 6 and negative above pH 7. These imidazolyl cellulose nanocrystals were tested for flocculation of Chlorella vulgaris using CO2 to induce flocculation. Up to 90% flocculation efficiency was achieved with 200 mg L(-1) dose. Furthermore, the modified cellulose nanocrystals showed good compatibility with the microalgae during cultivation, giving potential for the production of reversible flocculation systems.

  19. Removal and Biodegradation of Nonylphenol by Four Freshwater Microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ning; Sun, Xian; Zhong, Yu; Sun, Kaifeng; Liu, Weijie; Duan, Shunshan

    2016-01-01

    The removal and biodegradation of nonylphenol (NP) by four freshwater microalgae, including three green algae (Scendesmus quadriauda, Chlorella vulgaris, and Ankistrodesmus acicularis) and one cyanobacterium (Chroococcus minutus) were studied in bacteria-free cultures exposed to different concentrations of NP for 5 days. All four algal species showed a rapid and high ability to remove NP (including bioaccumulation and biodegradation). Among these species, A. acicularis (Ankistrodesmus acicularis) had the highest NP removal rate (83.77%) at 120 h when exposed to different NP treatments (0.5–2.5 mg·L−1), followed by C. vulgaris (Chlorella vulgaris) (80.80%), S. quadriauda (Scendesmus quadriauda) (70.96%) and C. minutus (Chroococcus minutus) (64.26%). C. vulgaris had the highest NP biodegradation percentage (68.80%) at 120 h, followed by A. acicularis (65.63%), S. quadriauda (63.10%); and C. minutus (34.91%). The extracellular NP contents were lower than the intracellular NP contents in all tested algae. The ratio of the extracellular NP content and the intracellular NP content ranged from 0.04 to 0.85. Therefore, the removal of NP from the medium was mainly due to the algal degradation. These results indicate that A. acicularis and C. vulgaris are more tolerant to NP and could be used for treatment of NP contaminated aqueous systems effectively by bioremoval and biodegradation. PMID:27983663

  20. Epigenetic modulation of Chlorella (Chlorella vulgaris) on exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mihi; Youn, Je-In; Kim, Seung Joon; Park, Jong Y

    2015-11-01

    DNA methylation in promoter region can be a new chemopreventive marker against polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We performed a randomized, double blind and cross-over trial (N=12 healthy females) to evaluate chlorella (Chlorella vulgaris)-induced epigenetic modulation on exposure to PAHs. The subjects consumed 4 tablets of placebo or chlorella supplement (total chlorophyll ≈ 8.3mg/tablet) three times a day before meals for 2 weeks. When the subjects consumed chlorella, status of global hypermethylation (5-methylcytosine) was reduced, compared to placebo (p=0.04). However, DNA methylation at the DNMT1 or NQO1 was not modified by chlorella. We observed the reduced levels of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), a typical metabolite of PAHs, by chlorella intake (p<0.1) and a positive association between chlorella-induced changes in global hypermethylation and urinary 1-OHP (p<0.01). Therefore, our study suggests chlorella works for PAH-detoxification through the epigenetic modulation, the interference of ADME of PAHs and the interaction of mechanisms.

  1. Cellulosic-Derived Biofuels Program in Kentucky - Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    growth of heterotrophic algae on biomass sugars. Genes Involved in the Accumulation of Oil in Chlorella p. Single celled microalgae produce...may be in ample supply due to the demand for biofuels and microalgae as future feedstock, this data suggests that AM may be a suitable ingredient for...Task B8. Algae Feedstocks Fresh water microalgae Algae Growth Heterotrophic method Carbon Source Lignocellulosic sugar Fermentation 2-stage

  2. Occurrence of 3-hydroxy acids in microalgae and cyanobacteria and their geochemical significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Genki I.; Nagashima, Hideyuki

    1984-08-01

    3-Hydroxy acids were detected in pure cultured microalgae: Chlorophyta— Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Rhodophyta— Cyanidium caldarium (two strains), and cyanobacteria (Cyanophyta)— Anacystis nidulans, Phormidium foveolarum, Anabaena variabilis and Oscillatoria sp. Normal and branched (iso and anteiso) 3-hydroxy acids in the ranges of C 8-C 26 were found in all the samples studied at concentrations ranging from 0.036 to 2.3 and 0.000 to 0.12 mg g -1 of dry sample, respectively. The major constituents were generally even-carbon numbered normal acids with carbon chain lengths below C 20. Microalgae and cyanobacteria may be the important sources of 3-hydroxy acids in natural environments.

  3. Heterotrophic bacterial populations in tropical sandy beaches

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Distribution pattern of heterotrophic bacterial flora of three sandy beaches of the west coast of India was studied. The population in these beaches was microbiologically different. Population peaks of halotolerant and limnotolerant forms were...

  4. 内置LED光源平板型光生物反应器用于微藻培养——普通小球藻在反应器中的固碳产油性能探究%Internally LED-illuminated flat plate photobioreactor for microalgae cultivation-carbon-fixation and production of lipid in Chlorella vulgaris cultured in photobioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王曰杰; 孟范平; 李永富; 崔鸿武

    2015-01-01

    为降低光生物反应器(PBR)的光照能耗和提高微藻对光能的利用效率,自制了内置LED光源的平板型光生物反应器,用于绿藻普通小球藻(Chlorella vulgaris)的培养和CO2生物固定.评价了这种新型反应器的进气CO2浓度对生物质产率(BP)、CO2固定速率(FCo2)和油脂产率(LP)的影响.经过l0d连续培养后,与通入空气的对照组相比,浓度1%10%的CO2均明显促进微藻生长,BP [0.258和0.263g/(L·d)]、最大FCo2 [1.18、1.00gCOJ(L·d)]和指数生长期平均FCO2[0.57、0.62gCO2/(L·d)]的高值均出现在CO2 1%、2.5%处理组中.较高浓度(5%、10%)CO2在培养初期造成酸化现象,导致藻细胞密度和生物量较低.CO2浓度变化对微藻总脂含量(17.81%~23.13%)影响较小,以CO2 2.5%条件下得到微藻油脂产率最大[60.71 mg/(L·d)].本研究证明,所设计的平板型PBR能够高效培养用于CO2固定和生物柴油原料生产的微藻.

  5. Biohydrogen from Microalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubini, Alexandra; Gonzalez-Ballester, David

    2016-03-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of the mechanisms involved in biohydrogen production from microalgae. The known limitations linked to photohydrogen productivity are addressed. Particular attention is given to physiological and molecular strategies to sustain and improve hydrogen production. The impact of different nutrient stresses and the effect of carbon supply on hydrogen production are discussed. The genetic and metabolic engineering approaches for increasing hydrogen production are outlined.

  6. Fuels from microalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-06-01

    Many species of aquatic plants can provide a source of renewable energy. Some species of microalgae, in particular, produce lipids -- oils that can be extracted and converted to a diesel fuel substitute or to gasoline. Since 1979 the Aquatic Species Program element of the Biofuels Program, has supported fundamental and applied research to develop the technology for using this renewable energy resource. This document, produced by the Solar Technical Information Program, provides an overview of the DOE/SERI Aquatic Species Program element. Chapter 1 is an introduction to the program and to the microalgae. Chapter 2 is an overview of the general principles involved in making fuels from microalgae. It also outlines the technical challenges to producing economic, high-energy transportation fuels. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the Algal Production and Economic Model (APEM). This model was developed by researchers within the program to identify aspects of the process critical to performance with the greatest potential to reduce costs. The analysis using this model has helped direct research sponsored by the program. Finally, Chapter 4 provides an overview of the Aquatic Species Program and describes current research. 28 refs., 17 figs.

  7. Biotechnological exploitation of microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangl, Doris; Zedler, Julie A Z; Rajakumar, Priscilla D; Martinez, Erick M Ramos; Riseley, Anthony; Włodarczyk, Artur; Purton, Saul; Sakuragi, Yumiko; Howe, Christopher J; Jensen, Poul Erik; Robinson, Colin

    2015-12-01

    Microalgae are a diverse group of single-cell photosynthetic organisms that include cyanobacteria and a wide range of eukaryotic algae. A number of microalgae contain high-value compounds such as oils, colorants, and polysaccharides, which are used by the food additive, oil, and cosmetic industries, among others. They offer the potential for rapid growth under photoautotrophic conditions, and they can grow in a wide range of habitats. More recently, the development of genetic tools means that a number of species can be transformed and hence used as cell factories for the production of high-value chemicals or recombinant proteins. In this article, we review exploitation use of microalgae with a special emphasis on genetic engineering approaches to develop cell factories, and the use of synthetic ecology approaches to maximize productivity. We discuss the success stories in these areas, the hurdles that need to be overcome, and the potential for expanding the industry in general. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. EVALUACIÓN DEL EFECTO DEL HIDROCARBURO FENANTRENO SOBRE EL CRECIMIENTO DE Chlorella vulgaris (CHLORELLACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANGÉLICA OTERO-PATERNINA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó el efecto del hidrocarburo policíclico aromático fenantreno sobre el creci- miento de la microalga Chlorella vulgaris bajo condiciones de laboratorio. Las microalgas fueron expuestas a diferentes concentraciones de fenantreno (0, 1, 10, 100, 1000 y 10000 μg/l. El tiempo de exposición fue de 72 h, determinándose diariamente la den- sidad algal mediante recuento en cámara de Neubauer. Se determinó la tasa promedio de crecimiento, la biomasa total y el porcentaje de inhibición de la biomasa. También se evaluó el contenido de clorofila a, al inicio y final del experimento. Los ensayos fueron realizados en recipientes de vidrio de 0,4 l, utilizando como medio de cultivo fertilizante inorgánico del complejo NPK (REMITAL® m – 17-6-18 a razón de 1 g/l. Los resultados mostraron que el fenantreno inhibió progresivamente el crecimiento de la microalga, observándose el menor crecimiento celular en el medio con la mayor concentración de fenantreno, el cual alcanzó un porcentaje de inhibición del crecimiento del 59 %. Las ta- sas de crecimiento diario se mantuvieron relativamente constantes en los demás trata- mientos. La concentración de clorofila a, medida mediante espectrofotometría, no se afectó por las diferentes concentraciones del hidrocarburo. En conclusión, el crecimiento de la microalga C. vulgaris puede afectarse negativamente por la exposición a concentra- ciones nominales superiores a 1 μg/l de fenantreno.

  9. Effects of dietary supplementation with freshwater microalgae on growth performance, nutrient digestibility and gut health in weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbeyre, H; van Milgen, J; Mener, T; Gloaguen, M; Labussière, E

    2017-02-01

    In pigs, digestive disorders associated with weaning lead to antibiotic use to maintain intestinal health. Microalgae have been studied in humans and rodents for their beneficial effects on health. The nutritional value of microalgae in animal diets has been assessed, but results were not conclusive. Dietary supplementation with microalgae as an alternative to antibiotic use was studied in two trials (72 piglets with initial BW=9.1±1.1 kg in trial 1 and 24 piglets with initial BW=9.1±0.9 kg in trial 2). All piglets were weaned at 28 days of age and then housed in individual cages. Piglets were randomly allocated to one of the four diets during 2 weeks after weaning: a standard diet with no supplementation (NC) or the standard diet supplemented with 1% Spirulina (SP), with 1% Chlorella (CV), or with 0.2% of colistin as positive control (PC). Trial 1 was performed to determine the effect of microalgae supplementation from 28 to 42 days on performance and incidence of diarrhoea. Animals received then a standard diet from 42 to 56 days of age. Trial 2 was performed from 28 to 42 days of age to assess nutrient digestibility of the experimental diets and to determine inflammatory status and intestinal morphology at 42 days of age. In trial 1, 94% of the pigs had diarrhoea in the 1st week after weaning with no beneficial effect of colistin on diarrhoea incidence, average daily feed intake (ADFI), average daily gain (ADG), and gain : feed (G : F) ratio. This suggests that the diarrhoea was due to digestive disorders that did not result from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection. Supplementation with either Spirulina or Chlorella did not affect ADFI, ADG and G : F in trials 1 and 2 (P>0.10). Diarrhoea incidence was reduced in CV pigs compared with NC, SP and PC pigs (Pmicroalgae was greater for gross energy (P<0.05), and tended to be greater for dry matter, organic matter and NDF (P<0.10) compared with NC and PC pigs. Villus height at the jejunum was greater in SP

  10. PEMANFAATAN MIKROALGA LAUT Chlorella vulgaris SUMBER DHA DAN EPA

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Penelitian tentang mikroalga laut jenis Chlorella vulgaris telah dilakukan. Chlorella vulgaris dipilih sebagai bahan penambah gizi untuk di fortifikasi kedalam makanan . Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kandungan gizi dengan menganalisis kandungan DHA dan EPA. Penelitian ini dilakukan dengan mengkultur fitoplankton Chlorella vulgaris dan dipanen setelah media kultur mencapai fase Stasioner. Kemudian, dikeringkan dengan menggunakan freeze dryer, biomassa kering dianalisis kandungan DH...

  11. Predicting the Reproduction Strategies of Several Microalgae Through Their Genome Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Li; YANG Guanpin

    2015-01-01

    Documenting the sex and sexual reproduction of the microalgae is very difficult, as most of the results are based on the microscopic observation that can be heavily influenced by genetic, physiological and environmental conditions. Understanding the reproduction strategy of some microalgae is required to breed them in large scale culture industry. Instead of direct observation of sex and sexual reproduction under microscope, the whole set or the majority of core meiosis genes may evidence the sex and sexual reproduction in the unicellular algae, as the meiosis is necessary for maintaining the genomic stability and the advantages of genetic recombination. So far, the available genome sequences and bioinformatic tools (in this study, homolog searching and phylogenetic analysis) allow us to propose that at least 20 core meiosis genes (among them≥6 must be meiosis specific) are enough for an alga to maintain its sexual reproduction. According to this assumption and the genome sequences, it is possible that sexual reproduction was carried out byMicromonas pusilla andCyanidioschyzon merolae, while asexual reproduction was adopted byBigelowiella natans, Guillardia theta,Nannochloropsis gaditana,N. oceanica,Chlorella variablis,Phaeodactylum tricornutum andThalassiosira pseu-donana. This understanding will facilitate the breeding trials of some economic microalgae (e.g.,N. gaditana,N. oceanica,C. vari-ablis andP. tricornutum). However, the reproduction strategies of these microalgae need to be proved by further biological experiments.

  12. Investigation on novel raceway pond with inclined paddle wheels through simulation and microalgae culture experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fanxue; Huang, Jianke; Meng, Chen; Zhu, Fachao; Chen, Jianpei; Li, Yuanguang

    2016-01-01

    The open raceway ponds are nowadays the most used large-scale reactors for microalgae culture. To avoid the stacking of microalgae, the paddle wheels are the most widely used to circulate and mix the culture medium. In this paper, a numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to investigate the hydrodynamic characteristics of open raceway ponds with different types of paddle wheels (the traditional paddle wheels and the novel paddle wheels with specially inclined angle of the blades). The particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to validate the reliability of the CFD model. The CFD simulation results showed that the novel raceway pond with 15° inclined angle of the blades had the best mixing efficiency under the same power consumption. Lastly, the results of microalgae culture experiments showed that the growth rates of Chlorella pyrenoidosa in the novel raceway pond with 15° inclined angle of the blades were higher than those in the traditional reactor. The results of the culture experiments and CFD simulations were identical with each other. Therefore, a novel paddle wheel with 15° inclined angle of the blades was obtained for better microalgae cultivation.

  13. Screening factors influencing the production of astaxanthin from freshwater and marine microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binti Ibnu Rasid, Elda Nurafnie; Mohamad, Shaza Eva; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Salleh, Madihah Md

    2014-02-01

    Astaxanthin, a carotenoid pigment found in several aquatic organisms, is responsible for the red colour of salmon, trout and crustaceans. In this study, astaxanthin production from freshwater microalga Chlorella sorokiniana and marine microalga Tetraselmis sp. was investigated. Cell growth and astaxanthin production were determined spectrophotometrically at 620 and 480 nm, respectively. Astaxanthin was extracted using acetone and measured subsequent to biomass removal. Aerated conditions favoured astaxanthin production in C. sorokiniana, whereas Tetraselmis sp. was best cultured under unaerated conditions. C. sorokiniana produced more astaxanthin with the highest yield reached at 7.83 mg/l in 6.0 mM in nitrate containing medium compared to Tetraselmis sp. which recorded the highest yield of only 1.96 mg/l in 1.5 mM nitrate containing medium. Production in C. sorokiniana started at the early exponential phase, indicating that astaxanthin may be a growth-associated product in this microalga. Further optimization of astaxanthin production was performed using C. sorokiniana through a 2(3) full factorial experimental design, and a yield of 8.39 mg/l was achieved. Overall, the study has shown that both microalgae are capable of producing astaxanthin. Additionally, this research has highlighted C. sorokiniana as a potential astaxanthin producer that could serve as a natural astaxanthin source in the current market.

  14. Removal of cephalosporin antibiotics 7-ACA from wastewater during the cultivation of lipid-accumulating microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wan-Qian; Zheng, He-Shan; Li, Shuo; Du, Juan-Shan; Feng, Xiao-Chi; Yin, Ren-Li; Wu, Qing-Lian; Ren, Nan-Qi; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using lipid-accumulating microalgae to remove cephalosporin antibiotics 7-amino cephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) from wastewater with the additional benefit of biofuels production. Three isolated microalgal strains (namely, Chlorella sp. Cha-01, Chlamydomonas sp. Tai-03 and Mychonastes sp. YL-02) were cultivated under 7-ACA stress and their biomass productivity, lipid production and N-NO3(-) consumption were monitored. It was found that 7-ACA had slight inhibition effects on the microalgal growth at the ratio of 12.0% (Cha-01), 9.6% (YL-02), 11.7% (Tai-03). However, lipid accumulation in the three microalgae was not influenced by the presence of 7-ACA. The investigation on the 7-ACA removal mechanisms during microalgal growth shows that 7-ACA was mainly removed by microalgae adsorption as well as hydrolysis and photolysis reactions. This study demonstrates that using microalgae to treat antibiotic-containing wastewater is promising due to the potential of simultaneous antibiotic removal and biofuel production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Predicting the reproduction strategies of several microalgae through their genome sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Yang, Guanpin

    2015-06-01

    Documenting the sex and sexual reproduction of the microalgae is very difficult, as most of the results are based on the microscopic observation that can be heavily influenced by genetic, physiological and environmental conditions. Understanding the reproduction strategy of some microalgae is required to breed them in large scale culture industry. Instead of direct observation of sex and sexual reproduction under microscope, the whole set or the majority of core meiosis genes may evidence the sex and sexual reproduction in the unicellular algae, as the meiosis is necessary for maintaining the genomic stability and the advantages of genetic recombination. So far, the available genome sequences and bioinformatic tools (in this study, homolog searching and phylogenetic analysis) allow us to propose that at least 20 core meiosis genes (among them ≥6 must be meiosis specific) are enough for an alga to maintain its sexual reproduction. According to this assumption and the genome sequences, it is possible that sexual reproduction was carried out by Micromonas pusilla and Cyanidioschyzon merolae, while asexual reproduction was adopted by Bigelowiella natans, Guillardia theta, Nannochloropsis gaditana, N. oceanica, Chlorella variablis, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. This understanding will facilitate the breeding trials of some economic microalgae ( e.g., N. gaditana, N. oceanica, C. variablis and P. tricornutum). However, the reproduction strategies of these microalgae need to be proved by further biological experiments.

  16. Isolation and characterization of microalgae for biodiesel production from Nisargruna biogas plant effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tale, Manisha; Ghosh, Sukhendu; Kapadnis, Balasaheb; Kale, Sharad

    2014-10-01

    Increasing energy demand and depleting fossil fuel sources have intensified the focus on biofuel production. Microalgae have emerged as a desirable source for biofuel production because of high biomass and lipid production from waste water source. In this study, five microalgae were isolated from effluents of Nisargruna biogas plants. These isolates were identified based on morphology and partial 18S and 23S rRNA gene sequences. Growth and lipid accumulation potential of these microalgae were investigated. One isolate, Chlorella sp. KMN3, accumulated high biomass (1.59 ± 0.05 g L(-1)) with moderate lipid content (20%), while another isolate Monoraphidium sp. KMN5 showed moderate biomass accumulation of 0.65 ± 0.05 g L(-1) with a very high (35%) lipid content. The fatty acid methyl esters mainly composed of C-16:0, C-18:0, C-18:1 and C-18:2. This observation makes these microalgae immensely potential candidate for biodiesel production using the effluent of a biogas plant as feed stock.

  17. Ratio between autoflocculating and target microalgae affects the energy-efficient harvesting by bio-flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, S; Vermuë, M H; Wijffels, R H

    2012-08-01

    The effect of ratio between autoflocculating and target microalgae in bio-flocculation was studied with emphasis on the recovery, sedimentation rate and energy demand for harvesting the target microalgae. When the autoflocculating microalgae Ettlia texensis, Ankistrodesmus falcatus and Scenedesmus obliquus were added to Chlorella vulgaris at a ratio of 0.25, the recovery of C. vulgaris increased from 25% to, respectively, 40%, 36% and 31%. The sedimentation rate increased as well. Addition of Tetraselmis suecica to Neochloris oleoabundans at a ratio of 0.25 increased the recovery from 40% to 50%. Application of bio-flocculation at a ratio of 0.25, followed by centrifugation reduces the energy demand for harvesting of the target microalgae from 13.8 MJ kgDW(-1) if only centrifugation is used to 1.83, 1.81, 1.53 and 1.34 MJ kgDW(-1), respectively, using T. suecica, E. texensis, A. falcatus and S. obliquus and 3h sedimentation before centrifugation.

  18. Phototrophic pigment production with microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, K.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract

    Microalgal pigments are regarded as natural alternatives for food colorants. To facilitate optimization of microalgae-based pigment production, this thesis aimed to obtain key insights in the pigment metabolism of phototrophic microalgae, with the main  focus

  19. Phototrophic pigment production with microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, K.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract

    Microalgal pigments are regarded as natural alternatives for food colorants. To facilitate optimization of microalgae-based pigment production, this thesis aimed to obtain key insights in the pigment metabolism of phototrophic microalgae, with the main  focus

  20. Mixotrophic growth and biochemical analysis of Chlorella vulgaris cultivated with diluted monosodium glutamate wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yan; Hu, Wenrong; Li, Xiuqing; Ma, Guixia; Song, Mingming; Pei, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    Monosodium glutamate wastewater (MSGW) is a potential medium for microbial cultivation because of containing abundant organic nutrient. This paper seeks to evaluate the feasibility of growing Chlorella vulgaris with MSGW and assess the influence of MSGW concentration on the biomass productivity and biochemical compositions. The MSGW diluted in different concentrations was prepared for microalga cultivation. C. vulgaris growth was greatly promoted with MSGW compared with the inorganic BG11 medium. C. vulgaris obtained the maximum biomass concentration (1.02 g/L) and biomass productivity (61.47 mg/Ld) with 100-time diluted MSGW. The harvested biomass was rich in protein (36.01-50.64%) and low in lipid (13.47-25.4%) and carbohydrate (8.94-20.1%). The protein nutritional quality and unsaturated fatty acids content of algal increased significantly with diluted MSGW. These results indicated that the MSGW is a feasible alternative for mass cultivation of C. vulgaris.

  1. Saline wastewater treatment by Chlorella vulgaris with simultaneous algal lipid accumulation triggered by nitrate deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qiao-Hui; Gong, Yu-Peng; Fang, Wen-Zhe; Bi, Zi-Cheng; Cheng, Li-Hua; Xu, Xin-Hua; Chen, Huan-Lin

    2015-10-01

    Chlorella vulgaris, a marine microalgae strain adaptable to 0-50 g L(-1) of salinity, was selected for studying the coupling system of saline wastewater treatment and lipid accumulation. The effect of total nitrogen (T N) concentration was investigated on algal growth, nutrients removal as well as lipid accumulation. The removal efficiencies of TN and total phosphorus (TP) were found to be 92.2-96.6% and over 99%, respectively, after a batch cultivation of 20 days. To illustrate the response of lipid accumulation to nutrients removal, C. vulgaris was further cultivated in the recycling experiment of tidal saline water within the photobioreactor. The lipid accumulation was triggered upon the almost depletion of nitrate (<5 mg L(-1)), till the final highest lipid content of 40%. The nitrogen conversion in the sequence of nitrate, nitrite, and then to ammonium in the effluents was finally integrated with previous discussions on metabolic pathways of algal cell under nitrogen deficiency.

  2. Lipid accumulation from pinewood pyrolysates by Rhodosporidium diobovatum and Chlorella vulgaris for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Luis; Orr, Valerie C A; Chen, Sean; Westerhof, Roel; Oudenhoven, Stijn; Rossum, Guus van; Kersten, Sascha; Berruti, Franco; Rehmann, Lars

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated the suitability of pinewood pyrolysates as a carbon source for lipid production and cultivation of the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium diobovatum and the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. Thermal decomposition of pinewood and fractional condensation were used to obtain an oil rich in levoglucosan which was upgraded to glucose by acid hydrolysis. Blending of pyrolytic sugars with pure glucose in both nitrogen rich and nitrogen limited conditions was studied for R. diobovatum, and under nitrogen limited conditions for C. vulgaris. Glucose consumption rate decreased with increasing proportions of pyrolytic sugars increasing cultivation time. While R. diobovatum was capable of growth in 100% (v/v) pyrolytic sugars, C. vulgaris growth declined rapidly in blends greater than 20% (v/v) until no growth was detected in blends >40%. Finally, the effects of pyrolysis sugars on lipid composition was evaluated and biodiesel fuel properties were estimated based on the lipid profiles.

  3. Influence of plaque-forming bacterium, Rhodobacteraceae sp. on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhangran; Zhang, Jingyan; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Bangzhou; Cai, Guanjing; Zhang, Huajun; Li, Yi; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to find out the molecular features, infection process of a special alga plaque-forming microorganism and its potential influence on the biomass of Chlorella vulgaris during the infection process. Direct contact between the algal cell and the bacterium may be the primary steps needed for the bacterium to lyse the alga. Addition of C. vulgaris cells into f/2 medium allowed us obtain the object bacterium. The 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons results showed that the plaque-forming bacterium kept the closest relationship with Labrenzia aggregata IAM 12614(T) at 98.90%. The existence of the bacterium could influence both the dry weight and lipid content of C. vulgaris. This study demonstrated that direct cell wall disruption of C. vulgaris by the bacterium would be a potentially effective method to utilize the biomass of microalgae.

  4. Phosphorus plays an important role in enhancing biodiesel productivity of Chlorella vulgaris under nitrogen deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Fei-Fei; Chu, Pei-Na; Cai, Pei-Jie; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Paul K S; Zeng, Raymond J

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the role of phosphorus in lipid production under nitrogen starvation conditions, five types of media possessing different nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations or their combination were prepared to culture Chlorella vulgaris. It was found that biomass production under nitrogen deficient condition with sufficient phosphorus supply was similar to that of the control (with sufficient nutrition), resulting in a maximum lipid productivity of 58.39 mg/L/day. Meanwhile, 31P NMR showed that phosphorus in the medium was transformed and accumulated as polyphosphate in cells. The uptake rate of phosphorus in cells was 3.8 times higher than the uptake rate of the control. This study demonstrates that phosphorus plays an important role in lipid production of C. vulgaris under nitrogen deficient conditions and implies a potential to combine phosphorus removal from wastewater with biodiesel production via microalgae.

  5. Nutrients and pharmaceuticals removal from wastewater by culture and harvesting of Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escapa, C; Coimbra, R N; Paniagua, S; García, A I; Otero, M

    2015-06-01

    This work aimed to study both the removal of nutrients and pharmaceuticals, namely salicylic acid or paracetamol, from water by the culture of Chlorella sorokiniana. The removal of nutrients was nearly complete at the end of the batch culture; above 70% for nitrates and 89% for phosphates in the semicontinuous culture. The pharmaceuticals removal kinetics were 2.3 times greater for the salicylic acid than paracetamol, reaching volumetric efficiencies above 93% for salicylic acid in the semicontinuous culture. Finally, to separate the microalgae biomass from treated water, metal salts, synthetic polyelectrolytes and a biopolymer were tested as coagulants-flocculants. The best flocculation results were achieved with AlCl3 (95.23% with 200mgg(-1), 1min incubation time). However, given that resulting flocs had different characteristics, flocculants must be chosen on the basis of the subsequent use of the biomass.

  6. The culture of Chlorella vulgaris in a recycled supernatant: Effects on biomass production and medium quality

    KAUST Repository

    Hadj-Romdhane, F.

    2013-03-01

    Reusing supernatant of microalgae culture medium can have inhibitory or toxic effects on the biomass production because of the release of organic metabolites by cells in the culture medium during their growth. This work investigated the impact of Chlorella vulgaris medium recycling on culture productivity, cells quality and accumulation of excreted metabolites in the culture medium. No significant impact on the C. vulgaris growth was observed after 63days of recycling, the productivity remained stable at around 0.55kgm-3day-1. Organic matters accumulated in supernatant were identified as biopolymers (BP) poor in nitrogen and with a size above 40kDa (probably polysaccharides), and small organic molecules (SOM) richer in nitrogen with a molecular size ranging from 1 to 3kDa. The concentration of biopolymers in the supernatant increased till to a maximum and then decreased, possibly consumed by bacteria, whereas small organic compounds accumulated in the medium. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Protease cell wall degradation of Chlorella vulgaris: effect on methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdy, Ahmed; Mendez, Lara; Blanco, Saul; Ballesteros, Mercedes; González-Fernández, Cristina

    2014-11-01

    In order to optimize the enzymatic dosage and microalgae biomass loads subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis prior anaerobic digestion of Chlorella vulgaris, organic matter solubilisation and methane production were investigated. Experimental data using protease dosage of 0.585 AU g DW(-1) showed that increasing biomass loads up to 65 g L(-1) did not affect markedly the hydrolysis efficiency (51%). Enzymatically pretreated biomasses subjected to anaerobic digestion enhanced methane production by 50-70%. The attempt of decreasing the enzymatic dosages revealed diminished hydrolysis efficiency concomitantly with a decreased methane production enhancement. In agreement with the good results observed for organic matter conversion into biogas, total nitrogen mineralization was attained for enzymatically pretreated biomass. Despite the high protein content of the biomass and the biocatalyst used in the present study no ammonia inhibition was detected.

  8. Application of ozonated piggery wastewater for cultivation of oil-rich Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ke; Mou, Xiaoqing; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haiying

    2014-11-01

    Ozonated and autoclaved piggery wastewaters were compared for cultivation of oil-rich Chlorella pyrenoidosa by measuring nutrient removal from the medium and growth rate and lipid production of the microalgae. The removal rates of chemical oxygen demand, NH4(+)-N, total nitrogen and total phosphorus by C. pyrenoidosa were not influenced by both sterilisation methods. The specific growth rate and biomass of C. pyrenoidosa were determined by analysing the chlorophyll concentration for eliminating the disturbance of bacteria growth in culture system. Bacteria raised from the residue in the ozonated medium achieved 30% of the total microorganisms at the end of cultivation. They reduced the growth of C. pyrenoidosa by 10.4%, but contributed to a faster decline of the nutrient content on the first day. Lipid production and fatty acid profile did not change markedly in both sterilisation methods. The results suggest that ozonation is acceptable for piggery wastewater treatment for C. pyrenoidosa cultivation.

  9. 气升式光生物反应器中Chlorella sp.优化培养与能量计算%Optimization of Chlorella sp. cultivation in airlift photobioreactor and energy calculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周集体; 桂冰; 李昂; 胡霞; 乔森

    2015-01-01

    Oleaginous microalgae can produce biodiesel by solar energy, transforming the inorganic carbon into organic carbon. However, the reduction of the energy consumption in the process of oleaginous microalgae cultivation is the bottleneck to achieve large-scale production of biodiesel. By the optimization of the Chlorella sp. cultivation in an airlift photobioreactor, as well as the energy calculation and comparison of different culture conditions, the work proposed that, the adoption of optical fibers as the internal illumination source and a proper flow rate (06 L/min) in the cultivation of Chlorella sp. in the airlift photobioreactor could enhance the energy efficiency and obtain the maximal productivity per energy consumption 440 g/( W·d) , 8-25 folds of those with the external illumination conditions.%高油脂含量的微藻能够有效利用太阳能生产生物油脂,从而实现无机碳转化为有机碳的过程.如何降低微藻培养过程的能量消耗,是实现含油微藻规模化生产生物柴油的关键.通过对气升式光生物反应器中Chlorella sp.培养条件的优化,以及不同培养条件的能量计算和比较,发现当使用侧光光纤作为内置光源时可以提高光能利用率,在适宜的通气速率(06 L/min)条件下,可获得单位能耗的最大生物产量440 g/(W·d),较同等条件下外置光源时产量提高了8~25倍.

  10. Promoting the Growth of Chlorella vulgaris in Secondary Wastewater Treatment Effluent of Tofu Industry using Azospirillum sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyunanto Agung Nugroho

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to investigate the influence of growth promoting bacteria (GPB Azospirillum sp on the growth of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris in wastewater of tofu industry as a medium. To observe the influence, about 106 cells/mL of Chlorella vulgaris was cultivated in 1 L of wastewater of tofu industry. The wastewater was an effluent of an aerobic treatment. Six different treatments were set regarding to the Azospirillum sp added to the medium. The glass was marked as A0 as no GPB inoculants added to the medium, and A2, A4, A6, A8 and A10 for 2 mL, 4mL, 6mL, 8 mL and 10 mL of GPB added to the medium respectively. The concentration of GPB inoculant was 108 cfu per mL. The result showed that the highest number of Chlorella vulgaris population was achieved by addition of 6 mL GPB Azospirillum sp in the day 10, while the highest maximum growth rate was achieved by addition of 10 mL GPB Azospirillum sp  to the medium.

  11. Improving high carbon dioxide tolerance and carbon dioxide fixation capability of Chlorella sp. by adaptive laboratory evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dengjin; Wang, Liang; Zhao, Quanyu; Wei, Wei; Sun, Yuhan

    2015-06-01

    CO2 capture by microalgae is a promising method to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It is critical to construct a highly efficient way to obtain a microalgal strain tolerant to high CO2 concentrations with high CO2 fixation capability. In this study, two evolved Chlorella sp. strains, AE10 and AE20 were obtained after 31 cycles of adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) under 10% and 20% CO2, respectively. Both of them grew rapidly in 30% CO2 and the maximal biomass concentration of AE10 was 3.68±0.08g/L, which was 1.22 and 2.94 times to those of AE20 and original strain, respectively. The chlorophyll contents of AE10 and AE20 were significantly higher than those of the original one under 1-30% CO2. The influences of ALE process on biochemical compositions of Chlorella cells were also investigated. This study proved that ALE was an effective approach to improve high CO2 tolerance of Chlorella sp.

  12. CO2 Biofixation by the Cyanobacterium Spirulina sp. LEB 18 and the Green Alga Chlorella fusca LEB 111 Grown Using Gas Effluents and Solid Residues of Thermoelectric Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Vaz, Bruna; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; de Morais, Michele Greque

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has increased from 280 to 400 ppm in the last 10 years, and the coal-fired power plants are responsible for approximately 22 % of these emissions. The burning of fossil fuel also produces a great amount of solid waste that causes serious industrial and environmental problems. The biological processes become interesting alternative in combating pollution and developing new products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the CO2 biofixation potential of microalgae that were grown using gaseous effluents and solid residues of thermoelectric origin. The microalgae Chlorella fusca LEB 111 presented higher rate of CO2 biofixation (42.8 %) (p Spirulina sp. LEB 18. The values for the CO2 biofixation rates and the kinetic parameters of Spirulina and Chlorella cells grown using combustion gas did not differ significantly from those of cells grown using CO2 and a carbon source in the culture media. These microalgae could be grown using ash derived from coal combustion, using the minerals present in this residue as the source of the essential metals required for their growth and the CO2 derived from the combustion gas as their carbon source.

  13. Identification of characteristic fatty acids to quantify triacylglycerols in microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peili eShen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid profiles of lipids from microalgae are unique. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are generally enriched in polar lipids, whereas saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids constitute the majority of fatty acids in triacylglycerols (TAG. Each species has characteristic fatty acids, and their content is positively or negatively correlated with TAGs. The marine oleaginous diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was used as the paradigm to determine the quantitative relationship between TAG and characteristic fatty acid content. Fatty acid profiles and TAG content of Phaeodactylum tricornutum were determined in a time course. C16:0/C16:1 and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n3 were identified as characteristic fatty acids in TAGs and polar lipids, respectively. The percentage of those characteristic fatty acids in total fatty acids had a significant linear relationship with TAG content and thus the correlation coefficient presenting r2 were 0.96, 0.94 and 0.97 respectively. The fatty acid-based method for TAG quantification could also be applied to other microalgae such as Nannochloropsis oceanica in which the r2 of C16:0, EPA were 0.94, 0.97 respectively and Chlorella pyrenoidosa, whose r2 value correspondingly between C18:1, C18:3 and TAG content were 0.91, 0.99 as well. This characteristic fatty acid-based method provided a distinct way to quantify TAGs in microalgae, by which TAGs could be measured precisely by immediate transesterification from wet biomass rather than using conventional methods. This procedure simplified the operation and required smaller samples than conventional methods.

  14. Transgene expression in microalgae – from tools to applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lior eDoron

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae comprise a biodiverse group of photosynthetic organisms that reside in water sources and sediments. The green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was adopted as a useful model organism for studying various physiological systems. Its ability to grow under both photosynthetic and heterotrophic conditions allows efficient growth of non-photosynthetic mutants, making Chlamydomonas a useful genetic tool to study photosynthesis. In addition, this green alga can grow as haploid or diploid cells, similar to yeast, providing a powerful genetic system. As a result, easy and efficient transformation systems have been developed for Chlamydomonas, targeting both the chloroplast and nuclear genomes. Since microalgae comprise a rich repertoire of species that offer variable advantages for biotech and biomed industries, gene transfer technologies were further developed for many microalgae to allow for the expression of foreign proteins of interest. Expressing foreign genes in the chloroplast enables the targeting of foreign DNA to specific sites by homologous recombination. Chloroplast transformation also allows for the introduction of genes encoding several enzymes from a complex pathway, possibly as an operon. Expressing foreign proteins in the chloroplast can also be achieved by introducing the target gene into the nuclear genome, with the protein product bearing a targeting signal that directs import of the transgene-product into the chloroplast, like other endogenous chloroplast proteins. Integration of foreign genes into the nuclear genome is mostly random, resulting in large variability between different clones, such that extensive screening is required. The use of different selection modalities is also described, with special emphasis on the use of herbicides and metabolic markers which are considered to be friendly to the environment, as compared to drug-resistance genes that are commonly used. Finally, despite the development of a wide

  15. Characterization of the highly branched glycogen from the thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria and comparison with other glycogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, Marta; Stuart, Marc C A; van der Maarel, Marc J E C

    2016-08-01

    The thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria synthesizes glycogen when growing under heterotrophic conditions. Structural characterization revealed that G. sulphuraria glycogen is the most highly branched glycogen described to date, with 18% of α-(1→6) linkages. Moreover, it differs from other glycogens because it is composed of short chains only and has a substantially smaller molecular weight and particle size. The physiological role of this highly branched glycogen in G. sulphuraria is discussed.

  16. Carotenoids, Phenolic Compounds and Tocopherols Contribute to the Antioxidative Properties of Some Microalgae Species Grown on Industrial Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Safafar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at investigating the potential of microalgae species grown on industrial waste water as a new source of natural antioxidants. Six microalgae from different classes, including Phaeodactylum sp. (Bacillariophyceae, Nannochloropsis sp. (Eustigmatophyceae, Chlorella sp., Dunaniella sp., and Desmodesmus sp. (Chlorophyta, were screened for their antioxidant properties using different in vitro assays. Natural antioxidants, including pigments, phenolics, and tocopherols, were measured in methanolic extracts of microalgae biomass. Highest and lowest concentrations of pigments, phenolic compounds, and tocopherols were found in Desmodesmus sp. and Phaeodactylum tricornuotom microalgae species, respectively. The results of each assay were correlated to the content of natural antioxidants in microalgae biomass. Phenolic compounds were found as major contributors to the antioxidant activity in all antioxidant tests while carotenoids were found to contribute to the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil (DPPH radical scavenging activity, ferrous reduction power (FRAP, and ABTS-radical scavenging capacity activity. Desmodesmus sp. biomass represented a potentially rich source of natural antioxidants, such as carotenoids (lutein, tocopherols, and phenolic compounds when cultivated on industrial waste water as the main nutrient source.

  17. Assessment of the mechanisms involved in the removal of emerging contaminants by microalgae from wastewater: a laboratory scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros, Víctor; Uggetti, Enrica; García, Joan; Bayona, Josep M

    2016-01-15

    Aerated batch reactors (2.5L) fed either with urban or synthetic wastewater were inoculated with microalgae (dominated by Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp.) to remove caffeine, ibuprofen, galaxolide, tributyl phosphate, 4-octylphenol, tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate and carbamazepine for 10 incubation days. Non-aerated and darkness reactors were used as controls. Microalgae grew at a rate of 0.25 d(-1) with the complete removal of N-NH4 during the course of the experiment. After 10 incubation days, up to 99% of the microcontaminants with a Henry's law constant higher than 3 10(-1) Pa m(3) mol(-1) (i.e., 4-octylphenol, galaxolide, and tributyl phosphate) were removed by volatilization due to the effect of air stripping. Whereas biodegradation was effective for removing ibuprofen and caffeine, carbamazepine and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate behaved as recalcitrant compounds. The use of microalgae was proved to be relevant for increasing the biodegradation removal efficiency of ibuprofen by 40% and reducing the lag phase of caffeine by 3 days. Moreover, the enantioselective biodegradation of S-ibuprofen suggested a biotic prevalent removal process, which was supported by the identification of carboxy-ibuprofen and hydroxy-ibuprofen. The results from microalgae reactors fed with synthetic wastewater showed no clear evidences of microalgae uptake of any of the studied microcontaminants.

  18. Carotenoids, Phenolic Compounds and Tocopherols Contribute to the Antioxidative Properties of Some Microalgae Species Grown on Industrial Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safafar, Hamed; van Wagenen, Jonathan; Møller, Per; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2015-12-11

    This study aimed at investigating the potential of microalgae species grown on industrial waste water as a new source of natural antioxidants. Six microalgae from different classes, including Phaeodactylum sp. (Bacillariophyceae), Nannochloropsis sp. (Eustigmatophyceae), Chlorella sp., Dunaniella sp., and Desmodesmus sp. (Chlorophyta), were screened for their antioxidant properties using different in vitro assays. Natural antioxidants, including pigments, phenolics, and tocopherols, were measured in methanolic extracts of microalgae biomass. Highest and lowest concentrations of pigments, phenolic compounds, and tocopherols were found in Desmodesmus sp. and Phaeodactylum tricornuotom microalgae species, respectively. The results of each assay were correlated to the content of natural antioxidants in microalgae biomass. Phenolic compounds were found as major contributors to the antioxidant activity in all antioxidant tests while carotenoids were found to contribute to the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazil (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, ferrous reduction power (FRAP), and ABTS-radical scavenging capacity activity. Desmodesmus sp. biomass represented a potentially rich source of natural antioxidants, such as carotenoids (lutein), tocopherols, and phenolic compounds when cultivated on industrial waste water as the main nutrient source.

  19. Combustion characteristics and air pollutant formation during oxy-fuel co-combustion of microalgae and lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Tahmasebi, Arash; Dou, Jinxiao; Yu, Jianglong

    2016-05-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels is seen as one of the key technologies for carbon capture to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The combustion characteristics of lignite coal, Chlorella vulgaris microalgae, and their blends under O2/N2 and O2/CO2 conditions were studied using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer-Mass Spectroscopy (TG-MS). During co-combustion of blends, three distinct peaks were observed and were attributed to C. vulgaris volatiles combustion, combustion of lignite, and combustion of microalgae char. Activation energy during combustion was calculated using iso-conventional method. Increasing the microalgae content in the blend resulted in an increase in activation energy for the blends combustion. The emissions of S- and N-species during blend fuel combustion were also investigated. The addition of microalgae to lignite during air combustion resulted in lower CO2, CO, and NO2 yields but enhanced NO, COS, and SO2 formation. During oxy-fuel co-combustion, the addition of microalgae to lignite enhanced the formation of gaseous species.

  20. Impacts of CO2 concentration on growth, lipid accumulation, and carbon-concentrating-mechanism-related gene expression in oleaginous Chlorella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianhua; Xu, Hui; Luo, Yuanchan; Wan, Minxi; Huang, Jianke; Wang, Weiliang; Li, Yuanguang

    2015-03-01

    Biodiesel production by microalgae with photosynthetic CO2 biofixation is thought to be a feasible way in the field of bioenergy and carbon emission reduction. Knowledge of the carbon-concentrating mechanism plays an important role in improving microalgae carbon fixation efficiency. However, little information is available regarding the dramatic changes of cells suffered upon different environmental factors, such as CO2 concentration. The aim of this study was to investigate the growth, lipid accumulation, carbon fixation rate, and carbon metabolism gene expression under different CO2 concentrations in oleaginous Chlorella. It was found that Chlorella pyrenoidosa grew well under CO2 concentrations ranging from 1 to 20 %. The highest biomass and lipid productivity were 4.3 g/L and 107 mg/L/day under 5 % CO2 condition. Switch from high (5 %) to low (0.03 %, air) CO2 concentration showed significant inhibitory effect on growth and CO2 fixation rate. The amount of the saturated fatty acids was increased obviously along with the transition. Low CO2 concentration (0.03 %) was suitable for the accumulation of saturated fatty acids. Reducing the CO2 concentration could significantly decrease the polyunsaturated degree in fatty acids. Moreover, the carbon-concentrating mechanism-related gene expression revealed that most of them, especially CAH2, LCIB, and HLA3, had remarkable change after 1, 4, and 24 h of the transition, which suggests that Chlorella has similar carbon-concentrating mechanism with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The findings of the present study revealed that C. pyrenoidosa is an ideal candidate for mitigating CO2 and biodiesel production and is appropriate as a model for mechanism research of carbon sequestration.

  1. Effect of a hot water extract of Chlorella vulgaris on proliferation of IEC-6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Seo-Hyeon; Kim, In-Hye; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2012-05-01

    Chlorella vulgaris, a unicellular microalgae, exerts various biological effects; however their effect on proliferation signaling pathways in normal cells has not been studied. We investigated the effect of hot water extracts of Chlorella vulgaris (CVE) on cell proliferation and related signaling pathways in rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). CVE increased the expression of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) and the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src. In addition, CVE induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways. We verified the increased phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-related kinase (ERK) and Akt and the increased expression of the PI3K regulatory subunit p85. CVE also influenced the canonical Wnt pathway through increased expression of the nuclear β-catenin, cyclin D1. Tyr-397 of FAK mediates interactions with Src homology 2 (SH2) domains in a number of other signaling proteins, including PI3K, PLC-γ, Shc, Grb7, Src and Nck2. Because CVE induced FAK activation, FAK may affect the Wnt pathway. Addition of a FAK inhibitor decreased the expression of nuclear β-catenin, cyclin D1 and c-myc, and increased the expression of cytosolic β-catenin. We conclude that CVE stimulated proliferation of IEC-6 cells via the MAPK, PI3K/Akt and canonical Wnt pathways, and that this affected the canonical Wnt pathway.

  2. Kinetic studies and thermodynamics of oil extraction and transesterification of Chlorella sp. for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, A L; Yasin, N H Mat; Derek, C J C; Lim, J K

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a mixture of chloroform and methanol (1:1, v/v) was applied to oil extraction from Chlorella sp. at 30, 40, 50 and 60 degrees C for 150 min extraction times. Kinetic studies revealed that the values of n and the rate constants were found to depend strongly on temperature. The activation energy was Ea = 38.893 kJ/mol, and the activation thermodynamic parameters at 60 degrees C were ΔS≠ = -180.190 J/mol , ΔH≠ = 36.124k J/mol and ΔG≠ = 96.128k J/mol. Both ΔH and ΔS yielded positive values, whereas ΔG was negative at 60 degrees C, indicating that this process is endothermic, irreversible and spontaneous. The acidic transesterification process was also investigated by gas chromatographic analysis of the microalgae fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) at different temperatures and reaction times. The fatty acid profile indicated that the main components were palmitic, linoleic and linolenic acids. The concentration of linolenic acid increased and oleic acid decreased as the temperature increased. Two-hour transesterification is the best reaction time for biodiesel production because it produces the highest percentage of unsaturated fatty acids (74%). These results indicate the potential of Chlorella sp. to produce biodiesel of good quality.

  3. Optimization of pressurized liquid extraction of carotenoids and chlorophylls from Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kwang Hyun; Lee, Hee Ju; Koo, Song Yi; Song, Dae-Geun; Lee, Dong-Un; Pan, Cheol-Ho

    2010-01-27

    Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) was applied to the extraction of carotenoids and chlorophylls from the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris. Four extraction techniques such as maceration (MAC), Soxhlet extraction (SOX), ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE), and PLE were compared, and both the extraction temperature (50, 105, and 160 degrees C) and the extraction time (8, 19, and 30 min), which are the two main factors for PLE, were optimized with a central composite design to obtain the highest extraction efficiency. The extraction solvent (90% ethanol/water) could adequately extract the functional components from C. vulgaris. PLE showed higher extraction efficiencies than MAC, SOX, and UAE. Temperature was the key parameter having the strongest influence on the extraction of carotenoids and chlorophylls from chlorella. In addition, high heat treatment (>110 degrees C) by PLE minimized the formation of pheophorbide a, a harmful chlorophyll derivative. These results indicate that PLE may be a useful extraction method for the simultaneous extraction of carotenoids and chlorophylls from C. vulgaris.

  4. Enhanced lipid production by co-cultivation and co-encapsulation of oleaginous yeast Trichosporonoides spathulata with microalgae in alginate gel beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitcha, Suleeporn; Cheirsilp, Benjamas

    2014-05-01

    This study attempted to enhance biomass and lipid productivity of an oleaginous yeast Trichosporonoides spathulata by co-culturing with microalgae Chlorella spp., optimizing culture conditions, and encapsulating them in alginate gel beads. The co-culture of the yeast with microalgae Chlorella vulgaris var. vulgaris TISTR 8261 most enhanced overall biomass and lipid productivity by 1.6-fold of the yeast pure culture at 48 h and by 1.1-fold at 72 h. After optimization and scale-up in a bioreactor, this co-culture produced the highest biomass of 12.2 g/L with a high lipid content of 47 %. The dissolved oxygen monitoring system in the bioreactor showed that the microalgae worked well as an oxygen supplier to the yeast. This study also showed that the co-encapsulated yeast and microalgae could grow and produce lipid as same as their free cells did. Therefore, it is possible to apply this encapsulation technique for lipid production and simplification of downstream harvesting process. This co-culture system also produced the lipid with high content of saturated fatty acids, indicating its potential use as biodiesel feedstock with high oxidative stability.

  5. Mixotrophic cyanobacteria and microalgae as distinctive biological agents for organic pollutant degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subashchandrabose, Suresh R; Ramakrishnan, Balasubramanian; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Kadiyala; Naidu, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Millions of natural and synthetic organic chemical substances are present in both soil and aquatic environments. Toxicity and/or persistence determine the polluting principle of these substances. The biological responses to these pollutants include accumulation and degradation. The responses of environments with organic pollutants are perceptible from the dwindling degradative abilities of microorganisms. Among different biological members, cyanobacteria and microalgae are highly adaptive through many eons, and can grow autotrophically, heterotrophically or mixotrophically. Mixotrophy in cyanobacteria and microalgae can provide many competitive advantages over bacteria and fungi in degrading organic pollutants. Laboratory culturing of strict phototrophic algae has limited the realization of their potential as bioremediation agents. In the natural assemblages, mixotrophic algae can contribute to sequestration of carbon, which is otherwise emitted as carbon dioxide to the atmosphere under heterotrophic conditions by other organisms. Molecular methods and metabolic and genomic information will help not only in identification and selection of mixotrophic species of cyanobacteria and microalgae with capabilities to degrade organic pollutants but also in monitoring the efficiency of remediation efforts under the field conditions. These organisms are relatively easier for genetic engineering with desirable traits. This review presents a new premise from the literature that mixotrophic algae and cyanobacteria are distinctive bioremediation agents with capabilities to sequester carbon in the environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The need to implement an efficient biomass fractionation and full utilization based on the concept of "biorefinery" for a viable economic utilization of microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibenedetto, Angela; Colucci, Antonella; Aresta, Michele

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, microalgae strains, such as Scenedesmus obliquus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum grown in indoor/outdoor photobioreactors (PBRs) and in open ponds (this is the first study on such strains cultivated in the local Southern Italy climatic conditions), were fully analyzed for their protein content, carbohydrates, lipids, and fatty acid profile in order to assess their potential use for the production of biofuels, chemicals, and omega-3, and as animal feed and human food. They are compared with Nannochloropsis sp. (commercial sample) which was fully analyzed in our laboratory and Chlorella (literature data). An economic evaluation was carried out, demonstrating that the cultivation of microalgae for the production of only biofuels will not match the economic standards. Conversely, if chemicals are also produced applying the biorefinery concept and using wastewater as a source of nutrients, it will be possible to have a good positive return from microalgae.

  7. Caracterización y perfil lipídico de aceites de microalgas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesly Tejeda-Benítez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available El uso creciente del biodiésel ha impulsado la búsqueda de nuevas materias primas, dentro de las que se destacan las microalgas. En esta investigación se estudió el cultivo de las microalgas Chlorella sp. y Dunaliella salina bajo diferentes condiciones de pH y concentración de nitrógeno (mgL-1, y la caracterización de los aceites obtenidos, con el fin de evaluar su potencial uso como materia prima en la producción de biodiésel. La D. salina alcanzó una máxima concentración celular de 1.15x106 células mL-1 en 6 días de cultivo en unas condiciones de 8.5 pH y 0.1 mg L-1 concentración de nitrógeno, mientras que Chlorella sp. presentó una máxima concentración celular de 2.6x107 células mL-1 en 14 días de cultivo en unas condiciones de 7.5 pH y 0.1 mg L-1 concentración de nitrógeno. La extracción de aceite intracelular de las microalgas cultivadas bajo las mejores condiciones de crecimiento celular se realizó empleando el método modificado de Bligh & Dyer. Al determinar el perfil de ácidos grasos de los aceites extraídos de ambas microalgas, se  encontraron en mayor proporción dos ácidos grasos insaturados: ácido linolénico y ácido oleico. En el aceite de D. salina se encontró una concentración de 51% p/p de ácido linolénico, mientras que para el aceite de Chlorella sp. fue de 39% p/p. Con relación al ácido oleico, el aceite de Chrorella sp. presentó una concentración de 35% p/p, superior al aceite de D. salina, con 25% p/p.

  8. Applying and comparing two chemometric methods in absorption spectral analysis of photopigments from Arctic microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; He, Jianfeng; Xia, Lihua; Cai, Minghong; Lin, Ling; Guang, Yingzhi

    2010-11-01

    Pigment absorption property of two arctic microalgae species (Skeletonema marinoi and Chlorella sp.) cultured at three temperatures (0, 4 and 8°C) was analyzed. Carotenoids and chlorophyll (Chl) c were positive factors to the high cell activities and primary productivities of S. marinoi at 4°C and 0°C, respectively; whereas Chl a had a positive effect on Chlorella sp. at all three temperatures, and carotenoids had a relatively high effect at 0°C. The absorption locations of photopigments were analyzed in detail using both fourth derivative and Symlet-6 wavelet analysis. Both methods precisely detected pigments with a relative large content; the fourth derivative analysis specifically detected the existence of a Chl a peak at about 410 nm and showed better differentiation of diatoxanthin, whereas the wavelet analysis distinctively indicated the existence of chlorophyllide a, β-carotene, and Chl c. The separation limit to pigment peaks of the fourth derivative spectra (4 nm) was 1 nm higher than that of the wavelet high-frequency spectra (3 nm). The wavelet high-frequency spectra were more stable in detecting pigment locations and were more effective in discriminating microalgae. Small algebraic difference of 10(-16) between the reconstructed absorption spectra obtained by the inverse wavelet transform and their corresponding original spectra also showed the validity of Symlet-6 wavelet in the detection of pigments. Another specific discovery of this research is the existence of a Chl a allomer in Chlorella sp., which was detected by both methods.

  9. Management of oxidative stress by microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirulis, Judith T; Scott, J Ashley; Ross, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current research on oxidative stress in eukaryotic microalgae and the antioxidant compounds microalgae utilize to control oxidative stress. With the potential to exploit microalgae for the large-scale production of antioxidants, interest in how microalgae manage oxidative stress is growing. Microalgae can experience increased levels of oxidative stress and toxicity as a result of environmental conditions, metals, and chemicals. The defence mechanisms for microalgae include antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases, and glutathione reductase, as well as non-enzymatic antioxidant molecules such as phytochelatins, pigments, polysaccharides, and polyphenols. Discussed herein are the 3 areas the literature has focused on, including how conditions stress microalgae and how microalgae respond to oxidative stress by managing reactive oxygen species. The third area is how beneficial microalgae antioxidants are when administered to cancerous mammalian cells or to rodents experiencing oxidative stress.

  10. Cell proliferation alterations in Chlorella cells under stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioboo, Carmen [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15008 A Coruna (Spain); O' Connor, Jose Enrique [Laboratorio de Citomica, Unidad Mixta de Investigacion CIPF-UVEG, Centro de Investigacion Principe Felipe, Avda. Autopista del Saler, 16, 46013 Valencia (Spain); Prado, Raquel; Herrero, Concepcion [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15008 A Coruna (Spain); Cid, Angeles, E-mail: cid@udc.es [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15008 A Coruna (Spain)

    2009-09-14

    Very little is known about growth and proliferation in relation to the cell cycle regulation of algae. The lack of knowledge is even greater when referring to the potential toxic effects of pollutants on microalgal cell division. To assess the effect of terbutryn, a triazine herbicide, on the proliferation of the freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris three flow cytometric approaches were used: (1) in vivo cell division using 5-,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) staining was measured, (2) the growth kinetics were determined by cytometric cell counting and (3) cell viability was evaluated with the membrane-impermeable double-stranded nucleic acid stain propidium iodide (PI). The results obtained in the growth kinetics study using CFSE to identify the microalgal cell progeny were consistent with those determined by cytometric cell counting. In all C. vulgaris cultures, each mother cell had undergone only one round of division through the 96 h of assay and the cell division occurred during the dark period. Cell division of the cultures exposed to the herbicide was asynchronous. Terbutryn altered the normal number of daughter cells (4 autospores) obtained from each mother cell. The number was only two in the cultures treated with 250 nM. The duration of the lag phase after the exposure to terbutryn could be dependent on the existence of a critical cell size to activate cytoplasmic division. Cell size, complexity and fluorescence of chlorophyll a of the microalgal cells presented a marked light/dark (day/night) cycle, except in the non-dividing 500 nM cultures, where terbutryn arrested cell division at the beginning of the cycle. Viability results showed that terbutryn has an algastatic effect in C. vulgaris cells at this concentration. The rapid and precise determination of cell proliferation by CFSE staining has allowed us to develop a model for assessing both the cell cycle of C. vulgaris and the in vivo effects of pollutants on growth and

  11. Two stage treatment of dairy effluent using immobilized Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadavalli, Rajasri; Heggers, Goutham Rao Venkata Naga

    2013-12-19

    Dairy effluents contains high organic load and unscrupulous discharge of these effluents into aquatic bodies is a matter of serious concern besides deteriorating their water quality. Whilst physico-chemical treatment is the common mode of treatment, immobilized microalgae can be potentially employed to treat high organic content which offer numerous benefits along with waste water treatment. A novel low cost two stage treatment was employed for the complete treatment of dairy effluent. The first stage consists of treating the diary effluent in a photobioreactor (1 L) using immobilized Chlorella pyrenoidosa while the second stage involves a two column sand bed filtration technique. Whilst NH4+-N was completely removed, a 98% removal of PO43--P was achieved within 96 h of two stage purification processes. The filtrate was tested for toxicity and no mortality was observed in the zebra fish which was used as a model at the end of 96 h bioassay. Moreover, a significant decrease in biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand was achieved by this novel method. Also the biomass separated was tested as a biofertilizer to the rice seeds and a 30% increase in terms of length of root and shoot was observed after the addition of biomass to the rice plants. We conclude that the two stage treatment of dairy effluent is highly effective in removal of BOD and COD besides nutrients like nitrates and phosphates. The treatment also helps in discharging treated waste water safely into the receiving water bodies since it is non toxic for aquatic life. Further, the algal biomass separated after first stage of treatment was highly capable of increasing the growth of rice plants because of nitrogen fixation ability of the green alga and offers a great potential as a biofertilizer.

  12. Enhanced removal of Zn(2+) or Cd(2+) by the flocculating Chlorella vulgaris JSC-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Asraful; Wan, Chun; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Chen, Li-Jie; Chang, Jo-Shu; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2015-05-30

    Microalgae are attracting attention due to their potentials in mitigating CO2 emissions and removing environmental pollutants. However, harvesting microalgal biomass from diluted cultures is one of the bottlenecks for developing economically viable processes for this purpose. Microalgal cells can be harvested by cost-effective sedimentation when flocculating strains are used. In this study, the removal of Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) by the flocculating Chlorella vulgaris JSC-7 was studied. The experimental results indicated that more than 80% Zn(2+) and 60% Cd(2+) were removed by the microalgal culture within 3 days in the presence up to 20.0mg/L Zn(2+) and 4.0mg/L Cd(2+), respectively, which were much higher than that observed with the culture of the non-flocculating C. vulgaris CNW11. Furthermore, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon was explored by investigating the effect of Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) on the growth and metabolic activities of the microalgal strains. It was found that the flocculation of the microalga improved its growth, synthesis of photosynthetic pigments and antioxidation activity under the stressful conditions, indicating a better tolerance to the heavy metal ions for a potential in removing them more efficiently from contaminated wastewaters, together with a bioremediation of other nutritional components contributed to the eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems.

  13. Changes in fatty acid composition of Chlorella vulgaris by hypochlorous acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Choi, Sun-A; Jeong, Min-Ji; Nam, Bora; Oh, You-Kwan; Lee, Jin-Suk

    2014-06-01

    Hypochlorous acid treatment of a microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, was investigated to improve the quality of microalgal lipid and to obtain high biodiesel-conversion yield. Because chlorophyll deactivates the catalyst for biodiesel conversion, its removal in the lipid-extraction step enhances biodiesel productivity. When microalgae contacted the hypochlorous acid, chlorophyll was removed, and resultant changes in fatty acid composition of microalgal lipid were observed. The lipid-extraction yield after activated clay treatment was 32.7 mg lipid/g cell; after NaClO treatment at 0.8% available chlorine concentration, it was 95.2 mg lipid/g cell; and after NaCl electrolysis treatment at the 1 g/L cell concentration, it was 102.4 mg lipid/g cell. While the contents of all of the unsaturated fatty acids except oleic acid, in the microalgal lipid, decreased as the result of NaClO treatment, the contents of all of the unsaturated fatty acids including oleic acid decreased as the result of NaCl electrolysis treatment.

  14. Sorption Capacity Measurement of Chlorella Vulgaris and Scenedesmus Acutus to Remove Chromium from Tannery Waste Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Liliana; Godoy, Rubén; Montenegro, Luis

    2017-08-01

    Tanning process is a polluting activity due to the release of toxic agents into the environment. One of the most important of those toxic chemicals is chromium. Different alternatives have been proposed for the removal of this metal from tanning waste water which include the optimization of the productive processes, physicochemical and biochemical waste water treatment. In this study, the biological adsorption process of trivalent chromium was carried out in synthetic water and tannery waste water through two types of native green microalgae, called Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus acutus in Free State and immobilized in PVA state. This, considering that cellular wall of microalgae has functional groups like amines and carboxyl that might bind with trivalent chromium. Statistical significance of variables as pH temperature, chromium and algae concentrations was evaluated just like bio sorption capacity of different types of water and kind of bioadsorbent was calculated to determine if this process is a competitive solution comparing to other heavy metal removal processes.

  15. Comparison between several methods of total lipid extraction from Chlorella vulgaris biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Raquel Rezende; Moreira, Daniel Mendonça; Kunigami, Claudete Norie; Aranda, Donato Alexandre Gomes; Teixeira, Cláudia Maria Luz Lapa

    2015-01-01

    The use of lipids obtained from microalgae biomass has been described as a promising alternative for production of biodiesel to replace petro-diesel. It involves steps such as the cultivation of microalgae, biomass harvesting, extraction and transesterification of lipids. The purpose of the present study was to compare different methods of extracting total lipids. These methods were tested in biomass of Chlorella vulgaris with the solvents ethanol, hexane and a mixture of chloroform:methanol in ratios 1:2 and 2:1. The solvents were associated with other mechanisms of cell disruption such as use of a Potter homogenizer and ultrasound treatment. The percentage of triglycerides in the total lipids was determinated by the glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase-p-chlorophenol method (triglycerides monoreagent K117; Bioclin). Among the tested methods, the mixture of chloroform:methanol (2:1) assisted by ultrasound was most efficient, extracting an average of 19% of total lipids, of which 55% were triglycerides. The gas chromatographic analysis did not show differences in methyl ester profiles of oils extracted under the different methods.

  16. Lipid accumulation and growth of Chlorella zofingiensis in flat plate photobioreactors outdoors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Pingzhong; Deng, Zhongyang; Hu, Zhengyu; Fan, Lu

    2011-11-01

    Culturing microalgae using natural sunlight is an effective way to reduce the cost of microalgae-based biodiesel production. In order to evaluate the feasibility of culturing Chlorella zofingiensis outdoors for biodiesel production, effects of nitrogen limitation and initial cell concentration on growth and lipid accumulation of this alga were investigated in 60 L flat plate photobioreactors outdoors. The highest μmax and biomass productivity obtained was 0.994 day(-1) and 58.4 mg L(-1)day(-1), respectively. The lipid content was much higher (54.5% of dry weight) under nitrogen limiting condition than under nitrogen sufficient condition (27.3%). With the increasing initial cell concentrations, the lipid contents declined, while lipid concentrations and productivities increased. The highest lipid content, lipid concentration, and lipid productivity obtained was 54.5%, 536 mg L(-1) and 22.3 mg L(-1)day(-1), respectively. This study demonstrated that it was possible to culture C. zofingiensis under outdoor conditions for producing biodiesel feedstock.

  17. Enhancement of Chlorella vulgaris Biomass Cultivated in POME Medium as Biofuel Feedstock under Mixotrophic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Azimatun Nur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae cultivated in mixotrophic conditions have received significant attention as a suitable source of biofuel feedstock, based on their high biomass and lipid productivity. POME is one of the wastewaters generated from palm oil mills, containing important nutrients that could be suitable for mixotrophic microalgae growth. The aim of this research was to identify the growth of Chlorella vulgaris cultured in POME medium under mixotrophic conditions in relation to a variety of organic carbon sources added to the POME mixture. The research was conducted with 3 different carbon sources (D-glucose, crude glycerol and NaHCO3 in 40% POME, monitored over 6 days, under an illumination of 3000 lux, and with pH = 7. The biomass was harvested using an autoflocculation method and dry biomass was extracted using an ultrasound method in order to obtain the lipid content. The results show that C. vulgaris using D-glucose as carbon source gained a lipid productivity of 195 mg/l/d.

  18. Optimization of the biomass production of oil algae Chlorella minutissima UTEX2341.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, ZhaoSheng; Yuan, HongLi; Yang, JinShui; Li, BaoZhen

    2011-10-01

    High production cost is a major obstacle to the extensive use of microalgae biodiesel. To cut the cost and achieve higher biomass productivity, Chlorella minutissima UTEX2341 was cultured under photoheterotrophic conditions. With the carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus concentration of 26.37, 2.61 and 0.03 g L⁻¹ d⁻¹ respectively, a maximum biomass productivity of 1.78 g L⁻¹ d⁻¹ was obtained, which was 59 times more than that cultured under autotrophic condition. The lipid productivity reached 0.29 g L⁻¹ d⁻¹, which was 11.9 times higher than the highest value reported by Oh et al. (2010). The conversion rate of microalgae lipids to FAME was found to be elevated from 45.65% to 62.97% and the FAME productivity increased from 1.16 to 180.68 mg L⁻¹ d⁻¹ after the optimization. 94% of the fatty acid of C. minutissima UTEX2341 was found to be composed of palmitic, oleic, linoleic and γ linoleic and the unsaturated fatty acids were the main parts (79.42%).

  19. Dewatering of Chlorella pyrenoidosa using diatomite dynamic membrane: filtration performance, membrane fouling and cake behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yalei; Zhao, Yangying; Chu, Huaqiang; Zhou, Xuefei; Dong, Bingzhi

    2014-01-01

    The diatomite dynamic membrane (DDM) was utilized to dewater Chlorella pyrenoidosa of 2 g dry weight/L under continuous-flow mode, whose ultimate algae concentration ranged from 43 g to 22 g dry weight/L of different culture time. The stable flux of DDM could reach 30 L/m(2) h over a 24 h operation time without backwash. Influences of extracellular organic matters (EOM) on filtration behavior and membrane fouling were studied. The DDM was divided into three sub-layers, the slime layer, the algae layer and the diatomite layer from the outside to the inside of the cake layer based on components and morphologies. It was found that EOM caused membrane fouling by accumulating in the slime and algae layers. The DDM intercepted polysaccharides, protein-like substances, humic-like substances and some low-MW organics. Proteins were indicated the major membrane foulants with increased protein/polysaccharide ratio from the slime layer to the diatomite layer as culture time increased. This method could be applied to subsequent treatment of microalgae coupling technology of wastewater treatment or microalgae harvesting for producing biofuel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Extraction of Lipids from Chlorella saccharophila Using High-Pressure Homogenization Followed by Three Phase Partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulchandani, Ketan; Kar, Jayaranjan R; Singhal, Rekha S

    2015-07-01

    Commercial exploitation of microalgae for biofuel and food ingredients is hindered due to laborious extraction protocols and use of hazardous chemicals. Production of lipids in the microalga grown in modified BG11 medium was evaluated to arrive at the appropriate harvesting conditions. The use of three phase partitioning (TPP) as a green approach for extraction of lipids from Chlorella saccharophila was investigated. Cells disrupted by probe sonication were used for separation of lipids by TPP. The TPP-optimized conditions of 30 % ammonium sulfate, using slurry/t-butanol of 1:0.75 for 60 min at 25 to 35 °C, showed a lipid recovery of 69.05 ± 3.12 % (w/w) as against 100 % (w/w) by using chloroform-methanol extraction. Subsequently, parameters of high-pressure homogenization for cell disruption were optimized for maximum recovery of lipids by TPP. A final recovery of 89.91 ± 3.69 % (w/w) lipids was obtained along with ∼1.26 % w/w carotenoids of dry biomass in the t-butanol layer and protein content of ∼12 % w/w of dry biomass in the middle protein layer due to ammonium sulfate precipitation, after performing TPP under the optimized conditions.

  1. Mild pressure induces rapid accumulation of neutral lipid (triacylglycerol) in Chlorella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Kim, Bohwa; Lee, Jiye; Vijayan, Durairaj; Lee, Kyubock; Nam, Bora; Jeon, Sang Goo; Kim, Dong-Myung; Oh, You-Kwan

    2016-11-01

    Effective enhancement of neutral lipid (especially triacylglycerol, TAG) content in microalgae is an important issue for commercialization of microalgal biorefineries. Pressure is a key physical factor affecting the morphological, physiological, and biochemical behaviors of organisms. In this paper, we report a new stress-based method for induction of TAG accumulation in microalgae (specifically, Chlorella sp. KR-1 and Ch. sp. AG20150) by very-short-duration application of mild pressure. Pressure treatments of 10-15bar for 2h resulted in a considerable, ∼55% improvement of the 10-100g/Lcells' TAG contents compared with the untreated control. The post-pressure-treatment increase of cytoplasmic TAG granules was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Notwithstanding the increased TAG content, the total lipid content was not changed by pressurization, implying that pressure stress possibly induces rapid remodeling/transformation of algal lipids rather than de novo biosynthesis of TAG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Chlorella vulgaris S-Nitrosoproteome under Nitrogen-Replete and -Deplete Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henard, Calvin A.; Guarnieri, Michael T.; Knoshaug, Eric P.

    2017-01-17

    Oleaginous microalgae synthesize and accumulate large quantities of lipids that are promising feedstocks for the production of biofuels (Hu et al., 2008; Williams and Laurens, 2010; Day et al., 2012; Quinn and Davis, 2015). The algal species Chlorella vulgaris accumulates triacylglycerides that dominate its cellular composition (>60% lipid based on dry cell weight) when cultured in medium lacking a nitrogen source (Guarnieri et al., 2011; Ikaran et al., 2015), which is a 'lipid trigger' in an array of microalgae. As such, C. vulgaris represents a model algal species for examination of lipid accumulation mechanisms and a potential deployment organism in industrial algal biofuels applications. C. vulgaris has been extensively characterized biochemically and physiologically (Converti et al., 2009; Liang et al., 2009), and de novo-generated transcriptomic and proteomic datasets have indicated that post-transcriptional and -translational mechanisms likely govern lipid accumulation in response to nitrogen starvation (Guarnieri et al., 2011, 2013). However, the specific mechanisms underlying lipid biosynthesis in response to nitrogen stress remain elusive.

  3. Urban nutrient recovery from fresh human urine through cultivation of Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanshan; Lim, Chun Yong; Chen, Chia-Lung; Liu, He; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2014-12-01

    High rate food consumption in urban cities causes vast amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus used in agriculture to end up in urban wastewaters. To substantially recover these nutrients, source-separated human urine should be targeted. The present study was to investigate the feasibility of recovering nitrogen and phosphorus in urine via microalgae cultivation. In concentrated urine, urea hydrolysis and precipitation occur rapidly, making microalgal growth difficult and nutrient recovery ineffective. However, when fresh urine was added as nutrient stock for 1-day growth requirement, biomass of Chlorella sorokiniana grew from 0.44 to 0.96 g L(-1) utilising 62.64 mg L(-1) of N and 10.64 mg L(-1) of P, achieving 80.4% and 96.6% recoveries, respectively in a 1-day non-sterile cultivation cycle. Overall, microalgae grown with urine added as nutrient supplement show no signs of inferiority as compared to those grown in recipe medium BG11 in terms of mass and chlorophyll a growth rates as well as resulting lipids (36.8%) and energy contents (21.0 kJ g(-1)).

  4. Continuous cultivation of Chlorella pyrenoidosa using anaerobic digested starch processing wastewater in the outdoors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hua-Qiang; Tan, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Ya-Lei; Yang, Li-Bin; Zhao, Fang-Chao; Guo, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Microalgae cultivation using wastewater might be a suitable approach to support sustainable large-scale biomass production. Its compelling characteristics included the recycling of nutrients and water resources, reducing carbon emissions and harvesting available biomass. In outdoor batch and continuous cultures, Chlorella pyrenoidosa completely adapted to anaerobic digested starch processing wastewater and was the dominant microorganism in the photobioreactor. However, seasonal changes of environmental conditions significantly influenced biomass growth and lipid production. The long-term outdoor operation demonstrated that the biomass concentration and productivity in continuous operations at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) can be successfully predicted using the kinetic growth parameters obtained from the batch culture. A moderate HRT (4days) in the summer provided the best microalgae and lipid production and achieved relatively high biomass concentrations of 1.29-1.62g/L, biomass productivities of 342.6±12.8mg/L/d and lipids productivities of 43.37±7.43mg/L/d.

  5. Production of Microalgal Lipids as Biodiesel Feedstock with Fixation of CO2 by Chlorella vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The global warming and shortage of energy are two critical problems for human social development. CO2 mitigation and replacing conventional diesel with biodiesel are effective routes to reduce these problems. Production of microalgal lipids as biodiesel feedstock by a freshwater microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, with the ability to fixate CO2 is studied in this work. The results show that nitrogen deficiency, CO2 volume fraction and photoperiod are the key factors responsible for the lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris. With 5 % CO2, 0.75 g/L of NaNO3 and 18:6 h of light/dark cycle, the lipid content and overall lipid productivity reached 14.5 % and 33.2 mg/(L·day, respectively. Furthermore, we proposed a technique to enhance the microalgal lipid productivity by activating acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase with an enzyme activator. Citric acid and Mg2+ were found to be efficient enzyme activators of ACCase. With the addition of 150 mg/L of citric acid or 1.5 mmol/L of MgCl2, the lipid productivity reached 39.1 and 38.0 mg/(L·day, respectively, which was almost twofold of the control. This work shows that it is practicable to produce lipids by freshwater microalgae that can fixate CO2, and provides a potential route to solving the global warming and energy shortage problems.

  6. Producción de moina sp alimentada con chlorella spp. cultivada con riles orgánicos de la industria pesquera cubana.

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Teresita de J.; Manso, B.M.; López,R.; Martínez, F.C.; Moreno, M.

    2010-01-01

    El incremento sustancial de la acuicultura cubana y la carencia de algunos fertilizantes usados para fines de cultivo fitoplantónico, que finalmente pasan a nutrir especies zooplanctónicas como el cladócero Moina, ha dado pauta para realizar el presente estudio, referido al cultivo de dicha especie con la microalga Chlorella spp. desarrollada previamente con riles orgánicos de la industria pesquera. Se realizaron dos tandas experimentales: 1) en acuarios de 50 L de capacidad efect...

  7. Light attenuation on Chlorella vulgaris cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Tadeusz; Lotocka, Maria

    1993-12-01

    The laboratory measurements of spectrum of light attenuation on phytoplankton particles i.e. monoculture of unicellural green algae Chlorella vulgaris are presented. The measurements were carried out for alive culture and the cultures subjected to chemical (NaOH) or physical (ultrasounds) modification. The distinct changes in the light attenuation spectrum were a result of modification of the internal cell structures.

  8. Substitution of stable isotopes in Chlorella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaumenhaft, E.; Katz, J. J.; Uphaus, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Replacement of biologically important isotopes in the alga Chlorella by corresponding heavier stable isotopes produces increasingly greater deviations from the normal cell size and changes the quality and distribution of certain cellular components. The usefulness of isotopically altered organisms increases interest in the study of such permuted organisms.

  9. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of heterotrophic nitrobacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Jun-feng; MA Fang; GUO Jing-bo; HOU Ning; GAO Shan-shan; WANG Hong-yu

    2008-01-01

    A method about the isolation of heterotrophic nitrosebactria and the characteristics of heterotrophic nitrosobaetria were studied, it can be seen from the fluorescence in situ hybridization results of the bio-mem-brahe sample from the bio-ceramic reactor, the spots of green nitrosobacteria are obviously more than those of orange nitrohaeteria. Two heterotrophic nitrohacteria were isolated from the bio-ceramic reactor. By sequencing 16SrDNA and establishing the phylogenic tree, they were identified physiologically and biochemically as Pseudomonas sp.. After 12 d, the COD removal efficiency of wgy55 and wgy68 were 45.03% and 50.85% , the NH4-N removal efficiency of them were 80.12% and 85.93%, and the TN removal efficiency of them were 69.71% and 64.7%. The final concentration of NO2-N of wgy55 and wgy68 was 0.753 mg/L and 0.601 mg/ L, and that of NO3-N was 3.21 mg/L and 3.38 mg/L. These results show that wgy55 and wgy68 have the ca-pability of nitrification and they are heterotrophic nitrobacteria.

  10. Cell disruption for microalgae biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günerken, E; D'Hondt, E; Eppink, M H M; Garcia-Gonzalez, L; Elst, K; Wijffels, R H

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are a potential source for various valuable chemicals for commercial applications ranging from nutraceuticals to fuels. Objective in a biorefinery is to utilize biomass ingredients efficiently similarly to petroleum refineries in which oil is fractionated in fuels and a variety of products with higher value. Downstream processes in microalgae biorefineries consist of different steps whereof cell disruption is the most crucial part. To maintain the functionality of algae biochemicals during cell disruption while obtaining high disruption yields is an important challenge. Despite this need, studies on mild disruption of microalgae cells are limited. This review article focuses on the evaluation of conventional and emerging cell disruption technologies, and a comparison thereof with respect to their potential for the future microalgae biorefineries. The discussed techniques are bead milling, high pressure homogenization, high speed homogenization, ultrasonication, microwave treatment, pulsed electric field treatment, non-mechanical cell disruption and some emerging technologies.

  11. Fuel from microalgae lipid products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, A.M.; Feinberg, D.A.

    1984-04-01

    The large-scale production of microalgae is a promising method of producing a renewable feedstock for a wide variety of fuel products currently refined from crude petroleum. These microalgae-derived products include lipid extraction products (triglycerides, fatty acids, and hydrocarbons) and catalytic conversion products (paraffins and olefins). Microalgal biomass productivity and lipid composition of current experimental systems are estimated at 66.0 metric tons per hectare year and 30% lipid content. Similar yields in a large-scale facility indicate that production costs are approximately six times higher than the average domestic price for crude, well-head petroleum. Based on achievable targets for productivity and production costs, the potential for microalgae as a fuel feedstock is presented in context with selected process refining routes and is compared with conventional and alternative feedstocks (e.g., oilseeds) with which microalgae must compete. 24 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.

  12. Experimental studies on dimethylsulfide (DMS) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) production by four marine microalgae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chengxuan; YANG Guipeng; PAN Jinfen; ZHANG Honghai

    2010-01-01

    The production of dimethylsulfide(DMS)and dimethylsulfoniopropionate(DMSP)by marine microalgae was investigated to elucidate more on the role of marine phytoplankton in ocean-atmosphere interactions in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle.Axenic laboratory cultures of four marine microalgae-Isochrysis galbana 8701,Pavlova viridis,Platymonas sp.and Chlorella were tested for DMSP production and conversion into DMS.Among these four microalgae,Isochrysis galbana 8701and Pavlova viridis are two species of Haptophyta,whine Chlorella and Platymonas sp.belong to Chlorophyta.The results demonstrate that the four algae can produce various amounts of DMS(P),and their DMS(P)production was species specific.With similar cell size,more DMS was released by Haptophyta than that by Chlorophyta.DMS and dissolved DMSP(DMSPd)concentrations in algal cultures varied significantly during their life cycles.The highest release of DMS appeared in the senescent period for all the four algae.Variations in DMSP concentrations were in strong compliance with variations in algal cell densities during the growing period.A highly significant correlation was observed between the DMS and DMSPd concentrations in algal cultures,and there was a time lag for the variation trend of the DMS concentrations as compared with that of the DMSPd.The consistency of variation patterns of DMS and DMSPd implies that the DMSPd produced by phytoplankton cells has a marked effect on the production of DMS.In the present study,the authors' results specify the significant contribution of the marine phytoplankton to DMS(P)production and the importance of biological control of DMS concentrations in oceanic water.

  13. Improved biomass and lipid production in a mixotrophic culture of Chlorella sp. KR-1 with addition of coal-fired flue-gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveenkumar, Ramasamy; Kim, Bohwa; Choi, Eunji; Lee, Kyubock; Park, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Jin-Suk; Lee, Young-Chul; Oh, You-Kwan

    2014-11-01

    Industrial CO2-rich flue-gases, owing to their eco-toxicity, have yet to be practically exploited for microalgal biomass and lipid production. In this study, various autotrophic and mixotrophic culture modes for an oleaginous microalga, Chlorella sp. KR-1 were compared for the use in actual coal-fired flue-gas. Among the mixotrophic conditions tested, the fed-batch feedings of glucose and the supply of air in dark cycles showed the highest biomass (561 mg/L d) and fatty-acid methyl-ester (168 mg/L d) productivities. This growth condition also resulted in the maximal population of microalgae and the minimal population and types of KR-1-associated-bacterial species as confirmed by particle-volume-distribution and denaturing-gradient-gel-electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses. Furthermore, microalgal lipid produced was assessed, based on its fatty acid profile, to meet key biodiesel standards such as saponification, iodine, and cetane numbers.

  14. Pentachlorophenol toxicity to a mixture of Microcystis aeruginosa and Chlorella vulgaris cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Paulo; Stoichev, Teodor; Basto, M Clara P; Ramos, V; Vasconcelos, V M; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D

    2014-05-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a priority pollutant due to its persistence and high toxicity. For the first time, PCP effects were investigated at laboratory scale on co-cultures of two ubiquitous freshwater phytoplankton species: the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. The cells were exposed to environmental levels of PCP for 10 days in Fraquil culture medium, at nominal concentrations from 0.1 to 10,000 μg L(-1). Growth was assessed by area under growth curve (cell count vs. time). The phytoplankton community structure can be changed as a consequence of a PCP contamination. Low μg L(-1) levels of PCP are advantageous to M. aeruginosa. This is the first report of the promoting effect of PCP on the growth of aquatic cyanobacteria, using mixtures with microalgae. As a result of the direct toxic effects of high PCP concentrations on M. aeruginosa, C. vulgaris cell count increased given that in biological controls M. aeruginosa inhibited the C. vulgaris growth. At 16.7 mg L(-1), PCP already had direct toxic effects also on the microalga. The pH of culture medium tended to decrease with increasing PCP concentrations, which was mostly related to the growth inhibition of cyanobacterium caused by PCP. The PCP concentration was stable in the co-cultures, which differed from what has been observed in monocultures of the same two species. Short-term laboratory assays with two phytoplankton species gives important information on the species interactions, namely possible direct and indirect effects of a toxicant, and must be considered in ecotoxicity studies regarding environmental extrapolations.

  15. Biogenic hydrogen and methane production from Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakaniemi Aino-Maija

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microalgae are a promising feedstock for biofuel and bioenergy production due to their high photosynthetic efficiencies, high growth rates and no need for external organic carbon supply. In this study, utilization of Chlorella vulgaris (a fresh water microalga and Dunaliella tertiolecta (a marine microalga biomass was tested as a feedstock for anaerobic H2 and CH4 production. Results Anaerobic serum bottle assays were conducted at 37°C with enrichment cultures derived from municipal anaerobic digester sludge. Low levels of H2 were produced by anaerobic enrichment cultures, but H2 was subsequently consumed even in the presence of 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid, an inhibitor of methanogens. Without inoculation, algal biomass still produced H2 due to the activities of satellite bacteria associated with algal cultures. CH4 was produced from both types of biomass with anaerobic enrichments. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling indicated the presence of H2-producing and H2-consuming bacteria in the anaerobic enrichment cultures and the presence of H2-producing bacteria among the satellite bacteria in both sources of algal biomass. Conclusions H2 production by the satellite bacteria was comparable from D. tertiolecta (12.6 ml H2/g volatile solids (VS and from C. vulgaris (10.8 ml H2/g VS, whereas CH4 production was significantly higher from C. vulgaris (286 ml/g VS than from D. tertiolecta (24 ml/g VS. The high salinity of the D. tertiolecta slurry, prohibitive to methanogens, was the probable reason for lower CH4 production.

  16. Biorrefinarias de microalgas

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Alberto; Gouveia, L.

    2013-01-01

    As microalgas autotróficas são organismos fotossintéticos, que graças à sua “maquinaria fotossintética” são capazes de transformar a energia luminosa em energia química com a produção de compostos orgânicos. Os propósitos económicos de produção de biomassa microalgal têm-se alterado ao longo das últimas décadas: após a fase inicial de produção de SCP (single cell protein) para alimentar um mundo carente de alimentos e posteriormente como suplemento de alimentação humana, pretendeu-se a obtenç...

  17. Microalgae biofuel potentials (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Y; Rasoul-Amini, S; Naseri, A T; Montazeri-Najafabady, N; Mobasher, M A; Dabbagh, F

    2012-01-01

    With the decrease of fossil based fuels and the environmental impact of them over the planet, it seems necessary to seek the sustainable sources of clean energy. Biofuels, is becoming a worldwide leader in the development of renewable energy resources. It is worthwhile to say that algal biofuel production is thought to help stabilize the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and decrease global warming impacts. Also, among algal fuels' attractive characteristics, algal biodiesel is non toxic, with no sulfur, highly biodegradable and relatively harmless to the environment if spilled. Algae are capable of producing in excess of 30 times more oil per acre than corn and soybean crops. Currently, algal biofuel production has not been commercialized due to high costs associated with production, harvesting and oil extraction but the technology is progressing. Extensive research was conducted to determine the utilization of microalgae as an energy source and make algae oil production commercially viable.

  18. A Novel Treatment Protects Chlorella at Commercial Scale from the Predatory Bacterium Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganuza, Eneko; Sellers, Charles E.; Bennett, Braden W.; Lyons, Eric M.; Carney, Laura T.

    2016-01-01

    The predatory bacterium, Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus, can destroy a Chlorella culture in just a few days, rendering an otherwise robust algal crop into a discolored suspension of empty cell walls. Chlorella is used as a benchmark for open pond cultivation due to its fast growth. In nature, V. chlorellavorus plays an ecological role by controlling this widespread terrestrial and freshwater microalga, but it can have a devastating effect when it attacks large commercial ponds. We discovered that V. chlorellavorus was associated with the collapse of four pilot commercial-scale (130,000 L volume) open-pond reactors. Routine microscopy revealed the distinctive pattern of V. chlorellavorus attachment to the algal cells, followed by algal cell clumping, culture discoloration and ultimately, growth decline. The “crash” of the algal culture coincided with increasing proportions of 16s rRNA sequencing reads assigned to V. chlorellavorus. We designed a qPCR assay to predict an impending culture crash and developed a novel treatment to control the bacterium. We found that (1) Chlorella growth was not affected by a 15 min exposure to pH 3.5 in the presence of 0.5 g/L acetate, when titrated with hydrochloric acid and (2) this treatment had a bactericidal effect on the culture (2-log decrease in aerobic counts). Therefore, when qPCR results indicated a rise in V. chlorellavorus amplicons, we found that the pH-shock treatment prevented the culture crash and doubled the productive longevity of the culture. Furthermore, the treatment could be repeatedly applied to the same culture, at the beginning of at least two sequential batch cycles. In this case, the treatment was applied preventively, further increasing the longevity of the open pond culture. In summary, the treatment reversed the infection of V. chlorellavorus as confirmed by observations of bacterial attachment to Chlorella cells and by detection of V. chlorellavorus by 16s rRNA sequencing and qPCR assay. The p

  19. Biochemical compositions and fatty acid profiles in four species of microalgae cultivated on household sewage and agro-industrial residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, Clediana Dantas; da Silva Santana, Jordana Kaline; de Lira, Evandro Bernardo; Sassi, Patrícia Giulianna Petraglia; Rosenhaim, Raul; da Costa Sassi, Cristiane Francisca; da Conceição, Marta Maria; Sassi, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    The potential of four regional microalgae species was evaluated in relation to their cell growth and biomass production when cultured in the following alternative media: bio-composts of fruit/horticultural wastes (HB), sugarcane waste and vinasse (VB) chicken excrements (BCE), raw chicken manure (RCM), and municipal domestic sewage (MDS). The cultures were maintained under controlled conditions and their growth responses, productivities, biochemical compositions, and the ester profiles of their biomasses were compared to the results obtained in the synthetic media. The MDS and HB media demonstrated promising results for cultivation, especially of Chlorella sp., Chlamydomonas sp., and Lagerheimia longiseta, which demonstrated productivities superior to those seen when grown on the control media. The highest lipid levels were obtained with the HB medium. The data obtained demonstrated the viability of cultivating microalgae and producing biomass in alternative media prepared from MDS and HB effluents to produce biodiesel.

  20. Biotechnological potential of Synechocystis salina co-cultures with selected microalgae and cyanobacteria: Nutrients removal, biomass and lipid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ana L; Pires, José C M; Simões, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Cultivation of microalgae and cyanobacteria has been the focus of several research studies worldwide, due to the huge biotechnological potential of these photosynthetic microorganisms. However, production of these microorganisms is still not economically viable. One possible alternative to improve the economic feasibility of the process is the use of consortia between microalgae and/or cyanobacteria. In this study, Chlorella vulgaris, Pseu