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Sample records for heriot-watt university edinburgh

  1. Applied Physics at Heriot-Watt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colles, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a course in applied physics with solid state electronics, aimed at providing a continuing broad background in general physics while allowing for the gradual development of an emphasis on applications, engineering expertise, and relevant industrial experience. (Author/GA)

  2. Implementing the Research Data Management Policy: University of Edinburgh Roadmap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Rice

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses work to implement the University of Edinburgh Research Data Management (RDM policy by developing the services needed to support researchers and fulfil obligations within a changing national and international setting. This is framed by an evolving Research Data Management Roadmap and includes a governance model that ensures cooperation amongst Information Services (IS managers and oversight by an academic-led steering group. IS has taken requirements from research groups and IT professionals, and at the request of the steering group has conducted pilot work involving volunteer research units within the three colleges to develop functionality and presentation for the key services. The first pilots cover three key services: the data store, a customisation of the Digital Curation Centre’s DMPonline tool, and the data repository. The paper will report on the plans, achievements and challenges encountered while we attempt to bring the University of Edinburgh RDM Roadmap to fruition.

  3. Steve Boardman and Julian Goodare, eds., Kings, Lords and Men in Scotland and Britain, 1300–1625: Essays in Honour of Jenny Wormald. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2014. Pp. 368. ISBN: 9780748691500. £75.00.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinda Dean

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Steve Boardman and Julian Goodare, eds., Kings, Lords and Men in Scotland and Britain, 1300–1625: Essays in Honour of Jenny Wormald. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2014. Pp. 368. ISBN: 9780748691500. £75.00.

  4. Edinburgh University, Schools and the Civil Service in the Early Twentieth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert David

    2013-01-01

    This article is a case study of the relation between urban schooling and university education, using two main sources. Data on the schools attended by history students at Edinburgh University between 1899 and 1933 illustrate the diversity and social ranking of schools in the city. New higher grade schools had a key role in increasing access to…

  5. Teaching Postcolonial Literature in an Elite University: An Edinburgh Lecturer’s Perspective

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    Michelle Keown

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This reflective essay explores some of the pedagogical challenges I have faced in teaching postcolonial literature and theory at the University of Edinburgh. There are particular social dynamics at work at Edinburgh that make engaging with intersectionality, particularly in the context of colonialism and racism, a rather complex endeavor. Edinburgh is a Russell Group university, and our undergraduate constituency is overwhelmingly white, middle class and British, with a high proportion of students coming from British public-school backgrounds. Many of these students approach postcolonial writing with well-meaning liberal intentions, but often adopt what Graham Huggan (2001 would term an exoticizing perspective on cultures that are entirely unfamiliar to them. The tiny proportion of students from ethnic-minority backgrounds who study within the department, on the other hand, can feel profoundly alienated due to what Les Back (2004 terms the “sheer weight of whiteness” at Edinburgh. However, I have found that by adopting critical pedagogical models from Paulo Freire, Sara Ahmed and others, it has been possible to foster an active, dialogical and transformative learning environment that has allowed students from these diverse backgrounds to extend their epistemological parameters and feel empowered to challenge dominant ideologies within and outside the university.

  6. William Gregory (1803-58): Professor of Chemistry at the University of Edinburgh and enthusiast for phrenology and mesmerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Matthew H

    2008-08-01

    William Gregory was descended from a long line of academics. Although he graduated in medicine, he had earlier determined on a career in Chemistry but more particularly to succeed Professor Thomas Charles Hope in the Edinburgh Chair in that discipline. At various times during the 1830s and 1840s he studied Chemistry at Giessen in Germany under Professor Justus Liebig and was closely associated with him over the succeeding years, translating and editing in all seven of his books. Gregory taught initially in London, at the Edinburgh Extra-mural School, in Dublin, at the Andersonian University, Glasgow and as Mediciner and Professor of Chemistry in Aberdeen. In 1844 he was appointed to the Chair of Chemistry in Edinburgh and remained in this post until his death in 1858. Shortly after he graduated he joined the Edinburgh Phrenological Society (he was initially its Secretary and later President) and took a particularly active role in the meetings of this Society and in the Aberdeen Phrenological Society. He was also interested in the phenomena of Mesmerism and Mesmero-Phrenology, despite the agitation and scorn of many of his academic colleagues both in Aberdeen and in Edinburgh.

  7. Review: Leonard and Virginia Woolf, the Hogarth Press and the Networks of Modernism, Ed. Helen Southworth (Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 2010

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    Caitlyn Tierney Caldwell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A review of Helen Southworth (Editor, Leonard and Virginia Woolf, the Hogarth Press and the Networks of Modernism. ix + 256 pp., notes, appendix, index. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2010. £75

  8. Murray Pittock, ed., The Edinburgh Companion to Scottish Romanticism.

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    Manfred Malzahn

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Murray Pittock, ed., The Edinburgh Companion to Scottish Romanticism. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011. Pp. 251. ISBN 978-0-7486-3845-1 (hardback. £ 65.00. ISBN 978-0-7486-3846-8 (paperback. £ 21.99.

  9. Sir John Struthers (1823-1899), Professor of Anatomy in the University of Aberdeen (1863-1889), President of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (1895-1897).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, M H

    2015-11-01

    Between 1841 and 1845 John Struthers attended both the University of Edinburgh and some of the various Extra-mural Schools of Medicine associated with Surgeons' Hall. While a medical student he became a Member of the Hunterian Medical Society of Edinburgh and later was elected one of their Annual Presidents. He graduated with the MD Edin and obtained both the LRCS Edin and the FRCS Edin diplomas in 1845. Shortly afterwards he was invited to teach Anatomy in Dr Handyside's Extra-mural School in Edinburgh. The College of Surgeons certified him to teach Anatomy in October 1847. He had two brothers, and all three read Medicine in Edinburgh. His younger brother, Alexander, died of cholera in the Crimea in 1855 while his older brother James, who had been a bachelor all his life, practised as a Consultant Physician in Leith Hospital, Edinburgh, until his death.When associated with Dr Handyside's Extra-mural School in Edinburgh, John taught Anatomy there until he was elected to the Chair of Anatomy in Aberdeen in 1863. Much of his time was spent in Aberdeen teaching Anatomy and in upgrading the administrative facilities there. He resigned from this Chair in 1889 and subsequently was elected President of Leith Hospital from 1891 to 1897. This was in succession to his older brother, James, who had died in 1891. Later, he was elected President of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh from 1895 to 1897 and acted as its Vice-President from 1897 until his death in 1899. In 1898, Queen Victoria knighted him. His youngest son, John William Struthers, was the only one of his clinically qualified sons to survive him and subsequently was elected President of the Edinburgh College of Surgeons from 1941 to 1943. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Criticisms of the University of Oxford in the Early 19th Century and the Formation of Newman’s Idea of a University: Focusing on attacks in the Edinburgh Review

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    This article retraces the infamous controversies between the Edinburgh Review and Oxford in the early 19th century. It seeks to broaden the understanding of the origins and background of John Henry Newman’s idea of a university by analyzing the connections and differences on both sides of the controversies, drawing from writers such as Sidney Smith, E. Copleston, W. Hamilton, and Newman himself. The article suggests that the controversies were one of the important bases for the formation of N...

  11. Population genomics of cardiometabolic traits: design of the University College London-London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB Consortium.

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    Tina Shah

    Full Text Available Substantial advances have been made in identifying common genetic variants influencing cardiometabolic traits and disease outcomes through genome wide association studies. Nevertheless, gaps in knowledge remain and new questions have arisen regarding the population relevance, mechanisms, and applications for healthcare. Using a new high-resolution custom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array (Metabochip incorporating dense coverage of genomic regions linked to cardiometabolic disease, the University College-London School-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB consortium of highly-phenotyped population-based prospective studies, aims to: (1 fine map functionally relevant SNPs; (2 precisely estimate individual absolute and population attributable risks based on individual SNPs and their combination; (3 investigate mechanisms leading to altered risk factor profiles and CVD events; and (4 use Mendelian randomisation to undertake studies of the causal role in CVD of a range of cardiovascular biomarkers to inform public health policy and help develop new preventative therapies.

  12. Botany in Edinburgh's Medical Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    In the early 18th century, at the founding of Edinburgh University Medical School, the study of botany was regarded as an essential component of medical training. Botanical teaching began as basic instruction in the recognition of medical plants, considered a vital aspect of a physician's Materia Medica studies. Over the next hundred years growing importance was given to the study of botany as a science, its popularity peaking under John Hutton Balfour's tenure as Professor (1845-1879). The relevance of botanical study later declined in the undergraduate medical curriculum until its cessation in 1961 .This paper considers the history of botanical studies in Edinburgh, including the reasons for its introduction and its changing importance over time.

  13. Penguin breeding in Edinburgh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillespie, T.H.; F.R.S.E.,; F.Z.S.,

    1939-01-01

    The Scottish National Zoological Park at Edinburgh has been notably successful in keeping and breeding penguins. It is happy in possessing as a friend and benefactor, Mr Theodore E. Salvesen, head of the firm of Christian Salvesen & Co., Leith, to whose interest and generosity it owes the great

  14. From Maastricht to Edinburgh: The Danish Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krunke, Helle

    2005-01-01

    Maastricht Treaty, Edinburgh Agreement, Danish Referendum, national compromise, parliamentary scrutiny of European policy, Metting of the Europe Council in Edinburgh 1992, Treaty on a Constitution for Europe, referenda...

  15. EUROTHERM Seminar No. 18

    CERN Document Server

    Heggs, Peter; Butterworth, David

    1992-01-01

    The Eurotherm Committee was created in 1986 from member countries of the European Community. It has the purpose of organising and coordinating scientific events such as seminars and conferences in the thermal sciences. The series of Eurotherm Seminars established by the Committee has become a popular forum for high-level scientific and technical interchange of ideas in a wide range of specialist topics. While the presentation and publication of papers at the Seminars are encouraged, the primary aim is to stimulate discussion and liaison between specialist groups. The present Chairman of Eurotherm is Professor C.J. Hoogendoorn of the Technical University, Delft (Fax [NL] 15, 783251). Information on Mure Seminars is available from the Secretary, Keith Cornwell, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh (Fax [UK] 31, 451, 3129). This particular Seminar No. 18 on the Design and Operation of Heat Exchangers was the first one on this topic and was held at the Universitat der Bundeswehr Hamburg (University of the Federal Ar...

  16. The Enduring Legacy of 250 Years of Pharmacology in Edinburgh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John S; Mackay, Angus V P

    2017-09-13

    Two hundred fifty years ago, the University of Edinburgh appointed Francis Home to the first chair of materia medica, the accumulated knowledge of materials used in healing. Francis Home and his colleagues were determined to improve the quality of medical training in Edinburgh by introducing a final examination and compiling a catalog of medicines validated by the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh. The catalog, known as the Edinburgh Pharmacopoeia, was a great success, partly due to the orderly nature of its contents, its routine editing to eliminate worthless entries, and the introduction of new treatments whose preparation was precisely documented. In a relatively short time, the worth of the Edinburgh Pharmacopoeia was recognized throughout Europe, America, and the British Empire. Today, the British and European Pharmacopoeias are catalogs of publicly available, legally enforceable standards for active pharmaceutical ingredients and finished dosage forms of pharmaceutical products and medical devices. Home and the many luminaries who succeeded him would surely take pleasure and pride in the fact that the mantra of today's medicines regulators worldwide is little different from that of these early visionaries: "To take better advantage of the best possible science in the service of the public health and our health-care systems" (1, p. 492). Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology Volume 58 is January 6, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  17. IMC9 Edinburgh Nomenclature Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvell, Lorelei L; Hawksworth, David L; Petersen, Ronald H; Redhead, Scott A

    2010-12-01

    The proceedings of the 3-5 August 2010, IMC9 Edinburgh Nomenclature Sessions are briefly summarized. The final resolution approved by the General Assembly endorses the recommendations by the Nomenclature Sessions regarding transfer of the governance of fungal nomenclature from botanical to mycological congresses, mandatory pre-publication deposit of nomenclatural information for valid publication of new fungal names, and the acceptability of English as an alternative to Latin in the valid publication of fungal names. Complete results from the IMC9 nomenclature questionnaire are also provided.

  18. Fit for purpose: the relevance of Masters preparation for the professional practice of nursing. A 10-year follow-up study of postgraduate nursing courses in the University of Edinburgh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, D A; Lugton, J; Fawcett, T N

    2000-05-01

    Continuing education is now recognized as essential if nursing is to develop as a profession. United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting (UKCC) consultations are currently seeking to establish appropriate preparation for a 'higher level of practice' in the United Kingdom. The relevance of Masters level education to developing professional roles merits examination. To this end the results of a 10-year follow-up study of graduates from the Masters programme at the University of Edinburgh are reported. The sample was the entire cohorts of nurses who graduated with a Masters degree in the academic sessions from 1986 to 1996. A postal questionnaire was designed consisting of mainly closed questions to facilitate coding and analysis but also including some open questions to allow for more qualitative data to be elicited. The findings indicated clearly that the possession of an MSc degree opened up job opportunities and where promotion was not identified, the process of study at a higher level was still perceived as relevant to the work environment. This applied as much to the context of clinical practice as to that of management, education or research. The perceived enhancement of clinical practice from a generic Masters programme was considered a significant finding. Also emerging from the data was an associated sense of personal satisfaction and achievement that related to the acquisition of academic skills and the ultimate reward of Masters status. The concept of personal growth, however, emerged as a distinct entity from that of satisfaction and achievement, relating specifically to the concept of intellectual sharing, the broadening of perspectives and the development of advanced powers of reasoning.

  19. [Polish doctors graves at the cemeteries in Edinburgh].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebertt, S

    1994-01-01

    The first part of the text reviews the cultural links between Poland and Scotland. These links were originated in the 14th century and were created by scottish students travelling to Poland to seek learning in the then polish centre of excellence Jagiellonian University in Cracow. There were also some learned Scots who ventured to Poland, seeking work. Some of them achieved positions of distinction. The first Polish medical men attended the University of Edinburgh in the 18th century. In the 19th century, following the suppression of the polish uprising against Russia, there were a small group of Poles seeking asylum in Scotland. A few of them enlisted at the University of Edinburgh at the medical faculty. The above history is described in detail in Annotations. In the second part of the paper all the polish medical and veterinary doctors whose graves are located in various cemeteries in Edinburgh are listed in chronological order of their deaths. As full as possible personal data, the kind of medical work, and location of their graves are given. Greater details, whenever obtainable, are dealt with in Annotations. The total of thirty deceased between 1942 and 1993 are described.

  20. Benjamin Rush, Edinburgh Medicine and the Rise of Physician Autobiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the place of Scottish medicine in the autobiographical writing of the Philadelphia physician and signer of the American Declaration of Independence, Benjamin Rush, who studied at the University of Edinburgh from 1766 to 1768. It focuses on Rush's 'Scottish journal' (his account of his period of study in Edinburgh), his protracted feud from 1797 over his treatment of yellow fever with the English journalist, politician and agriculturalist William Cobbett, and his account in 'Travels through Life' of that feud and of the influence of Cullen on his medical theory and practice. The different rhetorical strategies used by Rush to defend his character and practice and his role in the rise of physician autobiography are examined.

  1. Gupta, Dr Pradeep Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2007 Section: Physics. Gupta, Dr Pradeep Kumar Ph.D. (Heriot Watt University), FNASc. Date of birth: 16 August 1954. Specialization: Lasers, Biomedical Applications of Lasers, Nonlinear Optics, Laser Materials Address: Visiting Professor, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110 016, ...

  2. Fluid Mechanics of Fish Swimming

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    shark). Redrawn from Review of Fish. Swimming Modes for Aquatic. Locomotion, IEEE Journal of. Oceanic Engineering, Vol.24,. No.2, pp. 237–252, 1999, D M. Lane, M Sfakiotakis and J B C. Davies, Heriot-Watt University. undulatory → oscillatory caudaltail¯n (B C F ) m otions are know n collectively as. B C F sw im m ers.

  3. Change in email domain name

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    Different modes of swimming. See article on pp.32–46. Redrawn from Review of Fish Swimming Modes for Aquatic Locomotion, IEEE Journal of Oceanic. Engineering, Vol.24, No.2, pp. 237–252, 1999,. D M Lane, M Sfakiotakis and J B C Davies,. Heriot-Watt University. Sir James Lighthill. (1924–1998). ( Illustration: ...

  4. John Barclay (1758-1826) extra-mural teacher of anatomy in Edinburgh: Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, M H

    2006-04-01

    John Barclay (1758-1826) was one of the most distinguished, respected and enthusiastic teachers of anatomy in Edinburgh during the first decades of the 19th century. He taught this subject in the extra-mural school from 1797 until 1825. He initially studied divinity at St Andrews University, intending entering the Church. After acting as a minister of the Church for about 10 years and tutoring for most of these years, he decided to study medicine in Edinburgh, and was particularly attracted to anatomy. After he qualified with the MD degree, he proceeded to London where he attended the anatomical classes of Dr Marshall for about a year. On his return to Edinburgh he taught anatomy to a small class for three years in High School Yards. He then acquired a property at Number 10 Surgeons' Square where he taught from 1800 until 1825, when he was forced to withdraw due to poor health. His lectures were meticulously prepared, and his illustrations clear and copious. In 1804, his class was recognised by the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh as fulfilling their requirements for students who wished to take the College's examinations. During the winter sessions he taught anatomy, physiology and surgery, while in the summer sessions he taught comparative anatomy, a subject in which he was particularly interested. He was elected an Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh in 1821. His classes were taken over by his partner Robert Knox, at that time Conservator of the College's Museum.

  5. Seeking a Philosophy of Music in Higher Education: The Case of Mid-Nineteenth Century Edinburgh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    In 1851-2 the Trustees of the Reid bequest at the University of Edinburgh undertook an investigation into music education. Concerned that the funds which supported the Chair of Music should be spent as efficiently and effectively as possible, they consulted professional and academic musicians in search of new forms of teaching music at university…

  6. A question of merit: John Hutton Balfour, Joseph Hooker and the 'concussion' over the Edinburgh chair of botany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Richard

    2005-03-01

    In 1845, Robert Graham's death created a vacancy for the traditionally dual appointment to the University of Edinburgh's chair of botany and the Regius Keepership of the Edinburgh Royal Botanic Garden. John Hutton Balfour and Joseph Hooker emerged as the leading candidates. The contest quickly became embroiled in long running controversies over the nature and control of Scottish university education at a time of particular social and political tension after a recent schism in Church of Scotland. The politics of the appointment were complicated by the fact that the Edinburgh Town Council (which preferred Balfour) chose the chair while the keepership was under the patronage of the Westminster government (which preferred Hooker). Balfour eventually emerged triumphant after a bitter campaign marked on all sides by intense politicking. The struggle to replace Graham provides a case study in how Victorian men of science adapted their aspirations to the practical realities of life in industrial, reforming, imperial, multinational Britain.

  7. Terrestrial laser scanning for heritage conservation: the Cologne Cathedral documentation project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, D.; Sperner, J.; Hoepner, S.; Tenschert, R.

    2017-08-01

    Contemporary terrestrial laser scanners and photogrammetric imaging systems are an invaluable tool in providing objectively precise, as-built records of existing architectural, engineering and industrial sites. The comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) recording of culturally important sites such as heritage buildings, monuments, and sites can serve a variety of invaluable purposes; the data can assist in the conservation, management, and repair of a structure, as well as provide a visually engaging educational resource for both the public and scholars. The acquired data acts as a form of digital preservation, a timeless virtual representation of the as-built structure. The technical capability of these systems is particularly suited for the documentation of a richly articulated and detailed building such as the high Gothic Cologne Cathedral. The 3D documentation of the Cologne Cathedral UNESCO World Heritage Site is a multiphase project developed by Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh in partnership with the Fresenius University of Applied Sciences, Cologne, and the Metropolitankapitel der Hohen Domkirche Köln Dombauhütte. The project has also received generous support from Zoller + Fröhlich (Z+F) and the City of Cologne.

  8. 18 December 2012 - British University of Edinburgh Principal T. O’Shea and delegation (see list below) visiting the CERN Control Centre with Beams Department D. Nisbet, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Beams Department R. Veness, in the ATLAS Visitor Centre and experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, in LHCb experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Campana and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    The delegation was throughout accompanied by Beams Department R. Veness and Physics Department and ATLAS Collaboration P. Wells 1.\tProf. Sir Timothy O'Shea, Principal, University of Edinburgh 2.\tProf. Lesley Yellowlees, Vice Principal, Head of College of Science and Engineering 3.\tProf Jeff Haywood, Vice Principal for Knowledge Management 4.\tProf. Peter Higgs, Professor of Theoretical Physics 5.\tMr Bruce Minto, Supporter of the University 6.\tProf. Walter Nimmo, Supporter of the University 7.\tProf. Arthur Trew, Head of School of Physics and Astronomy 8.\tProf David Robertson, Head of School of Informatics 9.\tProf Stefano Brandani, Head of School of Engineering 10.\tMr Alan Walker, accompanying Prof. Higgs 11.\tProf. Peter Clarke, LHCb Collaboration, School of Physics and Astronomy

  9. James Cossar Ewart and the Origins of the Animal Breeding Research Department in Edinburgh, 1895-1920.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Clare

    2017-10-16

    In 1919 the Animal Breeding Research Department was established in Edinburgh. This Department, later renamed the Institute of Animal Genetics, forged an international reputation, eventually becoming the centrepiece of a cluster of new genetics research units and institutions in Edinburgh after the Second World War. Yet despite its significance for institutionalising animal genetics research in the UK, the origins and development of the Department have not received as much scholarly attention as its importance warrants. This paper sheds new light on Edinburgh's place in early British genetics by drawing upon recently catalogued archival sources including the papers of James Cossar Ewart, Regius Professor of Natural History at the University of Edinburgh between 1882 and 1927. Although presently a marginal figure in genetics historiography, Ewart established two sites for experimental animal breeding work between 1895 and 1911 and played a central role in the founding of Britain's first genetics lectureship, also in 1911. These early efforts helped to secure government funding in 1913. However, a combination of the First World War, bureaucratic problems and Ewart's personal ambitions delayed the creation of the Department and the appointment of its director by another six years. This paper charts the institutionalisation of animal breeding and genetics research in Edinburgh within the wider contexts of British genetics and agriculture in the early twentieth century.

  10. The Edinburgh modified cage for laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, M C; Hughes, B O

    1995-12-01

    1. Behaviour, production and welfare of ISA Brown medium hybrids were assessed in 2 trials (each from 20 to 44 weeks of age) of a novel design of cage for laying hens: the Edinburgh Modified Cage (EMC). 2. The EMC was 600 mm wide, 450 mm deep and 450 mm high at the rear; it had a softwood perch and at one side a 250 mm wide nest box (containing litter or artificial turf) with a dust bath directly above. It housed 4 birds and provided 675 cm2/bird in the main cage with an additional 281 cm2/bird in the nest box. The nest box and dust bath had automatically controlled doors which were closed at night. There were 18 EMC; in the first trial these were compared with 6 control cages with perch but without next box or dust bath. 3. Hens spent 32 to 37% of day time on the perch, 5 to 7% in the dust bath and 5 to 6% in the nest. At night 92 to 98% roosted on the perch. 4. Initially only 55 to 70% of eggs were laid in the nest box partly because some eggs were laid before dawn. Once the door was retimed to open 3h before lights-on the proportion rose to 91 to 96%. Very few eggs were laid in the dust bath. Pre-laying behaviour lasted longer in treatments with nest boxes (55 to 76min) than in control cages (48min); disturbance was slight in all treatments, but lowest in control cages. 5. Dust baths were well used, with on average 61% of hens dust bathing during a 3-h afternoon observation period compared with only 17% in control cages. Two birds could use the dust bath simultaneously. 6. It was concluded that although a number of minor design features still required attention the EMC has potential to reduce the disadvantages of conventional cages for welfare while retaining their advantages and has possible commercial application.

  11. Study Of Solar Charging Facility For Electric Vehicles In Edinburgh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Nassar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The solar power system decreases carbon dioxide CO2 emissions which are the lead cause of global warming. This paper presented a novel way to design a commercial solar photovoltaic PV farm to provide electricity for 10 of the Edinburgh domestic car fleet. The design is used for sizing of the solar system based on an excel spreadsheets. The results show that the proposed solar system reduces the CO2 emissions with around 95 less than the conventional energy system. Around 0.5TWh of electrical energy is required to meet Edinburgh domestic car fleet whenever converted to electrical vehicles. The PV solar panels at the investigated site has a capacity factor of around 12. The dynamic tilt angle is estimated for the investigated site while the fixed tilt angle is determined to be 49. Depending on dynamic solar panels leads to harvesting more solar energy than depending on fixed tilt angle around 14 higher energy. The meter square of land in Edinburgh receive some 950KWh per year based on the dynamic tilt angle. Around 218000 of solar panels are required to meet 10 of Edinburgh domestic car fleet.

  12. Validation of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale on a cohort ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Posmatal depression occurs in 10 - 15% of women. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is a ID-item self-report scale designed specifically as a screening instrument for the postnatal period. It was initially validated for use in the UK, but has subsequently been validated for other communities. It has not been ...

  13. Hong Kong's first Professor of Pathology and the laboratory of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, F C S

    2011-03-01

    At a time when the role of the laboratory in clinical medicine and in medical research was evolving rapidly, a young Chinese graduate of the Hong Kong College of Medicine and the University of Edinburgh undertook a period of intensive training at the laboratory of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh that was to play a pivotal role in determining his future career as the first Professor of Pathology at the University of Hong Kong and its first professor of Chinese descent. Chung Yik Wang's subsequent achievements over a span of ten years were a testament to the solid foundation that had been laid during that early period, and was an excellent example of how the skills of medical science could be transferred across continents to best effect. Tragically, Wang's career was cut short when he succumbed to tuberculosis, the disease he had spent many years studying.

  14. Intelevent 99. Telecom Networks in the New Millennium: Is Global Service Provisioning Inevitable? Conference Proceedings (Edinburgh, Scotland, September 12-15, 1999).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piele, Philip K., Ed.

    This volume contains 22 presentations delivered at the 1999 Intelevent Conference held in Edinburgh, Scotland. The proceedings were compiled, printed and distributed by the ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management at the University of Oregon. Papers delivered at the conference include the following: the inevitable globalization of…

  15. The accuracy of the Edinburgh Red Eye Diagnostic Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timlin, H; Butler, L; Wright, M

    2015-05-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of the Edinburgh Red Eye Algorithm. This was a prospective study. A questionnaire was designed and made available to clinicians referring patients to the acute ophthalmology service within Edinburgh. The questionnaire involved them using the algorithm to reach a diagnosis in patients presenting with red eye(s). Patients were then referred to the emergency eye clinic and the questionnaire faxed to the clinic or sent with the patients. Patients were then examined by an experienced ophthalmologist (not blinded) to reach a 'gold standard' diagnosis. The concordance between the 'algorithm assisted' diagnosis and the 'gold standard' was then assessed. All patients presenting with red eye(s) were eligible for inclusion. Forty-one questionnaires were completed, two were excluded. The algorithm assisted diagnosis was correct 72% (28/39) of the time. It correctly diagnosed: acute angle closure glaucoma in 100% of cases (4/4); iritis in 82% (9/11); stromal keratitis in 63% (5/8); epithelial keratitis in 70% (7/10); and infective conjunctivitis in 50% (3/6). The diagnostic accuracy of The Edinburgh Red Eye Diagnostic Algorithm is 72, rising to 76% when only the most serious red eye(s) causes are included. The diagnostic accuracy of non-ophthalmologists when assessing patients presenting with red eye(s) is greater when the algorithm is used. We hope that the use of this algorithm will prevent delayed presentations of certain serious eye conditions and reduce the morbidity from delayed treatment.

  16. Clinical photograph from the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh - 1853.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm-Smith, N A

    2005-10-01

    A child with a facial defect is presented using clinical details recorded in a ward journal of the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh for 1853. The entry in the journal is illustrated by a clinical photograph and a pen and ink drawing. The operation for facial reconstruction is described together with an account of post-operative course and outcome. The differential diagnoses and views on the aetiology of the patient's disorder are considered. The photograph itself is described and the historical and social background of the patient are outlined.

  17. Study Of Solar Charging Facility For Electric Vehicles In Edinburgh

    OpenAIRE

    Walid Nassar; Yasser Shaban

    2015-01-01

    The solar power system decreases carbon dioxide CO2 emissions which are the lead cause of global warming. This paper presented a novel way to design a commercial solar photovoltaic PV farm to provide electricity for 10 of the Edinburgh domestic car fleet. The design is used for sizing of the solar system based on an excel spreadsheets. The results show that the proposed solar system reduces the CO2 emissions with around 95 less than the conventional energy system. Around 0.5TWh of electrical ...

  18. The Edinburgh Pipe Phantom: characterising ultrasound scanners beyond 50 MHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, C M [Medical Physics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Ellis, W; Janeczko, A; Pye, S D [Medical Physics Department, NHS Lothian University Hospitals Division, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh EH16 4SA (United Kingdom); Bell, D, E-mail: carmel.moran@ed.ac.uk [Precision Acoustics Ltd, Hampton Farm Business Park, Dorset, DT2 8QH (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    The ability to measure the imaging performance of pre-clinical and clinical ultrasound scanners is important but difficult to achieve objectively. The Edinburgh Pipe Phantom was originally developed to assess the technical performance of clinical scanners up to 15MHz. It comprises a series of anechoic cylinders with diameters 0.4 - 8mm embedded in agar-based tissue mimic. This design enables measurement of the characteristics (Resolution Integral R, Depth of Field L{sub R}, Characteristic Resolution D{sub R}) of grey-scale images with transducer centre frequencies from about 2.5 to 15MHz. We describe further development of the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom as a tool for characterising ultrasound scanners with centre frequencies up to at least 50MHz. This was achieved by moulding a series of anechoic pipe structures (diameters 0.045 - 1.5mm) into a block of agar-based tissue mimic. We report measurements of R, L{sub R} and D{sub R} for a series of 10 transducers (5 single element and 5 array transducers) designed for pre-clinical scanning, with centre frequencies in the range 15-55 MHz. Values of R ranged from 18-72 for single element transducers and 49-58 for linear array transducers. In conclusion, the pre-clinical pipe phantom was able to successfully determine the imaging characteristics of ultrasound probes up to 55MHz.

  19. Radical Contagion and Healthy Literature in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jessica

    During the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the revolution in France served as a catalyst for heavily allegorical political rhetoric, and the idea that radical politics were contagious became commonplace in conservative writing and oratory. This political contagion is described by Blackwood's as raging through the ranks of the rural poor as late as 1830. Confronted by this threat, Blackwood's promoted itself alternatively as a stimulant or as a cure for the metaphorical poison or infection that radical publications were seen to be spreading amongst the poor. Blackwood's also strove to maintain the political health of its readership by identifying healthy literature for its readers and the lower order. This article analyzes Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine's application of the vocabulary of disease and contagion to radical politics and publications, and considers questions of taste, class, and Britishness in discussions of healthy reading habits.

  20. Technical Digest of Papers Presented at the UK National Quantum Electronics Conference (11th) Held in Belfast, Northern Ireland on 30 August - 2 September 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-02

    efficiently exploit optical hardware characteristics Snowdon J F and Waddie A J Heriot Watt University 0 0 Xix 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 WEDNESDAY 1 SEPTEMBER 1993...Comision Inter- ministerial de Ciencia y Tecnologia , Project TIC90/080. K.A.S. acknowledges support from the University of the Balearic Islands where the...example of a Landau-Zener level crossing case [51. The agreement is found to be 0 good. Both methods have their numerical advantages when the hardware and

  1. WattJournals: Towards an Economic and Lightweight Search Tool Alternative for Libraries To Help Their Students and Researchers Keep Up-To-Date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Chumbe

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Learn how Heriot-Watt University Library's WattJournals could be just the search tool your patrons need to efficiently find the content that your library subscribes to. Built on top of a RESTful search API created by the JISC-sponsored JournalTOCs Project, WattJournals is a toolkit for connecting fulltext articles to the people who need them. This article provides a technical overview of the system, showing how it uses citation data pulled from the JournalTOCs table of contents awareness service to provide access to just your library's subscriptions.

  2. Femtosecond Laser Machining of Gallium Arsenide Wafers for the Creation of Quasi-Phasematched Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-21

    visible structural damage, creating a tightly fitting sample as shown in the optical micrographs in Figure 5.5 below. Figure 5.5 Interlaced ...power photonics group at Heriot Watt University. The CO2 laser, operating at a wavelength of 10.6µm was a pulsed laser with variable repetition rate...above that of GaAs. Their Tg would be ~160°C”. In this case we could heat up a “blob” of glass on top of the interlaced comb structure, and let it flow

  3. Tetherless ROV offers major advantage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, G.T.

    1984-11-01

    Tethers supply the current generation of remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) with power, navigational commands and data links. The power required by ROVs to carry long tethers increases rapidly in proportion to depth, and additionally, snagging on subsea obstacles is very common. A technical advancement could come with the development of autonomous subsea vehicles with onboard power and an acoustic, rather than hard wire, data link to the surface. Important research in this area presently is being conducted at Scotland's Heriot-Watt University. The feasibility of the system is discussed.

  4. Physics in Edinburgh: From Napier's Bones to Higgs's Boson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, John

    Edinburgh has been the capital of Scotland since 1437 and by any standards is a beautiful city. It makes an immediate impact upon the visitor because major aspects of its history are there for all to see in the general arrangement of the city, and in its buildings. The Castle, sitting on the prominent summit of one of the volcanic plugs that dominate the topography of the city, is a constant focus for the eye of the wandering tourist. From the Castle Esplanade a downward-sloping road running eastward forms the spine of the Old Town. This road is known to tourists as the Royal Mile, but it actually consists of three parts with separate names: the Lawnmarket, the High Street, and the Canongate. The eastern end of the Canongate culminates at the ruined Holyrood Abbey (granted a Royal Charter in 1124) and the adjacent Palace of Holyrood House, the principal residence of the Scottish monarch since the fifteenth century (although rumored to be the least favorite of the present queen’s residences), and now the new Scottish Parliament building (officially opened in 2004). It is a Royal Mile, then, because it stretches from Castle to Palace.

  5. The Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (WEMWBS): development and UK validation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tennant, Ruth; Hiller, Louise; Fishwick, Ruth; Platt, Stephen; Joseph, Stephen; Weich, Scott; Parkinson, Jane; Secker, Jenny; Stewart-Brown, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    ...: the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (WEMWBS). WEMWBS was developed by an expert panel drawing on current academic literature, qualitative research with focus groups, and psychometric testing of an existing scale...

  6. Measuring depression in women around menopausal age. Towards a validation of the Edinburgh Depression Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becht, M.C.; van Erp, C.F.; Teeuwisse, T.M.; van Heck, G.L.; van Son, M.J.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Background: The relationship between menopause and depression is still rather unclear. Studies using different methodology especially those lacking a clear definition of depression are hardly comparable. Since the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS) is not influenced by (menopause-related) somatic

  7. ANÁLISIS ESPECTRAL DE OLAS MARINAS: MODELOS UNIVARIADOS // SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF WAVE SEA: UNIVARIATE MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor Escudero Mora

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available El análisis espectral, es el proceso técnico de la descomposición de una señal compleja en partes más simples. Muchos procesos físicos se describen mejor como una suma de muchas componentes de frecuencias individuales, alternativamente una señal puede dividirse en segmentos cortos y el análisis del espectro puede aplicarse a estos segmentos individuales. Desde el punto de vista del estudio de olas marinas, el espectro juega un rol fundamental y es interpretado como la energía presente en la serie de tiempo durante el periodo. Este estudio se basa en el análisis del espectro asociado a datos del mar del Norte en el ano de 1999 en la plataforma North Alwyn almacenados en la Universidad Heriot-Watt de Edimburgo, separados en periodos de 20 minutos, el total a estudiar son 244 periodos. Para ello, se determinó que existe información que no aporta al problema, representa ruido y es el 3% de la energía, la cual no fue tomada para el estudio. Se dividió el espectro en 12 subintervalos y se ajustaron modelos autorregresivos bajo el esquema de Box-Jenskin and Reinsel, estudiados estos hasta encontrar la mejor aproximación posible para cada subintervalo mediante las propiedades estadísticas obtenidas por cada modelo, junto con los pronósticos respectivos. // ABSTRACT: Spectral analysis is the technical process of a complex signal decomposition into simpler parts. Many physical processes are better described as a sum of many individual frequency components; alternatively a signal can be divided into short segments and the spectrum analysis can be applied to these individual segments. From the point of view of the study of Waves Sea, the spectrum plays a vital role and it is interpreted as the energy in the time series during the period. This study is based on analysis of the spectrum associated to data from the North Sea in the year of 1999, taken in North Alwyn platform, stored in the Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, separated in

  8. Improving discrimination in antepartum depression screening using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Kartik K; Kaimal, Anjali J; Castro, Victor M; Perlis, Roy H

    2017-05-01

    Universal screening of pregnant women for postpartum depression has recently been recommended; however, optimal application of depression screening tools in stratifying risk has not been defined. The current study examines new approaches to improve the ability of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to stratify risk for postpartum depression, including alternate cut points, use of a continuous measure, and incorporation of other putative risk factors. An observational cohort study of 4939 women screened both antepartum and postpartum with a negative EPDS screen antepartum(i.e. EPDSdepressive episode(EPDS cut-off ≥10). Area under the receiver operating characteristics curve(AUC), sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were calculated. 287 women(5.8%) screened positive for postpartum depression. An antepartum EPDS cut-offwomen with a low risk of postpartum depression with a negative predictive value of 97.6%; however, overall discrimination was modest(AUC 0.66, 95%CI: 0.64-0.69); sensitivity was 78.7%, and specificity was 53.8%, and the positive predictive value was low at 9.5%. The negative predictive values were similar(>95%) at all antepartum EPDS cut-off values from 4 to 8. Discrimination was improved(AUC ranging from 0.70 to 0.73) when the antepartum EPDS was combined with a prior history of major depressive disorder before pregnancy. An inability to assess EPDS subscales and a relatively low prevalence of depression in this cohort. Though an antepartum EPDS cut-off score women at low risk for postpartum depression, the negative predictive value was insufficient to substitute for postpartum screening. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen (ECAS)-Italian version: regression based norms and equivalent scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Mattia; Trojano, Luigi; Trojsi, Francesca; Greco, Roberta; Santoro, Manuela; Basile, Giuseppe; Piscopo, Fausta; D'Iorio, Alfonsina; Patrone, Manila; Femiano, Cinzia; Monsurrò, Mariarosaria; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Santangelo, Gabriella

    2017-06-01

    Cognitive assessment for individuals with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) can be difficult because of frequent occurrence of difficulties with speech, writing, and drawing. The Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen (ECAS) is a recent multi-domain neuropsychological screening tool specifically devised for this purpose, and it assesses the following domains: executive functions, social cognition, verbal fluency and language (ALS-specific), but also memory and visuospatial abilities (Non-ALS specific). ECAS total score ranges from 0 (worst performance) to 136 (best performance). Moreover, a brief caregiver interview provides an assessment of behaviour changes and psychotic symptoms usually associated with ALS patients. The aim of the present study was to provide normative values for ECAS total score and sub-scores in a sample of Italian healthy subjects. Two hundred and seventy-seven Italian healthy subjects (151 women and 126 men; age range 30-79 years; educational level from primary school to university) underwent ECAS and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and education significantly influenced performance on ECAS total score and sub-scale scores. From the derived linear equation, a correction grid for raw scores was built. Inferential cut-off scores were estimated using a non-parametric technique and equivalent scores (ES) were computed. Correlation analysis showed a good significant correlation between adjusted ECAS total scores with adjusted MoCA total scores (r rho  = 0.669, p study provided normative data for the ECAS in an Italian population useful for both clinical and research purposes.

  10. Are secrets of the universe just about to be revealed? Scots scientists search for "God's particle"

    CERN Multimedia

    Morgan, James

    2007-01-01

    "The invisible force which explains the nature of life, the universe and everything was first predicted by an Edinburgh scientist. Now, a team of Glasgow University physicists are prepring to discover if he was right. (2,5 pages)

  11. The platypus in Edinburgh: Robert Jameson, Robert Knox and the place of the Ornithorhynchus in nature, 1821-24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Bill

    2016-10-01

    The duck-billed platypus, or Ornithorhynchus, was the subject of an intense debate among natural historians in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Its paradoxical mixture of mammalian, avian and reptilian characteristics made it something of a taxonomic conundrum. In the early 1820s Robert Jameson (1774-1854), the professor of natural history at the University of Edinburgh and the curator of the University's natural history museum, was able to acquire three valuable specimens of this species. He passed one of these on to the anatomist Robert Knox (1791-1862), who dissected the animal and presented his results in a series of papers to the Wernerian Natural History Society, which later published them in its Memoirs. This paper takes Jameson's platypus as a case study on how natural history specimens were used to create and contest knowledge of the natural world in the early nineteenth century, at a time when interpretations of the relationships between animal taxa were in a state of flux. It shows how Jameson used his possession of this interesting specimen to provide a valuable opportunity for his protégé Knox while also helping to consolidate his own position as a key figure in early nineteenth-century natural history.

  12. Psychometric evaluation of the Mainland Chinese version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuqiong; Guo, Xiujing; Lau, Ying; Chan, Kin Sin; Yin, Lei; Chen, Jing

    2009-06-01

    The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) has been validated in many countries, but not in Mainland China. This study investigated the reliability and validity of the Mainland Chinese version of the EPDS. A three-stage design was used for this study. Stage I consisted of a multi-stepped process of forward and backward translation, using a panel of six experts to test content validity. Stage II established the psychometric properties of the EPDS by examining the convergent, discriminant and construct validity, internal consistency and stability of the scale. Stage III established its sensitivity, specificity and the optimal cutoff score of the EPDS according the DSM-IV-TR criteria using the Structured Clinical Interview. Three regional public hospitals in Chengdu. A convenience sample was composed of 312 and 451 pregnant women at 28-36 weeks' gestation. Translation and back-translation of the original English instrument and content validation by an expert panel. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was carried out to evaluate the global functioning of the scale. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) and standard SF-12 Health Survey (SF-12) were used to investigate the convergent, discriminant and construct validity. The Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient, split-half reliability and test-retest reliability were used to examine the internal consistency and stability of the scale. The translation process was rigorously conducted to ensure that equivalence was established. Content validity was confirmed by a satisfactory level of agreement with a content validity index (CVI) of 0.93. The area under curve (AUC) was 85.6% and the logistic estimate for the threshold score was 9.5 (sensitivity, 80.0%; specificity, 83.03%) for clinical depression. Convergent and construct validity was supported and discriminant validity suggested that the EPDS successfully discriminated among the non-depressed, mildly and clinically

  13. Geomagnetism Data Portal: a new service from the World Data Centre, Edinburgh

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, Ewan; Nkisi-Orji, Ikechukwu; Reay, Sarah; Macmillan, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Since 2007, the World Data Centre (WDC) for Geomagnetism in Edinburgh has made geomagnetic observatory datasets available via its “Geomagnetic Data Master Catalogue” website. This website is widely used by scientists looking for definitive geomagnetic observatory data, and has served over 1 million requests for data since first opening. Current data holdings span 150 years and 350 observatories. The original website, based on work at the Danish Meteorological Institute, provided a simple c...

  14. Securing Australia – for SIVs, from SIEVs, via Edinburgh Gardens NYE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pete Chambers

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Edinburgh Gardens is the crown jewel of Fitzroy North, one of inner northern Melbourne’s most gentrified suburbs. In 2009, Christian Lander, author of Stuff White People Like, dubbed Fitzroy North Melbourne’s whitest suburb. In January 2015, the median house price hit $1,050,000, a far cry from Chopper Reid’s stomping ground and the setting of precarious 70s student lives in Monkey Grip.

  15. The 24th annual meeting of the European Tissue Repair Society (ETRS) in Edinburgh, Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Tanya J; Lippens, Evi

    2014-01-01

    From the 10th to 12th of September 2014, in the midst of the Scottish Independence debate, the European Tissue Repair Society descended on Edinburgh for their 24th Annual Meeting. In the beautiful and historic setting of the Royal College of Surgeons of Scotland, Professors David Thomas (Chair), Phil Stephens, Chris Lloyd, and their teams from Cardiff hosted an educational and inspiring program. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  16. Flood-inundation maps for the Driftwood River and Sugar Creek near Edinburgh, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.; Kim, Moon H.; Menke, Chad D.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 11.2 mile reach of the Driftwood River and a 5.2 mile reach of Sugar Creek, both near Edinburgh, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Camp Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center, Edinburgh, Indiana. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 03363000 Driftwood River near Edinburgh, Ind. Current conditions at the USGS streamgage in Indiana may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/current/?type=flow. In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/. The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often collocated at USGS streamgages. That forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at the USGS streamgage 03363000 Driftwood River near Edinburgh, Ind. The hydraulic model was then used to determine elevations throughout the study reaches for nine water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-ft intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to nearly the highest recorded water level at the USGS streamgage 03363000 Driftwood River near Edinburgh, Ind. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geospatial digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to

  17. A qualitative study of the acceptability of routine screening of postnatal women using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Judy; Blake, Fiona; Garcia, Jo

    2003-08-01

    Screening for postnatal depression using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) has been widely recommended and implemented in primary care, although little is known about how acceptable it is to women. To explore the acceptability to women of postnatal screening by health visitors with the EPDS. Qualitative interview study. Postnatal patients from 22 general practices within the area of Oxford City Primary Care Group. Thirty-nine postnatal women from a purposive sample were interviewed, chosen on the basis of different general practices, EPDS results at eight weeks and eight months postnatal, and whether 'listening visits' were received. The interviews were analysed using the constant comparative method. Just over half of the women interviewed found screening with the EPDS less than acceptable, whatever their postnatal emotional health. The main themes identified were problems with the process of screening and, in particular, the venue, the personal intrusion of screening and stigma. The women interviewed had a clear preference for talking about how they felt, rather than filling out a questionnaire. For this sample, routine screening with the EPDS was less than acceptable for the majority of women. This is of concern, as universal screening with the EPDS for the detection of postnatal depression is already recommended and widespread in primary care.

  18. Examining Changes in Radioxenon Isotope Activity Ratios during Subsurface Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annewandter, Robert

    2014-05-01

    volume method. The parabolic and hyperbolic problem can be solved separately by operator-splitting. The resulting system of linear equations is solved by the algebraic multigrid library SAMG, developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Algorithms and Scientific Computing, Germany. CSMP++ is developed at Montan University of Leoben, ETH Zuerich, Imperial College London and Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh. This study examines barometric pumping-driven subsurface transport of Xe-135, Xe-133m, Xe-133, Xe-131m including I-131, I-133 and I-135 on arrival times and isotopic activity ratios. This work was funded by the CTBTO Research Award for Young Scientist and Engineers (2013).

  19. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from Photon08 Selected papers from Photon08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Allan D.; Harvey, Andrew; Jones, Julian C.

    2009-05-01

    Photon08 was the fifth in a biennial series of events that began in 2000 and has grown to become the largest optics research meeting in the UK. Two of the co-located constituent conferences of Photon08 were generated by the Institute of Physics. These were the Optics and Photonics Division conference plus QEP-18 organised by the Quantum Electronics and Photonics Group. In addition, Photon08 contained a major exhibition and an Industry Technology Programme. Photon08 was organised by the UK Consortium for Photonics and Optics (UKCPO), whose members comprise all organisations that represent the UK optics community, whether learned societies, professional institutions, trade associations, or regional special interest groups. In hosting the Photon series, it is the objective of the UKCPO to provide a single forum for UK optics. Photon08 was held at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, 26-29 August 2008, and was attended by around 500 people. The international representation was very impressive and the range of topics was mapped onto a wide audience, which embraced every aspect of photonics from quantum information processing to biomedical imaging and technology transfer into the commercial domain. The purpose of this special issue is to present a characteristic selection of the research reported at Photon08. On behalf of the conference, we are very grateful to the editors of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics for the opportunity to provide this archival record. The majority of the papers in this special issue follow the theme of measurement and instrumentation. This reflects one of the traditional strengths of the UK community that spans the interests of the Optical Group, the Optics and Photonics Division and the Instrument Science and Technology Group of the Institute of Physics, and the Fringe Analysis Special Interest Group. The other papers illustrate other UK strengths in quantum processing and nonlinear optics. There can be few areas of physics so diverse

  20. a New Design for Diamond Window Equipped Paris-Edinburgh — First Tests and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchard, M.; Glasmacher, U. A.; Dedera, S.; Trautmann, C.

    2012-12-01

    High pressure cells of the Paris-Edinburgh type are important tools for experimental high pressure studies in material science. Although these cells were originally developed for use in neutron diffraction, today they are also applied in alternative experimental high pressure fields. Their main advantages are their small construction size, limited weight and the relative high reachable pressures with a maximized sample volume. The small construction size also results in very good cost efficiency. The major drawback of these cells is that due to their simple squeezer geometry pressure extrapolations are nearly impossible and, hence, the use of internal standard is mandatory. Consequently, the normal use of Paris-Edinburgh cells is mostly limited to experiments with neutron or synchrotron radiation, during which pressure and temperature are determined by using an internal diffraction standard. To overcome this problem, tone may combine the advantages of diamond anvil cells with those of Paris-Edinburgh-cells by integrating diamond windows into the upper and / or the lower anvil. With such a cell it is possible to retrieve pressure and / or temperature data by measuring the shift of Raman bands or fluorescence lines by spectroscopic methods. Several attempts have been made to build such a cell ([1] and Klotz pers. communication) using different window materials. Until now no final setup has been published. We present a new Paris-Edinburgh cell design especially constructed for use within high energy relativistic heavy ion radiation experiments. This design uses conventional diamond anvils as spectroscopic windows in conjunction with specially designed hardened steel anvils. We have performed first feasibility studies up to 2.5 GPa with a standard Raman spectrometer using a special adapted Raman glass fiber probe. We present results of several mechanical test runs and one experiment with relativistic heavy ion radiation at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum f

  1. Highlights from the Faraday Discussion on New Directions in Porous Crystalline Materials, Edinburgh, UK, June 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addicoat, Matthew A; Bennett, Thomas D; Stassen, Ivo

    2017-09-28

    A lively discussion on new directions in porous crystalline materials took place in June 2017, with the beautiful city of Edinburgh as a backdrop, in the context of the unique Faraday Discussions format. Here, 5 minute presentations were given on papers which had been submitted in advance of the conference, with copious time allocated for in-depth discussion of the work presented. Prof. Mircea Dincă (MIT), chair of the scientific committee, opened the conference by welcoming the many different nationalities attending, and outlining the format of discussions.

  2. university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Universities occupy a special place in the city’s life, the place where centuries-old traditions of the past meet the future. Universities keep their ancestral roots stretching back into the Middle Ages. University rooms and laboratories are the places where the future of science and society is built and discussed.The oldest Siberian University located in Tomsk was included in the City Charter as a city-forming enterprise. Other Siberian cities have not yet come to such deep comprehension of the role of universities. But who can doubt the significance and beneficence of this role?A complex and debatable process of reformation of the Russian higher education has been going on for several decades. Many things are perceived painfully. Irkutsk has been a student city for a long time and ranked second in the percentage of students among citizens. But recently we have lost Irkutsk High Military Aviation Engineering School, nearly lost the MIA High School. Pedagogical University has lost its status of university, and then its independence. Linguistic University has turned into a branch of Moscow University…Besides, external threats still exist and even grow. The lands and the buildings of universities are of keen interest among big businessmen, speculators and developers… Isn’t it the reason why the ideas to evacuate universities to suburban campuses arise increasingly frequently?What is the impact of dislocation of universities out of the city historical center? Does it make the city poorer and older? Or safer and more manageable? As usual, we tried to show the challenge and diversity of the main topic of the issue.

  3. Redefining the Poet as Healer: Valerie Gillies's Collaborative Role in the Edinburgh Marie Curie Hospice Quiet Room Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the poetic contribution of Valerie Gillies, Edinburgh Makar (or poet of the city) from 2005-2008, to the Edinburgh Marie Curie Hospice Quiet Room, a new contemplation space for patients, families, and staff. In collaboration with others, Gillies created a transitional space for the Quiet Room, centered on the display of her sonnet, "A Place Apart." This space functions to comfort visitors to the Quiet Room by relocating them in their surroundings and offering the solace provided by nature and history. With this project, her first as Edinburgh Makar, Gillies redefines the role of the poet as healer and advocates for newer forms of palliative care that focus on patients' spiritual and emotional, as well as physical, wellbeing.

  4. (AJST) TABU SEARCH HEURISTIC FOR UNIVERSITY COURSE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applications of Artificial Intelligence and Expert. Systems, Edinburgh. 4. Daskalaki S., Birbas T., Housos E., (2004), An Integer. Programming formulation for a case study in. University timetabling, European Journal of. Operational Research, Vol. 153, pp. 117-135. 5. ElMohamed M., Fox G. (1998), A Comparison of.

  5. Gait in children with cerebral palsy : observer reliability of Physician Rating Scale and Edinburgh Visual Gait Analysis Interval Testing scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maathuis, KGB; van der Schans, CP; van Iperen, A; Rietman, HS; Geertzen, JHB

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the inter- and intra-observer reliability of the Physician Rating Scale (PRS) and the Edinburgh Visual Gait Analysis Interval Testing (GAIT) scale for use in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Both assessment scales are quantitative observational scales, evaluating

  6. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  7. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, the Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  8. Internet remote control interface for a multipurpose robotic arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Dunnigan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an Internet remote control interface for a MITSUBISHI PA10-6CE manipulator established for the purpose of the ROBOT museum exhibition during spring and summer 2004. The robotic manipulator is a part of the Intelligent Robotic Systems Laboratory at Heriot ? Watt University, which has been established to work on dynamic and kinematic aspects of manipulator control in the presence of environmental disturbances. The laboratory has been enriched by a simple vision system consisting of three web-cameras to broadcast the live images of the robots over the Internet. The Interface comprises of the TCP/IP server providing command parsing and execution using the open controller architecture of the manipulator and a client Java applet web-site providing a simple robot control interface.

  9. Complex Needs or Simplistic Approaches? Homelessness Services and People with Complex Needs in Edinburgh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Macias Balda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This research addresses how homelessness services from the statutory and voluntary sector are working for people with complex needs in the City of Edinburgh. Using a qualitative approach, it analyses the service providers’ perspectives on the concept, challenges and what works when dealing with this group of people. It also explores the opinions of a sample of service users, categorised as having complex needs, regarding the accommodation and support they are receiving. After analysing the data, it is argued that homelessness agencies do not have an appropriate cognitive nor institutional framework that facilitates an effective approach to work with people with complex needs. The lack of a sophisticated understanding that recognises the relational difficulties of individuals and the presence of structural, organisational, professional and interpersonal barriers hinder the development of positive long-term relationships which is considered as the key factor of change. For this reason, it is recommended to address a set of factors that go beyond simplistic and linear approaches and move towards complex responses in order to tackle homelessness from a broader perspective and, ultimately, achieve social inclusion.

  10. Factor structure of the Japanese version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in the postpartum period.

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    Chika Kubota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS is a widely used screening tool for postpartum depression (PPD. Although the reliability and validity of EPDS in Japanese has been confirmed and the prevalence of PPD is found to be about the same as Western countries, the factor structure of the Japanese version of EPDS has not been elucidated yet. METHODS: 690 Japanese mothers completed all items of the EPDS at 1 month postpartum. We divided them randomly into two sample sets. The first sample set (n = 345 was used for exploratory factor analysis, and the second sample set was used (n = 345 for confirmatory factor analysis. RESULTS: The result of exploratory factor analysis indicated a three-factor model consisting of anxiety, depression and anhedonia. The results of confirmatory factor analysis suggested that the anxiety and anhedonia factors existed for EPDS in a sample of Japanese women at 1 month postpartum. The depression factor varies by the models of acceptable fit. CONCLUSIONS: We examined EPDS scores. As a result, "anxiety" and "anhedonia" exist for EPDS among postpartum women in Japan as already reported in Western countries. Cross-cultural research is needed for future research.

  11. Preliminary validation of the Portuguese Edinburgh Handedness Inventory in an adult sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espírito-Santo, Helena; Pires, Catarina Freitas; Garcia, Inês Queiroz; Daniel, Fernanda; Silva, Alexandre Gomes da; Fazio, Rachel L

    2017-01-01

    The Edinburgh Handedness Inventory (EHI) is persistently the most used inventory to evaluate handedness, being neuropsychological investigation and clinical practice. Despite this, there is no information on how this instrument functions in a Portuguese population. The objective of this study was therefore to examine the sociodemographic influences on handedness and establish psychometric properties of the EHI in a Portuguese sample. The sample consisted of 342 adults (157 men and 185 women), assessed with a battery of neuropsychological tests. The mean EHI Laterality Quotient was 63.52 (SD = 38.00). A much high percentage of ambiguous-handedness compared to left-handedness was detected. An inconsistency was found between the preference for formal education activities (writing-drawing-using scissors) and the remaining EHI activities. From sociodemographic variables, only age, area, and regions of residence showed significant influence on EHI scores. The reliability and temporal reliability of EHI were adequate. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated a one-factor model (χ2/df = 2.141; TLI = 0.972; CFI = 0.979; RMSEA = 0.058). The inconsistency between formal education and nonformal activities could be an indicator of social pressure. The present data give support for the notion that handedness measured by EHI is potentially sensitive to sociodemographic and cultural influences.

  12. The dimensionality of the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory: An analysis with models of the item response theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büsch, Dirk; Hagemann, Norbert; Bender, Nils

    2010-11-01

    Handedness is frequently measured with sum scores or quotients taken from laterality questionnaires like the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory (EHI). In classical test theory such data cannot be used to confirm either the unidimensionality (i.e., quantitative differentiation with the poles left-handed and right-handed) or multidimensionality (i.e., typological differentiation between left-, right-, and mixed-handers) of this personal characteristic. This study uses item response theory models to test the construct validity of the EHI on an item level in order to gather empirical support for the differentiation of handedness as well as the appropriateness of the items and the response format. The EHI was given to 540 participants (303 male and 237 female) aged 17-37 years. Results of mixed-Rasch analyses revealed that the best model was a two-class solution; that is, left- and right-handers (types) with quantitative differences between persons. Hence, unlike earlier model tests, this rejects both the unidimensionality of the handedness construct and the need to consider so-called mixed-handers. It is proposed that mixed-Rasch analyses should be applied more frequently to test the construct validity of other as well as more extensive handedness questionnaires.

  13. The principles and in vivo performance of the Edinburgh pivoted aerofoil-disc prosthetic heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, N; Turina, M; Wade, J D; Wheatley, D J

    1977-01-01

    Prototypes of the Edinburgh prosthetic heart valve, known from previous experiments in vitro to promote exceptionally smooth and undisturbed forward flow, have been shown here in canine experiments to possess hemodynamic characteristics not inferior to those of the Bjork-Shiley valve (a present standard of excellence). In addition, we report a low incidence of valve thrombus deposition among calves in which this prototype valve, fabricated from the conventional materials, Delrin and stainless steel, has been implanted in the tricuspid site for up to 100 days without use of anticoagulants. This suggests that the design of the valve is such as to render it of low thrombogenicity. The new valve is designed for fabrication throughout in vitreous or pyro-coated carbon, materials of very high inherent athrombogenicity. It appears from the results discussed here that the developed form of the prosthesis, composed wholly of these athrombogenic materials, is likely to have both acceptable hemodynamic characteristics and an exceptionally low tendency to form thrombus. The introduction of such valves promises to be very advantageous and the results given here appear to warrant their development as the next stage of this program.

  14. Using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale for women and men-some cautionary thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthey, Stephen; Agostini, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the study was to critically consider some of the possible limitations in the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS), given that great emphasis is put on the results of this measure within both clinical and research fields. Using findings and discussion points from other studies, as well as from a critical analysis of issues by the authors based upon their clinical and research experience, possible limitations with the scale in nine areas are discussed. Possible limitations include the following: (1) ambiguous items, (2) exclusion of certain types of distress, (3) scoring difficulties, (4) low positive predictive value, (5) frequent use of incorrect cut-off scores, (6) a vast array of validated cut-off scores, (7) validation against a questionable gold-standard, (8) limited anxiety detection and of depressive symptoms in men, and (9) many screen positive women only have transient distress. While the EDS has unquestionably been an extremely valuable instrument in aiding in the recognition of the importance of perinatal mental health, users of the scale should be aware that it, like other measures, has limitations. We discuss possible strategies to overcome these limitations and describe a recent scale that has been developed to surmount these shortcomings more effectively.

  15. Anxious and depressive components of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in maternal postpartum psychological problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrozzi, Angela; Gagliardi, Luigi

    2013-07-01

    The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is a widely used instrument for screening for postpartum depression, but it might also detect anxiety symptoms. To investigate the factor structure of the EPDS administered immediately after delivery and to understand which factors predict a high EPDS score 3 months later. A cohort of 594 Italian mothers delivering a healthy baby at Versilia Hospital completed the EPDS at two points in time: 2 days after delivery (T0) and 3 months later (T1) by telephone interview. EPDS scores were higher at T0 than at T1. Overall, 15.7% of women at 2 days postpartum and 7.6% at 3 months later reported a score >9. The factor analysis of EPDS at T0 indicated a three-factor structure: "depression" (items 7-10), "anxiety" (items 3-6) and "anhedonia" (items 1-2). Anxious symptoms were quantitatively more important than depressive ones (mean 3.9 vs. 1.2) but tended to spontaneously ameliorate at T1, whereas total EPDS score at T1 was better predicted by depressive symptoms at T0 (discriminative ability 0.75 vs. 0.68). This study suggests that EPDS subscales immediately after delivery help understand the spectrum of maternal postpartum psychological problems. Anxious symptoms immediately after delivery are frequent but transient, linked probably to maternity blues or atypical depression, whereas the presence of depressive symptomatology at T0 suggests higher risk of later depressive disorders.

  16. A proposal for a new Brazilian six-item version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maicon Rodrigues Albuquerque

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Factor analysis of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS could result in a shorter and easier to handle screening tool. Therefore, the aim of this study was to check and compare the metrics of two different 6-item EPDS subscales. Methods: We administered the EPDS to a total of 3,891 women who had given birth between 1 and 3 months previously. We conducted confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses and plotted receiver-operating characteristics (ROC curves to, respectively, determine construct validity, scale items' fit to the data, and ideal cutoff scores for the short versions. Results: A previously defined 6-item scale did not exhibit construct validity for our sample. Nevertheless, we used exploratory factor analysis to derive a new 6-item scale with very good construct validity. The area under the ROC curve of the new 6-item scale was 0.986 and the ideal cutoff score was ≥ 6. Conclusions: The new 6-item scale has adequate psychometric properties and similar ROC curve values to the10-item version and offers a means of reducing the cost and time taken to administer the instrument.

  17. X-ray imaging in the large volume Paris-Edinburgh press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrillat, Jean-Philippe

    2013-06-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography is a non-destructive 3D imaging/microanalysis technique selective to a wide range of properties such as density, chemical composition, chemical states, structure, and crystallographic perfection; with extremely high sensitivity and spatial resolution. We describe a new device, based on the V7 Paris-Edinburgh press, to extend this technique to high-pressure high-temperature conditions. It consists of two opposed conical anvils to pressurize the sample encased in an X-ray transparent boron epoxy gasket. Both anvils can rotate, with no limitation in the rotating angles, through two sets of gear reducer and thrust bearings located at the end of each anvil. The accurate and simultaneous rotation of the top and bottom anvils is monitored by stepper motors and encoders. This enables the collection of data at small angular steps over 180° rotation required for a complete 3D tomographic reconstruction. The potentials of this new equipment will be illustrated on two examples: (1) the determination of the volumetric properties of materials by absorption contrast tomography, and (2) the characterisation of ill-ordered materials under HP-HT by X-ray diffraction tomography.

  18. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by St George`s School for Girls in Edinburgh

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    St George`s School for Girls is in the heart of Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland and home to Peter Higgs. It is an all-through school, with students as young as two and as old as eighteen. St George`s is a flexible and open learning community where students grow and develop at their own pace and in their own direction.

  19. The Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen in a Chinese Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shan; Ji, Ying; Li, Chengyu; He, Ji; Liu, Xiaolu; Fan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    The existing screening batteries assessing multiple neuropsychological functions are not specific to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and are limited to their physical dysfunctions, whereas category cognitive tests are too time-consuming to assess all the domains. The Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen (ECAS) was recently developed as a fast and easy cognitive screening tool specifically designed for patients. The purpose of the study was to validate the effectiveness of the Chinese version in Chinese ALS populations. Eighty-four ALS patients and 84 age-, gender- and education-matched healthy controls were included in this cross-sectional study. All the participants took the ECAS, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB). Primary caregivers of patients were interviewed for behavioural and psychiatric changes. Significant differences were noted in language (p = 0.01), fluency, executive function, ALS-specific functions, and ECAS total score (pALS patients and controls. The cut-off value of the total ECAS score was 81.92. Cognitive impairment was observed in 35.71% of patients, and 27.38% exhibited behavioural abnormalities. The ECAS total score had a medium correlation with education year. Memory was more easily impaired in the lower education group, whereas verbal fluency and language function tended to be preserved in the higher education group. The average time of ECAS was only 18 minutes. The Chinese version of the ECAS is the first screening battery assessing multiple neuropsychological functions specially designed for the ALS population in China, which provides an effective and rapid tool to screen cognitive and behavioural impairments.

  20. The Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen in a Chinese Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Ye

    Full Text Available The existing screening batteries assessing multiple neuropsychological functions are not specific to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS patients and are limited to their physical dysfunctions, whereas category cognitive tests are too time-consuming to assess all the domains. The Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen (ECAS was recently developed as a fast and easy cognitive screening tool specifically designed for patients. The purpose of the study was to validate the effectiveness of the Chinese version in Chinese ALS populations.Eighty-four ALS patients and 84 age-, gender- and education-matched healthy controls were included in this cross-sectional study. All the participants took the ECAS, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB. Primary caregivers of patients were interviewed for behavioural and psychiatric changes.Significant differences were noted in language (p = 0.01, fluency, executive function, ALS-specific functions, and ECAS total score (p<0.01 between ALS patients and controls. The cut-off value of the total ECAS score was 81.92. Cognitive impairment was observed in 35.71% of patients, and 27.38% exhibited behavioural abnormalities. The ECAS total score had a medium correlation with education year. Memory was more easily impaired in the lower education group, whereas verbal fluency and language function tended to be preserved in the higher education group. The average time of ECAS was only 18 minutes.The Chinese version of the ECAS is the first screening battery assessing multiple neuropsychological functions specially designed for the ALS population in China, which provides an effective and rapid tool to screen cognitive and behavioural impairments.

  1. Patterns of recreational drug use at dance events in Edinburgh, Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, S C; James, C; Gregory, D; Dingle, H; Cadger, M

    2001-07-01

    To describe the patterns of drug use at dance (rave) events in terms of prevalence, frequency, type of drugs used, patterns of use, access and risk-associated behaviours. Self-selecting participant-completed survey. Three dance events in Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. One hundred and twenty-two drug users (57% males, 43% females), 90% of whom were in employment or education, with an age range of 16-47, 80% between 18 and 23 years. Participants who answered 'yes' to the question 'Have you used drugs for dance events in the past year' reported (i) the prevalence, types and frequency of drugs used; (ii) prevalence and contents of mixing drugs; (iii) accessing drugs; and (iv) engagement with drug-associated risk behaviours. Over 80% of the participants had used ecstasy and amphetamine, over 30% cocaine and LSD; over 10% nitrites, psilocybin and ketamine and less than 5% had used crack or tranquillizers. Participants reported regular consumption of ecstasy and amphetamine (e.g. 35% used ecstasy and 25% amphetamine on a weekly basis) often taken in combination, with the occasional use of cocaine, LSD, ketamine and psilocybin. Poly- and mixing-drug behaviours were significantly more likely than monodrug usage. Drugs were accessed through friends than from any other source. Eighty-five per cent reported mixing drugs and/or alcohol, 35% driving on drugs, 36% having a bad experience on drugs; 30% unprotected sex; and 0.9% injecting drugs. Women in the sample reported higher consumption than men. Dance-drug use has a characteristic pattern that has implications for health promotion and criminal policy.

  2. Factorial structure and measurement invariance of the Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh across gender and age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fonseca-Pedrero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio instrumental fue examinar la estructura factorial y la invarianza de medición a través del sexo y la edad del Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh (BITE en una muestra comunitaria de adolescentes no clínicos. La muestra la formaron 1.794 adolescentes (50,2% varones, con una edad medida de 14,7 años (DT = 1,72. Los resultados mostraron que el BITE es un instrumento de medida que presenta adecuadas propiedades psicométricas. El nivel de consistencia interna para la subescala Síntomas fue 0,95, mientras que para la subescala de Gravedad fue de 0,70. El estudio de la dimensionalidad del BITE mediante análisis factorial exploratorio mostró una solución esencialmente unidimensional. Los índices de bondad de ajuste para el modelo unidimensional sometido a prueba en el análisis factorial confirmatorio fueron adecuados. Más aún, esta estructura dimensional del BITE se mostró invariante en función del género y la edad. Se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas en función del género y la edad cuando se compararon las medias latentes. Futuros estudios deberían incorporar los avances relacionados con la evaluación psicológica y educativa como la construcción de tests adaptativos computerizados, así como examinar la invarianza de medición de la sintomatología bulímica a través de las culturas.

  3. Cutaneous Mycobacterium chelonae infection in Edinburgh and the Lothians, South-East Scotland, U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Lang, V E; Sergeant, A; Sinclair, C G; Laurenson, I F; Biswas, A; Tidman, M J; Doherty, V R; Kavanagh, G M; Holme, S A

    2014-07-01

    We reviewed all cases of Mycobacterium chelonae infection seen in our department between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2012. To review the epidemiology, clinical features and management of cutaneous M. chelonae in South-East Scotland, and to compare prevalence data with the rest of Scotland. The Scottish Mycobacteria Reference Laboratory database was searched for all cases of cutaneous mycobacterial infections. One hundred and thirty-four cases of cutaneous mycobacterial infection were recorded. Sixty-three were tuberculous; of the remaining 71, M. chelonae was the most common nontuberculous organism (27 cases). National Health Service (NHS) Lothian Health Board was the area with highest incidence in the Scotland (12 cases). Three main groups of patients in the NHS Lothian Health Board contracted M. chelonae: immunosuppressed patients (n = 6); those who had undergone tattooing (n = 4); and others (n = 2). One case is, we believe, the first report of M. chelonae cutaneous infection associated with topical corticosteroid immunosuppression. The majority of patients were treated with clarithromycin monotherapy. The most prevalent nontuberculous cutaneous mycobacterial organism in Scotland is M. chelonae. The prevalence of M. chelonae in Edinburgh and the Lothians compared with the rest of Scotland is disproportionately high, possibly owing to increased local awareness and established facilities for mycobacterial studies. Immunosuppression with prednisolone appears to be a major risk factor. The first outbreak of tattoo-related M. chelonae infection in the U.K. has been reported. Clinicians should be aware of mycobacterial cutaneous infection and ensure that diagnostic skin samples are cultured at the optimal temperatures. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  4. Adaptation into Spanish of the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (WEMWBS) and preliminary validation in a student sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, María Andrée; Gabilondo, Andrea; Codony, Miquel; García-Forero, Carlos; Vilagut, Gemma; Castellví, Pere; Ferrer, Montse; Alonso, Jordi

    2013-06-01

    There is growing interest in the assessment of positive mental health as a global indicator of societal wealth. We aimed to adapt the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being scale (WEMWBS) into Spanish and to perform a preliminary evaluation of its metric properties. Forward and back-translations and cognitive debriefing were carried out. University students (n = 148) were recruited to evaluate the final Spanish version, following the UK original study. Distribution of WEMWBS responses, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and factor structure were assessed. Only 4 (out of 14) items of the initial Spanish version were not rated as conceptually and linguistically equivalent to the original and were modified. The final version was clear and comprehensible. Global score's Cronbach's alpha (0.90), item-total score correlations (0.44-0.76), and test-retest ICC (0.84) were all satisfactory. Moderate to high correlations (r = 0.45-0.70) were observed between the WEMWBS and validity scales. Preliminary confirmatory factor analyses did not support the hypothesis of a single factor. A conceptually equivalent Spanish version of the WEMWBS was obtained with high internal consistency, good test-retest reliability, and similar construct validity as the original instrument. Further validity and factorial studies are necessary in larger and more heterogeneous samples.

  5. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: translation and validation for a Greek sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogevinas Manolis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS is an important screening instrument that is used routinely with mothers during the postpartum period for early identification of postnatal depression. The purpose of this study was to validate the Greek version of EPDS along with sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. Methods 120 mothers within 12 weeks postpartum were recruited from the perinatal care registers of the Maternity Departments of 4 Hospitals of Heraklion municipality, Greece. EPDS and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II surveys were administered in random order to the mothers. Each mother was diagnosed with depression according to the validated Greek version of BDI-II. The psychometric measurements that were performed included: two independent samples t-tests, One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, reliability coefficients, Explanatory factor analysis using a Varimax rotation and Principal Components Method. Confirmatory analysis -known as structural equation modelling- of principal components was conducted by LISREL (Linear Structural Relations. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was carried out to evaluate the global functioning of the scale. Results 8 (6.7% of the mothers were diagnosed with major postnatal depression, 14 (11.7% with moderate and 38 (31.7% with mild depression on the basis of BDI-II scores. The internal consistency of the EPDS Greek version -using Chronbach's alpha coefficient- was found 0.804 and that of Guttman split-half coefficient 0.742. Our findings confirm the multidimensionality of EPDS, demonstrating a two-factor structure which contained subscales reflecting depressive symptoms and anxiety. The Confirmatory Factor analysis demonstrated that the two factor model offered a very good fit to our data. The area under ROC curve AUC was found 0.7470 and the logistic estimate for the threshold score of 8/9 fitted the model sensitivity at 76.7% and model specificity at 68

  6. The Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (WEMWBS: development and UK validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weich Scott

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing international interest in the concept of mental well-being and its contribution to all aspects of human life. Demand for instruments to monitor mental well-being at a population level and evaluate mental health promotion initiatives is growing. This article describes the development and validation of a new scale, comprised only of positively worded items relating to different aspects of positive mental health: the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (WEMWBS. Methods WEMWBS was developed by an expert panel drawing on current academic literature, qualitative research with focus groups, and psychometric testing of an existing scale. It was validated on a student and representative population sample. Content validity was assessed by reviewing the frequency of complete responses and the distribution of responses to each item. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the hypothesis that the scale measured a single construct. Internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Criterion validity was explored in terms of correlations between WEMWBS and other scales and by testing whether the scale discriminated between population groups in line with pre-specified hypotheses. Test-retest reliability was assessed at one week using intra-class correlation coefficients. Susceptibility to bias was measured using the Balanced Inventory of Desired Responding. Results WEMWBS showed good content validity. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the single factor hypothesis. A Cronbach's alpha score of 0.89 (student sample and 0.91 (population sample suggests some item redundancy in the scale. WEMWBS showed high correlations with other mental health and well-being scales and lower correlations with scales measuring overall health. Its distribution was near normal and the scale did not show ceiling effects in a population sample. It discriminated between population groups in a way that is largely consistent

  7. �Mission and Power� � The relevance of the Edinburgh 2010 discussion in the theological engagement with violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelius J.P. Niemandt

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The ecumenical conference in Edinburgh in 2010 identified the issue of �Mission and Power� as one of the pressing mission themes for our generation. Christian mission has always been associated with power. The promise of the risen Christ was that his followers would receive power when the Holy Spirit came on them. History, unfortunately, recounts how Christian mission became backed by force and violence, the very opposite of the kind of power and energy associated with the Spirit of God. At the Edinburgh 2010 conference this violence in mission was studied as expressed in churches� relations with indigenous peoples. This article engages violence theologically and ecumenically by inviting the Edinburgh 2010 discussion into the reflection on violence in the democratic South Africa, as it was presented as a contribution to a wider discussion on violence in South Africa. This is done with the following objectives in mind: (1 to better understand the interplay between violence and power against the background of a broader global and ecumenical discussion of this issue; and (2 to suggest clues for the theological reflection on violence that may help to create a powerless, spacecreating discourse that opens up thinking and contributes to healing and justice.The article concludes by building on the Edinburg 2010 foundations of mission as dialogue and proposing prophetic dialogue as a powerless discourse: �Transforming the meaning of mission means that � God�s mission calls all people to work together for healing and justice in partnerships of mutuality and respect.�

  8. The Edinburgh modification of the minimal access zygomatic osteotomy, used for the correction of zygomatic orbital hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, J N; Campbell, D F

    2017-09-01

    Zygomatic hypoplasia can be an exceedingly difficult proposition for the surgeon treating facial deformity. The classical approach would be a coronal access, which is time-consuming, leaves a long scar on the scalp that shows in patients with balding patterns, and carries the risk of permanent facial weakness. The Edinburgh technique presents a minimal access approach to the zygomatic osteotomy. This is performed through local incisions and a bone cut made using hand-held diamond-coated wire that mobilizes the entire zygoma. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The price of a drink: levels of consumption and price paid per unit of alcohol by Edinburgh's ill drinkers with a comparison to wider alcohol sales in Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Heather; Gill, Jan; Chick, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Aim To compare alcohol purchasing and consumption by ill drinkers in Edinburgh with wider alcohol sales in Scotland.\\ud \\ud Design Cross-sectional.\\ud \\ud Setting Two hospitals in Edinburgh in 2008/09.\\ud \\ud Participants A total of 377 patients with serious alcohol problems; two-thirds were in-patients with medical, surgical or psychiatric problems due to alcohol; one-third were out-patients.\\ud \\ud Measurements Last week's or typical weekly consumption of alcohol: type, brand, units (1 UK u...

  10. Dimensionality and scale properties of the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Cock, Evi S A; Emons, Wilco H M; Nefs, Giesje

    2011-01-01

    Scale (EDS) is a widely used method for screening depression. However, there is still debate about the dimensionality of the test. Furthermore, the EDS was originally developed to screen for depression in postpartum women. Empirical evidence that the EDS has comparable measurement properties in both......BACKGROUND: Depression is a common complication in type 2 diabetes (DM2), affecting 10-30% of patients. Since depression is underrecognized and undertreated, it is important that reliable and validated depression screening tools are available for use in patients with DM2. The Edinburgh Depression...... to laugh or enjoy) and sleeping problems were the most informative indicators for being able to differentiate between the diagnostic groups of mild and severe depression. CONCLUSIONS: The EDS constitutes a sound scale for measuring an attribute of general depression. Persons can be reliably measured using...

  11. Validity of the Edinburgh claudication questionnaire for diagnosis of peripheral artery disease in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita-Fernández, Salvador; Modroño-Freire, María José; Pértega-Díaz, Sonia; Herrera-Díaz, Lizbeth; Seoane-Pillado, Teresa; Paz-Solís, Adriana; Varela Modroño, José Luis

    2017-11-01

    To assess the prevalence of peripheral artery disease and the validity of clinical signs for its diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes. Setting: Health center (Mariñamansa,Orense). January 2011-January 2013. Patients with type 2 diabetes, informed consent. Age, sex, diabetes duration, body mass index, Charlson index, blood pressure, ankle-brachial index (ABI), cholesterol levels, smoking. Cardiovascular risk (UKPDS). Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire. n=323 (± 5.5% accuracy, 95% confidence). multivariate logistic regression analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and agreement were estimated. Informed consent and ethics committee approval were obtained (2010/278). Mean patient age was 71.56±12.73 years, and mean diabetes duration 12.38±9.96 years. Symptoms of intermittent claudication were reported by 26,4% of patients, ABI was normal (0.9-1.1) in 37.2% of patients, less than 0.9 in 26,5%, and higher than 1.10 in 36.2% of patients. The kappa index of agreement of peripheral artery disease according to the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire and the ankle-brachial index was 0.33). The questionnaire showed a sensitivity of 50.7% for predicting the diagnosis of peripheral artery disease (ABI 2.6%, with positive and negative predictive values of 48.6% and 83.8% respectively. One-fourth of patients with type 2 diabetes had peripheral artery disease. There was a low level of agreement between the evaluation of symptoms of intermittent claudication and the results of the ankle-brachial index. Presence or absence of symptoms of claudication did not allow for confirming or ruling out peripheral artery disease. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Predictive accuracy of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale assessment during pregnancy for the risk of developing postpartum depressive symptoms : a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J. L.; Beijers, C.; van Pampus, M. G.; Verbeek, T.; Stolk, R. P.; Milgrom, J.; Bockting, C. L. H.; Burger, H.

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate whether the 10-item Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) administered antenatally is accurate in predicting postpartum depressive symptoms, and whether a two-item EPDS has similar predictive accuracy. DesignProspective cohort study. SettingObstetric care in the

  13. Personalized Advice on Study Skills: A Computer-Based System To Help University Students and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Carol A.; And Others

    One recent goal of the British Higher Education Funding Council has been to find ways to use technology to cope with the increasing size and diversity of the student population. A development team at the University of Edinburgh (Scotland) received a grant to investigate how technology might be used to identify and help students put at risk by…

  14. Psychometric Properties and Diagnostic Accuracy of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in a Sample of Iranian Women

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    Gholam Reza Kheirabadi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS has been used as a reliable screening tool for postpartum depression in many countries. This study aimed to assess the psychometric properties and diagnostic accuracy of the EPDS in a sample of Iranian women.Methods: Using stratified sampling 262 postpartum women (2 weeks-3 months after delivery were selected from urban and rural health center in the city of Isfahan. They were interviewed using EPDS and Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS. Data were assessed using factor analysis, diagnosis analysis of receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve, Cronbach's alpha and Pearson correlation coefficient.Results: The age of then participants ranged 18-45 years (26.6±5.1. Based on a cut-off point of >13 for HDRS, 18.3% of the participants. The overall reliability (Cronbach's alpha of EPDS was 0.79. There was a significant correlation (r2=0.60, P value<0.01 between EPDS and HDRS. Two factor analysis showed that anhedonia and depression were two explanatory factors. At a cut-off point12 the sensitivity of the questionnaire was 78% (95% CI: 73%-83% and its specificity was 75% (95% CI: 72%-78%. Conclusion: The Persian version of the EPDS showed appropriate psychometric properties diagnostic accuracy index. It can be used by health system professionals for detection, assessment and treatment for mothers with post partum depression.

  15. Cohort study of the depression, anxiety, and anhedonia components of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale after delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardo, Vincenzo; Giliberti, Lara; Volpe, Francesca; Parotto, Matteo; de Luca, Federico; Straface, Gianluca

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the applicability of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) for identifying depressive symptoms following vaginal or cesarean delivery. The present observational study included consecutive Italian-speaking women who underwent vaginal or cesarean deliveries of uncomplicated singleton pregnancies at term at Policlinico Abano Terme, Abano Terme, Italy, between February 1, 2014, and May 31, 2015, who completed the EPDS 2 days after delivery. EPDS scores and the depression, anxiety, and anhedonia subscale items were compared between delivery methods to identify factors predictive of high EPDS scores. There were 950 patients included in the analysis; 694 (73.1%) and 256 (26.9%) patients underwent vaginal and cesarean deliveries, respectively. Total EPDS scores were higher among patients who had cesarean deliveries compared with vaginal deliveries (6.95±4.80 vs 6.05±4.20; P=0.007); the depression (0.53±0.72 vs 0.37±0.65; P=0.007), anxiety (1.07±0.88 vs 1.16±0.93; P=0.021), and anhedonia (0.32±0.59 vs 0.19±0.48; P=0.009) subscale scores were all higher among patients who underwent cesarean deliveries. Women who underwent cesarean deliveries demonstrated higher EPDS scores and could be at increased risk of developing early postpartum depressive symptomatology, particularly anhedonia, anxiety, and depression. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  16. The use of the edinburgh postpartum depression scale in a population of teenager pregnant women in Mexico: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sifuentes-Alvarez, Antonio; Salas-Martinez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    :Depression may occur in teenager pregnant women. The use of a validated tool for screening depression is highly recommended. The Edinburgh postnatal depression scale (EPDS) is a screening tool for depression used in women during the postnatal period and pregnancy. However, the EPDS has not been validated in teenager pregnant women. Therefore, we sought to validate a Spanish translated Mexican version of the EPDS in a population of teenager pregnant women. One hundred and twenty teenager pregnant women attending routine prenatal consultations in a public hospital in Durango City, Mexico participated in the study. All participants submitted a revised Spanish translated Mexican version of the EPDS and were examined by a psychiatrist to evaluate the presence of depression by using DSM-IV criteria. Of the 120 teenager pregnant women studied, 2 had major depression and 25 had minor depression according to the DSM-IV criteria. The optimal EPDS cut-off for screening combined major and minor depression in teenager pregnant women was 8/9. At this threshold, we found a sensitivity of 70.4%, a specificity of 84.9%, a positive predictive value of 47.6%, a negative predictive value of 91.0%, and an area under the curve of 0.81 (95% confidence interval: 0.56-1.07). The EPDS can be used for screening depression in Mexican teenager pregnant women whenever a cut-off score of 8/9 is used.

  17. Adaptation and cross-cultural validation of the Brazilian version of the Warwick-Edinburgh mental well-being scale

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    Jefferson Jovelino Amaral dos Santos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: the Warwick-Edinburgh mental well-being scale (WEMWBS was designed to assess the level of mental well-being of a population or specific groups. The scale consists of 14 items covering functional psychological aspects, as well as well-being. The final score is calculated by adding up the response of each item, ranging from 1 to 5, obtaining a result from 14 to 70 points. Methods: the procedure was developed in accordance with the protocol recommended by the World Health Organization covering translation, back translation, semantic equivalence, expert evaluation of the previous steps, pre-test and final version of the instrument. Following, the final version was applied to a sample of 122 individuals and the data were subjected to descriptive statistical analysis, factor analysis, internal consistency and correlation with other validated instruments. Results: we performed the instrument's adaptation to the Portuguese spoken in Brazil, replacing terms to approximate the language to expressions of everyday life. The final version showed similar results to those from the original version, demonstrated by factor analysis, internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha: 0.89 and positive correlation with instruments validated to the Portuguese language. Conclusion: the Brazilian version of the WEMWBS proved to be easy to use and understand, showed high internal consistency and construct validity similar to the original instrument.

  18. The relationship between lower limb symptoms and superficial and deep venous reflux on duplex ultrasonography: The Edinburgh Vein Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, A; Evans, C J; Allan, P; Lee, A J; Ruckley, C V; Fowkes, F G

    2000-11-01

    Previous work from this group has demonstrated the relationships between lower limb symptoms and the presence and severity of trunk varicose veins as seen on clinical examination to be generally weak, symptom specific, and gender dependent. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationships in the general population between lower limb symptoms and the presence of superficial or deep venous reflux. A cross-sectional study was made of an age-stratified random sample of 1566 subjects (699 men and 867 women) aged 18 to 64 selected from 12 general practices in Edinburgh, Scotland. Subjects completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding symptoms (heaviness/tension, a feeling of swelling, aching, restless legs, cramps, itching, tingling) and underwent duplex ultrasound examination of the superficial and deep venous systems of both legs. Reflux of 0.5 seconds or greater was considered pathologic. Deep venous reflux was defined as reflux in at least the popliteal vein. There was a significant positive relationship between isolated superficial reflux and the presence of heaviness/tension (P superficial reflux in men was not significantly positively associated with any symptom. Isolated deep venous reflux was not significantly related to any symptom in either leg in either sex. Combined reflux was related to a feeling of swelling (P =.018, right leg; P =.0022, left leg), cramps (P =.0049, left leg) and itching (P =.0043, left leg) in men, and aching (P =.03, right leg) and cramps (P =.026, left leg) in women. In the general population, only certain lower limb symptoms were related to the presence of reflux on duplex ultrasound scanning. The strongest relationships were observed in the left legs of men with combined superficial and deep reflux.

  19. Validation of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale among women in a high HIV prevalence area in urban Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibanda, Dixon; Mangezi, Walter; Tshimanga, Mustaf; Woelk, Godfrey; Rusakaniko, Peter; Stranix-Chibanda, Lynda; Midzi, Stanley; Maldonado, Yvonne; Shetty, Avinash K

    2010-06-01

    Despite the significant burden of common mental disorders (CMD) among women in sub Saharan Africa, data on postnatal depression (PND) is very limited, especially in settings with a high HIV prevalence. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), a widely used screening test for PND has been validated in many countries, but not in Zimbabwe. We assessed the validity of the EPDS scale among postpartum women compared with Diagnostic Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria for major depression. Six trained community counselors administered the Shona version of the EPDS to a random sample of 210 postpartum HIV-infected and uninfected women attending two primary care clinics in Chitungwiza. All women were subsequently subjected to mental status examination using DSM IV criteria for major depression by 2 psychiatrists, who were blinded to the subject's EPDS scores. Data were analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Of the 210 postpartum mothers enrolled, 64 (33%) met DSM IV criteria for depression. Using a cut-off score of 11/12 on the Shona version of the EPDS for depression, the sensitivity was 88%, and specificity was 87%, with a positive predictive value of 74%, a negative predictive value of 94%, and an area under the curve of 0.82. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the whole scale was 0.87. The Shona version of the EPDS is a reliable and valid tool to screen for PND among HIV-infected and un-infected women in Zimbabwe. Screening for PND should be integrated into routine antenatal and postnatal care in areas with high HIV prevalence.

  20. Measuring mental well-being in Norway: validation of the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (WEMWBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Otto R F; Alves, Daniele E; Knapstad, Marit; Haug, Ellen; Aarø, Leif E

    2017-05-12

    Mental well-being is an important, yet understudied, area of research, partly due to lack of appropriate population-based measures. The Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (WEMWBS) was developed to meet the needs for such a measure. This article assesses the psychometric properties of the Norwegian version of the WEMWBS, and its short-version (SWEMWBS) among a sample of primary health care patients who participated in the evaluation of Prompt Mental Health Care (PMHC), a novel Norwegian mental health care program aimed to increase access to treatment for anxiety and depression. Forward and back-translations were conducted, and 1168 patients filled out an electronic survey including the WEMWBS, and other mental health scales. The original dataset was randomly divided into a training sample (≈70%) and a validation sample (≈30%). Parallel analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were carried out to assess construct validity and precision. The final models were cross-validated in the validation sample by specifying a model with fixed parameters based on the estimates from the trainings set. Criterion validity and measurement invariance of the (S)WEMWBS were examined as well. Support was found for the single factor hypothesis in both scales, but similar to previous studies, only after a number of residuals were allowed to correlate (WEMWBS: CFI = 0.99; RMSEA = 0.06, SWEMWBS: CFI = .99; RMSEA = 0.06). Further analyses showed that the correlated residuals did not alter the meaning of the underlying construct and did not substantially affect the associations with other variables. Precision was high for both versions of the WEMWBS (>.80), and scalar measurement invariance was obtained for gender and age group. The final measurement models displayed adequate fit statistics in the validation sample as well. Correlations with other mental health scales were largely in line with expectations. No statistically significant differences were found in mean latent

  1. Early life influences on the risk of injecting drug use: case control study based on the Edinburgh Addiction Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, John; Hickman, Matthew; Jones, Hayley E; Copeland, Lorraine; McKenzie, James; De Angelis, Daniela; Kimber, Jo; Robertson, James R

    2013-04-01

    To investigate childhood influences on onset of injection drug use. Matched case-control study. Edinburgh, Scotland. A total of 432 individuals presenting at a community health facility with injection drug use and 432 age- and sex-matched non-injecting controls recruited through the same facility. Main exposures considered were family structure and experience of public care, carer substance use, physical and sexual victimization and conduct problems, all measured at personal interview. The outcome was history of adult injection drug use recorded in medical records corroborated at personal interview. Compared to two-parent families all other family structures were associated with increased risk of injection drug use, the greatest increased risk being associated with public care. Violence, criminality and financial problems in the family were also associated with increased risk, as were all types of carer substance use. The greatest increased risk was associated with markers of early conduct problems, particularly school exclusion and childhood contact with the criminal justice system. In multivariable analyses the strongest risk factors for later injecting were always having lived with a relative or family friend (not always a parent) and in care/adopted/foster home at any point [odds ratio (OR) = 2.66, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-6.92 and OR = 2.17, 95% CI: 0.91-5.17, respectively], experienced violence from parent or carer (OR = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.26, 3.38) and early evidence of conduct problems [ever excluded from school (OR = 2.73, 95% CI: 1.68, 4.45); childhood criminality (ever arrested by police pre-adult OR = 3.05, 95% CI: 1.90, 4.89, ever been in borstal/young offenders/list D school OR = 4.70, 95% CI: 2.02, 10.94)]. After adjustment for family structure and conduct problems, sexual victimization was associated weakly with injecting onset (OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 0.76-2.19). More than 70% of injection drug use onset appeared attributable to the risk factors

  2. Methods used to study bacterial diversity in the marine environment around Qingdao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, P. A. W.; Macinnes, J.; Sparagano, O. A. E.; Purdom, I.; Li, Y.; Yu, D. H.; Du, Z. J.; Xu, H. S.; Austin, B.

    2002-10-01

    Pollution has a considerable effect on biological communities, in terms of size and diversity of the populations. Yet, the precise consequences of human activity on microbial communities in the marine environment are poorly understood. Therefore, in an ongoing collaborative research programme between Heriot-Watt University and the Ocean University of Qingdao, bacteria were isolated in 1999 and 2000 from marine sediment, seawater, seaweed, fish and shellfish, taken from locations in Shandong Province adjacent to Qingdao. Sampling locations were comprised of industrial and aquacultural sites and a clean, control site. In order to analyse microbial diversity, a polyphasic approach was adopted for characterisation of these isolates, specifically through examination of key phenotypic traits, i.e. using Biolog GN MicroPlate™ profiles, bacterial whole cell protein profiles and 16S and 23S rRNA gene sequences. These techniques yielded complex taxonomic data, which were subjected to statistical and cluster analyses. The application of these methods to studies of microbial communities is discussed.

  3. A first approach to a neuropsychological screening tool using eye-tracking for bedside cognitive testing based on the Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jürgen; Krimly, Amon; Bauer, Lisa; Schulenburg, Sarah; Böhm, Sarah; Aho-Özhan, Helena E A; Uttner, Ingo; Gorges, Martin; Kassubek, Jan; Pinkhardt, Elmar H; Abrahams, Sharon; Ludolph, Albert C; Lulé, Dorothée

    2017-08-01

    Reliable assessment of cognitive functions is a challenging task in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients unable to speak and write. We therefore present an eye-tracking based neuropsychological screening tool based on the Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen (ECAS), a standard screening tool for cognitive deficits in ALS. In total, 46 ALS patients and 50 healthy controls matched for age, gender and education were tested with an oculomotor based and a standard paper-and-pencil version of the ECAS. Significant correlation between both versions was observed for ALS patients and healthy controls in the ECAS total score and in all of its ALS-specific domains (all r > 0.3; all p approach for assessing cognitive deficits in ALS patients who are unable to speak or write.

  4. Factor structure and psychometric properties of english and spanish versions of the edinburgh postnatal depression scale among Hispanic women in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Chelsey M; Barroso, Nicole; Rey, Yasmin; Pettit, Jeremy W; Bagner, Daniel M

    2014-12-01

    Although a number of studies have examined the factor structure of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in predominately White or African American samples, no published research has reported on the factor structure among Hispanic women who reside in the United States. The current study examined the factor structure of the EPDS among Hispanic mothers in the United States. Among 220 Hispanic women, drawn from a pediatric primary care setting, with an infant aged 0 to 10 months, 6 structural models guided by the empirical literature were evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis. Results supported a 2-factor model of depression and anxiety as the best fitting model. Multigroup models supported the factorial invariance across women who completed the EDPS in English and Spanish. These findings provide initial support for the 2-factor structure of the EPDS among Hispanic women in the United States. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Death and the dead-house in Victorian asylums: necroscopy versus mourning at the Royal Edinburgh Asylum, C. 1832-1901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jonathan

    2012-03-01

    This article examines the management and meaning of post-mortem examinations, and the spatial ordering of patients' death, dissection and burial at the Victorian asylum, referencing a range of institutional contexts and exploiting a case study of the Royal Edinburgh Asylum. The routinizing of dissection and the development of the dead-house from a more marginal asylum sector to a lynchpin of laboratory medicine is stressed. External and internal pressure to modernize pathological research facilities is assessed alongside governmental, public and professional critiques of variable necroscopy practices. This is contextualized against wider issues and attitudes surrounding consent and funereal rituals. Onus is placed on tendencies in anatomizing insanity towards the conversion of deceased lunatics--pauper lunatics especially--into mere pathological specimens. On the other hand, significant but compromised resistance on the part of a minority of practitioners, relatives and the wider public is also identified.

  6. Innovation at Stirling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    The 24th Stirling Meeting of the Scottish Branch of the Institute of Physics was held on 21 May 1998. It was, for the first time, coupled to a Physics Update Course, which then continued in the Heriot-Watt University over the following two days. This encouraged many more exhibitors to come to Stirling where some 220 physics teachers were present. Ten manufacturers, five publishers and, of course, the ASE and the Institute of Physics exhibited materials during the conference. Morning In his introductory remarks Jack Woolsey reminded teachers that a great deal of information about the Scottish Qualifications Authority was available on the web (http://www.sqa.org.uk). Lorna Neill chaired the morning session, which was devoted to teaching chips and assessing pupils! Tony Joyce (Motorola) emphasized the need to invest in the skills required by the electronics industry. There has been an explosion in the demand for microchips and Motorola, together with Edinburgh University, Compugraphics and Scottish Enterprise, have produced a number of `teaching chips' which are being used throughout Britain and abroad. Les Haworth (Edinburgh University) discussed the construction, operating principles and educational relevance of MOS devices. MOSFETs, he claimed, are the best vehicle for early teaching of device physics. Andrew Moore (Balerno High School) gave an entertaining presentation in which he suggested ways of using the `teaching chips' in practice. Although there were many good information sheets with suggested experiments and investigations, teachers often found it difficult to tailor them to specific courses. To reduce hassle Andrew recommended using the Teaching Chip Project Board which was now available. It was particularly useful for practical investigations at Standard Grade. For the question session Jim Jamieson (SSERC) and Walter Whitelaw (Edinburgh Council) joined the three speakers. Ian Kennedy (Kilwinning Academy) described a fascinating system, developed in his

  7. THE EFFECTS OF MENTAL (PSYCHOLOGICAL) WELL BEING LEVELS ONHAPPINESS LEVELS OF KOCAELI UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF SPORTSSCIENCE STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    GÖNENER, Ahmet; ÖZTÜRK, Arda; YILMAZ, Ozan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to investigate whether mental (psychological) well-being has an effect on the level of happiness of Kocaeli University Faculty of Sports Science students according to age, gender, department, class and perceived academic achievement. The research group constitutes 182 randomly chosen students in the 2015-2016 school year. In the study in order to evaluate mental well-being levels of the students "Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale" which was develo...

  8. The prevalence of suicidal ideation identified by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in postpartum women in primary care: findings from the RESPOND trial

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    Sharp Debbie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available 1 Abstract 1.1 Background Suicide is a leading cause of perinatal maternal deaths in industrialised countries but there has been little research to investigate prevalence or correlates of postpartum suicidality. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale is widely used in primary and maternity services to screen for perinatal depressive disorders, and includes a question on suicidal ideation (question 10. We aimed to investigate the prevalence, persistence and correlates of suicidal thoughts in postpartum women in the context of a randomised controlled trial of treatments for postnatal depression. 1.2 Methods Women in primary care were sent postal questionnaires at 6 weeks postpartum to screen for postnatal depression before recruitment into an RCT. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS was used to screen for postnatal depression and in those with high levels of symptoms, a home visit with a standardised psychiatric interview was carried out using the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised version (CIS-R. Other socio-demographic and clinical variables were measured, including functioning (SF12 and quality of the marital relationship (GRIMS. Women who entered the trial were followed up for 18 weeks. 1.3 Results 9% of 4,150 women who completed the EPDS question relating to suicidal ideation reported some suicidal ideation (including hardly ever; 4% reported that the thought of harming themselves had occurred to them sometimes or quite often. In women who entered the randomised trial and completed the EPDS question relating to suicidal ideation (n = 253, suicidal ideation was associated with younger age, higher parity and higher levels of depressive symptoms in the multivariate analysis. Endorsement of 'yes, quite often' to question 10 on the EPDS was associated with affirming at least two CIS-R items on suicidality. We found no association between suicidal ideation and SF-12 physical or mental health or the EPDS total score at 18 weeks. 1

  9. The price of a drink: levels of consumption and price paid per unit of alcohol by Edinburgh's ill drinkers with a comparison to wider alcohol sales in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Heather; Gill, Jan; Chick, Jonathan

    2011-04-01

    To compare alcohol purchasing and consumption by ill drinkers in Edinburgh with wider alcohol sales in Scotland. Cross-sectional. Two hospitals in Edinburgh in 2008/09. A total of 377 patients with serious alcohol problems; two-thirds were in-patients with medical, surgical or psychiatric problems due to alcohol; one-third were out-patients. Last week's or typical weekly consumption of alcohol: type, brand, units (1 UK unit 8 g ethanol), purchase place and price. Patients consumed mean 197.7 UK units/week. The mean price paid per unit was £0.43 (lowest £0.09/unit) (£1 = 1.6 US$ or 1.2€), which is below the mean unit price, £0.71 paid in Scotland in 2008. Of units consumed, 70.3% were sold at or below £0.40/unit (mid-range of price models proposed for minimum pricing legislation by the Scottish Government), and 83% at or below £0.50/unit proposed by the Chief Medical Officer of England. The lower the price paid per unit, the more units a patient consumed. A continuous increase in unit price from lower to higher social status, ranked according to the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (based on postcode), was not seen; patients residing in postcodes in the mid-quintile paid the highest price per unit. Cheapness was quoted commonly as a reason for beverage choice; ciders, especially 'white' cider, and vodka were, at off-sales, cheapest per unit. Stealing alcohol or drinking alcohol substitutes was only very rarely reported. Because patients with serious alcohol problems tend to purchase very cheap alcohol, elimination of the cheapest sales by minimum price or other legislation might reduce their consumption. It is unknown whether proposed price legislation in Scotland will encourage patients with serious alcohol problems to start stealing alcohol or drinking substitutes or will reduce the recruitment of new drinkers with serious alcohol problems and produce predicted longer-term gains in health and social wellbeing. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010

  10. 'On the street where you live': Neighbourhood deprivation and quality of life among community-dwelling older people in Edinburgh, Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mõttus, René; Gale, Catharine R; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J

    2012-05-01

    It is well established that neighbourhood quality is related to various aspects of people's health and coping, especially in old age. There have also been a few reports on the links between self-reported neighbourhood quality and quality of life in older age. However, it is not clear which aspects of quality of life in particular are related to neighbourhood quality and whether these associations are independent of the roles of cognitive, socioeconomic or health status, or rating biases. Using a large sample of Scots from the Edinburgh area (N = 1091, of whom 548 were men) aged between 68 and 71 years, this study shows direct associations of objectively and comprehensively determined neighbourhood deprivation with self-perceived quality of life in physical and environmental domains, but not in psychological or social relationship domains. In a path model, these associations were independent of the roles of childhood cognitive ability and change in it to age 70, educational attainment, and occupational social class. The count of adverse health conditions (cardiovascular disease, stroke history, high blood pressure, diabetes, or arthritis) was associated with both quality of life and neighbourhood deprivation, and mediated the indirect links from neighbourhood deprivation to physical, psychological and environmental domains of quality of life. It is concluded that the neighbourhood in which older people live plays a role in one of the most important outcomes-how satisfied they are with various aspects of their life including physical functioning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection of mental disorders other than depression with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in a sample of pregnant women in northern Mexico

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    Cosme Alvarado-Esquivel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We sought to evaluate the capacity of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS in discriminating mental disorders other than depression in pregnant women in northern Mexico. Three hundred pregnant women attending prenatal consultations in a public hospital in Durango City, Mexico submitted a validated EPDS and were examined for mental disorders other than depression using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - 4th Ed. (DSM-IV criteria. Sensitivity and specificity of cut-off points of the EPDS, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Of the 300 pregnant women studied, 21 had mental disorders other than depression by the DSM-IV criteria. The best EPDS score for screening mental disorders other than depression was 8/9. This threshold showed a sensitivity of 52.4%, a specificity of 67.0%, a positive predictive value of 11.5%, a negative predictive value of 95.4%, and an area under the curve of 0.643 (95% confidence interval: 0.52-0.76. The EPDS can be considered for screening mental disorders other than depression in Mexican pregnant women whenever a cut-off score of 8/9 is used. However, the tool showed small power to separate pregnant women with and without mental disorders other than depression.

  12. The Demise of the Preformed Embryo: Edinburgh, Leiden, and the Physician-Poet Mark Akenside's Contribution to Re-Establishing Epigenetic Embryology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Seventeenth-century advances in microscopy prompted a shift in the dominant theory of human reproduction from one of epigenesis, derived from such ancient authorities as Aristotle, which posited that the mixing of male and female reproductive material generated a being which had not existed before, to one of preformation, whereby embryologists argued that the offspring of an animal already existed in miniature in the reproductive material. This chapter reveals that the poet, Mark Akenside, anticipated the Enlightenment's challenge to the prevailing preformationist orthodoxy when a medical student at Edinburgh in the late 1730s, as evident in his May 1744 thesis entitled De ortu et incremento foetus humani ('On the Origin and Growth of the Human Foetus'). What prompted Akenside to take such a bold step? Faced with a scarcity of biographical sources, Akenside's major poem on The Pleasures of Imagination (1744) suggests how the poet had been thinking about reproductive processes in innovative contexts and that his medical research informed his concept of poetic creation.

  13. Dimensionality and scale properties of the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the DiaDDzoB study

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    Pop Victor JM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is a common complication in type 2 diabetes (DM2, affecting 10-30% of patients. Since depression is underrecognized and undertreated, it is important that reliable and validated depression screening tools are available for use in patients with DM2. The Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS is a widely used method for screening depression. However, there is still debate about the dimensionality of the test. Furthermore, the EDS was originally developed to screen for depression in postpartum women. Empirical evidence that the EDS has comparable measurement properties in both males and females suffering from diabetes is lacking however. Methods In a large sample (N = 1,656 of diabetes patients, we examined: (1 dimensionality; (2 gender-related item bias; and (3 the screening properties of the EDS using factor analysis and item response theory. Results We found evidence that the ten EDS items constitute a scale that is essentially one dimensional and has adequate measurement properties. Three items showed differential item functioning (DIF, two of them showed substantial DIF. However, at the scale level, DIF had no practical impact. Anhedonia (the inability to be able to laugh or enjoy and sleeping problems were the most informative indicators for being able to differentiate between the diagnostic groups of mild and severe depression. Conclusions The EDS constitutes a sound scale for measuring an attribute of general depression. Persons can be reliably measured using the sum score. Screening rules for mild and severe depression are applicable to both males and females.

  14. Patient Health Questionnaire-9 versus Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in screening for major depressive episodes: a cross-sectional population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Iná S; Tavares, Beatriz Franck; Munhoz, Tiago N; Manzolli, Patricia; de Ávila, Gisele Bartz; Jannke, Eduardo; Matijasevich, Alicia

    2017-01-21

    Major depressive episodes (MDE) are frequent at the population level and are generally associated with severe symptoms that impair performance of activities of daily living of individuals suffering from this condition. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of two tests that separately showed suitable properties in screening for MDE: the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). In a previous study, the sensitivity and specificity of the PHQ-9 and the EPDS in screening for MDE were compared with a structured diagnostic interview conducted by psychiatrics and psychologists using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview as the gold standard. In a sample of adults living in the community in Pelotas, Brazil, the PHQ-9 and EPDS were applied at the same interview and the gold standard on a median of 17 days later. The interviews were carried out at the participant's home. 447 Individuals (191 men and 256 women) were assessed. The PHQ-9 and the EPDS results were concordant in 87.5% of the respondents, with a moderate agreement beyond what was expected by chance alone (kappa = 0.61). The areas below the ROC curves were not statistically different (82.1% for PHQ-9 and 83.5% for EPDS) (p = 0.291), thus indicating that the two tests had similar moderate accuracy. PHQ-9 and EPDS may be applied with equal confidence in screening for MDE in the community.

  15. Using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to assess suicidal ideation among pregnant women in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qiu-Yue; Gelaye, Bizu; Rondon, Marta B; Sánchez, Sixto E; Simon, Gregory E; Henderson, David C; Barrios, Yasmin V; Sánchez, Pedro Mascaro; Williams, Michelle A

    2015-12-01

    We sought to examine the concordance of two suicidal ideation items from the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), to evaluate the prevalence of suicidal ideation among pregnant women, and to assess the co-occurrence of suicidal ideation with antepartum depressive symptoms. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1,517 pregnant women attending prenatal care clinics in Lima, Peru. Item 9 of the PHQ-9 assesses suicidal ideation over the last 14 days while item 10 of the EPDS assesses suicidal ideation in the past 7 days. The two suicidal ideation items have a high concordance rate (84.2 %) but a moderate agreement (the Cohen's kappa = 0.42). Based on the PHQ-9 and the EPDS, 15.8 and 8.8 % of participants screened positive for suicidal ideation, respectively. Assessed by the PHQ-9, 51 % of participants with suicidal ideation had probable depression. In prenatal care clinics, screening for suicidal ideation is needed for women with and without depressive symptoms. Future studies are needed to identify additional predictors of antepartum suicidality, determine the appropriate duration of reporting period for suicidal ideation screening, and assess the percentage of individuals with positive responses to the two suicidal ideation items at high risk of planning and attempting suicide.

  16. Screening for cognitive dysfunction in ALS: validation of the Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen (ECAS) using age and education adjusted normative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Grau, Marta; Burke, Tom; Lonergan, Katie; McHugh, Caroline; Mays, Iain; Madden, Caoifa; Vajda, Alice; Heverin, Mark; Elamin, Marwa; Hardiman, Orla; Pender, Niall

    2017-02-01

    Cognitive and behavioural changes are an important aspect in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). The Edinburgh Cognitive and Behavioural ALS Screen (ECAS) briefly assesses these changes in ALS. To validate the ECAS against a standardised neuropsychological battery and assess its sensitivity and specificity using age and education adjusted cut-off scores. 30 incident ALS cases were assessed on both, ECAS and neuropsychological battery. Age and education adjusted cut-off scores were created from a sample of 82 healthy controls. ECAS composite scores (Total, ALS Specific and Non-Specific) were highly correlated with battery composite scores. High correlations were also observed between ECAS and full battery cognitive domains and subtests. The ECAS Total, ALS Specific and Non-Specific scores were highly sensitive to cognitive impairment. ECAS ALS-Specific cognitive domains also evidenced high sensitivity. Individual subtest sensitivity was medium to low, suggesting that caution should be used when interpreting these scores. Low positive predictive values indicated the presence of false positives. Psychometric properties of the ECAS using age and education adjusted norms indicate that the ECAS, when used as an overall measure of cognitive decline, is highly sensitive. Further comprehensive assessment is required for patients that present as impaired on the ECAS.

  17. WIRED for EC: New White Dwarfs with WISE Infrared Excesses and New Classification Schemes from the Edinburgh-Cape Blue Object Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennihy, E.; Clemens, J. C.; Debes, John H.; Dunlap, B. H.; Kilkenny, D.; O'Brien, P. C.; Fuchs, J. T.

    2017-11-01

    We present a simple method for identifying candidate white dwarf systems with dusty exoplanetary debris based on a single temperature blackbody model fit to the infrared excess. We apply this technique to a sample of Southern Hemisphere white dwarfs from the recently completed Edinburgh-Cape Blue Object Survey and identify four new promising dusty debris disk candidates. We demonstrate the efficacy of our selection method by recovering three of the four Spitzer confirmed dusty debris disk systems in our sample. Further investigation using archival high-resolution imaging shows that Spitzer data of the unrecovered fourth object is likely contaminated by a line-of-sight object that either led to a misclassification as a dusty disk in the literature or is confounding our method. Finally, in our diagnostic plot, we show that dusty white dwarfs, which also host gaseous debris, lie along a boundary of our dusty debris disk region, providing clues to the origin and evolution of these especially interesting systems.

  18. Validation of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean and South Asian UK migrants: A sub-study to the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES) study

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman Stanley; Lip Gregory YH; Bennett Philip C; Blann Andrew D; Gill Paramjit S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background We determined the diagnostic accuracy of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire (ECQ) in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean UK migrants as previous diagnostic questionnaires have been found to be less accurate in this population. We also determined the diagnostic accuracy of translated versions of the ECQ in 1st generation South Asian UK migrants, as this has not been investigated before. Methods Subjects were recruited from the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of Engl...

  19. Versão em português, adaptação transcultural e validação do Questionário de Claudicação de Edimburgo Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Makdisse

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Traduzir, adaptar culturalmente e validar a versão em português do Questionário de Claudicação de Edimburgo, específico para avaliar a presença de claudicação intermitente. MÉTODOS: A versão em português do Questionário de Claudicação de Edimburgo foi desenvolvida, após autorização da Universidade de Edimburgo, e aplicada em 217 indivíduos residentes no município de São Paulo, com queixas de dor nas pernas, convidados pelos meios de comunicação de massa a participar da I Campanha de Combate à Doença Arterial Obstrutiva Periférica (DAOP. Na primeira etapa, eles responderam ao Questionário de Claudicação de Edimburgo e a um questionário sobre fatores de risco e antecedentes cardiovasculares. Na segunda etapa, realizaram medidas antropométricas e do índice tornozelo-braquial (ITB de repouso com Doppler vascular e, nos casos duvidosos, teste de esforço vascular em esteira (TEV. A presença de DAOP foi definida por ITB 65 anos e não-idosos. CONCLUSÃO: A versão em português do Questionário de Claudicação de Edimburgo manteve níveis adequados de sensibilidade e especificidade, podendo ser recomendado para o rastreamento de DAOP na prática clínica e em estudos epidemiológicos realizados no Brasil.OBJECTIVE: Translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire (ECQ a specific tool to assess intermittent claudication. METHODS: The Brazilian Portuguese version of the ECQ was developed after authorization by the University of Edinburgh. It was applied to 217 individuals: São Paulo Capital District residents with complaints of leg pain. Individuals under research were invited through mass communication media to participate in the I Campaign to Fight Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD. In stage 1, participants filled out the ECQ and another questionnaire on risk factors and cardiovascular history. In stage 2, participants had

  20. Chemical and biological quality of surface water at the U.S. Army Atterbury Reserve Forces Training Area near Edinburgh, Indiana, September 2000 through July 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risch, Martin R.

    2004-01-01

    A base-wide assessment of surface-water quality at the U.S. Army Atterbury Reserve Forces Training Area near Edinburgh, Indiana, examined short-term and long-term quality of surface water flowing into, across, and out of a 33,760-acre study area. The 30-day geometric-mean concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli) in water samples from all 16 monitoring sites on streams in the study area were greater than the Indiana recreational water-quality standard. None of the bacteria concentrations in samples from four lakes exceeded the standard. Half the samples with bacteria concentrations greater than the single-sample standard contained chemical tracers potentially associated with human sewage. Increased turbidity of water samples was related statistically to increased bacteria concentration. Lead concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 micrograms per liter were detected in water samples at seven monitoring sites. Lead in one sample collected during high-streamflow conditions was greater than the calculated Indiana water-quality standard. With the exception of Escherichia coli and lead, 211 of 213 chemical constituents analyzed in water samples did not exceed Indiana water-quality standards. Out of 131 constituents analyzed in streambed-sediment and fish-tissue samples from three sites in the Common Impact Area for weapons training, the largest concentrations overall were detected for copper, lead, manganese, strontium, and zinc. Fish-community integrity, based on diversity and pollution tolerance, was rated poor at one of those three sites. Compared with State criteria, the fish-community data indicated 8 of 10 stream reaches in the study area could be categorized as "fully supporting" aquatic-life uses.

  1. Translation and validation of the Chinese version of the short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale for patients with mental illness in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, S S W; Lo, A W Y; Leung, T K S; Chan, F S M; Wong, A T Y; Lam, R W T; Tsang, D K Y

    2014-03-01

    Quality of life outcomes are useful in the assessment of mental and social wellbeing and for informed health care decision-making, especially in the choice of interventions in psychiatric rehabilitation. In its original form, the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (WEMWBS) is a proven reliable and valid tool for assessing quality of life in normal adults, but not in adults from Asian countries. A shortened 7-item version of WEMWBS (SWEMWBS) with good internal construct validity was used for this study. The present study describes the translation of WEMWBS from English to Chinese and its validation in a sample of Chinese-speaking patient population. Participants included patients admitted to the inpatient units, and those attending the day hospital and outpatient units of the Kowloon Hospital (n = 126). Translation was performed using the multiple forward and backward translation protocol. Patients also completed the 5-item World Health Organization Well-being Index (WHO5) questionnaire. A case therapist completed the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale within 2 days. A total of 20 patients were selected for test-retest measurements performed after 2 weeks. The sample displayed a normal distribution of the Chinese version of SWEMWBS (C-SWEMWBS) scores (mean ± standard deviation, 23.16 ± 5.39; skewness, -0.068; kurtosis, -0.355). Internal reliability coefficient (Cronbach's alpha) for C-SWEMWBS was 0.89 which was consistent with that of English version. The corrected item-total correlation was high with Spearman's rank correlation coefficients ranging from 0.57 (item 6) to 0.75 (item 5). Good test-retest reliability was observed (r = 0.677; p = 0.001). Principal components factor analysis identified a single component (eigenvalues, 4.28; 61.1% variance), similar to the English version. Scores of C-SWEMWBS were positively correlated with the scores of WHO5 (r = 0.49; p gender. The C-SWEMWBS showed high levels of internal consistency and reliability against

  2. Skjemabasert eller fri samtale? Ein studie om barselkvinner sine erfaringar med å bruke The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) i møtet med helsesøster

    OpenAIRE

    Andenes, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Samandrag: Introduksjon: Psykiske vanskar er eit aukande samfunnsproblem. 10-15% av alle barselkvinner får symptom på barseldepresjon i større eller mindre grad. Nybakte mødre si psykiske helse er eit av mange tema i helsestasjonsarbeidet. Dei siste åra har over 200 av landet sine helsestasjonar teke i bruk the Edinburgh Postnatal Deppresion Scale (EPDS) for å førebygge og oppdage barseldepresjon. EPDS er eit spørjeskjema som kvinna skal fylle ut på 6-vekers konsultasjonen på h...

  3. Correlação entre a Visual Gait Assessment Scale, Edinburgh Visual Gait Scale e Escala Observacional da Marcha em crianças com paralisia cerebral diparética espástica Correlation among the Visual Gait Assessment Scale, Edinburgh Visual Gait Scale and Observational Gait Scale in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geruza P. Bella

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Desordens da marcha são comuns em crianças com paralisia cerebral (PC diparética espástica. Com o intuito de aprimorar a marcha dessas crianças e quantificar os desfechos de tal intervenção, torna-se necessário que se faça uma análise instrumentada pré e pós-intervenção. OBJETIVOS: Correlacionar a Edinburgh Visual Gait Scale (EVGS, a Visual Gait Assessment Scale (VGAS e a Escala Observacional de Marcha (EOM. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal de análise da marcha por meio das escalas EVGS, VGAS e EOM, envolvendo oito crianças com PC diparética espástica, nível I ou II do Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS, avaliadas por três examinadores. O estudo foi aprovado pelo Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa da Universidade Estadual de Campinas - UNICAMP. Os dados foram analisados pelo índice Kappa ponderado, considerando um nível de significância de 5%. RESULTADOS: O estudo intra-avaliadores mostrou que a concordância entre os métodos na classificação dos sujeitos foi de moderada a excelente (k=0,41, 1,00, sendo a comparação entre a VGAS e a EVGS a de maior índice de concordância, enquanto a EOM obteve grande discordância em comparação com as outras escalas. A concordância interavaliadores se mostrou predominantemente alta. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados fornecem evidências de que a VGAS e a EVGS são mais adequados para avaliação da marcha de crianças com PC diparética quando comparadas à EOM.BACKGROUND: Gait disorders are very common in children with spastic diplegia cerebral palsy (CP. In order to improve the CP children's gait and to quantify the outcomes of this intervention it becomes essential to perform an instrumented analysis before and after the intervention. OBJECTIVES: To analyze the correlation among the Edinburgh Visual Gait Scale (EVGS, the Visual Gait Assessment Scale (VGAS and the Observational Gait Scale (OGS. METHODS: Cross sectional study aiming to analyze the gait of 8

  4. Universal trellises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Collins (Pieter)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractA flow in three-dimensions is universal if the periodic orbits contains all knots and links. Universal flows were shown to exist by Ghrist, and can be constructed by means of templates. Likewise, a planar diffeomorphism is universal if it has a suspension flow which is a universal flow.

  5. THE EFFECTS OF MENTAL (PSYCHOLOGICAL) WELL BEING LEVELS ON HAPPINESS LEVELS OF KOCAELI UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF SPORTS SCIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Gönener; Arda Öztürk; Ozan Yılmaz

    2017-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to investigate whether mental (psychological) well-being has an effect on the level of happiness of Kocaeli University Faculty of Sports Science students according to age, gender, department, class and perceived academic achievement. The research group constitutes 182 randomly chosen students in the 2015-2016 school year. In the study in order to evaluate mental well-being levels of the students “Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale” which was developed by Ten...

  6. Preselecting Well Test Interpretation Models Using External Data Présélection de modèles d'interprétation de tests de puits par l'utilisation de données externes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison I.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The first stage in interpreting a well test is concerned with identifying a well test interpretation (WTI model for the reservoir that is consistent with all the known data and whose theoretical output response is qualitatively similar to the actual well test response. Conventionally, engineers identify WTI models by using WTI software to plot functions of well test pressure against time and then diagnose components of WTI models from their characteristic curve signatures, together with evidence from external (geological and engineering data. This paper focuses on the use of external data for preselecting WTI models, which can then be verified using conventional well test analysis techniques. The KADS methodology for developing knowledge based systems (KBS was adopted and the inference layer structure for the WTI model preselection task was derived. The WTI model preselection task will form one part of a KBS for well test interpretation, SPIRIT, being developed jointly by Artificial Intelligence Applications Institute and Heriot-Watt University. La première étape dans l'interprétation d'un test de puits est celle de l'identification d'un modèle d'interprétation (WTI pour le réservoir, qui soit en accord avec l'ensemble des données connues, et dont la sortie théorique est qualitativement semblable à celle du puits testé. Pour ceci, les ingénieurs de réservoir utilisent habituellement des logiciels WTI qui calculent et tracent la pression de test de puits en fonction du temps. Cela leur permet de diagnostiquer les composantes des modèles WTI à partir de leurs signatures caractéristiques, le diagnostic étant complété par la prise en compte d'informations externes, de géologie ou d'ingénierie. Cet article est consacré à l'utilisation de données externes pour la préselection des modèles WTI, modèles qui peuvent être ensuite validés au moyen de techniques classiques d'analyse de tests de puits. La méthodologie de d

  7. Universal Trellises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Collins (Pieter)

    2007-01-01

    htmlabstract A flow in three-dimensions is universal if the periodic orbits contains all knots and links. Universal flows were shown to exist by Ghrist, and can be constructed by means of templates. Likewise, a planar diffeomorphism is universal if it has a suspension

  8. Universe Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankatsing Nava, Tibisay; Russo, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an educational programme coordinated by Leiden University that uses the beauty and grandeur of the Universe to encourage young children, particularly those from an underprivileged background, to have an interest in science and technology and foster their sense of global citizenship from the earliest age.UNAWE's twofold vision uses our Universe to inspire and motivate very young children: the excitement of the Universe provides an exciting introduction to science and technology, while the vastness and beauty of the Universe helps broaden the mind and stimulate a sense of global citizenship and tolerance. UNAWE's goals are accomplished through four main activities: the coordination of a global network of more than 1000 astronomers, teachers and educators from more than 60 countries, development of educational resources, teacher training activities and evaluation of educational activities.Between 2011 and 2013, EU-UNAWE, the European branch of UNAWE, was funded by the European Commission to implement a project in 5 EU countries and South Africa. This project has been concluded successfully. Since then, the global project Universe Awareness has continued to grow with an expanding international network, new educational resources and teacher trainings and a planned International Workshop in collaboration with ESA in October 2015, among other activities.

  9. The universe

    CERN Document Server

    Osborne, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Where did the Universe come from? The single biggest and most difficult question that there is. From early religions through Greek Philosophy and Western Science man has attempted to discover the meaning of our place in the Universe. In the last twenty years these debates have been cast in a new light by amazing discoveries, big bang theory and ideas about new sub-atomic layers. The nature of Time and Space are truly up for grabs. With a witty and accessible style Osborne leads us on a historical and informative journey through the philosophies of the universe including the importance

  10. Validation of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean and South Asian UK migrants: a sub-study to the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Philip C; Lip, Gregory Y H; Silverman, Stanley; Blann, Andrew D; Gill, Paramjit S

    2011-06-03

    We determined the diagnostic accuracy of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire (ECQ) in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean UK migrants as previous diagnostic questionnaires have been found to be less accurate in this population. We also determined the diagnostic accuracy of translated versions of the ECQ in 1st generation South Asian UK migrants, as this has not been investigated before. Subjects were recruited from the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES) study, a community based screening survey for heart failure in minority ethnic groups. Translated versions of the ECQ were prepared following a recognised protocol. All participants attending screening between October 2007 and February 2009 were asked to complete the ECQ in the language of their choice (English, Punjabi, Bengali, Urdu, Hindi or Gujarati). Subjects answering positively to experiencing leg pain or discomfort on walking were asked to return to have Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI) measured. 154 out of 2831 subjects participating in E-ECHOES (5.4%) were eligible to participate in this sub-study, for which 74.3% returned for ABPI assessment. Non-responders were younger than participants (59[9] vs. 65[11] years; p=0.015). Punjabi, English and Bengali questionnaires identified participants with Intermittent Claudication, so these questionnaires were assessed. The sensitivities (SN), specificities (SP), positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were calculated. English: SN: 50%; SP: 68%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 74%. Punjabi: SN: 50%; SP: 87%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 90%. Bengali: SN: 33%; SP: 50%; PPV: 13%; NPV: 73%. There were significant differences in diagnostic accuracy between the 3 versions (Punjabi: 83.8%; Bengali: 45%; English: 62.2%; p<0.0001). No significant differences were found in sensitivity and specificity between illiterate and literate participants in any of the questionnaires and there was no significant different difference between those under and over 60

  11. Validation of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean and South Asian UK migrants: A sub-study to the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman Stanley

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We determined the diagnostic accuracy of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire (ECQ in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean UK migrants as previous diagnostic questionnaires have been found to be less accurate in this population. We also determined the diagnostic accuracy of translated versions of the ECQ in 1st generation South Asian UK migrants, as this has not been investigated before. Methods Subjects were recruited from the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES study, a community based screening survey for heart failure in minority ethnic groups. Translated versions of the ECQ were prepared following a recognised protocol. All participants attending screening between October 2007 and February 2009 were asked to complete the ECQ in the language of their choice (English, Punjabi, Bengali, Urdu, Hindi or Gujarati. Subjects answering positively to experiencing leg pain or discomfort on walking were asked to return to have Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI measured. Results 154 out of 2831 subjects participating in E-ECHOES (5.4% were eligible to participate in this sub-study, for which 74.3% returned for ABPI assessment. Non-responders were younger than participants (59[9] vs. 65[11] years; p = 0.015. Punjabi, English and Bengali questionnaires identified participants with Intermittent Claudication, so these questionnaires were assessed. The sensitivities (SN, specificities (SP, positive (PPV and negative (NPV predictive values were calculated. English: SN: 50%; SP: 68%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 74%. Punjabi: SN: 50%; SP: 87%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 90%. Bengali: SN: 33%; SP: 50%; PPV: 13%; NPV: 73%. There were significant differences in diagnostic accuracy between the 3 versions (Punjabi: 83.8%; Bengali: 45%; English: 62.2%; p Conclusions Our findings suggest that the ECQ is not as sensitive or specific a diagnostic tool in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean and South Asian UK migrants than in the Edinburgh

  12. Validation of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean and South Asian UK migrants: A sub-study to the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background We determined the diagnostic accuracy of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire (ECQ) in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean UK migrants as previous diagnostic questionnaires have been found to be less accurate in this population. We also determined the diagnostic accuracy of translated versions of the ECQ in 1st generation South Asian UK migrants, as this has not been investigated before. Methods Subjects were recruited from the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES) study, a community based screening survey for heart failure in minority ethnic groups. Translated versions of the ECQ were prepared following a recognised protocol. All participants attending screening between October 2007 and February 2009 were asked to complete the ECQ in the language of their choice (English, Punjabi, Bengali, Urdu, Hindi or Gujarati). Subjects answering positively to experiencing leg pain or discomfort on walking were asked to return to have Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI) measured. Results 154 out of 2831 subjects participating in E-ECHOES (5.4%) were eligible to participate in this sub-study, for which 74.3% returned for ABPI assessment. Non-responders were younger than participants (59[9] vs. 65[11] years; p = 0.015). Punjabi, English and Bengali questionnaires identified participants with Intermittent Claudication, so these questionnaires were assessed. The sensitivities (SN), specificities (SP), positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were calculated. English: SN: 50%; SP: 68%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 74%. Punjabi: SN: 50%; SP: 87%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 90%. Bengali: SN: 33%; SP: 50%; PPV: 13%; NPV: 73%. There were significant differences in diagnostic accuracy between the 3 versions (Punjabi: 83.8%; Bengali: 45%; English: 62.2%; p < 0.0001). No significant differences were found in sensitivity and specificity between illiterate and literate participants in any of the questionnaires and there was no significant different difference

  13. USAID University

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — USAID University is USAID's learning management system. Features include 1) Access online courses 2) Register for instructor-led courses 3)Access your student...

  14. Comparative validity of the chinese versions of the bulimic inventory test edinburgh and eating attitudes test for DSM-IV eating disorders among high school dance and nondance students in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Fang, David; Lee, Ming-Been

    2014-01-01

    To compare the validity of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT) and the Bulimic Investigatory Test Edinburgh (BITE) as screening tools for eating disorders (EDs), and to identify a new threshold for each questionnaire to detect ED cases among dance and nondance students. Dance students enrolled in high schools with gifted dance programs and nondance students randomly chosen from the same or nearby schools were invited to participate in a 2-phase ED survey. Participants completed the EAT and BITE questionnaires in the first phase. All participants who screened positive and 10% of the participants who screened negative were interviewed blindly using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders Patient Edition. The BITE had better accuracy than the EAT in detecting ED in general among both dance and non-dance students. BITE scores of 19 and 16 were the optimal cutoff values for determining ED among dance and nondance students, respectively. The optimal cutoff value for the EAT to diagnose an ED was 19 for dance students and 12 for nondance students. Both questionnaires showed higher sensitivity and lower specificity in dance students than nondance students at the same cutoff points. The BITE had better diagnostic performance than the EAT in this nonclinical population, although its ability to detect restrictive behaviors is likely as limited as that of the EAT. Plausible explanations for these results and limitations of this study are discussed in the text. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Detection of depression in women of child-bearing age in non-Western cultures: a comparison of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the Self-Reporting Questionnaire-20 in Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, J I; Manaseki-Holland, S; Patel, V

    2006-06-01

    This study assesses, for the first time, the validity and internal reliability of the Edinburgh Post Natal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the WHO Self-Reporting Questionnaire 20-item version (SRQ-20) in detecting depression in Mongolian women of reproductive age. 100 women age recruited from two psychiatric units specialising in depression (n = 55) and three community-based child immunisation clinics (n = 45) in Ulaanbataar, Mongolia, were formally psychiatrically assessed by a clinician and by administering the revised Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS-R). Each woman also completed the EPDS and SRQ-20. Ninety four women provided complete data and identical optimal cut-off points for both the EPDS (11.5) and SRQ-20 (8.5) were determined against both the psychiatrist's and CIS-R based diagnosis using standard validation parameters. On all parameters the SRQ-20 performed better than the EPDS. The sensitivity of the SRQ-20 in detecting depression was 93% and the specificity 97% against the psychiatrist's diagnosis. Internal reliability was satisfactory. The use of a mixed clinical and community sample for validation, and a single psychiatrist may limit the generalisability of these results. The SRQ-20 performed well and better than the EPDS in detecting depression in this group of Mongolian women.

  16. University Internationalization and University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gulieva, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    are determined by the structure and exercise of university autonomy settings at home and in the host countries, and that the process itself cannot be successfully achieved and maintained without changes in the autonomy settings. The key question the authors ask is to what degree universities, in embracing new......, dissimilar, and sometimes conflicting dimensions of the financial, legal, organisational, staffing, and academic autonomy of the host country, are compromising key aspects of their own autonomy and core mission?...

  17. Universities 2035

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrift, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the future of Western higher education. Situated midway between an analysis and a polemic, it concerns itself with how we might begin to actively design the universities of the future. That will require a productionist account of higher education which is so far sadly lacking. But there are signs that such an account might be…

  18. Universal randomness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotsenko, Viktor S [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-31

    In the last two decades, it has been established that a single universal probability distribution function, known as the Tracy-Widom (TW) distribution, in many cases provides a macroscopic-level description of the statistical properties of microscopically different systems, including both purely mathematical ones, such as increasing subsequences in random permutations, and quite physical ones, such as directed polymers in random media or polynuclear crystal growth. In the first part of this review, we use a number of models to examine this phenomenon at a simple qualitative level and then consider the exact solution for one-dimensional directed polymers in a random environment, showing that free energy fluctuations in such a system are described by the universal TW distribution. The second part provides detailed appendix material containing the necessary mathematical background for the first part. (reviews of topical problems)

  19. University writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Zabalza Beraza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing in the University is a basic necessity and a long-range educational purpose. One of the basic characteristics of the university context is that it requires writing both as a tool of communication and as a source of intellectual stimulation. After establishing the basic features of academic writing, this article analyzes the role of writing for students (writing to learn and for teachers (write to plan, to reflect, to document what has been done. The article also discusses the contributions of writing for both students and teachers together: writing to investigate. Finally, going beyond what writing is as academic tool, we conclude with a more playful and creative position: writing for pleasure and enjoyment.

  20. University physics

    CERN Document Server

    Arfken, George

    1984-01-01

    University Physics provides an authoritative treatment of physics. This book discusses the linear motion with constant acceleration; addition and subtraction of vectors; uniform circular motion and simple harmonic motion; and electrostatic energy of a charged capacitor. The behavior of materials in a non-uniform magnetic field; application of Kirchhoff's junction rule; Lorentz transformations; and Bernoulli's equation are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the speed of electromagnetic waves; origins of quantum physics; neutron activation analysis; and interference of light. This publi

  1. University lobbying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    In the past year, an increasing number of individual academic institutions have lobbied in Congress for new science facilities funds thus circumventing the traditional peer review process of evaluating the merits of such facilities. As an attempt to stem this rising tide, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) governing council and the Association of American Universities (AAU) recently and independently issued strong statements condemning lobbying by individual universities and enthusiastically supporting the peer review system.“Informed peer judgments on the scientific merits of specific proposals, in open competition, should be a central element in the awarding of all federal funds for science,” the NAS resolution stated. AAU, meanwhile, implored “scientists, leaders of America's universities, and members of Congress” to “refrain from actions that would make scientific decisions a test of political influence rather than a judgment on the quality of the work to be done.” Roughly 50 research institutions constitute AAU; the two AAU Canadian members did not vote on the consortium's statement.

  2. Human universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Human life is a staggeringly strange thing. On the surface of a ball of rock falling around a nuclear fireball in the blackness of a vacuum the laws of nature conspired to create a naked ape that can look up at the stars and wonder where it came from. What is a human being? Objectively, nothing of consequence. Particles of dust in an infinite arena, present for an instant in eternity. Clumps of atoms in a universe with more galaxies than people. And yet a human being is necessary for the question itself to exist, and the presence of a question in the universe - any question - is the most wonderful thing. Questions require minds, and minds bring meaning. What is meaning? I don't know, except that the universe and every pointless speck inside it means something to me. I am astonished by the existence of a single atom, and find my civilisation to be an outrageous imprint on reality. I don't understand it. Nobody does, but it makes me smile. This book asks questions about our origins, our destiny, and our place i...

  3. Open University

    CERN Multimedia

    Pentz,M

    1975-01-01

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  4. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 9 March 2009 COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Are We Descended From Heavy Neutrinos? Prof. Boris Kayser / Fermilab (Fermi National Accelerator Center, Geneva, Illinois, USA) Neutrinos are among the most abundant particles in the universe. The discovery that they have nonzero masses has raised a number of very interesting questions about them, and about their connections to other areas of physics and to cosmology. After briefly reviewing what has been learned about the neutrinos so far, we will identify the major open questions, explain why they are interesting, and discuss ideas and plans for answering them through future experiments. We will highlight a particularly intriguing question: Are neutrinos the key to understanding why the universe contains matter but almost no antimatter, making it s...

  5. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 13 May 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Observing the extreme universe with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Prof. Olaf Reimer / Stanford University The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST, formerly GLAST) is an international observatory-type satellite mission with a physics program spanning from gamma-ray astronomy to particle astrophysics and cosmology. FGST was launched on June 11, 2008 and is successfully conducting science observations of the high-energy gamma-ray sky since August 2008. A varienty of discoveries has been made already, including monitoring rapid blazar variability, the existence of GeV gamma-ray bursts, and numerous new gamma-ray sources of different types, including those belonging to previously unknown gamma-ray source classes like msPSRs, globula...

  6. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 18 November  2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Highlights of the European Strategy Workshop for Future Neutrino Physics Dr Ilias Efthymiopoulos, CERN   Seminar cancelled! Information Organizer : J.-S. Graulich Monday 7 December 2009 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Topological insulators and topological superconductors Professor Shoucheng Zhang Department of Physics, Stanford University, CA   Recently, a new class of topological states has been theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. The topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge or surface states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the edge s...

  7. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 7 December 2009 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Topological insulators and topological superconductors Professor Shoucheng Zhang Department of Physics, Stanford University, CA   Recently, a new class of topological states has been theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. The topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge or surface states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the edge states give rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect, in the absence of any external magnetic field. I shall review the theoretical prediction of the QSH state in HgTe/CdTe semiconductor quantum wells, and its recent experimental observation. The edge states of the QSH state supports fr...

  8. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Ecole de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 28 April 2008 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17.00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Gravity : an Emergent Perspective by Prof. Thanu Padmanabhan, Pune University Dean, Ganeshkhind, Pune, India I will motivate and describe a novel perspective in which gravity arises as an emergent phenomenon, somewhat like elasticity. This perspective throws light on several issues which are somewhat of a mystery in the conventional approach. Moreover it provides new insights on the dark energy problem. In fact, I will show that it is necessary to have such an alternative perspective in order to solve the cosmological constant problem.Information: http://theory.physics.unige.ch/~fiteo/seminars/COL/collist.html

  9. Reliability and validity of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) for detecting perinatal common mental disorders (PCMDs) among women in low-and lower-middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sumitra Devi; Pradhan, Rina; Tran, Thach D; Gualano, Rosa C; Fisher, Jane R W

    2016-04-04

    The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), originally developed in Britain, is one of the most widely used screening instruments for assessing symptoms of the Perinatal Common Mental Disorders (PCMDs) of depression and anxiety. However, its potential to detect PCMDs in culturally diverse low- and lower-middle income countries (LALMICs) is unclear. This systematic review aimed to appraise formally validated local language versions of the EPDS from these resource-constrained settings. Following the PRISMA protocol, we searched MEDLINE-OVID, CINAHL-Plus and PUBMED to identify studies reporting translation, cultural adaptation and formal validation of the EPDS to detect PCMDs among women in LALMICs. The quality of the studies meeting inclusion criteria was assessed using standard criteria and a new process-based criteria; which was developed specifically for this study. We identified 1281 records among which 16 met inclusion criteria; three further papers were identified by hand-searching reference lists. The publications reported findings from 12 LALMICs in 14 native languages. Most of these local language versions of the EPDS (LLV-EPDS) had lower precision for identifying true cases of PCMDs among women in the general perinatal population compared to the original English version. Only one study met all criteria for culturally sensitive translation, the others had not established the comprehensibility of the local version amongst representative groups of women in pre-testing. Many studies tested the LLV-EPDS only amongst convenience samples recruited at single health facilities. Diagnostic interviews for confirmation of mental disorders could have been influenced by the mental health professionals' lack of blinding to the initial screening results. Additionally, even when diagnostic-interviews were carried out in the local language, questions might not have been understood as most studies followed standard diagnostic protocol which had not been culturally

  10. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél. 022 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 14 October 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Long-lived particle searches at colliders Dr. Philippe Mermod / Oxford University The discovery of exotic long-lived particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics such as the origin and composition of dark matter and the unification of the fundamental forces. This talk will focus on searches for long-lived charged massive particles, where "charged" refers to the magnetic, electric or colour charge. Previous searches at the LEP and Tevatron Colliders allowed to put mass and cross section limits on various kinds of long-lived particles, such as Magnetic Monopoles and metastable leptons and up-type quarks. The new energy regime made available at the LHC will probe physics regions well beyond these limits. F...

  11. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Ecole de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 29 October 2008 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Precision measurements of low-energy neutrino-nucleus interactions with the SciBooNE experiment at Fermilab by Dr Michel Sorel, IFIC (CSIC and University of Valencia) «Do all modern accelerator-based neutrino experiments need to make use of kiloton-scale detectors and decade-long exposure times? In order to study the full pattern of neutrino mixing via neutrino oscillation experiments, the answer is probably yes, together with powerful proton sources. Still, to push the sensitivity of future neutrino oscillation searches into unchartered territory, those are necessary, but not sufficient, ingredients. In addition, accurate knowledge of neutrino interactions and neutrino production is mandatory. This knowledge can be acquired via small-scale and short-term dedicated n...

  12. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Lundi 6 avril 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR àt 17:00 – Auditoire Stückelberg Hospital superbugs, nanomechanics and statistical physics Prof. Dr G. Aeppli / University College London The alarming growth of the antibiotic-resistant superbug, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is driving the development of new technologies to investigate antibiotics and their modes of action. We report silicon cantilever based studies of self-assembled monolayers of mucopeptides which model drug-sensitive and resistant bacterial walls. The underlying concepts needed to understand the measurements will simplify the design of cantilevers and coatings for biosensing and could even impact our understanding of drug action on bacteria themselves. (Une verrée en compagnie du conférencier sera offerte après le colloque.) Organizer : Prof. Markus Büttiker ...

  13. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 25 March 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Hunting for the Higgs with D0 at the Tevatron Prof. Gustaaf Brooijmans / Columbia University The search for the Higgs boson is one of the most important endeavors in current experimental particle physics. At the eve of the LHC start, the Tevatron is delivering record luminosity allowing both CDF and D0 to explore a new region of possible Higgs masses. In this seminar, the techniques used to search for the Higgs boson at the Tevatron will be explained, limiting factors will be examined, and the sensitivity in the various channels will be reviewed. The newly excluded values of the standard model Higgs mass will be presented. Information : http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer : J.-S. Graulich

  14. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 14 April 2010 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium Dark Matter and the XENON Experiment By Dr. Marc Schumann, Physik Institut, Universität Zürich There is convincing astrophysical and cosmological evidence that most of the matter in the Universe is dark: It is invisible in every band of the electromagnetic spectrum. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are promising Dark Matter candidates that arise naturally in many theories beyond the Standard Model. Several experiments aim to directly detect WIMPs by measuring nuclear recoils from WIMPs scattered on target nuclei. In this talk, I will give an overview on Dark Matter and direct Dark Matter detection. Then I will focus on the XENON100 experiment, a 2-phase liquid/gas time projection chamber (TPC) that ...

  15. Universal algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Grätzer, George

    1979-01-01

    Universal Algebra, heralded as ". . . the standard reference in a field notorious for the lack of standardization . . .," has become the most authoritative, consistently relied on text in a field with applications in other branches of algebra and other fields such as combinatorics, geometry, and computer science. Each chapter is followed by an extensive list of exercises and problems. The "state of the art" account also includes new appendices (with contributions from B. Jónsson, R. Quackenbush, W. Taylor, and G. Wenzel) and a well-selected additional bibliography of over 1250 papers and books which makes this a fine work for students, instructors, and researchers in the field. "This book will certainly be, in the years to come, the basic reference to the subject." --- The American Mathematical Monthly (First Edition) "In this reviewer's opinion [the author] has more than succeeded in his aim. The problems at the end of each chapter are well-chosen; there are more than 650 of them. The book is especially sui...

  16. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 29 April 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium Search for spin-1 excited bosons at the LHC Mihail V. Chizhov (Physics Department, Sofia University, Bulgaria) I will discuss the resonance production of new type spin-1 excited bosons, Z*, at hadron colliders. They can be observed as a Breit-Wigner resonance peak in the invariant dilepton mass distribution in the same way as the well-known hypothetical gauge bosons, Z�. This makes them very interesting objects for early searches with the LHC first data. Moreover, they have unique signatures in transverse momentum and angular distributions, which allow to distinguish them from other resonances. Information : http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer: J.-S. Graulich

  17. Energy-Dispersive X-ray Diffraction Investigation of Amorphous Lithium Borate Structure: A Demonstration of the Paris-Edinburgh Cell Setup at 16BM-B at the APS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T.; Wang, Y.; Park, C.; Stebbins, J. F.; Sakamaki, T.; Shen, G.

    2010-12-01

    Knowledge of the structure and physical properties of silicate melts at a fundamental level is essential to help us understand the dynamics of mineral crystallization and fractionation, magma activities, thermal transport, etc. inside the Earth. The boron coordination number change due to pressure might be analogous to what happens on silicates at high pressure. Therefore, to understand the structure behavior under extreme pressure and temperature conditions in disordered silicates, borates are good cases to start with. And eventually we hope to apply the experimental method to silicates that are important in Earth Science. Results from previous NMR, Raman, and neutron diffraction studies on borate glasses show that boron has mixed coordination numbers that vary strongly with composition and temperature [Cormier et al., 2006]. Inelastic x-ray scattering of borate glass structure under pressure has been studied by Lee et al. [Lee et al., 2007]. However, studies of the pressure effect on liquid alkali borate structure are limited. In situ high pressure and high temperature x-ray total scattering of liquid state alkali borate has not even been reported. A 230-ton Paris-Edinburgh (PE) Press has been installed at Beamline 16BM-B at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory since June 2010. The PE Cell is capable of generating high pressure up to ~10GPa and can heat the sample cell up to 2100K in temperature. The bending magnet white beam spanning a large energy range up to 120 KeV provides sufficient energy to reach our experimental needs. The germanium solid state detector is mounted on a Huber rotation stage, which allows us to collect diffraction signal at two theta angles as high as 39.5 degrees. This, combined with the broad white beam spectrum, will provide a large Q range up to about 40 inverse Angstroms, making this setup an ideal beamline for studying non-crystalline materials. We have successfully collected high pressure (up to 7GPa) and high

  18. Determinants of health-related lifestyles among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceijas, Carmen; Waldhäusl, Sabrina; Lambert, Nicky; Cassar, Simon; Bello-Corassa, Rafael

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate students' health-related lifestyles and to identify barriers and social determinants of healthier lifestyles. An online survey, two focus groups and three in-depth interviews across 2014/2015. A stratified by school size and random sample ( n = 468) of university students answered a 67-item questionnaire comprising six scales: Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity, Rapid Eating and Activity Assessment for Patients-Short Version, CAGE, Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence, Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale short version, and ad hoc scale for drug use/misuse. Stratified by gender, χ(2) tests were run to test associations/estimate risks and three multivariate Logistic Regression models were adjusted. A thematic approach guided the analysis of qualitative data. A total of 60% of the respondents were insufficiently physically active, 47% had an unbalanced diet and 30% had low mental wellbeing. Alcohol drinkers versus abstinent were almost equally distributed. A total of 42% of alcohol drinkers reported getting drunk at least once a month. Smokers accounted for 16% of the respondents. Identified risk factors for suboptimal physical activity were as follows: being a woman, not using the university gym and smoking. Risk factors for unbalanced diet were low mental wellbeing and drug use. Poor mental wellbeing was predicted by unbalanced diet, not feeling like shopping and cooking frequently, and a lack of help-seeking behaviour in cases of distress. Qualitative analysis revealed seven thematic categories: transition to new life, university environment and systems, finances, academic pressure, health promotion on campus and recommendations. This study provides robust evidence that the health-related lifestyles of the student population are worrying and suggests that the trend in chronic diseases associated with unhealthy lifestyles sustained over years might be unlikely to change in future generations. University students

  19. Origin (?) of the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Origin (?) of the Universe. 2. The Expanding Universe. Jayant Narlikar, Director,. Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and. Astrophysics, works on action at a distance in physics, new theories of gravitation and new models of the universe. He has made strong efforts to promote teaching and research in astronomy in.

  20. The Global University Press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world's understanding of American university press has long been shaped by university-press books. American university-press books are good international advertisements for the universities whose logos grace their spines. The growth of transnational scholarship and the expansion of digital communications networks are converging in ways…

  1. On universal quantum dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkrtchyan, R. L.

    2017-08-01

    We represent in the universal form restricted one-instanton partition function of supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. It is based on the derivation of universal expressions for quantum dimensions (universal characters) of Cartan powers of adjoint and some other series of irreps of simple Lie algebras. These formulae also provide a proof of formulae for universal quantum dimensions for low-dimensional representations, needed in derivation of universal knot polynomials (i.e. colored Wilson averages of Chern-Simons theory on 3d sphere). As a check of the (complicated) formulae for universal quantum dimensions we prove numerically Deligne's hypothesis on universal characters for symmetric cube of adjoint representation.

  2. Universal deformation formulas

    OpenAIRE

    Remm, E.; Markl, M.

    2015-01-01

    We give a conceptual explanation of universal deformation formulas for unital associative algebras and prove some results on the structure of their moduli spaces. We then generalize universal deformation formulas to other types of algebras and their diagrams.

  3. Suicide Among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Lily; Ball, Michael J.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed study of university and provincial records was undertaken to determine whether or not the low rates of suicide at the University of Alberta might have resulted from incomplete reporting. (Authors/CB)

  4. Metaphor and Universal Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blown, Eric; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Attempts to identify elements of universal language and probes the limitations of the communication metaphor. Universal language is discussed in terms of the theory of quantum nonlocality and the implications of this theory for communication with extraterrestrial beings. (PCB)

  5. The Ohio State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The three computer service facilities at Ohio State University in Columbus are described. Computer services are provided for: instructional purposes, public service activities, university management, the hospital information system, and student services. (BH)

  6. The Worldhood university

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Nørgård, Rikke Toft

    now approach the mode 3 university, which is a university for, in, and of the world. However, new difficulties and challenges also become visible when moving into the mode 3 worldhood university. As we have argued elsewhere making the university belong to the world, and vice-versa, is a challenge...... and society risks breaking down, when the purpose of the university is no longer clear to the public, and indeed this becomes further complicated when the notion of the public itself becomes confused. Hereby we risk that the dialogue between the university and the public – their thinking together – breaks...... as an enclosed world is, as Barnett points out, that it may become ideological as well, where “[t]he university is unable to think imaginatively about itself, beyond its contemporary self-understandings.”, whereby our reflections on the future university needs to include a “counter-ideology thinking.” (Barnett...

  7. The Alien University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2018-01-01

    - they are alien. The conditions of universities today is not one of crisis and upheaval, as with the postmodern universities, it is one of night travel and exile. The alien university leaves behind the epistemological skirmishes of the postmodern university with all its rhetoric and knowledge activism. Thinking...... in the alien university is a move into a whirlpool of nothingness, a “nocturnal space”, where “[d]arkness fills it like a content; it is full, but full of the nothingness of everything.” (Levinas, 2001, p.53). In the alien university thinking is not situated, and instead of rhizomes, and assemblages of thought......, there is merely an imposing and nightly “swarming of points.” (ibid.). There is no place for the alien university, and exactly this exile of thought makes possible the move beyond postmodernism and the mentality of political crisis. The alien university is not in the future as such, but it is not entirely...

  8. Universities metaranking. Positioning of the Spanish universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodoro Luque-Martínez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes the elaboration of a meta-ranking, including the 14 Spanish universities which appear in at least four of the five global rankings considered in this study, that are some of the world’s most influential. It is necessary to differentiate between research rakings that use bibliometric data and rankings that take into account other aspects and other forms of data collection, basically based on surveys. Spanish universities attain better positions in the first group. The investigation highlighted that the higher weaknesses we can find are in the internationalization, the reputation or in the student-teacher ratio. The one exception is for universities that stand out in the two dimensions. Regarding the outcome, there is an evident need for a greater internationalisation, to improve the reputation of the higher education institutions and to enhance the international visibility of the Spanish universities.

  9. Gambling with the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawking, Stephen

    2002-05-01

    This is an excerpt from Stephen Hawking's book The Universe in a Nutshell. Roger Penrose and Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge, were able to show that Einstein's General Theory of Relativity implied that the universe and time itself must have had a beginning in a tremendous explosion. The discovery of the expansion of the universe is one of the great intellectual revolutions of the twentieth century.

  10. A lightweight universe?

    OpenAIRE

    Bahcall, Neta A.; Fan, Xiaohui

    1998-01-01

    How much matter is there in the universe? Does the universe have the critical density needed to stop its expansion, or is the universe underweight and destined to expand forever? We show that several independent measures, especially those utilizing the largest bound systems known - clusters of galaxies - all indicate that the mass-density of the universe is insufficient to halt the expansion. A promising new method, the evolution of the number density of clusters with time, provides the most ...

  11. What Are Good Universities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Raewyn

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers how we can arrive at a concept of the good university. It begins with ideas expressed by Australian Vice-Chancellors and in the "league tables" for universities, which essentially reproduce existing privilege. It then considers definitions of the good university via wish lists, classic texts, horror lists, structural…

  12. The Moral University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berube, Maurice R.; Berube, Clair T.

    2010-01-01

    The Moral University examines the ways that universities act morally toward students, faculty, their communities and the nation. It considers the effectiveness of moral reasoning courses in the curriculum and the growth of leadership courses. The book deals with the myriad ways in which universities act positively toward their communities. It also…

  13. Entrepreneurship in Finnish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi, Piia; Paasio, Kaisu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of universities in fostering and promoting entrepreneurship in Finland. In particular it seeks to examine the university-entrepreneurship relationship: its nature and how universities are addressing the entrepreneurship agenda. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a large…

  14. The Latin American University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Joseph, Ed.; Weatherhead, Richard W., Ed.

    A comparative overview is presented of the Latin American university, which is seen as an institution with a particular history and definite role. Chapters are as follows: "The Latin American University: An Introduction," by Joseph Maier and Richard W. Weatherhead; "Origin and Philosophy of the Spanish American University," by…

  15. Motivating University Researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, P.H.J.; Alves de Sousa, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical investigation into how universities approach the need and means for motivating university researchers through their management practices. The role of work motivation for this group deserves attention because pressures from outside and within the universities are said

  16. Multiply Connected Universes

    OpenAIRE

    Sidharth, B. G.

    2006-01-01

    It is now generally believed that our observable universe is one amongst a very large number - may be $10^{500}$ - of parallel universes. Following the author's own model in this context, we argue that this conglomeration of universes defines a multiply connected super space.

  17. Sierra University in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis, Francisco Manuel Orozco

    2003-01-01

    Sierra University was designed to promote the development of the mountain communities in the State of Sonora, Mexico. The university offers high school graduates an opportunity to pursue their studies in their home region, in order to stimulate economic development and contribute to social cohesion in the highlands area. The university is equipped…

  18. Universities That Litigate Patents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooksby, Jacob H.

    2012-01-01

    American research universities frequently obtain and license patents to their faculty members' inventions. While university licensing is carefully tracked and thoroughly studied, little is known about university decisions to assertively litigate their patents through filing patent infringement lawsuits in federal court. Which universities…

  19. Some Considerations on Universality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Kudlek

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper puts into discussion the concept of universality, in particular for structures not of the power of Turing computability. The question arises if for such structures a universal structure of the same kind exists or not. For that the construction of universal Turing machines and those with some constraints are presented in some detail.

  20. Hybrid Universities in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Molly; Wan, Chang Da; Sirat, Morshidi

    2017-01-01

    Are Asian universities different from those in Western countries? Premised on the hypothesis that Asian universities are different because of hybridization between Western academic models and local traditional cultures, this paper investigates the hybrid characteristics in Malaysian universities resulting from interaction between contemporary…

  1. Greek Universities: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmas, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    Aspects of Greek universities discussed include: current supply and demand for higher education, locus of decision-making under the new university organization, public finance, the state of academic and financial independence, and current issues of debate, including graduate study, research, and the recognition of private universities by the…

  2. The expanding universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lew, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    People have always been fascinated with the stars above and the universe that contains them. Over the years, astronomers have developed numerous theories to explain how the universe began, how it works, and what its ultimate fate will be. But all of the scientists' questions are far from answered. The Expanding Universe goes beyond the creation of the universe to explain how scientists think the universe works, grows, and changes, including what great thinkers Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein had to say about its fate. Readers will also learn about how researchers are slowly shedding light on

  3. On universal quantum dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.L. Mkrtchyan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We represent in the universal form restricted one-instanton partition function of supersymmetric Yang–Mills theory. It is based on the derivation of universal expressions for quantum dimensions (universal characters of Cartan powers of adjoint and some other series of irreps of simple Lie algebras. These formulae also provide a proof of formulae for universal quantum dimensions for low-dimensional representations, needed in derivation of universal knot polynomials (i.e. colored Wilson averages of Chern–Simons theory on 3d sphere. As a check of the (complicated formulae for universal quantum dimensions we prove numerically Deligne's hypothesis on universal characters for symmetric cube of adjoint representation.

  4. The defiant university

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Rikke Toft; Arndt, Sonja; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    heard in a world overcome with trumpism, neoliberalism, fake news and the alt-right? Is there any place and space for the university to be defiant through insisting on doing philosophy through embracing Otherness? And can the future university simultaneously be a non-violent, affectionate, and caring......When thinking about the purpose of the university, we often think about such things as knowledge, critical thinking, new ideas, rigorous science, scholarly development, and recently also employability, productivity, and academic citizenship. However, the future university might carry an equally...... at the university new ideas, innovative viewpoints and radical advances are nurtured. Unfortunately, looking across the higher education landscape today resistance and defiance are often suppressed as unproductive or even dangerous by the university itself. The university has become afraid and concerned with its...

  5. A lightweight universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, Neta A.; Fan, Xiaohui

    1998-01-01

    How much matter is there in the universe? Does the universe have the critical density needed to stop its expansion, or is the universe underweight and destined to expand forever? We show that several independent measures, especially those utilizing the largest bound systems known—clusters of galaxies—all indicate that the mass-density of the universe is insufficient to halt the expansion. A promising new method, the evolution of the number density of clusters with time, provides the most powerful indication so far that the universe has a subcritical density. We show that different techniques reveal a consistent picture of a lightweight universe with only ∼20–30% of the critical density. Thus, the universe may expand forever. PMID:9600898

  6. Universities scale like cities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony F J van Raan

    Full Text Available Recent studies of urban scaling show that important socioeconomic city characteristics such as wealth and innovation capacity exhibit a nonlinear, particularly a power law scaling with population size. These nonlinear effects are common to all cities, with similar power law exponents. These findings mean that the larger the city, the more disproportionally they are places of wealth and innovation. Local properties of cities cause a deviation from the expected behavior as predicted by the power law scaling. In this paper we demonstrate that universities show a similar behavior as cities in the distribution of the 'gross university income' in terms of total number of citations over 'size' in terms of total number of publications. Moreover, the power law exponents for university scaling are comparable to those for urban scaling. We find that deviations from the expected behavior can indeed be explained by specific local properties of universities, particularly the field-specific composition of a university, and its quality in terms of field-normalized citation impact. By studying both the set of the 500 largest universities worldwide and a specific subset of these 500 universities--the top-100 European universities--we are also able to distinguish between properties of universities with as well as without selection of one specific local property, the quality of a university in terms of its average field-normalized citation impact. It also reveals an interesting observation concerning the working of a crucial property in networked systems, preferential attachment.

  7. Rectors of European universities

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Several rectors of European universities visited CERN recently while in Geneva for a conference on coordination between their institutions. The visit began with a welcome by Roger Cashmore, CERN Director of Collider Programmes,and continued with tours of CMS, ALICE and the LHC magnet assembly hall. Photos 01, 02: The visitors in the ALICE assembly hall: (left to right) Dr. Raymond Werlen, Deputy Secretary-General of the Conference of Rectors of Swiss Universities; visit guide Prof. Alain Blondel, Department of Nuclear and Corpuscular Physics, University of Geneva; Prof. Adriano Pimpão, Rector of the University of Algarve, President of the Council of Rectors of Portuguese Universities; Prof. Jean-Pierre Finance, Conference of University Presidents, France; Prof. Jean-Paul Lehners, Vice-President of the Centre Universitaire, Luxemburg.

  8. University Performance Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    quantitative measurement systems for resource allocation and performance evaluation. Compared to other countries the changes in performance measurements and governance of the Danish universities are radical and the Minister of Science heralded them as "the greatest change in university management since...... the founding of Copenhagen University in 1479". The changes took place with surprisingly little resistance from university scholars. The articles in this anthology investigate the origins and rationales for the silent managerial revolution at Danish Universities and the radical implications for the identity......For the last two decades the Danish Universities have felt the impact of the international trend towards implementation of New Public Management. The results are seen in the implementation of new hierarchical governance structures and contractual governance system including market based...

  9. The liberal arts and nursing programme at the University of Maine, 1939-1956. A study of leadership behaviours and organisational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, V

    2001-01-01

    The trend for nursing programmes affiliated with universities in the US began in 1909 but did not gain momentum until the 1960s with the demise of hospital schools of nursing. During the period of time covered in this study, beginning in the 1930s, a hybrid of the present day university-based nursing programme began to appear. These 'cooperative' programmes often sandwiched traditional hospital experience between years of university course work and involved a five-year commitment on the part of students. In 1939 a liberal arts and nursing programme was established at the University of Maine. It continued to operate until 1956 and then ceased to exist. In this descriptive historical study the author investigates why this particular programme was initiated, of what it consisted, and why it had failed. Primary sources accessed included original correspondence, curriculum descriptions, faculty and students reports, and administrative policies. Leadership and organisational behaviour theory was utilised as well as identification of the historical nursing backdrop. Oral history was also utilised for the purpose of verification of written data. Analysis of the data suggests implications for nursing educators and administrators, as well as telling a story of the power of nursing when viewed in the context of constituency groups in a sociopolitical model of organisations. This paper was first presented at the History of Nursing Millennium Conference in Edinburgh in July 2000.

  10. Thermodynamics and emergent universe

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Saumya; Gangopadhyay, Sunandan

    2016-01-01

    We show that in the isentropic scenario the first order thermodynamical particle creation model gives an emergent universe solution even when the chemical potential is non-zero. However there exists no emergent universe scenario in the second order non-equilibrium theory for the particle creation model. We then point out a correspondence between the particle creation model with barotropic equation of state and the equation of state giving rise to an emergent universe without particle creation...

  11. The Entrepreneurial University as a Learning University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Bente

    1999-01-01

    Describes how the Copenhagen Business School (CBS) has increased its capacity for change through strategic management and management for quality. Focuses on the development of an environment for innovative learning, experimentalism, and evaluation and benchmarking to make CBS a "learning university." (SLD)

  12. A Universal Reactive Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Reif; Mørk, Simon; Sørensen, Morten U.

    1997-01-01

    Turing showed the existence of a model universal for the set of Turing machines in the sense that given an encoding of any Turing machine asinput the universal Turing machine simulates it. We introduce the concept of universality for reactive systems and construct a CCS processuniversal...... in the sense that, given an encoding of any CCS process, it behaves like this process up to weak bisimulation. This construction has arather non-constructive use of silent actions and we argue that this would be the case for any universal CCS process....

  13. College and University Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EPA's Green Power Partnership Challenge tracks and recognizes U.S. colleges and universities recognizes the largest single green power users within each participating collegiate athletic conferences.

  14. Universal Quantum Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Bera, Debajyoti; Fenner, Stephen; Green, Frederic; Homer, Steve

    2008-01-01

    We define and construct efficient depth-universal and almost-size-universal quantum circuits. Such circuits can be viewed as general-purpose simulators for central classes of quantum circuits and can be used to capture the computational power of the circuit class being simulated. For depth we construct universal circuits whose depth is the same order as the circuits being simulated. For size, there is a log factor blow-up in the universal circuits constructed here. We prove that this construc...

  15. University of Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The theme of the University of Washington based Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research (CHC) is understanding the biochemical, molecular and exposure...

  16. Imagining the Future University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Barnett, Ronald

    'Imagining the Future University' is a special issue in the journal Philosophy and Theory in Higher Education, published by Peter Lang. Editor in Chief of the journal is John Petrovic, University of Alabama. The speciale issue is edited by Søren Bengtsen and Ronald Barnett.......'Imagining the Future University' is a special issue in the journal Philosophy and Theory in Higher Education, published by Peter Lang. Editor in Chief of the journal is John Petrovic, University of Alabama. The speciale issue is edited by Søren Bengtsen and Ronald Barnett....

  17. Dropout Phenomena at Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Søgaard; Kornbeck, Kasper Pihl; Kristensen, Rune

    Dropout from university studies comprises a number of complex phenomena with serious complex consequences and profound political attention. Further analysis of the field is, therefore, warranted. Such an analysis is offered here as a systematic review which gives answers based on the best possible...... evidence found in the research field comprised by the three review questions to be addressed. The aims of this systematic review can, thus, be summarized like this: Which answers can be offered from research in relation to the following questions: What is dropout from university studies? Why do...... such dropout phenomena occur at universities? What can be done by the universities to prevent or reduce such dropout phenomena?...

  18. Mathematics at University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winsløw, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Mathematics is studied in universities by a large number of students. At the same time it is a field of research for a (smaller) number of university teachers. What relations, if any, exist between university research and teaching of mathematics? Can research “support” teaching? What research...... and what teaching? In this presentation we propose a theoretical framework to study these questions more precisely, based on the anthropological theory of didactics. As a main application, the links between the practices of mathematical research and university mathematics teaching are examined...

  19. Distant Supernovae Indicate Ever-Expanding Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    and its inhabitants are made comprise only a small fration of the gravitating mass in the Universe. There is now a new component, the "dark energy" which joins the "dark matter" in shaping the large-scale geometric and dynamical structure. Clearly, more observations are needed to further support the findings described here. They will soon be forthcoming, especially from new and large telescopes like the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) , that has recently delivered its first, impressive results. But already now, on the verge of the new millenium, we are having a first glimpse of extremely exciting and fundamental aspects in the continuing human quest for the deep truths of nature. Notes: [1] The ESO members of the "High-z Supernova Search" team (see URL: http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/cfa/oir/Research/supernova/HighZ.html) are Bruno Leibundgut and Patrick Woudt (ESO HQ, Garching, Germany) and Jason Spyromilio (Paranal Observatory, Chile). Chris Lidman (La Silla Observatory, Chile) and Isobel Hook (formerly ESO HQ, now Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, UK) are members of the "Supernova Cosmology Project" (see URL: http://www-supernova.lbl.gov/). The astronomers mostly used the ESO 3.6-m and 3.6-m NTT telescopes at La Silla for these research programmes. [2] In astronomy, the redshift (z) denotes the fraction by which the lines in the spectrum of an object are shifted towards longer wavelengths. The observed redshift of a distant galaxy or quasar gives a direct estimate of the universal expansion (i.e. the "recession velocity"). Since this expansion rate increases with the distance, the velocity is itself a function (the Hubble relation) of the distance to the object. For instance, a redshift of z = 0.1 corresponds to a velocity of 30,000 km/sec, and assuming a Hubble constant of 20 km/sec per million light-years, to a distance of about 1,500 million light-years. How to obtain ESO Press Information ESO Press Information is made available on the World-Wide Web (URL: http

  20. THE EFFECTS OF MENTAL (PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL BEING LEVELS ON HAPPINESS LEVELS OF KOCAELI UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF SPORTS SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Gönener

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it was aimed to investigate whether mental (psychological well-being has an effect on the level of happiness of Kocaeli University Faculty of Sports Science students according to age, gender, department, class and perceived academic achievement. The research group constitutes 182 randomly chosen students in the 2015-2016 school year. In the study in order to evaluate mental well-being levels of the students “Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale” which was developed by Tennant et al. (2007 and adapted to Turkish by Keldalı (2015 and in order to evaluate happiness levels of the students “Happiness Scale of Oxford” which was developed by Hills and Argyle (2002 and adapted to Turkish by Doğan and Sapmaz (2012 and in order to gather information on socio-demographic backgrounds of the students a personal information form developed by the researchers were used as data gathering tools. According to the findings of the research, there was a significant positive correlation between mental (psychological well-being and happiness. As a result this study showed that mental well-being has a positive effect on happiness for Kocaeli University Faculty of Sports Science Students

  1. Talent Management for Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores human resource management practices in the university sector with a specific focus on talent pools and talent management more generally. The paper defines talent management in the context of the university sector and then explores its interdependence with organisational strategy, the metrics used to measure academic performance…

  2. Neutrinos and the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nick E

    2013-01-01

    In this talk, I review the potential connection of neutrinos to the Physics of the Early Universe, in particular the r\\^ole of (sterile) neutrinos to leptogenesis/baryogenesis and the dark sector of the Universe. The possibility of CPT Violation among active neutrinos at early times and its role in leptogenesis/baryogenesis without sterile neutrinos is also touched upon.

  3. University-industry interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Arend J.; van der Sijde, Peter

    2002-01-01

    This book addresses the question of how to organise university-industry interaction. The objective was to identify best practices and to gain insight into the conditions necessary for optimal knowledge and technology transfer from universities to industry, in particular small and medium-sized

  4. Universality in heterogeneous catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Pedersen, Thomas Bligaard; Logadottir, Ashildur

    2002-01-01

    Based on an extensive set of density functional theory calculations it is shown that for a class of catalytic reactions there is a universal, reactant independent relation between the reaction activation energy and the stability of reaction intermediates. This leads directly to a universal relati...

  5. University students' adjustment problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, V I; Cherian, L

    1998-06-01

    Considerable information is available on the adjustment problems of first-year university students in developed countries, but comparatively little is known about such problems in Asia and Africa. This study of a representative sample of 1257 first-year students conducted at the University of the North showed that 33 to 85% of the first-year students experienced various adjustment problems.

  6. University Engineering Design Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-02

    shoulder strain or sprain 18 University Design Challenge 2012 –2013 Introduction Arizona State University (ASU) was contracted by the Air Force Research... causing issues with regards to lateral instability. Testing Parameters:  Amsteel purple rope, fed normally (horizontals and verticals), but then looped

  7. Universal Design Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Mary C.

    2004-01-01

    Universal design is made up of four elements: accessibility, adaptability, aesthetics, and affordability. This article addresses the concept of universal design problem solving through experiential learning for an interior design studio course in postsecondary education. Students' experiences with clients over age 55 promoted an understanding of…

  8. University Extension Before 1915

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Lowell R.

    1976-01-01

    The author traces university extension from its elite English roots to evolving forces toward democratization of educational opportunities and the simultaneous emergence of similar American programs such as library-related night schools, the Lyceum movement, Chataqua, the Philadelphia Society for Extension of University Teaching, and the…

  9. General Topology of the Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Pandya, Aalok

    2002-01-01

    General topology of the universe is descibed. It is concluded that topology of the present universe is greater or stronger than the topology of the universe in the past and topology of the future universe will be stronger or greater than the present topology of the universe. Consequently, the universe remains unbounded.

  10. The holographic universe

    CERN Document Server

    Talbot, Michael

    1991-01-01

    'There is evidence to suggest that our world and everything in it - from snowflakes to maple trees to falling stars and spinning electrons - are only ghostly images, projections from a level of reality literally beyond both space and time.' This is the astonishing idea behind the holographic theory of the universe, pioneered by two eminent thinkers: physicist David Bohm, a former protege of Albert Einstein, and quantum physicist Karl Pribram. The holographic theory of the universe encompasses consciousness and reality as we know them, but can also explain such hitherto unexplained phenomena as telepathy, out-of-body experiences and even miraculous healing. In this remarkable book, Michael Talbot reveals the extraordinary depth and power of the holographic theory of the universe, illustrating how it makes sense of the entire range of experiences within our universe - and in other universes beyond our own.

  11. Type II universal spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  12. Interaction university and school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gionara Tauchen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering that the interaction between universities and middle schools is fundamental for organization and the qualification of the education system, we conducted a qualitative study on twenty public municipal schools of Rio Grande, RS, designed to investigate and understand the effectiveness of university activities (teaching, research and extension in regard to the promotion and strengthening of the interactions between these institutions. We highlight the activities related to Pibid, the Education Observatory, extension, supervised internships, and to undergraduate and postgraduate research. From comprehensions about these activities, we discuss the interaction between school and university.

  13. Structure of the Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Haubold, H. J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    An introductory account is given of the understanding of the structure of the universe. At present the most plausible theory of the origin of the universe is that it formed from the explosion of an extremely hot and dense fireball several billion years ago. During the first few seconds after the big bang, the energy density was so great that only fundamental particles (leptons, quarks, gauge bosons) existed. As the universe cooled and expanded after the big bang, nuclei and atoms formed and c...

  14. Universe of Particles

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2010-01-01

    The entire Universe is made up of particles. But where do they come from? What is the origin of the laws of nature? The permanent exhibition "Universe of Particles", installed on the ground floor of the Globe of Science and Innovation, invites you to discover CERN by taking you on a journey all the way back to the Big Bang. It will help you answer questions such as: What's the purpose of this research? How do you accelerate particles? How do you detect them? What are today's theories on matter and the Universe? How does this affect our daily life?

  15. Cyberplagiarism in University Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Cavanillas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the legal framework for plagiarism, and its twofold nature of illicit appropriation (from the author of the plagiarized work and fraud (with regard to the target audience of the plagiarism. Based on these premises, academic cyberplagiarism is analysed as a form of plagiarism carried out using electronic tools in the university setting. The question of responsibility (who can regulate the legal consequences of plagiarism? before and after the Ley Orgánica de Universidades (organic law on universities, LOU is studied, as is the disciplinary handling of cyberplagiarism with the limited regulations currently in place at universities.

  16. Consciousness in the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Chamcham

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available So far we can identify at least three concepts within modern cosmology that bring into debate the question of consciousness in the universe: 1 Fine Tuning; 2 The Anthropic Principle and 3 The Multiverse. This does not exclude the question of the role of observer (i.e. consciousness in cosmology as developed within Quantum Physics: we observe the universe through quanta and any breakthrough in understanding the origin and nature of the universe will come only through a quantum theory of gravity […

  17. Clipboard: Selecting cells to make cerebral cortex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-02-27

    Feb 27, 2008 ... Author Affiliations. Yijing Chen1 David J Price1. Centres for Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience Research, University of Edinburgh, Hugh Robson Building, George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9XD, UK ...

  18. ULTRA: Universal Grammar as a Universal Parser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, David P

    2018-01-01

    A central concern of generative grammar is the relationship between hierarchy and word order, traditionally understood as two dimensions of a single syntactic representation. A related concern is directionality in the grammar. Traditional approaches posit process-neutral grammars, embodying knowledge of language, put to use with infinite facility both for production and comprehension. This has crystallized in the view of Merge as the central property of syntax, perhaps its only novel feature. A growing number of approaches explore grammars with different directionalities, often with more direct connections to performance mechanisms. This paper describes a novel model of universal grammar as a one-directional, universal parser. Mismatch between word order and interpretation order is pervasive in comprehension; in the present model, word order is language-particular and interpretation order (i.e., hierarchy) is universal. These orders are not two dimensions of a unified abstract object (e.g., precedence and dominance in a single tree); rather, both are temporal sequences, and UG is an invariant real-time procedure (based on Knuth's stack-sorting algorithm) transforming word order into hierarchical order. This shift in perspective has several desirable consequences. It collapses linearization, displacement, and composition into a single performance process. The architecture provides a novel source of brackets (labeled unambiguously and without search), which are understood not as part-whole constituency relations, but as storage and retrieval routines in parsing. It also explains why neutral word order within single syntactic cycles avoids 213-like permutations. The model identifies cycles as extended projections of lexical heads, grounding the notion of phase. This is achieved with a universal processor, dispensing with parameters. The empirical focus is word order in noun phrases. This domain provides some of the clearest evidence for 213-avoidance as a cross

  19. Burnout in university students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carmen Cecilia Caballero D; Edgar Breso Esteve; Orlando González Gutierréz

    2015-01-01

      In order to provide a better understanding and characterization of the nature of academic burnout in university students, a review of the concept, its evolution and extrapolation of the work context...

  20. University of Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The focus of the University of Southern California (USC) Children''s Environmental Health Center is to develop a better understanding of how host susceptibility and...

  1. Universities and Epistemology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnett, Ronald; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the relation between epistemology and higher education. We shall start by briefly examining three classical texts on the understanding of knowledge at universities, as well as noting some others, and go on to sketch a version of our own. Our argument is as follows: the world...... is such that the relationship between the university and knowledge remains fundamental but that it needs to be reconceptualised. In particular, the 21st century is seeing the emergence of digital reason, which could be said to be a form of non-reason. It may appear, therefore, that we are witnessing the dissolution or severing...... of the relationship between the university, on the one hand, and knowledge and truth on the other hand. To the contrary, we argue for what we term an ecological perspective on knowledge, with the concept of ecology being treated in the most generous way, partly as a way of rethinking the university into the future...

  2. Many Universes POSSIBLE!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Pankaj K.

    An innovative scientific work on the evolution of the universe unravels a fresh phenomenon about the birth and evolution of a Big Bang. We see why Big Bang is not the earliest evolutionary stage of the universe rather it is necessarily just a part of the Universe which couldn't be revered more than a womb for clusters. SYNTESIS: The Big Bang starts from a black hole i.e. prior to Big Bang there was a black hole and there is expected a number of Big Bang in the universe going similar to our Big Bang and the whole process of the expansion and contraction of the Big Bang as described in the paper.

  3. 2017 TRI University Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Details about the 2017 TRI University Challenge, in which EPA is looking to academic institutions to help build a diverse portfolio of practical and replicable projects that benefit communities, the environment, academic institutions, and the TRI Program.

  4. Learning in Parallel Universes

    OpenAIRE

    Berthold, Michael R.; Wiswedel, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    This abstract summarizes a brief, preliminary formalization of learning in parallel universes. It also attempts to highlight a few neighboring learning paradigms to illustrate how parallel learning fits into the greater picture.

  5. University of Wisconsin - Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... million people every year by providing access to university resources and engaging people in learning, wherever they ... people earn their degree or fostering new business growth or educating families on financial health, UW- ...

  6. Perelman's Universal Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, John W.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the concept of the universal audience as the basic factor of Chaim Perelman's rhetorical theory and concludes that it is subject to the same criticism as Rousseau's general will and Kant's categorical imperative. (JMF)

  7. The European University Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraio, Cinzia; Bonaccorsi, Andrea; Geuna, Aldo

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a new and systematic characterization of 488 universities, from 11 European countries: Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland and UK. Using micro indicators built on the integrated Aquameth database, we characterize the Euro...

  8. Decay of oscillating universes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithani, Audrey Todhunter

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested by Ellis et al that the universe could be eternal in the past, without beginning. In their model, the "emergent universe'' exists forever in the past, in an "eternal'' phase before inflation begins. We will show that in general, such an "eternal'' phase is not possible, because of an instability due to quantum tunneling. One candidate model, the "simple harmonic universe'' has been shown by Graham et al to be perturbatively stable; we find that it is unstable with respect to quantum tunneling. We also investigate the stability of a distinct oscillating model in loop quantum cosmology with respect to small perturbations and to quantum collapse. We find that the model has perturbatively stable and unstable solutions, with both types of solutions occupying significant regions of the parameter space. All solutions are unstable with respect to collapse by quantum tunneling to zero size. In addition, we investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and the Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. Finally, we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe. Although the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence in canonical quantum cosmology, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. Here, we apply this approach to the simple harmonic universe, by extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field φ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock''.

  9. The universal access handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Stephanidis, Constantine

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the field of Universal Access has made significant progress in consolidating theoretical approaches, scientific methods and technologies, as well as in exploring new application domains. Increasingly, professionals in this rapidly maturing area require a comprehensive and multidisciplinary resource that addresses current principles, methods, and tools. Written by leading international authorities from academic, research, and industrial organizations and nonmarket institutions, The Universal Access Handbook covers the unfolding scientific, methodological, technological, and pol

  10. Universal homotopy theories

    OpenAIRE

    Dugger, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Given a small category C, we show that there is a universal way of expanding C into a model category, essentially by formally adjoining homotopy colimits. The technique of localization becomes a method for imposing `relations' into these universal gadgets. The paper develops this formalism and discusses various applications, for instance to the study of homotopy colimits, the Dwyer-Kan theory of framings, and to the homotopy theory of schemes.

  11. Universal computer interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dheere, RFBM

    1988-01-01

    Presents a survey of the latest developments in the field of the universal computer interface, resulting from a study of the world patent literature. Illustrating the state of the art today, the book ranges from basic interface structure, through parameters and common characteristics, to the most important industrial bus realizations. Recent technical enhancements are also included, with special emphasis devoted to the universal interface adapter circuit. Comprehensively indexed.

  12. University contracts summary book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    The principal objectives of the Fossil Energy Program are to seek new ideas, new data, fundamental knowledge that will support the ongoing programs, and new processes to better utilize the nation's fossil energy resources with greater efficiency and environmental acceptability. Toward this end, the Department of Energy supports research projects conducted by universities and colleges to: Ensure a foundation for innovative technology through the use of the capabilities and talents in our academic institutions; provide an effective, two-way channel of communication between the Department of Energy and the academic community; and ensure that trained technical manpower is developed to carry out basic and applied research in support of DOE's mission. Fossil Energy's university activities emphasize the type of research that universities can do best - research to explore the potential of novel process concepts, develop innovative methods and materials for improving existing processes, and obtain fundamental information on the structure of coal and mechanisms of reactions of coal, shale oil, and other fossil energy sources. University programs are managed by different Fossil Energy technical groups; the individual projects are described in greater detail in this book. It is clear that a number of research areas related to the DOE Fossil Energy Program have been appropriate for university involvement, and that, with support from DOE, university scientific and technical expertise can be expected to continue to play a significant role in the advancement of fossil energy technology in the years to come.

  13. University students' mental health: Aksaray University example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezzan Gündoğdu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether mental health scores of the university students differ based on gender, whether they study in their ideal majors, whether they are contended with their majors, economic condition perceived and perceptions on employment opportunity after graduation. The sample group of the study constituted 3492 students comprising 2037 female students and 1455 male students attending Faculty of Education (634, Engineering Faculty (1582, Economic and Administrative Sciences Faculty (1097, Faculty of Science and Letters (762, Medical Vocational College (540, Physical Training and Sports College (443 and Aksaray Vocational College (1452 of Aksaray University in 2010-2011 Academic Year. Symptom Checklist (SCL 90-R developed by Deragotis, (1983; eg Öner, 1997 has been used to collect data on mental health level of the students involved in the study. Statistical analysis of the data collected has been carried out using t Test, One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Significant differences have been found in students in terms of independent variants according to the general symptom average score and numerous sub-scale scores.

  14. University to hold university-community partnership conference

    OpenAIRE

    Felker, Susan B.

    2007-01-01

    Community leaders, administrators, non-profit organization leaders, graduate students, local government officials, and college and university faculty are invited to attend Virginia Tech's "The Community Calls Forth the University, the Fourth Annual University-Community Partnership Conference."

  15. Recipes for the Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    As part of the World Year of Physics, the Physics Section of the University of Geneva is organising a series of conferences for the uninitiated. Each of the conferences will begin with a demonstration in the auditorium of the detection of cosmic rays and, in collaboration with Professor E. Ellberger of the Conservatoire de Musique de Genève, of how these signals from the farthest reaches of the Universe can be used to create "cosmic music". The third conference in the series, "How to build a universe?", will take place on Tuesday 15 March 2005 and the speaker will be the CERN theoretical physicist, John Ellis. A tiny number of elementary particles are responsible for the very diverse universe that surrounds us. These basic building blocks of matter interact by exchanging photons and other similar particles. After summing up what we know about these fundamental building blocks, their role in the history of the universe will be discussed. Where does matter come from? Where do the structures that ...

  16. The entangled accelerating universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F. [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Estacion Ecologica de Biocosmologia, Pedro de Alvarado, 14, 06411-Medellin (Spain)], E-mail: p.gonzalezdiaz@imaff.cfmac.csic.es; Robles-Perez, Salvador [Colina de los Chopos, Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Estacion Ecologica de Biocosmologia, Pedro de Alvarado, 14, 06411-Medellin (Spain)

    2009-08-31

    Using the known result that the nucleation of baby universes in correlated pairs is equivalent to spacetime squeezing, we show in this Letter that there exists a T-duality symmetry between two-dimensional warp drives, which are physically expressible as localized de Sitter little universes, and two-dimensional Tolman-Hawking and Gidding-Strominger baby universes respectively correlated in pairs, so that the creation of warp drives is also equivalent to spacetime squeezing. Perhaps more importantly, it has been also seen that the nucleation of warp drives entails a violation of the Bell's inequalities, and hence the phenomena of quantum entanglement, complementarity and wave function collapse. These results are generalized to the case of any dynamically accelerating universe filled with dark or phantom energy whose creation is also physically equivalent to spacetime squeezing and to the violation of the Bell's inequalities, so that the universe we are living in should be governed by essential sharp quantum theory laws and must be a quantum entangled system.

  17. How much we know about university internationalization and university autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gullieva, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we aim to deepen our theoretical and practical understanding of internationalization of universities by exploring the relationship between university internationalization and university autonomy. It has become an accepted practice for universities to incorporate internationalization...... raise concerns about the sustainability of university internationalization efforts as well as about the erosion of individual and university-wide autonomy. Herein, we conjecture that the process of university internationalization and its sustainability is determined by the structure and exercise...... of university autonomy settings at home and in host countries. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to identify empirical studies that theorize and conceptualize the intersection between university internationalization and university autonomy. We put forward a process model of university...

  18. Phonology without universal grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archangeli, Diana; Pulleyblank, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The question of identifying the properties of language that are specific human linguistic abilities, i.e., Universal Grammar, lies at the center of linguistic research. This paper argues for a largely Emergent Grammar in phonology, taking as the starting point that memory, categorization, attention to frequency, and the creation of symbolic systems are all nonlinguistic characteristics of the human mind. The articulation patterns of American English rhotics illustrate categorization and systems; the distribution of vowels in Bantu vowel harmony uses frequencies of particular sequences to argue against Universal Grammar and in favor of Emergent Grammar; prefix allomorphy in Esimbi illustrates the Emergent symbolic system integrating phonological and morphological generalizations. The Esimbi case has been treated as an example of phonological opacity in a Universal Grammar account; the Emergent analysis resolves the pattern without opacity concerns.

  19. Performance Measurement at Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lueg, Klarissa

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes empirical approaches to testing the reliability, validity, and organizational effectiveness of student evaluations of teaching (SET) as a performance measurement instrument in knowledge management at the institutional level of universities. Departing from Weber’s concept...... and legitimation forms the basis for proposing four steps of investigation. The suggested mixed-methods approach comprises the following: first, thematic analysis can serve as a tool to evaluate the legitimacy discourse as initiated by official SET affirmative documents by government, university, and students...... of bureaucracy and critical responses to this concept, we discuss how contemporary SET are used as an instrument of organizational control at Danish universities. A discussion of the current state of performance measurement within the frame of new public management (NPM) and its impact on knowledge creation...

  20. University Community Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G. Cooper

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available University-Community Partnerships have been recognized as a valuable contribution to both the academic community and our cities and towns. In the words of Henry Cisneros, former U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Design secretary, “The long-term futures of both the city and the university in this country are so intertwined that one cannot—or perhaps will not—survive without the other.” Increasingly, colleges and university are bringing their time, energy and resources to bear on local problems. They are using their other physical, financial and intellectual capital to facilitate economic development, provide social services, technical assistance and create opportunities for applied research.

  1. UNIVERSITIES FINANCING POLICY ISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala CRECIUN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available University autonomy represented an additional argument against government interference in university education. From academic perspective, the diversification of funding sources and the introduction of changes in the funding mechanism represented positive factors in the evolution of higher education. It is obvious that most of the problems associated with underfunding of higher education are relevant because it affects the quality of education and overall performance of universities. Since the training costs per capita in the higher education system were the lowest compared with the same indicator in relation to vocational schools and colleges in the period of 2005 – 2009, it is clear that underfunding is real and requires necessary measures to be taken to remedy the situation

  2. Phonology without Universal Grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eArchangeli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The question of identifying the properties of language that are specific human linguistic abilities, i.e. Universal Grammar, lies at the center of linguistic research. This paper argues for a largely Emergent Grammar in phonology, taking as the starting point that memory, categorization, attention to frequency, and the creation of symbolic systems are all nonlinguistic characteristics of the human mind. The articulation patterns of American English rhotics illustrate categorization and systems; the distribution of vowels in Bantu vowel harmony uses frequencies of particular sequences to argue against Universal Grammar and in favor of Emergent Grammar; prefix allomorphy in Esimbi illustrates the Emergent symbolic system integrating phonological and morphological generalizations. The Esimbi case has been treated as an example of phonological opacity in a Universal Grammar account; the Emergent analysis resolves the pattern without opacity concerns.

  3. Universities as Development Hubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Aage; Lindegaard, Klaus; Lehmann, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Capacity-building in environment and development has been implemented and tested over the last decade through university and university consortia networking. Universities from Africa (Botswana and South Africa), Asia (Malaysia and Thailand), Central America (Costa Rica, El Salvador and Nicaragua...... been promising in terms of concrete results within each type of activity and together they provide vital steps in capacity-building in tertiary education to the benefit of development and environment. Some of the results and their implications are presented in this chapter and more are documented...... international aid programmes to tertiary education, including research and innovation in an interplay with other research institutions and business. In the absence of such support the so-called digital divide between industrial and developing and transition countries will widen, and brain-drain and poverty...

  4. The future generations University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Weller

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a recent design project for the Future Generations University, by the interdisciplinary design company Room 4.1.3. The Future Generations University is to be a new university specifically devoted to issues of sustainability, sited north of Sydney on Australia's east coast. The paper describes the idea of such a new educational institution, the design process by which such a place expects to be formed, the theoretical position of Room 4.1.3's submission and the forms and concepts of the design itself. These aspects of the project are then placed within the context of contemporary environmental design theory. The project itself, and the means by which the work was both solicited and done, presents a case study in interdisciplinary design, wherein landscape architectural sensibilities provide a platform for emergent design paradigms.

  5. Supercomplexity and the university

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2018-01-01

    Ronald Barnett’s modern classic Realizing the University in an Age of Supercomplexity (published December 1999), has had a crucial impact internationally on the field of Higher Education research and develop- ment since the book was published now nearly 20 years ago. Bridging an academic oeuvre...... across almost 30 years with close to 30 published volumes, Realizing the University in an Age of Supercomplexity plays an important role in the development and transformation of Barnett’s social theory of Higher Education into a social philosophy of Higher Education. In the book Barnett performs...... an important move from a focus on knowledge and epistemology to a focus on being and ontol- ogy in relation to Higher Education practices. Barnett shifts his fundamental perspective and view on the relation between universities and the wider society from one of caution and worry to a perspective of hope...

  6. Universality in network dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzel, Baruch; Barabási, Albert-László

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant advances in characterizing the structural properties of complex networks, a mathematical framework that uncovers the universal properties of the interplay between the topology and the dynamics of complex systems continues to elude us. Here we develop a self-consistent theory of dynamical perturbations in complex systems, allowing us to systematically separate the contribution of the network topology and dynamics. The formalism covers a broad range of steady-state dynamical processes and offers testable predictions regarding the system's response to perturbations and the development of correlations. It predicts several distinct universality classes whose characteristics can be derived directly from the continuum equation governing the system's dynamics and which are validated on several canonical network-based dynamical systems, from biochemical dynamics to epidemic spreading. Finally, we collect experimental data pertaining to social and biological systems, demonstrating that we can accurately uncover their universality class even in the absence of an appropriate continuum theory that governs the system's dynamics.

  7. 2. Bullying Among University Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James O'Higgins Norman

    2016-01-01

      In terms of an institutionalised response to bullying among university students although Marilyn Campbell's research relates only to Australia her contribution sets out the importance of universities...

  8. The 4-percent universe

    CERN Document Server

    Panek, Richard

    2012-01-01

    It is one of the most disturbing aspects of our universe: only four per cent of it consists of the matter that makes up every star, planet, and every book. The rest is completely unknown. Acclaimed science writer Richard Panek tells the story of the handful of scientists who have spent the past few decades on a quest to unlock the secrets of “dark matter" and the even stranger substance called “dark energy". These are perhaps the greatest mysteries in science,and solving them will reshape our understanding of the universe and our place in it. The stakes could not be higher. Panek's fast-paced

  9. PBL at Aalborg university

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    From the preface: "All the articles in this book have been presented at the International Conference PBL 2006 ABP, that was held in Lima, Peru, July 19th-21th 2006. This conference is part of a series of Pan-American conferences. It is the first time that Aalborg University has participated....... At the PBL conference in Lima, there were 8 participants from Aalborg University presenting parts of an Aalborg model. All together we had the responsibility for 11 presentations including keynote presentation and workshop. We have found it worthwhile to publish these articles together, because there are...

  10. Fundamentals of university mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    McGregor, C M; Stothers, W W

    2010-01-01

    The third edition of this popular and effective textbook provides in one volume a unified treatment of topics essential for first year university students studying for degrees in mathematics. Students of computer science, physics and statistics will also find this book a helpful guide to all the basic mathematics they require. It clearly and comprehensively covers much of the material that other textbooks tend to assume, assisting students in the transition to university-level mathematics.Expertly revised and updated, the chapters cover topics such as number systems, set and functions, differe

  11. The Biological Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Steven J.

    2000-03-01

    Introduction; 1. From the physical world to the biological universe: Democritus to Lowell; 2. Plurality of worlds and the decline of anthropocentrism; 3. The solar system: the limits of observation; 4. Solar systems beyond: the limits of theory; 5. Extraterrestrials in literature and the arts: the role of imagination; 6. The UFO controversy: on perception and deception; 7. The origin and evolution of life in the extraterrestrial context; 8. SETI: the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence; 9. The convergence of disciplines: birth of a new science; 10. The meaning of life; Summary and conclusion: the biological universe and the limits of science.

  12. University-Community Engagement: Case Study of University Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chile, Love M.; Black, Xavier M.

    2015-01-01

    Corporatisation of universities has drawn parallels between contemporary universities and business corporations, and extended analysis of corporate social responsibility to universities. This article reports on a case study of university-community engagement with schools and school communities through youth engagement programmes to enhance…

  13. A Primer for University Presidents: Managing the Modern University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flawn, Peter T.

    This book is a practical guide to the management of a university. It discusses the role of the university president and offers advice on areas ranging from establishing the university agenda to timing for retirement. Discussions include all aspects of life in a major research university: governance and management, working with committees, campus…

  14. Are "universal" DNA primers really universal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pranay; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi

    2014-11-01

    "Universal" DNA primers LCO 1490 and HCO 2198 were originally designed from three coding and six anticoding strands by comparing highly conserved regions of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) genes across 15 taxa. These primers have been successful in amplifying a 710-bp fragment of highly conserved regions of the COI gene for more than 80 invertebrate species from 11 phyla. In the present study, 130,843 variations were reviewed in the primer region of mitochondrial molecular markers by comparing 725 COI sequences from the kingdom Animalia. It was found that, for 177 invertebrate species, the forward primer (LCO 1490) showed only four conserved regions, compared to 12 in the original study. For ascidians, fungi and vertebrates, it showed approximately 50 % conserved regions, dropping to one conserved region for echinoderms. However, the reverse primer (HCO 2198) was highly conserved across 725 COI primer sequences. A similar pattern was observed in amino acid distributions. There was a significant difference in the means of base pair differences from the level of family, genus and species for LCO 1490 [analysis of variance (ANOVA), F 6,188 = 8.193, P primers from reference sequences belonging to the level of order (maximum 5 bp differences), family (maximum 6 bp differences) or genus (maximum 1 bp difference). Reverse primers can be designed from the level of family (maximum 5 bp differences) or genus (maximum 2 bp differences).

  15. Entropy of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Humitaka

    2010-06-01

    Charles Darwin's calculation of a life of Earth had ignited Kelvin's insight on a life of Sun, which had eventually inherited to the physical study of stellar structure and energy source. Nuclear energy had secured a longevity of the universe and the goal of the cosmic evolution has been secured by the entropy of black holes.

  16. Homecoming at Atwater University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Sarah M.; Van Pelt, Scott; Kingsak, Phoebe; Williams, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Atwater University (AU) administration is struggling with an increased number of student alcohol-related problems. In particular, during the annual homecoming parade, students are extremely intoxicated and belligerent toward alumni. The new dean of students is appalled by the condoned student behavior. He also received two complaint letters from…

  17. University Student Online Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-mei

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a study investigating university student online plagiarism. The following questions are investigated: (a) What is the incidence of student online plagiarism? (b) What are student perceptions regarding online plagiarism? (c) Are there any differences in terms of student perceptions of online plagiarism and print plagiarism? (d)…

  18. Teaching Geomorphology at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, David; Hamilton, Patrick

    1978-01-01

    Geomorphology courses in British universities emphasize the main landform/process systems rather than more abstract concepts. Recommends a more theoretical focus on fundamental geomorphic processes and methodological problems. Available from: Faculty of Modern Studies, Oxford Polytechnic, Headington, Oxford OX3 OBP, England. (Author/AV)

  19. Revisiting the university front

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lock, G.; Lorenz, C.F.G.

    2007-01-01

    The article argues that the most important trends in the recent metamorphosis of higher education, especially of university teaching and research, cannot be understood without placing them in the context of general developments in political life. Both processes reveal alarming features and there is

  20. Empirically sampling Universal Dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schluter, Natalie; Agic, Zeljko

    2017-01-01

    Universal Dependencies incur a high cost in computation for unbiased system development. We propose a 100% empirically chosen small subset of UD languages for efficient parsing system development. The technique used is based on measurements of model capacity globally. We show that the diversity...

  1. Explore Your Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd-Ronning, Nicole Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This warm-up lab is intended to get students familiar with the large numbers encountered in astronomy (e.g. distances, times, numbers of stars and galaxies in the universe). Students will measure the dimensions of the classroom and/or the distance between objects in the classroom, and report their findings in units of millimeters, micrometers and nanometers.

  2. Fred Hoyle's Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    black hole at the nucleus of a galaxy had not received. 'standard sanction' and so the idea remainedrelatively unknown, especially because it was proposed in the context of a steady- state universe. existing massive objects and that the resulting energy spectrum of the particles would simulate that of high- energy cosmic ...

  3. Origin(?) of the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Inflation: Approach of the latter kind led in the 1980s to the now well known idea of the inflationary universe. ... This rapid expansion is called inflation. Just as compound interest grows much faster than simple ... Some Practical Weaknesses of Big Bang Cosmology. Let us now look at a few of the problems that the big bang.

  4. Baby universes revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambjørn, J.; Barkley, J.; Budd, T.G.; Loll, R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of baby universes has been an important ingredient in understanding and quantifying non-critical string theory or, equivalently, models of two-dimensional Euclidean quantum gravity coupled to matter. Within a regularized description based on dynamical triangulations, we amend an earlier

  5. Origin(?) of the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this part of the series we discuss the standard cosmologi- cal model valid close to the big bang epoch. The origin of light nuclei is believed to have taken place within the first three minutes or so when the universe was very hot and dominated by radiation. Subsequently, it cooled down and today we should see radiation ...

  6. Islamist Movement Challenges Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    In Tunisian and Egyptian universities, scholars face a growing Islamist resolve to remake their countries on the basis of religious principles. Both Tunisia and Egypt face questions that could affect higher education across the Middle East and North Africa: Can their new Islamist governments spread conservative religious values and also create…

  7. Note on parallel universes

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Niall; Hand, David J.

    2007-01-01

    The parallel universes idea is an attempt to integrate several aspects of learning which share some common aspects. This is an interesting idea: if successful, insights could cross-fertilise, leading to advances in each area. The ‘multi-view’ perspective seems to us to have particular potential.

  8. The Classification of Universes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorken, J

    2004-04-09

    We define a universe as the contents of a spacetime box with comoving walls, large enough to contain essentially all phenomena that can be conceivably measured. The initial time is taken as the epoch when the lowest CMB modes undergo horizon crossing, and the final time taken when the wavelengths of CMB photons are comparable with the Hubble scale, i.e. with the nominal size of the universe. This allows the definition of a local ensemble of similarly constructed universes, using only modest extrapolations of the observed behavior of the cosmos. We then assume that further out in spacetime, similar universes can be constructed but containing different standard model parameters. Within this multiverse ensemble, it is assumed that the standard model parameters are strongly correlated with size, i.e. with the value of the inverse Hubble parameter at the final time, in a manner as previously suggested. This allows an estimate of the range of sizes which allow life as we know it, and invites a speculation regarding the most natural distribution of sizes. If small sizes are favored, this in turn allows some understanding of the hierarchy problems of particle physics. Subsequent sections of the paper explore other possible implications. In all cases, the approach is as bottoms up and as phenomenological as possible, and suggests that theories of the multiverse so constructed may in fact lay some claim of being scientific.

  9. 3 Copperbelt University, School

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-08-02

    Aug 2, 2016 ... The aim of this study was to assess the quality of groundwater for human ... Key Words: Groundwater, ambia, rural areas, water quality, Mbala district ...... Freshwater Quality Studies and. Monitoring Programmes. University of Gothenburg (2010). Zambia Environmental and Climate. Change Policy Brief.

  10. Jimma University, Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    academic and social performances of students of J imma University (J_U). Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 242 ... oral contraceptives, menopause or inhibition of ovulation. Symptoms may also correlate with .... change in 150(61.9%), sleep change in. 14(60.3%). The commonest pschobehavioral.

  11. Origin (?) of the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 3. Origin (?) of the Universe The Big Bang. Jayant V Narlikar. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 3 March 1996 pp 6-12. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/03/0006-0012 ...

  12. Romanians decipher the Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    Balan, Sorin

    2007-01-01

    We are at the European Nuclear Research Center, the greatest partcile accelerator in the world. Approximately 50 people work here. Thanks to them, Romania can be proud of taking part in the greatest experiment in the world that tries to find an explanation for the ofrmation of the Universe. (1,5 page)

  13. Envisioning a Transdisciplinary University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Leigh; Ali, Mohammed K.; Cuff, Patricia; Huffman, Mark D.; Kelly, Bridget; Kishore, Sandeep P.; Narayan, K.M. Venkat; Siegel, Karen R; Vedanthan, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Achieving social and economic growth requires collaboration, especially in global health. If universities are to improve health globally, they will need to train students and to support faculty who can effectively collaborate with those from other disciplines and cultures. PMID:25564706

  14. Envisioning a transdisciplinary university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Leigh; Ali, Mohammed K; Cuff, Patricia; Huffman, Mark D; Kelly, Bridget B; Kishore, Sandeep P; Narayan, K M Venkat; Siegel, Karen R; Vedanthan, Rajesh

    2014-12-01

    Achieving social and economic growth requires collaboration, especially in global health. If universities are to improve health globally, they will need to train students and to support faculty who can effectively collaborate with those from other disciplines and cultures. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  15. Parallel universes beguile science

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A staple of mind-bending science fiction, the possibility of multiple universes has long intrigued hard-nosed physicists, mathematicians and cosmologists too. We may not be able -- as least not yet -- to prove they exist, many serious scientists say, but there are plenty of reasons to think that parallel dimensions are more than figments of eggheaded imagination.

  16. Personnel Management. Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus. Management Improvement Program.

    This manual is one of 10 completed in the Ohio Management Improvement Program (MIP) during the 1971-73 biennium. In this project, Ohio's 34 public universities and colleges, in an effort directed and staffed by the Ohio Board of Regents, have developed manuals of management practices, in this case, concerning personnel management. Emphasis in this…

  17. The holographic universe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McFadden, P.L.; Skenderis, K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a holographic description of four-dimensional single-scalar inflationary universes in terms of a three-dimensional quantum field theory (QFT). The holographic description correctly reproduces standard inflationary predictions in their regime of applicability. In the opposite case, wherein

  18. Entrepreneurship and University Licensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, M.

    2005-01-01

    Outside invention has gained in importance as universities are actively seeking commercialization of their inventions since the passage of the Bayh-Dole Act. The paper analyzes the incentives to invent for outside and inside inventors. It is shown that outside inventors have greater incentives to

  19. The University Needs "You"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Allen

    2009-01-01

    Colleges and universities need English education professors who know what it is to teach five classes a day, accommodate IEPs, and still take on extracurricular activities. They need English education professors who not only present at NCTE Annual Conventions, but who also want to be in schools talking to teachers on a regular basis. They need…

  20. Mapping the Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, S. D.

    1999-06-01

    Galaxies congregate into clusters, clusters amass into superclusters and so on - at every observed scale, as astronomers build maps of the sky, they find matter organized into clumps. Yet taken as a whole, the texture of the universe is smooth, in keeping with theory. A new "music of the spheres" may explain how ordered structures emerged from the original smooth chaos.

  1. Origin (?) of the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 1. Origin (?) of the Universe Historical Background. Jayant V Narlikar. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 7-13. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/01/0007-0013 ...

  2. Antimatter in the Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Dolgov, A.

    1992-01-01

    Cosmological models which predict a large amount of antimatter in the Universe are reviewed. Observational signatures and searches for cosmic antimatter are briefly considered. A short discussion of new long range forces which might be associated with matter and antimatter is presented.

  3. Universities and Epistemology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnett, Ronald; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the relation between epistemology and higher education. We shall start by briefly examining three classical texts on the understanding of knowledge at universities, as well as noting some others, and go on to sketch a version of our own. Our argument is as follows: the world...

  4. 9. Universality and Incomputability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 10. Algorithms - Universality and Incomputability. R K Shyamasundar. Series Article ... Author Affiliations. R K Shyamasundar1. Computer Science Group, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India ...

  5. Canadian Universities and Globalization

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In communications, health care, and economics, national policies and practices are today routinely influenced by events, discoveries, and decisions that originate beyond national borders. But what of our system of education,and particularly our universities? How are they participating in, and being affected by, globalization ...

  6. Karl Marx University Leipzig

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1987-06-02

    Soc.Ethiop.,2(1),29-37 (1988). ELECTROCHEMICAL REDUCTION OF COMPLEX SPECIES IN SOLUTION. WITH METAL ACCUMULATION AT THE ELECTRODE. Peter Grundler. Karl Marx University Leipzig. Chemical Department, Analytical Center. Talstr. 35, Leipzig, DDR-7010. (Received June 2, 1987 ; revised April 28, ...

  7. Origin (?) of the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W de Sitter wrote a paper in which he solved Einstein's equations with the A-term, and obtained a model in which the universe expands with a scale factor that increases exponentially with time. The Hubble constant for this univers~ is given by. H = [(113) Ac2]l/2. Thus this model is apparently closer to reality than Einstein's.

  8. University of Migeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgery,. University of Migeria teaching Hospital,. Enugu, Nigeria. REPR///T ... Conversely, the more we live within this ... Review. Hahnemann; Holism;. To properly introduce homeopathy, we must .... animals. Animals do not possess the power of speech. They cannot report the .... transition of death with dignity, serenity,.

  9. Organizing University Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Thomas E.

    During a period of projected declining enrollments some years ago, colleges and universities began looking to business and industry for models and methods to achieve stability and exhibit accountability. Zero-based budgeting, computerized record keeping, and planned-programmed-budgeting systems found their way to college campuses. A trend to…

  10. Chaotic universe model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydiner, Ekrem

    2018-01-15

    In this study, we consider nonlinear interactions between components such as dark energy, dark matter, matter and radiation in the framework of the Friedman-Robertson-Walker space-time and propose a simple interaction model based on the time evolution of the densities of these components. By using this model we show that these interactions can be given by Lotka-Volterra type equations. We numerically solve these coupling equations and show that interaction dynamics between dark energy-dark matter-matter or dark energy-dark matter-matter-radiation has a strange attractor for 0 > w de  >-1, w dm  ≥ 0, w m  ≥ 0 and w r  ≥ 0 values. These strange attractors with the positive Lyapunov exponent clearly show that chaotic dynamics appears in the time evolution of the densities. These results provide that the time evolution of the universe is chaotic. The present model may have potential to solve some of the cosmological problems such as the singularity, cosmic coincidence, big crunch, big rip, horizon, oscillation, the emergence of the galaxies, matter distribution and large-scale organization of the universe. The model also connects between dynamics of the competing species in biological systems and dynamics of the time evolution of the universe and offers a new perspective and a new different scenario for the universe evolution.

  11. Should Universities Promote Employability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCowan, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    Employability is becoming increasingly central to the mission and functioning of universities, spurred on by national and supranational agencies, and the demands of marketisation. This article provides a response to the normative dimensions of the question, progressing through four stages: first, there is a brief consideration of the meaning and…

  12. Universe or Multiverse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Bernard

    2009-08-01

    Part I. Overviews: 1. Introduction and overview Bernard Carr; 2. Living in the multiverse Steven Weinberg; 3. Enlightenment, knowledge, ignorance, temptation Frank Wilczek; Part II. Cosmology and Astrophysics: 4. Cosmology and the multiverse Martin J. Rees; 5. The anthropic principle revisited Bernard Carr; 6. Cosmology from the top down Stephen Hawking; 7. The multiverse hierarchy Max Tegmark; 8. The inflationary universe Andrei Linde; 9. A model of anthropic reasoning: the dark to ordinary matter ratio Frank Wilczek; 10. Anthropic predictions: the case of the cosmological constant Alexander Vilenkin; 11. The definition and classification of universes James D. Bjorken; 12. M/string theory and anthropic reasoning Renata Kallosh; 13. The anthropic principle, dark energy and the LHC Savas Dimopoulos and Scott Thomas; Part III. Particle Physics and Quantum Theory: 14. Quarks, electrons and atoms in closely related universes Craig J. Hogan; 15. The fine-tuning problems of particle physics and anthropic mechanisms John F. Donoghue; 16. The anthropic landscape of string theory Leonard Susskind; 17. Cosmology and the many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics Viatcheslav Mukhanov; 18. Anthropic reasoning and quantum cosmology James B. Hartle; 19. Micro-anthropic principle for quantum theory Brandon Carter; Part IV. More General Philosophical Issues: 20. Scientific alternatives to the anthropic principle Lee Smolin; 21. Making predictions in a multiverse: conundrums, dangers, coincidences Anthony Aguirre; 22. Multiverses: description, uniqueness and testing George Ellis; 23. Predictions and tests of multiverse theories Don N. Page; 24. Observation selection theory and cosmological fine-tuning Nick Bostrom; 25. Are anthropic arguments, involving multiverses and beyond, legitimate? William R. Stoeger; 26. The multiverse hypothesis: a theistic perspective Robin Collins; 27. Living in a simulated universe John D. Barrow; 28. Universes galore: where will it all end? Paul

  13. The Artful Universe Expanded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  14. Universal Design for Academic Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmen, John P. S.

    2011-01-01

    Universal design (UD) can play a role in many aspects of academic life and is often thought of in the context of learning. However, this chapter focuses on the impact of UD on the design of facilities in a university or campus setting. Universal design has the potential for transforming universities into truly egalitarian institutions that…

  15. State University System of Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board of Governors, State University System of Florida, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents some information about the State University System of Florida. The following are presented in this paper: (1) University Work Plans and Annual Reports; (2) State University System 2009 Annual Report; (3) Quick Facts: Planned New Degree Programs--2010 to 2013; (4) State University System Tuition Differential Summary, FY…

  16. Universals in the World's Musics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven; Jordania, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Many decades of skepticism have prevented the field of musicology from embracing the importance of musical universals. When universals "have" been discussed, it has generally been in the form of meta-critiques about the concept of universals, rather than in positive proposals about actual universals. We present here a typology of four categories…

  17. University Libraries in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Maria Elena Saucedo

    1983-01-01

    Provides brief description of recent situation of university libraries in Latin America and Caribbean, noting importance of education, characteristics of universities, and library services in supporting functions of universities. University library systems established in countries including Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela, Brazil, and Cuba are…

  18. QANU - Quality Assurance Netherlands Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Toft; Maria E., Weber; Vyt, André

    The Quality Assurance Netherlands Universities (QANU) underwent an ENQA-coordinated external review in 2016. The review was chaired by Henrik Toft Jensen, Research fellow at Roskilde University (RUC), Denmark.......The Quality Assurance Netherlands Universities (QANU) underwent an ENQA-coordinated external review in 2016. The review was chaired by Henrik Toft Jensen, Research fellow at Roskilde University (RUC), Denmark....

  19. Universities Venture into Venture Capitalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desruisseaux, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Reports that some universities are starting their own venture-capital funds to develop campus companies, or are investing endowment funds with established venture-capital firms inclined to finance potential spinoffs from campus research. Examples cited are from the University of Alabama, Vanderbilt University (Tennessee), University of…

  20. The future of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, AJ

    2007-01-01

    Many books have described how the universe became the way it is today. But what about the future of the universe? How long might the universe as we recognize it survive? The Future of the Universe takes the reader on a journey through space and time, beginning with a long look at the Earth and solar system, voyaging to the outermost galaxies, and finishing with speculations about the life and fate of the entire universe.

  1. Proliferation of the Phoenix Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic cosmology, in which the universe will experience alternating periods of gravitational collapse and expansion, provides an interesting understanding of the early universe and is described as "The Phoenix Universe". In usual expectation, the cyclic universe should be homogeneous, however, with studying the cosmological perturbations, we find that the amplification of curvature perturbations on the large scale may rip the homogeneous universe into a fissiparous multiverse after one or sev...

  2. Universal Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughery, Mike

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  3. Writing and University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Cecilia Andrade Calderón

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The article reports on the exploratory-descriptive investigation carried out to explain the writing behavior of the students of the Universidad Colegio Mayor of Cundinamarca. To this effect, it refers to the results of the project that are based on the state of the art of writing in higher education; it is supported by various conceptualizations about its technique throughout time, orality and writing at the University, the act of writing, and references about specific didactics. Furthermore, the article proposes theoretical approaches concerned with the process of writing, such as constructivism, meaningful learning, metacognition, social practices of language and new writing tendencies in information media. Through all this, the article present a profile of the University students on the level of writing and it evaluates their editing skills and the level of writing productiveness. This allows offering an academic proposal with possible guidelines for the institution to strengthen writing ability in their students.

  4. Universal metamaterial absorbe

    CERN Document Server

    Smaali, Rafik; Moreau, Antoine; Taliercio, Thierry; Centeno, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    We propose a design for an universal absorber, characterized by a resonance frequency that can be tuned from visible to microwave frequencies independently of the choice of the metal and the dielectrics involved. An almost resonant perfect absorption up to 99.8 % is demonstrated at resonance for all polarization states of light and for a very wide angular aperture. These properties originate from a magnetic Fabry-Perot mode that is confined in a dielectric spacer of $\\lambda/100$ thickness by a metamaterial layer and a mirror. An extraordinary large funneling through nano-slits explains how light can be trapped in the structure. Simple scaling laws can be used as a recipe to design ultra-thin perfect absorbers whatever the materials and the desired resonance wavelength, making our design truly universal.

  5. Universality for quintessence

    CERN Document Server

    Cicciarella, F

    2016-01-01

    Several recent works suggested the possibility of describing inflation by means of a renormalization group equation. In this paper we discuss the application of these methods to models of quintessence. In this framework a period of exponential expansion corresponds to the slow evolution of the scalar field in the neighborhood of a fixed point. A minimal set of universality classes for models of quintessence is defined and the transition from a matter dominated to quintessence dominated universe is studied. Models in which quintessence is non-minimally coupled with gravity are also discussed. We show that the formalism proves to be extremely convenient to describe quintessence and moreover we find that in most of the models discussed in this work quintessence naturally takes over ordinary matter.

  6. Universality for quintessence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciarella, F.; Pieroni, M.

    2017-08-01

    Several recent works suggested the possibility of describing inflation by means of a renormalization group equation. In this paper we discuss the application of these methods to models of quintessence. In this framework a period of exponential expansion corresponds to the slow evolution of the scalar field in the neighborhood of a fixed point. A minimal set of universality classes for models of quintessence is defined and the transition from a matter dominated to quintessence dominated universe is studied. Models in which quintessence is non-minimally coupled with gravity are also discussed. We show that the formalism proves to be extremely convenient to describe quintessence and moreover we find that in most of the models discussed in this work quintessence naturally takes over ordinary matter.

  7. Pythagorean Philolaus’ Pyrocentric Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maniatis, Yiorgo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, first, I reexamine the pyrocentric universe of the Pythagorean, Philolaus, who emphatically propounded that the center of the cosmos is neither the earth nor the sun, but a central fiery hearth that stands in the middle of the spherical universe. Second, I attempt to demonstrate the value and significance of this pyrocentric cosmic model by elaborating its novel revolutionary elements and its contribution to astronomy. Third, by underlining the diachroneity and timeliness of this cosmic model, I try to establish as to how the model served as a precursor to not only the ancient and modern heliocentric models, as widely believed, but also as much to the contemporary cosmic models and theories of astrophysics.

  8. Improving University Research Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley O’Reilly

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the current data management practices of university researchers at an Intermountain West land-grant research university in the United States. Key findings suggest that researchers are primarily focused on the collection and housing of research data. However, additional research value exists within the other life cycle stages for research data—specifically in the stages of delivery and maintenance. These stages are where most new demands and requirements exist for data management plans and policies that are conditional for external grant funding; therefore, these findings expose a “gap” in current research practice. These findings should be of interest to academics and practitioners alike as findings highlight key management gaps in the life cycle of research data. This study also suggests a course of action for academic institutions to coalesce campus-wide assets to assist researchers in improving research value.

  9. University Curricula in Nanoelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik; Nielsen, Ivan Ring

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is having increasing impact on university curricula in electrical engineering. The advent of nanotechnology brings about new possibilities in nanoelectronics, including increasingly complex systems on chip, sophisticated technology fusion between electronic devices and non-electron......Nanotechnology is having increasing impact on university curricula in electrical engineering. The advent of nanotechnology brings about new possibilities in nanoelectronics, including increasingly complex systems on chip, sophisticated technology fusion between electronic devices and non......-electronic devices (such as bio-devices or chemical devices), and possibilities for developing fundamentally new nanoscale electronic devices. New engineering curricula in nanoelectronics must take these developments into account. A model for the development of new curricula is presented and some representative...

  10. Life in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    Live Webcast from Europe's Leading Research Organisations Summary Is there life elsewhere in the Universe? Are we alone? These questions have always fascinated humanity and for more than 50 years, physicists, biologists, chemists, cosmologists, astronomers and other scientists have worked tirelessly to answer these fundamental questions. And now this November via webcast, all the world will have the opportunity to see and hear the latest news on extraterrestrial life from the most prestigious research centers and how for the past three months, European students have had the chance to jump into the scientists' shoes and explore these questions for themselves. The event is being sponsored by the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) , the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) , in cooperation with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). "Life in the Universe" is being mounted in collaboration with the Research Directorate-General of the European Commission for the European Week of Science and Technology in November 2001 . "Life in the Universe" competitions are already underway in 23 European countries to find the best projects from school students between 14 and 18. Two winning teams from each country will be invited to a final event at CERN in Geneva on 8-11 November 2001 to present their projects and discuss them with a panel of International Experts at a special three-day event. They will also compete for the "Super Prize" - a free visit to ESA's and ESO's research and technology facilities at Kourou and Paranal in South America. Students participating in the programme are encouraged to present their views on extraterrestrial life creatively. The only requirement is that the views be based upon scientific evidence. Many projects are being submitted just now - among them are scientific essays

  11. Principles of Quantum Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Pervushin, V N

    2014-01-01

    The present monograph is devoted to the theory of gravitation derived consequently as joint nonlinear realization of conformal and affine symmetries by means of Cartan differential forms. In the framework of the joint nonlinear realization of conformal and affine symmetries the interpretation of the last cosmological observational data of Ia Supernovae, anisotropy of the primordial radiation temperature and the mass spectrum of electroweak bosons, including the Higgs particle mass in the expected region ~ 125 GeV, is given. All these observational and experimental data testify to the vacuum energy dominance. The vacuum Casimir energy is a source of intensive cosmological quantum creation gravitons and electroweak bosons including Higgs particles from the empty Universe during the first 10^(-12) sec. The products of decay of the electroweak bosons give the matter content of the present day Universe, including primordial radiation and its baryon asymmetry.

  12. The universal Higgs fit

    CERN Document Server

    Giardino, Pier Paolo; Masina, Isabella; Raidal, Martti; Strumia, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    We perform a state-of-the-art global fit to all Higgs data. We synthesise them into a 'universal' form, which allows to easily test any desired model. We apply the proposed methodology to extract from data the Higgs branching ratios, production cross sections, couplings and to analyse composite Higgs models, models with extra Higgs doublets, supersymmetry, extra particles in the loops, anomalous top couplings, invisible Higgs decay into Dark Matter. Best fit regions lie around the Standard Model predictions and are well approximated by our 'universal' fit. Latest data exclude the dilaton as an alternative to the Higgs, and disfavour fits with negative Yukawa couplings. We derive for the first time the SM Higgs boson mass from the measured rates, rather than from the peak positions, obtaining $M_h = 125.0 \\pm 1.8$ GeV.

  13. Geneva University - Cancelled

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2010-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVA 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 19 April 2010 17h00 - Stückelberg Auditorium Into the darkness: Simulating the distribution of dark matter in our Universe Prof. Volker Springel - Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies   THE COLLOQUIUM IS CANCELLED. Prof. Markus Büttiker

  14. Inflation in the universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S.

    1987-05-01

    The hot big bang cosmology, or the standard cosmology as it is appropriately known, is a highly successful model, providing a reliable and tested accounting of the Universe from 0.01 sec after the bang until today, some 15 Gyr later. However, very special initial data seem to be required in order to account for the observed smoothness and flatness of our Hubble volume and for the existence of the small primeval density inhomogeneities required for the formation of structure in the Universe. Inflation offers a means of accounting for these special initial data, which is based upon physics at sub-planck energy scales (<< m/sub pl/ approx. = 10/sup 19/ GeV) and is motivated by contemporary ideas in particle theory. Here I review the status of the 'Inflationary Paradigm'. At present essentially all inflationary models involve a very weakly-coupled (quantified by the presence of a dimensionless parameter of order 10/sup -12/ or so) scalar field which is displaced from the minimum of its potential. Regions of the Universe where the scalar field is initially displaced from its minimum undergo inflation as the scalar field relaxes, resulting in a Universe today which resembles ours in regions much larger than our present Hubble volume (approx. = 10/sup 28/ cm), but which on very large scales (>> 10/sup 28/ cm) may be highly irregular. The most conspicuous blemish on the paradigm is the lack of a compelling particle physics model to implement it. I also review some other unresolved issues, and discuss in detail the all important confrontation between inflation and observational data. Finally, I discuss the possibility that inflation leads to large-scale, primeval magnetic fields of sufficient strength to be of astrophysical interest. 123 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Writing and University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Martha Cecilia Andrade Calderón

    2009-01-01

    The article reports on the exploratory-descriptive investigation carried out to explain the writing behavior of the students of the Universidad Colegio Mayor of Cundinamarca. To this effect, it refers to the results of the project that are based on the state of the art of writing in higher education; it is supported by various conceptualizations about its technique throughout time, orality and writing at the University, the act of writing, and references about specific didactics. Furthermore,...

  16. Universal gradient descent

    OpenAIRE

    Gasnikov, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    In this small book we collect many different and useful facts around gradient descent method. First of all we consider gradient descent with inexact oracle. We build a general model of optimized function that include composite optimization approach, level's methods, proximal methods etc. Then we investigate primal-dual properties of the gradient descent in general model set-up. At the end we generalize method to universal one.

  17. For information: Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 TéL: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Lundi 5 décembre COLLOQUE DE PHYSIQUE at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium ARCHEOLOGY OF THE UNIVERSE WITH THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND by Prof. Paolo de Bernardis / Université de Rome 'La Sapienza'

  18. Cyberplagiarism in University Regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago Cavanillas

    2008-01-01

    The article examines the legal framework for plagiarism, and its twofold nature of illicit appropriation (from the author of the plagiarized work) and fraud (with regard to the target audience of the plagiarism). Based on these premises, academic cyberplagiarism is analysed as a form of plagiarism carried out using electronic tools in the university setting. The question of responsibility (who can regulate the legal consequences of plagiarism?) before and after the Ley Orgánica de Universidad...

  19. The Bibliographical Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Zenovia Niculescu

    2006-01-01

    The article is an essay on bibliography, about its power and value. The bibliography universe perceived from the informational perspective reveals the representation levels regarding: the bibliographical thesaurus; support of the bibliographical information; organisation and communication of the bibliographical information; the bibliography users. From the perspective of the knowledge theory, the competency field of bibliography is situated at the level of the whole human knowledge, and it...

  20. Origin (?) of the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    our place in our galaxy, and its place as only one member of a far larger collection of galaxies which fill the observable universe. Primitive .... different types of motion. Figure 3 HflTSchel's tele- scope: This ma/or IeItISCDptI. hDd a lube length of 48 feet. andanapsrlureDf48lnd1es. SERIES I ARTICLE is one of rotational ...

  1. Dark matter universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, Neta A.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter—a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations—from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is “cold” (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology—a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)—fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle. PMID:26417091

  2. Life In The Universe!

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Is there life elsewhere in the Universe? Are we alone? These questions have always fascinated humanity and for more than 30 years, physicists, biologists, chemists, cosmologists and astronomers have worked tirelessly to answer these questions. Yet just this past week at CERN students from all over Europe came to present their ideas on the subject and listen to the latest on extraterrestrial life from some of the world's most prestigious researchers.

  3. Building baby universes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The thought of a scientist trying to design a laboratory experiment in which to create a whole new universe probably sounds like it belongs in the plot of a science-fiction B-movie. But as author Zeeya Merali explains in her new book A Big Bang in a Little Room, there are more than a few eminent physicists who think that this is theoretically possible.

  4. Dark matter universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, Neta A

    2015-10-06

    Most of the mass in the universe is in the form of dark matter--a new type of nonbaryonic particle not yet detected in the laboratory or in other detection experiments. The evidence for the existence of dark matter through its gravitational impact is clear in astronomical observations--from the early observations of the large motions of galaxies in clusters and the motions of stars and gas in galaxies, to observations of the large-scale structure in the universe, gravitational lensing, and the cosmic microwave background. The extensive data consistently show the dominance of dark matter and quantify its amount and distribution, assuming general relativity is valid. The data inform us that the dark matter is nonbaryonic, is "cold" (i.e., moves nonrelativistically in the early universe), and interacts only weakly with matter other than by gravity. The current Lambda cold dark matter cosmology--a simple (but strange) flat cold dark matter model dominated by a cosmological constant Lambda, with only six basic parameters (including the density of matter and of baryons, the initial mass fluctuations amplitude and its scale dependence, and the age of the universe and of the first stars)--fits remarkably well all the accumulated data. However, what is the dark matter? This is one of the most fundamental open questions in cosmology and particle physics. Its existence requires an extension of our current understanding of particle physics or otherwise point to a modification of gravity on cosmological scales. The exploration and ultimate detection of dark matter are led by experiments for direct and indirect detection of this yet mysterious particle.

  5. The universal Higgs fit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giardino, P. P.; Kannike, K.; Masina, I.

    2014-01-01

    We perform a state-of-the-art global fit to all Higgs data. We synthesise them into a 'universal' form, which allows to easily test any desired model. We apply the proposed methodology to extract from data the Higgs branching ratios, production cross sections, couplings and to analyse composite H...... as an alternative to the Higgs, and disfavour fits with negative Yukawa couplings. We derive for the first time the SM Higgs boson mass from the measured rates, rather than from the peak positions, obtaining M-h = 124.4 +/- 1.6 GeV.......We perform a state-of-the-art global fit to all Higgs data. We synthesise them into a 'universal' form, which allows to easily test any desired model. We apply the proposed methodology to extract from data the Higgs branching ratios, production cross sections, couplings and to analyse composite...... Higgs models, models with extra Higgs doublets, supersymmetry, extra particles in the loops, anomalous top couplings, and invisible Higgs decays into Dark Matter. Best fit regions lie around the Standard Model predictions and are well approximated by our 'universal' fit. Latest data exclude the dilaton...

  6. The Flying University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Catherine

    The Flying University is solo theater performance framed as an academic lecture about Marie Curie and her discovery of radium, delivered to a group of women who have gathered in secret to further their education. As the lecture proceeds, the professor brings in her own research based on a study of Esther Horsch (1905-1991) who lived on a farm in central Illinois. She introduces data from Esther's journals, personal memories, and dreams about Esther's life. The professor's investigation of radium plays at the intersections of magical and mundane, decay and the transformation of life, and the place of ambition in these two women's lives. The intention of this piece is to explore these themes, which are full of mystery, through the traces of the daily lives of Mme. Curie and Esther. Their words and photos are used as roots from which to imagine the things that echo beyond their familiar work; elemental and also fantastically radiant. The Flying University was written and performed by Catherine Friesen April 27-29, 2012 in the Center for Performance Experiment at Hamilton College as part of the University of South Carolina MFA Acting Class of 2013 showcase, Pieces of Eight.

  7. CRISIS COMMUNICATION IN UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan MADRAN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Institutions should implement effective crisis communication strategies to manage their reputations in crisis situations. Thus, the negative perceptions that may occur because of crisis can be reduced and eliminated by continuously informing stakeholders. Therefore, various researches are needed in the area of crisis communication management. The aim of the study is to determine the types of crises that often occur in universities and evaluate the crisis communication efforts in higher education institutions. Crises and crisis communication efforts were evaluated within the framework of media reflections in this study. Content analysis was applied in the classification of crises and responses provided for crises. As a result, the types of crises in Turkish universities were determined as campus safety, actions, protests, loss of confidential information, loss of financial opportunities, loss of key managers and personnel, staff problems, increase of accidents, slander and gossip, unnecessary explanations, rumors, damage to organization and employee reputation, terrorism, workplace violence, corruption, fire and epidemic. It is seen that universities don’t make any communicational effort regarding campus safety, staff problems, increase of accidents, corruption or fire.

  8. Aromatase 2004, Edinburgh, UK, 6-8 September 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R; Larionov, Alexey

    2004-11-02

    Aromatase is the key enzyme involved in oestrogen biosynthesis. Oestrogens not only influence normal development and function but are also implicated in the aetiology and progression of many diseases. Over recent years rational drug design programmes have led to the development of agents that specifically and potently inhibit aromatase. The multidisciplinary international symposium Aromatase 2004 provided a forum in which basic scientists, translational researchers and practising clinicians reviewed latest results, exchanged opinions, and defined future needs for the regulation of oestrogen biosynthesis and the use of aromatase inhibitors.

  9. The validity of the Arabic Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghubash, R; Abou-Saleh, M T; Daradkeh, T K

    1997-11-01

    For the purpose of this study, a consecutive sample of 95 postpartum women were assessed at 1 week postpartum with the (EPDS) and at 8 +/- 2 weeks postpartum using the Present State Examination (PSE). A moderate correlation between PSE total score and EPDS score was found (r = 0.57). A moderate agreement between EPDS and Catego diagnosis of depression was also found (Kappa = 0.52). Using a cut-off score of 12 on EPDS and Catego diagnosis as a criterion variable, the sensitivity and specificity of the scale were 73% and 90%, respectively. However, using a cut-off score of 10, the sensitivity of the scale rose to 91% without much fall in its specificity (84%). The internal reliability of the scale was 0.84 (alpha Cronbach). We conclude that the Arabic version of the EPDS is a reliable and valid screening tool for depression in postpartum women.

  10. The Validation of Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 2-stage design process was used. All high scorers and a randomly selected number of low scorers on EPDS were clinically assessed for depression using DSM IV Research Diagnostic Criteria. Validity coefficients were calculated and a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve was used to determine the best cut-off point.

  11. Use of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale to identify ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of postpartum depression and the demographic and clinical characteristics associated with a positive screen. Subjects and methods: Five hundred and fifty consecutive and consenting postnatal women at five postnatal clinics in Aba, Southeastern Nigeria over the period 1 June – 1 ...

  12. How Old is the Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-01

    First Reading of a Basic Cosmic Chronometer with UVES and the VLT Summary Most astronomers would agree that the age of the Universe - the time elapsed since the "Big Bang" - is one of the " holy grails of cosmology ". Despite great efforts during recent years, the various estimates of this basic number have resulted in rather diverse values. When derived from current cosmological models, it depends on a number of theoretical assumptions that are not very well constrained by the incomplete available observational data. At present, a value in the range of 10-16 billion years [1] is considered most likely. But now, an international team of astronomers [2] has used the powerful ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) and its very efficient spectrograph UVES to perform a unique measurement that paves the way for a new and more accurate determination of the age of the Universe. They measured for the first time the amount of the radioactive isotope Uranium-238 in a star that was born when the Milky Way, the galaxy in which we live, was still forming. It is the first measurement ever of uranium outside the Solar System . This method works in a way similar to the well-known Carbon-14 dating in archaeology, but over much longer times. Ever since the star was born, the Uranium "clock" has ticked away over the eons, unaffected by the turbulent history of the Milky Way. It now reads 12.5 billion years . Since the star obviously cannot be older than the Universe, it means that the Universe must be older than that . Although the stated uncertainty is still about 25% or about ±3 billion years, this is only to a minor extent due to the astronomical observation. The main problem is the current absence of accurate knowledge of some of the basic atomic and nuclear properties of the elements involved. However, further laboratory work will greatly improve this situation and a more accurate value for the age of the star and implicitly, for the Universe, should therefore be forthcoming before

  13. Assessing Public Engagement with Science in a University Primate Research Centre in a National Zoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Mark T.; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M.; Whiten, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen increasing encouragement by research institutions and funding bodies for scientists to actively engage with the public, who ultimately finance their work. Animal behaviour as a discipline possesses several features, including its inherent accessibility and appeal to the public, that may help it occupy a particularly successful niche within these developments. It has also established a repertoire of quantitative behavioural methodologies that can be used to document the public's responses to engagement initiatives. This kind of assessment is becoming increasingly important considering the enormous effort now being put into public engagement projects, whose effects are more often assumed than demonstrated. Here we report our first attempts to quantify relevant aspects of the behaviour of a sample of the hundreds of thousands of visitors who pass through the ‘Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre’ in Edinburgh Zoo. This University research centre actively encourages the public to view ongoing primate research and associated science engagement activities. Focal follows of visitors and scan sampling showed substantial ‘dwell times’ in the Centre by common zoo standards and the addition of new engagement elements in a second year was accompanied by significantly increased overall dwell times, tripling for the most committed two thirds of visitors. Larger groups of visitors were found to spend more time in the Centre than smaller ones. Viewing live, active science was the most effective activity, shown to be enhanced by novel presentations of carefully constructed explanatory materials. The findings emphasise the importance and potential of zoos as public engagement centres for the biological sciences. PMID:22496822

  14. List of Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Heller Jagiellonian University, Krakow Samuli Hemming University of Iceland Yasuaki Hikida DESY, Hamburg Christian Hillmann Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Potsdam Stephan Hoehne Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Gabriele Honecker CERN, Geneva Carlos Hoyos University of Wales, Swansea Mechthild Huebscher Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid Matthias Ihl University of Texas at Austin Emiliano Imeroni University of Wales, Swansea Nikos Irges University of Crete Negru Iulian University of Craiova Matthias Kaminski Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Stefanos Katmadas Universiteit Utrecht Shoichi Kawamoto Oxford University Christoph Keller Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Arjan Keurentjes Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Sadi Khodaee Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan, Iran Michael Kiermaier Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA Elias Kiritsis Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and University of Crete Ingo KirschEidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Johanna Knapp CERN, Geneva Paul Koerber Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Simon Koers Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Anatoly Konechny Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh Peter Koroteev Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow Daniel KreflLudwig-Maximilians-Universität and Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Chethan KrishnanUniversité Libre de Bruxelles Stanislav Kuperstein Université Libre de Bruxelles Alberto Lerda Università del Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria Roman Linares Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Iztapalapa, México Maria A Lledo Universidad de Valencia Dieter Luest Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Joseph Lykken Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, IL Carlo Maccaferri Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Oscar Macia Universidad de Valencia Tristan Maillard Centre de

  15. Asian top universities in six world university ranking systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood Khosrowjerdi; Zahra Seif Kashani

    2013-01-01

    There are a variety of ranking systems for universities throughout the different continents of the world. The majority of the world ranking systems have paid special attention toward evaluation of universities and higher education institutions at the national and international level. This paper tries to study the similarities and status of top Asian universities in the list of top 200 universities by these world ranking systems. Findings show that there are some parallelisms among the...

  16. University Pedagogy for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University (Part 1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Krogh, Lone

    2003-01-01

    The article describes a course for assistant professors within the University Teacher Education at Aalborg University. The course focus is to develop knowledge, skills and methods from within the didactic, pedagogical, and learning theory-based fields.......The article describes a course for assistant professors within the University Teacher Education at Aalborg University. The course focus is to develop knowledge, skills and methods from within the didactic, pedagogical, and learning theory-based fields....

  17. The future generations University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Weller

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper was first published in Landscape Review 1998: 4(1. Unfortunately only the text was printed: technical problems resulted in the illustrations being omitted. In this issue of Landscape Review we are reproducing the same paper inclusive of its illustrations (ed. We apologise to Richard Weller, the author, for the unfortunate earlier omission. I consider sustainable development to be a contradiction. What we need is sustainable life. In the 20th century the glory of the human has become the desolation of the earth. The desolation of the earth is becoming the destiny of the human. All human institutions, activities and programs must be judged primarily by the extent to which they inhibit, ignore or foster a mutually enhancing human-earth relationship. There are enormous creative possibilities if only we would take them. Thomas Berry in discussion with Paul Collins. Encounters, ABC Tapes, 1995. This paper describes a recent design project for the Future Generations University, by the interdisciplinary design company Room 4.1.3. The Future Generations University is to be a new university specifically devoted to issues of sustainability, sited north of Sydney on Australia's east coast. The paper describes the idea of such a new educational institution, the design process by which such a place expects to be formed, the theoretical position of Room 4.1.3's submission and the forms and concepts of the design itself. These aspects of the project are then placed within the context of contemporary environmental design theory. The project itself, and the means by which the work was both solicited and done, presents a case study in interdisciplinary design, wherein landscape architectural sensibilities provide a platform for emergent design paradigms.

  18. Green University Initiatives in China: A Case of Tsinghua University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wanxia; Zou, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine green university initiatives in the context of China, using Tsinghua University, which is China's green university pioneer, as a case study. Design/methodology/approach: The research method used for this paper is a case study based on participant observation and document analysis. The approach to…

  19. University Pedagogy for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University (Part 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Krogh, Lone

    2003-01-01

    In issue 1-2003, Anette Kolmos and Lone Krogh reported on the two-semester study course " University Pedagogy for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University (DK)". Now, in part 2, they are adressing guidelines for supervison and advising of assistant professors in the university teacher education...

  20. Understanding Our Only Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Marra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In an imaginary dialogue between a professor and a layman about the future of cosmology, the said professor relates the paradoxical story of scientist Zee Prime, a bold thinker of a future civilization, stuck in a lonely galaxy, forever unaware of the larger universe. Zee Prime comes to acknowledge his position and shows how important it is to question standard models and status quo, as only the most imaginative ideas give us the chance to understand what he calls “our only universe” — the special place and time in which we live.

  1. Journey Through the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J.

    2005-12-01

    Journey through the Universe held its first Journey Week January 21-28, 2005 in Hilo, Hawaii. This ambitious program uses the fi elds of space, earth science and exploration to engage communities with long-term connections to science, mathematics and technology. All content is aligned to state and national education standards. Last year, the Hawaii-based program trained 135 teachers, visited more than 120 classrooms, talked to more than 5,000 students and hosted three family science events for more than 2,500 people. In 2006 the program seeks to reach an additional 8,000 students in public, private and charter schools in North Hawaii.

  2. Physics of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Sachs, Mendel

    2010-01-01

    This book presents a new approach to the subject of cosmology. It fully exploits Einstein's theory of general relativity. It is found that the most general formal expression of the theory replaces the (10-component) tensor formalism with a (16-component) quaternion formalism. This leads to a unified field theory, where one field incorporates gravitation and electromagnetism. The theory predicts an oscillating universe cosmology with a spiral configuration. Dark matter is explained in terms of a sea of particle-antiparticle pairs, each in a particular (derived) ground state. This leads to an ex

  3. On universal procrastination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a general stochastic model for procrastination with respect to a deadline. The model establishes a universal procrastination pattern that follows an inverse power-law: if the time remaining to the deadline is r then the response is 1/rε , where ɛ is a positive exponent. The model further establishes that the exponent value ε =1 , which yields the harmonic response 1/r , stands out as special and distinguishable. The theoretical results of the model are shown to be in perfect accord with recent empirical findings.

  4. The Cornell University experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B

    2003-01-01

    The authors provide an account of their 20-year-old history of collaborative research and publication at Cornell University on ethics in fetal diagnosis and therapy. This research first developed and applied a conceptual framework for ethics in maternal-fetal medicine based on the concept of the fetus as a patient. The basic elements of this framework are described, as well as their application to fetal diagnosis and fetal therapy. Related topics, including obstetrics and gynecology, clinical medicine, managed care, and the ethical dimensions of medical leadership, are also briefly described. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. The Necessary University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Ibarra Mendívil

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Because of the complex scenarios brought about by globalization, the necessary university will require flexible models oriented toward problem solving and collaborative work, which will also allow students to enter and leave the institution at different times during their training. Among its main features, there will be collegial work, in the sense of collective teaching experimentation; active follow up of students’ progress; trust in the students’ potential; a close relationship of headmasters, teachers and students; and rules that provide certainty to institutional life.

  6. Universal spacetimes in four dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervik, S.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2017-10-01

    Universal spacetimes are exact solutions to all higher-order theories of gravity. We study these spacetimes in four dimensions and provide necessary and sufficient conditions for universality for all Petrov types except of type II. We show that all universal spacetimes in four dimensions are algebraically special and Kundt. Petrov type D universal spacetimes are necessarily direct products of two 2-spaces of constant and equal curvature. Furthermore, type II universal spacetimes necessarily possess a null recurrent direction and they admit the above type D direct product metrics as a limit. Such spacetimes represent gravitational waves propagating on these backgrounds. Type III universal spacetimes are also investigated. We determine necessary and sufficient conditions for universality and present an explicit example of a type III universal Kundt non-recurrent metric.

  7. For information: Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SECTION DE PHYSIQUEDépartement de physique de la matière condensée Quai Ernest-Ansermet 24CH-1211 Genève 4Tél. 022 379 65 11 - Fax 022 379 68 69 Mercredi 14 décembre Colloque exceptionnel 17h00 - Auditoire: Grand Auditoire A Possible Solution to the High Temperature Superconducivity Phenomena Professor Chandra Varma / Department of physics, University of California Riverside The intense effort on the solution of the high Tc problem (over 105 papers in 18 years) has led to remarkable new ideas which will affect future developments not just in condensed matter physics but all of physics. There may now exist a consistent microscopic theory which explains the universal features of the phase diagram of the Cuprates and whose principal predictions have been experimentally verified. This theory draws on an assimilation of the wide ranging experiments on the Cuprates to formulate a phenomenology. The phenomenology is used to formulate a microscopic theory which in turn draws on aspects ranging from solid ...

  8. Carbon in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past few decades, NASA missions have revealed that we live in a Universe that is not a hydrogen-dominated, physicist's paradise, but in a molecular Universe with complex molecules directly interwoven into its fabric. These missions have shown that molecules are an abundant and important component of astronomical objects at all stages of their evolution and that they play a key role in many processes that dominate the structure and evolution of galaxies. Closer to home in our galaxy, the Milky Way, they have revealed a unique and complex organic inventory of regions of star and planet formation that may well represent some of the prebiotic roots to life. Astrobiology emerges from the great interest in understanding astrochemical evolution from simple to complex molecules, especially those with biogenic potential and the roles they may play as primordial seeds in the origin of life on habitable worlds. The first part of this talk will highlight how infrared spectroscopic studies of interstellar space, combined with dedicated laboratory simulations, have revealed the widespread presence of complex organics across deep space. The remainder of the presentation will focus on the evolution of these materials and astrobiology.

  9. Universal Payload Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Ralph B.

    2003-01-01

    As the overall manager and integrator of International Space Station (ISS) science payloads, the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) at Marshall Space Flight Center has a critical need to provide an information management system for exchange and control of ISS payload files as well as to coordinate ISS payload related operational changes. The POIC's information management system has a fundamental requirement to provide secure operational access not only to users physically located at the POIC, but also to remote experimenters and International Partners physically located in different parts of the world. The Payload Information Management System (PIMS) is a ground-based electronic document configuration management and collaborative workflow system that was built to service the POIC's information management needs. This paper discusses the application components that comprise the PIMS system, the challenges that influenced its design and architecture, and the selected technologies it employs. This paper will also touch on the advantages of the architecture, details of the user interface, and lessons learned along the way to a successful deployment. With PIMS, a sophisticated software solution has been built that is not only universally accessible for POIC customer s information management needs, but also universally adaptable in implementation and application as a generalized information management system.

  10. Accelerating Universe via Spatial Averaging

    OpenAIRE

    Nambu, Yasusada; TANIMOTO, Masayuki

    2005-01-01

    We present a model of an inhomogeneous universe that leads to accelerated expansion after taking spatial averaging. The model universe is the Tolman-Bondi solution of the Einstein equation and contains both a region with positive spatial curvature and a region with negative spatial curvature. We find that after the region with positive spatial curvature begins to re-collapse, the deceleration parameter of the spatially averaged universe becomes negative and the averaged universe starts accele...

  11. Fuzzy Clustering in Parallel Universes

    OpenAIRE

    Wiswedel, Bernd; Berthold, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a modified fuzzy c-means algorithm that operates on different feature spaces, so-called parallel universes, simultaneously. The method assigns membership values of patterns to different universes, which are then adopted throughout the training. This leads to better clustering results since patterns not contributing to clustering in a universe are (completely or partially) ignored. The outcome of the algorithm are clusters distributed over different parallel universes, each modeling...

  12. Fuzzy clustering in parallel universes

    OpenAIRE

    Wiswedel, Bernd; Berthold, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    We present an extension of the fuzzy c-Means algorithm, which operates simultaneously on different feature spaces so-called parallel universes and also incorporates noise detection. The method assigns membership values of patterns to different universes, which are then adopted throughout the training. This leads to better clustering results since patterns not contributing to clustering in a universe are (completely or partially) ignored. The method also uses an auxiliary universe to capt...

  13. The rotating universe (philosophical understanding)

    OpenAIRE

    Demidchenko V. V.; Demidchenko V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The subject matter of the article is a standard cosmological model of the Universe. Contemporary opinion regarding origin, structure, and evolution of the Universe is of great interest. The answer to the question of the Universe origin is given by the Big Bang Theory. Is it possible to be sure in this theory correctness, which persuading of the Universe origination from the singularity fluctuation, when the World had appeared from nowhere, that is from abstract nothingness, further accelerate...

  14. Alcohol use, mental well-being, self-esteem and general self-efficacy among final-year university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Mei-Ling; Connor, Jennie; Gray, Andrew; Tustin, Karen

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to quantify associations between drinking and mental well-being, self-esteem and general self-efficacy among New Zealand university students approaching graduation. A web-based survey was conducted across all eight New Zealand universities in 2011. Participants were enrolled in their final year of a bachelor degree or a higher qualification and were aged 25 years and under (n = 5082, response level 65 %). Measures included the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption, Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale, and items from the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale and General Self-efficacy Scale. Linear regression models were used to estimate associations between the psychological measures and (1) drinking patterns for all participants (abstention/moderate/hazardous); and (2) consumption indicators for non-abstaining participants (frequency/quantity/heavy drinking frequency), adjusting for a range of individual, social and personality characteristics, separately for men and women. Lower mental well-being was associated with a moderate or hazardous drinking pattern for men, and a hazardous pattern for women, compared to abstaining participants. Higher self-esteem was associated with any level of heavy drinking frequency for men, while the heaviest drinking women had a pattern of lower self-esteem. There was a general pattern of higher general self-efficacy for men and women who drank alcohol. We observed that higher levels of drinking were associated with small, yet statistically significant, differences in psychological outcomes for men and women. Our findings are of uncertain clinical significance; however, they underscore the importance of investigating a fuller range of social and personality factors that may confound the association of drinking and psychological outcomes.

  15. From WWII to Kingston, Ontario: The History of Queen's University School of Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Karen; Wyllie, Kenneth; Davidson, John

    2016-01-01

    To describe the origin and development of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the Queen's University School of Medicine (Kingston, Ontario). Resarch ethics board approval and privacy agreements from the Kingston General Hospital (KGH, Kingston, Ontario) medical archives were obtained. Primary and secondary data sources were identified. A systematic examination of newspaper archives, research literature, KGH medical advisory committee meeting minutes, and testimonies from Dr Kenneth Wyllie and Dr John Davidson were obtained. In 1949, Dr Albert Ross Tilley arrived at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. There, Tilley initiated the Burn Unit at the KGH and began monthly teaching during the academic semester. Ken Wyllie (Meds '55), Lloyd Carlson (Meds '57) and John Emery (Meds '57) were the notable progeny of his early initiatives. In 1963, Kenneth Wyllie founded the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in Kingston, Ontario, having completed plastic surgery training in Toronto and Edinburgh with experiences in Stockholm (Sweden), Paris (France) and Baltimore (Maryland, USA). He was shortly joined by Pat Shoemaker (Meds '66). John Davidson (Meds '82) arrived in 1989, bringing an interest in microsurgery and critical inquiry to the division. Five notable surgeons, Cartotto (Meds '88), Watkins, Watters, Meathrel (Meds '03) and McKay, further enhanced the Division's clinical and academic mission. The collective activity of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Queen's School of Medicine in its 66-year history has encouraged more than 40 others to pursue distinguished careers in the specialty throughout North America, including three past presidents of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons.

  16. Recent University Reform in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas, Carlos; Post, David

    1992-01-01

    Examination of recent reforms at three Mexican public universities suggests that university administrators have had little will or power to regulate expansion in the face of growing social demand for higher education. Discusses "populist" and "modernist" conceptions of university reform, which focus on social needs and economic…

  17. Collapse of simple harmonic universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mithani, Audrey T.; Vilenkin, Alexander, E-mail: audrey.todhunter@tufts.edu, E-mail: vilenkin@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    In a recent paper Graham et al constructed oscillating and static universe models which are stable with respect to all classical perturbations. Here we show that such universes are quantum-mechanically unstable and can collapse by quantum tunneling to zero radius. We also present instantons describing nucleation of oscillating and static universes from nothing.

  18. Getting European universities into shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, B.; van der Ploeg, F.

    2006-01-01

    Most European universities lag behind the best universities in the Anglo-Saxon world. A key challenge is to raise resources per student in Europe to US levels. The Lisbon agenda demands fundamental reform of the European university system in order to enhance efficiency, yet avoid grade inflation, to

  19. ASSESSMENT OF UNIVERSITY- INDUSTRY COLLABORATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    2013-07-02

    Jul 2, 2013 ... Despite the cultural differences between university and industry, the mutual benefits from collaboration between university and ... and ecommerce [3]. Technology transfer between industry and university come in different ways such as direct hires of students, graduates, temporary exchanges of researchers ...

  20. Downsizing the University: Bonne Chance!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Steven H.; Patton, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Begins with a general discussion of downsizing and its outcomes, then offers an analysis of downsizing in higher education with an emphasis on three points: the factors causing universities to consider downsizing, the special nature of universities that makes downsizing particularly difficult, and the downsizing methods used by universities. (EV)

  1. Exploring the relationship between university internationalization and university autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gullieva, Valeria

    and moderated by target country institutional autonomy and globalization; and entry modes, timing and pace, as well as product mix of internationalization define university’s internationalization pattern. A systematic review is conducted to identify empirical studies at this intersection. One of the questions......This paper explores a research gap at the intersection of university internationalization and university autonomy. A process model of university internationalization is put forward whereby the process of university internationalization is mediated by university internationalization capacity...... this paper is addressing is whether there is a scope for international business theories in explaining university internationalization or in light of recent findings from successes and failures of university internationalization international business theories ought to be revised?...

  2. EDITORIAL: Micro-pixellated LEDs for science and instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Martin D.; Neil, Mark A. A.

    2008-05-01

    This Cluster Issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics highlights micro-pixellated gallium nitride light-emitting diodes or `micro-LEDs', an emerging technology offering considerable attractions for a broad range of scientific and instrumentation applications. It showcases the results of a Research Councils UK (RCUK) Basic Technology Research programme (http://bt-onethousand.photonics.ac.uk), running from 2004-2008, which has drawn together a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional research partnership to develop these devices and explore their potential. Images of LEDs Examples of GaN micro-pixel LEDs in operation. Images supplied courtesy of the Guest Editors. The partnership, of physicists, engineers and chemists drawn from the University of Strathclyde, Heriot-Watt University, the University of Sheffield and Imperial College London, has sought to move beyond the established mass-market uses of gallium nitride LEDs in illumination and lighting. Instead, it focuses on specialised solid-state micro-projection devices the size of a match-head, containing up to several thousand individually-addressable micro-pixel elements emitting light in the ultraviolet or visible regions of the spectrum. Such sources are pattern-programmable under computer control and can project into materials fixed or high-frame rate optical images or spatially-controllable patterns of nanosecond excitation pulses. These materials can be as diverse as biological cells and tissues, biopolymers, photoresists and organic semiconductors, leading to new developments in optical microscopy, bio-sensing and chemical sensing, mask-free lithography and direct writing, and organic electronics. Particular areas of interest are multi-modal microscopy, integrated forms of organic semiconductor lasers, lab-on-a-chip, GaN/Si optoelectronics and hybrid inorganic/organic semiconductor structures. This Cluster Issue contains four invited papers and ten contributed papers. The invited papers serve to set

  3. Uniformizable and realcompact bornological universes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Vroegrijk

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Bornological universes were introduced some time ago by Hu and obtained renewed interest in recent articles on convergence in hyperspaces and function spaces and optimization theory. One o fHu's results gives us a necessary and sufficient condition for which a bornological universe is metrizable. In this article we will extend thi sresult and give a characterization of uniformizable bornological universes. Furthermore, a construction on bornological universes that the author used to find the bornological dual of function spaces endowed with the bounded-open topology will be used to define realcompactness for bornological universes. We will also give various characterizations of this new concept.

  4. The International Space University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidian, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    The International Space University (ISU) was founded on the premise that any major space program in the future would require international cooperation as a necessary first step toward its successful completion. ISU is devoted to being a leading center for educating future authorities in the world space industry. ISU's background, goals, current form, and future plans are described. The results and benefits of the type of education and experience gained from ISU include technical reports describing the design projects undertaken by the students, an exposure to the many different disciplines which are a part of a large space project, an awareness of the existing activities from around the world in the space community, and an international professional network which spans all aspects of space activities and covers the globe.

  5. Life In The Universe!

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    An alien invasion of CERN? Is there life elsewhere in the Universe? Are we alone? These questions have always fascinated humanity and for more than 30 years, physicists, biologists, chemists, cosmologists and astronomers have worked tirelessly to answer these questions. Yet just this past week at CERN students from all over Europe came to present their ideas on the subject and listen to the latest on extraterrestrial life from some of the world's most prestigious researchers. Students participating in the programme were encouraged to present their views on extraterrestrial life creatively and boy did they! The team from Portugal ran performances of Greek Theatre, the team from Hungary created a board game, while the team from Belgium recited poetry questioning the existence of extraterrestrials. But all was not light hearted, there were touching presentations of violin and piano by the French team and a very thought provoking theatre performance by the German team contrasting the search for extraterrestrial...

  6. External conference: Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    ECOLE DE PHYSIQUE Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 - Tél : 022 379 62 73 - Fax: 022 379 69 92 Monday 12 June 2006 PARTICLE PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium Quantum computers - dream and realization Prof. R. Blatt / University of Innsbruck, Austria Computational operations always rely on real physical processes, which are data input, data representation in a memory, data manipulation using algorithms and finally, the data output. With conventional computers all the processes are classical processes and can be described accordingly. Theoretically, it is known for several years now that certain computations could be processed much more efficiently using quantum mechanical operations. This requires the implementation of quantum bits (qubits), quantum registers and quantum gates and the development of quantum algorithms. Several approaches for the implementation of quantum computers will be presented, with special emphasis o...

  7. Universal Limit on Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousso, Raphael

    2017-10-01

    I derive a universal upper bound on the capacity of any communication channel between two distant systems. The Holevo quantity, and hence the mutual information, is at most of order E Δ t /ℏ, where E is the average energy of the signal, and Δ t is the amount of time for which detectors operate. The bound does not depend on the size or mass of the emitting and receiving systems, nor on the nature of the signal. No restrictions on preparing and processing the signal are imposed. As an example, I consider the encoding of information in the transverse or angular position of a signal emitted and received by systems of arbitrarily large cross section. In the limit of a large message space, quantum effects become important even if individual signals are classical, and the bound is upheld.

  8. The Politics of Universalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Karen-Margrethe

    2013-01-01

    ’ of globalization. Historically speaking, human rights are closely connected with globalization, but at the same time, they raise a question about the foundation of globalization: is there a universal community or only economic and political power-relations? The article argues that the political use of human rights......This article investigates the political function of human rights in the 16th Century in Spain just after the conquest of America. It claims that the study of this period of early globalization is relevant for the understanding of the function of human rights discourses to day, at the ‘end...... discourses is split down the middle: it serves both as a critique of power and as an extension of power, and the disclosure of this split helps us understand the inner politics of human rights. The article discusses the trial in Valladolid in 1550 when the rights of the barbarian Indians of America were put...

  9. Teaching Function at University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Elena Figueroa Rubalcava

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A peremptory change in education and the higher education at universities is occurriyng. Since 60´s to date theoretical issues on the role of education are continuously on modification more rapidly than the teaching and learning practices that need more time to be realized. In this paper is presented a broad scope of main national and international organizations that propose, promote and systematize those educational changes since a half century ago and specially, those that impact the formation tendency based on competences. On other side, and not pretending be exhaustive, in this paper is highlighted a list of educational competences that teachers need to develop if they pretend to realize their teaching functions with high quality standards, mainly those related with velocity involvement as curriculum constructor.

  10. University Engagement at INL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrell, Sean Robert [Idaho National Laboratory; Rynes, Amanda Renee [Idaho National Laboratory

    2014-07-01

    There are currently over 900 facilities in over 170 countries which fall under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. As additional nations look to purse civilian nuclear programs or to expand infrastructure already in place, the number of reactors and accompanying facilities as well as the quantity of material has greatly increased. Due to the breadth of the threat and the burden placed on the IAEA as nuclear applications expand, it has become increasingly important that safeguards professionals have a strong understanding of both the technical and political aspects of nonproliferation starting early in their career. To begin overcoming this challenge, Idaho National Laboratory, has partnered with local universities to deliver a graduate level nuclear engineering course that covers both aspects of the field with a focus on safeguards applications. To date over 60 students across multiple disciplines have participated in this course with many deciding to transition into a nonproliferation area of focus in both their academic and professional careers.

  11. FOR INFORMATION: Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 TéL: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 30 November PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium CVD Diamond Radiation Sensors For Application In Very High Radiation Environments by Prof. Peter Weilhammer / University and INFN Perugia and CERN After an introduction into the basic properties and operating principles of CVD diamond radiation sensor material, measurements of charge carrier collection and leakage currents in single crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamonds will be presented. Results from measurements of the effective mobilities and carrier lifetime of electrons and holes, using the Transient Current Technique (TCT), will be shown. Radiation hardness of CVD polycrystalline diamonds will be discussed. A summary of radiation hardness measurements, carried out over several years, will be presented for polycrystalline material. Performance of diamond trackin...

  12. European Universe Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, P.; Miley, G.; Westra van Holthe, F.; Schrier, W.; Reed, S.

    2011-10-01

    The European Universe Awareness (EU-UNAWE) programme uses the beauty and grandeur of the cosmos to encourage young children, particularly those from underprivileged backgrounds, to develop an interest in science and technology and to foster a sense of global citizenship. EU-UNAWE is already active in 40 countries and comprises a global network of almost 500 astronomers, teachers and other educators. The programme was recently awarded a grant of 1.9 million euros by the European Union so that it can be further developed in five European countries and South Africa. The grant will be used to organise teacher training workshops and to develop educational materials, such as an astronomy news service for children and games. During this presentation we will outline some of the biggest achievements of EU-UNAWE to date and discuss future plans for the programme.

  13. Wikipedia ranking of world universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lages, José; Patt, Antoine; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-03-01

    We use the directed networks between articles of 24 Wikipedia language editions for producing the wikipedia ranking of world Universities (WRWU) using PageRank, 2DRank and CheiRank algorithms. This approach allows to incorporate various cultural views on world universities using the mathematical statistical analysis independent of cultural preferences. The Wikipedia ranking of top 100 universities provides about 60% overlap with the Shanghai university ranking demonstrating the reliable features of this approach. At the same time WRWU incorporates all knowledge accumulated at 24 Wikipedia editions giving stronger highlights for historically important universities leading to a different estimation of efficiency of world countries in university education. The historical development of university ranking is analyzed during ten centuries of their history.

  14. University involvement in sustainability initiatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Martin; Christensen, Per; Thrane, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    With an outset in the case of Aalborg University, the linkages (actual, potential and missing) between academic work in research & education and sustainability initiatives are explored. The focus is both on the university's core activities as a provider of research and education and on the univer......With an outset in the case of Aalborg University, the linkages (actual, potential and missing) between academic work in research & education and sustainability initiatives are explored. The focus is both on the university's core activities as a provider of research and education...... is Sustainable Development understood at executive level at the university? How (if at all) is sustainable development integrated in the core activities of the university? How is the university attached to ‘real life outside the ivory tower', e.g. through the establishing of Public-Private-Academic Partnerships...

  15. Universal service policy in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do Manh, Thai; Falch, Morten; Von Salakpi, Simeon

    2016-01-01

    Universal service provision is a key to bridge the digital divide. This paper provides an empirical examination of the Vietnamese universal policy introduced in 2015 for implementation up to 2020. Using the framework of King et al. (1994) the paper analyses the universal services policy in Vietnam...... as well as the policies of broadband development in South Korea and Japan in order to clarify the types of universal service initiatives made in these countries. Furthermore, the paper compares the universal service policy in Vietnam with the broadband development policy in South Korea and in Japan...... in order to evaluate whether the Vietnamese universal policy is efficient. The paper concludes with a discussion of how an effective universal policy can be designed....

  16. (Re)Discovering University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book challenges traditional approach to university autonomy which is based on four pillars: organisational, financial, human resource, and academic. The main thesis is that a fuller understanding of university autonomy can only be obtained through a more holistic view of the complex inter......-relationships between stakeholders and policies which can reinforce and equally pull in opposite directions. The holistic view is expressed in a model of institutional university autonomy that brings together the traditional basic four pillars of autonomy, and five interfaces: government–university; university......–university staff; academic staff–students; university–business; and university–internationalisation. This model is explored through international case studies that give new insights and reinforce our understanding that the issues relating to institutional university autonomy are complex, interactive and genuinely...

  17. Our Astounding Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Monika

    2016-04-01

    The philosophy of my life is to keep encouraging children to think beyond they could achieve easily. I understand children are adaptive to change and take things with an open mind. They are ready to experiment with new things and dare to dream big. I am fortunate to being a teacher by profession and thus I always attempt experimenting, observing, and participating with other children and adults. Children learn through play. From birth, children are active participants in building their own understanding. Teachers prepare the environment to help each child build on what they already know. It is such a great pleasure to observe every young kid that becomes excited and curious to know when we show them the Universe pictures and tell them about the strange objects in our Universe. So my aim is to keep them ignited by doing different activities throughout the year related to Space. I am always a firm believer of: Creativity is the key to success in the future, and primary education is where teachers can bring creativity in children at that level. One of my main ways of teaching is to conduct various presentations on The Solar System and beyond and debates on Space explorations. A Planet making project is one of the all-time favorite project for my students where they dare to dream to fly in the universe, and with their imagination, kids make different celestial objects and present them. To inculcate scientific attitude I arrange film screening, simulation exercises and quizzes on various topics of astronomy. Every year we celebrate World Space Week 4th to 10th of Oct. The motivation among all came through different hands-on activities like-painting, slogan competition, topics related to space, poetry and essay writing on various topics related to astronomy, assembly presentations in school. I am indeed overwhelmed when I started the very special Space and Astronomy club where young toddlers are involved in different activities like a star gazing program, conducting

  18. Postmodernity and the university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Scott

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The utility of post-modernism as an interpretative framework for understanding the development of contemporary higher education systems is sharply contested. Critics argue that post-modernism is, at best, a set of ideas in aesthetics, literature and critical theory with limited relevance outside these domains and, at worst, a passing intellectual fashion that is now out-of-date. However, post-modernity —or, as some would prefer, late modernity or ‘fluid’ modernity — is perhaps a more useful idea. In 21stcentury society there are a number of trends, some structural such as the growth of a knowledge-based economy and development of new patterns of knowledge production; and some conceptual such as the reconfiguration of time and space and the recognition of ‘difference’ (and risk? as key factor in the constitution of social life (and individual identity, which have a direct impact on the university. This impact is felt in two ways — first, the university is a primary engine of these transformations. Secondly, the university is shaped by these transformations (both normatively and cognitively in terms of teaching and research and structurally in terms of its organisational characteristics, governance and managementLa utilidad del postmodernismo como marco interpretativo para comprender el desarrollo de los sistemas contemporáneos de educación superior ha sido severamente contestada. Los críticos argumentan que el postmodernismo es, como mucho, un conjunto de ideas en los ámbitos de la estética, literatura y teoría crítica con relevancia limitada fuera de esos campos y, a lo peor, una moda intelectual pasajera que actualmente está caducada. No obstante, la postmodernidad —o, como algunos preferirían, la modernidad tardía o modernidad «fluida»— es quizá una idea más útil. En la sociedad del siglo XXI hay un cúmulo de tendencias, algunas estructurales, como el crecimiento de la economía basada en el conocimiento y el

  19. Between universalism and regionalism: universal systematics from imperial Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung

    2015-12-01

    Historiographic discussions of the universality and regionality of science have to date focused on European cases for making regional science universal. This paper presents a new perspective by moving beyond European origins and illuminating a non-European scientist's engagement with the universality and regionality of science. It will examine the case of the Japanese botanist Nakai Takenoshin (1882-1952), an internationally recognized authority on Korean flora based at Tokyo Imperial University. Serving on the International Committee on Botanical Nomenclature in 1926, Nakai endorsed and acted upon European claims of universal science, whilst simultaneously unsettling them with his regionally shaped systematics. Eventually he came to promote his own systematics, built regionally on Korean flora, as the new universal. By analysing his shifting claims in relation to those of other European and non-European botanists, this paper makes two arguments. First, universalism and regionalism were not contradictory foundations of scientific practice but useful tools used by this non-European botanist in maintaining his scientific authority as a representative Japanese systematist. Second, his claims to universality and regionalism were both imperially charged. An imperially monopolized study of Korean plants left a regional imprint on Nakai's systematics. In order to maintain his scientific authority beyond its region of origin he had to assert either the expanding regionalism of 'East Asia' or universalism.

  20. Open University Center of the Pontifical Javeriana University, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omayra Parra de Marroquin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available According to Garcia Canclini (1990 there is the assumption that Colombia is a hybrid society. Upon this standpoint, and within a traditional higher education structure characterized by being fundamentally conventional or campus based, the Open University Center of the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana was created as an education program that breaks with every traditional scheme, which in turn, encourages a new learning pattern. The Open University Center emerges as a "social response" focused on the "here and now" of today's society in Colombia.The Javeriana University (a hybrid university can be placed in this context as well as the Open University Center, as a part of it. Since its creation, through its programs this center offers education to the most vulnerable of Colombia's population, contributing to raise their quality of life.In this article, the authors outline the Open University Center's place in the University's context: its historical development and its structure concerning students, programs, regulations, infrastructure and technological equipment. They also identify the implications and relationships of the traditional education proper of the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, as well as the projection and contributions of the Open University Center to the University's future in the pedagogical order of distance education towards virtual education.

  1. Universities and Patent Demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Andrew K.; Feldman, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Research universities have made enormous contributions to the field of medicine and the treatment of human disease. Alone or in collaboration with pharmaceutical companies, academic researchers have added to the store of knowledge that has led to numerous life science breakthroughs. A new chapter may be opening for academic researchers, however, that could lead to a darker tale. ‘The mouse that trolled: the long and tortuous history of a gene mutation patent that became an expensive impediment to Alzheimer's research, by Bubela et al., chronicles one such tale.’ The authors do an excellent job of bringing to life the twisting saga that engulfed numerous academic and non-profit Alzheimer's researchers over many years. The authors note that the story is an outlier, but sadly, that may not be the case. There are increasing signs that academic researchers and their institutions are being caught up in the rush for gold that is accompanying the proliferation of the non-practicing entity business model. As I have noted before, academic institutions have a dual role, as keepers of the academic flame and guardians of the public monies entrusted to them through state and federal research funding. The specter of taxpayer money being used, not to advance research and for the betterment of society, but as part of schemes to extract money from productive companies may not sit well with voters, and ultimately, with legislators. In that case, researchers and institutions themselves may have much to lose. PMID:27774221

  2. Outside the Gutenberg Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Kodrič-Dačič

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Technological development has changed the media and formats for recording information, as well as the methods for their collection, preservation, reproduction and use. After six and a half centuries since the invention of printing press, electronic publications on Internet represent a revolutionary break-through in communication and data transmission. The new format has changed the publication to the extent that the library science should re-define the topic of its research, and re-consider the methods and procedures for its treatment. Consequently, the library science should refer to the underlying terminological and typological research, and re-define the subject of bibliographic processing and determine the elements for the subject’s identification. The new technological platform of electronic publications opens a range of possibilities, which make the significance and value of the established methods of knowledge management very relative, and thus also the basis of the library science and its “raisson d’ętre”. No cultural value is attached to electronic publications due to their specific characteristics, as it has been attached to a book in our civilization. Therefore, collection and long-term preservation of this material is not problematic only from the technological but also from the sociological aspect. By dealing with electronic media, library theory and practice finally step from the area of the known laws of the Gutenberg universe into the new space, where the new working rules will have to be established.

  3. Two Belgian University Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huylebrouck

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bevacizumab (BEV, a humanized immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody that inhibits VEGF has demonstrated activity against recurrent high-grade gliomas (HGG in phase II clinical trials. Patients and Methods. Data were collected from patients with recurrent HGG who initiated treatment with BEV outside a clinical trial protocol at two Belgian university hospitals. Results. 19 patients (11 M/8 F were administered a total of 138 cycles of BEV (median 4, range 1–31. Tumor response assessment by MRI was available for 15 patients; 2 complete responses and 3 partial responses for an objective response rate of 26% for the intent to treat population were observed on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images; significant regressions on T2/FLAIR were documented in 10 out of 15 patients (67%. A reduced uptake on PET was documented in 3 out of 4 evaluable patients. The six-month progression-free survival was 21% (95% CI 2.7–39.5. Two patients had an ongoing tumor response and remained free from progression after 12 months of BEV treatment. Conclusions. The activity and tolerability of BEV were comparable to results from previous prospective phase II trials. Reduced uptake on PET suggests a metabolic response in addition to an antiangiogenic effect in some cases with favorable clinical outcome.

  4. External meeting: Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Université de Genève Ecole de physique 24 quai Ernest Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél : + 41 22 379 63 83 (secrétariat) Tél : + 41 22 379 62 56 (réception) Fax: + 41 22 379 69 22 Lundi 20 novembre 2006 COLLOQUIUM 17:00 - Auditoire Stückelberg Electrical correlation measurements in quantum nano-structures Dr. Stefan Oberholzer / Basel University Measuring the current-voltage characteristics of small conductors is widely used to characterize their electronic transport properties. In addition to such time-averaged measurements, correlation measurements between temporal fluctuations (noise) around the time-averaged mean current provide us with very important supplementary information about electrical transport. In this talk, I review our experimental work on shot noise, noise which originates from the granularity of charge and the diffraction of the electronic wave-function, and especially address the fundamental relation between electronic scattering experiments and the statistical properties of indist...

  5. Benchmarking in University Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kuźmicz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the face of global competition and rising challenges that higher education institutions (HEIs meet, it is imperative to increase innovativeness and efficiency of their management. Benchmarking can be the appropriate tool to search for a point of reference necessary to assess institution’s competitive position and learn from the best in order to improve. The primary purpose of the paper is to present in-depth analysis of benchmarking application in HEIs worldwide. The study involves indicating premises of using benchmarking in HEIs. It also contains detailed examination of types, approaches and scope of benchmarking initiatives. The thorough insight of benchmarking applications enabled developing classification of benchmarking undertakings in HEIs. The paper includes review of the most recent benchmarking projects and relating them to the classification according to the elaborated criteria (geographical range, scope, type of data, subject, support and continuity. The presented examples were chosen in order to exemplify different approaches to benchmarking in higher education setting. The study was performed on the basis of the published reports from benchmarking projects, scientific literature and the experience of the author from the active participation in benchmarking projects. The paper concludes with recommendations for university managers undertaking benchmarking, derived on the basis of the conducted analysis.

  6. Water in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Due to its specific chemical and physical properties, water is essential for life on Earth. And it is assumed that this would be the case for extraterrestrial life as well. Therefore it is important to investigate where water can be found in the Universe. Although there are places that are completely dry, places where the last rainfall happened probably several 100 million years ago, surprisingly this substance is quite omnipresent. In the outer solar system the large satellites of Jupiter and Saturn are covered by a thick layer of ice that could be hiding a liquid ocean below. This of course brings up the question of whether the recently detected extrasolar planets could have some water on their surfaces and how we can detect this. Water molecules are also found in interstellar gas and dust clouds. This book begins with an introductory chapter reviewing the physical and chemical properties of water. Then it illuminates the apparent connection between water and life. This is followed by chapters dealing with ...

  7. Spirituality and the University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kourie

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available It is not often that we witness the birth of a new discipline; the academy is slow to open its doors to �newcomers�. Yet, within the last few decades, we have seen the introduction of the �new� discipline of Spirituality into the revered corridors of higher education, not without some raised eye-brows from those within the established disciplines, in particular that of theology and religion. Spirituality is difficult to define and its inter-disciplinary nature does not allow for easy classification. There are diverse spiritualities, each one culture-specific, expressing its own historical, sociological, theological, linguistic and philosophical orientation. Post-patriarchal and telluric, contemporary spirituality affects all areas of society, and is a force for personal and societal transformation. The important role of the academy in this endeavour is increasingly coming to the fore. Spirituality can no longer be considered a �Cinderella� discipline; on the contrary, it has returned to its rightful place and is exerting considerable influence both within and outside the walls of the university.

  8. External conference: Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    ECOLE DE PHYSIQUE Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 - Tél : 022 379 62 73 - Fax: 022 379 69 92 Monday 11 June 2007 COLLOQUE DE LA SECTION DE PHYSIQUE at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). Motivation, concept, results and potential implications Prof. Konstantin ZIOUTAS / University of Patras/Greece & CERN and CAST-spokesperson Axion is one of the leading dark matter particle candidates. The last few years axion searches are in the spotlight. The physics motivation will be presented. Particles like the axions should be produced also in Stars like our Sun. In magnetic fields axions can coherently oscillate to photons and vice versa (Primakoff effect). CAST searches for solar axions pointing a recycled LHC magnet towards the Sun, and, it provides new results since 2002. Its working principle might well be already at work in outer space, asking for an alternative, though exotic, point of view for certain myst...

  9. University Administrators' Use of Information and Communication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University Administrators' Use of Information and Communication Technology for Information Dissemination in the University Environment and Productivity of Academic Staff of Universities in Anambra State, Nigeria.

  10. A Small Universal Petri Net

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A. Zaitsev

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A universal deterministic inhibitor Petri net with 14 places, 29 transitions and 138 arcs was constructed via simulation of Neary and Woods' weakly universal Turing machine with 2 states and 4 symbols; the total time complexity is exponential in the running time of their weak machine. To simulate the blank words of the weakly universal Turing machine, a couple of dedicated transitions insert their codes when reaching edges of the working zone. To complete a chain of a given Petri net encoding to be executed by the universal Petri net, a translation of a bi-tag system into a Turing machine was constructed. The constructed Petri net is universal in the standard sense; a weaker form of universality for Petri nets was not introduced in this work.

  11. Achieving Research University: Indonesian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utama, Yos Johan; Ambariyanto

    2017-02-01

    Today many universities have the vision to become a research university, including in Indonesia. It is based on the desire to play a role in advancing science for the benefit of humanity as well as to enhance the university reputation at the international level. However, in the case of Indonesia, it can only be done by several universities, given the large number of universities with very different capabilities. In addition, another problem is human resources, infrastructure, and research funding. Various targets indicator used to determine its success include the number of publications, patents and industrial products. There is an urgent need to improve all factors that can accelerate the increase in research in Indonesia universities, and has been started by the policy of the current government.

  12. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor Letter from the Editor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2010, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal and look ahead to 2011. As many of you are no doubt aware, our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) is currently 1.317. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization (Thomson ISI) agreeing with my own assessment. Measurement Science and Technology is a journal with a broad scope covering new measurement techniques in all fields of science and engineering. I therefore find it particularly enjoyable to read summaries of recent research in our strong topical review programme as these cover many varied topics of interest. In 2010 several interesting articles by international leaders in their field were published, for example: Single-photon generation and detection, by G S Buller and R J Collins of Heriot-Watt University [1]. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in life sciences, by Jan Willem Borst and Antonie J W G Visser, from the Microspectroscopy Centre of Wageningen University [2]. Biological and chemical sensors for cancer diagnosis, by Elfriede Simon of Siemens AG [3]. I hope that these articles, and the others published in 2010 and now in 2011, will provide a useful overview for our readers, and be helpful to new researchers. When speaking to young researchers I am particularly aware that having their articles published in a timely fashion is important, and I am pleased that our publication times are highly competitive, with most authors receiving a

  13. Universal human habitat. Basic principles

    OpenAIRE

    Stepanov Vyacheslav Konstantinovich; Starikov Aleksandr Sergeevich

    2012-01-01

    Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities were adopted in 1993 by the United Nations. They have been valid since then. The number of disabled and elderly people is ever growing due to injuries, accidents, environmental problems, deterioration of health, population aging and demographic disorders. The term "universal habitat" reads as "universal design" worldwide. The concept of "universal design" was developed by Ronald Mace, American arc...

  14. On surjectively universal Polish groups

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Longyun

    2012-01-01

    A Polish group is surjectively universal if it can be continuously homomorphically mapped onto every Polish group. Making use of a type of new metrics on free groups \\cite{DG}, we prove the existence of surjectively universal Polish groups, answering in the positive a question of Kechris. In fact, we give several examples of surjectively universal Polish groups. We find a sufficient condition to guarantee that the new metrics on free groups can be computed directly. We also compare this condi...

  15. The Challenge of University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reilly, John; Turcan, Romeo V.; Bugaian, Larisa

    2016-01-01

    The authors introduce the reader to the book, providing a historical perspective and a current understanding of university autonomy. While appreciating the central role of the four dimensions of university autonomy – organisational, financial, human resource, and academic – the authors conjecture......, which is discussed at length in the chapter. The authors conclude by presenting international case studies that give new insights and reinforce our understanding that the issues relating to institutional university autonomy are genuinely global....

  16. FCC Universal Licensing System (ULS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Communications Commission — The Universal Licensing System allows electronic filing of applications processed by the Commission. The ULS allows you to indicate the application purpose and radio...

  17. Multi-Particle Universal Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Novotný

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We generalize bipartite universal processes to the subclass of multi-particle universal processes from one to N particles. We show how the general statement for a multi-particle universal process can be constructed. The one-parameter family of processes generating totally anti-symmetric states has been generalized to a multi-particle regime and its entanglement properties have been studied. A view is given on the complete positivity and the possible physical realization of universal processes. 

  18. Taiwan Universities: Where to Go?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ying Kuo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The dramatic expansion of Taiwan universities/colleges from about 100 to 160 from the late 1980s has encountered problems due to social and global changes. What should Taiwan universities move toward and how? This research relies on secondary data to explore the issues Taiwan universities currently face—a low birth rate and global competition. The decreasing number of incoming students will result in a lower registration rate and less tuition revenue, which will make some universities struggle to survive. Hence, government policies, proposed by the Ministry of Education, have been implemented to assist Taiwan universities to adjust to external changes. The Innovative Transformation Policy, adopted in 2015, consists of strategies for university–industry cooperation, university mergers, university closures, and a re-shaping of the university paradigm. This policy has begun to be implemented and its initial outcome will be continually evaluated. In accordance with the Innovative Transformation Policy, this study encourages Taiwan universities to improve governance, set prominent unique characteristics of development, and enhance global competitiveness.

  19. International University Ranking Systems and the Idea of University Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Paul; Braddock, Richard

    2007-01-01

    We look at some of the theoretical and methodological issues underlying international university ranking systems and, in particular, their conceptual connection with the idea of excellence. We then turn to a critical examination of the two best-known international university ranking systems--the "Times Higher Education Supplement (THES)" World…

  20. Visibility of University of Zululand and Moi University Researchers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reflects on the representation of the University of Zululand (UNIZULU) and Moi University (MU)'s research publications in WoS (Web of Science) and Scopus between 2003 and 2013 as an indicator of active research engagement, quality, and international visibility. Research quality, visibility and collaboration ...

  1. The Emotionally Affected University Student: Support from the University Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Paul M.; MacLean, Doug

    1997-01-01

    A study measured the general attitudes toward disability of 337 students, 49 academic staff, and 21 administrative staff in a small Australian university. Attitudes toward disability were more positive than the general population; however, this did not translate into positive concrete support for university students with emotional disabilities.…

  2. Building Effective Community-University Partnerships: Are Universities Truly Ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curwood, Susan Eckerle; Munger, Felix; Mitchell, Terry; Mackeigan, Mary; Farrar, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Community service learning and community-based research necessitate the development of strong community-university partnerships. In this paper, students, faculty, and a community partner critically reflect upon the process of establishing a long-term community-university partnership through the integration of a community service learning component…

  3. TIGER: the universal biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstadler, Steven A.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Blyn, Lawrence B.; Eshoo, Mark W.; Hall, Thomas A.; Jiang, Yun; Drader, Jared J.; Hannis, James C.; Sannes-Lowery, Kristin A.; Cummins, Lendell L.; Libby, Brian; Walcott, Demetrius J.; Schink, Amy; Massire, Christian; Ranken, Raymond; Gutierrez, Jose; Manalili, Sheri; Ivy, Cristina; Melton, Rachael; Levene, Harold; Barrett-Wilt, Greg; Li, Feng; Zapp, Vanessa; White, Neill; Samant, Vivek; McNeil, John A.; Knize, Duane; Robbins, David; Rudnick, Karl; Desai, Anjali; Moradi, Emily; Ecker, David J.

    2005-03-01

    In this work, we describe a strategy for the detection and characterization of microorganisms associated with a potential biological warfare attack or a natural outbreak of an emerging infectious disease. This approach, termed TIGER (Triangulation Identification for the Genetic Evaluation of Risks), relies on mass spectrometry-derived base composition signatures obtained from PCR amplification of broadly conserved regions of the microbial genome(s) in a sample. The sample can be derived from air filtration devices, clinical samples, or other sources. Core to this approach are "intelligent PCR primers" that target broadly conserved regions of microbial genomes that flank variable regions. This approach requires that high-performance mass measurements be made on PCR products in the 80-140 bp size range in a high-throughput, robust modality. As will be demonstrated, the concept is equally applicable to bacteria and viruses and could be further applied to fungi and protozoa. In addition to describing the fundamental strategy of this approach, several specific examples of TIGER are presented that illustrate the impact this approach could have on the way biological weapons attacks are detected and the way that the etiologies of infectious diseases are determined. The first example illustrates how any bacterial species might be identified, using Bacillus anthracis as the test agent. The second example demonstrates how DNA-genome viruses are identified using five members of Poxviridae family, whose members includes Variola virus, the agent responsible for smallpox. The third example demonstrates how RNA-genome viruses are identified using the Alphaviruses (VEE, WEE, and EEE) as representative examples. These examples illustrate how the TIGER technology can be applied to create a universal identification strategy for all pathogens, including those that infect humans, livestock, and plants.

  4. Democracy as a Universal Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Amartya

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that the rise of democracy was the most important development of the 20th century, examining the question of democracy as a universal value by focusing on: India's experience with democracy; democracy and economic development; the functions of democracy; universality of values; and cultural differences in values. Concludes with a…

  5. PDP Portfolios at Utrecht University

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keulen, H.

    2006-01-01

    Utrecht University, a large and fairly traditional (but highly successful) research university in The Netherlands, embraced the concept of personal development and planning portfolios in the aftermath of the Bologna agreements. Five-year HE programmes without much freedom or choice were changed into

  6. Telecommunications and Universal Service : International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1996-01-01

    Telecommunications and Universal Service : International Experience in the Context of South African Policy Reform. Couverture du livre Telecommunications and Universal Service : International Experience in the Context of South African. Author(s):. Seán Ó Siochrú. Publisher(s):. CRDI. January 1, 1996. ISBN: Épuisé.

  7. in University of Benin campus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: A one-yearstudy of the pattern of injuries sustained from motorcycle accidents (MCAS) in a University campus in Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: A retrospective study of the medical records of 918 road traffic accident patient attending the Accident and. Emergency Unit (A & E) of the University of Benin Teaching ...

  8. De-Internationalization of Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gulieva, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    forms and requires various approaches. Alongside student and staff mobility, universities get also actively involved in cross-border activities, such as licensing, joint ventures and green field investments. These cross-border activities are not without pitfalls however. A large number of universities...

  9. Environmental Management at Swedish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Karin

    2004-01-01

    Since 1996, all Swedish public authorities, which includes most universities, have been made responsible for contributing to the sustainable development of the society. Swedish universities are thus required to submit annual environmental reports about their policies, structures and actions. This study provides a review of the activities that…

  10. Are Universities Becoming More Unequal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lau; Rosen, Harvey S.

    2016-01-01

    Observers have expressed concern about growing inequality in resources across universities. But are universities really becoming more unequal? We argue that the typical approach of examining endowment growth alone is not sensible. In line with the literature on household inequality, we focus instead on a comprehensive income measure. We find that…

  11. THE INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL OF UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratianu Constantin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present some of our research results concerning the intellectual capital of universities. This is an important topic of the intellectual research area since universities are knowledge intensive organizations. They contain b

  12. University Satellite Campus Management Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Doug; Stott, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Among the 60 or so university satellite campuses in Australia are many that are probably failing to meet the high expectations of their universities and the communities they were designed to serve. While in some cases this may be due to the demand driven system, it may also be attributable in part to the ways in which they are managed. The…

  13. The Expanding Universe: Dark Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lincoln, Don [Fermilab; Nord, Brian [Fermilab

    2014-09-01

    In 1998, observations of distant supernovae led physicists that not only was the universe expanding, but the expansion was speeding up. In this article, we describe the evidence for an expanding universe and describe what physicists and cosmologists have learned in the intervening years. The target audience for this article is high school physics teachers and college physics professors at teaching institutions.

  14. Beyond QCD: A Composite Universe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco

    Strong dynamics constitutes one of the pillars of the standard model of particle interactions, and it accounts for the bulk of the visible matter in the universe. It is therefore a well posed question to ask if the rest of the universe can be described in terms of new highly natural four...

  15. Future University-Industry Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrows, Howard E.

    1983-01-01

    University and industry relations in the United States, it is suggested, must promote competitive U.S. industries. The prime motive for increasing university-industrial relations is competitive commercial products and services. Other countries' success results from national technology ventures based on superior marketing and marshalling of…

  16. Virtual Models of European Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sanya Gertsen

    2003-01-01

    The study provides a detailed report on the current and possible future use of ICT by European universities for educational and organisational purposes. The report presents: • A general description of the current situation regarding the use of ICT in EU universities in both the educational...

  17. The Philosophy of University Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, James A.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines a stated philosophy of university housing and the philosophy's effect on the facilitation of the personal and intellectual growth of students residing in the residence halls and the development of a sense of community. This particular philosophy governs the housing operations at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.…

  18. Geometry of the quantum universe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambjørn, J.; Görlich, A.; Jurkiewicz, J.; Loll, R.

    2010-01-01

    A quantum universe with the global shape of a (Euclidean) de Sitter spacetime appears as dynamically generated background geometry in the causal dynamical triangulation (CDT) regularisation of quantum gravity. We investigate the micro- and macro-geometry of this universe, using geodesic shell

  19. Plausibility Arguments and Universal Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Ricardo F. F.; Tort, A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Newton's law of universal gravitation underpins our understanding of the dynamics of the Solar System and of a good portion of the observable universe. Generally, in the classroom or in textbooks, the law is presented initially in a qualitative way and at some point during the exposition its mathematical formulation is written on the blackboard…

  20. Small Turing universal signal machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Durand-Lose

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at providing signal machines as small as possible able to perform any computation (in the classical understanding. After presenting signal machines, it is shown how to get universal ones from Turing machines, cellular-automata and cyclic tag systems. Finally a halting universal signal machine with 13 meta-signals and 21 collision rules is presented.

  1. Human Education at Reitaku University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Jitaro

    1988-01-01

    Examines Japan's Reitaku University (Chiba-ken, Japan) and its goal of producing students who have a good balance between technical intelligence and morality. Discusses in detail how the university uses foreign-language instruction, moral education coursework, and dormitory living experiences to further the students' moral education. (GEA)

  2. University Rankings and Social Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marginson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    University rankings widely affect the behaviours of prospective students and their families, university executive leaders, academic faculty, governments and investors in higher education. Yet the social science foundations of global rankings receive little scrutiny. Rankings that simply recycle reputation without any necessary connection to real…

  3. University Ranking as Social Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsler, Sarah S.; Bolsmann, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the dual role of global university rankings in the creation of a new, knowledge-identified, transnational capitalist class and in facilitating new forms of social exclusion. We examine how and why the practice of ranking universities has become widely defined by national and international organisations as an important…

  4. Language Alternation in University Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, T. A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the alternate use of Arabic and English in the context of a university classroom, where a policy to use the former language in place of the latter was being implemented. Analysis of a sample of recorded university lectures of English and Arabic medium classes in sciences and humanities reveals that teachers use code switching,…

  5. Universities: Engaging with Local Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Universities UK, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This leaflet illustrates the many ways in which universities impact on the local area. Universities are a major contributor to the economy in their own right, both as employers and purchasers of goods. Their social and cultural influence is also felt through their provision of: (1) art galleries, museums and exhibitions; (2) cinemas and theatres;…

  6. Positioning the Undervalued Metropolitan University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Herbert E.

    1993-01-01

    It is noted that "undervalued metropolitan universities," which generally have open enrollment, low tuition, and a large proportion of nontraditional students, often also have a diffuse and unclear public image. A model positioning concept for these institutions, used by Wright State University (Ohio) is proposed and described. (MSE)

  7. Water Recycling in Schools & Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeten, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Consider the waste streams generated in schools and universities. So what is in the typical used water generated in schools and universities? It is typically about 99 percent water, with the remaining 1 percent mainly made up of organic compounds. Used water contains nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous. When one judges it on its quality, it…

  8. Outdoor Recreation at Brock University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Mary; O'Connell, Tim; Hutson, Garrett

    2007-01-01

    Brock University offers both undergraduate and graduate programs and is host to approximately 17,000 students. It is the only Canadian university located in a World Biosphere Reserve--the Niagara Escarpment. The Bruce Trail passes through campus, and offers ample opportunities for hiking, mountain biking, nature interpretation and outdoor…

  9. Managing University Research Microdata Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfrey, Lynn; Fry, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the management of microdata collections in a university context. It is a cross-country analysis: Collection management at data services in Canada and South Africa are considered. The case studies are of two university sub-contexts: One collection is located in a library; the other at a Faculty-based Data Service. Stages in…

  10. A Model of Nonsingular Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjun Gao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the background of Friedmann–Robertson–Walker Universe, there exists Hawking radiation which comes from the cosmic apparent horizon due to quantum effect. Although the Hawking radiation on the late time evolution of the universe could be safely neglected, it plays an important role in the very early stage of the universe. In view of this point, we identify the temperature in the scalar field potential with the Hawking temperature of cosmic apparent horizon. Then we find a nonsingular universe sourced by the temperature-dependent scalar field. We find that the universe could be created from a de Sitter phase which has the Planck energy density. Thus the Big-Bang singularity is avoided.

  11. The American University of Beirut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Rasmus Gjedssø

    2016-01-01

    with American society through its board of trustees. American civil society has been a major financial partner since the missionary days to modern day foundation philanthropy. American business has supported the university and recruited its graduates. American government has supported the university financially...... power of the AUB and its peers and discuss the transnational power of these universities. The chapter will highlight the extent and limitations of the soft power of AUB and its peers since the origins, how they failed in their proselytizing mission and how students have always rejected US Middle East......—or China—policy (creating acceptance of this policy was never a university aim). On the other hand, the universities have—despite proselytizing and later US foreign policy—been academically very successful and held great attraction to Lebanese and Middle Eastern—as Chinese—students. These students have...

  12. De-Internationalization of Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gulieva, Valeria

    Alongside student and staff mobility, universities these days get also actively involved in out-ward cross-border activities, such as licensing, entering joint ventures and establishing campuses. These cross-border activities are not without pitfalls however. A large number of universities de-internationalize...... from their international markets and such cases raise concerns about sustainability of university internationalization. Despite this evidence, the research in this area is lacking. In this paper we develop a theoretical understanding of how and why universities de-internationalize by focusing...... on withdrawals from franchise, joint venture, and branch campus operations. We use the concept of de-internationalization as a theoretical lens and conduct a review of available unobtrusive data to identify reasons and patterns of universities' withdrawals from international markets....

  13. Kyoto University-National Taiwan University International Symposium "Social Cognitive Biology on Representation of Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Saiki, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Sponsored by Kyoto University, National Taiwan University; Cosponsored by Unit for Advanced Studies of the Human Mind, Kyoto University, Kokoro Research Center, Kyoto University, Supported by Supporting Program for InteRaction-based Initiative Team Studies (SPIRITS), Kyoto University

  14. PREFACE: EUCAS '05: The 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (Vienna University of Technology, Austria, 11 15 September 2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Gordon; Weber, Harald W.; Sauerzopf, Franz M.

    2006-03-01

    This issue of Superconductor Science and Technology contains the plenary and invited papers presented at the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS '05) that was held at the Vienna University of Technology from 11-15 September 2005. All those contributed papers that were submitted to the Conference Proceedings will be published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The scientific aims of EUCAS '05 followed the tradition established at the preceding conferences in Göttingen, Edinburgh, Eindhoven, Sitges (Barcelona), Lyngby (Copenhagen) and finally Sorrento (Napoli). The focus was placed on the interplay between the most recent developments in superconductor research and the positioning of applications of superconductivity in the marketplace. Although initially founded as an exchange forum mainly for European scientists, it has gradually developed into a truly international meeting with significant attendance from the Far East and the United States. The Vienna conference attracted 813 participants in the scientific programme and 90 accompanying persons. 59% of all participants came from Europe, 31% from the Far East, 6% from the United States and Canada as well as 4% from other nations worldwide. 27 companies presented their latest developments in the field. 32 plenary and invited lectures highlighted the state-of-the-art in the areas of materials, large-scale as well as small-scale applications; 625 contributed papers (among them 556 posters) demonstrated the broad range of exciting activities in all research areas of our field. EUCAS '05 spread a lot of optimism and enthusiasm for this fascinating field of research and for its well established technological potential, especially among the numerous young researchers attending this conference. We are grateful to all those who participated in the meeting and contributed to its success.

  15. Universal planetary tectonics (supertectonics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2009-04-01

    Universal planetary tectonics (supertectonics) G. Kochemasov IGEM of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia, kochem.36@mail.ru The wave planetology [1-3 & others] proceeds from the following: "planetary structures are made by orbits and rotations". A uniform reason makes uniform structures. Inertia-gravity waves arising in planetary bodies due to their movements in Keplerian elliptical orbits with periodically changing accelerations warp these bodies in such way that they acquire polyhedron shapes (after interference of standing waves of four directions). Strong Newtonian gravity makes bodies larger than ~400 to 500 km in diameter globular and polyhedra are rarely seen. Only geomorphologic, geologic and geophysical mapping can develop these hidden structures. But small bodies, normally less than ~ 300 to 400 km in diameter, often show parts of the polyhedra, rarely fully developed forms (the asteroid Steins and satellite Amalthea present rather perfect forms of "diamond"). Depending on warping wavelengths (they make harmonics) various Plato's figures superimposed on each other can be distinguished. The fundamental wave 1 produces a tetrahedron, intrinsically dichotomic figure in which a vertex (contraction) always is opposed to a face (expansion). From the recent examples the best is the saturnian northern hexagon (a face) opposed to the southern hurricane (a vertex). The first overtone wave 2 is responsible for creation of structural octahedra. Whole ‘diamonds" and their parts are known [4, 5]. Other overtones produce less developed (because of smaller wave amplitudes) planetary shapes complicating main forms. Thus, the first common structural peculiarity of planetary bodies is their polyhedron nature. Not less important is the second common structural peculiarity. As all globular or smaller more or less isometric bodies rotate, they have an angular momentum. It is inevitably different in tropic and extra-tropic belts having uneven radii or distances to

  16. The University for Older Adults: On Cuba's Universalization of the University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Clara Lig Long; Proenza, Antonia Zenaida Sanchez

    2006-01-01

    In this study we focus on a new program in Cuba, university studies for older adults or seniors. Specifically, we look at the Special Municipality of the Isla de la Juventud (Isle of Youth) in the context of the larger policy of "universalization of higher education." We provide information about Cuban perspectives on adult education,…

  17. Astrobiology and the Biological Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, S. J.

    2002-12-01

    Four hundred years ago two astronomical world views hung in the balance: the geocentric and the heliocentric. Today astronomy faces a similar choice between two grand world views: a purely physical universe, in which cosmic evolution commonly ends in planets, stars and galaxies, and a biological universe, in which cosmic evolution routinely results in life, mind and intelligence. Astrobiology is the science providing the data to make this critical choice. This 20th century overview shows how we have arrived at the view that cosmic evolution may have resulted in life and intelligence in the universe. It examines how our astronomical world view has changed over the last century, recalls the opinions of astronomical pioneers like Russell, Shapley, and Struve on life in the universe, and shows how planetary science, planetary systems science, origins of life studies and SETI have combined to form a new discipline. Astrobiology now commands \\$50 million in direct funding from NASA, funds 15 Astrobiology Institute members around the country and four affiliates around the world, and seeks to answer one of astronomy's oldest questions. Whether we live in a mostly physical universe, as exemplified in Isaac Asimov's Foundation series, or in a biological universe, as portrayed in Arthur C. Clarke's works, this reality will have profound consequences, no less than the Copernican theory. Astrobiology also looks to the future of life; taking a long-term ``Stapledonian" view, it is possible we may live in a postbiological universe.

  18. Achieving universal access to broadband

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten; Henten, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses appropriate policy measures for achieving universal access to broadband services in Europe. Access can be delivered by means of many different technology solutions described in the paper. This means a greater degree of competition and affects the kind of policy measures...... to be applied. The paper concludes that other policy measure than the classical universal service obligation are in play, and discusses various policy measures taking the Lisbon process as a point of departure. Available policy measures listed in the paper include, universal service obligation, harmonization...

  19. From Traditional to Modern Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anja Birch; Sort, Jesper Chrautwald; Nielsen, Christian

    This paper reports a longitudinal multi-case research project encompassing 72 semi-structured interviews carried out in 2011 and 2012. The interviews covered topics of the collaboration between university and industry, why they were engaged, who benefitted from it, the initial motives and final...... results. In addition the interviews tried to focus on whether the industry understood the motives of the university to engage in collaboration and vice versa. Focusing on whether the performance measurements used by politicians and universities today enhances the collaborations or obstruct them. The paper...

  20. Cosmology in the plasma universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfven, Hannes (Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Plasma Physics)

    1988-08-01

    Space observations have opened the spectral regions of X-rays and {gamma}-ray, which are produced by plasma processes. The Plasma Universe derived from observations in these regions is drastically different from the now generally accepted 'Visual Light Universe' based on visual light observations alone. Historically this transition can be compared only to the transition from the geocentric to the heliocentric cosmology. The criteria a cosmological theory must satisfy in order to be acceptable in the Plasma Universe, is discussed. (author).

  1. Achieving Universal Access to Broadband

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten FALCH

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses appropriate policy measures for achieving universal access to broadband services in Europe. Access can be delivered by means of many different technology solutions described in the paper. This means a greater degree of competition and affects the kind of policy measures to be applied. The paper concludes that other policy measure than the classical universal service obligation are in play, and discusses various policy measures taking the Lisbon process as a point of departure. Available policy measures listed in the paper include, universal service obligation, harmonization, demand stimulation, public support for extending the infrastructure, public private partnerships (PPP, and others.

  2. How old is the universe?

    CERN Document Server

    Weintraub, David A

    2010-01-01

    Astronomers have determined that our universe is 13.7 billion years old. How exactly did they come to this precise conclusion? How Old Is the Universe? tells the incredible story of how astronomers solved one of the most compelling mysteries in science and, along the way, introduces readers to fundamental concepts and cutting-edge advances in modern astronomy. The age of our universe poses a deceptively simple question, and its answer carries profound implications for science, religion, and philosophy. David Weintraub traces the centuries-old quest by astronomers to fathom the

  3. Exploring the Digital Universe with Europe's Astrophysical Virtual Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-01

    organisations are the European Space Agency (ESA) , the United Kingdom's ASTROGRID consortium, the CNRS-supported Centre de Données Astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS) at the University Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg (France), the CNRS-supported TERAPIX astronomical data centre at the Institut d'Astrophysique in Paris and the Jodrell Bank Observatory of the Victoria University of Manchester (UK). Note [1]: This is a joint Press Release issued by the European Southern Observatory (ESO), the Hubble European Space Agency Information Centre, ASTROGRID, CDS, TERAPIX/CNRS and the University of Manchester. A 13 minute background video (broadcast PAL) is available from ESO PR and the Hubble European Space Agency Information Centre (addresses below). This will also be transmitted via satellite Wednesday 12 December 2001 from 12:00 to 12:15 CET on "ESA TV Service", cf. http://television.esa.int. An international conference, "Toward an International Virtual Observatory" will take place at ESO (Garching, Germany) on June 10 - 14, 2002. Contacts AVO Contacts Peter Quinn European Southern Observatory Garching, Germany Tel.: +4989-3200-6509 email: pjq@eso.org Piero Benvenuti Space Telescope-European Coordinating Facility Garching, Germany Tel.: +49-89-3200-6290 email: pbenvenu@eso.org Andy Lawrence (on behalf of The ASTROGRID Consortium) Institute for Astronomy University of Edinburgh United Kingdom Tel.: +44-131-668-8346/56 email: al@roe.ac.uk Francoise Genova Centre de Données Astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS) France Tel.: +33-390-24-24-76 email: genova@astro.u-strasbg.fr Yannick Mellier CNRS, Delegation Paris A (CNRSDR01-Terapix)/IAP/INSU France Tel.: +33-1-44-32-81-40 email: mellier@iap.fr Phil Diamond University of Manchester/Jodrell Bank Observatory United Kingdom Tel.: +44-147-757-2625 email: pdiamond@jb.man.ac.uk PR Contacts Richard West European Southern Observatory Garching, Germany Tel.: +49-89-3200-6276 email: rwest@eso.org Lars Lindberg Christensen Hubble European Space Agency

  4. Universal Design: Places to Start

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jay Dolmage

    2015-01-01

    Beginning with a series of possible ways to introduce an essay on Universal Design for Learning, this contribution instead resolves to offer a long listing or inventory of different places to start...

  5. STORYTELLING AND UNIVERSITY BRANDING IDENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREEA MONICA STATE

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present article sets out to clarify the concepts of storytelling and branding, with a focus on university branding and visual identity – the latter being a vital element to a brand’s uniqueness. Storytelling is an important method of brand construction, and it entails a strong power of seduction. Branding is increasingly more about storytelling. Practically, a story is an image made up of facts, feelings and interpretations, which are often told to us solely by the university itself. As such, the brand appears on the market accompanied by its identity. Identity is what we aim to express with help of the brand. Implementing a system of visual identity that would help to harmoniously develop a university brand requires a handbook of visual identity. The present article aims to be a starting point for such a handbook serving the University of Bucharest, which currently does not own such a handbook

  6. The early universe and cosmogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukash, V. N.; Mikheeva, E. V.; Strokov, V. N.

    2013-05-01

    We extrapolate the Cosmological Standard Model to the past, determine initial geometrical conditions in the early universe, and consider a new cosmogenesis paradigm based on the concept of black-and-white holes with integrable singularities.

  7. Baryon number of the universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, S.; Susskind, L.

    1978-12-15

    We consider the possibility that the observed particle-antiparticle imbalance in the universe is due to baryon-numbers, C, and CP nonconservation. We make general observations and describe a framework for making quantitative estimates.

  8. Emergent Universe with particle production

    CERN Document Server

    Gangopadhyay, Sunandan; Mukherjee, S

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of an emergent universe solution to Einstein's field equations allowing for an irreversible creation of matter at the expense of the gravitational field is shown. With the universe being chosen as spatially flat FRW spacetime together with equation of state proposed in [17], the solution exists when the ratio of the phenomenological matter creation rate to the number density times the Hubble parameter is a number $\\beta$ of the order of unity and independent of time. The thermodynamic behaviour is also determined for this solution. Interestingly, we also find that an emergent universe scenario is present with usual equation of state in cosmology when the matter creation rate is chosen to be a constant. More general class of emergent universe solutions are also discussed.

  9. Lenz v. Universal Music Corp

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2016-01-01

    .... Universal Music Corp, the Ninth Circuit attempted to combat such abuse by ruling that copyright holders must first conduct an analysis of whether the material constitutes fair use, and therefore does...

  10. Guest Comment: Universal Language Requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Bruce Arne

    1979-01-01

    Explains that reading English among Scientists is almost universal, however, there are enormous problems with spoken English. Advocates the use of Esperanto as a viable alternative, and as a language requirement for graduate work. (GA)

  11. Perelman Quadrangle, University of Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates a large campus renovation and expansion project at the University of Pennsylvania, whose quadrangle preserves the school's historical buildings and student union as the center of student activity. Includes nine photographs, a site plan, and project data. (GR)

  12. Beyond Divestment: The Moral University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifer, Alan

    1986-01-01

    Issues in university divestment of stock in American corporations doing business in South Africa, in protest of apartheid, are discussed in light of the American experience with discrimination. Divestment options are examined. (MSE)

  13. Richard Compton, University of Oxford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The Analyst profiles Richard Compton, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Oxford and the first and only recipient of both the RSC Medals in Electrochemistry and in Electroanalytical Chemistry.

  14. The TR University Research Scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacks, Rebecca

    2000-01-01

    Presents a ranking of the top United States universities in their quest for intellectual property, commercial partners, and profits. Bases rankings on a consideration of patent numbers, patent quality, and licensing revenues. (WRM)

  15. Particle accelerator; the Universe machine

    CERN Multimedia

    Yurkewicz, Katie

    2008-01-01

    "In summer 2008, scientists will switch on one of the largest machines in the world to search for the smallest of particle. CERN's Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator has the potential to chagne our understanding of the Universe."

  16. Comparing Sustainable Universities between the United States and China: Cases of Indiana University and Tsinghua University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Zou

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that universities can play critical roles in promoting sustainability. In the United States and China, many universities have initiated sustainability programs. Employing Indiana University, Bloomington, the U.S. (IUB and Tsinghua University, Beijing, China (Tsinghua as two cases, we examine the conceptualization and implementation of university sustainability programs through a comparison of their respective definitions, goals, organizational dynamics, and strategies. We find that IUB’s sustainability scheme is more detailed and specific, while Tsinghua’s is more general; this is principally attributable to differences in national and local contexts. Furthermore, IUB values the environmental, economic, and social aspects of university sustainability equally, while Tsinghua focuses more on the environmental aspect. In addition, IUB has a more loosely-structured and more inclusive sustainability organizational dynamic while Tsinghua has a more hierarchical one. This comparative study helps us to understand how these two research universities understand and implement sustainability within the respective cultural, political, and institutional contexts of the United States and China.

  17. Universe creation on a computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Gordon

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of the epistemology and metaphysics of universe creation on a computer. The paper begins with F.J. Tipler's argument that our experience is indistinguishable from the experience of someone embedded in a perfect computer simulation of our own universe, hence we cannot know whether or not we are part of such a computer program ourselves. Tipler's argument is treated as a special case of epistemological scepticism, in a similar vein to 'brain-in-a-vat' arguments. It is argued that Tipler's hypothesis that our universe is a program running on a digital computer in another universe, generates empirical predictions, and is therefore a falsifiable hypothesis. The computer program hypothesis is also treated as a hypothesis about what exists beyond the physical world, and is compared with Kant's metaphysics of noumena. It is argued that if our universe is a program running on a digital computer, then our universe must have compact spatial topology, and the possibilities of observationally testing this prediction are considered. The possibility of testing the computer program hypothesis with the value of the density parameter Ω0 is also analysed. The informational requirements for a computer to represent a universe exactly and completely are considered. Consequent doubt is thrown upon Tipler's claim that if a hierarchy of computer universes exists, we would not be able to know which 'level of implementation' our universe exists at. It is then argued that a digital computer simulation of a universe, or any other physical system, does not provide a realisation of that universe or system. It is argued that a digital computer simulation of a physical system is not objectively related to that physical system, and therefore cannot exist as anything else other than a physical process occurring upon the components of the computer. It is concluded that Tipler's sceptical hypothesis, and a related hypothesis from Bostrom, cannot be

  18. Escala de Depressão Pós-natal de Edimburgo para triagem no sistema público de saúde Escala de Depresión Post-natal de Edimburgo para tamizage en el sistema público de salud Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale for screening in the public health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Figueira

    2009-08-01

    ón-oro para diagnóstico de depresión. Fueron calculadas sensibilidad y especificidad de la escala y se utilizó la curva ROC para encontrar el mejor punto de corte. Fue utilizada la prueba t de Stuident para comparación de las variables numéricas y el chi-cuadrado para las variables categóricas. La confiabilidad fue confirmada por el cociente de consistencia interna a de Cronbach. RESULTADOS: Fueron diagnosticadas 66 mujeres con el cuadro depresivo post-parto (26,9% de las muestras. No hubo diferencia entre las mujeres con y sin depresión post-parto con relación a la edad, escolaridad, número de partos anteriores y estado civil. Utilizándose el punto de corte de 10, la sensibilidad de la escala fue 86,4, la especificidad 91,1 y el valor predictivo positivo 0,78. CONCLUSIONES: Las propiedades psicométricas de la Escala la caracterizan como un buen instrumento de tamizage de la depresión post-parto y su uso diseminado en el Sistema Único de Salud podría repercutir positivamente con el aumento significativo en la tasa de reconocimiento, diagnóstico y tratamiento de la depresión post-parto.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the utilization of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale as a screening tool in the public health system. METHODS: The Scale was administered between the 40th and 90th day after delivery to 245 mothers whose delivery occurred at a private maternity hospital located in the municipality of Belo Horizonte, Southeastern Brazil, from 2005 to 2006. All participants were submitted to a structured psychiatric interview (Mini-Plus 5.0, used as gold standard for postpartum depression diagnosis. The scale's sensitivity and specificity were calculated, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to find the best cut-off point. Student's t test was employed to compare numeric variables and chi-square was used for the categorical variables. Reliability was calculated by Cronbach's coefficient á of internal consistency. RESULTS: Postpartum depression

  19. UNPACKED: Middlesex University Product Design

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, Wyn

    2013-01-01

    'UNPACKED: Middlesex University Product Design' is showcasing the 2013 graduating group of the Middlesex University BA/BSc Product Design course.\\ud The group of Product Designers will be exhibiting at two places in 2013; at the Old Truman Brewery, Brick Lane, London from 6-10th June and at the prestigious New Designers exhibition, Business Design Centre, London 3-6th July.

  20. Toward universal electrification in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemausuor, Francis; Ackom, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    In 1989, the government of Ghana set in motion an electrification plan that aims to provide universal access to electricity within a 30-year period, from 1990 to 2020. About 25 years down the line, Ghana seems to be inching closer toward universal electrification. However, a number of challenges ......-grid and off-grid systems are other alternatives that could be explored within the framework of the access agenda in order to reach the unserved poor located in remote rural communities....

  1. Challenges for current University management

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Rodríguez Vargas

    2016-01-01

    The Ecuadorian university through a change of era, this complex pathway mediated by globalization imposes imminently. The aim of this paper is to present a review of literature on the main aspects of management that are generated for the interaction University - context. This scan was performed on secondary sources, and grounded in scienti?c data abstraction. College education is an information and training process that allows the scientific, technological, economic, political, social and cul...

  2. (Re)Discovering University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reilly, John; Turcan, Romeo V.; Bugaian, Larisa

    2016-01-01

    discussion of challenges. The other outcome is the extent to which academic colleagues in a wide-range of disciplines and not directly engaged with research on university autonomy may not perceive or engage with the wider autonomy outcomes of their work and as a result their own case studies may not fully...... identify the autonomy impact real or potential. Many academic staff take for granted university autonomy without questioning its sometimes contradictory assumptions and impacts....

  3. Professional Values in University Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar M. Casares García

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the key functions of universities is professional training. Performing professional tasks properly calls for not only acquisition of the appropriate technical competences, but also the development of ethical values. In order to adjust to the needs of society and students, university education should offer an integrated development model, which, in addition to technical and cognitive competences, also plans for the inclusion of personal and moral growth.

  4. ICT uses between university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanda García

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to analyse gender differences in the use of ICT among university students. We present the results of a study about the uses and the perception in relation to ICT in everyday life and in academia. The study is based on a statistical simple of 1042 students from 5 different universities. The results show gender differences, both with respect to use as their perception of technology.

  5. A Universe without Weak Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2006-04-07

    A universe without weak interactions is constructed that undergoes big-bang nucleosynthesis, matter domination, structure formation, and star formation. The stars in this universe are able to burn for billions of years, synthesize elements up to iron, and undergo supernova explosions, dispersing heavy elements into the interstellar medium. These definitive claims are supported by a detailed analysis where this hypothetical ''Weakless Universe'' is matched to our Universe by simultaneously adjusting Standard Model and cosmological parameters. For instance, chemistry and nuclear physics are essentially unchanged. The apparent habitability of the Weakless Universe suggests that the anthropic principle does not determine the scale of electroweak breaking, or even require that it be smaller than the Planck scale, so long as technically natural parameters may be suitably adjusted. Whether the multi-parameter adjustment is realized or probable is dependent on the ultraviolet completion, such as the string landscape. Considering a similar analysis for the cosmological constant, however, we argue that no adjustments of other parameters are able to allow the cosmological constant to raise up even remotely close to the Planck scale while obtaining macroscopic structure. The fine-tuning problems associated with the electroweak breaking scale and the cosmological constant therefore appear to be qualitatively different from the perspective of obtaining a habitable universe.

  6. Food intake of university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greyce Luci BERNARDO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This narrative literature review aimed to analyze the results of studies on the food intake of university students. A literature search was conducted in July 2014 and updated in July 2016 in the Scopus, MedLine/PubMed, and SciELO databases, using descriptors related to university students and food intake in English and Portuguese. Overall, 37 studies that analyzed university students’ food intake were included in this review, eight of which were conducted in Brazil. The results demonstrated that most university students have unhealthy eating behaviors, such as high intake of fast foods, snacks, sweets, soft drinks, and alcoholic beverages, and low intake of fruits, vegetables, fish, whole grains, and legumes. Undergraduate students of health sciences, such as nursing, nutrition, and medicine, did not have healthier diets. University students’ food intake was characterized as unhealthy, regardless of undergraduate program or sex, especially among students who left the parents’ home and became responsible for their own food. Therefore, there is a need of developing public policies that promote healthy eating habits among students, such as interventions to change their eating habits and increase their access to healthy foods at the university environment.

  7. Class of probe brane universes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilić, Milovan

    2013-06-01

    I examine the idea that our world is a branelike object of negligible influence on the bulk spacetime. No particular action functional is specified. Instead, the probe brane dynamics is derived from the universally valid stress-energy conservation equations. As an example, I study the case of a three-sphere in the five-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. The resulting four-universe turns out to depend on the equation of state of the brane constituent matter but differs from that of general relativity. One observes that, for every general relativistic universe, there exists a brane universe of equal geometry but a slightly different equation of state. As for the stability of brane universes, I find that no equation of state leads to a stable solution. However, the situation changes if the bulk spacetime has a Euclidean signature. In this case, a class of stable cosmological solutions is obtained. The brane vibrations are guided by the covariant Klein-Gordon equation with an effective metric of the Minkowski signature. It is this effective metric that local observers actually detect. As a consequence, the detected Universe is of bouncing type, with an accelerating expanding phase.

  8. From WWII to Kingston, Ontario: The History of Queen’s University School of Medicine, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Karen; Wyllie, Kenneth; Davidson, John

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the origin and development of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the Queen’s University School of Medicine (Kingston, Ontario). METHODS Resarch ethics board approval and privacy agreements from the Kingston General Hospital (KGH, Kingston, Ontario) medical archives were obtained. Primary and secondary data sources were identified. A systematic examination of newspaper archives, research literature, KGH medical advisory committee meeting minutes, and testimonies from Dr Kenneth Wyllie and Dr John Davidson were obtained. RESULTS In 1949, Dr Albert Ross Tilley arrived at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. There, Tilley initiated the Burn Unit at the KGH and began monthly teaching during the academic semester. Ken Wyllie (Meds ’55), Lloyd Carlson (Meds ’57) and John Emery (Meds ’57) were the notable progeny of his early initiatives. In 1963, Kenneth Wyllie founded the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in Kingston, Ontario, having completed plastic surgery training in Toronto and Edinburgh with experiences in Stockholm (Sweden), Paris (France) and Baltimore (Maryland, USA). He was shortly joined by Pat Shoemaker (Meds ’66). John Davidson (Meds ’82) arrived in 1989, bringing an interest in microsurgery and critical inquiry to the division. Five notable surgeons, Cartotto (Meds ’88), Watkins, Watters, Meathrel (Meds ’03) and McKay, further enhanced the Division’s clinical and academic mission. CONCLUSIONS The collective activity of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Queen’s School of Medicine in its 66-year history has encouraged more than 40 others to pursue distinguished careers in the specialty throughout North America, including three past presidents of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons. PMID:28439504

  9. University of Aarhus - the stepping stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kent T.

    The University of Aarhus has more than 20,000 students, making it the second largest university in Denmark. It is also the second-oldest multi-faculty university in the country, and is celebrating its 75th anniversary in 2003. Like the other Danish universities, the University of Aarhus is curren...... closely at the history of the University of Aarhus, the importance of the University for the Aarhus region, and the opportunities and barriers facing an "old" comprehensive University in its attempts to adapt to the new role of universities in the knowledge society....

  10. University Program Management Information System: NASA's University Program Active Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data. This report was prepared by the Office of Education/N.

  11. The Pragmatic University: A Feasible Utopia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badley, Graham

    2016-01-01

    "Imaginings" of the modern university include such ideas as "the ecological university" and "the pragmatic university". In his attempt to separate utopian from dystopian visions of the university, Ronald Barnett concentrates on an analysis of the ecological university and ignores, for example, the case of the…

  12. Can the Universe create itself?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, J. Richard, III; Li, Li-Xin

    1998-07-01

    The question of first-cause has troubled philosophers and cosmologists alike. Now that it is apparent that our universe began in a big bang explosion, the question of what happened before the big bang arises. Inflation seems like a very promising answer, but as Borde and Vilenkin have shown, the inflationary state preceding the big bang could not have been infinite in duration-it must have had a beginning also. Where did it come from? Ultimately, the difficult question seems to be how to make something out of nothing. This paper explores the idea that this is the wrong question-that that is not how the Universe got here. Instead, we explore the idea of whether there is anything in the laws of physics that would prevent the Universe from creating itself. Because spacetimes can be curved and multiply connected, general relativity allows for the possibility of closed timelike curves (CTCs). Thus, tracing backwards in time through the original inflationary state we may eventually encounter a region of CTCs-giving no first-cause. This region of CTCs may well be over by now (being bounded toward the future by a Cauchy horizon). We illustrate that such models-with CTCs-are not necessarily inconsistent by demonstrating self-consistent vacuums for Misner space and a multiply connected de Sitter space in which the renormalized energy-momentum tensor does not diverge as one approaches the Cauchy horizon and solves Einstein's equations. Some specific scenarios (out of many possible ones) for this type of model are described. For example, a metastable vacuum inflates producing an infinite number of (big-bang-type) bubble universes. In many of these, either by natural causes or by action of advanced civilizations, a number of bubbles of metastable vacuum are created at late times by high energy events. These bubbles will usually collapse and form black holes, but occasionally one will tunnel to create an expanding metastable vacuum (a baby universe) on the other side of the

  13. Pre-University Mathematics (Case: Core University Alberto Adriani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Guerrero Mora

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work an approach to a written didactic guide was made to leverage the training of our pre-university students of the Alberto Adriani University Nucleus of the Universidad de los Andes. It starts with a diagnosis about the competences in basic mathematics of young people who are studying to study engineering at Universidad de los Andes. 6 independent modules are proposed in a written guide and validated with their respective application in a group of students enrolled in the pre-university course. This work follows in general terms a methodology based on the structured survey. With the results obtained we can conclude that its development has been successful, this despite the fact that the general average did not exceed 50%, taking into account that more than 40% managed to assimilate the information and exceed 10 points.

  14. Ethics Education In The University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen K. Q. Trung

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Accounting faculty of universities in Vietnam takes an important role in the training of human resources for the society in the field of accounting auditing and taxation. All professors and lecturers who teaching in those faculties have participated in editing and changing the accounting curricular in order to meet the needs of the market labor and requirements of new internationally professional standards. The integration of professional ethics into the curriculum has raised the concern of many universities not only in Vietnam but also in the world. This paper presents the study on teaching and learning of professional ethics at Faculty of Accounting and Auditing of Banking University of HCMC. The results of the study do highlight some recommendations for improving the contents of courses used for the teaching and learning accounting effectively. The research is presented in this paper as follows a short literature review and then the methodology of interviewing the professors in accounting fields who have the best experiences in education of accounting. Also students who are studying accounting course will be interviewed. In addition to content Analysis research methods and a case study approach are used to investigate the whether it is necessary for teaching and learning of Professional Ethics in accounting at Banking University of HCMC. The paper aims to answer the following questions i Should ethics be taught in accounting classes at universities ii How professional ethics has been taught and learned as a separate course or integration into different accounting and auditing courses

  15. University Program Management Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  16. Euclid and the Dark Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellier, Yannick

    2016-07-01

    The ESA Euclid mission aims to understand why the expansion of the Universe is accelerating and pin down the source responsible for the acceleration. It will uncover the very nature of dark energy and gravitation by measuring with exquisite accuracy the expansion rate of the Universe and the growth rate of structure formation in the Universe. To achieve its objectives Euclid will observe the distribution of dark matter in the Universe by measuring shapes of weakly distorted distant galaxies lensed by foreground cosmic structures with the VIS imaging instrument. In parallel, Euclid will analyse the clustering of galaxies and the distribution of clusters of galaxies by using spectroscopy and measuring redshifts of galaxies with the NISP photometer and spectrometer instrument. The Euclid mission will observe one third of the sky (15,000 deg2) to collect data on several billion galaxies spread over the last ten billion years. In this presentation I will report on the considerable technical and scientific progresses made since COSPAR 2014, on behalf of the Euclid Collaboration. The recent mission PDR that has been passed successfully shows that Euclid should meet its requirements and achieve its primary scientific objectives to map the dark universe. The most recent forecasts and constraints on dark energy, gravity, dark matter and inflation will be presented.

  17. SYSTEMIC EFFECTS OF UNIVERSITY COMPLEXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. O. Vaganova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present article is to reveal system effects of the university complexes including the organizations of professional education on different levels.Methodology and research methods. Theoretical methods: receipt of scientific information on systems, collection of data on university complexes; empirical: comparison and correlation of the obtained data.Results and scientific novelty. A university complex is designated as a system. The system effects being the results of integration of the organizations of professional education of different levels are educed: effect of instability of the hierarchical relations when preserving a certain structure of a university complex; effect of a single educational purpose, effect of influence of the external environment. These effects cause emergence of new quality of the integrated pedagogical system which is designated as «ability to self-regulating updating».Practical significance. The materials and results of the study can be used for further development of university complexes as organizations that integrate the establishments of vocational education on different levels.

  18. curricular innovation in the university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Mercedes Callejas Restrepo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The 21st century sets out new challenges to universities and university professors,who have to debate on the quality of education, the requirements on the teaching and learning, and the proposed curricula for the professional and disciplinary training in the university. In this context, research groups from four Colombian universities have developed a project in order to articulate therelationshipswithin the training of university professors, through the research of their practices and processes of curricular innovation. With such a goal the conformation of pedagogical collectives is promoted, and a reflective process about their pedagogical styles is generated (Callejas&,Corredor, 2002. Action research as a methodology and strategy of professional evelopment is proposed (McKernan, 1999, observation-reflection, planning-action, and then back to observation-reflection.Video recordings of classes, individual and group observation of the recordings, and individual and group interviews that favor reflection processes about the dimensions of the pedagogical style are performed. The analysis of the practice is guided by a complex, investigative and comprehensive vision of the curriculum that articulates theory and practice. The critical recognition that teachers do about their own pedagogical style favors the evolution of their ideas and guides them to start a process of curricular innovation.

  19. Association of African Universities : Education and Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Association of African Universities : Education and Research Networking Unit. The Association of African Universities (AAU), headquartered in Accra, Ghana, is an international nongovernmental organization (NGO) that promotes cooperation between African universities and with the international community.

  20. Air University Style and Author Guide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bassett, Marvin

    2005-01-01

    The "Air University Style and Author Guide" is designed to unify the writing of faculty, staff, and students of Air University stylistically, and to give them information about publishing with Air University (AU) Press...

  1. Medical Physics Undergraduate Degree Courses at University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Roy

    1989-01-01

    Described are the course, teaching/study, entry qualifications, and destination of graduates of four courses in medical physics from Exeter University, King's College London, University College London, and University College of Swansea. (YP)

  2. Big questions about the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavinschi, Magda

    2011-06-01

    Astronomy is not only a branch of science but also an important part of the culture and civilisations of peoples. Starting with archeoastronomy to the present day, it has always contributed to a better understanding of life, of humanity. After 400 years of modern astronomy, it still addresses major problems such as: Why there is something rather than nothing? Why is nature comprehensible to humans? How is cosmos related to humanity? Do multiverses exist? Is there life on other planets? Are we alone in the universe? Does the universe have a beginning? If so, what does it mean? How did the universe originate? All these questions are a challenge for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary investigations, for philosophers, physicists, cosmologists, mathematicians, theologians. The new insights gained by pursuing in depth these common investigations will shape the society we live in and have important consequences on the future we are creating.

  3. The Alphabet of the Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    One of the most culturally inspiring – yet unexpected – venues where you can find an exhibition about CERN and particle physics these days is the Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt. Discover The Alphabet of the Universe: from CERN to North Africa and the Middle East in the cradle of knowledge par excellence.   The Alphabet of the Universe exhibition in Alexandria. (Image credit: Bibliotheca Alexandrina) With its 400 square metres surface area, about 40 exhibits and more than 50 people involved, The Alphabet of the Universe exhibition was inaugurated on 19 January in the Planetarium Science Centre (PSC), one of the main attractions of the New Library of Alexandria. “The exhibition has been designed to cover four main themes related to particle physics and CERN: what we know; open issues; accelerators and detectors; computing and applications,” explains Barbara Gallavotti, curator of the exhibition. “The exhibits were designed b...

  4. In Defense of Soft Universalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaumburg-Müller, Sten

    2011-01-01

    The present paper is work in progress, a preliminary attempt to present a position of soft universalism as regards human rights. The position is not seen as a compromise between contradicting perceptions, universalism and relativism, but rather as a better and more correct position. It takes...... human rights is the emerging global society, and human rights law is therefore best understood as (part of) the law of this emerging society. Seen in this way, human rights are an attempt to cope with a (partly) new situation, based on knowledge of human beings and society, a knowledge which has...... improved considerably since the time of the natural rights theories and the enlightenment. As a consequence prevailing international human rights are not the only possible human rights, and soft universalism is therefore partially open as regards the content of human rights, even though non discrimination...

  5. Universal mortality law and immortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azbel', Mark Ya.

    2004-10-01

    Well-protected human and laboratory animal populations with abundant resources are evolutionarily unprecedented. Physical approach, which takes advantage of their extensively quantified mortality, establishes that its dominant fraction yields the exact law, which is universal for all animals from yeast to humans. Singularities of the law demonstrate new kinds of stepwise adaptation. The law proves that universal mortality is an evolutionary by-product, which at any given age is reversible, independent of previous life history, and disposable. Life expectancy may be extended, arguably to immortality, by minor biological amendments in the animals. Indeed, in nematodes with a small number of perturbed genes and tissues it increased 6-fold (to 430 years in human terms), with no apparent loss in health and vitality. The law relates universal mortality to specific processes in cells and their genetic regulation.

  6. Hopping models and ac universality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe; Schrøder, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Some general relations for hopping models are established. We proceed to discuss the universality of the ac conductivity which arises in the extreme disorder limit of the random barrier model. It is shown that the relevant dimension entering into the diffusion cluster approximation (DCA) is the h......Some general relations for hopping models are established. We proceed to discuss the universality of the ac conductivity which arises in the extreme disorder limit of the random barrier model. It is shown that the relevant dimension entering into the diffusion cluster approximation (DCA......) is the harmonic (fracton) dimension of the diffusion cluster. The temperature scaling of the dimensionless frequency entering into the DCA is discussed. Finally, some open problems regarding ac universality are listed....

  7. Emergent universe from noncommutative spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jungjai [Daejin University, Pocheon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hyunseok [Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    The Big Bang, which was the birth of our Universe, happened at the Planck epoch. It was not an event that developed in a pre-existing space-time. Rather, it was a cosmological event simultaneously generating space-time as well as all other matter fields. Therefore, in order to describe the origin of our Universe, it is necessary to have a background-independent theory for quantum gravity in which no space-time structure is a priori assumed, but is defined from the theory. The emergent gravity based on noncommutative gauge theory provides such a background-independent formulation of quantum gravity, and the emergent space-time leads to a novel picture of the dynamical origin of space-time. We address some issues about the origin of our Universe and discuss the implications to cosmology of the emergent gravity.

  8. Physics of the plasma universe

    CERN Document Server

    Peratt, Anthony L

    2015-01-01

    Today many scientists recognize plasma as the key element to understanding new observations in near-Earth, interplanetary, interstellar, and intergalactic space; in stars, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies, and throughout the observable universe. Physics of the Plasma Universe, 2nd Edition is an update of observations made across the entire cosmic electromagnetic spectrum over the two decades since the publication of the first edition. It addresses paradigm changing discoveries made by telescopes, planetary probes, satellites, and radio and space telescopes. The contents are the result of the author's 37 years research at Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories, and the U.S. Department of Energy. This book covers topics such as the large-scale structure and the filamentary universe; the formation of magnetic fields and galaxies, active galactic nuclei and quasars, the origin and abundance of light elements, star formation and the evolution of solar systems, and cosmic rays. Chapters 8 and 9 are based ...

  9. Information Classification on University Websites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawaz, Ather; Clemmensen, Torkil; Hertzum, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Websites are increasingly used as a medium for providing information to university students. The quality of a university website depends on how well the students’ information classification fits with the structure of the information on the website. This paper investigates the information...... classification of 14 Danish and 14 Pakistani students and compares it with the information classification of their university website. Brainstorming, card sorting, and task exploration activities were used to discover similarities and differences in the participating students’ classification of website...... information and their ability to navigate the websites. The results of the study indicate group differences in user classification and related taskperformance differences. The main implications of the study are that (a) the edit distance appears a useful measure in cross-country HCI research and practice...

  10. Information Classification on University Websites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawaz, Ather; Clemmensen, Torkil; Hertzum, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Websites are increasingly used as a medium for providing information to university students. The quality of a university website depends on how well the students’ information classification fits with the structure of the information on the website. This paper investigates the information...... classification of 14 Danish and 14 Pakistani students and compares it with the information classification of their university website. Brainstorming, card sorting, and task exploration activities were used to discover similarities and differences in the participating students’ classification of website...... information and their ability to navigate the websites. The results of the study indicate group differences in user classification and related task-performance differences. The main implications of the study are that (a) the edit distance appears a useful measure in cross-country HCI research and practice...

  11. Information Classification on University Websites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawaz, Ather; Clemmensen, Torkil; Hertzum, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Websites are increasingly used as a medium for providing information to university students. The quality of a university website depends on how well the students’ information classification fits with the structure of the information on the website. This paper investigates the information...... classification of 14 Danish and 14 Pakistani students and compares it with the information classification of their university website. Brainstorming, card sorting and task exploration activities were used to discover similarities and differences in the participating students’ classification of website...... information and their ability to navigate the websites. The results of the study indicated group differences in user classification and related task performances differences. The main implications of the study were that (a) the edit distance appears a useful measure in cross-country HCI research and practice...

  12. When Universities First Encountered Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVaugh, Michael

    2017-01-01

    From student notes of the teaching of William de Congenis, at Montpellier ca. 1225, we can recognize that surgical education fitted not too uneasily into an academic environment at that moment, when universities and medical faculties were beginning to shape their institutional identity. But medical institutionalization over the next two hundred years operated in a variety of ways to strengthen rather than break down a nascent hierarchical distinction between medical and surgical learning. At Montpellier, medical masters acquired many surgical skills themselves and abandoned the most difficult operations to non-academic restauratores; surgeons per se were not part of the university. In the north Italian universities, Padua and Bologna, separate chairs of surgery did come into existence within medical faculties in the fourteenth century, yet surgical education never achieved more than second-class status there, and professors of surgery typically tried to move up into medical chairs; anatomy remained a medical subject until the beginning of the sixteenth century.

  13. How to build a universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian; Feachem, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    The Infinite Monkey Cage, the legendary BBC Radio 4 programme, brings you this irreverent celebration of scientific marvels. Join us on a hectic leap through the grand and bizarre ideas conjured up by human imagination, from dark matter to consciousness via neutrinos and earthworms. Professor Brian Cox and Robin Ince muse on multifaceted subjects involved in building a universe, with pearls of wisdom from leading scientists and comedians peppered throughout. Covering billions of concepts and conundrums, they tackle everything from the Big Bang to parallel universes, fierce creatures to extraterrestrial life, brain science to artificial intelligence. How to Build a Universe is an illuminating and inspirational celebration of science - sometimes silly, sometimes astounding and very occasionally facetious.

  14. UNIVERSITY LYCEUM” AS INTEGRATIVE MODEL OF PRE-UNIVERSITY EDUCATION AT A BACKBONE UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya V. Grishina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the article describes the development of educational institutions for the needs of the regional economy in Russia. The focus is on students’ understanding of their careers, early identification of their professional trajectory and intensive development of future professional competencies for local labor market. This process underscores the diversification of the universities’ educational space, the integration of general, higher and further education programmes. The purpose of the article is to model the integrative pre-university educational space based on the synthesis of form al, informal and informational education. Materials and Methods: the integrative approach as a theoretical and methodological strategy allows exploring the various structures of pre-university education and improving the quality of schooling in conjunction with the system, activity, competence, and synergetic approaches. The author reviewed the scholarly and methodological literature on the topic, compared, summarised, structured and modeled the data. In addition, they studied leading pedagogical experience and used the expert assessment method. Results: the developed University lyceum model as a fundamental structure of continuous formation integrating resources and scientific and educational potential of the general, professional and additional education of the region is presented. The organization of network partnership as a method of an integration interaction contributes to the inclusion in the educational process of various actors of continuing education. It ensures the effectiveness of the conscious professional self-determination and self-development of the student’s personality. Discussion and Conclusions: the author expects the proposed model of the pre-university educational institution will allow to motivate students of the lyceum to enter the university. This will contribute to the establishment of the university as a structure

  15. Towards a University Popular Theatre: The Case of University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Part of the argument, therefore, is that the theatre practiced in the University of Botswana [UB], in spite of its academic demands, needs to seriously rethink the social function of being in touch with the community, an idea which was pioneered in Botswana by the now defunct Laedza Batanani project, which has roots in UB.

  16. Universities in external knowledge networks: particular roles for particular universities?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thune, Taran; Gulbrandsen, Magnus; Benneworth, Paul Stephen; Olmos Peñuela, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The paper addresses the key issue within the special track “One size does not fit all”: are there distinct ways that different kinds of universities interact with their environments at local, regional and national levels? In this paper, we begin from the critique in the call for papers in this track

  17. El Espanol como Idioma Universal (Spanish as a Universal Language)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijares, Jose

    1977-01-01

    A proposal to transform Spanish into a universal language because it possesses the prerequisites: it is a living language, spoken in several countries; it is a natural language; and it uses the ordinary alphabet. Details on simplification and standardization are given. (Text is in Spanish.) (AMH)

  18. Arizona State University: Student Tracking in a University System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John D.; Gebel, Melinda A.

    1995-01-01

    Arizona State University has created longitudinal student files capable of tracking each student's curricular and financial aid history from entry until graduation. The structure of the files, their creation and maintenance, and their evolution over the years are described. Uses of the files to conduct different kinds of studies to inform…

  19. Dark matter in the universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA) Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-11-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the Universe This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the Universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the Universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the Universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand: Most of the material in the Universe does not give off detectable radiation, i.e., is dark;'' the dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10% and 30% of the critical density (by comparison luminous matter contributes less than 1%); baryonic matter contributes between 1.1% and 12% of critical. The case for the spatially-flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments--structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation--and by some observational data. If {Omega} is indeed unity--or even just significantly greater than 0.1--then there is a strong case for a Universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark-matter candidates: an axion of mass 10{sup {minus}6} eV to 10{sup {minus}4} eV; a neutralino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either being planned or are underway. 63 refs.

  20. Dark matter in the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA) Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1991-03-01

    What is the quantity and composition of material in the universe This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask about the universe, and its answer bears on a number of important issues including the formation of structure in the universe, and the ultimate fate and the earliest history of the universe. Moreover, answering this question could lead to the discovery of new particles, as well as shedding light on the nature of the fundamental interactions. At present, only a partial answer is at hand: most of the material in the universe does not give off detectable radiation, i.e., is dark;'' the dark matter associated with bright galaxies contributes somewhere between 10% and 30% of the critical density (by comparison luminous matter contributes less than 1%); baryonic matter contributes between 1.1% and 12% of critical. The case for the spatially-flat, Einstein-de Sitter model is supported by three compelling theoretical arguments -- structure formation, the temporal Copernican principle, and inflation -- and by some observational data. If {Omega} is indeed unity--or even just significantly greater than 0.1--then there is a strong case for a universe comprised of nonbaryonic matter. There are three well motivated particle dark-matter candidates: an axion of mass 10{sup {minus}6} eV to 10{sup {minus}4} eV; a neutralino of mass 10 GeV to about 3 TeV; or a neutrino of mass 20 eV to 90 eV. All three possibilities can be tested by experiments that are either being planned or are underway. 71 refs., 6 figs.