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Sample records for herpes simplex virus-induced

  1. Herpes Simplex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin diseases Athlete's foot Chickenpox Cold sores Genital herpes Genital warts Head lice Herpes simplex Impetigo Molluscum contagiosum ... swollen lymph nodes (glands) in the neck (oral herpes) or groin (genital herpes) are possible. Problems urinating . People (most often ...

  2. Herpes simplex virus induces neural oxidative damage via microglial cell Toll-like receptor-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little Morgan R

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using a murine model of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 encephalitis, our laboratory has determined that induction of proinflammatory mediators in response to viral infection is largely mediated through a Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2-dependent mechanism. Published studies have shown that, like other inflammatory mediators, reactive oxygen species (ROS are generated during viral brain infection. It is increasingly clear that ROS are responsible for facilitating secondary tissue damage during central nervous system infection and may contribute to neurotoxicity associated with herpes encephalitis. Methods Purified microglial cell and mixed neural cell cultures were prepared from C57B/6 and TLR2-/- mice. Intracellular ROS production in cultured murine microglia was measured via 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA oxidation. An assay for 8-isoprostane, a marker of lipid peroxidation, was utilized to measure free radical-associated cellular damage. Mixed neural cultures obtained from β-actin promoter-luciferase transgenic mice were used to detect neurotoxicity induced by HSV-infected microglia. Results Stimulation with HSV-1 elevated intracellular ROS in wild-type microglial cell cultures, while TLR2-/- microglia displayed delayed and attenuated ROS production following viral infection. HSV-infected TLR2-/- microglia produced less neuronal oxidative damage to mixed neural cell cultures in comparison to HSV-infected wild-type microglia. Further, HSV-infected TLR2-/- microglia were found to be less cytotoxic to cultured neurons compared to HSV-infected wild-type microglia. These effects were associated with decreased activation of p38 MAPK and p42/p44 ERK in TLR2-/- mice. Conclusions These studies demonstrate the importance of microglial cell TLR2 in inducing oxidative stress and neuronal damage in response to viral infection.

  3. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test is Performed A blood sample ... person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  4. Immune- and Nonimmune-Compartment-Specific Interferon Responses Are Critical Determinants of Herpes Simplex Virus-Induced Generalized Infections and Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Zachary M; Pasieka, Tracy Jo; Parker, George A; Leib, David A

    2016-12-01

    blindness-inducing herpetic stromal keratitis, highly debilitating and lethal herpes simplex encephalitis, and generalized infections that can lead to herpes simplex virus-induced acute liver failure. While immune compromise is a known factor, the precise mechanisms that lead to generalized HSV infections are unknown. In this study, we used and developed a mouse model system in combination with real-time bioluminescence imaging to demonstrate the relative importance of the immune and nonimmune compartments for containing viral spread and promoting host survival after corneal infection. Our results shed light on the pathogenesis of HSV infections that lead to generalized infection and acute liver failure. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. The Role of T Cell Immunoglobulin Mucin Domains 1 and 4 in a Herpes Simplex Virus-Induced Behçet’s Disease Mouse Model

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    Ju A. Shim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The T cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM proteins regulate T cell activation and tolerance. TIM-1 plays an important role in the regulation of immune responses and the development of autoimmune diseases. TIM-4 is a natural ligand of TIM-1, and the interaction of TIM-1 and TIM-4 is involved in the regulation of T helper (Th cell responses and modulation of the Th1/Th2 cytokine balance. Behçet’s disease (BD is a chronic, multisystemic inflammatory disorder with arthritic, intestinal, mucocutaneous, ocular, vascular, and central nervous system involvement. Tim-1 expression was lower in a herpes simplex virus-induced BD mouse model compared to that in asymptomatic BD normal (BDN mice. Tim-4 expression was higher in BD mice than that in BDN mice. In this study, we investigated the Tim expression in a BD mouse model with BD-like symptoms. Tim-1 and Tim-4 expression was regulated by an expression vector or siRNA injected into the BD mouse model. The Tim-1 vector injected into BD mice resulted in changes in BD-like symptoms and decreased the severity score. Treatment with Tim-4 siRNA also improved BD-like symptoms and decreased the severity score accompanied by upregulation of regulatory T cells. We showed that regulating Tim-1 or Tim-4 affected BD-like symptoms in mice.

  6. antibodies against Herpes simplex virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types -1 and -2 in pregnant women in. Port Harcourt, Nigeria. ... Cite as: Okonko IO, Cookey TI. Seropositivity and determinants of immunoglobulin-G (IgG) antibodies against Herpes simplex virus (HSV) ..... zadeh, Z. and Akbari, S. Seroepidemiology of Herpes. Simplex Virus Type 1 and 2 in ...

  7. Herpes simplex-encefalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Laura Krogh; Mogensen, Trine Hyrup

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a rare disease, although it is the most common form of sporadic encephalitis worldwide. Recently, studies have provided important new insight into the genetic and immunological basis of HSE. However, even in the presence of antiviral treatment, mortality...

  8. Herpes Simplex Virus (Cold Sores)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Share Cold Sores in Children: About the Herpes Simplex Virus Page Content ​A child's toddler and ... Cold sores (also called fever blisters or oral herpes) start as small blisters that form around the ...

  9. Chronic herpes simplex virus encephalitis in childhood.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Verbeek, M.M.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Although herpes simplex virus is a major cause of acute encephalitis in childhood, chronic herpes simplex virus encephalitis has only rarely been reported. This report presents a case of chronic herpes simplex virus encephalitis in a 6-year-old female. Diagnosis was based on the detection of herpes

  10. Herpes simplex virus following stab phlebectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Lum, Ying Wei; Heller, Jennifer A

    2017-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection following surgery is an unusual postoperative phenomenon. Many mechanisms have been suggested, with the most likely explanation related to latent virus reactivation due to a proinflammatory response in the setting of local trauma. Here, we present a case of herpes simplex virus reactivation in an immunocompetent female following a conventional right lower extremity stab phlebectomy. Salient clinical and physical examination findings are described, and management strategies for herpes simplex virus reactivation are outlined. This is the first known case report of herpes simplex virus reactivation following lower extremity phlebectomy.

  11. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305... simplex virus serological assays. (a) Identification. Herpes simplex virus serological assays are devices... herpes simplex virus in serum. Additionally, some of the assays consist of herpes simplex virus antisera...

  12. SHORT COMMUNICATION Serological profiles of Herpes simplex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr.Mirambo

    SHORT COMMUNICATION. Serological profiles of Herpes simplex ... Herpes Simplex Virus Type-2 (HSV-2) infections is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and causes ... A total of 174 non HIV infected health professional students were enrolled between April and May 2016 from Mwanza City, ...

  13. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Bell's Palsy

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The association between herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 infection and Bell palsy was determined in 47 children studied at Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, NY. Swabs of saliva and conjunctiva were taken for PCR testing.

  15. Prodrugs of herpes simplex thymidine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanachkova, Milka; Xu, Wei-Chu; Dvoskin, Sofya; Dix, Edward J; Yanachkov, Ivan B; Focher, Federico; Savi, Lida; Sanchez, M Dulfary; Foster, Timothy P; Wright, George E

    2015-04-01

    Because guanine-based herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase inhibitors are not orally available, we synthesized various 6-deoxy prodrugs of these compounds and evaluated them with regard to solubility in water, oral bioavailability, and efficacy to prevent herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation from latency in a mouse model. Organic synthesis was used to prepare compounds, High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to analyze hydrolytic conversion, Mass Spectrometry (MS) to measure oral bioavailability, and mouse latent infection and induced reactivation to evaluate the efficacy of a specific prodrug. Aqueous solubilities of prodrugs were improved, oxidation of prodrugs by animal cytosols occurred in vitro, and oral absorption of the optimal prodrug sacrovir™ (6-deoxy-mCF3PG) in the presence of the aqueous adjuvant Soluplus® and conversion to active compound N(2)-[3-(trifluoromethyl)pheny])guanine (mCF3PG) were accomplished in mice. Treatment of herpes simplex virus-1 latent mice with sacrovir™ in 1% Soluplus in drinking water significantly suppressed herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation and viral genomic replication. Ad libitum oral delivery of sacrovir™ was effective in suppressing herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation in ocularly infected latent mice as measured by the numbers of mice shedding infectious virus at the ocular surface, numbers of trigeminal ganglia positive for infectious virus, number of corneas that had detectable infectious virus, and herpes simplex virus-1 genome copy numbers in trigeminal ganglia following reactivation. These results demonstrate the statistically significant effect of the prodrug on suppressing herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation in vivo. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Clinical pattern of recurrent herpes simplex keratitis

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    Saini Jagjit

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To document the clinical pattern in recurrent herpes simplex disease. Methods: Eyes with clinically documented pattern of corneal manifestation on more than one occasion were analysed. For each eye recruited, the clinical pattern of the disease at each recurrence of herpes simplex corneal disease, age, disease-free intervals, triggering factors, laterality and steroid abuse were noted and evaluated. Results: For an average follow up of 6.9 years, a recurrence rate of 0.6 episodes per year was observed. Disease-free intervals of 75.7 months for epithelial herpes simplex disease was considerably longer than the 21.3 months observed for stromal disease. Clinical pattern of recurrence was of the same type following first episode of disciform keratitis, epithelial keratitis and endothelitis in 84%, 72.7%, and 75% of the eyes respectively. Conclusion: Herpes simplex disease often recurs in the same manifest clinical pattern as the first episode. This clinical evidence provides additional support for the potential role of herpes simplex biotypes in determining manifestation of clinical disease pattern.

  17. Herpes Simplex Esophagitis in Immunocompetent Hosts

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    Daniel Eymard

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Over four months, three cases of biopsy-proven herpes simplex esophagitis were seen at Centre hospitalier Pierre-Boucher, Longueuil, in young adult males with no evidence of immunosuppression and negative serological testing for antibody against the human immunodeficiency virus. Clinical presentation consisted of odynophagia, fever and retrosternal chest pain. All patients rapidly improved with acyclovir therapy.

  18. Intermittent oral cyclosporin for recurrent herpes simplex-associated erythema multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakis, Sophie; Zagarella, Samuel

    2005-02-01

    Recurrent erythema multiforme is one of three distinct clinical subtypes of erythema multiforme. We present a 42-year-old man with a 10-year history of recurrent herpes simplex virus-induced erythema multiforme. Our patient was debilitated by the frequency of his attacks and the associated pain, for which he often required leave from work. The frequency, duration and morbidity of the attacks were poorly controlled using oral prednisone and oral aciclovir. Three episodes of his recurrent herpes simplex virus-induced erythema multiforme were treated with intermittent oral cyclosporin. Oral cyclosporin rapidly reduced his symptoms and led to rapid resolution of his erythema multiforme, provided the cyclosporin was commenced on day 1 or 2 of the erythema multiforme episode. Consequently, his quality of life has dramatically improved. We recommend the use of intermittent oral cyclosporin for recurrent, debilitating episodes of erythema multiforme.

  19. Preventing herpes simplex virus in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2014-12-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are very common worldwide. Approximately 22% of pregnant women are infected genitally with HSV, and most of them are unaware of this. The most devastating consequence of maternal genital herpes is HSV disease in the newborn. Although neonatal HSV infections remain uncommon, due to the significant morbidity and mortality associated with the infection, HSV infection in the newborn is often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. This review summarizes the epidemiology and management of neonatal HSV infections and discusses strategies to prevent HSV infection in the newborn. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Herpes simplex virus induces the marked up-regulation of the zinc finger transcriptional factor INSM1, which modulates the expression and localization of the immediate early protein ICP0

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    Kimura Hiroshi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs rapidly shut off macromolecular synthesis in host cells. In contrast, global microarray analyses have shown that HSV infection markedly up-regulates a number of host cell genes that may play important roles in HSV-host cell interactions. To understand the regulatory mechanisms involved, we initiated studies focusing on the zinc finger transcription factor insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1, a host cell protein markedly up-regulated by HSV infection. Results INSM1 gene expression in HSV-1-infected normal human epidermal keratinocytes increased at least 400-fold 9 h after infection; INSM1 promoter activity was also markedly stimulated. Expression and subcellular localization of the immediate early HSV protein ICP0 was affected by INSM1 expression, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays revealed binding of INSM1 to the ICP0 promoter. Moreover, the role of INSM1 in HSV-1 infection was further clarified by inhibition of HSV-1 replication by INSM1-specific siRNA. Conclusions The results suggest that INSM1 up-regulation plays a positive role in HSV-1 replication, probably by binding to the ICP0 promoter.

  1. Neuronal apoptosis in herpes simplex virus - 1 encephalitis (HSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athmanathan, S; Vydehi, B V; Sundaram, C; Vemuganti, G K; Murthy, J M

    2001-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus infections are encountered often due to their ubiquitous nature. Common sites involved include skin, mucous membrane, genitalia, eye and the nervous system. HSV infection of the central nervous system can be life threatening. Little is known about the pathogenesis of this cataclysmic disease, at the cellular level. Virus induced apoptosis may play a role in the molecular pathogenesis of encephalitis. This study aims to detect the presence of apoptosis: a) In the brain tissue obtained at autopsy from a patient who succumbed to Herpes simplex virus - 1 encephalitis (HSE) and b) In a human glioblastoma cell line (SNB 19). Wedge tissue samples were obtained from the inferior surface of the frontal lobe and fixed in buffered formalin. Tissue sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin for histopathological analysis. An indirect immunoperoxidase assay was performed for the detection of HSV -1 antigen in the tissue sections. Apoptosis in the brain tissue was detected employing the TUNEL assay (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl Transferase (TdT) mediated deoxy Uridine Triphosphate Nick End Labeling) using a commerically available kit (TdT Fragel DNA fragmentation detection kit, Oncogene Research Products, CA). HSV-1 induced apoptosis of SNB 19 cells were detected in-vitro by: a) Membrane blebbing assay and b) Hoechst 33258 staining. Classical features of viral encephalitis including the presence of intranuclear inclusions, neuronal loss and perivascular cuffing were seen in the tissue sections. The immunoperoxidase assay revealed the presence of abundant viral antigen in the neurons, microglial and satellite cells. TUNEL assay revealed many apoptotic neurons, microglial and satellite cells. In-vitro assays showed evidence of HSV-1 induced apoptosis in the SNB 19 cell line. These results suggest that virus induced apoptosis may play a role in the molecular pathogenesis of HSE. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the role of HSV-1 induced apoptosis

  2. Penatalaksanaan infeksi herpes simpleks oral rekuren Management of recurrent oral herpes simplex infection

    OpenAIRE

    Erni Marlina; Bagus Soebadi

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent oral herpes simplex infection was the secondary or recurrent form of primary herpes simpex infection. In human, herpes simplex virus was latent or dormant and could reactivate. Recurrency due to virus reactivation induced by emotional stress, high fever, ultraviolet exposed, oral tissue or neuron tissue trauma, immunosuppresion condition, and hormonal disturbance. The aim of this paper was to report and discuss management of recurrent oral herpes simplex infection which ...

  3. Development history of herpes simplex encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-wei WANG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is an acute central nervous system infection caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV. Early clinical manifestations mainly include fever, headache and unconsciousness; when progressing, psychiatric symptoms can occur. Death or serious neurological sequelae will happen if not treated. With the development of laboratory tests and imaging techniques, the early diagnosis of HSE is possible. Even though imaging with temporal lobe abnormal signal has the implication to HSE, the application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR in detecting HSV DNA in cerebrospinal fluid is currently the "gold standard" to diagnose HSE. Once diagnosed, acyclovir must be given as soon as possible, as delayed treatment will result in a poor outcome. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.08.003

  4. Decompressive craniectomy in herpes simplex encephalitis

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    Muhammed Jasim Abdul Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypertension is a common cause of morbidity in herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE. HSE is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis. Hereby we report a case of HSE in which decompressive craniectomy was performed to treat refractory intracranial hypertension. A 32-year-old male presented with headache, vomiting, fever, and focal seizures involving the right upper limb. Cerebrospinal fluid-meningoencephalitic profile was positive for herpes simplex. Magnetic resonance image of the brain showed swollen and edematous right temporal lobe with increased signal in gray matter and subcortical white matter with loss of gray, white differentiation in T2-weighted sequences. Decompressive craniectomy was performed in view of refractory intracranial hypertension. Decompressive surgery for HSE with refractory hypertension can positively affect patient survival, with good outcomes in terms of cognitive functions.

  5. Inactivation of Herpes Simplex Viruses by Nonionic Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asculai, Samuel S.; Weis, Margaret T.; Rancourt, Martha W.; Kupferberg, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    Nonionic surface-active agents possessing ether or amide linkages between the hydrophillic and hydrophobic portions of the molecule rapidly inactivated the infectivity of herpes simplex viruses. The activity stemmed from the ability of nonionic surfactants to dissolve lipid-containing membranes. This was confirmed by observing surfactant destruction of mammalian cell plasma membranes and herpes simplex virus envelopes. Proprietary vaginal contraceptive formulations containing nonionic surfactants also inactivated herpes simplex virus infectivity. This observation suggests that nonionic surfactants in appropriate formulation could effectively prevent herpes simplex virus transmission. Images PMID:208460

  6. Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 Infection among Females in Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Herpes simplex virus type 2 infection is life long with manifestation in a small proportion of those infected. It has presented public health concern because of its progressively increasing prevalence which some authorities say is of epidemic proportion in developing countries. Herpes simplex virus type 2 has ...

  7. Operculum syndrome: unusual feature of herpes simplex encephalitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, J. C.; Haenggeli, C. A.; Overweg-Plandsoen, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis in adults and young patients carries a high mortality and morbidity. Its presentation may be nonspecific, sometimes hampering early diagnosis. Two young children are reported with herpes simplex encephalitis in whom the operculum syndrome was an outstanding feature. This

  8. Herpes simplex encephalitis : from virus to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, Flore; Deback, Claire; Agut, Henri

    2011-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is the cause of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), a devastating human disease which occurs in 2-4 cases per million/year. HSE results either from a primary infection or virus reactivation, in accordance with the common pattern of HSV infection which is a chronic lifelong process. However its pathophysiology remains largely unknown and its poor prognosis is in contrast with the usually good tolerance of most clinical herpetic manifestations. HSE is due to HSV type 1 (HSV-1) in most cases but HSV type 2 (HSV-2) may be also implicated, especially in infants in the context of neonatal herpes. Polymerase chain reaction detection of HSV DNA in cerebrospinal fluid is the diagnosis of choice for HSE. Acyclovir, a nucleoside analogue which inhibits viral DNA polymerase activity, is the reference treatment of HSE while foscarnet constitutes an alternative therapy and the efficacy of cidofovir is currently uncertain in that context. The emergence of HSV resistance to acyclovir, a phenomenon which is mainly observed among immunocompromised patients, is a current concern although no case of HSE due to an acyclovir-resistant HSV strain has been reported to date. Nevertheless the identification and development of novel therapeutic strategies against HSV appears to be a non dispensable objective for future research in virology.

  9. Penatalaksanaan infeksi herpes simpleks oral rekuren Management of recurrent oral herpes simplex infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erni Marlina; Bagus Soebadi

    2013-01-01

    .... The aim of this paper was to report and discuss management of recurrent oral herpes simplex infection which complicated in the diagnosis due to manifestation of both herpes labialis and intraoral...

  10. Two step culture for production of recombinant herpes simplex virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was the major cause of genital herpes in humans. The HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD2) had been proved to be a potentially effective vaccine for treatment of genital herpes. The present study was to develop a two step culture to express the recombinant gD2 protein using the immobilized ...

  11. Pathogenesis of herpes simplex virus infections of the cornea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Maertzdorf (Jeroen)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe identification of human herpes virus (HHV) infections can be traced back to ancient Greece where Herpes simplex vims (HSV) infections in humans were first documented. Hippocrates used the word "herpes", meaning to creep or crawl, to describe spreading skin lesions. Although the

  12. The herpes simplex virus UL20 protein functions in glycoprotein K (gK intracellular transport and virus-induced cell fusion are independent of UL20 functions in cytoplasmic virion envelopment

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    Kousoulas Konstantin G

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The HSV-1 UL20 protein (UL20p and glycoprotein K (gK are both important determinants of cytoplasmic virion morphogenesis and virus-induced cell fusion. In this manuscript, we examined the effect of UL20 mutations on the coordinate transport and Trans Golgi Network (TGN localization of UL20p and gK, virus-induced cell fusion and infectious virus production. Deletion of 18 amino acids from the UL20p carboxyl terminus (UL20 mutant 204t inhibited intracellular transport and cell-surface expression of both gK and UL20, resulting in accumulation of UL20p and gK in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER in agreement with the inability of 204t to complement UL20-null virus replication and virus-induced cell fusion. In contrast, less severe carboxyl terminal deletions of either 11 or six amino acids (UL20 mutants 211t and 216t, respectively allowed efficient UL20p and gK intracellular transport, cell-surface expression and TGN colocalization. However, while both 211t and 216t failed to complement for infectious virus production, 216t complemented for virus-induced cell fusion, but 211t did not. These results indicated that the carboxyl terminal six amino acids of UL20p were crucial for infectious virus production, but not involved in intracellular localization of UL20p/gK and concomitant virus-induced cell fusion. In the amino terminus of UL20, UL20p mutants were produced changing one or both of the Y38 and Y49 residues found within putative phosphorylation sites. UL20p tyrosine-modified mutants with both tyrosine residues changed enabled efficient intracellular transport and TGN localization of UL20p and gK, but failed to complement for either infectious virus production, or virus-induced cell fusion. These results show that UL20p functions in cytoplasmic envelopment are separable from UL20 functions in UL20p intracellular transport, cell surface expression and virus-induced cell fusion.

  13. Herpes simplex and mood: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalkvist, J; Wahlin, T B; Bartsch, E; Forsbeck, M

    1995-01-01

    The effect of mood, the common cold, amount of sleep, and sunshine on recurring herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection was investigated using daily self-reports over a 3-month period from 23 female and 15 male patients with genital herpes and 26 female and two male patients with oral herpes. Results showed recurring genital HSV infection to be preceded by reduced and decreasing overall emotional well being over a period of 10 days, with a temporary improvement in the middle of the period. This pattern was significantly represented by rated nervousness and rated alertness. Females showed more marked trends for reported mood than did the males, which could not be attributed to the menstrual cycle. Conversely, males showed a more marked, strongly significant fourth-order trend for reported amount of sleep, with nadirs on the 8th and the 3rd day before the recurrence. Neither exposure to sunshine nor the common cold showed any relation to recurrence of genital HSV infection. The common cold appeared as the major precipitating factor in oral herpes. Except for a significant fourth-order trend for rated alertness, no relationship between mood and subsequent onset was found. This negative finding was interpreted as a masking effect of the common cold. Two alternative physiological theories, the ganglion trigger theory and the skin trigger theory, were discussed in relation to present findings. It was suggested that various possible mediators between mood states and recurring herpes should be investigated using the present approach, with structured diaries as complement to the rating scales.

  14. Herpes simplex encephalitis with thalamic, brainstem and cerebellar involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Meenal; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Udwadia Hegde, Anaita

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus encephalitis is a common and treatable cause of acute encephalitis in all age groups. Certain radiological features such as temporal parenchymal involvement facilitate the diagnosis. The use of herpes simplex virus polymerase chain reaction has expanded the clinical and imaging spectrum. We report the case of a young patient who presented with a movement disorder and predominant involvement of thalami, brainstem and cerebellum on magnetic resonance imaging, and was diagnosed with herpes simplex virus encephalitis. Differentiation from Japanese encephalitis may be difficult in these patients, especially in endemic areas, and may necessitate the use of relevant investigations in all patients.

  15. Reactivation of herpes simplex virus-1 following epilepsy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Monteiro de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The authors stress the potential risk of reactivation of HSV encephalitis after intracranial surgery. Herpes simplex virus encephalitis must be considered in neurosurgical patients who develop postoperative seizures and fever.

  16. [The lysate and recombinant antigens in ELISA-test-systems for diagnostic of herpes simplex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganova, L A; Kovtoniuk, G V; Korshun, L N; Kiseleva, E K; Tereshchenko, M I; Vudmaska, M I; Moĭsa, L N; Shevchuk, V A; Spivak, N Ia

    2014-08-01

    The lysate and recombinant antigens of various production included informula of ELISA-test-systems were analyzed. The ELISA-test-systems are used for detection of IgG to Herpes simplex virus type I and II. For testing the panel of serums PTH 201 (BBI Inc.) were used. The samples of this panel contain antibodies to Herpes simplex virus type I and II in mixed titers. The 69 serums of donors were used too (17 samples had IgG to Herpes simplex virus type I, 23 samples to Herpes simplex virus type II and 29 samples had no antibodies to Herpes simplex virus). The diagnostic capacity of mixture of recombinant antigens gG1 Herpes simplex virus type I and gG2 Herpes simplex virus type II (The research-and-production complex "DiaprofMed") was comparable with mixture of lysate antigen Herpes simplex virus type I and II (Membrane) EIE Antigen ("Virion Ltd."). In the test-systems for differentiation of IgG to Herpes simplex virus type I the recombinant antigen gG1 Herpes simplex virus type I proved to be comparable with commercial analogue Herpes simplex virus-1 gG1M ("Viral Therapeutics Inc."'). At the same time, capacity to detect IgG to Herpes simplex virus type II in recombinant protein gG2 Herpes simplex virus type II is significantly higher than in its analogue Herpes simplex virus-2 gG2c ("Viral Therapeutics Inc.").

  17. Chronic Ulcerative Herpes Simplex Virus Infection of the Vulva

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly Griffith-Bauer; Mary O’Hearn; Benjamin D. Ehst

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus infections in HIV-infected individuals can be clinically unusual and difficult to treat due to underlying problems with cell-mediated immunity and the occurrence of antiviral resistance. Additionally, partial or incomplete restoration of immune function may result in chronic ulcerations that require rotational treatments. In this report, we describe the case of a 38-year-old HIV-positive woman who developed the ulcerative form of chronic herpes simplex infection despite h...

  18. Antiviral agents for herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vere Hodge, R Anthony; Field, Hugh J

    2013-01-01

    This review starts with a brief description of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), the clinical diseases they cause, and the continuing clinical need for antiviral chemotherapy. A historical overview describes the progress from the early, rather toxic antivirals to acyclovir (ACV) which led the way for its prodrug, valacyclovir, to penciclovir and its prodrug, famciclovir (FCV). These compounds have been the mainstay of HSV therapy for two decades and have established a remarkable safety record. This review focuses on these compounds, the preclinical studies which reveal potentially important differences, the clinical trials, and the clinical experience through two decades. Some possible areas for further investigation are suggested. The focus shifts to new approaches and novel compounds, in particular, the combination of ACV with hydrocortisone, known as ME609 or zovirax duo, an HSV helicase-primase inhibitor, pritelivir (AIC316), and CMX001, the cidofovir prodrug for treating resistant HSV infection in immunocompromised patients. Letermovir has established that the human cytomegalovirus terminase enzyme is a valid target and that similar compounds could be sought for HSV. We discuss the difficulties facing the progression of new compounds. In our concluding remarks, we summarize the present situation including a discussion on the reclassification of FCV from prescription-only to pharmacist-controlled for herpes labialis in New Zealand in 2010; should this be repeated more widely? We conclude that HSV research is emerging from a quiescent phase. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF THE HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS INFECTION

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    Ljiljana Kostadinović

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Over 150 sorts of viruses are capable of causing diseases of the respiratory ways. The virus infections have become the cost to be paid for urbanization and industrialization. The acute virus infections jeopardize mankind by their complications with numerous consequences. They open up the way to super infections, they provoke endogenous infections and lead to insufficiency of the vital organs. The viruses penetrate the organism mainly through the respiratory ways, digestive and urinary-sexual organs and skin. Some viruses immediately at the place of their entrance into the organism find receptive cells in which they can multiply (herpes virus and etc.. Some viruses must get through the blood, through the lymph or the nerve fibers to the target organs that they have affinity for.The changes that primarily occur in the mouth with manifest lymphadenopathy of the surrounding area emerge with respect to the type of the acute infection dis-ease.The human herpes viruses are responsible for a great number of diseases in people; that is why it can be said that the infections they induce are a very frequent cause of people's diseases in the world. Man is natural and the only host for the types I and II of the herpes simplex virus (HSV; that is why the infected person is regarded as the source of infection. The infection transmission can be by direct contact or over the contaminated secretions during the sexual intercourse. The age and the socioeconomic status (living conditions, level of medical culture, habits, etc. affect to agreat extent epidemiology of the HSV infection. The HSV distribution in the region of Niš in the five-year period (from 1987 to 1992 was the highest in the early and late summer (June and September.

  20. Clinical Efficacy of Oral Ganciclovir for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Recurrent Herpes Simplex Keratitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xin Wang Linnong Wang Nianlang Wu Xinjun Ma Jianjiang Xu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1),which has high recurrent rate and incidence of severe vision loss,is the leading cause of infectious blindness...

  1. Chronic Ulcerative Herpes Simplex Virus Infection of the Vulva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Griffith-Bauer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus infections in HIV-infected individuals can be clinically unusual and difficult to treat due to underlying problems with cell-mediated immunity and the occurrence of antiviral resistance. Additionally, partial or incomplete restoration of immune function may result in chronic ulcerations that require rotational treatments. In this report, we describe the case of a 38-year-old HIV-positive woman who developed the ulcerative form of chronic herpes simplex infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapy and valacyclovir prophylaxis. Repeated intravenous courses of foscarnet and topical cidofovir finally controlled her erosions as her cell-mediated immunity was slowly restored. This case highlights the challenges that still exist in diagnosing and managing this rare presentation of herpes simplex virus

  2. Recidiverende erythema multiforme udløst af herpes simplex-virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergård Grejsen, Dorthe; Henningsen, Emil

    2012-01-01

    We describe two cases of recurrent erythema multiforme, both associated to infection with herpes simplex virus. The importance of subclinical herpes is illustrated. Antiviral and additional treatment is described.......We describe two cases of recurrent erythema multiforme, both associated to infection with herpes simplex virus. The importance of subclinical herpes is illustrated. Antiviral and additional treatment is described....

  3. Nonvirion Antigens Produced by Herpes Simplex Viruses 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarro, Giulio; Sabin, Albert B.

    1973-01-01

    Of nine herpes simplex virus 1 strains (from lip, mouth, throat, cornea, or brain) only five produced enough nonvirion antigen (i.e., not a structural component of the virus) to be detected by complement fixation with specially prepared, virion-absorbed, type-1 guinea pig antisera, while the remaining four strains produced only enough of the same antigen to induce specific antibody in hyperimmunized guinea pigs. While the type 1 virion antiserum used reacted equally well by complement fixation with the type 1 and type 2 strains, the type 1 nonvirion antisera failed to react with nonvirion antigens produced by three type-2 (genital) strains. However, type 2 nonvirion antiserum reacted equally well with the three type 2 and four type 1 nonvirion antigens that were tested. It appears, therefore, that while herpes simplex virus 1 codes only for type 1 nonvirion antigen, herpes simplex 2 codes not only for an immunologically distinct type 2 nonvirion antigen but also for enough type 1 nonvirion antigen to stimulate antibody production for it. Herpes simplex 2 nonvirion antigen exhibited the same properties as type 1, i.e., its activity was lost on storage at 4° for 15 days, it was sedimented by centrifugation at 33,360 × g for 1 hr, and the maximum concentration was found at 3 hr in guinea pig kidney culture cells, but at 24 hr in HEp 2 and rabbit kidney culture cells. Sera from patients with genital lesions caused by herpes simplex virus 2, as well as from randomly selected adults, failed to react with either type 2 or type 1 nonvirion antigens. Accordingly, the basic information is now available to permit the use of these nonvirion antigens to determine the possible role of the herpes simplex viruses in certain human cancers. PMID:4352219

  4. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Complicated by Cerebral Hemorrhage during Acyclovir Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Yukinori; Hara, Yuuta

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) can be complicated by adverse events in the acute phase. We herein present the case of a 71-year-old woman with HSE complicated by cerebral hemorrhage. She presented with acute deterioration of consciousness and fever and was diagnosed with HSE based on the detection of herpes simplex virus-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid by a polymerase chain reaction. The cerebral hemorrhage developed during acyclovir therapy; however, its diagnosis was delayed for 2 days. After the conservative treatment of the cerebral hemorrhage, the patient made a near-complete recovery. Cerebral hemorrhage should be considered as an acute-phase complication of HSE.

  5. Cystic encephalomalacia and intrauterine herpes simplex virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, P H; Tudehope, D I; Masel, J

    1992-01-01

    Cystic encephalomalacia occurred in two preterm infants who had proven intrauterine herpes simplex virus type 2 infection. Calcification was evident in the basal ganglia. Follow-up scans indicated that the cysts had resolved over a period of two months in one infant, while in the case of the other, the cysts became progressively larger with significant ventricular dilatation developing. While cystic changes in the brain of preterm infants are usually due to periventricular leukomalacia, intrauterine infection needs to be considered as a possible cause. Antiviral treatment may be of benefit to infants with herpes simplex virus infection.

  6. Pityriasis Lichenoides Chronica Associated with Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Javier González Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pityriasis lichenoides is a rare, acquired spectrum of skin conditions of an unknown etiology. Case Report. A 28-year-old man presented with recurrent outbreaks of herpes simplex virus associated with the onset of red-to-brown maculopapules located predominantly in trunk in each recurrence. Positive serologies to herpes simplex virus type 2 were detected. Histopathological examination of one of the lesions was consistent with a diagnosis of pityriasis lichenoides chronica. Discussion. Pityriasis lichenoides is a rare cutaneous entity of an unknown cause which includes different clinical presentations. A number of infectious agents have been implicated based on the clustering of multiple outbreaks and elevated serum titers to specific pathogens (human immunodeficiency virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, Toxoplasma gondii, and herpes simplex virus. In our patient, resolution of cutaneous lesions coincided with the administration of antiviral drugs and clinical improvement in each genital herpes recurrence. In conclusion, we report a case in which cutaneous lesions of pityriasis lichenoides chronica and a herpes simplex virus-type 2-mediated disease have evolved concomitantly.

  7. [Clinical, epidemiological, and etiological studies of adult aseptic meningitis: a report of 12 cases of herpes simplex meningitis, and a comparison with cases of herpes simplex encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himeno, Takahiro; Shiga, Yuji; Takeshima, Shinichi; Tachiyama, Keisuke; Kamimura, Teppei; Kono, Ryuhei; Takemaru, Makoto; Takeshita, Jun; Shimoe, Yutaka; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2018-01-26

    We treated 437 cases of adult aseptic meningitis and 12 cases (including 2 recurrent patients; age, 31.8 ± 8.9 years; 7 females) of herpes simplex meningitis from 2004 to 2016. The incidence rate of adult herpes simplex meningitis in the cases with aseptic meningitis was 2.7%. One patient was admitted during treatment of genital herpes, but no association was observed between genital herpes and herpes simplex meningitis in the other cases. The diagnoses were confirmed in all cases as the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was positive for herpes simplex virus (HSV)-DNA. For diagnosis confirmation, the DNA test was useful after 2-7 days following initial disease onset. Among other types of aseptic meningitis, the patients with herpes simplex meningitis showed relatively high white blood cell counts and relatively high CSF protein and high CSF cell counts. CSF cells showed mononuclear cell dominance from the initial stage of the disease. During same period, we also experienced 12 cases of herpes simplex encephalitis and 21 cases of non-hepatic acute limbic encephalitis. Notably, the patients with herpes simplex meningitis were younger and their CSF protein and cells counts were higher than those of the patients with herpes simplex encephalitis.

  8. Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Herpes Testing Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At ... Content View Sources Ask Us Also Known As Herpes Culture Herpes Simplex Viral Culture HSV DNA HSV ...

  9. Herpes simplex encephalitis | Ladapo | Nigerian Journal of Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Herpes simplex encephalitis. TA Ladapo, E Oyenusi, FEA Lesi ...

  10. Serological profiles of Herpes simplex virus type 2 among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) is the major cause of genital ulcer diseases (GUD) consequently a significant factor for the acquisition and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Despite its importance there is paucity of data regarding the magnitude of HSV-2 in non-HIV infected population in ...

  11. Determination of human herpes simplex virus in clear cerebrospinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICROBIO TA

    The purpose of this study was to test CSF obtained from different regions of Rwanda for herpes simplex viruses (HSV) type 1 and 2 using a commercial multiplex PCR kit. CSF samples were obtained from patients with clinical suspicion of meningitis and encephalitis which may be caused by different microorganisms ...

  12. Herpes Simplex Virus Infections of the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Richard J

    2015-12-01

    This article summarizes knowledge of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections of the central nervous system (CNS). Disease pathogenesis, detection of DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis and prognosis, and approaches to therapy warrant consideration. HSV infection of the CNS is one of few treatable viral diseases. Clinical trials indicate that outcome following neonatal herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections of the CNS is significantly improved when 6 months of suppressive oral acyclovir therapy follows IV antiviral therapy. In contrast, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections of the brain do not benefit from extended oral antiviral therapy. This implies a difference in disease pathogenesis between HSV-2 and HSV-1 infections of the brain. PCR detection of viral DNA in the CSF is the gold standard for diagnosis. Use of PCR is now being adopted as a basis for determining the duration of therapy in the newborn. HSV infections are among the most common encountered by humans; seropositivity occurs in 50% to 90% of adult populations. Herpes simplex encephalitis, however, is an uncommon result of this infection. Since no new antiviral drugs have been introduced in nearly 3 decades, much effort has focused on learning how to better use acyclovir and how to use existing databases to establish earlier diagnosis.

  13. Computed tomography in young children with herpes simplex virus encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, T.; Woo, M.; Okazaki, H.; Nishida, N.; Hara, T.; Yasuhara, A.; Kasahara, M.; Kobayashi, Y.

    1985-09-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scans were obtained from eight infants and young children with herpes simplex virus encephalitis. In two cases the initial scan showed diffuse edematous changes as a mass effect without laterality. Unilateral localized low attenuation in the initial scan was evident 4 days after the onset in one patient, and high attenuation in the initial scan appeared on the 6th day in another patient, but in general, it was not possible to establish an early diagnosis of herpes simplex virus encephalitis from CT scan. In the longitudinal study the calcification with ventriculomegaly appeared in 3 of 5 survivors, and gyriform calcification in 2 of 3 patients, respectively. The appearance of multicystic encephalomalacia was evident in one patient 6 months after the onset of neonatal herpes simplex encephalitis. It is shown that the CT findings of neonates and young children with herpes simplex encephalitis are different from those of older children and adults, and the importance of longitudinal CT studies was stressed in clarifying the pathophysiology of the central nervous system involvement in survivors.

  14. Computed tomography in young children with herpes simplex virus encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, T; Woo, M; Okazaki, H; Nishida, N; Hara, T; Yasuhara, A; Kasahara, M; Kobayashi, Y

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scans were obtained from eight infants and young children with herpes simplex virus encephalitis. In two cases the initial scan showed diffuse edematous changes as a mass effect without laterality. Unilateral localized low attenuation in the initial scan was evident 4 days after the onset in one patient, and high attenuation in the initial scan appeared on the 6th day in another patient, but in general, it was not possible to establish an early diagnosis of herpes simplex virus encephalitis from CT scan. In the longitudinal study the calcification with ventriculomegaly appeared in 3 of 5 survivors, and gyriform calcification in 2 of 3 patients, respectively. The appearance of multicystic encephalomalacia was evident in one patient 6 months after the onset of neonatal herpes simplex encephalitis. It is shown that the CT findings of neonates and young children with herpes simplex encephalitis are different from those of older children and adults, and the importance of longitudinal CT studies was stressed in clarifying the pathophysiology of the central nervous system involvement in survivors.

  15. Herpes Simplex Virus Type-2 and Human Immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To estimate the seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex Type 2 (HSV-2) and its association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections in rural Kilimanjaro Tanzania. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Oria village from March to June 2005 involving all individuals aged 15-44 years ...

  16. Human Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in Confiscated Gorilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxford, Kristie L.; Gardner-Roberts, David; Kinani, Jean-Felix; Spelman, Lucy; Barry, Peter A.; Cranfield, Michael R.; Lowenstine, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, we detected human herpes simplex virus type 1, which caused stomatitis, in a juvenile confiscated eastern lowland gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) that had a high degree of direct contact with human caretakers. Our findings confirm that pathogens can transfer between nonhuman primate hosts and humans. PMID:25341185

  17. The "Other" Venereal Diseases: Herpes Simplex, Trichomoniasis and Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, Warren L.

    1979-01-01

    Although the term venereal disease has been synonymous with gonorrhea and syphilis, the Center for Disease Control now states that the number of new cases of herpes simplex, trichomoniasis, and candidiasis is rapidly approaching the number of cases of syphilis and gonorrhea. (MM)

  18. Recurrent herpes simplex virus keratitis in a young Nigerian male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Herpes Simplex Virus Keratitis is the infection of cornea by double stranded DNA Viruses.This condition has a tendency to reoccur after a certain period of time. A 25 year old male presented to the clinic with reduced visual acuity, itching, redness, pain and photophobia in the left eye. Onset of symptoms was 10 days prior to ...

  19. Herpes Simplex Mastitis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Brown

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common sites of herpes simplex virus (HSV infection are around the oral cavity and the genitalia. However, HSV can infect any skin or mucous membrane surface. One uncommon site of HSV infection is the breast. Reports of herpetic breast infections are predominantly cases of transmission from a systemically HSV-infected neonate to the mother during breast-feeding. A review of the literature identified only six reports suggesting HSV breast lesions acquired by means other than through an infected infant. Of these, only one report suggests HSV transmission to the breast from a male sexual partner. A second case of clinically unsuspected symptomatic herpes mastitis presumably acquired from sexual contact in a 46-year-old woman is presented. Herpes simplex type 1 was isolated by using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymerization techniques. The purpose of this report is to alert physicians to HSV mastitis.

  20. Recurrent facial urticaria following herpes simplex labialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Zawar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe recurrent acute right-sided facial urticaria associated with herpes labialis infection in a middle-aged female patient. Antiviral medications and antihistamines not only successfully cleared the herpes infection and urticaria but also prevented further recurrences.

  1. Fatal Neonatal Herpes Simplex Infection Likely from Unrecognized Breast Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Scott S

    2016-02-01

    Type 1 herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is very prevalent yet in rare circumstances can lead to fatal neonatal disease. Genital acquisition of type 2 HSV is the usual mode for neonatal herpes, but HSV-1 transmission by genital or extragenital means may result in greater mortality rates. A very rare scenario is presented in which the mode of transmission was likely through breast lesions. The lesions were seen by nurses as well as the lactation consultant and obstetrician in the hospital after delivery of the affected baby but not recognized as possibly being caused by herpes. The baby died 9 days after birth with hepatic failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Peripartum health care workers need to be aware of potential nongenital (including from the breast[s]) neonatal herpes acquisition, which can be lethal. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection Mimicking Bullous Disease in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne L.Y. Lecluse

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Immunodeficient patients are at risk of developing extended or atypical herpes simplex virus infections, which can be easily misdiagnosed. We present the case of a 79-year-old, treatment-induced (oral corticosteroid, immunocompromised female with an extensive atypical herpes simplex virus infection. This patient presented with multiple erosions and vesicles on the trunk with a subacute onset. The clinical differential diagnosis was herpes simplex infection, herpes zoster infection, pemphigus vulgaris or bullous pemphigoid. Due to the atypical clinical presentation and negative Tzanck test, suspicion of viral infection was low. High-dose steroid treatment was initiated. Subsequent histopathology, however, showed a herpes simplex virus infection. After discontinuing steroid treatment and initiating antiviral treatment, the patient recovered within a week. Emphasis must be placed on the importance of clinical awareness of extended and clinically atypical herpes simplex infections in immunocompromised patients. A negative Tzanck test does not rule out the possibility of a herpes infection.

  3. Update on Neonatal Herpes Simplex Epidemiology in the Netherlands: A Health Problem of Increasing Concern?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oeffelen, Louise; Biekram, Manisha; Poeran, Jashvant; Hukkelhoven, Chantal; Galjaard, Sander; van der Meijden, Wim; Op de Coul, Eline

    2018-01-01

    This paper provides an update on the incidence of neonatal herpes, guideline adherence by health care professionals (HCP), and trends in genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection during pregnancy in the Netherlands.

  4. Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis mimicking herpes simplex encephalitis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Henrique Milhomem

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (AHLE is a more severe form of acute disseminated encephalomyelities (ADEM characterized by a fulminant clinical course and the presence of hemorrhagic necrosis of the white matter. We report the case of a 57-year-old woman who developed delirium following a respiratory infection. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain disclosed signal abnormalities in the frontal and temporal lobes, usually found in herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE. Gram stain, India ink and acid-fast bacilli staining were all negative in CSF as was a polymerase chain reaction (PCR for herpes simplex virus. A diagnosis of AHLE was made and the patient was treated with IV methylprednisolone 1g/day for 5 days. Despite treatment, the patient developed several neurological sequelae compatible with the severity of her illness.

  5. Unusual Clinical Presentation and Role of Decompressive Craniectomy in Herpes Simplex Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Pratibha; Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Kumar, Nuthan; Vyas, Sameer; Vasishta, Rakesh Kumar; Aggarwal, Ashish

    2015-08-01

    Decompressive craniectomy in pediatric central nervous infections with refractory intracranial hypertension is less commonly practiced. We describe improved outcome of decompressive craniectomy in a 7-year-old boy with severe herpes simplex encephalitis and medically refractory intracranial hypertension, along with a brief review of the literature. Timely recognition of refractory intracranial hypertension and surgical decompression in children with herpes simplex encephalitis can be life-saving. Additionally, strokelike atypical presentations are being increasingly recognized in children with herpes simplex encephalitis and should not take one away from the underlying herpes simplex encephalitis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Herpes simplex virus bronchiolitis in a cannabis user

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Libraty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV lower respiratory tract infections in adults are uncommon. We present a case of HSV bronchiolitis and pneumonitis in an immunocompetent individual, likely linked to chronic habitual marijuana use and a herpetic orolabial ulcer. The case serves as a reminder to consider HSV as a potential unusual cause of lower respiratory tract infection/inflammation in individuals with chronic habitual marijuana use.

  7. Psychosocial implications of recurrent genital herpes simplex virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldmeier, D; Johnson, A.; Byrne, M.; Barton, S

    1988-01-01

    Fifty seven patients experiencing first attacks of genital herpes simplex virus infection (HSVI) were compared with 50 patients who were concerned about frequently recurring attacks despite routine counselling and reassurance. Using the general health questionnaire this latter group was found to be more psychologically distressed and more socially naive than the first attack group, as measured by socioeconomic class and the lie score of the Eysenck personality questionnaire; otherwise the two...

  8. Prevention and management of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Upton D; Robinson, Joan L

    2014-01-01

    Human herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in neonates can result in devastating outcomes, including mortality and significant morbidity. All infants are potentially at risk for neonatal HSV infection. This position statement reviews epidemiology, transmission and risk factors, with a focus on intrapartum infection. It considers diagnosis and prognosis according to infection category, along with testing modalities and limitations. Recommendations for managing newborns known to have been expos...

  9. Cytodiagnosis of herpes simplex mastitis: Report of a rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardi Kavita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV is a rare cause of breast infection. Few cases of maternal-infant transmission of the virus during breastfeeding resulting in nipple lesions have been documented. Only three cases have been reported in nonlactating women. We report an additional case of HSV mastitis in a 36-year-old nonlactating female who was diagnosed on scrape cytology smears.

  10. Generalized acute mucocutaneous herpes simplex type 2 with fatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopyan, L; Young, A W; Menegus, M

    1977-06-01

    To our knowledge, we present the first culturally documented case of generalized acute mucocutaneous herpes simplex type 2 in an immunosuppressed adult who died during the course of the disease. The picture of the clinical spectrum of herpetic disease in immunosuppressed patients is detailed, and the need for typing the virus, particularly in the disseminated form, and for clarifying possible differences in epidemiology, clinical expression, and prognosis is emphasized.

  11. Evasion of Early Antiviral Responses by Herpes Simplex Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suazo, Paula A.; Ibañez, Francisco J.; Retamal-Díaz, Angello R.; Paz-Fiblas, Marysol V.; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.; González, Pablo A.

    2015-01-01

    Besides overcoming physical constraints, such as extreme temperatures, reduced humidity, elevated pressure, and natural predators, human pathogens further need to overcome an arsenal of antimicrobial components evolved by the host to limit infection, replication and optimally, reinfection. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infect humans at a high frequency and persist within the host for life by establishing latency in neurons. To gain access to these cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) must replicate and block immediate host antiviral responses elicited by epithelial cells and innate immune components early after infection. During these processes, infected and noninfected neighboring cells, as well as tissue-resident and patrolling immune cells, will sense viral components and cell-associated danger signals and secrete soluble mediators. While type-I interferons aim at limiting virus spread, cytokines and chemokines will modulate resident and incoming immune cells. In this paper, we discuss recent findings relative to the early steps taking place during HSV infection and replication. Further, we discuss how HSVs evade detection by host cells and the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to circumvent early antiviral mechanisms, ultimately leading to neuron infection and the establishment of latency. PMID:25918478

  12. Reactivation of herpes simplex virus-1 following epilepsy surgery☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro; Crippa, Ana; Cruz, Cristina; de Paola, Luciano; de Souza, Luciana Paula; Noronha, Lucia; Torres, Luis Fernando Bleggi; Koneski, Julio A.S.; Pessa, Luis Felipe Cavalli; Nogueira, Meri Bordignon; Raboni, Sonia Mara; Silvado, Carlos Eduardo; Vidal, Luine Rosele

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The present study reports a case of encephalitis due to herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), following surgical manipulation of the site of a primary infection. Methods Herpes simplex virus-1 infection was confirmed by CSF PCR and DNA sequencing. Results The patient was an 11-year-old girl who required temporal lobe surgery for epilepsy. She had meningoencephalitis due to HSV at the age of 20 months, and she was treated with acyclovir. Three years later, the patient developed uncontrolled seizures that became more frequent and changed in character at 11 years of age. On the 12th postoperative day, she developed fever and seizures, and she was diagnosed with HSV-1 by positive CSF PCR. She was treated with acyclovir (30 mg/kg/day for 21 days). In this report, we describe the patient and review the relevant literature. Conclusion The authors stress the potential risk of reactivation of HSV encephalitis after intracranial surgery. Herpes simplex virus encephalitis must be considered in neurosurgical patients who develop postoperative seizures and fever. PMID:26543809

  13. Seronegative Herpes simplex Associated Esophagogastric Ulcer after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Matevossian

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex infection is characterized by acute or subacute infection, often followed by a chronic carrier state. Consecutive recurrences may flare up if immunocompromise occurs. Herpes simplex associated esophagitis or duodenal ulcer have been reported in immunocompromised patients due to neoplasm, HIV/AIDS or therapeutically induced immune deficiency. Here we report the case of an HSV-DNA seronegative patient who developed grade III dysphagia 13 days after allogeneic liver transplantation. Endoscopy revealed an esophageal-gastric ulcer, and biopsy histopathology showed a distinct fibroplastic and capillary ulcer pattern highly suspicious for viral infection. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed a distinct nuclear positive anti-HSV reaction. Antiviral therapy with acyclovir and high-dose PPI led to a complete revision of clinical symptoms within 48 h. Repeat control endoscopy after 7 days showed complete healing of the former ulcer site at the gastroesophageal junction. Although the incidence of post-transplantation Herpes simplex induced gastroesophageal disease is low, the viral HSV ulcer may be included into a differential diagnosis if dysphagia occurs after transplantation even if HSV-DNA PCR is negative.

  14. The Laboratory Diagnosis of Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameeta Singh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV types 1 and 2 cause genital herpes infections and are the most common cause of genital ulcer disease in industrialized nations. Although these infections are very common, the majority of them remain underdiagnosed because they are asymptomatic or unrecognized. A clinical diagnosis of genital herpes should always be confirmed by laboratory testing; this can be accomplished through the use of direct tests for viral isolation, the detection of antigen or, more recently, the detection of HSV DNA using molecular diagnostic techniques. Testing for serotypes is recommended because of the different prognostic and counselling implications. Type-specific HSV serology is becoming more readily available and will enhance the ability to make the diagnosis and guide clinical management in select patients.

  15. Granulomatous herpes simplex encephalitis in an infant with multicystic encephalopathy: a distinct clinicopathologic entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Peter W; Fauth, Clarissa T; Al-Rawahi, Ghada N; Pugash, Denise; White, Valerie A; Stockler, Sylvia; Dunham, Christopher P

    2014-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus encephalitis can manifest as a range of clinical presentations including classic adult, neonatal, and biphasic chronic-granulomatous herpes encephalitis. We report an infant with granulomatous herpes simplex virus type 2 encephalitis with a subacute course and multicystic encephalopathy. A 2-month-old girl presented with lethargy and hypothermia. Computed tomography scan of the head showed multicystic encephalopathy and calcifications. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis by polymerase chain reaction testing for herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, enterovirus, and cytomegalovirus was negative. Normal cerebrospinal fluid interferon-α levels argued against Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. The patient died 2 weeks after presentation. At autopsy, multicystic encephalopathy was confirmed with bilateral gliosis, granulomatous inflammation with multinucleated giant cells, and calcifications. Bilateral healing necrotizing retinitis suggested a viral etiology, but retina and brain were free of viral inclusions and immunohistochemically negative for herpes simplex virus-2 and cytomegalovirus. However, polymerase chain reaction analysis showed herpes simplex virus-2 DNA in four cerebral paraffin blocks. Subsequent repeat testing of the initial cerebrospinal fluid sample using a different polymerase chain reaction assay was weakly positive for herpes simplex virus-2 DNA. Granulomatous herpes simplex virus encephalitis in infants can present with subacute course and result in multicystic encephalopathy with mineralization and minimal cerebrospinal fluid herpes simplex virus DNA load. Infectious etiologies should be carefully investigated in the differential diagnosis of multicystic encephalopathy with mineralization, in particular if multinucleated giant cells are present. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pediatric herpes simplex virus infections: an evidence-based approach to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jennifer E; Garcia, Sylvia E

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is a common virus that causes a variety of clinical presentations ranging from mild to life-threatening. Orolabial and genital herpes are common disorders that can often be managed in an outpatient setting; however, some patients do present to the emergency department with those conditions, and emergency clinicians should be aware of possible complications in the pediatric population. Neonatal herpes is a rare disorder, but prompt recognition and initiation of antiviral therapy is imperative, as the morbidity and mortality of the disease is high. Herpes encephalitis is an emergency that also requires a high index of suspicion to diagnose. Herpes simplex virus is also responsible for a variety of other clinical presentations, including herpes gladiatorum, herpetic whitlow, eczema herpeticum, and ocular herpes. This issue reviews the common clinical presentations of the herpes simplex virus, the life-threatening infections that require expedient identification and management, and recommended treatment regimens.

  17. [Role of herpes simplex virus in the development of exudative erythema multiforme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samgin, M A; Ivanov, O L; Kuzheleva, S A; Biriukov, A V; L'vov, N D

    1990-03-01

    The paper presents analysis of current knowledge on etiology and immunopathogenesis of multiform exudative erythema (MEE). Among a variety of pathogenetic actions of herpes simplex on immune system are those relevant to MEE onset. These variants are dealt with in detail. The view on MEE as resultant from herpes simplex infection promises appearance of new prospective modes of etiotropic therapy.

  18. [Post-herpes simplex encephalitis chorea: Viral replication or immunological mechanism?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benrhouma, H; Nasri, A; Kraoua, I; Klaa, H; Turki, I; Gouider-Khouja, N

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis is a severe neurological condition, whose outcome is improved if treated early with acyclovir. Post-herpes simplex encephalitis with acute chorea has rarely been reported. We report on two observations of children presenting with post-herpes simplex encephalitis with acute chorea, related to two different pathophysiological mechanisms. The first one is an 11-month-old girl developing relapsing herpes simplex encephalitis with chorea due to resumption of viral replication. The second one is a 2-year-old boy with relapsing post-herpes simplex encephalitis acute chorea caused by an immunoinflammatory mechanism. We discuss the different neurological presentations of herpetic relapses, notably those presenting with movement disorders, as well as their clinical, paraclinical, physiopathological, and therapeutic aspects. Post-herpes simplex encephalitis with acute chorea may involve two mechanisms: resumption of viral replication or an immunoinflammatory mechanism. Treatment of post-herpes simplex encephalitis with acute chorea depends on the underlying mechanism, while prevention is based on antiviral treatment of herpes simplex encephalitis with acyclovir at the dose of 20mg/kg/8h for 21 days. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Improving immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccines for genital herpes containing herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Sita; Shaw, Carolyn; Friedman, Harvey

    2014-12-01

    No vaccines are approved for prevention or treatment of genital herpes. The focus of genital herpes vaccine trials has been on prevention using herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD2) alone or combined with glycoprotein B. These prevention trials did not achieve their primary end points. However, subset analyses reported some positive outcomes in each study. The most recent trial was the Herpevac Trial for Women that used gD2 with monophosphoryl lipid A and alum as adjuvants in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 seronegative women. Unexpectedly, the vaccine prevented genital disease by HSV-1 but not HSV-2. Currently, HSV-1 causes more first episodes of genital herpes than HSV-2, highlighting the importance of protecting against HSV-1. The scientific community is conflicted between abandoning vaccine efforts that include gD2 and building upon the partial successes of previous trials. We favor building upon success and present approaches to improve outcomes of gD2-based subunit antigen vaccines.

  20. RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type 1 isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Amanda Perse da; Lopes, Juliana Freitas; Paula, Vanessa Salete de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of RNA interference to inhibit herpes simplex virus type-1 replication in vitro. For herpes simplex virus type-1 gene silencing, three different small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 gene (sequence si-UL 39-1, si-UL 39-2, and si-UL 39-3) were used, which encode the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an essential enzyme for DNA synthesis. Herpes simplex virus type-1 was isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions from infected patients. All mucocutaneous lesions' samples were positive for herpes simplex virus type-1 by real-time PCR and by virus isolation; all herpes simplex virus type-1 from saliva samples were positive by real-time PCR and 50% were positive by virus isolation. The levels of herpes simplex virus type-1 DNA remaining after siRNA treatment were assessed by real-time PCR, whose results demonstrated that the effect of siRNAs on gene expression depends on siRNA concentration. The three siRNA sequences used were able to inhibit viral replication, assessed by real-time PCR and plaque assays and among them, the sequence si-UL 39-1 was the most effective. This sequence inhibited 99% of herpes simplex virus type-1 replication. The results demonstrate that silencing herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 expression by siRNAs effectively inhibits herpes simplex virus type-1 replication, suggesting that siRNA based antiviral strategy may be a potential therapeutic alternative. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  1. Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Esophagitis in a Young Immunocompetent Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K; Candelaria, Angela; Kwak, Ye Eun; Loeser, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex esophagitis (HSE) is commonly identified in immunosuppressed patients. It is rare among immunocompetent patients and almost all of the reported cases are due to HSV-1 infection. HSV-2 esophagitis is extremely rare. We report the case of a young immunocompetent male who presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and epigastric pain. Endoscopy showed multitudes of white nummular lesions in the distal esophagus initially suspected to be candida esophagitis. However, classic histopathological findings of multinucleated giant cells with eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions and positive HSV-2 IgM confirmed the diagnosis of HSV-2 esophagitis. The patient rapidly responded to acyclovir treatment. Although HSV-2 is predominantly associated with genital herpes, it can cause infections in other parts of the body previously attributed to only HSV-1 infection.

  2. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection: epidemiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) are highly prevalent viruses capable of establishing lifelong infection. Genital herpes in women of childbearing age represents a major risk for mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HSV infection, with primary and first-episode genital HSV infections posing the highest risk. The advent of antiviral therapy with parenteral acyclovir has led to significant improvement in neonatal HSV disease mortality. Further studies are needed to improve the clinician's ability to identify infants at increased risk for HSV infection and prevent MTCT, and to develop novel antiviral agents with increased efficacy in infants with HSV infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Autophagy interaction with herpes simplex virus type-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Douglas; Liang, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    abstract More than 50% of the U.S. population is infected with herpes simplex virus type-I (HSV-1) and global infectious estimates are nearly 90%. HSV-1 is normally seen as a harmless virus but debilitating diseases can arise, including encephalitis and ocular diseases. HSV-1 is unique in that it can undermine host defenses and establish lifelong infection in neurons. Viral reactivation from latency may allow HSV-1 to lay siege to the brain (Herpes encephalitis). Recent advances maintain that HSV-1 proteins act to suppress and/or control the lysosome-dependent degradation pathway of macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) and consequently, in neurons, may be coupled with the advancement of HSV-1-associated pathogenesis. Furthermore, increasing evidence suggests that HSV-1 infection may constitute a gradual risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders. The relationship between HSV-1 infection and autophagy manipulation combined with neuropathogenesis may be intimately intertwined demanding further investigation. PMID:26934628

  4. A Herpes Simplex Virus Infection Secondary to Acupuncture and Cupping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ye-Jin; Kim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Hae-Jin; Bak, Hana; Hong, Seung Phil; Jeon, Soo Young

    2011-01-01

    Acupuncture and cupping have a public reputation as being safe even though these practices can lead to complications such as trauma or infection. We report here on a case of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection secondary to acupuncture and cupping in a 56-year-old woman. The patient, who had a history of acupuncture and cupping on her left forearm for treating her myalgia, developed painful papules. Histologically, the biopsy specimen showed characteristic ballooning degeneration and inclusion bodies in the epidermis and mid-dermis. These clinical and histological findings were consistent with the diagnosis of HSV infection. PMID:21738366

  5. Unilateral Negative Myoclonus Caused by Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Mo Park

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Various neurologic manifestations of herpes simplex virus (HSV encephalitis have been reported on the literatures. Chorea, ballism, choreoathetosis and myoclonus were reported as movement disorders which might be related with brain lesion by HSV encephalitis, but negative myoclonus (NM has never been reported before. NM can be characterized as a shock-like involuntary jerky movement caused by a sudden, brief interruption of muscle activity. We experienced a case of HSV encephalitis with NM in unilateral arm and leg. In polygraphic monitoring, electroencephalography (EMG silent periods are 50–250 ms in duration with no detectable EMG correlate.

  6. Computed tomography (CT) in children with herpes simplex encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taccone, A.; Gambaro, G.; Ghiorzi, M.; Fondelli, P.; Ferrea, G.; Gianbartolomei, G.; Rolando, S.

    1988-11-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) scans were obtained from nine infants with herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE). The early CT findings were generalized or localized edematous change and a mass effect was also seen in two cases. In the follow-up study two patients showed bilateral gyriform calcification, a rare occurrence in association with intracranial infection. The appearance of multicystic encephalomalacia was evident in one patient 3 months after the onset of disease. It is shown that the CT findings of neonates and young children with HSE are different from those of adults.

  7. Computed tomography (CT) in children with herpes simplex encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taccone, A; Gambaro, G; Ghiorzi, M; Ferrea, G; Gianbartolomei, G; Rolando, S; Fondelli, P

    1988-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) scans were obtained from nine infants with herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE). The early CT findings were generalized or localized edematous change and a mass effect was also seen in two cases. In the follow-up study two patients showed bilateral gyriform calcification, a rare occurrence in association with intracranial infection. The appearance of multicystic encephalomalacia was evident in one patient 3 months after the onset of disease. It is shown that the CT findings of neonates and young children with HSE are different from those of adults.

  8. Herpes simplex infection in a juvenile orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus pygmaeus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kik, Maria J L; Bos, Jan H; Groen, Jan; Dorrestein, Gerry M

    2005-03-01

    A juvenile orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus pygmaeus) died after 8 days of diarrhea and vomiting. Necropsy showed petechial hemorrhages in the skin, the myocardium, and the peritoneal membranes. The lungs were hyperemic and edematous, and the liver and spleen were enlarged. Histologic changes consisted of interstitial pneumonia, hepatitis, and splenic hyperplasia. Numerous eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies were visible in pulmonary epithelial cells, hepatocytes, and splenic endothelial cells. Electron microscopic examination revealed herpesvirus in hepatocyte nuclei. Polymerase chain reaction of liver tissue demonstrated the presence of a herpes simplex virus-1.

  9. No association between herpes simplex virus 1 and cardiac myxoma

    OpenAIRE

    Schurr, U.; Berdajs, D A; Bode, B.; Dzemali, O.; Emmert, M. Y.; Genoni, M

    2011-01-01

    PRINCIPLES: Cardiac myxoma is the most commonly diagnosed cardiac tumour. Infection of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) has been postulated to be a factor for this pathologic entity. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the association between HSV 1 and myxoma occurrence.METHODS: Between 1965 and 2005, 70 patients (36 female, mean age: 52.6 years) underwent a resection of myxoma. Selected variables such as hospital mortality and morbidity were studied. A follow-up (FU; mean FU time: 138 ...

  10. Herpes Simplex Esophagitis in Immunocompetent Host: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Geraci

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Herpes simplex esophagitis is well recognized in immunosuppressed subjects, but it is infrequent in immunocompetent patients. We present a case of HSE in a 53-year-old healthy man. Materials and Methods. The patient was admitted with dysphagia, odynophagia, and retrosternal chest pain. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed minute erosive area in distal esophagus and biopsies confirmed esophagitis and findings characteristic of Herpes Simplex Virus infection. Results. The patients was treated with high dose of protonpump inhibitor, sucralfate, and acyclovir, orally, with rapid resolution of symptoms. Discussion. HSV type I is the second most common cause of infectious esophagitis. The majority of symptomatic immunocompetent patients with HSE will present with an acute onset of esophagitis. Endoscopic biopsies from the ulcer edges should be obtained for both histopathology and viral culture. In immunocompetent host, HSE is generally a self-limited condition. Conclusions. HSE should be suspected in case of esophagitis without evident cause, even if the patient is immunocompetent. When the diagnosis of HSE is confirmed, careful history and assessment for an immune disorder such as HIV infection is crucial, to look for underlying immune deficiency.

  11. The molecular basis of herpes simplex virus latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Michael P; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is a neurotropic herpesvirus that establishes latency within sensory neurones. Following primary infection, the virus replicates productively within mucosal epithelial cells and enters sensory neurones via nerve termini. The virus is then transported to neuronal cell bodies where latency can be established. Periodically, the virus can reactivate to resume its normal lytic cycle gene expression programme and result in the generation of new virus progeny that are transported axonally back to the periphery. The ability to establish lifelong latency within the host and to periodically reactivate to facilitate dissemination is central to the survival strategy of this virus. Although incompletely understood, this review will focus on the mechanisms involved in the regulation of latency that centre on the functions of the virus-encoded latency-associated transcripts (LATs), epigenetic regulation of the latent virus genome and the molecular events that precipitate reactivation. This review considers current knowledge and hypotheses relating to the mechanisms involved in the establishment, maintenance and reactivation herpes simplex virus latency. PMID:22150699

  12. Unusual Initial Presentation of Herpes Simplex Virus as Inguinal Lymphadenopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Fleming

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV infections are a common cause of inguinal lymphadenopathy. However, surgical excision of enlarged inguinal nodes is almost never performed to initially diagnose genital herpes simplex virus, due to the distinct external presentation of genital herpetic vesicles that usually occur with the first symptoms of infection. Therefore, the histologic and immunophenotypic features of HSV-associated inguinal lymphadenopathy are unfamiliar to most pathologists. The current report describes the lymph node pathology of two immunocompetent patients, whose initial HSV diagnosis was established through surgical excision of enlarged inguinal lymph nodes. Histologic examination showed features consistent with viral lymphadenopathy, including florid follicular hyperplasia, monocytoid B-cell hyperplasia, and paracortical hyperplasia without extensive necrosis. Immunohistochemical stains for HSV antigens, using polyclonal anti-HSV I and II antibodies, demonstrate strong immunoreactivity for HSV in a small number of cells in the subcapsular sinuses, especially in areas with monocytoid B-cell hyperplasia. Rare scattered HSV-positive cells also are identified in paracortical areas and germinal centers. We conclude that an initial diagnosis of genital HSV infection may be established by inguinal lymph node biopsy.

  13. Concomitant herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis in a man with ulcerative colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Varun K.; Friedman-Moraco, Rachel J.; Quigley, Brian C.; Farris, Alton B.; Norvell, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Herpesvirus infections often complicate the clinical course of patients with inflammatory bowel disease; however, invasive disease due to herpes simplex virus is distinctly uncommon. Methods: We present a case of herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis, review all the previously published cases of herpes simplex virus colitis, and discuss common clinical features and outcomes. We also discuss the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of herpes simplex virus infections, focusing specifically on patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Results: A 43-year-old man with ulcerative colitis, previously controlled with an oral 5-aminosalicylic agent, developed symptoms of a colitis flare that did not respond to treatment with systemic corticosteroid therapy. One week later he developed orolabial ulcers and progressive hepatic dysfunction, with markedly elevated transaminases and coagulopathy. He underwent emergent total colectomy when imaging suggested bowel micro-perforation. Pathology from both the colon and liver was consistent with herpes simplex virus infection, and a viral culture of his orolabial lesions and a serum polymerase chain reaction assay also identified herpes simplex virus. He was treated with systemic antiviral therapy and made a complete recovery. Conclusions: Disseminated herpes simplex virus infection with concomitant involvement of the colon and liver has been reported only 3 times in the published literature, and to our knowledge this is the first such case in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk of invasive herpes simplex virus infections increases with some, but not all immunomodulatory therapies. Optimal management of herpes simplex virus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease includes targeted prophylactic therapy for patients with evidence of latent infection, and timely initiation of antiviral therapy for those patients suspected to have invasive disease. PMID:27759636

  14. Mucosal Herpes Immunity and Immunopathology to Ocular and Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Alami Chentoufi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex viruses type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2 are amongst the most common human infectious viral pathogens capable of causing serious clinical diseases at every stage of life, from fatal disseminated disease in newborns to cold sores genital ulcerations and blinding eye disease. Primary mucocutaneous infection with HSV-1 & HSV-2 is followed by a lifelong viral latency in the sensory ganglia. In the majority of cases, herpes infections are clinically asymptomatic. However, in symptomatic individuals, the latent HSV can spontaneously and frequently reactivate, reinfecting the muco-cutaneous surfaces and causing painful recurrent diseases. The innate and adaptive mucosal immunities to herpes infections and disease remain to be fully characterized. The understanding of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms operating at muco-cutaneous surfaces is fundamental to the design of next-generation herpes vaccines. In this paper, the phenotypic and functional properties of innate and adaptive mucosal immune cells, their role in antiherpes immunity, and immunopathology are reviewed. The progress and limitations in developing a safe and efficient mucosal herpes vaccine are discussed.

  15. Mucosal Herpes Immunity and Immunopathology to Ocular and Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are amongst the most common human infectious viral pathogens capable of causing serious clinical diseases at every stage of life, from fatal disseminated disease in newborns to cold sores genital ulcerations and blinding eye disease. Primary mucocutaneous infection with HSV-1 & HSV-2 is followed by a lifelong viral latency in the sensory ganglia. In the majority of cases, herpes infections are clinically asymptomatic. However, in symptomatic individuals, the latent HSV can spontaneously and frequently reactivate, reinfecting the muco-cutaneous surfaces and causing painful recurrent diseases. The innate and adaptive mucosal immunities to herpes infections and disease remain to be fully characterized. The understanding of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms operating at muco-cutaneous surfaces is fundamental to the design of next-generation herpes vaccines. In this paper, the phenotypic and functional properties of innate and adaptive mucosal immune cells, their role in antiherpes immunity, and immunopathology are reviewed. The progress and limitations in developing a safe and efficient mucosal herpes vaccine are discussed. PMID:23320014

  16. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging findings in a patient with herpes simplex encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiner, L. E-mail: heiner_lajos@freemail.hu; Demaerel, Ph

    2003-03-01

    Introduction: Herpes simplex meningoencephalitis is one of the most common viral central nervous system infection in adults. Early diagnosis is essential for treatment. Case report: We present a case of a 68-year-old female patient with herpes simplex infection. On admission, she was in severe clinical condition. Diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging detected brain involvement better than conventional sequences. After acyclovir therapy, the patient fully recovered. Conclusion: DW magnetic resonance imaging is expected to provide a more sensitive imaging in herpes simplex patients than conventional sequences.

  17. Herpes simplex virus type 1 is the leading cause of genital herpes in New Brunswick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garceau, Richard; Leblanc, Danielle; Thibault, Louise; Girouard, Gabriel; Mallet, Manon

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the role of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV1) in the epidemiology of genital herpes in Canada. Data on herpes viral cultures for two consecutive years obtained from L'Hôpital Dr GL Dumont, which performs all the viral culture testing in New Brunswick, were reviewed. It was hypothesized that HSV1 was the main cause of genital herpes in New Brunswick. Samples of genital origin sent to the laboratory for HSV culture testing between July 2006 and June 2008 were analyzed. Samples from an unspecified or a nongenital source were excluded from analysis. Multiple positive samples collected from the same patient were pooled into a single sample. HSV was isolated from 764 different patients. HSV1 was isolated in 62.6% of patients (male, 55%; female, 63.8%). HSV1 was isolated in 73.2% of patients 10 to 39 years of age and in 32% of patients ≥40 years of age. The difference in rates of HSV1 infection between the 10 to 39 years of age group and the ≥40 years of age group was statistically significant (Pgenital site. Significant rate differences were demonstrated between the groups 10 to 39 years of age and ≥40 years of age. Little is known about the role of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV1) in the epidemiology of genital herpes in Canada. Data on herpes viral cultures for two consecutive years obtained from L’Hôpital Dr GL Dumont, which performs all the viral culture testing in New Brunswick, were reviewed. It was hypothesized that HSV1 was the main cause of genital herpes in New Brunswick. Samples of genital origin sent to the laboratory for HSV culture testing between July 2006 and June 2008 were analyzed. Samples from an unspecified or a nongenital source were excluded from analysis. Multiple positive samples collected from the same patient were pooled into a single sample. HSV was isolated from 764 different patients. HSV1 was isolated in 62.6% of patients (male, 55%; female, 63.8%). HSV1 was isolated in 73.2% of patients 10 to

  18. Laboratory diagnosis and epidemiology of herpes simplex 1 and 2 genital infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinšek Biškup, Urška; Uršič, Tina; Petrovec, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 are the main cause of genital ulcers worldwide. Although herpes simplex virus type 2 is the major cause of genital lesions, herpes simplex virus type 1 accounts for half of new cases in developed countries. Herpes simplex virus type 2 seroprevalence rises with sexual activity from adolescence through adulthood. Slovenian data in a high-risk population shows 16% seroprevalence of HSV-2. HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA in genital swabs was detected in 19% and 20.7%, respectively. In most cases, genital herpes is asymptomatic. Primary genital infection with herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 can be manifested by a severe clinical picture, involving the vesicular skin and mucosal changes and ulcerative lesions of the vulva, vagina, and cervix in women and in the genital region in men. Direct methods of viral genome detection are recommended in the acute stage of primary and recurrent infections when manifest ulcers or lesions are evident. Serological testing is recommended as an aid in diagnosing genital herpes in patients with reinfection in atypical or already healed lesions. When herpes lesions are present, all sexual activities should be avoided to prevent transmission of infection. Antiviral drugs can reduce viral shedding and thus reduce the risk of sexual transmission of the virus.

  19. In vitro antiviral activity of antimicrobial peptides against herpes simplex virus 1, adenovirus, and rotavirus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carriel-Gomes, Márcia Cristina; Kratz, Jadel Müller; Barracco, Margherita Anna; Bachére, Evelyne; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte; Simões, Cláudia Maria Oliveira

    2007-01-01

    .... This paper describes the in vitro evaluation of the cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of nine peptides with different structures and origins against herpes simplex virus type 1, human adenovirus...

  20. Molecular Characterization of Prostate Cancer Cell Oncolysis by Herpes Simplex Virus ICP0 Mutants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mossman, Karen

    2006-01-01

    .... Briefly, the goals of the proposal were to characterize the oncolytic capacity of Herpes simplex virus type 1 ICP0 mutants in prostate cancer cells given the relationship between ICP0 and two tumor...

  1. A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2004-01-01

    The tasks that were originally planned for the first year of this 3 year project are to demonstrate that the fusogenic oncolytic herpes simplex viruses are potent anti-tumor agents for advanced ovarian cancer...

  2. Molecular Characterization of Prostate Cancer Cell Oncolysis by Herpes Simplex Virus ICP0 Mutants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mossman, Karen

    2005-01-01

    .... Briefly, the goals of the proposal were to characterize the oncolytic capacity of Herpes simplex virus type 1 ICPO mutants in prostate cancer cells given the relationship between ICPO and two tumor...

  3. Prevention and management of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Upton D; Robinson, Joan L

    2014-01-01

    Human herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in neonates can result in devastating outcomes, including mortality and significant morbidity. All infants are potentially at risk for neonatal HSV infection. This position statement reviews epidemiology, transmission and risk factors, with a focus on intrapartum infection. It considers diagnosis and prognosis according to infection category, along with testing modalities and limitations. Recommendations for managing newborns known to have been exposed intrapartum to HSV are based on expert opinion because a randomized trial to compare management options is not feasible. Guidance is provided for the empirical management of infants with suspected clinical sepsis, including those who do not respond to antibacterial therapy. The present statement replaces a 2006 position statement by the Canadian Paediatric Society. PMID:24855418

  4. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Viral Infections and Acyclovir: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Amy P.

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections have high morbidity and mortality rates. Optimization of treatment and prevention strategies are imperative to improve the care and outcomes of neonates infected with HSV. Management of HSV includes reducing neonatal transmission, treating acute infections, and limiting adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes and future cutaneous outbreaks after acute infections. Transmission risk may be affected by route of delivery and maternal suppressive therapy. Neonatal HSV infections are divided into 3 categories: localized skin, eyes, or mouth; localized central nervous system; or disseminated infections. Parenteral acyclovir, the pharmacologic agent of choice, is used when treating each type of infection. However, dosage strategies and durations of therapy may vary based on disease state severity, presentation, and patient characteristics. Oral acyclovir may be used as suppressive therapy after acute treatment completion in specific neonatal populations, reducing long-term adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes and future skin eruptions. The mortality rate remains high even with treatment. PMID:28469532

  5. [Role of Herpes simplex virus in the immune stromal keratitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, C; Martínez, M J; Vogel, M; Traipe, L; Stoppel, J; Squella, O; Srur, M; Charlín, R

    2001-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection of the cornea is a leading cause of blindness in occidental countries and a common recurrent manifestation of it is the immune stromal keratitis (ISK). However, it is not known whether active viral replication occurs during the acute phase of the disease, because isolation of the virus by conventional culture techniques has not been accomplished. To establish the presence of HSV in patients with ISK. Fourteen corneal swabbing samples, from active diseased eyes of patients with clinical diagnosis of ISK, were submitted to Herpchek and PCR for the identification of HSV antigens and genome. All ISK samples were negative by both techniques. It was not possible to identify HSV antigens nor their genome by the methodology used. It is likely that, they can't be detected in corneal superficial layers or probably there is no viral replication at this stage of the disease, so antiviral therapy should be reconsidered.

  6. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces de novo phospholipid synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutter, Esther [Electron Microscopy, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Tobler, Kurt [Electron microscopy, Institute of Virology, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Schraner, Elisabeth M. [Electron Microscopy, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Sonda, Sabrina [Institute of Parasitology, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Kaech, Andres [Center for Microscopy and Image Analysis, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Lucas, Miriam S. [Electron Microscopy ETH Zuerich (EMEZ), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Ackermann, Mathias [Electron microscopy, Institute of Virology, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Wild, Peter, E-mail: pewild@access.uzh.ch [Electron Microscopy, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, University of Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes acquiring an envelope composed of phospholipids. Hence, we measured incorporation of phospholipid precursors into these membranes, and quantified changes in size of cellular compartments by morphometric analysis. Incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-choline into both nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes was significantly enhanced upon infection. [{sup 3}H]-choline was also part of isolated virions even grown in the presence of brefeldin A. Nuclei expanded early in infection. The Golgi complex and vacuoles increased substantially whereas the endoplasmic reticulum enlarged only temporarily. The data suggest that HSV-1 stimulates phospholipid synthesis, and that de novo synthesized phospholipids are inserted into nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes to i) maintain membrane integrity in the course of nuclear and cellular expansion, ii) to supply membrane constituents for envelopment of capsids by budding at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes, and iii) to provide membranes for formation of transport vacuoles.

  7. Von Willebrand Factor Gene Variants Associate with Herpes simplex Encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Abdelmagid

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is a rare complication of Herpes simplex virus type-1 infection. It results in severe parenchymal damage in the brain. Although viral latency in neurons is very common in the population, it remains unclear why certain individuals develop HSE. Here we explore potential host genetic variants predisposing to HSE. In order to investigate this we used a rat HSE model comparing the HSE susceptible SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with the asymptomatic infection of BN (Brown Norway. Notably, both strains have HSV-1 spread to the CNS at four days after infection. A genome wide linkage analysis of 29 infected HXB/BXH RILs (recombinant inbred lines-generated from the prior two strains, displayed variable susceptibility to HSE enabling the definition of a significant QTL (quantitative trait locus named Hse6 towards the end of chromosome 4 (160.89-174Mb containing the Vwf (von Willebrand factor gene. This was the only gene in the QTL with both cis-regulation in the brain and included several non-synonymous SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism. Intriguingly, in human chromosome 12 several SNPs within the intronic region between exon 43 and 44 of the VWF gene were associated with human HSE pathogenesis. In particular, rs917859 is nominally associated with an odds ratio of 1.5 (95% CI 1.11-2.02; p-value = 0.008 after genotyping in 115 HSE cases and 428 controls. Although there are possibly several genetic and environmental factors involved in development of HSE, our study identifies variants of the VWF gene as candidates for susceptibility in experimental and human HSE.

  8. Herpes simplex virus type 2: Cluster of unrelated cases in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troché, Gilles; Marque Juillet, Stephanie; Burrel, Sonia; Boutolleau, David; Bédos, Jean-Pierre; Legriel, Stephane

    2016-10-01

    Herpes simplex viruses, which are associated with various clinical manifestations, can be transmitted to critically ill patients from other patients or health care staff. We report an apparent outbreak of mucocutaneous herpes simplex virus 2 infections (5 cases in 10 weeks). An epidemiologic investigation and genotype analysis showed no connections among the 5 cases. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

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    Schlehofer, J.R.; Ehrbar, M.; zur Hausen, H.

    1986-07-15

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells.

  10. Exploiting Herpes Simplex Virus Entry for Novel Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Shukla

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Herpes Simplex virus (HSV is associated with a variety of diseases such as genital herpes and numerous ocular diseases. At the global level, high prevalence of individuals who are seropositive for HSV, combined with its inconspicuous infection, remains a cause for major concern. At the molecular level, HSV entry into a host cell involves multiple steps, primarily the interaction of viral glycoproteins with various cell surface receptors, many of which have alternate substitutes. The molecular complexity of the virus to enter a cell is also enhanced by the existence of different modes of viral entry. The availability of many entry receptors, along with a variety of entry mechanisms, has resulted in a virus that is capable of infecting virtually all cell types. While HSV uses a wide repertoire of viral and host factors in establishing infection, current therapeutics aimed against the virus are not as diversified. In this particular review, we will focus on the initial entry of the virus into the cell, while highlighting potential novel therapeutics that can control this process. Virus entry is a decisive step and effective therapeutics can translate to less virus replication, reduced cell death, and detrimental symptoms.

  11. Serologic Screening for Herpes Simplex Virus among University Students: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Hayley; Nanda, Joy P.; Joffe, Alain; Roberts, Jessica; Rompalo, Anne; Melendez, Johan; Zenilman, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the feasibility of conducting serologic testing for the herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) among university students and assessed the psychosocial impact of an HSV-2 diagnosis. Methods: The authors recruited a convenience sample of 100 students (aged 18-39 years) without a history of genital herpes from 1 university…

  12. Analysis of contributions of herpes simplex virus type 1 UL43 protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    system implemented on the Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). ... UL43 gene of HSV-1 encodes a non- glycosylated transmembrane protein which is conserved only in alpha- and gamma herpes viruses [8]. The HSV-1 UL43 has been ... AG-3'), which mutates the initiation codon from.

  13. Oral erythema multiforme: Laboratory findings in monitoring Herpes simplex virus involvement (A case report)

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Leny Raiyon; Gus Permana Subita

    2008-01-01

    Erythema Multiforme is polymorphous recurrent eruptions on the skin and oral mucosa. This case is describing a progression of a case of Erythema Multiforme in the oral mucosa of a 33-year-old man suggesting of herpes viral involvement. In the absence of identified inducing drugs, past medical history of clinical manifestation on Herpes Simplex Viral (HSV) but positive serum antibody against HSV-1 is suggesting of Herpes Associated Erythema Multiforme. This became the basis of the patient mana...

  14. The role of oral acyclovir in the management of genital herpes simplex.

    OpenAIRE

    Sacks, S L

    1987-01-01

    Oral acyclovir is an antiviral nucleoside analogue that has recently been released in Canada for use in selected patients with genital infections by the herpes simplex virus. First episodes of genital herpes should be treated with oral acyclovir as soon as the diagnosis is considered. Most people with recurrent genital herpes do not require systemic drug therapy. Selected patients with severe or long-lasting recurrences, recurrences associated with long prodromal periods (greater than 12 to 2...

  15. Necrotizing Keratitis Caused by Acyclovir-Resistant Herpes Simplex Virus

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    Koji Toriyama

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report a case of necrotizing keratitis caused by acyclovir (ACV-resistant herpes simplex virus (HSV with a clinical appearance similar to a previous fungal keratitis infection. Methods: Observational case report. Results: Penetrating keratoplasty was performed in the left eye with a history of herpetic keratitis that resolved with periodic treatment with ACV ointment and a topical steroid. The left eye was painful and red with an abscess and corneal erosion in the peripheral donor cornea. Examination of the scraped corneal epithelium by light microscopy and culturing identified Candida albicans; polymerase chain reaction (PCR was negative for human herpes viruses. After antifungal treatment, the ocular pain gradually decreased and the lesions slowly improved but recurred with a similar clinical appearance. A second light microscopy examination and cultures were negative for pathogens including C. albicans. PCR was positive for HSV-1 DNA; treatment with 3% topical ACV ointment was unsuccessful. A third examination showed only HSV-1 DNA. Despite antiviral ACV ointment, no clinical improvement occurred based on the HSV DNA copy numbers, which were the same before and after treatment, indicating a possible ACV-resistant strain. When topical trifluorothymidine was substituted for ACV, clinical improvement occurred and the HSV DNA copy numbers decreased. Conclusion: Necrotizing keratitis induced by ACV-resistant HSV occurred independently after fungal keratitis, with a similar clinical appearance in this case, making diagnosis and treatment difficult. Monitoring the HSV DNA load by real-time PCR could be useful for refractory cases even with atypical clinical appearances.

  16. Analysis of contributions of herpes simplex virus type 1 UL43 protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate whether UL43 protein, which is highly conserved in alpha- and gamma herpes viruses, and a non-glycosylated transmembrane protein, is involved in virus entry and virus-induced cell fusion. Methods: Mutagenesis was accomplished by a markerless two-step Red recombination mutagenesis system ...

  17. Analysis of contributions of herpes simplex virus type 1 UL43 protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate whether UL43 protein, which is highly conserved in alpha- and gamma herpes viruses, and a non-glycosylated transmembrane protein, is involved in virus entry and virus-induced cell fusion. Methods: Mutagenesis was accomplished by a markerless two-step Red recombination mutagenesis.

  18. Herpes neolabialis: herpes simplex virus type 1 infection of the neolabia in a transgender woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfering, Lian; van der Sluis, Wouter B; Mermans, Joline F; Buncamper, Marlon E

    2017-07-01

    A 24-year-old transgender woman consulted our outpatient clinic with a painful, itchy and red left labia. She underwent a penile inversion vaginoplasty 18 months before presentation. At physical examination of the left labia, erythema, edema and herpetic vesicles with ulceration were observed. A vesicle fluid swab was obtained and the presence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was detected by PCR assay. Treatment consisted of oral valaciclovir (500 mg twice daily) for a total of five days.Topically-applied lidocaine cream (3%) was used for pain management. Treatment gave symptom relief in five days. At physical examination 14 days after symptom onset, there were no signs of active infection. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of HSV-1 infection of the neolabia in a transgender woman.

  19. Higher Throughput Quantification of Neutralizing Antibody to Herpes Simplex Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara P Blevins

    Full Text Available We report a rapid, higher throughput method for measuring neutralizing antibody to herpes simplex virus (HSV in human sera. Clinical isolates and sera from the Herpevac Trial for Women were used in a colorimetric assay in which infection of tissue culture (lack of neutralization was indicated by substrate metabolism by beta-galactosidase induced in the ELVIS cell line. The neutralization assay was optimized by addition of guinea pig complement, which particularly enhanced neutralizing antibody titers to HSV-2. Higher neutralizing antibody titers were also achieved using virus particles isolated from the supernatant of infected cells rather than lysate of infected cells as the source of virus. The effect of assay incubation time and incubation time with substrate were also optimized. We found that incubating with substrate until a standard optical density of 1.0 was reached permitted a better comparison among virus isolates, and achieved reliable measurement of neutralizing antibody activity. Interestingly, in contrast to results in the absence of complement, addition of complement allowed sera from HSV-2 gD-vaccinated subjects to neutralize HSV-1 and HSV-2 clinical and laboratory isolates with equal potency.

  20. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection Associated with Atrial Myxoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanwen; Pan, Zhigang; Ji, Yuan; Sheppard, Mary; Jeffries, Donald J.; Archard, Leonard C.; Zhang, Hongyi

    2003-01-01

    Some findings suggest an infectious factor in cardiac myxoma and certain histopathological features indicate herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. We hypothesized that HSV-1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac myxoma. Paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 17 patients with atrial myxoma were investigated for HSV-1 antigen by immunohistochemistry and viral genomic DNA by nested polymerase chain reaction. The histogenesis and oncogenesis of atrial myxoma were assessed by the expression of calretinin, Ki67, and p53 protein, respectively. Autopsy myocardial samples, including endocardium from 12 patients who died by accident or other conditions, were used for comparison. HSV-1 antigen was detected in atrial myxoma from 12 of 17 patients: 8 of these 12 samples were positive also for HSV-1 DNA. No HSV-1 antigen or DNA was found in tissue from the comparison group. Antigens of HSV-2, varicella-zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus were not found in atrial myxoma. Calretinin was found in myxoma cells of all 17 cases but Ki67 was present only in smooth muscle cells or infiltrating cells in some cases. p53 was not detectable in any myxoma. Most infiltrating cells were cytotoxic T lymphocytes. These data suggest that HSV-1 infection is associated with some cases of sporadic atrial myxoma and that these may result from a chronic inflammatory lesion of endocardium. PMID:14633612

  1. Pneumomediastinum and Pneumothorax Associated with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rivera, Fermín; Colón Rivera, Xavier; González Monroig, Hernán A; Garcia Puebla, Juan

    2018-01-30

    BACKGROUND Pneumonia is one of the most common causes of death from infectious disease in the United States (US). Although most cases of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are secondary to bacterial infection, up to one-third of cases are secondary to viral infection, most commonly due to rhinovirus and influenza virus. Pneumonia due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) is rare, and there is limited knowledge of the pathogenesis and clinical complications. This report is of a fatal case of HSV pneumonia associated with bilateral pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum. CASE REPORT A 36-year-old homeless male Hispanic patient, who was a chronic smoker, with a history of intravenous drug abuse and a medical history of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), was admitted to hospital as an emergency with a seven-day history of productive purulent cough. The patient was admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) with a diagnosis of CAP, with intubation and mechanical ventilation. Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and was positive for HSV. The patient developed bilateral pneumothorax with pneumomediastinum, which was fatal, despite aggressive clinical management. CONCLUSIONS Pneumonia due to HSV infection is uncommon but has a high mortality. Although HSV pneumonia has been described in immunocompromised patients, further studies are required to determine the pathogenesis, early detection, identification of patients who are at risk and to determine the most effective approaches to prophylaxis and treatment for HSV pneumonia.

  2. Evolution and Diversity in Human Herpes Simplex Virus Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatherer, Derek; Ochoa, Alejandro; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Dolan, Aidan; Bowden, Rory J.; Enquist, Lynn W.; Legendre, Matthieu; Davison, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) causes a chronic, lifelong infection in >60% of adults. Multiple recent vaccine trials have failed, with viral diversity likely contributing to these failures. To understand HSV-1 diversity better, we comprehensively compared 20 newly sequenced viral genomes from China, Japan, Kenya, and South Korea with six previously sequenced genomes from the United States, Europe, and Japan. In this diverse collection of passaged strains, we found that one-fifth of the newly sequenced members share a gene deletion and one-third exhibit homopolymeric frameshift mutations (HFMs). Individual strains exhibit genotypic and potential phenotypic variation via HFMs, deletions, short sequence repeats, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms, although the protein sequence identity between strains exceeds 90% on average. In the first genome-scale analysis of positive selection in HSV-1, we found signs of selection in specific proteins and residues, including the fusion protein glycoprotein H. We also confirmed previous results suggesting that recombination has occurred with high frequency throughout the HSV-1 genome. Despite this, the HSV-1 strains analyzed clustered by geographic origin during whole-genome distance analysis. These data shed light on likely routes of HSV-1 adaptation to changing environments and will aid in the selection of vaccine antigens that are invariant worldwide. PMID:24227835

  3. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Envelope Cholesterol Facilitates Membrane Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Wudiri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Methyl beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD treatment of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 reduced envelope cholesterol levels and inhibited viral entry and infectivity in several cell types, regardless of the dependence of entry on endocytosis or low pH. Viral protein composition was similar in MβCD-treated and untreated virions, and ultrastructural analysis by electron microscopy revealed that cholesterol removal did not grossly affect virion structure or integrity. Removal of envelope cholesterol greatly reduced virion fusion activity as measured by fusion-from-without, suggesting that virion cholesterol is critical for the step of membrane fusion. MβCD-treatment of HSV-1 did not reduce viral attachment to the cells nor endocytic uptake of HSV-1 from the cell surface. The pre-fusion form of gB present in the HSV-1 envelope undergoes conformational changes in response to mildly acidic pH. These gB changes occurred independently of envelope cholesterol. Removal of cholesterol compromised virion stability as measured by recovery of infectivity following cycles of freeze-thaw. Taken together, the data suggest that HSV-1 envelope cholesterol is important for viral entry and infectivity due to a critical role in membrane fusion.

  4. Inhibition of multiplication of herpes simplex virus by caffeic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Keiko; Tsujimoto, Kazuko; Uozaki, Misao; Nishide, Mitsunori; Suzuki, Yukiko; Koyama, A Hajime; Yamasaki, Hisashi

    2011-10-01

    Hot water extracts of coffee grinds and commercial instant coffee solutions have been shown to exhibit marked antiviral and virucidal activities against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Specifically, it has been shown that caffeine and N-methyl-pyridinium formate inhibit the multiplication of HSV-1 in HEp-2 cells. The present study examined the virological properties and the antiviral activity of caffeic acid against HSV-1. Caffeic acid inhibited the multiplication of HSV-1 in vitro, while chlorogenic acid, a caffeic acid ester with quinic acid, did not. These reagents did not have a direct virucidal effect. The one-step growth curve of HSV-1 showed that the addition of caffeic acid at 8 h post infection (h p.i.) did not significantly affect the formation of progeny viruses. An analysis of the influence of the time of caffeic acid addition, revealed that addition at an early time post infection remarkably inhibited the formation of progeny infectious virus in the infected cells, but its addition after 6 h p.i. (i.e., the time of the completion of viral genome replication) did not efficiently inhibit this process. These results indicate that caffeic acid inhibits HSV-1 multiplication mainly before the completion of viral DNA replication, but not thereafter. Although caffeic acid showed some cytotoxicity by prolonged incubation, the observed antiviral activity is likely not the secondary result of the cytotoxic effect of the reagent, because the inhibition of the virus multiplication was observed before appearance of the notable cytotoxicity.

  5. Stabilising the Herpes Simplex Virus capsid by DNA packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuite, Gijs; Radtke, Kerstin; Sodeik, Beate; Roos, Wouter

    2009-03-01

    Three different types of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) nuclear capsids can be distinguished, A, B and C capsids. These capsids types are, respectively, empty, contain scaffold proteins, or hold DNA. We investigate the physical properties of these three capsids by combining biochemical and nanoindentation techniques. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments show that A and C capsids are mechanically indistinguishable whereas B capsids already break at much lower forces. By extracting the pentamers with 2.0 M GuHCl or 6.0 M Urea we demonstrate an increased flexibility of all three capsid types. Remarkably, the breaking force of the B capsids without pentamers does not change, while the modified A and C capsids show a large drop in their breaking force to approximately the value of the B capsids. This result indicates that upon DNA packaging a structural change at or near the pentamers occurs which mechanically reinforces the capsids structure. The reported binding of proteins UL17/UL25 to the pentamers of the A and C capsids seems the most likely candidate for such capsids strengthening. Finally, the data supports the view that initiation of DNA packaging triggers the maturation of HSV-1 capsids.

  6. Fatal fulminant herpes simplex hepatitis secondary to tongue piercing in an immunocompetent adult: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhan Shaheen E

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Herpes simplex infection is most commonly a benign, self-limiting disease with mucocutaneous lesions and mild viremia. Immunosuppressed patients are at a higher risk of disseminated infection, as are neonates and pregnant women. The incidence of fulminant herpes simplex virus hepatitis is extremely low, and the diagnosis is often missed due to the lack of specific signs or symptoms. Case presentation We present the case of an immunocompetent, previously healthy young woman who contracted herpes simplex virus, presumably through a recent tongue piercing, which progressed to fulminant hepatitis and death. Conclusion Despite aggressive medical therapy, fulminant herpes simplex virus hepatitis is fatal in the majority of patients. We present a review of the literature, which shows that immunocompetent adults have rarely been affected by fulminant herpes simplex virus hepatitis. Initiation of empirical therapy is warranted in patients with progressive hepatic failure with no other underlying cause. Acyclovir therapy has proven effective in some patients, but is less effective in patients who present in advanced stages of infection.

  7. Cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex infections in mothers and newborns in a Havana maternity hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festary, Aimée; Kourí, Vivian; Correa, Consuelo B; Verdasquera, Denis; Roig, Tania; Couret, Martha P

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus are associated with congenital or perinatal infection, causing potential damage to the newborn. Determine the prevalence of active or latent infection by cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus in a population of mothers, congenital infection by these agents in their infants, and association between prevalence of virus infection in mothers and in their newborns. A cross-sectional study was conducted from June to September 2012 in a population of 95 pregnant women admitted to the Dr Ramón González Coro University Maternity Hospital during the third trimester of pregnancy, and their infants (98). Patients were tested for antibodies specific to these viruses; vaginal swabs and urine from the women and serum and urine from the newborns were tested for viral genome. The Fisher exact test with 95% confidence interval was used for comparisons. Of the women studied, 89.5% tested positive for cytomegalovirus and 83.2% for herpes simplex. Active infection from cytomegalovirus was detected in 16.7%, and from herpes simplex in 3.2%. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection was detected in 4.1% of newborns; no herpes simplex virus infection was found in this group. Two newborns of women with active cytomegalovirus infection were congenitally infected. Serology demonstrated that most of the women were immune to both viruses. Active cytomegalovirus infections are common in this population, and newborns of women with active cytomegalovirus infection during pregnancy are at increased risk of congenital infection.

  8. Dendritic cells in the cornea during Herpes simplex viral infection and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min S; Carnt, Nicole A; Truong, Naomi R; Pattamatta, Ushasree; White, Andrew J; Samarawickrama, Chameen; Cunningham, Anthony L

    2017-11-10

    Herpes simplex keratitis is commonly caused by Herpes simplex virus type 1, which primarily infects eyelids, corneas, or conjunctiva. Herpes simplex virus type 1-through sophisticated interactions with dendritic cells (DCs), a type of antigen-presenting cell)-initiates proinflammatory responses in the cornea. Corneas were once thought to be an immune-privileged region; however, with the recent discovery of DCs that reside in the cornea, this long-held conjecture has been overturned. Therefore, evaluating the clinical, preclinical, and cell-based studies that investigate the roles of DCs in corneas infected with Herpes simplex virus is critical. With in vivo confocal microscopy, animal models, and cell culture experiments, we may further the understanding of the sophisticated interactions of Herpes simplex virus with DCs in the cornea and the molecular mechanism associated with it. It has been shown that specific differentiation of DCs using immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and polymerase chain reaction analysis in both human and mice tissues and viral tissue infections are integral to increasing understanding. As for in vivo confocal microscopy, it holds promise as it is the least invasive and a real-time investigation. These tools will facilitate the discovery of various targets to develop new treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A successfully treated case of herpes simplex encephalitis complicated by subarachnoid bleeding: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okuchi Kazuo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Histopathologically, herpes simplex virus type 1 causes hemorrhagic necrosis. Overt hemorrhage is infrequent in herpes simplex virus encephalitis but can lead to poor outcomes. This report describes a successfully treated case of herpes simplex virus encephalitis associated with subarachnoid bleeding in which real-time polymerase chain reaction was useful for diagnosis. Case presentation A 30-year-old previously healthy Japanese woman who had fever and headache for five days presented with disorganised speech, unusual behavior and delusional thinking. Real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification of herpes simplex virus type 1 in cerebrospinal fluid was positive (38,000 copies/mL and antivirus treatment was started. During the course of her illness, the level of her consciousness decreased in association with desaturation and tachycardia. Thrombosis of the right pulmonary artery trunk with pulmonary embolism was evident on enhanced chest computed tomography. In addition, cranial computed tomography revealed subarachnoid and intraventricular bleeding. Intravenous heparin (12,000 U/day was started and the dose was adjusted according to the activated partial thromboplastin time for about a month (maximum dose of heparin, 20,400 U/day. After the treatments, her Glasgow coma score increased and the thrombosis of the pulmonary artery trunk had disappeared. Conclusions The present case raises the question of whether anticoagulant treatment is safe in patients with herpes simplex virus encephalitis complicated by subarachnoid bleeding.

  10. Whole Blood Polymerase Chain Reaction in a Neonate with Disseminated Herpes Simplex Virus Infection and Liver Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Scoble

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A late preterm neonate born by cesarean section with intact membranes presented at 9 days of life with shock and liver failure. Surface cultures were negative but whole blood polymerase chain reaction was positive for herpes simplex virus type 2, underscoring the value of this test in early diagnosis of perinatally acquired disseminated herpes simplex virus infection without skin lesions.

  11. The Type I Interferon Response and Age-Dependent Susceptibility to Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Daniel; Wilcox, Douglas R; Longnecker, Richard

    2017-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a highly prevalent human neurotropic pathogen. HSV-1 infection is associated with a variety of diseases ranging from benign orolabial lesions to more serious and even life-threatening conditions such as herpes simplex keratitis and herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). HSE is a rare occurrence among healthy adult individuals, but newborns are a particularly susceptible population. Type I IFN signaling has been identified as a crucial component of the innate immune response to the control of HSV-1 infection. In this study, we review the contribution of the type I IFN response to controlling HSV-1 infection, and differences in the early host response between adults and newborns that may contribute to the increased susceptibility to infection and central nervous system disease in newborns.

  12. Anterior opercular syndrome as a first presentation of herpes simplex encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kleermaeker, Floriaan G C M; Bouwmans, Angela E P; Nicolai, Joost; Klinkenberg, Sylvia

    2014-04-01

    We report a 5-year-old girl who presented with fever, drooling, dysphagia, and anarthria. Moreover, voluntary facial movements were disturbed, but the emotional facial movements were completely normal. This clinical phenomenon is known as the anterior opercular syndrome. There was a positive polymerase chain reaction for herpes simplex in the cerebrospinal fluid. The diagnosis herpes simplex encephalitis was supported by both magnetic resonance images (MRI) as by electroencephalogram (EEG). Herpes simplex encephalitis is a rare, but severe, cause of the anterior opercular syndrome that demands treatment as soon as possible in order to prevent high morbidity or mortality. The phenomenon of autonomic-voluntary dissociation, associated with other clinical and radiologic findings related to an underlying neurologic disorder, alerts clinicians to the anterior opercular syndrome as a critical diagnostic observation with time-dependent therapeutic consequences.

  13. Herpes simplex encephalitis: MRI findings in two cases confirmed by polymerase chain reaction assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.W.; Kim, I.O.; Kim, W.S.; Yeon, K.M. [Dept. of Radiology and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea); Lee, H.-J.; Hwang, Y.S. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type I causes a fulminant necrotising meningoencephalitis distinguished from other encephalitides by its focal and often haemorrhagic nature. Specific antiviral therapy with acyclovir can significantly improve the prognosis. We present MRI findings of two cases of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) confirmed by PCR analysis, focusing on the serial changes after acyclovir therapy: gyral swelling, high signal intensity on T2-weighted images in the subfrontal region, temporal lobe and insula in the initial stage, then regional extension with enhancement and haemorrhage despite appropriate acyclovir therapy, and finally encephalomalacia and brain atrophy. (orig.)

  14. Herpes simplex hepatitis after liver transplantation: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté-Daigneault, J; Carrier, F M; Toledano, K; Wartelle-Bladu, C; Willems, B

    2014-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) hepatitis is an uncommon cause of liver failure, but may have a dramatic outcome. We herein present a case report of a liver graft infection by HSV-1 associated with liver failure and encephalitis. A complete hospital chart review of the case and a literature search were undertaken. Literature review suggests that herpes simplex acute liver failure is rare and associated with a poor prognosis, even with early treatment. Novel diagnostic and preventive approaches need to be instituted. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Autoimmune post-herpes simplex encephalitis of adults and teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armangue, Thaís; Moris, Germán; Cantarín-Extremera, Verónica; Conde, Carlos Enrique; Rostasy, Kevin; Erro, Maria Elena; Portilla-Cuenca, Juan Carlos; Turón-Viñas, Eulàlia; Málaga, Ignacio; Muñoz-Cabello, Beatriz; Torres-Torres, Carmen; Llufriu, Sara; González-Gutiérrez-Solana, Luis; González, Guillermo; Casado-Naranjo, Ignacio; Rosenfeld, Myrna; Graus, Francesc; Dalmau, Josep

    2015-11-17

    To report 14 patients with immune-mediated relapsing symptoms post-herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) and to compare the clinical and immunologic features of the teenage and adult group with those of young children. Prospective observational study of patients diagnosed between June 2013 and February 2015. Immunologic techniques have been reported previously. Among the teenage and adult group (8 patients, median age 40 years, range 13-69; 5 male), 3 had an acute symptom presentation suggesting a viral relapse, and 5 a presentation contiguous with HSE suggesting a recrudescence of previous deficits. Seven patients developed severe psychiatric/behavioral symptoms disrupting all social interactions, and one refractory status epilepticus. Blepharospasm occurred in one patient. Five patients had CSF antibodies against NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and 3 against unknown neuronal cell surface proteins. In 5/6 patients, the brain MRI showed new areas of contrast enhancement that decreased after immunotherapy and clinical improvement. Immunotherapy was useful in 7/7 patients, sometimes with impressive recoveries, returning to their baseline HSE residual deficits. Compared with the 6 younger children (median age 13 months, range 6-20, all with NMDAR antibodies), the teenagers and adults were less likely to develop choreoathetosis (0/8 vs 6/6, p < 0.01) and decreased level of consciousness (2/8 vs 6/6, p < 0.01) and had longer delays in diagnosis and treatment (interval relapse/antibody testing 85 days, range 17-296, vs 4 days, range 0-33, p = 0.037). In teenagers and adults, the immune-mediated relapsing syndrome post-HSE is different from that known in young children as choreoathetosis post-HSE and is underrecognized. Prompt diagnosis is important because immunotherapy can be highly effective. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. No association between herpes simplex virus 1 and cardiac myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, Ulrich P; Berdajs, Denis A; Bode, Beate; Dzemali, Omer; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Genoni, Michele

    2011-08-26

    Cardiac myxoma is the most commonly diagnosed cardiac tumour. Infection of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) has been postulated to be a factor for this pathologic entity. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the association between HSV 1 and myxoma occurrence. Between 1965 and 2005, 70 patients (36 female, mean age: 52.6 years) underwent a resection of myxoma. Selected variables such as hospital mortality and morbidity were studied. A follow-up (FU; mean FU time: 138 ± 83 months) was obtained (76% complete). Immunohistological studies with monoclonal antibodies against HSV type 1 were performed on tumour biopsies of 40 patients. The mean age was 53 ± 16 years (range 23 to 84 years, 51% female). Of the investigated population, 31 (44%) were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III-IV. Mitral valve stenosis was identified in 14 patients (20%), and in 25 (36%) patients mitral valve was insufficient. During hospitalisation 3 patients suffered from a transient neurological disorder, and in addition to myxoma resection 18 (25.7%) patients had to undergo an additional intervention. The overall survival rate was 91% at 40 years. There was no early postoperative mortality in follow-up, although 4 patients died and 2 patients had been re-operated on for recurrent myxomas after 2 and 9 years. Immunohistology revealed no positive signals for HSV-1 antigens among the 40 analysed cases. Complete surgical resection, septum included, was the treatment of choice and mandatory to prevent relapse. Peri-operative morbidity and mortality over 40 years remained low, and no association between HSV infection and occurrence of cardiac myxoma was found.

  17. Can we differentiate between herpes simplex encephalitis and Japanese encephalitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha Kant; Mani, Vinita Elizabeth; Bhoi, Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-07-15

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) occurs without regional and seasonal predilections. HSE is important to differentiate from arboviral encephalitis in endemic areas because of therapeutic potential of HSE. This study evaluates clinical features, MRI and laboratory findings which may help in differentiating HSE from Japanese encephalitis (JE). Confirmed patients with JE and HSE in last 10years were included. The presenting clinical symptoms including demographic information, seizure, behavioral abnormality, focal weakness and movement disorders were noted. Cranial MRI was done and location and nature of signal alteration were noted. Electroencephalography (EEG), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), blood counts and serum chemistry were done. Outcome was measured by modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Death, functional outcome and neurological sequelae were noted at 3, 6 and 12months follow up, and compared between HSE and JE. Outcome was categorized as poor (mRS;>2) and good (mRS≤2). 97 patients with JE and 40 HSE were included. JE patients were younger than HSE and occurred in post monsoon period whereas HSE occurred throughout the year. Seizure (86% vs 40%) and behavioral abnormality (48% vs 10%) were commoner in HSE; whereas movement disorders (76% vs 0%) and focal reflex loss (42% vs 10%) were commoner in JE. CSF findings and laboratory parameters were similar in both the groups. Thalamic involvement in JE and temporal involvement in HSE were specific markers of respective encephalitis. Delta slowing on EEG was more frequent in JE than HSE. 20% JE and 30% HSE died in the hospital, and at 1year follow up JE patients showed better outcome compared to HSE (48% vs 24%). Memory loss (72% vs 22%) was the predominant sequelae in HSE. Seizure and behavioral abnormality are common features in HSE whereas focal reflex loss is commoner in JE. In a patient with acute encephalitis, thalamic lesion suggests JE and temporal lobe involvement HSE. Long term outcome in JE is better compared to

  18. Additional file 2: Figure S1. of CXCL11 production in cerebrospinal fluid distinguishes herpes simplex meningitis from herpes simplex encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Lind, Liza; Studahl, Marie; Berg, Linn Persson; Eriksson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Levels of (A) CXCL10, (B) CXCL11 and (C) CCL8 in CSF of female HSE (n = 6-7) and HSM (n = 7-17) patients compared to healthy controls (n = 7-15). Data are presented as individual values with medians indicated by horizontal bars. CSF comparisons were performed using Kruskal-Wallis’ non-parametric test with Dunn’s post-test. Statistical analysis was performed using GraphPad Prism version 6 (GraphPad Software). Abbreviations: CSF, cerebrospinal fluid; HSE, herpes simplex encephalitis; HSM, herpe...

  19. Transient natural killer deficiency in a boy with herpes simplex virus-associated recurrent erythema multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Maria Francesca; Cannavò, Serafinella Patrizia; Aversa, Salvatore; De Luca, Filippo

    2011-07-01

    Erythema multiforme is characterized by itching macules, papules and bullae, symmetrically distributed on the dorsum of the hands. They can follow the administration of several drugs or infections with various agents, and in particular with herpes simplex virus. The recurrent variant is very rare, especially in the paediatric age group. We describe the case of a male adolescent with recurrent erythema multiforme caused by herpes virus and transient natural killer deficiency.

  20. Estudio de sensibilidad antiviral de Virus Herpes simplex en pacientes trasplantados Antiviral sensitivity of Herpes simplex virus in immunocompromised patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Illán

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available La resistencia de virus Herpes simplex (VHS a Aciclovir (ACV ocurre en aproximadamente un 5% de los pacientes inmunocomprometidos. El tratamiento con análogos de nucleósidos, provoca la aparición de cepas VHS-ACV resistentes (ACVr. El mecanismo responsable de la resistencia a ACV son las mutaciones en los genes que codifican las enzimas timidina quinasa y/o ADN- polimerasa. En un estudio de aislamientos clinicos de pacientes inmunodeficientes, se encontró que el 96% de los VHS ACVr son debidos a una baja producción o ausencia de la enzima y un4% son cepas con alteración de la especificidad por el sustrato, casi no se obtuvieron cepas mutantes en la ADN-polimerasa (15. Los análogos de Pirofosfatos generan resistencia por mutación en el gen de la ADN-polimerasa. En este trabajo se presenta la metodología empleada para el estudio de los perfiles de sensibilidad a ACV y a Foscarnet (PFA en una población de inmunosuprimidos. Se estudiaron 46 aislamientos de VHS en fibroblastos humanos, provenientes de muestras de trasplantados con lesiones vesiculares. De los 46 aislamientos, 26 resultaron VHS-1 y 20 VHS-2, tipificados por Inmunofluorescencia (IF con anticuerpos monoclonales. Posteriormente se amplificaron y se les determinó su perfíl de sensibilidad en células Vero, utilizando 100 Dosis infectivas en cultivo de tejidos 50% (DICT50 de cada cepa viral y las drogas antivirales en diferentes concentraciones. La concentración inhibitoria 50%(CI50 se calculó a partir del porcentaje de inhibición del efecto citopático en función de la concentración de la droga. Ninguno de los aislamientos resultó resistente al PFA y solo dos de ellos, uno de VHS-1 y uno de VHS-2, fueron resistentesa ACV.The Herpes simplex Virus (HSV resistance to acyclovir (ACV occurs in a 5% of the inmunocompromised patients, approximately. The treatment with analogs of nucleosides, causes the appearance of resistent HSV-ACV stocks(ACVr which can be produced by

  1. Molecular and serologic diagnostic approaches; the prevalence of herpes simplex in idiopathic men infertile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirjannati, Nasser; Yaghmaei, Farhad; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Nasiri, Mahboubeh; Heidari-Vala, Hamed; Sehhat, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human pathogens that can cause infertility may also affect sperm count and quality. Viral infections can be considered as direct and/or indirect cause of male factor infertility. Objective: Our goal was to investigate the prevalence of herpes simplex virus in the semen of infertile men attending the Avicenna Infertility Clinic, and to compare it with the herpes virus serology results. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted during 2009-2010. Infertile men participating without any clinical signs of infection with herpes simplex virus, and no obvious cause for their infertility were included. Semen and blood samples were used for Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and serologic testing for these people. Two samples were collected: one ml semen sample to verify the existence of genital herpes simplex virus in infertile men, and blood samples of 217 individuals tested for antibodies to herpes simplex virus. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16. Results: According to the PCR results of semen samples the prevalence of herpes simplex in semen was 12% and serologic test showed 3.2% prevalence within blood. Nine to 10% of IgM negative were PCR positive and only 2-3% of IgM positive were PCR positive. Between herpes serologic studies with positive controls and negative controls by using both tests, there was a significant positive relationship (r=0.718 and p<0.001). The relationship between semen PCR test results and serological survey of herpes patients with a negative control in both Pearson and Spearman tests was positive and significant (r=0.229 and p=0.001). Correlation between the PCR results of semen samples with two positive control subjects and a positive IgM test was statistically confirmed (r=0.235 and p<0.001). Conclusion: We recommend that if there is suspicion to herpes simplex as a microorganism that theoretically could impact semen parameters and cause infertility it is prudent to use PCR technique on semen sample rather than ELISA

  2. Isolation of herpes simplex virus from the genital tract during symptomatic recurrence on the buttocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkering, Katrina; Gardella, Carolyn; Selke, Stacy; Krantz, Elizabeth; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna

    2006-10-01

    To estimate the frequency of isolation of herpes simplex virus (HSV) from the genital tract when recurrent herpes lesions were present on the buttocks. Data were extracted from a prospectively observed cohort attending a research clinic for genital herpes infections between 1975 and 2001. All patients with a documented herpes lesion on the buttocks, upper thigh or gluteal cleft ("buttock recurrence") and concomitant viral cultures from genital sites including the perianal region were eligible. We reviewed records of 237 subjects, 151 women and 86 men, with a total of 572 buttock recurrences. Of the 1,592 days with genital culture information during a buttock recurrence, participants had concurrent genital lesions on 311 (20%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 14-27%) of these days. Overall, HSV was isolated from the genital region on 12% (95% CI 8-17%) of days during a buttock recurrence. In the absence of genital lesions, HSV was isolated from the genital area on 7% (95% CI 4%-11%) of days during a buttock recurrence and, among women, from the vulvar or cervical sites on 1% of days. Viral shedding of herpes simplex virus from the genital area is a relatively common occurrence during a buttock recurrence of genital herpes, even without concurrent genital lesions, reflecting perhaps reactivation from concomitant regions of the sacral neural ganglia. Patients with buttock herpes recurrences should be instructed about the risk of genital shedding during such recurrences. II-2.

  3. Original papers Herpes simplex virus infection – survey on knowledge of herpes virus infection among people aged 18–35

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Biało-Wójcicka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Genital herpes is one of the most common sexually transmitted viral diseases and the most common cause of mucous membrane ulcerations in the genital area. The number of sexually transmitted infections caused by herpes virus (HSV, especially by HSV-1, is increasing. In the Polish population, there are no precise and current epidemiological data on herpes virus infections, especially in the anogenital area. A major problem concerns HSV infections in pregnancy, which are connected with the risk of in-utero and perinatal virus transmission. Herpes simplex virus infection in pregnancy threatens the life and health of an infant. Objective . To obtain information regarding the occurrence of herpes simplex in people of reproductive age as well as the assessment of knowledge on HSV infection and transmission, especially in pregnancy. Material and methods. Two hundred people (133 women and 67 men aged 18–35 years, attending a dermatological clinic in the first half of 2014 with typical dermatological diseases, took part in the study. The subjects filled in the questionnaire including information on age, occurrence of erosions, scabs in the facial and genital area, diagnosis of oral and genital herpes virus infection, information given by the medical staff on the herpes infection, treatment with oral antivirus drugs, danger of herpes infection in pregnancy and risk of transmission of the HSV virus to fetuses and newborns. Results . Among the 200 people who took part in the study, 27% indicated the occurrence of herpes or recurring lesions in the form of vesicles and scabs on the border of skin and mucous membranes; in 1.5% of them genital herpes was diagnosed. Only 12% of investigated persons were treated with antiviral medicines. Sixty-eight percent of subjects stated that HSV is an infectious disease, 16% claimed that it is non-infectious, and a similar number did not know if it is an infectious disease or not. Only half of the studied

  4. Concomitant herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis in a man with ulcerative colitis: Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Varun K; Friedman-Moraco, Rachel J; Quigley, Brian C; Farris, Alton B; Norvell, J P

    2016-10-01

    Herpesvirus infections often complicate the clinical course of patients with inflammatory bowel disease; however, invasive disease due to herpes simplex virus is distinctly uncommon. We present a case of herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis, review all the previously published cases of herpes simplex virus colitis, and discuss common clinical features and outcomes. We also discuss the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of herpes simplex virus infections, focusing specifically on patients with inflammatory bowel disease. A 43-year-old man with ulcerative colitis, previously controlled with an oral 5-aminosalicylic agent, developed symptoms of a colitis flare that did not respond to treatment with systemic corticosteroid therapy. One week later he developed orolabial ulcers and progressive hepatic dysfunction, with markedly elevated transaminases and coagulopathy. He underwent emergent total colectomy when imaging suggested bowel micro-perforation. Pathology from both the colon and liver was consistent with herpes simplex virus infection, and a viral culture of his orolabial lesions and a serum polymerase chain reaction assay also identified herpes simplex virus. He was treated with systemic antiviral therapy and made a complete recovery. Disseminated herpes simplex virus infection with concomitant involvement of the colon and liver has been reported only 3 times in the published literature, and to our knowledge this is the first such case in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk of invasive herpes simplex virus infections increases with some, but not all immunomodulatory therapies. Optimal management of herpes simplex virus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease includes targeted prophylactic therapy for patients with evidence of latent infection, and timely initiation of antiviral therapy for those patients suspected to have invasive disease.

  5. Prevalence of herpes simplex, Epstein Barr and human papilloma viruses in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Benay; Sengüven, Burcu; Demir, Cem

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of Herpes Simplex virus, Epstein Barr virus and Human Papilloma virus -16 in oral lichen planus cases and to evaluate whether any clinical variant, histopathological or demographic feature correlates with these viruses. The study was conducted on 65 cases. Viruses were detected immunohistochemically. We evaluated the histopathological and demographic features and statistically analysed correlation of these features with Herpes Simplex virus, Epstein Barr virus and Human Papilloma virus-16 positivity. Herpes Simplex virus was positive in six (9%) cases and this was not statistically significant. The number of Epstein Barr virus positive cases was 23 (35%) and it was statistically significant. Human Papilloma virus positivity in 14 cases (21%) was statistically significant. Except basal cell degeneration in Herpes Simplex virus positive cases, we did not observe any significant correlation between virus positivity and demographic or histopathological features. However an increased risk of Epstein Barr virus and Human Papilloma virus infection was noted in oral lichen planus cases. Taking into account the oncogenic potential of both viruses, oral lichen planus cases should be detected for the presence of these viruses.

  6. Prevalence and clinical consequences of herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA in human cornea tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Remeijer (Lies); R. Duan (Rui); J.M. van Dun (Jessica); M.A.W. Bettink; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. We determined the prevalence and clinical consequences of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV-1), HSV type 2 (HSV-2), and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in cornea tissues obtained after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) was performed. Methods. The excised corneas of 83 patients

  7. Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 modulate autophagy in SIRC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Autophagy and apoptosis function as important early cellular defense mechanisms in infections and other diseases. The outcome of an infection is determined by a complex interplay between the pathogenic microorganism and these intracellular pathways. To better understand the cytopathogenicity of Herpes simplex virus ...

  8. Corneal herpes simplex virus type 1 superinfection in patients with recrudescent herpetic keratitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Remeijer (Lies); J. Maertzdorf (Jeroen); J. Buitenwerf (Johannes); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: Herpetic keratitis is a common sequel of a corneal infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1. Recrudescent herpetic keratitis (RHK) may result in irreversible damage to the cornea. Recurrences may be caused by reactivation of endogenous HSV-1 or reinfection with exogenous

  9. Corneal herpes simplex virus type 1 superinfection in patients with recrudescent herpetic keratitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Remeijer (Lies); J. Maertzdorf (Jeroen); J. Buitenwerf (Johannes); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: Herpetic keratitis is a common sequel of a corneal infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1. Recrudescent herpetic keratitis (RHK) may result in irreversible damage to the cornea. Recurrences may be caused by reactivation of endogenous HSV-1 or reinfection with exogenous

  10. Elimination of the truncated message from the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalmers, D; Ferrand, C; Apperley, JF; Melo, JV; Ebeling, S; Newton, [No Value; Duperrier, A; Hagenbeek, A; Garrett, E; Tiberghien, P; Garin, M

    Introduction of the Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene into target cells renders them susceptible to killing by ganciclovir (GCV). We are studying the use of HSV-tk-transduced T lymphocytes in the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We have previously shown, in vitro

  11. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1 Encephalitis Mimicking Glioblastoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke A. Cunha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM often presents as a brain mass with encephalitis. In a patient with GBM, subsequent presentation with new onset encephalitis may be due to another GBM or Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 encephalitis. We present a case of HSV-1 encephalitis mimicking GBM in a patient with previous GBM.

  12. Antiviral Activity of Crude Hydroethanolic Extract from Schinus terebinthifolia against Herpes simplex Virus Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocchi, Samara Requena; Companhoni, Mychelle Vianna Pereira; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Carollo, Carlos Alexandre; Silva, Denise Brentan; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia

    2017-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus infections persist throughout the lifetime of the host and affect more than 80 % of the humans worldwide. The intensive use of available therapeutic drugs has led to undesirable effects, such as drug-resistant strains, prompting the search for new antiherpetic agents. Although diverse bioactivities have been identified in Schinus terebinthifolia, its antiviral activity has not attracted much attention. The present study evaluated the antiherpetic effects of a crude hydroethanolic extract from the stem bark of S. terebinthifolia against Herpes simplex virus type 1 in vitro and in vivo as well as its genotoxicity in bone marrow in mammals and established the chemical composition of the crude hydroethanolic extract based on liquid chromatography-diode array detector-mass spectrometry and MS/MS. The crude hydroethanolic extract inhibited all of the tested Herpes simplex virus type 1 strains in vitro and was effective in the attachment and penetration stages, and showed virucidal activity, which was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The micronucleus test showed that the crude hydroethanolic extract had no genotoxic effect at the concentrations tested. The crude hydroethanolic extract afforded protection against lesions that were caused by Herpes simplex virus type 1 in vivo. Liquid chromatography-diode array detector-mass spectrometry and MS/MS identified 25 substances, which are condensed tannins mainly produced by a B-type linkage and prodelphinidin and procyanidin units. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Molecular requirement for sterols in herpes simplex virus entry and infectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) required cholesterol for virion-induced membrane fusion. HSV successfully entered DHCR24-/-cells, which lack a desmosterol-to-cholesterol conversion enzyme, indicating entry can occur independently of cholesterol. Depletion of desmosterol from these cells resulted in d...

  14. Membrane prteins of herpes simplex infected cells. Immunological and biochemical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling-Wester, Sijtske

    1981-01-01

    As a consequence of infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV), cells exhibit a number of alterations. One of these is expressed as a change in the polypeptide composition of the surface of the infected cells. In this study several methods used for the isolation of these polypeptides expressed on the

  15. Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viral Therapy: A Stride toward Selective Targeting of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchala, Dhaval S; Bhatt, Lokesh K; Prabhavalkar, Kedar S

    2017-01-01

    Oncolytic viral therapy, which makes use of replication-competent lytic viruses, has emerged as a promising modality to treat malignancies. It has shown meaningful outcomes in both solid tumor and hematologic malignancies. Advancements during the last decade, mainly genetic engineering of oncolytic viruses have resulted in improved specificity and efficacy of oncolytic viruses in cancer therapeutics. Oncolytic viral therapy for treating cancer with herpes simplex virus-1 has been of particular interest owing to its range of benefits like: (a) large genome and power to infiltrate in the tumor, (b) easy access to manipulation with the flexibility to insert multiple transgenes, (c) infecting majority of the malignant cell types with quick replication in the infected cells and (d) as Anti-HSV agent to terminate HSV replication. This review provides an exhaustive list of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 along with their genetic alterations. It also encompasses the major developments in oncolytic herpes simplex-1 viral therapy and outlines the limitations and drawbacks of oncolytic herpes simplex viral therapy.

  16. Treatment of malignant gliomas with a replicating adenoviral vector expressing herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Nanda (Dharminderkoemar); R. Vogels; M. Havenga; C.J.J. Avezaat (Cees); A. Bout; P.S. Smitt

    2001-01-01

    textabstractWe evaluated the interaction between oncolytic, replication-competent adenoviral vectors and the herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene/ganciclovir (GCV) suicide system for the treatment of malignant gliomas. We constructed a panel of

  17. Anti-herpes simplex virus activity of extracts from the culinary herbs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-01-31

    Jan 31, 2011 ... steps of the viral multiplication cycle. Key words: Medicinal plant, herpes simplex virus, Ocimum sanctum L., Ocimum basilicum L., Ocimum ..... research and the Graduate school, Department of. Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University and. Nakhon Sawan Rajabhat University, Thailand for suppor-.

  18. Effects of morphine on replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2009-05-17

    May 17, 2009 ... and most of them inhibit viral DNA synthesis. Recently, ... penicillin and 100 µg/ml of streptomycin. Herpes simplex virus type .... Viral DNA synthesis. To determine presence of viral DNA in morphine treated. Monavari and Shahrabadi 2947. Figure 5a. Electron micrograph of morphine treated infected cells in ...

  19. Public TCR Use by Herpes Simplex Virus-2-Specific Human CD8 CTLs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, Lichun; Li, Penny; Oenema, Tjitske; McClurkan, Christopher L.; Koelle, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Recombination of germline TCR alpha and beta genes generates polypeptide receptors for MHC peptide. Ag exposure during long-term herpes simplex infections may shape the T cell repertoire over time. We investigated the CD8 T cell response to HSV-2 in chronically infected individuals by sequencing the

  20. Herpes simplex virus type 2 infections of the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Lars Haukali; Vestergaard, Bent Faber; Wandall, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are rare with meningitis as the most common clinical presentation. We have investigated the clinical spectrum of CNS infections in 49 adult consecutive patients with HSV-2 genome in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). HSV...

  1. Effects of morphine on replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2009-05-17

    May 17, 2009 ... Herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 belongs to α- herpesvirinae subfamily of Herpesviridae family. HSV virus genome has a double strand DNA which codes over. 70 gene products. HSV infection is the most common viral infections in human and causes an extended range of diseases (Roizman et al., 1974; ...

  2. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in a University Health Population: Clinical Manifestations, Epidemiology, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Robert; Aierstuck, Sara; Williams, Elizabeth A.; Melby, Bernette

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors described clinical presentations of oral and genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in a university health population and implications of these findings. Participants and Methods: Using a standardized data collection tool, 215 records of patients with symptomatic culture-positive HSV infections were reviewed. Results:…

  3. Seroprevalence of IgG Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) can cause chronic ulcerative infection in immunosuppressed children leading to latency with subsequent reactivate in the conjunctiva resulting in scarring, thickening of the cornea and blindness. They are also common cause of fatal sporadic encephalitis in 70% of ...

  4. 75 FR 59611 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological Assays...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological Assays; Confirmation of Effective Date AGENCY: Food and...

  5. Herpes Simplex 1 and Periopathogen Role in Peri-implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthiban, S; Ahmed, Nizar; Ramakrishnan, T; Balakumar, V; Raja, Manoj; Shekhar, Himanshu

    2017-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the qualitative and quantitative profiles of herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) in implant surfaces between participants with peri-implantitis (PI) and Healthy peri-implant tissues and to quantitatively assess the relation between HSV-1 and periopathogens inside the microbiological profile associated with PI. A total of 40 patients with PI and 40 with healthy peri-implant tissues (HI) were recruited. Plaque samples from peri-implant sulcus and internal implant connections were analyzed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect and quantify HSV-1 and periodonto-pathogens. Frequencies of detection and levels of microorganisms were compared between PI and HI; the frequencies and levels of periodontopathogens were compared between HSV-1+ and HSV-1- PI to assess qualitative relations between HSV-1 and bacteria. Correlation between HSV-1 and periodontopatho-gens levels was assessed in PI and HI. A total of 77 dental implants affected by PI, and 113 HIs were included. The HSV-1 prevalence was slightly higher in PI compared with controls (33.3 vs 23.8%; p > 0.05); HSV-1 was detected in external samples more frequently compared with internal samples. The HSV-1-positive patients revealed higher median loads of Prevotella intermedia (Pi) and Campylobacter rectus (Cr) compared with HSV-1-negative patients. In the PI group, a significant positive correlation was evidenced between HSV-1 and Tannerella forsythia, Parvimonas micra (Pm), Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Cr levels, while in the HI, positive correlation between HSV-1 and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Pi, and Pm was established. The HSV-1 prevalence cannot be used to identify PI. The HSV-1 was found in similar levels of PI and HI patients after an average of 6 years of loaded implants. The HSV-1 prevalence cannot be used to identify implants with or without the presence of PI. Although HSV-1 is detected in PI site, HSV-1 may represent an

  6. Structural basis for the antibody neutralization of Herpes simplex virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheng-Chung; Lin, Li-Ling [Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chan, Woan-Eng [Development Center for Biotechnology, New Taipei City 221, Taiwan (China); Ko, Tzu-Ping [Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Lai, Jiann-Shiun [Development Center for Biotechnology, New Taipei City 221, Taiwan (China); Ministry of Economic Affairs, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Wang, Andrew H.-J., E-mail: ahjwang@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-01

    The gD–E317-Fab complex crystal revealed the conformational epitope of human mAb E317 on HSV gD, providing a molecular basis for understanding the viral neutralization mechanism. Glycoprotein D (gD) of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) binds to a host cell surface receptor, which is required to trigger membrane fusion for virion entry into the host cell. gD has become a validated anti-HSV target for therapeutic antibody development. The highly inhibitory human monoclonal antibody E317 (mAb E317) was previously raised against HSV gD for viral neutralization. To understand the structural basis of antibody neutralization, crystals of the gD ectodomain bound to the E317 Fab domain were obtained. The structure of the complex reveals that E317 interacts with gD mainly through the heavy chain, which covers a large area for epitope recognition on gD, with a flexible N-terminal and C-terminal conformation. The epitope core structure maps to the external surface of gD, corresponding to the binding sites of two receptors, herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) and nectin-1, which mediate HSV infection. E317 directly recognizes the gD–nectin-1 interface and occludes the HVEM contact site of gD to block its binding to either receptor. The binding of E317 to gD also prohibits the formation of the N-terminal hairpin of gD for HVEM recognition. The major E317-binding site on gD overlaps with either the nectin-1-binding residues or the neutralizing antigenic sites identified thus far (Tyr38, Asp215, Arg222 and Phe223). The epitopes of gD for E317 binding are highly conserved between two types of human herpesvirus (HSV-1 and HSV-2). This study enables the virus-neutralizing epitopes to be correlated with the receptor-binding regions. The results further strengthen the previously demonstrated therapeutic and diagnostic potential of the E317 antibody.

  7. Surgical excision for recurrent herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) anogenital infection in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinze, Folasade; Shaver, Aaron; Raffanti, Stephen

    2017-10-01

    Recurrent anogenital herpes simplex virus infections are common in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), of whom approximately 5% develop resistance to acyclovir. We present a case of a 49-year-old man with HIV who had an 8-year history of recurrent left inguinal herpes simplex virus type 2 ulcerations. He initially responded to oral acyclovir, but developed resistance to acyclovir and eventually foscarnet. The lesion progressed to a large hypertrophic mass that required surgical excision, which led to resolution without recurrences. Our case highlights the importance of surgical excision as a treatment option in refractory herpes simplex virus anogenital infections.

  8. The "Knife-Cut Sign" Revisited: A Distinctive Presentation of Linear Erosive Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in Immunocompromised Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2015-10-01

    The "knife-cut sign" is a distinctive presentation of linear erosive herpes simplex virus infection in immunocompromised patients. To describe a man whose herpes simplex virus infection-related skin lesions demonstrated the "knife-cut sign" and to review the characteristics of reported immunosuppressed individuals with "knife-cut" cutaneous herpes simplex virus lesions. A man with multiple myeloma and post-stem cell transplant cutaneous graft-versus-host disease managed with systemic prednisone and sirolimus developed disseminated cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection with virus-associated linear ulcers of the inguinal folds and the area between his ear and scalp; the lesions at both sites had a distinctive "knife-cut" appearance. Using the PubMed database, an extensive literature search was performed on herpes simplex virus, immunocompromised patient, and "knife-cut sign". Herpes simplex virus infection-associated skin lesions that demonstrate the "knife-cut sign" present in patients who are immunosuppressed secondary to either an underlying medical condition or a systemic therapy or both. The distinctive virus-related cutaneous lesions appear as linear ulcers and fissures in intertriginous areas, such as the folds in the inguinal area, the vulva, and the abdomen; in addition, other sites include beneath the breast, within the gluteal cleft, and the area between the ear and the scalp. Not only herpes simplex virus-2, but also herpes simplex virus-1 has been observed as the causative viral serotype; indeed, herpes simplex virus-1 has been associated with genital and inframammary lesions in addition to those above the neck. Direct fluorescent antibody testing is a rapid method for confirming the clinically suspected viral infection; however, since false-negative direct fluorescent antibody testing occurred in some of the patients, it may be prudent to also perform viral cultures and possibly lesional skin biopsies to establish the diagnosis. The herpes simplex

  9. History and genomic sequence analysis of the herpes simplex virus 1 KOS and KOS1.1 sub-strains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Colgrove, Robert C; Liu, Xueqiao; Griffiths, Anthony; Raja, Priya; Deluca, Neal A; Newman, Ruchi M; Coen, Donald M; Knipe, David M

    2016-01-01

    A collection of genomic DNA sequences of herpes simplex virus (HSV) strains has been defined and analyzed, and some information is available about genomic stability upon limited passage of viruses in culture...

  10. Acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex encephalitis in a patient treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Kinda; Hernandez, Antonio; Andrei, Graciela; Gillemot, Sarah; Fiten, Pierre; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Bier, Jean-Christophe; David, Philippe; Delforge, Marie-Luce; Jacobs, Frédérique; Snoeck, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is the most common cause of severe sporadic encephalitis. We report a case of herpes simplex type 1-encephalitis in a 50-year-old woman receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibodies adalimumab. Although she was an acyclovir naïve patient, a mixed viral population (wild-type and acyclovir-resistant bearing a thymidine-kinase mutation) was identified in the cerebrospinal fluid. The virus in cerebrospinal fluid evolved and a second thymidine-kinase mutant virus emerged. Combined foscavir and acyclovir treatment resolved the herpes simplex encephalitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex encephalitis in a patient treated with adalimumab. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Chemical composition of Propolis Extract ACF® and activity against herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankova, V; Galabov, A S; Antonova, D; Vilhelmova, N; Di Perri, B

    2014-09-25

    Propolis Extract ACF(®) (PPE) is a purified extract manufactured from propolis collected in a Canadian region rich in poplar trees, and it is the active substance of a topical ointment used against herpes labialis (cold sores or fever blisters). Aim of this study was to analyze the chemical composition of PPE in order to understand the plant origin and possible relations between compounds and antiviral activity, and to characterize the antiviral activity of the extract against herpes simplex virus in vitro. The analysis of the propolis extract samples was conducted by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). The antiviral activity was tested against herpes simplex viruses type 1 and type 2 in MDBK cell cultures by treating the cells with PPE at the time of virus adsorption, and by incubating the virus with the extract before infection (virucidal assay). Results from the GC-MS analyses revealed a dual plant origin of PPE, with components derived from resins of two different species of poplar. The chemical composition appeared standardized between extract samples and was also reproduced in the sample of topical ointment. The antiviral studies showed that PPE had a pronounced virucidal effect against herpes simplex viruses type 1 and type 2, and also interfered with virus adsorption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. An outbreak of herpes simplex virus type 1 in an intensive care nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerberg, O; Watts, J; Chernesky, M; Luchsinger, I; Rawls, W

    1983-01-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex infection is not a common occurrence but one which warrants particular concern. An 1800-g premature infant who developed respiratory distress and died at 12 days unexpectedly yielded HSV from a culture of cerebrospinal fluid. There were no mucocutaneous lesions. Ten days later three other infants (ages 40, 69 and 11 days) developed vesicles which yielded herpes simplex. Health care staff cohorts were assigned to "clean" or "exposed" nursery areas. The three secondarily infected cases were treated with vidarabine and did not develop systemic symptoms. Typing of the isolates using immunofluorescence and monoclonal antibodies revealed all to be herpes simplex type 1. Restriction endonuclease cleavage of viral DNA determined that the isolates from the four infants were identical. The mothers of the infants denied any history of recent or recurrent herpes, and their cervical cultures were negative. The source of the outbreak has remained unknown. The possibility of manual transmission to the secondary cases remains likely despite standard infection control practices. Cohort isolation of all exposed patients prevented further spread.

  13. Validity of the coding for herpes simplex encephalitis in the Danish National Patient Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Laura Krogh; Dalgaard, Lars Skov; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Large health care databases are a valuable source of infectious disease epidemiology if diagnoses are valid. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the recorded diagnosis coding of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) in the Danish National Patient Registry (DNPR...... (7.3%) as probable cases providing an overall PPV of 58.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 53.0-62.9). For "Encephalitis due to herpes simplex virus" (ICD-10 code B00.4), the PPV was 56.6% (95% CI: 51.1-62.0). Similarly, the PPV for "Meningoencephalitis due to herpes simplex virus" (ICD-10 code B00.4A......) was 56.8% (95% CI: 39.5-72.9). "Herpes viral encephalitis" (ICD-10 code G05.1E) had a PPV of 75.9% (95% CI: 56.5-89.7), thereby representing the highest PPV. The estimated sensitivity was 95.5%. CONCLUSION: The PPVs of the ICD-10 diagnosis coding for adult HSE in the DNPR were relatively low. Hence...

  14. Comparison of an avidin-biotin immunoassay with three commercially available immunofluorescence kits for typing of herpes simplex virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Barnard, D L; Johnson, F B; Richards, D F

    1985-01-01

    An avidin-biotin complex system was compared with three commercially available immunofluorescence kits for serotyping herpes simplex virus isolates from clinical specimens. Sensitivity values showed that the Electro-Nucleonics and Immulok reagents were useful in detecting the presence of virus, whereas the predictive values showed that the Syva and Immulok reagents possessed adequate discrimination between the herpes simplex virus serotypes. The avidin-biotin complex system was equal or super...

  15. Oral erythema multiforme: Laboratory findings in monitoring Herpes simplex virus involvement (A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leny Raiyon

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Erythema Multiforme is polymorphous recurrent eruptions on the skin and oral mucosa. This case is describing a progression of a case of Erythema Multiforme in the oral mucosa of a 33-year-old man suggesting of herpes viral involvement. In the absence of identified inducing drugs, past medical history of clinical manifestation on Herpes Simplex Viral (HSV but positive serum antibody against HSV-1 is suggesting of Herpes Associated Erythema Multiforme. This became the basis of the patient management. Several episodes of recurrences and relapses occurred during our treatment period in oral isolated sites which were later progressed with skin eruption of bullae. The later clinical presentation challenges the on going working diagnosis. It also necessitated a skin biopsy to rule out another possibility of bullous lesion diseases. The latter blood test showed seroconverted of HSV-2 antibody accompanying previous detected HSV-1 antibody. Both biopsy and peripheral blood sera test consistent with Herpes Simplex Virus involvement. The patient is on a scheduled antiviral prophylaxis. This case showed that Herpes Associated Erythema Multiforme (HAEM does present initially as an isolated oral lesions and a serological test could be used to monitor seroconverting of HSV.

  16. A prospective study of the clinical characteristics of patients with herpes simplex and varicella zoster keratitis, presenting to a New Zealand emergency eye clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Elissa M; Patel, Dipika V; McGhee, Charles N J

    2015-03-01

    To identify the demographic and clinical associations of patients presenting with herpetic keratitis in New Zealand compared with presentations of presumed microbial keratitis. A prospective, 6-month, observational case series of presumed microbial keratitis (including marginal keratitis), specifically identifying all cases of herpes simplex and varicella zoster keratitis attending an emergency eye clinic was conducted. Main outcome measures included demographics, presenting signs and symptoms, and medical, ocular, and drug history. A total of 140 cases of herpetic keratitis were identified, which comprised 125 cases of herpes simplex virus (89%) and 15 cases of varicella zoster virus (11%). Herpes simplex keratitis was associated with a history of keratitis (n = 58, phi = 0.24, P herpes simplex keratitis and ocular surface disease (n = 8, phi = -0.16, P herpes simplex as a possible cause of keratitis. Clinicians prescribing inhaled corticosteroids or topical corticosteroid creams should be aware of possible association with herpes simplex keratitis.

  17. Update on Neonatal Herpes Simplex Epidemiology in the Netherlands: A Health Problem of Increasing Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oeffelen, Louise; Biekram, Manisha; Poeran, Jashvant; Hukkelhoven, Chantal; Galjaard, Sander; van der Meijden, Wim; Op de Coul, Eline

    2018-01-18

    This paper provides an update on the incidence of neonatal herpes, guideline adherence by health care professionals (HCP), and trends in genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection during pregnancy in the Netherlands. Questionnaires were sent to all hospitals inquiring about numbers and characteristics of neonatal and maternal HSV infections, and guideline adherence between 2012 and 2015. Longitudinal trends were investigated from 1999 onwards using survey data and Perinatal Registry of the Netherlands data (Perined). Trends were smoothed with Poisson regression splines. Risk indicators for neonatal and maternal HSV infections were examined with Poisson regression analyses. Neonatal herpes incidence was 4.8/100,000 live births based on survey data (2012-2015) and 3.4/100,000 based on Perined (2012-2014). Mortality rate was 23% (7/30). Neonatal herpes incidence increased slightly over time as did the prevalence of genital HSV infection among pregnant women. Non-Western ethnicity (RR 1.9, 95%CI 1.5-2.5) and age herpes during pregnancy. In Perined, none of the neonatal herpes cases had a mother diagnosed with an active genital herpes infection during pregnancy. Preventive measures to reduce vertical herpes transmission (such as caesarean section) were less commonly reported by HCP in 2012-2015 compared to 2006-2011. Neonatal herpes incidence in the Netherlands slowly increased over the last 15 years. An increased genital HSV prevalence during pregnancy or, to lower extent, the decreased guideline adherence by HCP may be responsible. A rise in asymptomatic maternal HSV shedding is also plausible, emphasizing the challenges in preventing neonatal herpes.

  18. Mimicking herpes simplex virus 1 and herpes simplex virus 2 mucosal behavior in a well-characterized human genital organ culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steukers, Lennert; Weyers, Steven; Yang, Xiaoyun; Vandekerckhove, Annelies P; Glorieux, Sarah; Cornelissen, Maria; Van den Broeck, Wim; Temmerman, Marleen; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-07-15

    We developed and morphologically characterized a human genital mucosa explant model (endocervix and ectocervix/vagina) to mimic genital herpes infections caused by herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2). Subsequent analysis of HSV entry receptor expression throughout the menstrual cycle in genital tissues was performed, and the evolution of HSV-1/-2 mucosal spread over time was assessed. Nectin-1 and -2 were expressed in all tissues during the entire menstrual cycle. Herpesvirus entry mediator expression was limited mainly to some connective tissue cells. Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 exhibited a plaque-wise mucosal spread across the basement membrane and induced prominent epithelial syncytia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Herpes simplex Virus Esophagitis in an Immunocompetent Patient with Ebstein-Barr Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tzouvala

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis can cause transient immune deficiency which may predispose to reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV infection in the immunocompetent host. We report the case of a 15-year-old male who presented with severe odynophagia and herpes labialis during the course of Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis that had been diagnosed ten days before. Esophagoscopy revealed extensive ulcerations with distinct borders and whitish exudates at the mid and distal esophagus. Polymerase chain reaction detected HSV-1 DNA in the biopsy specimens. The patient was treated with intravenous acyclovir. The symptoms resolved rapidly within 3 days, in accordance with improved endoscopic findings.

  20. Synthetic analogues of bovine bactenecin dodecapeptide reduce herpes simplex virus type 2 infectivity in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard; Shestakov, Andrey; Hancock, Robert E. W

    2013-01-01

    We have evaluated the potential of four synthetic peptides (denoted HH-2, 1002, 1006, 1018) with a distant relationship to the host defense peptide bovine bactenecin dodecapeptide for their ability to prevent genital infections with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in mice. All four peptides...... infectious doses of HSV-2. These data show that peptides HH-2 and 1018 have antiviral properties and can be used to prevent genital herpes infection in mice. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  1. Ganciclovir nucleotides accumulate in mitochondria of rat liver cells expressing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Eb, Marjolijn M.; Geutskens, Sacha B.; van Kuilenburg, André B. P.; van Lenthe, Henk; van Dierendonck, Jan-Hein; Kuppen, Peter J. K.; van Ormondt, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; van Gennip, Albert H.; Hoeben, Rob C.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ganciclovir exhibits broad-spectrum activity against DNA viruses such as cytomegaloviruses, herpes simplex viruses, varicella-zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus and human herpes virus-6. Ganciclovir is widely applied for anti-herpetic treatment, cytomegalovirus prophylaxis after organ

  2. Recurrent Labial Herpes Simplex in Pediatric Dentistry: Low-level Laser Therapy as a Treatment Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stona, Priscila; da Silva Viana, Elizabete; dos Santos Pires, Leandro; Blessmann Weber, João Batista

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recurrent labial herpes simplex is a pathology of viral origin that is frequently observed in children. The signs and symptoms are uncomfortable and, in many cases, the efficacy of treatment is unproven. However, several studies have demonstrated good results from the use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), primarily due to acceleration of the healing process and pain relief, which make it a promising resource for use with this pathology. This paper describes a clinical case of a 7-year-old patient affected by this pathology and the therapeutic resolution proposed. How to cite this article: Stona P, da Silva Viana E, dos Santos Pires L, Weber JBB, Kramer PF. Recurrent Labial Herpes Simplex in Pediatric Dentistry: Low-level Laser Therapy as a Treatment Option. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):140-143. PMID:25356015

  3. Chronic herpes simplex type-1 encephalitis with intractable epilepsy in an immunosuppressed patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohathai, Christopher; Weber, Daniel J; Hayat, Ghazala; Thomas, Florian P

    2016-02-01

    Chronic herpes simplex virus type-1 encephalitis (HSE-1) is uncommon. Past reports focused on its association with prior documented acute infection. Here, we describe a patient with increasingly intractable epilepsy from chronic HSE-1 reactivation without history of acute central nervous system infection. A 49-year-old liver transplant patient with 4-year history of epilepsy after initiation of cyclosporine developed increasingly frequent seizures over 3 months. Serial brain magnetic resonance imaging showed left temporoparietal cortical edema that gradually improved despite clinical decline. Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) DNA was detected in cerebrospinal fluid by polymerase chain reaction. Cerebrospinal fluid HSV-1&2 IgM was negative. Seizures were controlled after acyclovir treatment, and the patient remained seizure free at 1-year follow-up. Chronic HSE is a cause of intractable epilepsy, can occur without a recognized preceding acute phase, and the clinical course of infection may not directly correlate with neuroimaging changes.

  4. MRI diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis in an elderly man with nonspecific symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J. Croll, BS

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A 78-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department complaining of a 1-week onset of increasing fatigue and anorexia. The patient was previously well but had a history of depression, chronic diarrhea, and hypertension. His examination was remarkable for mild fever (100.1°F. He had no acute neurologic deficits. The patient felt better after intravenous fluids and was discharged to follow-up with the primary care provider. With no resolution of symptoms and new memory loss, the patient's primary care doctor ordered an MRI which revealed abnormal signal/patchy enhancement of the left temporal lobe indicative (pathognomonic of herpes simplex encephalitis. This case emphasizes the importance of early consideration of herpes simplex encephalitis in the differential of patient's with these symptoms.

  5. Oncolytic virotherapy using herpes simplex virus: how far have we come?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolowski NAS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas AS Sokolowski,1 Helen Rizos,2 Russell J Diefenbach1 1Centre for Virus Research, Westmead Millennium Institute for Medical Research, The University of Sydney, 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, NSW, Australia Abstract: Oncolytic virotherapy exploits the properties of human viruses to naturally cause cytolysis of cancer cells. The human pathogen herpes simplex virus (HSV has proven particularly amenable for use in oncolytic virotherapy. The relative safety of HSV coupled with extensive knowledge on how HSV interacts with the host has provided a platform for manipulating HSV to enhance the targeting and killing of human cancer cells. This has culminated in the approval of talimogene laherparepvec for the treatment of melanoma. This review focuses on the development of HSV as an oncolytic virus and where the field is likely to head in the future. Keywords: herpes simplex virus, cancer, immunity, combination therapy, oncolysis

  6. Calcium spirulan derived from Spirulina platensis inhibits herpes simplex virus 1 attachment to human keratinocytes and protects against herpes labialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Julia; Gallo, Antonio; Schommartz, Tim; Handke, Wiebke; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Günther, Patrick; Brune, Wolfram; Reich, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 are highly prevalent in populations worldwide and cause recurrent oral lesions in up to 40% of infected subjects. We investigated the antiviral activity of a defined Spirulina platensis microalga extract and of purified calcium spirulan (Ca-SP), a sulfated polysaccharide contained therein. The inhibitory effects of HSV-1 were assessed by using a plaque reduction assay and quantitative PCR in a susceptible mammalian epithelial cell line and confirmed in human keratinocytes. Time-of-addition and attachment experiments and fluorescence detection of the HSV-1 tegument protein VP16 were used to analyze the mechanism of HSV-1 inhibition. Effects of Ca-SP on Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8 replication and uptake of the ORF45 tegument protein were tested in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. In an observational trial the prophylactic effects of topically applied Ca-SP were compared with those of systemic and topical nucleoside analogues in 198 volunteers with recurrent herpes labialis receiving permanent lip makeup. Ca-SP inhibited HSV-1 infection in vitro with a potency at least comparable to that of acyclovir by blocking viral attachment and penetration into host cells. Ca-SP also inhibited entry of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8. In the clinical model of herpes exacerbation, the prophylactic effect of a Ca-SP and microalgae extract containing cream was superior to that of acyclovir cream. These data indicate a potential clinical use of Ca-SP containing Spirulina species extract for the prophylactic treatment of herpes labialis and suggest possible activity of Ca-SP against infections caused by other herpesviruses. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of herpes simplex, Epstein Barr and human papilloma viruses in oral lichen planus

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim, Benay; Sengüven, Burcu; Demir, Cem

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of Herpes Simplex virus, Epstein Barr virus and Human Papilloma virus -16 in oral lichen planus cases and to evaluate whether any clinical variant, histopathological or demographic feature correlates with these viruses. Study Design: The study was conducted on 65 cases. Viruses were detected immunohistochemically. We evaluated the histopathological and demographic features and statistically analysed correlation of these...

  8. Diagnosis of genital herpes simplex virus infection in the clinical laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    LeGoff, Jérôme; Péré, Hélène; Bélec, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Since the type of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection affects prognosis and subsequent counseling, type-specific testing to distinguish HSV-1 from HSV-2 is always recommended. Although PCR has been the diagnostic standard method for HSV infections of the central nervous system, until now viral culture has been the test of choice for HSV genital infection. However, HSV PCR, with its consistently and substantially higher rate of HSV detection, could replace viral cultur...

  9. Ascending in utero herpes simplex virus infection in an initially healthy-appearing premature infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Morven S; Popek, Edwina J; Wise, Brittany; Hatzenbuehler, Lindsay; Arunachalam, Athis R; Hair, Amy B

    2015-01-01

    The usual route of acquisition for intrauterine herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is transplacental. We evaluated a premature infant with in utero acquisition of HSV resulting from ascending infection. Histopathologic evidence of chronic chorioamnionitis and positive staining with immunohistochemistry for HSV in the placenta and umbilical cord established the diagnosis. The clinical presentation was also of interest in that the infant was initially healthy appearing.

  10. Contributions of herpes simplex virus type 1 envelope proteins to entry by endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) proteins specifically required for endocytic entry but not direct penetration have not been identified. HSVs deleted of gE, gG, gI, gJ, gM, UL45, or Us9 entered cells via either pH-dependent or pH-independent endocytosis and were inactivated by mildly acidic pH. Thus, the ...

  11. Evaluation of three immunofluorescence assays for culture confirmation and typing of herpes simplex virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Lipson, S M; Schutzbank, T E; Szabo, K

    1987-01-01

    Three pairs of monoclonal antibodies, supplied in kits by Electro-Nucleonics, Inc. (ENI), The Syva Co., and Kallestad Laboratories, Inc. (KL), were evaluated for the laboratory confirmation and typing of herpes simplex virus (HSV). Of 108 coded HSV slide preparation, run in parallel with each monoclonal-antibody set, 103 were equivalent by the immunofluorescence assays. Among the five discordant isolates, three (2.8%) did not type with the KL monoclonal antibodies and two (1.9%) false-positiv...

  12. Evaluation of two immunofluorescence assays with monoclonal antibodies for typing of herpes simplex virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Swierkosz, E M; Arens, M Q; Schmidt, R R; Armstrong, T

    1985-01-01

    An indirect immunofluorescence assay and a direct immunofluorescence assay were evaluated for typing clinical isolates of herpes simplex virus (HSV). The indirect immunofluorescence assay (Electro-Nucleonics, Inc.) correctly identified 16 HSV type 2 (HSV-2) isolates, but failed to identify 4 of 14 HSV-1 isolates because of background fluorescence and instability of reagents. Forty-nine HSV-1 isolates were correctly typed by direct immunofluorescence assay (Kallestad Laboratories, Inc.), but 1...

  13. Uptake, distribution, and anabolism of acyclovir in herpes simplex virus-infected mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Biron, K K; Noblin, J E; Miranda, P; Elion, G B

    1982-01-01

    The uptake, distribution, and anabolism of the nucleoside analog 9-(2-hydroxyethoxymethyl) guanine (acyclovir) were compared in herpes simplex virus-infected and uninfected mice. Analyses of tissue distribution and the concentration of acyclovir after either a single dose or multiple doses failed to reveal significant differences between drug levels in infected and uninfected animals. Extracts of tissues from [8-14C] acyclovir-treated animals were examined by high-performance liquid chromatog...

  14. Mutation Spectra of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Thymidine Kinase Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Qiaosheng; Hwang, Ying T.; Hwang, Charles B. C.

    2002-01-01

    To examine whether the exonuclease activity intrinsic to the polymerase (Pol) of herpes simplex virus type 1 can influence the mutational spectra, we applied the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) system combined with sequencing to characterize thymidine kinase mutants isolated from both the wild-type virus and a mutant deficient in exonuclease activity, Y7. Wild-type viruses produced predominately frameshift mutations (67%), whereas Y7 replicated a significantly lower proportion ...

  15. Immunopathogenic Role of Herpes Simplex Virus in Behçet’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Do Young Kim; Suhyun Cho; Min Ju Choi; Seonghyang Sohn; Eun-So Lee; Dongsik Bang

    2013-01-01

    The role of viral infections, such as herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection, in the pathogenesis of Beh?et's disease (BD) has been investigated for many years. HSV has been detected in peripheral blood leukocytes, saliva, and genital ulcers of patients with BD. Various cell adhesion molecules on cultured endothelial cells have been induced by HSV in a TNF- ? dependent manner. In addition, a BD-like animal model was developed by inoculating ICR mouse earlobes with HSV, and antiviral treatment w...

  16. Incidence of Herpes Simplex Virus Keratitis in HIV/AIDS patients compared with the general population

    OpenAIRE

    Burcea, M; Gheorghe, A.; Pop, M

    2015-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is associated with a wide spectrum of systemic and ocular infectious diseases. Little information is known about Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) keratoconjunctivitis in association with AIDS. Because HSV-1 is becoming, day by day, a common eye disease (nearly 100% patients of over 60 years old harbor HSV in their trigeminal ganglia at autopsy), this article discussing a worldwide public health problem. Aim. The purpose of this paper is to compare...

  17. Chronic ulcerating genital herpes simplex virus infection: A diagnosis mislead by HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Parajuli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of chronic herpes simplex in a 27 year old lady presenting with a history of persistent verrucous ulcer in the natal cleft of nine months duration. The patient was diagnosed and treated initially as a case of Tuberculosis Verrucosa Cutis (TVC based on the chronicity of the ulcer, negative HIV serological tests and histopathological findings. The diagnosis had to be revised as the lesion was increasing in size and the patient was not responding to treatment even after completing antituberculous treatment for six months. Repeat histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry showed DNA of herpes simplex. Based on this finding a repeat HIV serology was sent which was positive. The ulcer healed after a course of acyclovir. The case is being reported to highlight the importance of considering chronic herpes simplex infection in a case of chronic genital ulcer. In addition this case reminds us the nature of HIV infection to mislead the diagnosis by altering the natural course of the disease process.

  18. Case of herpes simplex encephalitis(HSE) with a thalamic lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimori, K.; Koike, R.; Yuasa, T.; Miyatake, T.; Ito, J.

    1987-02-01

    A case of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) with thalamic involvement was reported. The patient, a 27-year-old man, was admitted because of abnormal behavior and fever. He exhibited a disturbance of consciousness, meningial signs, and hyperreflexia. A CT scan of the head revealed diffuse brain edema. Acute encephalitis, especially HSE, was suspected, and so the intravenous administration of acyclovir and steroid therapy were started. The titer of herpes simplex Type 1 virus, as measured by CF and ELISA, was found to have increased amounts of serum and cerebrospinal fluid. 5 days after the onset, his consciousness worsened. He could not tell his name and scarely opened his eyes upon pain stimulation. A CT scan at this time showed low-density lesions in the left thalamus, cingulate gyrus, and the posterior portion of the putamen. About 5 days later, his consciousness level was increased, but he was mute. This symptom was thought to be thalamic aphasia, which might be correlative with the low-density lesions shown in the left thalamus by the CT scan. About 30 days after the onset of the disease, his speech became normal, and a CT scan at 51 hospital days showed no abnormality. The etiology of low-density lesions of the left thalamus in the CT scan is speculated to be as follows: firstly, vascular damage of circulation disturbance, and secondly a special affinity of herpes simplex Type 1 virus to the thalamus.

  19. Herpes Simplex Vaccines: Prospects of Live-attenuated HSV Vaccines to Combat Genital and Ocular infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanfield, Brent; Kousoulas, Konstantin Gus

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) and its closely related type-2 (HSV-2) viruses cause important clinical manifestations in humans including acute ocular disease and genital infections. These viruses establish latency in the trigeminal ganglionic and dorsal root neurons, respectively. Both viruses are widespread among humans and can frequently reactivate from latency causing disease. Currently, there are no vaccines available against herpes simplex viral infections. However, a number of promising vaccine approaches are being explored in pre-clinical investigations with few progressing to early phase clinical trials. Consensus research findings suggest that robust humoral and cellular immune responses may partially control the frequency of reactivation episodes and reduce clinical symptoms. Live-attenuated viral vaccines have long been considered as a viable option for generating robust and protective immune responses against viral pathogens. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the same alphaherpesvirus subfamily with herpes simplex viruses. A live-attenuated VZV vaccine has been extensively used in a prophylactic and therapeutic approach to combat primary and recurrent VZV infection indicating that a similar vaccine approach may be feasible for HSVs. In this review, we summarize pre-clinical approaches to HSV vaccine development and current efforts to test certain vaccine approaches in human clinical trials. Also, we discuss the potential advantages of using a safe, live-attenuated HSV-1 vaccine strain to protect against both HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections. PMID:27114893

  20. Attitudes and Willingness to Assume Risk of Experimental Therapy to Eradicate Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseso, Linda; Magaret, Amalia S; Jerome, Keith R; Fox, Julie; Wald, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Current treatment of genital herpes is focused on ameliorating signs and symptoms but is not curative. However, as potential herpes simplex virus (HSV) cure approaches are tested in the laboratory, we aimed to assess the interest in such studies by persons with genital herpes and the willingness to assume risks associated with experimental therapy. We constructed an anonymous online questionnaire that was posted on websites that provide information regarding genital herpes. The questions collected demographic and clinical information on adults who self-reported as having genital herpes, and assessed attitudes toward and willingness to participate in HSV cure clinical research. Seven hundred eleven participants provided sufficient responses to be included in the analysis. Sixty-six percent were women; the median age was 37 years, and the median time since genital HSV diagnosis was 4.7 years. The willingness to participate in trials increased from 59.0% in phase 1 to 68.5% in phase 2, and 81.2% in phase 3 trials, and 40% reported willingness to participate even in the absence of immediate, personal benefits. The most desirable outcome was the elimination of risk for transmission to sex partner or neonate. The mean perceived severity of receiving a diagnosis of genital HSV-2 was 4.2 on a scale of 1 to 5. Despite suppressive therapy available, persons with genital herpes are interested in participating in clinical research aimed at curing HSV, especially in more advanced stages of development.

  1. Diagnosis of Herpes Simplex Encephalitis by ELISA Using Antipeptide Antibodies Against Type-Common Epitopes of Glycoprotein B of Herpes Simplex Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Shradha S; Chandak, Nitin H; Baheti, Neeraj N; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) represents one of the most severe infectious diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). As effective antiviral drugs are available, an early, rapid, and reliable diagnosis has become important. The objective of this article was to develop a sensitive ELISA protocol for herpes simplex viruses (HSV) antigen detection and quantitation by assessing the usefulness of antipeptide antibodies against potential peptides of HSV glycoprotein B (gB). A total of 180 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of HSE and non-HSE patients were analyzed using a panel of antipeptide antibodies against synthetic peptides of HSV glycoprotein gB. The cases of confirmed and suspected HSE showed 80% and 51% positivity for antipeptide against synthetic peptide QLHDLRF and 77% and 53% positivity for antipeptide against synthetic peptide MKALYPLTT, respectively for the detection of HSV antigen in CSF. The concentration of HSV antigen was found to be higher in confirmed HSE as compared to suspected HSE group and the viral load correlated well with antigen concentration obtained using the two antipeptides in CSF of confirmed HSE group. This is the first article describing the use of antibodies obtained against synthetic peptides derived from HSV in diagnostics of HSE using patients' CSF samples.

  2. Oral herpes simplex virus infection in pregnancy: what are the concerns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficarra, Giuseppe; Birek, Catalena

    2009-09-01

    Although epidemiologic data and the potentially serious effects of transmission of genital herpes from mother to infant during birth have been widely reported, published reports on oral herpes disease in pregnancy remain scarce and no clear management guidelines exist. Thus, questions remain about acquisition, transmission and outcome of infection, especially with respect to acute gingivostomatitis in pregnancy. In response to these questions, we summarize previous reports on herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) oral disease in pregnancy and, briefly, present 2 cases of primary gingivostomatitis in the first trimester of pregnancy, resulting in a favourable outcome for both mother and infant. We also point out the most recent data on rare, potentially severe in outcome, but treatable, primary central nervous system HSV-1 infection in later stages of pregnancy. Finally, we emphasize a multidisciplinary approach to oral HSV disease in pregnancy, with dentist participation in the diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Prevention of herpes simplex virus induced stromal keratitis by a glycoprotein B-specific monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalbert Krawczyk

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence of acyclovir (ACV and multidrug-resistant strains in patients with corneal HSV-1 infections leading to Herpetic Stromal Keratitis (HSK is a major health problem in industrialized countries and often results in blindness. To overcome this obstacle, we have previously developed an HSV-gB-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb 2c that proved to be highly protective in immunodeficient NOD/SCID-mice towards genital infections. In the present study, we examined the effectivity of mAb 2c in preventing the immunopathological disease HSK in the HSK BALB/c mouse model. Therefore, mice were inoculated with HSV-1 strain KOS on the scarified cornea to induce HSK and subsequently either systemically or topically treated with mAb 2c. Systemic treatment was performed by intravenous administration of mAb 2c 24 h prior to infection (pre-exposure prophylaxis or 24, 40, and 56 hours after infection (post-exposure immunotherapy. Topical treatment was performed by periodical inoculations (5 times per day of antibody-containing eye drops as control, starting at 24 h post infection. Systemic antibody treatment markedly reduced viral loads at the site of infection and completely protected mice from developing HSK. The administration of the antiviral antibody prior or post infection was equally effective. Topical treatment had no improving effect on the severity of HSK. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that mAb 2c proved to be an excellent drug for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections and for prevention of HSK and blindness. Moreover, the humanized counterpart (mAb hu2c was equally effective in protecting mice from HSV-induced HSK when compared to the parental mouse antibody. These results warrant the future development of this antibody as a novel approach for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections in humans.

  4. [The Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of neonatal herpes simplex infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-13

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections are rare, but are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Most newborns acquire herpes simplex virus infection in the peripartum period. For peripartum transmission to occur, women must be shedding the virus in their genital tracts symptomatically or asymptomatically around the time of delivery. There are evidence-based interventions in pregnancy to prevent the transmission to the newborn. Caesarean section should be performed in the presence of herpetic lesions, and antiviral prophylaxis in the last weeks of pregnancy is recommended to suppress genital tract herpes simplex virus at the time of delivery. The diagnosis and early treatment of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections require a high index of suspicion, especially in the absence of skin lesions. It is recommended to rule out herpes simplex virus infections in those newborns with mucocutaneous lesions, central nervous system involvement, or septic appearance. The prognosis of newborns with skin, eye, and/or mouth disease in the high-dose acyclovir era is very good. Antiviral treatment not only improves mortality rates in disseminated and central nervous system disease, but also improves the rates of long-term neurodevelopmental impairment in the cases of disseminated disease. Interestingly, a 6-month suppressive course of oral acyclovir following the acute infection has improved the neurodevelopmental prognosis in patients with CNS involvement. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  5. Leflunomide in the Treatment of a Pseudotumoral Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in an HIV Patient

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    Marie R. Roger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The patient is a 52-year-old African American man with a past medical history of HIV infection (on antiretroviral therapy, CD4 count 399 cells/µL, and undetectable HIV viral load and recurrent genital herpes. While on valacyclovir, the patient presented with four tumorous lesions on the perineum and scrotum. A biopsy specimen stained positively with HSV-1 and HSV-2 immunostains and displayed a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. The patient received foscarnet and imiquimod for two weeks with minimal improvement. Based on the previous activity of leflunomide, which has both antiviral and immunomodulatory properties, in cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex infections, leflunomide 20 mg orally twice daily was started. The patient received 23 days of foscarnet, 14 days of topical imiquimod, and 11 days of leflunomide with approximately 80% reduction in the size of the perineal lesion. After nine months on leflunomide there was complete regression of the large perineal lesion and only two small ulcerations remained on the scrotum. Pseudotumoral herpes lesions in HIV patients represent an immune reconstitution event and are poorly responsive to the usual anti-herpes agents. This report demonstrates the successful use of leflunomide in the treatment of an HIV patient with pseudotumoral herpes. Thalidomide has also been used with some success.

  6. Replication-defective virus vaccine-induced protection of mice from genital herpes simplex virus 2 requires CD4 T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Lynda A.

    2008-01-01

    Replication-defective herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), used as an immunization strategy, protects against HSV-2 challenge in animal models. The roles of replication-defective virus-induced T cell subsets in control of HSV-2 infection have not been established. Mice lacking B cells (μMT) were immunized, depleted of CD4 or CD8 T cells, and then challenged intravaginally with HSV-2 to elucidate T cell subset contributions in the absence of virus-specific antibody. Immunized, CD4-depleted μMT mice developed severe infection of the genital tract and nervous system. In contrast, depletion of CD8 T cells from μMT mice did not attenuate protection. Immunized wild-type mice depleted of CD4 T cells also developed more severe HSV-2 infection than mice from which CD8 T cells were depleted. Thus, immunization with replication-defective virus induces T cell responses that effectively control HSV-2 infection in the absence of HSV-immune antibody, and CD4 T cells play the predominant role in this protective effect. PMID:18410949

  7. Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 educational assessment of young adults in rural southwest Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hover, Shantal S; Bertke, Andrea S

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) causes genital herpes, one of the most common sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the U.S. HSV-1, commonly associated with cold sores, is increasing as a cause of genital herpes. Abstinence-only sexual health classes, commonly taught in Virginia, generate young adults who are under-educated in sexual health, increasing STI risks. College students in southwest Virginia were surveyed to assess comprehensiveness of high school health education regarding HSV-1 and HSV-2 and to identify students' preferred methods for STI education. To obtain data on knowledge of HSV, comprehensiveness of sexual health education in high school, and preferred learning methods, 237 college students participated in an online questionnaire and 28 students were interviewed using structured interviews. Questionnaire and interview data indicated that Family Life Education classes need to include more comprehensive information on prevention, viral transmission, and differences between HSV-1 and HSV-2. The majority of total respondents (both the questionnaire and interview) (65%) reported non-comprehensive high school sexual health education. The majority of interview (79%) and questionnaire (55%) respondents wished they had learned more about herpes and other STIs in high school. Education preferences of both interviewed and surveyed respondents included interactive internet programs or games, more realistic lectures, and learning about STIs later in high school when students reported greater sexual activity. Our results indicate that more comprehensive sexual health education is needed and wanted by students in southwest Virginia. More relevant educational programs should be implemented for VA high school students utilizing technology and interactive methods to improve student engagement in sexual health education. These studies provide information on knowledge of herpes simplex viruses among college students, comprehensiveness of sexual health education

  8. Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 educational assessment of young adults in rural southwest Virginia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantal S Hover

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 causes genital herpes, one of the most common sexually transmitted infections (STIs in the U.S. HSV-1, commonly associated with cold sores, is increasing as a cause of genital herpes. Abstinence-only sexual health classes, commonly taught in Virginia, generate young adults who are under-educated in sexual health, increasing STI risks. College students in southwest Virginia were surveyed to assess comprehensiveness of high school health education regarding HSV-1 and HSV-2 and to identify students' preferred methods for STI education.To obtain data on knowledge of HSV, comprehensiveness of sexual health education in high school, and preferred learning methods, 237 college students participated in an online questionnaire and 28 students were interviewed using structured interviews.Questionnaire and interview data indicated that Family Life Education classes need to include more comprehensive information on prevention, viral transmission, and differences between HSV-1 and HSV-2. The majority of total respondents (both the questionnaire and interview (65% reported non-comprehensive high school sexual health education. The majority of interview (79% and questionnaire (55% respondents wished they had learned more about herpes and other STIs in high school. Education preferences of both interviewed and surveyed respondents included interactive internet programs or games, more realistic lectures, and learning about STIs later in high school when students reported greater sexual activity.Our results indicate that more comprehensive sexual health education is needed and wanted by students in southwest Virginia. More relevant educational programs should be implemented for VA high school students utilizing technology and interactive methods to improve student engagement in sexual health education.These studies provide information on knowledge of herpes simplex viruses among college students, comprehensiveness of sexual health

  9. Early rehabilitation results in a child who developed herpes simplex encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, Seyma; Ozdemir, Filiz; Kızılay, Fatma; Ersoy, Yuksel; Apaydın, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    In this case, a 4-year-old girl was admitted to the emergency service with the complaints of a sudden onset of fever, shortness of breath, jerking motions of the hands and feet and a sliding mouth. Her condition deteriorated, and she was kept under observation in the intensive care unit for 6 days. The Glasgow Coma Score of the patient was 1. Lumbar puncture revealed a white blood cell count of 0 and cerebrospinal fluid was positive for herpes simplex virus 1 and 2. Antiviral therapy was administered for 14 days. One month earlier, the patient had experienced a herpes labialis infection, which suggested herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). Cranial magnetic resonance imaging indicated significant bilateral cerebral ischemic changes, which also supported suspicion of HSE. After antiviral treatment, the patient was referred to the department of physical therapy and rehabilitation. The Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM) scale was used to evaluate the patient. A 30-session rehabilitation program based on the Bobath concept of neurodevelopmental therapy was implemented. Before the treatment, the WeeFIM score was 20 points, and at its conclusion, the score was 88 points. The patient began to walk without limitation and the choreoathetosis was almost completely corrected. The patient was discharged with medical treatment and a home-based exercise training program.

  10. Fatal Multiorgan Failure Associated with Disseminated Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Infection: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Glas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infections cause typical dermal and mucosal lesions in children and adults. Also complications to the peripheral and central nervous system, pneumonia or hepatitis are well known. However, dissemination to viscera in adults is rare and predominantly observed in immunocompromised patients. Here we describe the case of a 70-year-old male admitted with macrohematuria and signs of acute infection and finally deceasing in a septic shock with multi organ failure 17 days after admission to intensive care unit. No bacterial or fungal infection could be detected during his stay, but only two days before death the patient showed signs of rectal, orolabial and genital herpes infection. The presence of HSV-1 was detected in swabs taken from the lesions, oropharyngeal fluid as well as in plasma. Post-mortem polymerase chain reaction analyses confirmed a disseminated infection with HSV-1 involving various organs and tissues but excluding the central nervous system. Autopsy revealed a predominantly retroperitoneal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma as the suspected origin of immunosuppression underlying herpes simplex dissemination.

  11. Early rehabilitation results in a child who developed herpes simplex encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, Seyma; Ozdemir, Filiz; Kızılay, Fatma; Ersoy, Yuksel; Apaydın, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    In this case, a 4-year-old girl was admitted to the emergency service with the complaints of a sudden onset of fever, shortness of breath, jerking motions of the hands and feet and a sliding mouth. Her condition deteriorated, and she was kept under observation in the intensive care unit for 6 days. The Glasgow Coma Score of the patient was 1. Lumbar puncture revealed a white blood cell count of 0 and cerebrospinal fluid was positive for herpes simplex virus 1 and 2. Antiviral therapy was administered for 14 days. One month earlier, the patient had experienced a herpes labialis infection, which suggested herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). Cranial magnetic resonance imaging indicated significant bilateral cerebral ischemic changes, which also supported suspicion of HSE. After antiviral treatment, the patient was referred to the department of physical therapy and rehabilitation. The Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM) scale was used to evaluate the patient. A 30-session rehabilitation program based on the Bobath concept of neurodevelopmental therapy was implemented. Before the treatment, the WeeFIM score was 20 points, and at its conclusion, the score was 88 points. The patient began to walk without limitation and the choreoathetosis was almost completely corrected. The patient was discharged with medical treatment and a home-based exercise training program. PMID:29270579

  12. Update On Emerging Antivirals For The Management Of Herpes Simplex Virus Infections: A Patenting Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadlapudi, Aswani D.; Vadlapatla, Ramya K.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can be treated efficiently by the application of antiviral drugs. The herpes family of viruses is responsible for causing a wide variety of diseases in humans. The standard therapy for the management of such infections includes acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV) with their respective prodrugs valaciclovir and famciclovir. Though effective, long term prophylaxis with the current drugs leads to development of drug-resistant viral isolates, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, some drugs are associated with dose-limiting toxicities which limit their further utility. Therefore, there is a need to develop new antiherpetic compounds with different mechanisms of action which will be safe and effective against emerging drug resistant viral isolates. Significant advances have been made towards the design and development of novel antiviral therapeutics during the last decade. As evident by their excellent antiviral activities, pharmaceutical companies are moving forward with several new compounds into various phases of clinical trials. This review provides an overview of structure and life cycle of HSV, progress in the development of new therapies, update on the advances in emerging therapeutics under clinical development and related recent patents for the treatment of Herpes simplex virus infections. PMID:23331181

  13. Herpes simplex virus infection in pregnancy and in neonate: status of art of epidemiology, diagnosis, therapy and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barucca Valentina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Herpes simplex virus (HSV infection is one of the most common viral sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. The first time infection of the mother may lead to severe illness in pregnancy and may be associated with virus transmission from mother to foetus/newborn. Since the incidence of this sexually transmitted infection continues to rise and because the greatest incidence of herpes simplex virus infections occur in women of reproductive age, the risk of maternal transmission of the virus to the foetus or neonate has become a major health concern. On these purposes the Authors of this review looked for the medical literature and pertinent publications to define the status of art regarding the epidemiology, the diagnosis, the therapy and the prevention of HSV in pregnant women and neonate. Special emphasis is placed upon the importance of genital herpes simplex virus infection in pregnancy and on the its prevention to avoid neonatal HSV infections.

  14. Fate of the inner nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor and nuclear lamins in herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, E S; O'Hare, P

    2001-09-01

    During herpesvirus egress, capsids bud through the inner nuclear membrane. Underlying this membrane is the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate filaments with which it is tightly associated. Details of alterations to the lamina and the inner nuclear membrane during infection and the mechanisms involved in capsid transport across these structures remain unclear. Here we describe the fate of key protein components of the nuclear envelope and lamina during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. We followed the distribution of the inner nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR) and lamins A and B(2) tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in live infected cells. Together with additional results from indirect immunofluorescence, our studies reveal major morphologic distortion of nuclear-rim LBR and lamins A/C, B(1), and B(2). By 8 h p.i., we also observed a significant redistribution of LBR-GFP to the endoplasmic reticulum, where it colocalized with a subpopulation of cytoplasmic glycoprotein B by immunofluorescence. In addition, analysis by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching reveals that LBR-GFP exhibited increased diffusional mobility within the nuclear membrane of infected cells. This is consistent with the disruption of interactions between LBR and the underlying lamina. In addition to studying stably expressed GFP-lamins by fluorescence microscopy, we studied endogenous A- and B-type lamins in infected cells by Western blotting. Both approaches reveal a loss of lamins associated with virus infection. These data indicate major disruption of the nuclear envelope and lamina of HSV-1-infected cells and are consistent with a virus-induced dismantling of the nuclear lamina, possibly in order to gain access to the inner nuclear membrane.

  15. Herpes simplex type 1 pneumonitis and acute respiratory distress syndrome in a patient with chronic lymphatic leukemia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luginbuehl, Miriam; Imhof, Alexander; Klarer, Alexander

    2017-11-23

    Pulmonary pathogenicity of herpes simplex virus type 1 in patients in intensive care without classic immunosuppression as well as the necessity of antiviral treatment in the case of herpes simplex virus detection in respiratory specimens in these patients is controversial. We present a case of acute respiratory distress syndrome in a patient with stable chronic lymphatic leukemia not requiring treatment, in whom we diagnosed herpes simplex virus type 1 bronchopneumonitis based on herpes simplex virus type 1 detection in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and clinical response to antiviral treatment. A 72-year-old white man presented with symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection. His medical history was significant for chronic lymphatic leukemia, which had been stable without treatment, arterial hypertension, multiple squamous cell carcinomas of the scalp, and alcohol overuse. Community-acquired pneumonia was suspected and appropriate broad-spectrum antibacterial treatment was initiated. Within a few hours, rapid respiratory deterioration led to cardiac arrest. He was successfully resuscitated, but developed acute respiratory distress syndrome. Furthermore, he remained febrile and inflammation markers remained elevated despite antibacterial treatment. Polymerase chain reaction from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and viral culture from tracheobronchial secretions tested positive for herpes simplex virus type 1. We initiated antiviral treatment with acyclovir. Concomitantly we further escalated the antibacterial treatment, although no bacterial pathogen had been isolated at any point. Defervescence occurred rapidly and his C-reactive protein and leukocyte levels decreased. He was successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation, transferred to the ward, and eventually discharged to home. Herpes simplex virus should be considered a cause for lower respiratory tract infection in critically ill patients, especially in the setting of an underlying disease.

  16. Spectroscopic investigation of herpes simplex viruses infected cells and their response to antiviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Talyshinsky, Marina; Souprun, Yelena; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, we used microscopic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to evaluate the antiviral activity of known antiviral agents against herpes viruses. The antiviral activity of Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) (which is an active compound of propolis) against herpes simplex type 1 and 2 was examined in cell culture. The advantage of microscopic FTIR spectroscopy over conventional FTIR spectroscopy is that it facilitates inspection of restricted regions of cell culture or tissue. Our results showed significant spectral differences at early stages of infection between infected and non-infected cells, and between infected cells treated with the used antiviral agent and those not treated. In infected cells, there was a considerable increase in phosphate levels. Our results show that treatment with used antiviral agent considerably abolish the spectral changes induced by the viral infection. In addition, it is possible to track by FTIR microscopy method the deferential effect of various doses of the drug.

  17. Social Stress and the Reactivation of Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, David A.; Sheridan, John F.; Dorne, Julianne; Berntson, Gary G.; Candelora, Jessica; Glaser, Ronald

    1998-06-01

    Psychological stress is thought to contribute to reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV). Although several animal models have been developed in an effort to reproduce different pathogenic aspects of HSV keratitis or labialis, until now, no good animal model existed in which application of a psychological laboratory stressor results in reliable reactivation of the virus. Reported herein, disruption of the social hierarchy within colonies of mice increased aggression among cohorts, activated the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and caused reactivation of latent HSV type 1 in greater than 40% of latently infected animals. However, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis using restraint stress did not activate the latent virus. Thus, the use of social stress in mice provides a good model in which to investigate the neuroendocrine mechanisms that underlie behaviorally mediated reactivation of latent herpes-viruses.

  18. Midtrimester fetal herpes simplex-2 diagnosis by serology, culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, William M; Menegus, Marilyn A; Patru, Maria-Magdalena; Peterson, C Jeanne; Metlay, Leon A; Mooney, Robert A; Stanwood, Nancy L; Scheible, Amy L; Dorgan, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of herpes simplex virus (HSV) in utero comprises a minority of neonatal herpes infections. Prenatal diagnosis is rare. We describe a midtrimester diagnosis of fetal HSV-2 infection. Ultrasound at 20 weeks for elevated maternal serum α-fetoprotein (MSAFP) showed lagging fetal growth, echogenic bowel, echogenic myocardium, and liver with a mottled pattern of echogenicity. Amniocentesis demonstrated normal karyotype, elevated AFP and positive acetylcholinesterase. Culture isolated HSV-2 with an aberrant growth pattern. Maternal serology was positive for HSV-2. Quantitative DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed 59 million copies/ml. Fetal autopsy demonstrated widespread tissue necrosis but only sparse HSV-2 inclusions. Fetal HSV-2 infection can be suspected when an elevated MSAFP accompanies ultrasound findings suggesting perinatal infection. Maternal HSV serology, amniotic fluid culture and quantitative PCR are recommended for diagnostic certainty and counseling. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. The Challenges and Opportunities for Development of a T-Cell Epitope-Based Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    The infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a half billion individuals worldwide. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. HSV-1 infections are more prevalent than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. While genital herpes in mainly caused by HSV-2 infections, in recent years, there is an increase in the proportion of genital herpes caused by HSV-1 infections in young adults, which reach 50% in some western societies. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries their development has been notoriously difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One “common denominator” among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or whole viral proteins, which contain both pathogenic “symptomatic” and protective “asymptomatic” antigens/epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate that using an “asymptomatic” epitope-based vaccine strategy that selectively incorporates protective epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized, in vitro, by effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ TEM cells from “naturally” protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect, in vivo, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models from ocular and genital herpes infections and diseases, could be the answer to many of the scientific challenges facing HSV vaccine

  20. Prospects and perspectives for development of a vaccine against herpes simplex virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Shane C; Schleiss, Mark R

    2014-11-01

    Herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 are human pathogens that lead to significant morbidity and mortality in certain clinical settings. The development of effective antiviral medications, however, has had little discernible impact on the epidemiology of these pathogens, largely because the majority of infections are clinically silent. Decades of work have gone into various candidate HSV vaccines, but to date none has demonstrated sufficient efficacy to warrant licensure. This review examines developments in HSV immunology and vaccine development published since 2010, and assesses the prospects for improved immunization strategies that may result in an effective, licensed vaccine in the near future.

  1. Affinity purification combined with mass spectrometry to identify herpes simplex virus protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckes, David G

    2014-01-01

    The identification and characterization of herpes simplex virus protein interaction complexes are fundamental to understanding the molecular mechanisms governing the replication and pathogenesis of the virus. Recent advances in affinity-based methods, mass spectrometry configurations, and bioinformatics tools have greatly increased the quantity and quality of protein-protein interaction datasets. In this chapter, detailed and reliable methods that can easily be implemented are presented for the identification of protein-protein interactions using cryogenic cell lysis, affinity purification, trypsin digestion, and mass spectrometry.

  2. Conjunctival geographic ulcer: an overlooked sign of herpes simplex virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jia-Horung; Chu, Chang-Yao; Lee, Chaw-Ning; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Lee, Julia Yu-Yun; Wang, Jen-Ren; Chang, Kung-Chao; Huang, Fu-Chin

    2015-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) ocular infection causes significant visual burden worldwide. Despite the fact that dendritic or geographic corneal ulcers are typical findings in HSV epithelial keratitis, conjunctival ulcer as a sign of HSV infection has rarely been reported. Although easily overlooked, this important sign could be enhanced by fluorescein staining. We report two cases of conjunctival geographic ulcers proven to be HSV infection by viral isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One patient had bilateral disease and blepharitis, and the other had unilateral involvement without skin lesions. With timely diagnosis and proper management, excellent visual outcome can be expected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Oncolytic virotherapy using herpes simplex virus: how far have we come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Nicolas As; Rizos, Helen; Diefenbach, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy exploits the properties of human viruses to naturally cytolysis of cancer cells. The human pathogen herpes simplex virus (HSV) has proven particularly amenable for use in oncolytic virotherapy. The relative safety of HSV coupled with extensive knowledge on how HSV interacts with the host has provided a platform for manipulating HSV to enhance the targeting and killing of human cancer cells. This has culminated in the approval of talimogene laherparepvec for the treatment of melanoma. This review focuses on the development of HSV as an oncolytic virus and where the field is likely to head in the future.

  4. Placental examination in intrauterine coinfection with herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlemann, K; Menegus, M A

    1996-01-01

    Intrauterine coinfections have rarely been reported. However, pregnancies exposed to multiple sexually transmitted infectious agents and drugs are likely to occur with increasing frequency and lead to complex pathology in the newborn. Often it will be difficult to establish a diagnosis, above all when this has to be done retrospectively. A premature (34 weeks) newborn presented with a complex clinical picture after exposure to multiple infectious and noninfectious teratogens during gestation. Immunocytochemical staining of the placental membranes and parenchyma suggested intrauterine coinfection by herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 and cytomegalovirus. This case illustrates the importance of careful placental investigation with modern techniques for the diagnosis of intrauterine HSV infection and coinfections.

  5. [Complete human Klüver-Bucy syndrome after encephalitis caused by herpes simplex type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakchine, S; Chain, F; Lhermitte, F

    1986-01-01

    A case of complete Klüver-Bucy syndrome is reported. A 42 year-old man developed Herpes Simplex type II (H.S.V.II) encephalitis. Good sparing of language functions allowed thorough neuropsychological testing. The troubles usually described in Klüver-Bucy syndrome as psychic blindness, colour agnosia, prosopagnosia, auditive and tactile agnosia were present. The authors theorize that these symptoms are mainly correlated with the amnestic syndrome, which is constantly reported in human Klüver-Bucy syndrome. Unfortunately, after 8 weeks, the encephalitis recurred and the patient was left demented and untestable.

  6. Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 in the Netherlands: seroprevalence, risk factors and changes during a 12-year period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestenberg, Petra J.; Tjhie, Jeroen H. T.; de Melker, Hester E.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; van Bergen, Jan E. A. M.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; van Benthem, Birgit H. B.

    2016-01-01

    Genital herpes results in considerable morbidity, including risk of neonatal herpes, and is increasingly being caused by Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) type 1. Possibly children are less often HSV-1 infected, leaving them susceptible until sexual debut. We assessed changes in the Dutch HSV-1 and HSV-2

  7. Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 in the Netherlands : seroprevalence, risk factors and changes during a 12-year period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestenberg, Petra J; Tjhie, Jeroen H T; de Melker, Hester E; van der Klis, Fiona R M; van Bergen, Jan E A M; van der Sande, Marianne A B|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/205083420; van Benthem, Birgit H B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genital herpes results in considerable morbidity, including risk of neonatal herpes, and is increasingly being caused by Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) type 1. Possibly children are less often HSV-1 infected, leaving them susceptible until sexual debut. We assessed changes in the Dutch HSV-1

  8. Psychiatric aspects of herpes simplex encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis and herpes zoster encephalitis among immunocompetent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Więdłocha, Magdalena; Marcinowicz, Piotr; Stańczykiewicz, Bartłomiej

    2015-01-01

    The psychopathological symptoms occurring in the course of diseases associated with infections are often initially isolated and non-characteristic, and may cause diagnostic difficulties. Moreover, such disorders tend to be less responsive to psychiatric management. Among possible causes such as trauma, neoplasm and vascular changes, inflammatory changes of the brain as a result of a viral infection should also be considered. There were 452 registered cases of viral encephalitis in Poland in 2010, and although not very prevalent they remain a severe and life-threatening condition. What is more, the frequently occurring neurological and psychiatric complications of viral encephalitis often result in permanent disabilities, causing a significant decrease in the quality of life. This article presents the three types of encephalitis that are most prevalent among immunocompetent patients in Poland, i.e. herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and herpes zoster encephalitis (HZE). The psychopathology of the acute phase of the infection, the residual symptoms, features apparent in imaging studies and some neuropathological aspects are also presented. The paper also focuses on psychiatric aspects of the diagnostics and treatment of the described conditions. The clinical pictures of these infections are quite specific, although they cover a wide range of symptoms, and these characteristic features are described. The aim of this review is also to show the significance of thorough diagnostics and a multidisciplinary approach to patients with viral CNS infections.

  9. Potential risk of developing herpes simplex encephalitis in patients treated with sildenafil following primary exposure to genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, A; Mccoy, J; Kovacevic, M; Situm, M; Lonky, N

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. As a consequence of HSE, up to 75% of infected individuals die or experience irreversible neurological damage. While the pathogenesis of the disease is unknown, it is traditionally hypothesized that the viral infection occurs by neuronal transmission directly from peripheral sites. Non-neuronal modes of infection have generally been overlooked as the brain is protected by the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). The BBB poses an effective barrier to pathogens as well as to drugs such as chemotherapies. In the pursuit to deliver chemotherapeutic agents to the brain, several studies demonstrated that phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, such as sildenafil, may increase the permeability of the BBB enabling successful delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the brain. In this communication, we report a case of HSE infection in a 62-year-old man, which we suspect was facilitated by the use of sildenafil during a primary genital herpes simple virus (HSV) infection. Due to large number of patients treated with PDE5 inhibitors for erectile dysfunction and the high incidence of genital HSV infection in the general population, a larger study should examine the potential risk of developing HSE in patients treated with PDE5 inhibitors.

  10. Genital Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by a herpes simplex virus (HSV). It can cause sores on ... also infect their babies during childbirth. Symptoms of herpes are called outbreaks. You usually get sores near ...

  11. Rise in seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 1 among highly sexual active homosexual men and an increasing association between herpes simplex virus type 2 and HIV over time (1984-2003)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Colette; Pfrommer, Christiaan; Mindel, Adrian; Taylor, Janette; Spaargaren, Joke; Berkhout, Ben; Coutinho, Roel; Dukers, Nicole H. T. M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are both highly prevalent. The rate of genital HSV-1 transmission is reportedly increasing over time. HSV-2 is considered to be an important risk factor for HIV transmission. We therefore studied changes in the HSV-1 and HSV-2

  12. Seroepidemiology of Rubella, Cytomegalovirus, Herpes simplex & Varicella zoster virus in college women of Bushehr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Barazesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Acute viral infections such as cytomegalovirus, Rubella, Herpes simplex and varicella zoster virus in pregnant women can cause congenital infection with increased risk of developing congenital anomalies and morbidity. We aimed to identify young women susceptible to these viral infections in Bushehr. Materials and Methods: In 2009, 180 female were randomly selected from high schools and college students who were been assisted in marriage consulting clinics. In this cross sectional study, IgG antibodies against varicella zoster virus (VZV, Herpes simplex virus I,II (HSV I,II , Rubella & cytomegalovirus (CMV were determined by indirect enzyme immunoassay (ELISA technique. Results: Mean age of the participants was 18.72 years old. %99.4 and %95 of sera were positive for cytomegalovirus & Rubella respectively and also Antibodies against VZV & HSV were detected in %74.5 & %69.4 of samples. There were no significant correlation between antibody seropositivity and education level, living places (rural or urban and occupation. (P<0/05. Conclusion: Although, The findings of this study indicated that high prevalence rate of VZV &HSV 1,2 in child bearing age women, but 1/3 -1/4 of them, are still susceptible to these infections, so routine screening of these viruses is suggested in antenatal care.

  13. Relationship of herpes simplex encephalitis and transcranial direct current stimulation--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuanbin; Xiao, Juan; Song, Haiqing; Wang, Ralph; Hussain, Mohammed; Song, Weiqun

    2015-04-01

    We report a rare case of relapsing herpes simplex encephalitis in a-37-year-old patient which was previously confirmed by positive polymerase chain reaction, herpes simplex virus (HSV) type1 IgG antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid and characterized on MRI. During the first admission, he was treated with continuous acyclovir treatment for one month with clinical improvement except for residual aphasia, for which he received a course of outpatient transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). A constant current of 1.2 mA was applied for 20 min twice daily. After the 4th day the patient was found to be irritable and uncooperative by staff and family members. A subsequent MRI showed significant deterioration of the lesion on comparison to the first MRI which led to discontinuation of tDCS.The relatively rapid exacerbation of HSV in only a few days is unusual. Our aim is to discuss if tDCS is related to HSV relapse and in doing so highlight possible mechanisms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Class I defective herpes simplex virus DNA as a molecular cloning vehicle in eucaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, J W; Eppstein, D A; Chan, H W

    1983-01-01

    Defective herpes simplex virus type 1 genomes are composed of head-to-tail tandem repeats of small regions of the nondefective genome. Monomeric repeat units of class I defective herpes simplex virus genomes were cloned into bacterial plasmids. The repeat units functioned as replicons since both viral and convalently linked bacterial plasmid DNA replicated (with the help of DNA from nondefective virus) when transfected into rabbit skin cells. Recombinant plasmids were packaged into virions and were propagated from culture to culture by infection with progeny virus. Replication was evidently by a rolling circle mechanism since plasmid DNA was present in a high-molecular-weight form in transfected cells. Circular recombinant plasmid DNA replicated with a high degree of fidelity. In contrast, linear plasmid DNA underwent extensive deletions of both viral and bacterial sequences when transfected into rabbit skin cells. Derivative plasmids, a fraction of the size of the parental plasmid, were rescued by transforming Escherichia coli with DNA from the transfected rabbit skin cells. These plasmids functioned as shuttle vectors since they replicated faithfully in both eucaryotic and procaryotic cells. Images PMID:6312096

  15. [Herpes simplex virus bronchopneumonitis in patient with acute respiratory failure after surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Montesinos-De la Peña, M; Oteiza-López, L; Aldunate-Calvo, S; Gómez-Sánchez, M J; Sáenz-Bañuelos, J J; Tihista-Jiménez, J A

    2010-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus bronchopneumonitis is a clinical entity described in critically ill patients and classically associated to immunosuppression. Recent reports have shown a higher frequency of virus detection from samples obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage of immunocompetent critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. This fact suggests its role as an independent pathogenic substrate. We report the case of a female patient who was admitted after an elective surgery of rectal tumor with suspected bronchoaspiration during anesthetic induction. The patient presented persistent fever despite broad spectrum antibiotic treatment. All cultures were negative for bacterial growth. The chest X-ray did not show opacifities. Prolonged mechanical ventilation with repeated failures to wean made it mandatory to perform percutaneous tracheostomy. A fibrobronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, performed previously, showed positive result for herpes simplex virus (PCR and specific nuclear inclusions in cells). Thus, treatment was initiated with acyclovir, with clinical improvement and weaning from mechanical ventilation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Recombination in vitro between herpes simplex virus type 1 a sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, R C; Dutch, R E; Zemelman, B V; Mocarski, E S; Lehman, I R

    1992-01-01

    We have partially purified an activity from extracts of cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 that mediates recombination between repeated copies of the 317-base-pair a sequence of herpes simplex virus type 1. Recombination leads to deletion of a lacZ indicator gene situated between two directly repeated copies of the a sequence and is scored by transformation of lacZ- Escherichia coli. The two products of the reaction can be observed directly by restriction enzyme digestion and Southern blot analysis. The recombinase activity is also detectable, but at a lower level, in uninfected cell extracts. The DNA substrate must contain the two a sequences arranged in direct orientation to generate the lacZ deletion. However, when the a sequences are arranged in inverted orientation, an inversion results. A substrate with two homologous sequences of size and G + C content similar to the a sequence undergoes recombination at a much lower frequency. The reaction requires a divalent cation (Mg2+ or Mn2+) but not ATP or any other nucleoside triphosphate. The simple requirements and specificity for the a sequence suggest that the recombination may proceed by a site-specific mechanism. Images PMID:1332062

  17. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Encephalitis in Adults: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Michael J; Venkatesan, Arun

    2016-07-01

    Herpetic infections have plagued humanity for thousands of years, but only recently have advances in antiviral medications and supportive treatments equipped physicians to combat the most severe manifestations of disease. Prompt recognition and treatment can be life-saving in the care of patients with herpes simplex-1 virus encephalitis, the most commonly identified cause of sporadic encephalitis worldwide. Clinicians should be able to recognize the clinical signs and symptoms of the infection and familiarize themselves with a rational diagnostic approach and therapeutic modalities, as early recognition and treatment are key to improving outcomes. Clinicians should also be vigilant for the development of acute complications, including cerebral edema and status epilepticus, as well as chronic complications, including the development of autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies to the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and other neuronal cell surface and synaptic epitopes. Herein, we review the pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and clinical and radiological features of herpes simplex virus-1 encephalitis in adults, including a discussion of the most common complications and their treatment. While great progress has been made in the treatment of this life-threatening infection, a majority of patients will not return to their previous neurologic baseline, indicating the need for further research efforts aimed at improving the long-term sequelae.

  18. Herpes Simplex Type 2 Encephalitis After Craniotomy: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Assaf; Shahar, Tal; Margalit, Nevo

    2016-04-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) after neurosurgical procedures is extremely uncommon, and the few published case reports mainly described herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) as being culpable. We present a rare case of HSV-2 encephalitis after craniotomy and describe its pathophysiology and optimal management. A 70-year-old woman underwent an elective resection of a recurrent left sphenoid wing meningioma and clipping of a left middle cerebral artery aneurysm, the latter having been found incidentally. She returned to our department with clinical findings suggestive of meningitis 12 days after the operation. Her lack of response to empiric antibiotic treatment, taken together with the lymphocyte-predominant initial cerebrospinal fluid obtained by lumbar puncture and the electroencephalographic indications of encephalopathy, led to the suspicion of a diagnosis of HSE, which was later confirmed by a polymerase chain reaction test positive for HSV-2. The patient was then successfully treated with intravenous acyclovir for 2 weeks followed by another week of oral acyclovir treatment before being discharged. The present case stresses the importance of recognizing the relatively rare entity of HSE after craniotomy. Timely correct diagnosis will expedite the initiation of appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Severe acute disseminated encephalomyelitis with clinical findings of transverse myelitis after herpes simplex virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarioglu, Berrak; Kose, Seda Sirin; Saritas, Serdar; Kose, Engin; Kanik, Ali; Helvaci, Mehmet

    2014-11-01

    ADEM is a central nervous disease that leads to myelin damage as a result of autoimmune response that develops after infections or vaccination. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) infection rarely leads to ADEM. 25-month-old male due to urinary retention, paradoxical respiration and muscle weakness after herpetic gingivostomatitis diagnosed as transverse myelitis. In follow-up with cranial and spinal magnetic resonance imaging multiple lesions were demonstrated. Electroneuromyography findings were compatible with acute sensorimotor neuropathy, serum anti-GM2 antibodies and Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Type 1/2 IgM / IgG detected negative and positivite, respectively. With these findings he was diagnosed acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) following HSV infection. Although acyclovir, intravenous immunoglobulin, methylprednisolone and plasmapheresis therapies, he is still in intensive physical therapy program with heavy sequel. In our case, ADEM demonstrated transverse myelitis clinic after HSV infection which is rarely seen in literature. As well as clinic and spinal imaging findings, cranial imaging findings helped establishment of ADEM diagnosis. To our best knowledge, HSV is a rare etiological and probably the poor prognostic factor of ADEM. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. The Diagnosis of Genital Herpes – Beyond Culture: An Evidence-Based Guide for the Utilization of Polymerase Chain Reaction and Herpes Simplex Virus Type-Specific Serology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ratnam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate identification of persons with genital herpes is necessary for optimal patient management and prevention of transmission. Because of inherent inaccuracies, clinical diagnosis of genital herpes should be confirmed by laboratory testing for the causative agents herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and HSV type 2 (HSV-2. Further identification of the HSV type is valuable for counselling on the natural history of infection and risk of transmission. Laboratory methods include antigen detection, culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR and conventional and type-specific serology (TSS. PCR has, by far, the greater sensitivity and should be the test of choice for symptomatic cases. HSV-2 TSS is indicated for patients with genital lesions in whom antigen detection, culture or PCR fail to detect HSV, and for patients who are asymptomatic but have a history suggestive of genital herpes. HSV-2 TSS is further indicated for patients infected with HIV. HSV-2 TSS along with HSV-1 TSS may be considered, as appropriate, in evaluating infection and/or immune status in couples discordant for genital herpes, women who develop their first clinical episode of genital herpes during pregnancy, asymptomatic pregnant women whose partners have a history of genital herpes or HIV infection, and women contemplating pregnancy or considering sexual partnership with those with a history of genital herpes. The above should be performed in conjunction with counselling of infected persons and their sex partners.

  1. Disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection between black and white men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, Netochukwu; Rosenberg, Eli S; Luisi, Nicole; Sanchez, Travis; del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S; Kelley, Colleen F

    2015-09-01

    HIV disproportionately affects black men who have sex with men, and herpes simplex virus type 2 is known to increase acquisition of HIV. However, data on racial disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 prevalence and risk factors are limited among men who have sex with men in the United States. InvolveMENt was a cohort study of black and white HIV-negative men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA. Univariate and multivariate cross-sectional associations with herpes simplex virus type 2 seroprevalence were assessed among 455 HIV-negative men who have sex with men for demographic, behavioural and social determinant risk factors using logistic regression. Seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 was 23% (48/211) for black and 16% (38/244) for white men who have sex with men (p = 0.05). Education, poverty, drug/alcohol use, incarceration, circumcision, unprotected anal intercourse, and condom use were not associated with herpes simplex virus type 2. In multivariate analyses, black race for those ≤25 years, but not >25 years, and number of sexual partners were significantly associated. Young black men who have sex with men are disproportionately affected by herpes simplex virus type 2, which may contribute to disparities in HIV acquisition. An extensive assessment of risk factors did not explain this disparity in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection suggesting differences in susceptibility or partner characteristics. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. TLR3 deficiency renders astrocytes permissive to herpes simplex virus infection and facilitates establishment of CNS infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Harder, Louis Andreas; Holm, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) are highly prevalent neurotropic viruses. While they can replicate lytically in cells of the epithelial lineage, causing lesions on mucocutaneous surfaces, HSVs also establish latent infections in neurons, which act as reservoirs of virus for subsequent reactivation ...

  3. [F-18]FHPG positron emission tomography for detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV) in experimental HSV encephalitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buursma, AR; de Vries, EFJ; Garssen, J; Kegler, D; van Waarde, A; Schirm, J; Hospers, GAP; Mulder, NH; Vaalburg, W; Klein, HC

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is one of the most common causes of sporadic encephalitis. The initial clinical course of HSV encephalitis (HSE) is highly variable, and the infection may be rapidly fatal. For effective treatment with antiviral medication, an early diagnosis of HSE is crucial.

  4. Quantification of viral DNA and liver enzymes in plasma improves early diagnosis and management of herpes simplex virus hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F.C. Beersma (Thijs); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George); H.J. Metselaar (Herold); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); W.R. Berrington; G.J.J. van Doornum (Gerard)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHerpes simplex virus (HSV) hepatitis is a rare and potential life-threatening disease. The diagnosis of HSV hepatitis is hampered by its indifferent clinical presentation, which necessitates confirmatory laboratory data to identify HSV in the affected liver. However, liver biopsies are

  5. Herpes simplex virus type 1 and respiratory disease in critically-ill patients: Real pathogen or innocent bystander?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simoons-Smit, A. M.; Kraan, E. M.; Beishuizen, A.; Strack van Schijndel, R. J.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has been associated with pulmonary disease, mostly in severely immunocompromised patients. After reactivation and shedding in the oropharynx, the virus may reach the lower respiratory tract by aspiration or by contiguous spread. HSV-1 can be detected in clinical

  6. Herpes simplex virus type 2 induces rapid cell death and functional impairment of murine dendritic cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, CA; Fernandez, M; Herc, K; Bosnjak, L; Miranda-Saksena, M; Boadle, RA; Cunningham, A

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are critical for stimulation of naive T cells. Little is known about the effect of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection on DC structure or function or if the observed effects of HSV-1 on human DC are reproduced in murine DC. Here, we demonstrate that by 12 h

  7. TLR3 deficiency renders astrocytes permissive to herpes simplex virus infection and facilitates establishment of CNS infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Harder, Louis Andreas; Holm, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) are highly prevalent neurotropic viruses. While they can replicate lytically in cells of the epithelial lineage, causing lesions on mucocutaneous surfaces, HSVs also establish latent infections in neurons, which act as reservoirs of virus for subsequent reactivation...

  8. The morphogenesis of herpes simplex virus type 1 in infected parental mouse L fibroblasts and mutant gro29 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle Lone; Norrild, Bodil

    2003-01-01

    Mutants of cell lines and viruses are important biological tools. The pathway of herpesvirus particle maturation and egress are contentious issues. The mutant gro29 line of mouse L cells is defective for egress of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) virions, and a candidate for studies of virus...

  9. Detection of varicella-zoster virus and herpes simplex virus by the polymerase chain reaction with degenerate primers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.J.L.; Folkers, E.; Vreeswijk, J.

    1999-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) are human pathogens of significance involved in multiple diseases with either typical or atypical clinical features. In neonates and immunocompromised patients these alphaherpesviruses may cause life-threatening diseases such as

  10. Description of a nonlethal herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein D deletion mutant affecting a site frequently used for PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, P V; Jain, S; Wyatt, D; McCaughey, C; O'Neill, H J

    2000-03-01

    We report a herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant which failed to amplify with a commonly used glycoprotein D primer set. The virus contained a nine-base deletion in the gene's 5' nontranslated region. The altered amplicon was clearly distinguishable on a 4% high-resolution agarose gel.

  11. Description of a Nonlethal Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein D Deletion Mutant Affecting a Site Frequently Used for PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Coyle, P V; Jain, S; Wyatt, D; McCaughey, C.; O'Neill, H J

    2000-01-01

    We report a herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant which failed to amplify with a commonly used glycoprotein D primer set. The virus contained a nine-base deletion in the gene's 5′ nontranslated region. The altered amplicon was clearly distinguishable on a 4% high-resolution agarose gel.

  12. Dendritic cells mediate herpes simplex virus infection and transmission through the C-type lectin DC-SIGN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Marein A. W. P.; de Witte, Lot; Bolmstedt, Anders; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for the induction of specific immune responses against invading pathogens. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a common human pathogen that causes painful but mild infections of the skin and mucosa, and which results in latency and recurrent infections. Of the two HSV

  13. Atypical presentations of genital herpes simplex virus in HIV-1 and HIV-2 effectively treated by imiquimod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendry, Anna; Narayana, Srinivasulu; Browne, Rita

    2015-05-01

    Atypical presentations of genital herpes simplex virus have been described in HIV. We report two cases with hypertrophic presentations which were effectively treated with imiquimod, one of which is the first reported case occurring in a patient with HIV-2. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. Glycoprotein I of herpes simplex virus type 1 contains a unique polymorphic tandem-repeated mucin region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norberg, Peter; Olofsson, Sigvard; Tarp, Mads Agervig

    2007-01-01

    Glycoprotein I (gI) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) contains a tandem repeat (TR) region including the amino acids serine and threonine, residues that can be utilized for O-glycosylation. The length of this TR region was determined for 82 clinical HSV-1 isolates and the results revealed...

  15. A Strategy for O-Glycoproteomics of Enveloped Viruses-the O-Glycoproteome of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagdonaite, Ieva; Nordén, Rickard; Joshi, Hiren J

    2015-01-01

    present a novel proteome-wide discovery strategy for O-glycosylation sites on viral envelope proteins using herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) as a model. We identified 74 O-linked glycosylation sites on 8 out of the 12 HSV-1 envelope proteins. Two of the identified glycosites found in glycoprotein B...

  16. The challenges and opportunities for the development of a T-cell epitope-based herpes simplex vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-11-28

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) infections have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a billion individuals worldwide. HSV-1 infections are predominant than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries, their development has been difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One "common denominator" among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or a whole viral protein, which contain both "pathogenic symptomatic" and "protective asymptomatic" antigens and epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate developing "asymptomatic" epitope-based sub-unit vaccine strategies that selectively incorporate "protective asymptomatic" epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized by effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells (TEM cells) from "naturally" protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models of ocular and genital herpes. We review the role of animal models in herpes vaccine development and discuss their current status, challenges, and prospects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Future of an “Asymptomatic” T-cell Epitope-Based Therapeutic Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervillez, Xavier; Gottimukkala, Chetan; Kabbara, Khaled W.; Nguyen, Chelsea; Badakhshan, Tina; Kim, Sarah M.; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Summary Considering the limited success of the recent herpes clinical vaccine trial [1], new vaccine strategies are needed. Infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) in the majority of men and women are usually asymptomatic and results in lifelong viral latency in neurons of sensory ganglia (SG). However, in a minority of men and women HSV spontaneous reactivation can cause recurrent disease (i.e., symptomatic individuals). Our recent findings show that T cells from symptomatic and asymptomatic men and women (i.e. those with and without recurrences, respectively) recognize different herpes epitopes. This finding breaks new ground and opens new doors to assess a new vaccine strategy: mucosal immunization with HSV-1 & HSV-2 epitopes that induce strong in vitro CD4 and CD8 T cell responses from PBMC derived from asymptomatic men and women (designated here as “asymptomatic” protective epitopes”) could boost local and systemic “natural” protective immunity, induced by wild-type infection. Here we highlight the rationale and the future of our emerging “asymptomatic” T cell epitope-based mucosal vaccine strategy to decrease recurrent herpetic disease. PMID:22701511

  18. Diagnosis of genital herpes simplex virus infection in the clinical laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Since the type of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection affects prognosis and subsequent counseling, type-specific testing to distinguish HSV-1 from HSV-2 is always recommended. Although PCR has been the diagnostic standard method for HSV infections of the central nervous system, until now viral culture has been the test of choice for HSV genital infection. However, HSV PCR, with its consistently and substantially higher rate of HSV detection, could replace viral culture as the gold standard for the diagnosis of genital herpes in people with active mucocutaneous lesions, regardless of anatomic location or viral type. Alternatively, antigen detection—an immunofluorescence test or enzyme immunoassay from samples from symptomatic patients--could be employed, but HSV type determination is of importance. Type-specific serology based on glycoprotein G should be used for detecting asymptomatic individuals but widespread screening for HSV antibodies is not recommended. In conclusion, rapid and accurate laboratory diagnosis of HSV is now become a necessity, given the difficulty in making the clinical diagnosis of HSV, the growing worldwide prevalence of genital herpes and the availability of effective antiviral therapy. PMID:24885431

  19. Molecular diagnostics and newborns at risk for genital herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Caroline; Arnolds, Marin; Niklas, Victoria

    2015-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in the newborn carries a high mortality rate and can result in lifelong neurologic impairment. The severity of HSV infection in the newborn has always dictated conservative management when prodromal symptoms or active genital lesions (or those suggestive of genital herpes) are present during labor and delivery. The risk of intrapartum infection, however, is related to the presence or absence of maternal immunity (neutralizing antibody) to HSV. The most significant risk of transmission is in first-episode primary infections with active lesions at delivery. Recent recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics Committees on Infectious Diseases and the Fetus and Newborn use rapid serologic and virologic screening in the management of asymptomatic infants born to mothers with active genital herpes. The revised guidelines highlight infants at greatest risk for HSV disease but do not apply to asymptomatic infants born to mothers with a history of HSV but no genital lesions at delivery. The current guidelines also stipulate that maternal serologic screening and molecular assays for HSV in newborn blood and cerebrospinal fluid must be available and reported in a timely fashion. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. SEROEPIDEMIOLOGY OF TOXOPLASMA, RUBELLA, CYTOMEGALOVIRUS AND HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS -2 IN WOMEN WITH BAD OBSTETRIC HISTORY. PART II. CYTOMEGALOVIRUS AND HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulghani Mohamed Alsamarai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bad obstetric history (BOH is reported worldwide and is associated with social and psychological impacts. Cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus play an important role in the induction of adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Highest CMV IgG prevalence rate was reported for India (91.05%, while the lowest rate was reported for Iran (14.28%. Unfortunately, six studies in Iraq reported a high prevalence of CMV IgM in non-married, pregnant and women with BOH. The range of recent CMV infection in pregnant women with BOH was from 1.4% in Jordan to 60.2% in Iraq. In women with BOH, the highest HSV 2 prevalence (16.8% was noted in India, while the lowest rate (1.69% was reported in India also. In Arab countries, among women with BOH, HSV 2 IgG and IgM seroprevalence higher rates were reported for Iraq. This literature review highlights the high bacterial and viral maternal infection rate in the developing world. Urgent, concerted action is required to reduce the burden of these infections. In addition to raising awareness about the severity of the problem of maternal infections in the developing world, data from this review will be beneficial in guiding public health policy, research interests and donor funding towards achieving improvement in health care delivery.

  1. Herpes Simplex Virus Suppressive Therapy in Herpes Simplex Virus-2/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Coinfected Women Is Associated With Reduced Systemic CXCL10 But Not Genital Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen-Nissen, Erica; Chang, Joanne T; Thomas, Katherine K; Adams, Devin; Celum, Connie; Sanchez, Jorge; Coombs, Robert W; McElrath, M Juliana; Baeten, Jared M

    2016-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) may heighten immune activation and increase human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) replication, resulting in greater infectivity and faster HIV-1 disease progression. An 18-week randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial of 500 mg valacyclovir twice daily in 20 antiretroviral-naive women coinfected with HSV-2 and HIV-1 was conducted and HSV-2 suppression was found to significantly reduce both HSV-2 and HIV-1 viral loads both systemically and the endocervical compartment. To determine the effect of HSV-2 suppression on systemic and genital mucosal inflammation, plasma specimens, and endocervical swabs were collected weekly from volunteers in the trial and cryopreserved. Plasma was assessed for concentrations of 31 cytokines and chemokines; endocervical fluid was eluted from swabs and assayed for 14 cytokines and chemokines. Valacyclovir significantly reduced plasma CXCL10 but did not significantly alter other cytokine concentrations in either compartment. These data suggest genital tract inflammation in women persists despite HSV-2 suppression, supporting the lack of effect on transmission seen in large scale efficacy trials. Alternative therapies are needed to reduce persistent mucosal inflammation that may enhance transmission of HSV-2 and HIV-1.

  2. Risk factors for herpes simplex virus type 2 and HIV among women at high risk in northwestern Tanzania: preparing for an HSV-2 intervention trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watson-Jones, Deborah; Weiss, Helen A; Rusizoka, Mary; Baisley, Kathy; Mugeye, Kokugonza; Changalucha, John; Everett, Dean; Balira, Rebecca; Knight, Louise; Ross, David; Hayes, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    To determine prevalence of and risk factors for herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and HIV among women being screened for a randomized, controlled trial of HSV suppressive therapy in northwestern Tanzania...

  3. Association of Chlamydia trachomatis Infection and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Serostatus With Genital Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men: The HPV in Men Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberts, Catharina Johanna; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Papenfuss, Mary R.; da Silva, Roberto José Carvalho; Villa, Luisa Lina; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Nyitray, Alan G.; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Studies in women indicate that some sexually transmitted infections promote human papillomavirus (HPV) persistence and carcinogenesis. Little is known about this association in men; therefore, we assessed whether Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection and herpes simplex virus type 2

  4. An atypical case of herpes simplex virus endotheliitis presented as bullous keratopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Lamprini; Tsolkas, Georgios; Theodossiadis, Panagiotis; Papathanassiou, Miltiadis

    2013-12-01

    To present an atypical case of herpes simplex virus (HSV) endotheliitis. The authors report the case of a 62-year-old female patient who presented with unilateral diffuse corneal edema with Descemet's membrane folds and bullae, without keratic precipitates, iritis, significant anterior chamber reaction, or intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation. The patient had no documented positive history of ocular surgery and no abnormal findings were present in the fellow eye. Endotheliitis of viral origin was suspected and Goldmann-Witmer coefficient for HSV, cytomegalovirus, and varicela zoster virus was calculated. Goldmann-Witmer coefficient was positive for HSV. Treatment with oral valacyclovir and topical dexamethasone resulted in complete resolution of corneal edema within 1 week. HSV endotheliitis can present with bullous keratopathy as the only clinical manifestation, without typical findings such as keratic precipitates, iritis, and IOP elevation.

  5. Herpes Simplex Proctitis Mimicking Inflammatory Bowel Disease in a Teenaged Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen E. Sandgren

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 17-year-old male who was initially assessed for pain with defecation, bloody rectal discharge, and diarrhea, consistent with proctitis. Though proctitis is most commonly due to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, infectious etiologies must also be considered, including sexually transmitted causes of infectious proctitis. In discussion of his sexual history, he identified as homosexual and acknowledged engaging in receptive anal intercourse. Rectal biopsies obtained via colonoscopy were culture-positive for herpes simplex virus (HSV, leading to a diagnosis of HSV proctitis and treatment with an appropriate antiviral medication. HSV proctitis is more common in individuals with high-risk sexual practices, including men who have sex with men. While this may be an uncommon diagnosis for pediatricians to make in practice, a high clinical index of suspicion for sexually transmitted infectious proctitis in those with risk factors must be maintained in order to facilitate appropriate testing, treatment, and counseling of affected individuals.

  6. A unique presentation of acute liver failure from herpes simplex virus hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, C; Kebriaei, P; Turner, K A; Yemelyanova, A; Ariza-Heredia, E J; Foo, W C

    2016-08-01

    We present the case of a patient, with history of myelodysplastic syndrome and recent bone marrow transplant, who developed fulminant liver failure secondary to herpes simplex virus (HSV) hepatitis. His presentation was unique, as findings of liver microabscesses on computed tomography scan have not been described previously in this patient population. Despite initial treatment with acyclovir, he continued to deteriorate, and later sensitivities found the HSV strain to be resistant to acyclovir. HSV hepatitis with secondary liver failure is rare and, without appropriate treatment, its mortality is >80%. Early suspicion and immediate therapy are the keys to improve patient survival. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Tin oxide nanowires suppress herpes simplex virus-1 entry and cell-to-cell membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Trigilio

    Full Text Available The advent of nanotechnology has ushered in the use of modified nanoparticles as potential antiviral agents against diseases such as herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 (HSV-2, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, monkeypox virus, and hepatitis B virus. Here we describe the application of tin oxide (SnO(2 nanowires as an effective treatment against HSV-1 infection. SnO(2 nanowires work as a carrier of negatively charged structures that compete with HSV-1 attachment to cell bound heparan sulfate (HS, therefore inhibiting entry and subsequent cell-to-cell spread. This promising new approach can be developed into a novel form of broad-spectrum antiviral therapy especially since HS has been shown to serve as a cellular co-receptor for a number of other viruses as well, including the respiratory syncytial virus, adeno-associated virus type 2, and human papilloma virus.

  8. Ultrastructural studies on the replication of herpes simplex virus in PK and XTC-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampor, F; Szántó, J

    1982-01-01

    Ultrastructural changes showed the following characteristics of restricted replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV 1) strains MA and HSZP in PK and XTC-2 cells: 1) minimal cytopathic changes in PK cells as compared to more pronounced alterations in XTC-2 cells; 2) formation of single nucleocapsids or their absence in the nuclei of PK cells infected with the HSZP strain; 3) lack of budding and envelopment and absence of reduplication of the nuclear membrane; 4) persistence of partially uncoated virions within the endocytic vacuoles in the cytoplasm of PK cells; and 5) formation of dense inclusion bodies in addition to the presence of defective virions in the cytoplasm of XTC-2 cells and vacuolation of their cytoplasmic membranes. The replication of HSV 1 in PK and XTC-2 cells seemed to be blocked at both early and late stages of virus replication. At low multiplicity of infection, no virus particles were formed.

  9. Asymptomatic Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in Iranian Mothers and Their Newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Ahmad; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Mollaei, Hamidreza; Abedi-Kiasari, Bahman; Fallah, Fatemeh Hoda; Mortazavi, Helya Sadat

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to determine the prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection among pregnant women as well as congenital infection of their newborns in Tehran. One hundred samples of blood sera from pregnant women were analyzed for the presence of HSV specific antibodies. Umbilical cord blood samples from the newborns were analyzed for the presence of HSV DNA using real-time PCR. HSV IgG and IgM antibodies were found in 97% and 2% of pregnant women, respectively. Of all the 100 cord blood samples, 6 were positive for HSV DNA in which 2 cases were from mothers who had detectable IgM. It was notable that all corresponding mothers of six HSV positive infants had detectable IgG antibodies in their sera. It was demonstrated that the presence of HSV DNA in cord blood of newborns could be a risk marker for maternal-fetal transmission of the virus in asymptomatic pregnant women.

  10. In vitro virucidal activity of a styrylpyrone derivative against herpes simplex virus strain KOS-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Micheal; Nor, Norefrina Shafinaz Md.; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2014-09-01

    In this study, styrylpyrone derivative (SPD) extracted from Goniothalamus umbrosus root was tested against herpes simplex virus (HSV) strain KOS-1. Firstly, the cytotoxicity of SPD on Vero cells was tested and the value of cytotoxic concentration, CC50, was 44 μM (8.88 μg/mL), and the 50% Effective Concentration, EC50, was 3.35 μM (0.67 μg/mL). Selectivity index of SPD against HSV Kos-1 was more than 13 indicating potential as antiviral agent. Three treatments were used in the antiviral test; 1) post-treatment, 2) pre-treatment, and 3) virucidal. The results revealed that the post-treatment was more effective in inhibiting viral replication compared to pre-treatment. The findings indicated that the SPD from G. umbrosus has good potential for prospective nature-based antiviral drug.

  11. Recombination Promoted by DNA Viruses: Phage λ to Herpes Simplex Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Sandra K.; Sawitzke, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore recombination strategies in DNA viruses. Homologous recombination is a universal genetic process that plays multiple roles in the biology of all organisms, including viruses. Recombination and DNA replication are interconnected, with recombination being essential for repairing DNA damage and supporting replication of the viral genome. Recombination also creates genetic diversity, and viral recombination mechanisms have important implications for understanding viral origins as well as the dynamic nature of viral-host interactions. Both bacteriophage λ and herpes simplex virus (HSV) display high rates of recombination, both utilizing their own proteins and commandeering cellular proteins to promote recombination reactions. We focus primarily on λ and HSV, as they have proven amenable to both genetic and biochemical analysis and have recently been shown to exhibit some surprising similarities that will guide future studies. PMID:25002096

  12. TLR3 Mutations in Adult Patients With Herpes Simplex Virus and Varicella-Zoster Virus Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Manuela; Peri, Anna Maria; Cagliani, Rachele; Forni, Diego; Riva, Stefania; Biasin, Mara; Clerici, Mario; Gori, Andrea

    2017-05-01

    Defects in genes of the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) pathway are associated with susceptibility to herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis (HSE). We analyzed a cohort of 11 adult Italian patients in whom viral encephalitis developed. We detected 2 rare missense mutations in TLR3: 1 in a patient with HSE (p.Leu297Val) and 1 in a patient with varicella-zoster virus encephalitis (p.Leu199Phe). Both mutations are extremely rare in human populations and have pathogenicity scores highly suggestive of a functional effect. Data herein expand the phenotypic spectrum of TLR3 mutations to varicella-zoster virus encephalitis and support the role of TLR3 genetic defects as risk factors for HSE in adults. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Herpes simplex virus infection in burned patients: epidemiology of 11 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdarias, B; Perro, G; Cutillas, M; Castede, J C; Lafon, M E; Sanchez, R

    1996-06-01

    Burned patients suffer significant immunosuppression during the first 3 or 4 weeks after hospitalization. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are commonly seen in immunosuppressed patients and may account for considerable morbidity and some mortality. We studied retrospectively 11 patients with severe burn injury who became infected with HSV. We determined the prevalence of viral infection in this group of patients. Serological testing and viral culture was used to diagnose HSV infection. No general complications appeared in these 11 patients in association with HSV but two patients died of multiorgan failure. Locally, areas of active epidermal regeneration were most commonly affected. Acyclovir therapy was not used and the duration of hospitalization was normal in these 11 patients.

  14. Herpes Simplex epithelial keratitis associated with daily disposable contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamroush, Ahmed; Welch, James

    2014-06-01

    To report a case of epithelial Herpes Simplex keratitis in a patient wearing daily disposable contact lenses. Case report. A 30-year-old female contact lens wearer presented to the emergency clinic with a painful, red left eye associated with an acute reduction of vision over 48 h. On examination, confluent dendritic ulcers were present on the cornea. Neither pertinent ocular nor medical history was obtained to explain such a dramatic clinical presentation. Contact lens wear was the only risk factor identified, perhaps resulting in deviation of the immune response at the ocular surface, with consequent extensive dendritic ulceration. Copyright © 2013 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ocular herpes simplex virus: how are latency, reactivation, recurrent disease and therapy interrelated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dujaili, Lena J; Clerkin, Patrick P; Clement, Christian; McFerrin, Harris E; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Varnell, Emily D; Kaufman, Herbert E; Hill, James M

    2012-01-01

    Most humans are infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 in early childhood and remain latently infected throughout life. While most individuals have mild or no symptoms, some will develop destructive HSV keratitis. Ocular infection with HSV-1 and its associated sequelae account for the majority of corneal blindness in industrialized nations. Neuronal latency in the peripheral ganglia is established when transcription of the viral genome is repressed (silenced) except for the latency-associated transcripts and microRNAs. The functions of latency-associated transcripts have been investigated since 1987. Roles have been suggested relating to reactivation, establishment of latency, neuronal protection, antiapoptosis, apoptosis, virulence and asymptomatic shedding. Here, we review HSV-1 latent infections, reactivation, recurrent disease and antiviral therapies for the ocular HSV diseases. PMID:21861620

  16. Epilepsy surgery for epileptic encephalopathy as a sequela of herpes simplex encephalitis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Birce Dilge; Tanji, Kurenai; Feldstein, Neil A; McSwiggan-Hardin, Maureen; Akman, Cigdem I

    2017-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis can manifest with different clinical presentations, including acute monophasic illness and biphasic chronic granulomatous HSV encephalitis. Chronic encephalitis is much less common, and very rare late relapses are associated with intractable epilepsy and progressive neurological deficits with or without evidence of HSV in the cerebrospinal fluid. The authors report on an 8-year-old girl with a history of treated HSV-1 encephalitis when she was 13 months of age and focal epilepsy when she was 2 years old. Although free of clinical seizures, when she was 5, she experienced behavioral and academic dysfunction, which was later attributed to electrographic focal seizures and worsening electroencephalography (EEG) findings with electrical status epilepticus during slow-wave sleep (ESES). Following a right temporal lobectomy, chronic granulomatous encephalitis was diagnosed. The patient's clinical course improved with the resolution of seizures and EEG abnormalities.

  17. Acute and prolonged complement activation in the central nervous system during herpes simplex encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Charlotta E; Studahl, Marie; Bergström, Tomas

    2016-06-15

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is characterized by a pronounced inflammatory activity in the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we investigated the acute and prolonged complement system activity in HSE patients, by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for numerous complement components (C). We found increased cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of C3a, C3b, C5 and C5a in HSE patients compared with healthy controls. C3a and C5a concentrations remained increased also compared with patient controls. Our results conclude that the complement system is activated in CNS during HSE in the acute phase, and interestingly also in later stages supporting previous reports of prolonged inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Case of herpes simplex encephalitis without neurologic symptoms. A comparison between CT scan and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawabata, N.; Tanaka, T.; Hiramoto, N.; Takazuka, K.; Komatsu, T.

    1987-03-01

    The lack of neurologic symptoms is rare in herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). A 42-year-old woman presented with psychiatric features alone, such as Korsakoff syndrome and abortive type Kluver-Bucy syndrome. The diagnosis of HSE was confirmed by serologically elevated antibody titer. The patient underwent both X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). X-ray computed tomography showed transient contrast enhancement and low density area confined to the lateral lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse areas with a high MRI signal intensity. Considering that the lack of neurologic features, as seen in the present HSE patient, may sometimes rule out the possibility of parenchymal disease, imaging modalities, especially MRI, may be of value in the detection of lesions for HSE.

  19. Electroencephalographic and computed X-ray tomographic findings in 99 Japanese cases of herpes simplex encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Satoshi; Takasu, Toshiaki; Tamura, Masato; Otani, Sugishi.

    1988-10-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of electroencephalograms (EEG) and computed tomograms (CT) obtained from 99 Japanese patients with herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). Abnormal findings of EEG were seen in 89 patients (99 %). Focal abnormality, which was frequently detected in the first EEG recording, was seen in 68 patients (76 %). Periodic synchronous discharge was observed in 25 patients (28 %). There were abnormal findings on CT in 88 patients (81 %). Low and high density areas were seen in 64 patients (73 %) and 26 patients (37 %), respectively, with the most frequent site being the temporal lobe. Mass effect was demonstrated in 33 patients (37 %). Electroencephalography detected the abnormal findings earlier than CT during the early stage of HSE in many instances. There was concordance between EEG and CT in the detection of HSE lesions in 45 patients (58 %). (Namekawa, K.).

  20. The relationship of graft survival and herpes simplex virus latency in recipient corneal buttons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Aydemir

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Orhan Aydemir1, Peykan Türkçüoglu1, Yasemin Bulut2, Ahmet Kalkan31Firat University School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, Elazig, Turkey; 2Firat University School of Medicine, Department of Microbiology, Elazig, Turkey; 3Firat University School of Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases, Elazig, TurkeyPurpose: To demonstrate relationship between herpes simplex virus (HSV corneal latency and graft survival.Methods: Prospective case control study. 28 recipient corneal buttons and donor cornea-scleral remnants were examined for HSV DNA with polymerase chain reaction (PCR. None of the recipient had a history of HSV infection. Serum samples of graft recipients were analyzed for the presence of anti-HSV IgG and IgM with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. All corneas were free of stromal scarring or epithelial defect before sampling and had an endothelial cell density of >2000 cells/mm2.Results: In twenty three patients (82% anti-HSV IgG was detected in serum. In none of the recipients anti-HSV IgM was positive. HSV DNA was positive in six out of twenty eight (21% of the recipient corneal buttons and none of the donor cornea-scleral remnants. In eighteen months follow-up period three out of six (50% HSV DNA positive and one out of twenty-two (4.5% HSV DNA negative patients experienced late endothelial failure that was statistically significantly different (p = 0.022. Conclusion: Even without a history of HSV keratitis, presence of latent HSV virus in recipient cornea is an important risk factor for subsequent graft survival.Keywords: herpes simplex virus, polymerase chain reaction, corneal latency, corneal graft survival

  1. [Multilayer amniotic membrane transplantation for treatment of necrotizing herpes simplex stromal keratitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei-yun; Chen, Min; Wang, Fu-hua; Zhao, Jing; Ma, Lin; Xie, Li-xin

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of multilayer amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) combined with antivirus and corticosteroid drug to treat necrotizing herpes simplex stromal keratitis. Thirteen patients (13 eyes) of necrotizing stromal keratitis were referred to Shandong Eye Institute and Qingdao Eye Hospital between January 2003 and April 2004. The course of disease was 3 - 22 months (mean 15 months). Corneal inflammation persisted and corneal ulcer progressed despite topical and systemic antiviral treatment for over 1 weeks. Multilayer amniotic membrane transplantation was performed after excluding of bacterial and fungal infection by microbiologic studies including smears and cultures of necrotic corneal tissue and confocal microscope. Topical and systemic antiviral medications were given with adjuvant corticosteroid eyedrops postoperatively. We investigated the healing of corneal ulcer and improvement of stromal edema with slit lamp biomicroscope, the integrity of corneal defect with fluorescein staining, the migration of healthy corneal epithelial cells and transformation of amniotic membrane with confocal microscopy. All patients were followed up for 3 - 13 months (mean 10 months). Corneal ulcer healed within 1 - 3 weeks postoperatively with negative fluorescein staining. Corneal stromal edema faded away within 1 month. Superficial amniotic membrane patches dissolved or shed on postoperative day 7 - 10, while the deeper grafts were adhered into the ulcer and fused with the surrounding fibroblasts. One of these grafts remained in situ more than 3 months. Confocal microscope examination indicated flat epithelial progenitor cells on the surface of residual amniotic membrane. Corneal transparence was achieved in 7 eyes, macula in 4 eyes and leucoma in 2 eyes 3 months after the operation. No recurrence of necrotizing stromal keratitis was occurred in 13 patients during the follow-up period. Multilayer AMT combined with antivirus and corticosteroid treatment is an

  2. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis: Lack of Clinical Benefit of Long-term Valacyclovir Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnann, John W; Sköldenberg, Birgit; Hart, John; Aurelius, Elisabeth; Schliamser, Silvia; Studahl, Marie; Eriksson, Britt-Marie; Hanley, Daniel; Aoki, Fred; Jackson, Alan C; Griffiths, Paul; Miedzinski, Lil; Hanfelt-Goade, Diane; Hinthorn, Daniel; Ahlm, Clas; Aksamit, Allen; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Dale, Ilet; Cloud, Gretchen; Jester, Penelope; Whitley, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Despite the proven efficacy of acyclovir (ACV) therapy, herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) continues to cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Among patients with HSE treated with ACV, the mortality rate is approximately 14%-19%. Among survivors, 45%-60% have neuropsychological sequelae at 1 year. Thus, improving therapeutic approaches to HSE remains a high priority. Following completion of a standard course of intravenous ACV, 87 adult patients with HSE (confirmed by positive polymerase chain reaction [PCR] for herpes simplex virus DNA in cerebrospinal fluid) were randomized to receive either valacyclovir (VACV) 2 g thrice daily (n = 40) or placebo tablets (n = 47) for 90 days (12 tablets of study medication daily). The primary endpoint was survival with no or mild neuropsychological impairment at 12 months, as measured by the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS). Logistic regression was utilized to assess factors related to the primary endpoint. The demographic characteristics of the 2 randomization groups were statistically similar with no significant differences in age, sex, or race. At 12 months, there was no significant difference in the MDRS scoring for VACV-treated vs placebo recipients, with 85.7% and 90.2%, respectively, of patients demonstrating no or mild neuropsychological impairment (P = .72). No significant study-related adverse events were encountered in either treatment group. Following standard treatment with intravenous ACV for PCR-confirmed HSE, an additional 3-month course of oral VACV therapy did not provide added benefit as measured by neuropsychological testing 12 months later in a population of relatively high-functioning survivors. NCT00031486. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Evaluation of the HerpeSelect Express rapid test in the detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 antibodies in patients with genital ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shobaili, Hani; Hassanein, Khaled M; Mostafa, Marwa Salah; Al Duways, Ali Saleh

    2015-01-01

    A rapid point-of-care test with high sensitivity and specificity is required in order to fulfill the need for early detection and screening of Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection among patients with genital ulcer disease (GUD), for better management and control of virus transmission. The goal of this study is to evaluate the performance of the commercially available HerpeSelect Express rapid test in comparison with three ELISA assays: HerpeSelect ELISA, Kalon HSV-2 glycoprotein G2 assay, and monoclonal antibody blocking enzyme immunoassay, which was used as the gold standard for the detection of HSV-2 antibodies. This study showed high sensitivity (ranging from 82.6 to 100%) and specificity (100%) of the HerpeSelect Express rapid test when compared to the three ELISA assays. The agreement between the HerpeSelect Express rapid test with the three ELISAs ranged from 93.3 to 100%. The HerpeSelect Express rapid test has adequate sensitivity and specificity for confirming HSV-2 infection in patients with GUD, indicating its suitability for epidemiological studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Expression of IFN-Inducible Genes with Antiviral Function OAS1 and MX1 in Health and under Conditions of Recurrent Herpes Simplex Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaulov, A V; Shulzhenko, A E; Karsonova, A V

    2017-07-01

    We studied the expression of IFN-inducible genes OAS1 and Mx1 in lysates of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients suffering from recurrent Herpes simplex infections in comparison with healthy people. To induce the expression of the studied genes, blood mononuclears were incubated with recombinant IFN-α2b in concentrations of 1, 10, and 100 U/ml for 3 h and then the content of the studied transcripts was evaluated. Relative expression of OAS1 and Mx1 in patients with recurrent forms of Herpes simplex both during the acute stage and clinical remission did not differ significantly from that in healthy people after stimulation with IFN-α2b in a concentration of 1 U/ml and in higher concentrations (10 and 100 U/ml). It was concluded that intracellular signal transduction in IFN-α-activated cells in vitro was not disturbed in patients with recurrent forms of Herpes simplex infection. Thus, the reported phenomenon of IFN-signalling distortion by Herpes simplex virus proteins observed in experiments on model cell lines infected with Herpes simplex virus was not confirmed in our experiments on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with Herpes simplex infection.

  5. Severe herpes simplex virus type-I infections after dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hayderi, Lara; Raty, Laurent; Failla, Valerie; Caucanas, Marie; Paurobally, Dilshad; Nikkels, Arjen F

    2011-01-01

    Recurrences of herpes labialis (RHL) may be triggered by systemic factors, including stress, menses, and fever. Local stimuli, such as lip injury or sunlight exposure are also associated to RHL. Dental extraction has also been reported as triggering event. Seven otherwise healthy patients are presented with severe and extensive RHL occurring about 2-3 days after dental extraction under local anaesthesia. Immunohistochemistry on smears and immunofluorescence on cell culture identified herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-I). Five patients reported more severe prodromal signs than usual. Although all the patients suffered from RHL, none had previously experienced RHL after dental care. Two patients required hospitalisation for intravenous acyclovir therapy, whereas the others were successfully treated with oral valaciclovir or acyclovir. Severe and extensive RHL can occur soon after dental extraction under local anaesthesia. Patients with a previous history of RHL seem to be at higher risk. It is not clear whether RHL is linked to the procedure itself, to the anaesthetic procedure or both. As the incidence is unknown, more studies are required to recommend prophylactic antiviral treatment in RHL patients who are undergoing extractions. Dentists should be aware of this potentially severe post-extraction complication.

  6. Computational sensing of herpes simplex virus using a cost-effective on-chip microscope

    KAUST Repository

    Ray, Aniruddha

    2017-07-03

    Caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV), herpes is a viral infection that is one of the most widespread diseases worldwide. Here we present a computational sensing technique for specific detection of HSV using both viral immuno-specificity and the physical size range of the viruses. This label-free approach involves a compact and cost-effective holographic on-chip microscope and a surface-functionalized glass substrate prepared to specifically capture the target viruses. To enhance the optical signatures of individual viruses and increase their signal-to-noise ratio, self-assembled polyethylene glycol based nanolenses are rapidly formed around each virus particle captured on the substrate using a portable interface. Holographic shadows of specifically captured viruses that are surrounded by these self-assembled nanolenses are then reconstructed, and the phase image is used for automated quantification of the size of each particle within our large field-of-view, ~30 mm2. The combination of viral immuno-specificity due to surface functionalization and the physical size measurements enabled by holographic imaging is used to sensitively detect and enumerate HSV particles using our compact and cost-effective platform. This computational sensing technique can find numerous uses in global health related applications in resource-limited environments.

  7. Herpes simplex and varicella zoster CNS infections: clinical presentations, treatments and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewpoowat, Quanhathai; Salazar, Lucrecia; Aguilera, Elizabeth; Wootton, Susan H; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    To describe the clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics, imaging studies and prognostic factors of adverse clinical outcomes (ACO) among adults with herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella zoster virus (VZV) CNS infections. Retrospective review of adult patients with positive HSV or VZV polymerase chain reaction on CSF from an observational study of meningitis or encephalitis in Houston, TX (2004-2014), and New Orleans, LA (1999-2008). Ninety-eight adults patients were identified; 25 had encephalitis [20 (20.4 %) HSV, 5 (5.1 %) VZV], and 73 had meningitis [60 (61.1 %) HSV and 13 (13.3 %) VZV]. HSV and VZV had similar presentations except for nausea (P 1 and an encephalitis presentation were independently associated with an ACO. The treatment for HSV meningitis was variable, and all patients had a good clinical outcome. Alpha herpes CNS infections due to HSV and VZV infections have similar clinical and laboratory manifestations. ACO was observed more frequently in those patients with comorbidities and an encephalitis presentation.

  8. Persistent genital herpes simplex virus-2 shedding years following the first clinical episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Warren; Saracino, Misty; Magaret, Amalia; Selke, Stacy; Remington, Mike; Huang, Meei-Li; Warren, Terri; Casper, Corey; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna

    2011-01-15

    Patients with newly acquired genital herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) infection have virus frequently detected at the genital mucosa. Rates of genital shedding initially decrease over time after infection, but data on long-term viral shedding are lacking. For this study, 377 healthy adults with history of symptomatic genital HSV-2 infection collected anogenital swabs for HSV-2 DNA polymerase chain reaction for at least 30 consecutive days. Time since first genital herpes episode was significantly associated with reduced genital shedding. Total HSV shedding occurred on 33.6% of days in participants <1 year, 20.6% in those 1-9 years, and 16.7% in those ≥10 years from first episode. Subclinical HSV shedding occurred on 26.2% of days among participants <1 year, 13.1% in those 1-9 years, and 9.3% in those ≥10 years from first episode. On days with HSV detection, mean quantity was 4.9 log₁₀ copies/mL for those <1 year, 4.7 log₁₀ copies/mL among those 1-9 years, and 4.6 log₁₀ copies/mL among those ≥10 years since first episode. Rates of total and subclinical HSV-2 shedding decrease after the first year following the initial clinical episode. However, viral shedding persists at high rates and copy numbers years after infection, and therefore may pose continued risk of HSV-2 transmission to sexual partners.

  9. Overlapping reactivations of herpes simplex virus type 2 in the genital and perianal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Sunitha; Johnston, Christine; Huang, Meei-Li; Selke, Stacy; Magaret, Amalia; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna

    2010-02-15

    Genital shedding of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 occurs frequently. Anatomic patterns of genital HSV-2 reactivation have not been intensively studied. Four HSV-2-seropositive women with symptomatic genital herpes attended a clinic daily during a 30-day period. Daily samples were collected from 7 separate genital sites. Swab samples were assayed for HSV DNA by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Anatomic sites of clinical HSV-2 recurrences were recorded. HSV was detected on 44 (37%) of 120 days and from 136 (16%) of 840 swab samples. Lesions were documented on 35 (29%) of 120 days. HSV was detected at >1 anatomic site on 25 (57%) of 44 days with HSV shedding (median, 2 sites; range, 1-7), with HSV detected bilaterally on 20 (80%) of the 25 days. The presence of a lesion was significantly associated with detectable HSV from any genital site (incident rate ratio [IRR], 5.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-23.50; P= .02) and with the number of positive sites (IRR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1. 01-1.40; P=.03). The maximum HSV copy number detected was associated with the number of positive sites (IRR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.44-1.82; Pgenital tract. To prevent HSV-2 reactivation, suppressive HSV-2 therapy must control simultaneous viral reactivations from multiple sacral ganglia.

  10. Therapeutic Vaccine for Genital Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Infection: Findings From a Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, David I; Wald, Anna; Warren, Terri; Fife, Kenneth; Tyring, Stephen; Lee, Patricia; Van Wagoner, Nick; Magaret, Amalia; Flechtner, Jessica B; Tasker, Sybil; Chan, Jason; Morris, Amy; Hetherington, Seth

    2017-03-15

    Genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection causes recurrent lesions and frequent viral shedding. GEN-003 is a candidate therapeutic vaccine containing HSV-2 gD2∆TMR and ICP4.2, and Matrix-M2 adjuvant. Persons with genital herpes were randomized into 3 dose cohorts to receive 3 intramuscular doses 21 days apart of 10 µg, 30 µg, or 100 µg of GEN-003, antigens without adjuvant, or placebo. Participants obtained genital swab specimens twice daily for HSV-2 detection and monitored genital lesions for 28-day periods at baseline and at intervals after the last dose. One hundred and thirty-four persons received all 3 doses. Reactogenicity was associated with adjuvant but not with antigen dose or dose number. No serious adverse events were attributed to GEN-003. Compared with baseline, genital HSV-2 shedding rates immediately after dosing were reduced with GEN-003 (from 13.4% to 6.4% for 30 μg [P < .001] and from 15.0% to 10.3% for 100 µg [P < .001]). Lesion rates were also significantly (P < .01) reduced immediately following immunization with 30 µg or 100 µg of GEN-003. GEN-003 elicited increases in antigen binding, virus neutralizing antibody, and T-cell responses. GEN-003 had an acceptable safety profile and stimulated humoral and cellular immune responses. GEN-003 at doses of 30 µg and 100 µg reduced genital HSV shedding and lesion rates. NCT01667341 (funded by Genocea).

  11. Relay of herpes simplex virus between Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism by which immunity to Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV is initiated is not completely defined. HSV initially infects mucosal epidermis prior to entering nerve endings. In mice, epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs are the first dendritic cells (DCs to encounter HSV, but it is CD103(+ dermal DCs that carry viral antigen to lymph nodes for antigen presentation, suggesting DC cross-talk in skin. In this study, we compared topically HSV-1 infected human foreskin explants with biopsies of initial human genital herpes lesions to show LCs are initially infected then emigrate into the dermis. Here, LCs bearing markers of maturation and apoptosis formed large cell clusters with BDCA3(+ dermal DCs (thought to be equivalent to murine CD103(+ dermal DCs and DC-SIGN(+ DCs/macrophages. HSV-expressing LC fragments were observed inside the dermal DCs/macrophages and the BDCA3(+ dermal DCs had up-regulated a damaged cell uptake receptor CLEC9A. No other infected epidermal cells interacted with dermal DCs. Correspondingly, LCs isolated from human skin and infected with HSV-1 in vitro also underwent apoptosis and were taken up by similarly isolated BDCA3(+ dermal DCs and DC-SIGN(+ cells. Thus, we conclude a viral antigen relay takes place where HSV infected LCs undergo apoptosis and are taken up by dermal DCs for subsequent antigen presentation. This provides a rationale for targeting these cells with mucosal or perhaps intradermal HSV immunization.

  12. Characterization of Neuronal Populations in the Human Trigeminal Ganglion and Their Association with Latent Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Flowerdew, Sarah E.; Desiree Wick; Susanne Himmelein; Anja K E Horn; Inga Sinicina; Michael Strupp; Thomas Brandt; Diethilde Theil; Katharina Hüfner

    2013-01-01

    Following primary infection Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) establishes lifelong latency in the neurons of human sensory ganglia. Upon reactivation HSV-1 can cause neurological diseases such as facial palsy, vestibular neuritis or encephalitis. Certain populations of sensory neurons have been shown to be more susceptible to latent infection in the animal model, but this has not been addressed in human tissue. In the present study, trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons expressing six neuronal marker...

  13. Herpes simplex virus 1 recombinants with noninverting genomes frozen in different isomeric arrangements are capable of independent replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, F J; Roizman, B

    1986-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 genome consists of two covalently linked components, L and S, that invert relative to each other to yield four equimolar isomeric populations designated P (prototype), Is (inversion of S component), Il (inversion of L component), and Ils (inversion of L and S components) differing in the orientation of the two components. Previous studies have yielded recombinant genomes frozen in the P isomeric arrangement, reinforcing suggestions that the four isomers may not be funct...

  14. Herpes simplex encephalitis presenting as stroke-like symptoms with atypical MRI findings and lacking cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboguchi, Shintaro; Wakasugi, Takahiro; Umeda, Yoshitaka; Umeda, Maiko; Oyake, Mutsuo; Fujita, Nobuya

    2017-07-29

    A 73-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of right hemiparesis and was diagnosed as having cerebral infarction on the basis of diffusion-weighted brain MRI, which demonstrated lesions in the left parietal cortex. On the 3rd day, the patient developed right upper limb myoclonus, aphasia, and disturbance of consciousness with high fever. On the 6th day, she was transferred to our hospital with suspected viral encephalitis, and treatment with acyclovir was started. By the 6th day, the lesions detected by MRI had expanded to the gyrus cinguli, insula and thalamus, but not to the temporal lobe. At that time, the CSF cell count was 8/μl, and this later increased to 17/μl by the 13th day. Although herpes simplex virus DNA was detected in the CSF on the 6th day, there was no evidence of CSF pleocytosis or temporal lobe abnormalities demonstrable by brain MRI throughout the whole follow-up period. This was very atypical case of herpes simplex encephalitis characterized by a stroke-like episode, atypical MRI findings, and absence of cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis. It is important to be mindful that herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) can have an atypical presentation, and that sufficient acyclovir treatment should be initiated until HSE can be ruled out.

  15. Rapid detection of herpes simplex virus in clinical specimens with human embryonic lung fibroblast and primary rabbit kidney cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callihan, D R; Menegus, M A

    1984-04-01

    The performance of a culture system for isolation of herpes simplex virus, consisting of one tube each of human embryonic lung fibroblasts and primary rabbit kidney cells, was evaluated. Cultures were incubated at 37 degrees C on a roller drum and observed daily for characteristic cytopathic effect for 5 days. During 1982, a positive isolation rate of 28.1% was seen among 3,154 specimens submitted. Cultures from genital sources were positive more frequently from males (43.8%) than from females (25.5%). Oral lesion cultures were positive as often from males (34.6%) as from females (38.4%). Although detection of herpes simplex virus occurred significantly earlier in rabbit kidney cells on days 1 and 2 of incubation, by day 3 the number of positive cultures was nearly the same in both cell types. By day 4 of incubation, 99.5% of the positive cultures were detected. These results demonstrate that cell culture can be a rapid and sensitive method for detecting herpes simplex virus.

  16. The Telomerase Inhibitor MST-312 Interferes with Multiple Steps in the Herpes Simplex Virus Life Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberichter, Jarod; Roberts, Scott; Abbasi, Imran; Dedthanou, Phonphanh; Pradhan, Prajakta; Nguyen, Marie L

    2015-10-01

    The life cycle of herpes simplex virus (HSV) has the potential to be further manipulated to yield novel, more effective therapeutic treatments. Recent research has demonstrated that HSV-1 can increase telomerase activity and that expression of the catalytic component of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), alters sensitivity to HSV-dependent apoptosis. Telomerase is a cellular enzyme that synthesizes nucleotide repeats at the ends of chromosomes (telomeres), which prevents shortening of the 3' ends of DNA with each cell division. Once telomeres reach a critical length, cells undergo senescence and apoptosis. Here, we used a cell-permeable, reversible inhibitor of the telomerase enzyme, MST-312, to investigate telomerase activity during HSV infection. Human mammary epithelial cells immortalized through TERT expression and human carcinoma HEp-2 cells were infected with the KOS1.1 strain of HSV-1 in the presence of MST-312. MST-312 treatment reduced the number of cells displaying a cytopathic effect and the accumulation of immediate early and late viral proteins. Moreover, the presence of 20 μM to 100 μM MST-312 during infection led to a 2.5- to 5.5-log10 decrease in viral titers. MST-312 also inhibited the replication of HSV-2 and a recent clinical isolate of HSV-1. Additionally, we determined that MST-312 has the largest impact on viral events that take place prior to 5 h postinfection (hpi). Furthermore, MST-312 treatment inhibited virus replication, as measured by adsorption assays and quantification of genome replication. Together, these findings demonstrate that MST-312 interferes with the HSV life cycle. Further investigation into the mechanism for MST-312 is warranted and may provide novel targets for HSV therapies. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can lead to cold sores, blindness, and brain damage. Identification of host factors that are important for the virus life cycle may provide novel targets for HSV antivirals. One such factor

  17. Quantitative Evaluation of Protein Heterogeneity within Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bilali, Nabil; Duron, Johanne; Gingras, Diane; Lippé, Roger

    2017-05-15

    Several virulence genes have been identified thus far in the herpes simplex virus 1 genome. It is also generally accepted that protein heterogeneity among virions further impacts viral fitness. However, linking this variability directly with infectivity has been challenging at the individual viral particle level. To address this issue, we resorted to flow cytometry (flow virometry), a powerful approach we recently employed to analyze individual viral particles, to identify which tegument proteins vary and directly address if such variability is biologically relevant. We found that the stoichiometry of the U L 37, ICP0, and VP11/12 tegument proteins in virions is more stable than the VP16 and VP22 tegument proteins, which varied significantly among viral particles. Most interestingly, viruses sorted for their high VP16 or VP22 content yielded modest but reproducible increases in infectivity compared to their corresponding counterparts containing low VP16 or VP22 content. These findings were corroborated for VP16 in short interfering RNA experiments but proved intriguingly more complex for VP22. An analysis by quantitative Western blotting revealed substantial alterations of virion composition upon manipulation of individual tegument proteins and suggests that VP22 protein levels acted indirectly on viral fitness. These findings reaffirm the interdependence of the virion components and corroborate that viral fitness is influenced not only by the genome of viruses but also by the stoichiometry of proteins within each virion. IMPORTANCE The ability of viruses to spread in animals has been mapped to several viral genes, but other factors are clearly involved, including virion heterogeneity. To directly probe whether the latter influences viral fitness, we analyzed the protein content of individual herpes simplex virus 1 particles using an innovative flow cytometry approach. The data confirm that some viral proteins are incorporated in more controlled amounts, while

  18. Mechanical Barriers Restrict Invasion of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 into Human Oral Mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thier, Katharina; Petermann, Philipp; Rahn, Elena; Rothamel, Daniel; Bloch, Wilhelm; Knebel-Mörsdorf, Dagmar

    2017-11-15

    Oral mucosa is one of the main target tissues of the human pathogen herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). How the virus overcomes the protective epithelial barriers and penetrates the tissue to reach its receptors and initiate infection is still unclear. Here, we established an ex vivo infection assay with human oral mucosa that allows viral entry studies in a natural target tissue. The focus was on the susceptibility of keratinocytes in the epithelium and the characterization of cellular receptors that mediate viral entry. Upon ex vivo infection of gingiva or vestibular mucosa, we observed that intact human mucosa samples were protected from viral invasion. In contrast, the basal layer of the oral epithelium was efficiently invaded once the connective tissue and the basement membrane were removed. Later during infection, HSV-1 spread from basal keratinocytes to upper layers, demonstrating the susceptibility of the stratified squamous epithelium to HSV-1. The analysis of potential receptors revealed nectin-1 on most mucosal keratinocytes, whereas herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) was found only on a subpopulation of cells, suggesting that nectin-1 acts as primary receptor for HSV-1 in human oral mucosa. To mimic the supposed entry route of HSV-1 via microlesions in vivo , we mechanically wounded the mucosa prior to infection. While we observed a limited number of infected keratinocytes in some wounded mucosa samples, other samples showed no infected cells. Thus, we conclude that mechanical wounding of mucosa is insufficient for the virus to efficiently overcome epithelial barriers and to make entry-mediating receptors accessible. IMPORTANCE To invade the target tissue of its human host during primary infection, herpes simplex virus (HSV) must overcome the epithelial barriers of mucosa, skin, or cornea. For most viruses, the mechanisms underlying the invasion into the target tissues of their host organism are still open. Here, we established an ex vivo infection model of

  19. Infant Deaths Due To Herpes Simplex Virus, Congenital Syphilis, and HIV in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Amitha; Maduro, Gil; Schillinger, Julia A

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) is not a nationally reportable disease; there have been few population-based measures of HSV-related infant mortality. We describe infant death rates due to neonatal HSV as compared with congenital syphilis (CS) and HIV, 2 reportable, perinatally transmitted diseases, in New York City from 1981 to 2013. We identified neonatal HSV-, CS-, and HIV-related deaths using International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes listed on certificates of death or stillbirth issued in New York City. Deaths were classified as HSV-related if certificates listed (1) any HSV ICD-9/ICD-10 codes for deaths ≤42 days of age, (2) any HSV ICD-9/ICD-10 codes and an ICD code for perinatal infection for deaths at 43 to 365 days of age, or (3) an ICD-10 code for congenital HSV. CS- and HIV-related deaths were those listing any ICD code for syphilis or HIV. There were 34 deaths due to neonatal HSV (0.82 deaths per 100 000 live births), 38 from CS (0.92 per 100 000), and 262 from HIV (6.33 per 100 000). There were no CS-related deaths after 1996, and only 1 HIV-related infant death after 2004. The neonatal HSV-related death rate during the most recent decade (2004-2013) was significantly higher than in previous years. The increasing neonatal HSV-related death rate may reflect increases in neonatal herpes incidence; an increasing number of pregnant women have never had HSV type 1 and are therefore at risk of acquiring infection during pregnancy and transmitting to their infant. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Mechanism of herpes simplex virus type 2 suppression by propolis extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolkemper, Silke; Reichling, Jürgen; Sensch, Karl Heinz; Schnitzler, Paul

    2010-02-01

    Genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a chronic, persistent infection spreading efficiently and silently as sexually transmitted disease through the population. Antiviral agents currently applied for the treatment of herpesvirus infections include acyclovir and derivatives. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts of propolis were phytochemically analysed, different polyphenols, flavonoids and phenylcarboxylic acids were identified as major constituents. The aqueous propolis extract revealed a relatively high amount of phenylcarboxylic acids and low concentrations flavonoids when compared to the ethanolic special extract GH 2002. The cytotoxic and antiherpetic effect of propolis extracts against HSV-2 was analysed in cell culture, and revealed a moderate cytotoxicity on RC-37 cells. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of aqueous and ethanolic GH 2002 propolis extracts for HSV-2 plaque formation was determined at 0.0005% and 0.0004%, respectively. Both propolis extracts exhibited high levels of antiviral activity against HSV-2 in viral suspension tests, infectivity was significantly reduced by >99% and a direct concentration- and time-dependent antiherpetic activity could be demonstrated for both extracts. In order to determine the mode of virus suppression by propolis, the extracts were added at different times during the viral infection cycle. Addition of these drugs to uninfected cells prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells during intracellular replication had no effect on virus multiplication. However both propolis extracts exhibited high anti-herpetic activity when viruses were pretreated with these drugs prior to infection. Selectivity indices were determined at 80 and 42.5 for the aqueous and ethanolic extract, respectively, thus propolis extracts might be suitable for topical therapy in recurrent herpetic infection. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of antiviral therapy in immunocompromised patients with herpes simplex virus meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noska, Amanda; Kyrillos, Ramona; Hansen, Glen; Hirigoyen, Diane; Williams, David N

    2015-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are important causes of acute neurologic illness. Although the role of acyclovir in treating HSV encephalitis is clear, the role of antiviral therapy in HSV meningitis remains controversial. In this retrospective observational study, we reviewed the charts of all patients with cerebrospinal fluid specimens positive for HSV-1 or HSV-2 by polymerase chain reaction between July 2000 and November 2012. Patients' charts were reviewed for demographic data, clinical presentation, treatment, and clinical outcomes. Forty-two patient-episodes were clinically classified as meningitis. In 6 episodes (14.3%), patients with meningitis received no antivirals, whereas the remaining episodes were treated with an oral antiviral (n = 11 [26.2%]), combination intravenous and oral therapy (n = 22 [52.4%]), or intravenous acyclovir alone (n = 3 [7.1%]). Six patients had recurrent episodes of meningitis and all recovered without any neurologic sequelae. Neurologic outcomes were significantly improved with antiviral therapy in immunocompromised patients with herpes meningitis (P meningitis rapidly improve, but immunocompromised hosts have more neurologic sequelae and may benefit from antiviral therapy. Our data suggest symptomatic treatment alone for immunocompetent patients with HSV meningitis, avoiding the cost and side effects of prolonged intravenous acyclovir therapy; in contrast, immunocompromised patients had improved outcomes and would therefore benefit from antiviral therapy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Cryo electron tomography of herpes simplex virus during axonal transport and secondary envelopment in primary neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosune Ibiricu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1 egress in neurons, viral particles travel from the neuronal cell body along the axon towards the synapse. Whether HSV1 particles are transported as enveloped virions as proposed by the 'married' model or as non-enveloped capsids suggested by the 'separate' model is controversial. Specific viral proteins may form a recruitment platform for microtubule motors that catalyze such transport. However, their subviral location has remained elusive. Here we established a system to analyze herpesvirus egress by cryo electron tomography. At 16 h post infection, we observed intra-axonal transport of progeny HSV1 viral particles in dissociated hippocampal neurons by live-cell fluorescence microscopy. Cryo electron tomography of frozen-hydrated neurons revealed that most egressing capsids were transported independently of the viral envelope. Unexpectedly, we found not only DNA-containing capsids (cytosolic C-capsids, but also capsids lacking DNA (cytosolic A-/B-capsids in mid-axon regions. Subvolume averaging revealed lower amounts of tegument on cytosolic A-/B-capsids than on C-capsids. Nevertheless, all capsid types underwent active axonal transport. Therefore, even few tegument proteins on the capsid vertices seemed to suffice for transport. Secondary envelopment of capsids was observed at axon terminals. On their luminal face, the enveloping vesicles were studded with typical glycoprotein-like spikes. Furthermore, we noted an accretion of tegument density at the concave cytosolic face of the vesicle membrane in close proximity to the capsids. Three-dimensional analysis revealed that these assembly sites lacked cytoskeletal elements, but that filamentous actin surrounded them and formed an assembly compartment. Our data support the 'separate model' for HSV1 egress, i.e. progeny herpes viruses being transported along axons as subassemblies and not as complete virions within transport vesicles.

  3. Frequency of herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus and human papillomavirus DNA in semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aynaud, Olivier; Poveda, Jean-Dominique; Huynh, Bernard; Guillemotonia, Aline; Barrasso, Renzo

    2002-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV-2) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections produce brain damage in the newborn, and human papillomavirus (HPV) plays a role in cervical carcinogenesis. To assess the frequency of herpes virus and HPV in semen and its role in transmission, semen from 111 male partners of women with histologically-detected genital HPV infection was analysed for HSV, CMV and HPV infection. We used cell culture to detect HSV and CMV, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HPV. Virological findings in the sperm were correlated to the presence or absence of HPV-associated genital lesions and to the viral type. Viral cultures yielded HSV-2 DNA in 9% and CMV DNA in 6.3% of cases. No correlation was established with a history of clinically apparent infection for HSV. HPV-DNA was detected in 23.4% of semen by PCR techniques: in 48% of subjects with urethral lesions, in 22% of patients with penile lesions, in 2% of patients without HPV-associated lesions. HPV-DNA type 16 was detected in 3.6% of cases. Patients with a positive HPV semen sample and penile or urethral lesions had the same HPV type detected in the two specimens. The study shows a high detection of clinically inapparent HSV and CMV, but does not confirm high HPV prevalence in semen from men without detectable lesions. Our study also suggests that the mechanism for semen contamination by HPV is the exfoliation of infected cells from urethral lesions during semen ejaculation, and probably, by abrasion from penile lesions. This could result in the contamination of semen used in assisted reproductive technology.

  4. A comparison of herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella-zoster virus latency and reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Peter G E; Rovnak, Joel; Badani, Hussain; Cohrs, Randall J

    2015-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1; human herpesvirus 1) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV; human herpesvirus 3) are human neurotropic alphaherpesviruses that cause lifelong infections in ganglia. Following primary infection and establishment of latency, HSV-1 reactivation typically results in herpes labialis (cold sores), but can occur frequently elsewhere on the body at the site of primary infection (e.g. whitlow), particularly at the genitals. Rarely, HSV-1 reactivation can cause encephalitis; however, a third of the cases of HSV-1 encephalitis are associated with HSV-1 primary infection. Primary VZV infection causes varicella (chickenpox) following which latent virus may reactivate decades later to produce herpes zoster (shingles), as well as an increasingly recognized number of subacute, acute and chronic neurological conditions. Following primary infection, both viruses establish a latent infection in neuronal cells in human peripheral ganglia. However, the detailed mechanisms of viral latency and reactivation have yet to be unravelled. In both cases latent viral DNA exists in an 'end-less' state where the ends of the virus genome are joined to form structures consistent with unit length episomes and concatemers, from which viral gene transcription is restricted. In latently infected ganglia, the most abundantly detected HSV-1 RNAs are the spliced products originating from the primary latency associated transcript (LAT). This primary LAT is an 8.3 kb unstable transcript from which two stable (1.5 and 2.0 kb) introns are spliced. Transcripts mapping to 12 VZV genes have been detected in human ganglia removed at autopsy; however, it is difficult to ascribe these as transcripts present during latent infection as early-stage virus reactivation may have transpired in the post-mortem time period in the ganglia. Nonetheless, low-level transcription of VZV ORF63 has been repeatedly detected in multiple ganglia removed as close to death as possible. There is increasing

  5. A comparison of herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella-zoster virus latency and reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Peter G. E.; Rovnak, Joel; Badani, Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1; human herpesvirus 1) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV; human herpesvirus 3) are human neurotropic alphaherpesviruses that cause lifelong infections in ganglia. Following primary infection and establishment of latency, HSV-1 reactivation typically results in herpes labialis (cold sores), but can occur frequently elsewhere on the body at the site of primary infection (e.g. whitlow), particularly at the genitals. Rarely, HSV-1 reactivation can cause encephalitis; however, a third of the cases of HSV-1 encephalitis are associated with HSV-1 primary infection. Primary VZV infection causes varicella (chickenpox) following which latent virus may reactivate decades later to produce herpes zoster (shingles), as well as an increasingly recognized number of subacute, acute and chronic neurological conditions. Following primary infection, both viruses establish a latent infection in neuronal cells in human peripheral ganglia. However, the detailed mechanisms of viral latency and reactivation have yet to be unravelled. In both cases latent viral DNA exists in an ‘end-less’ state where the ends of the virus genome are joined to form structures consistent with unit length episomes and concatemers, from which viral gene transcription is restricted. In latently infected ganglia, the most abundantly detected HSV-1 RNAs are the spliced products originating from the primary latency associated transcript (LAT). This primary LAT is an 8.3 kb unstable transcript from which two stable (1.5 and 2.0 kb) introns are spliced. Transcripts mapping to 12 VZV genes have been detected in human ganglia removed at autopsy; however, it is difficult to ascribe these as transcripts present during latent infection as early-stage virus reactivation may have transpired in the post-mortem time period in the ganglia. Nonetheless, low-level transcription of VZV ORF63 has been repeatedly detected in multiple ganglia removed as close to death as possible. There is

  6. Subacute herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis as an initial presentation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and multiple sclerosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corman Lourdes C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis presents acutely in patients who are immunocompetent. We report what we believe to be the first published case of a subacute course of herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis in a patient with asymptomatic chronic lymphocytic leukemia who subsequently developed multiple sclerosis. Case presentation A 49-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of fever blisters presented to the emergency department with a history of left temporal headache for four weeks, and numbness of the left face and leg for two weeks. A complete blood count revealed white blood cell count of 11,820 cells/mL, with an absolute lymphocyte count of 7304 cells/mL. The cerebrospinal fluid contained 6 white blood cells/μL, 63 red blood cells/μL, 54 mg glucose/dL, and 49 mg total protein/dL. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed meningoencephalitis and bilateral ventriculitis. Cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction for herpes simplex virus type 1 was positive, and the patient's symptoms resolved after ten days of treatment with parenteral aciclovir. Incidental findings on peripheral blood smear and flow cytometry testing confirmed chronic lymphocytic leukemia. One month later, she developed bilateral numbness of the hands and feet; a repeat cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction for herpes simplex virus type 1 at this time was negative. A repeat magnetic resonance imaging scan showed an expansion of the peri-ventricular lesions, and the cerebrospinal fluid contained elevated oligoclonal bands and myelin basic protein. A brain biopsy revealed gliosis consistent with multiple sclerosis, and the patient responded to treatment with high-dose parenteral steroids. Conclusion Herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis is a rare presentation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Our patient had an atypical, subacute course, presumably due to immunosuppression from chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This unusual

  7. DNA replication catalyzed by herpes simplex virus type 1 proteins reveals trombone loops at the fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermek, Oya; Willcox, Smaranda; Griffith, Jack D

    2015-01-30

    Using purified replication factors encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1 and a 70-base minicircle template, we obtained robust DNA synthesis with leading strand products of >20,000 nucleotides and lagging strand fragments from 600 to 9,000 nucleotides as seen by alkaline gel electrophoresis. ICP8 was crucial for the synthesis on both strands. Visualization of the deproteinized products using electron microscopy revealed long, linear dsDNAs, and in 87%, one end, presumably the end with the 70-base circle, was single-stranded. The remaining 13% had multiple single-stranded segments separated by dsDNA segments 500 to 1,000 nucleotides in length located at one end. These features are diagnostic of the trombone mechanism of replication. Indeed, when the products were examined with the replication proteins bound, a dsDNA loop was frequently associated with the replication complex located at one end of the replicated DNA. Furthermore, the frequency of loops correlated with the fraction of DNA undergoing Okazaki fragment synthesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. SAMHD1 restricts herpes simplex virus 1 in macrophages by limiting DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eui Tae; White, Tommy E; Brandariz-Núñez, Alberto; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2013-12-01

    Macrophages play important roles in host immune defense against virus infection. During infection by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), macrophages acquire enhanced antiviral potential. Restriction of HSV-1 replication and progeny production is important to prevent viral spread, but the cellular mechanisms that inhibit the DNA virus in macrophages are unknown. SAMHD1 was recently identified as a retrovirus restriction factor highly expressed in macrophages. The SAMHD1 protein is expressed in both undifferentiated monocytes and differentiated macrophages, but retroviral restriction is limited to differentiated cells by modulation of SAMHD1 phosphorylation. It is proposed to block reverse transcription of retroviral RNA into DNA by depleting cellular deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs). Viruses with DNA genomes do not employ reverse transcription during infection, but replication of their viral genomes is also dependent on intracellular dNTP concentrations. Here, we demonstrate that SAMHD1 restricts replication of the HSV-1 DNA genome in differentiated macrophage cell lines. Depleting SAMHD1 in THP-1 cells enhanced HSV-1 replication, while ectopic overexpression of SAMHD1 in U937 cells repressed HSV-1 replication. SAMHD1 did not impact viral gene expression from incoming HSV-1 viral genomes. HSV-1 restriction involved the dNTP triphosphohydrolase activity of SAMHD1 and was partially overcome by addition of exogenous deoxynucleosides. Unlike retroviruses, restriction of HSV-1 was not affected by SAMHD1 phosphorylation status. Our results suggest that SAMHD1 functions broadly to inhibit replication of DNA viruses in nondividing macrophages.

  9. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 regulates herpes simplex virus replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation

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    Yu, Jungeun; Shin, Bongjin; Park, Eui-Soon; Yang, Sujeong; Choi, Seunga [Department of Microbiology, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); BK21 Bio Brain Center, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Misun [Department of Microbiology, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Jaerang, E-mail: jrrho@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); BK21 Bio Brain Center, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); GRAST, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is involved in viral infection and replication through the modulation of diverse cellular processes including RNA metabolism, cytokine signaling, and subcellular localization. It has been suggested previously that the protein arginine methylation of the RGG-box of ICP27 is required for herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) viral replication and gene expression in vivo. However, a cellular mediator for this process has not yet been identified. In our current study, we show that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is a cellular mediator of the arginine methylation of ICP27 RGG-box. We generated arginine substitution mutants in this domain and examined which arginine residues are required for methylation by PRMT1. R138, R148 and R150 were found to be the major sites of this methylation but additional arginine residues serving as minor methylation sites are still required to sustain the fully methylated form of ICP27 RGG. We also demonstrate that the nuclear foci-like structure formation, SRPK interactions, and RNA-binding activity of ICP27 are modulated by the arginine methylation of the ICP27 RGG-box. Furthermore, HSV-1 replication is inhibited by hypomethylation of this domain resulting from the use of general PRMT inhibitors or arginine mutations. Our data thus suggest that the PRMT1 plays a key role as a cellular regulator of HSV-1 replication through ICP27 RGG-box methylation.

  10. Recent advances in vaccine development for herpes simplex virus types I and II.

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    Coleman, Jeffrey L; Shukla, Deepak

    2013-04-01

    Despite recent advances in vaccine design and strategies, latent infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) remains a formidable challenge. Approaches involving live-attenuated viruses and inactivated viral preparations were popular throughout the twentieth century. In the past ten years, many vaccine types, both prophylactic or therapeutic, have contained a replication-defective HSV, viral DNA or glycoproteins. New research focused on the mechanism of immune evasion by the virus has involved developing vaccines with various gene deletions and manipulations combined with the use of new and more specific adjuvants. In addition, new "prime-boost" methods of strengthening the vaccine efficacy have proven effective, but there have also been flaws with some recent strategies that appear to have compromised vaccine efficacy in humans. Given the complicated lifecycle of HSV and its unique way of spreading from cell-to-cell, it can be concluded that the development of an ideal vaccine needs new focus on cell-mediated immunity, better understanding of the latent viral genome and serious consideration of gender-based differences in immunity development among humans. This review summarizes recent developments made in the field and sheds light on some potentially new ways to conquer the problem including development of dual-action prophylactic microbicides that prohibit viral entry and, in addition, induce a strong antigen response.

  11. In-vivo immunofluorescence confocal microscopy of herpes simplex virus type 1 keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Stephen C.; Laird, Jeffery A.; Beuerman, Roger W.

    1996-05-01

    The white-light confocal microscope offers an in vivo, cellular-level resolution view of the cornea. This instrument has proven to be a valuable research and diagnostic tool for the study of infectious keratitis. In this study, we investigate the direct visualization of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-infected corneal epithelium, with in vivo confocal microscopy, using HSV-1 immunofluorescent antibodies. New Zealand white rabbits were infected with McKrae strain of HSV-1 in one eye; the other eye of each rabbit was used as an uninfected control. Four days later, the rabbits were anesthetized and a cellulose sponge was applied to each cornea, and a drop of direct HSV fluorescein-tagged antibody was placed on each sponge every 3 to 5 minutes for 1 hour. Fluorescence confocal microscopy was then performed. The HSV-infected corneas showed broad regions of hyperfluorescent epithelial cells. The uninfected corneas revealed no background fluorescence. Thus, using the confocal microscope with a fluorescent cube, we were able to visualize HSV-infected corneal epithelial cells tagged with a direct fluorescent antibody. This process may prove to be a useful clinical tool for the in vivo diagnosis of HSV keratitis.

  12. Effect of Repeat Dosing of Engineered Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus on Preclinical Models of Rhabdomyosarcoma

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    Alicia M. Waters

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS, a tumor of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common sarcoma of childhood. Despite multidrug chemotherapy regimens, surgical intervention, and radiation treatment, outcomes remain poor, especially in advanced disease, and novel therapies are needed for the treatment of these aggressive malignancies. Genetically engineered oncolytic viruses, such as herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV, are currently being explored as treatments for pediatric tumors. M002, an oncolytic HSV, has both copies of the γ134.5 gene deleted, enabling replication in tumor cells but thwarting infection of normal, postmitotic cells. We hypothesized that M002 would infect human RMS tumor cells and lead to decreased tumor cell survival in vitro and impede tumor growth in vivo. In the current study, we demonstrated that M002 could infect, replicate in, and decrease cell survival in both embryonal (ERMS and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS cells. Additionally, M002 reduced xenograft tumor growth and increased animal survival in both ARMS and ERMS. Most importantly, we showed for the first time that repeated dosing of oncolytic virus coupled with low-dose radiation provided improved tumor response in RMS. These findings provide support for the clinical investigation of oncolytic HSV in pediatric RMS.

  13. Effect of ultrasound on herpes simplex virus infection in cell culture

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    Iwai Soichi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound has been shown to increase the efficiency of gene expression from retroviruses, adenoviruses and adeno-associated viruses. The effect of ultrasound to stimulate cell membrane permeabilization on infection with an oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 was examined. Results Vero monkey kidney cells were infected with HSV-1 and exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound after an adsorption period. The number of plaques was significantly greater than that of the untreated control. A combination of ultrasound and microbubbles further increased the plaque number. Similar results were obtained using a different type of HSV-1 and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells. The appropriate intensity, duty cycle and time of ultrasound to increase the plaque number were 0.5 W/cm2, 20% duty cycle and 10 sec, respectively. Ultrasound with microbubbles at an intensity of 2.0 W/cm2, at 50% duty cycle, or for 40 sec reduced cell viability. Conclusion These results indicate that ultrasound promotes the entry of oncolytic HSV-1 into cells. It may be useful to enhance the efficiency of HSV-1 infection in oncolytic virotherapy.

  14. Managing aggression in global amnesia following herpes simplex virus encephalitis: The case of E.B.

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    Shannon, Tracy E; Griffin, Stefanie L

    2015-01-01

    This article describes an integrative approach to the case of EB, a 33 year old male who presented with agitation, delusional ideation and global amnesia after contracting herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE) while in a state prison in 2004. Although several prior case studies have described outcome following acute onset of HSVE, this case presents a unique challenge for rehabilitation in several respects. First, EB's pre-morbid history is complicated; in contrast with prior HSVE case studies that have typically involved individuals with a relatively high level of pre-morbid functioning, EB presents with limited educational attainment and a prior history of several incarcerations for violent offenses. Post-injury, his presentation includes significant verbal aggression, threats of harm toward others, physical posturing and occasional physical aggression toward his caretakers. Third, EB presents with a fixed delusion that others are constantly taking advantage of him. These features are present in the context of global amnesia and relatively intact cognitive functioning in other domains. Following a brief review of prior HSVE case studies, this study reviews the outcomes of various pharmacological, cognitive, behavioural and integrative interventions designed for management of EB's aggression and agitation.

  15. N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Antibodies in Herpes Simplex Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüss, Harald; Finke, Carsten; Höltje, Markus; Hofmann, Joerg; Klingbeil, Christine; Probst, Christian; Borowski, Kathrin; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Harms, Lutz; Schwab, Jan M.; Ploner, Christoph J.; Komorowski, Lars; Stoecker, Winfried; Dalmau, Josep; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the presence and kinetics of antibodies against synaptic proteins in patients with herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE). Methods Retrospective analysis of 44 patients with polymerase chain reaction-proven HSE for the presence of a large panel of onconeuronal and synaptic receptor antibodies. The effect of patients’ serum was studied in cultures of primary mouse hippocampal neurons. Results N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibodies of the immunoglobulin (Ig) subtypes IgA, IgG, or IgM were detected in 13 of 44 patients (30%) in the course of HSE, suggesting secondary autoimmune mechanisms. NMDAR antibodies were often present at hospital admission, but in some patients developed after the first week of HSE. Antibody-positive sera resulted in downregulation of synaptic marker proteins in hippocampal neurons. Interpretation Some patients with HSE develop IgA, IgG, or IgM autoantibodies against NMDAR. Sera from these patients alter the density of neuronal synaptic markers, suggesting a potential pathogenic disease-modifying effect. These findings have implications for the understanding of autoimmunity in infectious diseases, and prospective studies should reveal whether the subgroup of patients with HSE and NMDAR antibodies may benefit from immunotherapy. PMID:23280840

  16. Practice patterns for herpes simplex keratitis: A survey of ophthalmologists in Gulf Coast countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhayyal, Mashael A; Stone, Donald U

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex is a common cause of visual disability, and there are published evidence-based guidelines for therapy. This survey aims to determine the preferred practice patterns of ophthalmologists in Gulf Coast Countries regarding herpetic eye disease, as well as identify areas of controversy or barriers to acceptance of evidence-based protocols. Anonymous web-based survey of ophthalmologists in Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, and Oman. There were 48 responses to the survey. For a first episode of epithelial dendritic keratitis, 28.2% reported "observation" rather than specific therapy. The majority of respondents utilize oral or topical antiviral for epithelial keratitis, with oral antiviral being the most popular (43.6%). The majority also included a corticosteroid with antiviral for stromal keratitis (83.9%) or iritis (70.3%). Over 90% prescribe a prophylactic antiviral after keratoplasty for herpetic eye disease, although the length of therapy ranged widely from disease was ranked as the most important factor when considering antiviral prophylaxis, followed by risk of adverse effects. Topical cyclosporine was utilized "never or almost never" by 76.9% of respondents. Most respondents report following evidence-based guidelines. There was less consensus in areas where there are remaining knowledge gaps, such as the length of antiviral prophylaxis after keratoplasty and the potential role for topical cyclosporine.

  17. Association between herpes simplex virus Types 1 and 2 with cardiac myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvari, Maryam Sotoudeh; Sabagh, Moud; Goodarzynejad, Hamidreza; Ziaei, Shayan; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Pourgholi, Leyla; Jenab, Yaser; Abbasi, Kyomars

    Most cases of atrial myxoma are sporadic, and the exact etiology is unknown. We examined if herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 and HSV-2 antigens and/or DNA could be detected in a cohort of Iranian patients with cardiac myxomas. From July 2004 to June 2014, among a total of 36,703 patients undergoing open heart surgeries, consecutive patients with cardiac myxoma who were treated by surgical excision at our center included in this study. Of 73 patients studied, 56% were female with a mean age of 54 years (ranging from 23 to 77 years). Seventy-four myxomas were surgically removed from 73 patients, since one patient had two myxomas which were located on both the right atrium and right ventricle. The materials for this analysis were retrospectively gathered from extracted tumors that stored in a pathology bank of tissue paraffin blocks. The formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue samples were investigated for HSV genomic DNA by both immunohistochemistry (IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. In all 74 cases there was no presence of HSV 1 and HSV 2 infection. This suggests that HSV may not play a role in sporadic cardiac myxomas; however, evidence for such association is currently lacking, and further studies are required to determine such a role. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. The herpes simplex virus amplicon: a new eucaryotic defective-virus cloning-amplifying vector.

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    Spaete, R R; Frenkel, N

    1982-08-01

    We have employed repeat units of herpes simplex virus (HSV) defective genomes to derive a cloning-amplifying vector (amplicon) that can replicate in eucaryotic cells in the presence of standard HSV helper virus. The design of the HSV amplicon system is based on the previous observation that cotransfection of cells with helper virus DNA and seed monomeric repeat units of HSV defective genomes results in the regeneration of concatemeric defective genomes composed of multiple reiterations of the seed repeats. Cotransfection of cells with helper virus DNA and chimeric repeat units containing bacterial plasmid pKC7 DNA resulted in the generation of defective genomes composed of reiterations of the seed HSV-pKC7 repeats. These chimeric defective genomes were packaged into virus particles and could be propagated in virus stocks, with the most enriched passages containing more than 90% chimeric defective genomes. Furthermore, monomeric chimeric repeat units could be transferred back and forth between bacteria and eucaryotic cells. A derivative vector constructed so as to contain several unique restriction enzyme sites could be potentially employed in the introduction of additional viral or eucaryotic DNA sequences into eucaryotic cells.

  19. Adaptation of a retrovirus as a eucaryotic vector transmitting the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabin, C J; Hoffmann, J W; Goff, S P; Weinberg, R A

    1982-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using retroviruses as vectors for transferring DNA sequences into animal cells. The thymidine kinase (tk) gene of herpes simplex virus was chosen as a convenient model. The internal BamHI fragments of a DNA clone of Moloney leukemia virus (MLV) were replaced with a purified BamHI DNA segment containing the tk gene. Chimeric genomes were created carrying the tk insert in both orientations relative to the MLV sequence. Each was transfected into TK- cells along with MLV helper virus, and TK+ colonies were obtained by selection in the presence of hypoxanthine, aminopterin, and thymidine (HAT). Virus collected from TK+-transformed, MLV producer cells passed the TK+ phenotype to TK- cells. Nonproducer cells were isolated, and TK+ transducing virus was subsequently rescued from them. The chimeric virus showed single-hit kinetics in infections. Virion and cellular RNA and cellular DNA from infected cells were all shown to contain sequences which hybridized to both MLV- and tk-specific probes. The sizes of these sequences were consistent with those predicted for the chimeric virus. In all respects studied, the chimeric MLV-tk virus behaved like known replication-defective retroviruses. These experiments suggest great general applicability of retroviruses as eucaryotic vectors. Images PMID:6180306

  20. Herpes simplex virus type 2 among mobile pastoralists in northwestern Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, Ashley; Foxman, Betsy; Low, Bobbi S

    2015-01-01

    Although herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) epidemiology has been described for many western and/or urban populations, disease burden has not been characterized for remote, non-western, under treated populations, where patterns of risk and vulnerability may be very different. To understand demographic, behavioural and geographic influences on risk for HSV-2 in a population of mobile, rural pastoralists in northwestern Namibia. The authors conducted a cross-sectional survey of reproductively aged adults (n = 445) across 28 villages in Kaokoveld, Namibia. All participants completed a questionnaire of demographic data, ecological interactions and sexual behaviour, and a rapid test specific for HSV-2. HSV-2 status was significantly associated with being female (OR = 3.1, 95% CI = 2.00, 4.71), increasing age (men: OR = 7.5, 95% CI = 2.67, 20.85; women: OR = 6.2, 95% CI = 2.48, 15.50) and with higher wealth among men (OR = 5.1, 95% CI = 1.98, 13.09). Higher risk among women can be explained, in part, by local hygiene practices and a preference for "dry" sex. There was considerable variation in prevalence by region, which appears to be linked to geographic remoteness. Culturally contextualized epidemiologic studies of remote, vulnerable populations can provide essential information for limiting the introduction and spread of new infections.

  1. Selective inhibition of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein synthesis by a benz-amidinohydrazone derivative

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    Campadelli-Fiume, G.; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, P.; Mannini-Palenzona, A. (Bologna Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Microbiologia e Virologia); Cavrini, V. (Bologna Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Chimica Farmaceutica e Tossicologica)

    1980-01-01

    1 H-benz(f)indene-1.3(2H)dione-bis-amidinohydrazone (benzhydrazone) inhibited incorporation of /sup 14/C-glucosamine, /sup 14/C-fucose and /sup 14/C-mannose into glycoproteins of HEp-2 cells infected with various strains of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and impaired RNA and protein synthesis to a low extent. These biochemical effects are very similar to those induced by glycosylation inhibitors such as tunicamycin, D-glucosamine and 2-deoxy-D-glucose. In contrast to these inhibitors, benzhydrazone reduced HSV glycoprotein synthesis selectively since it did not significantly modify i) the saccharide uptake into glycoproteins of uninfected and of Sindbis virus-infected cells, ii) viral growth and cell fusion in paramyxovirus-infected cells, two activities which depend on viral glycoprotein synthesis. Benzhydrazone had only minor effects on the overall metabolism of uninfected cells, since it did not alter cell growth rate, and amino acid, uridine, and hexose incorporations were about 80 per cent those of untreated cells.

  2. Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus Inhibits Pediatric Brain Tumor Migration and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia V. Cockle

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric high-grade glioma (pHGG and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG are invasive tumors with poor survival. Oncolytic virotherapy, initially devised as a direct cytotoxic treatment, is now also known to act via immune-mediated mechanisms. Here we investigate a previously unreported mechanism of action: the inhibition of migration and invasion in pediatric brain tumors. We evaluated the effect of oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1716 (HSV1716 on the migration and invasion of pHGG and DIPG both in vitro using 2D (scratch assay, live cell imaging and 3D (spheroid invasion in collagen assays and in vivo using an orthotopic xenograft model of DIPG invasion. HSV1716 inhibited migration and invasion in pHGG and DIPG cell lines. pHGG cells demonstrated reduced velocity and changed morphology in the presence of virus. HSV1716 altered pHGG cytoskeletal dynamics by stabilizing microtubules, inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3, and preventing localized clustering of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC to the leading edge of cells. HSV1716 treatment also reduced tumor infiltration in a mouse orthotopic xenograft DIPG model. Our results demonstrate that HSV1716 targets the migration and invasion of pHGG and DIPG and indicates the potential of an oncolytic virus (OV to be used as a novel anti-invasive treatment strategy for pediatric brain tumors.

  3. Molecular detection of cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus 2, human papillomavirus 16-18 in Turkish pregnants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinc, Bedia; Bozdayi, Gulendam; Biri, Aydan; Kalkanci, Ayse; Dogan, Bora; Bozkurt, Nuray; Rota, Seyyal

    2010-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common cause of viral intrauterine infections in the world. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and human papillomavirus (HPV) are the main agents of viral sexually transmitted diseases, which cause genital ulcers and genital warts, respectively. HPV infection has been linked to the majority of the anogenital malignancies. The aim of this study was to detect the existence of CMV, HSV-2 and HPV type 16-18 in Turkish pregnants by using sensitive molecular assays. One hundred thirty-four women (18-41 years old; mean age ± SD: 27 ± 8) applied to outpatient clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology, in between 18th - 22nd weeks of their pregnancy and a control group of 99 healthy women (15-39 years old; mean age ± SD: 24 ± 8) were included in the study. Cervical smear samples were used for DNA extraction. CMV, HSV-2 and HPV 16-18 detections were carried out by real time PCR and in house PCR method, respectively. Three patients (3/134; 2.2%) were found to be positive for each HPV and HSV-2. Dual infection with HPV and HSV was found in just one patient. HPV 18 was detected in all positive samples. CMV was found to be positive in two patients (2/134; 1.4 %). HPV, HSV and CMV must be screened due to high prevalence of these viruses in pregnants by using sensitive molecular methods.

  4. Molecular detection of cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus 2, human papillomavirus 16-18 in Turkish pregnants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedia Dinc

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Human cytomegalovirus (CMV is the most common cause of viral intrauterine infections in the world. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 and human papillomavirus (HPV are the main agents of viral sexually transmitted diseases, which cause genital ulcers and genital warts, respectively. HPV infection has been linked to the majority of the anogenital malignancies. The aim of this study was to detect the existence of CMV, HSV-2 and HPV type 16-18 in Turkish pregnants by using sensitive molecular assays. METHODS: One hundred thirty-four women (18-41 years old; mean age ± SD: 27 ± 8 applied to outpatient clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology, in between 18th - 22nd weeks of their pregnancy and a control group of 99 healthy women (15-39 years old; mean age ± SD: 24 ± 8 were included in the study. Cervical smear samples were used for DNA extraction. CMV, HSV-2 and HPV 16-18 detections were carried out by real time PCR and in house PCR method, respectively. RESULTS: Three patients (3/134; 2.2% were found to be positive for each HPV and HSV-2. Dual infection with HPV and HSV was found in just one patient. HPV 18 was detected in all positive samples. CMV was found to be positive in two patients (2/134; 1.4 %. CONCLUSION: HPV, HSV and CMV must be screened due to high prevalence of these viruses in pregnants by using sensitive molecular methods.

  5. Binding to chromosomes of herpes simplex-related antigens in biochemically transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kit, S; Kurchak, M; Wray, W; Dubbs, D R

    1978-07-01

    Association of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-related antigens with chromosomes was demonstrated in human and mouse cells biochemically transformed by HSV that had been irradiated with ultraviolet light. This was accomplished by using peroxidase-anti-peroxidase immunological staining with rabbit antisera that had high neutralizing titers against both HSV-specific thymidine kinase activity and virus infectivity. Antisera-against HSV did not react with chromosomes of uninfected cells nor did normal sera react with any of the constitutents of biochemically transformed cells. Methanol/acetic acid treatment of biochemically transformed cells eliminated their nuclear staining for HSV-related antigens. In vitro binding of HSV-related antigens to chromosomes was demonstrated by incubating soluble antigens from high salt extracts of HSV-infected cells with methanol/acetic acid-fixed chromosomes of biochemically transformed or uninfected cells, followed by exposure to antiserum against HSV and peroxidase-anti-peroxidase staining. There was no staining when soluble extracts from uninfected cells were substituted for those from HSV-infected cells. The results show that cells biochemically transformed and lytically infected by HSV, respectively, contain antigens, which like the Epstein-Barr virus-associated nuclear antigen (EBNA), bind to chromosomes in vivo and in vitro.

  6. Fusogenic oncolytic herpes simplex viruses as a potent and personalized cancer vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi-Xiang; Liu, Guohong; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2012-07-01

    The recent FDA approval of Sipuleucel-T for the treatment of prostate cancer represents an important milestone of cancer immunotherapy, which, for the first time, validates the concept of bringing true clinical benefit to cancer patients by stimulating patients' own anti-tumor immunity. Among the different experimental cancer immunotherapies, oncolytic virotherapy may represent a low-cost yet potent and personalized cancer vaccine for the treatment of solid tumors. This review describes the constructions of several human herpes simplex virus (HSV)-derived oncolytic viruses as candidate cancer vaccines, which induce specific and potent anti-tumor immunity in pre-clinical models, and thus resulting in stronger overall anti-tumor efficacy as compared to oncolytic effect alone. This article also describes the approaches to enhance the antitumor immunity of oncolytic HSVs, and in particular, the key role played by integrating membrane-fusion activity into these viruses. Additionally, this article reviews the potential effect of certain chemotherapeutic agents (e.g. cyclophosphamide) in boosting antitumor immunity induced by oncolytic HSV, and the mechanisms behind it. In summary, all the preclinical and clinical data have suggested that HSV-based oncolytic virotherapies could likely be developed as a new generation of cancer vaccines for the treatment of solid tumors.

  7. Unusual progression of herpes simplex encephalitis with basal ganglia and extensive white matter involvement

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    Yasuhiro Manabe

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a 51-year old male with herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE showing unusual progression and magnetic resonance (MR findings. The initial neurological manifestation of intractable focal seizure with low-grade fever persisted for three days, and rapidly coma, myoclonic status, and respiratory failure with high-grade fever emerged thereafter. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR result of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was positive for HSV-1 DNA. In the early stage, MR images (MRI were normal. On subsequent MR diffusion-weighted (DW and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images, high-intensity areas first appeared in the left frontal cortex, which was purely extra-temporal involvement, and extended into the basal ganglia, then the white matter, which are relatively spared in HSE. Antiviral therapy and immunosuppressive therapy did not suppress the progression of HSE, and finally severe cerebral edema developed into cerebral herniation, which required emergency decompressive craniectomy. Histological examination of a biopsy specimen of the white matter detected perivascular infiltration and destruction of basic structure, which confirmed non specific inflammatory change without obvious edema or demyelination. The present case shows both MR and pathological findings in the white matter in the acute stage of HSE.

  8. Transient fasting enhances replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus in glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Shinichi; Rabkin, Samuel D; Martuza, Robert L; Wakimoto, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Short-term nutritional restriction (fasting) has been shown to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy by sensitizing cancer cells and protecting normal cells in a variety of cancer models, including glioblastoma (GBM). Cancer cells, unlike normal cells, respond to fasting by promoting oncogenic signaling and protein synthesis. We hypothesized that fasting would increase the replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) in GBM. Patient-derived GBM cell lines were fasted by growth in glucose and fetal calf serum restricted culture medium. “Transient fasting”, 24-hour fasting followed by 24-hour recovery in complete medium, increased late virus gene expression and G47Δ yields about 2-fold in GBM cells, but not in human astrocytes, and enhanced G47Δ killing of GBM cells. Mechanistically, “transient fasting” suppressed phosphorylation of the subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) in GBM cells, but not in astrocytes. Pharmacological inhibition of JNK also increased G47Δ yield. In vivo, transient fasting (48-hour food restriction and 24-hour recovery) doubled luciferase activity after intratumoral G47Δ-US11fluc injection into orthotopic GBM xenografts. Thus, “transient fasting” increases G47Δ replication and oncolytic activity in human GBM cells. These results suggest that “transient fasting” may be effectively combined to enhance oncolytic HSV therapy of GBM. PMID:27186404

  9. Current Concepts for Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection: Diagnostics and Pathogenesis of Genital Tract Shedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is a DNA virus that is efficiently transmitted through intimate genital tract contact and causes persistent infection that cannot be eliminated. HSV-2 may cause frequent, symptomatic self-limited genital ulcers, but in most persons infection is subclinical. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the virus is frequently shed from genital surfaces even in the absence of signs or symptoms of clinical disease and that the virus can be transmitted during these periods of shedding. Furthermore, HSV-2 shedding is detected throughout the genital tract and may be associated with genital tract inflammation, which likely contributes to increased risk of HIV acquisition. This review focuses on HSV diagnostics, as well as what we have learned about the importance of frequent genital HSV shedding for (i) HSV transmission and (ii) genital tract inflammation, as well as (iii) the impact of HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition and transmission. We conclude with discussion of future areas of research to push the field forward. PMID:26561565

  10. Herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D relocates nectin-1 from intercellular contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Arjun K; Rothlauf, Paul W; Krummenacher, Claude

    2016-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) uses the cell adhesion molecule nectin-1 as a receptor to enter neurons and epithelial cells. The viral glycoprotein D (gD) is used as a non-canonical ligand for nectin-1. The gD binding site on nectin-1 overlaps with a functional adhesive site involved in nectin-nectin homophilic trans-interaction. Consequently, when nectin-1 is engaged with a cellular ligand at cell junctions, the gD binding site is occupied. Here we report that HSV gD is able to disrupt intercellular homophilic trans-interaction of nectin-1 and induce a rapid redistribution of nectin-1 from cell junctions. This movement does not require the receptor's interaction with the actin-binding adaptor afadin. Interaction of nectin-1 with afadin is also dispensable for virion surfing along nectin-1-rich filopodia. Cells seeded on gD-coated surfaces also fail to accumulate nectin-1 at cell contact. These data indicate that HSV gD affects nectin-1 locally through direct interaction and more globally through signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Linear Multiepitope (Glyco)peptides for Type-Specific Serology of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risinger, Christian; Sørensen, Kasper K; Jensen, Knud J; Olofsson, Sigvard; Bergström, Tomas; Blixt, Ola

    2017-05-12

    Detection of type-specific antibodies is an important and essential part of accurate diagnosis, even in silent carriers of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 (oral) and HSV-2 (genital) infections. Serologic assays that identify HSV-1 and HSV-2 type-specific antibodies have been commercially available for more than a decade but often face problems related to cross-reactivity and similar issues. Attempts to identify type-specific peptide epitopes for use in serology for both HSV-1 and HSV-2 have been limited. We recently demonstrated epitope mapping of envelope glycoprotein G2 and identified a type-specific glycopeptide epitope that broadly recognized HSV-2 infected individuals. In the present work we have performed a comprehensive glycopeptide synthesis and microarray epitope mapping of 14 envelope proteins from HSV-1 and HSV-2, namely, gB, gC, gD, gE, gG, gH, and gI, using sera from HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected individuals and control sera. Several unique type-specific peptide epitopes with high sensitivity were identified and synthesized as one large linear multiepitope sequence using microwave-assisted solid-phase (glyco)peptide synthesis. Microarray validation with clinically defined HSV and Varicella Zoster (VZV) sera confirmed excellent cumulative specificities and sensitivities.

  12. Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christine; Gottlieb, Sami L; Wald, Anna

    2016-06-03

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) and -2 (HSV-2) are highly prevalent global pathogens which commonly cause recurrent oral and genital ulcerations. Less common but more serious complications include meningitis, encephalitis, neonatal infection, and keratitis. HSV-2 infection is a significant driver of the HIV epidemic, increasing the risk of HIV acquisition 3 fold. As current control strategies for genital HSV-2 infection, including antiviral therapy and condom use, are only partially effective, vaccines will be required to reduce infection. Both preventive and therapeutic vaccines for HSV-2 are being pursued and are in various stages of development. We will provide an overview of efforts to develop HSV-2 vaccines, including a discussion of the clinical need for an HSV vaccine, and status of research and development with an emphasis on recent insights from trials of vaccine candidates in clinical testing. In addition, we will touch upon aspects of HSV vaccine development relevant to low and middle income countries. Copyright © 2016 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part I: strategies for utilizing oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripe, Timothy P; Chen, Chun-Yu; Denton, Nicholas L; Haworth, Kellie B; Hutzen, Brian; Leddon, Jennifer L; Streby, Keri A; Wang, Pin-Yi; Markert, James M; Waters, Alicia M; Gillespie, George Yancey; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Friedman, Gregory K

    2015-01-01

    Progress for improving outcomes in pediatric patients with solid tumors remains slow. In addition, currently available therapies are fraught with numerous side effects, often causing significant life-long morbidity for long-term survivors. The use of viruses to kill tumor cells based on their increased vulnerability to infection is gaining traction, with several viruses moving through early and advanced phase clinical testing. The prospect of increased efficacy and decreased toxicity with these agents is thus attractive for pediatric cancer. In part I of this two-part review, we focus on strategies for utilizing oncolytic engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV) to target pediatric malignancies. We discuss mechanisms of action, routes of delivery, and the role of preexisting immunity on antitumor efficacy. Challenges to maximizing oncolytic HSV in children are examined, and we highlight how these may be overcome through various arming strategies. We review the preclinical and clinical evidence demonstrating safety of a variety of oncolytic HSVs. In Part II, we focus on the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic HSV in pediatric tumor types, pediatric clinical advances made to date, and future prospects for utilizing HSV in pediatric patients with solid tumors. PMID:26436135

  14. Interaction of humic acids and humic-acid-like polymers with herpes simplex virus type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöcking, Renate; Helbig, Björn

    The study was performed in order to compare the antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) of synthetic humic-acid-like polymers to that of their low-molecular-weight basic compounds and naturally occurring humic acids (HA) in vitro. HA from peat water showed a moderate antiviral activity at a minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 20 µg/ml. HA-like polymers, i.e. the oxidation products of caffeic acid (KOP), hydrocaffeic acid (HYKOP), chlorogenic acid (CHOP), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (3,4-DHPOP), nordihydroguaretic acid (NOROP), gentisinic acid (GENOP), pyrogallol (PYROP) and gallic acid (GALOP), generally inhibit virus multiplication, although with different potency and selectivity. Of the substances tested, GENOP, KOP, 3,4-DHPOP and HYKOP with MEC values in the range of 2 to 10 µg/ml, proved to be the most potent HSV-1 inhibitors. Despite its lower antiviral potency (MEC 40 µg/ml), CHOP has a remarkable selectivity due to the high concentration of this polymer that is tolerated by the host cells (>640 µg/ml). As a rule, the antiviral activity of the synthetic compounds was restricted to the polymers and was not preformed in the low-molecular-weight basic compounds. This finding speaks in favour of the formation of antivirally active structures during the oxidative polymerization of phenolic compounds and, indirectly, of corresponding structural parts in different HA-type substances.

  15. Immune response of T cells during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Huan; Wei, Bin

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a neurotropic member of the alphaherpes virus family, is among the most prevalent and successful human pathogens. HSV-1 can cause serious diseases at every stage of life including fatal disseminated disease in newborns, cold sores, eye disease, and fatal encephalitis in adults. HSV-1 infection can trigger rapid immune responses, and efficient inhibition and clearance of HSV-1 infection rely on both the innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Multiple strategies have been used to restrict host innate immune responses by HSV-1 to facilitate its infection in host cells. The adaptive immunity of the host plays an important role in inhibiting HSV-1 infections. The activation and regulation of T cells are the important aspects of the adaptive immunity. They play a crucial role in host-mediated immunity and are important for clearing HSV-1. In this review, we examine the findings on T cell immune responses during HSV-1 infection, which hold promise in the design of new vaccine candidates for HSV-1.

  16. Infected cell protein 0 functional domains and their coordination in herpes simplex virus replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen that establishes latent infection in ganglia neurons. Its unique life cycle requires a balanced “conquer and compromise” strategy to deal with the host anti-viral defenses. One of HSV-1 α (immediate early) gene products, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), is a multifunctional protein that interacts with and modulates a wide range of cellular defensive pathways. These pathways may locate in different cell compartments, which then migrate or exchange factors upon stimulation, for the purpose of a concerted and effective defense. ICP0 is able to simultaneously attack multiple host pathways by either degrading key restrictive factors or modifying repressive complexes. This is a viral protein that contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase, translocates among different cell compartments and interacts with major defensive complexes. The multiple functional domains of ICP0 can work independently and at the same time coordinate with each other. Dissecting the functional domains of ICP0 and delineating the coordination of these domains will help us understand HSV-1 pathogenicity as well as host defense mechanisms. This article focuses on describing individual ICP0 domains, their biochemical properties and their implication in HSV-1 infection. By putting individual domain functions back into the picture of host anti-viral defense network, this review seeks to elaborate the complex interactions between HSV-1 and its host. PMID:26870669

  17. Rapid host immune response and viral dynamics in herpes simplex virus-2 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Joshua T; Corey, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus-2 (HSV-2) is episodically shed throughout the human genital tract. While high viral load correlates with development of genital ulcers, shedding also commonly occurs even when ulcers are not present, allowing for silent transmission during coitus and contributing to high seroprevalence of HSV-2 worldwide. Frequent viral reactivation occurs despite diverse and complementary host and viral mechanisms within ganglionic tissue that predispose towards latency, suggesting that viral replication may be constantly occurring in a small minority of neurons within the ganglia. Within genital mucosa, the in vivo expansion and clearance rates of HSV-2 are extremely rapid. Resident dendritic cells and memory HSV-specific T cells persist at prior sites of genital tract reactivation, and in conjunction with prompt innate recognition of infected cells, lead to rapid containment of infected cells. Shedding episodes vary greatly in duration and severity within a single person over time: this heterogeneity appears best explained by variation in the densities of host immunity across the genital tract. The fact that immune responses usually control viral replication in genital skin prior to development of lesions provides optimism that enhancing such responses could lead to effective vaccines and immunotherapies. PMID:23467247

  18. Glycoprotein Targeted Therapeutics: A New Era of Anti-Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Thessicar; Park, Paul J.; Shukla, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) is among the most common human pathogens worldwide. Its entry into host cells is an intricate process that relies heavily on the ability of the viral glycoproteins to bind host cellular proteins and to efficiently mediate fusion of the virus envelope with the cell membrane. Acquisition of HSV-1 results in a lifelong latent infection. Due to the cycles of reactivation from a latent state, much emphasis has been placed on the management of infection through the use of DNA synthesis inhibitors. However, new methods are needed to provide more effective treatment at earlier phases of the viral infection and to prevent the development of drug resistance by the virus. This review outlines the infection process and the common therapeutics currently used against the fundamental stages of HSV-1 replication and fusion. The remainder of this article will focus on a new approach for HSV-1 infection control and management, the concept of glycoprotein-receptor targeting. PMID:23440920

  19. Proteomic analysis of the herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 transactivator protein in infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Hyung; Knipe, David M

    2015-06-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 (VP16) tegument protein forms a transactivation complex with the cellular proteins host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) and octamer-binding transcription factor 1 (Oct-1) upon entry into the host cell. VP16 has also been shown to interact with a number of virion tegument proteins and viral glycoprotein H to promote viral assembly, but no comprehensive study of the VP16 proteome has been performed at early times postinfection. We therefore performed a proteomic analysis of VP16-interacting proteins at 3 h postinfection. We confirmed the interaction of VP16 with HCF-1 and a large number of cellular Mediator complex proteins, but most surprisingly, we found that the major viral protein associating with VP16 is the infected cell protein 4 (ICP4) immediate-early (IE) transactivator protein. These results raise the potential for a new function for VP16 in associating with the IE ICP4 and playing a role in transactivation of early and late gene expression, in addition to its well-documented function in transactivation of IE gene expression. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Structural analysis of herpes simplex virus by optical super-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Romain F.; Albecka, Anna; van de Linde, Sebastian; Rees, Eric J.; Crump, Colin M.; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) is one of the most widespread pathogens among humans. Although the structure of HSV-1 has been extensively investigated, the precise organization of tegument and envelope proteins remains elusive. Here we use super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) in combination with a model-based analysis of single-molecule localization data, to determine the position of protein layers within virus particles. We resolve different protein layers within individual HSV-1 particles using multi-colour dSTORM imaging and discriminate envelope-anchored glycoproteins from tegument proteins, both in purified virions and in virions present in infected cells. Precise characterization of HSV-1 structure was achieved by particle averaging of purified viruses and model-based analysis of the radial distribution of the tegument proteins VP16, VP1/2 and pUL37, and envelope protein gD. From this data, we propose a model of the protein organization inside the tegument.

  1. Clinical efficacy of oral and topical acyclovir in herpes simplex virus stromal necrotizing keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surabhi Dutt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of systemic and topical antiviral therapy in the treatment of active herpes simplex virus (HSV necrotizing stromal keratitis (NSK. Design: Prospective interventional case series. Methodology: Patients with a diagnosis of HSV NSK based on history and clinical findings were enrolled in the study. A standard protocol was used for microbiologic investigations. Ten weeks regime of systemic acyclovir and 2 weeks of topical acyclovir was given. Complete ophthalmic examination was performed at every visit. Outcome measures were a reduction in the area of infiltration and improvement in visual acuity. Results: Fifteen patients were enrolled in the study. The mean age of presentation was 51.53 years. The duration of symptoms at presentation ranged from 2 to 8 weeks. HSV1 DNA polymerase chain reaction was positive in 70% cases of those tested. Area of infiltration at trial entry and at the end of 2 weeks of antiviral treatment reduced significantly (P = 0.007. All patients showed a complete resolution of keratitis at the end of study. Conclusion: Topical and systemic acyclovir for treatment of NSK facilitates healing of ulceration. Topical steroids after initial antiviral therapy are safe and decreases inflammation and improve visual recovery. Early initiation of therapy has better outcomes as compared to late presentations.

  2. VP22 herpes simplex virus protein can transduce proteins into stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabanyi, I.; Lojudice, F.H.; Kossugue, P.M. [Centro de Terapia Celular e Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rebelato, E. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Demasi, M.A.; Sogayar, M.C. [Centro de Terapia Celular e Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-02-01

    The type I herpes simplex virus VP22 tegument protein is abundant and well known for its ability to translocate proteins from one cell to the other. In spite of some reports questioning its ability to translocate proteins by attributing the results observed to fixation artifacts or simple attachment to the cell membrane, VP22 has been used to deliver several proteins into different cell types, triggering the expected cell response. However, the question of the ability of VP22 to enter stem cells has not been addressed. We investigated whether VP22 could be used as a tool to be applied in stem cell research and differentiation due to its capacity to internalize other proteins without altering the cell genome. We generated a VP22.eGFP construct to evaluate whether VP22 could be internalized and carry another protein with it into two different types of stem cells, namely adult human dental pulp stem cells and mouse embryonic stem cells. We generated a VP22.eGFP fusion protein and demonstrated that, in fact, it enters stem cells. Therefore, this system may be used as a tool to deliver various proteins into stem cells, allowing stem cell research, differentiation and the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells in the absence of genome alterations.

  3. Antiviral resistance in herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piret, Jocelyne; Boivin, Guy

    2016-12-01

    Aciclovir (ACV) is the first-line drug for the management of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections. Long-term administration of ACV for the treatment of severe infections in immunocompromised patients can lead to the development of drug resistance. Furthermore, the emergence of isolates resistant to ACV is increasingly recognized in immunocompetent individuals with herpetic keratitis. This review describes the mechanisms involved in drug resistance for HSV and VZV, the laboratory diagnosis and management of patients with infections refractory to ACV therapy. Genotypic testing is more frequently performed for the diagnosis of infections caused by drug-resistant HSV or VZV isolates. Molecular biology-based systems for the generation of recombinant viruses have been developed to link unknown mutations with their drug phenotypes. Fast and sensitive methods based on next-generation sequencing will improve the detection of heterogeneous viral populations of drug-resistant viruses and their temporal changes during antiviral therapy, which could allow better patient management. Novel promising compounds acting on targets that differ from the viral DNA polymerase are under clinical development. Antiviral drug resistance monitoring for HSV and VZV is required for a rational use of antiviral therapy in high-risk populations.

  4. Linear antimicrobial peptides with activity against herpes simplex virus 1 and Aichi virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas Boas, Liana Costa Pereira; de Lima, Lídia Maria Pinto; Migliolo, Ludovico; Mendes, Gabriele Dos Santos; de Jesus, Maianne Gonçalves; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Silva, Paula Andréia

    2017-03-01

    Viruses are the major cause of disease and mortality worldwide. Nowadays there are treatments based on antivirals or prophylaxis with vaccines. However, the rising number of reports of viral resistance to current antivirals and the emergence of new types of virus has concerned the scientific community. In this scenario, the search for alternative treatments has led scientists to the discovery of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) derived from many different sources. Since some of them have shown antiviral activities, here we challenged 10 synthetic peptides from different animal and plant sources against, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), and Aichi virus. Among them, the highlight was Pa-MAP from the polar fish Pleuronectes americanus, which caused around 90% of inhibition of the HSV with a selectivity index of 5 and a virucidal mechanism of action. Moreover, LL-37 from human neutrophils showed 96% of inhibition against the Aichi virus, showing a selectivity index of 3.4. The other evaluated peptides did not show significant antiviral activity. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that Pa-MAP seems to be a reliable candidate for a possible alternative drug to treat HSV-1 infections. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 108: 1-6, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Sex partners and herpes simplex virus type 2 in the epidemiology of cancer of the cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, S; Rawls, W; Swanson, M; McCurtis, J

    1982-05-01

    The authors examined the interaction of exposure to various numbers of sex partners and evidence of antibodies to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in cervical neoplasia in 181 cases of cervical dysplasia, carcinoma in situ and cancer of the cervix and 130 control patients in Los Angeles County, California hospitals, in 1974-1979. Studies by the authors and other investigators have found that risk of cancer of the cervix was enhanced with numbers of sex partners, frequency and duration of using the vaginal douche, early age at first pregnancy, and antibodies to HSV-2 as measured by radioimmunoassay. In this study, it was found that for women with only one or no sex partner in their history, risk was elevated if evidence of antibodies to HSV-2 were present. The same was true for women with two or more sex partners. The risk associated with two or more sex partners was not higher than that for women with one sex partner among those positive for HSV-2, and among those negative for HSV-2. Thus, although this inquiry needs replication on larger numbers of women, whatever the other microorganisms or carcinogens patients were exposed to with multiple sex partners, there was no apparent effect beyond the fact that HSV-2 raises the risk of cancer of the cervix. This may strengthen credence in the hypothesis that HSV-2 is an etiologic factor in cervical cancer.

  6. Effect and clinical medicine observation after phacoemulsification for herpes simplex keratitis with cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chun Li

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To research the vision changes after phacoemulsification for herpes simplex keratitis(HSKwith cataract, and the clinical effect of antiviral drugs in preventing HSK relapse as well.METHODS:Twenty-two cases(22 eyeswith HSK combined cataract were treated by phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation, and then randomly divided into two groups. The patients in treatment group received aciclovir tablets and ganciclovir ophthalmic gel, those in control group received ganciclovir ophthalmic gel only. The vision changes after phacoemulsification were observed and the HSK relapse was analyzed.RESULTS: After follow-up of 6 months, the visions of patients in both groups were improved. No relapse of HSK was found in the treatment group, and only one relapse of HSK was found in the control group after 6 months. There were no significant differences in therapy effects. CONCLUSION: Under the protection of antiviral drug, cataract surgery can be applied to patients with HSK recurrence-free more than 6 months, and improve the visions effectively. Ganciclovir ophthalmic gel can effectively prevent the relapse of HSK after cataract surgery.

  7. Ganciclovir uptake in human mammary carcinoma cells expressing herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase

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    Haberkorn, Uwe; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Morr, Iris; Altmann, Annette; Mueller, Markus; Kaick, Gerhard van

    1998-05-01

    Assessment of suicide enzyme activity would have considerable impact on the planning and the individualization of suicide gene therapy of malignant tumors. This may be done by determining the pharmacokinetics of specific substrates. We generated ganciclovir (GCV)-sensitive human mammary carcinoma cell lines after transfection with a retroviral vector bearing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene. Thereafter, uptake measurements and HPLC analyses were performed up to 48 h in an HSV-tk-expressing cell line and in a wild-type cell line using tritiated GCV. HSV-tk-expressing cells showed higher GCV uptake and phosphorylation than control cells, whereas in wild-type MCF7 cells no phosphorylated GCV was detected. In bystander experiments the total GCV uptake was related to the amount of HSV-tk-expressing cells. Furthermore, the uptake of GCV correlated closely with the growth inhibition (r=0.92). Therefore, the accumulation of specific substrates may serve as an indicator of the HSV-tk activity and of therapy outcome. Inhibition and competition experiments demonstrated slow transport of GCV by the nucleoside carriers. The slow uptake and low affinity to HSV-tk indicate that GCV is not an ideal substrate for the nucleoside transport systems or for HSV-tk. This may be the limiting factor for therapy success, necessitating the search for better substrates of HSV-tk.

  8. Herpes simplex virus-2 transmission probability estimates based on quantity of viral shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Joshua T; Mayer, Bryan T; Fong, Youyi; Swan, David A; Wald, Anna

    2014-06-06

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-2 is periodically shed in the human genital tract, most often asymptomatically, and most sexual transmissions occur during asymptomatic shedding. It would be helpful to identify a genital viral load threshold necessary for transmission, as clinical interventions that maintain viral quantity below this level would be of high utility. However, because viral expansion, decay and re-expansion kinetics are extremely rapid during shedding episodes, it is impossible to directly measure genital viral load at the time of sexual activity. We developed a mathematical model based on reproducing shedding patterns in transmitting partners, and median number of sex acts prior to transmission in discordant couples, to estimate infectivity of single viral particles in the negative partner's genital tract. We then inferred probability estimates for transmission at different levels of genital tract viral load in the transmitting partner. We predict that transmission is unlikely at viral loads less than 10(4) HSV DNA copies. Moreover, most transmissions occur during prolonged episodes with high viral copy numbers. Many shedding episodes that result in transmission do not reach the threshold of clinical detection, because the ulcer remains very small, highlighting one reason why HSV-2 spreads so effectively within populations.

  9. Visualization of herpes simplex virus type 1 virions using fluorescent colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Lyns; Joshi, Poorval; Dingle, Laura; Huang, Eugene; Grzesik, Peter; Desai, Prashant J

    2017-03-01

    Our laboratory was one of the first to engineer a live fluorescent tag, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), that marked the capsid of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and subsequently maturing virus as the particle made its way to the cell surface. In the present study we sought to increase the repertoire of colors available as fusion to the small capsid protein, VP26, so that they can be used alone or in conjunction with other fluorescent tags (fused to other HSV proteins) to follow the virus as it enters and replicates within the cell. We have now generated viruses expressing VP26 fusions with Cerulean, Venus, mOrange, tdTomato, mCherry, and Dronpa3 fluorescent proteins. These fusions were made in a repaired UL35 gene (VP26) background. These fusions do not affect the replication properties of the virus expressing the fusion polypeptide and the fusion tag was stably associated with intranuclear capsids and mature virions. Of note we could not isolate viruses expressing fusions with fluorescent proteins that have a tendency to dimerize. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Global and Regional Estimates of Prevalent and Incident Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infections in 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine J Looker

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 commonly causes orolabial ulcers, while HSV-2 commonly causes genital ulcers. However, HSV-1 is an increasing cause of genital infection. Previously, the World Health Organization estimated the global burden of HSV-2 for 2003 and for 2012. The global burden of HSV-1 has not been estimated.We fitted a constant-incidence model to pooled HSV-1 prevalence data from literature searches for 6 World Health Organization regions and used 2012 population data to derive global numbers of 0-49-year-olds with prevalent and incident HSV-1 infection. To estimate genital HSV-1, we applied values for the proportion of incident infections that are genital.We estimated that 3709 million people (range: 3440-3878 million aged 0-49 years had prevalent HSV-1 infection in 2012 (67%, with highest prevalence in Africa, South-East Asia and Western Pacific. Assuming 50% of incident infections among 15-49-year-olds are genital, an estimated 140 million (range: 67-212 million people had prevalent genital HSV-1 infection, most of which occurred in the Americas, Europe and Western Pacific.The global burden of HSV-1 infection is huge. Genital HSV-1 burden can be substantial but varies widely by region. Future control efforts, including development of HSV vaccines, should consider the epidemiology of HSV-1 in addition to HSV-2, and especially the relative contribution of HSV-1 to genital infection.

  11. Current Concepts for Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection: Diagnostics and Pathogenesis of Genital Tract Shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christine; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is a DNA virus that is efficiently transmitted through intimate genital tract contact and causes persistent infection that cannot be eliminated. HSV-2 may cause frequent, symptomatic self-limited genital ulcers, but in most persons infection is subclinical. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the virus is frequently shed from genital surfaces even in the absence of signs or symptoms of clinical disease and that the virus can be transmitted during these periods of shedding. Furthermore, HSV-2 shedding is detected throughout the genital tract and may be associated with genital tract inflammation, which likely contributes to increased risk of HIV acquisition. This review focuses on HSV diagnostics, as well as what we have learned about the importance of frequent genital HSV shedding for (i) HSV transmission and (ii) genital tract inflammation, as well as (iii) the impact of HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition and transmission. We conclude with discussion of future areas of research to push the field forward. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Recurrence rates of herpes simplex virus keratitis in contact lens and non-contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucci, Joti Juneja; Utz, Virginia M; Galor, Anat; Feuer, William; Jeng, Bennie H

    2009-07-01

    To evaluate the recurrence rates of herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis in contact lens wearers compared with non-contact lens wearers. Retrospective cohort study. Charts of patients diagnosed with HSV keratitis seen at the Cleveland Clinic between January 2001 and December 2004 were reviewed. One hundred seventeen patients were included in this study: 21 contact lens wearers and 96 non-contact lens wearers. Contact lens wearers were found to have a higher median recurrence rate (0.4 episodes/year) compared with non-contact lens wearers (0.2 episodes/year) (P=0.02). A multivariate regression evaluating factors predictive of the number of recurrences found that contact lens use remained a significant predictive variable (P=0.02) when accounting for patient demographic and disease factors and variable follow-up time. Patients with a history of HSV keratitis should be counseled about the potential increased risk of recurrence that may be associated with contact lens wear.

  13. Nelfinavir impairs glycosylation of herpes simplex virus 1 envelope proteins and blocks virus maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Gachelet, Eliora; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Barcy, Serge; Casper, Corey; Lagunoff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Nelfinavir (NFV) is an HIV-1 aspartyl protease inhibitor that has numerous effects on human cells, which impart attractive antitumor properties. NFV has also been shown to have in vitro inhibitory activity against human herpesviruses (HHVs). Given the apparent absence of an aspartyl protease encoded by HHVs, we investigated the mechanism of action of NFV herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in cultured cells. Selection of HSV-1 resistance to NFV was not achieved despite multiple passages under drug pressure. NFV did not significantly affect the level of expression of late HSV-1 gene products. Normal numbers of viral particles appeared to be produced in NFV-treated cells by electron microscopy but remain within the cytoplasm more often than controls. NFV did not inhibit the activity of the HSV-1 serine protease nor could its antiviral activity be attributed to inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. NFV was found to decrease glycosylation of viral glycoproteins B and C and resulted in aberrant subcellular localization, consistent with induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response by NFV. These results demonstrate that NFV causes alterations in HSV-1 glycoprotein maturation and egress and likely acts on one or more host cell functions that are important for HHV replication.

  14. The herpes simplex virus type 2 alkaline DNase activity is essential for replication and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, H

    1986-06-01

    A mutant of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), which is temperature-sensitive (ts) for the induction of an alkaline DNase activity, was examined at a number of different temperatures. Induction of DNase activity by this mutant resembled that of wild-type (wt) virus at 31 degrees C but was greatly reduced at 38.5 degrees C and barely detectable at 39.2 degrees C. Virus DNA synthesis showed similar patterns, exhibiting wt levels at 31 degrees C, reduced levels at 38.5 degrees C and very little incorporation at 39.2 degrees C. Similarly, virus growth in cells infected with this mutant was equal to that of wt at 31 degrees C, slightly reduced at 38.5 degrees C but considerably reduced at 39.2 degrees C. Marker rescue of the ts DNase lesion restored wt levels of virus DNase activity, of virus DNA synthesis and of virus growth, thus providing direct evidence that HSV DNase activity is essential for virus replication.

  15. Nuclear sensing of viral DNA, epigenetic regulation of herpes simplex virus infection, and innate immunity

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    Knipe, David M., E-mail: david_knipe@hms.harvard.edu

    2015-05-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. HSV viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. - Highlights: • HSV lytic and latent gene expression is regulated differentially by epigenetic processes. • The sensors of foreign DNA have not been defined fully. • IFI16 and cGAS cooperate to sense viral DNA in HSV-infected cells. • IFI16 plays a role in both innate sensing of HSV DNA and in restricting its expression.

  16. The herpes simplex virus 1 U{sub S}3 regulates phospholipid synthesis

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    Wild, Peter, E-mail: pewild@access.uzh.ch [Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Institute of Virology, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Oliveira, Anna Paula de [Institute of Virology, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Sonda, Sabrina [Institute for Parasitology, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Schraner, Elisabeth M. [Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Institute of Virology, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Ackermann, Mathias; Tobler, Kurt [Institute of Virology, University of Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-10-25

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear and Golgi membranes for envelopment by phospholipid bilayers. In the absence of U{sub S}3, nuclear membranes form multiple folds harboring virions that suggests disturbance in membrane turnover. Therefore, we investigated phospholipid metabolism in cells infected with the U{sub S}3 deletion mutant R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), and quantified membranes involved in viral envelopment. We report that (i) [{sup 3}H]-choline incorporation into nuclear membranes and cytoplasmic membranes was enhanced peaking at 12 or 20 h post inoculation with wild type HSV-1 and R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), respectively, (ii) the surface area of nuclear membranes increased until 24 h of R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection forming folds that equaled {approx}45% of the nuclear surface, (iii) the surface area of viral envelopes between nuclear membranes equaled {approx}2400 R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) virions per cell, and (iv) during R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection, the Golgi complex expanded dramatically. The data indicate that U{sub S}3 plays a significant role in regulation of membrane biosynthesis.

  17. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part I: strategies for utilizing oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children

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    Timothy P Cripe

    Full Text Available Progress for improving outcomes in pediatric patients with solid tumors remains slow. In addition, currently available therapies are fraught with numerous side effects, often causing significant life-long morbidity for long-term survivors. The use of viruses to kill tumor cells based on their increased vulnerability to infection is gaining traction, with several viruses moving through early and advanced phase clinical testing. The prospect of increased efficacy and decreased toxicity with these agents is thus attractive for pediatric cancer. In part I of this two-part review, we focus on strategies for utilizing oncolytic engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV to target pediatric malignancies. We discuss mechanisms of action, routes of delivery, and the role of preexisting immunity on antitumor efficacy. Challenges to maximizing oncolytic HSV in children are examined, and we highlight how these may be overcome through various arming strategies. We review the preclinical and clinical evidence demonstrating safety of a variety of oncolytic HSVs. In Part II, we focus on the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic HSV in pediatric tumor types, pediatric clinical advances made to date, and future prospects for utilizing HSV in pediatric patients with solid tumors.

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitors improve the replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus in breast cancer cells.

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    James J Cody

    Full Text Available New therapies are needed for metastatic breast cancer patients. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV is an exciting therapy being developed for use against aggressive tumors and established metastases. Although oHSV have been demonstrated safe in clinical trials, a lack of sufficient potency has slowed the clinical application of this approach. We utilized histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, which have been noted to impair the innate antiviral response and improve gene transcription from viral vectors, to enhance the replication of oHSV in breast cancer cells. A panel of chemically diverse HDAC inhibitors were tested at three different doses (LD50 for their ability to modulate the replication of oHSV in breast cancer cells. Several of the tested HDAC inhibitors enhanced oHSV replication at low multiplicity of infection (MOI following pre-treatment of the metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and the oHSV-resistant cell line 4T1, but not in the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. Inhibitors of class I HDACs, including pan-selective compounds, were more effective for increasing oHSV replication compared to inhibitors that selectively target class II HDACs. These studies demonstrate that select HDAC inhibitors increase oHSV replication in breast cancer cells and provides support for pre-clinical evaluation of this combination strategy.

  19. Refractory lymphedema of the hand: an unusual presentation of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection

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    Ali Majdzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV infection of the hand resulting in lymphatic complications such as lymphangitis and lymphedema is exceedingly uncommon. Although these complications typically resolve in 21 days, they can be persistent and may not resolve even with antiviral use, thereby mimicking dyshidrotic eczema or a bacterial event and often being misdiagnosed and inappropriately treated as such. We report a case of frequently recurring HSV infection of the hand over a long period of time resulting in refractory lymphedema which did not resolve with antiviral treatment. We further endeavor to raise awareness about this highly unusual presentation of HSV infection. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted for similar cases using PubMed and Medline. Case Report: This is the first reported case with nearly a decade-long interval between the onset of primary HSV infection and the development of chronic lymphedema. Although valacyclovir significantly reduced the episodic aggravation of the lymphedema, it did not entirely resolve it. Similar cases of persistent lymphedema also included a long history of untreated and recurrent HSV infection of the hand, suggesting that this lymphatic outcome may be circumvented by prompt treatment with antivirals. Conclusion: This case report not only presents a highly uncommon lymphatic manifestation and unusual timeline of exacerbation of the very common HSV infection, but also highlights the importance and benefits of early initiation of antiviral therapy and the prevention of reactivation.

  20. Antiviral activity of extracts from Brazilian seaweeds against herpes simplex virus

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    Angélica Ribeiro Soares

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Organic extracts of 36 species of marine algae (sixteen species of Rhodophyta, eight species of Ochrophyta and twelve species of Chlorophyta from seven locations on the Brazilian coast were evaluated for their anti-HSV-1 and anti-HSV-2 activity resistant to Acyclovir (ACV. Activity tests in crude extracts, followed by the identification of the major compounds present, were performed for all species. The chemical profiles of all crude extracts were obtained by ¹H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. The percentage of extracts with antiviral activity was higher for HSV-1 (86.1% than for HSV-2 (55.5%. The green algae Ulva fasciata and Codium decorticatum both showed the highest activity (99.9% against HSV-1, with triacylglycerols and fatty acids as the major components. The red alga Laurencia dendroidea showed good activity against HSV-1 (97.5% and the halogenated sesquiterpenes obtusol and (--elatol were identified as the major components in the extract. Against HSV-2, the green alga Penicillus capitatus (Chlorophyta and Stypopodium zonale (Ochrophyta were the most active (96.0 and 95.8%. Atomaric acid, a meroditerpene, was identified as the major secondary metabolite in the S. zonale extract. These results reinforce the role of seaweeds as important sources of compounds with the potential to enter into the pipeline for development of new drugs against herpes simplex.

  1. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Myelitis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Raffaele Nardone

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-traumatic myelopathies can result from a wide spectrum of conditions including inflammatory, ischemic, and metabolic disorders. Here, we describe the case of a 60-year old immunocompetent woman who developed acute back pain followed by rapidly ascending flaccid tetraparesis, a C6 sensory level, and sphincter dysfunction within 8 h. Acyclovir and steroids were started on day 2 and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction in cerebrospinal fluid. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a bilateral anterior horn tractopathy expanding from C2 to T2 and cervicothoracic cord swelling. Screening for paraneoplastic antibodies and cancer was negative. Neurophysiology aided in the work-up by corroborating root involvement. Recovery was poor despite early initiation of antiviral treatment, adjuvant anti-inflammatory therapy, and neurorehabilitation efforts. The clinical course, bilateral affection of the anterior horns, and early focal atrophy on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging take a necrotizing myelitis potentially caused by intraneuronal spread of the virus into consideration. Further, we summarize the literature on classical and rare presentations of HSV-2 myeloradiculitis in non-immunocompromised patients and raise awareness for the limited treatment options for a condition with frequent devastating outcome.

  2. Herpes simplex virus vector-mediated delivery of neurturin rescues erectile dysfunction of cavernous nerve injury

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    Kato, Ryuichi; Wolfe, Darren; Coyle, Christian H.; Wechuck, James B.; Tyagi, Pradeep; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Nelson, Joel B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.; Chancellor, Michael B.; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    Summary Neurturin (NTN), a member of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family, is known as an important neurotrphic factor for penis-projecting neurons. We recently demonstrated significant protection from erectile dysfunction (ED) following a replication defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector-mediated GDNF delivery to the injured cavernous nerve. Herein we applied HSV vector-mediated delivery of NTN to this ED model. Rat cavernous nerve was injured bilaterally using a clamp and dry ice. For HSV-treated groups, 20μl of vector stock was administered directly to the damaged nerve. Delivery of an HSV vector expressing both green fluorescent protein (GFP) and lacZ (HSV-LacZ) was used as a control. Intracavernous pressure along with systemic arterial pressure (ICP/AP) was measured 2 and 4 weeks after the nerve injury. Fluorogold (FG) was injected into the penile crus 7 days before sacrifice to assess neuronal survival. Four weeks after nerve injury, rats treated with HSV-NTN exhibited significantly higher ICP/AP compared to untreated or control vector treated groups. The HSV-NTN group had more FG-positive MPG neurons than control group following injury. HSV vector-mediated delivery of NTN could be a viable approach for improvement of erectile dysfunction following cavernous nerve injury. PMID:18668142

  3. Bovine lactoferrin peptidic fragments involved in inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

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    Siciliano, R; Rega, B; Marchetti, M; Seganti, L; Antonini, G; Valenti, P

    1999-10-14

    Bovine lactoferrin (BLf) prevents the infection of some enveloped and naked viruses. To identify BLf sequences responsible for the antiviral activity, we tested 31 HPLC fractions, derived from tryptic digestion of BLf, toward herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Only a few HPLC purified fragments were active against HSV-1, even if at lower extent than the native undigested BLf. Two large fragments, one corresponding to the C-lobe (amino acid sequence 345-689) and the other corresponding to a large portion of the N-lobe (1-280), were inhibitors of HSV-1 infection, while a smaller part of the N-lobe (86-258) was ineffective. Among the low-molecular-weight fragments, only two small peptides, which coeluted in a single chromatographic peak, were effective towards HSV-1. These peptides, both present in the N-lobe, were identified as peptides 222-230 (ADRDQYELL) and 264-269 (EDLIWK). The same peptides, chemically synthesised, were able to inhibit HSV-1 infection only when they were assayed in association. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Immunopathogenic Role of Herpes Simplex Virus in Behçet’s Disease

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    Do Young Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of viral infections, such as herpes simplex virus (HSV infection, in the pathogenesis of Behçet’s disease (BD has been investigated for many years. HSV has been detected in peripheral blood leukocytes, saliva, and genital ulcers of patients with BD. Various cell adhesion molecules on cultured endothelial cells have been induced by HSV in a TNF-α dependent manner. In addition, a BD-like animal model was developed by inoculating ICR mouse earlobes with HSV, and antiviral treatment was effective in improving BD-like symptoms in this model. Still, there are several incompletely characterized proteins that possess antiviral properties and are being investigated as mediators of viral infection-related chronic inflammatory reactions. Although the role of HSV in the pathogenesis of BD remains to be fully established, recent research findings regarding HSV in BD have expanded our understanding of the disease and will hopefully lead to the development of more effective therapeutic agents in the near future.

  5. Incidence of Herpes Simplex Virus Keratitis in HIV/AIDS patients compared with the general population.

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    Burcea, M; Gheorghe, A; Pop, M

    2015-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is associated with a wide spectrum of systemic and ocular infectious diseases. Little information is known about Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) keratoconjunctivitis in association with AIDS. Because HSV-1 is becoming, day by day, a common eye disease (nearly 100% patients of over 60 years old harbor HSV in their trigeminal ganglia at autopsy), this article discussing a worldwide public health problem. The purpose of this paper is to compare the incidence and clinical aspects of HSV-1 Keratitis in HIV/ AIDS patients compared with the general population who develops HSV- 1 Keratitis. The study is retrospective and comparative. Each patient was examined thoroughly at the biomicroscope ocular slit after corneal staining with fluorescein or rose bengal. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure and corneal sensitivity were also examined. From 170 patients with HIV and ocular anterior segment disorders, 47 patients had viral etiology. 58 patients had keratitis; 14 of them were HSV-1 keratitis. Doctors should be aware of the existence of the ocular damage in HIV/ AIDS and emphasize the importance of regular ophthalmologic examination of patients with HIV/ AIDS as HSV infection is common nowadays among the general population.

  6. Induction of uterine cancer with inactivated herpes simplex virus, types 1 and 2

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    Wentz, W.B.; Reagan, J.W.; Heggie, A.D.; Fu, Y.S.; Anthony, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    A series of studies were performed to evaluate the oncogenic potential of inactivated herpes simplex viruses types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) in the mouse cervix. HSV-1 or HSV-2 prepared in HEp-2 cell cultures and inactivated by exposure to formalin or ultraviolet light was applied to the mouse cervix for periods ranging from 20 to 90 weeks. Control mice were exposed for the same period to control fluids. Vaginal cytologic preparations from all animals were examined weekly to detect epithelial abnormalities. Animals were sacrificed and histopathological studies were carried out when cellular changes seen on vaginal smears resembled those indicative of premalignant or malignant changes as previously established in a similar model system using coal tar hydrocarbons. Other animals were exposed for periods up to 90 weeks, or until there was cellular evidence of invasive cancer. Cytologic and histologic materials were coded and evaluated without knowledge of whether they were from virus-exposed or control animals. Premalignant and malignant cervical lesions similar to those that occur in women were encountered in 78 to 90% of the virus-exposed animals. All controls were normal. Invasive cancer was detected in 24 to 60% of the animals and dysplasia was found in 18 to 66%. The yield of invasive cancer was twice as great after exposure to ultraviolet-inactivated HSV-2 as compared with formalin-inactivated virus. Various histologic grades of carcinoma of the cervix and endometrium were found. No primary lesions were found in the vagina or ovaries.

  7. Involvement of intracellular free Ca2+ in enhanced release of herpes simplex virus by hydrogen peroxide

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    Ogawa Yuzo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It was reported that elevation of the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i by a calcium ionophore increased the release of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1. Freely diffusible hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is implied to alter Ca2+ homeostasis, which further enhances abnormal cellular activity, causing changes in signal transduction, and cellular dysfunction. Whether H2O2 could affect [Ca2+]i in HSV-1-infected cells had not been investigated. Results H2O2 treatment increased the amount of cell-free virus and decreased the proportion of viable cells. After the treatment, an elevation in [Ca2+]i was observed and the increase in [Ca2+]i was suppressed when intracellular and cytosolic Ca2+ were buffered by Ca2+ chelators. In the presence of Ca2+ chelators, H2O2-mediated increases of cell-free virus and cell death were also diminished. Electron microscopic analysis revealed enlarged cell junctions and a focal disintegration of the plasma membrane in H2O2-treated cells. Conclusion These results indicate that H2O2 can elevate [Ca2+]i and induces non-apoptotic cell death with membrane lesions, which is responsible for the increased release of HSV-1 from epithelial cells.

  8. Herpes simplex virus detection in oral mucosa lesions in patients undergoing oncologic therapy.

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    Sepúlveda Tebache, Ester; Brethauer Meier, Ursula; Jiménez Moraga, Marco; Morales Figueroa, Rocío; Rojas Castro, Jaime; Le Fort Canales, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The presence of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) has been a frequent detection in gingivitis and ulcerations of oral mucosa in patients undergoing oncologic therapy. In these patients, lesions tend to show atypical clinical patterns, leading to misdiagnosis. To detect HSV, using an ELISA test, in oral lesions of patients under oncologic therapy, to determine localization of these lesions in the oral cavity, to relate their presence with the general diagnosis of the patient and to compare the test results with the previous clinical diagnosis of the lesions. Thirty lesions where examined in nineteen pediatric patients under oncologic therapy. Direct samples of all lesions were taken and an ELISA test for HSV type I and II was applied to them. General diagnosis of the patients was consigned, as well as localization of the lesions in the oral cavity and clinical diagnosis of them. A database was elaborated with all the information. 33% of lesions were positive to the test, most of them in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Localization of lesions was not restricted to areas of mucosa attached to periosteum, but also in areas like the dorsum of the tongue. Positive predictivity of clinical diagnosis was 56,25% and negative predictive index was 92,86%. Sensitivity of the test was 90% and specificity was 65%. It is very important to corroborate clinical diagnosis of gingivitis and ulcerative lesions of the oral cavity of patients under oncologic therapy with laboratory tests, because of the atypical clinical presentation that can lead to misdiagnosis.

  9. Nelfinavir Impairs Glycosylation of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Envelope Proteins and Blocks Virus Maturation

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    Soren Gantt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nelfinavir (NFV is an HIV-1 aspartyl protease inhibitor that has numerous effects on human cells, which impart attractive antitumor properties. NFV has also been shown to have in vitro inhibitory activity against human herpesviruses (HHVs. Given the apparent absence of an aspartyl protease encoded by HHVs, we investigated the mechanism of action of NFV herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in cultured cells. Selection of HSV-1 resistance to NFV was not achieved despite multiple passages under drug pressure. NFV did not significantly affect the level of expression of late HSV-1 gene products. Normal numbers of viral particles appeared to be produced in NFV-treated cells by electron microscopy but remain within the cytoplasm more often than controls. NFV did not inhibit the activity of the HSV-1 serine protease nor could its antiviral activity be attributed to inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. NFV was found to decrease glycosylation of viral glycoproteins B and C and resulted in aberrant subcellular localization, consistent with induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response by NFV. These results demonstrate that NFV causes alterations in HSV-1 glycoprotein maturation and egress and likely acts on one or more host cell functions that are important for HHV replication.

  10. Dependence of herpes simplex virus type 1-induced cell fusion on cell type

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    Bzik, D.J.; Person, S.

    1981-04-15

    Syncytial mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), such as syn20, cause extensive fusion of human embryonic lung (HEL) cells but only a small amount of fusion of human epidermoid carcinoma No. 2 (HEp-2) cells. In order to determine the cellular basis of this difference in fusion, sparse cultures of syn20-infected HEL or HEp-2 cells, previously labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine, were surrounded with uninfected, unlabeled HEL or HEp-2 cells. The fusion of radioactive with nonradioactive cells was determined at different times after infection using radioautography. The major difference in the fusion capacity of HEL and HEp-2 cells was not due to a difference in cell-surface receptors for a fusion factor in the two cell types. The process of infection of HEp-2 cells did not cause the plasma membranes of the cells to become refractory to fusion, because syn20-infected HEL cells fused equally well with either uninfected or infected HEp-2 cells. In a mixed infection with equal numbers of MP and its nonsyncytial parent, mP, extensive fusion was observed for infected HEL cells and significantly less fusion was observed for infected African green monkey (CV-1), baby hamster kidney (BHK-21), and HEp-2 cells.

  11. Genetic studies of cell fusion induced by herpes simplex virus type 1

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    Read, G.S.; Person, S.; Keller, P.M.

    1980-07-01

    Eight cell fusion-causing syn mutants were isolated from the KOS strain of herpes simplex virus type 1. Unlike the wild-type virus, the mutants produced plaques containing multinucleated cells, or syncytia. Fusion kinetics curves were established with a Coulter Counter assay for the mutants and wild-type virus in single infections of human embryonic lung (HEL) cells, for the mutants and wild-type virus in mixed infections (dominance test), and for pairs of mutants in mixed infection and proceeded with an exponential decrease in the number of small single cells. At some later time that was characteristic of the mutant, there was a significant reduction in the rate of fusion for all but possibly one of the mutants. Although the wild-type virus did not produce syncytial plaques, it did induce a small amount of fusion that stopped abruptly about 2 h after it started. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that both mutants and wild type induce an active fusion inducer and that the activity of this inducer is subsequently inhibited. The extent of fusion is apparently determined by the length of the interval during which the fusion inducer is active. That fusion is actively inhibited in wild-type infections is indicated by the observation that syn mutant-infected cells fused more readily with uninfected cells than with wild type-infected cells.

  12. Enhanced replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 in human cells

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    Miller, C.S.; Smith, K.O. (Univ. of Kentucky College of Dentistry, Lexington (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The effects of DNA-damaging agents on the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were assessed in vitro. Monolayers of human lung fibroblast cell lines were exposed to DNA-damaging agents (methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS), ultraviolet light (UV), or gamma radiation (GR)) at specific intervals, before or after inoculation with low levels of HSV-1. The ability of cell monolayers to support HSV-1 replication was measured by direct plaque assay and was compared with that of untreated control samples. In this system, monolayers of different cell lines infected with identical HSV-1 strains demonstrated dissimilar levels of recovery of the infectious virus. Exposure of DNA-repair-competent cell cultures to DNA-damaging agents produced time-dependent enhanced virus replication. Treatment with agent before virus inoculation significantly (p less than 0.025) increased the number of plaques by 10 to 68%, compared with untreated control cultures, while treatment with agent after virus adsorption significantly increased (p less than 0.025) the number of plaques by 7 to 15%. In a parallel series of experiments, cells deficient in DNA repair (xeroderma pigmentosum) failed to support enhanced virus replication. These results suggest that after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, fibroblasts competent in DNA repair amplify the replication of HSV-1, and that DNA-repair mechanisms that act on a variety of chromosomal lesions may be involved in the repair and biological activation of HSV-1 genomes.

  13. The Effect of Cumin Seed Extracts against Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in Vero Cell Culture

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    Mohammad Motamedifar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L. [family Apiaceae]seed essential oil is reported to have antiseptic activity.Until now the antiviral properties of cumin seed extracts onviruses such as herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 have not beenstudied. The objective of this study was to investigate the invitro effects of aqueous, methanolic and hydroalcoholic extractsof cumin seed on HSV-1 growth in Vero cell line.Methods: Antiviral activity of various concentrations aqueous,hydroalcoholic and methanolic extracts of cumin seed in Verocells were studied using plaque reduction assays. The 50%cytotoxic concentration (CC50, 50% inhibitory concentration(IC50, and therapeutic index of the effective extracts were calculated.Results: Methanolic extract of cumin seed showed a significantantiviral activity on HSV-1 in Vero cell line. Its CC50 forVero cells, IC50 and the therapeutic index for HSV-1 were0.45, 0.18 mg/mL and 2.5, respectively. Aqueous and hydroalcoholicextracts of cumin seeds showed no inhibitory effecton HSV-1.Conclusion: The methanolic extract of cumin seed producesanti-HSV-1 effect. Probable interference of phenolic compoundswith fusion of Vero cell membrane and HSV-1 envelopemight be the mechanism of such inhibitory effect. Furtherstudies are required to ascertain its in vivo antiviral propertiesand potential toxicity.Iran J Med Sci 2010; 35(4: 304-309.

  14. Acyclovir resistant acute herpes simplex encephalitis associated with acute retinal necrosis: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Haruchika; Fukae, Jiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Aoki, Mikiko; Nabeshima, Kazuki; Tsuboi, Yoshio

    2017-05-27

    A 55-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for investigation of high fever, decreased consciousness and bilateral visual impairment. His cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed pleocytosis of mononuclear cells and an increased protein concentration. FLAIR images revealed multiple high-intensity lesions in the frontal lobe, part of which was enhanced with gadolinium. Despite initiating treatment with acyclovir and corticosteroids, his consciousness and visual acuity deteriorated. Immunopathological examination of brain biopsies showed numerous herpes simplex virus type 2-positive neurons and macrophages, leading to a diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). Fundoscopic examination revealed multiple foci of retinitis with vasculopathies, and inflammation in the anterior chamber and vitreous, indicating acute retinal necrosis (ARN). Foscarnet treatment was initiated in place of acyclovir and his consciousness improved, with a slight improvement in visual acuity. ARN is typically caused by a herpes virus infection limited to the eyeball, and rarely in combination with HSE. In such cases, there is a latency of approximately 2-4 weeks between ARN and the onset of encephalitis. Our case is unique in that HSE and ARN developed simultaneously, and it highlights that there may not always be a latency between the onsets of the two disorders. Finally, foscarnet should be considered in cases of HSE and ARN with acyclovir resistance.

  15. Herpes simplex virus type-1(HSV-1 oncolytic and highly fusogenic mutants carrying the NV1020 genomic deletion effectively inhibit primary and metastatic tumors in mice

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    David Andrew T

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NV1020 oncolytic herpes simplex virus type-1 has shown significant promise for the treatment of many different types of tumors in experimental animal models and human trials. Previously, we described the construction and use of the NV1020-like virus OncSyn to treat human breast tumors implanted in nude mice. The syncytial mutation gKsyn1 (Ala-to-Val at position 40 was introduced into the OncSyn viral genome cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome using double-red mutagenesis in E. coli to produce the OncdSyn virus carrying syncytial mutations in both gB(syn3 and gK(syn1. Results The OncdSyn virus caused extensive virus-induced cell fusion in cell culture. The oncolytic potential of the OncSyn and OncdSyn viruses was tested in the highly metastatic syngeneic mouse model system, which utilizes 4T1 murine mammary cancer cells implanted within the interscapular region of Balb/c mice. Mice were given three consecutive intratumor injections of OncSyn, OncdSyn, or phosphate buffered saline four days apart. Both OncSyn and OncdSyn virus injections resulted in significant reduction of tumor sizes (p Conclusion These results show that the attenuated, but highly fusogenic OncSyn and OncdSyn viruses can effectively reduce primary and metastatic breast tumors in immuncompetent mice. The available bac-cloned OncSyn and OncdSyn viral genomes can be rapidly modified to express a number of different anti-tumor and immunomodulatory genes that can further enhance their anti-tumor potency.

  16. Laryngopharyngeal reflux and herpes simplex virus type 2 are possible risk factors for adult-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (prospective case-control study).

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    Formánek, M; Jančatová, D; Komínek, P; Matoušek, P; Zeleník, K

    2017-06-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) causes recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). Although HPV prevalence is high, the incidence of papillomatosis is low. Thus, factors other than HPV infection probably contribute to RRP. This study investigated whether patients with papillomatosis are more often infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 and chlamydia trachomatis (ChT) and whether laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) occurs in this group of patients more often. Prospective case-control study. Department of Otorhinolaryngology of University Hospital. The study included 20 patients with adult-onset RRP and 20 adult patients with vocal cord cyst and no pathology of laryngeal mucosa (control group). Immunohistochemical analysis of pepsin, HPV, herpes simplex virus type 2 and ChT was performed in biopsy specimens of laryngeal papillomas and of healthy laryngeal mucosa (control group) obtained from medial part of removed vocal cord cyst during microlaryngoscopy procedures. Pathologic LPR (pepsin in tissue) was diagnosed in 8/20 (40.0%) patients with papillomatosis and in 0/20 control patients (P = .003). Herpes simplex virus type 2 was present in 9/20 (45.0%) patients with papillomatosis and in 0/20 control patients (P = .001). Five specimens were positive for both pepsin and herpes simplex virus type 2. No samples were positive for ChT. There were no significant differences between groups for age, body mass index, diabetes mellitus and gastrooesophageal reflux disease. Tobacco exposure was not more frequent in RRP group either (P = .01). Results show that LPR and herpes simplex virus type 2 are significantly more often present in patients with RRP. LPR and herpes simplex virus type 2 might activate latent HPV infection and thereby be possible risk factors for RRP. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Analysis of Colorectal Cancer and Polyps for the Presence of Herpes Simplex Virus and Epstein - Barr virus DNA Sequences by Polymerase Chain Reaction

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    Sahar Mehrabani-Khasraghi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide with more than one million new cases diagnosed each year. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of herpes simplex virus and Epstein-Barr virus in patients with colorectal carcinomas and polyps in comparison with healthy subjects by using the polymerase chain reaction technique. Methods: In this analytical case-control study, we selected 15 patients with colorectal cancer, 20 patients with colorectal polyps and 35 patients without malignancy as controls. Biopsy specimens were frozen under sterile conditions at -20ºC. After DNA extraction, analysis of polymerase chain reaction to detect herpes simplex virus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA in tissue samples was performed. Statistical analysis was performed with the χ2 test. Results: We observed herpes simplex DNA in 33.3% of tumor samples (5 of 15 and 20% from the non-malignant control group (7 of 35. There was no herpes simplex DNA in the polyp tissues (0 of 20. Epstein-Barr DNA was found in 60% of tumor samples (9 of 15, 35% of polyp samples (7 of 20, and 40% of the non-malignant control group (14 of 35. Statistical analysis showed no significant association between the prevalence of herpes simplex and Epstein- Barr viruses and the incidence of colorectal cancer and polyps compared with the control group. Conclusion: The results demonstrate a lack of direct molecular evidence to support an association between herpes simplex and Epstein-Barr viruses with human colorectal malignancies. These results do not exclude a possible oncogenic role of these viruses to infect different colon cells.

  18. Ganciclovir ophthalmic gel 0.15%: safety and efficacy of a new treatment for herpes simplex keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Herbert E; Haw, Weldon H

    2012-07-01

    Until the availability of ganciclovir ophthalmic gel in 2009, the only option for treating herpes simplex (HSV) keratitis in the USA has been trifluridine (TFT), a compound with tolerability issues related to its nonselective inhibition of DNA replication in both normal cells and virus-infected cells. Ganciclovir has selective pharmacologic activity on viral thymidine kinase and a lower potential for toxicity to healthy human cells. Our objective was to evaluate safety and efficacy findings reported with the use of ganciclovir ophthalmic gel, both for HSV keratitis and other potential clinical indications. Clinical and preclinical data with ganciclovir were identified through a comprehensive electronic search of PubMed and Medline, using the search terms ganciclovir, ganciclovir 0.15% ophthalmic gel, acyclovir, acyclovir ointment 3%, herpes simplex keratitis, treatment of herpes simplex keratitis, and adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis. The authors were also granted access to previously unpublished ganciclovir surveillance safety data from Bausch & Lomb, Inc. No clinical data comparing ganciclovir ophthalmic gel to 1% trifluorothymidine (TFT) for HSV keratitis could be identified. Four international, randomized, multicenter clinical trials have demonstrated that ganciclovir gel is at least as effective as acyclovir ointment for the treatment of HSV keratitis. Ganciclovir gel was better tolerated, with lower rates of blurred vision, eye irritation, and punctate keratitis. Recent data also indicate it may hold promise as a treatment for adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis. Worldwide safety surveillance data collected over the past 10-15 years in over 30 countries suggests an extremely low rate of spontaneously reported adverse events with ganciclovir ophthalmic gel. Current data suggest that ganciclovir ophthalmic gel has similar efficacy as acyclovir ointment for the treatment of HSV keratitis and is better tolerated. Clinical head-to-head studies comparing ganciclovir and

  19. A proprietary topical preparation containing EGCG-stearate and glycerin with inhibitory effects on herpes simplex virus: case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Man; Jiang, Jinyan; Zheng, Rongrong; Pearl, Henna; Dickinson, Douglas; Fu, Baiping; Hsu, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    The effects of a proprietary topical formulation containing EGCG-stearate in 100% glycerin USP were studied in two volunteer patients with recurrent herpes simplex (HSV) type 1. Application during early onset (prodromal stage) in a patient with herpes labialis prevented lesion progression. In a second patient with herpetic stomatitis, application of the formula during a later stage (inflammation stage) led to a remarkably shortened duration of symptoms. In contrast, a third patient provided 100% glycerin USP only as placebo failed to demonstrate any therapeutic or preventive effect against lesion occurrence or duration of lesion and healing time. These results suggest that this proprietary topical preparation could be used effectively to prevent and treat HSV-induced symptoms, and warrants further clinical investigation.

  20. Clinical Efficacy of Oral Ganciclovir for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Recurrent Herpes Simplex Keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herpes simplex keratitis (HSK caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1, which has high recurrent rate and incidence of severe vision loss, is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the world. The aim was to explore the clinical efficacy of oral ganciclovir (GCV in the prevention of recurrent HSK. Methods: A multicenter, prospective, randomized, single-blind, and controlled clinical trial was conducted from April 2010 to June 2013. One hundred seventy-three patients (173 eyes involved who were diagnosed as recurrent HSK definitely, including stromal keratitis and corneal endotheliitis, were divided into three groups randomly: negative control (placebo group was topically administered with 0.15% GCV ophthalmic gel, 4 times per day and 0.1% fluorometholone eye drops, 3 times per day until resolution of HSK; positive control acyclovir (ACV group was topically adopted the same ophthalmic gel and eye drops and additionally received oral ACV 400 mg 5 times a day for 10 weeks and followed by 400 mg 2 times per day for 6 months; test GCV group was topically adopted the same treatment as negative control group and additionally received oral GCV 1000 mg 3 times per day for 8 weeks. The symptoms and signs were evaluated before and after the therapy 1 st week, 2 nd week and then followed up every 2 weeks until recovery. Furthermore, we followed up recurrence of HSK for every 3 months after recovery and then assessed the cure time, recurrent rate and adverse reactions. Results: One hundred and seventy-three patients were followed up 7-48 months (mean 32.1 ± 12.3 months, but 34 patients were failed to follow-up. The cure time was 12.1 ± 4.3, 11.9 ± 4.0 weeks in negative control (placebo group and positive control ACV group respectively (P = 0.991, which was longer than that in test GCV group (8.6 ± 2.8 weeks and there was a significant difference between test GCV group and negative control (placebo group or positive control ACV group (P

  1. Clinical efficacy of oral ganciclovir for prophylaxis and treatment of recurrent herpes simplex keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Linnong; Wu, Nianlang; Ma, Xinjun; Xu, Jianjiang

    2015-01-05

    Herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), which has high recurrent rate and incidence of severe vision loss, is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the world. The aim was to explore the clinical efficacy of oral ganciclovir (GCV) in the prevention of recurrent HSK. A multicenter, prospective, randomized, single-blind, and controlled clinical trial was conducted from April 2010 to June 2013. One hundred seventy-three patients (173 eyes involved) who were diagnosed as recurrent HSK definitely, including stromal keratitis and corneal endotheliitis, were divided into three groups randomly: negative control (placebo) group was topically administered with 0.15% GCV ophthalmic gel, 4 times per day and 0.1% fluorometholone eye drops, 3 times per day until resolution of HSK; positive control acyclovir (ACV) group was topically adopted the same ophthalmic gel and eye drops and additionally received oral ACV 400 mg 5 times a day for 10 weeks and followed by 400 mg 2 times per day for 6 months; test GCV group was topically adopted the same treatment as negative control group and additionally received oral GCV 1000 mg 3 times per day for 8 weeks. The symptoms and signs were evaluated before and after the therapy 1 st week, 2 nd week and then followed up every 2 weeks until recovery. Furthermore, we followed up recurrence of HSK for every 3 months after recovery and then assessed the cure time, recurrent rate and adverse reactions. One hundred and seventy-three patients were followed up 7-48 months (mean 32.1 ± 12.3 months), but 34 patients were failed to follow-up. The cure time was 12.1 ± 4.3, 11.9 ± 4.0 weeks in negative control (placebo) group and positive control ACV group respectively (P = 0.991), which was longer than that in test GCV group (8.6 ± 2.8 weeks) and there was a significant difference between test GCV group and negative control (placebo) group or positive control ACV group (P = 0.000). Furthermore, the recurrent rate

  2. Seroprevalencia de la infección por el virus herpes simplex tipo 2 en tres grupos poblacionales de la Ciudad de México Herpes simplex virus type 2 seroprevalence among three female population groups from Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J Conde-González

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar la seroprevalencia de infección por el virus herpes simplex tipo 2 y los factores epidemiológicos asociados a ella, en tres grupos de población femenina de la Ciudad de México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal efectuado en el año 2000, que incluyó mujeres de la Ciudad de México diagnosticadas con cáncer de mama, cáncer cervical , y mujeres de población general negativas al Papanicolaou. Todas las participantes proporcionaron su consentimiento informado para responder un cuestionario sociodemográfico y de vida sexual, y permitir la toma de una muestra sanguínea. La presencia de anticuerpos contra el virus herpes simplex tipo 2 entre las mujeres se realizó por la técnica de "Western blot"específica para el virus herpes simplex tipo 2; las asociaciones entre estos resultados y los datos de la encuesta se analizaron estadísticamente, de manera cruda y ajustada. RESULTADOS: Las mujeres concáncer cervical tuvieron una seroprevalencia de infección por el virus herpes simplex tipo 2 de 46.8% (191/408; las de población general negativas al Papanicolaou de 29.3% (214/730, y aquellas con cáncer de mama de 22.6% (29/128. Las variables asociadas significativamente a la seropositividad contra este virus fueron la edad creciente, el aumento en el número de parejas sexuales, tener cáncer cervical, y entre las mujeres con esa patología, el inicio antes de los 21 años de edad de la actividad sexual y el estar divorciadas o separadas. CONCLUSIONES: Los hallazgos observados revelaron diferencias estadísticas en la seroprevalencia del virus herpes, de acuerdo con los grupos poblacionales estudiados. La frecuencia global de la infección viral entre las participantes las sitúa en un riesgo intermedio, en comparación con otros grupos poblacionales que en México son de alto y bajo riesgo (trabajadoras sexuales y estudiantes universitarias, respectivamente, analizados en años recientes. Las principales caracter

  3. Lesiones por virus Herpes simplex y estomatitis aftosa recidivante. Estudio epidemiológico en una muestra elegida al azar

    OpenAIRE

    Puy Carrión, David; Chimenos Küstner, Eduardo; Dorado, C.

    1996-01-01

    De entre las lesiones observadas en la cavidad bucal, las producidas por el virus Herpes simplex (VHS) y las originadas en la estomatitis aftosa recidivante (EAR) representan una parte importante de las lesiones que el odontólogo o estomatólogo encuentra cotidianamente. Aunque cada uno de estos dos procesos posee una etiopatogenia y unas características diferentes, en algunas ocasiones su diagnóstico puede llegar a ser controvertido y difícil, debido a su similar apariencia clínica, planteánd...

  4. Cloning of the herpes simplex virus type 1 genome as a novel luciferase-tagged infectious bacterial artificial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You; Wang, Shuai; Zhu, Hua; Zheng, Chunfu

    2011-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen of skin and mucous membranes. In the present study, the genome of the HSV-1 F strain was cloned as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone without any deletions of the viral genes. Additionally, a firefly luciferase cassette was inserted to generate a novel luciferase-expressing HSV-1 BAC. Importantly, the resulting recombinant HSV-1 BAC Luc behaved indistinguishably from the wild-type virus in Vero cells, and the luciferase activity could be easily quantified in vitro. Thus, this novel HSV-1 BAC system would serve as a powerful tool for gene function profiling.

  5. [Follow-up serological study of herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus in Cuban patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resik, S; Santana, E; Rivero, J; Pérez, A B; Kourí, V; Larralde, O

    1997-01-01

    The evolution serological response against the herpes simplex virus and citomegalovirus in HIV infected patients grouped into different stages of the disease was studied. Fluctuations in the TPG of antibodies were observed in these values in a cyclical way through time. There was a greater significant difference among the TPG of antibodies against HSV in the group of asymptomatic patients compared with AIDS patients and with those who died. There is a marked decrease in the TPG of antibodies against HSV and CMV approximately one year before the death of patients.

  6. Randomized clinical study comparing Compeed (R) cold sore patch to acyclovir cream 5% in the treatment of herpes simplex labialis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsmark, T.; Goodman, J.J.; Drouault, Y.

    2008-01-01

    with acyclovir, P = 0.37). Both treatments were well tolerated. Conclusion CSP using hydrocolloid technology provides an efficacious and safe alternative to topical antivirals in treating HSL as a wound while affording additional immediate benefits of wound protection, discretion and relief of social......Background Hydrocolloid technology has been proven effective in treating dermal wounds. A previous study showed that a newly developed thin hydrocolloid patch [Compeed (R) cold sore patch (CSP)] provided multiple wound-healing benefits across all stages of a herpes simplex labialis (HSL) outbreak...

  7. H2AX phosphorylation and DNA damage kinase activity are dispensable for herpes simplex virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botting, Carolyn; Lu, Xu; Triezenberg, Steven J

    2016-01-27

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can establish both lytic and latent infections in humans. The phosphorylation of histone H2AX, a common marker of DNA damage, during lytic infection by HSV-1 is well established. However, the role(s) of H2AX phosphorylation in lytic infection remain unclear. Following infection of human foreskin fibroblasts by HSV-1 or HSV-2, we assayed the phosphorylation of H2AX in the presence of inhibitors of transcription, translation, or viral DNA replication, or in the presence of inhibitors of ATM and ATR kinases (KU-55933 and VE-821, respectively). We also assayed viral replication in fibroblasts in the presence of the kinase inhibitors or siRNAs specific for ATM and ATR, as well as in cell lines deficient for either ATR or ATM. The expression of viral immediate-early and early proteins (including the viral DNA polymerase), but not viral DNA replication or late protein expression, were required for H2AX phosphorylation following HSV-1 infection. Inhibition of ATM kinase activity prevented HSV-stimulated H2AX phosphorylation but had only a minor effect on DNA replication and virus yield in HFF cells. These results differ from previous reports of a dramatic reduction in viral yield following chemical inhibition of ATM in oral keratinocytes or following infection of ATM(-/-) cells. Inhibition of the closely related kinase ATR (whether by chemical inhibitor or siRNA disruption) had no effect on H2AX phosphorylation and reduced viral DNA replication only moderately. During infection by HSV-2, H2AX phosphorylation was similarly dispensable but was dependent on both ATM activity and viral DNA replication. H2AX phosphorylation represents a cell type-specific and virus type-specific host response to HSV infection with little impact on viral infection.

  8. Coexistence of herpes simplex virus infection in microsporidial stromal keratitis associated with granulomatous inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ruchi; Balne, Praveen K; Sahu, Srikant; Das, Sujata; Sharma, Savitri

    2017-04-01

    Microsporidial stromal keratitis poses several diagnostic challenges. Patients may present with corneal ulceration, marked stromal thinning, or even as a quite corneal scar. The presentation of microsporidial stromal keratitis commonly mimics viral keratitis. Microbiology scrapings are usually helpful; however, scraping and culture-negative cases pose a significant diagnostic dilemma. Histopathological examination is diagnostic but shows varying degree of inflammation, predominantly composed of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Granulomatous inflammation, in microsporidial stromal keratitis, is never well described, and the authors in this article aim to describe the presence of granulomatous inflammation in microsporidial stromal keratitis, in patients with associated herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis. This was a retrospective and observational study conducted at a tertiary eye care center. Of 263 patients who underwent therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty for infectious keratitis, during 2011-2013, seven patients were diagnosed as microsporidial stromal keratitis. Microsporidial spores could be demonstrated on microbiological scrapings in 5/7 (71%) of cases, but identified on histopathological examination and also confirmed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for microsporidium in 100% of cases. There was evidence of diffuse stromal necrosis with markedly severe degree of polymorphonuclear leukocytic infiltrates, with granulomatous inflammation in 42% of cases. Interestingly, these were positive for HSV-1 DNA on PCR. Review of medical records revealed much severe clinical presentations in patients with granulomatous inflammation, in comparison to cases without granulomatous inflammation. The authors hereby recommend that severe clinical presentation in patients with microsporidial stromal keratitis, markedly dense polymorphonuclear leukocytic infiltrates or the presence of granulomatous inflammation on the histopathological examination, should be investigated

  9. Inhibition of cdk9 during herpes simplex virus 1 infection impedes viral transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ou

    Full Text Available During herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 infection there is a loss of the serine-2 phosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II found in elongation complexes. This occurs in part because RNAP II undergoes ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation during times of highly active viral transcription, which may result from stalled elongating complexes. In addition, a viral protein, ICP22, was reported to trigger a loss of serine-2 RNAP II. These findings have led to some speculation that the serine-2 phosphorylated form of RNAP II may not be required for HSV-1 transcription, although this form is required for cellular transcription elongation and RNA processing. Cellular kinase cdk9 phosphorylates serine-2 in the C-terminal domain (CTD of RNAP II. To determine if serine-2 phosphorylated RNAP II is required for HSV-1 transcription, we inhibited cdk9 during HSV-1 infection and measured viral gene expression. Inhibition was achieved by adding cdk9 inhibitors 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazone-1-β-D-ribofuranoside (DRB or flavopiridol (FVP or by expression of a dominant-negative cdk9 or HEXIM1, which in conjunction with 7SK snRNA inhibits cdk9 in complex with cyclin 1. Here we report that inhibition of cdk9 resulted in decreased viral yields and levels of late proteins, poor formation of viral transcription-replication compartments, reduced levels of poly(A+ mRNA and decreased RNA synthesis as measured by uptake of 5-bromouridine into nascent RNA. Importantly, a global reduction in viral mRNAs was seen as determined by microarray analysis. We conclude that serine-2 phosphorylation of the CTD of RNAP II is required for HSV-1 transcription.

  10. A cell culture model of facial palsy resulting from reactivation of latent herpes simplex type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Maggie A; Nayak, Shruti; Camarena, Vladimir; Gardner, Jimmy; Wilson, Angus; Mohr, Ian; Chao, Moses V; Roehm, Pamela C

    2012-01-01

    Reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in geniculate ganglion neurons (GGNs) is an etiologic mechanism of Bell's palsy (BP) and delayed facial palsy (DFP) after otologic surgery. Several clinical studies, including temporal bone studies, antibody, titers, and intraoperative studies, suggest that reactivation of HSV-1 from latently infected GGNs may lead to both BP and DFP. However, it is difficult to study these processes in humans or live animals. Primary cultures of GGNs were latently infected with Patton strain HSV-1 expressing a green fluorescent protein-late lytic gene chimera. Four days later, these cultures were treated with trichostatin A (TSA), a known chemical reactivator of HSV-1 in other neurons. Cultures were monitored daily by fluorescent microscopy. Titers of media from lytic, latent, and latent/TSA treated GGN cultures were obtained using plaque assays on Vero cells. RNA was harvested from latently infected GGN cultures and examined for the presence of viral transcripts using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Latently infected GGN cultures displayed latency-associated transcripts only, whereas lytically infected and reactivated latent cultures produced other viral transcripts, as well. The GGN cultures displayed a reactivation rate of 65% after treatment with TSA. Media from latently infected cultures contained no detectable infectious HSV-1, whereas infectious virus was observed in both lytically and latently infected/TSA-treated culture media. We have shown that cultured GGNs can be latently infected with HSV-1, and HSV-1 in these latently infected neurons can be reactivated using TSA, yielding infectious virus. These results have implications for the cause of both BP and DFP.

  11. The role of dendritic cells in immunity against primary Herpes Simplex Virus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammy eBedoui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV is a DNA virus with tropism for infecting skin and mucosal epithelia during the lytic stages of its complex life cycle. The immune system has evolved a multitude of strategies to respond to primary HSV infections. These include rapid innate immune responses largely driven by pattern recognition systems and protective anti-viral immunity. Dendritic cells (DC represent a versatile and heterogenic group of antigen presenting cells that are important for pathogen recognition at sites of infection and for priming of protective HSV-specific T cells. Here we will review the current knowledge on the role of DCs in the host immune response to primary HSV infection. We will discuss how DCs integrate viral cues into effective innate immune responses, will dissect how HSV infection of DCs interferes with their capacity to migrate from sites of infection to the draining lymph nodes and will outline how migratory DCs can make antigens available to lymph node resident DCs. The role of distinct DC subsets and their relevant contribution to antigen presentation on MHC class I and MHC class II molecules will be detailed in the context of T cell priming in the lymph node and the elicitation of effector function in infected tissues. An improved understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of how DCs recognize HSV, process and present its antigens to naïve and effector T cells will not only assist in the improvement of vaccine-based preventions of this important viral disease, but also serves as a paradigm to resolve basic immunological principles.

  12. Uncoupling uncoating of herpes simplex virus genomes from their nuclear import and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Kathrin; Döhner, Katinka; Binz, Anne; Glass, Mandy; Strive, Tanja; Bauerfeind, Rudolf; Sodeik, Beate

    2011-05-01

    Incoming capsids of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) enter the cytosol by fusion of the viral envelopes with host cell membranes and use microtubules and microtubule motors for transport to the nucleus. Upon docking to the nuclear pores, capsids release their genomes into the nucleoplasm. Progeny genomes are replicated in the nucleoplasm and subsequently packaged into newly assembled capsids. The minor capsid protein pUL25 of alphaherpesviruses is required for capsid stabilization after genome packaging and for nuclear targeting of incoming genomes. Here, we show that HSV-1 pUL25 bound to mature capsids within the nucleus and remained capsid associated during assembly and nuclear targeting. Furthermore, we tested potential interactions between parental pUL25 bound to incoming HSV-1 capsids and host factors by competing for such interactions with an experimental excess of cytosolic pUL25. Overexpression of pUL25, GFPUL25, or UL25GFP prior to infection reduced gene expression of HSV-1. Electron microscopy and in situ hybridization studies revealed that an excess of GFPUL25 or UL25GFP prevented efficient nuclear import and/or transcription of parental HSV-1 genomes, but not nuclear targeting of capsids or the uncoating of the incoming genomes at the nuclear pore. Thus, the uncoating of HSV-1 genomes could be uncoupled from their nuclear import and gene expression. Most likely, surplus pUL25 competed with important interactions between the parental capsids, and possibly between authentic capsid-associated pUL25, and cytosolic or nuclear host factors required for functional interaction of the incoming genomes with the nuclear machinery.

  13. Treatment of orthotopic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors with oncolytic herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoszczyk, Slawomir; Spyra, Melanie; Mautner, Victor Felix; Kurtz, Andreas; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Martuza, Robert L; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2014-08-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are an aggressive and often lethal sarcoma that frequently develops in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). We developed new preclinical MPNST models and tested the efficacy of oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs), a promising cancer therapeutic that selectively replicates in and kills cancer cells. Mouse NF1(-) MPNST cell lines and human NF1(-) MPNST stemlike cells (MSLCs) were implanted into the sciatic nerves of immunocompetent and athymic mice, respectively. Tumor growth was followed by external measurement and sciatic nerve deficit using a hind-limb scoring system. Oncolytic HSV G47Δ as well as "armed" G47Δ expressing platelet factor 4 (PF4) or interleukin (IL)-12 were injected intratumorally into established sciatic nerve tumors. Mouse MPNST cell lines formed tumors with varying growth kinetics. A single intratumoral injection of G47Δ in sciatic nerve tumors derived from human S462 MSLCs in athymic mice or mouse M2 (37-3-18-4) cells in immunocompetent mice significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival. Local IL-12 expression significantly improved the efficacy of G47Δ in syngeneic mice, while PF4 expression prolonged survival. Injection of G47Δ directly into the sciatic nerve of athymic mice resulted in only mild symptoms that did not differ from phosphate buffered saline control. Two new orthotopic MPNST models are described, including in syngeneic mice, expanding the options for preclinical testing. Oncolytic HSV G47Δ exhibited robust efficacy in both immunodeficient and immunocompetent MPNST models while maintaining safety. Interleukin-12 expression improved efficacy. These studies support the clinical translation of G47Δ for patients with MPNST. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Clinical and Laboratory Findings That Differentiate Herpes Simplex Virus Central Nervous System Disease from Enteroviral Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layli Sanaee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It can be difficult for clinicians to distinguish between the relatively benign enteroviral (EnV meningitis and potentially lethal herpes simplex virus (HSV central nervous system (CNS disease. Very limited evidence currently exists to guide them. Objective. This study sought to identify clinical features and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF findings associated with HSV CNS disease. Methods. Given that PCR testing often is not immediately available, this chart review study sought to identify clinical and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF findings associated with HSV meningitis over a 6-year period. In cases where PCR was not performed, HSV and EnV were assigned based on clinical criteria. Results. We enrolled 166 consecutive patients: 40 HSV and 126 EnV patients. HSV patients had a mean 40.4 versus 31.3 years for EnV, p=0.005, seizures 21.1% versus 1.6% for EnV, p<0.001, altered mental status 46.2% versus 3.2% for EnV, p<0.001, or neurological deficits 44.7% versus 3.9% for EnV, p<0.001. CSF neutrophils were lower in HSV (median 3.0% versus 9.5%, p=0.0002; median lymphocytes (87.0% versus 67.0%, p=0.0004 and protein (0.9 g/L versus 0.6 g/L, p=0.0005 were elevated. Conclusion. Our study found that HSV patients were older and more likely to have seizure, altered mental status, or neurological deficits than patients with benign EnV meningitis. HSV cases had lower CSF neutrophils, higher lymphocytes, and higher protein levels.

  15. The Positively Charged Surface of Herpes Simplex Virus UL42 Mediates DNA Binding*S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komazin-Meredith, Gloria; Santos, Webster L.; Filman, David J.; Hogle, James M.; Verdine, Gregory L.; Coen, Donald M.

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase is a heterodimer composed of UL30, a catalytic subunit, and UL42, a processivity subunit. Mutations that decrease DNA binding by UL42 decrease long chain DNA synthesis by the polymerase. The crystal structure of UL42 bound to the C terminus of UL30 revealed an extensive positively charged surface (“back face”). We tested two hypotheses, 1) the C terminus of UL30 affects DNA binding and 2) the positively charged back face mediates DNA binding. Addressing the first hypothesis, we found that the presence of a peptide corresponding to the UL30 C terminus did not result in altered binding of UL42 to DNA. Addressing the second hypothesis, previous work showed that substitution of four conserved arginine residues on the basic face with alanines resulted in decreased DNA affinity. We tested the affinities for DNA and the stimulation of long chain DNA synthesis of mutants in which the four conserved arginine residues were substituted individually or together with lysines and also a mutant in which a conserved glutamine residue was substituted with an arginine to increase positive charge on the back face. We also engineered cysteines onto this surface to permit disulfide cross-linking studies. Last, we assayed the effects of ionic strength on DNA binding by UL42 to estimate the number of ions released upon binding. Our results taken together strongly suggest that the basic back face of UL42 contacts DNA and that positive charge on this surface is important for this interaction. PMID:18178550

  16. Population-based surveillance of neonatal herpes simplex virus infection in Australia, 1997-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cheryl A; Raynes-Greenow, Camille; Isaacs, David

    2014-08-15

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is uncommon, but mortality after disseminated disease and morbidity after encephalitis are high. For the last decade, increased dose and duration of acyclovir has been advised to prevent disease progression and recurrence. We sought to determine prospectively the epidemiologic, clinical, and secular trends of this condition in Australia. This was prospective national active surveillance for neonatal HSV disease through the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit from 1997 to 2011. Case notification triggered a questionnaire requesting de-identified data from the pediatric clinician. We identified 131 confirmed cases of neonatal HSV disease in 15 years from 261 notifications (95% response). The reported incidence (3.27 cases per 100 000 live births overall; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.73-3.86) was stable. Overall mortality was 18.8% (95% CI, 12.1-25.5); the mortality rate was significantly lower in the latter part of the study period, 2005-2011, compared with 1997-2004 (P = .04). There were significantly more young mothers (<20 years of age) compared with Australian birth record data (18.5% vs 4.8%; P < .001). HSV-1 infection was more common than HSV-2 (62.7% vs 37.3%; P < .001), and the rate of HSV-1 infections increased significantly over the surveillance period (P < .05). From 2002, most infants received high-dose acyclovir. The time from symptom onset to initiation of therapy in survivors did not change over time. Mortality from neonatal HSV infection has fallen but remains high. HSV-1 is the major serotype causing neonatal disease in Australia. Young mothers represent an important target group for prevention. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Clinical relevance of herpes simplex virus viremia in Intensive Care Unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepiller, Q; Sueur, C; Solis, M; Barth, H; Glady, L; Lefebvre, F; Fafi-Kremer, S; Schneider, F; Stoll-Keller, F

    2015-07-01

    To determine the clinical relevance of herpes simplex virus (HSV) viremia episodes in critically ill adult patients. 1556 blood samples obtained for HSV PCR analysis in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients over 4 years were retrospectively analyzed, focusing on the comprehensive analysis of 88 HSV-viremic patients. HSV DNA was detected in 11.8% of samples from the ICU. HSV viral loads remained below 5×10(2) copies/ml in 68.2% of patients and exceeded 10(4) copies/ml in 7.9%. Episodes of HSV-viremia correlated with immunosuppressed status and mechanical ventilation in 79.5% and 65.9% of patients, respectively. Only a subset of patients exhibited HSV-related organ damage, including pneumonia and hepatitis (10.2% and 2.3%, respectively). The mortality rate in HSV-viremic patients was not significantly increased compared to the overall mortality rate in the ICU (27.3% vs. 22.9%, p = 0.33). Only patients with high HSV viral loads tended to have a higher, though non-significant, death rate (57.1%, p = 0.14). Our results suggest HSV viremia is common in ICU patients, potentially favored by immunocompromised status and mechanical ventilation. The global impact of HSV-viremia on mortality in the ICU was low. Quantifying HSV DNA may help identifying patients at-risk of severe HSV-induced symptoms. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Other Pathogens are Key Causative Factors in Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Steven A; Harris, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on research in epidemiology, neuropathology, molecular biology, and genetics regarding the hypothesis that pathogens interact with susceptibility genes and are causative in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Sporadic AD is a complex multifactorial neurodegenerative disease with evidence indicating coexisting multi-pathogen and inflammatory etiologies. There are significant associations between AD and various pathogens, including Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), Cytomegalovirus, and other Herpesviridae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, spirochetes, Helicobacter pylori, and various periodontal pathogens. These pathogens are able to evade destruction by the host immune system, leading to persistent infection. Bacterial and viral DNA and RNA and bacterial ligands increase the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules and activate the innate and adaptive immune systems. Evidence demonstrates that pathogens directly and indirectly induce AD pathology, including amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation, phosphorylation of tau protein, neuronal injury, and apoptosis. Chronic brain infection with HSV-1, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and spirochetes results in complex processes that interact to cause a vicious cycle of uncontrolled neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Infections such as Cytomegalovirus, Helicobacter pylori, and periodontal pathogens induce production of systemic pro-inflammatory cytokines that may cross the blood-brain barrier to promote neurodegeneration. Pathogen-induced inflammation and central nervous system accumulation of Aβ damages the blood-brain barrier, which contributes to the pathophysiology of AD. Apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) enhances brain infiltration by pathogens including HSV-1 and Chlamydophila pneumoniae. ApoE4 is also associated with an increased pro-inflammatory response by the immune system. Potential antimicrobial treatments for AD are discussed, including the rationale for antiviral and antibiotic clinical trials.

  19. Pharmacological Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 Impairs Nuclear Accumulation of Herpes Simplex Virus Capsids upon Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Ibáñez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is an inducible enzyme that is expressed in response to physical and chemical stresses, such as ultraviolet radiation, hyperthermia, hypoxia, reactive oxygen species (ROS, as well as cytokines, among others. Its activity can be positively modulated by cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP and negatively by tin protoporphirin (SnPP. Once induced, HO-1 degrades iron-containing heme into ferrous iron (Fe2+, carbon monoxide (CO and biliverdin. Importantly, numerous products of HO-1 are cytoprotective with anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer effects. The products of HO-1 also display antiviral properties against several viruses, such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, influenza, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and Ebola virus. Here, we sought to assess the effect of modulating HO-1 activity over herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 infection in epithelial cells and neurons. There are no vaccines against HSV-2 and treatment options are scarce in the immunosuppressed, in which drug-resistant variants emerge. By using HSV strains that encode structural and non-structural forms of the green fluorescent protein (GFP, we found that pharmacological induction of HO-1 activity with CoPP significantly decreases virus plaque formation and the expression of virus-encoded genes in epithelial cells as determined by flow cytometry and western blot assays. CoPP treatment did not affect virus binding to the cell surface or entry into the cytoplasm, but rather downstream events in the virus infection cycle. Furthermore, we observed that treating cells with a CO-releasing molecule (CORM-2 recapitulated some of the anti-HSV effects elicited by CoPP. Taken together, these findings indicate that HO-1 activity interferes with the replication cycle of HSV and that its antiviral effects can be recapitulated by CO.

  20. The multipartite system that mediates entry of herpes simplex virus into the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella; Amasio, Michele; Avitabile, Elisa; Cerretani, Arianna; Forghieri, Cristina; Gianni, Tatiana; Menotti, Laura

    2007-01-01

    The multipartite entry-fusion system of herpes simplex virus is made of a quartet of glycoproteins-gD, gB, gH.gL-and three alternative gD receptors, herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM), nectin1 and modified sites on heparan sulphate. This multipartite system recapitulates the basic steps of virus-cell fusion, i.e. receptor recognition, triggering of fusion and fusion execution. Specifically, in addition to serving as the receptor-binding glycoprotein, gD triggers fusion through a specialised domain, named pro-fusion domain (PFD), located C-terminally in the ectodomain. In the unliganded gD the C-terminal region folds around the N-terminal region, such that gD adopts a closed autoinhibited conformation. In HVEM- and nectin1-bound gD the C-terminal region is displaced (opened conformation). gD is the tool for modification of HSV tropism, through insertion of ligands to heterologous tumour-specific receptors. It is discussed whether gD responds to the interaction with the natural and the heterologous receptors by adopting similar conformations, and whether the closed-to-open switch in conformation is a generalised mechanism of activation. A peculiar recombinant highlighted that the central Ig-folded core of gD may not encode executable functions for entry and that the 219-314 aa segment may be sufficient to trigger fusion. With respect to fusion execution, gB appears to be a prospective fusogen based on its coiled-coil trimeric structure, similar to that of another fusion glycoprotein. On the other hand, gH exhibits molecular elements typical of class 1 fusion glycoproteins, in particular heptad repeats and strong tendency to interact with lipids. Whether fusion execution is carried out by gB or gH.gL, or both glycoproteins in complex or sequentially remains to be determined.

  1. Interferon Lambda Inhibits Herpes Simplex Virus Type I Infection of Human Astrocytes and Neurons

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    LI, JIELIANG; HU, SHUXIAN; ZHOU, LIN; YE, LI; WANG, XU; HO, JIE; HO, WENZHE

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus that is capable of infecting not only neurons, but also microglia and astrocytes and can establish latent infection in the central nervous system (CNS). We investigated whether IFN lambda (IFN-λ), a newly identified member of IFN family, has the ability to inhibit HSV-1 infection of primary human astrocytes and neurons. Both astrocytes and neurons were found to be highly susceptible to HSV-1 infection. However, upon IFN-λ treatment, HSV-1 replication in both astrocytes and neurons was significantly suppressed, which was evidenced by the reduced expression of HSV-1 DNA and proteins. This IFN-λ-mediated action on HSV-1 could be partially neutralized by antibody to IFN-λ receptor. Investigation of the mechanisms showed that IFN-λ treatment of astrocytes and neurons resulted in the upregulation of endogenous IFN-α/β and several IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). To block IFN-α/β receptor by a specific antibody could compromise the IFN-λ actions on HSV-1 inhibition and ISG induction. In addition, IFN-λ treatment induced the expression of IFN regulatory factors (IRFs) in astrocytes and neurons. Furthermore, IFN-λ treatment of astrocytes and neurons resulted in the suppression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS-1), a key negative regulator of IFN pathway. These data suggest that IFN-λ possesses the anti-HSV-1 function by promoting type I IFN-mediated innate antiviral immune response in the CNS cells. PMID:20878770

  2. Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Shedding Among Adults With and Without HIV Infection in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Warren; Nakku-Joloba, Edith; Krantz, Elizabeth M; Selke, Stacy; Huang, Meei-Li; Kambugu, Fred; Orem, Jackson; Casper, Corey; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Despite the high prevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in sub-Saharan Africa, the natural history of infection among Africans is not well characterized. We evaluated the frequency of genital HSV shedding in HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative men and women in Uganda. Ninety-three HSV-2-seropositive Ugandan adults collected anogenital swab specimens for HSV DNA quantification by polymerase chain reaction 3 times daily for 6 weeks. HSV-2 was detected from 2484 of 11 283 swab specimens collected (22%), with a median quantity of 4.3 log10 HSV copies/mL (range, 2.2-8.9 log10 HSV copies/mL). Genital lesions were reported on 749 of 3875 days (19%), and subclinical HSV shedding was detected from 1480 of 9113 swab specimens (16%) collected on days without lesions. Men had higher rates of total HSV shedding (relative risk [RR], 2.0 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.3-2.9]; P genital lesions (RR, 2.1 [95% CI, 1.2-3.4]; P = .005), compared with women. No differences in shedding rates or lesion frequency were observed based on HIV serostatus. HSV-2 shedding frequency and quantity are high among HSV-2-seropositive adults in sub-Saharan Africa, including persons with and those without HIV infection. Shedding rates were particularly high among men, which may contribute to the high prevalence of HSV-2 and early acquisition among African women. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Virologic and Immunologic Evidence of Multifocal Genital Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia; Jing, Lichen; Laing, Kerry J.; McClurkan, Christopher M.; Klock, Alexis; Diem, Kurt; Jin, Lei; Stanaway, Jeffrey; Tronstein, Elizabeth; Kwok, William W.; Huang, Meei-li; Selke, Stacy; Fong, Youyi; Magaret, Amalia; Koelle, David M.; Wald, Anna; Corey, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) reactivation is thought to be anatomically and temporally localized, coincident with limited ganglionic infection. Short, subclinical shedding episodes are the most common form of HSV-2 reactivation, with host clearance mechanisms leading to rapid containment. The anatomic distribution of shedding episodes has not been characterized. To precisely define patterns of anatomic reactivation, we divided the genital tract into a 22-region grid and obtained daily swabs for 20 days from each region in 28 immunocompetent, HSV-2-seropositive persons. HSV was detected via PCR, and sites of asymptomatic HSV shedding were subjected to a biopsy procedure within 24 h. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were quantified by immunofluorescence, and HSV-specific CD4+ T cells were identified by intracellular cytokine cytometry. HSV was detected in 868 (7%) of 11,603 genital swabs at a median of 12 sites per person (range, 0 to 22). Bilateral HSV detection occurred on 83 (67%) days with shedding, and the median quantity of virus detected/day was associated with the number of sites positive (P genital tract and are associated with a localized cellular infiltrate that was demonstrated to be HSV specific in 3 cases. These data provide evidence that asymptomatic HSV-2 shedding contributes to chronic inflammation throughout the genital tract. IMPORTANCE This detailed report of the anatomic patterns of genital HSV-2 shedding demonstrates that HSV-2 reactivation can be detected at multiple bilateral sites in the genital tract, suggesting that HSV establishes latency throughout the sacral ganglia. In addition, genital biopsy specimens from sites of asymptomatic HSV shedding have increased numbers of CD8+ T cells compared to control tissue, and HSV-specific CD4+ T cells are found at sites of asymptomatic shedding. These findings suggest that widespread asymptomatic genital HSV-2 shedding is associated with a targeted host immune response and contributes to chronic

  4. Circumcision status and incident herpes simplex virus type 2 infection, genital ulcer disease, and HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Supriya D.; Moses, Stephen; Parker, Corette B.; Agot, Kawango; Maclean, Ian; Bailey, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We assessed the protective effect of medical male circumcision (MMC) against HIV, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), and genital ulcer disease (GUD) incidence. Design Two thousand, seven hundred and eighty-seven men aged 18–24 years living in Kisumu, Kenya were randomly assigned to circumcision (n=1391) or delayed circumcision (n =1393) and assessed by HIV and HSV-2 testing and medical examinations during follow-ups at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Methods Cox regression estimated the risk ratio of each outcome (incident HIV, GUD, HSV-2) for circumcision status and multivariable models estimated HIV risk associated with HSV-2, GUD, and circumcision status as time-varying covariates. Results HIV incidence was 1.42 per 100 person-years. Circumcision was 62% protective against HIV [risk ratio =0.38; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.22–0.67] and did not change when controlling for HSV-2 and GUD (risk ratio =0.39; 95% CI 0.23–0.69). GUD incidence was halved among circumcised men (risk ratio =0.52; 95% CI 0.37–0.73). HSV-2 incidence did not differ by circumcision status (risk ratio =0.94; 95% CI 0.70–1.25). In the multivariable model, HIV seroconversions were tripled (risk ratio =3.44; 95% CI 1.52–7.80) among men with incident HSV-2 and seven times greater (risk ratio =6.98; 95% CI 3.50–13.9) for men with GUD. Conclusion Contrary to findings from the South African and Ugandan trials, the protective effect of MMC against HIV was independent of GUD and HSV-2, and MMC had no effect on HSV-2 incidence. Determining the causes of GUD is necessary to reduce associated HIV risk and to understand how circumcision confers protection against GUD and HIV PMID:22382150

  5. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 entry by chloride channel inhibitors tamoxifen and NPPB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Kai [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Chen, Maoyun [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); College of pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Xiang, Yangfei; Ma, Kaiqi [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Jin, Fujun [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); College of pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Wang, Xiao [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Shaoxiang [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Wang, Yifei, E-mail: twang-yf@163.com [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We analyze the anti-HSV potential of chloride channel inhibitors. • Tamoxifen and NPPB show anti-HSV-1 and anti-ACV-resistant HSV-1 activities. • HSV-1 infection induces intracellular chloride concentration increasing. • Tamoxifen and NPPB inhibit HSV-1 early infection. • Tamoxifen and NPPB prevent the fusion process of HSV-1. - Abstract: Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection is very common worldwide and can cause significant health problems from periodic skin and corneal lesions to encephalitis. Appearance of drug-resistant viruses in clinical therapy has made exploring novel antiviral agents emergent. Here we show that chloride channel inhibitors, including tamoxifen and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenyl-propylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB), exhibited extensive antiviral activities toward HSV-1 and ACV-resistant HSV viruses. HSV-1 infection induced chloride ion influx while treatment with inhibitors reduced the increase of intracellular chloride ion concentration. Pretreatment or treatment of inhibitors at different time points during HSV-1 infection all suppressed viral RNA synthesis, protein expression and virus production. More detailed studies demonstrated that tamoxifen and NPPB acted as potent inhibitors of HSV-1 early entry step by preventing viral binding, penetration and nuclear translocation. Specifically the compounds appeared to affect viral fusion process by inhibiting virus binding to lipid rafts and interrupting calcium homeostasis. Taken together, the observation that tamoxifen and NPPB can block viral entry suggests a stronger potential for these compounds as well as other ion channel inhibitors in antiviral therapy against HSV-1, especially the compound tamoxifen is an immediately actionable drug that can be reused for treatment of HSV-1 infections.

  6. Acyclovir resistance in herpes simplex virus type I encephalitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, M; Beer, R; Kofler, M; Helbok, R; Pfausler, B; Schmutzhard, E

    2017-04-01

    Acyclovir resistance is rarely seen in herpes simplex virus (HSV) type I encephalitis. Prevalence rates vary between 0.5 % in immunocompetent patients (Christophers et al. 1998; Fife et al. 1994) and 3.5-10 % in immunocompromised patients (Stranska et al. 2005). We report a 45-year-old, immunocompetent (negative HIV antigen/antibody testing), female patient, without previous illness who developed-after a febrile prodromal stage-aphasia and psychomotor slowing. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) showed right temporal and insular T2-hyperintense lesions with spreading to the contralateral temporal lobe. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis yielded lymphocytic pleocytosis and elevated protein level. Polymerase chain reaction testing for HSV type I showed a positive result in repeat lumbar puncture. HSV type I encephalitis was diagnosed and intravenous acyclovir treatment was initiated (750 mg t.i.d.). Acyclovir treatment was intensified to 1000 mg t.i.d., due to clinical deterioration, ongoing pleocytosis and progression on cMRI 5 days after initiation of antiviral therapy. In parallel, acyclovir resistance testing showed mutation of thymidine kinase gene at position A156V prompting foscarnet therapy (60 mg t.i.d.). Patient's condition improved dramatically over 2 weeks. Acyclovir resistance is rare but should be considered in case of clinical worsening of patient's condition. To our knowledge, this is the first report of acyclovir resistance in HSV type I encephalitis of an immunocompetent and previously healthy patient in Austria.

  7. Impact of a Rapid Herpes Simplex Virus PCR Assay on Duration of Acyclovir Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Tam T; Mongkolrattanothai, Kanokporn; Arevalo, Melissa; Lustestica, Maryann; Dien Bard, Jennifer

    2017-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality rates in children. This study assessed the impact of a direct HSV (dHSV) PCR assay on the time to result reporting and the duration of acyclovir therapy for children with signs and symptoms of meningitis and encephalitis. A total of 363 patients with HSV PCR results from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were included in this retrospective analysis, divided into preimplementation and postimplementation groups. For the preimplementation group, CSF testing was performed using a laboratory-developed real-time PCR assay; for the postimplementation group, CSF samples were tested using a direct sample-to-answer assay. All CSF samples were negative for HSV. Over 60% of patients from both groups were prescribed acyclovir. The average HSV PCR test turnaround time for the postimplementation group was reduced by 14.5 h (23.6 h versus 9.1 h; P < 0.001). Furthermore, 79 patients (43.6%) in the postimplementation group had dHSV PCR results reported <4 h after specimen collection. The mean time from specimen collection to acyclovir discontinuation was 17.1 h shorter in the postimplementation group (31.1 h versus 14 h; P < 0.001). The median duration of acyclovir therapy was also significantly reduced in the postimplementation group (29.2 h versus 14.3 h; P = 0.01). Our investigation suggests that implementation of rapid HSV PCR testing can decrease turnaround times and the duration of unnecessary acyclovir therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Interventions for prevention of herpes simplex labialis (cold sores on the lips).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Ching-Chi; Wang, Shu-Hui; Delamere, Finola M; Wojnarowska, Fenella; Peters, Mathilde C; Kanjirath, Preetha P

    2015-08-07

    Herpes simplex labialis (HSL), also known as cold sores, is a common disease of the lips caused by the herpes simplex virus, which is found throughout the world. It presents as a painful vesicular eruption, forming unsightly crusts, which cause cosmetic disfigurement and psychosocial distress. There is no cure available, and it recurs periodically. To assess the effects of interventions for the prevention of HSL in people of all ages. We searched the following databases up to 19 May 2015: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Oral Health Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library (Issue 4, 2015), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), LILACS (from 1982), the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) database, Airiti Library, and 5 trial registers. To identify further references to relevant randomised controlled trials, we scanned the bibliographies of included studies and published reviews, and we also contacted the original researchers of our included studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions for preventing HSL in immunocompetent people. Two authors independently selected trials, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias. A third author was available for resolving differences of opinion. This review included 32 RCTs, with a total of 2640 immunocompetent participants, covering 19 treatments. The quality of the body of evidence was low to moderate for most outcomes, but was very low for a few outcomes. Our primary outcomes were 'Incidence of HSL' and 'Adverse effects during use of the preventative intervention'.The evidence for short-term (≤ 1 month) use of oral aciclovir in preventing recurrent HSL was inconsistent across the doses used in the studies: 2 RCTs showed low quality evidence for a reduced recurrence of HSL with aciclovir 400 mg twice daily (risk ratio (RR) 0.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13 to 0.51; n = 177), while 1 RCT testing aciclovir 800 mg twice daily and 2 RCTs testing 200 mg 5

  9. Using centralized laboratory data to monitor trends in herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 infection in British Columbia and the changing etiology of genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Mark; Li, Xuan; Petric, Martin; Krajden, Mel; Isaac-Renton, Judith L; Ogilvie, Gina; Rekart, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the regional epidemiology of genital Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) infections is important for clinical and public health practice, due to the increasing availability of type-specific serologic testing in Canada and the contribution of genital HSV-2 infection to ongoing HIV transmission. We used centralized laboratory data to describe trends in viral identifications of genital HSV in BC and assess the utility of these data for ongoing population surveillance. Records of viral identifications (1997-2005) were extracted from the Provincial Public Health Microbiology & Reference Laboratory database. Classification as genital or other site was based on documented specimen site. We conducted a descriptive analysis of trends over time, and calculated odds of HSV-1 infection among individuals with genital herpes. Of 48,183 viral identifications, 56.8% were genital, 10.0% were peri-oral and 9.1% cutaneous; site was unknown for 22.9%. Among genital identifications, HSV-1 infection was more likely in females, younger age groups, and later time periods. The proportion of genital herpes due to HSV-1 increased over time from 31.4% to 42.8% in BC. Our analysis of population-level laboratory data demonstrates that the proportion of genital herpes due to HSV-1 is increasing over time in BC, particularly among women and younger age groups; this has implications for clinical practice including the interpretation of type-specific serology. Provincial viral identification data are useful for monitoring the distribution of genital HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections over time. Improving clinical documentation of specimen site would improve the utility of these data.

  10. Oral ulcers in children under chemotherapy: clinical characteristics and their relation with Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, Ester; Brethauer, Ursula; Rojas, Jaime; Fernández, Eduardo; Le Fort, Patricia

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of oral ulcers in pediatric oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy and their relation with the presence of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) type 1 and Candida albicans. The sample consisted of 20 ulcerative lesions from 15 children treated with chemotherapy in the Pediatric Service of the Regional Hospital of Concepción, Chile. Two calibrated clinicians performed clinical diagnosis of the ulcers and registered general data from the patients (age, general diagnosis, absolute neutrophil count, and number of days after chemotherapy) and clinical characteristic of the ulcers: number, size, location, presence or absence of pain and inflammatory halo, edge characteristics, and exudate type. Additional to clinical diagnosis, culture for Candida albicans (C) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 was performed. Ten ulcers occurred in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, five in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia and five in patients with other neoplastic diseases. Eight ulcers were HSV (+) / C (-), 6 HSV (-) / C (-), 4 HSV (+) / C (+) and 2 HSV (-) / C (+). Preferential location was the hard palate. Most lesions were multiple, painful, with inflammatory halo, irregular edges and fibrinous exudate. The average size was 6,5 millimeters, and the mean number of days after chemotherapy was 7.5 days. Oral ulcers in children with oncological diseases did not present a specific clinical pattern. They were strongly associated with HSV.

  11. The management of herpes simplex virus infections in HIV infected patients: current issues and the role of cidofovir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakakawa E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethel Nakakawa1, Steven J Reynolds21Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Department of Microbiology, Kampala, Uganda; 2Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Herpes simplex virus (HSV type 1 and 2 are among the most common transmitted viral infections causing a spectrum of mucocutaneous and other syndromes. Treatment of these infections has primarily been with acyclovir (ACV and prodrugs valacyclovir and famcyclovir. Immunocompromised hosts either due to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV or other factors have given rise to an increase in ACV resistant viruses most commonly due to a mutation in the cellular thymidine kinase enzyme. This review focuses on the spectrum of disease caused by HSV 1 and 2, the emergence of ACV resistant disease, and the role of alternative agents including cidofovir in the treatment of ACV resistant disease.Keywords: herpes simplex virus, HIV, resistance, cidofovir

  12. Autophagy is involved in anti-viral activity of pentagalloylglucose (PGG) against Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Ying, E-mail: peiying-19802@163.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Chen, Zhen-Ping, E-mail: 530670663@qq.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Ju, Huai-Qiang, E-mail: 344464448@qq.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Komatsu, Masaaki, E-mail: komatsu-ms@igakuken.or.jp [Laboratory of Frontier Science, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8613 (Japan); Ji, Yu-hua, E-mail: tjyh@jnu.edu.cn [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Liu, Ge, E-mail: lggege_15@hotmail.com [Division of Molecular Pharmacology of Infectious agents, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Guo, Chao-wan, E-mail: chaovan_kwok@hotmail.com [Division of Molecular Pharmacology of Infectious agents, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Zhang, Ying-Jun, E-mail: zhangyj@mail.kib.ac.cn [Kunming Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yunnan, Kunming 650204 (China); Yang, Chong-Ren, E-mail: cryang@mail.kib.ac.cn [Kunming Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yunnan, Kunming 650204 (China); Wang, Yi-Fei, E-mail: twang-yf@163.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Kitazato, Kaio, E-mail: kkholi@msn.com [Division of Molecular Pharmacology of Infectious agents, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan)

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} We showed PGG has anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and can induce autophgy. {yields} Autophagy may be a novel and important mechanism mediating PGG anti-viral activities. {yields} Inhibition of mTOR pathway is an important mechanism of induction of autophagy by PGG. -- Abstract: Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a natural polyphenolic compound with broad-spectrum anti-viral activity, however, the mechanisms underlying anti-viral activity remain undefined. In this study, we investigated the effects of PGG on anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) associated with autophagy. We found that the PGG anti-HSV-1 activity was impaired significantly in MEF-atg7{sup -/-} cells (autophagy-defective cells) derived from an atg7{sup -/-} knockout mouse. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that PGG-induced autophagosomes engulfed HSV-1 virions. The mTOR signaling pathway, an essential pathway for the regulation of autophagy, was found to be suppressed following PGG treatment. Data presented in this report demonstrated for the first time that autophagy induced following PGG treatment contributed to its anti-HSV activity in vitro.

  13. Incorporation of a lambda phage recombination system and EGFP detection to simplify mutagenesis of Herpes simplex virus bacterial artificial chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weir Jerry P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted mutagenesis of the herpesvirus genomes has been facilitated by the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology. Such modified genomes have potential uses in understanding viral pathogenesis, gene identification and characterization, and the development of new viral vectors and vaccines. We have previously described the construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 BAC and the use of an allele replacement strategy to construct HSV-2 recombinants. While the BAC mutagenesis procedure is a powerful method to generate HSV-2 recombinants, particularly in the absence of selective marker in eukaryotic culture, the mutagenesis procedure is still difficult and cumbersome. Results Here we describe the incorporation of a phage lambda recombination system into an allele replacement vector. This strategy enables any DNA fragment containing the phage attL recombination sites to be efficiently inserted into the attR sites of the allele replacement vector using phage lambda clonase. We also describe how the incorporation of EGFP into the allele replacement vector can facilitate the selection of the desired cross-over recombinant BACs when the allele replacement reaction is a viral gene deletion. Finally, we incorporate the lambda phage recombination sites directly into an HSV-2 BAC vector for direct recombination of gene cassettes using the phage lambda clonase-driven recombination reaction. Conclusion Together, these improvements to the techniques of HSV BAC mutagenesis will facilitate the construction of recombinant herpes simplex viruses and viral vectors.

  14. Herpes viral culture of lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have an active infection with herpes simplex virus. Herpes infections include genital herpes , cold sores on the lips or in the ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Genital Herpes Read more Herpes Simplex Read more NIH MedlinePlus ...

  15. Delayed Diagnosis of Tuberculous Meningitis Misdiagnosed as Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Encephalitis With the FilmArray Syndromic Polymerase Chain Reaction Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Carlos A; Pinsky, Benjamin A; Liu, Anne; Banaei, Niaz

    2017-01-01

    The FilmArray meningitis/encephalitis (ME) panel is a novel syndromic, nucleic acid amplification test for diagnosis of acute meningitis and encephalitis. Emerging data on its performance are concerning for false-positive results. We present a case of tuberculous meningitis misdiagnosed as herpes simplex virus-1 encephalitis with the FilmArray ME panel. Strategies to mitigate erroneous results are discussed.

  16. Detergent extraction of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein D by zwitterionic and non-ionic detergents and purification by ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling-Wester, S; Feijlbrief, M; Koedijk, DGAM; Welling, GW

    1998-01-01

    Detergents (surfactants) are the key reagents in the extraction and purification of integral membrane proteins. Zwitterionic and non-ionic detergents were used for the extraction of recombinant glycoprotein D (gD-1) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) from insect cells infected with recombinant

  17. Natural infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) induces humoral and T cell responses to the HSV-1 glycoprotein H : L complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, DF; Verjans, GMGM; Osterhaus, ADME; van Kooij, A; Welling, GW; Scheffer, AJ; The, TH; Welling-Wester, S

    The glycoproteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are important targets for the immune system in the control of HSV-1 infections. The humoral and T cell responses to the glycoprotein (g)H-t(His):gL complex of HSV-1 were studied in seven HSV-1-seropositive and three HSV-1-seronegative healthy

  18. Susceptibility of Drug-Resistant Clinical Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Strains to Essential Oils of Ginger, Thyme, Hyssop, and Sandalwood▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Paul; Koch, Christine; Reichling, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    Acyclovir-resistant clinical isolates of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were analyzed in vitro for their susceptibilities to essential oils of ginger, thyme, hyssop, and sandalwood. All essential oils exhibited high levels of virucidal activity against acyclovir-sensitive strain KOS and acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 clinical isolates and reduced plaque formation significantly. PMID:17353250

  19. Consequences of chemoresistance for the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir-induced bystander effect in a human small cell lung cancer cell line model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dillen, IJ; Mulder, NH; Sluiter, WJ; Meijer, C; De Jong, S; Loncarek, J; Mesnil, M; De Vries, EFJ; Vaalburg, W; Hospers, GAP

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the influence of chemoresistance on the herpes simplex virus (HSVtk)/ganciclovir (GCV)-induced bystander effect (BE), as studied in a human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell line (GLC(4)) and its sublines with in vitro acquired resistance to adriamycin (GLC(4)/ADR),

  20. Prevalence and association between herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2-specific antibodies in attendees at a sexually transmitted disease clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Roest; W.I. van der Meijden (Willem); G. van Dijk (Grietje); J. Groen (Jan); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 was determined in 1993 and 1998 in a randomly selected study group of 1024 and 654 attendees, respectively, at the sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic of the University Hospital Rotterdam-Dijkzigt, The

  1. Tumor-selective replication herpes simplex virus-based technology significantly improves clinical detection and prognostication of viable circulating tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wen; Bao, Li; Yang, Shaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells remains a significant challenge due to their vast physical and biological heterogeneity. We developed a cell-surface-marker-independent technology based on telomerase-specific, replication-selective oncolytic herpes-simplex-virus-1 that targets telomerase...

  2. Herpes simplex virus infection is sensed by both Toll-like receptors and retinoic acid-inducible gene- like receptors, which synergize to induce type I interferon production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon Brandtoft; Jensen, Søren B; Nielsen, C

    2009-01-01

    interferons (IFNs) after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). Our work also identified RNase L as a critical component in IFN induction. Moreover, we found that TLR9 and RLRs activate distinct, as well as overlapping, intracellular signalling pathways. Thus, RLRs are important for recognition of HSV...

  3. F-18-FEAU as a radiotracer for herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene expression : in-vitro comparison with other PET tracers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buursma, AR; Rutgers, [No Value; Hospers, GAP; Mulder, NH; Vaalburg, W; de Vries, EFJ

    Objective The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene has frequently been applied as a reporter gene for monitoring transgene expression in animal models. In clinical gene therapy protocols, however, extremely low expression levels of the transferred gene are generally observed.

  4. Seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and 2 in Taiwan and Risk Factor Analysis, 2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hsiang Shen

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and 2 (HSV-2 are common human pathogens and might cause severe illness. Following primary infection, the viruses establish lifelong latent infection and are transmitted by close contact, both sexual and nonsexual. However, the information about the seroprevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 across all age groups is limited.Residual sera collected during the nationwide serosurvey in 2007 in Taiwan were selected for the study. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect anti-HSV-1 and anti-HSV-2 type-specific glycoprotein IgG. Demographics and personal health data were used for risk analysis.A total of 1411 and 1072 serum samples were included for anti-HSV-1 and anti-HSV-2 seroprevalence analysis, respectively. The weighted overall seroprevalence was 63.2% for HSV-1, and 7.7% for HSV-2, respectively. The HSV-1 seropositive rate was 19.2% for those less than 5 years old, increased to 46.4% for those aged 5-13 years, 60.9% for those aged 14-29 years, and reached as much as 95.0% for those aged over 30 years. In contrast, the HSV-2 seropositve rate was 1.6% for those less than 30 years old, rose to 10.1% for those age 30-39 years, and was up to 31.2% for those aged over 60 years. A significantly higher HSV-2 seropositive rate was noted in females than males aged over 40 years (26.3% v.s. 16.8%, and the overall HSV-2 seropositive rate was almost twice higher in females than males. Smoking history, drinking habit, and educational level were associated with the HSV-1 seropositivity. Female gender and rural residence were independent factors for the HSV-2 seropositivity.An obvious increase of primary HSV-1 infection occurred in late adolescents and young adults, joined by the rise of HSV-2 infection in middle-aged adults, especially females. The acquistion and transmission of HSV warrant further studies in the susceptible population.

  5. Roles of M1 and M2 Macrophages in Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dhong Hyun; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2017-08-01

    Macrophages are the predominant infiltrate in the corneas of mice that have been ocularly infected with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). However, very little is known about the relative roles of M1 (classically activated or polarized) and M2 (alternatively activated or polarized) macrophages in ocular HSV-1 infection. To better understand these relationships, we assessed the impact of directed M1 or M2 activation of RAW264.7 macrophages and peritoneal macrophages (PM) on subsequent HSV-1 infection. In both the RAW264.7 macrophage and PM in vitro models, HSV-1 replication in M1 macrophages was markedly lower than in M2 macrophages and unstimulated controls. The M1 macrophages expressed significantly higher levels of 28 of the 32 tested cytokines and chemokines than M2 macrophages, with HSV-1 infection significantly increasing the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the M1 versus the M2 macrophages. To examine the effects of shifting the immune response toward either M1 or M2 macrophages in vivo, wild-type mice were injected with gamma interferon (IFN-γ) DNA or colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) DNA prior to ocular infection with HSV-1. Virus replication in the eye, latency in trigeminal ganglia (TG), and markers of T cell exhaustion in the TG were determined. We found that injection of mice with IFN-γ DNA, which enhances the development of M1 macrophages, increased virus replication in the eye; increased latency; and also increased CD4, CD8, IFN-γ, and PD-1 transcripts in the TG of latently infected mice. Conversely, injection of mice with CSF-1 DNA, which enhances the development of M2 macrophages, was associated with reduced virus replication in the eye and reduced latency and reduced the levels of CD4, CD8, IFN-γ,and PD-1 transcripts in the TG. Collectively, these results suggest that M2 macrophages directly reduce the levels of HSV-1 latency and, thus, T-cell exhaustion in the TG of ocularly infected mice.IMPORTANCE Our findings demonstrate

  6. Cellular Cholesterol Facilitates the Postentry Replication Cycle of Herpes Simplex Virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wudiri, George A; Nicola, Anthony V

    2017-07-15

    Cholesterol is an essential component of cell membranes and is required for herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) entry (1-3). Treatment of HSV-1-infected Vero cells with methyl beta-cyclodextrin from 2 to 9 h postentry reduced plaque numbers. Transport of incoming viral capsids to the nuclear periphery was unaffected by the cholesterol reduction, suggesting that cell cholesterol is important for the HSV-1 replicative cycle at a stage(s) beyond entry, after the arrival of capsids at the nucleus. The synthesis and release of infectious HSV-1 and cell-to-cell spread of infection were all impaired in cholesterol-reduced cells. Propagation of HSV-1 on DHCR24 -/- fibroblasts, which lack the desmosterol-to-cholesterol conversion enzyme, resulted in the generation of infectious extracellular virions (HSV des ) that lack cholesterol and likely contain desmosterol. The specific infectivities (PFU per viral genome) of HSV chol and HSV des were similar, suggesting cholesterol and desmosterol in the HSV envelope support similar levels of infectivity. However, infected DHCR24 -/- fibroblasts released ∼1 log less infectious HSV des and ∼1.5 log fewer particles than release of cholesterol-containing particles (HSV chol ) from parental fibroblasts, suggesting that the hydrocarbon tail of cholesterol facilitates viral synthesis. Together, the results suggest multiple roles for cholesterol in the HSV-1 replicative cycle. IMPORTANCE HSV-1 infections are associated with a wide range of clinical manifestations that are of public health importance. Cholesterol is a key player in the complex interaction between viral and cellular factors that allows HSV-1 to enter host cells and establish infection. Previous reports have demonstrated a role for cellular cholesterol in the entry of HSV-1 into target cells. Here, we employed both chemical treatment and cells that were genetically defined to synthesize only desmosterol to demonstrate that cholesterol is important at stages following the

  7. Global estimates of prevalent and incident herpes simplex virus type 2 infections in 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine J Looker

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 infection causes significant disease globally. Adolescent and adult infection may present as painful genital ulcers. Neonatal infection has high morbidity and mortality. Additionally, HSV-2 likely contributes substantially to the spread of HIV infection. The global burden of HSV-2 infection was last estimated for 2003. Here we present new global estimates for 2012 of the burden of prevalent (existing and incident (new HSV-2 infection among females and males aged 15-49 years, using updated methodology to adjust for test performance and estimate by World Health Organization (WHO region.We conducted a literature review of HSV-2 prevalence studies world-wide since 2000. We then fitted a model with constant HSV-2 incidence by age to pooled HSV-2 prevalence values by age and sex. Prevalence values were adjusted for test sensitivity and specificity. The model estimated prevalence and incidence by sex for each WHO region to obtain global burden estimates. Uncertainty bounds were computed by refitting the model to reflect the variation in the underlying prevalence data. In 2012, we estimate that there were 417 million people aged 15-49 years (range: 274-678 million living with HSV-2 infection world-wide (11.3% global prevalence, of whom 267 million were women. We also estimate that in 2012, 19.2 million (range: 13.0-28.6 million individuals aged 15-49 years were newly-infected (0.5% of all individuals globally. The highest burden was in Africa. However, despite lower prevalence, South-East Asia and Western Pacific regions also contributed large numbers to the global totals because of large population sizes.The global burden of HSV-2 infection is large, leaving over 400 million people at increased risk of genital ulcer disease, HIV acquisition, and transmission of HSV-2 to partners or neonates. These estimates highlight the critical need for development of vaccines, microbicides, and other new HSV prevention strategies.

  8. Infiltration Pattern of Blood Monocytes into the Central Nervous System during Experimental Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafik Menasria

    Full Text Available The kinetics and distribution of infiltrating blood monocytes into the central nervous system and their involvement in the cerebral immune response together with resident macrophages, namely microglia, were evaluated in experimental herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 encephalitis (HSE. To distinguish microglia from blood monocyte-derived macrophages, chimeras were generated by conditioning C57BL/6 recipient mice with chemotherapy regimen followed by transplantation of bone morrow-derived cells that expressed the green fluorescent protein. Mice were infected intranasally with a sub-lethal dose of HSV-1 (1.2 x 10(6 plaque forming units. Brains were harvested prior to and on days 4, 6, 8 and 10 post-infection for flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry analysis. The amounts of neutrophils (P < 0.05 and "Ly6C hi" inflammatory monocytes (P < 0.001 significantly increased in the CNS compared to non-infected controls on day 6 post-infection, which corresponded to more severe clinical signs of HSE. Levels decreased on day 8 for both leukocytes subpopulations (P < 0.05 for inflammatory monocytes compared to non-infected controls to reach baseline levels on day 10 following infection. The percentage of "Ly6C low" patrolling monocytes significantly increased (P < 0.01 at a later time point (day 8, which correlated with the resolution phase of HSE. Histological analysis demonstrated that blood leukocytes colonized mostly the olfactory bulb and the brainstem, which corresponded to regions where HSV-1 particles were detected. Furthermore, infiltrating cells from the monocytic lineage could differentiate into activated local tissue macrophages that express the microglia marker, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1. The lack of albumin detection in the brain parenchyma of infected mice showed that the infiltration of blood leukocytes was not necessarily related to a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier but could be the result of a functional recruitment. Thus

  9. IL-12 Expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus promotes anti-tumor activity and immunologic control of metastatic ovarian cancer in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Eric D; Meza-Perez, Selene; Bevis, Kerri S; Randall, Troy D; Gillespie, G Yancey; Langford, Catherine; Alvarez, Ronald D

    2016-10-27

    Despite advances in surgical aggressiveness and conventional chemotherapy, ovarian cancer remains the most lethal cause of gynecologic cancer mortality; consequently there is a need for new therapeutic agents and innovative treatment paradigms for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Several studies have demonstrated that ovarian cancer is an immunogenic disease and immunotherapy represents a promising and novel approach that has not been completely evaluated in ovarian cancer. Our objective was to evaluate the anti-tumor activity of an oncolytic herpes simplex virus "armed" with murine interleukin-12 and its ability to elicit tumor-specific immune responses. We evaluated the ability of interleukin-12-expressing and control oncolytic herpes simplex virus to kill murine and human ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro. We also administered interleukin-12-expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus to the peritoneal cavity of mice that had developed spontaneous, metastatic ovarian cancer and determined overall survival and tumor burden at 95 days. We used flow cytometry to quantify the tumor antigen-specific CD8 + T cell response in the omentum and peritoneal cavity. All ovarian cancer cell lines demonstrated susceptibility to oncolytic herpes simplex virus in vitro. Compared to controls, mice treated with interleukin-12-expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus demonstrated a more robust tumor antigen-specific CD8 + T-cell immune response in the omentum (471.6 cells vs 33.1 cells; p = 0.02) and peritoneal cavity (962.3 cells vs 179.5 cells; p = 0.05). Compared to controls, mice treated with interleukin-12-expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus were more likely to control ovarian cancer metastases (81.2 % vs 18.2 %; p = 0.008) and had a significantly longer overall survival (p = 0.02). Finally, five of 6 mice treated with interleukin-12-expressing oHSV had no evidence of metastatic tumor when euthanized at 6 months, compared to two of 4 mice treated with

  10. Comparison of the ocular characteristics of anterior uveitis caused by herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, and cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Hiroshi; Kubono, Reo; Terada, Yukiko; Imai, Ayano; Fukuda, Shoko; Tomita, Makoto; Miyanaga, Masaru; Kamoi, Koju; Sugita, Sunao; Miyata, Kazunori; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2014-11-01

    To compare the clinical characteristics of anterior uveitis (AU) caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), or cytomegalovirus (CMV). The medical records were reviewed of 46 patients whose diagnoses were based on their clinical characteristics [e.g., unilateral involvement, presence of keratic precipitates (KPs), and elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP)] and on PCR detection of herpes virus DNA in the aqueous humor. The demographics, chief complaints, and clinical characteristics of the three types of herpetic AU were compared. Of the 46 patients with AU, eight had HSV-AU, 20 had VZV-AU, and 18 had CMV-AU. HSV-AU and VZV-AU shared common features, i.e., a relatively acute disease process and the presence of large KPs. Among the three groups of patients, the characteristic features of those with VZV-AU were severe intraocular inflammation, as shown by severe aqueous flare, highest viral load in the aqueous humor, and presence of segmental iris atrophy. In comparison, patients with CMV-AU had the mildest intraocular inflammation, lowest corneal endothelial cell density, and highest IOP. Although the AU caused by each of the three types of herpes viruses has a number of common features, each disease also has distinct features that should facilitate an accurate diagnosis.

  11. [The alpha-herpesviridae in dermatology : Herpes simplex virus types I and II. German version].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hayderi, L; Rübben, A; Nikkels, A F

    2017-03-01

    This review on herpes simplex virus type I and type II (HSV-I, HSV-II) summarizes recent developments in clinical manifestations and treatment interventions for primary and recurrent orolabial and genital herpes, as well as those regarding vaccination issues. Among the clinical presentations, the relationship between pyogenic granuloma and chronic HSV-I infection; HSV-related folliculitis; verrucous HSV-I and HSV-II lesions; the role of recurrent HSV-I infection in burning mouth syndrome; HSV-I and HSV-II infection of the periareolar area; zosteriform HSV; the "knife-cut sign"; and the preferential colonization and infection of preexisting dermatoses by HSV-I or HSV-II are discussed. The usual antiviral treatment regimens for primary and recurrent orolabial and genital herpes are compared to short-term and one-day treatment options. New anti-HSV-I and anti-HSV-II agents include amenavir, pritelivir, brincidofovir, valomaciclovir, and FV-100. Therapeutic or preventive vaccination against HSV-I and HSV-II infections still remains a highly desirable treatment aim, which, unfortunately, has no clinically relevant applications to date.

  12. Epidemiology of genital herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 infections in southwestern Finland during a 10-year period (2003-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortekangas-Savolainen, Outi; Orhanen, Elina; Puodinketo, Teemu; Vuorinen, Tytti

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the proportion of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) in genital infections during a 10-year period (2003-2012) among outpatients of a clinic of sexually transmitted disease in Southwestern Finland. We analyzed prospectively the proportion of HSV-1- or HSV-2-positive culture samples from our sexually transmitted disease clinic outpatients with genital herpes infection during the years 2003 to 2012 and compared the proportions of positive HSV-1 and HSV-2 findings with the age and sex of the patients. Herpes simplex virus type 2 was typed in 66.4% (557/839) and HSV-1 in 33.6% (282/839) of the patients during the entire study period. The mean age of male patients (26.3 years) with a laboratory-confirmed HSV-1 infection was significantly lower than that in male patients with an HSV-2 infection in 2003 to 2007 (26.3 vs. 32.9 years), with P Herpes simplex virus type 2 was still the most common causative agent of genital herpes in Southwestern Finland, but the proportion of HSV-1 was increasingly high. The age difference between male patients with HSV-1 and HSV-2 narrowed during the years studied.

  13. NFκB-mediated activation of the cellular FUT3, 5 and 6 gene cluster by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordén, Rickard; Samuelsson, Ebba; Nyström, Kristina

    2017-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 has the ability to induce expression of a human gene cluster located on chromosome 19 upon infection. This gene cluster contains three fucosyltransferases (encoded by FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6) with the ability to add a fucose to an N-acetylglucosamine residue. Little is known regarding the transcriptional activation of these three genes in human cells. Intriguingly, herpes simplex virus type 1 activates all three genes simultaneously during infection, a situation not observed in uninfected tissue, pointing towards a virus specific mechanism for transcriptional activation. The aim of this study was to define the underlying mechanism for the herpes simplex virus type 1 activation of FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6 transcription. The transcriptional activation of the FUT-gene cluster on chromosome 19 in fibroblasts was specific, not involving adjacent genes. Moreover, inhibition of NFκB signaling through panepoxydone treatment significantly decreased the induction of FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6 transcriptional activation, as did siRNA targeting of p65, in herpes simplex virus type 1 infected fibroblasts. NFκB and p65 signaling appears to play an important role in the regulation of FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6 transcriptional activation by herpes simplex virus type 1 although additional, unidentified, viral factors might account for part of the mechanism as direct interferon mediated stimulation of NFκB was not sufficient to induce the fucosyltransferase encoding gene cluster in uninfected cells. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The occurrence of herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 in skin and mucosal lesions in patients with suspicion of genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorka, Emilia; Mlynarczyk-Bonikowska, Beata; Machura, Paulina; Majewska, Anna; Dzieciqtkowski, Tomasz; Mlynarzyk, Grazyna; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Majewski, Slawomir

    Infection with herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 (HSV 1 and 2 or Human herpesvirus HHV) are one of the most common infections in human. Real time PCR is a sensitive and specific method for diagnostics of HHV infections. The aim of the study was to investigate the occurrence of HHV 1 and HHV 2 DNA in patient with clinical symptoms suggesting HHV infection. We used real time PCR to investigate swabs from genital and perianal lesions from 74 patients of the Department of Dermatology and Venereology Medical University Warsaw and of gynecological outpatient clinics in Warsaw 40 women and 34 men. The results were positive for HHV 2 in 25 cases (34%), for HHV 1 in 19 cases (26%) and for both viruses in 20 cases (27%). 10 samples were negative for both viruses. The results confirm that the main cause of symptomatic genital herpes is HHV 2, however the percentage of HHV 1 and specially of mixed HHV 1/HHV 2 infections was unexpectedly high.

  15. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein B Epitope-Specific Effector and Memory CD8+ T Cells from Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Individuals with Ocular Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif A.; Srivastava, Ruchi; Spencer, Doran; Garg, Sumit; Fremgen, Daniel; Vahed, Hawa; Lopes, Patricia P.; Pham, Thanh T.; Hewett, Charlie; Kuang, Jasmine; Ong, Nicolas; Huang, Lei; Scarfone, Vanessa M.; Nesburn, Anthony B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB)-specific CD8+ T cells protect mice from herpes infection and disease. However, whether and which HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells play a key role in the “natural” protection seen in HSV-1-seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease) remain to be determined. In this study, we have dissected the phenotypes and the functions of HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells from HLA-A*02:01 positive, HSV-1 seropositive ASYMP and symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent ocular herpes disease). We found the following. (i) Healthy ASYMP individuals maintained a significantly higher proportion of differentiated HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7low CD44high CD62Llow). In contrast, SYMP patients had frequent less-differentiated central memory CD8+ T cells (TCM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7high CD44low CD62Lhigh). (ii) ASYMP individuals had significantly higher proportions of multifunctional effector CD8+ T cells which responded mainly to gB342–350 and gB561–569 “ASYMP” epitopes, and simultaneously produced IFN-γ, CD107a/b, granzyme B, and perforin. In contrast, effector CD8+ T cells from SYMP individuals were mostly monofunctional and were directed mainly against nonoverlapping gB17–25 and gB183–191 “SYMP” epitopes. (iii) Immunization of an HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mouse model of ocular herpes with “ASYMP” CD8+ TEM cell epitopes, but not with “SYMP” CD8+ TCM cell epitopes, induced a strong CD8+ T cell-dependent protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. Our findings provide insights into the role of HSV-specific CD8+ TEM cells in protection against herpes and should be considered in the development of an effective vaccine. IMPORTANCE A significantly higher proportion of differentiated and multifunctional HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM

  16. Blocking herpes simplex virus 2 glycoprotein E immune evasion as an approach to enhance efficacy of a trivalent subunit antigen vaccine for genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Sita; Huang, Jialing; Shaw, Carolyn; Friedman, Harvey M

    2014-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) subunit antigen vaccines targeting virus entry molecules have failed to prevent genital herpes in human trials. Our approach is to include a virus entry molecule and add antigens that block HSV-2 immune evasion. HSV-2 glycoprotein C (gC2) is an immune evasion molecule that inhibits complement. We previously reported that adding gC2 to gD2 improved vaccine efficacy compared to the efficacy of either antigen alone in mice and guinea pigs. Here we demonstrate that HSV-2 glycoprotein E (gE2) functions as an immune evasion molecule by binding the IgG Fc domain. HSV-2 gE2 is synergistic with gC2 in protecting the virus from antibody and complement neutralization. Antibodies produced by immunization with gE2 blocked gE2-mediated IgG Fc binding and cell-to-cell spread. Mice immunized with gE2 were only partially protected against HSV-2 vaginal challenge in mice; however, when gE2 was added to gC2/gD2 to form a trivalent vaccine, neutralizing antibody titers with and without complement were significantly higher than those produced by gD2 alone. Importantly, the trivalent vaccine protected the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of 32/33 (97%) mice between days 2 and 7 postchallenge, compared with 27/33 (82%) in the gD2 group. The HSV-2 DNA copy number was significantly lower in mice immunized with the trivalent vaccine than in those immunized with gD2 alone. The extent of DRG protection using the trivalent vaccine was better than what we previously reported for gC2/gD2 immunization. Therefore, gE2 is a candidate antigen for inclusion in a multivalent subunit vaccine that attempts to block HSV-2 immune evasion. Herpes simplex virus is the most common cause of genital ulcer disease worldwide. Infection results in emotional distress for infected individuals and their partners, is life threatening for infants exposed to herpes during childbirth, and greatly increases the risk of individuals acquiring and transmitting HIV infection. A vaccine that prevents

  17. Rapid quantitative PCR assays for the simultaneous detection of herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and human herpesvirus 6 DNA in blood and other clinical specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelmann, I.; Petzold, D. R.; Kosinska, A.; Hepkema, B. G.; Schulz, T. F.; Heim, A.

    Rapid diagnosis of human herpesvirus primary infections or reactivations is facilitated by quantitative PCRs. Quantitative PCR assays with a standard thermal cycling profile permitting simultaneous detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV), varicella zoster virus (VZV), cytomegalovirus (CMV),

  18. Evaluation of the prevalence of herpes simplex-1 infection in oral squamous cell carcinoma specimens in Alzahra and Kashani Hospitals with polymerase chain reaction method in 2012-2013

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mokhtari, Mozhgan; Beiraghdar, Mozhdeh

    2015-01-01

    ...), there is evidence to indicate that herpes simplex virus (HSV) may also play some inducing role. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of HSV in Iranian patients with OSCC using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR...

  19. Treatment of relapse in herpes simplex on labial and facial areas and of primary herpes simplex on genital areas and "area pudenda" with low-power He-Ne laser or Acyclovir administered orally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez-Gonzalez, Mariano; Urrea-Arbelaez, Alejandro; Nicolas, M.; Serra-Baldrich, E.; Perez, J. L.; Pavesi, M.; Camarasa, J. M.; Trelles, Mario A.

    1996-01-01

    Sixty patients (greater than 16 yrs old) suffering primary or relapse genital herpes simplex viruses (HSV) and relapse labial HSV were appointed for this study. Three or more relapses were experienced per year. Patients (under treatment) were divided into two groups (distribution areas), corresponding to either labial herpes or genital herpes. These groups were sub-divided into 3 groups. The total number of labial or facial HSV patients was 36 (10 in group 1, 12 in group 2, 14 in group 3) and 24 for genital, buttocks, or 'area pudenda' HSV patients (6 in group 1, 8 in group 2, 10 in group 3). The design was a randomized, double- blind study. The setting was hospital and outpatient. The patients diagnosed as having the HVS disease were sent to the dermatology department and were assigned to a group at random. Treatment was begun as follows: During the treatment signs and symptoms were assessed and after the treatment, the relapses were also assessed (biochemical and hematological tests before and after the treatment) and the diagnosis of the HSV type I and II. The statistical evaluation of the results was performed and carried out with the SPSS and BMDP program. The relapses of the herpes infection in the lips and the face were significantly reduced (p less than 0.026) in patients treated with laser He-Ne and laser He-Ne plus Acyclovir. The interim between the relapses also increased significantly (p less than 0.005) in relation with the group treated with Acyclovir. The duration of the herpetic eruptions was clearly reduced in all locations in patients treated with laser He-Ne plus Acyclovir. No differences were noted between patients treated with laser He-Ne only or Acyclovir only. Therefore it is probable that therapeutic synergism took place. In relation with this, laser He-Ne shows the same therapeutic efficacy as Acyclovir taken orally. The association of Acyclovir and laser Ne-Ne could be an alternative method for the treatment of HSV in the face. The number

  20. Herpes Simplex Virus Hepatitis: A Presentation of Multi-Institutional Cases to Promote Early Diagnosis and Management of the Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwinee Natu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare three cases of Herpes simplex virus (HSV hepatitis to increase early diagnosis of the disease. Case  1. A 23-year-old man with Crohn’s disease and oral HSV. HSV hepatitis was diagnosed clinically and he improved with acyclovir. Case  2. An 18-year-old G1P0 woman with transaminitis. Despite early empiric acyclovir therapy, she died due to fulminant liver failure. Case  3. A 65-year-old woman who developed transaminitis after liver transplant. Diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy and she had resolution of acute liver failure with acyclovir. Conclusion. It is imperative that clinicians be aware of patients at high risk for developing HSV hepatitis to increase timely diagnosis and prevent morbidity and fatality.

  1. Neurons versus herpes simplex virus: the innate immune interactions that contribute to a host–pathogen standoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Pamela C; Leib, David A

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a prevalent neurotropic virus, which establishes lifelong latent infections in the neurons of sensory ganglia. Despite our long-standing knowledge that HSV predominately infects sensory neurons during its life cycle, little is known about the neuronal antiviral response to HSV infection. Recent studies show that while sensory neurons have impaired intrinsic immunity to HSV infection, paracrine IFN signaling can potentiate a potent antiviral response. Additionally, antiviral autophagy plays an important role in neuronal control of HSV infection. Here we review the literature of antiviral signaling and autophagy in neurons, the mechanisms by which HSV can counteract these responses, and postulate how these two pathways may synergize to mediate neuronal control of HSV infection and yet result in lifelong persistence of the virus. PMID:26213562

  2. Vaginal Lactobacillus gasseri CMUL57 can inhibit herpes simplex type 2 but not Coxsackievirus B4E2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassaa, Imad Al; Hober, Didier; Hamze, Monzer; Caloone, Delphine; Dewilde, Anny; Chihib, Nour-Eddine; Drider, Djamel

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed at demonstrating the antiviral activity of Lactobacillus gasseri CMUL57 (L. gasseri CMUL57), L. acidophilus CMUL67 and L. plantarum CMUL140 against herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-2) and Coxsackievirus B4E2 (CVB4E2), which are enveloped and naked viruses, respectively. These lactobacilli were non-cytotoxic and were able to reduce the cytopathic effect induced by HSV-2 in Vero cell monolayers. However, lactobacilli were not active against CVB4E2. Tested lactobacilli displayed anti-HSV-2 activity when they were co-incubated with the virus prior to inoculating the mixture to Vero cell monolayers. The detection of HSV-2 DNA by PCR in pellets of bacteria/virus mixtures let us to hypothesize that anti-HSV-2 activity of lactobacilli resulted from the viruses' entrapment. This study showed the capabilities of vaginal lactobacilli to inhibit enveloped viruses such as HSV-2.

  3. Mechanism of inhibition of herpes simplex virus replication by delta 7-prostaglandin A1 and delta 12-prostaglandin J2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Fukushima, M; Tsurumi, T; Maeno, K; Nishiyama, Y

    1987-08-14

    We studied the effect of prostaglandins (PGs) A1, delta 7-A1, A2, D2, E1, E2, F2 alpha, J2 and delta 12-J2 on the replication of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Of nine PGs we tested, delta 7-PGA1 was found to have the most potent inhibitory effect; 50% inhibitory dose (ID50) was 0.35 microgram/ml in the plaque reduction assays and HSV-2 induced protein synthesis was strongly suppressed at 0.5 microgram/ml whereas at this dose, the protein synthesis of uninfected cells was not inhibited. Dot blot hybridization analysis revealed that delta 7-PGA1 and delta 12-PGJ2 inhibited the primary transcription of HSV-2. Thus we suggest that those PGs are primarily active at the level of mRNA synthesis.

  4. Rapid localized spread and immunologic containment define Herpes simplex virus-2 reactivation in the human genital tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Joshua T; Swan, David; Al Sallaq, Ramzi; Magaret, Amalia; Johnston, Christine; Mark, Karen E; Selke, Stacy; Ocbamichael, Negusse; Kuntz, Steve; Zhu, Jia; Robinson, Barry; Huang, Meei-Li; Jerome, Keith R; Wald, Anna; Corey, Lawrence

    2013-04-16

    Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) is shed episodically, leading to occasional genital ulcers and efficient transmission. The biology explaining highly variable shedding patterns, in an infected person over time, is poorly understood. We sampled the genital tract for HSV DNA at several time intervals and concurrently at multiple sites, and derived a spatial mathematical model to characterize dynamics of HSV-2 reactivation. The model reproduced heterogeneity in shedding episode duration and viral production, and predicted rapid early viral expansion, rapid late decay, and wide spatial dispersion of HSV replication during episodes. In simulations, HSV-2 spread locally within single ulcers to thousands of epithelial cells in genital epithelium. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00288.001.

  5. The genome of herpesvirus papio 2 is closely related to the genomes of human herpes simplex viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigger, John E; Martin, David W

    2003-06-01

    Infection of baboons (Papio species) with herpesvirus papio 2 (HVP-2) produces a disease that is clinically similar to herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infection of humans. The development of a primate model of simplexvirus infection based on HVP-2 would provide a powerful resource to study virus biology and test vaccine strategies. In order to characterize the molecular biology of HVP-2 and justify further development of this model system we have constructed a physical map of the HVP-2 genome. The results of these studies have identified the presence of 26 reading frames that closely resemble HSV homologues. Furthermore, the HVP-2 genome shares a collinear arrangement with the genome of HSV. These studies further validate the development of the HVP-2 model as a surrogate system to study the biology of HSV infections.

  6. Performance of the HerpeSelect (Focus) and Kalon Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays for Detection of Antibodies against Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 by Use of Monoclonal Antibody-Blocking Enzyme Immunoassay and Clinicovirological Reference Standards in Brazil▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Maria Claudia; Ferreira, Suzete; Sabino, Ester; Hamilton, Ingrid; Parry, John; Pannuti, Claudio S.; Mayaud, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    A total of 586 serum samples were used to evaluate the performance of type-specific herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) by using the monoclonal antibody-blocking enzyme immunoassay (MAb-EIA) and a clinicovirological panel as reference standards. The Kalon and HerpeSelect ELISAs had similar sensitivities (93.5% and 93.8% compared with the results obtained by MAb-EIA, respectively, and 100% for both ELISAs compared with the results obtained with a clinicovirological panel). The Kalon ELISA had a higher specificity (96.5% and 96.8% compared with the results obtained by MAb-EIA and with a clinicovirological panel, respectively) than the HerpeSelect ELISA (86.9% and 94% compared with the results obtained by MAb-EIA and with a clinicovirological panel, respectively). A higher cutoff significantly improved the specificity of the HerpeSelect ELISA. PMID:17507516

  7. A Strategy for Cultivation of Retargeted Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viruses in Non-cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Valerio; Gatta, Valentina; Casiraghi, Costanza; Nicosia, Alfredo; Petrovic, Biljana; Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella

    2017-05-15

    The oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) that has been approved for clinical practice and those HSVs in clinical trials are attenuated viruses, often with the neurovirulence gene γ 1 34.5 and additional genes deleted. One strategy to engineer nonattenuated oncolytic HSVs consists of retargeting the viral tropism to a cancer-specific receptor of choice, exemplified by HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2), which is present in breast, ovary, and other cancers, and in detargeting from the natural receptors. Because the HER2-retargeted HSVs strictly depend on this receptor for infection, the viruses employed in preclinical studies were cultivated in HER2-positive cancer cells. The production of clinical-grade viruses destined for humans should avoid the use of cancer cells. Here, we engineered the R-213 recombinant, by insertion of a 20-amino-acid (aa) short peptide (named GCN4) in the gH of R-LM113; this recombinant was retargeted to HER2 through insertion in gD of a single-chain antibody (scFv) to HER2. Next, we generated a Vero cell line expressing an artificial receptor (GCN4R) whose N terminus consists of an scFv to GCN4 and therefore is capable of interacting with GCN4 present in gH of R-213. R-213 replicated as well as R-LM113 in SK-OV-3 cells, implying that addition of the GCN4 peptide was not detrimental to gH. R-213 grew to relatively high titers in Vero-GCN4R cells, efficiently spread from cell to cell, and killed both Vero-GCN4R and SK-OV-3 cells, as expected for an oncolytic virus. Altogether, Vero-GCN4R cells represent an efficient system for cultivation of retargeted oncolytic HSVs in non-cancer cells. IMPORTANCE There is growing interest in viruses as oncolytic agents, which can be administered in combination with immunotherapeutic compounds, including immune checkpoint inhibitors. The oncolytic HSV approved for clinical practice and those in clinical trials are attenuated viruses. An alternative to attenuation is a cancer specificity

  8. Immunization against Genital Herpes with a Vaccine Virus That has Defects in Productive and Latent Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Xavier J.; Jones, Cheryl A.; Knipe, David M.

    1999-06-01

    An effective vaccine for genital herpes has been difficult to achieve because of the limited efficacy of subunit vaccines and the safety concerns about live viruses. As an alternative approach, mutant herpes simplex virus strains that are replication-defective can induce protective immunity. To increase the level of safety and to prove that replication was not needed for immunization, we constructed a mutant herpes simplex virus 2 strain containing two deletion mutations, each of which eliminated viral replication. The double-mutant virus induces protective immunity that can reduce acute viral shedding and latent infection in a mouse genital model, but importantly, the double-mutant virus shows a phenotypic defect in latent infection. This herpes vaccine strain, which is immunogenic but has defects in both productive and latent infection, provides a paradigm for the design of vaccines and vaccine vectors for other sexually transmitted diseases, such as AIDS.

  9. Diagnosis of genital herpes simplex virus infection in the clinical laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LeGoff, Jérôme; Péré, Hélène; Bélec, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    .... However, HSV PCR, with its consistently and substantially higher rate of HSV detection, could replace viral culture as the gold standard for the diagnosis of genital herpes in people with active...

  10. In vitro antiviral activity of Chamaecrista nictitans (Fabaceae against herpes simplex virus: Biological characterization of mechanisms of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libia Herrero Uribe

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We have previously identified a crude extract of the plant Chamaecrista nictitans (Fabaceaewith antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus.The main objectives of this research were to identify the step of the replication cycle of herpes simplex inhibited by the extract,and to attempt to characterize the chemical characteristics of this extract.The crude extract from Chamaecrista nictitans (Fabaceaewas extracted with a mixture of diclorometane/methanol,and further fractionated following a bioassay-guided protocol using a combination of preparative thin layer and column chromatography.Toxicity and bioassay experiments were carried out in monolayers of Vero cells.The antiviral activity of the extract was assessed by total inhibition of cytopathic effect after three-day incubation.The highest concentration of the extract which was not toxic to the cells was 200 mu g/ml. Western blot and immunofluorescence techniques were used to elucidate the antiviral mechanism of the extract by infecting Vero cells with the virus at different times and monitoring the synthesis of viral proteins.A 60 kDa protein was detected at 2 hr and 8 hr post-infection but no additional proteins were synthesized at later time intervals,and cytopathic effect was not observed after 24 hr.This result indicates that the extract acts at the intracellular level in order to inhibit late transcription.However,it does not inhibit transcription/translation of early viral proteins.These results were confirmed by immunofluorescence experiments.A strong fluorescent signal was observed in control cell monolayers at 24 hr post infection,accompanied with a clear cytopathic effect.In contrast,in the presence of acyclovir or the extract,cells showed very discrete immunofluorescence,characterized by a punctuated pattern, and no cytopathic effect was observed.Neutralization assays were performed using pre-incubation of virus with either specific herpes simplex-1 antiserum,200 mu g/ml of the

  11. Multicenter Evaluation of Meridian Bioscience HSV 1&2 Molecular Assay for Detection of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2 from Clinical Cutaneous and Mucocutaneous Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faron, Matthew L; Ledeboer, Nathan A; Patel, Anami; Beqa, Safedin H; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Kohn, Debra; Leber, Amy L; Mayne, Donna; Northern, William I; Buchan, Blake W

    2016-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) causes acute and relapsing symptoms characterized by ulcerative lesions. Laboratory diagnosis of HSV in cutaneous or mucocutaneous lesions has historically been performed with the use of viral cell culture systems; however, these tests are laborious and suffer decreased sensitivity for advanced-stage lesions. The recent availability of FDA-cleared moderately complex assays has resulted in the increased use of molecular diagnostics for the routine detection of HSV in superficial swab specimens. We performed a clinical evaluation of the recently FDA-cleared illumigene HSV 1&2 loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay (Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati OH) for the detection and differentiation of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in cutaneous and mucocutaneous swab specimens. A total of 1,153 clinical swab specimens were collected and tested at 7 different clinical centers. Each specimen was tested for the presence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 using the illumigene assay, and results were compared to those of the enzyme-linked virus-inducible system (ELVIS) as the reference method. Overall, the illumigene assay demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 94.8% and 95.5%, respectively, for the detection of HSV-1. Detection of HSV-2 was similar, with a sensitivity of 98.9% and a specificity of 95.5%. Discrepant analysis was performed using an alternative molecular test (AmpliVue HSV1+2 assay; Quidel Molecular, San Diego, CA) on 91/99 specimens that were recorded as false positive (FP) or false negative (FN) compared to the reference method. In total, 57/78 (73%) FP and 9/13 (69%) FN illumigene results were supported by the AmpliVue result. The illumigene HSV 1&2 assay demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity to detect and differentiate HSV in clinical specimens and identified 57 additional specimens that were positive for HSV compared to culture. The use of LAMP eliminates the need for the cycling of temperatures and provides results in less than 60 min

  12. Herpes simplex virus serotype and entry receptor availability alter CNS disease in a mouse model of neonatal HSV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Sarah J; Ranaivo, Hantamalala R; Wilcox, Douglas R; Karaba, Andrew H; Wainwright, Mark S; Muller, William J

    2014-12-01

    Outcomes of neonates with herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis are worse after infection with HSV-2 when compared with HSV-1. The proteins herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) and nectin-1 mediate HSV entry into susceptible cells. Prior studies have shown receptor-dependent differences in pathogenesis that depend on route of inoculation and host developmental age. We investigated serotype-related differences in HSV disease and their relationship to entry receptor availability in a mouse model of encephalitis. Mortality was attenuated in 7-d-old, wild-type (WT) mice inoculated with HSV-1(F) when compared with HSV-2(333). No serotype-specific differences were seen after inoculation of adult mice. HSV-1 pathogenesis was also attenuated relative to HSV-2 in newborn but not adult mice lacking HVEM or nectin-1. HSV-2 requires nectin-1 for encephalitis in adult but not newborn mice; in contrast, nectin-1 was important for HSV-1 pathogenesis in both age groups. Early viral replication was independent of age, viral serotype, or mouse genotype, suggesting host responses influence outcomes. In this regard, significantly greater amounts of inflammatory mediators were detected in brain homogenates from WT newborns 2 d after infection compared with adults and receptor-knockout newborns. Dysregulation of inflammatory responses induced by infection may influence the severity of HSV encephalitis.

  13. Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Glycoprotein Interaction with HVEM Influences Virus-Specific Recall Cellular Responses at the Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Kopp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection of susceptible cells by herpes simplex virus (HSV requires the interaction of the HSV gD glycoprotein with one of two principal entry receptors, herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM or nectins. HVEM naturally functions in immune signaling, and the gD-HVEM interaction alters innate signaling early after mucosal infection. We investigated whether the gD-HVEM interaction during priming changes lymphocyte recall responses in the murine intravaginal model. Mice were primed with attenuated HSV-2 expressing wild-type gD or mutant gD unable to engage HVEM and challenged 32 days later with virulent HSV-2 expressing wild-type gD. HSV-specific CD8+ T cells were decreased at the genital mucosa during the recall response after priming with virus unable to engage HVEM but did not differ in draining lymph nodes. CD4+ T cells, which are critical for entry of HSV-specific CD8+ T cells into mucosa in acute infection, did not differ between the two groups in either tissue. An inverse association between Foxp3+ CD4+ regulatory T cells and CD8+ infiltration into the mucosa was not statistically significant. CXCR3 surface expression was not significantly different among different lymphocyte subsets. We conclude that engagement of HVEM during the acute phase of HSV infection influences the antiviral CD8+ recall response by an unexplained mechanism.

  14. Herpes simplex virus-2 in the genital mucosa: insights into the mucosal host response and vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amanda J; Ashkar, Ali A

    2012-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-2 is the predominant cause of genital herpes and has been implicated in HIV infection and transmission. Thus far, vaccines developed against HSV-2 have been clinically ineffective in preventing infection. This review aims to summarize the innate and adaptive immune responses against HSV-2 and examines the current status of vaccine development. Both innate and adaptive immune responses are essential for an effective primary immune response and the generation of immunity. The innate response involves Toll-like receptors, natural killer cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and type I, II, and III interferons. The adaptive response requires a balance between CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells for optimal viral clearance. T-regulatory cells may be involved, although their exact function has yet to be determined. Current vaccine development involves the use of HSV-2 peptides or attenuated/replication-defective HSV-2 to generate adaptive anti-HSV-2 immune responses, however the generation of innate responses may also be an important consideration. Although vaccine development has primarily focused on the adaptive response, arguments for innate involvement are emerging. A greater understanding of the innate and adaptive processes underlying the response to HSV-2 infection will provide the foundation for the development of an effective vaccine.

  15. Analysis of colorectal cancer and polyp for presence herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus DNA sequences by polymerase chain reaction

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    Sahar Mehrabani khasraghi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent years, it was demonstrated that there is a clear association between the complicated course of colorectal cancer (CRC and the presence of herpes viruses. Despite a great number of published reports, the exact pathogenic role of herpes viruses remains unclear in these patients. The purpose of this study is to explore the prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV and cytomegalovirus (CMV in patients with CRC and polyp in comparison with healthy subjects using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. Methods: In this case-control study, 15 biopsies of patients with CRC and 20 colorectal polyp sample were selected. From each patient, two tissue samples were obtained: one sample from malignant tissue, and the other from normal colorectal tissue in an area located 15 cm away from the malignant tissue. Furthermore, 35 samples from healthy people as controls were selected. After DNA extraction, PCR was used to determine HSV and CMV genomes by specific primers. A statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test. Results: Five CRC patients (33.3% had HSV DNA detected in both the malignant and the matched normal tissue. Five CRC patients (33.3% and seven polyp patients (35.0% had CMV DNA detected in both the malignant and the matched normal tissue. HSV DNA was found in 20% and CMV DNA in 37.1% of samples from healthy people as a control group. Thus, no significant association was observed between the prevalence of HSV and CMV, and an incidence of CRC and polyps according to the location of the samples as compared with the control group. Conclusion: The findings demonstrated that there is no direct molecular evidence to support the association between HSV and CMV and human colorectal malignancies. However, the results from this study do not exclude a possible oncogenic role of these viruses in the neoplastic development of colon cells.

  16. Amino acid substitutions in the thymidine kinase gene of induced acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, Ainulkhir; Nor, Norefrina Shafinaz Md; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2013-11-01

    Acyclovir (ACV) is an antiviral drug of choice in healthcare setting to treat infections caused by herpes viruses, including, but not limited to genital herpes, cold sores, shingles and chicken pox. Acyclovir resistance has emerged significantly due to extensive use and misuse of this antiviral in human, especially in immunocompromised patients. However, it remains unclear about the amino acid substitutions in thymidine (TK) gene, which specifically confer the resistance-associated mutation in herpes simplex virus. Hence, acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 was selected at high concentration (2.0 - 4.5 μg/mL), and the TK-gene was subjected to sequencing and genotypic characterization. Genotypic sequences comparison was done using HSV-1 17 (GenBank Accesion no. X14112) for resistance-associated mutation determination whereas HSV-1 KOS, HSV-1 473/08 and HSV clinical isolates sequences were used for polymorphism-associated mutation. The result showed that amino acid substitutions at the non-conserved region (UKM-1: Gln34Lys, UKM-2: Arg32Ser & UKM-5: Arg32Cys) and ATP-binding site (UKM-3: Tyr53End & UKM-4: Ile54Leu) of the TK-gene. These discoveries play an important role to extend another dimension to the evolution of acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 and suggest that selection at high ACV concentration induced ACV-resistant HSV-1 evolution. These findings also expand the knowledge on the type of mutations among acyclovir-resistant HSV-1. In conclusion, HSV-1 showed multiple strategies to exhibit acyclovir resistance, including amino acid substitutions in the TK gene.

  17. Does porphyrin suppres the apoptotic and necrotic effects of bovine herpes virus type-1(BoHV-1) and herpes simplex virus type-1(HSV-1)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Beyza; Yazici, Zafer

    2016-09-01

    In this study, antiviral effect of porphyrin was investigated. Cooper strain of Bovine Herpes Virus type 1(BoHV-1) and Kos strain of Herpes Simplex Virus type-1 (HSV-1) were used to determine the potential of porphyrins to inhibit infection in vitro (with morphological and cytopathological criteria). Apoptotic and necrotic changes were determined by using DAPI and propidium staining. The non-cytotoxic dose of porphyrin (NCD-p) was initially calculated as 312.50µg/mL on MDBK and Vero cells. The apoptotic cell (APC) count was found 10% with BoHV-1 while it was 5.3% with BoHV-1 treated with porphyrin on MDBK cells between 6th to 24th hours post infection (hpi). Necrotic cell (NEC) count was 51% with BoHV-1 and 37.8% BoHV-1 treated with porphyrin on MDBK cells at 24th hpi. On the other hand, the APC count was found 23% with HSV-1, while 22% with the HSV-1 treated with porphyrin on Vero cells between 6th to 24th hpi. NEC count was 49% with HSV-1 and 34% HSV-1 treated with porphyrin on MDBK cells at 24th hpi. The results show that BoHV-1 was inhibited by porphyrin resulting in decreased apoptotic and necrotic changes in MDBK cells. On the contrary, porphyrine was not effective in the inhibition of HSV-1 in terms of apoptosis but it caused necrotic changes in Vero cells.

  18. Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1) and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Promote Survival of Latently Infected Sensory Neurons, in Part by Inhibiting Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    α-Herpesvirinae subfamily members, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), initiate infection in mucosal surfaces. BHV-1 and HSV-1 enter sensory neurons by cell-cell spread where a burst of viral gene expression occurs. When compared to non-neuronal cells, viral gene expression is quickly extinguished in sensory neurons resulting in neuronal survival and latency. The HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT), which is abundantly expressed in latently infected neurons, inhibits apoptosis, viral transcription, and productive infection, and directly or indirectly enhances reactivation from latency in small animal models. Three anti-apoptosis genes can be substituted for LAT, which will restore wild type levels of reactivation from latency to a LAT null mutant virus. Two small non-coding RNAs encoded by LAT possess anti-apoptosis functions in transfected cells. The BHV-1 latency related RNA (LR-RNA), like LAT, is abundantly expressed during latency. The LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) and two microRNAs that are expressed in certain latently infected neurons. Wild-type expression of LR gene products is required for stress-induced reactivation from latency in cattle. ORF2 has anti-apoptosis functions and interacts with certain cellular transcription factors that stimulate viral transcription and productive infection. ORF2 is predicted to promote survival of infected neurons by inhibiting apoptosis and sequestering cellular transcription factors which stimulate productive infection. In addition, the LR encoded microRNAs inhibit viral transcription and apoptosis. In summary, the ability of BHV-1 and HSV-1 to interfere with apoptosis and productive infection in sensory neurons is crucial for the life-long latency-reactivation cycle in their respective hosts. PMID:25278776

  19. Development and evaluation of the quantitative real-time PCR assay in detection and typing of herpes simplex virus in swab specimens from patients with genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junlian; Yi, Yong; Chen, Wei; Si, Shaoyan; Yin, Mengmeng; Jin, Hua; Liu, Jianjun; Zhou, Jinlian; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Genital herpes (GH), which is caused mainly by herpes simplex virus (HSV)-2 and HSV-1, remains a worldwide problem. Laboratory confirmation of GH is important, particularly as there are other conditions which present similarly to GH, while atypical presentations of GH also occur. Currently, virus culture is the classical method for diagnosis of GH, but it is time consuming and with low sensitivity. A major advance for diagnosis of GH is to use Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In this study, to evaluate the significance of the real-time PCR method in diagnosis and typing of genital HSV, the primers and probes targeted at HSV-1 DNA polymerase gene and HSV-2 glycoprotein D gene fraction were designed and applied to amplify DNA from HSV-1 or HSV-2 by employing the real-time PCR technique. Then the PCR reaction system was optimized and evaluated. HSV in swab specimens from patients with genital herpes was detected by real-time PCR. The real-time PCR assay showed good specificity for detection and typing of HSV, with good linear range (5×10(2)~5×10(8) copies/ml, r=0.997), a sensitivity of 5×10(2) copies/ml, and good reproducibility (intra-assay coefficients of variation 2.29% and inter-assay coefficients of variation 4.76%). 186 swab specimens were tested for HSV by real-time PCR, and the positive rate was 23.7% (44/186). Among the 44 positive specimens, 8 (18.2%) were positive for HSV-1 with a viral load of 8.5546×10(6) copies/ml and 36 (81.2%) were positive for HSV-2 with a viral load of 1.9861×10(6) copies/ml. It is concluded that the real-time PCR is a specific, sensitive and rapid method for the detection and typing of HSV, which can be widely used in clinical diagnosis of GH.

  20. Efficacy of the anti-VZV (anti-HSV3 vaccine in HSV1 and HSV2 recurrent herpes simplex disease: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Goaster J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Le Goaster,1 Sylvie Gonzalo,2 Patrice Bourée,1 Frederic Tangy,3 Anne-Lise Haenni41Department of Tropical Diseases, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire (CHU, University of Paris XI, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, 2Biomnis Laboratory, Ivry-sur-Seine, 3Retro-Virology, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, Pasteur Institute, Paris; 4Jacques Monod Institute, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, University of Paris VII, Paris, FranceBackground: The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using the anti-varicella zoster virus (anti-VZV, also known as anti-HSV3 vaccine against orobuccal herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 and genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV2. This was suggested by study of the phylogenetic tree of members of the herpes virus family, which showed a close relationship between VZV (HSV3 and the HSV1 and HSV2 herpes viruses.Methods: The present prospective study was conducted from January 2005 through January 2011. Twenty-four patients afflicted with HSV1 and HSV2 herpes recurrences over a period of years, numbering 6–8 and more recurrences per year, agreed to receive the anti-VZV vaccine. They were compared with 26 nonvaccinated patients presenting with herpes simplex diseases 2–5 times a year. All 50 patients were documented with anti-HSV1, anti-HSV2, and anti-VZV antibody serological testing.Results: From 2005 through 2011, for the 24 anti-VZV vaccinated patients, the average number of herpes relapses decreased to 0, correlated with an increased anti-VZV antibody level and clinical recovery of all patients, whereas no improvement was observed for the 26 nonvaccinated herpes patients.Conclusion: Data for the anti-VZV serological antibody levels tested before and after anti-VZV vaccination showed a significant (P < 0.001 increase among vaccinated patients. This suggests defective anti-VZV immune power in these patients. After 6 years of positive results for anti-VZV vaccine, this is a logical and

  1. The interaction between herpes simplex virus 1 genome and promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs as a hallmark of the entry in latency

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    Patrick Lomonte

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 is a human pathogen that establishes latency in the nucleus of infected neurons in the PNS and the CNS. At the transcriptional level latency is characterized by a quasi-complete silencing of the extrachromosomal viral genome that otherwise expresses more than 80 genes during the lytic cycle. In neurons, latency is anticipated to be the default transcriptional program; however, limited information exists on the molecular mechanisms that force the virus to enter the latent state. Our recent study demonstrates that the interaction of the viral genomes with the nuclear architecture and specifically the promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs is a major determinant for the entry of HSV-1 into latency (Maroui MA, Callé A et al. (2016. Latency entry of herpes simplex virus 1 is determined by the interaction of its genome with the nuclear environment. PLoS Pathogens 12(9: e1005834..

  2. The calcitonin receptor gene is a candidate for regulation of susceptibility to herpes simplex type 1 neuronal infection leading to encephalitis in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Abdelmagid

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is a fatal infection of the central nervous system (CNS predominantly caused by Herpes simplex virus type 1. Factors regulating the susceptibility to HSE are still largely unknown. To identify host gene(s regulating HSE susceptibility we performed a genome-wide linkage scan in an intercross between the susceptible DA and the resistant PVG rat. We found one major quantitative trait locus (QTL, Hse1, on rat chromosome 4 (confidence interval 24.3-31 Mb; LOD score 29.5 governing disease susceptibility. Fine mapping of Hse1 using recombinants, haplotype mapping and sequencing, as well as expression analysis of all genes in the interval identified the calcitonin receptor gene (Calcr as the main candidate, which also is supported by functional studies. Thus, using unbiased genetic approach variability in Calcr was identified as potentially critical for infection and viral spread to the CNS and subsequent HSE development.

  3. Delayed Diagnosis of Tuberculous Meningitis Misdiagnosed as Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Encephalitis With the FilmArray Syndromic Polymerase Chain Reaction Panel

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez, Carlos A.; Pinsky, Benjamin A.; Liu, Anne; Banaei, Niaz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The FilmArray meningitis/encephalitis (ME) panel is a novel syndromic, nucleic acid amplification test for diagnosis of acute meningitis and encephalitis. Emerging data on its performance are concerning for false-positive results. We present a case of tuberculous meningitis misdiagnosed as herpes simplex virus-1 encephalitis with the FilmArray ME panel. Strategies to mitigate erroneous results are discussed.

  4. Comparison of effects of adjuvants on efficacy of virion envelope herpes simplex virus vaccine against labial infection of BALB/c mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, T A; Hilfenhaus, J; Moser, H; Morahan, P S

    1983-01-01

    A subunit virion envelope vaccine of herpes simplex virus type 1 was evaluated for its ability to protect labially infected mice from development of the primary herpetic lesion, encephalitic death, and latent virus infection in the trigeminal ganglion. Several adjuvants, including aluminum hydroxide and polyriboinosinic acid-polyribocytidylic acid complexed with poly-L-lysine and carboxymethyl cellulose were investigated for their ability to enhance protection of the subunit vaccine and were ...

  5. Use of a fragment of glycoprotein G-2 produced in the baculovirus expression system for detecting herpes simplex virus type 2-specific antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikoma, M; Liljeqvist, JA; Glazenburg, KL; The, TH; Welling-Wester, S; Groen, J.

    Fragments of glycoprotein G (gG-2(281-594His)), comprising residues 281 to 594 of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), glycoprotein G of HSV-1 (gG-1(t26-189His)), and glycoprotein D of HSV-1 (gD-1(1-313)), were expressed in the baculovirus expression system to develop an assay for the detection of

  6. Role of type-specific herpes simplex virus-1 and 2 serology as a diagnostic modality in patients with clinically suspected genital herpes: A comparative study in Indian population from a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Vrushali; Bhalla, Preena

    2016-01-01

    Type-specific serology (TSS) test for herpes simplex virus (HSV) have been used as a research tool in seroepidemiological studies for some years. However, TSS as a diagnostic modality for diagnosis of current episode of genital herpes is not well documented. To measure the seroprevalence of type-specific HSV Type 1 (HSV-1) and Type 2 (HSV-2) IgG antibodies in cases provisionally diagnosed as primary and recurrent genital herpes and to evaluate the role of TSS as a diagnostic modality for diagnosis of genital herpes versus polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A cross-sectional study was performed over a period of 10 months in which 44 adult patients with clinically suspected genital herpes were recruited. An in-house glycoprotein G gene base PCR was performed directly from the genital lesion specimen for simultaneous detection and typing of HSV. TSS was performed to detect IgG antibody against HSV-1 and 2 in all patients using commercially available kits, and the results were compared. Seroprevalence of HSV-1 IgG was 43% among primary and 65% among recurrent genital herpes cases (P = 0.22). Whereas that of HSV-2 IgG was found to be 14% and 83% in respective patient group (P = 0.0001). When compared to PCR results HSV-1 IgG detection in both primary and recurrent genital herpes diagnosis had poor specificity, positive predictive value, and sensitivity. Whereas, HSV-2 serology had a sensitivity of 13.33% and 73.33% in primary and recurrent genital herpes and specificity of 83.33% and 85.71%, respectively. HSV-2 IgG detection helps in strengthening the diagnosis of recurrent HSV-2 disease, whereas the absence of HSV-2 IgG antibody helps in excluding genital herpes as a likely cause of recurrent genital ulceration. However, detection of HSV-1 IgG antibody may not be useful for diagnosis in patients of genital ulcer disease.

  7. Antiviral treatment and other therapeutic interventions for herpes simplex virus epithelial keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmus, Kirk R

    2015-01-01

    Background Eye disease due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) commonly presents as epithelial keratitis which, though usually self-limiting, may persist or progress without treatment. Objectives To compare the relative effectiveness of antiviral agents, interferon, and corneal debridement in the treatment of HSV epithelial keratitis. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 12), PubMed (January 1946 to 31 December 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to 31 December 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to 31 December 2014), System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe (OpenGrey) (January 1995 to 31 December 2014), BIOSIS (January 1926 to 5 May 2014), Scopus (January 1966 to 31 December 2014), Japan Science and Technology Institute (J-Global) (January 1975 to 31 December 2014), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (January 1979 to 31 December 2014), British Library’s Electronic Table of Contents (Zetoc) (January 1993 to 7 May 2014). We looked for trials listed on the the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en), Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (www.fda.gov/), National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) (www.evidence.nhs.uk) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) (www.ema.europa.eu/ema/) as of 31 December 2014. There were no language or date restrictions in the search for trials. We also culled literature digests and conference proceedings as of 15 April 2014. There were no language or date restrictions in the search for trials. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised trials of HSV dendritic or geographic epithelial keratitis were included that reported the proportion of

  8. Herpes simplex virus type 2 enhances HIV-1 susceptibility by affecting langerhans cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.W.P. de Jong (Marein); L. de Witte (Lot); M.E. Taylor (Maureen); T.B.H. Geijtenbeek (Teunis)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractGenital herpes is the most prevalent viral sexually transmitted infection worldwide and is mainly caused by HSV type 2 (HSV-2). HSV-2 infection enhances HIV-1 susceptibility, even in the absence of clinical symptoms. In this study, we investigated the effect of HSV-2 on HIV-1

  9. Genital herpes.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Genital herpes is an infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or type 2 (HSV-2). The typical clinical features include painful shallow anogenital ulceration. It is among the most common sexually transmitted diseases, with up to 23% of adults in the UK and US having antibodies to HSV-2.

  10. Intrinsic innate immunity fails to control herpes simplex virus and vesicular stomatitis virus replication in sensory neurons and fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Pamela C; Leib, David A

    2014-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes lifelong latent infections in the sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia (TG), wherein it retains the capacity to reactivate. The interferon (IFN)-driven antiviral response is critical for the control of HSV-1 acute replication. We therefore sought to further investigate this response in TG neurons cultured from adult mice deficient in a variety of IFN signaling components. Parallel experiments were also performed in fibroblasts isolated concurrently. We showed that HSV-1 replication was comparable in wild-type (WT) and IFN signaling-deficient neurons and fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, a similar pattern was observed for the IFN-sensitive vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Despite these findings, TG neurons responded to IFN-β pretreatment with STAT1 nuclear localization and restricted replication of both VSV and an HSV-1 strain deficient in γ34.5, while wild-type HSV-1 replication was unaffected. This was in contrast to fibroblasts in which all viruses were restricted by the addition of IFN-β. Taken together, these data show that adult TG neurons can mount an effective antiviral response only if provided with an exogenous source of IFN-β, and HSV-1 combats this response through γ34.5. These results further our understanding of the antiviral response of neurons and highlight the importance of paracrine IFN-β signaling in establishing an antiviral state. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous virus that establishes a lifelong latent infection in neurons. Reactivation from latency can cause cold sores, blindness, and death from encephalitis. Humans with deficiencies in innate immunity have significant problems controlling HSV infections. In this study, we therefore sought to elucidate the role of neuronal innate immunity in the control of viral infection. Using neurons isolated from mice, we found that the intrinsic capacity of neurons to restrict virus replication was unaffected by the presence or absence of

  11. Crystal Structure of the N-Terminal Half of the Traffic Controller UL37 from Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenigsberg, Andrea L.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M.

    2017-08-02

    Inner tegument protein UL37 is conserved among all three subfamilies of herpesviruses. Studies of UL37 homologs from two alphaherpesviruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), have suggested that UL37 plays an essential albeit poorly defined role in intracellular capsid trafficking. At the same time, HSV and PRV homologs cannot be swapped, which suggests that in addition to a conserved function, UL37 homologs also have divergent virus-specific functions. Accurate dissection of UL37 functions requires detailed maps in the form of atomic-resolution structures. Previously, we reported the crystal structure of the N-terminal half of UL37 (UL37N) from PRV. Here, we report the crystal structure of HSV-1 UL37N. Comparison of the two structures reveals that UL37 homologs differ in their overall shapes, distributions of surface charges, and locations of projecting loops. In contrast, the previously identified R2 surface region is structurally conserved. We propose that within the N-terminal half of UL37, functional conservation is centered within the R2 surface region, whereas divergent structural elements pinpoint regions mediating virus-specific functions and may engage different binding partners. Together, the two structures can now serve as templates for a structure-guided exploration of both conserved and virus-specific functions of UL37.

    IMPORTANCEThe ability to move efficiently within host cell cytoplasm is essential for replication in all viruses. It is especially important in the neuroinvasive alphaherpesviruses, such as human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, and veterinarian pseudorabies virus (PRV), that infect the peripheral nervous system and have to travel long distances along axons. Capsid movement in these viruses is controlled by capsid-associated tegument proteins, yet their specific roles have not yet been defined. Systematic exploration of the roles of tegument proteins in capsid trafficking requires

  12. The Fusion Loops of the Initial Prefusion Conformation of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Fusion Protein Point Toward the Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Juan; Atanasiu, Doina; Saw, Wan Ting; Gallagher, John R; Cox, Reagan G; Whitbeck, J Charles; Brown, Lauren M; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H

    2017-08-22

    All enveloped viruses, including herpesviruses, must fuse their envelope with the host membrane to deliver their genomes into target cells, making this essential step subject to interference by antibodies and drugs. Viral fusion is mediated by a viral surface protein that transits from an initial prefusion conformation to a final postfusion conformation. Strikingly, the prefusion conformation of the herpesvirus fusion protein, gB, is poorly understood. Herpes simplex virus (HSV), a model system for herpesviruses, causes diseases ranging from mild skin lesions to serious encephalitis and neonatal infections. Using cryo-electron tomography and subtomogram averaging, we have characterized the structure of the prefusion conformation and fusion intermediates of HSV-1 gB. To this end, we have set up a system that generates microvesicles displaying full-length gB on their envelope. We confirmed proper folding of gB by nondenaturing electrophoresis-Western blotting with a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) covering all gB domains. To elucidate the arrangement of gB domains, we labeled them by using (i) mutagenesis to insert fluorescent proteins at specific positions, (ii) coexpression of gB with Fabs for a neutralizing MAb with known binding sites, and (iii) incubation of gB with an antibody directed against the fusion loops. Our results show that gB starts in a compact prefusion conformation with the fusion loops pointing toward the viral membrane and suggest, for the first time, a model for gB's conformational rearrangements during fusion. These experiments further illustrate how neutralizing antibodies can interfere with the essential gB structural transitions that mediate viral entry and therefore infectivity.IMPORTANCE The herpesvirus family includes herpes simplex virus (HSV) and other human viruses that cause lifelong infections and a variety of diseases, like skin lesions, encephalitis, and cancers. As enveloped viruses, herpesviruses must fuse their envelope

  13. Severe herpes simplex virus type-I infections after dental procedures

    OpenAIRE

    El Hayderi, Lara; Raty, Laurent; Failla, Valerie; Caucanas, Marie; Paurobally, Dilshad; Nikkels, A. F.

    2011-01-01

    Background : Reccurences of herpes labialis (RHL) may be triggered by systemic factors, including stress, menses, and fever. Local stimuli, such as lip injury or sunlight exposure are also associated to RHL. Dental extraction has also been reported as triggering event. Case report : Seven otherwise healthy patients are presented with severe and extensive RHL occuring about 2-3 days after dental extraction under local anaesthesia. Immunohistochemistry on smears and immunofluorescence on c...

  14. Herpes simplex virus type 2-associated recurrent aseptic (Mollaret's meningitis in genitourinary medicine clinic: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou-Foul AK

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad K Abou-Foul, Thajunisha M Buhary, Sedki L Gayed Department of Genitourinary Medicine, Royal Blackburn Hospital, East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, Blackburn, UK Introduction: Cases of idiopathic recurrent benign aseptic meningitis were first described by Mollaret. Today, herpes simplex virus (HSV is considered the cause of most cases of Mollaret's meningitis. Case report: A 40-year-old male was referred to our genitourinary medicine clinic with recurrent genital herpetic lesions. He had HSV-2-positive genital ulcers 8 years earlier. One year after the first infection, he developed severe recurrent attacks of headache associated with meningitis symptoms. The results of all radiological and biochemical tests were normal, but the patient reported a correlation between his attacks and genital herpes flare-ups. We diagnosed the patient with Mollaret's meningitis and started him on continuous suppressive acyclovir therapy, which resulted in marked clinical improvement. Discussion: Mollaret's meningitis is a rare form of idiopathic recurrent aseptic meningitis that has a sudden onset, short duration, and spontaneous remission with unpredictable recurrence. We believe that the presence of concurrent or recurrent mucocutaneous herpetic lesions can aid its diagnosis, prior to which, affected patients usually have many unnecessary investigations and treatments. Therefore, detailed sexual history should be sought in all patients with aseptic meningitis, and clinicians should also ask about history of recurrent headaches in all patients with recurrent herpetic anogenital lesions. Continuous suppressive acyclovir therapy may reduce the frequency and severity of attacks and can dramatically improve lifestyle. Keywords: HSV-2 virus, acyclovir, Mollaret's meningitis, recurrent aseptic meningitis, HSV-2 virus, viral meningitis, acyclovir

  15. Cost-effective and label-free holographic biosensor for detection of herpes simplex virus (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Ho, Ha; Daloglu, Mustafa; Torres, Avee; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-03-01

    Herpes is one of the most widespread sexually transmitted viral diseases. Timely detection of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) can help prevent the rampant spreading of the virus. Current detection techniques such as viral culture, immuno-assays or Polymerase-Chain-Reaction, are time extensive and require expert handling. Here we present a field-portable, easy-to-use, and cost-effective biosensor for the detection of HSV based on holographic imaging. The virus is first captured from a target solution onto specifically developed substrates, prepared by coating glass coverslips with HSV-specific antibodies, and imaged using a lensfree holographic microscope. Several light-emitting-diodes (LEDs), coupled to multi-mode optical-fibers, are used to illuminate the sample containing the viruses. A micro-controller is used to activate the LEDs one at a time and in-line holograms are recorded using a CMOS imager placed immediately above the substrate. These sub-pixel shifted holograms are used to generate a super-resolved hologram, which is reconstructed to obtain the phase and amplitude images of the viruses. The signal of the viruses is enhanced using self-assembled PEG-based nanolenses, formed around the viral particles. Based on the phase information of the reconstructed images we can estimate the size of the viral particles, with an accuracy of +/- 11 nm, as well as quantify the viral load. The limit-of-detection of this system is estimated to be <500 viral copies per 100 μL sample volume that is imaged over 30 mm^2 field-of-view. This holographic microscopy based biosensor is label-free, cost-effective and field-portable, providing results in 2 hours, including sample preparation and imaging time.

  16. Herpes simplex virus: 'to disclose or not to disclose.' An exploration of the multi-disciplinary team's role in advising patients about disclosure when diagnosed with genital herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Pauline; Willis, Diane

    2017-07-01

    The first UK prosecution for genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) transmission in 2011 attracted strong criticism from medical experts. To address the dearth of research on the topic, this study aimed to explore the nature of advice given to patients by the multidisciplinary team (MDT) in the West of Scotland on HSV disclosure to partners. Ten semi-structured interviews with members of the MDT were conducted and the interviews were analysed using Burnard's Thematic Content Analysis. Four themes emerged which explored practitioners' knowledge of HSV and their feelings regarding the emotional aspects of the diagnosis on clients including the challenges of discussing disclosure. Within this framework, participants' attitudes to the legal prosecution were also surveyed. This study revealed that participants had good knowledge about HSV. Furthermore, participants believed disclosure to be the patient's choice and had not altered their practice to advise disclosure to all partners in accordance with local protocol. However, there was a general consensus that disclosure was not required due to the prevalence of HSV and prevalence was used to dissipate emotional reactions to HSV diagnosis.

  17. Herpes Simplex Virus Type-I and Pyogenic Granuloma: A Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Mediated Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. el Hayderi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic granuloma (PG is a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-related neoangiogenic process. Minor trauma, chronic irritation, certain drugs and pregnancy may favor PG. Viral triggers have not been reported up to date. A 52-year-old woman with hairy-cell leukemia presented because of a 3-month history of a giant pseudotumoral lesion on her left cheek. All prior antibacterial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory treatments had failed. Histology revealed PG with sparse and isolated epithelial cell aggregates. Immunohistochemistry (IHC identified herpes simplex virus type-I (HSV-I antigens in the nuclei and cytoplasm of normal-appearing as well as cytopathic epithelial cells, suggesting a chronic, low-productive HSV infection. No HSV-I signal was evidenced in the endothelial cells of the PG. Furthermore, IHC revealed VEGF in the HSV-I infected epithelial cells as well as within the PG endothelial cells. These results incited oral treatment with valaciclovir, and the PG promptly resolved after 2 weeks. These findings suggest that a chronic HSV-I infection might play an indirect, partial role in neoangiogenesis, presumably via HSV-I infection-related stimulation of keratinocytic VEGF production.

  18. History and genomic sequence analysis of the herpes simplex virus 1 KOS and KOS1.1 sub-strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgrove, Robert C; Liu, Xueqiao; Griffiths, Anthony; Raja, Priya; Deluca, Neal A; Newman, Ruchi M; Coen, Donald M; Knipe, David M

    2016-01-01

    A collection of genomic DNA sequences of herpes simplex virus (HSV) strains has been defined and analyzed, and some information is available about genomic stability upon limited passage of viruses in culture. The nature of genomic change upon extensive laboratory passage remains to be determined. In this report we review the history of the HSV-1 KOS laboratory strain and the related KOS1.1 laboratory sub-strain, also called KOS (M), and determine the complete genomic sequence of an early passage stock of the KOS laboratory sub-strain and a laboratory stock of the KOS1.1 sub-strain. The genomes of the two sub-strains are highly similar with only five coding changes, 20 non-coding changes, and about twenty non-ORF sequence changes. The coding changes could potentially explain the KOS1.1 phenotypic properties of increased replication at high temperature and reduced neuroinvasiveness. The study also provides sequence markers to define the provenance of specific laboratory KOS virus stocks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Application of polymerase chain reaction to differentiate herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 serotypes in culture negative intraocular aspirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyamal, G; Sowmya, P; Sudha, B; Malathi, J; Therese, L K; Madhavan, H N

    2005-10-01

    To standardize and apply a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on the glycoprotein D gene to differentiate Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 & 2 serotypes in culture negative intraocular specimens. Twenty-one intraocular fluids collected from 19 patients were subjected to cultures for HSV and uniplex PCR (uPCR) for DNA polymerase gene. To differentiate HSV serotypes, as 1 & 2, a seminested PCR (snPCR) targeting the glycoprotein D gene was standardised and applied onto 21 intraocular fluids. The specificity of the snPCR was verified by application onto ATCC strains of HSV 1 and 2, clinical isolates and DNA sequencing of the amplified products. All specimens were also tested for the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) by nucleic acid amplification methods. Four of the 21 intraocular fluids were positive for HSV by uPCR. snPCR detected HSV in three additional specimens (total of seven specimens), and identified three as HSV 1 and four as HSV 2. DNA sequencing of PCR products showed 100% homology with the standard strains of HSV 1 and 2 respectively. None of the samples were positive in culture. Among the other patients, CMV DNA was detected in two and VZV DNA in five others. The standardized snPCR can be applied directly onto the culture negative specimens for rapid differentiation of HSV serotypes.

  20. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Us3 Deletion Mutant is Infective Despite Impaired Capsid Translocation to the Cytoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wild

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 capsids are assembled in the nucleus bud at the inner nuclear membrane into the perinuclear space, acquiring envelope and tegument. In theory, these virions are de-enveloped by fusion of the envelope with the outer nuclear membrane and re-enveloped by Golgi membranes to become infective. Us3 enables the nucleus to cytoplasm capsid translocation. Nevertheless, Us3 is not essential for the production of infective progeny viruses. Determination of phenotype distribution by quantitative electron microscopy, and calculation per mean nuclear or cell volume revealed the following: (i The number of R7041(∆US3 capsids budding at the inner nuclear membrane was significantly higher than that of wild type HSV-1; (ii The mean number of R7041(∆US3 virions per mean cell volume was 2726, that of HSV-1 virions 1460 by 24 h post inoculation; (iii 98% of R7041(∆US3 virions were in the perinuclear space; (iv The number of R7041(∆US3 capsids in the cytoplasm, including those budding at Golgi membranes, was significantly reduced. Cell associated R7041(∆US3 yields were 2.37 × 108 and HSV-1 yields 1.57 × 108 PFU/mL by 24 h post inoculation. We thus conclude that R7041(∆US3 virions, which acquire envelope and tegument by budding at the inner nuclear membrane into the perinuclear space, are infective.

  1. Primary Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Type I in Preterm Prelabour Rupture of Membranes at 30 Weeks' Gestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Anna; Grivell, Rosalie

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disseminated herpes simplex virus (HSV) in the neonate is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines recommend caesarean in third-trimester maternal primary genital HSV outbreaks to prevent transmission from mother to fetus. In the premature fetus, however, expectant management is often necessary to reduce morbidity of prematurity. The benefit of performing caesarean after 6 hrs of rupture of membranes (ROM) to reduce maternal-fetal transmission is unclear. Case. A female patient with primary genital HSV type 1 outbreak coinciding with preterm, prelabour rupture of membranes (PPROM) at 30 + 3 weeks' gestation. An immediate caesarean section was not performed after multidisciplinary team discussion due to the benefits of glucocorticoids on immune complications of prematurity. The patient had expectant management for 5 days with intravenous (IV) aciclovir and then delivered an infant vaginally with disseminated neonatal HSV. Conclusion. We address the rare presentation of primary HSV infection associated with PPROM and the dilemma of how to manage these patients given the limited literature. We discuss the role of intrauterine compartment monitoring with amniocentesis, the mode of delivery when ROM has occurred for 120 hours, expectant management to reduce prematurity, and the effectiveness of aciclovir to reduce viral shedding in the prevention of neonatal HSV. PMID:26649212

  2. A Cell Culture Model of Latent and Lytic Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection in Spiral Ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuehong; Li, Shufeng

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) is supposed to be one of the causes of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. This study aims to establish a cell culture model of latent and lytic HSV-1 infection in spiral ganglia. In the presence of acyclovir, primary cultures of SGNs were latently infected with HSV-1 expressing green fluorescent protein. Four days later, these cells were treated with trichostatin A (TSA), a known chemical reactivator of HSV-1. TCID50 was used to measure the titers of virus in cultures on Vero cells. RNA from cultures was detected for the presence of transcripts of ICP27 and latency-associated transcript (LAT) using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. There is no detectable infectious HSV-1 in latently infected cultures, whereas they could be observed in both lytically infected and latently infected/TSA-treated cultures. LAT was the only detectable transcript during latent infection, whereas lytic ICP27 transcript was detected in lytically infected and latently infected/TSA-treated cultures. Cultured SGNs can be both latently and lytically infected with HSV-1. Furthermore, latently infected SGNs can be reactivated using TSA, yielding infectious virus.

  3. Herpes-simplex virus encephalitis is characterized by an early MMP-9 increase and collagen type IV degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellner, Johann; Simon, Franziska; Meyding-Lamade, Uta; Leib, Stephen L

    2006-12-13

    Cerebrovascular complications including cerebral edema, raised intracranial pressure and hemorrhage contribute to the high mortality and morbidity of herpes-simplex virus encephalitis (HSE). We examined changes of collagen type IV, the major constituent of the neurovascular matrix, together with expression and localization of matrix-degrading enzymes during the development of acute HSE. In an experimental model of focal HSE, we found that early, symptomatic HSE (3 days after infection) and acute, fully developed HSE (7 days after infection) are associated with significantly raised levels of matrix-metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) (both PHSE and further expanded towards the perivascular space and adjacent tissue in acute HSE. Around the cerebral vasculature, we observed that MMP-9 activity was insufficiently counterbalanced by its endogenous tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP) TIMP-1, resulting in loss of collagen type IV. Our findings suggest that MMP-9 is involved in the evolution of HSE by causing damage to the cerebral vasculature. The degradation of the neurovascular matrix in HSE facilitates the development of cerebrovascular complications and may represent a target for novel adjuvant treatment strategies.

  4. Sustained Elevation of Kynurenic Acid in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Atlas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV type 1 encephalitis (HSE is a viral infectious disease with commonly occurring neurodegeneration and neurological/cognitive long-term sequelae. Kynurenic acid (KYNA is a neuroactive tryptophan metabolite, which is elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF during viral infection as a result of immune activation. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of endogenous brain KYNA for the long-term outcome of the disease. CSF KYNA concentration was analyzed in 25 HSE patients along the course of the disease and compared with that of 25 age-matched healthy volunteers. Within 3 weeks of admission CSF KYNA of HSE patients was markedly elevated (median 33.6 nM compared to healthy volunteers (median 1.45 nM. Following a decline observed after 1–2 months, levels of CSF KYNA were elevated more than 1 year after admission (median 3.4 nM range: 1–9 years. A negative correlation was found between initial CSF KYNA concentrations and severity of the long-term sequelae. This study show a marked elevation in CSF KYNA from patients with HSE, most pronounced during the acute phase of the disease and slowly declining along the recovery. We propose that brain KYNA might potentially protect against neurodegeneration while causing a long-lasting loss in cognitive function associated with the disease.

  5. Cervical Infection with Herpes simplex Virus, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae among Symptomatic Women, Dubai, UAE: A Molecular Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Mohammad Amin; Azizi, Saeed; Payombarnia, Hamid; Vahdani, Ali; Namayandeh, Mandana; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar

    2014-01-01

    Tragically, genital tract infections are still a major public health problem in many regions. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of cervical infection with Herpes simplex virus (HSV), Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) among married women referring to Iranian Hospital, Dubai, UAE. In a retrospective cross-sectional survey, 201 female patients aged 16–80 years who referred to the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of Iranian Hospital, Dubai, UAE, in 2010 were enrolled. The patients were categorized into three age groups: 15–30 (group I), 31–40 (group II), and ≥41 years old (group III). A cervical swab sample was collected from each woman and the prevalence of cervical infection with HSV, CT, and NG was determined by PCR method. HSV, CT, and NG were detected in 6.5%, 10.4%, and 5.5% of swab samples, respectively. Regarding age, a significant difference was noticed for prevalence of NG and HSV between groups I and III. Because of public health importance of sexual transmitted diseases (STDs), their long-lasting impact on quality of life, and their economic burden, preventing measures and education of women seem necessary. PMID:24982675

  6. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus 1 gene expression and replication by RNase P-associated external guide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Shao, Luyao; Trang, Phong; Yang, Zhu; Reeves, Michael; Sun, Xu; Vu, Gia-Phong; Wang, Yu; Li, Hongjian; Zheng, Congyi; Lu, Sangwei; Liu, Fenyong

    2016-06-09

    An external guide sequence (EGS) is a RNA sequence which can interact with a target mRNA to form a tertiary structure like a pre-tRNA and recruit intracellular ribonuclease P (RNase P), a tRNA processing enzyme, to degrade target mRNA. Previously, an in vitro selection procedure has been used by us to engineer new EGSs that are more robust in inducing human RNase P to cleave their targeted mRNAs. In this study, we constructed EGSs from a variant to target the mRNA encoding herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) major transcription regulator ICP4, which is essential for the expression of viral early and late genes and viral growth. The EGS variant induced human RNase P cleavage of ICP4 mRNA sequence 60 times better than the EGS generated from a natural pre-tRNA. A decrease of about 97% and 75% in the level of ICP4 gene expression and an inhibition of about 7,000- and 500-fold in viral growth were observed in HSV infected cells expressing the variant and the pre-tRNA-derived EGS, respectively. This study shows that engineered EGSs can inhibit HSV-1 gene expression and viral growth. Furthermore, these results demonstrate the potential for engineered EGS RNAs to be developed and used as anti-HSV therapeutics.

  7. Acute Interstitial Nephritis Proteinuria and Herpes Simplex Virus Hepatitis in Pregnancy Mimic HELLP Syndrome (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, Low Platelets

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    Wendy M. White

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Elevated transaminases, hemolysis, and thrombocytopenia in pregnancy are most often caused by a preeclampsia variant—HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets. In atypical cases, it is important to consider other causes, such as herpes simplex virus (HSV hepatitis. Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN-induced proteinuria can make distinguishing HELLP from its mimics more difficult. A 43-year-old G4P3 gestational carrier at 28 weeks had abnormal laboratory findings consistent with HELLP, including proteinuria. However, she was normotensive and febrile, prompting an investigation into other possible causes of her signs and symptoms. She ultimately was diagnosed with disseminated HSV infection, started on definitive therapy, and allowed to continue her pregnancy to term. The proteinuria was attributed to AIN. AIN can cause proteinuria in the critically ill pregnant patient. When mimics of HELLP syndrome, such as disseminated HSV infection, are the cause of critical illness, the presence of AIN-induced proteinuria may falsely implicate a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, resulting in iatrogenic premature delivery of the fetus and failure to initiate definitive potential lifesaving treatment.

  8. Aptamer That Binds to the gD Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and Efficiently Inhibits Viral Entry

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    Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Hayashi, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    The ectodomain of the gD protein of herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) plays an important role in viral entry by binding to specific cellular coreceptors and mediating viral entry to the host cells. In the present study, we isolated RNA aptamers (aptamer-1 and aptamer-5) that specifically bind to the gD protein of HSV-1 with high affinity and are able to discriminate the gD protein of a different virus, HSV-2. Aptamer-1 efficiently interfered with the interaction between the gD protein and the HSV-1 target cell receptor (HVEM) in a dose-dependent manner. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) of aptamer-1 was estimated to be in the nanomolar range (60 nM). Furthermore, aptamer-1 was analyzed for anti-HSV-1 activity by using plaque assays, and it efficiently inhibited viral entry with an estimated Ki of 0.8 μM. To expand the future applications of aptamer-1, a shorter variant was designed by using both mapping and boundary analyses, resulting in the mini-1 aptamer (44-mer). Compared to the full-length aptamer, mini-1 had at least as high an affinity, specificity, and ability to interfere with gD-HVEM interactions. These studies suggest that the mini-1 aptamer could be explored further as an anti-HSV-1 topical therapy designed to prevent the risk of acquiring HSV-1 infection through physical contact. PMID:22514343

  9. Corneal Higher-order Aberrations and Visual Improvement Following Corneal Transplantation in Treating Herpes Simplex Keratitis.

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    Shimizu, Eisuke; Yamaguchi, Takefumi; Tomida, Daisuke; Yagi-Yaguchi, Yukari; Satake, Yoshiyuki; Tsubota, Kazuo; Shimazaki, Jun

    2017-12-01

    To examine corneal higher-order aberrations (HOAs) and visual improvement following corneal transplantation in treating corneal scar caused by herpes simplex keratitis (HSK). Retrospective consecutive case series. This study included a total of 52 eyes: 18 eyes of normal subjects, and 34 eyes of consecutive patients with corneal scar owing to HSK who underwent penetrating keratoplasty (PKP, 17 eyes) or deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK, 17 eyes). HOAs of the anterior, posterior surfaces and the total cornea were analyzed by anterior segment optical coherence tomography. The correlations between corneal HOAs and visual improvement were also analyzed. Mean logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution (logMAR) visual acuity significantly improved from 1.40 ± 0.70 to 0.46 ± 0.45 after corneal transplantation (P transplantation (PKP: from 1.16 ± 0.59 μm to 0.58 ± 0.35 μm, P = .035, DALK: from 0.94 ± 0.57 μm to 0.37 ± 0.18 μm, P = .004). Visual acuity following corneal transplantation was correlated with the corneal HOAs at 12 months (r = 0.53, P = .01). Visual improvement at 3, 6, and 12 months was positively correlated with preoperative HOAs of the total cornea and posterior surface (all P transplantation in eyes with HSK. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of virion-incorporated host proteins required for herpes simplex virus type 1 infection through a RNA interference screen.

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    Camille Stegen

    Full Text Available Viruses are strictly dependent on cells to propagate and many incorporate host proteins in their viral particles, but the significance of this incorporation is poorly understood. Recently, we performed the first comprehensive characterization of the mature herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in which up to 49 distinct cellular proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. In the present study, we sought to identify if these cellular factors are relevant for the HSV-1 life cycle. To this end, we performed a small interfering RNA functional screen and found that 15 of these host proteins altered HSV-1 proliferation in cell culture, without any significant effect on cell viability. Moreover, the siRNA used had no negative consequences for Adenovirus type 5 propagation (with one exception indicating that the modulation was specific for HSV-1 and not merely due to unhealthy cells. The positive host proteins include several Rab GTPases and other intracellular transport components as well as proteins involved in signal transduction, gene regulation and immunity. Remarkably, in most cases when virions were depleted for one of the above proteins, they replicated more poorly in subsequent infections in wild type cells. This highlights for the first time that both the cellular and virion-associated pools of many of these proteins actively contribute to viral propagation. Altogether, these findings underscore the power and biological relevance of combining proteomics and RNA interference to identify novel host-pathogen interactions.

  11. Efficacy of Brazilian Propolis against Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection in Mice and Their Modes of Antiherpetic Efficacies

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    Tomomi Shimizu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol extracts (AF-06, 07, and 08, 10 mg/kg of Brazilian propolis were administered orally to cutaneously herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1-infected mice three times daily on days 0 to 6 after infection to evaluate their efficacies against HSV-1 infection and significantly limited development of herpetic skin lesions. AF-07 and 08 significantly reduced virus titers in brain and/or skin on day 4 without toxicity, but AF-08 had no anti-HSV-1 activity in vitro. AF-06 and 08 significantly enhanced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH to inactivated HSV-1 antigen in infected mice. Oral AF-08-administration significantly augmented interferon (IFN-γ production by HSV-1 antigen from splenocytes of HSV-1-infected mice, while direct exposure of splenocytes of infected mice to AF-06 significantly elevated IFN-γ production in vitro. Thus, AF-08 might have components that are active in vivo even after oral administration and those of AF-06 might be active only in vitro. Because DTH is a major host defense for intradermal HSV-1 infection, augmentation of DTH response by AF-06 or 08, directly or indirectly, respectively, may contribute to their efficacies against HSV-1 infection. In addition, AF-06 and 07 possibly contain anti-HSV-1 components contributing to their efficacies. Such biological activities of Brazilian propolis may be useful to analyze its pharmacological actions.

  12. Endonuclease G, a candidate human enzyme for the initiation of genomic inversion in herpes simplex type 1 virus.

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    Huang, Ke-Jung; Zemelman, Boris V; Lehman, I Robert

    2002-06-07

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) a sequence is present as a direct repeat at the two termini of the 152-kilobase viral genome and as an inverted repeat at the junction of the two unique components L and S. During replication, the HSV-1 genome undergoes inversion of L and S, producing an equimolar mixture of the four possible isomers. Isomerization is believed to result from recombination triggered by breakage at the a sequence, a recombinational hot spot. We have identified an enzyme in HeLa cell extracts that preferentially cleaves the a sequence and have purified it to near homogeneity. Microsequencing showed it to be human endonuclease G, an enzyme with a strong preference for G+C-rich sequences. Endonuclease G appears to be the only cellular enzyme that can specifically cleave the a sequence. Endonuclease G also showed the predicted recombination properties in an in vitro recombination assay. Based on these findings, we propose that endonuclease G initiates the a sequence-mediated inversion of the L and S components during HSV-1 DNA replication.

  13. New model cell systems (PK and XTC-2) for studying acute and persistent infections with herpes simplex and pseudorabies viruses.

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    Szántó, J; Lesso, J; Golais, F

    1980-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) showed limited replication in PK (pig kidney) and XTC-2 (Xenopus laevis frog) cell lines. Virus replication depended on the multiplicity of infection (MOI). At a high MOI, HSV-1 caused a typical cytopathic effect (CPE) in XTC-2 cells but a little marked CPE in PK cells. Pseudorabies virus (PRV) replicated intensively in PK cells (permissive system) but not in XTC-2 cells (nonpermissive system). Both viruses were adsorbed on to PK and XTC-2 cells. In infected PK cells, fluorescent HSV-1 antigen was demonstrated only in the vicinity of the nuclear membrane and in the paranuclear area of the cytoplasm but not in the nuclei. In XTC-2 cells, HSV-1 antigen was demonstrated also in the nuclei. Persistent HSV-1 infection was induced in PK but not in XTC-2 cells; it was of limited duration. PK cells which had lost HSV-1 multiplied further and proved susceptible to infection with HSV-1 or PRV.

  14. Blocking of PDL-1 interaction enhances primary and secondary CD8 T cell response to herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

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    Rudragouda Channappanavar

    Full Text Available The blocking of programmed death ligand-1 (PDL-1 has been shown to enhance virus-specific CD8 T cell function during chronic viral infections. Though, how PDL-1 blocking at the time of priming affects the quality of CD8 T cell response to acute infections is not well understood and remains controversial. This report demonstrates that the magnitude of the primary and secondary CD8 T cell responses to herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 infection is subject to control by PDL-1. Our results showed that after footpad HSV-1 infection, PD-1 expression increases on immunodominant SSIEFARL peptide specific CD8 T cells. Additionally, post-infection, the level of PDL-1 expression also increases on CD11c+ dendritic cells. Intraperitoneal administration of anti-PDL-1 monoclonal antibody given one day prior to and three days after cutaneous HSV-1 infection, resulted in a marked increase in effector and memory CD8 T cell response to SSIEFARL peptide. This was shown by measuring the quantity and quality of SSIEFARL-specific CD8 T cells by making use of ex-vivo assays that determine antigen specific CD8 T cell function, such as intracellular cytokine assay, degranulation assay to measure cytotoxicity and viral clearance. Our results are discussed in terms of the beneficial effects of blocking PDL-1 interactions, while giving prophylactic vaccines, to generate a more effective CD8 T cell response to viral infection.

  15. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part II: potential clinical application of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children

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    Gregory K Friedman

    Full Text Available Oncolytic engineered herpes simplex viruses (HSVs possess many biologic and functional attributes that support their use in clinical trials in children with solid tumors. Tumor cells, in an effort to escape regulatory mechanisms that would impair their growth and progression, have removed many mechanisms that would have protected them from virus infection and eventual virus-mediated destruction. Viruses engineered to exploit this weakness, like mutant HSV, can be safely employed as tumor cell killers, since normal cells retain these antiviral strategies. Many preclinical studies and early phase trials in adults demonstrated that oncolytic HSV can be safely used and are highly effective in killing tumor cells that comprise pediatric malignancies, without generating the toxic side effects of nondiscriminatory chemotherapy or radiation therapy. A variety of engineered viruses have been developed and tested in numerous preclinical models of pediatric cancers and initial trials in patients are underway. In Part II of this review series, we examine the preclinical evidence to support the further advancement of oncolytic HSV in the pediatric population. We discuss clinical advances made to date in this emerging era of oncolytic virotherapy.

  16. Etiology of acute conjunctivitis due to coxsackievirus A24 variant, human adenovirus, herpes simplex virus, and Chlamydia in Beijing, China.

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    Li, Jie; Yang, Yongsheng; Lin, Changying; Li, Weihong; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Jia, Lei; Li, Xitai; Chen, Lijuan; Wang, Quanyi

    2014-01-01

    Acute conjunctivitis is a common disease associated with high morbidity and economic burden. To clarify the etiological characteristics of acute conjunctivitis in Beijing, surveillance of acute conjunctivitis was conducted from July to October during 2007-2012 by collecting eye swabs from patients treated at surveillance hospitals affiliated with a surveillance program of 18 districts Center for Disease Prevention and Control in Beijing. Coxsackievirus A24 variant (CA24v), enterovirus 70 (EV70), human adenovirus (HAdV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and chlamydia were identified by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 region of CA24v was conducted. Comparisons of proportions and statistical significance were performed using the chi-square test. HAdV was found to be the most prevalent pathogen, followed by CA24v, chlamydia, and HSV. Significant differences in the symptoms of ocular pain, photophobia, and epiphora were identified among the 4 agents. The prevalence of HAdV- and CA24v-mediated conjunctivitis peaked in July or August and September or October, respectively. Nucleotide sequences of the VP1 regions among the isolated CA24v strains shared 92.8%-100% homology. In conclusion, HAdV followed by CA24v, chlamydia, and HSV were the most common causative agents of acute conjunctivitis in Beijing. Comprehensive, continuous surveillance and advanced laboratory techniques are needed for further studies.

  17. Differential Detection of Enterovirus and Herpes Simplex Virus in Cerebrospinal Fluid by Real-Time RT-PCR.

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    Sarquiz-Martínez, Brenda; González-Bonilla, César R; Santacruz-Tinoco, Clara Esperanza; Muñoz-Medina, José E; Pardavé-Alejandre, Héctor D; Barbosa-Cabrera, Elizabeth; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto; Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto

    2017-09-28

    Enterovirus (EV) and herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV1 and HSV2) are the main etiologic agents of central nervous system infections. Early laboratory confirmation of these infections is performed by viral culture of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or the detection of specific antibodies in serum (e.g., HSV). The sensitivity of viral culture ranges from 65 to 75%, with a recovery time varying from 3 to 10 days. Serological tests are faster and easy to carry out, but they exhibit cross-reactivity between HSV1 and HSV2. Although molecular techniques are more sensitive (sensitivity >95%), they are more expensive and highly susceptible to cross-contamination. A real-time RT-PCR for the detection of EV, HSV1, and HSV2 was compared with end-point nested PCR. We tested 87 CSF samples of patients with a clinical diagnosis of viral meningitis or encephalitis. Fourteen samples were found to be positive by RT-PCR, but only 8 were positive by end-point PCR. The RT-PCR showed a specificity range of 94-100%, the negative predictive value was 100%, and the positive predictive value was 62, 100, and 28% for HSV1, HSV2, and EV, respectively. Real-time RT-PCR detected EV, HSV1, and HSV2 with a higher sensitivity and specificity than end-point nested RT-PCR. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Application of polymerase chain reaction to differentiate herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 serotypes in culture negative intraocular aspirates

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    Shyamal G

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To standardize and apply a polymerase chain reaction (PCR on the glycoprotein D gene to differentiate Herpes simplex virus (HSV 1 & 2 serotypes in culture negative intraocular specimens. Methods: Twenty-one intraocular fluids collected from 19 patients were subjected to cultures for HSV and uniplex PCR (uPCR for DNA polymerase gene. To differentiate HSV serotypes, as 1 & 2, a seminested PCR (snPCR targeting the glycoprotein D gene was standardised and applied onto 21 intraocular fluids. The specificity of the snPCR was verified by application onto ATCC strains of HSV 1 and 2, clinical isolates and DNA sequencing of the amplified products. All specimens were also tested for the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV and varicella zoster virus (VZV by nucleic acid amplification methods. Results: Four of the 21 intraocular fluids were positive for HSV by uPCR. snPCR detected HSV in three additional specimens (total of seven specimens, and identified three as HSV 1 and four as HSV 2. DNA sequencing of PCR products showed 100% homology with the standard strains of HSV 1 and 2 respectively. None of the samples were positive in culture. Among the other patients, CMV DNA was detected in two and VZV DNA in five others. Conclusions: The standardized snPCR can be applied directly onto the culture negative specimens for rapid differentiation of HSV serotypes.

  19. Visualization of mouse neuronal ganglia infected by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) using multimodal non-linear optical microscopy.

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    Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Houle, Marie-Andrée; Blache, Marie-Claire; Légaré, François; Pearson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus that causes skin lesions and goes on to enter a latent state in neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Following stress, the virus may reactivate from latency leading to recurrent lesions. The in situ study of neuronal infections by HSV-1 is critical to understanding the mechanisms involved in the biology of this virus and how it causes disease; however, this normally requires fixation and sectioning of the target tissues followed by treatment with contrast agents to visualize key structures, which can lead to artifacts. To further our ability to study HSV-1 neuropathogenesis, we have generated a recombinant virus expressing a second generation red fluorescent protein (mCherry), which behaves like the parental virus in vivo. By optimizing the application of a multimodal non-linear optical microscopy platform, we have successfully visualized in unsectioned trigeminal ganglia of mice both infected cells by two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and myelinated axons of uninfected surrounding cells by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. These results represent the first report of CARS microscopy being combined with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy to visualize virus-infected cells deep within unsectioned explanted tissue, and demonstrate the application of multimodal non-linear optical microscopy for high spatial resolution biological imaging of tissues without the use of stains or fixatives.

  20. The Epidemiology of Herpes Simplex Virus Type-2 Infection among Pregnant Women in Rural Mysore Taluk, India

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    Aaron F. Bochner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess the prevalence and determinants of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 infections among pregnant women attending mobile antenatal health clinic in rural villages in Mysore Taluk, India. Methods. Between January and September 2009, 487 women from 52 villages participated in this study. Each participant consented to provide a blood sample for HSV-2 and HIV testing and underwent an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Results. HSV-2 prevalence was 6.7% (95% confidence interval (CI 4.4–9.0, and one woman tested positive for HIV. The median age of women was 20 years and 99% of women reported having a single lifetime sex partner. Women whose sex partner traveled away from home had 2.68 (CI: 1.13–6.34 times the odds of being HSV-2 seropositive compared to women whose sex partner did not travel. Having experienced genital lesions was also associated with HSV-2 infection (P value = 0.08. Conclusion. The 6.7% HSV-2 prevalence was similar to results obtained in studies among pregnant women in other parts of India. It appeared that most women in this study contracted HSV-2 from their spouses and few regularly used condoms. This finding highlights the need for public health policies to increase awareness and education about prevention methods among women and men living in rural India.