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Sample records for hereditary bleeding disorder

  1. Bleeding disorders

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    ... can occur when certain factors are low or missing. Bleeding problems can range from mild to severe. Some bleeding disorders are present at birth and are passed through families (inherited). Others develop from: Illnesses such as vitamin ...

  2. Bleeding Disorders in Women

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    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Bleeding Disorders in Women Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... risk for a bleeding disorder. What is excessive bleeding in women? Women with excessive bleeding may experience ...

  3. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Kjeldsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in a number of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and may lead to a high transfusion need. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and severity of gastrointestinal bleeding in a geographically well defined HHT population....

  4. Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents with Hereditary Bleeding Disorders and in Children and Adolescents with Stroke: Cross-Sectional Comparison to Siblings and Peers.

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    Neuner, Bruno; von Mackensen, Sylvia; Holzhauer, Susanne; Funk, Stephanie; Klamroth, Robert; Kurnik, Karin; Krümpel, Anne; Halimeh, Susan; Reinke, Sarah; Frühwald, Michael; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate self-reported health-related quality of life (HrQoL) in children and adolescents with chronic medical conditions compared with siblings/peers. Methods. Group 1 (6 treatment centers) consisted of 74 children/adolescents aged 8-16 years with hereditary bleeding disorders (HBD), 12 siblings, and 34 peers. Group 2 (one treatment center) consisted of 70 children/adolescents with stroke/transient ischemic attack, 14 siblings, and 72 peers. HrQoL was assessed with the "revised KINDer Lebensqualitätsfragebogen" (KINDL-R) questionnaire. Multivariate analyses within groups were done by one-way ANOVA and post hoc pairwise single comparisons by Student's t-tests. Adjusted pairwise comparisons were done by hierarchical linear regressions with individuals nested within treatment centers (group 1) and by linear regressions (group 2), respectively. Results. No differences were found in multivariate analyses of self-reported HrQoL in group 1, while in group 2 differences occurred in overall wellbeing and all subdimensions. These differences were due to differences between patients and peers. After adjusting for age, gender, number of siblings, and treatment center these differences persisted regarding self-worth (p = .0040) and friend-related wellbeing (p children with HBD, HrQoL was comparable to siblings and peers. In children with stroke/TIA HrQoL was comparable to siblings while peers, independently of relevant confounder, showed better self-worth and friend-related wellbeing.

  5. Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents with Hereditary Bleeding Disorders and in Children and Adolescents with Stroke: Cross-Sectional Comparison to Siblings and Peers

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    Bruno Neuner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate self-reported health-related quality of life (HrQoL in children and adolescents with chronic medical conditions compared with siblings/peers. Methods. Group 1 (6 treatment centers consisted of 74 children/adolescents aged 8–16 years with hereditary bleeding disorders (HBD, 12 siblings, and 34 peers. Group 2 (one treatment center consisted of 70 children/adolescents with stroke/transient ischemic attack, 14 siblings, and 72 peers. HrQoL was assessed with the “revised KINDer Lebensqualitätsfragebogen” (KINDL-R questionnaire. Multivariate analyses within groups were done by one-way ANOVA and post hoc pairwise single comparisons by Student’s t-tests. Adjusted pairwise comparisons were done by hierarchical linear regressions with individuals nested within treatment centers (group 1 and by linear regressions (group 2, respectively. Results. No differences were found in multivariate analyses of self-reported HrQoL in group 1, while in group 2 differences occurred in overall wellbeing and all subdimensions. These differences were due to differences between patients and peers. After adjusting for age, gender, number of siblings, and treatment center these differences persisted regarding self-worth (p=.0040 and friend-related wellbeing (p<.001. Conclusions. In children with HBD, HrQoL was comparable to siblings and peers. In children with stroke/TIA HrQoL was comparable to siblings while peers, independently of relevant confounder, showed better self-worth and friend-related wellbeing.

  6. Platelet function in bleeding disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bladel, E.R.

    2013-01-01

    The first bleeding diathesis we studied was hemophilia A. Since FVIII activity level does not always correlate with the bleeding tendency in individual patients, bleeding tendency must also be influenced by other factors. Earlier studies excluded the remaining clotting factors and FVIII genotype as

  7. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

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    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation.

  8. Hereditary profiles of disorderly transcription?

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    Simons Johannes WIM

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microscopic examination of living cells often reveals that cells from some cell strains appear to be in a permanent state of disarray without obvious reason. In all probability such a disorderly state affects cell functioning. The aim of this study was to establish whether a disorderly state could occur that adversely affects gene expression profiles and whether such a state might have biomedical consequences. To this end, the expression profiles of the 14 genes of the proteasome derived from the GEO SAGE database were utilized as a model system. Results By adopting the overall expression profile as the standard for normal expression, deviation in transcription was frequently observed. Each deviating tissue exhibited its own characteristic profile of over-expressed and under-expressed genes. Moreover such a specific deviating profile appeared to be epigenetic in origin and could be stably transmitted to a clonal derivative e.g. from a precancerous normal tissue to its tumor. A significantly greater degree of deviation was observed in the expression profiles from the tumor tissues. The changes in the expression of different genes display a network of interdependencies. Therefore our hypothesis is that deviating profiles reflect disorder in the localization of genes within the nucleus The underlying cause(s for these disorderly states remain obscure; it could be noise and/or deterministic chaos. Presence of mutational damage does not appear to be predominantly involved. Conclusion As disturbances in expression profiles frequently occur and have biomedical consequences, its determination could prove of value in several fields of biomedical research. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Trey Ideker, Itai Yanai and Stephan Beck

  9. Intracranial hemorrhage in congenital bleeding disorders.

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    Tabibian, Shadi; Motlagh, Hoda; Naderi, Majid; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2017-09-09

    : Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), as a life-threatening bleeding among all kinds of congenital bleeding disorders (CBDs), is a rare manifestation except in factor XIII (FXIII) deficiency, which is accompanied by ICH, early in life, in about one-third of patients. Most inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs) are mild to moderate bleeding disorders that can never experience a severe bleeding as in ICH; however, Glanzmann's thrombasthenia, a common and severe inherited platelet function disorder, can lead to ICH and occasional death. This bleeding feature can also be observed in grey platelet syndrome, though less frequently than in Glanzmann's thrombasthenia. In hemophilia, intracerebral hemorrhage is affected by various risk factors one of which is the severity of the disease. The precise prevalence of ICH in these patients is not clear but an estimated incidence of 3.5-4% among newborns with hemophilia is largely ascertained. Although ICH is a rare phenomenon in CBDs, it can be experienced by every patient with severe hemophilia A and B, FXIII deficiency (FXIIID), FVIID, FXD, FVD, FIID, and afibrinogenemia. Upon observing the general signs and symptoms of ICH such as vomiting, seizure, unconsciousness, and headache, appropriate replacement therapies and cranial ultrasound scans must be done to decrease ICH-related morbidity and mortality.

  10. Italian Registry of Congenital Bleeding Disorders

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    Giampaolo, Adele; Abbonizio, Francesca; Arcieri, Romano; Hassan, Hamisa Jane

    2017-01-01

    In Italy, the surveillance of people with bleeding disorders is based on the National Registry of Congenital Coagulopathies (NRCC) managed by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità). The NRCC collects epidemiological and therapeutic data from the 54 Hemophilia Treatment Centers, members of the Italian Association of Hemophilia Centres (AICE). The number of people identified with bleeding disorders has increased over the years, with the number rising from approx. 7000 in 2000 to over 11,000 in 2015. The NRCC includes 4020 patients with hemophilia A and 859 patients with hemophilia B. The prevalence of the rare type 3 vWD is 0.20/100,000 inhabitants. Less common congenital bleeding disorders include the following deficiencies: Factor I (fibrinogen), Factor II (prothrombin), Factor V, Factor VII, Factor X, Factor XI and Factor XIII, which affect 1953 patients. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection affects 1561 patients, more than 200 of whom have two infections (HCV + HIV). Estimated hemophilia-related drug consumption in 2015 was approx. 550 million IU of FVIII for hemophilia A patients and approx. 70 million IU of FIX for hemophilia B patients. The NRCC, with its bleeding disorder data set, is a tool that can provide answers to fundamental questions in public health, monitoring care provision and drug treatment, as well as facilitating clinical and epidemiological research. PMID:28335488

  11. Signs and Symptoms of a Bleeding Disorder in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... received treatment for anemia. I have experienced heavy bleeding after dental surgery, other surgery, or childbirth. I have experienced prolonged ... if they are not treated. Women with untreated bleeding disorders face serious ... dental surgery, other surgery, or injury. Bleeding disorders can be ...

  12. Corpus luteum hemorrhage in women with bleeding disorders.

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    Hoffman, Ron; Brenner, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Bleeding into the corpus luteum following ovulation rarely has clinical significance in healthy women, but may lead to life-threatening hemorrhage in women with congenital or acquired bleeding disorders. Women who are at an increased risk for corpus luteum hemorrhage (CLH) can be divided in two categories; first, those taking anticoagulants because of a thrombotic disorder; and second, women with congenital bleeding disorders. The management and prevention of CLH is still unsettled and the literature dealing with this problem is based on case reports only. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment options of an acute bleeding event and prevention modalities of CLH in women with bleeding disorders.

  13. Thrombosis and bleeding disorders outside Western countries.

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    Mannucci, P M

    2007-07-01

    The rapidly developing countries of Asia are witnessing substantial progress in the awareness of bleeding and thrombotic disorders as important health care problems. It has been thought for a long time that venous thromboembolism is very rare in Asia. Recent large studies that involved the majority of Asian countries demonstrated that this is not true, so that the practice of not using thromboprophylaxis in high-risk medical and surgical cases should be abandoned. The management of hemophilia and allied coagulation disorders has also dramatically improved in several Asian countries, due to the increased availability of blood products for replacement therapy coupled with the leadership role exerted by a few charismatic physicians, particularly in India and Thailand. As to the future, countries such as China and India have the capacity and expertise in biotechnology to consider the production of recombinant factors and gene transfer as the best strategies to tackle the management of persons with hemophilia in these densely populated and huge countries.

  14. Hereditary red cell membrane disorders and laboratory diagnostic testing.

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    King, M-J; Zanella, A

    2013-06-01

    This overview describes two groups of nonimmune hereditary hemolytic anemias caused by defects in membrane proteins located in distinct layers of the red cell membrane. Hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), and hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP) represent disorders of the red cell cytoskeleton. Hereditary stomatocytoses represents disorders of cation permeability in the red cell membrane. The current laboratory screening tests for HS are the osmotic fragility test, acid glycerol lysis time test (AGLT), cryohemolysis test, and eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA)-binding test. For atypical HS, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of erythrocyte membrane proteins is carried out to confirm the diagnosis. The diagnosis of HE/HPP is based on abnormal red cell morphology and the detection of protein 4.1R deficiency or spectrin variants using gel electrophoresis. None of screening tests can detect all HS cases. Some testing centers (a survey of 25 laboratories) use a combination of tests (e.g., AGLT and EMA). No specific screening test for hereditary stomatocytoses is available. The preliminary diagnosis is based on presenting a compensated hemolytic anemia, macrocytosis, and a temperature or time dependent pseudohyperkalemia in some patients. Both the EMA-binding test and the osmotic fragility test may help in differential diagnosis of HS and hereditary stomatocytosis.

  15. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

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    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  16. HEREDITARY INTRAVENTRICULAR CONDUCTION DISORDERS IN THE FAMILY FROM KRASNOYARSK

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    A. A. Chernova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pedigree of the family from Krasnoyarsk city with hereditary disorders of intracardiac conduction was studied. The diagnosis of each family member was verified by electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography , bicycle ergometry , ECG Holter monitoring. The family 10-year follow-up showed familial aggregation of intracardiac conduction disorders in grandson, niece, son of the proband niece, ie, in the III-degree relatives. Family history of III-degree relatives with intracardiac conduction disorders and discordant pathology is identified.

  17. Bleeding from gastrointestinal angioectasias is not related to bleeding disorders - a case control study

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    Lärfars Gerd

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angioectasias in the gastrointestinal tract can be found in up to 3% of the population. They are typically asymptomatic but may sometimes result in severe bleeding. The reasons for why some patients bleed from their angioectasias are not fully understood but it has been reported that it may be explained by an acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS. This condition has similar laboratory findings to congenital von Willebrand disease with selective loss of large von Willebrand multimers. The aim of this study was to find out if AVWS or any other bleeding disorder was more common in patients with bleeding from angioectasias than in a control group. Methods We compared bleeding tests and coagulation parameters, including von Willebrand multimers, from a group of 23 patients with anemia caused by bleeding from angioectasias, with the results from a control group lacking angioectasias. Results No significant differences between the two groups were found in coagulation parameters, bleeding time or von Willebrand multimer levels. Conclusion These results do not support a need for routine bleeding tests in cases of bleeding from angioectasias and do not show an overall increased risk of AVWS among these patients.

  18. Assessment of bleeding disorders in Sheehan's syndrome: are bleeding disorders the underlying cause of Sheehan's syndrome?

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    Gokalp, Deniz; Tuzcu, Alpaslan; Bahceci, Mithat; Ayyildiz, Orhan; Erdemoglu, Mahmut; Alpagat, Gulistan

    2011-01-01

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) is an adenopituitary insufficiency caused by hypovolemia secondary to excessive blood loss during or after childbirth. However, the mechanism of postpartum hemorrhage and ischemia is not clear. We aimed to evaluate the bleeding disorders among patients with SS, in comparison with healthy controls. In addition, we investigated underlying causes in postpartum hemorrhage that begin the event. The present study was conducted at the Dicle University School of Medicine. Forty-eight patients with SS and 50 age-matched female healthy controls were included. Biochemical and hormonal variables were measured, as was platelet function by means of closure times (PFA-100 testing using collagen plus epinephrine and collagen plus ADP), von Willebrand factor (vWF) level, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), international normalized ratio (INR), and coagulation factors. Although PT and INR were significantly higher in patients with SS (both P<0.01), aPTT and levels of fibrinogen, vWF, and factors II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, and XII did not differ significantly. Closure times with collagen/epinephrine and collagen/ADP also did not differ significantly between patients with SS and control patients. The nonspecific etiology and presence of excessive postpartum hemorrhage in patients with SS suggest that coagulation disorders may play a role in their predisposition to bleeding. The increased PT and INR noted might implicate bleeding diathesis as the underlying etiology, although no significant decreases were noted in factor levels. Further studies are needed to elucidate this complex mechanism of this disorder.

  19. The potential of disease management for neuromuscular hereditary disorders.

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    Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Gagnon, Cynthia; Laberge, Luc; Tremblay, Carmen; Côté, Charlotte; Leclerc, Nadine; Mathieu, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular hereditary disorders require long-term multidisciplinary rehabilitation management. Although the need for coordinated healthcare management has long been recognized, most neuromuscular disorders are still lacking clinical guidelines about their long-term management and structured evaluation plan with associated services. One of the most prevalent adult-onset neuromuscular disorders, myotonic dystrophy type 1, generally presents several comorbidities and a variable clinical picture, making management a constant challenge. This article presents a healthcare follow-up plan and proposes a nursing case management within a disease management program as an innovative and promising approach. This disease management program and model consists of eight components including population identification processes, evidence-based practice guidelines, collaborative practice, patient self-management education, and process outcomes evaluation (Disease Management Association of America, 2004). It is believed to have the potential to significantly improve healthcare management for neuromuscular hereditary disorders and will prove useful to nurses delivering and organizing services for this population.

  20. Hereditary spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and other red cell membrane disorders.

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    Da Costa, Lydie; Galimand, Julie; Fenneteau, Odile; Mohandas, Narla

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis are the two most common inherited red cell membrane disorders resulting from mutations in genes encoding various red cell membrane and skeletal proteins. Red cell membrane, a composite structure composed of lipid bilayer linked to spectrin-based membrane skeleton is responsible for the unique features of flexibility and mechanical stability of the cell. Defects in various proteins involved in linking the lipid bilayer to membrane skeleton result in loss in membrane cohesion leading to surface area loss and hereditary spherocytosis while defects in proteins involved in lateral interactions of the spectrin-based skeleton lead to decreased mechanical stability, membrane fragmentation and hereditary elliptocytosis. The disease severity is primarily dependent on the extent of membrane surface area loss. Both these diseases can be readily diagnosed by various laboratory approaches that include red blood cell cytology, flow cytometry, ektacytometry, electrophoresis of the red cell membrane proteins, and mutational analysis of gene encoding red cell membrane proteins.

  1. Impact of inherited bleeding disorders on pregnancy and postpartum hemorrhage.

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    Shahbazi, Shirin; Moghaddam-Banaem, Lida; Ekhtesari, Fatemeh; Ala, Fereydoun A

    2012-10-01

    Inherited bleeding disorders are caused by various genetic defects in the proteins involved in haemostasis. Female patients or carriers are faced with the risk of haemorrhage throughout life. During pregnancy and postpartum, this complication affects the health of either the mother or the baby, or both. This retrospective cohort study was designed to assess the occurrence of obstetric bleeding in the three trimesters of pregnancy, along with primary and secondary postpartum haemorrhage among 100 women with inherited bleeding disorders. A questionnaire was designed in order to collect historical data. The patients were evaluated in three groups: haemophilia carriers, von Willebrand disease (VWD) and rare bleeding disorders. In comparison with normal women, significantly severe bleeding was observed among patients in all of the five stages. VWD patients showed a higher frequency of bleeding in first trimester but the rate of miscarriage was lower. Haemophilia carriers were threatened with bleeding complications during the prenatal period, but they also had the highest frequency of postpartum haemorrhage. Based on our results, vaginal bleeding is a serious threat in all three patient groups, especially during the first trimester of pregnancy and in the postpartum period.

  2. Pharmacologic Agents in the Management of Bleeding Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    patients with mild congenital and well as vitamin K in patients with cirrn-,sis. The use of acquired bleeding disorders. Despite intensive screen- DDAVP and...induce hemostasis during surgical pro- Moderate doses of aspirin 0 2 or drugs such as diphen- cedures such as renal biopsies. hydramine and diazepam ...Harris AS, Sjorin E, Nilsson IM. Intranasal andmnfor congenital an acquired bleeding disorders. Blood intravenous administration of desmopressin

  3. Bleeding disorders in dental practice: A diagnostic overview

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    Abhirup Goswami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental health care workers are increasingly called upon to provide quality dental care to individuals whose bleeding and clotting mechanisms have been altered by inherited or acquired diseases. This provides an opportunity for the dentist who is trained in the recognition of oral and systemic signs of altered hemostasis to assist in the diagnosis of the underlying condition. A number of dental procedures result in the risk of bleeding that can have serious consequences, such as severe hemorrhage or possibly death, for the patient with a bleeding disorder. Oral care providers must be aware of the impact of bleeding disorders on the management of their patients. These disorders must be recognized from history, clinical examinations, and laboratory investigations, if indicated, prior to surgical procedures including those in dental surgery to prevent bleeding related complications. Safe dental care may require consultation with the patient′s physician, systemic management, and dental treatment modifications. The purpose of this article is how to identify these patients with bleeding disorders.

  4. Hereditary congenital unilateral deafness : A new disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, FG; Verheij, JBGM; van Mechelen, M

    2005-01-01

    Congenital unilateral deafness is a rare disorder. The prevalence rates are unknown. The prevalence of children with severe to profound hearing losses that are congenital (or acquired before the development of speech and language) is 0.5 to 3 per 1,000 live births. Evidently, congenital unilateral d

  5. Studies on four hereditary blood disorders in Iceland

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    Jensson, O.

    1978-01-01

    An Icelandic family with fifty elliptocytic individuals is reviewed. Pedigree studies indicate strongly that affected members of the family are descendants of a common ancestor. The hereditary pattern is typical of a dominant autosomal gene with full penetrance. Thirty members with typical hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and over 70 apparently unaffected members belonging to 12 families have been studied. Pedigree studies on one of the families indicate that the HS gene or genes have been transmitted through six generations over the past 200 years. Much reduced penetrance of the HS gene or the presence of the so-called mild form is upheld as the main explanation for the unevenness in the genetic ratio. An Icelandic family containing fourteen members with Pelger anomaly is reviewed. It is possible that this family is the only one with this type of mutation in Icelanders. Genealogical information indicates that the Pelger anomaly gene has been present in this family over 200 years. Three families with Von Willebrand's disease (VW) are reviewed. Severe symptoms of bleeding predominate in the males, two of whom have died from hemorrhage. There is a reduced expressivity of the mutant gene, amounting to nonpenetrance, mainly in the female members of the families. It is thought probable that the mutant gene present in the three families has originated from a common ancestor in a district which is common to the three families. (KRM)

  6. Progressive cerebellar atrophy: hereditary ataxias and disorders with spinocerebellar degeneration.

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    Wolf, Nicole I; Koenig, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias with onset in childhood are a group of heterogeneous disorders, usually with autosomal recessive inheritance. In many of them, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows cerebellar atrophy. The most prominent exception to this is Friedreich's ataxia, where MRI shows normal cerebellar volume, but sometimes spinal cord atrophy. In several of the hereditary ataxias, the causative gene plays an important role in DNA repair: ataxia telangiectasia and ataxia telangiectasia-like disorder, and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type I and II. Mitochondrial metabolism is impaired in another group of inherited ataxias including the emergent group of defects in coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Few of these disorders are amenable to effective treatment, the most important of these being vitamin E-responsive ataxia. The autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias are rare in childhood. Some of them, especially SCA7 and SCA2, may begin in childhood or even infancy, family history being positive in these cases. Additional clinical clues such as presence or absence of neuropathy or oculomotor apraxia still help in making a definitive diagnosis albeit there are still many unsolved cases. In pontocerebellar hypoplasia, a neurodegenerative disease with prenatal onset, the genetic basis of the different subtypes has recently been elucidated and involves genes with different functions.

  7. Treatment for preventing bleeding in people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders undergoing surgery.

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    Coppola, Antonio; Windyga, Jerzy; Tufano, Antonella; Yeung, Cindy; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario

    2015-02-09

    In people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders undergoing surgical interventions, haemostatic treatment is needed in order to correct the underlying coagulation abnormalities and minimise the bleeding risk. This treatment varies according to the specific haemostatic defect, its severity and the type of surgical procedure. The aim of treatment is to ensure adequate haemostatic coverage for as long as the bleeding risk persists and until wound healing is complete. To assess the effectiveness and safety of different haemostatic regimens (type, dose and duration, modality of administration and target haemostatic levels) administered in people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders for preventing bleeding complications during and after surgical procedures. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of the last search: 20 November 2014. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing any hemostatic treatment regimen to no treatment or to another active regimen in children and adults with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders undergoing any surgical intervention. Two authors independently assessed trials (eligibility and risks of bias) and extracted data. Meta-analyses were performed on available and relevant data. Of the 16 identified trials, four (112 participants) were eligible for inclusion.Two trials evaluated 59 people with haemophilia A and B undergoing 63 dental extractions. Trials compared the use of a different type (tranexamic acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid) and regimen of antifibrinolytic agents as haemostatic support to the initial replacement treatment. Neither trial specifically addressed mortality (one of this review's primary outcomes); however, in the frame

  8. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

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    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does...... however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack...... of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting....

  9. Lung Involvement in Children with Hereditary Autoinflammatory Disorders

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    Giusyda Tarantino

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Short-lived systemic inflammatory reactions arising from disrupted rules in the innate immune system are the operating platforms of hereditary autoinflammatory disorders (HAIDs. Multiple organs may be involved and aseptic inflammation leading to disease-specific phenotypes defines most HAIDs. Lungs are infrequently involved in children with HAIDs: the most common pulmonary manifestation is pleuritis in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS, respectively caused by mutations in the MEFV and TNFRSF1A genes, while interstitial lung disease can be observed in STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI, caused by mutations in the TMEM173 gene. The specific pleuropulmonary diseases may range from sub-clinical abnormalities during inflammatory flares of FMF and TRAPS to a severe life-threatening disorder in children with SAVI.

  10. Lung Involvement in Children with Hereditary Autoinflammatory Disorders

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    Tarantino, Giusyda; Esposito, Susanna; Andreozzi, Laura; Bracci, Benedetta; D’Errico, Francesca; Rigante, Donato

    2016-01-01

    Short-lived systemic inflammatory reactions arising from disrupted rules in the innate immune system are the operating platforms of hereditary autoinflammatory disorders (HAIDs). Multiple organs may be involved and aseptic inflammation leading to disease-specific phenotypes defines most HAIDs. Lungs are infrequently involved in children with HAIDs: the most common pulmonary manifestation is pleuritis in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), respectively caused by mutations in the MEFV and TNFRSF1A genes, while interstitial lung disease can be observed in STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI), caused by mutations in the TMEM173 gene. The specific pleuropulmonary diseases may range from sub-clinical abnormalities during inflammatory flares of FMF and TRAPS to a severe life-threatening disorder in children with SAVI. PMID:27983684

  11. Animal Models of Hemophilia and Related Bleeding Disorders

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    Lozier, Jay N.; Nichols, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of hemophilia and related diseases are important for development of novel treatments and to understand the pathophysiology of bleeding disorders in humans. Testing in animals with the equivalent human disorder provides informed estimates of doses and measures of efficacy, which aids in design of human trials. Many models of hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and von Willebrand disease have been developed from animals with spontaneous mutations (hemophilia A dogs, rats, sheep; hemophilia B dogs; and von Willebrand disease pigs and dogs), or by targeted gene disruption in mice to create hemophilia A, B, or VWD models. Animal models have been used to generate new insights into the pathophysiology of each bleeding disorder and also to perform pre-clinical assessments of standard protein replacement therapies as well as novel gene transfer technology. Both the differences between species and differences in underlying causative mutations must be considered in choosing the best animal for a specific scientific study PMID:23956467

  12. Post-partum hemorrhage in women with rare bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyvandi, Flora; Menegatti, Marzia; Siboni, Simona Maria

    2011-02-01

    Post-partum hemorrhage (PPH) accounts for a substantial fraction of maternal deaths in the general population. Among all women, however, those affected with rare bleeding disorders (RBDs) represent a particular group since to usual bleeding symptoms, they are likely to experience bleedings associated to obstetrical and gynaecological problems. Pregnancy and childbirth, two important stages in the life of a woman, pose a special clinical challenge in women with RBDs, since information about these issues are really scarce and limited to few case reports. These data show that all women with RBDs, except for FXI deficiency, have to be considered potentially at risk for developing PPH, therefore they should be monitored carefully during and immediately after pregnancy. The implication is that women with bleeding disorders may require prophylaxis and/or close observation for several weeks and should be followed by a multidisciplinary team including expertises such as laboratory haematologist, obstetrician-gynaecologist, anaesthesiologist, family physician, and laboratory technician. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychiatric manifestations of treatable hereditary metabolic disorders in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demily, Caroline; Sedel, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Detecting psychiatric disorders of secondary origin is a crucial concern for the psychiatrist. But how can this reliably be done among a large number of conditions, most of which have a very low prevalence? Metabolic screening undertaken in a population of subjects with psychosis demonstrated the presence of treatable metabolic disorders in a significant number of cases. The nature of the symptoms that should alert the clinician is also a fundamental issue and is not limited to psychosis. Hereditary metabolic disorders (HMD) are a rare but important cause of psychiatric disorders in adolescents and adults, the signs of which may remain isolated for years before other more specific organic signs appear. HMDs that present purely with psychiatric symptoms are very difficult to diagnose due to low awareness of these rare diseases among psychiatrists. However, it is important to identify HMDs in order to refer patients to specialist centres for appropriate management, disease-specific treatment and possible prevention of irreversible physical and neurological complications. Genetic counselling can also be provided. This review focuses on three HMD categories: acute, treatable HMDs (urea cycle abnormalities, remethylation disorders, acute intermittent porphyria); chronic, treatable HMDs (Wilson's disease, Niemann-Pick disease type C, homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis); and chronic HMDs that are difficult to treat (lysosomal storage diseases, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, creatine deficiency syndrome). We also propose an algorithm for the diagnosis of HMDs in patients with psychiatric symptoms.

  14. Antimyosin scintigraphy in patients with acquired and hereditary muscular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefberg, M. (Dept. of Neurology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)); Liewendahl, K. (Dept. of Clinical Chemistry, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)); Savolainen, S. (Dept. of Clinical Chemistry, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)); Nikkinen, P. (Dept. of Clinical Chemistry, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)); Lamminen, A. (Dept. of Radiology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)); Tiula, E. (First Dept. of Internal Medicine, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)); Somer, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland))

    1994-10-01

    Scintigraphy with indium-111 labelled antimyosin has an established role in the evaluation of cardiac muscle damage. This antibody has been shown to cross-react with myosin in skeletal muscle. We therefore studied the usefulness of this method for the detection of skeletal muscle lesions in rhabdomyolysis, myositis and hereditary muscular dystrophies. All nine patients with rhabdomyolysis had focal uptake of antimyosin antibody which correlated with the clinical findings of soft tissue damage. However, a number of symptomless lesions were also detected by immunoscintigraphy. In rhabdomyolysis the target to non-target uptake ratios varied from 1.3 to 7.6. Diffuse uptake of antibody in skeletal muscle was observed in all three patients with polymyositis-dermatomyositis and in 12 out of 13 patients with muscular dystrophies. In myositis the intensity of antibody accumulation correlated reasonably well with the magnitude of oedema detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Most patients with Becker type or non-X-chromosomal muscular dystrophies showed slight or moderate uptake of antibody, mainly in the lower extremities. In these patients more antibody accumulated in the calves than in the thighs, whereas the findings on MRI were more prominent in the thighs than in the calves, presumably because of the better preserved muscle bulk in the calves. We conclude that antimyosin scintigraphy can be used for the detection of muscle lesions not only in acquired muscle diseases but also in hereditary muscular disorders, and that immunoscintigraphy provides information on muscle disease activity not obtainable with MRI. (orig.)

  15. The prevalence of underlying bleeding disorders in patients with heavy menstrual bleeding with and without gynecologic abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, H. Marieke; Mulder, Andre; Bogchelman, Dick H.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Meijer, Karina

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of underlying bleeding disorders in women with heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) with and without gynecologic abnormalities. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a single-center prospective cohort study of 112 consecutive patients who were referre

  16. Clinical audit of inherited bleeding disorders in a developing country

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    Sajid Raihan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We did a clinical audit to determine the status of coagulation disorders in a hemophilia care center in Pakistan. Setting: Fatimid foundation blood bank and hematological diseases center, Lahore. Study Design: This is a retrospective descriptive study. Materials and Methods: All patients registered at Lahore center were included. Data was collected using a questionnaire including age, gender, diagnosis, hepatitis and human immune deficiency virus (HIV status, number of episodes of bleeding, most common site of bleeding, severity of disorder and number of transfusions required to treat the episode. Results: During the study period, a total of 923 registered patients were reviewed at Lahore center and of these, 408 patients (44.2% were on regular follow-up. Inherited bleeding disorders identified in these patients included hemophilia A, hemophilia B, vWD, factor VII deficiency, factor V deficiency, factor X deficiency, dysfibrinogenemia, afibrinogenemia, factor XIII deficiency; and platelet function defects. Median age was 17 years with a range of three to 57 years. Median age at diagnosis was one year. There were 329 (80.6% males and 79 (19.3% females. The products used in these patients included factor VIII concentrate, fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, cryosupernatant and platelets. Testing for transmission of viral infections was also done in these patients and one patient (0.2% was found hepatitis B positive, six patients (1.4% were hepatitis C positive and two patients (0.49% were HIV positive. Conclusion: Hemophilia A, hemophilia B and vWD are the commonly encountered inherited bleeding disorders in our patients followed by other recessively transmitted disorders with a median age of 17 years and male to female ratio of 4: 1. Most of the patients utilized services available at Fatimid foundation with good clinical results. In Pakistan, non-governmental organizations (NGOs are trying their best for providing optimal treatment

  17. Registry of hemophilia and other bleeding disorders in Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, T; Schved, J F

    2012-11-01

    Creating a national registry for bleeding disorders is a major step in establishing a National Hemophilia Care Program in all countries. Creating such a registry which would contain accurate and regularly updated data, including laboratory analysis confirmed by a reference laboratory established at the Syrian Hemophilia Society. Blood samples were drawn and analysed in the Society reference laboratory for the following screening tests: prothrombin time (PT), APTT and coagulation factor assays. Inhibitor detection and VWF RiCof were performed depending on the result of the screening tests. HBs Ag, anti-HCV, anti-HIV 1+2 and syphilis tests were also performed to detect transfusion transmitted agents (TTA). Diagnosis of the bleeding disorder type was confirmed for 760 of these cases. Among the 760 confirmed patients, 82.5% had haemophilia. Among these, 89.6%were haemophilia A; 10.4% were haemophilia B; 8.3% had VWD; 9.2% had other rare bleeding disorders as follows: 1.2% FVII deficiency, 0.7% FV deficiency, 1.8% F1 deficiency, 0.4% FX deficiency, 1.4% platelets dysfunctions (mainly Glanzmann Thrombasthenia) and 3.7% had combined FVIII and FV deficiency. Eighty (21.3%) cases of 375 screened for transfusion transmitted agents were positive for at least one infection: 0.5% were HBsAg positive, 19.7% were anti-HCV positive, 0.8% had combined HBsAg and anti-HCV positivity and 0.3% was anti-Syphilis positive. All patients were negative for HIV1 and HIV2. The preliminary data presented here follow known data on haemophilia A, haemophilia B and VWD disease. This registry will certainly help in improving haemophilia care in Syria.

  18. Ayurvedic management of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda, a rare hereditary disorder

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    Sarvesh Kumar Singh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda (SEDT is a rare genetic disease in which patient suffers from short stature, short trunk and neck with disproportionately long arms, coxa vara, skeletal features such as barrel shaped chest, kyphosis, scoliosis and early arthropathy. Only limited medical and surgical management is available in modern medicine. A 15 years old male suffering from SEDT and diagnosed as Vata vyadhi was treated with Panchakarma therapy and selected Ayurvedic oral medicines. Ayurvedic treatment was directed to ameliorate the orthopaedic clinical conditions in this case. Panchakarma procedures such as Shalishastika pinda svedana for a month and Mustadi yapana basti for 16 days were given along with oral Ayurvedic medicines. Same Panchakarma procedures were repeated after an interval of 2 months. A combination of Ayurvedic oral medicines such as Trayodashanga guggulu-500 mg twice a day, Dashmool kvatha (decoction of roots of 10 herbs 40 ml twice a day, Eranda paka 10 g twice a day, Shiva gutika-500 mg twice a day and Dashmoolarista-20 ml (with equal water twice a day were prescribed. Eight scales based Medical outcome study (MOS – 36 item short form – health surveys was assessed for outcome which shows good improvement. Kyphosis, scoliosis and pain were moderately reduced. Clinical experience of this case indicates that Ayurvedic herbs along with Panchakarma can play a major role in the management of hereditary disorder SEDT.

  19. Clinical use of Plasma and Plasma Fractions in Bleeding Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆钺

    2008-01-01

    Internal and/or external bleeding is a common and sometimes very severe clinical manifestations of disorders of hemostasis. It may follow minor trauma or may arise apparently spontaneously. Disorders of hemostasis are generally divided into those caused by abnormalities of platelets, abnormalities of blood vessels, abnormalities of plasma coagulation factors, and hyperfibrinolysis, or com-binations of these. The use of plasma and plasma fractions dependents on the causing diseases and their severity. Several plasma products and plasma fractions are availa-ble in China and other plasma components and deriva-tives are commercially obtained. There have been the guidelines for their clinical use, and the revised ones will soon be published by Chinese Medical Association.

  20. HEREDITARY CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISORDERS: NOMENCLATURE AND DIAGNOSTIC ALGORITHM

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    A. V. Klemenov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary connective tissue disorders (HCTDs are a genetically and clinically diverse group of diseases, which encompasses common congenital disorders of fibrous connective tissue structures. Out of the whole variety of the clinical manifestations of NCTDs, only differentiated monogenic syndromes with the agreed guidelines for their diagnosis have been long the focus of the medical community’s attention. Many unclassified forms of the pathology (dysplasia phenotypes have been disregarded while assessing a person’s prognosis and defining treatment policy. With no clear definition of NCTDs or their approved diagnostic algorithm, it is difficult to study their real prevalence in the population, to compare literature data, and to constructively discuss various scientific and practical aspects of this disease. Efforts to systematize individual clinical types of NCTD and to formulate their diagnostic criteria are set forth in the All-Russian Research Society Expert Committee national guidelines approved in 2009 and revised in 2012. The paper gives current views on the nomenclature of NCTDs, considers diagnostic criteria for both classified monogenic syndromes (Marfan's syndrome, Ehlers–Danlos' syndrome, MASS phenotype, primary mitral valve prolapse, joint hypermobility syndrome and unclassified dysplasia phenotypes (MASS-like phenotype, marfanoid appearance, Ehlers–Danlos-like phenotype, benign joint hypermobility syndrome, unclassified phenotype. The above abnormalities are presented as a continuous list drawn up in the decreasing order of the degree of their clinical manifestations and prognostic value (the phenotypic continuum described by M.J. Glesby and R.E. Pyentz: from monogenic syndromes through dysplasia phenotypes to an unclassified phenotype. Emphasis is laid on the clinical NCTD identification difficulties associated with the lack of specificity of external and visceral markers of connective tissue asthenia and with the certain

  1. Hereditary spherocytosis

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    Weed, R.I.

    1975-10-01

    Studies of the clinical features of hereditary spherocytosis since 1871 and laboratory investigation of the cellular abnormalities since 1940 have led to the characterization of hereditary spherocytosis as a prime example of a Mendelian dominant, genetically determined disorder of the erythrocyte membrane. This review of hereditary spherocytosis emphasizes the contributions of Dr. Lawrence Young and many others to our present understanding of the disease and discusses current studies of the protein abnormality in the membrane of hereditary spherocytes.

  2. Intracranial hemorrhage after blunt head trauma in children with bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lois K; Dayan, Peter S; Gerardi, Michael J; Borgialli, Dominic A; Badawy, Mohamed K; Callahan, James M; Lillis, Kathleen A; Stanley, Rachel M; Gorelick, Marc H; Dong, Li; Zuspan, Sally Jo; Holmes, James F; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2011-06-01

    To determine computerized tomography (CT) use and prevalence of traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in children with and without congenital and acquired bleeding disorders. We compared CT use and ICH prevalence in children with and without bleeding disorders in a multicenter cohort study of 43 904 children bleeding disorders; all had Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 14 to 15. These children had higher CT rates than children without bleeding disorders and GCS scores of 14 to 15 (risk ratio, 2.29; 95% CI, 2.15 to 2.44). Of the children who underwent imaging with CT, 2 of 186 children with bleeding disorders had ICH (1.1%; 95% CI, 0.1 to 3.8) , compared with 655 of 14 969 children without bleeding disorders (4.4%; 95% CI, 4.1-4.7; rate ratio, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.06 to 0.98). Both children with bleeding disorders and ICHs had symptoms; none of the children required neurosurgery. In children with head trauma, CTs are obtained twice as often in children with bleeding disorders, although ICHs occurred in only 1.1%, and these patients had symptoms. Routine CT imaging after head trauma may not be required in children without symptoms who have congenital and acquired bleeding disorders. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hepatitis A and B immunization for individuals with inherited bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, M; Cochrane, A; Wakefield, C; Stain, A-M; Ling, S; Blanchette, V; Gold, R; Ford-Jones, L

    2009-03-01

    Hepatitis A and B vaccines are highly effective tools that can greatly reduce infection risk in the bleeding disorder population. Although hepatitis A and B immunization for individuals with bleeding disorders is universally recommended, various advisory bodies often differ with respect to many practical aspects of vaccination. To review the published literature and guidelines and form a practical, comprehensive and consistent approach to hepatitis A and B immunization for individuals with bleeding disorders. We reviewed published immunization guidelines from North American immunization advisory bodies and published statements from North American and international haemophilia advisory bodies. A search of the MEDLINE database was performed to find original published literature pertaining to hepatitis A or B immunization of patients with haemophilia or bleeding disorder patients that provided supporting or refuting evidence for advisory body guidelines. Various advisory bodies' immunization guidelines regarding individuals with bleeding disorders have contradictory statements and often did not clarify issues (e.g. post vaccination surveillance). Published literature addressing immunization in bleeding disorder patients is sparse and mostly examines route of vaccine administration, complications and corresponding antibody response. Although the risk of hepatitis A and B infection is low, the use of simple measures such as vaccination is reasonable and advocated by haemophilia advisory bodies. Following our review of the available literature and North American guidelines, we have developed comprehensive and practical recommendations addressing hepatitis A and B immunization for the bleeding disorder population that may be applicable in Bleeding Disorder clinics.

  4. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKie Iain

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI and dentine dysplasia (DD, comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp chambers radiographically. The underlying defect of mineralisation often results in shearing of the overlying enamel leaving exposed weakened dentine which is prone to wear. Currently, three sub-types of DGI and two sub-types of DD are recognised but this categorisation may change when other causative mutations are found. DGI type I is inherited with osteogenesis imperfecta and recent genetic studies have shown that mutations in the genes encoding collagen type 1, COL1A1 and COL1A2, underlie this condition. All other forms of DGI and DD, except DD-1, appear to result from mutations in the gene encoding dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP, suggesting that these conditions are allelic. Diagnosis is based on family history, pedigree construction and detailed clinical examination, while genetic diagnosis may become useful in the future once sufficient disease-causing mutations have been discovered. Differential diagnoses include hypocalcified forms of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, conditions leading to early tooth loss (Kostmann's disease, cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome, permanent teeth discolouration due to tetracyclines, Vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-resistant rickets. Treatment involves removal of sources of infection or pain, improvement of aesthetics and protection of the posterior teeth from wear. Beginning in infancy, treatment usually continues into adulthood with a

  5. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Martin J; McDonnell, Sinead T; Mackie, Iain; Dixon, Michael J

    2008-11-20

    The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and dentine dysplasia (DD), comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp chambers radiographically. The underlying defect of mineralisation often results in shearing of the overlying enamel leaving exposed weakened dentine which is prone to wear. Currently, three sub-types of DGI and two sub-types of DD are recognised but this categorisation may change when other causative mutations are found. DGI type I is inherited with osteogenesis imperfecta and recent genetic studies have shown that mutations in the genes encoding collagen type 1, COL1A1 and COL1A2, underlie this condition. All other forms of DGI and DD, except DD-1, appear to result from mutations in the gene encoding dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), suggesting that these conditions are allelic. Diagnosis is based on family history, pedigree construction and detailed clinical examination, while genetic diagnosis may become useful in the future once sufficient disease-causing mutations have been discovered. Differential diagnoses include hypocalcified forms of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, conditions leading to early tooth loss (Kostmann's disease, cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome), permanent teeth discolouration due to tetracyclines, Vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-resistant rickets. Treatment involves removal of sources of infection or pain, improvement of aesthetics and protection of the posterior teeth from wear. Beginning in infancy, treatment usually continues into adulthood with a number of options including

  6. Post-tonsillectomy hemorrhagic outcomes in children with bleeding disorders at a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Priyesh N; Arambula, Alexandra M; Wheeler, Allison P; Penn, Edward B

    2017-09-01

    To report on the post-tonsillectomy bleeding outcomes and factors associated with hemorrhage among children with pre- or post-operatively diagnosed bleeding disorders treated with an institutional protocol. Retrospective cohort study of patients with hematologic disorders who underwent tonsillectomy between 2003 and 2016 and were treated with perioperative desmopressin or factor replacement and/or aminocaproic acid. Postoperative outcomes were compared to controls matched for age, sex, and indication for surgery. Analysis of factors associated with hemorrhage was performed in patients with bleeding disorders using Mann-Whitney U or chi-squared tests. 45 patients with hematologic disorders met inclusion criteria. Platelet dysfunction, including von Willebrand Disease (vWD), was the most common diagnosis (77.8%). Most patients had a preoperative diagnosis of a bleeding disorder and received perioperative hematologic medications (86.7%). Compared to matched controls, patients with hematologic disorders experienced more postoperative bleeding (15.5%; 12 bleeds, 7 patients vs. 1.7%; 1 bleed, 1 patient, p = 0.05) and had longer postoperative stays (1.3 days vs. 0.4 days, p bleed were significantly more likely to have a factor deficiency (e.g. Hemophilia over vWD) and have a postoperative diagnosis (compared to preoperative diagnosis) for which they did not receive perioperative hematologic medication. Of patients with a postoperative bleed, all those diagnosed postoperatively required at least one surgical intervention to control bleeding compared to 33% of patients with a preoperative diagnosis. A history of post-surgical bleeding, male sex, age at surgery, and pharyngitis as surgical indication were not associated with higher hemorrhage rates in this group. This study suggests a clinically important magnitude of increased bleeding risk in patients with hematologic disease. This risk appears to decrease with the use of an institutional protocol consisting of

  7. In Vivo NMR Studies of the Brain with Hereditary or Acquired Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Erica B; Lee, Phil; Choi, In-Young

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic disorders, whether hereditary or acquired, affect the brain, and abnormalities of the brain are related to cellular integrity; particularly in regard to neurons and astrocytes as well as interactions between them. Metabolic disturbances lead to alterations in cellular function as well as microscopic and macroscopic structural changes in the brain with diabetes, the most typical example of metabolic disorders, and a number of hereditary metabolic disorders. Alternatively, cellular dysfunction and degeneration of the brain lead to metabolic disturbances in hereditary neurological disorders with neurodegeneration. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques allow us to assess a range of pathophysiological changes of the brain in vivo. For example, magnetic resonance spectroscopy detects alterations in brain metabolism and energetics. Physiological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detects accompanying changes in cerebral blood flow related to neurovascular coupling. Diffusion and T1/T2-weighted MRI detect microscopic and macroscopic changes of the brain structure. This review summarizes current NMR findings of functional, physiological and biochemical alterations within a number of hereditary and acquired metabolic disorders in both animal models and humans. The global view of the impact of these metabolic disorders on the brain may be useful in identifying the unique and/or general patterns of abnormalities in the living brain related to the pathophysiology of the diseases, and identifying future fields of inquiry.

  8. Unravelling the genetic basis of hereditary disorders by high-throughput exome sequencing strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jazayeri, Omid

    2016-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis focuses on using Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) to unravel the genetic basis of human hereditary disorders with different inheritance patterns. We set out to apply WES as a diagnostic approach for establishing a molecular diagnosis in a highly heterogeneous group

  9. Abnormal red cell features associated with hereditary neurodegenerative disorders: the neuroacanthocytosis syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franceschi, L. De; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Mohandas, N.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review discusses the mechanisms involved in the generation of thorny red blood cells (RBCs), known as acanthocytes, in patients with neuroacanthocytosis, a heterogenous group of neurodegenerative hereditary disorders that include chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc) and McLeod syndro

  10. Consensus statement by hospital based dentists providing dental treatment for patients with inherited bleeding disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hewson, I. D.; Daly, J.; Hallett, K. B.; Liberali, S. A.; Scott, C. L. M.; Spaile, G.; Widmer, R.; Winters, J.

    2011-01-01

    Avoidance of dental care and neglect of oral health may occur in patients with inherited bleeding disorders because of concerns about perioperative and postoperative bleeding, but this is likely to result in the need for crisis care, and more complex and high-risk procedures. Most routine dental car

  11. Consensus statement by hospital based dentists providing dental treatment for patients with inherited bleeding disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hewson, I. D.; Daly, J.; Hallett, K. B.; Liberali, S. A.; Scott, C. L. M.; Spaile, G.; Widmer, R.; Winters, J.

    Avoidance of dental care and neglect of oral health may occur in patients with inherited bleeding disorders because of concerns about perioperative and postoperative bleeding, but this is likely to result in the need for crisis care, and more complex and high-risk procedures. Most routine dental

  12. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Fog Andersen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting.

  13. Attitudes towards mandatory national premarital screening for hereditary hemolytic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aama, Jumana Y

    2010-09-01

    A compulsory national premarital screening (PMS) program for hereditary hemoglobinopathies was established in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) in February 2004. Termination of pregnancy of affected fetuses is not widely acceptable. Many couples decide to get married regardless of the result. A trend towards coercive interference with this decision is emerging. To examine the attitude of young educated individuals regarding the national PMS program and its implementation. Eight hundred university students (aged 18-29) filled in a self-administered structured questionnaire. Data were analyzed using the EPI Info Statistical Package version 6. A P-value Screening singles on admission to university prior to any commitment may be preferable than screening immediately before the marriage certificate is issued.

  14. Rare acquired hemostatic disorders as a cause of prolonged bleeding – presentation of two case reports

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    Polona Novak

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDPatient’s anamnesis is of primary importance in determining hemostatic disorders. Based on anamnestic data, a clinician may decide for further laboratory tests. We must consider an acquired bleeding disorder in a patient with unusual, unexpected and prolonged bleeding episodes. In this article we will describe two rare acquired hemostatic disordes.TWO CASE REPORTSOur first patient had prolonged bleeding after a pacemaker implantation. We diagnosed him with acquired von Willebrand syndrome. Further on, the patient required a planned surgical procedure. In our second case we describe a patient with unusual and excessive skin bruising and prolonged bleeding after teeth extractions. He was diagnosed with acquired hemophilia.CONCLUSIONIn the assessment of a patient with a potential acquired bleeding disorder we must first rule out the most common causes, such as iatrogenic ones. But, because of high morbidity and mortality rates, we must also be aware of some rare acquired bleeding disorders. In case of uncertainty, we should consult with a hematologist.

  15. Hereditary angioedema: New therapeutic options for a potentially deadly disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eidelman Frank J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although the biochemistry of hereditary angioedema (HAE is fairly well understood today, the lag in diagnosis of a decade or more suggests that clinicians have low awareness of this disease. This lag in diagnosis and hence treatment certainly stems from the rarity and complexity of the presentation which can be easily mistaken for allergic and non-allergic reactions alike. The symptoms of the disease include acute swelling of any or multiple parts of the body. The attacks may be frequent or rare, and they may vary substantially in severity, causing stomach discomfort or periorbital swelling in mild cases and hypovolemic shock due to abdominal fluid shift or asphyxiation in the most severe cases. Given that these patients are at significant risk for poor quality of life and death, greater awareness of this disease is needed to ensure that newly available, effective medications are used in these patients. These new medications represent significant advances in HAE therapy because they are targeted at the plasma cascades implicated in the pathophysiology of this disease. The clinical presentation of HAE, overlapping symptoms with other angioedemas, and available therapies are reviewed.

  16. [Hereditary red cell membrane disorders in Japan: comparison with other countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Hidekazu; Wada, Hideho; Suemori, Shinichiro; Sugihara, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Red cell membrane disorders are the most common type of inherited hemolytic disorders in the Japanese population. In hereditary spherocytosis (HS), the primary presentation is a loss of membrane surface area, leading to reduced deformability because of defects in the membrane proteins ankyrin, band 3, β-spectrin, α spectrin, or protein 4.2 (P4.2). Complete P4.2 deficiencies, which are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, comprise a unique HS subgroup and are common in Japanese, but rare in other populations. In contrast, the principle presentation in hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) is mechanical weakness of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton due to defects in α-spectrin, β-spectrin, or protein 4.1. Although α-spectrin mutations are the most frequent cause of HE in Caucasian, African, and Mediterranean populations, these mutations are rare in the Japanese population, in which P4.1 deficiencies are instead most common. Furthermore, hereditary stomatocytoses (HSt) are disorders of monovalent cation permeability in the red cell membrane.

  17. Therapeutic and prophylactic ethanol lock therapy in patients with bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpurkar, M; McGrath, E; Joyce, J; Boldt-MacDonald, K; Chitlur, M; Lusher, J

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining a reliable venous access is a limiting factor for early initiation of clotting factor prophylaxis and immune tolerance induction. To circumvent this issue, central venous access devices (CVADs) are increasingly being used. Catheter-related infections (CRIs) remain the primary complication of insertion of CVAD. Thus, newer strategies for treatment and prevention of CRI are needed. Ethanol lock therapy (ELT) has been used to treat and prevent CRI in non-bleeding disorder patients. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of ELT in treating and preventing CRI in bleeding disorder patients. The medical charts of patients with bleeding disorders who underwent ELT for antimicrobial resistant CRIs were reviewed and data were analysed. ELT was effective in catheter salvage in 87% of patients with antimicrobial resistant CRI by a wide variety of pathogens. Prophylactic therapy with ethanol lock was associated with catheter dysfunction especially in mediports. ELT should be considered prior to removal of catheters in bleeding disorder patients with resistant CRIs. Further studies are needed for using prophylactic ethanol lock in prevention of CRIs in bleeding disorder patients.

  18. Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine Device Use in Female Adolescents with Heavy Menstrual Bleeding and Bleeding Disorders: Single Institution Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi-Fowode, Oluyemisi A; Santos, Xiomara M; Dietrich, Jennifer E; Srivaths, Lakshmi

    2017-08-01

    To identify complications and efficacy of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNgIUD) in adolescents with heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) and bleeding disorders (BD). A retrospective chart review of 13 postmenarchal adolescent girls with HMB/BD who underwent placement of an LNgIUD. Placement of an LNgIUD. Primary outcome was to identify complications from placement of an LNgIUD. Secondary outcome was to evaluate the efficacy of the LNgIUD in adolescents with BD. Thirteen patients met study criteria. The mean age of diagnosis of HMB was 14.08 ± 1.75 years. BD or bleeding risk factor diagnoses included low von Willebrand (VW) activity in 5, type I VW disease in 5, type IIM VW disease in 1, low VW activity and factor 7 deficiency in 1, and acquired VW disease and factor 7 deficiency in 1. Before LNgIUD placement, other hormonal therapy (n = 13) and hemostatic therapy (antifibrinolytic agents, desmopressin acetate; n = 8) yielded poor control of HMB. The LNgIUD was placed using anesthesia with periprocedure hemostatic therapy with no complications. All patients reported significant improvement in HMB after LNgIUD placement and 60% achieved amenorrhea, with mean time to improvement of 94 ± 69 days. Mean hemoglobin and ferritin levels increased after LNgIUD placement compared with before LNgIUD placement values (P = .02, P = .0085, respectively). Use of supplemental hormonal and hemostatic agents decreased (n = 4) after LNgIUD placement. None required LNgIUD removal; 1 spontaneously expelled the LNgIUD with subsequent replacement. Study results indicated the LNgIUD is an effective therapeutic option in postmenarchal adolescents with HMB due to BD/bleeding risk factor with minimal complications, high compliance rate, improvement in HMB and anemia, and no periprocedural bleeding with hemostatic management. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Applications of CRISPR/Cas9 for Gene Editing in Hereditary Movement Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Wooseok; Moon, Jangsup; Kim, Manho

    2016-09-01

    Gene therapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating hereditary movement disorders, including hereditary ataxia, dystonia, Huntington's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Genome editing is a type of genetic engineering in which DNA is inserted, deleted or replaced in the genome using modified nucleases. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/CRISPR associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) has been used as an essential tool in biotechnology. Cas9 is an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease enzyme that was originally associated with the adaptive immune system of Streptococcus pyogenes and is now being utilized as a genome editing tool to induce double strand breaks in DNA. CRISPR/Cas9 has advantages in terms of clinical applicability over other genome editing technologies such as zinc-finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases because of easy in vivo delivery. Here, we review and discuss the applicability of CRISPR/Cas9 to preclinical studies or gene therapy in hereditary movement disorders.

  20. Applications of CRISPR/Cas9 for Gene Editing in Hereditary Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Wooseok; Moon, Jangsup; Kim, Manho

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating hereditary movement disorders, including hereditary ataxia, dystonia, Huntington’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. Genome editing is a type of genetic engineering in which DNA is inserted, deleted or replaced in the genome using modified nucleases. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/CRISPR associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) has been used as an essential tool in biotechnology. Cas9 is an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease enzyme that was originally associated with the adaptive immune system of Streptococcus pyogenes and is now being utilized as a genome editing tool to induce double strand breaks in DNA. CRISPR/Cas9 has advantages in terms of clinical applicability over other genome editing technologies such as zinc-finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases because of easy in vivo delivery. Here, we review and discuss the applicability of CRISPR/Cas9 to preclinical studies or gene therapy in hereditary movement disorders. PMID:27667185

  1. [Hereditary hemocromatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2004-10-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a disorder of iron metabolism characterized by a progressive tissue iron overload which leads to an irreversible organ damage if it is not treated timely. The recent developments in the field of molecular medicine have radically changed the physiopathology and the diagnosis of this disease. However, transferrin saturation and serum ferritin are still the most reliable tests for the detection of subjects with hereditary hemochromatosis. Therapeutic phlebotomy is the mainstay of the treatment of hereditary hemochromatosis. If phlebotomy is started before the onset of irreversible organ damages, the life expectancy of these patients is similar to that of normal population.

  2. Health-related quality of life, developmental milestones, and self-esteem in young adults with bleeding disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limperg, P.F. (P. F.); L. Haverman (Lotte); H. Maurice-Stam (Heleen); M. Coppens; Valk, C. (C.); M.J.H.A. Kruip (Marieke); J.C.J. Eikenboom (Jeroen); M. Peters; M.A. Grootenhuis (Martha)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The treatment of bleeding disorders improved in the last decades. However, the effect of growing up with bleeding disorders on developmental, emotional, and social aspects is understudied. Therefore, this study assesses HRQOL, developmental milestones, and self-esteem in

  3. Challenges in the Evaluation for Possible Abuse: Presentations of Congenital Bleeding Disorders in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jami; Carpenter, Shannon; Anderst, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe children with congenital bleeding disorders that present in a manner that may be concerning for non-accidental trauma (NAT), and to evaluate associations with disease and demographic characteristics. Methods: Ten year retrospective charts of subjects were reviewed at a Hemophilia Treatment Center. Demographic, historical,…

  4. Third trimester amniocentesis for diagnosis of inherited bleeding disorders prior to delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, J; Chappell, L C; Kyle, P; Madan, B

    2013-11-01

    X-linked and autosomally inherited bleeding disorders confer a risk of foetal intracranial haemorrhage during delivery. Conventional prenatal diagnosis involving chorionic villus sampling or early amniocentesis is primarily aimed at offering the choice of pregnancy termination. Currently, non-invasive procedures, involving analysis of free foetal DNA in the maternal circulation, are restricted to gender determination, and are of limited value in women at risk of carrying a foetus with a bleeding disorder. These limitations, together with the rising proportion of women shown to be carrying an affected foetus, who decide to continue the pregnancy, have led to the development of prenatal mutation identification via late amniocentesis after 34 weeks of gestation, with the sole aim of directing delivery management. Although this approach has been documented in some cases of potential foetal anomaly, there are no previous reports of its use in women with heritable bleeding disorders. We report a single-centre experience of this technique in managing nine such deliveries. Of these, three showed an affected foetus, five showed an unaffected foetus and in one case no result could be obtained. In the three affected cases and the one with the inconclusive result restrictive birth plans were implemented, whereas the five unaffected cases underwent routine obstetric management; with one delivery necessitating interventions which would have been contraindicated if foetal status had not been determined. Late amniocentesis is a safe technique for guiding delivery management in women with bleeding disorders where the mutation is known.

  5. Health-related quality of life, developmental milestones, and self-esteem in young adults with bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limperg, P F; Haverman, L; Maurice-Stam, H; Coppens, M; Valk, C; Kruip, M J H A; Eikenboom, J; Peters, M; Grootenhuis, M A

    2017-09-12

    The treatment of bleeding disorders improved in the last decades. However, the effect of growing up with bleeding disorders on developmental, emotional, and social aspects is understudied. Therefore, this study assesses HRQOL, developmental milestones, and self-esteem in Dutch young adults (YA) with bleeding disorders compared to peers. Ninety-five YA (18-30 years) with bleeding disorders (78 men; mean 24.7 years, SD 3.5) and 17 women (mean 25.1 years, SD 3.8) participated and completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Young Adult version, the Course of Life Questionnaire, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Differences between patients with bleeding disorders and their peers, and between hemophilia severity groups, were tested using Mann-Whitney U tests. YA men with bleeding disorders report a slightly lower HRQOL on the total scale, physical functioning, and school/work functioning in comparison to healthy peers (small effect sizes). YA men with severe hemophilia report more problems on the physical functioning scale than non-severe hemophilia. YA men with bleeding disorders achieved more psychosexual developmental milestones than peers, but show a delay in 'paid jobs, during middle and/or high school.' A somewhat lower self-esteem was found in YA men with bleeding disorders in comparison to peers (small effect size). For YA women with bleeding disorders, no differences were found on any of the outcomes in comparison to peers. This study demonstrates some impairments in HRQOL and self-esteem in YA men with bleeding disorders. By monitoring HRQOL, problems can be identified early, especially with regard to their physical and professional/school functioning.

  6. A global quantitative survey of hemostatic assessment in postpartum hemorrhage and experience with associated bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Andra H; Cooper, David L; Paidas, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Coagulopathy may be a serious complicating or contributing factor to postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), and should be promptly recognized to ensure proper bleeding management. This study aims to evaluate the approaches of obstetrician-gynecologists worldwide towards assessing massive PPH caused by underlying bleeding disorders. A quantitative survey was completed by 302 obstetrician-gynecologists from 6 countries (the UK, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Japan). The survey included questions on the use of hematologic laboratory studies, interpretation of results, laboratory's role in coagulation assessments, and experience with bleeding disorders. Overall, the most common definitions of "massive" PPH were >2,000 mL (39%) and >1,500 mL (34%) blood loss. The most common criteria for rechecking a "stat" complete blood count and for performing coagulation studies were a drop in blood pressure (73%) and ongoing visible bleeding (78%), respectively. Laboratory coagulation (prothrombin time/activated partial thromboplastin time [PT/aPTT]) and factor VIII/IX assays were performed on-site more often than were mixing studies (laboratory coagulation studies, 93%; factor VIII/IX assays, 63%; mixing studies, 22%). Most commonly consulted sources of additional information were colleagues within one's own specialty (68%) and other specialists (67%). Most respondents had consulted with a hematologist (78%; least, Germany [56%]; greatest, UK [98%]). The most common reason for not consulting was hematologist unavailability (44%). The most commonly reported thresholds for concern with PT and aPTT were 13 to 20 seconds (36%) and 30 to 45 seconds (50%), respectively. Most respondents reported having discovered an underlying bleeding disorder (58%; least, Japan [35%]; greatest, Spain [74%]). Global survey results highlight similarities and differences between countries in how PPH is assessed and varying levels of obstetrician-gynecologist experience with identification of underlying

  7. Expanding the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of hereditary disorders of connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazami, Anas M; Al-Qattan, Sarah M; Faqeih, Eissa; Alhashem, Amal; Alshammari, Muneera; Alzahrani, Fatema; Al-Dosari, Mohammed S; Patel, Nisha; Alsagheir, Afaf; Binabbas, Bassam; Alzaidan, Hamad; Alsiddiky, Abdulmonem; Alharbi, Nasser; Alfadhel, Majid; Kentab, Amal; Daza, Riza M; Kircher, Martin; Shendure, Jay; Hashem, Mais; Alshahrani, Saif; Rahbeeni, Zuhair; Khalifa, Ola; Shaheen, Ranad; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2016-05-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) describes a group of clinical entities in which the connective tissue, primarily that of the skin, joint and vessels, is abnormal, although the resulting clinical manifestations can vary widely between the different historical subtypes. Many cases of hereditary disorders of connective tissue that do not seem to fit these historical subtypes exist. The aim of this study is to describe a large series of patients with inherited connective tissue disorders evaluated by our clinical genetics service and for whom a likely causal variant was identified. In addition to clinical phenotyping, patients underwent various genetic tests including molecular karyotyping, candidate gene analysis, autozygome analysis, and whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing as appropriate. We describe a cohort of 69 individuals representing 40 families, all referred because of suspicion of an inherited connective tissue disorder by their primary physician. Molecular lesions included variants in the previously published disease genes B3GALT6, GORAB, ZNF469, B3GAT3, ALDH18A1, FKBP14, PYCR1, CHST14 and SPARC with interesting variations on the published clinical phenotypes. We also describe the first recessive EDS-like condition to be caused by a recessive COL1A1 variant. In addition, exome capture in a familial case identified a homozygous truncating variant in a novel and compelling candidate gene, AEBP1. Finally, we also describe a distinct novel clinical syndrome of cutis laxa and marked facial features and propose ATP6V1E1 and ATP6V0D2 (two subunits of vacuolar ATPase) as likely candidate genes based on whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing of the two families with this new clinical entity. Our study expands the clinical spectrum of hereditary disorders of connective tissue and adds three novel candidate genes including two that are associated with a highly distinct syndrome.

  8. Identification and management of women with inherited bleeding disorders: a survey of obstetricians and gynaecologists in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, C; Shiltagh, N; Kingman, C E C; Economides, D L; Lee, C A; Kadir, R A

    2006-07-01

    A mail survey of members and fellows of Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists was carried out to determine current practices of obstetricians and gynaecologists in the United Kingdom in the management of women with inherited bleeding disorders. In total, 3929 questionnaires were sent, 707 returned and analysis was limited to 545 valid questionnaires. In the past 5 years, 91% have managed women with inherited bleeding disorders. The majority (83%) considered inherited bleeding disorders to be under diagnosed in obstetrics and gynaecology. More than 80% considered the prevalence of von Willebrand's disease (VWD) to be management guidelines are essential in minimizing haemorrhagic complications and improving quality of care of these women.

  9. Perioperative Physiotherapy for Total Ankle Replacement in Patients with Inherited Bleeding Disorders: Outline of an Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Kotela, Andrzej; Wilk-Frańczuk, Magdalena; Jaczewska, Joanna; Żbikowski, Piotr; Łęgosz, Paweł; Ambroziak, Paweł; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of end-stage hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle joint remains a controversial problem, and total ankle replacement (TAR) is considered to be a valuable management option. Physiotherapy continues to be an extremely important part of TAR and has a tremendous impact on the outcomes of this procedure. Given the lack of data on the latter, this study details a protocol of perioperative physiotherapy in TAR in patients with inherited bleeding disorders (IBD). The protocol outlined in...

  10. Emergency and out of hours care of patients with inherited bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, H; Lacey, R; Keaney, J; Kay-Jones, C; Martlew, V; Thachil, J

    2012-05-01

    Recently, the United Kingdom Haemophilia Centre Doctors Organisation published recommendations for the standard of care for assessment and treatment of patients with bleeding disorders in the emergency department (A&E). An audit was undertaken to compare the level of care to the acceptable standards in a tertiary hospital A&E, attached to a haemophilia comprehensive care centre. A&E attendances were found by cross referencing all patients with known bleeding disorders against the EDMS attendance system. Visits from the past 3 years were identified to produce sufficient data and electronic notes from these visits were then accessed, and marked against the proforma. Data were available from 45 of a total of 54 patients, who had a total of 75 emergency visits documented. In all aspects of care, the standards were not adequately met including the average length of time between booking and clinical assessment, early initiation of specific haemostatic treatment, seeking haematology advice and arrangement of follow-up. Also no specialist clotting investigations were done with only 9/11 patients admitted having their haematological diagnosis recorded. In addition, only very few patients had the severity of bleeding disorder noted and less than half their first line treatment documented. There were significant differences in the standard of care for haemophilia patients provided by the A&E department when compared with acceptable standards. Measures have been put in place and policies have been drafted to improve this situation and provide the best possible care to persons with haemophilia.

  11. Lack of increased prevalence of immunoregulatory disorders in hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Henriette; Csuka, Dorottya; Gács, Judit; Czaller, Ibolya; Zotter, Zsuzsanna; Füst, George; Varga, Lilian; Gergely, Péter

    2011-10-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to deficiency of C1-INH (HAE-C1-INH) is associated with enhanced consumption of the early complement components, which may predispose for autoimmune disease. We assessed the prevalence of such disorders among HAE- C1-INH patients and their impact on the natural course of HAE-C1-INH. Clinical data and immunoserological parameters of 130 HAE-C1-INH and 174 non-C1-INH-deficient patients with angioedema were analyzed. In our study, the incidence of immunoregulatory disorders was 11.5% in the population of HAE-C1-INH patients and 5.2% among non-C1-INH-deficient controls with angioedema. Immunoserology screening revealed a greater prevalence of anticardiolipin IgM (p=0.0118) among HAE-C1-INH patients, than in those with non-C1-INH-deficient angioedema. We did not find higher prevalence of immunoregulatory disorders among our HAE-C1-INH patients. However, in patients with confirmed immunoregulatory disorders, the latter influenced both the severity of HAE-C1-INH and the effectiveness of its long-term management. Appropriate management of the immunoregulatory disease thus identified improves the symptoms of HAE-C1-INH.

  12. Hereditary angioedema as a metabolic liver disorder: novel therapeutic options and prospects for cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Ameratuga

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema (HAE is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations of the SERPING1 or the Factor 12 genes. It is potentially fatal, particularly if not identified at an early stage. Apart from androgens, which are contraindicated in children and in pregnant women, a range of effective, albeit very expensive treatments have recently become available for HAE patients. The cost of these new treatments is beyond the reach of most developing countries. At this time, there is no cure for the disorder. In spite of mutations of the SERPING1 gene, autoimmunity and infections are not prominent features of the condition. Here we present the argument that HAE should be viewed primarily as a metabolic liver disorder. This conceptual paradigm shift will stimulate basic research and may facilitate new therapeutic approaches to HAE outlined in this paper. We suggest several novel potential treatment options for HAE from the perspectives of clinical immunology, molecular biology and liver transplantation. Many of these offer the prospect of curing the disorder. The effectiveness of these options are rapidly improving in many cases and their risks are decreasing. Given the very high costs of treating HAE, some of these curative options may become feasible in the next decade.

  13. Cognitive dysfunction in hereditary spastic paraplegias and other motor neuron disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Faber

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP is a diverse group of single-gene disorders that share the predominant clinical feature of progressive lower limb spasticity and weakness. More than 70 different genetic subtypes have been described and all modes of inheritance are possible. Intellectual dysfunction in HSP is frequent in recessive forms but rare in dominant families. It may manifest by either mental retardation and/or cognitive decline. The latter may be subtle, restricted to executive dysfunction or may evolve to severe dementia. The cognitive profile is thought to depend largely on the genetic subtype of HSP, although wide phenotypic variability within the same genetic subtype and also within the same family can be found.

  14. Hereditary hyperbilirubinemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited disorders of bilirubin metabolism involve four autosomal recessive syndromes: Gilbert, Crigler- Najjar, Dubin-Johnson and Rotor, among which the first two are characterized by unconjugated and the second two by conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Gilbert syndrome occurs in 2%-10% of general population, while others are rare. Except for Crigler-Najjar syndrome, hereditary hyperbilirubinemias belong to benign disorders and thus no treatment is required.

  15. Hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, A; Avvisati, R A; Piscopo, C

    2010-09-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is a common hemolytic disorder characterized by a defect or deficiency in one or more of the proteins composing red blood cell membrane. As a result, red blood cells have an abnormal shape, higher metabolic requirements, and are prematurely trapped and destroyed in the spleen. Hereditary spherocytosis, including the very mild or subclinical forms, is the most common cause of non-immune hemolytic anemia among people of Northern European ancestry, with a prevalence of approximately 1 in 2000. However very mild forms of the disease may be much more common. Hereditary spherocytosis is inherited in a dominant fashion in 75% of cases, whereas the remaining are truly recessive cases and de novo mutations. This review reports current concepts on red cell membrane structure and it will attempt to clarify molecular defects leading to spherocyte and their consequences.

  16. Treatment for speech disorder in Friedreich ataxia and other hereditary ataxia syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Adam P; Folker, Joanne; Poole, Matthew L

    2014-10-28

    Hereditary ataxia syndromes can result in significant speech impairment, a symptom thought to be responsive to treatment. The type of speech impairment most commonly reported in hereditary ataxias is dysarthria. Dysarthria is a collective term referring to a group of movement disorders affecting the muscular control of speech. Dysarthria affects the ability of individuals to communicate and to participate in society. This in turn reduces quality of life. Given the harmful impact of speech disorder on a person's functioning, treatment of speech impairment in these conditions is important and evidence-based interventions are needed. To assess the effects of interventions for speech disorder in adults and children with Friedreich ataxia and other hereditary ataxias. On 14 October 2013, we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, Education Resources Information Center (ERIC), Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA), Dissertation Abstracts and trials registries. We checked all references in the identified trials to identify any additional published data. We considered for inclusion randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs that compared treatments for hereditary ataxias with no treatment, placebo or another treatment or combination of treatments, where investigators measured speech production. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included studies using the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. The review authors collected information on adverse effects from included studies. We did not conduct a meta-analysis as no two studies utilised the same assessment procedures within the same treatment. Fourteen clinical trials, involving 721 participants, met the criteria for inclusion in the review. Thirteen studies compared a pharmaceutical treatment with placebo (or a

  17. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions hereditary diffuse gastric cancer hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited disorder that greatly increases ...

  18. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of adolescents with platelet function disorders and heavy menstrual bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amesse Lawrence S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet function disorders (PFDs have emerged as an important etiology of heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB in adolescents. However, neither clinical nor laboratory data have been methodically analyzed in this population subset. The objective of this study was to evaluate these parameters in order to distinguish characteristics of the disorder that in turn will lead to earlier diagnosis and therapy initiation. Methods Retrospective review of medical records from postmenarcheal adolescents with documented PFDs referred to a hemophilia treatment center and university faculty practices for bleeding diatheses with their clinical and laboratory data evaluated. Results Of 63 teens with documented PFDs, HMB was the most common clinical manifestation of PFD (43; 68.3%. Of these, 37 (86% were diagnosed with PFD either at or after menarche with the diagnosis based on HMB symptoms alone. Only 6 (14% were diagnosed with a PFD prior to menarche, based on associated bleeding, i.e., epistaxis, ecchymosis, and all developed HMB after menstruation onset. Interestingly, 20 girls were diagnosed with a PFD prior to menarche and of these, only 6 (30% went on to develop HMB after pubertal transition, while the majority (14; 70% did not. The average age-at-PFD diagnosis was 14.5yrs, significantly differing from the 10.9yrs average age-at-PFD diagnosis in their counterparts that, after menarche, did not develop HMB (PP P Conclusions Adolescents with PFDs and HMB appear to be clinically distinct from their non-HMB counterparts. This group of girls is characterized by HMB the major bleeding symptom, significantly high incidences of blood group O and the δ-SPD with a PFD diagnosed well after menarche. High false negative standard platelet function study results indicate additional diagnostic strategies, particularly for δ-SPD, should be considered.

  19. Epidemic History of Hepatitis C Virus among Patients with Inherited Bleeding Disorders in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi-Rad, Katayoun; Rahimnia, Ramin; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Malekpour, Seyed Amir; Marzban, Mona; Keshvari, Maryam; Kiani, Seyed Jalal; Alavian, Seyed-Moayed

    2016-01-01

    The high rate of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among transfusion related risk groups such as patients with inherited bleeding disorders highlighting the investigation on prevalent subtypes and their epidemic history among this group. In this study, 166 new HCV NS5B sequences isolated from patients with inherited bleeding disorders together with 29 sequences related to hemophiliacs obtained from a previous study on diversity of HCV in Iran were analyzed. The most prevalent subtype was 1a (65%), followed by 3a (18.7%),1b (14.5%),4(1.2%) and 2k (0.6%). Subtypes 1a and 3a showed exponential expansion during the 20th century. Whereas expansion of 3a started around 20 years earlier than 1a among the study patients, the epidemic growth of 1a revealed a delay of about 10 years compared with that found for this subtype in developed countries. Our results supported the view that the spread of 3a reached the plateau 10 years prior to the screening of blood donors for HCV. Rather, 1a reached the plateau when screening program was implemented. The differences observed in the epidemic behavior of HCV-1a and 3a may be associated with different transmission routes of two subtypes. Indeed, expansion of 1a was more commonly linked to blood transfusion, while 3a was more strongly associated to drug use and specially IDU after 1960. Our findings also showed HCV transmission through blood products has effectively been controlled from late 1990s. In conclusion, the implementation of strategies such as standard surveillance programs and subsiding antiviral treatments seems to be essential to both prevent new HCV infections and to decline the current and future HCV disease among Iranian patients with inherited bleeding disorders. PMID:27611688

  20. Application of Molecular Genetics to the Investigation of Inherited Bleeding Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lethagen, Stefan Rune; Dunø, Morten; Nielsen, Lars Bo

    2013-01-01

    22. In hemophilia B, more than 1100 unique F9 mutations have been described scattered all over the gene. Carrier analysis, genetic counseling, prenatal and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis are all based on correct identifying the disease-causing mutation. Linkage analysis can be considered when...... the causative mutation is unknown. More rare bleeding disorders are generally recessively inherited, and are often caused by mutations that are specific for individual families, and mutations are scattered throughout the genes. Laboratories performing molecular genetic analyses must have validated internal...

  1. Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, N. C.

    1971-01-01

    Case studies of two siblings suffering from a gum disorder in which enlargement of the gingival mucosa is caused by a fibrosis. The disorder in the two children was felt to be an hereditary recessive trait. (CD)

  2. The experience of girls and young women with inherited bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khair, K; Holland, M; Pollard, D

    2013-09-01

    Haemophilia carriers and women with inherited bleeding disorders (IBD) experience menorrhagia, bleed following dentistry, surgery, injury or childbirth. Symptoms are easily treated leading to full and active lives. Nevertheless, some girls and women suffer with abnormal bleeding for many years before diagnosis. We explored the experiences of girls and young women (aged 9-34 years) with IBD by means of focus groups which consisted of moderated discussion addressing specific aspects of bleeding, management and coping strategies. Subsequently, these issues were explored further though a paper-based questionnaire distributed via five specialist haemophilia centres in the UK. The study suggested that young women with IBD who are managed at haemophilia centres receive appropriate care and feel well supported. Although the clinic-based literature available to these women is "fit for purpose", it does not fully address the perceived needs specifically regarding sex, menorrhagia, conception and childbirth, the Pill, tattoos/piercings and so on, leading many to turn to other information sources. Most of those who responded to our survey are confident in their lives, able to manage their IBD and take pragmatic views towards the inherited nature of their condition. But there is a substantial subgroup of women who experience stigmatization, isolation and bullying and express concerns relating to fertility and conception. Overall, this cohort would benefit from opportunities for mutual support. This could be via Internet-based social networking and may be of particular value to those who are unable to seek help from traditional medical services due to religious or other cultural barriers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Coagulation factor V(A2440G) causes east Texas bleeding disorder via TFPIα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Lisa M; Tran, Sinh; Livaja, Ruzica; Bensend, Tracy A; Milewicz, Dianna M; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2013-09-01

    The autosomal dominantly inherited east Texas bleeding disorder is linked to an A2440G variant in exon 13 of the F5 gene. Affected individuals have normal levels of coagulation factor V (FV) activity, but demonstrate inhibition of global coagulation tests. We demonstrated that the A2440G mutation causes upregulation of an alternatively spliced F5 transcript that results in an in-frame deletion of 702 amino acids of the large activation fragment, the B domain. The approximately 250-kDa FV isoform (FV-short), which can be fully activated by thrombin, is present in all A2440G carriers' plasma (n = 16). FV-short inhibits coagulation through an indirect mechanism by forming a complex with tissue factor pathway inhibitor-α (TFPIα), resulting in an approximately 10-fold increase in plasma TFPIα, suggesting that the TFPIα:FV-short complexes are retained in circulation. The TFPIα:FV-short complexes efficiently inhibit thrombin generation of both intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways. These data demonstrate that the east Texas bleeding disorder-associated F5(A2440G) leads to the formation of the TFPIα:FV-short complex, which inhibits activation and propagation of coagulation.

  4. Evidence supporting the use of recombinant activated factor VII in congenital bleeding disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär I Johansson

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Pär I Johansson, Sisse R OstrowskiCapital Region Blood Bank, Section for Transfusion Medicine, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkBackground: Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa, NovoSeven® was introduced in 1996 for the treatment of hemophilic patients with antibodies against coagulation factor VIII or IX.Objective: To review the evidence supporting the use of rFVIIa for the treatment of patients with congenital bleeding disorders.Patients and methods: English-language databases were searched in September 2009 for reports of randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluating the ability of rFVIIa to restore hemostasis in patients with congenital bleeding disorders.Results: Eight RCTs involving 256 hemophilic patients with antibodies against coagulation factors, also known as inhibitors, were identified. The evidence supporting the use of rFVIIa in these patients was weak with regard to dose, clinical setting, mode of administration, efficacy, and adverse events, given the limited sample size of each RCT and the heterogeneity of the studies.Conclusion: The authors suggest that rFVIIa therapy in hemophilic patients with inhibitors should be based on the individual’s ability to generate thrombin and form a clot, and not on the patient’s weight alone. Therefore, assays for thrombin generation, such as whole-blood thromboelastography, have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of these patients.Keywords: hemophilia, inhibitors, coagulation factor VIII, coagulation factor IX, rFVIIa, NovoSeven, FEIBA, hemostasis, RCT

  5. Molecular phenotype and bleeding risks of an inherited platelet disorder in a family with a RUNX1 frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badin, M S; Iyer, J K; Chong, M; Graf, L; Rivard, G E; Waye, J S; Paterson, A D; Pare, G; Hayward, C P M

    2017-05-01

    Inherited defects in RUNX1 are important causes of platelet function disorders. Our goals were to evaluate RUNX1-related platelet disorders among individuals evaluated for uncharacterized, inherited platelet function disorders and test a proof of concept that bleeding risks could be quantitatively estimated for typical families with an inherited platelet function disorder. Index cases with an uncharacterized inherited platelet function disorder were subjected to exome sequencing with confirmation of RUNX1 mutations by Sanger sequencing. Laboratory findings were obtained from medical records and persistence of platelet non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIB (MYH10), a biomarker of RUNX1 defects, was assessed by Western blotting. Bleeding histories were assessed using standardized assessment tools. Bleeding risks were estimated as odds ratios (OR) using questionnaire data for affected individuals compared to controls. Among 12 index cases who had their exomes sequenced, one individual from a family with eight study participants had a c.583dup in RUNX1 that segregated with the disease and was predicted to cause a frameshift and RUNX1 haploinsufficiency. Unlike unaffected family members (n = 2), affected family members (n = 6) had increased bleeding scores and abnormal platelet aggregation and dense granule release responses to agonists but only some had thrombocytopenia and/or dense granule deficiency. This family's mutation was associated with persistence of MYH10 in platelets and increased risks (OR 11-440) for wound healing problems and mild bleeding symptoms, including bleeding interfering with lifestyle in women. Inherited platelet dysfunction due to a RUNX1 haploinsufficiency mutation significantly increases bleeding risks. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Barriers to effective diagnosis and management of a bleeding patient with undiagnosed bleeding disorder across multiple specialties: results of a quantitative case-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reding MT

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mark T Reding,1 David L Cooper21Center for Bleeding and Clotting Disorders, University of Minnesota Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, 2Medical Affairs, Novo Nordisk Inc, Princeton, NJ, USABackground: Bleeding symptoms commonly seen by multiple physician specialties may belie undiagnosed congenital or acquired bleeding disorders. Acquired hemophilia is a potentially life-threatening cause of unexplained acute bleeding manifested by an abnormal activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT that does not correct with 1:1 mixing with normal plasma.Methods: Practicing physicians (hematology/oncology, emergency medicine, geriatrics, internal medicine, rheumatology, obstetrics and gynecology, critical care medicine, and general surgery completed an online survey based on a hypothetical case scenario.Results: Excluding surgeons and obstetrician/gynecologist respondents, 302 physicians (about 50 per specialty were presented with an older adult woman complaining of recurrent epistaxis. Nearly 90% ordered a complete blood count and coagulation studies (aPTT, prothrombin time [PT]/international normalized ratio [INR]. Despite a prolonged aPTT of 42 seconds, <50% of nonhematologists would repeat the aPTT, and <45% would consult a hematologist; emergency medicine physicians were least likely (10% and rheumatologists were most likely (43% to consult. After presentation weeks later with bruising and abdominal/back pain, ≥90% of physicians within each specialty ordered a complete blood count or PT/INR/aPTT. Despite an aPTT of 63 seconds, the majority did not repeat the aPTT. At this point, approximately 75% of internal medicine and geriatric physicians indicated they would consult a hematologist, versus 47% in emergency medicine and 50% in critical care. All participants preferred abdominal computed tomography (80%–84%. After 12 hours of additional observation, 73% to 94% of respondents consulted a hematologist. Complete blood count revealed anemia and an a

  7. Coagulation factor VA2440G causes east Texas bleeding disorder via TFPIα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Lisa M.; Tran, Sinh; Livaja, Ruzica; Bensend, Tracy A.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2013-01-01

    The autosomal dominantly inherited east Texas bleeding disorder is linked to an A2440G variant in exon 13 of the F5 gene. Affected individuals have normal levels of coagulation factor V (FV) activity, but demonstrate inhibition of global coagulation tests. We demonstrated that the A2440G mutation causes upregulation of an alternatively spliced F5 transcript that results in an in-frame deletion of 702 amino acids of the large activation fragment, the B domain. The approximately 250-kDa FV isoform (FV-short), which can be fully activated by thrombin, is present in all A2440G carriers’ plasma (n = 16). FV-short inhibits coagulation through an indirect mechanism by forming a complex with tissue factor pathway inhibitor-α (TFPIα), resulting in an approximately 10-fold increase in plasma TFPIα, suggesting that the TFPIα:FV-short complexes are retained in circulation. The TFPIα:FV-short complexes efficiently inhibit thrombin generation of both intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways. These data demonstrate that the east Texas bleeding disorder–associated F5A2440G leads to the formation of the TFPIα:FV-short complex, which inhibits activation and propagation of coagulation. PMID:23979162

  8. Hereditary spherocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Kalyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a familial hemolytic disorder with marked heterogeneity of clinical features, ranging from an asymptomatic condition to a fulminant hemolytic anemia. In severe cases, the disorder may present in early childhood, but in some cases it may go unnoticed until later in adult life. We present a 32-year-old male who presented with anemia, jaundice, splenomegaly, and gallstones. Seven of his family members had similar illness in the past. The Mother died of similar illness at the age of 40. The Blood film showed spherocytosis and reticulocytosis. There was increased osmotic fragility and a negative direct coomb′s test. He was given folic acid supplements and was advised for splenectomy and cholecystectomy. This case is reported due to its rarity in Indian population.

  9. Allo-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a potential treatment for a patient with a combined disorder of hereditary spherocytosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-hui; WANG Yu; ZHAO Ting; LIU Kai-yan; HUANG Xiao-jun; FU Hai-xia; XU Lan-ping; LIU Dai-hong; CHEN Huan; HAN Wei; CHEN Yu-hong; WANG Feng-rong; WANG Jing-zhi

    2012-01-01

    Both human hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) are life threatening.Herein we have reported the case of a woman with a combined disorder of HS and CML who underwent the matched sibling allogeneic stem cell transplantation.The complete donor erythroid cells were obtained.The red blood cell counts significantly improved throughout life comparing with pre-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).Reticulocyte counts normalized,and BCR-ABL was cleared away.The total bilirubin level was also corrected in this recipient.Our case is a rare example with a combined disorder of HS and CML following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.HS was not a contraindication for patient in the matched sibling transplant setting.

  10. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases: Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Ali J; van Rooij, Eva; Roberts, Robert

    2016-12-27

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on "omics." Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments, describes the basis of human genetic diversity, and addresses the phenotypic consequences of genetic variants. Rare variants with large effect sizes are responsible for single-gene disorders, whereas complex polygenic diseases are typically due to multiple genetic variants, each exerting a modest effect size. To illustrate the clinical implications of genetic variants with large effect sizes, 3 common forms of hereditary cardiomyopathies are discussed as prototypic examples of single-gene disorders, including their genetics, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, and treatment. The genetic basis of complex traits is discussed in a separate paper. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Perioperative Physiotherapy for Total Ankle Replacement in Patients with Inherited Bleeding Disorders: Outline of an Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotela, Andrzej; Wilk-Frańczuk, Magdalena; Jaczewska, Joanna; Żbikowski, Piotr; Łęgosz, Paweł; Ambroziak, Paweł; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2017-01-27

    The treatment of end-stage hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle joint remains a controversial problem, and total ankle replacement (TAR) is considered to be a valuable management option. Physiotherapy continues to be an extremely important part of TAR and has a tremendous impact on the outcomes of this procedure. Given the lack of data on the latter, this study details a protocol of perioperative physiotherapy in TAR in patients with inherited bleeding disorders (IBD). The protocol outlined in this paper was devised via consultations within an interdisciplinary group, the authors' own experiences with TAR in hemophilic and non-hemophilic patients, previous reports on this issue in the literature, and patient opinions. Our working group followed the criteria of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The algorithm includes 4 physiotherapy phases with specified time frames, aims, interventions, and examples of exercises for each phase. We emphasize the importance of preoperative rehabilitation, and recommend introducing intensive physiotherapy immediately after the surgery, with regard to the wound protection and avoiding full weight-bearing in the first weeks. The intensity of physiotherapy should be adjusted individually depending on individual patient progress. This study details a rehabilitation protocol for TAR in patients with IBDs, which can be equally applicable to clinicians and researchers. Further scientific studies are required to investigate the beneficial effect of different protocols as well as to clarify the effectiveness of various frequencies, durations, and intensities of selected interventions.

  12. Perioperative Physiotherapy for Total Ankle Replacement in Patients with Inherited Bleeding Disorders: Outline of an Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotela, Andrzej; Wilk-Frańczuk, Magdalena; Jaczewska, Joanna; Żbikowski, Piotr; Łęgosz, Paweł; Ambroziak, Paweł; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of end-stage hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle joint remains a controversial problem, and total ankle replacement (TAR) is considered to be a valuable management option. Physiotherapy continues to be an extremely important part of TAR and has a tremendous impact on the outcomes of this procedure. Given the lack of data on the latter, this study details a protocol of perioperative physiotherapy in TAR in patients with inherited bleeding disorders (IBD). The protocol outlined in this paper was devised via consultations within an interdisciplinary group, the authors’ own experiences with TAR in hemophilic and non-hemophilic patients, previous reports on this issue in the literature, and patient opinions. Our working group followed the criteria of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The algorithm includes 4 physiotherapy phases with specified time frames, aims, interventions, and examples of exercises for each phase. We emphasize the importance of preoperative rehabilitation, and recommend introducing intensive physiotherapy immediately after the surgery, with regard to the wound protection and avoiding full weight-bearing in the first weeks. The intensity of physiotherapy should be adjusted individually depending on individual patient progress. This study details a rehabilitation protocol for TAR in patients with IBDs, which can be equally applicable to clinicians and researchers. Further scientific studies are required to investigate the beneficial effect of different protocols as well as to clarify the effectiveness of various frequencies, durations, and intensities of selected interventions. PMID:28129322

  13. Revision Knee Arthroplasty in Patients with Inherited Bleeding Disorders: A Single-Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotela, Andrzej; Wilk-Frańczuk, Magdalena; Żbikowski, Piotr; Łęgosz, Paweł; Ambroziak, Paweł; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2017-01-01

    Background The results of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients with inherited bleeding disorders (IBDs) are poorer when compared with those in the general population, with a notably higher risk of complications and higher revision rates. Thus, revision procedures are becoming a growing concern in this group of patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of revision TKA in patients with IBD. Material/Methods A retrospective cohort study with longitudinal assessment of hemophilia patients scheduled for revision TKA between January 2010 and September 2015 was performed. The clinical status of the patients was assessed based on the Knee Society Score, and the Numeric Rating Scale was used to assess knee pain severity and patient satisfaction with the surgery. Radiological examination, post-operative complications, and reinterventions were recorded and analyzed. Results Very good results were obtained in all patients treated for aseptic loosening of the implant. However, inferior results were found in cases with infection. All patients operated on for aseptic loosening required only single-stage TKA, whereas patients with infection underwent multiple interventions. Complications were observed only in cases with infection. Conclusions Our study clearly outlined the differences in results based on failure mode, with far inferior results obtained in cases with infection. Given the lack of data in this area as well as the high specificity of this population, further high-quality studies are needed. PMID:28068306

  14. [Developments in hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubourg, O

    2012-12-01

    Hereditary sensorimotor neuropathies, or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) comprise a group of diseases with heterogeneous clinical, electrophysiological and genetic expression. They are classified by the mode of inheritance (autosomal dominant, X-linked dominant, autosomal recessive) and their electrophysiological characteristics taking into account the speed of motor conduction of the median nerve (demyelinating, intermediary and axonal forms). Certain purely motor forms are called spinal CMT or hereditary distal motor neuropathy, or distal spinal amyotrophy. CMT involving an important sensorial component, trophic disorders, or signs of dysautonomia are included in the classification of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

  15. Direct-to-consumer advertising for bleeding disorders: a content analysis and expert evaluation of advertising claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, G. A.; Neufeld, E. J.; Sorel, M; Weeks, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires that all direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) contain both an accurate statement of a medication’s effects (“truth”) and an even-handed discussion of its benefits and risks/adverse effects (“fair balance”). DTCA for medications to treat rare diseases such as bleeding disorders is unlikely to be given high priority for FDA review. METHODS We reviewed all DTCA for bleeding disorder products appearing in the patient-directed magazine HemeAware from January, 2004 to June, 2006. We categorized the information presented in each advertisement as benefit, risk/adverse effect, or neither, and assessed the amount of text and type size devoted to each. We also assessed the readability of each type of text using the Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES, where a score of ≥ 65 is considered of average readability), and assessed the accuracy of the advertising claims utilizing a panel of five bleeding disorder experts. RESULTS A total of 39 unique advertisements for 12 products were found. On average, approximately twice the amount of text was devoted to benefits as compared to risks/adverse effects, and the later was more difficult to read (FRES of 20.45 for risks/adverse effects versus 32.08 for benefits; difference of 11.56 [95% CI: 4.52, 18.60]). Only about two-thirds of the advertising claims were considered by a majority of the experts to be based on at least low-quality evidence. CONCLUSION As measured by our methods, print DTCA for bleeding disorders may not reach the FDA’s standards of truth and fair balance. PMID:18647231

  16. A high-throughput sequencing test for diagnosing inherited bleeding, thrombotic, and platelet disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeoni, Ilenia; Stephens, Jonathan C.; Hu, Fengyuan; Deevi, Sri V. V.; Megy, Karyn; Bariana, Tadbir K.; Lentaigne, Claire; Schulman, Sol; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Vries, Minka J. A.; Westbury, Sarah K.; Greene, Daniel; Papadia, Sofia; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Attwood, Antony P.; Ballmaier, Matthias; Baynam, Gareth; Bermejo, Emilse; Bertoli, Marta; Bray, Paul F.; Bury, Loredana; Cattaneo, Marco; Collins, Peter; Daugherty, Louise C.; Favier, Rémi; French, Deborah L.; Furie, Bruce; Gattens, Michael; Germeshausen, Manuela; Ghevaert, Cedric; Goodeve, Anne C.; Guerrero, Jose A.; Hampshire, Daniel J.; Hart, Daniel P.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Henskens, Yvonne M. C.; Hill, Marian; Hogg, Nancy; Jolley, Jennifer D.; Kahr, Walter H.; Kelly, Anne M.; Kerr, Ron; Kostadima, Myrto; Kunishima, Shinji; Lambert, Michele P.; Liesner, Ri; López, José A.; Mapeta, Rutendo P.; Mathias, Mary; Millar, Carolyn M.; Nathwani, Amit; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite; Nurden, Alan T.; Nurden, Paquita; Othman, Maha; Peerlinck, Kathelijne; Perry, David J.; Poudel, Pawan; Reitsma, Pieter; Rondina, Matthew T.; Smethurst, Peter A.; Stevenson, William; Szkotak, Artur; Tuna, Salih; van Geet, Christel; Whitehorn, Deborah; Wilcox, David A.; Zhang, Bin; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Gresele, Paolo; Bellissimo, Daniel B.; Penkett, Christopher J.; Laffan, Michael A.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Rendon, Augusto; Freson, Kathleen; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Turro, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Inherited bleeding, thrombotic, and platelet disorders (BPDs) are diseases that affect ∼300 individuals per million births. With the exception of hemophilia and von Willebrand disease patients, a molecular analysis for patients with a BPD is often unavailable. Many specialized tests are usually required to reach a putative diagnosis and they are typically performed in a step-wise manner to control costs. This approach causes delays and a conclusive molecular diagnosis is often never reached, which can compromise treatment and impede rapid identification of affected relatives. To address this unmet diagnostic need, we designed a high-throughput sequencing platform targeting 63 genes relevant for BPDs. The platform can call single nucleotide variants, short insertions/deletions, and large copy number variants (though not inversions) which are subjected to automated filtering for diagnostic prioritization, resulting in an average of 5.34 candidate variants per individual. We sequenced 159 and 137 samples, respectively, from cases with and without previously known causal variants. Among the latter group, 61 cases had clinical and laboratory phenotypes indicative of a particular molecular etiology, whereas the remainder had an a priori highly uncertain etiology. All previously detected variants were recapitulated and, when the etiology was suspected but unknown or uncertain, a molecular diagnosis was reached in 56 of 61 and only 8 of 76 cases, respectively. The latter category highlights the need for further research into novel causes of BPDs. The ThromboGenomics platform thus provides an affordable DNA-based test to diagnose patients suspected of having a known inherited BPD. PMID:27084890

  17. A case report of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome as a rare hereditary disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirous, Mehri; Tayari, Nazila

    2011-06-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant and a rare hereditary disease. Diagnosis of this syndrome is based on major and minor criteria. We report a Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in a 25-year-old male who was presented with progressive pain of maxilla and mandible over 5 years. The pain was diffuse and compatible with expansile cyst in alveolar ridges on panoramic radiography. In physical examination, he had coarse face and prognathism. Computer tomography of face revealed two expansile maxillary and one mandibular cyst. Calcification of entire length in falx and tentorium were detected in bone window.

  18. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sigmoidoscopy Alternative Names Lower GI bleeding; GI bleeding; Upper GI bleeding; Hematochezia Images GI bleeding - series Fecal occult blood test References Kovacs TO, Jensen DM. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  19. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  20. HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelkamp, EJ; Yapp, TR; Powell, LW

    2000-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of the iron metabolism Screening studies indicate that it has a prevalence of one in 200 to 400, depending on the population studied, and a carrier rate of about one in seven to one in 10. Feder et al identified the hereditary hemochromatosis

  1. Hereditary erythrocytosis, thrombocytosis and neutrophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wan-Jen; Gotlib, Jason

    2014-06-01

    Hereditary erythrocytosis, thrombocytosis, and neutrophilia are rare inherited syndromes which exhibit Mendelian inheritance. Some patients with primary hereditary erythrocytosis exhibit a mutation in the erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) which is associated with low serum erythropoietin (EPO) levels. Secondary congenital erythrocytosis may be characterized by normal or high serum EPO levels, and is related to high oxygen affinity haemoglobin variants, mutation of the enzyme biphosphoglycerate mutase (BPGM), or defects in components of the oxygen-sensing pathway. Hereditary thrombocytosis was first linked to mutations in genes encoding thrombopoietin (THPO) or the thrombopoietin receptor, MPL. More recently, germline mutations in JAK2, distinct from JAK2 V617F, and mutation of the gelsolin gene, were uncovered in several pedigrees of hereditary thrombocytosis. Hereditary neutrophilia has been described in one family with an activating germline mutation in CSF3R. The mutational basis for most hereditary myeloproliferative disorders has yet to be identified. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Coagulation disorders in patients with severe leptospirosis are associated with severe bleeding and mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F.P. Wagenaar (Jiri); M.G.A. Goris (Marga); D.L. Partiningrum; B. Isbandrio; R.A. Hartskeerl (Rudy); D.P.M. Brandjes; J.C.M. Meijers; M.H. Gasem; E.C.M. van Gorp (Eric)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective To determine the involvement of coagulation in bleeding and poor outcome in patients with severe leptospirosis. Methods In a prospective study, parameters of the coagulation system were measured on admission and during follow-up in 52 consecutive patients with severe leptospiro

  3. Propolis influence on erythrocyte membrane disorder (hereditary spherocytosis): a first approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Leandro L; Dias, Teresa; Dias, Luís G; Rogão, Mónica; Da Silva, José P; Estevinho, Letícia M

    2011-02-01

    Propolis is a resinous substance collected from plants by bees. Its composition depends on the vegetation, the season, and the source area. It usually contains many chemical compounds such as polyphenols, steroids and amino acids. The hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is a type of anaemia characterized by microcytic and hyperchromic red cells, spherical in shape and without central pallor. Clinically, subjects present from asymptomatic conditions to severe haemolytic anaemia. In this study it was evaluated the effect of two propolis extracts in the osmotic fragility of HS patient red blood cell (RBC) membrane. It was found that propolis decreases the erythrocytes membrane fragility, being the effect of Bornes propolis more pronounced than Fundão propolis'. This effect was related with the higher phenolic content of the former propolis. The results obtained in vitro suggest that the membrane fragility increases under oxidative stress conditions for the patient RBC's and the protection effect of propolis is due to its antioxidant properties. These results open doors for future investigations in order to elucidate the mechanisms, identify the main compounds involved in this fragility protection of the erythrocyte membrane. This is the first work reporting an evaluation of the propolis effect in a blood disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often ...

  5. Vaginal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menstruation, or period, is a woman's monthly bleeding.Abnormal vaginal bleeding is different from normal menstrual periods. It could be bleeding that is between periods, is very heavy, or lasts much ...

  6. Interventional Radiology and Bleeding Disorders: What the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Needs to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gart, Laura; Ferneini, Antoine M

    2016-11-01

    Endovascular techniques are essential for controlling acute head and neck bleeding that cannot be controlled by local or systemic measures. Detailed knowledge of the head and neck vascular anatomy, advances in catheterization techniques, and the availability of new embolic materials have improved the safety, efficacy, and predictability of these procedures. To improve patient safety, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon must be familiar with these techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Syndrome of occipitoatlantoaxial hypermobility, cranial settling, and chiari malformation type I in patients with hereditary disorders of connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhorat, Thomas H; Bolognese, Paolo A; Nishikawa, Misao; McDonnell, Nazli B; Francomano, Clair A

    2007-12-01

    Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) is generally regarded as a disorder of the paraxial mesoderm. The authors report an association between CM-I and hereditary disorders of connective tissue (HDCT) that can present with lower brainstem symptoms attributable to occipitoatlantoaxial hypermobility and cranial settling. The prevalence of HDCT was determined in a prospectively accrued cohort of 2813 patients with CM-I. All patients underwent a detailed medical and neuroradiological workup that included an assessment of articular mobility. Osseous structures composing the craniocervical junction were investigated morphometrically using reconstructed 3D computed tomography and plain x-ray images in 114 patients with HDCT/CM-I, and the results were compared with those obtained in patients with CM-I (55 cases) and healthy control individuals (55 cases). The diagnostic criteria for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and related HDCT were met in 357 (12.7%) of the 2813 cases. Hereditability was generally compatible with a pattern of autosomal dominant transmission with variable expressivity. The diagnostic features of HDCT/CM-I were distinguished from those of CM-I by clinical stigmata of connective tissue disease, a greater female preponderance (8:1 compared with 3:1, p supine and upright positions in healthy control individuals and patients with CM-I. In patients with HDCT/CM-I, there was a reduction of the basion-dens interval (3.6 mm, p cervical traction or returning to the supine position. The identification of HDCT in 357 patients with CM-I establishes an association between two presumably unrelated mesodermal disorders. Morphometric evidence in this cohort-cranial settling, posterior gliding of the occipital condyles, and reduction of the clivus-axis angle, clivus-atlas angle, and atlas-axis angle in the upright position-suggests that hypermobility of the occipitoatlantal and atlantoaxial joints contributes to retroodontoid pannus formation and symptoms referable to basilar

  8. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Hereditary Fructose Intolerance Health Topic: Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 ...

  9. Evaluation of Aryoseven Safety (Recombinant Activated Factor VII) in Patients with Bleeding Disorders (An Observational Post-Marketing Surveillance Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toogeh, Gholamreza; Abolghasemi, Hassan; Eshghi, Peyman; Managhchi, Mohammadreza; Shaverdi-niasari, Mohammadreza; Karimi, Katayoon; Roostaei, Samin; Emran, Neda; Abdollahi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recombinant activated factor VII induces hemostasis in patients with coagulopathy disorders. AryoSeven™ as a safe Iranian Recombinant activated factor VII has been available on our market. This study was performed to establish the safety of AryoSeven on patients with coagulopathy disorder. Methods: This single-center, descriptive, cross sectional study was carried out in Thrombus and Homeostasis Research Center ValiAsr Hospital during 2013-2014. Fifty one patients with bleeding disorders who received at least one dose of Aryoseven were enrolled. Patients’ demographic data and adverse effect of drug and reaction related to Aryoseven or previous usage of Recombinant activated FVII were recorded in questionnaires. Finally data were analyzed to compare side effects of Aryoseven and other Recombinant activated FVII brands. Results: Aryoseven was prescribed for 51 Patients. Of all participants with mean age 57.18+21.38 yr, 31 cases were male and 26 subjects had past history of recombinant activated FVII usage. Glanzman was the most frequent disorder followed by congenital FVII deficiency, hemophilia with inhibitors, factor 5 deficiency, acquired hemophilia, hemophilia A with inhibitor, and hemophilia A or B with inhibitor. The majority of bleeding episodes had occurred in joints. Three patients (5.9%) complained about adverse effects of Aryoseven vs. 11.5 % about adverse effects of other brands. However this difference was not significant, statistically. Conclusion: Based on monitor patients closely for any adverse events, we concluded that Aryoseven administration under careful weighing of benefit versus potential harm may comparable with other counterpart drugs. PMID:27799968

  10. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  11. Bipolar and panic disorders may be associated with hereditary defects in the innate immune system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldager, Leslie; Köhler, Karl Ole; Steffensen, Rudi;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) represent important arms of the innate immune system, and different deficiencies may result in infections or autoimmune diseases. Both bipolar and panic disorders are associated with increased...

  12. A Web Site to Improve Management of Patients with Inherited Bleeding Disorders in the Emergency Department: Results at 2 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliaferri, Annarita; Di Perna, Caterina; Biasoli, Chiara; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Quintavalle, Gabriele; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Barozzi, Marco; Benedettini, Laura; Pattacini, Corrado

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of patients with inherited bleeding disorders (PWIBD) in the emergency department (ED) is challenging. In 2010, a project was started involving all eight hemophilia centers (HC) and all 44 EDs of the Region of Emilia-Romagna (Italy) to improve emergency care for PWIBD. The project incorporates guidelines for emergency treatment, education for ED staff, and a dedicated Web site providing extensive information, proposing treatments, and sharing data with patients' electronic clinical records. A Web algorithm, accessible to PWIBD as well as ED and HC staff, suggests the first dose of concentrate for each type and severity of bleed or trauma. Following training courses in each ED, the network was activated. During 2012 and 2013, the site was visited 14,000 times, the EDs accessed the Web site 1,739 times, and used the algorithms 206 times. In two reference EDs, triage-assessment and triage-treatment times were reduced in 2013 and 2012 (27/20 and 110/71.5 minutes, respectively) and medical advice from the HC increased (54 vs. 24% cases). The main advantages of this system are better management of patients in ED (shorter triage-to-treatment times) and improved collaboration between HCs and EDs. The most critical point remaining is staff turnover in EDs, necessitating continual training.

  13. Hereditary tubular transport disorders: implications for renal handling of Ca2+ and Mg2+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimke, Henrik; Hoenderop, Joost G; Bindels, René J;

    2010-01-01

    The kidney plays an important role in maintaining the systemic Ca2+ and Mg2+ balance. Thus the renal reabsorptive capacity of these cations can be amended to adapt to disturbances in plasma Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations. The reabsorption of Ca2+ and Mg2+ is driven by transport of other electrolytes......, sometimes through selective channels and often supported by hormonal stimuli. It is, therefore, not surprising that monogenic disorders affecting such renal processes may impose a shift in, or even completely blunt, the reabsorptive capacity of these divalent cations within the kidney. Accordingly, in Dent......'s disease, a disorder with defective proximal tubular transport, hypercalciuria is frequently observed. Dysfunctional thick ascending limb transport in Bartter's syndrome, familial hypomagnesaemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis, and diseases associated with Ca2+-sensing receptor defects, markedly...

  14. Hereditary pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard M Charnley

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant condition,which results in recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis,progressing to chronic pancreatitis often at a young age.The majority of patients with hereditary pancreatitis expressone of two mutations (R122H or N29I) in the cationictrypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene). It has been hypothesisedthat one of these mutations, the R122H mutation causespancreatitis by altering a trypsin recognition site sopreventing deactivation of trypsin within the pancreas andprolonging its action, resulting in autodigestion. Families withthese two mutations have been identified in many countriesand there are also other rarer mutations, which have alsobeen linked to hereditary pancreatitis.Patients with hereditary pancreatitis present in the sameway as those with sporadic pancreatitis but at an earlierage. It is common for patients to remain undiagnosed formany years, particularly ifthey present with non-specificsymptoms. Hereditary pancreatitis should always beconsidered in patients who present with recurrent pancreatitiswith a family history of pancreatic disease. If patients withthe 2 common mutations are compared, those with theR122H mutation are more likely to present at a younger ageand are more likely to require surgical intervention than thosewith N29I. Hereditary pancreatitis carries a 40 % lifetimerisk of pancreatic cancer with those patients aged between50 to 70 being most at risk in whom screening tests maybecome important.

  15. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/2015 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited ...

  16. Positive effects of voluntary running on metabolic syndrome-related disorders in non-obese hereditary hypertriacylglycerolemic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojt ch Škop

    Full Text Available While metabolic syndrome is often associated with obesity, 25% of humans suffering from it are not obese and the effect of physical activity remains unclear in such cases. Therefore, we used hereditary hypertriaclyglycerolemic (HHTg rats as a unique model for studying the effect of spontaneous physical activity [voluntary running (VR] on metabolic syndrome-related disorders, such as dyslipidemia, in non-obese subjects. Adult HHTg males were fed standard (CD or high-sucrose (HSD diets ad libitum for four weeks. Within both dietary groups, some of the rats had free access to a running wheel (CD+VR, HSD+VR, whereas the controls (CD, HSD had no possibility of extra physical activity. At the end of the four weeks, we measured the effects of VR on various metabolic syndrome-associated parameters: (i biochemical parameters, (ii the content and composition of triacylglycerols (TAG, diacylglycerols (DAG, ceramides and membrane phospholipids, and (iii substrate utilization in brown adipose tissue. In both dietary groups, VR led to various positive effects: reduced epididymal and perirenal fat depots; increased epididymal adipose tissue lipolysis; decreased amounts of serum TAG, non-esterified fatty acids and insulin; a higher insulin sensitivity index. While tissue ceramide content was not affected, decreased TAG accumulation resulted in reduced and modified liver, heart and skeletal muscle DAG. VR also had a beneficial effect on muscle membrane phospholipid composition. In addition, compared with the CD group, the CD+VR rats exhibited increased fatty acid oxidation and protein content in brown adipose tissue. Our results confirm that physical activity in a non-obese model of severe dyslipidemia has many beneficial effects and can even counteract the negative effects of sucrose consumption. Furthermore, they suggest that the mechanism by which these effects are modulated involves a combination of several positive changes in lipid metabolism.

  17. Positive effects of voluntary running on metabolic syndrome-related disorders in non-obese hereditary hypertriacylglycerolemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škop, Vojt ch; Malínská, Hana; Trnovská, Jaroslava; Hüttl, Martina; Cahová, Monika; Blachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka; Baranowski, Marcin; Burian, Martin; Oliyarnyk, Olena; Kazdová, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    While metabolic syndrome is often associated with obesity, 25% of humans suffering from it are not obese and the effect of physical activity remains unclear in such cases. Therefore, we used hereditary hypertriaclyglycerolemic (HHTg) rats as a unique model for studying the effect of spontaneous physical activity [voluntary running (VR)] on metabolic syndrome-related disorders, such as dyslipidemia, in non-obese subjects. Adult HHTg males were fed standard (CD) or high-sucrose (HSD) diets ad libitum for four weeks. Within both dietary groups, some of the rats had free access to a running wheel (CD+VR, HSD+VR), whereas the controls (CD, HSD) had no possibility of extra physical activity. At the end of the four weeks, we measured the effects of VR on various metabolic syndrome-associated parameters: (i) biochemical parameters, (ii) the content and composition of triacylglycerols (TAG), diacylglycerols (DAG), ceramides and membrane phospholipids, and (iii) substrate utilization in brown adipose tissue. In both dietary groups, VR led to various positive effects: reduced epididymal and perirenal fat depots; increased epididymal adipose tissue lipolysis; decreased amounts of serum TAG, non-esterified fatty acids and insulin; a higher insulin sensitivity index. While tissue ceramide content was not affected, decreased TAG accumulation resulted in reduced and modified liver, heart and skeletal muscle DAG. VR also had a beneficial effect on muscle membrane phospholipid composition. In addition, compared with the CD group, the CD+VR rats exhibited increased fatty acid oxidation and protein content in brown adipose tissue. Our results confirm that physical activity in a non-obese model of severe dyslipidemia has many beneficial effects and can even counteract the negative effects of sucrose consumption. Furthermore, they suggest that the mechanism by which these effects are modulated involves a combination of several positive changes in lipid metabolism.

  18. Significant liver damage in patients with bleeding disorders and chronic hepatitis C : non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis using transient elastography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthouwer, D.; Mauser-Bunschoten, E. P.; Van Erpecum, K. J.; De Knegt, R. J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Many patients with bleeding disorders have been infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), mainly with genotype 1. Antiviral treatment is only effective in 50% of these patients and is often accompanied by serious side effects. Consequently, careful selection of patients for treatment is

  19. Hereditary angioedema: Not an allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Bhivgade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a genetic disorder due to a deficiency or malfunction of C1 esterase inhibitor. We herein describe a case of 25-year-old male who presented with swelling over face since one day. There was history of similar episodes since two years with gradual subsidence of swelling without any treatment. Investigations revealed grossly reduced complement C4 and C1 esterase inhibitor level. Patient was diagnosed to have hereditary angioedema type 1 and started on stanozolol 2 mg three times a day with no recurrence in one year of follow-up. Hereditary angioedema resembles angioedema of an allergic reaction. However, the cause is different.

  20. Maternal and foetal outcomes following natural vaginal versus caesarean section (c-section) delivery in women with bleeding disorders and carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanth, Laxminarayan; Kanagasabai, Sachchithanantham; Abas, Adinegara Bl

    2017-08-04

    Bleeding disorders are uncommon but may pose significant bleeding complications during pregnancy, labour and following delivery for both the woman and the foetus. While many bleeding disorders in women tend to improve in pregnancy, thus decreasing the haemorrhagic risk to the mother at the time of delivery, some do not correct or return quite quickly to their pre-pregnancy levels in the postpartum period. Therefore, specific measures to prevent maternal bleeding and foetal complications during childbirth, are required. The safest method of delivery to reduce morbidity and mortality in these women is controversial. This is an update of a previously published review. To assess the optimal mode of delivery in women with, or carriers of, bleeding disorders. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register as well as trials registries and the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search of the Group's Trials Registers: 16 February 2017. Randomised controlled trials and all types of controlled clinical trials investigating the optimal mode of delivery in women with, or carriers of, any type of bleeding disorder during pregnancy were eligible for the review. No trials matching the selection criteria were eligible for inclusion MAIN RESULTS: No results from randomised controlled trials were found. The review did not identify any randomised controlled trials investigating the safest mode of delivery and associated maternal and foetal complications during delivery in women with, or carriers of, a bleeding disorder. In the absence of high quality evidence, clinicians need to use their clinical judgement and lower level evidence (e.g. from observational trials, case studies) to decide upon the optimal mode of delivery to ensure

  1. Health Care Challenges of Hereditary Common Hematological Disorders in Odisha, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RS Balgir

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Medical Genetics over the past few decades have emerged as an important and powerful medical specialty with increasing appreciation of its role and function in the biomedical sciences. This emergence is related to a great extent to the progress in the Human Genome Project, which promises wide-ranging applications in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of human diseases. Nevertheless, the discussion on the role of genetics as the preventive medicine and public health care also lead to ethical, legal and social concerns about general applicability of genetic testing in the ethnic communities. The interpretation of prevention in the context of genetic diseases leads to the unavoidable discussions of genetic engineering, stem cell transplantation, prenatal diagnosis and selective termination of pregnancy, as well as broader concerns about discrimination in health care coverage, gender bias, employment and insurance in the society. In Indian communities where consanguineous marriage is widely practiced, recessive/x-linked genetic disorders such as sickle cell disease and beta-thalassemia, will continue to gain greater prominence in the overall spectrum of ill health. Developing an understanding of these changes will require a wide-ranging and multidisciplinary investigative approach for which public health genetics is ideally suited to conditions in Odisha.

  2. Evaluation of a web-based registry of inherited bleeding disorders: a descriptive study of the Brazilian experience with HEMOVIDAweb Coagulopatias

    OpenAIRE

    Rezende,Suely Meireles; Rodrigues,Silvia Helena Lacerda; Brito, Kelly Neves Pinheiro; da Silva, Diego Lima Quintino; Santo, Marcos Lázaro; Simões, Bárbara de Jesus; Genovez,Guilherme; Melo, Helder Teixeira; Araújo, João Paulo Baccara; Barca, Danila Augusta Accioly Varella; ,; Streva, Anelisa Schittini Costa; Silveira, Katty Pollyanni Ferreira; de Souza, Sylvia Daniella Freitas; de Figueiredo, Sandra Sibele Leite Vieira

    2017-01-01

    Background Inherited bleeding disorders (IBD) consist of a group of rare heterogeneous diseases, which require treatment for life. Management of these disorders is complex and costly. Therefore, good quality data of the affected population is crucial to guide policy planning. The aim of this manuscript is to describe the impact of a national, web-based registry – the Hemovidaweb Coagulopatias (HWC) – in the management of the IBD in Brazil. Methods The system was developed in PHP 5.0 language ...

  3. Bleeding gums

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... periodontal exam. DO NOT use tobacco, since it makes bleeding gums worse. Control gum bleeding by applying pressure directly on the gums with a gauze pad soaked in ice water. If you have been diagnosed with a ...

  4. Internal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Paralyzed Monkeys Additional Content Medical News Internal Bleeding By Amy H. Kaji, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, ... Emergency First Aid Priorities Cardiac Arrest Choking Internal Bleeding Wounds Soft-Tissue Injuries Severed or Constricted Limbs ...

  5. [Hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Calvo, Judith; Ghorab, Karima; Tazir, Meriem

    2008-11-15

    Although there are many human hereditary neuropathies, most of them with the exception of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease or hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy, are rare. Irrespective of their type, the mode of transmission may be autosomal dominant or recessive, or X-linked. The most difficult to diagnose, however, are the sporadic forms. It is customary to distinguish the cases in which the neuropathy is the sole clinical expression from multisystemic diseases where neuropathy is one component of multi-organ involvement. The complexity and the multiplicity of genes involved and the lack of understanding of their exact functions hinder logical presentation of these hereditary neuropathies. For understandable technical reasons, the stage of specific treatment, namely the repair of the mutated gene, has yet to be attained.

  6. Hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, M P; Bygum, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a 64-year-old man who suffered from recurrent visible swelling attacks since the age of 20 as well as episodes with severe upper airway edema, resulting in 4 emergency tracheotomies. Eventually after 44 years he was diagnosed with hereditary angioedema (HAE) type II. The aims...

  7. Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdel-Karim, Omar; Dizdarevic, Adis; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an inherited disease that causes periodic swelling attacks, which can be life threatening and have a major effect on a patient's life. Studies have shown that home therapy for angioedema reduces disease severity, leads to faster relief of symptoms, and improves quality...

  8. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB) is defined as abnormal uterine bleeding that results from an ovarian endocrinopathy. It may be associated with ovulatory and anovulatory cycles. The diagnosis of DUB depends on a thorough history and physical examination to exclude organic disorders. In older women, endometrial biopsy should be done before starting therapy. The treatment depends on an understanding of the menstrual cycle. In less urgent cases, anovulatory cycles are managed using progester...

  9. Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients About ACOG Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Home For Patients Search FAQs Perimenopausal Bleeding and ... 2011 PDF Format Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Gynecologic Problems What are menopause and perimenopause? What ...

  10. Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients About ACOG Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Home For Patients Search FAQs Perimenopausal Bleeding and ... 2011 PDF Format Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Gynecologic Problems What are menopause and perimenopause? What ...

  11. UNILATERAL RETINAL VASCULAR MALFORMATION IN HEREDITARY HEMORRHAGIC TELANGIECTASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananth Bhandary

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemorrhagic telangeiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder that leads to vascular malformations. It was first recognized in the 19th century as a familial disorder with abnormal vascular structures causing bleeding from the nose and gastrointestinal tract. HHT is characterized by telangiectatic lesions of the nose, lips, lungs, brain, and spinal cord. The reported incidence in Europe and Japan is between 1:5000 and 1:8000; but is widely variable in other regions. It is seen more frequently in whites. Ocular involvement has been reported in patients with HHT. Although conjunctival telangiectasia is the most common manifestation, rarely intraocular vascular lesions such as retinal telangiectasia and arteriovenous malformations in the retina, are seen. We describe a patient with HHT who had an abnormal unilateral retinal vascular abnormality along with tortuous conjunctival vasculature in the other eye, which has not been reported till date

  12. Treatment of hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Nancy J

    2012-10-01

    The hereditary optic neuropathies are inherited disorders in which optic nerve dysfunction is a prominent feature in the phenotypic expression of disease. Optic neuropathy may be primarily an isolated finding, such as in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dominant optic atrophy, or part of a multisystem disorder. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the hereditary optic neuropathies involve mitochondrial dysfunction owing to mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA that encodes proteins essential to mitochondrial function. Effective treatments are limited, and current management includes therapies directed at enhancing mitochondrial function and preventing oxidative damage, as well as genetic counselling, and supportive and symptomatic measures. New therapies, including gene therapy, are emerging via animal models and human clinical trials. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, in particular, provides a unique model for testing promising treatments owing to its characteristic sequential bilateral involvement and the accessibility of target tissue within the eye. Lessons learned from treatment of the hereditary optic neuropathies may have therapeutic implications for other disorders of presumed mitochondrial dysfunction. In this Review, the natural history of the common inherited optic neuropathies, the presumed pathogenesis of several of these disorders, and the literature to date regarding potential therapies are summarized.

  13. Dental health in children with congenital bleeding disorders in and around Davangere: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N B Nagaveni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was carried out to investigate the dental and some other aspects of oral health status of young patients with congenital bleeding disorders (CBDs and compared with controls. Materials and Methods: Decayed, missed, filled tooth surfaces (DMFS-dmfs in permanent and primary teeth scores, simplified oral hygiene index, occlusion, occurrence of hypoplasia, fluorosis other hard tissue and soft tissue findings of 50 CBD patients at the age range of 4-15 years and 50 of other children as control were compared. Data were analyzed by Chi-square and Student′s unpaired t-test. Results: Patients were significantly more caries-free with less decayed teeth in primary-permanent dentition (P < 0.05 and with lower scores for overall hygiene. Conclusion: By this, it can be concluded that children with CBD have a significantly lower prevalence of dental caries and better oral hygiene compared with matched, healthy controls.

  14. Bleeding complications after oral surgery in outpatients with compromised haemostasis: incidence and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Waldemar; Kriwalsky, Marcus S; Wolf, Hans H; Schubert, Johannes

    2009-06-01

    PURPOSE AND RESULTS: The aim of this prospective study was to determine the incidence of postoperative bleeding after oral surgery under local anaesthesia performed in outpatients with haemostatic disorders within a 5-year period (2003-2007). One hundred twenty one (70 males, 51 females) out of 2,056 outpatients with different haemostatic disorders (acquired or hereditary) were included in this study. The following data were recorded: medical history and general condition; medications; indication for the surgical procedure; specification of local anaesthesia; applied surgical techniques, considering the kind of haemostatic disorder; and peri- or postoperative bleeding complications. Postoperative bleeding was observed in 12 patients (9.9%). In three cases, inpatient treatment became necessary. The management of two patients with a haemostatic disorder (von Willebrand s disease and haemophilia A) is presented in short case reports. In a heterogeneous group of 121 outpatients with known haemostatic disorders, a combination of a few haemostatic agents with appropriate operative technique enables an effective wound management. In cases of failed local interventions after postoperative bleeding, further diagnostic investigations are required.

  15. Ehlers-danlos syndrome with platelet aggregation defect-presenting as mysterious bleeding disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawhney M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A 7-year-old girl presented with recurrent episodes of petechiae, purpura and ecchymoses since six months of age and recurrent episodes of mild to severe epistaxis since two years of age requiring repeated blood transfusions. In April '99 while being investigated for a massive epistaxis, she was found to have platelet function defect with abnormal aggregation of platelets to ADP, epinephrine, collagen as well as to ristocetin. Further investigations ruled out the possibility of Glanzmann's disorder and von-Willebrand's disease as to its cause. In May 2001 she was referred to the dermatologist for evaluation of subcutaneous tumours, which had developed since the last six months. On clinical evaluation, she was found to be having mild hyperextensibility of the skin, joint hypermobility, atrophic scars over knee, spontaneous bruises over right forearm and left thigh and nontender firm to hard subcutaneous nodules over both wrists, both shoulders, right index finger and dorsum of right foot consistent with a clinical picture of a mild form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS. Histopathology of the nodule from left wrist was consistent with molluscoid tumour of EDS and skin histopathology and ultrastructure studies showed thick irregular collagen fibrils. Only other sibling, a five-year-old male also had history of repeated mild to moderate epistaxis and on examination was found to have a milder variant of EDS. Born out of I degree consanguineous marriage of normal parents with mildly affected other sibling, she was diagnosed to be suffering from EDS with autosomal recessive inheritance, most probably EDS type X due to the associated platelet aggregation defect. Only one such family with EDS type X has been reported so far.

  16. Ehlers-danlos syndrome with platelet aggregation defect-presenting as mysterious bleeding disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawhney M

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A 7-year-old girl presented with recurrent episodes of petechiae, purpura and ecchymoses since six months of age and recurrent episodes of mild to severe epistaxis since two years of age requiring repeated blood transfusions. In April '99 while being investigated for a massive epistaxis, she was found to have platelet function defect with abnormal aggregation of platelets to ADP, epinephrine, collagen as well as to ristocetin. Further investigations ruled out the possibility of Glanzmann's disorder and von-Willebrand's disease as to its cause. In May 2001 she was referred to the dermatologist for evaluation of subcutaneous tumours, which had developed since the last six months. On clinical evaluation, she was found to be having mild hyperextensibility of the skin, joint hypermobility, atrophic scars over knee, spontaneous bruises over right forearm and left thigh and nontender firm to hard subcutaneous nodules over both wrists, both shoulders, right index finger and dorsum of right foot consistent with a clinical picture of a mild form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS. Histopathology of the nodule from left wrist was consistent with molluscoid tumour of EDS and skin histopathology and ultrastructure studies showed thick irregular collagen fibrils. Only other sibling, a five-year-old male also had history of repeated mild to moderate epistaxis and on examination was found to have a milder variant of EDS. Born out of I degree consanguineous marriage of normal parents with mildly affected other sibling, she was diagnosed to be suffering from EDS with autosomal recessive inheritance, most probably EDS type X due to the associated platelet aggregation defect. Only one such family with EDS type X has been reported so far.

  17. Two cases of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananth, N; Praveenkumar, G S; Rao, K Aravind; Vasanthi; Kakkilaya, Srinivas

    2003-07-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare cause of hepatic cirrhosis in the young. The disorder has a reported frequency of 1 in 20000 live births and no case has been reported from India so far. We report two cases of hereditary fructose intolerance, both with bilateral cataracts and one with cirrhosis of the liver.

  18. [Hereditary optic neuropathies: clinical and molecular genetic characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanakova, N A; Sheremet, N L; Loginova, A N; Chukhrova, A L; Poliakov, A V

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a review of literature on hereditary optic neuropathies: Leber mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathy, autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive optic neuropathies, X-linked optic atrophy. Clinical and molecular genetic characteristics are covered. Isolated optic neuropathies, as well as hereditary optic disorders, being a part of a complex syndromic disease are described.

  19. Gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, T A

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains one of the most important emergencies in gastroenterology. Despite this, only about 100 abstracts concerning gastrointestinal bleeding (excluding bleeding complicating endoscopic procedures) were presented at this year's Digestive Disease Week (DDW; 7-10 May 2011; Chicago, Illinois, USA), accounting for less than 2% of all presented lectures and posters. It seems that the number of such abstracts has been decreasing over recent years. This may be due in part to the high level of medical care already achieved, especially in the areas of pharmacotherapy and endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review of gastrointestinal bleeding, priority has been given to large epidemiological studies reflecting "real life," and abstracts dealing more or less directly with endoscopic management. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Application of whole-exome sequencing to direct the specific functional testing and diagnosis of rare inherited bleeding disorders in patients from the Öresund Region, Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinøe, Eva; Zetterberg, Eva; Kinalis, Savvas; Østrup, Olga; Kampmann, Peter; Norström, Eva; Andersson, Nadine; Klintman, Jenny; Qvortrup, Klaus; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Rossing, Maria

    2017-07-27

    Rare inherited bleeding disorders (IBD) are a common cause of bleeding tendency. To ensure a correct diagnosis, specialized laboratory analyses are necessary. This study reports the results of an upfront diagnostic strategy using targeted whole exome sequencing. In total, 156 patients with a significant bleeding assessment tool score participated in the study, of which a third had thrombocytopenia. Eighty-seven genes specifically associated with genetic predisposition to bleeding were analysed by whole exome sequencing. Variants were classified according to the five-tier scheme. We identified 353 germline variants. Eight patients (5%) harboured a known pathogenic variant. Of the 345 previously unknown variants, computational analyses predicted 99 to be significant. Further filtration according to the Mendelian inheritance pattern, resulted in 59 variants being predicted to be clinically significant. Moreover, 34% (20/59) were assigned as novel class 4 or 5 variants upon targeted functional testing. A class 4 or 5 variant was identified in 30% of patients with thrombocytopenia (14/47) versus 11% of patients with a normal platelet count (12/109) (P < 0·01). An IBD diagnosis has a major clinical impact. The genetic investigations detailed here extricated our patients from a diagnostic conundrum, thus demonstrating that continuous optimization of the diagnostic work-up of IBD is of great benefit. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Non responsive celiac disease due to coexisting hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadia, Lalit; Shivpuri, Deepak

    2012-04-01

    Celiac disease is associated with several genetic disorders, but its association with hereditary fructose intolerance is rare. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare autosomal recessive disease of fructose metabolism presenting as vomiting after intake of fructose. An association between these two distinct genetic gastrointestinal disorders is important as treatment failure of celiac disease calls for careful evaluation for hereditary fructose intolerance. We report a patient with an association of these two disorders.

  2. [Hereditary peripheral neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Tazir, Mériem; Calvo, Judith; Funalot, Benoît

    2009-09-01

    Currently more than 30 genes are known to be responsible for genetically determined neuropathies. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most frequent of these hereditary neuropathies, with a prevalence of 4.7 to 36 per 100 000. In its demyelinating forms (CMT1), approximately 70% of cases are associated with a duplication of the PMP22gene. In its axonal forms (CMT2), 10-20% of the cases may be associated with a mutation of the MFN2gene. For North African patients with recessive transmission, a mutation of the LMNA gene must be sought. It is essential to stress the great variability of the phenotype--clinical, electrophysiological, and histologic--between and within families. A detailed analysis of these criteria, together with consideration of ethnic origin, may guide the search for the causal mutation. Whether the case involves certainly hereditary transmission or a sporadic form, it is desirable to be able to examine the maximum number of the patient's kin, both clinically and electrophysiologically. The forms with recessive transmission usually have a very early onset and are more serious than the dominant forms. The early- and very early-onset forms of CMT are increasingly better distinguished: congenital hypomyelination neuropathy (mutations of PMP22, MPZ or EGR2), or more axonal forms, including SMARD1 (Spinal muscle atrophy with respiratory distress; mutations of IGHMBP2) and EOHMSN (Early-onset hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy; mutations of MFN2). The prevention of cutaneous (ulcerations), bone, and amputation complications is very important in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies, because of the severity of the sensory disorders.

  3. Bleeding Disorders Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resource Annual Global Survey Treatment Guidelines Laboratory Manual Hemophilia in Pictures Young Voices Compendium of Assessment Tools Educational Games Video Library Find a Treatment Centre Haemophilia Journal ...

  4. Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia with Thrombocytopenia - A Rare Association with an Atypical Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmakumar R

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (Osler-Rendu-Weber disease is a rare autosomal dominant disorder commonly a ecting small vessels of skin and mucosa. It is usually misdiagnosed because of its atypical presentation. This disease frequently presents as epistaxis, GI bleed and visceral arterio venous malformations. Patient may present with stroke or migraine but presentation due to predominant respiratory symptoms may occur in the presence of pulmonary A-V stula. We present a 9 yr old male with dyspnoea on exertion and cyanosis and clubbing. He had a past history of intracerebral bleed with thrombocytopenia and he was being treated as ITP. Contrast echo revealed ndings suggestive of pulmonary arterio venous stula which led to subsequent investigations and retrospective evaluation and hence achieving the final diagnosis.

  5. Point mutations in the murine fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase gene: Animalmodels for the human genetic disorder hereditary tyrosinemia type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aponte, Jennifer [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sega, Gary A [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Dhar, Madhu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Withrow, Catherine [ORNL; Carpenter, D A [ORNL; Rinchik, Eugene M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Culiat, Cymbeline T [ORNL; Johnson, Dabney K [ORNL

    2001-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a severe autosomal recessive metabolic disease associated with point mutations in the human fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) gene that disrupt tyrosine catabolism. An acute form of HT1 results in death during the first months of life because of hepatic failure, whereas a chronic form leads to gradual development of liver disease often accompanied by renal dysfunction, childhood rickets, neurological crisis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Mice homozygous for certain chromosome 7 deletions of the albino Tyr; c locus that also include Fah die perinatally as a result of liver dysfunction and exhibit a complex syndrome characterized by structural abnormalities and alterations in gene expression in the liver and kidney. Here we report that two independent, postnatally lethal mutations induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and mapped near Tyr are alleles of Fah. The Fah6287SB allele is a missense mutation in exon 6, and Fah5961SB is a splice mutation causing loss of exon 7, a subsequent frameshift in the resulting mRNA, and a severe reduction of Fah mRNA levels. Increased levels of the diagnostic metabolite succinylacetone in the urine of the Fah6287SB and Fah5961SB mutants indicate that these mutations cause a decrease in Fah enzymatic activity. Thus, the neonatal phenotype present in both mutants is due to a deficiency in Fah caused by a point mutation, and we propose Fah5961SB and Fah6287SB as mouse models for acute and chronic forms of human HT1, respectively.

  6. Term neonate with intracranial hemorrhage and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, H M; Rooks, V J; Wolfe, S Q; Sawyer, T L

    2012-08-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mucocutaneous telangiectases and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The disease rarely presents in the neonatal period, primarily manifesting with epistaxis and gastrointestinal bleeding in adulthood. Occasionally, HHT can also present with symptoms related to AVMs in the cerebral, pulmonary or gastrointestinal vasculature. In prior reports, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) secondary to cerebral AVM in neonates with HHT has been catastrophic and uniformly fatal. Here we report a case of a newborn with HHT and ICH from a suspected AVM who survived with aggressive medical management and surgical intervention, and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on ICH in neonates with HHT.

  7. Intervention and Prevention of Hereditary Hemolytic Disorders in Two Ethnic Communities of Sundargarh District of Orissa, India: An Experience from KAP Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balgir RS

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemolytic disorders are important public health challenges in India. They cause a high degree of morbidity, mortality and fetal wastage in vulnerable communities. Tradition-bound-psychosocial influences are detrimental to the process of prevention. This study was designed to create awareness, motivate, and sensitize two major vulnerable tribal communities: Bhuyan and Kharia for hemoglobin and allied hemolytic disorders in addition to imparting prospective and retrospective genetic/marriage counseling. Bhuyan and Kharia tribal people in Orissa live in clusters practicing inter-village tribal endogamy and clan exogamy. For the present study, random sampling procedure for the selection of whole village was followed. Imparting of education, motivation and sensitization for carrier detection were carried out through IEC materials, holding interactive meetings and discussions at district, block and village levels. Both prospective and retrospective intervention and genetic/marriage counseling was done through the local PHC doctor. The pre- and post-intervention knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP studies were conducted. Tribal people were not knowing the signs and symptoms of sickle cell disease (2.1% and beta-thalassemia (1.0%, but after IEC, their knowledge was considerably improved (67.8%, 56.4%, respectively. Sickle cell patient needs treatment (37.6% like folic acid, blood transfusion, etc. Beta-thalassemia is disease causes bloodlessness and is a transfusion dependent (73.2%. All patients of thalassemia major or sickle cell disease have carrier parents and carriers do not suffer from any clinical ailments. After intervention, it was known that G-6-PD is an enzyme, which helps in glucose metabolism of red cells (76.4% and its hereditary deficiency causes hemolytic anemia, jaundice and black urination (73.8% in malaria cases when anti-malarials are administered. Methodical and prudent intervention and preventive strategies found

  8. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: a population-based study of prevalence and mortality in Danish patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Vase, P; Green, A

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by telangiectatic lesions. The disease manifestations are variable and include epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Early d...

  9. A Review of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fructose intolerance is a metabolic disorder with hereditary determinism, clinically manifested on terms of fructose intake. Untreated, hereditary fructose intolerance may result in renal and hepatic failure. Unfortunately, there are no formal diagnostic and surveillance guidelines for this disease. If identified and treated before the occurrence of permanent organ damage, patients can improve their symptoms and self-rated health. Implementation and adherence to a strict fructose free diet is often difficult, but not impossible.

  10. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with oral manifestations. Report of periodontal treatment in two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, G B; Quart, A M; Novak, B

    1981-03-01

    The periodontal conditions of two patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia were successfully treated by a two-phase plan. The first phase of treatment eliminated inflammation from local etiologic factors by removing plaque and plaque-retaining factors. The second phase eliminated the residual anatomic defects of periodontal disease. Gingival bleeding has been indicated as a symptomatic factor of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, but such bleeding is more likely the result of periodontal inflammation.

  11. [Hereditary pathology of the enamel and dentin. A review of molecular genetic research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliakov, Iu A; Elizarova, V M; Krotov, V A; Blinnikova, O E

    2000-01-01

    Mapped phenotype of imperfect amelogenesis, type II imperfect dentinogenesis, hereditary opalescent dentin, Capdepont's dysplasia, and type II dentin dysplasia is described for the first time in Russia. Classification of hereditary disorders in dentin development is presented.

  12. Genetics of Hereditary Angioedema Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germenis, Anastasios E; Speletas, Matthaios

    2016-10-01

    Contemporary genetic research has provided evidences that angioedema represents a diverse family of disorders related to kinin metabolism, with a much greater genetic complexity than was initially considered. Convincing data have also recently been published indicating that the clinical heterogeneity of hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (classified as C1-INH-HAE) could be attributed at least in part, either to the type of SERPING1 mutations or to mutations in genes encoding for enzymes involved in the metabolism and function of bradykinin. Alterations detected in at least one more gene (F12) are nowadays considered responsible for 25 % of cases of hereditary angioedema with normal C1-INH (type III hereditary angioedema (HAE), nlC1-INH-HAE). Interesting data derived from genetic approaches of non-hereditary angioedemas indicate that other immune pathways might be implicated in the pathogenesis of HAE. More than 125 years after the recognition of the hereditary nature of HAE by Osler, the heterogeneity of clinical expressions, the genetics of this disorder, and the genotype-phenotype relationships, still presents a challenge that will be discussed in this review. Large scale, in-depth genetic studies are expected not only to answer these emerging questions but also to further elucidate many of the unmet aspects of angioedema pathogenesis. Uncovering genetic biomarkers affecting the severity of the disease and/or the effectiveness of the various treatment modalities might lead to the prevention of attacks and the optimization of C1-INH-HAE management that is expected to provide a valuable benefit to the sufferers of angioedema.

  13. Topological Structures and Membrane Nanostructures of Erythrocytes after Splenectomy in Hereditary Spherocytosis Patients via Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ying; Lu, Liyuan; Li, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is an inherited red blood cell membrane disorder resulting from mutations of genes encoding erythrocyte membrane and cytoskeletal proteins. Few equipments can observe the structural characteristics of hereditary spherocytosis directly expect for atomic force microscopy In our study, we proved atomic force microscopy is a powerful and sensitive instrument to describe the characteristics of hereditary spherocytosis. Erythrocytes from hereditary spherocytosis patients we...

  14. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  15. Major and minor form of hereditary hyperekplexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Vergouwe, MN; van Dijk, JG; Rees, M; Frants, RR; Brown, P

    2002-01-01

    Hyperekplexia is a hereditary neurological disorder characterized by excessive startle responses. Within the disorder two clinical forms can be distinguished. The major form is characterized by continuous generalized stiffness in the first year of life and an exaggerated startle reflex, accompanied

  16. Hereditary angioedema: imaging manifestations and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakhal, Mandip S; Marcotte, Gregory V

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a genetic disorder typically related to insufficient or dysfunctional C1-esterase inhibitor. Patients present with episodic swelling of various body parts, such as the face, neck, bowel, genitals, and extremities. Acute or severe symptoms can lead to patients presenting to the emergency room, particularly when the neck and abdominopelvic regions are affected, which is often accompanied by radiologic imaging evaluation. Patients with hereditary angioedema can pose a diagnostic challenge for emergency department physicians and radiologists at initial presentation, and the correct diagnosis may be missed or delayed, due to lack of clinical awareness of the disease or lack of its consideration in the radiologic differential diagnosis. Timely diagnosis of hereditary angioedema and rapid initiation of appropriate therapy can avoid potentially life-threatening complications. This article focuses on the spectrum of common and characteristic acute imaging manifestations of hereditary angioedema and provides an update on important recent developments in its clinical management and treatment.

  17. Recent pharmacological management of oral bleeding in hemophilic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Widyawati Setiawan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemophilia is a hereditary bleeding disorder that can increase the risk of disease in oral cavity. Sometimes hemophilia is not always established already in a patient. The lack of awareness of hemophilia presence can cause serious problem. Purpose: The purpose of this review is to explain about dental bleeding manifestation and management in hemophilic patient. Reviews: Hemophilia can be manifested as dental bleeding that cannot stop spontaneously. It should be treated with factor VIIII either by giving whole blood, fresh plasma, fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, and factor VIII concentrate. Factor VIII dose for hemophilia treatment can be calculated based on factor VIII present in hemophilia patient’s body. Factor VIII can also be given as prophylaxis to prevent bleeding. Complications that can be caused by factor VIII replacement therapy are the presence of factor VIII inhibitor and transfusion related diseases. Treatment of dental bleeding due to hemophilia consists of factor replacement therapy and supportive therapy. Conclusion: Treatment of dental bleeding due to hemophilia consists of factor replacement therapy and supportive therapy. There are complications that can happen due to factor VIII replacement therapy that should be considered and anticipated.Latar belakang: Hemofilia adalah kelainan pembekuan darah yang diturunkan. Hemophilia dapat meningkatkan resiko penyakit rongga mulut. Hemofilia tidak selalu sudah terdiagnosa saat penderita melakukan kunjungan ke dokter gigi. Kurangnya kewaspadaan akan adanya hemofilia dapat menyebabkan masalah serius. Tujuan: Tujuan dari kajian pustaka ini adalah memaparkan tentang manifestasi dan penanganan perdarahan gigi pada penderita hemofilia. Tinjauan pustaka: hemofilia dapat bermanifestasi sebagai perdarahan gigi yang tidak dapat berhenti secara spontan. Pada keadaan perdarahan tersebut, pemberian faktor VIII yang diberikan sebagai whole blood, fresh plasma, fresh frozen plasma

  18. Moyamoya Syndrome Associated With Hereditary Spherocytosis: An Emerging Clinical Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gait-Carr, Eleanor; Connolly, Daniel J A; King, David

    2017-04-01

    Moyamoya syndrome is an unusual cerebrovascular disorder, which has rarely been reported in association with hereditary spherocytosis. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy with hereditary spherocytosis who was diagnosed with Moyamoya syndrome following a stroke. We discuss why these conditions may coexist and briefly outline the management of such children.

  19. [Diagnosis of hereditary angioedema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillet, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare disease, potentially life-threatening. It requires a specific treatment. Angioedema without wheals associated with abdominal attacks are very specific of this disease. Antigenemy and functional C1Inhibitor assays are necessary for the diagnosis. The hereditary angioedema with normal C1Inh (type III) is a diagnostic challenge. Bradykinin, secondary to kallikrein-kinin system activation is the key mediator of hereditary angioedema. Female are more symptomatic. Attacks can be induced by menstruations, pregnancies or contraceptive pills.

  20. Proteomic characterization of freeze-dried human plasma: providing treatment of bleeding disorders without the need for a cold chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steil, Leif; Thiele, Thomas; Hammer, Elke; Bux, Jürgen; Kalus, Monika; Völker, Uwe; Greinacher, Andreas

    2008-11-01

    Transfusion of human plasma is a basic treatment for severe coagulopathies, especially in major bleeding. The required logistics to provide plasma is challenging because of the need to maintain a cold chain. This disadvantage could be overcome by lyophilized plasma. However, it is unknown to what extent lyophilization alters plasma proteins. Quantitative proteomic technologies were applied to monitor protein changes during production of lyophilized, solvent/detergent (S/D)-treated plasma. The impact of S/D treatment and lyophilization on the plasma proteome was evaluated by differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and proteins were characterized by mass spectrometry. Clotting factor activities were determined in lyophilized S/D-treated plasma after 24 months of storage at room temperature. By 2D-DIGE, 600 individual protein spots were compared. Lyophilization did not change any of the 600 spots, whereas pathogen inactivation caused significant changes of 38 spots including alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-antichymotrypsin, and alpha2-antiplasmin. Clotting factor activities remained stable over 24 months of storage. Lyophilization of human plasma neither alters its protein composition nor impairs its clotting capacity. It does not require cost-intensive logistics for storage and transport and can be quickly reconstituted. It is suggested that lyophilized, pathogen-inactivated plasma is an attractive option to provide the most important basic treatment for severe coagulopathies in areas without cold chain and to provide plasma with reduced time delay in emergency situations.

  1. Prognosis following upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E Roberts

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding is one of the most common, high risk emergency disorders in the western world. Almost nothing has been reported on longer term prognosis following upper GI bleeding. The aim of this study was to establish mortality up to three years following hospital admission with upper GI bleeding and its relationship with aetiology, co-morbidities and socio-demographic factors. METHODS: Systematic record linkage of hospital inpatient and mortality data for 14 212 people in Wales, UK, hospitalised with upper GI bleeding between 1999 and 2004 with three year follow-up to 2007. The main outcome measures were mortality rates, standardised mortality ratios (SMRs and relative survival. RESULTS: Mortality at three years was 36.7% overall, based on 5215 fatalities. It was highest for upper GI malignancy (95% died within three years and varices (52%. Compared with the general population, mortality was increased 27-fold during the first month after admission. It fell to 4.3 by month four, but remained significantly elevated during every month throughout the three years following admission. The most important independent prognostic predictors of mortality at three years were older age (mortality increased 53 fold for people aged 85 years and over compared with those under 40 years; oesophageal and gastric/duodenal malignancy (48 and 32 respectively and gastric varices aetiologies (2.8 when compared with other bleeds; non-upper GI malignancy, liver disease and renal failure co-morbidities (15, 7.9 and 3.9; social deprivation (29% increase for quintile V vs I; incident bleeds as an inpatient (31% vs admitted with bleeding and male patients (25% vs female. CONCLUSION: Our study shows a high late as well as early mortality for upper GI bleeding, with very poor longer term prognosis following bleeding due to malignancies and varices. Aetiologies with the worst prognosis were often associated with high levels of social

  2. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary spherocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions hereditary spherocytosis hereditary spherocytosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary spherocytosis is a condition that affects red blood cells. ...

  3. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ095 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is abnormal bleeding more ...

  4. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / For Patients / Patient Information Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding What are the possible causes of minor rectal bleeding? Hemorrhoids Anal fissures Proctitis (inflammation of the rectum) ...

  5. Menorrhagia (Heavy Menstrual Bleeding)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Menorrhagia (heavy menstrual bleeding) By Mayo Clinic Staff Menorrhagia is the medical term for menstrual periods with abnormally heavy or prolonged bleeding. Although heavy ...

  6. An overview of hereditary pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebours, Vinciane; Lévy, Philippe; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatitis. The prevalence was evaluated to 0.3/100000 in Western Countries. Genetic disorders are due to mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). Since 1996, more than 30 mutations were found. The three more common mutations are R122H, N29I and A16V. First symptoms begin since childhood, mainly before 10 years old. Main symptoms are pancreatic pain and acute pancreatitis (>70%). CP morphological changes as pancreatic calcifications are diagnosed at a median age of 22-25 years. Exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency occurred in 34% and 26% at a median age of 29 and 38 years. No clinical differences exist according to the mutation type. No excess of mortality in hereditary pancreatitis population compared to general population was found, despite a real risk of cancer. The cumulative risks of pancreatic cancer at 50, 60 and, 75 years are 10%, 18.7% and, 53.5%, respectively. The relative risk of cancer increases in smokers and is evaluated to 8.55. Hereditary pancreatitis diagnosis permits to propose an adapted management in expert centres.

  7. Sporadic diffuse segmental interstitial cell of Cajal hyperplasia harbouring two gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST mimicking hereditary GIST syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafalda Costa Neves

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: We describe a diffuse form of sporadic ICC hyperplasia harbouring multifocal GISTs, mimicking diffuse ICC hyperplasia in hereditary GIST syndromes. Detection of somatic c-KIT exon 11 mutation ruled out a hereditary disorder.

  8. Hereditary urea cycle abnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitro so the specific genetic cause is known. Teamwork between parents, the affected child, and doctors can help prevent severe illness. Alternative Names Abnormality of the urea cycle - hereditary; Urea cycle - hereditary abnormality Images Male urinary system Urea cycle References Lichter-Konecki ...

  9. Hereditary periodic fever and reactive amyloidosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilst, J.C.H. van der; Simon, A.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPF) are a group of diseases characterised by recurrences of fever and inflammation separated by symptom-free intervals. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most frequent entity within this group of disorders which further consists of

  10. Demyelinating polyneuropathy in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    We report a patient with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (G11778A mtDNA) and a severe demyelinating neuropathy, for which no other cause except his mitochondrial disorder could be found. The involvement of the peripheral nervous system of patients with LHON, in particular with a 11778 mtDNA, is di

  11. Adult hereditary fructose intolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Ismail Yasawy; Ulrich Richard Folsch; Wolfgang Eckhard Schmidt; Michael Schwend

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an underrecognized,preventable life-threatening condition. It is an autosomal recessive disorder with subnormal activity of aldolase B in the liver, kidney and small bowel. Symptoms are present only after the ingestion of fructose, which leads to brisk hypoglycemia, and an individual with continued ingestion will exhibit vomiting,abdominal pain, failure to thrive, and renal and liver failure. A diagnosis of HFI was made in a 50-year-old woman on the basis of medical history, response to Ⅳ fructose intolerance test, demonstration of aldolase B activity reduction in duodenal biopsy, and molecular analysis of leukocyte DNA by PCR showed homozygosity for two doses of mutant gene. HFI may remain undiagnosed until adult life and may lead to disastrous complications following inadvertent fructose or sorbitol infusion. Several lethal episodes of HFI following sorbitol and fructose infusion have been reported. The diagnosis can only be suspected by taking a careful dietary history, and this can present serious complications.

  12. Adult hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasawy, Mohamed Ismail; Folsch, Ulrich Richard; Schmidt, Wolfgang Eckhard; Schwend, Michael

    2009-05-21

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an under-recognized, preventable life-threatening condition. It is an autosomal recessive disorder with subnormal activity of aldolase B in the liver, kidney and small bowel. Symptoms are present only after the ingestion of fructose, which leads to brisk hypoglycemia, and an individual with continued ingestion will exhibit vomiting, abdominal pain, failure to thrive, and renal and liver failure. A diagnosis of HFI was made in a 50-year-old woman on the basis of medical history, response to IV fructose intolerance test, demonstration of aldolase B activity reduction in duodenal biopsy, and molecular analysis of leukocyte DNA by PCR showed homozygosity for two doses of mutant gene. HFI may remain undiagnosed until adult life and may lead to disastrous complications following inadvertent fructose or sorbitol infusion. Several lethal episodes of HFI following sorbitol and fructose infusion have been reported. The diagnosis can only be suspected by taking a careful dietary history, and this can present serious complications.

  13. Clinical symptoms according to genotype amongst patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Møller, T R; Brusgaard, K

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease, characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including epistaxis, gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and neurological symptoms. HHT is a genetically...... heterogeneous disorder involving at least two loci; HHT 1 mapping to chromosome 9 q 34.1 (ENG) and HHT 2 mapping to chromosome 12 q 31 (ALK-1). OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and describe the diversity of clinical manifestations in a Danish population of HHT patients with known HHT 1 or HHT 2 subtype. DESIGN......: Prospective clinical examination with genetic evaluation and follow-up. SETTING: Investigation centre was Odense University Hospital. All HHT patients in the County of Fyn were included. METHODS: HHT family members were invited to a clinical examination including registration of HHT manifestations, screening...

  14. Evaluation of a web-based registry of inherited bleeding disorders: a descriptive study of the Brazilian experience with HEMOVIDAweb Coagulopatias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Suely Meireles; Rodrigues, Silvia Helena Lacerda; Brito, Kelly Neves Pinheiro; da Silva, Diego Lima Quintino; Santo, Marcos Lázaro; Simões, Bárbara de Jesus; Genovez, Guilherme; Melo, Helder Teixeira; Araújo, João Paulo Baccara; Barca, Danila Augusta Accioly Varella

    2017-02-10

    Inherited bleeding disorders (IBD) consist of a group of rare heterogeneous diseases, which require treatment for life. Management of these disorders is complex and costly. Therefore, good quality data of the affected population is crucial to guide policy planning. The aim of this manuscript is to describe the impact of a national, web-based registry - the Hemovidaweb Coagulopatias (HWC) - in the management of the IBD in Brazil. The system was developed in PHP 5.0 language and is available on the internet at http://coagulopatiasweb.datasus.gov.br . The system was validated in September 2008 and launched nationally with input from January 1, 2009. HWC collects variables related to socio-demographic, clinical, laboratory and treatment data of patients with IBD. Within 7 years, there was an increment of 90.8% on the diagnosis of IBD altogether, which increased from 11,040 in December 2007 to 21,066 in December 2014. This is now the fourth and third largest world population of patients with haemophilia and von Willebrand's disease (vWD), respectively, according to the most recent (2015) Annual Global Survey of the World Federation of Hemophilia. The data collected provided the basis for planning and implementing home therapy, prophylaxis and immune tolerance induction (ITI), recently initiated in Brazil. HWC was an effective tool in the increment of registration of patients with IBD in Brazil. Furthermore, it was essential to support policy planning, monitoring, evaluation and treatment. Future development should focus on surveillance, health outcomes and research. Every country should implement a national registry on IBD.

  15. Diagnosis and management of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgia, Reena J; Brown, Kimberly

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a rare genetic disorder that can have significant clinical consequences. Hemochromatosis is associated with iron overload, and can initially be recognized through laboratory testing for serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Genetic testing for the HFE mutation can be performed in patients with elevated iron indices and a suspicion for hemochromatosis or liver disease. The main pathway resulting in iron overload is through altered hepcidin levels. Treatment of patients with the clinical phenotype of hereditary hemochromatosis is commonly through phlebotomy for removal of excess iron stores. This article highlights the current information and data regarding the diagnosis and management of hemochromatosis.

  16. Albright hereditary osteodystrophy: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goswami M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO is a rare hereditary metabolic disorder that may be associated with or without resistant to parathyroid hormone (pseudohypoparathyroidism. It is commonly characterized by a constellation of physical features of short stature, round face, short neck, and small metacarpals and metatarsals, mild mental retardation, osteoporosis, subcutaneous calcification, and sometimes olfactory and hearing functional defect. Hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphatemia are the most important manifestations of the case. We report a clinical case of siblings with AHO with reduced Gs-alpha activity and we discuss their clinical features with oral manifestations, radiographic findings, laboratory tests along with treatment.

  17. [Hereditary optic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milea, D; Verny, C

    2012-10-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a group of heterogeneous conditions affecting both optic nerves, with an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-related or mitochondrial transmission. The two most common non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathies (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and autosomal dominant optic atrophy) are very different in their clinical presentation and their genetic transmission, leading however to a common, non-specific optic nerve atrophy. Beyond the optic atrophy-related visual loss, which is the clinical hallmark of this group of diseases, other associated neurological signs are increasingly recognized.

  18. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup

    2017-01-01

    of this systematic review is to provide a guide for determining when to consider molecular genetic testing in patients presenting with small vessel disease and stroke. CADASIL, CARASIL, collagen type IV mutations (including PADMAL), retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, Fabry disease, hereditary...... cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, and forkhead box C1 mutations are described in terms of genetics, pathology, clinical manifestation, imaging, and diagnosis. These monogenic disorders are often characterized by early-age stroke, but also by migraine, mood disturbances, vascular dementia and often gait......Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose...

  19. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Sun Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes.

  20. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gene testing for hereditary pancreatitis is now available. Ataxia telangiectasia The team at Johns Hopkins discovered that inherited ... are known to cause the clinical syndrome of "ataxia telangiectasia," and 2-3% of people with familial pancreatic ...

  1. Learning about Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Its Implications Meeting A 1997 ELSI Report Learning About Hereditary Hemochromatosis What do we know about ... and treatment information. Hosted by the Dolan DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Iron Overload ...

  2. RECOMBINANT FACTOR VIIa – NEW TREATMENT OPTION FOR CONTROL OF INTRACTABLE BLEEDING IN SURGICAL AND TRAUMA PATIENTS AND IN OTHER HAEMOSTASIS DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samo Zver

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa, which is currently registered only for the treatment of haemophilia A and B patients with inhibitors, is seen increasingly as a possible universal haemostatic agent in untractable bleedings. One possible mechanism for the efficacy rFVIIa may be a consequence of it’s from the tissue factor (TF and from the level of disfunction in haemostatic system independant activity, which generates »thrombin burst« formation. It seems that rFVIIa remains active only at the site of tissue injury/bleeding.Conclusions. There are two components of bleeding in surgery and trauma patients. One is bleeding from large calibre arteries and veins which requires surgical intervention. The other, which goes along with the first one, is coagulopathic bleeding. The latter is a consequence of consumptional and dilutional coagulopathy, hypothermia, multitransfusion syndrom and metabolic disbalances in patients. rFVIIa effects coagulopathic component of the bleeding. For effective treatment with rFVIIa in such patients, replacement therapy with erythrocytes, platelets and fresh frozen plasma is mandatory and requires a haematologist assistance in the treatment strategy.Most reported cases of effective rFVIIa usage are from the field of traumatology. Until now, there have been no universal recommendations when to start treatment with rFVIIa in a bleeding trauma patient. Most experience with rFVIIa are from Israel and their recommendations are perhaps the most valuable ones. rFVIIa was used several times during intra-operative and post-operative bleeding episodes. There are reports of clinical studies and usage in patients with/ after prostate surgery, cardiovascular operations and liver transplants.There are data about effective rFVIIa usage in neurology and neurosurgery patients (intracranial haemorrhages, obstetrics and gynecology field. Possible future indications are thrombocytopenias, thrombocytopathias (Glanzmann

  3. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first few months of a normal pregnancy. Some birth control pills or the intrauterine device (IUD) can also cause ... this type can significantly reduce abnormal bleeding. Like birth control pills, sometimes IUDs can actually cause abnormal bleeding. Tell ...

  4. Bleeding esophageal varices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000268.htm Bleeding esophageal varices To use the sharing features on ... veins in the esophagus to balloon outward. Heavy bleeding can occur if the veins break open. Any ...

  5. Bleeding into the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003235.htm Bleeding into the skin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bleeding into the skin can occur from broken blood ...

  6. [Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, J; Adámek, S

    2013-08-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding represents 5% of all cases of bleeding into the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The cause of this type of bleeding cannot be found by gastroscopy or colonoscopy - the most common cause being bleeding from the source in the small intestine. In other cases it is bleeding from other parts of the digestive tube which has already stopped or was not noticed during admission endoscopy. Imaging methods (X-ray, CT, MRI, scintigraphy) and endoscopic methods (flexible or capsule enteroscopy) are used in the diagnosis and treatment. If, despite having used these methods, the source of bleeding is not found and the bleeding continues, or if the source is known but the bleeding cannot be stopped by radiologic or endoscopic intervention, surgical intervention is usually indicated. The article provides an overview of current diagnostic and treatment options, including instructions on how to proceed in these diagnostically difficult situations.

  7. Monoclonal gammopathy in hereditary spherocytosis: Possible pathogenetic relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, A.I. (Univ. of Chicago); Miller, J.B.; Lester, E.P.; Bowers, T.K.; Jacob, H.S.

    1978-01-01

    Two cases of monoclonal gammopathy in patients with hereditary spherocytosis led us to consider the possible pathogenetic relation between these two disorders. Twelve adult patients with hereditary spherocytosis had significant hypergammaglobulinemia in comparison to normal subjects. Retrospective analysis of previous illness in 140 patients with multiple myeloma showed a significant association between IgA myeloma and previous gallbladder disease. We propose that the chronic reticuloendothelial stimulation due to extravascular hemolysis, possibly potentiated by the inflammation associated with cholelithiasis and cholecystitis, may foster neoplastic transformation of immunocytes in patients with hereditary spherocytosis, ultimately leading to the development of monoclonal gammopathy.

  8. Hereditary optic neuropathies share a common mitochondrial coupling defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrollier, Arnaud; Guillet, Virginie; Loiseau, Dominique; Gueguen, Naïg; de Crescenzo, Marie-Anne Pou; Verny, Christophe; Ferre, Marc; Dollfus, Hélène; Odent, Sylvie; Milea, Dan; Goizet, Cyril; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Procaccio, Vincent; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal

    2008-06-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are heterogeneous diseases characterized by the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells leading to optic nerve atrophy and impairment of central vision. We found a common coupling defect of oxidative phosphorylation in fibroblasts of patients affected by autosomal dominant optic atrophy (mutations of OPA1), autosomal dominant optic atrophy associated with cataract (mutations of OPA3), and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, a disorder associated with point mutations of mitochondrial DNA complex I genes. Interestingly, the energetic defect was significantly more pronounced in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and autosomal dominant optic atrophy patients with a more complex phenotype, the so-called plus phenotype.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... InfoSearch: Hereditary angioedema MalaCards: c1 inhibitor deficiency Merck Manual Professional Version Orphanet: Hereditary angioedema Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) International Patient Organization for C1 Inhibitor Deficiencies National Organization for Rare ...

  10. Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy and anaesthesia - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini Dave

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies are a rare group of disorders characterized by progressive loss of function that predominantly affects the peripheral sensory nerves. Autonomic dysfunction is present to a variable degree and can have several implications for anaesthesia. We report the case of a patient with Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy who was posted for a below knee amputation and discuss the anaesthesia management.

  11. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSN/HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders of the peripheral nervous system that predominantly affect the sensory and autonomic neurons. Hallmark features comprise not only prominent sensory signs and symptoms and ulcerative mutilations but also variable autonomic and motor disturbances. Autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance has been reported. Molecular genetics studies have identified disease-causing mutations in 11 genes. Some of the affected proteins have nerve-specific roles but underlying mechanisms have also been shown to involve sphingolipid metabolism, vesicular transport, structural integrity, and transcription regulation. Genetic and functional studies have substantially improved the understanding of the pathogenesis of the HSN/HSAN and will help to find preventive and causative therapies in the future.

  12. Managing hereditary ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of recent developments in the management of hereditary ovarian cancer. Until recently, intensive screening of the ovaries was recommended to mutation carriers and their first-degree female relatives. However, since screening is not effective in detecting early-s

  13. Understanding Hereditary Angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... INH) in their blood or this C1-INH protein does not function appropriately. These forms of hereditary angioedema are different ... In addition to a physical examination and medical history, HAE is diagnosed by measuring the level and function of C1-INH in the blood. Living with ...

  14. Hereditary Angioedema in Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Line; Bygum, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare inherited disease that is often difficult to diagnose. We report a case of a 9-year-old boy with a spontaneous mutation causing HAE, diagnosed after a life-threatening episode of angioedema of the head and upper respiratory tract after a 5-year history...

  15. Genética das doenças hematológicas: as hemoglobinopatias hereditárias The genetics of blood disorders: hereditary hemoglobinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima Sonati

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Sumarizar os dados disponíveis na literatura recente sobre os aspectos fisiopatológicos, de diagnóstico e tratamento das doenças falciformes e da talassemia β, hemoglobinopatias hereditárias de maior relevância nas populações. FONTES DOS DADOS: MEDLINE e SciELO, utilizando os termos hemoglobinopatias hereditárias, doenças falciformes e talassemia beta, no período de 2003 a maio de 2008. Dois livros e dois capítulos de livro foram também incluídos. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Foram encontrados mais de 2.000 artigos, sendo selecionados aqueles de maior pertinência e amplitude. CONCLUSÕES: As taxas de morbidade e a mortalidade das doenças falciformes e da talassemia β são ainda bastante expressivas e constituem importante desafio. Um maior conhecimento dos mecanismos fisiopatológicos tem permitido avanços significativos nas formas de tratamento e prevenção dessas doenças.OBJECTIVE: To summarize recently published data on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of sickle cell diseases and β-Thalassemias, the most relevant hereditary hemoglobinopathies in the global population. SOURCES: Searches were run on the MEDLINE and SCIELO databases, limited to the period from 2003 to May 2008, using the terms hereditary hemoglobinopathies, sickle cell diseases and β-thalassemia. Two books and two chapters were also included. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: More than 2,000 articles were identified; those providing the most important information and broadest views were selected. CONCLUSIONS: Morbidity and mortality rates from sickle cell diseases and β-thalassemia are still very high and represent an important challenge. Increased understanding of pathophysiological aspects has lead to significant improvements in treatment and prevention of these diseases.

  16. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); Golzarian, Jafar [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  17. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Marcie; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding remains a commonly encountered diagnosis for acute care surgeons. Initial stabilization and resuscitation of patients is imperative. Stable patients can have initiation of medical therapy and localization of the bleeding, whereas persistently unstable patients require emergent endoscopic or operative intervention. Minimally invasive techniques have surpassed surgery as the treatment of choice for most upper GI bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Management of hereditary angioedema: 2010 Canadian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract C1-inhibitor (C1-INH deficiency is a rare blood disorder resulting in angioedema attacks that are debilitating and may be life-threatening. Prophylaxis and therapy of events has changed since our first Canadian Consensus Conference on the diagnosis, therapy and management of HAE. We have formed the Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'Angioédème Héréditaire (RCAH - http://www.haecanada.com to advance care of patients with this disorder in Canada. We here present a review of management of HAE in Canada.

  19. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  20. Human hereditary hepatic porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmann, Yves; Puy, Hervé

    2002-11-01

    The human hereditary hepatic porphyrias are diseases due to marked deficiencies of enzymes in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Porphyrias can be classified as either hepatic or erythroid, depending on the major production site of porphyrins or their precursors. The pathogenesis of inherited hepatic porphyrias has now been defined at the molecular level. Some gene carriers are vulnerable to a range of exogenous and endogenous factors, which may trigger neuropsychiatric and/or cutaneous symptoms. Early diagnosis is of prime importance since it makes way for counselling. In this article we present an overview of recent advances on hepatic porphyrias: 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), hereditary coproporphyria (HC), and variegate porphyria (VP).

  1. The biochemical basis of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouteldja, Nadia; Timson, David J

    2010-04-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare, but potentially lethal, inherited disorder of fructose metabolism, caused by mutation of the aldolase B gene. Treatment currently relies solely on dietary restriction of problematic sugars. Biochemical study of defective aldolase B enzymes is key to revealing the molecular basis of the disease and providing a stronger basis for improved treatment and diagnosis. Such studies have revealed changes in enzyme activity, stability and oligomerisation. However, linking these changes to disease phenotypes has not always been straightforward. This review gives a general overview of the features of hereditary fructose intolerance, then concentrates on the biochemistry of the AP variant (Ala149Pro variant of aldolase B) and molecular pathological consequences of mutation of the aldolase B gene.

  2. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  3. Hereditary Gigantism-the biblical giant Goliath and his brothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Deirdre E; Morrison, Patrick J

    2014-05-01

    The biblical giant Goliath has an identifiable family tree suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. We suggest that he had a hereditary pituitary disorder possibly due to the AIP gene, causing early onset and familial acromegaly or gigantism. We comment on the evidence within the scriptures for his other relatives including a relative with six digits and speculate on possible causes of the six digits. Recognition of a hereditary pituitary disorder in the biblical Goliath and his family sheds additional information on his and other family members' battles with David and his relatives.

  4. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight into the t......Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  5. Hereditary neuropathies: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, T

    2016-12-01

    Hereditary neuropathies are the most common inherited neuromuscular diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease represents the most common form with an average prevalence ranging from 1/2500 to 1/1200, depending on the studies. To date and with the advances of the latest generation sequencing, more than 80 genes have been identified. Although the common clinical phenotype comprises a progressive distal muscle weakness and sensory loss, foot deformities and decreased or absent tendon reflexes, clinical and electrophysiological phenotypes exhibit great variability. Moreover, atypical phenotypes are arising, overlapping with spastic paraplegia, hereditary sensory neuropathies or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The causative genes are involved in various biological processes such as myelin development and maintenance, biosynthesis and degradation of proteins, neuronal structural maintenance, axonal transport, endocytosis, membrane dynamics, ion-channel function and the mitochondrial network. An accurate genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counselling and treatment options. Therapeutic advances, particularly small interfering RNA therapy, are encouraging in hereditary transthyretin amyloid neuropathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. A MELAS-associated ND1 mutation causing leber hereditary optic neuropathy and spastic dystonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, L.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Hendrickx, A.; Bettink-Remeijer, M.W.; Maat-Kievit, A.; Schoonderwoerd, K.C.; Sluiter, W.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Hintzen, R.Q.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report a novel mutation that is associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) within the same family affected by spastic dystonia. DESIGN: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by isolated central visual loss. Of patients with LHON, 95%

  7. A MELAS-associated ND1 mutation causing leber hereditary optic neuropathy and spastic dystonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, L.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Hendrickx, A.; Bettink-Remeijer, M.W.; Maat-Kievit, A.; Schoonderwoerd, K.C.; Sluiter, W.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Hintzen, R.Q.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report a novel mutation that is associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) within the same family affected by spastic dystonia. DESIGN: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by isolated central visual loss. Of patients with LHON, 95%

  8. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are many causes of abnormal vaginal bleeding. HORMONES Most often, abnormal uterine bleeding is caused by a hormone imbalance. When hormones are the cause, doctors call the problem dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB) . DUB is more ...

  9. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit ...

  10. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit blood ...

  11. [Genetics of hereditary iron overload].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Jean-Yves; Jouanolle, Anne-Marie; Fergelot, Patricia; Mosser, Jean; David, Véronique

    2004-01-01

    The classification of hereditary abnormalities of iron metabolism was recently expanded and diversified. Genetic hemochromatosis now corresponds to six diseases, namely classical hemochromatosis HFE 1; juvenile hemochromatosis HFE 2 due to mutations in an unidentified gene on chromosome 1; hemochromatosis HFE 3 due to mutations in the transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2); hemochromatosis HFE 4 caused by a mutation in the H subunit of ferritin; and hemochromatosis HFE 6 whose gene is hepcidine (HAMP). Systemic iron overload is also associated with aceruloplasminemia, atransferrinemia and the "Gracile" syndrome caused by mutations in BCS1L. The genes responsible for neonatal and African forms of iron overload are unknown. Other genetic diseases are due to localized iron overload: Friedreich's ataxia results from the expansion of triple nucleotide repeats within the frataxin (FRDA) gene; two forms of X-linked sideroblastic anemia are due to mutations within the delta aminolevulinate synthetase (ALAS 2) or ABC-7 genes; Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is caused by a pantothenate kinase 2 gene (PANK-2) defect; neuroferritinopathies; and hyperferritinemia--cataract syndrome due to a mutation within the L-ferritin gene. In addition to this wide range of genetic abnormalities, two other features characterize these iron disorders: 1) most are transmitted by an autosomal recessive mechanism, but some, including hemochromatosis type 4, have dominant transmission; and 2) most correspond to cytosolic iron accumulation while some, like Friedreich's ataxia, are disorders of mitochondrial metabolism.

  12. Preoperative screening for von Willebrand disease type 1: low yield and limited ability to predict bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biron, C; Mahieu, B; Rochette, A; Capdevila, X; Castex, A; Amiral, J; D'Athis, F; Schved, J F

    1999-12-01

    Type 1 von Willebrand disease (vWd) is the most common hereditary bleeding disorder. The objective of this study was to measure the von Willebrand factor antigen (vWf:Ag) in a large cohort of patients who underwent surgery to assess the role of a new rapid immunoassay in a screening procedure for vWd in preoperative conditions. We studied 832 consecutive patients (540 children, 292 adults) referred to the surgical departments. For each patient we determined the vWf:Ag level with two different assays, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)(Asserachrom vWf:Ag; Diagnostica Stago, France) and a rapid immunoassay (Liatest vWf:Ag; Diagnostica Stago). Using the reference test, we found 30 of 832 patients with a vWf:Ag value below the lower limits (21 U/dL to 46 U/dL). The coefficient of correlation between the two tests was 0.77 (P = .001). When receiver operating characteristic curves were used, the cutoff value calculated to detect vWf:Ag defect with the rapid assay was 68.5 U/dL, leading to 0.36% false negatives and 9.7% false positives. Thus the rapid immunoassay appears to be a useful and easy method that is adaptable to urgent situations. Among the 30 patients with low values in ELISA, 8 had personal or familial bleeding history. Repeat blood samples confirmed the diagnosis of vWd in 5 cases, leading to a prevalence of vWd type 1 of 0.6%. However, in our series the absence of severe bleeding complications raises the question of the screening and the management of patients bearing a type 1 Willebrand disease during surgery.

  13. Hypercoagulability in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Finsterer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent data indicate that in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia (HHT, low iron levels due to inadequate replacement after hemorrhagic iron losses are associated with elevated factor-VIII plasma levels and consecutively increased risk of venous thrombo-embolism. Here, we report a patient with HHT, low iron levels, elevated factor-VIII, and recurrent venous thrombo-embolism. A 64-year-old multimorbid Serbian gipsy was diagnosed with HHT at age 62 years. He had a history of recurrent epistaxis, teleangiectasias on the lips, renal and pulmonary arterio-venous malformations, and a family history positive for HHT. He had experienced recurrent venous thrombosis (mesenteric vein thrombosis, portal venous thrombosis, deep venous thrombosis, insufficiently treated with phenprocoumon during 16 months and gastro-intestinal bleeding. Blood tests revealed sideropenia and elevated plasma levels of coagulation factor-VIII. His history was positive for diabetes, arterial hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, cerebral abscess, recurrent ischemic stroke, recurrent ileus, peripheral arterial occluding disease, polyneuropathy, mild renal insufficiency, and epilepsy. Following recent findings, hypercoagulability was attributed to the sideropenia-induced elevation of coagulation factor-VIII. In conclusion, HHT may be associated with hypercoagulability due to elevated factor-VIII associated with low serum iron levels from recurrent bleeding. Iron substitution may prevent HHT patients from hypercoagulability.

  14. Systemic causes of heavy menstrual bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschueren, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is a common problem in fertile women. In addition to local factors, such as a polyp or a uterine fibroid, systemic causes may lead to HMB. These systemic causes are discussed in this thesis. For years, women with HMB were tested underlying thyroid disorder, but our res

  15. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  16. Avoiding Winter Nose Bleeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    WINTER is the best season for peopleto do cold-endurance exercises. But thedry, windy weather makes the moisturein the nasal mucosa evaporate quickly,reducing the elasticity of capillaries andmaking for frequent nose-bleeds.

  17. GI bleeding - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100162.htm GI bleeding - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... colon, and finally, the rectum and anus. The GI tract is a long, hollow, muscular tube through ...

  18. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Marcie; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-02-01

    This article examines causes of occult, moderate and severe lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The difference in the workup of stable vs unstable patients is stressed. Treatment options ranging from minimally invasive techniques to open surgery are explored.

  19. Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Menorrhagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related to pregnancy, such as a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy, can cause abnormal bleeding. A miscarriage is when ... called a fetus) dies in the uterus. An ectopic pregnancy is when a baby starts to grow outside ...

  20. Severe Bleeding: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... remove the gauze or bandage. If the bleeding seeps through the gauze or other cloth on the ... up blood Bruising A tender or swollen stomach Cold, clammy skin Thirst Fractures Shock, indicated by a ...

  1. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with bilateral pulmonary vascular malformations: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lončarević Olivera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease that occurs due to vascular dysplasia associated with the disorder in the signaling pathway of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β. The clinical consequence is a disorder of blood vessels in multiple organ systems with the existence of telangiectasia which causes dilation of capillaries and veins, are present from birth and are localized on the skin and mucosa of the mouth, respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary tract. They can make a rupture with consequent serious bleeding that can end up with fatal outcome. Since there is a disruption of blood vessels of more than one organic system, the diagnosis is very complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Case report. We reported a 40-year-old female patient with a long-time evolution of problems, who was diagnosed and treated at the Clinic for Lung Diseases of the Military Medical Academy in Belgrade, Serbia, because of bilaterally pulmonary arteriovenous malformations associated with HHT. Embolization was performed in two acts, followed with normalization of clinical, radiological and functional findings with the cessation of hemoptysis, effort intolerance with a significant improvement of the quality of life. Conclusion. HHT is a rare dominant inherited multisystem disease that requires multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and treatment. Embolization is the method of choice in the treatment of arteriovenous malformations with minor adverse effects and very satisfying therapeutic effect.

  2. Hereditary angioedema in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouillet Laurence

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women with hereditary angioedema (HAE are more likely to be symptomatic that men. Hormonal factors (puberty, contraception, pregnancy,.... play a significant role in the precipitation or worsening of the condition in women. So, combined contraceptive pills are not indicated and progestogen pill must be preferred. During pregnancy, attack rate can increase (38-48% of women. C1Inhibitor concentrate and tranexamic acid can be used during pregnancy. Attenuated androgens for long term prophylaxis are effective but side effects appear more often in female patients. These side effects are dose dependant and can be attenuated by titrating the dose down the lowest effective level.

  3. Genes for hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies : a genotype-phenotype correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven g

  4. The International Bleeding Risk Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Laine, L.; Dalton, H.

    2017-01-01

    The International Bleeding Risk Score: A New Risk Score that can Accurately Predict Mortality in Patients with Upper GI-Bleeding.......The International Bleeding Risk Score: A New Risk Score that can Accurately Predict Mortality in Patients with Upper GI-Bleeding....

  5. Gene-environment interactions in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Kirkman; P. Yu-Wai-Man (Patrick); A. Korsten (Alex); M. Leonhardt (Miriam); K. Dimitriadis (Konstantin); I.F.M. de Coo (René); T. Klopstock (Thomas); P.F. Chinnery

    2009-01-01

    textabstractLeber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic disorder primarily due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Environmental factors are thought to precipitate the visual failure and explain the marked incomplete penetrance of LHON, but previous small studies have failed to conf

  6. On the many faces of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostra, RJ; Tijmes, NT; Cobben, JM; Bolhuis, PA; vanNesselrooij, BPM; Houtman, WA; deKokNazaruk, MM; BleekerWagemakers, EM

    1997-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disorder, associated with mutations in the mitochondrial DNA, which is notorious for its aspecific presentations. Two pedigrees are described with cases that are atypical for LHON with respect to sex, age of onset, interval between t

  7. On the many faces of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostra, RJ; Tijmes, NT; Cobben, JM; Bolhuis, PA; vanNesselrooij, BPM; Houtman, WA; deKokNazaruk, MM; BleekerWagemakers, EM

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disorder, associated with mutations in the mitochondrial DNA, which is notorious for its aspecific presentations. Two pedigrees are described with cases that are atypical for LHON with respect to sex, age of onset, interval between

  8. Keratinocytes modify fibroblast metabolism in hereditary gingival fibromatosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, L.; Ye, X.; Fan, M.; Xiong, X.; Hoff, J.W. Von den; Bian, Z.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare benign disorder characterized by progressive fibrous overgrowth of the gingiva. The proliferation and expression of growth factors of HGF keratinocytes are abnormal. However, the exact role of keratinocytes in HGF pathogenesis is still unk

  9. Hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by the PLP1 'rumpshaker mutation'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Kirsten; Giraud, Geneviève; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders characterised by progressive spasticity and weakness in the lower limbs. Mutations in PLP1 on the X chromosome cause spastic paraplegia type 2 (SPG2) or the allelic...

  10. Alterations of red blood cell metabolome in overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darghouth, D.; Koehl, B.; Heilier, J.F.; Madalinski, G.; Bovee, P.H.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Delaunay, J.; Junot, C.; Romeo, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis, clinically characterized by hemolytic anemia, is a rare disorder of the erythrocyte membrane permeability to monovalent cations, associated with mutations in the Rh-associated glycoprotein gene. We assessed the red blood cell metabolome of 4 patients with this

  11. Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia and severe respiratory distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Halawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia (HMD is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mucoepithelial disruption of the skin, hair and mucous membranes. It results from defective gap junction formation and leads to non-scarring alopecia, mucosal erythema, perineal erythematous intertrigo, involvement of the conjunctival mucosa, and pulmonary disease. We present a case of severe respiratory distress in an initially healthy full term infant born to a mother with HMD. This infant later developed signs and symptoms of HMD. A high index of suspicion for pulmonary infection with atypical organism is essential in infants with a family history of HMD who present with respiratory distress.

  12. Multiple mechanisms for hereditary sideroblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuyama, Kazumichi; Sassa, Shigeru

    2002-02-01

    Hereditary sideroblastic anemia (HSA) is a heterogeneous group of inherited anemic disorders which is characterized by the presence of ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow, microcytic hypochromic anemia and typically its X-linked inheritance in patients. It has been shown that a deficiency of the erythroid-specific delta-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS-E) activity is responsible for pyridoxine-responsive HSA in many patients, however, the pathogenesis of other types of HSA remains still unknown. In this article, recent evidence suggesting multiple causes for HSA is summarized and discussed.

  13. Imaging findings of arteriovenous malformations involving lung and liver in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia(Osler-weber-rendu disease): two cases report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Jeong Geun; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Seong, Su Ok [Cheongju St. Mary' s Hospital, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Osler-Weber-Rendu disease is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of bleeding. Multiple telangiectases consisting of thin-walled, dilated vascular channels with arteriovenous communication may involve, for example, mucocutaneous tissue, the gastrointestinal tract, and the liver, lung, and brain. We report the imaging findings of two cases of HHT involving arteriovenous malformation of both the lungs and liver, a rare condition. Chest radiography revealed a round mass, while helical CT showed a feeding artery and draining vein with arteriovenous malformation in the lung. Color Doppler sonography revealed an enlarged and tortuous hepatic artery with high systolic velocity. CT demonstrated an enlarged hepatic artery, arteriovenous shunt, and early draining hepatic vein in the liver. Celiac angiography showed arteriovenous malformation.

  14. The optic nerve head in hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Evelyn C; Mackey, David A; Connell, Paul P; Hewitt, Alex W; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V; Crowston, Jonathan G

    2009-05-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a prominent cause of blindness in both children and adults. The disorders in this group share many overlapping clinical characteristics, including morphological changes that occur at the optic nerve head. Accurate and prompt clinical diagnosis, supplemented with imaging when indicated, is essential for optimum management of the relevant optic neuropathy and appropriate counseling of the patient on its natural history. Patient history, visual field assessment, optic disc findings and imaging are the cornerstones of a correct diagnosis. This Review highlights the characteristic optic nerve head features that are common to the various hereditary optic neuropathies, and describes the features that enable the conditions to be differentiated.

  15. Gynaecological and obstetrical bleeding in women with factor XI deficiency - a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiewel-Verschueren, S.; Arendz, I. J.; Knol, H. M.; Meijer, Karina

    Menstrual bleeding, pregnancy and delivery present an intrinsic haemostatic challenge to women with bleeding disorders such as factor XI (FXI) deficiency. Aim: To provide a systematic overview of studies on gynaecological and obstetrical bleeding problems in women with FXI deficiency. Methods: We

  16. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  17. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo-Kottler, B; Wissinger, B

    2011-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a rare disease primarily affecting the retinal ganglion cells. In most cases patients with LHON develop permanent visual loss with a large central scotoma in the visual field of both eyes. The optic disc becomes partially or completely pale. At the onset of the disease many patients are considered to suffer from an optic neuritis and are treated under the diagnostic and therapeutic regimen of optic neuritis. LHON is mostly only considered when high dose cortisone therapy fails to be effective or the second eye is affected. Thereafter, molecular genetic analysis will prove LHON in these cases. Detailed anamnesis including pedigree analysis in combination with observance of the peripapillary microangiopathic alterations at the fundus will help to speed up the diagnosis of LHON, but even after exact clinical and molecular genetic diagnosis of LHON some aspects of the disease still remain a mystery today.

  18. Cranial nerves palsy as an initial feature of an early onset distal hereditary motor neuropathy--a new distal hereditary motor neuropathy phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlová, J; Claeys, K G; De Jonghe, P; Seeman, P

    2009-06-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by a pure motor axonal neuropathy. It is occasionally associated with additional signs such as facial weakness, vocal cord paralysis, weakness of the diaphragm, and pyramidal signs. Although predominantly the inheritance is autosomal dominant, all types of inheritance have been described. Here we report a Czech family with cranial nerves palsy as an initial feature of a non progressive infantile onset dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy. This family may represent a new subtype of distal hereditary motor neuropathy.

  19. Hereditary Elliptocytosis with Pyropoikilocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turan Bayhan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 17-day-old boy was admitted because of jaundice and anemia. He was born weighing 2900 g subsequent to a term gestation as the fourth child of first-degree cousin parents. The previous history revealed the administration of phototherapy for 4 days starting from the first day of life. Complete blood count revealed hemoglobin (Hb of 6.9 g/dL, hematocrit of 19.8%, mean corpuscular volume (MCV of 87.5 fL, red cell distribution width (RDW of 37%, white blood cell count of 11.4x109/L, and platelet count of 263x109/L. Corrected reticulocyte count was 5.3%. Peripheral blood smear revealed polychromasia and pyropoikilocytosis. Direct antibody test was negative. Erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, and pyrimidine 5’ nucleotidase levels were normal. An erythrocyte transfusion was administered with a diagnosis of non-immune hemolytic anemia and the patient was discharged at the 26th day of life with initiation of folic acid. During his outpatient followup, he required erythrocyte transfusions 2 more times and the last transfusion was performed when he was 3 months old. At a visit 3 months after the last transfusion, his blood count was as follows: Hb of 9.5 g/dL, hematocrit of 28.2%, MCV of 68.2 fL, and RDW of 30.5%. Erythrocyte osmotic fragility was found to be normal and Hb electrophoresis revealed Hb F of 6.6% and Hb A2 of 1.7%. Upon physical examination he had mild jaundice and no splenomegaly. The parents’ blood counts were within normal ranges. Peripheral blood smear revealed prominent elliptocytes and occasional microcytic and fragmented erythrocytes with poikilocytosis (Figure 1. The clinical findings and laboratory results were diagnostic for the hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP type of hereditary elliptocytosis (HE, but in vitro fragmentation testing was not performed

  20. Inhibiting Plasma Kallikrein for Hereditary Angioedema Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Aleena; Busse, Paula; Shennak, Mustafa; Lumry, William; Davis-Lorton, Mark; Wedner, Henry J; Jacobs, Joshua; Baker, James; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Lockey, Richard; Li, H Henry; Craig, Timothy; Cicardi, Marco; Riedl, Marc; Al-Ghazawi, Ahmad; Soo, Carolyn; Iarrobino, Ryan; Sexton, Daniel J; TenHoor, Christopher; Kenniston, Jon A; Faucette, Ryan; Still, J Gordon; Kushner, Harvey; Mensah, Robert; Stevens, Chris; Biedenkapp, Joseph C; Chyung, Yung; Adelman, Burt

    2017-02-23

    Background Hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency is characterized by recurrent, unpredictable swelling episodes caused by uncontrolled plasma kallikrein generation and excessive bradykinin release resulting from cleavage of high-molecular-weight kininogen. Lanadelumab (DX-2930) is a new kallikrein inhibitor with the potential for prophylactic treatment of hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency. Methods We conducted a phase 1b, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-ascending-dose trial. Patients with hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive either lanadelumab (24 patients) or placebo (13 patients), in two administrations 14 days apart. Patients assigned to lanadelumab were enrolled in sequential dose groups: total dose of 30 mg (4 patients), 100 mg (4 patients), 300 mg (5 patients), or 400 mg (11 patients). The pharmacodynamic profile of lanadelumab was assessed by measurement of plasma levels of cleaved high-molecular-weight kininogen, and efficacy was assessed by the rate of attacks of angioedema during a prespecified period (day 8 to day 50) in the 300-mg and 400-mg groups as compared with the placebo group. Results No discontinuations occurred because of adverse events, serious adverse events, or deaths in patients who received lanadelumab. The most common adverse events that emerged during treatment were attacks of angioedema, injection-site pain, and headache. Dose-proportional increases in serum concentrations of lanadelumab were observed; the mean elimination half-life was approximately 2 weeks. Lanadelumab at a dose of 300 mg or 400 mg reduced cleavage of high-molecular-weight kininogen in plasma from patients with hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency to levels approaching that from patients without the disorder. From day 8 to day 50, the 300-mg and 400-mg groups had 100% and 88% fewer attacks, respectively, than the placebo group. All

  1. Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Syed Irfan-Ur; Saeian, Kia

    2016-04-01

    In the intensive care unit, vigilance is needed to manage nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A focused history and physical examination must be completed to identify inciting factors and the need for hemodynamic stabilization. Although not universally used, risk stratification tools such as the Blatchford and Rockall scores can facilitate triage and management. Urgent evaluation for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeds requires prompt respiratory assessment, and identification of hemodynamic instability with fluid resuscitation and blood transfusions if necessary. Future studies are needed to evaluate the indication, safety, and efficacy of emerging endoscopic techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anaesthetic management of a patient with hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nergis Ataol

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by reduced activity of the C1 esterase inhibitor. Patients with hereditary angioedema are clinically characterized by recurrent episodes of swelling of the extremities, face, trunk, airways and abdominal organs. Attacks may occur either spontaneously or following trauma, stress, surgery, infections and hormonal fluctuations. The most common cause of death is asphyxia related to laryngeal edema. Giving C1 esterase inhibitor is the most effective method of treatment. Also fresh frozen plasma, androgen steroids, quinine pathway inhibitors, antifibrinolytics and bradykinin receptor antagonists can be used as treatment. In this paper, the anesthetic management of a patient with hereditary angioedema undergoing inguinal hernia repair surgery is reported.

  3. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mesquita Simão

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody is a well stablished serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  4. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Luciano Mesquita

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody) is a well established serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  5. In-vivo assessment of DNA ligation efficiency and fidelity in cells from patients with Fanconi's anemia and other cancer-prone hereditary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rünger, T M; Sobotta, P; Dekant, B; Möller, K; Bauer, C; Kraemer, K H

    1993-04-01

    We developed a host cell DNA ligation assay, in which we transfected linearized plasmid pZ189 into human lymphoblasts or fibroblasts in order to assess the efficiency and accuracy of DNA ligation within these host cells. We used cell lines from patients with Fanconi's anemia and other chromosome breakage or instability syndromes (Bloom's syndrome, ataxia telangiectasia, Werner's syndrome). With the Fanconi's anemia lymphoblast line GM8010 we did not find a reduced, but a slightly hypermutable DNA ligation. Mutation analysis revealed a unique 7.9-12.5-fold increase in insertions or complex mutations. With cells from the other chromosome breakage/instability syndromes we also found a hypermutable and/or reduced DNA ligation. An impaired DNA ligation might be a common molecular mechanism of genetic instability in these disorders.

  6. HEREDITARY FRUCTOSE INTOLERANCE – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Brecelj

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism that presents with hypoglicemia, metabolic acidosis and liver decompensation when the patient is exposed to fructose. Diagnosis was established by fructose tolerance test in the past and nowadays mostly by determination of deficient enzyme fructose-1phosphate aldolase (aldolase B activity in hepatic tissue or by molecular genetic means if the mutation is known. Treatment involves elimination (in infants or reduction of fructose and sucrose from the diet and results in improvement in the patient’s clinical status and liver disease.Results. This article presents a patient with hereditary fructose intolerance who was diagnosed 18 years ago on the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Ljubljana Children’s Hospital. At that time oral fructose tolerance test was used to diagnose the disorder. When she was 17 we performed liver biopsy. The enzyme determination showed the absence of aldolase B activity.Conclusions. Only cooperation of different experts enables recognition of rare metabolic disorders which must be prompt to prevent further damage.

  7. Bleeding during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQ090 “Early Pregnancy Loss”). What is an ectopic pregnancy? An ectopic pregnancy occurs when the fertilized egg does not implant ... vaginal bleeding is the only sign of an ectopic pregnancy. Other symptoms may include abdominal, pelvic, or shoulder ...

  8. A longitudinal prospective study of bleeding diathesis in Egyptian pediatric patients: single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Galila M; Tantawy, Azza A G; Adly, Amira A M; Telbany, Manal A S; El Arab, Sahar Ezz; Ismail, Mona

    2012-07-01

    Keeping an updated registry of bleeding disorders is crucial for planning care and documenting prevalence. We aimed to assess the prevalence of various bleeding disorders including rare inherited coagulation and platelet disorders concerning their clinico-epidemiological, diagnostic data and bleeding manifestations severity. Patients suffering from manifestations of bleeding or coagulation disorders presented to Hematology Clinic during 16 years were included and prospectively followed up. Demographics, clinical characteristics, complete blood count, bleeding, prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times, platelet aggregation tests and bone marrow aspiration were recorded. Overall 687 patients with bleeding disorders from total 2949 patients were identified. Inherited coagulation defects were found in 27.2%; hemophilia A (70.6%), hemophilia B (13.9%), factor I deficiency (2.3%), factor V deficiency (1.6%), factor X deficiency (4.2%), factor VII deficiency (2.6%), factor XIII deficiency (1.1%), combined factor deficiency (2.1%) and unclassified coagulation disorders in 1.6% of studied patients. Overall 72.7% had diagnosed with platelet disorders; immune thrombocytopenia was the commonest (74.8%), and inherited conditions represent (25.2%) in the following order: Glanzman's thrombasthenia (11.2%), von Willebrand disease (6.6%), Bernard-Soulier syndrome (1%) and Chediak Higashi in 0.4% and unclassified in 6%. Median age of diagnosis of coagulation and platelet disorders were 33 and 72 months. Presenting symptoms of coagulation disorders were: 25.1% post circumcision bleeding, 22.5% ecchymosis, 20.9% hemoarthrosis and 15% epistaxis. Symptoms of rare coagulation disorders were postcircumcision bleeding (20%), bleeding umbilical stump (20%), epistaxis (12%), hemoarthrosis (8%) and hematomas (4%). Presenting symptoms in rare inherited platelet disorders were purpura, ecchymosis, epistaxis and bleeding gums, respectively. Analysis of the clinico

  9. Non-coding RNAs at the Gnas and Snrpn-Ube3a imprinted gene loci and their involvement in hereditary disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius ePlagge

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs have long been recognized at imprinted gene loci and provided early paradigms, to investigate their functions and molecular mechanisms of action. The characteristic feature of imprinted genes, their monoallelic, parental-origin-dependent expression, is achieved through complex epigenetic regulation, which is modulated by ncRNAs. This minireview focuses on two imprinted gene clusters, in which changes in ncRNA expression contribute to human disorders. At the GNAS locus loss of NESP RNA can cause autosomal dominant Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1b (AD-PHP-Ib, while at the SNRPN-UBE3A locus a long ncRNA and processed snoRNAs play a role in Angelman-Syndrome (AS and Prader-Willi-Syndrome (PWS. The ncRNAs silence overlapping protein-coding transcripts in sense or anti-sense orientation through changes in histone modifications as well as DNA methylation at CpG-rich sequence motifs. Their epigenetic modulatory functions are required in early development in the pre-implantation embryo or already in the parental germ cells. However, it remains unclear whether the sequence homology-carrying ncRNA itself is required, or whether the process of its transcription through other promoters causes the silencing effect.

  10. Correlation of bleeding pattern with endometrial histopathologic results in perimenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Yilmaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB is referred as bleeding outside of normal menstruation pattern and it is the most common gynecological problem for women of all ages. This study was evaluated the correlation of menstrual bleeding patterns and endometrial histopathological findings in perimenopausal women. Methods: This study was done on perimenopausal aged women presented with AUB for the last 6 months at a gynecology clinic of a tertiary medical center. Only the patients with isolated endometrial causes of AUB were selected for study. A total of 313 cases were included in the study. Abnormal bleeding patterns of the patients were recorded and endometrial sampling was performed to all women. AUB was classified as menorrhagia, metrorrhagia, menometrorrhagia, polymenorrhea, intermenstrual bleeding, and histopathological findings were classified as Proliferative Endometrium (PE, Secretory Endometrium (SE, Disordered Proliferative Pattern (DPP, Endometrial Polyp (EP, Chronic Endometritis (CE, Endometrial Hyperplasia (EH, and Endometrial Adenocarcinoma (CA. Results: The most common bleeding pattern was menorrhagia (45.0% and the most common histopathological finding was PE+SE (52.0% in our study. PE+SE and endometrial hyperplasia without atypia were found more common in menorrhagia group. The most histopathological findings were found PE+SE in menometrorrhagia and polymenorrhea group (P 0.05. Conclusions: We concluded that although menometrorrhagia and polymenorrhea were significantly more associated with PE+SE, intermenstrual bleeding was significantly more associated with EP and CE. It is noteworthy that endometrial hyperplasia without atypia is significantly higher in patients with menorrhagia which is the most common abnormal bleeding pattern in perimenopausal aged women. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(3.000: 547-550

  11. Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000627.htm Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy To use the sharing features ... the blood from soaking your clothes. What Causes Bleeding Later in Pregnancy? When labor begins, the cervix ...

  12. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies.

  13. Invisible Bleeding: The Command Team’s Role in the Identification, Understanding, and Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    compromise the blood-brain barrier, which typically protects the central nervous system from substances that could cause dangerous inflammation . It is...the inflammation or inflammatory molecules that work to create irreversible brain damage; it’s as if the body is engaged in a tug of war. The brain...both. There have been documented incidents of patients being diagnosed with schizophrenia or other mental disorders only to be re-diagnosed as

  14. [Hereditary phaeochromocytoma in twins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Géza; Patócs, Attila; Tóth, Miklós

    2016-08-01

    Phaeochromocytoma is a tumor of the catecholamine-producing cells of the adrenal gland. Extraadrenal phaeochromocytomas are frequently called paragangliomas. The majority of phaeochromocytomas are sporadic, however, about 25-30% are caused by genetic mutation. These tumor are frequently referred as hereditary phaeochromocytomas/paragangliomas. Their incidence increases continuously which can be attributed to availability of genetic examination and to the discovery of novel genes. The 47-year-old female patient underwent abdominal computed tomography which revealed bilateral adrenal gland enlargement. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, the 131-I- metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy, urinary catecholamines and serum chomogranin A measurements confirmed the diagnosis of bilateral phaeochromocytomas. The genetically identical twin sister of the patient was also diagnosed with hormonally active bilateral phaechromocytoma, suggesting the genetic origin of phaeochromocytoma. Mutation screening confirmed a germline mutation of the transmembrane protein 127 tumorsupressor gene in both patients. Both patients underwent cortical-sparing adrenalectomy. The adrenal gland with the larger tumor was totally resected, while in the opposite side only the tumor was resected and a small part of the cortex was saved. After the operation urinary catecholamines and serum chromogranin A returned to normal in both patients. Adrenocortical deficiency was absent in the first patient, but her sister developed adrenal insufficiency requiring glucocorticoid replacement. To the best of the authors' knowledge phaeochromocytoma affecting twins has never been described earlier. Genetic examination performed in siblings confirmed the presence of the mutant gene through four generations. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1326-1330.

  15. [Advances in hereditary hemochromatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Graciela; Cadiz, Claudia; Lachman, J; Cornelio, Cecilia

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary hemocromatosis (HH) is a genetic disease with a recessive autosomic pattern, in which inadequate iron (Fe) absorption is made by the intestinal cell. As consequence of that process, takes place a progressive accumulation of metal in different organs, predominantly in the liver. This leads to an alteration of liver structure and function: cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma (1). The gene implied in this pathology was identified (HFE) in 1996. This codes a similar molecule to the mayor histocompatibility complex type 1(MHC-T1 like) that can modulate the transport of PE binding the transferrin receptor. This progress allows a deep understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of the homeostasis of the Fe and its alterations in the NH. The diagnosis of disease by means of a genetic test let to carry out a familiar screening and to detect asymptomatic carriers. This makes possible to begin the appropriate treatment at early stages of the disease in order to avoid its consequences and offering a better quality of life to these patients.

  16. Approach to the bleeding newborn

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Bleeding in the newborn can lead to serious cardiovascular and neurological effects. Routine administration of vitamin K has reduced the incidence of hemorrhagic disease of the newborn, but abnormal bleeding can occur in babies from many causes. A practical approach to the diagnosis and treatment of bleeding in the newborn is described in this article.

  17. Bleeding gums: Duloxetine may be the cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balhara YPS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Duloxetine is a newly introduced drug. It is being prescribed for the management of diabetic neuropathic pain and major depressive disorder. The most frequently observed adverse events with duloxetine are nausea, dry mouth and somnolence, constipation, diarrhea, decreased appetite, weight loss, feeling of fatigue, dizziness, somnolence, hypohidrosis, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction. One of the patients being prescribed the drug developed bleeding gums on being started with the drug which resolved on stopping it. We hereby report this case.

  18. Coinheritance of hereditary spherocytosis and reversibility of cirrhosis in a young female patient with hereditary hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höblinger A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Here we report a 33-years-old woman with hereditary spherocytosis and hemochromatosis due to homozygosity for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene. The coinheritance of both conditions led to severe iron overload and liver cirrhosis at young age. The patient was treated by repeated phlebotomy, and reversibility of cirrhosis was documented by transient elastography. This report discusses the pathophysiology of iron accumulation in patients with hemolytic anemia combined with HFE C282Y homozygosity. The case indicates that patients with hematological disorders characterized by increased erythropoetic activity should be screened for HFE mutations.

  19. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Right Sport for You Shyness Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) KidsHealth > For Teens > Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) ... español Hemorragia uterina disfuncional What Is Abnormal Uterine Bleeding? Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is the name doctors ...

  20. Autosomal recessive hereditary auditory neuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秋菊; 顾瑞; 曹菊阳

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Auditory neuropathy (AN) is a sensorineural hearing disorder characterized by absent or abnormal auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and normal cochlear outer hair cell function as measured by otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Many risk factors are thought to be involved in its etiology and pathophysiology. Three Chinese pedigrees with familial AN are presented herein to demonstrate involvement of genetic factors in AN etiology. Methods: Probands of the above - mentioned pedigrees, who had been diagnosed with AN, were evaluated and followed up in the Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, China PLA General Hospital. Their family members were studied and the pedigree diagrams were established. History of illness, physical examination,pure tone audiometry, acoustic reflex, ABRs and transient evoked and distortion- product otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs and DPOAEs) were obtained from members of these families. DPOAE changes under the influence of contralateral sound stimuli were observed by presenting a set of continuous white noise to the non - recording ear to exam the function of auditory efferent system. Some subjects received vestibular caloric test, computed tomography (CT)scan of the temporal bone and electrocardiography (ECG) to exclude other possible neuropathy disorders. Results: In most affected subjects, hearing loss of various degrees and speech discrimination difficulties started at 10 to16 years of age. Their audiological evaluation showed absence of acoustic reflex and ABRs. As expected in AN, these subjects exhibited near normal cochlear outer hair cell function as shown in TEOAE & DPOAE recordings. Pure- tone audiometry revealed hearing loss ranging from mild to severe in these patients. Autosomal recessive inheritance patterns were observed in the three families. In Pedigree Ⅰ and Ⅱ, two affected brothers were found respectively, while in pedigree Ⅲ, 2 sisters were affected. All the patients were otherwise normal without

  1. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Matthew; Lobo, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a frequently encountered medical emergency with an incidence of 84-160/100000 and associated with mortality of approximately 10%. Guidelines from the National Institute for Care and Care Excellence outline key features in the management of AUGIB. Patients require prompt resuscitation and risk assessment using validated tools. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy provides accurate diagnosis, aids in estimating prognosis and allows therapeutic intervention. Endoscopy should be undertaken immediately after resuscitation in unstable patients and within 24 hours in all other patients. Interventional radiology may be required for bleeding unresponsive to endoscopic intervention. Drug therapy depends on the cause of bleeding. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors should be used in patients with high-risk ulcers. Terlipressin and broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used following variceal haemorrhage. Hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB need to provide well organised services and ensure access to relevant services for all patients, and particularly to out of hours endoscopy. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  2. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  3. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerson C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cherise Meyerson, Greg Van Stavern, Collin McClelland Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. Keywords: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, mitochondria, neuro-ophthalmology, mitochondrial DNA

  4. Molecular genetics of hereditary sensory neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Mauko, Barbara; Auer-Grumbach, Piet; Pieber, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), also known as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. They are caused by neuronal atrophy and degeneration, predominantly affecting peripheral sensory and autonomic neurons. Both congenital and juvenile to adulthood onset is possible. Currently, the classification of the HSN depends on the mode of inheritance, age at onset, and clinical presentation. Hallmark features are progressive sensory loss, chronic skin ulcers, and other skin abnormalities. Spontaneous fractures and neuropathic arthropathy are frequent complications and often necessitate amputations. Autonomic features vary between different subgroups. Distal muscle weakness and wasting may be present and is sometimes so prominent that it becomes difficult to distinguish HSN from Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome. Recent major advances in molecular genetics have led to the identification of seven gene loci and six-disease causing genes for autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive HSN. These genes have been shown to play roles in lipid metabolism and the regulation of intracellular vesicular transport, but also a presumptive transcriptional regulator, a nerve growth factor receptor, and a nerve growth factor have been described among the causative genes in HSN. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how mutations in the known genes lead to the phenotype of HSN. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of the molecular genetics of the HSN and the implicated genes.

  5. Inhibition of TFG function causes hereditary axon degeneration by impairing endoplasmic reticulum structure

    OpenAIRE

    Beetz, Christian; Johnson, Adam; Schuh, Amber L.; Thakur, Seema; Varga, Rita-Eva; Fothergill, Thomas; Hertel, Nicole; Bomba-Warczak, Ewa; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Altmüller, Janine; Saxena, Renu; Chapman, Edwin R.; Dent, Erik W.; Nürnberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of gait disorders. Their pathological hallmark is a length-dependent distal axonopathy of nerve fibers in the corticospinal tract. Involvement of other neurons can cause additional neurological symptoms, which define a diverse set of complex hereditary spastic paraplegias. We present two siblings who have the unusual combination of early-onset spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy, and neuropathy. Genome-wide SNP-...

  6. 阿胶及其为主的组方在妇科出血性疾病中的应用%Donkey-hide gelatin-based group in gynecological bleeding disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海琳; 李莉

    2012-01-01

    Donkey-hide gelatin, also known as animal skin glue, lo pay caused by glue, is a valuable medicine, said "Chinese ginseng, deer horn Sambo" . Its sweel nature, into the lungs, liver and kidney meridians, yin blood, moistening hemostasis, the role of tocolysis. Compendium ot' Materia Medica, the blood "holy medicine" . "Women with blood-based . Therefore, donkey-hide gelatin was promoted as the "gynecological medicine" . In this paper, its clinical application in gynecological bleeding disorders are summarized below.%阿胶,又名驴皮胶、付致胶,是名贵中药,与人参、鹿茸并称“中药三宝”.其味甘、性平,入肺、肝、肾经,有滋阴补血、润燥止血、安胎的作用.《本草纲目》中有补血“圣药”之称.“女子以血为本”,故阿胶被推崇为“妇科要药”.文章就其在妇科出血性疾病的临床应用情况综述如下.

  7. An update on hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdi, Marylee; Shaker, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema affects approximately 1 in 50,000 individuals without gender or ethnic preference. Hereditary angioedema is caused by a decreased level (type I) or function (type II) of C1 inhibitor. Patients experience repeated episodes of angioedema involving sites that include the face, extremities, gastrointestinal tract, and larynx. Treatment involves measures to increase functioning levels of active C1 inhibitor through stimulation of endogenous pathways or exogenous supplementation. Additional therapies targeted at inhibition of bradykinin can also be used to treat episodes of angioedema. Treatment may be indicated for both acute episodes of angioedema and prevention of future episodes.

  8. Hereditary peripheral neuropathies of childhood: an overview for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Ouvrier, Robert

    2011-11-01

    This review focuses on the "pure" hereditary peripheral neuropathies where peripheral nerve disease is the main manifestation and does not address neurodegenerative disorders associated with but not dominated by peripheral neuropathy. Aetiologies of childhood-onset peripheral neuropathies differ from those of adult-onset, with more inherited conditions, especially autosomal recessive. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is the commonest neuromuscular disorder. The genetic labels of CMT (Charcot-Marie-Tooth) disease types 1-4 are the preferred sub-type terms. Clinical presentations and molecular genetic heterogeneity of hereditary peripheral neuropathies are diverse. For most patients worldwide, diagnostic studies are limited to clinical assessment. Such markers which could be used to identify specific sub-types include presentation in early childhood, scoliosis, marked sensory involvement, respiratory compromise, upper limb involvement, visual or hearing impairment, pyramidal signs and mental retardation. These key markers may assist targeted genetic testing and aid in diagnosing children where DNA testing is not possible.

  9. Hereditary Nonsyndromic Gingival Fibromatosis: Report of Family Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Wali Peeran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF is a rare, benign disorder with slowly progressive enlargement of maxillary and mandibular gingiva. Herewith, we report the first case series of HGF presenting among mother and all of her 3 children. Their complaints included unaesthetic appearance due to gingival growth, malocclusion, and difficulty in mastication. Conventional gingivectomy with oral hygiene measures and regular followup is the treatment of choice for such presentation.

  10. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain in Children: Hereditary Angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Özçeker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema (HA is a rare, autosomal-dominant genetic disorder presenting with recurrent attacks of angioedema. The most commonly involved organs include the extremites, face, neck, upper respiratory tract, genital region and the gastrointestinal tract. Edema of the intestinal mucosa can cause temporary obstruction and severe abdominal pain that can be confused with acute abdomen. Pediatricians and emergency physicians should keep in mind this rare disease in the differential diagnosis of severe abdominal pain.

  11. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: types II, III, and IV

    OpenAIRE

    Axelrod Felicia B; Gold-von Simson Gabrielle

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) encompass a number of inherited disorders that are associated with sensory dysfunction (depressed reflexes, altered pain and temperature perception) and varying degrees of autonomic dysfunction (gastroesophageal reflux, postural hypotention, excessive sweating). Subsequent to the numerical classification of four distinct forms of HSAN that was proposed by Dyck and Ohta, additional entities continue to be described, so that iden...

  12. Hereditary vitamin D rickets: a case series in a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surender, Kumar; Kochar, I P S; Ahmad, Ayesha; Kapoor, Meenal

    2014-11-01

    Hereditary vitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by end-organ resistance to 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3). Clinically, the syndrome is recognized by severe early onset rickets with bowing of the lower extremities, short stature, and often alopecia. Here, we report a case series on three siblings who had HVDRR with varied clinical findings.

  13. Story: A Bleeding Watermelon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor bzang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A Bleeding Watermelon was written by Norsang (Nor bzang;b. 1988, a native of Dpa ris (Rab rgyas (Huazangsi 华藏寺 Township, Tianzhu 天祝 Tibetan Autonomous County,Gansu 甘肃 Province. Norsang writes: I heard that a university student opened an elevator door in a campus building still under construction. The elevator shaft was empty and he fell to his death. Many people had questions about his death. This inspired me to write this story.

  14. Prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Shelley E; Ramaciotti, Claudio; Buchanan, George R

    2011-12-01

    Vascular complications, including pulmonary hypertension (PH), have been reported to occur following splenectomy for various disorders,including hereditary spherocytosis (HS). We performed a prospective cross-sectional study of 36 adults with HS (78% with prior splenectomy)utilizing echocardiography to estimate tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) as well as measurement of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) to screen for PH. No participant with HS hada significantly elevated TRV or NT-proBNP level, despite a median 25-year interval since splenectomy (95% confidence interval for point prevalence 0, 0.097). Although our study was limited by a small sample size, it appears that persons with HS, following splenectomy, appear unlikely to be at significantly increased risk of developing PH to the degree reported for thalassemia and sickle cell disease

  15. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis with distinctive facies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sunkara Shree Ramalinga; Radharani, Chitturi; Sinha, Soumya; Kumar, Sv Kiran

    2012-11-01

    Hereditary gingival enlargement also known as gingivitis or familial elephantiasis is a rare type of gingival enlargement. It appears as an isolated autosomal dominant disorder or maybe associated with other conditions. Oral manifestations may vary from minimal involvement of only tuberosity area and the buccal gingiva around the lower molars to a generalized enlargement inhibiting eruption of the teeth. This paper discusses the case of a 13-year-old female patient with distinctive facial characteristics who presented to the department with a chief complaint of swollen gums since 1 year. She had severe diffuse gingival enlargement of the maxilla and mandible. Diagnosis was made based upon clinical examination and family history. Quadrant wise internal bevel gingivectomy procedure was done for the patient to restore her functional and esthetic needs.

  16. Pulmonary hypertension in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Veronique; MM; Vorselaars; Sebastiaan; Velthuis; Repke; J; Snijder; Jan; Albert; Vos; Johannes; J; Mager; Martijn; C; Post

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia(HHT) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterised by vascular malformations in predominantly the brain,liverand lungs.Pulmonary hypertension(PH) is increasingly recognised as a severe complication of HHT.PH may be categorised into two distinct types in patients with HHT.Post-capillary PH most often results from a high pulmonary blood flow that accompanies the high cardiac output state associated with liver arteriovenous malformations.Less frequently,the HHT-related gene mutations in ENG or ACVRL1 appear to predispose patients with HHT to develop pre-capillary pulmonary arterial hypertension.Differentiation between both forms of PH by right heart catheterisation is essential,since both entities are associated with severe morbidity and mortality with different treatment options.Therefore all HHT patients should be referred to an HHT centre.

  17. [Hereditary spastic paraplegia: up to date].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders that are clinically characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. HSP genetic loci are designated SPG1-72 in order of their discovery. In 206 Japanese families with autosomal dominant HSP, SPG4 was the most common form, accounting for 38%, followed by SPG3A (5%), SPG31 (5%), SPG10 (2%), and SPG8 (1%). We have identified novel mutations in the C12orf65 gene and the LYST gene in several Japanese families with autosomal recessive HSP. JASPAC will facilitate gene discovery and mechanistic understanding of HSP. The future challenge will be the establishment of treatment of HSP.

  18. Mutation Screening for Candidate Genes in a Chinese Pedigree with Autosomal Dominant Hereditary Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder (ANSD)%常染色体显性遗传性听神经病基因突变筛查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵昱; 石力; 王剑; 梁鹏飞; 王淑娟; 邱建华

    2014-01-01

    目的:针对一个常染色体显性遗传性非综合征性听神经病谱系障碍家系进行已知致病基因筛查分析,了解是否存在可能致病的基因突变。方法选择本课题组收集到的一个家系4代24人作为研究对象,采集受试者外周静脉血提取基因组DNA,应用在线引物设计软件Primers进行引物设计,采用直接测序法对已知听神经病相关基因进行测序,使用DNAMan软件对序列进行比对分析。结果该家系遗传方式符合显性遗传特征,患者听力学特征符合非综合征型听神经病谱系障碍,对家系中全部患者及部分听力正常成员完成DIAPH3、OTOF、PJVK、GJB2基因外显子及线粒体DNA12S rRNA1494、1555位点的测序分析,未发现可疑致病突变。结论该家系未检测到已知相关基因致病突变,高度提示新基因突变致病的可能,有待于进一步研究。%Objective To identify possible pathogenic gene mutations in a Chinese pedigree with autosomal dominant hereditary non-syndromic auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) . Methods A pedigree of 4 generations (24 people ) was studied. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood. Primers were designed using a free internet primer de-sign software. Known auditory neuropathy related genes were analyzed by direct sequencing and gene sequences were ana-lyzed comparatively using the DNAMan software. Results In this pedigree, the mode of inheritance was consistent with autoso-mal dominant genetic diseases, and the characteristics of patients were in accordance with the diagnosis of auditory neuropa-thy spectrum disorder (ANSD). Direct sequencing of exons of the DIAPH3, OTOF, PJVK, GJB2 and GJB3 genes as well as the mitochondrial 12SrRNA gene in all patients and some other members with normal hearing in this pedigree showed no suspi-cious mutation. Conclusion None of the known pathogenic mutations is detected in this Chinese ANSD family, suggesting the

  19. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is an important cause of progressive painless visual loss among young male patients. OBJECTIVE: To report on a case of a young patient with a clinical and neurophysiological condition suggestive of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, confirmed by genetic testing. CASE REPORT: We describe a 17-year-old male with progressive bilateral visual loss. Two maternal uncles had had similar patterns of visual loss. The patient had a history of smoking and alcohol abuse. Neuro-ophthalmological examination revealed visual acuity of 20/800 in both eyes, with decreased direct and consensual pupillary light reflexes. Fundus examination demonstrated pale optic discs. The visual evoked potential test showed signs of conduction disturbances in both optic nerves and campimetric study showed complete visual loss in all fields of both eyes. A diagnosis of bilateral optic neuropathy with a clinical suspicion of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy was made. A blood sample was submitted to genetic analysis in relation to the principal mutations of this disorder, and homoplasmic mutation in 11778 was detected, thereby confirming the diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

  20. Hereditary epilepsy syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, PMC; Brouwer, OF

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the present knowledge on the genetics of the epilepsies. Main clinical features, gene localization and pattern of inheritance of the idiopathic epilepsies, the progressive myoclonus epilepsies, and some other genetic disorders often associated with epilepsy, are described. (C) 199

  1. Hereditary epilepsy syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callenbach, PMC; Brouwer, OF

    This paper reviews the present knowledge on the genetics of the epilepsies. Main clinical features, gene localization and pattern of inheritance of the idiopathic epilepsies, the progressive myoclonus epilepsies, and some other genetic disorders often associated with epilepsy, are described. (C)

  2. Disorders of the erythrocyte membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Delicou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemolytic anemia due to abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane comprises an important group of inherited disorders. These include hereditary spherocytosis, hereditary elliptocytosis, hereditary pyropoikilocytosis, and the hereditary stomatocytosis syndromes. The erythrocyte membrane skeleton composed of spectrin, actin, and several other proteins is essential for the maintenance of the erythrocyte shape, reversible deformability, and membrane structural integrity in addition to controlling the lateral mobility of integral membrane proteins. These disorders are characterized by clinical and laboratory heterogeneity and, as evidenced by recent molecular studies, by genetic heterogeneity. Defects in various proteins involved in linking the lipid bilayer to membrane skeleton result in loss in membrane cohesion leading to surface area loss and hereditary spherocytosis while defects in proteins involved in lateral interactions of the spectrin-based skeleton lead to decreased mechanical stability, membrane fragmentation and hereditary elliptocytosis. The disease severity is primarily dependent on the extent of membrane surface area loss. Treatment with splenectomy is curative in most patients.

  3. Clinical approach to the patient with unexpected bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, J M

    2000-10-01

    Bleeding can be considered unexpected if it is disproportionate to the intensity of the haemostatic stress in a patient with no known haemorrhagic disorder or if it occurs in a patient in whom a bleeding disorder has been characterized but is adequately treated. A thorough history usually allows the clinician to predict reasonably accurately whether the patient is likely to have a systemic haemostatic defect (and if so whether it is congenital or acquired), or whether the bleeding likely has a purely anatomical basis. The nature of bleeding is instructive with respect to preliminary categorization. Thus, mucocutaneous bleeding suggests defects of primary haemostasis (disordered platelet-vascular interactions). Bleeding into deeper structures is more suggestive of coagulation defects leading to impaired fibrin clot formation, and delayed bleeding after primary haemostasis is characteristic of hyperfibrinolysis. Localized bleeding suggests an anatomical cause, although an underlying haemostatic defect may coexist. Where bleeding is so acutely threatening as to require urgent intervention, diagnosis and treatment must proceed simultaneously. In the case of minor haemorrhage (not threatening to life or limb) it may be preferable to defer therapy while the nature of the bleeding disorder is methodically investigated. Initial laboratory evaluation is guided by the preliminary clinical impression. The amount of blood loss can be inferred from the haematocrit or haemoglobin concentration, and the platelet count will quickly identify cases in which thrombocytopenia is the likely cause of bleeding. In the latter instance, examination of the red cell morphology, leucocyte differential, and mean platelet volume may allow the aetiological mechanism to be presumptively identified as hypoproliferative or consumptive. With regard to coagulation testing, the activated PTT, prothrombin time, and thrombin time usually constitute an adequate battery of screening tests, unless the

  4. Histology of hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alfen, N. van; Gabreëls-Festen, A.A.W.M.; Laak, H.J. ter; Arts, W.F.M.; Gabreëls, F.J.M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2005-01-01

    We report the findings in five muscle and three sural nerve biopsies, and in one postmortem plexus specimen, from six patients with hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA). We found that the sensory nerves are definitely involved in HNA despite the mainly motor symptoms, and that lesions in nerves and

  5. [Hereditary fructose intolerance (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanner, F

    1977-07-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is the most important disturbance in human fructose metabolism. This paper deals with the present knowledge of biochemistry and pathophysiology of this inborn error of metabolism, which is often wrongly diagnosed and gives a detailed description of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

  6. Hereditary skin diseases of hemidesmosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkman, MF

    1999-01-01

    Studies of hereditary blistering skin diseases (epidermolysis bullosa) and targeted gene mutation experiments in knockout mice have greatly improved our understanding of hemidesmosomes and their associated structures in the cytoskeleton and basement membrane of the skin and mucous membranes. At leas

  7. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  8. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Christopher W; Woods, Amanda G; Cederholm, Carmen K

    2013-12-01

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB), formerly known as hemorrhagic disease of the newborn (HDN), is a bleeding disorder in neonates that is caused by inadequate serum levels of vitamin K. Vitamin K is a nutrient essential for adequate function of the coagulation cascade. Certain internal and external factors place newborn infants at higher risk for VKDB. Therefore, vitamin K prophylaxis has become the standard of care for newborns. Although the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the administration of vitamin K to newborns, some parents are choosing to withhold vitamin K administration at birth. This case study describes an infant who developed VKDB in the absence of vitamin K prophylaxis. Although parents ultimately have the right to choose whether or not to administer vitamin K, as healthcare professionals, it is important to provide education regarding the potential complications of withholding vitamin K and the signs of VKDB if vitamin K prophylaxis at birth is withheld.

  9. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia with associated platelet abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soslau, G; Brodsky, I

    1989-12-01

    A 62 year old male (R.H.) presented with a mild anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) and a history of multiple hemorrhagic episodes. The marrow had 40-50% sideroblasts. Marrow chromosomes were normal. His wife was hematologically normal, while one daughter, age 30 years, had a sideroblastic anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) with 40-50% sideroblasts in the marrow. Her anemia was first noted at age 15 years. Administration of vitamin B6 did not correct the anemia in either the father or daughter. Platelet abnormalities inherited jointly with this disorder are described for the first time. Both R.H. and his daughter had prolonged bleeding times, with normal PTT, PT times, fVIII:C, fVIII:Ag levels, and vWF multimers, which may rule out a von Willebrand's disease. They have normal platelet numbers but abnormally low platelet adhesiveness and greatly depressed ADP, collagen, and epinephrine responsiveness. Response to ristocetin was in the low normal range, and aggregation with thrombin was normal. While desmopressin completely normalized R.H.'s bleeding time, none of these platelet parameters were improved. No differences in the SDS PAGE protein patterns of RH platelets could be detected in comparison to normal samples. His platelets took up and released serotonin (5HT) normally, and electron micrographs defined no morphological abnormalities. However, no ATP was released from platelets activated with collagen, and when followed by thrombin about fourfold greater ATP was released by control platelets as compared to RH platelets. The dense granule fraction derived from RH platelets contained about 20% the level of ATP, 40% the level of ADP, and 50% the level of 5HT detected in a normal sample. The results indicate that the bleeding disorder is related to a non-classical heritable storage pool defect. The connection between the inherited sideroblastic anemia and platelet defects is obscure.

  10. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  11. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr eAlaarg

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterised by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely asessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary

  12. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M; van Solinge, Wouter W; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-12-13

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias.

  13. Non-hereditary cherubism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Niranjan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cherubism is a self-limiting non-neoplastic autosomal dominant fibro-osseous disorder of the jaw usually found in children between 2-5 years of age. It occurs predominantly in boys and is characterized clinically by bilateral swelling of cheeks due to bony enlargement of the jaw that gives the patient a typical cherubic look. Cherubism may occur as solitary cases or in many members of family, often in multiple lesions. Radiographically the lesions appear as multilocular bilateral radiolucent areas. The present case report describes a 13-year-old female cherubic child with progressive swelling of cheeks.

  14. Evaluation and Management of Adolescents with Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Tanya L Kowalczyk; Miller, Rachel J; Mullins, Eric S

    2015-09-01

    The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists support the use of new terminology for abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) to consistently categorize AUB by etiology. The term AUB can be further classified as AUB/heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) (replacing the term "menorrhagia") or AUB/intermenstrual bleeding (replacing the term "metrorrhagia"). Although many cases of AUB in adolescent women are attributable to immaturity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, underlying bleeding disorders should be considered in women with AUB/HMB. This article reviews the new terminology for AUB, discusses important relevant features of history and examination, presents the laboratory evaluation of HMB, and describes hormonal (oral contraceptive pills, progestin-only methods, long-acting reversible contraceptives including intrauterine systems), hematologic (tranexamic acid and desmopressin), and surgical management options for AUB/HMB.

  15. Challenges in the management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, James Y W; Barkun, Alan; Fan, Dai-ming; Kuipers, Ernst J; Yang, Yun-sheng; Chan, Francis K L

    2013-06-08

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency worldwide, a major cause of which are bleeding peptic ulcers. Endoscopic treatment and acid suppression with proton-pump inhibitors are cornerstones in the management of the disease, and both treatments have been shown to reduce mortality. The role of emergency surgery continues to diminish. In specialised centres, radiological intervention is increasingly used in patients with severe and recurrent bleeding who do not respond to endoscopic treatment. Despite these advances, mortality from the disorder has remained at around 10%. The disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities who use antiplatelet agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and anticoagulants. The management of such patients, especially those at high cardiothrombotic risk who are on anticoagulants, is a challenge for clinicians. We summarise the published scientific literature about the management of patients with bleeding peptic ulcers, identify directions for future clinical research, and suggest how mortality can be reduced.

  16. Treatment for dysphagia (swallowing difficulties) in hereditary ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Adam P; Keage, Megan J; Johansson, Kerstin; Schalling, Ellika

    2015-11-13

    Hereditary ataxias are a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting in progressive inco-ordination. Swallowing impairment, also known as dysphagia, is a common and potentially life threatening sequel of disease progression. The incidence and nature of dysphagia in these conditions is largely unknown. The loss of an effective and safe swallow can dramatically affect the health and well-being of an individual. Remediation of difficulties of eating and drinking is an important goal in the clinical care of people with hereditary ataxia. To assess the effects of interventions for swallowing impairment (dysphagia) in people with hereditary ataxias. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, and the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) on 14 September 2015. We also searched Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA), Dissertation Abstracts, and Trials Registries on 24 September 2015. We considered all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that compared treatments for hereditary ataxia with placebo or no treatment. We only included studies measuring dysphagia. Three review authors (ES, KJ, MK) independently screened all titles and abstracts. In the event of any disagreement or uncertainty over the inclusion of a particular paper, the review authors planned to meet and reach consensus. We identified no RCTs from the 519 titles and abstracts screened. We excluded papers primarily for not including participants with a hereditary ataxia (that is, being focused on other neurological conditions), being theoretical reviews rather than intervention studies, or being neither randomised nor quasi-randomised trials.We identified five papers of various design that described treatment for dysphagia, or improvement to swallow as a by-product of treatment, in people with hereditary ataxia. None of these studies were RCTs or

  17. Bleeding complications in immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Donald M

    2015-01-01

    Bleeding manifestations in patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) range from mild skin bruises to life-threatening intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). Severe bleeding is distinctly uncommon when the platelet count is >30 × 10(9)/L and usually only occurs when the platelet count falls administrative databases, the frequency of ICH in patients with ITP is ~0.5% in children and 1.5% in adults. Estimates of severe (non-ICH) bleeding are difficult to obtain because of the lack of standardized case definitions; the lack of a universally accepted, ITP-specific bleeding assessment tool; and the omission of reporting bleeding outcomes in many clinical studies. In practice, the presence of bleeding should dictate whether or not treatment is needed because many patients, especially children, can be safely managed with observation alone. Guiding principles for the management of ITP, based on the bleeding risk are: (1) Decide when treatment is needed and when it can safely be withheld; (2) for patients with chronic ITP, use the least toxic treatment at the lowest dose; (3) emergency treatment of severe thrombocytopenia-associated bleeding requires combination therapy; and (4) early aggressive therapy may result in durable platelet count responses.

  18. [Hereditary peroxisomal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astudillo, Leonardo; Sabourdy, Frédérique; Touati, Guy; Levade, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    Peroxisomes are small intracellular organelles that catalyse key metabolic reactions such as the beta-oxidation of some straight-chain or branched-chain fatty acids and the alpha-oxidation of phytanic acid. These enzyme reactions produce hydrogen peroxide, which is subsequently neutralized by the peroxisomal catalase. Peroxisomes also metabolize glyoxylate to glycine, and catalyze the first steps of plasmalogen biosynthesis. There are more than a dozen inherited peroxisomal disorders in humans. These metabolic diseases are due to monogenic defects that affect either a single function (such as enzyme or a transporter) or more than two distinct functions because of the impairment of several aspects of peroxisome biogenesis. With the notable exception of X-linked adrenoleucodystrophy, these inborn disorders are transmitted as autosomal recessive traits. Their clinical presentation can be very heterogeneous, and include neonatal, infantile or adult forms. The present review describes the symptomatology of these genetic diseases, the underlying genetic and biochemical alterations, and summarizes their diagnostic approach. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngu, Jing H.; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Chin, YK

    2017-01-01

    Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study.......Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study....

  20. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: a cause of preventable morbidity and mortality.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brady, A P

    2012-01-31

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant condition whose effects are mediated through deficient blood vessel formation and regeneration, with multisystem involvement. Patients are usually aware of resulting skin telangiectasia and epistaxis, but are also exposed to dangers posed by occult vascular malformations in other organs. About 15-35% of HHT patients have pulmonary AVMs (PAVMs), 10% have cerebral AVMs (CAVMs), 25-33% suffer significant GI blood loss from GI tract telangiectasia, and an unknown but high percentage have liver involvement. In total, 10% of affected individuals die prematurely or suffer major disability from HHT, largely because of bleeding from CAVMs and PAVMs, or paradoxical embolization through PAVMs. Screening for and early intervention to treat occult PAVMs and CAVMs can largely eliminate these risks, and should be undertaken in a specialist centre. The National HHT Center in The Mercy University Hospital in Cork is the referral centre for HHT screening in Ireland.

  1. Efficiency of laser treatment in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Gita; Lange, Bibi; Wanscher, Jens Højberg

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown the effect of laser treatment on epistaxis in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). At the present time, only very few prospective trials have been performed, and many studies are based on patients' subjective assessment of the severity of epistaxis....... This prospective study measures the objective effect of laser treatment in HHT patients with mild to moderate epistaxis. We introduce an objective measure to assess the severity of epistaxis: the bleeding time (BT). Before and after treatment, the quality of life, as measured by the patient, was assessed...... and compared to normative data. In 30 patients, we measured the BT before laser treatment 1.5 and 6.5 months after treatment. The Short form 36 (SF-36), a validated health questionnaire, was completed before and 6.5 months after treatment. Compared to preoperative value, BT was significantly reduced 1.5 and 6...

  2. HEREDITARY FACTOR VII DEFICIENCY IN THE ASIAN ELEPHANT (ELEPHAS MAXIMUS) CAUSED BY A F7 MISSENSE MUTATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael; McGrath, Ken; Raj, Karthik; McLaren, Philippa; Payne, Karen; McCoy, Richard; Giger, Urs

    2017-04-01

    Hereditary disorders and genetic predispositions to disease are rarely reported in captive and free-ranging wildlife, and none have been definitively identified and characterized in elephants. A wild-caught, 41-yr-old male Asian elephant ( Elephas maximus ) without an apparent increased bleeding tendency was consistently found to have prolonged prothrombin times (PTs, mean=55±35 s) compared to 17 other elephants (PT=10±2 s). This elephant's partial thromboplastin times (PTT) fell within the normal range of the other elephants (12-30 s). A prolonged PT in the presence of a normal PTT suggests disruption of the extrinsic pathway via deficiency of coagulation Factor VII (FVII). This elephant's plasma FVII activity was very low (2%) compared to that of 15 other elephants (57-80%), but other coagulation factors' activities did not differ from the control elephants. Sequencing of genomic DNA from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid blood revealed a single homozygous point mutation (c.202A>G) in the F7 gene of the FVII deficient elephant that was not present in unrelated elephants. This mutation causes an amino acid substitution (p.Arg68Gly) that is predicted to be deleterious. Two living offspring of the affected elephant were heterozygous for the mutation and had normal plasma FVII activities and coagulation profiles. Tissue from a third offspring, a deceased calf, was utilized to show that it was also a heterozygote. A DNA test has been developed to enable the screening of additional elephants for this mutation. Consistent with FVII deficiency investigations in other species, the condition did not cause a serious bleeding tendency in this individual elephant.

  3. Let's Talk Period! Preliminary results of an online bleeding awareness knowledge translation project and bleeding assessment tool promoted on social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynen, E; Grabell, J; Ellis, A K; James, P

    2017-07-01

    Undiagnosed bleeding disorders are common and can pose significant health risks, especially for women. Recently, a self-administered bleeding assessment tool (Self-BAT) was validated in von Willebrand disease. To increase awareness of undiagnosed bleeding disorders through the use of an informational website (http://letstalkperiod.ca) targeted at women in their reproductive years. The Let's Talk Period website was built in consultation with a medical communications company and focus groups of women, with the aim of clearly presenting key messages around menstrual bleeding. The website was promoted through social media and local and national interviews. Upon completion of the online Self-BAT available at http://letstalkperiod.ca, the result is displayed to the user along with a recommendation to seek medical attention if the score is abnormal. During the initial 3-month period, there were 5158 page views from 64 countries. A total of 489 individuals, 95% female, completed the online Self-BAT. The mean Self-BAT score was 6, range 0-44. Abnormal Self-BAT scores were reported in 45% of the respondents, of whom 96% were female. The most commonly reported bleeding symptoms were menorrhagia (98%) and postpartum haemorrhage (82%). Bleeding symptoms were similar across different geographical areas. An online screening tool is an effective method of identifying individuals concerned with abnormal bleeding. A significant portion of the general population report experiencing symptoms of abnormal bleeding. In women, the most frequently reported bleeding symptoms were menorrhagia and postpartum haemorrhage. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. New treatments of hereditary blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life and a structura......Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life...... and a structurally intact retinal tissue to adult life with a complete loss of photoreceptors. It must be assumed that some of the trials will succeed in producing new therapies and action must be taken to refine and accelerate diagnostics and to preserve therapeutic potential in blind people....

  5. Hereditary epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasik, L G; Dimond, R L; Baughman, R D

    1981-04-01

    We describe herein a patient in whose family 11 of 20 members have a palmoplantar keratoderma. The pathologic findings in the proband were those of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. As in the other families described, the disease was found to be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. All involved family members had hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles as infants. Light microscopy showed hyperkeratosis, hypergranulosis with large irregular keratohyalin granules, and large clear spaces in the cells of the granular and upper spinous layers. Our electron microscopic findings showed that the clear spaces were areas of cytoplasm filled with a fibrillar material and cellular organelles; abnormal clumps of tonofilaments and keratohyalin were also present. We consider this disorder to be a form of keratoderma rather than a localized ichthyosis.

  6. Chaperonopathies: Spotlight on Hereditary Motor Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Vincenzo; Aguado, Carmen; Knecht, Erwin; Espinós, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN) are a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by an atrophy that affects peroneal muscles in the absence of sensory symptoms. To date, 23 genes are thought to be responsible for dHMN, four of which encode chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family; and HSPB1, HSPB3, and HSPB8, encoding three members of the small heat shock protein family. While around 30 different mutations in HSPB1 have been identified, the remaining three genes are altered in many fewer cases. Indeed, a mutation of HSPB3 has only been described in one case, whereas a few cases have been reported carrying mutations in DNAJB2 and HSPB8, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the K141 residue in the HSPB8 chaperone. Hence, their rare occurrence makes it difficult to understand the pathological mechanisms driven by such mutations in this neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble into multi-chaperone complexes that form an integrated chaperone network within the cell. Such complexes fulfill relevant roles in a variety of processes, such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, in which chaperones escort them to precise cellular locations, and as a response to protein misfolding, which includes the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite this range of functions, mutations in some of these chaperones lead to diseases with a similar clinical profile, suggesting common pathways. This review provides an overview of the genetics of those dHMNs that share a common disease mechanism and that are caused by mutations in four genes encoding chaperones: DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3, and HSPB8.

  7. Chaperonopathies: spotlight on hereditary motor neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Lupo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN comprise a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by a peroneal muscular atrophy without sensory symptoms. To date twenty-three genes for dHMN have been reported and four of them encode for chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family, and HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode three members of the family of small heat shock proteins. Except for HSPB1, with around thirty different mutations, the remaining three genes comprise a much low number of cases. Thus, only one case has been described caused by an HSPB3 mutation, whereas few DNAJB2 and HSPB8 cases are known, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the hot spot K141 residue of the HSPB8 chaperone. This low number of cases makes it difficult to understand the pathomechanism underlying the neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble in multi-chaperone complexes forming an integrative chaperone network in the cell, which plays relevant cellular roles in a variety of processes such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, their escort to their precise cellular locations to form functional proteins and complexes and the response to protein misfolding, including the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite of this variety of functions, mutations in some of them lead to diseases with a similar clinical picture, suggesting common pathways. This review gives an overview of the genetics of dHMNs caused by mutations in four genes, DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode chaperones and show a common disease mechanism.

  8. Chaperonopathies: Spotlight on Hereditary Motor Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Vincenzo; Aguado, Carmen; Knecht, Erwin; Espinós, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN) are a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by an atrophy that affects peroneal muscles in the absence of sensory symptoms. To date, 23 genes are thought to be responsible for dHMN, four of which encode chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family; and HSPB1, HSPB3, and HSPB8, encoding three members of the small heat shock protein family. While around 30 different mutations in HSPB1 have been identified, the remaining three genes are altered in many fewer cases. Indeed, a mutation of HSPB3 has only been described in one case, whereas a few cases have been reported carrying mutations in DNAJB2 and HSPB8, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the K141 residue in the HSPB8 chaperone. Hence, their rare occurrence makes it difficult to understand the pathological mechanisms driven by such mutations in this neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble into multi-chaperone complexes that form an integrated chaperone network within the cell. Such complexes fulfill relevant roles in a variety of processes, such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, in which chaperones escort them to precise cellular locations, and as a response to protein misfolding, which includes the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite this range of functions, mutations in some of these chaperones lead to diseases with a similar clinical profile, suggesting common pathways. This review provides an overview of the genetics of those dHMNs that share a common disease mechanism and that are caused by mutations in four genes encoding chaperones: DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3, and HSPB8. PMID:28018906

  9. [Hereditary ataxias, spastic parapareses and neuropathies in Eastern Canada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, N; Chrestian, N; Thiffault, I; Brais, B; Rouleau, G A; Bouchard, J-P

    2008-01-01

    It has been demonstrated, for many inherited diseases, that historical events have shaped the various regional gene pools of Eastern Canada. In so doing, it has given rise to the increased prevalence of some rare diseases due, to founder effects. The following neurogenetic disorders were first identified in patients from Eastern Canada: AOA-2, Arsacs, HSN-2, Arca-1, HMSN/ACC and Arsal. The population of Eastern Canada, we are convinced, will still allow the identification of new rare forms of hereditary ataxias, spastic parapareses and neuropathies as well as contribute to the uncovering of their mutated genes. We have summarized our current knowledge of the various hereditary ataxias, spastic parapareses and neuropathies in Eastern Canada. The study of the more common and homogenous features of these diseases has been largely completed.

  10. Hereditary angioedema may not be the only cause of abdominal pain in patients with hereditary angioedema!

    OpenAIRE

    Ozgur Kartal; Sevket Arslan; Mustafa Gulec; Ahmet Zafer Caliskaner; Abdullah Baysan; Nail Ersoz; Ugur Musabak; Osman Sener

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the basic clinical presentations of the hereditary angioedema and danazol is a common medicine which has been used for long years in patients with hereditary angioedema. We present two hereditary angioedema patients with abdominal pain albeit under danazol treatment, whose final diagnoses was colon carcinoma. There are two consequences in this article which shall be insisted on: First; in patients with hereditary angioedema, the differential diagnosis of and ldquo;ab...

  11. Recurrent Epistaxis and Bleeding as the Initial Manifestation of Brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali Aghdam, Mojtaba; Davari, Kambiz; Eftekhari, Kambiz

    2016-03-01

    Severe thrombocytopenia with bleeding is rarely reported in children with brucellosis, and recurrent epistaxis is extremely rare. Brucellosis with hemorrhage should be differentiated from viral hemorrhagic fever, malignancy, and other blood disorders. Bone marrow aspiration (BMA) is mandatory to differentiate from other blood diseases. An 8-year-old boy was admitted with recurrent epistaxis, petechiae and purpura on face and extremities and bleeding from the gums. During the hospitalization, he was febrile and complained of muscle pain. Leukopenias associated with thrombocytopenia were observed. BMA showed to be normal. Among the multiple tests requested, only serum agglutination test (SAT) and 2-MercaptoEthanol test (2-ME) were positive. He was treated with Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) associated with co-trimoxazole and rifampin. Finally, fever subsided, and he was discharged with good condition and normal platelet count. Brucellosis should be a differential diagnosis in patients with fever and bleeding disorders and a history of consumption of unpasteurized dairy, in endemic areas.

  12. Recurrent bleeding after perimesencephalic hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauw, Frans; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Kizilates, Ufuk; van der Schaaf, Irene C; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2017-08-31

    Perimesencephalic hemorrhage (PMH) is a type of subarachnoid hemorrhage with excellent long-term outcomes. Only one well-documented case of in-hospital rebleeding after PMH is described in the literature, which occurred after initiating antithrombotic treatment because of myocardial ischemia. In this case report we describe a patient with PMH without antithrombotic treatment who had two episodes of recurrent bleeding on the day of ictus. In order to validate the radiological findings we conducted a case-control study. Six neuroradiologists and two neuroradiology fellows performed a blinded assessment of serial unenhanced head CT scans of eight patients with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern (1 index patient, 6 patients with PMH, 1 patient with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern and basilar artery aneurysm) to investigate a potential increase in amount of subarachnoid blood. A 56-year-old woman with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern and negative CT angiography had after the onset headache two episodes with a sudden increase of the headache. Blinded assessment of serial head CTs of eight patients with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern identified the patient who was clinically suspected to have two episodes of recurrent bleeding to have an increased amount of subarachnoid blood on two subsequent CT scans. Recurrent bleeding after PMH may also occur in patients not treated with antithrombotics. Even after early rebleeding, prognosis of PMH is excellent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary antithrombin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Merck Manual Home Edition for Patients and Caregivers: Thrombophilia National Blood Clot Alliance: Antithrombin Deficiency Orphanet: Hereditary thrombophilia due to congenital antithrombin deficiency Patient Support and ...

  14. Menstrual bleeding after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth; Larsen, Signe Holm; Wilkens, Helena; Jakobsen, Anja; Pedersen, Thais Almeida Lins

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether open-heart surgery with the use of extracorporeal circulation has an impact on menstrual bleeding. The menstrual bleeding pattern was registered in fertile women undergoing open-heart surgery in 2010-12. Haematocrit and 24-h postoperative bleeding were compared with those of men undergoing cardiac surgery. Women (n = 22), with mean age of 36 (range 17-60) years, were operated on and hospitalized for 4-5 postoperative days. The mean preoperative haematocrit was 40% (range 32-60%), and mean haematocrit at discharge was 32% (range 26-37%). Mean postoperative bleeding in the first 24 h was 312 (range 50-1442) ml. They underwent surgery for atrial septal defect (n = 5), composite graft/David procedure (n = 4), pulmonary or aortic valve replacement (n = 6), myxoma (n = 2), mitral valvuloplasty (n = 2), ascending aortic aneurysm (n = 1), aortic coarctation (n = 1) and total cavopulmonary connection (n = 1). Unplanned menstrual bleeding (lasting 2-5 days) was detected in 13 (60%) patients. Of them, 4 were 1-7 days early, 4 were 8-14 days early, 3 were 1-7 days late and 2 had menstruation despite having had menstrual bleeding within the last 2 weeks. None had unusually large or long-lasting menstrual bleeding. Ten women took oral contraceptives, 8 of whom had unexpected menstrual bleeding during admission. Men (n = 22), with a mean age of 35 (range 17-54) years, had mean bleeding of 331 (range 160-796) ml postoperatively, which was not statistically significantly different from the women's. The mean preoperative haematocrit was 40% (range 29-49%) among men, while haematocrit at discharge was 32% (28-41), not significantly different from that seen in the female subgroup. Menstrual bleeding patterns are disturbed by open-heart surgery in the majority of fertile women. Nevertheless, the unexpected menstrual bleeding is neither particularly long-lasting nor of large quantity, and the postoperative surgical bleeding is unaffected. We recommend that

  15. Acute variceal bleeding: general management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Patch; Lucy Dagher

    2001-01-01

    @@ TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR ACUTE VARICEAL BLEEDING Backgound Acute variceal bleeding has a significant mortality which ranges form 5% to 50% in patients with cirrhosis[1].Overall survival is probably improving,because of new therapeutic approaches,and improved medical care.However,mortality is still closely related to failure to control hacmorrhage or carly rebleeding,which is a distinct characteristic of portal hypertensive bleeding and occures in as many as 50% of patients in the first days to 6 weeks after admission et al[2].

  16. [Prophylactic use of icatibant before tracheal intubation of a patient with hereditary angioedema type III. (A literature review of perioperative management of patients with hereditary angioedema type III)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturri Clavero, F; González Uriarte, A; Tamayo Medel, G; Gamboa Setién, P M

    2014-01-01

    Type III hereditary angioedema is a rare familial disorder that has recently been described as a separate condition. Triggers for episodes of angioedema include surgery, dental procedures, and tracheal intubation maneuvers. Since episodes affecting the upper airway are potentially life-threatening, prophylactic treatment is recommended in these situations. The use of icatibant (Firazyr(®)), for prevention of angioedema prior to tracheal intubation, is reported in a patient with type iii hereditary angioedema. A literature review on the anesthetic management of this condition was conducted.

  17. Management of bleeding in acquired hemophilia A : results from the European Acquired Haemophilia (EACH2) Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Huth-Kuehne, Angela; Levesque, Herve; Marco, Pascual; Nemes, Laszlo; Pellegrini, Fabio; Tengborn, Lilian; Knoebl, Paul; Aspoeck, G.; Heistinger, M.; Knobl, P.; Makipernaa, A.; Andre, H; Aouba, A.; Bellucci, S.; Beurrier, P.; Borg, J.Y.; Darnige, L.; Devignes, J.; d'Oiron, R.; Gautier, P.; Gay, V.; Girault, S.; Gruel, Y.; Guerin, V.; Hezard, N.; Khellaf, M.; Koenig, M.; Levesque, H.; Lifermann, F; Marlu, R; Ninet, J.; Peynet, J.; Quemeneur, T.; Rothschild, C.; Schleinitz, N.; Sigaud, M.; Trouillier, S; Voisin, S.; Giebl, A.; Holstein, K.; Huth-Kuhne, A; Loreth, R.M.; Steigerwald, U.; Tiede, A.; Theodossiades, G.; Nemes, L.; Radvanyi, G.; Schlammadinger, A.; Barillari, G.; Pasca, S.; Baudo, F; Caimi, T.; Contino, L.; D'Angelo Armando, C.L.; Fattorini, A.; Di Minno, G.; Cerbone, A.M.; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; D'inca, M.; Falanga, A.; Maggioni, A.; Lerede, T.; Franchini, M.; Gaidano, G.; De Paoli, L.; Gamba, G.; Ghirardi, R; Girotto, M.; Tasca, D.; Grandone, E.; Tiscia, G.; Imberti, D.; Iorio, A.; Landolfi, R; Di Gennaro, L.; Novarese, L.; Mariani, G.; Lapecorella, M.; Marietta, M.; Pedrazzi, P.; Mazzucconi, M.G.; Santoro, C.; Morfini, M.; Linari, S.; Moratelli, S.; Paolini, R.; Piseddu, G.; Poggio, R.; Pogliani, E.; Carpenedo, M.; Remiddi, C.; Santagostino, E.; Mancuso, M.E.; Santoro, R.; Papaleo, G.; Schinco, P.; Borchiellini, A.; Valeri, F.; Scortechini, A.R.; Siragusa, S.; Sottilotta, G.; Squizzato, A.; Tagariello, G.; Sartori, R; Tagliaferri, A.R.; Di Perna, C.; Rivolta, G.F.; Testa, S.; Paoletti, O.; Toschi, V.; Zanon, E.; Brandolin, B.; Hamulyak, K.; Kamphuisen, P.; Laros-van Gorkom, B.; Leebeek, F.W.; Marten, N.; Novakova, I.; Schutgens, R.; van der Linden, P.W.; van Esser, J.; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, P.; Campos, M.; Aguilar, C.; Altisent, C.; Bermejo, N.; Del Campo, R.; Ferreiro Arguelles, M.; Gonzalez Bolos', R.; Gutierrez Pimentel, M.J.; Jimenez-Yuste, V.; Jose-Felix, L.; Marco, P.; Mingot, M.E.; Perez Garrido, R.; Perez Gonzale, N.Z.; Prieto Garcia, M.; Rodriguez-Huerta, A.M.; Sedano, C.; Tolosa Munoz, A.; Baghaei, F.; Tengborn, L.; Boehlen, F.; Korte, W.; Chowdary, P.; Collins, P.; Evans, G.; Pavord, S.; Rangarajan, S.; Wilde, J.

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation FVIII. Bleeding episodes at presentation are spontaneous and severe in most cases. Optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial, and available data are from observational and retrospective studies only. The EACH

  18. Effect of fibrinolysis on bleeding phenotype in moderate and severe von Willebrand disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wee, E. M.; Klaij, K.; Eikenboom, H. C. J.; Van der Bom, J. G.; Fijnvandraat, K.; Laros-Van Gorkom, B. A. P.; Mauser-Bunschoten, E. P.; Meijer, K.; Goverde, G.; Van der Linden, P. W. G.; Rijken, D. C.; Leebeek, F. W. G.

    Patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD), the most common inherited bleeding disorder, display large variation in bleeding tendency, which is not completely related to VWF levels. The cause of variability in clinical expression is largely unknown. The effect of plasma fibrinolytic capacity on

  19. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We published the Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE; C1 inhibitor [C1-INH] deficiency and updated this as Hereditary angioedema: a current state-of-the-art review: Canadian Hungarian 2007 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema. Objective To update the International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (circa 2010. Methods The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'angioédème héréditaire (RCAH http://www.haecanada.com and cosponsors University of Calgary and the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (with an unrestricted educational grant from CSL Behring held our third Conference May 15th to 16th, 2010 in Toronto Canada to update our consensus approach. The Consensus document was reviewed at the meeting and then circulated for review. Results This manuscript is the 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema that resulted from that conference. Conclusions Consensus approach is only an interim guide to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase III and IV clinical trials, meta analyses, and using data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, followed by large head-to-head clinical trials and then evidence-based guidelines and standards for HAE disease management.

  20. Excessive bleeding predictors after cardiac surgery in adults: integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Camila Takao; Dos Santos, Talita Raquel; Brunori, Evelise Helena Fadini Reis; Moorhead, Sue A; Lopes, Juliana de Lima; Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite de

    2015-11-01

    To integrate literature data on the predictors of excessive bleeding after cardiac surgery in adults. Perioperative nursing care requires awareness of the risk factors for excessive bleeding after cardiac surgery to assure vigilance prioritising and early correction of those that are modifiable. Integrative literature review. Articles were searched in seven databases. Seventeen studies investigating predictive factors for excessive bleeding after open-heart surgery from 2004-2014 were included. Predictors of excessive bleeding after cardiac surgery were: Patient-related: male gender, higher preoperative haemoglobin levels, lower body mass index, diabetes mellitus, impaired left ventricular function, lower amount of prebypass thrombin generation, lower preoperative platelet counts, decreased preoperative platelet aggregation, preoperative platelet inhibition level >20%, preoperative thrombocytopenia and lower preoperative fibrinogen concentration. Procedure-related: the operating surgeon, coronary artery bypass surgery with three or more bypasses, use of the internal mammary artery, duration of surgery, increased cross-clamp time, increased cardiopulmonary bypass time, lower intraoperative core body temperature and bypass-induced haemostatic disorders. Postoperative: fibrinogen levels and metabolic acidosis. Patient-related, procedure-related and postoperative predictors of excessive bleeding after cardiac surgery were identified. The predictors summarised in this review can be used for risk stratification of excessive bleeding after cardiac surgery. Assessment, documentation and case reporting can be guided by awareness of these factors, so that postoperative vigilance can be prioritised. Timely identification and correction of the modifiable factors can be facilitated. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of a 16-year-old Chinese patient with concurrent hereditary hemochromatosis and Gilbert's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianbo; Liu, Yanmin; Chang, Yujuan; Liu, Huimin; Wang, Peng

    2014-09-28

    Gilbert's syndrome and hereditary hemochromatosis predominantly affect Caucasians with a low incidence in Asians. Here we report the case of a 16-year-old Chinese boy, who was admitted with hepatalgia, jaundice, hyperpigmentation, and splenomegaly to our hospital. After excluding chronic hepatitis, autoimmune disorders, and alcohol or drug injury, genetic analyses of the patient and his parents revealed simultaneous manifestations of Gilbert's syndrome and hereditary hemochromatosis, though his parents did not develop related symptoms. The presented case indicates that diagnoses of Gilbert's syndrome and hereditary hemochromatosis should be taken into consideration when chronic hepatitis is suspected without a clear etiology.

  2. Side Effects: Bleeding and Bruising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and targeted therapy, can increase patients’ risk of bleeding and bruising, also called thrombocytopenia. Learn about steps to take if you are at increased risk of a low platelet count.

  3. Fibrinogen concentrate in bleeding patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Anne; Lunde, Jens; Johansen, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Hypofibrinogenaemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, but the optimal treatment level, the use of preemptive treatment and the preferred source of fibrinogen remain disputed. Fibrinogen concentrate is increasingly used and recommended for bleeding with acquired haemostatic...

  4. Bleeding in children with cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    His tory and clinical picture ... Bleeding at presentation is most commonly caused by bone marrow infiltration, whether by ... 7 - 10 days after chemotherapy, except in the case of carboplatinum/ ... adult autologous stem cell transplant patients.

  5. Vascular gastric anomalies as a cause of relapsing bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubović Gradimir

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although relatively rare, gastric vascular anomalies can be recognized as a source of both chronic and acute blood loss, most often presenting as long term iron deficiency anemia, rarely as severe acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Case report. We present five patients with various gastric vascular anomalies, diagnosed during the year of 2003. in the Clinical Hospital Center Zemun. The diagnosis was based on endoscopic appearances, clinical history and characteristic histological findings. Gastric vascular anomalies presented in our review were: portal hypertensive gastropathy, gastric antral vascular ectasia, angiodysplasia, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and Dieulafoy lesion. The used treatment modalities included surgery and various endoscopic techniques (schlerotherapy, argon plasma coagulation. Conclusion. Patients presented with chronic iron deficiency anemia or acute and recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage should be considered as having one of gastric vascular anomalies.

  6. An overview of novel therapies for acute hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firszt, Rafael; Frank, Michael M

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an episodic swelling disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance. Attacks are characterized by nonpitting edema of external or mucosal body surfaces. Patients often present with swelling of the extremities, abdominal pain, and swelling of the mouth and throat, which can at times lead to asphyxiation. The disease is caused by a mutation in the gene encoding the complement C1-inhibitor protein, which leads to unregulated production of bradykinin. Long-term therapy has depended on the use of attenuated androgens or plasmin inhibitors but in the US there was, until recently, no specific therapy for acute attacks. As well, many patients with hereditary angioedema in the US were either not adequately controlled on previously available therapies or required doses of medications that exposed them to the risk of serious adverse effects. Five companies have completed or are currently conducting phase III clinical trials in the development of specific therapies to terminate acute attacks or to be used as prophylaxis. These products are based on either replacement therapy with purified plasma-derived or recombinant C1-inhibitor, or inhibition of the kinin-generating pathways with a recombinant plasma kallikrein inhibitor or bradykinin type 2 receptor antagonist. Published studies thus far suggest that all of these products are likely to be effective. These new therapies will likely lead to a totally new approach in treating hereditary angioedema.

  7. [Diagnosis of the peripheral hereditary neuropathies and its molecular genetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Zamora, Edgar; Arenas-Sordo, María de la Luz

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies include a wide range of pathological disorders characterized by damage of peripheral nerves. Among them, peripheral hereditary neuropathies are a group of frequent illnesses and early evolution. They have been named hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) or peripheral hereditary neuropathies type Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT). The most frequent types are CMT1, CMT2 and CMTX. Approximately 70% of the cases correspond to subtype CMT1A, associated with tandem duplication of a 1.5 Mb DNA fragment on chromosome 17p11.2-p12 that codifies the peripheral myelin protein PMP22. So far, there five different types of CMT (1,2,3,4,X) with approximately 32 subtypes, associated with more than 30 genes. Have been reported genetic heterogeneity and expression variability of the illness makes it necessary to carry on diagnostic strategies that integrate clinical study for determining genetic clinical history, family history, complete physical exploration, muscular strength, physical deformities, reflexes and sensitivity, and molecular studies allow detection of different types of mutations and help establish a correct diagnosis and an adequate genetic counseling.

  8. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hansen, Thomas van Overeem; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among...... affected families without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The new pathogenic variants are rare, posing challenges to estimation of risk attribution through patient cohorts. In this Review article, we examine HBOC genes, focusing on their role in genome maintenance, the possibilities for functional testing...... of putative causal variants and the clinical application of new HBOC genes in cancer risk management and treatment decision-making....

  9. Topological Structures and Membrane Nanostructures of Erythrocytes after Splenectomy in Hereditary Spherocytosis Patients via Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Lu, Liyuan; Li, Juan

    2016-09-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is an inherited red blood cell membrane disorder resulting from mutations of genes encoding erythrocyte membrane and cytoskeletal proteins. Few equipments can observe the structural characteristics of hereditary spherocytosis directly expect for atomic force microscopy In our study, we proved atomic force microscopy is a powerful and sensitive instrument to describe the characteristics of hereditary spherocytosis. Erythrocytes from hereditary spherocytosis patients were small spheroidal, lacking a well-organized lattice on the cell membrane, with smaller cell surface particles and had reduced valley to peak distance and average cell membrane roughness vs. those from healthy individuals. These observations indicated defects in the certain cell membrane structural proteins such as α- and β-spectrin, ankyrin, etc. Until now, splenectomy is still the most effective treatment for symptoms relief for hereditary spherocytosis. In this study, we further solved the mysteries of membrane nanostructure changes of erythrocytes before and after splenectomy in hereditary spherocytosis by atomic force microscopy. After splenectomy, the cells were larger, but still spheroidal-shaped. The membrane ultrastructure was disorganized and characterized by a reduced surface particle size and lower than normal Ra values. These observations indicated that although splenectomy can effectively relieve the symptoms of hereditary spherocytosis, it has little effect on correction of cytoskeletal membrane defects of hereditary spherocytosis. We concluded that atomic force microscopy is a powerful tool to investigate the pathophysiological mechanisms of hereditary spherocytosis and to monitor treatment efficacy in clinical practices. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to study hereditary spherocytosis with atomic force microscopy and offers important mechanistic insight into the underlying role of splenectomy.

  10. Hereditary angioedema: quality of life in Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Abadia Consuelo M. S. Gomide

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hereditary angioedema is a serious medical condition caused by a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder and it is associated with deficient production or dysfunction of the C1 esterase inhibitor. In most cases, affected patients experience unexpected and recurrent crises of subcutaneous, gastrointestinal and laryngeal edema. The unpredictability, intensity and other factors associated with the disease impact the quality of life of hereditary angioedema patients. We evaluated the quality of life in Brazilian hereditary angioedema patients. METHODS: Patients older than 15 years with any severity of hereditary angioedema and laboratory confirmation of C1 inhibitor deficiency were included. Two questionnaires were used: a clinical questionnaire and the SF-36 (a generic questionnaire. This protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo. RESULTS: The SF-36 showed that 90.4% (mean of all the patients had a score below 70 and 9.6% had scores equal to or higher than 70. The scores of the eight dimensions ranged from 51.03 to 75.95; vitality and social aspects were more affected than other arenas. The internal consistency of the evaluation was demonstrated by a Cronbach's alpha value above 0.7 in seven of the eight domains. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, Brazilian patients demonstrated an impaired quality of life, as measured by the SF-36. The most affected domains were those related to vitality and social characteristics. The generic SF-36 questionnaire was relevant to the evaluation of quality of life; however, there is a need for more specific instruments for better evaluation.

  11. The medical management of abnormal uterine bleeding in reproductive-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Linda D; Gueye, Ndeye-Aicha

    2016-01-01

    In the treatment of women with abnormal uterine bleeding, once a thorough history, physical examination, and indicated imaging studies are performed and all significant structural causes are excluded, medical management is the first-line approach. Determining the acuity of the bleeding, the patient's medical history, assessing risk factors, and establishing a diagnosis will individualize their medical regimen. In acute abnormal uterine bleeding with a normal uterus, parenteral estrogen, a multidose combined oral contraceptive regimen, a multidose progestin-only regimen, and tranexamic acid are all viable options, given the appropriate clinical scenario. Heavy menstrual bleeding can be treated with a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, combined oral contraceptives, continuous oral progestins, and tranexamic acid with high efficacy. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs may be utilized with hormonal methods and tranexamic acid to decrease menstrual bleeding. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are indicated in patients with leiomyoma and abnormal uterine bleeding in preparation for surgical interventions. In women with inherited bleeding disorders all hormonal methods as well as tranexamic acid can be used to treat abnormal uterine bleeding. Women on anticoagulation therapy should consider using progestin-only methods as well as a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist to treat their heavy menstrual bleeding. Given these myriad options for medical treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding, many patients may avoid surgical intervention.

  12. Retained fetal bones: an unusual cause of abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Chawla

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB is a common gynaecological problem with most common causes being fibroid, polyp, endometritis, neoplasia and coagulation disorder. Presence of retained intrauterine fetal bones as a cause of AUB, is a rare but well recognized entity. Patient may present with subfertility, secondary infertility, chronic pelvic pain, vaginal discharge, pelvic inflammatory disease, abnormal uterine bleeding. Incidence reported in literature is 0.15% among patients undergoing diagnostic hysteroscopy. Calcification appears as hyperechoeic area on ultrasound. Hysteroscopy guided removal of bony fragments is the gold standard and leads to complete resolution of symptoms. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(6.000: 2032-2033

  13. Prolonged bleeding on the neck in leech therapy: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan Savrun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Superficial skin bleeding can usually be stopped by applying short-time compression, unless the patient suffers from coagulation disorders or uses anticoagulant. Because of the anticoagulant component of leech saliva, a leech bite may cause long-time bleeding, which cannot be stopped via compression. In this study, the case of a patient who applied leech therapy on her neck for the treatment of migraine has been presented. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(4.000: 234-237

  14. Human Plasma-Derived, Nanofiltered, C1-Inhibitor Concentrate (Cinryze®), a Novel Therapeutic Alternative for the Management of Hereditary Angioedema Resulting from C1-Inhibitor Deficiency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farkas, Henriette; Varga, Lilian

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema resulting from the deficiency of the C1 inhibitor (HAE-C1-INH) is a rare, but potentially life-threatening disorder characterized by paroxysmal episodes of subcutaneous or submucosal edema...

  15. Hereditary persistence of alpha-fetoprotein (HPAFP) : review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwert, A. C.; Giltay, J. C.; Lentjes, E. G. W. M.; Lock, M. T. W. T.

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) serum levels are raised in several clinical conditions, ranging from non-pathological conditions to malignancies. Hereditary persistence of alpha-fetoprotein (HPAFP) is a rare benign disorder with elevated AFP levels. HPAFP is described as a benign autosomal dominantly inheri

  16. First experiences with genetic counselling based on predictive DNA diagnosis in hereditary glomus tumours (paragangliomas)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk, JC; Jansen, JC; vanSchothorst, EM; Oosterhof, AW; Devilee, P; Bakker, E; Zoeteweij, MW; vanderMey, AGL

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary glomus tumour (MIM 168000) or paraganglioma (PGL) is a slowly progressive disorder causing benign tumour growth predominantly in the head and neck region. Though benign in nature the tumours can lead to severe morbidity. Inheritance of PGL is autosomal dominant and is strongly modified by

  17. Hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes : with emphasis on hyper-IgD and periodic fever syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, A.

    2004-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is a group of rare hereditary disorders, collectively called auto-inflammatory syndromes, with a specific focus on the hyper-IgD and periodic fever syndrome. The autoinflammatory syndromes are characterized by lifelong recurrent episodes with fever, usually accompanied by

  18. Clinical expression of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is affected by the mitochondrial DNA-haplogroup background.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hudson, G.; Carelli, V.; Spruijt, L.; Gerards, M.; Mowbray, C.; Achilli, A.; Pyle, A.; Elson, J.; Howell, N.; Morgia, C. La; Valentino, M.L.; Huoponen, K.; Savontaus, M.L.; Nikoskelainen, E.; Sadun, A.A.; Salomao, S.R.; Belfort Jr, R.; Griffiths, P.; Man, P.Y.; Coo, R.F. de; Horvath, R.; Zeviani, M.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Torroni, A.; Chinnery, P.F.

    2007-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is due primarily to one of three common point mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but the incomplete penetrance implicates additional genetic or environmental factors in the pathophysiology of the disorder. Both the 11778G-->A and 14484T-->C LHON mutation

  19. First experiences with genetic counselling based on predictive DNA diagnosis in hereditary glomus tumours (paragangliomas)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk, JC; Jansen, JC; vanSchothorst, EM; Oosterhof, AW; Devilee, P; Bakker, E; Zoeteweij, MW; vanderMey, AGL

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary glomus tumour (MIM 168000) or paraganglioma (PGL) is a slowly progressive disorder causing benign tumour growth predominantly in the head and neck region. Though benign in nature the tumours can lead to severe morbidity. Inheritance of PGL is autosomal dominant and is strongly modified by

  20. Hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes : with emphasis on hyper-IgD and periodic fever syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, A.

    2004-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is a group of rare hereditary disorders, collectively called auto-inflammatory syndromes, with a specific focus on the hyper-IgD and periodic fever syndrome. The autoinflammatory syndromes are characterized by lifelong recurrent episodes with fever, usually accompanied by

  1. First experiences with genetic counselling based on predictive DNA diagnosis in hereditary glomus tumours (paragangliomas)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk, JC; Jansen, JC; vanSchothorst, EM; Oosterhof, AW; Devilee, P; Bakker, E; Zoeteweij, MW; vanderMey, AGL

    Hereditary glomus tumour (MIM 168000) or paraganglioma (PGL) is a slowly progressive disorder causing benign tumour growth predominantly in the head and neck region. Though benign in nature the tumours can lead to severe morbidity. Inheritance of PGL is autosomal dominant and is strongly modified by

  2. Genes for Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven genes: two genes for autosomal dominant ("SPTLC1"…

  3. Widespread thalamic and cerebellar degeneration in a patient with a complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, K.; De Vos, Rai; Derksen, L.; Bauer, P.; Riess, O.; den Dunnen, W.; Deller, T.; Hageman, G.; Rueb, U.

    2009-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSP) are a heterogeneous group of familial movement disorders sharing progressive spastic paraplegia as a common disease sign. In the present study, we performed the first pathoanatomical investigation of the central nervous degeneration of a female patient with a

  4. Genes for Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven genes: two genes for autosomal dominant ("SPTLC1"…

  5. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis: a report of four cases in the same family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelar, Rafael Linard; de Luna Campos, Gustavo José; de Carvalho Bezerra Falcão, Paulo Germano; da Costa Araújo, Fábio Andrey; de Carvalho, Ricardo Wathson Feitosa; de Souza Andrade, Emanuel Sávio

    2010-02-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is characterized by a slow, progressive increase in the gingival tissue that develops as either an isolated disorder or as part of the clinical characteristics of diverse syndromes. The present case report describes a Brazilian family with individuals from three generations affected. The proposed treatment was maxillary and mandibular gingivectomy with 12 months of monitoring.

  6. Near fatal spontaneous intraperitoneal bleeding: A rare manifestation in a congenital factor X deficiency carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K V Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital factor X (FX deficiency is a rare coagulation disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance, characterized by bleeding of variable severity. Bleeding severity generally correlates with the level of FX functional activity and severe bleeding usually occurs in moderate and severe deficiency, when FX coagulant activity is <5%. FX activity above 10% is infrequently associated with severe bleeding. Here we report the rare occurrence of life-threatening massive spontaneous intraperitoneal bleeding with hypovolemic shock, resulting from spontaneous rupture of an ovarian luteal cyst in a 25-year-old FX deficiency carrier woman, with a FX activity of 26%. She was managed successfully conservatively, with fresh frozen plasma and packed red blood cell transfusions and she showed gradual improvement. The case is being reported to discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare inherited coagulation disorder.

  7. Moyamoya disease in a patient with hereditary spherocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holz, A.; Woldenberg, R.; Miller, D.; Kalina, P.; Black, K.; Lane, E. [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, New York University School of Medicine, 300 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030 (United States)

    1998-02-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebral vasculopathy characterized by occlusion of the supraclinoid portion of the internal carotid artery and proximal portions of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Patients develop an extensive collateral network of parenchymal, transdural and leptomeningeal vessels to supply the compromised brain. These collateral channels, also known as ``moyamoya vessels,`` may be seen in a number of disorders which lead to intracranial vascular occlusion. We report a case of MMD in a child with hereditary spherocytosis. (orig.) With 4 figs., 5 refs.

  8. Current concepts in the treatment of hereditary ataxias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Braga Neto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hereditary ataxias (HA represents an extensive group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative diseases, characterized by progressive ataxia combined with extra-cerebellar and multi-systemic involvements, including peripheral neuropathy, pyramidal signs, movement disorders, seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. There is no effective treatment for HA, and management remains supportive and symptomatic. In this review, we will focus on the symptomatic treatment of the main autosomal recessive ataxias, autosomal dominant ataxias, X-linked cerebellar ataxias and mitochondrial ataxias. We describe management for different clinical symptoms, mechanism-based approaches, rehabilitation therapy, disease modifying therapy, future clinical trials and perspectives, genetic counseling and preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

  9. Hereditary vitamin D-resistant rickets presenting as alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Genevieve; McPherson, Tess; Kini, Usha; Ryan, Fiona; Taibjee, Saleem M; Moss, Celia; Burge, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary vitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene. We report the case of an infant presenting with alopecia, growth failure, and gross motor developmental delay. Serum biochemistry and skeletal survey were consistent with rickets. After a poor response to standard treatment, genetic testing confirmed a c.147-2A>T novel mutation in the VDR gene consistent with HVDRR. It is important for dermatologists and pediatricians to recognize alopecia as a presenting sign of HVDRR because appropriate treatment leads to better growth and development of the child.

  10. Postangioedema attack skin blisters: an unusual presentation of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesen, Jonathan; Gonzalez-Estrada, Alexei; Auron, Moises

    2014-04-10

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by attacks of self-limited swelling affecting extremities, face and intra-abdominal organs, most often caused by mutations in the C1-inhibitor gene with secondary Bradykinin-mediated increased vascular permeability. We describe a 36-year-old man with a history of HAE who presented with painful interdigital bullae secondary to an acute oedema exacerbation. Biopsy and cultures of the lesions were negative and they resolved spontaneously. It is important to highlight and recognise the development of oedema blisters after resolution of a flare of HAE (only 1 previous case report), and hence avoid unnecessary dermatological diagnostic workup and treatment.

  11. Late-onset Leber hereditary optic neuropathy mimicking Susac's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccolella, Stefano; Petruzzella, Vittoria; Prascina, Francesco; Artuso, Lucia; Pacillo, Francesca; Dell'Aglio, Rosa; Avolio, Carlo; Delle Noci, Nicola; Attimonelli, Marcella; Specchio, Luigi Maria

    2010-12-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by bilateral painless optic atrophy and blindness. It usually occurs in young men in association with three major mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). We report a patient with a history of alcohol abuse who developed at age 63 years visual impairment, sensorineural hearing loss, and memory dysfunction, suggestive of Susac's syndrome. The patient carried the heteroplasmic mt. 11778G>A mutation on the T2e mtDNA haplogroup. It remains unclear if chronic alcohol abuse combined with the mitochondrial genetic background prompted an aged-related neurodegeneration or deferred the onset of the LHON disease.

  12. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: Bringing the Lab to the Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Nailyn; Lessell, Simmons; Cestari, Dean M

    2016-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was the first clinically characterized mitochondrial disorder. Since its first description in 1871, much has been discovered regarding the genetics and pathophysiology of the disease. This has enabled the development of in vitro cell and animal models that can be used to try to determine not only the effects of the genetic mutation upon the clinical phenotype but to also test potential novel therapies. Treatments for LHON have ranged from vitamins and minerals to immunosuppressants and, more recently, targeted gene therapy. This article reviews the pathophysiology and clinical features of LHON with a focus on translational research.

  13. Hereditary spastic paraplegia: clinical principles and genetic advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, John K

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) refers to inherited disorders in which spastic gait is either the only feature or is a major syndrome feature. There are more than 70 genetic types of HSP. Neuropathological studies, albeit limited to only a few genetic types of HSP, have identified axon degeneration involving the distal ends of the corticospinal tracts and fasciculus gracilis fibers. In this review, the author highlights the clinical and genetic features of HSP. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Hyper-IgD syndrome and hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Vicentini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are a group of systemic disorders characterized by recurrent attacks of systemic inflammation (autoinflammation without infectious or autoimmune cause. The hyper-IgD syndrome (HIDS is a rare autosomal recessive inflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent fever, increased serum IgD (normal value < 100 U/ml and generalized inflammation (lymphadenopathy, arthralgias/arthritis, abdominal complaints, skin rash, and headache. The attacks persist during the entire life although frequency and severity tend to diminish with age. HIDS is caused by specific mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, resulting in depressed enzymatic activity. At present the therapy for the syndrome is only supportive. Other than HIDS, other hereditary systemic inflammatory disorders have been described: the Familial Mediterranean Fever, the tumour necrosis factor receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS, a disease related to the mutations of one of the TNF receptors, the Familial Cold Urticaria and the Muckle-Wells syndrome. The differential diagnosis with other causes of periodic fever is crucial for assessing appropriate management and treatment.

  15. Targeted high throughput sequencing in hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koht, Jeanette; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Rengmark, Aina H.; Henriksen, Sandra P.; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.; Toft, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous monogenic neurodegenerative disorders. To date, a large number of individuals with such disorders remain undiagnosed. Here, we have assessed molecular diagnosis by gene panel sequencing in 105 early and late-onset hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia probands, in whom extensive previous investigations had failed to identify the genetic cause of disease. Pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants were identified in 20 probands (19%) and variants of uncertain significance in ten probands (10%). Together these accounted for 30 probands (29%) and involved 18 different genes. Among several interesting findings, dominantly inherited KIF1A variants, p.(Val8Met) and p.(Ile27Thr) segregated in two independent families, both presenting with a pure spastic paraplegia phenotype. Two homozygous missense variants, p.(Gly4230Ser) and p.(Leu4221Val) were found in SACS in one consanguineous family, presenting with spastic ataxia and isolated cerebellar atrophy. The average disease duration in probands with pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants was 31 years, ranging from 4 to 51 years. In conclusion, this study confirmed and expanded the clinical phenotypes associated with known disease genes. The results demonstrate that gene panel sequencing and similar sequencing approaches can serve as efficient diagnostic tools for different heterogeneous disorders. Early use of such strategies may help to reduce both costs and time of the diagnostic process. PMID:28362824

  16. Growth and development: hereditary and mechanical modulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jeremy J; Nah, Hyun-Duck

    2004-06-01

    Growth and development is the net result of environmental modulation of genetic inheritance. Mesenchymal cells differentiate into chondrogenic, osteogenic, and fibrogenic cells: the first 2 are chiefly responsible for endochondral ossification, and the last 2 for sutural growth. Cells are influenced by genes and environmental cues to migrate, proliferate, differentiate, and synthesize extracellular matrix in specific directions and magnitudes, ultimately resulting in macroscopic shapes such as the nose and the chin. Mechanical forces, the most studied environmental cues, readily modulate bone and cartilage growth. Recent experimental evidence demonstrates that cyclic forces evoke greater anabolic responses of not only craniofacial sutures, but also cranial base cartilage. Mechanical forces are transmitted as tissue-borne and cell-borne mechanical strain that in turn regulates gene expression, cell proliferation, differentiation, maturation, and matrix synthesis, the totality of which is growth and development. Thus, hereditary and mechanical modulations of growth and development share a common pathway via genes. Combined approaches using genetics, bioengineering, and quantitative biology are expected to bring new insight into growth and development, and might lead to innovative therapies for craniofacial skeletal dysplasia including malocclusion, dentofacial deformities, and craniofacial anomalies such as cleft palate and craniosynostosis, as well as disorders associated with the temporomandibular joint.

  17. Advances in laboratory diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Mariela Granero

    2016-11-12

    Among the red cell membrane disorders, hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is one of the most common causes of inherited hemolytic anemia. HS results from the deficiency or dysfunction of red blood cell membrane proteins, such as α spectrin, β spectrin, ankyrin, anion channel protein (Band-3 protein), protein 4.1 and protein 4.2. Conventionally, HS diagnosis is established through a series of tests, which include spherocytes identification in peripheral smear, reticulocyte count, osmotic fragility, etc. Currently, different hematological analyzers provide erythrocyte indicators that estimate the presence of spherocytes and correlate that with HS, which can be useful for disease screening. The most traditional method is the osmotic fragility (OF) test, which is labor-intensive and time-consuming to perform and presents low sensitivity and specificity values. Thus, new methods have been developed for HS diagnosis, such as flow cytometry. Current guidelines recommend the use of flow cytometry as a screening test for HS diagnosis using the eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA) binding test. Thus, HS diagnosis is the result of a collaboration between clinicians and laboratories, who should take into account the family history and the exclusion of other causes of secondary spherocytosis.

  18. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells.

  19. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  20. [Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: a rare diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahem-Jmili, N; Salem, N; Abdelkefi, S; Champ, B Grand; Bekri, S; Sboui, H; Mahjoub, T; Yacoub, S; Kortas, M

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary sideroblastic anemia is a very rare disease recessive and X-linked that affect heme biosynthesis by deficit or decreased of delta aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS) activity. We report a case of a six-month-old boy, admitted in the hospital for anemic syndrome. The hemogram showed anemia (hemoglobin: 4.5 g/dL), frankly hypochronic microcytic and a regenerated (mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration: 26 g/dL, mean cell volume: 53 fl, reticulocytes: 10 x 10(9)/L) with red cells morphologic disorders in smears (anisopoikylocytosis) without attack of the other lineages; white blood cells: 11 x 10(9)/L (neutrophils: 64% and lymphocytes: 35%); platelets: 350 x 10(9)/L. Examination of bone marrow showed an important erythroid hyperplasia (about 69%) with dyserythropoiesis. Perls stain revealed intense siderosis with 90% of ringed sideroblasts and a large number of siderocytes. Exploration of ALAS2 and ABC7 genes on the DNA of the infant was not found abnormalities. Treatment with pyridoxine corrects moderately the anemia. By the way, we proposed to remind that iron deficiency, inflammatory syndrome and thalassemia are the common microcytic anemia. However, it's mandatory to explore other causes if diagnosis is not solved.

  1. Bleed Hole Flow Phenomena Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Boundary-layer bleed is an invaluable tool for controlling the airflow in supersonic aircraft engine inlets. Incoming air is decelerated to subsonic speeds prior to entering the compressor via a series of oblique shocks. The low momentum flow in the boundary layer interacts with these shocks, growing in thickness and, under some conditions, leading to flow separation. To remedy this, bleed holes are strategically located to remove mass from the boundary layer, reducing its thickness and helping to maintain uniform flow to the compressor. The bleed requirements for any inlet design are unique and must be validated by extensive wind tunnel testing to optimize performance and efficiency. To accelerate this process and reduce cost, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center initiated an experimental program to study the flow phenomena associated with bleed holes. Knowledge of these flow properties will be incorporated into computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that will aid engine inlet designers in optimizing bleed configurations before any hardware is fabricated. This ongoing investigation is currently examining two hole geometries, 90 and 20 (both with 5-mm diameters), and various flow features.

  2. PALM-COEIN Nomenclature for Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneris, Angela

    2016-05-01

    Approximately 30% of women will experience abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) during their life time. Previous terms defining AUB have been confusing and imprecisely applied. As a consequence, both clinical management and research on this common problem have been negatively impacted. In 2011, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Menstrual Disorders Group (FMDG) published PALM-COEIN, a new classification system for abnormal bleeding in the reproductive years. Terms such as menorrhagia, menometrorrhagia, metrorrhagia, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, polymenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, and uterine hemorrhage are no longer recommended. The PALM-COEIN system was developed to standardize nomenclature to describe the etiology and severity of AUB. A brief description of the PALM-COEIN nomenclature is presented as well as treatment options for each etiology. Clinicians will frequently encounter women with AUB and should report findings utilizing the PALM-COEIN system.

  3. Endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarun; McCarty, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    Diverticular hemorrhage is the most common reason for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) with substantial cost of hospitalization and a median length of hospital stay of 3 days. Bleeding usually is self-limited in 70-80% of cases but early rebleeding is not an uncommon problem that can be reduced with proper endoscopic therapies. Colonoscopy is recommended as first-line diagnostic and therapeutic approach. In the vast majority of patients diverticular hemorrhage can be readily managed by interventional endotherapy including injection, heat cautery, clip placement, and ligation to achieve endoscopic hemostasis. This review will serve to highlight the various interventions available to endoscopists with specific emphasis on superior modalities in the endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

  4. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2012-01-01

    serious ulcer bleeding is suspected and blood found in gastric aspirate, endoscopy within 12 hours will result in faster discharge and reduced need for transfusions. Endoscopic hemostasis remains indicated for high-risk lesions. Clips, thermocoagulation, and epinephrine injection are effective......Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved......-risk stigmata. Although selected patients can be discharged promptly after endoscopy, high-risk patients should be hospitalized for at least 3 days after endoscopic hemostasis. Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who require secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis should start receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA...

  5. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2012-01-01

    serious ulcer bleeding is suspected and blood found in gastric aspirate, endoscopy within 12 hours will result in faster discharge and reduced need for transfusions. Endoscopic hemostasis remains indicated for high-risk lesions. Clips, thermocoagulation, and epinephrine injection are effective......Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved......-risk stigmata. Although selected patients can be discharged promptly after endoscopy, high-risk patients should be hospitalized for at least 3 days after endoscopic hemostasis. Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who require secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis should start receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA...

  6. Endoscopic Management of Diverticular Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Rustagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverticular hemorrhage is the most common reason for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB with substantial cost of hospitalization and a median length of hospital stay of 3 days. Bleeding usually is self-limited in 70–80% of cases but early rebleeding is not an uncommon problem that can be reduced with proper endoscopic therapies. Colonoscopy is recommended as first-line diagnostic and therapeutic approach. In the vast majority of patients diverticular hemorrhage can be readily managed by interventional endotherapy including injection, heat cautery, clip placement, and ligation to achieve endoscopic hemostasis. This review will serve to highlight the various interventions available to endoscopists with specific emphasis on superior modalities in the endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

  7. Hereditary angioedema type 2 presented as an orbital complication of acute rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somuk, Battal Tahsin; Göktas, Göksel; Özer, Samet; Sapmaz, Emrah; Bas, Yalcın

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant and life-threatening disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of non-pitting edema affecting the skin, respiratory system and digestive tracts and caused by a congenital deficiency or function defect of the C1 esterase inhibitor. Preseptal cellulitis is defined as an infection of the tissues of the anterior orbital septum. It is generally caused by complications from an upper respiratory tract infection, dacryocystitis, dermal infection, and, rarely, sinusitis. The disease presents with orbital pain, edema on the eyelids, erythema, and fever. In this case, a child with hereditary angioedema type 2 who presented as mimicking a complication of acute sinusitis is discussed.

  8. High liver FDG uptake on PET/CT in patient with lymphoma diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Jose R; Moreno, Manuel; Rayo, Juan I; Serrano, Justo; Dominguez, Maria L; Garcia, Lucia

    2015-06-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disorder of iron metabolism resulting in toxic accumulation of iron in vital organs. We present a 64-year-old white man with non-Hodgkin lymphoma treated with high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplant that was subsequently diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis. F-FDG PET/CT was performed as routine follow-up and showed a pathological finding of homogeneous increased liver glucose metabolism. Increased FDG avidity in the liver suggested the presence of damage caused by hemochromatosis.

  9. Cardiac arrest after anesthetic management in a patient with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergül Yakup

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV is a rare disorder with an autosomal recessive transmission and characterized by self-mutilation due to a lack in pain and heat sensation. Recurrent hyperpyrexia and anhydrosis are seen in patients as a result of a lack of sweat gland innervation. Self-mutilation and insensitivity to pain result in orthopedic complications and patients undergone recurrent surgical interventions with anesthesia. However, these patients are prone to perioperative complications such as hyperthermia, hypothermia, and cardiac complications like bradycardia and hypotension. We report a 5-year-old boy with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV, developing hyperpyrexia and cardiac arrest after anesthesia.

  10. Hepatic and renal failure associated with amiodarone infusion in a patient with hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, B J; Havill, J H

    2002-06-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare inherited metabolic disorder. Although fructose intolerance usually presents in the paediatric age group, individuals can survive into adulthood by self.manipulation of diet. Hospitalisation can become a high.risk environment for these individuals because of loss of control of their strict dietary constraints and the added danger of administration of medications containing fructose, sucrose and sorbitol. We report a case of hereditary fructose intolerance in an adult presenting with hepatic and renal failure associated with an amiodarone infusion and explore the possibility of polysorbate 80 as a cause of this patient's hepatic and renal failure.

  11. HEREDITARY ANGIOEDEMA IN CHILDREN — A RARE CLINICAL CASE IN THE PRACTICE OF THE ABDOMINAL SURGEON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. Yu. Dyakonova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a rare and dangerous hereditary disease, the differential diagnostics of which is very difficult up to date. Children with this disorder come with acute abdominal pain that may be caused by diseases of the digestive and urinary system, various gynecological diseases, and infectious processes in the body. The main task of the children's surgeon is to exclude acute surgical pathology and perform differential diagnostics with diseases such as acute appendicitis, Meckel diverticulum, intestinal obstruction, omentum infarction and the other as soon as possible. The article presents the clinical observation of a 14-year-old female patient with angioedema.

  12. Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Generalized Gingival Overgrowth Resembling Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis in Siblings: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Yaprak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI is a group of hereditary disorders primarily characterized by developmental abnormalities in the quantity and/or quality of enamel. There are some reports suggesting an association between AI and generalized gingival enlargement. This paper describes the clinical findings and oral management of two siblings presenting both AI and hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF like generalized gingival enlargements. The treatment of gingival enlargements by periodontal flap surgery was successful in the management of the physiologic gingival form for both patients in the 3-year follow-up period. Prosthetic treatment was also satisfactory for the older patient both aesthetically and functionally.

  13. [Gastrointestinal bleeding: the role of radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga Gómez, S; Pérez Lafuente, M; Abu-Suboh Abadia, M; Castell Conesa, J

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a diagnostic challenge both in its acute presentation, which requires the point of bleeding to be located quickly, and in its chronic presentation, which requires repeated examinations to determine its etiology. Although the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding is based on endoscopic examinations, radiological studies like computed tomography (CT) angiography for acute bleeding or CT enterography for chronic bleeding are becoming more and more common in clinical practice, even though they have not yet been included in the clinical guidelines for gastrointestinal bleeding. CT can replace angiography as the diagnostic test of choice in acute massive gastrointestinal bleeding, and CT can complement the endoscopic capsule and scintigraphy in chronic or recurrent bleeding suspected to originate in the small bowel. Angiography is currently used to complement endoscopy for the treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  14. Management of severe perioperative bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A; Afshari, Arash; Albaladejo, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The aims of severe perioperative bleeding management are three-fold. First, preoperative identification by anamesis and laboratory testing of those patients for whom the perioperative bleeding risk may be increased. Second, implementation of strategies for correcting preoperative anaemia......-sectional surveys were selected. At the suggestion of the ESA Guideline Committee, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) grading system was initially used to assess the level of evidence and to grade recommendations. During the process of guideline development, the official position of the ESA...

  15. Histopathological pattern of abnormal uterine bleeding in endometrial biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, S; Lakhey, M; Vaidya, S; Sharma, P K; Hirachand, S; Lama, S; KC, S

    2013-03-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common presenting complaint in gyanecology out patient department. Histopathological evaluation of the endometrial samples plays a significant role in the diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding. This study was carried out to determine the histopathological pattern of the endometrium in women of various age groups presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding. Endometrial biopsies and curettings of patients presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding was retrospectively studied. A total of 403 endometrial biopsies and curettings were analyzed. The age of the patients ranged from 18 to 70 years. Normal cyclical endometrium was seen in 165 (40.94%) cases, followed by 54 (13.40%) cases of disordered proliferative endometrium and 44 (10.92%) cases of hyperplasia. Malignancy was seen in 10 (2.48%) cases. Hyperplasia and malignancy were more common in the perimenopausal and postmenopausal age groups. Histopathological examination of endometrial biopsies and curettings in patients presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding showed a wide spectrum of changes ranging from normal endometrium to malignancy. Endometrial evaluation is specially recommended in women of perimenopausal and postmenopausal age groups presenting with AUB, to rule out a possibility of any preneoplastic condition or malignancy.

  16. The distal hereditary motor neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Alexander M; Kalmar, Bernadett; Greensmith, Linda; Reilly, Mary M

    2012-01-01

    The distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN) comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that share the common feature of a length-dependent predominantly motor neuropathy. Many forms of dHMN have minor sensory abnormalities and/or a significant upper-motor-neuron component, and there is often an overlap with the axonal forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2) and with juvenile forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and hereditary spastic paraplegia. Eleven causative genes and four loci have been identified with autosomal dominant, recessive and X-linked patterns of inheritance. Despite advances in the identification of novel gene mutations, 80% of patients with dHMN have a mutation in an as-yet undiscovered gene. The causative genes have implicated proteins with diverse functions such as protein misfolding (HSPB1, HSPB8, BSCL2), RNA metabolism (IGHMBP2, SETX, GARS), axonal transport (HSPB1, DYNC1H1, DCTN1) and cation-channel dysfunction (ATP7A and TRPV4) in motor-nerve disease. This review will summarise the clinical features of the different subtypes of dHMN to help focus genetic testing for the practising clinician. It will also review the neuroscience that underpins our current understanding of how these mutations lead to a motor-specific neuropathy and highlight potential therapeutic strategies. An understanding of the functional consequences of gene mutations will become increasingly important with the advent of next-generation sequencing and the need to determine the pathogenicity of large amounts of individual genetic data.

  17. Coexistence of gilbert syndrome and hereditary spherocytosis in a child presenting with extreme jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hee; Moon, Kyung Rye

    2014-12-01

    Gilbert syndrome is the most common inherited disorder of bilirubin glucuronidation. It is characterized by intermittent episodes of jaundice in the absence of hepatocellular disease or hemolysis. Hereditary spherocytosis is the most common inherited hemolytic anemia and is characterized by spherical, osmotically fragile erythrocytes that are selectively trapped by the spleen. The patients have variable degrees of anemia, jaundice, and splenomegaly. Hereditary spherocytosis usually leads to mild-to-moderate elevation of serum bilirubin levels. Severe hyperbilirubinemia compared with the degree of hemolysis should be lead to suspicion of additional clinical conditions such as Gilbert syndrome or thalassemia. We present the case of a 12-year-old boy with extreme jaundice and nausea. The diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis was confirmed by osmotic fragility test results and that of Gilbert syndrome by genetic analysis findings.

  18. Rare hereditary red blood cell enzymopathies associated with hemolytic anemia - pathophysiology, clinical aspects, and laboratory diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koralkova, P; van Solinge, W W; van Wijk, R

    2014-06-01

    Hereditary red blood cell enzymopathies are genetic disorders affecting genes encoding red blood cell enzymes. They cause a specific type of anemia designated hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (HNSHA). Enzymopathies affect cellular metabolism, which, in the red cell, mainly consists of anaerobic glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, glutathione metabolism, and nucleotide metabolism. Enzymopathies are commonly associated with normocytic normochromic hemolytic anemia. In contrast to other hereditary red cell disorders such as membrane disorders or hemoglobinopathies, the morphology of the red blood cell shows no specific abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on detection of reduced specific enzyme activity and molecular characterization of the defect on the DNA level. The most common enzyme disorders are deficiencies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and pyruvate kinase (PK). However, there are a number of other enzyme disorders, often much less known, causing HNSHA. These disorders are rare and often underdiagnosed, and the purpose of this review. In this brief review, we provide an overview of clinically relevant enzymes, their function in red cell metabolism, and key aspects of laboratory diagnosis.

  19. Previously undiagnosed hereditary spherocytosis in a patient with jaundice and pyelonephritis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Tateno

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary spherocytosis is autosomal dominant inherited extravascular hemolytic disorder and is the commonest cause of inherited hemolysis in northern Europe and the United States. The classical clinical features of hereditary spherocytosis are anemia, jaundice, and splenomegaly. However, all of these classical features are not always revealed in the case of mild hemolysis or when hemolysis is well compensated. Patients with hereditary spherocytosis may remain undiagnosed for years if their hemolysis is mild. Case presentation A 42-year-old Asian woman presented to our clinic with a sudden onset of high fever with shaking chills and jaundice, suggesting septicemia; however, following detailed investigation, the patient was diagnosed with pyelonephritis and accelerated hemolysis of hereditary spherocytosis due to infection. Conclusions It is important to note that transient anemia or jaundice can sometimes be the only initial presenting symptoms in cases of undiagnosed latent hereditary spherocytosis. This case also highlights the fact that physicians should consider concomitant hemolytic disease in patients in whom jaundice and infections that rarely cause jaundice coexist.

  20. A Family with Hereditary Angioedema Having Been Followed as Familial Mediterranean Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülben Sarıcı

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is a rare autosomal dominant disorder resulting from the congenital deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor protein. Patients with hereditary angioedema are clinically characterized by recurrent episodes of swelling of the extremities, face, trunk, airways and abdominal viscera. Attacks may occur either spontaneously or following stress or trauma. The disease is usually associated with attacks of abdominal pain. So, patients may apply for this complaint to other clinics rather than dermatology, and may be misdiagnosed and followed for a long time. Therefore hereditary angioedema should be thought in differential diagnosis of patients suffering from abdominal pain. Here in this writing, we describe a family with hereditary angioedema who has been followed as Familial Mediterranean Fever for a long time. The family members complained from swellings which have been occuring in various regions of the body and disappearing spontaneously, and complained from severe abdominal pain, since childhood. These patients have been followed and tried to be treated with the misdiagnosis of Familial Mediterranean Fever for many years. These patients were diagnosed as hereditary angioedema in our clinic, and benefited from danazol treatment

  1. A novel locus for a hereditary recurrent neuropathy on chromosome 21q21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calpena, E; Martínez-Rubio, D; Arpa, J; García-Peñas, J J; Montaner, D; Dopazo, J; Palau, F; Espinós, C

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary recurrent neuropathies are uncommon. Disorders with a known molecular basis falling within this group include hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) due to the deletion of the PMP22 gene or to mutations in this same gene, and hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA) caused by mutations in the SEPT9 gene. We report a three-generation family presenting a hereditary recurrent neuropathy without pathological changes in either PMP22 or SEPT9 genes. We performed a genome-wide mapping, which yielded a locus of 12.4 Mb on chromosome 21q21. The constructed haplotype fully segregated with the disease and we found significant evidence of linkage. After mutational screening of genes located within this locus, encoding for proteins and microRNAs, as well as analysis of large deletions/insertions, we identified 71 benign polymorphisms. Our findings suggest a novel genetic locus for a recurrent hereditary neuropathy of which the molecular defect remains elusive. Our results further underscore the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of this group of neuropathies.

  2. Pes cavus and hereditary neuropathies: when a relationship should be suspected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, S; Ricci, G; Caldarazzo Ienco, E; Carlesi, C; Volpi, L; Siciliano, G; Mancuso, M

    2010-12-01

    The hereditary peripheral neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Foot deformities, including the common pes cavus, but also hammer toes and twisting of the ankle, are frequently present in patients with hereditary peripheral neuropathy, and often represent one of the first signs of the disease. Pes cavus in hereditary peripheral neuropathies is caused by imbalance between the intrinsic muscles of the foot and the muscles of the leg. Accurate clinical evaluation in patients with pes cavus is necessary to exclude or confirm the presence of peripheral neuropathy. Hereditary peripheral neuropathies should be suspected in those cases with bilateral foot deformities, in the presence of family history for pes cavus and/or gait impairment, and in the presence of neurological symptoms or signs, such as distal muscle hypotrophy of limbs. Herein, we review the hereditary peripheral neuropathies in which pes cavus plays a key role as a "spy sign," discussing the clinical and molecular features of these disorders to highlight the importance of pes cavus as a helpful clinical sign in these rare diseases.

  3. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B.

    2012-01-01

    Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved by the D......Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved...... serious ulcer bleeding is suspected and blood found in gastric aspirate, endoscopy within 12 hours will result in faster discharge and reduced need for transfusions. Endoscopic hemostasis remains indicated for high-risk lesions. Clips, thermocoagulation, and epinephrine injection are effective......-risk stigmata. Although selected patients can be discharged promptly after endoscopy, high-risk patients should be hospitalized for at least 3 days after endoscopic hemostasis. Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who require secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis should start receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA...

  4. Treatment of acute variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Flemming; Krag, Aleksander Ahm; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The management of variceal bleeding remains a clinical challenge with a high mortality. Standardisation in supportive and new therapeutic treatments seems to have improved survival within the last 25 years. Although overall survival has improved in recent years, mortality is still closely related...

  5. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B.

    2012-01-01

    -risk stigmata. Although selected patients can be discharged promptly after endoscopy, high-risk patients should be hospitalized for at least 3 days after endoscopic hemostasis. Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who require secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis should start receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA...

  6. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-11-17

    BACKGROUND Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. CASE REPORT A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. CONCLUSIONS Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding.

  7. Genetics 101 --The Hereditary Material of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 Genetics 101 — The Hereditary Material of Life Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Genetics is the study of heredity, the process in ...

  8. Hereditary History Preserving Bisimilarity Is Undecidable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurdzinski, Marcin; Nielsen, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    History preserving bisimilarity (hp-bisimilarity) and hereditary history preserving bisimilarity (hhp-bisimilarity) are behavioural equivalences taking into account causal relationships between events of concurrent systems. Their prominent feature is being preserved under action refinement...

  9. Splenic Involvement in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Takamatsu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old man who presented with prolonged epigastric pain was referred to our hospital. He had experienced recurrent epistaxis and had a family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed splenomegaly and a 9 cm hypervascular mass in his spleen. Computed tomography also showed a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation and heterogeneous enhancement of the liver parenchyma, suggesting the presence of arteriosystemic shunts and telangiectases. Based on these findings, the patient was definitely diagnosed with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia according to Curaçao criteria. He underwent splenectomy, and his symptoms disappeared after surgery. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed that the hypervascular lesion of the spleen was not a tumor but was composed of abnormal vessels associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Symptomatic splenic involvement may be a rare manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia but can be revealed by imaging modalities.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neubert TA, Lu Y, Rebeck GW, Frangione B, Greenberg SM, Ghiso J. Iowa variant of familial Alzheimer's ... ML, van Duinen SG, Roos RA, Frosch MP, Greenberg SM. The cerebral beta-amyloid angiopathies: hereditary and ...

  11. Hereditary History Preserving Bisimilarity Is Undecidable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurdzinski, Marcin; Nielsen, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    History preserving bisimilarity (hp-bisimilarity) and hereditary history preserving bisimilarity (hhp-bisimilarity) are behavioural equivalences taking into account causal relationships between events of concurrent systems. Their prominent feature is being preserved under action refinement...

  12. Molecular and genetic characteristics of hereditary autoinflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunca, Mehmet; Ozdogan, Huri

    2005-02-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are defined as recurrent "unprovoked" inflammatory events which do not produce high-titer autoantibodies or antigen-specific T cells. There are currently eight hereditary forms of these diseases: Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS), tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous articular (CINCA) syndrome or neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID), pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA) and Blau syndrome. Apart from FMF (which has a prevalence of about 0.1 percent among non-Ashkenazi Jews, Armenians, Turks and Arabs), they are very rare disorders. FMF and HIDS are autosomal recessive diseases, all the other members of the family are autosomal and dominantly transmitted. Their common clinical features are recurrent and usually short attacks of synovitis and various skin eruptions; abdominal pain and fever are also frequently observed. The genes of all of these diseases have been discovered and, with the exception of HIDS, it was found that the proteins they encode share certain domains taking part in innate immunity and apoptosis. Thus it was evident that hereditary autoinflammatory diseases may help us understand better a number of important and prevalent pathologic events. We have reviewed the recent and rapidly accumulating knowledge on the molecular aspects of these disorders.

  13. Capsule endoscopy and push enteroscopy in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戈之铮; 胡运彪; 萧树东

    2004-01-01

    Background In obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, it is often difficult to detect the bleeding sites located in the small bowel with conventional radiological, scintigraphic or angiographic techniques. Push enteroscopy and capsule endoscopy are currently considered to be the most effective diagnostic procedures. The aim of this study was to compare the detection rates between capsule endoscopy and push enteroscopy. Methods From May 2002 through January 2003, we prospectively examined by capsule endoscopy 39 patients with suspected small bowel diseases, in particular GI bleeding of unknown origin in Renji Hospital. Among them, 32 complained of obscure recurrent GI bleeding. Between January 1993 and October 1996, we used push enteroscopy on 36 patients who suffered from unexplained GI bleeding. All patients had prior normal results on gastroscopy, colonoscopy, small bowel barium radiography, scintigraphy and/or angiography. Results M2A capsule endoscopy disclosed abnormal small bowel findings in 26 (82%) out of 32 patients. Twenty-one of them had significant pathological findings explaining their clinical disorders. Diagnostic yield was therefore 66% (21 of 32 patients). Definite bleeding sites diagnosed by capsule endoscopy in 21 patients included angiodysplasia (8), inflammatory small-bowel (5), small-bowel polyps (4), gastrointestinal stromal tumour (2), carcinoid tumour and lipoma (1), and hemorrhagic gastritis (1). Push enteroscopy detected the definite sources of bleeding in 9 (25%) of the 36 patients. Patients with definite bleeding sources included angiodysplasias (2), leiomyosarcoma (2), leiomyoma (1), lymphoma (1), Crohn's disease (1), small-bowel polyps (1) and adenocarcinoma of ampulla (1). Suspected bleeding sources were shown by push enteroscopy in two additional patients (6%), and in other five patients (16%) by capsule endoscopy.Conclusions The present study of patients with obscure GI bleeding showed that capsule endoscopy significantly superior

  14. Gastrointestinal Bleeding: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GI Bleeding in Children (North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition) - PDF Patient Handouts Bleeding esophageal varices (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Bloody or tarry stools (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in ...

  15. Facts about Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit Button Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding Recommend on Facebook ... deficiency and VKDB? Protect Your Baby from Bleeds Fact Sheet   Download and print this fact ...

  16. Massive upper gastrointestinal bleed from epiphrenic diverticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Cesar J; Dias, Ajoy; Hejazi, Reza A; Burgos, Jose D; Huerta, Ana; Zuckerman, Marc J

    2011-05-01

    Epiphrenic diverticula are outpouchings of the esophagus that retain some or all layers of the esophageal wall. Symptoms such as intermittent dysphagia and vomiting may occur. The authors present a case of an elderly woman with a history of dysphagia who presented with a massive upper gastrointestinal bleed because of a bleeding epiphrenic diverticulum seen at endoscopy who responded to conservative management. Bleeding epiphrenic diverticula should be considered as a cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  17. Abdominal compartment syndrome from bleeding duodenal diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakhtang Tchantchaleishvili

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal diverticuli are acquired false diverticuli of unknown etiology. Although mostly asymptomatic, they can occasionally cause upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, rarely with massive bleeding. In this report, we present (to the best of our knowledge the first reported case of duodenal diverticular bleeding, causing abdominal compartment syndrome. Albeit a rare event, duodenal diverticular bleeding should be included in the differential diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. As with our case, a multidisciplinary approach to managing such patients is crucial.

  18. An unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C K Adarsh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI bleed often brings the patient to the emergency medical service with great anxiety. Known common causes of GI bleed include ulcers, varices, Mallory-Weiss among others. All causes of GI bleed should be considered however unusual during the evaluation. Aortoenteric fistula (AEF is one of the unusual causes of GI bleed, which has to be considered especially in patients with a history of abdominal surgery in general and aortic surgery in particular.

  19. Inherited focal, episodic neuropathies: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Phillip F

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP; also called tomaculous neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder that produces a painless episodic, recurrent, focal demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP generally develops during adolescence, and may cause attacks of numbness, muscular weakness, and atrophy. Peroneal palsies, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other entrapment neuropathies may be frequent manifestations of HNPP. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities may be reduced in clinically affected patients, as well as in asymptomatic gene carriers. The histopathological changes observed in peripheral nerves of HNPP patients include segmental demyelination and tomaculous or "sausage-like" formations. Mild overlap of clinical features with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 1 (CMT1) may lead patients with HNPP to be misdiagnosed as having CMT1. HNPP and CMT1 are both demyelinating neuropathies, however, their clinical, pathological, and electrophysiological features are quite distinct. HNPP is most frequently associated with a 1.4-Mb pair deletion on chromosome 17p12. A duplication of the identical region leads to CMT1A. Both HNPP and CMT1A result from a dosage effect of the PMP22 gene, which is contained within the deleted/duplicated region. This is reflected in reduced mRNA and protein levels in sural nerve biopsy samples from HNPP patients. Treatment for HNPP consists of preventative and symptom-easing measures. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA; also called familial brachial plexus neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder causing episodes of paralysis and muscle weakness initiated by severe pain. Individuals with HNA may suffer repeated episodes of intense pain, paralysis, and sensory disturbances in an affected limb. The onset of HNA is at birth or later in childhood with prognosis for recovery usually favorable; however, persons with HNA may have permanent residual neurological dysfunction following attack(s). Episodes are often

  20. Occurrence of Wilms' tumor in a child with hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özyörük, Derya; Demir, Hacı Ahmet; Emir, Suna; Karakuş, Esra; Tunç, Bahattin

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is the most frequent cause of congenital hemolytic anemia. It is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by cell membrane abnormalities, specifically in red blood cells. Although the association between benign, borderline and malignant tumors and HS is not clear, various tumors such as splenoma, adrenal myolipoma, pancreatic schwannoma, ganglioneuroma, extramedullary hematopoiesis, myeloproliferative disorders, multiple myeloma, B-cell lymphoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been presented in case reports concerning HS patients. Here we describe a 6-year-old boy with HS who presented with a mass in the left kidney. Tru-cut biopsy revealed Wilms' tumor (WT). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of WT associated with HS to be reported in the literature.

  1. Antiretroviral therapy-induced Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Moodley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Optic neuropathy in HIV-infected patients results from the HIV infection itself, post-infectious auto-immune disease, opportunistic infections and drugs. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs such as zidovudine and stavudine have known mitochondrial toxicity and can cause mitochondrial myopathies, neuropathies, hyperlactataemia, and can induce mitochondrial genetic disorders. Individuals with the mutation for Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON, a mitochondrial disorder, are usually asymptomatic but develop visual loss when exposed to external triggers such as smoking. We report on two HIV-infected patients with LHON mutations (m.14484T>C and m.11778G>A who developed profound visual loss with antiretroviral therapy. We postulate that the phenotypic expression of LHON in these genetically predisposed individuals was triggered by NRTI drugs lamivudine and tenofovir when used in combination, despite their relatively weak mitochondrial toxic effects. 

  2. Hereditary motor-sensory, motor, and sensory neuropathies in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrieu, Pierre; Baets, Jonathan; De Jonghe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathies (HN) are categorized according to clinical presentation, pathogenic mechanism based on electrophysiology, genetic transmission, age of occurrence, and, in selected cases, pathological findings. The combination of these parameters frequently orients towards specific genetic disorders. Ruling out a neuropathy secondary to a generalized metabolic disorder remains the first pediatric concern. Primary, motor-sensory are the most frequent HN and are dominated by demyelinating AD forms (CMT1). Others are demyelinating AR forms, axonal AD/AR forms, and forms with "intermediate" electrophysiological phenotype. Pure motor HN represent40 genes with various biological functions have been found responsible for HN. Many are responsible for various phenotypes, including some without the polyneuropathic trait: for the pediatric neurologist, phenotype/genotype correlations constitute a permanent bidirectional exercise.

  3. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease and Related Hereditary Neuropathies: From Gene Function to Associated Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareyson, D; Saveri, P; Piscosquito, G

    2014-10-10

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and related neuropathies are a genetically highly heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. CMT affects both the sensory and motor nerves, distal Hereditary Motor Neuropathies (dHMN) are phenotypically similar disorders involving only motor nerves, while Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies (HSAN) are rare distinct disorders affecting sensory and sometimes autonomic nerves. Almost 70 genes have been identified as responsible for these disorders. It is astonishing to learn how diverse are the cellular sublocalisation and the functional roles of the encoded proteins of CMT-associated genes which all lead to similar disorders of the peripheral nervous system. Myelin formation and maintenance, mitochondrial dynamics, cytoskeleton organization, axonal transport, and vesicular trafficking are the most frequently involved pathways. However, dysfunction of several activities from the nucleus to the neuromuscular junction forms the basis for these hereditary neuropathies, making it challenging predicting the functions of newly identified mutated genes. In this review we will discuss the function and related phenotypes of all the genes thus far associated with CMT, dHMN, and HSAN.

  4. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: preoperative CT-guided percutaneous needle localization of the bleeding small bowel segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Peter; Feuerbach, Stefan; Iesalnieks, Igors; Rockmann, Felix; Wrede, Christian E; Zorger, Niels; Schlitt, Hans J; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Hamer, Okka W

    2009-04-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Double balloon enteroscopy, angiography, and surgery including intraoperative enteroscopy failed to identify the bleeding site. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) depicted active bleeding of a small bowel segment. The bleeding segment was localized by CT-guided percutaneous needle insertion and subsequently removed surgically.

  5. Chapter 22: Hereditary and acquired angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgy, Mary S; Pongracic, Jacqueline A

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disorder defined by a deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). Acquired angioedema (AAE) is caused by either consumption (type 1) or inactivation (type 2) of CI-INH. Both HAE and AAE can be life-threatening. The screening test for both conditions is complement component C4, which is low to absent at times of angioedema or during quiescent periods. A useful test to differentiate HAE from AAE is C1q protein, which is normal in HAE and low in AAE. There are three types of HAE: type 1 HAE is most common, occurring in ∼85% of patients and characterized by decreased production of C1-INH, resulting in reduced functional activity to 5-30% of normal. In type 2, which occurs in 15% of cases, C1-INH is detectable in normal or elevated quantities but is dysfunctional. Finally, type 3, which is rare and almost exclusively occurs in women, is estrogen dependent and associated with normal CI-INH and C4 levels. One-third of these patients have a gain-of-function mutation in clotting factor XII leading to kallikrein-driven bradykinin production. Although the anabolic steroid, danazol, is useful in increasing the concentration of C4 and reducing the episodes of angioedema in HAE and AAE, it has expected adverse effects. Fortunately, disease-specific therapies are available and include C1-INH enzyme for i.v. infusion either acutely or empirically, ecallantide, an inhibitor of kallikrein, and icatibant, a bradykinin B2-receptor antagonist, both approved for acute angioedema and administered, subcutaneously.

  6. Prevalence of autoantibodies in a group of hereditary angioedema patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dortas Junior, Sergio Duarte; Valle, Solange Oliveira Rodrigues; Levy, Soloni Afra Pires; Tortora, Rosangela P; Abe, Augusto Tiaqui; Pires, Gisele Viana; Papi, José Angelo de Souza; França, Alfeu Tavares

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary Angioedema is a dominantly inherited disease. Routine screening of autoantibodies (AAB) is not recommended for individuals with Hereditary Angioedema; however, prevalence of these antibodies in Hereditary Angioedema patients is not well documented. We aim to determine the prevalence of AAB so that individuals at risk of developing autoimmune diseases can be identified. Fifteen patients with Hereditary Angioedema attended at Clementino Fraga Filho University Hospital accepted to participate in this study. Prevalence of AAB was 40%. Our data indicate high prevalence of AAB in patients with Hereditary Angioedema. Large-scale studies should be considered to determine the significance of these AAB in the follow-up care of patients with Hereditary Angioedema.

  7. Hereditary angioedema may not be the only cause of abdominal pain in patients with hereditary angioedema!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Kartal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal pain is one of the basic clinical presentations of the hereditary angioedema and danazol is a common medicine which has been used for long years in patients with hereditary angioedema. We present two hereditary angioedema patients with abdominal pain albeit under danazol treatment, whose final diagnoses was colon carcinoma. There are two consequences in this article which shall be insisted on: First; in patients with hereditary angioedema, the differential diagnosis of and ldquo;abdominal pain and rdquo; is always important even though hereditary angioedema diagnosis exists. And the second; It can be hardy speculated that long term danazol treatment may cause different malignancies. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(3.000: 567-569

  8. Acute, nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Amir; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-04-01

    Acute, nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a common medical emergency encountered worldwide. Despite medical and technological advances, it remains associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Rapid patient assessment and management are paramount. When indicated, upper endoscopy in patients presenting with acute UGIB is effective for both diagnosis of the bleeding site and provision of endoscopic hemostasis. Endoscopic hemostasis significantly reduces rebleeding rates, blood transfusion requirements, length of hospital stay, surgery, and mortality. Furthermore, early upper endoscopy, defined as being performed within 24 h of patient presentation, improves patient outcomes. A structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes early hemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization, preendoscopic risk stratification using validated instruments, pharmacologic and endoscopic intervention, and postendoscopy therapy is important to optimize patient outcome and assure efficient use of medical resources.

  9. Management of severe perioperative bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A; Ahmed, Aamer B; Afshari, Arash

    2017-01-01

    healthcare professionals with an overview of the most recent evidence to help ensure improved clinical management of patients. For this update, electronic databases were searched without language restrictions from 2011 or 2012 (depending on the search) until 2015. These searches produced 18 334 articles. All......: The management of perioperative bleeding involves multiple assessments and strategies to ensure appropriate patient care. Initially, it is important to identify those patients with an increased risk of perioperative bleeding. Next, strategies should be employed to correct preoperative anaemia...... articles were assessed and the existing 2013 guidelines were revised to take account of new evidence. This update includes revisions to existing recommendations with respect to the wording, or changes in the grade of recommendation, and also the addition of new recommendations. The final draft guideline...

  10. Role of videocapsule endoscopy for gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Carretero; Ignacio Fernandez-Urien; Maite Betes; Miguel Mu(n)oz-Navas

    2008-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is defined as bleeding of an unknown origin that persists or recurs after negative initial upper and lower endoscopies.Several techniques,such as endoscopy,arteriography,scintigraphy and barium radiology are helpful for recognizing the bleeding source;nevertheless,in about 5%-10% of cases the bleeding lesion cannot be determined.The development of videocapsule endoscopy (VCE) has permitted a direct visualization of the small intestine mucosa.We will analyze those techniques in more detail.The diagnostic yield of CE for OGIB varies from 38% to 93%,being in the higher range in those cases with obscure-overt bleeding.

  11. Angiogenesis and vascular malformations: Antiangiogenic drugs for treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with angiodysplasias and Osler's disease (hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia) is clinically challenging.Frequently, vascular malformations occur as multiple disseminated lesions, making local treatment an unfavorable choice or impossible. After local therapy,lesions often recur at other sites of the intestine.However, as there are few therapeutic alternatives,repeated endoscopic coagulations or surgical resections are still performed to prevent recurrent bleeding.Hormonal therapy has been employed for more than 50 years but has recently been shown to be ineffective.Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are required.Understanding of the pathophysiology of angiogenesis and vascular malformations has recently substantially increased. Currently, multiple inhibitors of angiogenesis are under development for treatment of malignant diseases. Experimental and clinical data suggest that antiangiogenic substances, which were originally developed for treatment of malignant diseases, may also represent long-awaited specific drugs for the treatment of vascular malformations. However, antiangiogenics display significantly different actions and side-effects.Although antiangiogenics like thalidomide seem to inhibit gastrointestinal bleeding, other substances like bevacizumab can cause mucosal bleeding. Therefore differential and cautious evaluation of this therapeutic strategy is necessary.

  12. Management of bleeding in acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia (EACH2) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Huth-Kühne, Angela; Lévesque, Hervé; Marco, Pascual; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Tengborn, Lilian; Knoebl, Paul

    2012-07-05

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation FVIII. Bleeding episodes at presentation are spontaneous and severe in most cases. Optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial, and available data are from observational and retrospective studies only. The EACH2 registry, a multicenter, pan-European, Web-based database, reports current patient management. The aim was to assess the control of first bleeding episodes treated with a bypassing agent (rFVIIa or aPCC), FVIII, or DDAVP among 501 registered patients. Of 482 patients with one or more bleeding episodes, 144 (30%) received no treatment for bleeding; 31 were treated with symptomatic therapy only. Among 307 patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent, 174 (56.7%) received rFVIIa, 63 (20.5%) aPCC, 56 (18.2%) FVIII, and 14 (4.6%) DDAVP. Bleeding was controlled in 269 of 338 (79.6%) patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent or ancillary therapy alone. Propensity score matching was applied to allow unbiased comparison between treatment groups. Bleeding control was significantly higher in patients treated with bypassing agents versus FVIII/DDAVP (93.3% vs 68.3%; P = .003). Bleeding control was similar between rFVIIa and aPCC (93.0%; P = 1). Thrombotic events were reported in 3.6% of treated patients with a similar incidence between rFVIIa (2.9%) and aPCC (4.8%).

  13. Circulatory contributors to the phenotype in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L Shovlin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is mechanistically and therapeutically challenging, not only because of the molecular and cellular perturbations that generate vascular abnormalities, but also the modifications to circulatory physiology that result, and are likely to exacerbate vascular injury. First, most HHT patients have visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs. Significant visceral AVMs reduce the systemic vascular resistance: supra-normal cardiac outputs are required to maintain arterial blood pressure, and may result in significant pulmonary venous hypertension. Secondly, bleeding from nasal and gastrointestinal telangiectasia leads to iron losses of such magnitude that in most cases, diet is insufficient to meet the ‘hemorrhage adjusted iron requirement.’ Resultant iron deficiency restricts erythropoiesis, leading to anemia and further increases in cardiac output. Low iron levels are also associated with venous and arterial thromboses, elevated Factor VIII, and increased platelet aggregation to circulating 5HT (serotonin. Third, recent data highlight that reduced oxygenation of blood due to pulmonary AVMs results in a graded erythrocytotic response to maintain arterial oxygen content, and higher stroke volumes and/or heart rates to maintain oxygen delivery. Finally, HHT-independent factors such as diet, pregnancy, sepsis and other intercurrent illnesses also influence vascular structures, hemorrhage, and iron handling in HHT patients. These considerations emphasize the complexity of mechanisms that impact on vascular structures in HHT, and also offer opportunities for targeted therapeutic approaches.

  14. [Antithrombotic therapy and nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanová, Veronika; Gřiva, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is about 85-108/100,000 inhabitants per year, nonvariceal bleeding accounts for 80-90%. Antiplatelet and anticoagulation treatment are the significant risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. To evaluate the occurrence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the general community of patients in a county hospital. And to compare the role played by antiplatelet and anticoagulation drugs and other risk medication. Retrospective analysis of patients over 18 years of age who underwent endoscopy for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding or anaemia (haemoglobinupper gastrointestinal tract during a hospital stay in 2013 (from January to June). We included 111 patients of average age 69±15 years, men 60%. Nonvariceal bleeding accounted for 90% of the cases. None of the patients with variceal bleeding (10% of patients) took antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy. There were 100 patients with nonvariceal bleeding of average age 70±15, 61% men. With the symptoms of acute bleeding (hematemesis, melena) presented in 73% of patients. The most frequent cause of bleeding was gastric and duodenal ulcer (54%). 32% of patients with nonvariceal bleeding had antiplatelets, 19% anticoagulants and 10% used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or corticosteroids. 30-days mortality of patients with nonvariceal bleeding was 11%, annual mortality was 23%. There was no significant difference in mortality, blood transfusion requirements or surgical intervention between the patients with antithrombotic agents and without them. 25% of patients (8 patients) using acetylsalicylic acid did not fulfil the indication for this treatment. Among the patients examined by endoscopy for symptomatic nonvariceal bleeding and/or anaemia (haemoglobingastrointestinal bleeding. With regard to that, it is alarming, that there still exists a nonnegligible percentage of patients taking acetylsalicylic acid even

  15. Outcomes of Lensectomy in Hereditary Lens Subluxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Hossein Dehghan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the results of pars plana lensectomy in patients with hereditary lens subluxation. METHOD: Hospital records of patients with hereditary lens subluxation who had undergone pars plana lensectomy at Labbafinejad Medical Center, Tehran-Iran from 1996 to 2003 were reviewed. Patients with more than 6 months of follow up were included. Underlying disorders, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA before and after surgery, intraocular pressure (IOP, postoperative refraction and complications were evaluated. RESULTS: Overall, records of 87 eyes of 49 patients including 27 male and 22 female subjects were reviewed. Mean follow up duration was 20±18 months. Underlying disorders leading to lens subluxation included Marfan syndrome (79.5%, Weill-Marchesani syndrome (8.2%, simple ectopia lentis (8.2%, and homocystinuria (4.1%. The most common indication for surgery was non-correctable refractive error (92.1%. Mean BCVA was 1.13 LogMAR (20/250 preoperatively, which improved to 0.26 LogMAR (20/30-20/40 postoperatively (P < 0.001. BCVA better than 20/40 was achieved in 82.8% of cases after surgery. Angle-supported anterior chamber intraocular lens (ACIOL was implanted in

  16. Endocrine carcinoma of the pancreatic tail exhibiting gastric variceal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yuan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonfunctional endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas is uncommon. Without excess hormone secretion, it is clinically silent until the enlarging or metastatic tumor causes compressive symptoms. Epigastric pain, dyspepsia, jaundice, and abdominal mass are the usual symptoms, whereas upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding is rare. Here, we describe the case of a 24-year-old man with the chief complaint of hematemesis. Upper GI panendoscopy revealed isolated gastric varices at the fundus and upper body. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a tumor mass at the pancreatic tail causing a splenic vein obstruction, engorged vessels near the fundus of the stomach, and splenomegaly. After distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, the bleeding did not recur. The final pathologic diagnosis was endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. Gastric variceal bleeding is a possible manifestation of nonfunctional endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas if the splenic vein is affected by a tumor. In non-cirrhotic patients with isolated gastric variceal bleeding, the differential diagnosis should include pancreatic disorders.

  17. Histopathological study of endometrium in cases of abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj A. Bolde

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the commonest complaints in women and when it occurs without organic lesions like tumor, inflammation, it is called as dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Aim of current study was to find out the histopathological pattern of endometrium in Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB also to study organic causes of AUB. Methods: Specimens received as endometrial curettage and hysterectomy specimens were studied followed by correlation of histopathology with age and clinical presentation. Results: The patients were mainly from the age group of 30-49 years (74.24%. The most common menstrual disorder was menorrhagia (46.86%. In dysfunctional uterine bleeding the most common histological pattern of endometrium includes proliferative endometrium (22.8% followed by endometrial hyperplasia (19.40%, atrophic endometrium (7.16%, secretory endometrium (5.97%, irregular shedding [1.80%], irregular ripening (1.20% and anovulatory endometrium (0.59%. Organic lesions encountered in AUB cases were leiomyoma (17.92%, endometrial polyp (1.79%, endometrial carcinoma (1.50%, endometriosis (0.59% and choriocarcinoma (0.29%. Conclusion: It is important to know the histological pattern of the endometrium like proliferative endometrium, endometrial hyperplasia, atrophic endometrium, secretory endometrium, irregular ripening and shredding and organic lesions in patients diagnosed as AUB in different age groups since recognition of these conditions will help and will avoid further complications. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1378-1381

  18. Is Previous Tubal Ligation a Risk Factor for Hysterectomy because of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding?

    OpenAIRE

    Sanam Moradan; Raheb Gorbani

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Post tubal ligation syndrome (PTLS) is a term used to describe a variety of post tubal ligation side effects or symptoms. These include increased menstrual bleeding and hysterectomy. Whether or not post tubal syndrome is a real entity, it has been a subject of controversy in the medical literature for decades. Numerous studies have reported conflicting conclusions about these symptoms. In this study the incidence of hysterectomy for bleeding disorders among sterilized women was co...

  19. Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency medical services: overview and ground transport. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. ... Simon BC, Hern HG. Wound management principles. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions HSAN5 hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Description Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V ( HSAN5 ) is a condition that primarily affects the ...

  1. Late onset hereditary episodic ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damak, M; Riant, F; Boukobza, M; Tournier-Lasserve, E; Bousser, M-G; Vahedi, K

    2009-05-01

    Episodic ataxias (EA) are hereditary paroxysmal neurological diseases with considerable clinical and genetic heterogeneity. So far seven loci have been reported and four different genes have been identified. Analysis of additional sporadic or familial cases is needed to better delineate the clinical and genetic spectrum of EA. A two generation French family with late onset episodic ataxia was examined. All consenting family members had a brain MRI with volumetric analysis of the cerebellum. Haplotype analysis was performed for the EA2 locus (19p13), the EA5 locus (2q22), the EA6 locus (5p13) and the EA7 locus (19q13). Mutation screening was performed for all exons of CACNA1A (EA2), EAAT1 (EA6) and the coding sequence of KCNA1 (EA1). Four family members had episodic ataxia with onset between 48 and 56 years of age but with heterogeneity in the severity and duration of symptoms. The two most severely affected had daily attacks of EA with a slowly progressive and disabling permanent cerebellar ataxia and a poor response to acetazolamide. Brain MRI showed in three affected members a decrease in the ratio of cerebellar volume:total intracranial volume, indicating cerebellar atrophy. No deleterious mutation was found in CACNA1A, SCA6, EAAT1 or KCNA1. In addition, the EA5 locus was excluded. A new phenotype of episodic ataxia has been described, characterised clinically by a late onset and progressive permanent cerebellar signs, and genetically by exclusion of the genes so far identified in EA.

  2. Pediatric hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkas Henriette

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary angioedema (HAE resulting from the deficiency of the C1 inhibitor (C1-INH is a rare, life-threatening disorder. It is characterized by attacks of angioedema involving the skin and/or the mucosa of the upper airways, as well as the intestinal mucosa. In approximately 50 per cent of cases, clinical manifestations may appear during childhood. The complex management of HAE in pediatric patients is in many respects different from the management of adults. Establishing the diagnosis early, preferably before the onset of clinical symptoms, is essential in cases with a positive family history. Complement studies usually afford accurate diagnosis, whereas molecular genetics tests may prove helpful in uncertain cases. Appropriate therapy, supported by counselling, suitable modification of lifestyle, and avoidance of triggering factors (which primarily include mechanical trauma, mental stress and airway infections in children may spare the patient unnecessary surgery and may prevent mortality. Prompt control of edematous attacks, short-term prophylaxis and intermittent therapy are recommended as the primary means for the management of pediatric cases. Medicinal products currently used for the treatment of children with hereditary angioedema include antifibrinolytics, attenuated androgens, and C1-INH replacement therapy. Current guidelines favour antifibrinolytics for long-term prophylaxis because of their favorable safety profile but efficacy may be lacking. Attenuated androgens administered in the lowest effective dose are another option. C1-INH replacement therapy is also an effective and safe agent for children. Regular monitoring and follow-up of patients are necessary.

  3. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian canc...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....

  4. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia treated by pulsed neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (1,064 nm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, A; Bäumler, W; Zietz, S; Kühnel, T; Hohenleutner, U; Landthaler, M

    2008-10-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a familial, autosomal, dominant, multi-system, vascular, dysplasia. Besides repetitive epistaxis, cutaneous eruptive macules and nodules lead to recurring bleeding and cosmetic problems. We report on a pilot study of four cases of HHT in which cutaneous lesions were treated with a pulsed neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (1,064 nm). Pulsed Nd:YAG laser treatment, without anaesthesia, was performed several times on eruptive angiomas on palmar and facial skin. Lesions on fingers and face mostly showed very good, or even complete, clearing after the first laser treatment. Several macules required multiple treatment; only a few lesions showed no effect. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser therapy (1,064 nm) appears to be an effective and safe treatment option for hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia on the skin of face and extremities.

  5. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ulrich Weiss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Hereditary pancreatitis often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of hereditary pancreatitis patients to develop pancreatic cancer.

  6. High liver glycogen in hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, A R; Ryman, B E

    1971-11-01

    A case of hereditary fructose intolerance is reported in a girl aged 2 years at the time of her death. She had apparently progressed normally until the age of 14 months. At 19 months she was admitted to hospital with failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, and superficial infections. Investigations revealed hypoglycaemia, persistent acidosis, aminoaciduria, and a high liver glycogen level which suggested that she had glycogen storage disease. There was also some evidence of malabsorption. At necropsy the liver enzyme estimations showed that fructose 1-phosphate aldolase activity was absent and that fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase activity was reduced. Hereditary fructose intolerance and glycogen storage disease have been confused in the past on clinical grounds, but a high liver glycogen level has not previously been reported in hereditary fructose intolerance.

  7. The management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Y; Lebreton, G; Le Pennec, V; Hourna, E; Viennot, S; Alves, A

    2014-06-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (LGI) bleeding is generally less severe than upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding with spontaneous cessation of bleeding in 80% of cases and a mortality of 2-4%. However, unlike UGI bleeding, there is no consensual agreement about management. Once the patient has been stabilized, the main objective and greatest difficulty is to identify the location of bleeding in order to provide specific appropriate treatment. While upper endoscopy and colonoscopy remain the essential first-line examinations, the development and availability of angiography have made this an important imaging modality for cases of active bleeding; they allow diagnostic localization of bleeding and guide subsequent therapy, whether therapeutic embolization, interventional colonoscopy or, if other techniques fail or are unavailable, surgery directed at the precise site of bleeding. Furthermore, newly developed endoscopic techniques, particularly video capsule enteroscopy, now allow minimally invasive exploration of the small intestine; if this is positive, it will guide subsequent assisted enteroscopy or surgery. Other small bowel imaging techniques include enteroclysis by CT or magnetic resonance imaging. At the present time, exploratory surgery is no longer a first-line approach. In view of the lesser gravity of LGI bleeding, it is most reasonable to simply stabilize the patient initially for subsequent transfer to a specialized center, if minimally invasive techniques are not available at the local hospital. In all cases, the complexity and diversity of LGI bleeding require a multidisciplinary collaboration involving the gastroenterologist, radiologist, intensivist and surgeon to optimize diagnosis and treatment of the patient.

  8. [Clinical practice of hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of neuropathies, the main category becomes Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT), also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN), and hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy (HSAN). At least 80 genes have been associated with CMT, HMN or HSAN, a precise molecular diagnosis is often needed to make a clinical diagnosis accurately, enable genetic counseling of the patient and understanding of their molecular mechanisms. To identify the mutation in each patient, using a high-throughput NGS, we established a diagnostic procedure involving screening of disease causing genes in CMT, HMN or HSAN.

  9. A bleeding assessment tool correlates with intraoperative blood loss in children and adolescents undergoing major spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anadio, Jennifer M; Sturm, Peter F; Forslund, Johan M; Agarwal, Sunil; Lane, Adam; Tarango, Cristina; Palumbo, Joseph S

    2017-04-01

    Screening laboratory studies for bleeding disorders are of little predictive value for operative bleeding risk in adults. Predicting perioperative bleeding in pediatric patients is particularly difficult as younger patients often have not had significant hemostatic challenges. This issue is distinctly important for high bleeding risk surgeries, such as major spinal procedures. The aim of this study was to determine if the score of a detailed bleeding questionnaire (BQ) correlated with surgical bleeding in pediatric patients undergoing major spinal surgery. A total of 220 consecutive pediatric patients (mean age 14.2years) undergoing major spinal surgery were administered the BQ preoperatively, as well as having routine screening laboratory studies (i.e., PT, aPTT, PFA) drawn. A retrospective analysis was conducted to determine if there was a correlation between either the results of the BQ and/or laboratory studies with operative outcomes. A BQ score>2 showed a strong positive correlation with intraoperative bleeding based on both univariate and multivariate analyses. In contrast, abnormalities in screening laboratory studies showed no significant correlation with operative bleeding outcomes. Relying on screening laboratory studies alone is inadequate. The BQ used here correlated with increased intraoperative hemorrhage, suggesting this tool may be useful for assessing pediatric surgical bleeding risk, and may also be useful in identifying a subset of patients with a very low bleeding risk that may not require laboratory screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Extramedullary paraspinal hematopoiesis in hereditary spherocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a common inherited hemolytic anemia due to red cell membrane defects. Extramedullary hematopoiesis is a compensatory response to insufficient bone marrow blood cell production. The preferred sites of extramedullary hematopoietic involvement are the spleen, liver and lymph nodes; but in HS, the posterior paravertebral mediastinum is also commonly involved. We report a case of a 50-year-old male who presented to us in respiratory distress and with bilateral paravertebral posterior mediastinal masses, which on trucut biopsy were found to be extra-hematopoietic masses; and the patient was found to have hereditary spherocytosis.

  11. Disease expression in women with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouillet, Laurence; Longhurst, Hilary; Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    project launched by the European Union, data on 150 postpubertal women with hereditary angioedema were collected in 8 countries, using a patient-based questionnaire. RESULTS: Puberty worsened the disease for 62%. Combined oral contraceptives worsened the disease for 79%, whereas progestogen-only pills......OBJECTIVE: Fluctuations in sex hormones can trigger angioedema attacks in women with hereditary angioedema. Combined oral contraceptive therapies, as well as pregnancy, can induce severe attacks. The course of angioedema may be very variable in different women. STUDY DESIGN: Within the PREHAEAT...

  12. Hereditary angioedema with normal C1 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, Konrad

    2013-11-01

    Until recently it was assumed that hereditary angioedema was a disease that results exclusively from a genetic deficiency of the C1 inhibitor. In 2000, families with hereditary angioedema, normal C1 inhibitor activity, and protein in plasma were described. Since then, numerous patients and families with that condition have been reported. Most of the patients were women. In many of the affected women, oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy containing estrogens, and pregnancies triggered the clinical symptoms. In some families mutations in the coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor) gene were detected.

  13. Polycythemia vera and the Jak2(V617F) mutation in a case of hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Roger A

    2013-10-01

    The identification of Jak2(V617F) mutations in more than 90% of patients with polycythemia vera (PV) has greatly improved the diagnostic accuracy for this uncommon myeloproliferative disorder. Although previous cases of presumptive PV in patients with hereditary spherocytosis (HS) have been described, these earlier reports either preceded the establishment of widely accepted criteria for the diagnosis of PV or lacked definitive studies to rule out secondary causes of polycythemia. In contrast, the author describes here a novel case of PV confirmed at the molecular level in a patient with hereditary spherocytosis by the finding of a Jak2(V617F) mutation. Based on recent advances in understanding the role of Jak2 signaling in the pathogenesis of PV, the author proposes 2 independent biological mechanisms that could account for more than a chance association of these 2 disorders.

  14. The metabolomic signature of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy reveals endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao de la Barca, Juan Manuel; Simard, Gilles; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Safiedeen, Zainab; Prunier-Mirebeau, Delphine; Chupin, Stéphanie; Gadras, Cédric; Tessier, Lydie; Gueguen, Naïg; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Desquiret-Dumas, Valérie; Ferré, Marc; Bris, Céline; Kouassi Nzoughet, Judith; Bocca, Cinzia; Leruez, Stéphanie; Verny, Christophe; Miléa, Dan; Bonneau, Dominique; Lenaers, Guy; Martinez, M Carmen; Procaccio, Vincent; Reynier, Pascal

    2016-09-15

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (MIM#535000), the commonest mitochondrial DNA-related disease, is caused by mutations affecting mitochondrial complex I. The clinical expression of the disorder, usually occurring in young adults, is typically characterized by subacute, usually sequential, bilateral visual loss, resulting from the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. As the precise action of mitochondrial DNA mutations on the overall cell metabolism in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is unknown, we investigated the metabolomic profile of the disease. High performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify 188 metabolites in fibroblasts from 16 patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and eight healthy control subjects. Latent variable-based statistical methods were used to identify discriminating metabolites. One hundred and twenty-four of the metabolites were considered to be accurately quantified. A supervised orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis model separating patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy from control subjects showed good predictive capability (Q(2)cumulated = 0.57). Thirty-eight metabolites appeared to be the most significant variables, defining a Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy metabolic signature that revealed decreased concentrations of all proteinogenic amino acids, spermidine, putrescine, isovaleryl-carnitine, propionyl-carnitine and five sphingomyelin species, together with increased concentrations of 10 phosphatidylcholine species. This signature was not reproduced by the inhibition of complex I with rotenone or piericidin A in control fibroblasts. The importance of sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines in the Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy signature, together with the decreased amino acid pool, suggested an involvement of the endoplasmic reticulum. This was confirmed by the significantly increased phosphorylation of PERK and eIF2α, as well as

  15. Endoglin, a TGF-β binding protein of endothelial cells, is the gene for hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.A. McAllister (K.); K.M. Grogg (K.); D.W. Johnson (D.); C.J. Gallione (C.); P.J. Baldwin (Peter); C.E. Jackson (C.); E.A. Helmbold (E.); D.S. Markel (D.); W. McKinnon; J.R. Murrell (Jill); J.A. McCormick (James); M.A. Pericak-Vance (Margaret); P. Heutink (Peter); B.A. Oostra (Ben); T. Haitjema (T.); C.J.J. Westerman (C. J J); M.E. Porteous (Mary); A.E. Guttmacher (A.); M. Letarte (M.); D.A. Marchuk (D.)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractHereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multisystemic vascular dysplasia and recurrent haemorrhage. Linkage for some families has been established to chromosome 9q33−q34. In the present study, endoglin, a transforming growth factor

  16. Relative Contribution of Mutations in Genes for Autosomal Dominant Distal Hereditary Motor Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierick, Ines; Baets, Jonathan; Irobi, Joy; Jacobs, An; De Vriendt, Els; Deconinck, Tine; Merlini, Luciano; Van den Bergh, Peter; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Robberecht, Wim; Fischer, Dirk; Morales, Raul Juntas; Mitrovic, Zoran; Seeman, Pavel; Mazanec, Radim; Kochanski, Andrzej; Jordanova, Albena; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Helderman-van den Enden, A. T. J. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Nelis, Eva; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders affecting spinal alpha-motor neurons. Since 2001, mutations in six different genes have been identified for autosomal dominant distal HMN; "glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS)," "dynactin 1 (DCTN1)," "small heat shock 27 kDa…

  17. Gross deletions/duplications in PROS1 are relatively common in point mutation-negative hereditary protein S deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pintao, M.C.; Garcia, A.A.; Borgel, D.; Alhenc-Gelas, M.; Spek, C.A.; de Visser, M.C.H.; Gandrille, S.; Reitsma, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary protein S (PS) deficiency is an autosomal disorder caused by mutations in the PS gene (PROS1). Conventional PCR-based mutation detection identifies PROS1 point mutations in approximately 50% of the cases. To verify if gross copy number variations (CNVs) are often present in point mutation

  18. Relative Contribution of Mutations in Genes for Autosomal Dominant Distal Hereditary Motor Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierick, Ines; Baets, Jonathan; Irobi, Joy; Jacobs, An; De Vriendt, Els; Deconinck, Tine; Merlini, Luciano; Van den Bergh, Peter; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Robberecht, Wim; Fischer, Dirk; Morales, Raul Juntas; Mitrovic, Zoran; Seeman, Pavel; Mazanec, Radim; Kochanski, Andrzej; Jordanova, Albena; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Helderman-van den Enden, A. T. J. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Nelis, Eva; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders affecting spinal alpha-motor neurons. Since 2001, mutations in six different genes have been identified for autosomal dominant distal HMN; "glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS)," "dynactin 1 (DCTN1)," "small heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1),"…

  19. Postmenopausal Vaginal Bleeding after Infesting with Leeches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghaieh Rahmani-Bilandi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and therapeutic measures are immediately taken for abnormal postmenopausal vaginal bleeding, because its causes range from atrophic endometrium to malignancy. In this paper, abnormal bleeding is reported due to leech infection. The patient is a 69-year-old woman who has reached menopause for 12 years and has visited a physician because of vaginal bleeding. The patient had no history of abnormal bleeding or medication. The patient first refused to get hospitalized and continue medical care, but she finally accepted to take diagnostic and therapeutic procedures after a few times of visit and increased bleeding. During general anesthesia and upon opening vagina, a large hemorrhagic and moving mass was observed at the upper posterior vaginal wall which was removed with surgical forceps. Surprisingly, this mass was a leech. Bleeding at the leech’s junction was stopped after half an hour using sterile gas and the patient was discharged on the next day.

  20. AN UNUSUAL CAUSE OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Kishwar; Zarin, Muhammad; Latif, Humera

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (GI) is a serious condition that presents both diagnostic as well as therapeutic challenges. Resuscitation of the patient is the first and most important step in its management followed by measures to localize and treat the exact source and site of bleeding. These modalities are upper and lower GI endoscopies, radionuclide imaging and angiography. Surgery is the last resort to handle the situation, if the patient does not respond to resuscitative measures and the various interventional procedures fail to locate and stop the bleeding. We present a case of upper GI bleeding which presented with massive per rectal bleeding and the patient was not responding to resuscitation with multiple blood transfusions. Ultimately an exploratory laparotomy was done which revealed an extra-intestinal source of bleeding into the lumen of duodenum, presenting as upper GI bleeding.

  1. Anesthetic management of a case with hereditary spherocytosis for splenectomy and open cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal S Khatavkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a familial hemolytic disorder with marked heterogeneity of clinical features ranging from asymptomatic condition to a fulminant hemolytic anemia. HS is characterized by the strong family history of anemia, jaundice, splenomegaly and cholelithiasis. Anesthetic Management of HS with liver dysfunction is very challenging since most of the anesthetic drugs are metabolized by the liver. Hereby, we report anesthetic management in a case of HS with splenomegaly and gall stones for elective splenectomy and cholecystectomy.

  2. Recombinant Human C1 Esterase Inhibitor in the Management of Hereditary Angioedema

    OpenAIRE

    Riedl, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE), a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder, is caused by a deficiency in functional C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). This potentially life-threatening condition manifests as recurrent attacks of subcutaneous and submucosal swelling of the skin, gastrointestinal tract and larynx. The management of HAE includes treatment of acute episodes, short-term prophylaxis in preparation for exposure to known triggers and long-term prophylaxis to decrease the incidence and seve...

  3. The hereditary spastic paraplegia-related enzyme DDHD2 is a principal brain triglyceride lipase

    OpenAIRE

    Inloes, Jordon M.; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Dix, Melissa M.; Viader, Andreu; Masuda, Kim; Takei, Thais; Wood, Malcolm R.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2014-01-01

    Many rare human genetic disorders are caused by mutations in genes that code for proteins of poorly characterized function. Determining the functions of these proteins is critical for understanding and devising potential treatments for human diseases. In this article, we discover using a combination of mouse genetic models, selective inhibitors, and lipid profiling that the DDHD2 enzyme, mutations of which cause a neurological disease termed complex hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), acts a...

  4. [Hereditary sensory and motor neuropathy and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: recent advances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, T

    2011-12-01

    This review summarizes the recent genetic advances in hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy also called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. The different new genes discovered in 2010 and their underlying phenotypes will be presented.

  5. [Hereditary spherocytosis. Review. Part II. Symptomatology, outcome, complications, and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Hugo; Crisp, Renée Leonor; Rapetti, María Cristina; García, Eliana; Attie, Myriam

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis must always be suspected in children with anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, splenomegaly or cholelithiasis, in the asymptomatic individual with an affected relative, and in the neonate with hyperbilirubinemia with no blood group incompatibility; its early detection is key to avoid kernicterus. Follow-up of these patients is based on periodical control and supply of information on the adequate management of hemolytic or aplastic crisis, and early detection of cholelithiasis. The decision to perform splenectomy is usually associated with quality of life rather than life-threatening risk, and it should result from a consensus between patient, parents and physicians. The postsplenectomy follow-up is based on control of compliance with the prophylactic antibiotic therapy and the early diagnosis of infectious disorders.

  6. Sepsis and siderosis, Yersinia enterocolitica and hereditary haemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwaites, Phoebe A; Woods, Marion L

    2017-01-04

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted with sepsis, relative bradycardia, CT evidence of numerous small liver abscesses and 'skin bronzing' consistent with hereditary haemochromatosis (HH). Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 infection was confirmed by serology specimens taken 10 days apart. Iron overload was detected, and homozygous C282Y gene mutation confirmed HH. Liver biopsy revealed grade IV siderosis with micronodular cirrhosis. Haemochromatosis is a common, inherited disorder leading to iron overload that can produce end-organ damage from excess iron deposition. Haemochromatosis diagnosis allowed aggressive medical management with phlebotomy achieving normalisation of iron stores. Screening for complications of cirrhosis was started that included hepatoma surveillance. Iron overload states are known to increase patient susceptibility to infections caused by lower virulence bacteria lacking sophisticated iron metabolism pathways, for example, Yersinia enterocolitica Although these serious disseminated infections are rare, they may serve as markers for occult iron overload and should prompt haemochromatosis screening.

  7. Clinical features and management of hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Faber

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP is a group of genetically-determined disorders characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of lower limbs. An apparently sporadic case of adult-onset spastic paraplegia is a frequent clinical problem and a significant proportion of cases are likely to be of genetic origin. HSP is clinically divided into pure and complicated forms. The later present with a wide range of additional neurological and systemic features. To date, there are up to 60 genetic subtypes described. All modes of monogenic inheritance have been described: autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked and mitochondrial traits. Recent advances point to abnormal axonal transport as a key mechanism leading to the degeneration of the long motor neuron axons in the central nervous system in HSP. In this review we aim to address recent advances in the field, placing emphasis on key diagnostic features that will help practicing neurologists to identify and manage these conditions.

  8. State of the art in hereditary muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkat-Rott, K; Lehmann-Horn, F

    2010-10-01

    A combination of electrophysiological and genetic studies has resulted in the identification of several skeletal muscle disorders to be caused by pathologically functioning ion channels and has led to the term channelopathies. Typical hereditary muscle channelopa thies are congenital myasthenic syndromes, non-dystrophic myotonias, periodic paralyses, malignant hyperthermia, and central core disease. Most muscle channelopathies are commonly considered to be benign diseases. However, life-threatening weakness episodes or progressive permanent weakness may make these diseases severe, particularly the periodic paralyses (PP). Even in the typical PP forms characterized by episodic occurrence of weakness, up to 60% of the patients suffer from permanent weakness and myopathy with age. In addition, some PP patients present with a predominant progressive muscle weakness phenotype. The weakness can be explained by strongly depolarized fibers that take up sodium and water and that are electrically inexcitable. Drugs that repolarize the fiber membrane can restore muscle strength and may prevent progression.

  9. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chih-Chia; Wang, Su-Ming; Kuo, Huey-Liang; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Liu, Jiung-Hsiun; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Wang, I-Kuan; Yang, Ya-Fei; Lu, Yueh-Ju; Chou, Che-Yi; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2014-08-07

    Patients with CKD receiving maintenance dialysis are at risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with early CKD who are not receiving dialysis is unknown. The hypothesis was that their risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is negatively linked to renal function. To test this hypothesis, the association between eGFR and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis was analyzed. Patients with stages 3-5 CKD in the CKD program from 2003 to 2009 were enrolled and prospectively followed until December of 2012 to monitor the development of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding was analyzed using competing-risks regression with time-varying covariates. In total, 2968 patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis were followed for a median of 1.9 years. The incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding per 100 patient-years was 3.7 (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 3.9) in patients with stage 3 CKD, 5.0 (95% confidence interval, 4.8 to 5.3) in patients with stage 4 CKD, and 13.9 (95% confidence interval, 13.1 to 14.8) in patients with stage 5 CKD. Higher eGFR was associated with a lower risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (P=0.03), with a subdistribution hazard ratio of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.87 to 0.99) for every 5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) higher eGFR. A history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Pupper gastrointestinal bleeding risk. In patients with CKD who are not receiving dialysis, lower renal function is associated with higher risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk is higher in patients with previous upper gastrointestinal bleeding history and low serum albumin. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  10. Gastric ulcer bleeding: diagnosis by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voloudaki, Argyro; Tsagaraki, Kaliopi; Mouzas, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nickolas

    1999-06-01

    A case of CT demonstration of a bleeding gastric ulcer is presented, in a patient with confusing clinical manifestations. Abdominal CT was performed without oral contrast medium administration, and showed extravasation of intravenous contrast into a gastric lumen distended with material of mixed attenuation. It is postulated that if radiopaque oral contrast had been given, peptic ulcer bleeding would probably have been masked. CT demonstration of gastric ulcer bleeding, may be of value in cases of differential diagnostic dilemmas.

  11. Membranous nephropathy in a patient with hereditary angioedema: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majoni Sandawana W

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hereditary angioedema is the commonest inherited disorder of the complement system and has been associated with several immune glomerular diseases. A case of nephrotic syndrome and renal impairment due to idiopathic membranous glomerulonephritis in a patient with hereditary angioedema has not been described before. Case presentation We present the first reported case of the association of membranous nephropathy and hereditary angioedema in a 43-year-old male Caucasian patient who presented with acute intestinal angioedema, hypertension, acute pancreatitis, renal impairment and generalised body swelling due to severe nephrotic syndrome. We present the challenges involved in the clinical management of the patient. Conclusion This patient's presentation with severe nephrotic syndrome, renal impairment and hypertension required aggressive treatment of the membranous nephropathy given the high risk for progression to end stage renal failure. The contraindication to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers in this patient, the lack of published evidence on the use of alkylating agents and other immunosuppressive agents in patients with hereditary angioedema and the lack of published data on the management of similar cases presented a clinical challenge in this patient's management.

  12. Experimental therapeutics in hereditary neuropathies: the past, the present, and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, David N

    2008-10-01

    Hereditary neuropathies represent approximately 40% of undiagnosed neuropathies in a tertiary clinic setting. The Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies (CMT) are the most common. Mutations in more than 40 genes have been identified to date in CMT. Approximately 50% of CMT cases are accounted for by CMT type 1A, due to a duplication within the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22). Mutations in the gap junction beta 1 gene (GJB1), the myelin protein zero gene (MPZ), and the mitofusin 2 gene (MFN2) account for a substantial proportion of other genetically definable CMT. Some 15% of demyelinating CMT and 70% of axonal CMT await genetic clarification. Other hereditary neuropathies include the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies, the familial amyloid polyneuropathies, and multisystem disorders (e.g., lipid storage diseases and inherited ataxias) that have peripheral neuropathy as a major or minor component. This review surveys the challenges of developing effective therapies for hereditary neuropathies in terms of past, present, and future experimental therapeutics in CMT.

  13. Serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants and abnormal bleeding: a review for clinicians and a reconsideration of mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Sandarsh, Surya; Chethan, Kumar B; Nagesh, Koregala S

    2010-12-01

    It is generally believed that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) drugs increase the risk of abnormal bleeding and decrease the risk of ischemic heart disease events by blocking the uptake of serotonin into platelets, leading to an impairment in the platelet hemostatic response. To perform a detailed qualitative review of existing literature on the association of abnormal bleeding with the use of SSRIs. We conducted a PubMed search during June 2009 using the search terms antidepressants and SSRIs (including the names of individual SSRIs: fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, fluvoxamine, citalopram, and escitalopram) in association with bleeding, platelets, hemostasis, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin, antiplatelet drugs, proton pump inhibitors, peptic ulcer, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, menstruation, pregnancy, postpartum hemorrhage, surgery, tooth extraction, dental bleeding, stroke, ischemic heart disease, and other terms related to the field. We then searched the reference lists of identified studies. We provide a qualitative discussion of all studies that would inform clinicians about the mechanisms of bleeding and bleeding risks associated with these drugs in different clinical contexts. Epidemiologic studies show that SSRI use is associated with roughly doubled odds of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding; bleeding at other sites has been less commonly described, as has a possibly increased risk of bleeding associated with surgical procedures. The risk of SSRI-associated GI bleeding is increased with the concurrent use of NSAIDs, anticoagulants, and antiplatelet agents and is decreased by concurrent proton pump inhibitors. The risk of bleeding is increased in patients with cirrhosis of the liver or liver failure. There is, curiously, little literature on use of SSRIs and menstrual or postpartum blood loss. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors appear protective against ischemic heart disease events. The data are too

  14. Effect of intravenous iron supplementation on iron stores in non-anemic iron-deficient patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torbjörn Karlsson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, frequent episodes of nasal and gastrointestinal bleeding commonly lead to irondeficiency with or without anemia. In the retrospective study presented here we assessed the iron stores, as determined by analysis of plasma ferritin, during oral and intravenous iron supplementation, respectively, in a population of iron-deficient non-anemic HHT patients who were inadequately iron-repleted by oral supplementation. A switch from oral to intravenous iron supplementation was associated with a significant increase in ferritin in this patient population.

  15. The diagnosis of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, B; Gitzelmann, R

    1981-09-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a potentially life-threatening disorder and can be suspected from a detailed nutritional history. The usefulness of 2 diagnostic procedures, fructose tolerance test (FTT) and aldolase assay on biopsied liver, was studied. A standardized intravenous FTT with 200 mg/kg b.w. was done on 11 children with HFI, 17 age-matched contrast children, 6 adults with HFI and 6 adult controls. Blood glucose, phosphorus, urate, magnesium and fructose were followed for 2 hours. By the FTT, each HFI individual was reliably distinguished from controls and contrasts and even from those with acute liver disease other than HFI. Both children with non-HFI hepatopathy examined by both procedures had a normal FTT in spite of reduced liver fructaldolase activity. HFI children responded to the FTT by earlier and more pronounced hypoglycemia than adults, and one girl converted to an adult type response between the ages 12 and 181/2 years. Responses of two HFI sibling pairs and of one set of monozygotic twins were typical for age, but resemblance was no greater than within the unrelated HFI probands. The intravenous FTT is judged a reliable diagnostic tool, simple and harmless if done in hospital. Essential fructosuria is readily diagnosed by the FTT, but fructose-1,6-diphosphatase deficiency and HFI are not differentiated with certainty. Liver biopsies were obtained from 35 children with HFI, 14 contrast persons and 10 controls (of which 9 organ donors) and examined enzymatically. Deficiency of fructaldolase was observed in all HFI children but also in some contrast children suffering from acute liver disease other than HFI. In these, HFI could only be excluded when the reduced activity of reference enzymes such as fructose-1,6-diphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase and liver histology were included in the evaluation. In one deceased HFI infant, fructaldolase was deficient in both, liver and kidney cortex. Extent of antibody activation and of heat

  16. Secondary chondrosarcoma: Malignant transformation of pre-existing hereditary and non-hereditary cartilaginous lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna C.S. Vlok

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Secondary chondrosarcoma is a malignant hyaline cartilage tumour originating from a cartilaginous precursor, either osteochondroma or enchondroma. We contrast two different cases of biopsy-proven secondary chondrosarcomas resulting from benign, pre-existing cartilaginous lesions – our aim is to contrast and compare these two benign conditions consisting of multiple cartilaginous lesions – one hereditary and the other non-hereditary – and emphasise their potential for malignant transformation.

  17. Endoscopy for Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Ki Bae; Yoon, Soon Man; Youn, Sei Jin

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopy for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding plays an important role in primary diagnosis and management, particularly with respect to identification of high-risk stigmata lesions...

  18. Mutation analysis of genes within the dynactin complex in a cohort of hereditary peripheral neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, S; Ahmad-Annuar, A; Drew, A P; Shahrizaila, N; Nicholson, G A; Kennerson, M L

    2016-08-01

    The cytoplasmic dynein-dynactin genes are attractive candidates for neurodegenerative disorders given their functional role in retrograde transport along neurons. The cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain (DYNC1H1) gene has been implicated in various neurodegenerative disorders, and dynactin 1 (DCTN1) genes have been implicated in a wide spectrum of disorders including motor neuron disease, Parkinson's disease, spinobulbar muscular atrophy and hereditary spastic paraplegia. However, the involvement of other dynactin genes with inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN) namely, hereditary sensory neuropathy, hereditary motor neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is under reported. We screened eight genes; DCTN1-6 and ACTR1A and ACTR1B in 136 IPN patients using whole-exome sequencing and high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis. Eight non-synonymous variants (including one novel variant) and three synonymous variants were identified. Four variants have been reported previously in other studies, however segregation analysis within family members excluded them from causing IPN in these families. No variants of disease significance were identified in this study suggesting the dynactin genes are unlikely to be a common cause of IPNs. However, with the ease of querying gene variants from exome data, these genes remain worthwhile candidates to assess unsolved IPN families for variants that may affect the function of the proteins.

  19. Hereditary spherocytosis: Consequences of delayed diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Steward

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine whether patients with undiagnosed hereditary spherocytosis hospitalized for transfusions might have avoided hospitalization via earlier diagnosis. Study design: Charts of all (N = 30 patients with hereditary spherocytosis seen in pediatric hematology at West Virginia University-Charleston were reviewed. Family and transfusion history and presence of neonatal jaundice were recorded. Complete blood count and reticulocyte values during infancy were available for 20 of 30 patients, while baseline steady-state values were available for all 30. Results: Transfusions were given to 22 patients; 12 of 14 with an aplastic crisis were undiagnosed. In 10 of 12, the severity of anemia led to hospitalization (3 to intensive care. All 10 had prior mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and/or red cell distribution width elevations and a history of neonatal jaundice; 7 of 10 had a positive family history. Conclusions: Undiagnosed hereditary spherocytosis may lead to inpatient transfusions for severe anemia. Earlier detection of hereditary spherocytosis is easily achievable and may reduce hospitalizations via closer monitoring.

  20. Gynecologic screening in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, FEM; Mourits, MJE; Kleibeuker, JH; Hollema, H; van der Zee, AGJ

    2003-01-01

    Objective. In hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), women with a mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation have a cumulative lifetime risk of 25-50% for endometrial cancer and 8-12% for ovarian cancer. Therefore, female members of HNPCC families are offered an annual gynecologic and transvagi

  1. Hereditary spherocytosis presenting as indolent leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed K

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Indolent leg ulcertation, which is the rarest manifestation of hereditary spherocytosis, started at the age of 5 years affecting a 15-year-old boy and his mother is reported. Review of literature showed very few reports from India and abroad. The response to oral folic acid was excellent

  2. [Sudden blindness: consider Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schieving, J.H.; Vries, L.B.A. de; Hol, F.A.; Stroink, H.

    2008-01-01

    In 3 young male patients, aged 10, 19 and 21 years respectively, sequential, severe, painless bilateral visual loss occurred. Ophthalmological examination revealed no other abnormalities and this delayed the diagnosis Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). LHON is a mitochondrial genetic diseas

  3. Clinical management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Tomlinson, Ian; Castells, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary factors are involved in the development of a substantial proportion of all cases of colorectal cancer. Inherited forms of colorectal cancer are usually subdivided into polyposis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple colorectal polyps and nonpolyposis syndromes characterized by the development of few or no polyps. Timely identification of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes is vital because patient participation in early detection programmes prevents premature death due to cancer. Polyposis syndromes are fairly easy to recognize, but some patients might have characteristics that overlap with other clinically defined syndromes. Comprehensive analysis of the genes known to be associated with polyposis syndromes helps to establish the final diagnosis in these patients. Recognizing Lynch syndrome is more difficult than other polyposis syndromes owing to the absence of pathognomonic features. Most investigators therefore recommend performing systematic molecular analysis of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer using immunohistochemical methods. The implementation in clinical practice of new high-throughput methods for molecular analysis might further increase the identification of individuals at risk of hereditary colorectal cancer. This Review describes the clinical management of the various hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and demonstrates the advantage of using a classification based on the underlying gene defects.

  4. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jorn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    % in the abdominal area, 17% had diarrhoea, 11% had vomiting and 6% fainted during attacks. Non-hereditary angioedema has high lifetime prevalence and becomes chronic in approximately 50% of affected patients. Symptoms in the larynx and throat, as well as non-specific symptoms, such as dizziness and abdominal pain...

  5. Reprogramming development of experimental hereditary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeners, M.P.M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the development of experimental hereditary hypertension and to persistently ameliorate the development of hypertension due brief interventions during early development (perinatal treatment). We used two different models of experiment

  6. An Unusual Appearance of Meckel's Diverticulum as a Site of Bleed on Gastrointestinal Bleeding Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Madhuri Shimpi

    2013-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a frequently encountered and challenging clinical problem. GI bleeding scans are extremely useful for localizing the source of GI bleeding before interventional radiology procedures. It is essential that physicians understand the numerous possible pitfalls when interpreting these scans. Understanding the potential causes of false-positive scan interpretation eliminates unnecessary procedures for the patient and minimizes costs. We report a rare case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with GI bleeding. Upper and lower GI endoscopy did not reveal a source of bleeding. We emphasize case of Meckel's diverticulum appearing as a proximal jejunum false-positive site of bleed on bleeding scan. In addition, we reinforce the criteria needed for diagnosis of GI bleeding site on the nuclear bleeding scan. A high index of suspicion is the most important diagnostic aid that can prevent the nuclear medicine physicians from misdiagnosing the site of lower GI hemorrhage. PMID:25165421

  7. Provocative Endoscopy to Identify Bleeding Site in Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Novel Approach in Transarterial Embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Minobu; Fuwa, Sokun; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yoshiyuki; Kurihara, Yasuyuki

    2016-07-01

    This report describes a novel approach to endoscopically induce bleeding by removing a clot from the bleeding site during angiography for upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage. This procedure enabled accurate identification of the bleeding site, allowing for successful targeted embolization despite a negative initial angiogram. Provocative endoscopy may be a feasible and useful option for angiography of obscure bleeding sites in patients with UGI arterial hemorrhage. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of stretch therapy in comprehensive physical habilitation of patients with Charcot–Marie–Tooth hereditary neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shnayder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot–Marie–Tooth hereditary neuropathy (Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, CMT is the most common form of hereditary neuropathies, accompanied by sensory disorders, progressive muscle weakness with the formation of disabling contractures of the limbs. Currently, the main treatment program is effective CMT habilitation, which can prevent the development of limb deformities and thereby improve the life quality of the patient. Stretch therapy is one of the most effective methods of prevention and treatment of contractures in patients with CMT. This article provides a brief review of the literature regarding the use of stretching as physical therapy program of CMT habilitation.

  9. Factors Associated With Major Bleeding Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Shaun G.; Wojdyla, Daniel M.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; White, Harvey D.; Paolini, John F.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Patel, Manesh R.; Sherwood, Matthew W.; Becker, Richard C.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Hacke, Werner; Singer, Daniel E.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Breithardt, Gunter; Fox, Keith A. A.; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to report additional safety results from the ROCKET AF (Rivaroxaban Once-daily oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation). Background The ROCKET AF trial demonstrated similar risks of stroke/systemic embolism and major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding (principal safety endpoint) with rivaroxaban and warfarin. Methods The risk of the principal safety and component bleeding endpoints with rivaroxaban versus warfarin were compared, and factors associated with major bleeding were examined in a multivariable model. Results The principal safety endpoint was similar in the rivaroxaban and warfarin groups (14.9 vs. 14.5 events/100 patient-years; hazard ratio: 1.03; 95% confidence interval: 0.96 to 1.11). Major bleeding risk increased with age, but there were no differences between treatments in each age category (<65, 65 to 74, ≥75 years; pinteraction = 0.59). Compared with those without (n = 13,455), patients with a major bleed (n = 781) were more likely to be older, current/prior smokers, have prior gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, mild anemia, and a lower calculated creatinine clearance and less likely to be female or have a prior stroke/transient ischemic attack. Increasing age, baseline diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥90 mm Hg, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were independently associated with major bleeding risk; female sex and DBP <90 mm Hg were associated with a decreased risk. Conclusions Rivaroxaban and warfarin had similar risk for major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding. Age, sex, DBP, prior GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were associated with the risk of major bleeding. (An Efficacy and Safety Study of Rivaroxaban With Warfarin for the Prevention of Stroke and Non-Central Nervous System Systemic Embolism in Patients With Non

  10. Clinical and genetic findings in a Chinese family with VDR-associated hereditary vitamin D-resistant rickets

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Qianqian; Qi, Xuan; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Ou; Li, Mei; Xing, Xiaoping; Dong, Jin; Xia, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary vitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe rickets, hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and elevated alkaline phosphatase. This disorder is caused by homogeneous or heterogeneous mutations affecting the function of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which lead to complete or partial target organ resistance to the action of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D. A non-consanguineous family of Chinese Han origin with on...

  11. Evaluative comparison of systemic aspirin therapy effects on gingival bleeding in post non-surgical periodontal therapy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elanchezhiyan Sundram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gingival bleeding is considered as an important clinical sign for diagnosis of periodontal disease pathogenesis. Immune inflammatory reactions caused by local factors are considered as essential reasons for gingival bleeding, as also for the systemic bleeding disorders. In disease-free conditions of gingiva, the bleeding disorders are considered to be the main contender for bleeding. Other than these variables, many systemic drugs including systemic aspirin could also cause gingival bleeding. The main aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of buffered aspirin therapy on gingival bleeding. Materials and Methods: Totally, 36 systemically healthy individuals were included in the 15-day randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The 15 days were divided as: control period for the first 7 days and study period for the following 7 days. On the 1 st day, all individuals were given oral prophylaxis after recording gingival parameters such as Plaque Index, probing depth, and Bleeding Index, and then blood samples were collected for hematological investigations. Then, all individuals were administered placebo capsules for 1 week as once daily dose. On the 8 th day, all procedures were repeated and the individuals were prescribed with 325 coated aspirin capsules for 1 week. On the 15 th day, all parameters were repeated and the results were statistically analyzed. Results: In the study period, the parameters such as Bleeding Index, bleeding time, and prothrombin time were increased significantly, compared to the control period. Conclusion: The variables such as systemic drug therapy should be considered for the examination of gingiva while the diagnosis is considered mainly based on gingival bleeding.

  12. First trimester bleeding and maternal cardiovascular morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jacob A; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2012-01-01

    First trimester bleeding without miscarriage is a risk factor for complications later in the pregnancy, such as preterm delivery. Also, first trimester miscarriage has been linked to subsequent maternal ischemic heart disease. We investigated the link between maternal cardiovascular disease prior...... to and subsequent to first trimester bleeding without miscarriage....

  13. Helical CT in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Olivier; Leroy, Christophe; Sergent, Geraldine [Department of Radiology, Hopital Huriez, 1 rue Polonovski, 59037 Lille (France); Bulois, Philippe; Saint-Drenant, Sophie; Paris, Jean-Claude [Department of Gastroenterology, Hopital Huriez, 1 rue Polonovski, 59037 Lille (France)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of helical CT in depicting the location of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. A three-phase helical CT of the abdomen was performed in 24 patients referred for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The diagnosis of the bleeding site was established by CT when there was at least one of the following criteria: spontaneous hyperdensity of the peribowel fat; contrast enhancement of the bowel wall; vascular extravasation of the contrast medium; thickening of the bowel wall; polyp or tumor; or vascular dilation. Diverticula alone were not enough to locate the bleeding site. The results of CT were compared with the diagnosis obtained by colonoscopy, enteroscopy, or surgery. A definite diagnosis was made in 19 patients. The bleeding site was located in the small bowel in 5 patients and the colon in 14 patients. The CT correctly located 4 small bowel hemorrhages and 11 colonic hemorrhages. Diagnosis of the primary lesion responsible for the bleeding was made in 10 patients. Our results suggest that helical CT could be a good diagnostic tool in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding to help the physician to diagnose the bleeding site. (orig.)

  14. Recurrent Midgut Bleeding due to Jejunal Angioleiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir Gachabayov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Angioleiomyoma being a type of true smooth muscle gastrointestinal tumors can lead to serious life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with recurrent midgut bleeding. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed highly vascular small bowel neoplasm. The patient underwent laparotomy with bowel resection and recovered uneventfully. Histopathology revealed jejunal angioleiomyoma.

  15. Recurrent Midgut Bleeding due to Jejunal Angioleiomyoma

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Angioleiomyoma being a type of true smooth muscle gastrointestinal tumors can lead to serious life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with recurrent midgut bleeding. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed highly vascular small bowel neoplasm. The patient underwent laparotomy with bowel resection and recovered uneventfully. Histopathology revealed jejunal angioleiomyoma.

  16. Novel therapeutic approaches for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Shilpa

    2013-03-01

    Many human childhood mitochondrial disorders result from abnormal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and altered bioenergetics. These abnormalities span most of the mtDNA, demonstrating that there are no "unique" positions on the mitochondrial genome that when deleted or mutated produce a disease phenotype. This diversity implies that the relationship between mitochondrial genotype and clinical phenotype is very complex. The origins of clinical phenotypes are thus unclear, fundamentally difficult-to-treat, and are usually clinically devastating. Current treatment is largely supportive and the disorders progress relentlessly causing significant morbidity and mortality. Vitamin supplements and pharmacological agents have been used in isolated cases and clinical trials, but the efficacy of these interventions is unclear. In spite of recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of mitochondrial diseases, a cure remains elusive. An optimal cure would be gene therapy, which involves introducing the missing gene(s) into the mitochondria to complement the defect. Our recent research results indicate the feasibility of an innovative protein-transduction ("protofection") technology, consisting of a recombinant mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) that avidly binds mtDNA and permits efficient targeting into mitochondria in situ and in vivo. Thus, the development of gene therapy for treating mitochondrial disease offers promise, because it may circumvent the clinical abnormalities and the current inability to treat individual disorders in affected individuals. This review aims to focus on current treatment options and future therapeutics in mitochondrial disease treatment with a special emphasis on Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

  17. [The application of method of flow cytometry in diagnostics of hereditary spherocytosis (eosin-5 maleimid binding test)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorova, Iu A; Zueva, E E; Sokolova, N E

    2012-07-01

    The technique of binding eosin-5 maleimid fluorescent dye with lysine-430 of first extracellular protein bulge of band 3 of erythrocytes' membranes makes it possible to detect the defects of cytoskeleton of erythrocytes as a biological foundation of pathogenesis of hereditary spherocytosis. The samples of peripheral blood from 125 adult persons and 18 children with established absence of hematologic disorders were analyzed The samples of peripheral blood from 19 patients with verified hereditary spherocytosis were analyzed too. The method of flow cytometry was applied to register the average intensity of fluorescence of eosin-5 maleimid. The decrease of average intensity of fluorescence of eosin-5 maleimid of erythrocytes of patients with hereditary spherocytosis as compared with data from comparison groups was established in all cases.

  18. Transarterial embolization of acute intercostal artery bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jae Ik; Park, Auh Whan; Lee, Seon Joo [Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Chang Jin [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Tae Beom [Donga University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hwan [Kyimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    To report our experiences of transarterial embolization for acute intercostal artery bleeding. A retrospectively analysis of the causes, clinical manifestations, angiographic findings and transarterial embolization technique in 8 patients with acute intercostal artery bleeding, with a review of the anatomical basis. The causes of intercostal artery bleeding were iatrogenic and traumatic in 88 and 12% of cases, respectively. Active bleeding from the collateral intercostal or posterior intercostal arteries was angiographically demonstrated in 75 and 25% of cases, respectively. Transarterial embolization successfully achieved hemostasis in all cases. However, two patient with hypovolemic shock expired due to a massive hemothorax, despite successful transarterial embolization. Intercostal access should be performed through the middle of the intercostal space to avoid injury to the collateral intercostal artery. Transarterial embolization is an effective method for the control of intercostal artery bleeding.

  19. Successful treatment of acute hereditary angioedema attacks with self-administered icatibant in patients with venous access problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiednig, Michaela

    2013-04-25

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare and potentially fatal autosomal dominant disorder characterised by unpredictable skin, gastrointestinal tract or respiratory tract oedema. Plasma-derived C1-esterase inhibitors are effective in the prophylaxis or treatment of hereditary angioedema type I and II attacks, but must be administered intravenously. This may be problematic in patients with venous access difficulties. Icatibant, a bradykinin B2-receptor antagonist, is administered subcutaneously. In July 2008 icatibant received approval for healthcare professional-administered treatment of hereditary angioedema attacks in adults. In 2011 it received European Medicines Agency and US Food and Drug Administration licences for patient-administered treatment of hereditary angioedema attacks. Given these approvals, and with the appropriate training, icatibant could provide the opportunity for patients to self-administer treatment. This is one of the first long-term follow-up reports of patients with hereditary angioedema using self-administered icatibant. During follow-up, icatibant remained effective and patient satisfaction was high.

  20. 沧州地区城镇居民高血压患者糖代谢异常调查分析%Investigation and analysis on bleed sugar metabolism disorder of high blood pressure patients in Cangzhou residents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘植蕊; 姚淑红; 尹雪梅; 许峰; 顾玉发

    2012-01-01

    Objective It is to investigate the sugar metabolism disorder rates of hypertension patients in Cangzhou residents and observe the related risk factors. Methods According to random sampling stratification investigation method, all urban dweller in Cangzhou area were selected to survey. The sugar metabolism anomalies statuses of patients with high blood pressure were analyzed. According to blood pressure, gender, age groups, blood pressure and sugar metabolism disorders distribution characteristics and associated risk factors were analyzed in different blood pressure level, age and gender. Results Total incidence rate of sugar metabolism disorders in investigation was 17. 69% . The incidence rate of diabetes mellitus in hypertension patients was 17.15% , and of pre-diabetes ( including IFG and IGT ) was 20. 79% ; according to the age group, it was higher in women than men of more than 70 years old group, other age group was higher in men than women. Sugar metabolism disorders incidence rate was increased with blood pressure level increased, men sugar metabolism disorder rates of each group was higher than women. Sugar metabolism disorders were increased with age, obesity. Conclusion Cangzhou regional urban residents, diabetes and pre-diabetes rates are higher in high blood pressure crowds. High blood pressure and sugar metabolism disorders are closely related, sugar metabolism disorders risk factors: high blood pressure, age, obesity. To prevent diabetes should actively control variable risk factor.%目的 了解沧州地区城镇居民高血压患者糖代谢异常患病率及相关危险因素.方法 以沧州地区城镇居民为调查对象,按随机分层抽样调查方法,对范围内所有原发性高血压患者糖代谢异常情况进行分析.按血压、性别、年龄分组,分析不同血压、年龄、男女患者血压和糖代谢异常分布特点及相关危险因素.结果 调查组糖代谢异常总患病率17.69%.高血

  1. Effect of Gastric Acid Suppressant Prophylaxis on Incidence of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahoora Abdollahi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Critically ill children admitted to pediatric intensive care unit (PICU are at increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding due to stress related mucosal injury. Reducing gastric acid by acid suppressant medication is the accepted prophylaxis treatment, but there is not any definitive guideline for using prophylaxis in PICU patients. The present study aimed to assess the effect of Proton Pump Inhibitor (PPI and H2 Blocker (H2B prophylaxis on gastrointestinal bleeding in admitted patients of PICU, Mashhad- Iran.Materials and Methods: In this study, 100 patients admitted in PICU divided into two equal groups on the first day of admission. They received ranitidine or pantoprazole as prophylaxis of stress ulcer. Those patients who had history of gastrointestinal bleeding or coagulation disorder were excluded. 100 PICU patients who had not received prophylaxis during last 6 months retrospectively evaluated as control of the study. Data were collected as demographic characteristics, admission reason, definitive diagnosis, receiving corticosteroid and mechanical ventilation in each patient. Gastrointestinal bleeding (hematemesis, coffee ground aspirate, and melena and clinically significant gastrointestinal bleeding were daily monitored. Data analyzed through descriptive statistical tests, Chi-square, logistic regression, t-test and using SPSS-16 software.Results: Among 204 patients (control group=105 and case group=99, incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding (GB was 13.2% in which 6.9% of cases presented with clinically significant gastrointestinal bleeding (CSGB. Loss of consciousness and respiratory distress were the main reason of admission. There was no significant differences between the incidence of (GB and (CSGB in experimental and control groups (P>0.05 as well as ranitidine and pantoprazole prophylaxis (P>0.05. Significant risk factors of (GB were mechanical ventilation and loss of consciousness and corticosteroid therapy

  2. PATIENTS REFERRED FOR BLEEDING SYMPTOMS OF UNKNOWN CAUSE: DOES EVALUATION OF THROMBIN GENERATION CONTRIBUTE TO DIAGNOSIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Holm

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Patients with mild to moderate bleeding symptoms referred for coagulation investigation sometimes never receive a definitive diagnosis. Bleed assessment tools have been developed and validated to assess the severity of symptoms. Global coagulation assays, e.g., the thrombin generation test (thrombogram have a potential to identify hemostatic defects that are not detected in specific assays. Material and Methods One hundred and eighty-five patients referred to our centre because of bleeding symptoms were evaluated using  the bleeding assessment tool (BAT described by Tosetto and colleagues in 2006.  Blood samples were investigated for thrombin generation (TG capacity (Technoclone , in platelet poor (PPP  plasma , and specific clotting factors, i.e, von Willebrand factor, factor VIII and IX, as well as INR, APTT, platelet count, and platelet adhesion. Results Of the 185 patients, five women were diagnosed with mild von Willebrand disease and one male with mild hemophilia A. The remaining 179 subjects (76% females and 24% males with average ages of 33 and 28 years, respectively were evaluated further. In the total cohort and among women, peak TG, and lag time   correlated with bleeding score (p=0.01 and p=0.04, respectively with correlation coefficients.  No such correlations were found among males.   Discussion and conclusion   Although our study showed some correlation between TG and bleeding score, results are generally consistent with a previous report which failed to demonstrate the value of TG measurement in a similar setting. In conclusion, the complexity of the mechanisms underlying clinical bleeding complicates the ability to use TG tests as reliable predictors of bleeding. Mild congenital bleeding disorders, especially VWD, should be specifically screened for in patients with mild/moderate symtoms.

  3. A 13 year-old boy with post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder presenting with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: a case report [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2p0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Y. Ho

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available One well recognized and potentially serious complication of chronic immunosuppression in organ transplant recipients is post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD. This accounts for 20% of all malignancies in transplant recipients, which is four times higher than the general population1,2. The diagnosis of PTLD is often difficult, due to various manifestations resulting in late diagnosis. We report an unusual presentation of PTLD in a pediatric patient where the diagnosis was achieved only after extensive investigation.

  4. Imaging features of type 1 hereditary tyrosinemia: a review of 30 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, J. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Garel, L. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Patriquin, H. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Paradis, K. [Department of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology, Universite de Montreal, Que. (Canada); Forget, S. [Department of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology, Universite de Montreal, Que. (Canada); Filiatrault, D. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Grignon, A. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Russo, P. [Department of Pathology, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Que. (Canada); St-Vil, D. [Department of Surgery, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Que. (Canada)

    1996-12-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1, a common genetic disorder in the province of Quebec, is characterized by a deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase. In this autosomal recessive disorder of tyrosine metabolism, the accumulation of succinylacetone leads to neurologic crises, acute and chronic liver failure, complex renal tubulopathy, rickets and a hemorrhagic syndrome. Liver trans- plantation has dramatically modified the spontaneous course of this lethal disease. The present paper describes the imaging fea- tures of tyrosinemia in 30 patients followed from 1980 to 1995 at Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Canada. (orig.). With 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Orofacial hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: high power diode laser in early and advanced lesion treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempesta, Angela; Franco, Simonetta; Miccoli, Simona; Suppressa, Patrizia; De Falco, Vincenzo; Crincoli, Vito; Lacaita, Mariagrazia; Giuliani, Michele; Favia, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a muco-cutaneous inherited disease. Symptoms are epistaxis, visceral arterio-venous malformations, multiple muco-cutaneous telangiectasia with the risk of number increasing enlargement, bleeding, and super-infection. The aim of this work is to show the dual Diode Laser efficacy in preventive treatment of Early Lesions (EL < 2mm) and therapeutic treatment of Advanced Lesions (AL < 2mm). 21 patients affected by HHT with 822 muco-cutaneous telangiectatic nodules have been treated in several sessions with local anaesthesia and cooling of treated sites. EL preventive treatment consists of single Laser impulse (fibre 320) in ultrapulsed mode (2 mm single point spot). AL therapeutic treatment consists of repeated Laser impulses in pulsed mode (on 200ms / off 400ms). According to the results, Diode Laser used in pulsed and ultra-pulsed mode is very effective as noninvasive treatment both in early and advanced oral and perioral telangiectasia.

  6. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: types II, III, and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle

    2007-10-03

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) encompass a number of inherited disorders that are associated with sensory dysfunction (depressed reflexes, altered pain and temperature perception) and varying degrees of autonomic dysfunction (gastroesophageal reflux, postural hypotention, excessive sweating). Subsequent to the numerical classification of four distinct forms of HSAN that was proposed by Dyck and Ohta, additional entities continue to be described, so that identification and classification are ongoing. As a group, the HSAN are rare diseases that affect both sexes. HSAN III is almost exclusive to individuals of Eastern European Jewish extraction, with incidence of 1 per 3600 live births. Several hundred cases with HSAN IV have been reported. The worldwide prevalence of HSAN type II is very low. This review focuses on the description of three of the disorders, HSAN II through IV, that are characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance and onset at birth. These three forms of HSAN have been the most intensively studied, especially familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome or HSAN III), which is often used as a prototype for comparison to the other HSAN. Each HSAN disorder is likely caused by different genetic errors that affect specific aspects of small fiber neurodevelopment, which result in variable phenotypic expression. As genetic tests are routinely used for diagnostic confirmation of HSAN III only, other means of differentiating between the disorders is necessary. Diagnosis is based on the clinical features, the degree of both sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and biochemical evaluations, with pathologic examinations serving to further confirm differences. Treatments for all these disorders are supportive.

  7. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: types II, III, and IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axelrod Felicia B

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN encompass a number of inherited disorders that are associated with sensory dysfunction (depressed reflexes, altered pain and temperature perception and varying degrees of autonomic dysfunction (gastroesophageal reflux, postural hypotention, excessive sweating. Subsequent to the numerical classification of four distinct forms of HSAN that was proposed by Dyck and Ohta, additional entities continue to be described, so that identification and classification are ongoing. As a group, the HSAN are rare diseases that affect both sexes. HSAN III is almost exclusive to individuals of Eastern European Jewish extraction, with incidence of 1 per 3600 live births. Several hundred cases with HSAN IV have been reported. The worldwide prevalence of HSAN type II is very low. This review focuses on the description of three of the disorders, HSAN II through IV, that are characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance and onset at birth. These three forms of HSAN have been the most intensively studied, especially familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome or HSAN III, which is often used as a prototype for comparison to the other HSAN. Each HSAN disorder is likely caused by different genetic errors that affect specific aspects of small fiber neurodevelopment, which result in variable phenotypic expression. As genetic tests are routinely used for diagnostic confirmation of HSAN III only, other means of differentiating between the disorders is necessary. Diagnosis is based on the clinical features, the degree of both sensory and autonomic dysfunction, and biochemical evaluations, with pathologic examinations serving to further confirm differences. Treatments for all these disorders are supportive.

  8. Cate's Story: Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Megan

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a major cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and is thought to be responsible for about 10% of cancer-related deaths across the globe. A small proportion of all gastric cancers arise because of a known hereditary syndrome, the most common of which is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). This is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an increased risk of developing diffuse gastric cancer at a young age. The gene responsible for HDGC is CDH1, also known as E-cadherin, a germline mutation conferring an 80% risk of developing gastric cancer during the lifetime of the carrier. Females with germline CDH1 mutations face an additional risk of developing lobular breast cancer, with a reported cumulative risk of 60% by the age of 80 years.
.

  9. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer--An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurzu, Simona; Jung, Ioan; Orlowska, Janina; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Kadar, Zoltan; Turdean, Sabin; Bara, Tivadar

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of gastric cancer varies by up to ten fold throughout the world, and the geographic distribution of hereditary cases is not well explored. Familial clustering is seen in 10% of cases, and approximately 3% of all gastric cancers develop due to hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). In this review, the characteristics of HDGC are presented according to molecular particularities, geographic distribution, and other parameters. Based on our experience and the data from the literature, we discuss the possibility of applying a mutation signature (spectrum) study and adductomic approaches to a comparative carcinogenesis of HDGC. We also provide a comprehensive, up-to-date review of genetic counseling and criteria for screening and surveillance of eligible families.

  10. Hereditary angioedema type I: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Peralta, Francisca; Buller Vigueira, Eva; Cabello Pulido, Juana

    2016-01-28

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare disease with great heterogeneity of symptoms such as edema of the skin, gastro-intestinal mucosa and larynx or pharynx. Even though there are three types, the most frequent is type I, which is a result from a deficiency of the complement C1 inhibitor. The severity of its symptoms along with the low prevalence of the disease and the need for appropriate specific treatment make the diagnosis and treatment of the pathology an outstanding subject for the family physician. The present is the case of a male teenager with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency since he was six months old, angioedema on arms and legs since 11 years old and diagnosed with hereditary angioedema type I one year after. The definitive diagnosis of the disease enabled an appropriate treatment which consists in preventing outbreaks that may compromise the patient's life and, if they occur, administration of complement C1 inhibitor.

  11. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  12. Hereditary hypophosphatemias: new genes in the bone-kidney axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Armando L

    2007-08-01

    Hypophosphatemia due to isolated renal phosphate wasting is a genetically heterogeneous disease. Two new genes linked to two different forms of hereditary hypophosphatemias have recently been described. Autosomal recessive form of hypophosphatemic rickets was mapped to chromosome 4q21 and identified homozygous mutations in dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) gene, which encodes a non-collagenous bone matrix protein. Intact plasma levels of the phosphaturic protein FGF23 (fibroblast growth factor 23) were clearly elevated in some of the affected individuals, providing a possible explanation for the phosphaturia and inappropriately normal 1,25(OH)2D levels, and suggesting that DMP1 may regulate FGF23 expression. Hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets with hypercalciuria is another rare disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance. Affected individuals present with hypercalciuria due to increased serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels and increased intestinal calcium absorption. The disease was mapped to a 1.6 Mbp region on chromosome 9q34, which contains SLC34A3, the gene encoding the renal sodium-phosphate cotransporter NaPi-IIc. This was the first demonstration that NaPi-IIc has a key role in the regulation of phosphate homeostasis. Thus, DMP1 and NaPi-IIc add two new members to the bone-kidney axis proposed since it was discovered that the first phosphatonin, FGF23, was of osteoblastic/osteocyte origin. This provides a mechanism for the skeleton to communicate with the kidney to coordinate the mineralization of extracelular matrix and the renal handling of phosphate.

  13. [Review of the recent literature on hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birouk, N

    2014-12-01

    The recent literature included interesting reports on the pathogenic mechanisms of hereditary neuropathies. The axonal traffic and its abnormalities in some forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease were particularly reviewed by Bucci et al. Many genes related to CMT disease code for proteins that are involved directly or not in intracellular traffic. KIF1B controls vesicle motility on microtubules. MTMR2, MTMR13 and FIG4 regulate the metabolism of phosphoinositide at the level of endosomes. The HSPs are involved in the proteasomal degradation. GDAP1 and MFN2 regulate the mitochondrial fission and fusion respectively and the mitochondial transport within the axon. Pareyson et al. reported a review on peripheral neuropathies in mitochondrial disorders. They used the term of "mitochondrial CMT" for the forms of CMT with abnormal mitochondrial dynamic or structure. Among the new entities, we can draw the attention to a proximal form of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with autosomal dominant inheritance, which is characterized by motor deficit with cramps and fasciculations predominating in proximal muscles. Distal sensory deficit can be present. The gene TFG on chromosome 3 has been recently identified to be responsible for this form. Another rare form of axonal autosomal recessive neuropathy due to HNT1 gene mutation is characterized by the presence of hands myotonia that appears later than neuropathy but constitute an interesting clinical hallmark to orientate the diagnosis of this form. In terms of differential diagnosis, CMT4J due to FIG4 mutation can present with a rapidly progressive and asymmetric weakness that resembles CIDP. Bouhy et al. made an interesting review on the therapeutic trials, animal models and the future therapeutic strategies to be developed in CMT disease.

  14. Distal renal tubular acidosis with hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rajiv; Agarwal, Indira; Bawazir, Waleed M; Bruce, Lesley J

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA), although distinct entities, share the same protein i.e. the anion exchanger1 (AE1) protein. Despite this, their coexistence has been rarely reported. We hereby describe the largest family to date with co-existence of dRTA and HS and discuss the molecular basis for the co-inheritance of these conditions.

  15. Hereditary angioedema:44 years of diagnostic delay

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, M.P.; Bygum, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a 64-year-old man who suffered from recurrent visible swelling attacks since the age of 20 as well as episodes with severe upper airway edema, resulting in 4 emergency tracheotomies. Eventually after 44 years he was diagnosed with hereditary angioedema (HAE) type II. The aims of this report is to emphasize the importance of awareness concerning HAE, which does not respond to traditional anti-allergic therapy, and remind physicians to test for functional C1-INH deficiency.

  16. Hereditary chin tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erer, Sevda; Jankovic, Joseph

    2007-11-01

    Hereditary chin tremor (HCT) is characterized by rhythmical, involuntary movements of the chin muscles usually inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. We describe a 74-year old man with familial, childhood-onset chin tremor, and a 3-year history of progressive hand tremor, gait difficulty, and other parkinsonian features. Since chin tremor often occurs in Parkinson's disease (PD), a coexistent HCT may not be recognized unless past and family history of tremor is carefully explored.

  17. Hereditary Transthyretin Amyloidosis in Eight Chinese Families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-Chao Meng; He Lyu; Wei Zhang; Jing Liu; Zhao-Xia Wang; Yun Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background:Mutations of transthyretin (TTR) cause the most common type of autosomal-dominant hereditary systemic amyloidosis,which occurs worldwide.To date,more and more mutations in the TTR gene have been reported.Some variations in the clinical presentation are often observed in patients with the same mutation or the patients in the same family.The purpose of this study was to find out the clinicopathologic and genetic features of Chinese patients with hereditary TTR amyloidosis.Methods:Clinical and necessary examination materials were collected from nine patients of eight families with hereditary TTR amyloidosis at Peking University First Hospital from January 2007 to November 2014.Sural nerve biopsies were taken for eight patients and skin biopsies were taken in the calf/upper arm for two patients,for light and electron microscopy examination.The TTR genes from the nine patients were analyzed.Results:The onset age varied from 23 to 68 years.The main manifestations were paresthesia,proximal and/or distal weakness,autonomic dysfunction,cardiomyopathy,vitreous opacity,hearing loss,and glossohypertrophia.Nerve biopsy demonstrated severe loss ofmyelinated fibers in seven cases and amyloid deposits in three.One patient had skin amyloid deposits which were revealed from electron microscopic examination.Genetic analysis showed six kinds of mutations of TTR gene,including Val30Met,Phe33Leu,Ala36Pro,Val30Ala,Phe33Val,and Glu42Gly in exon 2.Conclusions:Since the pathological examinations of sural nerve were negative for amyloid deposition in most patients,the screening for TTR mutations should be performed in all the adult patients,who are clinically suspected with hereditary TTR amyloidosis.

  18. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy mimicking neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Collin M; Van Stavern, Gregory P; Tselis, Alex C

    2011-09-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is rarely associated with multiple sclerosis-like features. We present a case of a 65-year-old African American woman with LHON masquerading as neuromyelitis optica (NMO). We highlight the features of the clinical examination and MRI that were suggestive of an alternative diagnosis and review the literature regarding LHON and multiple sclerosis. The diagnosis of LHON should be considered in all cases of acute or subacute bilateral optic neuropathy, including presumed seronegative NMO.

  19. Treatment of type I and II hereditary angioedema with Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Lilian; Farkas, Henriette

    2008-11-01

    Hereditary and acquired angioedema are of outstanding clinical importance, as edematous attacks associated with these conditions can thrust afflicted patients into mortal danger. Currently, C1 inhibitor concentrate - a human blood product - is available as a replacement therapy. In view of the limited number of donors, as well as the risk of transmission of blood-borne infections, it is a reasonable expectation to develop a therapeutic alternative based on recombinant technology, which would eliminate all these shortcomings. Pharming (Leiden, The Netherlands) has developed Rhucin, a recombinant human C1 inhibitor, as a proprietary product, which is currently being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials. Ongoing studies conducted within the framework of the development program are almost complete and their interim findings are reassuring. This should facilitate successful regulatory approval in the near future, which is indispensable in order to make Rhucin available for patients with hereditary angioedema or other disorders amenable to C1 inhibitor replacement.

  20. Suspected Perinatal Depression Revealed to be Hereditary Diffuse Leukoencephalopathy with Spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Josefine; Weissert, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Early motor symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases often appear in combination with psychiatric symptoms, such as depression or personality changes, and are in danger of being misdiagnosed as psychogenic in young patients. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman who presented with rapid-onset depression, followed by a hypokinetic movement disorder and cognitive decline during pregnancy. Genetic testing revealed a mutation in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene, which led to the diagnosis of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids. Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) is probably an under-recognized disease. HDLS should be considered in patients with rapidly progressing parkinsonian symptoms and dementia accompanied by white matter lesions. PMID:28122429