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Sample records for hepatotoxic microcystins mcs

  1. A review of reproductive toxicity of microcystins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liang; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Xuezhen; Xie, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Reproductive toxicity of MCs on mammals, fishes, amphibians, and birds is reviewed. • PP1/2A inhibition and oxidative stress are important toxic mechanisms of MCs. • Reproductive toxicity of MCs may be closely related to endocrine-disrupting effects. • The trans-generational toxicity of microcystins is a matter of concern. • Data concerning female reproductive and sex-specific effects of MCs are lacking. - Abstract: Animal studies provide strong evidence of positive associations between microcystins (MCs) exposure and reproductive toxicity, representing a threat to human reproductive health and the biodiversity of wild life. This paper reviews current knowledge of the reproductive toxicity of MCs, with regard to mammals, fishes, amphibians, and birds, mostly in males. Toxicity of MCs is primarily governed by the inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1 and PP2A) and disturbance of cellular phosphorylation balance. MCs exposure is related to excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress, leading to cytoskeleton disruption, mitochondria dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and DNA damage. MCs induce cell apoptosis mediated by the mitochondrial and ROS and ER pathways. Through PP1/2A inhibition and oxidative stress, MCs lead to differential expression/activity of transcriptional factors and proteins involved in the pathways of cellular differentiation, proliferation, and tumor promotion. MC-induced DNA damage is also involved in carcinogenicity. Apart from a direct effect on testes and ovaries, MCs indirectly affect sex hormones by damaging the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad (HPG) axis and liver. Parental exposure to MCs may result in hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity of offspring. We also summarize the current research gaps which should be addressed by further studies.

  2. A review of reproductive toxicity of microcystins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liang, E-mail: chan91@yeah.net [Donghu Experimental Station of Lake Ecosystems, State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Jun, E-mail: chenjun@ihb.ac.cn [Donghu Experimental Station of Lake Ecosystems, State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhang, Xuezhen, E-mail: xuezhen@mail.hzau.edu.cn [College of Fisheries, Huazhong Agricultural University, Freshwater Aquaculture Collaborative Innovation Center of Hubei Province, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xie, Ping, E-mail: xieping@ihb.ac.cn [Donghu Experimental Station of Lake Ecosystems, State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Reproductive toxicity of MCs on mammals, fishes, amphibians, and birds is reviewed. • PP1/2A inhibition and oxidative stress are important toxic mechanisms of MCs. • Reproductive toxicity of MCs may be closely related to endocrine-disrupting effects. • The trans-generational toxicity of microcystins is a matter of concern. • Data concerning female reproductive and sex-specific effects of MCs are lacking. - Abstract: Animal studies provide strong evidence of positive associations between microcystins (MCs) exposure and reproductive toxicity, representing a threat to human reproductive health and the biodiversity of wild life. This paper reviews current knowledge of the reproductive toxicity of MCs, with regard to mammals, fishes, amphibians, and birds, mostly in males. Toxicity of MCs is primarily governed by the inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1 and PP2A) and disturbance of cellular phosphorylation balance. MCs exposure is related to excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress, leading to cytoskeleton disruption, mitochondria dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and DNA damage. MCs induce cell apoptosis mediated by the mitochondrial and ROS and ER pathways. Through PP1/2A inhibition and oxidative stress, MCs lead to differential expression/activity of transcriptional factors and proteins involved in the pathways of cellular differentiation, proliferation, and tumor promotion. MC-induced DNA damage is also involved in carcinogenicity. Apart from a direct effect on testes and ovaries, MCs indirectly affect sex hormones by damaging the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad (HPG) axis and liver. Parental exposure to MCs may result in hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity of offspring. We also summarize the current research gaps which should be addressed by further studies.

  3. Hepatotoxicity associated with microcystin/ Hepatotoxicidade associada à microcistina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Frederico Rodrigues Loureiro Bracarense

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Urban and industrial discharges, intense agricultural exploitation and fisheries have been causing the eutrophication in both drinking and recreational waters. A frequent consequence of eutrophication in waters is the massive development of cyanobacteria. The occurrence of these blooms induces a severe problem, as Microcystis aeruginosa, the most widespread distributed cyanobacteria, can produce microcystins (MC. Toxic effects of MC have been described in liver, lungs, stomach, and intestine. Deaths in wildlife, livestock and human beings were also associated with MC exposition. MC exposition can occurs directly by ingestion, inhalation, contact, intravenous inoculation of contaminated water (hemodialysis or indirectly, by the consumption of animals, as fish and mollusks, the majors ingestors of cyanobacteria and its toxins. The most toxic MC, an also the most common is microcystin-LR (MC-LR, that has the liver as the main target organ. Microcystin is taken up specifically into the liver by bile acid transporters and, after entering the cytoplasm, inhibit protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, which leads to the increase in protein phosphorylation. This effect has two main consequences: the destruction of cytoskeleton directly causing cytotoxic effects, and deregulation of cell division, leading to tumor-promoting activity. Acute exposition to MC induces severe intrahepatic hemorrhage, necrosis and apoptosis, while chronic exposure can cause hepatic or intestinal neoplasia. It has been documented that MC hepatotoxicity is closely associated with intracellular reactive oxygen species formation. Natural degradation of microcystins depends on the solar radiation and bacteria. If degradation is insufficient, MC will persist in the freshwater food chain. Microcystin contamination of waters is therefore a hazard to human and animal health, so efforts to avoid eutrophication of waters sources are essential, in order to minimize the risks to public health

  4. Hepatotoxic Seafood Poisoning (HSP Due to Microcystins: A Threat from the Ocean?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Briasoulis

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial blooms are a major and growing problem for freshwater ecosystems worldwide that increasingly concerns public health, with an average of 60% of blooms known to be toxic. The most studied cyanobacterial toxins belong to a family of cyclic heptapeptide hepatotoxins, called microcystins. The microcystins are stable hydrophilic cyclic heptapeptides with a potential to cause cell damage following cellular uptake via organic anion-transporting proteins (OATP. Their intracellular biologic effects presumably involve inhibition of catalytic subunits of protein phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A and glutathione depletion. The microcystins produced by cyanobacteria pose a serious problem to human health, if they contaminate drinking water or food. These toxins are collectively responsible for human fatalities, as well as continued and widespread poisoning of wild and domestic animals. Although intoxications of aquatic organisms by microcystins have been widely documented for freshwater ecosystems, such poisonings in marine environments have only occasionally been reported. Moreover, these poisonings have been attributed to freshwater cyanobacterial species invading seas of lower salinity (e.g., the Baltic or to the discharge of freshwater microcystins into the ocean. However, recent data suggest that microcystins are also being produced in the oceans by a number of cosmopolitan marine species, so that Hepatotoxic Seafood Poisoning (HSP is increasingly recognized as a major health risk that follows consumption of contaminated seafood.

  5. Tissue distributions and seasonal dynamics of the hepatotoxic microcystins-LR and -RR in a freshwater snail (Bellamya aeruginosa) from a large shallow, eutrophic lake of the subtropical China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jun; Xie Ping; Guo Longgen; Zheng Li; Ni Leyi

    2005-01-01

    Tissue distributions and seasonal dynamics of the hepatotoxic microcystins-LR and -RR in a freshwater snail (Bellamya aeruginosa) were studied monthly in a large shallow, eutrophic lake of the subtropical China during June-November, 2003. Microcystins (MCs) were quantitatively determined by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with a qualitative analysis by a Finnigan LC-MS system. On the average of the study period, hepatopancreas was the highest in MC contents (mean 4.14 and range 1.06-7.42 μg g -1 DW), followed by digestive tracts (mean 1.69 and range 0.8-4.54 μg g -1 DW) and gonad (mean 0.715 and range 0-2.62 μg g -1 DW), whereas foot was the least (mean 0.01 and range 0-0.06 μg g -1 DW). There was a positive correlation in MC contents between digestive tracts and hepatopancreas. A constantly higher MC content in hepatopancreas than in digestive tracts indicates a substantial bioaccumulation of MCs in the hepatopancreas of the snail. The average ratio of MC-LR/MC-RR showed a steady increase from digestive tracts (0.44) to hepatopancreas (0.63) and to gonad (0.96), suggesting that MC-LR was more resistant to degradation in the snail. Since most MCs were present in the hepatopancreas, digestive tracts and gonad with only a very small amount in the edible foot, the risk to human health may not be significant if these toxic parts are removed prior to snail consumption. However, the possible transference of toxins along food chains should not be a negligible concern. - Snails bioaccumulate microcystins in their hepatopancreas, gut and gonad, posing a risk to human consumers

  6. Microcystin in cyanobacterial blooms in a Chilean lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, V; Cantarero, S; Urrutia, H; Heinze, R; Wirsing, B; Neumann, U; Weckesser, J

    1999-05-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms dominated by Microcystis sp. occurred in lake Rocuant ("marisma", near Concepción/Chile) in February 1995 and 1996. In the bloom samples collected in both years the hepatotoxin microcystin was detected by RP-HPLC in both samples and in the sample of 1995 also by a toxicity assay using primary rat hepatocytes. In the bloom of 1995, the microcystin content of the dry bloom biomass was determined to be 130 micrograms/g on the basis of the RP-HPLC peak area and 800 micrograms/g on the basis of the rat hepatotoxicity assay, respectively. In the bloom of 1996, RP-HPLC analysis revealed a microcystin content of 8.13 micrograms/g bloom material dry weight. In this year no hepatotoxicity was measured using a concentration range up to 0.8 mg (d. w.) of bloom material per ml in the rat hepatotoxicity assay. This is the first report on the detection of microcystins in Chilean water bodies.

  7. In vivo assessment of the hepatotoxicity of a new Nostoc isolate from the Nile River: Nostoc sp. strain NRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Serie, Marwa M; Nasser, Nermine; Abd El-Wahab, Abeer; Shehawy, Rehab; Pienaar, Harrison; Baddour, Nahed; Amer, Ranya

    2018-03-01

    Nostoc sp. is one of the most widely distributed cyanobacterial genera that produce potentially protein phosphatase (PP) inhibitor; microcystins (MCs). MCs have posed a worldwide concern due to predominant hepatotoxicity to human health. We have previously isolated a Nostoc strain (NR1) from the Nile River (the main water supply in Egypt) and this strain exerted production of rare and highly toxic MC; demethylated microcystin-LR. There is no data concerning risk factors of liver diseases for human and animal exposure to NR1-contaminated drinking water yet. It is thus important to evaluate acute (LD 50 dose), subacute (0.01% and 10% of LD 50 dose) and subchronic (0.01% and 10% of LD 50 dose) hepatotoxicity's NR1 extract using experimental mice. Mice groups, who orally received 0.01% LD 50 , represented a permissible concentration of the World Health Organization (WHO) for MC in drinking water. Several parameters were detected, including hepatotoxicity (i.e. PP activity, liver function, oxidative stress markers and DNA fragmentation), pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α) and liver histopathology. Our results demonstrated LD 50 of NR1 extract was at 15,350 mg/kg body weight and caused hepatotoxicity that attributed to PP inhibition and a significant increase of hepatic damage biomarkers with lipid accumulation. Moreover, NR1 extract induced hepatic oxidative damage that may have led to DNA fragmentation and production of TNF-α. As demonstrated from the histopathological study, NR1 extract caused a severe collapse of cytoskeleton with subsequent focal degeneration of hepatocytes, necroinflammation and steatosis. The grade of hepatotoxicity in subacute (10% of LD 50 ) group was higher than that in the subchronic (10% of LD 50 and 0.01% of LD 50 , WHOch, respectively) groups. No significant hepatotoxicity was detectable for subacute (0.01% of LD 50 , WHOac) group. NR1 is therefore considered as one of the harmful and life-threatening cyanobacteria for Egyptian people

  8. Accumulation of free and covalently bound microcystins in tissues of Lymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda) following toxic cyanobacteria or dissolved microcystin-LR exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lance, Emilie; Neffling, Milla-Riina; Gerard, Claudia; Meriluoto, Jussi; Bormans, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of free microcystins (MCs) in freshwater gastropods has been demonstrated but accumulation of MCs covalently bound to tissues has never been considered so far. Here, we follow the accumulation of total (free and bound) MCs in Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to i) dissolved MC-LR (33 and 100 μg L -1 ) and ii) Planktothrix agardhii suspensions producing 5 and 33 μg MC-LR equivalents L -1 over a 5-week period, and after a 3-week depuration period. Snails exposed to dissolved MC-LR accumulated up to 0.26 μg total MCs g -1 dry weight (DW), with no detection of bound MCs. Snails exposed to MCs producing P. agardhii accumulated up to 69.9 μg total MCs g -1 DW, of which from 17.7 to 66.7% were bound. After depuration, up to 15.3 μg g -1 DW of bound MCs were detected in snails previously exposed to toxic cyanobacteria, representing a potential source of MCs transfer through the food web. - The study concerns accumulation and elimination of both free and bound microcystins (MCs) in tissues of a gastropod exposed to MCs producing cyanobacteria or dissolved MC-LR.

  9. Accumulation of free and covalently bound microcystins in tissues of Lymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda) following toxic cyanobacteria or dissolved microcystin-LR exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lance, Emilie, E-mail: emilie.lance@live.f [UMR CNRS Ecobio 6553, University of Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 265 Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Neffling, Milla-Riina [Department of Biochemistry and Pharmacy, Abo Akademi University, Tykistoekatu 6, FI-20520 Turku (Finland); Gerard, Claudia [UMR CNRS Ecobio 6553, University of Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 265 Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Meriluoto, Jussi [Department of Biochemistry and Pharmacy, Abo Akademi University, Tykistoekatu 6, FI-20520 Turku (Finland); Bormans, Myriam [UMR CNRS Ecobio 6553, University of Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 265 Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2010-03-15

    Accumulation of free microcystins (MCs) in freshwater gastropods has been demonstrated but accumulation of MCs covalently bound to tissues has never been considered so far. Here, we follow the accumulation of total (free and bound) MCs in Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to i) dissolved MC-LR (33 and 100 mug L{sup -1}) and ii) Planktothrix agardhii suspensions producing 5 and 33 mug MC-LR equivalents L{sup -1} over a 5-week period, and after a 3-week depuration period. Snails exposed to dissolved MC-LR accumulated up to 0.26 mug total MCs g{sup -1} dry weight (DW), with no detection of bound MCs. Snails exposed to MCs producing P. agardhii accumulated up to 69.9 mug total MCs g{sup -1} DW, of which from 17.7 to 66.7% were bound. After depuration, up to 15.3 mug g{sup -1} DW of bound MCs were detected in snails previously exposed to toxic cyanobacteria, representing a potential source of MCs transfer through the food web. - The study concerns accumulation and elimination of both free and bound microcystins (MCs) in tissues of a gastropod exposed to MCs producing cyanobacteria or dissolved MC-LR.

  10. Identification of microcystins from three collection strains of Microcystis aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campo, Francisca F. del; Ouahid, Youness

    2010-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are toxic cyclic heptapeptides produced by various cyanobacteria genera, especially Microcystis. We identified 10 out of 12 MCs produced by three Microcystis aeruginosa strains from cyanobacteria collections, UTEX 2666, UTEX 2670 and UAM 1303, by using two analytical methods: Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) and HPLC Photodiode Array Detector coupled to a hybrid Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-PDA-QTOF/MS). MALDI-TOF/MS failed to detect non-polar MCs, such as MC-LY and MC-LW. HPLC-QTOF/MS permitted the accurate identification of most MCs present in methanolic extracts. Besides, three new MCs, namely: [D-Glu(OCH 3 ) 6 , D-Asp 3 ] MC-LAba, MC-YL and MC-YM were detected by HPLC-QTOF/MS. - Three new microcystin variants identified by HPLC-QTOF/MS.

  11. Bioaccumulation of microcystins in two freshwater gastropods from a cyanobacteria-bloom plateau lake, Lake Dianchi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Junqian; Wang Zhi; Song Zhuoyan; Xie Zhicai; Li Lin; Song, Lirong

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the bioaccumulation patterns of microcystins (MCs) in organs of two gastropods, samples were collected in Lake Dianchi monthly from May to October, 2008, when cyanobacteria typically bloom. The average MCs concentrations for Radix swinhoei (pulmonate) and Margarya melanioides (prosobranch) tended to be similar for the different organs: the highest values in the hepatopancreas (9.33 by 3.74 μg/g DW), followed by digestive tracts (1.66 by 3.03 μg/g DW), gonads (0.45 by 1.34 μg/g DW) and muscles (0.22 by 0.40 μg/g DW). Pulmonate had higher value than prosobranch because of the stronger bioaccumulation ability in hepatopancreas. The levels in organs of R. swinhoei were correlated with environmentally dissolved MCs, but influenced by intracellular MCs for M. melanioides. The estimated MCs concentrations in edible parts of M. melanioides were beyond the WHO’s provisional tolerable daily intake (0.04 μg/kg), suggesting the risk of consumption of M. melanioides from the lake. Highlights: ► We probe bioaccumulated patterns of microcystins in organs of pulmonate and prosobranch. ► The highest microcystins in hepatopancreas for both snails. ► The higher microcystins for pulmonate results from the stronger bioaccumulation ability in hepatopancreas. ► Environmentally dissolved microcystins are the main sources for pulmonate, but intracellular for prosobranch. ► Suggesting the risk of consumption snails in the studying regions. - Higher bioaccumulation MCs level for pulmonate mainly contributed to the stronger bioaccumulation ability in its hepatopancreas.

  12. [ADMAdda5]-microcystins in Planktothrix agardhii strain PH-123 (cyanobacteria) -  importance for monitoring of microcystins in the environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laub, J.; Henriksen, P.; Brittain, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Two major and two minor microcystins (MCYST) were isolated from a hepatotoxic Danish strain of Planktothrix agardhii (Gomont) Anagnostidis et Komárek by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The microcystins were characterized by UV spectroscopy, amino acid analysis, fast atom bo...... in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/tox.10042...

  13. Non-microcystin producing Microcystis wesenbergii (Komarek) Komarek (Cyanobacteria) representing a main waterbloom-forming species in Chinese waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yao; Wu Zhongxing; Yu Boshi; Peng Xin; Yu Gongliang; Wei Zhihong; Wang Guoxiang; Li Renhui

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that several morphospecies of Microcystis, such as Microcystis aeruginosa (Kuetzing) Lemmermann and Microcystis viridis (A. Brown) Lemmermann can produce hepatotoxic microcystins. However, previous studies gave contradictory conclusions about microcystin production of Microcystis wesenbergii (Komarek) Komarek. In the present study, ten Microcystis morphospecies were identified in waterblooms of seven Chinese waterbodies, and Microcystis wesenbergii was shown as the dominant species in these waters. More than 250 single colonies of M. wesenbergii were chosen, under morphological identification, to examine whether M. wesenbergii produce hepatotoxic microcystin by using multiplex PCR for molecular detection of a region (mcyA) of microcystin synthesis genes, and chemical analyses of microcystin content by ELISA and HPLC for 21 isolated strains of M. wesenbergii from these waters were also performed. Both molecular and chemical methods demonstrated that M. wesenbergii from Chinese waters did not produce microcystin. - Both molecular and chemical methods demonstrated that Microcystis wesenbergii was not a microcystin producer in Chinese waters

  14. Discovery of Rare and Highly Toxic Microcystins from Lichen-Associated Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain IO-102-I

    OpenAIRE

    Oksanen, Ilona; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P.; Wahlsten, Matti; Rikkinen, Jouko; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2004-01-01

    The production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins, is almost exclusively reported from planktonic cyanobacteria. Here we show that a terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I isolated from a lichen association produces six different microcystins. Microcystins were identified with liquid chromatography-UV mass spectrometry by their retention times, UV spectra, mass fragmentation, and comparison to microcystins from the aquatic Nostoc sp. strain 152. The dominant micr...

  15. Accumulation of free and covalently bound microcystins in tissues of Lymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda) following toxic cyanobacteria or dissolved microcystin-LR exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Emilie; Neffling, Milla-Riina; Gérard, Claudia; Meriluoto, Jussi; Bormans, Myriam

    2010-03-01

    Accumulation of free microcystins (MCs) in freshwater gastropods has been demonstrated but accumulation of MCs covalently bound to tissues has never been considered so far. Here, we follow the accumulation of total (free and bound) MCs in Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to i) dissolved MC-LR (33 and 100 microg L(-1)) and ii) Planktothrix agardhii suspensions producing 5 and 33 microg MC-LR equivalents L(-1) over a 5-week period, and after a 3-week depuration period. Snails exposed to dissolved MC-LR accumulated up to 0.26 microg total MCs g(-1) dry weight (DW), with no detection of bound MCs. Snails exposed to MCs producing P. agardhii accumulated up to 69.9 microg total MCs g(-1) DW, of which from 17.7 to 66.7% were bound. After depuration, up to 15.3 microg g(-1) DW of bound MCs were detected in snails previously exposed to toxic cyanobacteria, representing a potential source of MCs transfer through the food web. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of cyanotoxins (microcystins/nodularins) in livers from estuarine and coastal bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from Northeast Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amber; Foss, Amanda; Miller, Melissa A; Gibson, Quincy

    2018-06-01

    Microcystins/Nodularins (MCs/NODs) are potent hepatotoxic cyanotoxins produced by harmful algal blooms (HABs) that occur frequently in the upper basin of the St. Johns River (SJR), Jacksonville, FL, USA. Areas downstream of bloom locations provide critical habitat for an estuarine population of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Since 2010, approximately 30 of these dolphins have stranded and died within this impaired watershed; the cause of death was inconclusive for a majority of these individuals. For the current study, environmental exposure to MCs/NODs was investigated as a potential cause of dolphin mortality. Stranded dolphins from 2013 to 2017 were categorized into estuarine (n = 17) and coastal (n = 10) populations. Because estuarine dolphins inhabit areas with frequent or recurring cyanoblooms, they were considered as a comparatively high-risk group for cyanotoxin exposure in relation to coastal animals. All available liver samples from estuarine dolphins were tested regardless of stranding date, and samples from coastal individuals that stranded outside of the known cyanotoxin bloom season were assessed as controls. The MMPB (2-methyl-3-methoxy-4-phenylbutiric acid) technique was used to determine total (bound and free) concentrations of MCs/NODS in liver tissues. Free MCs/NODs extractions were conducted and analyzed using ELISA and LC-MS/MS on MMPB-positive samples to compare test results. MMPB testing resulted in low-level total MCs/NODs detection in some specimens. The Adda ELISA produced high test values that were not supported by concurrent LC-MS/MS analyses, indicative of false positives. Our results indicate that both estuarine and coastal dolphins are exposed to MCs/NODs, with potential toxic and immune health impacts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Removal of MCs by Bi2O2CO3: adsorption and the potential of photocatalytic degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujiao; Cao, Yanqiu; Li, Hongmei; Gong, Aijun; Han, Jintao; Qian, Zhen; Chao, Wenran

    2018-04-01

    Microcystins (MCs) is a kind of hepatotoxin, which is the secondary metabolite of cyanobacteria. Bi 2 O 2 CO 3 (BOC) is a kind of cheap and nontoxic semiconductor material. BOC was synthetized by solvothermal method and then microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and microcystin-RR (MC-RR) were removed by BOC, through adsorption and photocatalytic degradation. When the dosage of BOC is 6 g/L, the MC-LR and MC-RR in the natural water sample can be completely adsorbed in 30 min and then after 12 h irradiation, MC-LR and MC-RR were photocatalytically degraded by BOC.

  18. Development and validation of a rapid method for microcystins in fish and comparing LC-MS/MS results with ELISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microcystins (MCs) are the most common cyanotoxins found world-wide in freshwater, brackish and marine environments. The rapid and accurate analysis of microcystins and nodularin in fish tissue is important for determining occurrence, monitoring trends, and exposure monitoring for risk assessment a...

  19. Differentiation between microcystin contaminated and uncontaminated fish by determination of unconjugated MCs using an ELISA anti-Adda test based on receiver-operating characteristic curves threshold values: application to Tinca tinca from natural ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Isabel María; Herrador, M Ángeles; Atencio, Loyda; Puerto, María; González, A Gustavo; Cameán, Ana María

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) anti-Adda technique could be used to monitor free microcystins (MCs) in biological samples from fish naturally exposed to toxic cyanobacteria by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve software to establish an optimal cut-off value for MCs. The cut-off value determined by ROC curve analysis in tench (Tinca tinca) exposed to MCs under laboratory conditions by ROC curve analysis was 5.90-μg MCs/kg tissue dry weight (d.w.) with a sensitivity of 93.3%. This value was applied in fish samples from natural ponds (Extremadura, Spain) in order to asses its potential MCs bioaccumulation by classifying samples as either true positive (TP), false positive (FP), true negative (TN), or false negative (FN). In this work, it has been demonstrated that toxic cyanobacteria, mainly Microcystis aeruginosa, Aphanizomenon issatchenkoi, and Anabaena spiroides, were present in two of these ponds, Barruecos de Abajo (BDown) and Barruecos de Arriba (BUp). The MCs levels were detected in waters from both ponds with an anti-MC-LR ELISA immunoassay and were of similar values (between 3.8-6.5-μg MC-LR equivalent/L in BDown pond and 4.8-6.0-μg MC-LR equivalent/L in BUp). The MCs cut-off values were applied in livers from fish collected from these two ponds using the ELISA anti-Adda technique. A total of 83% of samples from BDown pond and only 42% from BUp were TP with values of free MCs higher than 8.8-μg MCs/kg tissue (d.w.). Copyright © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A comprehensive immunoassay for the detection of microcystins in waters based on polyclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Jianwu; He Miao; Shi Hanchang; Qian Yi

    2006-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are a group of closely related toxic cyclic heptapeptides produced by common cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), and microcystin-leucine-arginine (MC-LR) is among the most frequent and most toxic microcystin congeners. In this study, a free amino group was introduced to MC-LR at its seventh amino acid residue with 2-mercaptoethylamine, and the product aminoethyl-MC-LR was coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and horseradish peroxidise (HRP) by glutaraldehyde to be complete antigen (MC-LR-BSA) and labelled hapten (MC-LR-HRP), respectively. Polyclonal antibodies against MC-LR were generated by immunization with MC-LR-BSA. A direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dc-ELISA) was established to detect the MCs in waters, which showed a good cross-reactivity with MC-LR, MC-RR, MC-YR, MC-LF, MC-LW and nodularin, and have a detection limit for MC-LR 0.12 μg L -1 , the 50% inhibition concentration (IC 50 ) for MC-LR was 0.63 ± 0.06 μg L -1 and the quantitative detection range was from 0.17 to 2.32 μg L -1 , the analysis result of water samples showed good recovery and reliability. So the comprehensive and reliable dc-ELISA will well potentially suit for sensitive analysis for total MCs in drinking as well as resource water samples

  1. Co-operative effects in tumorigenicity. The microcystin example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedmak, B.; Suput, D.

    2002-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have been implicated in many deaths of livestock, wildlife and human throughout the world. They produce a broad range of biologically active substances including proteinase inhibitors, endotoxins (LPS), which are generally present in gram-negative bacteria, and a variety of other toxic compounds. These substances are released in the water environment during the senescence of the bloom and can penetrate in the water supply system. Little attention has been paid to possible synergistic interactions between these biologically active substances in tumor promotion and tumor initiation. With few exceptions, the vast majority of experiments used for the human risk assessment of cyanobacteria have been performed using purified microcystins. To evaluate liver injuries such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma high doses of pure microcystins have been used. The present paper presents an attempt to verify the possible synergistic effects of different biologically active substances we have tested the toxic effects of lyophilized hepatotoxic cyanobacteria in comparison to the effects produced by the same amounts of purified microcystins. (author)

  2. MICROCYSTIN ANALYSIS IN HUMAN SERA AND LIVER FROM HUMAN FATALITIES IN CARUARU, BRAZIL 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    The detection of cyanotoxins, especially hepatotoxic microcystins in tissue, is of growing interest to scientists, clinicians, and public health officials because cyanotoxins can contaminate surface waters that are used for drinking and recreational purposes. Documentation of hum...

  3. Lettuce facing microcystins-rich irrigation water at different developmental stages: Effects on plant performance and microcystins bioaccumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levizou, Efi; Statiris, George; Papadimitriou, Theodoti; Laspidou, Chrysi S; Kormas, Konstantinos Ar

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the microcystins (MCs)-rich irrigation water effect on lettuce of different developmental stages, i.e. during a two months period, covering the whole period from seed germination to harvest at marketable size of the plant. We followed four lettuce plant groups receiving MCs-rich water (1.81μgl -1 of dissolved MCs), originating from the Karla Reservoir, central Greece: 1) from seeds, 2) the cotyledon, 3) two true leaves and 4) four true leaves stages, all of which were compared to control plants that received tap water. Lettuce growth, photosynthetic performance, biochemical and mineral characteristics, as well as MCs accumulation in leaves, roots and soil were measured. The overall performance of lettuce at various developmental stages pointed to increased tolerance since growth showed minor alterations and non-enzymatic antioxidants remained unaffected. Plants receiving MCs-rich water from the seed stage exhibited higher photosynthetic capacity, chlorophylls and leaf nitrogen content. Nevertheless, considerable MCs accumulation in various plant tissues occurred. The earlier in their development lettuce plants started receiving MCs-rich water, the more MCs they accumulated: roots and leaves of plants exposed to MCs-rich water from seeds and cotyledons stage exhibited doubled MCs concentrations compared to respective tissues of the 4 Leaves group. Furthermore, roots accumulated significantly higher MCs amounts than leaves of the same plant group. Concerning human health risk, the Estimated Daily Intake values (EDI) of Seed and Cotyledon groups leaves exceeded Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) by a factor of 6, while 2 Leaves and 4 Leaves groups exceeded TDI by a factor of 4.4 and 2.4 respectively. Our results indicate that irrigation of lettuce with MCs-rich water may constitute a serious public health risk, especially when contaminated water is received from the very early developmental stages (seed and cotyledon). Finally, results obtained for

  4. Characterization of a microcystin and detection of microcystin synthetase genes from a Brazilian isolate of Nostoc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; Silva-Stenico, Maria Estela; Welker, Martin; Beraldo Moraes, Luiz Alberto; Fiore, Marli Fátima

    2010-04-01

    A nostocalean nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium isolated from an eutrophic freshwater reservoir located in Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil, was evaluated for the production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins. Morphologically this new cyanobacterium strain appears closest to Nostoc, however, in the phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene it falls into a highly stable cluster distantly only related to the typical Nostoc cluster. Extracts of Nostoc sp. CENA88 cultured cells, investigated using ELISA assay, gave positive results and the microcystin profile revealed by ESI-Q-TOF/MS/MS analysis confirmed the production of [Dha(7)]MCYST-YR. Further, Nostoc sp. CENA88 genomic DNA was analyzed by PCR for sequences of mcyD, mcyE and mcyG genes of microcystin synthetase (mcy) cluster. The result revealed the presence of mcyD, mcyE and mcyG genes with similarities to those from mcy of Nostoc sp. strains 152 and IO-102-I and other cyanobacterial genera. The phylogenetic tree based on concatenated McyG, McyD and McyE amino acids clustered the sequences according to cyanobacterial genera, with exception of the Nostoc sp. CENA88 sequence, which was placed in a clade distantly related from other Nostoc strains, as previously observed also in the 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis. The present study describes for the first time a Brazilian Nostoc microcystin producer and also the occurrence of demethyl MCYST-YR variant in this genus. The sequenced Nostoc genes involved in the microcystin synthesis can contribute to a better understanding of the toxigenicity and evolution of this cyanotoxin. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bioreactor Study Employing Bacteria with Enhanced Activity toward Cyanobacterial Toxins Microcystins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Dziga

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An important aim of white (grey biotechnology is bioremediation, where microbes are employed to remove unwanted chemicals. Microcystins (MCs and other cyanobacterial toxins are not industrial or agricultural pollutants; however, their occurrence as a consequence of human activity and water reservoir eutrophication is regarded as anthropogenic. Microbial degradation of microcystins is suggested as an alternative to chemical and physical methods of their elimination. This paper describes a possible technique of the practical application of the biodegradation process. The idea relies on the utilization of bacteria with a significantly enhanced MC-degradation ability (in comparison with wild strains. The cells of an Escherichia coli laboratory strain expressing microcystinase (MlrA responsible for the detoxification of MCs were immobilized in alginate beads. The degradation potency of the tested bioreactors was monitored by HPLC detection of linear microcystin LR (MC-LR as the MlrA degradation product. An open system based on a column filled with alginate-entrapped cells was shown to operate more efficiently than a closed system (alginate beads shaken in a glass container. The maximal degradation rate calculated per one liter of carrier was 219.9 µg h−1 of degraded MC-LR. A comparison of the efficiency of the described system with other biological and chemo-physical proposals suggests that this new idea presents several advantages and is worth investigating in future studies.

  6. Similar uptake profiles of microcystin-LR and -RR in an in vitro human intestinal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeller, P.; Clement, M.; Fessard, V.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → First description of in vitro cellular uptake of MCs into intestinal cells. → OATP 3A1 and OATP 4A1 are expressed in Caco-2 cell membranes. → MC-LR and MC-RR show similar uptake in Caco-2 cells. → MCs are probably excreted from Caco-2 cells by an active mechanism. -- Abstract: Microcystins (MCs) are cyclic hepatotoxins produced by various species of cyanobacteria. Their structure includes two variable amino acids (AA) leading to more than 80 MC variants. In this study, we focused on the most common variant, microcystin-LR (MC-LR), and microcystin-RR (MC-RR), a variant differing by only one AA. Despite their structural similarity, MC-LR elicits higher liver toxicity than MC-RR partly due to a discrepancy in their uptake by hepatic organic anion transporters (OATP 1B1 and 1B3). However, even though ingestion is the major pathway of human exposure to MCs, intestinal absorption of MCs has been poorly addressed. Consequently, we investigated the cellular uptake of the two MC variants in the human intestinal cell line Caco-2 by immunolocalization using an anti-MC antibody. Caco-2 cells were treated for 30 min to 24 h with several concentrations (1-50 μM) of both variants. We first confirmed the localization of OATP 3A1 and 4A1 at the cell membrane of Caco-2 cells. Our study also revealed a rapid uptake of both variants in less than 1 h. The uptake profiles of the two variants did not differ in our immunostaining study neither with respect to concentration nor the time of exposure. Furthermore, we have demonstrated for the first time the nuclear localization of MC-RR and confirmed that of MC-LR. Finally, our results suggest a facilitated uptake and an active excretion of MC-LR and MC-RR in Caco-2 cells. Further investigation on the role of OATP 3A1 and 4A1 in MC uptake should be useful to clarify the mechanism of intestinal absorption of MCs and contribute in risk assessment of cyanotoxin exposure.

  7. Analysis of intracellular and extracellular microcystin variants in sediments and pore waters by accelerated solvent extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zastepa, Arthur; Pick, Frances R.; Blais, Jules M.; Saleem, Ammar

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • First analytical method for intracellular microcystins (MCs) in sediment. • Includes a suite of variants (LR, 7dm LR, RR, YR, WR, LA, LF, LY, LW) and nodularin. • Reports the first measurements of MCs in sediment pore waters. • MCs detected in >100 year old lake sediments suggesting long-term preservation. • Sediment-pore water distribution (K d ) differed between variants suggesting differences in environmental fate. - Abstract: The fate and persistence of microcystin cyanotoxins in aquatic ecosystems remains poorly understood in part due to the lack of analytical methods for microcystins in sediments. Existing methods have been limited to the extraction of a few extracellular microcystins of similar chemistry. We developed a single analytical method, consisting of accelerated solvent extraction, hydrophilic–lipophilic balance solid phase extraction, and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, suitable for the extraction and quantitation of both intracellular and extracellular cyanotoxins in sediments as well as pore waters. Recoveries of nine microcystins, representing the chemical diversity of microcystins, and nodularin (a marine analogue) ranged between 75 and 98% with one, microcystin-RR (MC-RR), at 50%. Chromatographic separation of these analytes was achieved within 7.5 min and the method detection limits were between 1.1 and 2.5 ng g −1 dry weight (dw). The robustness of the method was demonstrated on sediment cores collected from seven Canadian lakes of diverse geography and trophic states. Individual microcystin variants reached a maximum concentration of 829 ng g −1 dw on sediment particles and 132 ng mL −1 in pore waters and could be detected in sediments as deep as 41 cm (>100 years in age). MC-LR, -RR, and -LA were more often detected while MC-YR, -LY, -LF, and -LW were less common. The analytical method enabled us to estimate sediment-pore water distribution coefficients (K d

  8. Analysis of intracellular and extracellular microcystin variants in sediments and pore waters by accelerated solvent extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zastepa, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.zastepa@gmail.com; Pick, Frances R.; Blais, Jules M.; Saleem, Ammar

    2015-05-04

    Highlights: • First analytical method for intracellular microcystins (MCs) in sediment. • Includes a suite of variants (LR, {sup 7dm}LR, RR, YR, WR, LA, LF, LY, LW) and nodularin. • Reports the first measurements of MCs in sediment pore waters. • MCs detected in >100 year old lake sediments suggesting long-term preservation. • Sediment-pore water distribution (K{sub d}) differed between variants suggesting differences in environmental fate. - Abstract: The fate and persistence of microcystin cyanotoxins in aquatic ecosystems remains poorly understood in part due to the lack of analytical methods for microcystins in sediments. Existing methods have been limited to the extraction of a few extracellular microcystins of similar chemistry. We developed a single analytical method, consisting of accelerated solvent extraction, hydrophilic–lipophilic balance solid phase extraction, and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, suitable for the extraction and quantitation of both intracellular and extracellular cyanotoxins in sediments as well as pore waters. Recoveries of nine microcystins, representing the chemical diversity of microcystins, and nodularin (a marine analogue) ranged between 75 and 98% with one, microcystin-RR (MC-RR), at 50%. Chromatographic separation of these analytes was achieved within 7.5 min and the method detection limits were between 1.1 and 2.5 ng g{sup −1} dry weight (dw). The robustness of the method was demonstrated on sediment cores collected from seven Canadian lakes of diverse geography and trophic states. Individual microcystin variants reached a maximum concentration of 829 ng g{sup −1} dw on sediment particles and 132 ng mL{sup −1} in pore waters and could be detected in sediments as deep as 41 cm (>100 years in age). MC-LR, -RR, and -LA were more often detected while MC-YR, -LY, -LF, and -LW were less common. The analytical method enabled us to estimate sediment-pore water

  9. Microcystin-LR induced reactive oxygen species mediate cytoskeletal disruption and apoptosis of hepatocytes in Cyprinus carpio L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlin Jiang

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MCs are a group of cyclic hepatotoxic peptides produced by cyanobacteria. Microcystin-LR (MC-LR contains Leucine (L and Arginine (R in the variable positions, and is one of the most common and potently toxic peptides. MC-LR can inhibit protein phosphatase type 1 and type 2A (PP1 and PP2A activities and induce excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The underlying mechanism of the inhibition of PP1 and PP2A has been extensively studied. The over-production of ROS is considered to be another main mechanism behind MC-LR toxicity; however, the detailed toxicological mechanism involved in over-production of ROS in carp (Cyprinus carpio L. remains largely unclear. In our present study, the hydroxyl radical (•OH was significantly induced in the liver of carp after a relatively short-term exposure to MC-LR. The elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS production may play an important role in the disruption of microtubule structure. Pre-injection of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC provided significant protection to the cytoskeleton, however buthionine sulfoximine (BSO exacerbated cytoskeletal destruction. In addition, the elevated ROS formation induced the expression of apoptosis-related genes, including p38, JNKa, and bcl-2. A significant increase in apoptotic cells was observed at 12-48 hours. Our study further supports evidence that ROS are involved in MC-LR induced damage to liver cells in carp, and indicates the need for further study of the molecular mechanisms behind MC-LR toxicity.

  10. Microcystin-LR Induced Reactive Oxygen Species Mediate Cytoskeletal Disruption and Apoptosis of Hepatocytes in Cyprinus carpio L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinlin; Shan, Zhengjun; Xu, Weili; Wang, Xiaorong; Zhou, Junying; Kong, Deyang; Xu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are a group of cyclic hepatotoxic peptides produced by cyanobacteria. Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) contains Leucine (L) and Arginine (R) in the variable positions, and is one of the most common and potently toxic peptides. MC-LR can inhibit protein phosphatase type 1 and type 2A (PP1 and PP2A) activities and induce excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The underlying mechanism of the inhibition of PP1 and PP2A has been extensively studied. The over-production of ROS is considered to be another main mechanism behind MC-LR toxicity; however, the detailed toxicological mechanism involved in over-production of ROS in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) remains largely unclear. In our present study, the hydroxyl radical (•OH) was significantly induced in the liver of carp after a relatively short-term exposure to MC-LR. The elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production may play an important role in the disruption of microtubule structure. Pre-injection of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) provided significant protection to the cytoskeleton, however buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) exacerbated cytoskeletal destruction. In addition, the elevated ROS formation induced the expression of apoptosis-related genes, including p38, JNKa, and bcl-2. A significant increase in apoptotic cells was observed at 12 - 48 hours. Our study further supports evidence that ROS are involved in MC-LR induced damage to liver cells in carp, and indicates the need for further study of the molecular mechanisms behind MC-LR toxicity. PMID:24376844

  11. Discovery of Rare and Highly Toxic Microcystins from Lichen-Associated Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain IO-102-I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksanen, Ilona; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P.; Wahlsten, Matti; Rikkinen, Jouko; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2004-01-01

    The production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins, is almost exclusively reported from planktonic cyanobacteria. Here we show that a terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I isolated from a lichen association produces six different microcystins. Microcystins were identified with liquid chromatography-UV mass spectrometry by their retention times, UV spectra, mass fragmentation, and comparison to microcystins from the aquatic Nostoc sp. strain 152. The dominant microcystin produced by Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I was the highly toxic [ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR, which accounted for ca. 80% of the total microcystins. We assigned a structure of [DMAdda5]microcystin-LR and [d-Asp3,ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR and a partial structure of three new [ADMAdda5]-XR type of microcystin variants. Interestingly, Nostoc spp. strains IO-102-I and 152 synthesized only the rare ADMAdda and DMAdda subfamilies of microcystin variants. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated congruence between genes involved directly in microcystin biosynthesis and the 16S rRNA and rpoC1 genes of Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I. Nostoc sp. strain 152 and the Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I are distantly related, revealing a sporadic distribution of toxin production in the genus Nostoc. Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I is closely related to Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 and other symbiotic Nostoc strains and most likely belongs to this species. Together, this suggests that other terrestrial and aquatic strains of the genus Nostoc may have retained the genes necessary for microcystin biosynthesis. PMID:15466511

  12. Destruction of microcystins (cyanotoxins) by UV-254 nm-based direct photolysis and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): influence of variable amino acids on the degradation kinetics and reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuexiang; de la Cruz, Armah A; Hiskia, Anastasia; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; O'Shea, Kevin; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2015-05-01

    Hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) are the most frequently detected group of cyanobacterial toxins. This study investigated the degradation of common MC variants in water, MC-LR, MC-RR, MC-YR and MC-LA, by UV-254 nm-based processes, UV only, UV/H2O2, UV/S2O8(2-) and UV/HSO5(-). Limited direct photolysis of MCs was observed, while the addition of an oxidant significantly improved the degradation efficiency with an order of UV/S2O8(2-) > UV/HSO5(-) > UV/H2O2 at the same initial molar concentration of the oxidant. The removal of MC-LR by UV/H2O2 appeared to be faster than another cyanotoxin, cylindrospermopsin, at either the same initial molar concentration or the same initial organic carbon concentration of the toxin. It suggested a faster reaction of MC-LR with hydroxyl radical, which was further supported by the determined second-order rate constant of MCs with hydroxyl radical. Both isomerization and photohydration byproducts were observed in UV only process for all four MCs; while in UV/H2O2, hydroxylation and diene-Adda double bond cleavage byproducts were detected. The presence of a tyrosine in the structure of MC-YR significantly promoted the formation of monohydroxylation byproduct m/z 1061; while the presence of a second arginine in MC-RR led to the elimination of a guanidine group and the absence of double bond cleavage byproducts. It was therefore demonstrated in this study that the variable amino acids in the structure of MCs influenced not only the degradation kinetics but also the preferable reaction mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of microcystins on root growth, oxidative response, and exudation of rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Rediske, Richard R; Yao, Lei; Xie, Liqiang

    2018-03-01

    A 30 days indoor hydroponic experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of microcystins (MCs) on rice root morphology and exudation, as well as bioaccumulation of MCs in rice. MCs were bioaccumulated in rice with the greatest concentrations being observed in the leaves (113.68μgg -1 Fresh weight (FW)) when exposed to 500μgL -1 MCs. Root activity at 500μgL -1 decreased 37%, compared to the control. MCs also induced disruption of the antioxidant system and lipid peroxidation in rice roots. Root growth was significantly inhibited by MCs. Root weight, length; surface area and volume were significantly decreased, as well as crown root number and lateral root number. After 30 days exposure to MCs, an increase was found in tartaric acid and malic acid while the other organic acids were not affected. Glycine, tyrosine, and glutamate were the only amino acids stimulated at MCs concentrations of 500μgL -1 . Similarly, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and carbohydrate at 50 and 500μgL -1 treatments were significantly increased. The increase of DOC and carbohydrate in root exudates was due to rice root membrane permeability changes induced by MCs. Overall, this study indicated that MCs significantly inhibited rice root growth and affected root exudation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. In vitro genotoxicity of microcystin-RR on primary cultured rat hepatocites and Hep G2 cell line detected by Comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zegura, B.; Filipic, M.; Lah Turnsek, T.; Sedmak, B.; Suput, D.

    2002-01-01

    Microcystins are hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides produced by different species of bloom forming cyanobacteria (Microcystis, Anabaena, Nostoc Oscillatoria). The primary target of the toxin is the liver. The uptake of microcystins into the hepatocites occurs via carrier-mediated transport system. Microcystins cause cytoskeletal damage, necrosis and pooling of blood in the liver, with a consequent increase in the liver weight. The cause of death is a massive hepatic haemorrhage. Microcystins are inhibitors of serine/threonine protein phosphatases 1 and 2A and act as tumor-promoters. Ito and coworkers demonstrated that microcystins induced neoplastic nodules in the liver after repeated injections without an initiator, which indicates that they might act also as tumor initiators. The aim of our studies was to elucidate possible genotoxic effects of microcystin-RR (MCYST-RR) at molecular level using Comet assay. The Comet assay is a sensitive method for detection of DNA strand breaks at the level of a single cell. DNA single-strand breaks can lead to mutations, which are the first step in carcinogensis. (author)

  15. Investigations into the biodegradation of microcystin-LR in wastewaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Lionel; Hoefel, Daniel; Palazot, Sebastien; Sawade, Emma; Newcombe, Gayle; Saint, Christopher P.; Brookes, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    Microcystins are potent hepatotoxins that can be produced by cyanobacteria. These organisms can proliferate in wastewaters due to a number of factors including high concentrations of nutrients for growth. As treated wastewaters are now being considered as supplementary drinking water sources, in addition to their frequent use for irrigated agriculture, it is imperative that these wastewaters are free of toxins such as microcystins. This study investigated the potential for biodegradation of microcystin-LR (MCLR) in wastewaters through a biological sand filtration experiment and in static batch reactor experiments. MCLR was effectively removed at a range of concentrations and at various temperatures, with degradation attributed to the action of microorganisms indigenous to the wastewaters. No hepatotoxic by-products were detected following the degradation of MCLR as determined by a protein phosphatase inhibition assay. Using TaqMan polymerase chain reaction, the first gene involved in bacterial degradation of MCLR (mlrA) was detected and the responsible bacteria shown to increase with the amount of MCLR being degraded. This finding suggested that the degradation of MCLR was dependent upon the abundance of MCLR-degrading organisms present within the wastewater, and that MCLR may provide bacteria with a significant carbon source for proliferation; in turn increasing MCLR removal.

  16. Degradation of microcystin-RR using boron-doped diamond electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunyong; Fu Degang; Gu Zhongze

    2009-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs), produced by blue-green algae, are one of the most common naturally occurring toxins found in natural environment. The presence of MCs in drinking water sources poses a great threat to people's health. In this study, the degradation behavior of microcystin-RR on boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode was investigated under galvanostatic conditions. Such parameters as reaction time, supporting electrolyte and applied current density were varied in order to determine their effects on this oxidation process. The experimental results revealed the suitability of electrochemical processes employing BDD electrode for removing MC-RR from the solution. However, the efficient removal of MC-RR only occurred in the presence of sodium chloride that acted as redox mediators and the reaction was mainly affected by the chloride concentration (c NaCl ) and applied current density (I appl ). Full and quick removal of 0.50 μg/ml MC-RR in solution was achieved when the operating conditions of c NaCl and I appl were 20 mM and 46.3 mA/cm 2 , or 35 mM and 18.2 mA/cm 2 respectively. The kinetics for MC-RR degradation followed a pesudo-first order reaction in most cases, indicating the process was under mass transfer control. As a result of its excellent performance, the BDD technology could be considered as a promising alternative to promote the degradation of MC-RR than chlorination in drinking water supplies.

  17. Synthesis of visible light sensitized S, N and C co-doped polymorphic TiO2 for Microcystin-LR MC-LR removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) is considered as one of the most widespread and toxic cyanotoxins, which had been discovered to be hepatotoxic, cytotoxic and neurotoxic. It is the only cyanotoxin that has been proposed by Word Health Organization (WHO) for a provisional guideline (1 ppb) ...

  18. The impact of warming and nutrients on algae production and microcystins in seston from the iconic lake lesser Prespa, Greece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maliaka, Valentini; Faassen, Elisabeth J.; Smolders, Alfons J.P.; Lürling, Miquel

    2018-01-01

    Lake Lesser Prespa and its adjacent pond, Vromolimni in Greece, is a shallow freshwater system and a highly protected area hosting an exceptional biodiversity. The occurrence of microcystins (MCs) producing cyanobacterial blooms in these waters during recent years can be harmful to the wildlife. We

  19. Evaluation of the transfer and the accumulation of microcystins in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cultivar MicroTom) tissues using a cyanobacterial extract containing microcystins and the radiolabeled microcystin-LR ("1"4C-MC-LR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbel, Sylvain; Mougin, Christian; Nélieu, Sylvie; Delarue, Ghislaine; Bouaïcha, Noureddine

    2016-01-01

    Microcystins are the most common cyanotoxins and may be expected wherever blooms of cyanobacteria occur in surface waters. Their persistence both in the irrigation water and in the soil can lead to their transfer and bioaccumulation into agricultural plants. The aim of this work was to investigate microcystin accumulation in Solanum lycopersicum cultivar MicroTom. The plant was exposed to either Microcystis aeruginosa crude extracts containing up to 100 μg eq. MC-LR L"−"1 in a soil–plant system for 90 days or pure radiolabeled "1"4C-MC-LR in a hydroponic condition for 48 h. Toxin bioaccumulation in the soil and different plant tissues was assessed both by the PP2A inhibition assay and by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). After 90 days of exposure, microcystins persisted in the soil and their free extractable concentrations accumulated were very low varying between 1.6 and 3.9 μg eq. MC-LR kg"−"1 DW. Free MC-LR was detected only in roots and leaves with concentrations varying between 4.5 and 8.1 μg kg"−"1 DW and between 0.29 and 0.55 μg kg"−"1 DW, respectively. By using radioactivity ("1"4C-MC-LR), the results have reported a growing accumulation of toxins within the organs roots > leaves > stems and allowed them to confirm the absence of MC-LR in fruits after 48 h of exposure. The bioconcentration factor (BCF) was 13.6 in roots, 4.5 in leaves, and 1.4 in stems. On the other hand, the results highlight the presence of two radioactive fractions in different plant tissues. The non-extractable fraction of radioactivity, corresponding to the covalently bound MC-LR, was higher than that of the extractable fraction only in roots and leaves reaching 56% and 71% of the total accumulated toxin, respectively. Therefore, results raise that monitoring programs must monitor the presence of MCs in the irrigation water to avoid the transfer and accumulation of these toxins in crops. - Graphical abstract: Bioconcentration factors in organs of the

  20. Evaluation of the transfer and the accumulation of microcystins in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cultivar MicroTom) tissues using a cyanobacterial extract containing microcystins and the radiolabeled microcystin-LR ({sup 14}C-MC-LR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbel, Sylvain [INRA, UMR1402 ECOSYS, F-78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); AgroParisTech, UMR1402 ECOSYS, F-78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Laboratoire Ecologie, Systématique et Evolution, UMR8079, Univ. Paris-Sud/CNRS/AgroParisTech, Université Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Mougin, Christian; Nélieu, Sylvie; Delarue, Ghislaine [INRA, UMR1402 ECOSYS, F-78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); AgroParisTech, UMR1402 ECOSYS, F-78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Bouaïcha, Noureddine, E-mail: noureddine.bouaicha@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire Ecologie, Systématique et Evolution, UMR8079, Univ. Paris-Sud/CNRS/AgroParisTech, Université Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France)

    2016-01-15

    Microcystins are the most common cyanotoxins and may be expected wherever blooms of cyanobacteria occur in surface waters. Their persistence both in the irrigation water and in the soil can lead to their transfer and bioaccumulation into agricultural plants. The aim of this work was to investigate microcystin accumulation in Solanum lycopersicum cultivar MicroTom. The plant was exposed to either Microcystis aeruginosa crude extracts containing up to 100 μg eq. MC-LR L{sup −1} in a soil–plant system for 90 days or pure radiolabeled {sup 14}C-MC-LR in a hydroponic condition for 48 h. Toxin bioaccumulation in the soil and different plant tissues was assessed both by the PP2A inhibition assay and by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). After 90 days of exposure, microcystins persisted in the soil and their free extractable concentrations accumulated were very low varying between 1.6 and 3.9 μg eq. MC-LR kg{sup −1} DW. Free MC-LR was detected only in roots and leaves with concentrations varying between 4.5 and 8.1 μg kg{sup −1} DW and between 0.29 and 0.55 μg kg{sup −1} DW, respectively. By using radioactivity ({sup 14}C-MC-LR), the results have reported a growing accumulation of toxins within the organs roots > leaves > stems and allowed them to confirm the absence of MC-LR in fruits after 48 h of exposure. The bioconcentration factor (BCF) was 13.6 in roots, 4.5 in leaves, and 1.4 in stems. On the other hand, the results highlight the presence of two radioactive fractions in different plant tissues. The non-extractable fraction of radioactivity, corresponding to the covalently bound MC-LR, was higher than that of the extractable fraction only in roots and leaves reaching 56% and 71% of the total accumulated toxin, respectively. Therefore, results raise that monitoring programs must monitor the presence of MCs in the irrigation water to avoid the transfer and accumulation of these toxins in crops. - Graphical abstract: Bioconcentration

  1. Impacts of microcystin, a cyanobacterial toxin, on laboratory rodents in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ziková

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial water blooms became a global problem/issue because beside a dramatic deterioration of water quality parameters they also produce cyanobacterial toxins being harmful for animals and humans. Cyanotoxins especially the most prominent one, microcystin-LR (MC-LR, are of major concern and they have been reported to cause even death of mammals following ingestion or ingurgitation due to hepatotoxic modes of action. The aim of the recent study is to summarize briefly the impacts of microcystin on laboratory rodents, mice and rats, being used as models for other mammals including human beings. Most experimental approaches used intraperitoneal rather than oral and intratracheal application of microcystins, especially MC-LR, being the most efficient way to induce adverse impacts on different target organs. However, no matter how the exposure of rodents was performed, microcystins induced severe harmful impacts on the different target organs, preferentially the liver, for instances hemorrhages and apoptosis in liver, liver tumours, adverse effects on gut, kidney, testis and epididymis including spermatogenesis, on lung, on serum parameters and on progeny. In addition to these histological findings, microcystin was found to affect specifically biochemical parameters of target organs such as enzymes e.g. GST, CAT, GR, GPX, SOD, AST, ALT, γ-GT, protein phosphatases, SDH, SoDH and LDH or stress proteins such as HSP-70 and further parameters such as hepatic sulfhydryl content, GSH depletion, total bilirubin, urea nitrogen, and creatinine. Gene array analyses revealed that microcystin affects genes related to actin organization, cell cycle, apoptosis, cellular redox potential, cell signalling, albumin metabolism, glucose homeostasis pathway and organic anion transport polypeptide system. In combination with a further proteomics approach the proteomic analyses indicate that liver apoptosis induced by microcystin can be induced by two pathways: the

  2. Evidence for a novel marine harmful algal bloom: cyanotoxin (microcystin transfer from land to sea otters.

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    Melissa A Miller

    "harmful algal bloom" in the Pacific coastal environment; that of hepatotoxic shellfish poisoning (HSP, suggesting that animals and humans are at risk from microcystin poisoning when consuming shellfish harvested at the land-sea interface.

  3. Evidence for a novel marine harmful algal bloom: Cyanotoxin (Microcystin) transfer from land to sea otters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Melissa A.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Mekebri, Abdu; Crane, Dave; Oates, Stori C.; Tinker, M. Timothy; Staedler, Michelle; Miller, Woutrina A.; Toy-Choutka, Sharon; Dominik, Clare; Hardin, Dane; Langlois, Gregg; Murray, Michael; Ward, Kim; Jessup, David A.

    2010-01-01

    bloom" in the Pacific coastal environment; that of hepatotoxic shellfish poisoning (HSP), suggesting that animals and humans are at risk from microcystin poisoning when consuming shellfish harvested at the land-sea interface.

  4. Factors Affecting Temporal and Spatial Variations of Microcystins in Gonghu Bay of Lake Taihu, with Potential Risk of Microcystin Contamination to Human Health

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    Qing Wang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A field survey of the seasonal variation of microcystin (MC concentration was performed in Gonghu Bay (a total of 15 sampling sites of Lake Taihu from January to December 2008. Microcystis spp. biomass and intra-/extracellular MCs were significantly correlated with water temperature, suggesting the importance of temperature in cyanobacterial blooming in the lake. Higher MC concentration was found in summer and autumn, and peaks of Microcystis biomass and intra-/extracellular MC concentrations were all present in October. Spatially, risk of MCs was higher in littoral zones than in the pelagic area. There were significant correlations between N or P concentrations, and Microcystis biomass or MC content, suggesting that N and P levels affected MC production through influencing Microcystis biomass. Intra-/extracellular MCs and Microcystis biomass had negative exponential relationships with TN:TP, and the maximum values all occurred when TN:TP was <25. Multivariate analyses by pcca indicated that intra- and extracellular MC concentrations had better correlations with biological factors (such as Microcystis biomass and chl-a than physicochemical factors. The maximum concentration reached up to 17 µg/L MC-Lreq, considerably higher drinking water safety standard (1 µg/L recommended who. So it is necessary take measures reduce exposure risk of cyanobacterial toxins human beings.

  5. Toxic Cyanobacteria in Svalbard: Chemical Diversity of Microcystins Detected Using a Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Precursor Ion Screening Method

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    Julia Kleinteich

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria synthesize a large variety of secondary metabolites including toxins. Microcystins (MCs with hepato- and neurotoxic potential are well studied in bloom-forming planktonic species of temperate and tropical regions. Cyanobacterial biofilms thriving in the polar regions have recently emerged as a rich source for cyanobacterial secondary metabolites including previously undescribed congeners of microcystin. However, detection and detailed identification of these compounds is difficult due to unusual sample matrices and structural congeners produced. We here report a time-efficient liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS precursor ion screening method that facilitates microcystin detection and identification. We applied this method to detect six different MC congeners in 8 out of 26 microbial mat samples of the Svalbard Archipelago in the Arctic. The congeners, of which [Asp3, ADMAdda5, Dhb7] MC-LR was most abundant, were similar to those reported in other polar habitats. Microcystins were also determined using an Adda-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Adda-ELISA. Nostoc sp. was identified as a putative toxin producer using molecular methods that targeted 16S rRNA genes and genes involved in microcystin production. The mcy genes detected showed highest similarities to other Arctic or Antarctic sequences. The LC-MS precursor ion screening method could be useful for microcystin detection in unusual matrices such as benthic biofilms or lichen.

  6. Occurrence of Microcystis aeruginosa and microcystins in Río de la Plata river (Argentina

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    Darío Andrinolo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the first report on microcystins producer blooms of Microcystis aeruginosa in the Argentinean coast of the Río de la Plata river, the most important drinking water supply of Argentina. The distribution of toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis cf. aeruginosa blooms in the Argentinean coast of the Rio de la Plata river was studied from December 2003 and January 2006. Microcystis aeruginosa persisted in the river with values ranged between 0 - 7.8 10(4 cells ml-1. Samples of two Microcystis aeruginosa water blooms were collected at La Plata river and were analyzed by the mouse bioassay and by high-performance liquid chromatography with Diode-array and MS detector. The samples showed high hepatotoxicity in mouse bioassay and, in accordance, important amount of microcystins. The bloom samples contained microcystins LR and a variant of microcystin with a molecular ion [M+H]+= 1037.8 m/z as major components. The total toxin content found in these samples was 0.94μg/mg and 0.69μg/mg of lyophilised cells. We conclude that the presence of toxic clones of Microcystis aeruginosa in the Argentinean coast of the Río de la Plata is an actual sanitary and environmental problem and that further studies are necessary to make the risk assessment.

  7. Microcystin accumulation and potential effects on antioxidant capacity of leaves and fruits of Capsicum annuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobac, Damjana; Tokodi, Nada; Kiprovski, Biljana; Malenčić, Djordje; Važić, Tamara; Nybom, Sonja; Meriluoto, Jussi; Svirčev, Zorica

    2017-01-01

    Surface water, often used for irrigation purposes, may sometimes be contaminated with blooming cyanobacteria and thereby may contain their potent and harmful toxins. Cyanotoxins adversely affect many terrestrial plants, and accumulate in plant tissues that are subsequently ingested by humans. Studies were undertaken to (1) examine the bioaccumulation of microcystins (MCs) in leaves and fruits of pepper Capsicum annuum and (2) examine the potential effects of MCs on antioxidant capacity of these organs. Plants were irrigated with water containing MCs for a period of 3 mo. Data showed that MCs did not accumulate in leaves; however, in fruits the presence of the MC-LR (0.118 ng/mg dry weight) and dmMC-LR (0.077 ng/mg dry weight) was detected. The concentrations of MC-LR in fruit approached the acceptable guideline values and tolerable daily intake for this toxin. Lipid peroxidation levels and flavonoids content were significantly enhanced in both organs of treated plants, while total phenolic concentrations were not markedly variable between control and treated plants. Significant decrease in 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging capacity was noted for both organs. The levels of superoxide anion in fruits and hydroxyl radical in leaves were markedly reduced. Data suggest that exposure to MCs significantly reduced antioxidant capacity of experimental plants, indicating that MCs affected antioxidant systems in C. annuum.

  8. Microcystin assimilation and detoxification by Daphnia spp. in two ecosystems of different cyanotoxin concentrations

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    Adrianna Wojtal-Frankiewicz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MCs, the main group of cyanotoxins, can induce oxidative stress in the cells of aquatic animals. This study evaluated the sensitivity of daphniids – from two ecosystems characterised by different trophic states and habitat levels of cyanobacteria abundance – to microcystin toxicity by analysing oxidative stress parameters and MC detoxification ability. As a study site, we chose the eutrophic Sulejow reservoir, which has regular annual toxic cyanobacterial blooms, and the mesotrophic lake Białe, where low abundances of cyanobacteria have only recently appeared. We found much higher accumulations of MCs in tissues of Daphnia spp. in lake Białe, despite low toxin concentrations in this ecosystem compared with the Sulejow reservoir. Simultaneously, high levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO and a significant decrease in glutathione (GSH were observed in daphniid cells in lake Białe, while LPO levels were generally lower and GSH concentration more stable in the Sulejow reservoir. Catalase activity, which reflects more efficient oxidative protection, was always significantly higher in the reservoir than in lake Białe. These results demonstrate that generations of daphniids from the Sulejow reservoir had more effective antioxidant systems protecting them against the accumulation of cyanobacterial toxins; thereby, they are less susceptible to toxic effects than the daphniids from lake Białe. However, the presence of conjugate forms of microcystins (MC-GSH and MC-Cys in tissues of the studied animals indicated the ability for MC detoxification by daphniids from the Sulejow reservoir and lake Białe. Nevertheless, the high effectiveness of antioxidant systems in daphniids coexisting with cyanobacteria for a long time in the Sulejow reservoir indicates the importance of a selective pressure exerted by toxic cyanobacterial strains that favours the most resistant daphniid genotypes.

  9. Lettuce irrigated with contaminated water: Photosynthetic effects, antioxidative response and bioaccumulation of microcystin congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt-Oliveira, Maria do Carmo; Cordeiro-Araújo, Micheline Kézia; Chia, Mathias Ahii; Arruda-Neto, João Dias de Toledo; de Oliveira, Ênio Tiago; dos Santos, Flávio

    2016-06-01

    The use of microcystins (MCs) contaminated water to irrigate crop plants represents a human health risk due to their bioaccumulation potential. In addition, MCs cause oxidative stress and negatively influence photosynthetic activities in plants. The present study was aimed at investigating the effect of MCs on photosynthetic parameters and antioxidative response of lettuce. Furthermore, the bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of total MCs, MC-LR and MC-RR in the vegetable after irrigation with contaminated water was determined. Lettuce crops were irrigated for 15 days with water containing cyanobacterial crude extracts (Microcystis aeruginosa) with MC-LR (0.0, 0.5, 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 µg L(-1)), MC-RR (0.0, 0.15, 0.5, 1.5 and 3.0 µg L(-1)) and total MCs (0.0, 0.65, 2.5, 6.5 and 13.0 µg L(-1)). Increased net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, leaf tissue transpiration and intercellular CO2 concentration were recorded in lettuce exposed to different MCs concentrations. Antioxidant response showed that glutathione S-transferase activity was down-regulated in the presence of MCs. On the other hand, superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase activities were upregulated with increasing MCs concentrations. The bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of total MCs and MC-LR was highest at 6.50 and 5.00 µg L(-1), respectively, while for MC-RR, the highest BAF was recorded at 1.50 µg L(-1) concentration. The amount of total MCs, MC-LR and MC-RR bioacumulated in lettuce was highest at the highest exposure concentrations. However, at the lowest exposure concentration, there were no detectable levels of MC-LR, MC-RR and total MCs in lettuce. Thus, the bioaccumulation of MCs in lettuce varies according to the exposure concentration. In addition, the extent of physiological response of lettuce to the toxins relies on exposure concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Characteristics of UV-MicroO3 Reactor and Its Application to Microcystins Degradation during Surface Water Treatment

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    Guangcan Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The UV-ozone (UV-O3 process is not widely applied in wastewater and potable water treatment partly for the relatively high cost since complicated UV radiation and ozone generating systems are utilized. The UV-microozone (UV-microO3, a new advanced process that can solve the abovementioned problems, was introduced in this study. The effects of air flux, air pressure, and air humidity on generation and concentration of O3 in UV-microO3 reactor were investigated. The utilization of this UV-microO3 reactor in microcystins (MCs degradation was also carried out. Experimental results indicated that the optimum air flux in the reactor equipped with 37 mm diameter quartz tube was determined to be 18∼25 L/h for efficient O3 generation. The air pressure and humidity in UV-microO3 reactor should be low enough in order to get optimum O3 output. Moreover, microcystin-RR, YR, and LR (MC-RR, MC-YR, and MC-LR could be degraded effectively by UV-microO3 process. The degradation of different MCs was characterized by first-order reaction kinetics. The pseudofirst-order kinetic constants for MC-RR, MC-YR, and MC-LR degradation were 0.0093, 0.0215, and 0.0286 min−1, respectively. Glucose had no influence on MC degradation through UV-microO3. The UV-microO3 process is hence recommended as a suitable advanced treatment method for dissolved MCs degradation.

  11. An acute case of intoxication with cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins in recreational water in Salto Grande Dam, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannuzzi, Leda; Sedan, Daniela; Echenique, Ricardo; Andrinolo, Dario

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms and hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) usually occur in summer, constituting a sanitary and environmental problem in Salto Grande Dam, Argentina. Water sports and recreational activities take place in summer in this lake. We reported an acute case of cyanobacterial poisoning in Salto Grande dam, Argentina, which occurred in January 2007. Accidentally, a young man was immersed in an intense bloom of Microcystis spp. A level of 48.6 μg·L(-1) of microcystin-LR was detected in water samples. Four hours after exposure, the patient showed nausea, abdominal pain and fever. Three days later, dyspnea and respiratory distress were reported. The patient was hospitalized in intensive care and diagnosed with an atypical pneumonia. Finally, a week after the exposure, the patient developed a hepatotoxicosis with a significant increase of hepatic damage biomarkers (ALT, AST and γGT). Complete recovery took place within 20 days. This is the first study to show an acute intoxication with microcystin-producing cyanobacteria blooms in recreational water.

  12. Liquid chromatographic determination of microcystins in water samples following pre-column excimer fluorescence derivatization with 4-(1-pyrene)butanoic acid hydrazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Tadashi; Katoh, Kenji; Aoki, Takayoshi; Itoyama, Miki; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Nohta, Hitoshi

    2012-11-28

    A method to measure the concentrations of microcystins (MCs) in water samples has been developed by incorporating pre-column fluorescence derivatization and liquid chromatography (LC). A solid-phase extraction for pretreatment was used to extract the MCs in water samples. The MCs were derivatized with excimer-forming 4-(1-pyrene)butanoic acid hydrazide (PBH). The MCs could then be detected by fluorescence after separation with a pentafluorophenyl (PFP)-modified superficially porous (core shell) particle LC column. The derivatization reactions of MCs with PBH proceeded easily in the presence of 4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl-4-methylmorpholinium (DMT-MM) as a condensation reagent, and the resulting derivatives could be easily separated on the PFP column. The derivatives were selectively detected at excimer fluorescence wavelengths (440-540 nm). The instrument detection limit and the instrument quantification limit of the MCs standards were 0.4-1.2 μg L(-1) and 1.4-3.9 μg L(-1), respectively. The method was validated at 0.1 and 1.0 μg L(-1) levels in tap and pond water samples, and the recovery of MCs was between 67 and 101% with a relative standard deviation of 11%. The proposed method can be used to quantify trace amounts of MCs in water samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Toxicoproteomic approach to develop biomakers for microcystins using Medaka fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezhoud, Karim; Daniele, Praseuth; Simone, Puiseaux-Daol; Jean, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are hepato toxins with a potent inhibitor activity of protein phosphatases P P1 and PP2A. These non-ribosomal peptides are getting more and more attention due to their acute toxicity and potent tumor-promoting activity. These toxins are produced by freshwater cyanobacteria. we report a toxicological study conducted on aquatic animal models such as the medaka fish. to date, the detailed mechanisms underlying the toxicity of microcystins are unknown. MC-leucine-arginine (MC-LR) is the most toxic and the most commonly encountered variant of MCs in aquatic environment. it has been used for toxicological investigations on the liver of intoxicated medeka. We performed differential proteome analyses of MC-LR - treated and untreated medaka fish in order to investigate the mechanisms of establishment of early responses to the toxin. The identification of proteins involved in these early responses might constitute candidates as bio markers of MC-LR exposure. Cytosolic proteins from livers of exposed or non-exposed medaka were resolved by 2D electrophoresis and detected using stains specific for phosphoproteins and for whole proteinaceous content. Overall, phosphoproteomic 2D maps. Of these 15 proteins, only two could not be identified by mass spectrometry. Among the other identified proteins, phenylalanine hydroxylase and keratin 18 (type I) showed variations in phosphoryl content in agreement with inhibition of PP2A activity after exposure of the fish to MC-LR. The other identified proteins exhibited variations in their expression level. The identified proteins appear to be involved in cytoskeleton assembly, cell signalling, oxidative w tress and apoptosis. The functional implications of responses to MC-LR exposure of these proteins are discussed. The methodology described in this report should be widely generalizable to a number of tissues and organisms, thus helping in the search for bio markers of MC-LR contamination

  14. Co-occurrence of non-toxic (cyanopeptolin) and toxic (microcystin) peptides in a bloom of Microcystis sp. from a Chilean lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, U; Campos, V; Cantarero, S; Urrutia, H; Heinze, R; Weckesser, J; Erhard, M

    2000-06-01

    A cyanobacterial bloom occurring in 1998 in lake Tres Pascualas (Concepción/Chile) was found to be dominated by Microcystis sp. The bloom contained both non-toxic (cyanopeptolin-type) and hepatotoxic (microcystin-type) peptides. Cyanopeptolin structure of the non-toxic peptides (called cyanopeptolin VW-1 and VW-2, respectively) was revealed by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) of whole cells, showing dominant molecular ions at m/z = 975 and m/z 995, respectively. On post source decay (PSD), both cyanopeptolins showed fragments deriving from Ahp-Phe-MTyr (3-amino-6-hydroxy-2-piperidone), the characteristic partial structure of cyanopeptolins. The amounts of each of the two cyanopeptolins could only roughly be estimated to be >0.1% of bloom material dry weight. In addition the blooms contained microcystins (20 microg/g bloom dry weight as determined by RP-HPLC, 13 microg/g according to ELISA determination). MALDI-TOF-MS revealed several structural variants of microcystin: MCYST-RR (microcystin with Arg and Arg, indicated by m/z 1,038 and confirmed by PSD revealing a m/z = 135 fragment deriving from the Adda side chain, MCYST-FR (microcystin with Phe and Arg, indicated by m/z = 1,015). The presence of [Asp(3)]-MCYST-LR (microcystin with Leu and Arg, Asp non-methylated, indicated by m/z 981), and [Asp(3)]-MCYST-YR (microcystin with Tyr and Arg, Asp non-methylated, indicated by m/z 1,031) were likely. The relative amounts of the peptides varied between February, April, and May. Whole cell extracts from the bloom material revealed specific enzyme inhibitory activities. The serin-proteases trypsin, plasmin, elastase were inhibited, assumable due to the cyanopeptolins found. Elastase and the cysteine-protease papain were not inhibited, inhibitions of protein kinase and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were low. Strong inhibition was observed with protein-phosphatase-1, likely due to the microcystins present in the samples.

  15. In situ studies on the distribution patterns and dynamics of microcystins in a biomanipulation fish - bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jun; Xie Ping; Zhang Dawen; Lei Hehua

    2007-01-01

    The distribution and dynamics of microcystins in various organs of the phytoplanktivorous bighead carp were studied monthly in Lake Taihu, which is dominated by toxic cyanobacteria. There was a good agreement between LC-MS and HPLC-UV determinations. Average recoveries of spiked fish samples were 63% for MC-RR and 71% for MC-LR. The highest MC contents in intestine, liver, kidney and spleen were 85.67, 2.83, 1.70 and 1.57 μg g -1 DW, respectively. MCs were much higher in mid-gut walls (1.22 μg g -1 DW) than in hind- and fore-gut walls (0.31 and 0.18 μg g -1 DW, respectively), suggesting the importance of mid-gut wall as major site for MC absorption. A cysteine conjugate of MC-LR was detected frequently in kidney. Among the muscle samples analyzed, 25% were above the provisional tolerable daily intake level by WHO. Bighead is strongly resistant to microcystins and can be used as biomanipulation fish to counteract cyanotoxin contamination in eutrophic waters. - Bighead carp is resistant to microcystins and can be used as biomanipulation fish to counteract cyanotoxin contamination

  16. Alteration in the Expression of Cytochrome P450s (CYP1A1, CYP2E1, and CYP3A11 in the Liver of Mouse Induced by Microcystin-LR

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    Bangjun Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MCs are cyclic heptapeptide toxins and can accumulate in the liver. Cytochrome P450s (CYPs play an important role in the biotransformation of endogenous substances and xenobiotics in animals. It is unclear if the CYPs are affected by MCs exposure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of microcystin-LR (MCLR on cytochrome P450 isozymes (CYP1A1, CYP2E1, and CYP3A11 at mRNA level, protein content, and enzyme activity in the liver of mice the received daily, intraperitoneally, 2, 4, and 8 µg/kg body weight of MCLR for seven days. The result showed that MCLR significantly decreased ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD (CYP1A1 and erythromycin N-demthylase (ERND (CYP3A11 activities and increased aniline hydroxylase (ANH activity (CYP2E1 in the liver of mice during the period of exposure. Our findings suggest that MCLR exposure may disrupt the function of CYPs in liver, which may be partly attributed to the toxicity of MCLR in mice.

  17. Development of a silicone-membrane passive sampler for monitoring cylindrospermopsin and microcystin LR-YR-RR in natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyoni, Hlengilizwe; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Msagati, Titus A. M.

    2017-08-01

    Silicone membrane tubes were functionalised by filling them with synthesised γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles and used as a passive sampling device for monitoring microcystins and cylindrospermopsin in aquatic environments. This novel device was calibrated for the measurement of microcystin and cylindrospermopsin concentrations in water. The effect of temperature and hydrodynamics on the sampler performance was studied in a flow-through system under controlled conditions. The chemical uptake of microcystins (MCs) and cylindrospermopsin (CYN) into the passive sampler remained linear and integrative throughout the exposure period. The rate of accumulation of most of the MC compounds tested was dependent on temperature and flow velocity. The use of 13C labelled polychlorinated biphenyls as performance reference compounds (PRCs) in silicone membrane/γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticle passive sampler, Chemcatcher and polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) was evaluated. The majority of PRCs improved the semi quantitative nature of water concentration estimated by the three samplers. The corrected sampling rate values of model biotoxin compounds were used to estimate the time-weighted average concentrations in natural cyanobacterial water blooms of the Hartbeespoort dam. The corrected sampling rates RScorr values varied from 0.1140 to 0.5628 Ld-1 between samplers with silicone membrane having the least RScorr values compared to the Chemcatcher and POCIS. The three passive sampling devises provided a more relevant picture of the biotoxin concentration in the Hartbeespoort dam. The results suggested that the three sampling devices are suitable for use in monitoring microcystins and cylindrospermopsin concentrations in aquatic environments.

  18. Impact of toxic cyanobacteria on gastropods and microcystin accumulation in a eutrophic lake (Grand-Lieu, France) with special reference to Physa (= Physella) acuta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lance, Emilie; Brient, Luc; Carpentier, Alexandre; Acou, Anthony; Marion, Loic; Bormans, Myriam; Gerard, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) produced by cyanobacteria are known to accumulate in gastropods following grazing of toxic cyanobacteria and/or absorption of MCs dissolved in water, with adverse effects on life history traits demonstrated in the laboratory. In the field, such effects may vary depending on species, according to their relative sensitivity and ecology. The aims of this study were to i) establish how various intensities of MC-producing cyanobacteria proliferations alter the structure of gastropod community and ii) compare MC tissue concentration in gastropods in the field with those obtained in our previous laboratory experiments on the prosobranch Potamopyrgus antipodarum and the pulmonate Lymnaea stagnalis. We explored these questions through a one-year field study at three stations at Grand-Lieu Lake (France) affected by different intensities of cyanobacteria proliferations. A survey of the community structure and MC content of both cyanobacteria and gastropods was associated with a caging experiment involving P. antipodarum and L. stagnalis. In total, 2592 gastropods belonging to 7 prosobranch and 16 pulmonate species were collected. However, distribution among the stations was unequal with 62% vs 2% of gastropods sampled respectively at the stations with the lowest vs highest concentrations of MC. Irrespective of the station, pulmonates were always more diverse, more abundant and occurred at higher frequencies than prosobranchs. Only the pulmonate Physa acuta occurred at all stations, with abundance and MC tissue concentration (≤ 4.32 μg g DW -1 ) depending on the degrees of MC-producing cyanobacteria proliferations in the stations; therefore, P. acuta is proposed as a potential sentinel species. The caging experiment demonstrated a higher MC accumulation in L. stagnalis (≤ 0.36 μg g DW -1 for 71% of individuals) than in P. antipodarum (≤ 0.02 μg g DW -1 for 12%), corroborating previous laboratory observations. Results are discussed in

  19. Evidence of trophic transfer of microcystins from the gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis to the fish Gasterosteus aculeatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Emilie; Petit, Anais; Sanchez, Wilfried; Paty, Christelle; Gérard, Claudia; Bormans, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    According to our previous results the gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to MC-producing cyanobacteria accumulates microcystins (MCs) both as free and covalently bound forms in its tissues, therefore representing a potential risk of MC transfer through the food web. This study demonstrates in a laboratory experiment the transfer of free and bound MCs from L. stagnalis intoxicated by MC-producing Planktothrix agardhii ingestion to the fish Gasterosteus aculeatus. Fish were fed during five days with digestive glands of L. stagnalis containing various concentrations of free and bound MCs, then with toxin-free digestive glands during a 5-day depuration period. MC accumulation was measured in gastropod digestive gland and in various fish organs (liver, muscle, kidney, and gills). The impact on fish was evaluated through detoxification enzyme (glutathion-S-transferase, glutathion peroxydase and superoxyde dismutase) activities, hepatic histopathology, and modifications in gill ventilation, feeding and locomotion. G. aculeatus ingestion rate was similar with intoxicated and toxin-free diet. Fish accumulated MCs (up to 3.96±0.14μgg -1 DW) in all organs and in decreasing order in liver, muscle, kidney and gills. Hepatic histopathology was moderate. Glutathion peroxydase was activated in gills during intoxication suggesting a slight reactive oxygen species production, but without any impact on gill ventilation. Intoxication via ingestion of MC-intoxicated snails impacted fish locomotion. Intoxicated fish remained significantly less mobile than controls during the intoxication period possibly due to a lower health condition, whereas they showed a greater mobility during the depuration period that might be related to an acute foraging for food. During depuration, MC elimination was total in gills and kidney, but partial in liver and muscle. Our results assess the MC transfer from gastropods to fish and the potential risk induced by bound MCs in the food web. Copyright

  20. First Identification of the Toxicity of Microcystins on Pancreatic Islet Function in Humans and the Involved Potential Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanyan; Xue, Qingju; Su, Xiaomei; Xie, Liqiang; Yan, Yunjun; Wang, Lixiao; Steinman, Alan D

    2016-03-15

    Microcystins (MCs) produced by cyanobacteria have been recognized as a major public health threat. However, the toxicity of MCs to humans is still largely unknown. In this study, we examined the changes in pancreatic islet function in fishers exposed to ambient levels of MCs at Lake Taihu and, using a mouse model, explored the molecular mechanisms involved in toxicity. MCs content in the serum of fishers tested positive, with a range from 0.10 to 0.64 μg/L. Both lower blood insulin levels (2.26 ± 0.96 μIU/mL) and impaired fasting glucose were found in participants from the Meiliang Bay area in Lake Taihu, where MC-LR levels were substantially greater than the MC threshold established by WHO for drinking water. Animal experiments showed that glucose level increased by 27.9% in mice exposed to 5 μg/kg bw and decreased by 41.5% in mice exposed to 20 μg/kg bw. Blood insulin levels declined by 21.9% and 56.2% in mice exposed to 5 and 20 μg/kg bw MC-LR, respectively, which was consistent with the results observed in fishers. Furthermore, the diabetes gene pdx1 and several other proteins (such as Ppp3ca, Ide, Marcks, Pgk1, Suclg1, Ndufs4) involved in insulin secretion were identified for the first time in mice following MC-LR exposure; these biomarkers were considered responsible for MC-LR induced islet dysfunction. This study suggests that subchronic exposure to environmental levels of MCs may increase the risk of the occurrence of diabetes in humans.

  1. Ultra-trace levels analysis of microcystins and nodularin in surface water by on-line solid-phase extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balest, Lydia; Murgolo, Sapia; Sciancalepore, Lucia; Montemurro, Patrizia; Abis, Pier Paolo; Pastore, Carlo; Mascolo, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    An on-line solid phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography in tandem with mass spectrometry (on-line SPE/HPLC/MS-MS) method for the determination of five microcystins and nodularin in surface waters at submicrogram per liter concentrations has been optimized. Maximum recoveries were achieved by carefully optimizing the extraction sample volume, loading solvent, wash solvent, and pH of the sample. The developed method was also validated according to both UNI EN ISO IEC 17025 and UNICHIM guidelines. Specifically, ten analytical runs were performed at three different concentration levels using a reference mix solution containing the six analytes. The method was applied for monitoring the concentrations of microcystins and nodularin in real surface water during a sampling campaign of 9 months in which the ELISA method was used as standard official method. The results of the two methods were compared showing good agreement when the highest concentration values of MCs were found. Graphical abstract An on-line SPE/HPLC/MS-MS method for the determination of five microcystins and nodularin in surface waters at sub μg L(-1) was optimized and compared with ELISA assay method for real samples.

  2. Detection of the cyanobacterial hepatotoxins microcystins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElhiney, Jacqui; Lawton, Linda A.

    2005-01-01

    Concern regarding the presence of microcystins in drinking water and their possible contamination in food (e.g., salad vegetables, fish, shellfish) has resulted in the need for reliable methods for the detection and accurate quantification of this class of toxins. Currently, routine analysis of microcystins is most commonly carried out using high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (HPLC-PDA), although more sensitive biological assays such as antibody-based ELISAs and protein phosphatase inhibition assays have also proven useful. However, many of these methods have been hindered by the availability of a wide range of purified microcystins. Although over 60 variants have now been reported, only a very small number are commercially available and calibrated standards are not yet obtainable. This has led to the common practice of reporting microcystin-LR equivalence regardless of which variant is present. The increased availability of HPLC with online mass spectral analysis (HPLC-MS) may facilitate more accurate detection of toxin variants but as several microcystins share the same molecular mass, definitive identification can be difficult. A further difficulty in analyzing microcystins is the requirement for sample processing before analysis. Solid phase extraction (SPE) is typically used to enrich environmental concentrations of microcystins, or to eliminate contaminants from complex samples such as animal and plant tissues. Recently, new technologies employing recombinant antibodies and molecularly imprinted polymers have been exploited to develop assays and biosensors for microcystins. These novel detection systems are highly sensitive, often do not require sample processing, and offer a simpler, less expensive alternative to analytical techniques. They have also been successfully employed in solid phase extraction formats for the concentration and clean up of environmental samples before HPLC analysis

  3. Microcystin mcyA and mcyE Gene Abundances Are Not Appropriate Indicators of Microcystin Concentrations in Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beversdorf, Lucas J; Chaston, Sheena D; Miller, Todd R; McMahon, Katherine D

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cyanoHABs) are a primary source of water quality degradation in eutrophic lakes. The occurrence of cyanoHABs is ubiquitous and expected to increase with current climate and land use change scenarios. However, it is currently unknown what environmental parameters are important for indicating the presence of cyanoHAB toxins making them difficult to predict or even monitor on time-scales relevant to protecting public health. Using qPCR, we aimed to quantify genes within the microcystin operon (mcy) to determine which cyanobacterial taxa, and what percentage of the total cyanobacterial community, were responsible for microcystin production in four eutrophic lakes. We targeted Microcystis-16S, mcyA, and Microcystis, Planktothrix, and Anabaena-specific mcyE genes. We also measured microcystins and several biological, chemical, and physical parameters--such as temperature, lake stability, nutrients, pigments and cyanobacterial community composition (CCC)--to search for possible correlations to gene copy abundance and MC production. All four lakes contained Microcystis-mcyE genes and high percentages of toxic Microcystis, suggesting Microcystis was the dominant microcystin producer. However, all genes were highly variable temporally, and in few cases, correlated with increased temperature and nutrients as the summer progressed. Interestingly, toxin gene abundances (and biomass indicators) were anti-correlated with microcystin in all lakes except the largest lake, Lake Mendota. Similarly, gene abundance and microcystins differentially correlated to CCC in all lakes. Thus, we conclude that the presence of microcystin genes are not a useful tool for eliciting an ecological role for toxins in the environment, nor are microcystin genes (e.g. DNA) a good indicator of toxins in the environment.

  4. Can we effectively degrade microcystins? - Implications on human health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Cruz, Armah A; Antoniou, Maria; Hiskia, Anastasia

    2011-01-01

    leading to the disruption of cascade of events important in the regulation and control of cellular processes. Covalent binding of microcystins with phosphatases is thought to be responsible for the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of microcystins. In addition, microcystins can trigger oxidative stress......Microcystins are cyclic heptapeptide toxins produced by a number of genera of cyanobacteria. They are ubiquitous in bodies of water worldwide and pose significant hazard to human, plant, and animal health. Microcystins are primarily hepatotoxins known to inhibit serine-threonine phosphatases...... harmful bloom events. Combination of conventional and advanced oxidation technologies can potentially remove 100% of microcystins in water even in turbid conditions. This review covers selected treatment technologies to degrade microcystins in water....

  5. PET in patients with clear-cut multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS); PET bei Patienten mit klar definierter multipler chemischer Sensibilitaet (MCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornschein, S. [Toxikologische Abt. der II. Medizinischen Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie der Technischen Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Hausteiner, C.; Foerstl, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie der Technischen Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Drzezga, A.; Schwaiger, M. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Bartenstein, P. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Mainz (Germany); Zilker, Th. [Toxikologische Abt. der II. Medizinischen Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    Aim: Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a controversially discussed symptom complex. Patients afflicted by MCS react to very low and generally non-toxic concentrations of environmental chemicals. It has been suggested that MCS leads to neurotoxic damage or neuroimmunological alteration in the brain detectable by positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT). These methods are often applied to MCS patients for diagnosis, although they never proved appropriate. Method: We scanned 12 MCS patients with PET, hypothesizing that it would reveal abnormal findings. Results: Mild glucose hypometabolism was present in one patient. In comparison with normal controls, the patient group showed no significant functional brain changes. Conclusion: This first systematic PET study in MCS patients revealed no hint of neurotoxic or neuroimmunological brain changes of functional significance. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Multiple chemische sensibilitaet (MCS) ist ein umstrittenes Krankheitsbild, das durch Reaktionen auf geringe, fueer Normalpersonen unschaedliche Mengen an Umweltchemikalien gekennzeichnet ist. Es wurde postuliert, dass MCS zu neurotoxischer Schaedigung bzw. neuroimmunologischer Veraenderung im Gehirn fuehrt, die mittels funktioneller bildgebender Verfahren, z. B. positronenemissionstomographie (PET), single-photon-emissions-computer-tomographie (SPECT) dargestellt werden koennte. Obwohl hierfuer kein wissenschaftlicher Beleg erbracht wurde, werden diese Methoden vielfach diagnostisch bei MCS-Patienten eingesetzt. Methode: Wir untersuchten 12 MCS-Patienten mit PET, um etwaige funktionelle Hirnveraenderungen nachzuweisen. Ergebnisse: Im Einzelvergleich war bei einem Patienten ein diskreter Glukose-Hypometabolismus in einzelnen Hirnregionen vorhanden. Im Gruppenvergleich konnte keine signifikante Abweichung von der Norm gefunden werden. Schlussfolgerung: Diese erste systematische PET-Studie bei MCS-Patienten erbrachte keinen

  6. Culture-based Identification Of Microcystin-Degrading Bacteria In the Sandusky Bay and Maumee Bay of Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormiston, A.; Mou, X.

    2012-12-01

    Harmful cyanobacteria blooms (cyanoHABs) are a serious issue that affects wildlife, human health, recreation and local economics worldwide. CyanoHABs produce cyanotoxins, such as microcystins (MCs) that lead to skin irritation, illness and liver tumors. Bacterially mediated degradation of MCs plays a key role to transform these toxic substrates to less harmful metabolites in natural environments. However, only a few Sphingomonos species have been isolated for degradation of MCs and many of which are from other habitats such as water plants. This project aims to isolate and identify bacteria that can degrade MC-LR and MC-RR, two major forms of MCs found during cyanoHABs in Lake Erie. Water samples were collected from the surface of Sandusky Bay and Maumee Bay of Lake Erie and immediately filtered through 3.0 -μm-pore-size membrane filters to obtain bacterioplankton fraction. The filtrates were amended with excessive inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus compounds and incubated in the dark for a week to purposely establish a carbon-limited condition. Afterwards, enrichment microcosms were established in flasks filled with pre-incubated bacterioplankton and single MC compounds (final concentration 10 μM). Once cell growth was confirmed by flow cytometry-based cell counting, bacterial cells in enriched microcosms were transferred onto solid surfaces, i.e., GFF filter and noble agar for colony isolation. Obtained single colonies were inoculated in defined liquid media with MCs as single carbon source. DNA was extracted from each purified isolate and analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP). A total of 18 different RFLP banding patterns were found, indicating MC-degrading bacteria may be heterogeneous in studied water samples. 16S rRNA genes of selected bacterial isolates were PCR amplified and sequenced for taxonomic identification. Our results demonstrated that MCs can be degraded by multiple bacterial species in Lake Erie. Future directions

  7. Methods for determining microcystins (peptide hepatotoxins) and microcystin-producing cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangolkar, Lalita N; Maske, Sarika S; Chakrabarti, Tapan

    2006-11-01

    Episodes of cyanobacterial toxic blooms and fatalities to animals and humans due to cyanobacterial toxins (CBT) are known worldwide. The hepatotoxins and neurotoxins (cyanotoxins) produced by bloom-forming cyanobacteria have been the cause of human and animal health hazards and even death. Prevailing concentration of cell bound endotoxin, exotoxin and the toxin variants depend on developmental stages of the bloom and the cyanobacterial (CB) species involved. Toxic and non-toxic strains do not show any predictable morphological difference. The current instrumental, immunological and molecular methods applied for determining microcystins (peptide hepatotoxins) and microcystin-producing cyanobacteria are reviewed.

  8. Cyanobacterial Xenobiotics as Evaluated by a Caenorhabditis elegans Neurotoxicity Screening Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jingjuan; Saul, Nadine; Kochan, Cindy; Putschew, Anke; Pu, Yuepu; Yin, Lihong; Steinberg, Christian E. W.

    2014-01-01

    In fresh waters cyanobacterial blooms can produce a variety of toxins, such as microcystin variants (MCs) and anatoxin-a (ANA). ANA is a well-known neurotoxin, whereas MCs are hepatotoxic and, to a lesser degree, also neurotoxic. Neurotoxicity applies especially to invertebrates lacking livers. Current standardized neurotoxicity screening methods use rats or mice. However, in order to minimize vertebrate animal experiments as well as experimental time and effort, many investigators have proposed the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an appropriate invertebrate model. Therefore, four known neurotoxic compounds (positive compounds: chlorpyrifos, abamectin, atropine, and acrylamide) were chosen to verify the expected impacts on autonomic (locomotion, feeding, defecation) and sensory (thermal, chemical, and mechanical sensory perception) functions in C. elegans. This study is another step towards successfully establishing C. elegans as an alternative neurotoxicity model. By using this protocol, anatoxin-a adversely affected locomotive behavior and pharyngeal pumping frequency and, most strongly, chemotactic and thermotactic behavior, whereas MC-LR impacted locomotion, pumping, and mechanical behavior, but not chemical sensory behavior. Environmental samples can also be screened in this simple and fast way for neurotoxic characteristics. The filtrate of a Microcystis aeruginosa culture, known for its hepatotoxicity, also displayed mild neurotoxicity (modulated short-term thermotaxis). These results show the suitability of this assay for environmental cyanotoxin-containing samples. PMID:24776722

  9. Simultaneous Microcystis Algicidal and Microcystin Degrading Capability by a Single Acinetobacter Bacterial Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Ai, Hainan; Kang, Li; Sun, Xingfu; He, Qiang

    2016-11-01

    Measures for removal of toxic harmful algal blooms often cause lysis of algal cells and release of microcystins (MCs). In this study, Acinetobacter sp. CMDB-2 that exhibits distinct algal lysing activity and MCs degradation capability was isolated. The physiological response and morphological characteristics of toxin-producing Microcystis aeruginosa, the dynamics of intra- and extracellular MC-LR concentration were studied in an algal/bacterial cocultured system. The results demonstrated that Acinetobacter sp. CMDB-2 caused thorough decomposition of algal cells and impairment of photosynthesis within 24 h. Enhanced algal lysis and MC-LR release appeared with increasing bacterial density from 1 × 10 3 to 1 × 10 7 cells/mL; however, the MC-LR was reduced by nearly 94% within 14 h irrespective of bacterial density. Measurement of extracellular and intracellular MC-LR revealed that the toxin was decreased by 92% in bacterial cell incubated systems relative to control and bacterial cell-free filtrate systems. The results confirmed that the bacterial metabolite caused 92% lysis of Microcystis aeruginosa cells, whereas the bacterial cells were responsible for approximately 91% reduction of MC-LR. The joint efforts of the bacterium and its metabolite accomplished the sustainable removal of algae and MC-LR. This is the first report of a single bacterial strain that achieves these dual actions.

  10. Microcystin-LR Induced Immunotoxicity in Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqoob Lone

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins are toxic molecules produced by cyanobacterial blooms due to water eutrophication. Exposure to microcystins is a global health problem because of its association with various other pathological effects and people all over the world are exposed to microcystins on a regular basis. Evidence shows that microcystin-LR (MC-LR may adversely affect the immune system, but its specific effects on immune functions are lacking. In the present review, immunotoxicological effects associated with MC-LR in animals, humans, and in vitro models have been reported. Overall, the data shows that chronic exposure to MC-LR has the potential to impair vital immune responses which could lead to increased risk of various diseases including cancers. Studies in animal and in vitro models have provided some pivotal understanding into the potential mechanisms of MC-LR related immunotoxicity suggesting that further investigation, particularly in humans, is required to better understand the relationship between development of disease and the MC-LR exposure.

  11. Comparative Measurement of Microcystins in Diverse Surface ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The measurement of microcystins, cyanotoxins associated with cyanobacterial blooms which are increasingly prevalent in inland waters, is complicated by the diversity of congeners which have been observed in the environment. At present, more than 150 microcystin congeners have been identified, and this poses a significant challenge to analytical methods intended to assess human health risks in surface and drinking water systems. The most widely employed analytical method at present is the ADDA-ELISA technique which is potentially sensitive to all microcystins, but it is primarily intended as a semi-quantitative method, and questions have been raised regarding the potential for cross-reactivity and false positives. LC-MS/MS methods targeting specific congeners, such as US EPA Method 544, are intended for use as a secondary confirmation following a positive ELISA response, but these techniques can target only those congeners for which commercial standards are available. Accordingly, they are not suitable for ascertaining the safety of a given water sample, given the potential for omitting unknown microcystin congeners which might be present.An alternative approach involves oxidative transformation of microcystins to a common product, 2-methyl-3-methoxy-4-phenylbutyric acid, or MMPB. Measuring MMPB by LC-MS/MS can potentially provide a metric for the sum of all microcystin congeners present in a sample, subject to the efficiency and overall yield of conversion. The

  12. Acute Exposure to Microcystin-Producing Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Alters Adult Zebrafish (Danio rerio Swimming Performance Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Wilges Kist

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MCs are toxins produced by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae, primarily Microcystis aeruginosa, forming water blooms worldwide. When an organism is exposed to environmental perturbations, alterations in normal behavioral patterns occur. Behavioral repertoire represents the consequence of a diversity of physiological and biochemical alterations. In this study, we assessed behavioral patterns and whole-body cortisol levels of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio exposed to cell culture of the microcystin-producing cyanobacterium M. aeruginosa (MC-LR, strain RST9501. MC-LR exposure (100 μg/L decreased by 63% the distance traveled and increased threefold the immobility time when compared to the control group. Interestingly, no significant alterations in the number of line crossings were found at the same MC-LR concentration and time of exposure. When animals were exposed to 50 and 100 μg/L, MC-LR promoted a significant increase (around 93% in the time spent in the bottom portion of the tank, suggesting an anxiogenic effect. The results also showed that none of the MC-LR concentrations tested promoted significant alterations in absolute turn angle, path efficiency, social behavior, or whole-body cortisol level. These findings indicate that behavior is susceptible to MC-LR exposure and provide evidence for a better understanding of the ecological consequences of toxic algal blooms.

  13. Stability of cyanotoxins, microcystin-LR, microcystin-RR and nodularin in seawater and BG-11 medium of different salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Mazur

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins and nodularin are potent hepatotoxins produced by fresh and seawater cyanobacteria. The persistence of three hepatotoxins - microcystin-LR, microcystin-RR and nodularin - was investigated in sterile BG-11 medium of different salinity and in water collected from the Gulf of Gdansk. After 21 days of incubation at 17 ± 1oC and constant illumination of about 40 µmol photon m-2 s-1 the concentration of toxins decreased by about 30-37%. No significant changes in toxin concentration in the BG-11 media of different salinity were observed. When toxins were incubated in non-sterile seawater, their concentrations decreased markedly. It is likely that some strains of bacteria are responsible for the breakdown of the toxins. Nodularin turned out to be more resistant to biodegradation than the two microcystins. The influence of certain components of cyanobacteria cells on the accelerated rate of toxin degradation was also considered.

  14. Occurrence of the Microcystins MC-LW and MC-LF in Dutch Surface Waters and Their Contribution to Total Microcystin Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth J. Faassen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MCs are the most frequently found cyanobacterial toxins in freshwater systems. Many MC variants have been identified and variants differ in their toxicity. Recent studies showed that the variants MC-LW and MC-LF might be more toxic than MC-LR, the variant that is most abundant and mostly used for risk assessments. As little is known about the presence of these two variants in The Netherlands, we determined their occurrence by analyzing 88 water samples and 10 scum samples for eight MC variants ((dm-7-MC-RR, MC-YR, (dm-7-MC-LR, MC-LY, MC-LW and MC-LF by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry detection. All analyzed MC variants were detected, and MC-LW and/or MC-LF were present in 32% of the MC containing water samples. When MC-LW and MC-LF were present, they contributed to nearly 10% of the total MC concentrations, but due to their suspected high toxicity, their average contribution to the total MC toxicity was estimated to be at least 45%. Given the frequent occurrence and possible high toxicity of MC-LW and MC-LF, it seems better to base health risk assessments on the toxicity contributions of different MC variants than on MC-LR concentrations alone.

  15. Rapid Isolation of a Single-Chain Antibody against the Cyanobacterial Toxin Microcystin-LR by Phage Display and Its Use in the Immunoaffinity Concentration of Microcystins from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhiney, Jacqui; Drever, Mathew; Lawton, Linda A.; Porter, Andy J.

    2002-01-01

    A naïve (unimmunized) human semisynthetic phage display library was employed to isolate recombinant antibody fragments against the cyanobacterial hepatotoxin microcystin-LR. Selected antibody scFv genes were cloned into a soluble expression vector and expressed in Escherichia coli for characterization against purified microcystin-LR by competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The most sensitive single-chain antibody (scAb) isolated was capable of detecting microcystin-LR at levels below the World Health Organization limit in drinking water (1 μg liter−1) and cross-reacted with three other purified microcystin variants (microcystin-RR, -LW, and -LF) and the related cyanotoxin nodularin. Extracts of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa were assayed by ELISA, and quantifications of microcystins in toxic samples showed good correlation with analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. Immobilized scAb was also used to prepare immunoaffinity columns, which were assessed for the ability to concentrate microcystin-LR from water for subsequent analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. Anti-microcystin-LR scAb was immobilized on columns via a hexahistidine tag, ensuring maximum exposure of antigen binding sites, and the performance of the columns was evaluated by directly applying 150 ml of distilled water spiked with 4 μg of purified microcystin-LR. The procedure was simple, and a recovery rate of 94% was achieved following elution in 1 ml of 100% methanol. Large-scale, low-cost production of anti-microcystin-LR scAb in E. coli is an exciting prospect for the development of biosensors and on-line monitoring systems for microcystins and will also facilitate a range of immunoaffinity applications for the cleanup and concentration of these toxins from environmental samples. PMID:12406716

  16. Cyanobacteria and microcystin contamination in untreated and treated drinking water in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Naa Dzama Addico

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although cyanobacterial blooms and cyanotoxins represent a worldwide-occurring phenomenon, there are large differences among different countries in cyanotoxin-related human health risk assessment, management practices and policies. While national standards, guideline values and detailed regulatory frameworks for effective management of cyanotoxin risks have been implemented in many industrialized countries, the extent of cyanobacteria occurrence and cyanotoxin contamination in certain geographical regions is under-reported and not very well understood. Such regions include major parts of tropical West and Central Africa, a region constisting of more than 25 countries occupying an area of 12 million km2, with a total population of 500 milion people. Only few studies focusing on cyanotoxin occurrence in this region have been published so far, and reports dealing specifically with cyanotoxin contamination in drinking water are extremely scarce. In this study, we report seasonal data on cyanobacteria and microcystin (MC contamination in drinking water reservoirs and adjacent treatment plants located in Ghana, West Africa. During January-June 2005, concentrations of MCs were monitored in four treatment plants supplying drinking water to major metropolitan areas in Ghana: the treatment plants Barekese and Owabi, which serve Kumasi Metropolitan Area, and the plants Kpong and Weija, providing water for Accra-Tema Metropolitan Area. HPLC analyses showed that 65% samples of raw water at the intake of the treatment plants contained intracellular MCs (maximal detected concentration was 8.73 µg L-1, whereas dissolved toxins were detected in 33% of the samples. Significant reduction of cyanobacterial cell counts and MC concentrations was achieved during the entire monitoring period by the applied conventional water treatment methods (alum flocculation, sedimentation, rapid sand filtration and chlorination, and MC concentration in the final treated water

  17. Microbial activity and bacterial community structure during degradation of microcystins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, K.; Lyck, Susanne; Winding, A.

    2002-01-01

    experiments were analysed by polymerase chain reaction-density gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) of 16S rDNA, which showed that the indigenous bacterial community responded quickly to the addition of lysates. Our study confirms that bacteria can efficiently degrade microcystins in natural waters....... It was hypothesised that the bacterial community from a lake with frequent occurrence of toxic cyanobacteria can degrade microcystin along with other organic compounds. The initial dissolved microcystin concentrations ranged between 10 and 136 mug 1(-1) (microcystin-LR equivalents) in the laboratory experiment, using...... experiment to evaluate the effects of organic lysates on bacterial proliferation in the absence of microcystin. An exponential decline of the dissolved toxins was observed in all cases with toxins present, and the degradation rates ranged between 0.5 and 1.0 d(-1). No lag phases were observed but slow...

  18. Sex-dependent effects of microcystin-LR on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad axis and gametogenesis of adult zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanjing; Chen, Chuanyue; Chen, Liang; Wang, Li; Li, Jian; Chen, Yuanyuan; Jin, Jienan; Kawan, Atufa; Zhang, Xuezhen

    2016-03-01

    While microcystins (MCs) have been reported to exert reproductive toxicity on fish with a sex-dependent effect, the underlying mechanism has been rarely investigated. In the present study, zebrafish were exposed to 1, 5 and 20 μg/L MC-LR for 30 d. The gonad-somatic index declined in all treated males. 17β-estradiol (E2), testosterone (T), 11-keto testosterone (11-KT) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels increased in serum from all treated females, while T, FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels changed in all treated males. Histomorphological observation showed that MC-LR exposure evidently retarded oogenesis and spermatogenesis. Transcriptional changes of 22 genes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad (HPG) axis exhibited sex-specific responses, and the relationship between gene transcriptions and gametogenesis was evaluated by principle component analysis (PCA). Major contributors to PC1 (gnrh2, gnrhr3, ar, lhr, hmgra, hmgrb and cyp19a) were positively correlated with the number of post-vitellogenic oocytes, while PC1 (gnrh2, lhβ, erβ, fshr, cyp11a and 17βhsd) were positively correlated with the number of spermatozoa. The protein levels of 17βHSD and CYP19a were affected in both females and males. In conclusion, this study first investigated the sex-dependent effects of microcystins on fish reproduction and revealed some important molecular biomarkers related to gametogenesis in zebrafish suffered from MC-LR.

  19. Liquid chromatography/negative electrospray ionization ion trap MS(2) mass spectrometry application for the determination of microcystins occurrence in Southern Portugal water reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M A; Reis, M P; Mateus, M C

    2013-11-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are toxins produced by cyanobacteria which are common organisms in the phytoplankton of eutrophic lakes, rivers and freshwater reservoirs. In the present work, a novel method of liquid chromatography-electrospray ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/Ion trap-MS/MS), operated in the negative ionization mode, was developed for the analysis of these cyanotoxins. The method was applied to determine the amounts of total microcystins-LR, -YR and -RR in two water reservoirs in Southern Portugal, namely Alqueva and Beliche. A total of 30 water samples were analysed along 2011. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used for sample cleaning-up and analyte enrichment. The extracted toxins were separated on a C18 column with a gradient of acetonitrile/water with 0.1% formic acid. Detection of microcystins was carried out using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in the negative polarity mode, as this method gave a higher selectivity. The MC-RR, YR and LR quantification limits were 17.9, 31.7 and 15.8 ng/L, respectively; quite below the limits recommended by WHO guidelines for drinking water (1 μg/L). Total MC highest concentrations were found in the warm months of June, July and September in Alqueva sampling sites, with concentrations of MC LR and RR ranging 17-344 and 25-212 ng/L, respectively, showing comparable results for MC-RR and LR and slightly lower concentration of MC-YR. Detected values for Beliche reservoir were below quantification limits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of chlorination by-products on the quantitation of microcystins in finished drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Laura; Zaffiro, Alan; Adams, William A; Wendelken, Steven C

    2017-11-01

    Microcystins are toxic peptides that can be produced by cyanobacteria in harmful algal blooms (HABs). Various analytical techniques have been developed to quantify microcystins in drinking water, including liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and oxidative cleavage to produce 2-methyl-3-methoxy-4-phenylbutyric acid (MMPB) with detection by LC/MS/MS, the "MMPB method". Both the ELISA and MMPB methods quantify microcystins by detecting a portion of the molecule common to most microcystins. However, there is little research evaluating the effect of microcystin chlorination by-products potentially produced during drinking water treatment on analytical results. To evaluate this potential, chlorinated drinking water samples were fortified with various microcystin congeners in bench-scale studies. The samples were allowed to react, followed by a comparison of microcystin concentrations measured using the three methods. The congener-specific LC/MS/MS method selectively quantified microcystins and was not affected by the presence of chlorination by-products. The ELISA results were similar to those obtained by LC/MS/MS for most microcystin congeners, but results deviated for a particular microcystin containing a variable amino acid susceptible to oxidation. The concentrations measured by the MMPB method were at least five-fold higher than the concentrations of microcystin measured by the other methods and demonstrate that detection of MMPB does not necessarily correlate to intact microcystin toxins in finished drinking water. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Microcystis aeruginosa : source of toxic microcystins in drinking water

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , which is the most common toxic cyanobacterium in eutrophic freshwater. The association of environmental parameters with cyanobacterial blooms and the toxicity of microcystin are discussed. Also, the synthesis of the microcystins, as well as ...

  2. Sublethal microcystin exposure and biochemical outcomes among hemodialysis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyanobacteria are commonly-occurring contaminants of surface waters worldwide. Microcystins, potent hepatotoxins, are among the best characterized cyanotoxins. During November, 2001, a group of 44 hemodialysis patients were exposed to microcystins via contaminated dialysate. Seru...

  3. Metagenomic identification of bacterioplankton taxa and pathways involved in microcystin degradation in lake erie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Mou

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial harmful blooms (CyanoHABs that produce microcystins are appearing in an increasing number of freshwater ecosystems worldwide, damaging quality of water for use by human and aquatic life. Heterotrophic bacteria assemblages are thought to be important in transforming and detoxifying microcystins in natural environments. However, little is known about their taxonomic composition or pathways involved in the process. To address this knowledge gap, we compared the metagenomes of Lake Erie free-living bacterioplankton assemblages in laboratory microcosms amended with microcystins relative to unamended controls. A diverse array of bacterial phyla were responsive to elevated supply of microcystins, including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria of the alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subdivisions and Verrucomicrobia. At more detailed taxonomic levels, Methylophilales (mainly in genus Methylotenera and Burkholderiales (mainly in genera Bordetella, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Polaromonas, Ralstonia, Polynucleobacter and Variovorax of Betaproteobacteria were suggested to be more important in microcystin degradation than Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria. The latter taxa were previously thought to be major microcystin degraders. Homologs to known microcystin-degrading genes (mlr were not overrepresented in microcystin-amended metagenomes, indicating that Lake Erie bacterioplankton might employ alternative genes and/or pathways in microcystin degradation. Genes for xenobiotic metabolism were overrepresented in microcystin-amended microcosms, suggesting they are important in bacterial degradation of microcystin, a phenomenon that has been identified previously only in eukaryotic systems.

  4. Ingestion of microcystins by Daphnia: Intestinal uptake and toxic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrlack, T.; Christoffersen, K.; Dittmann, E.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the intestinal uptake and adverse effects of microcystins ingested with Microcystis on Daphnia galeata. The gut structure, blood microcystin concentration, appearance, and movements of Daphnia fed Microcystis PCC 7806 or a microcystin-deficient PCC 7806 mutant were monitored over ...

  5. Laboratory studies of dissolved radiolabelled microcystin-LR in lake water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyenstrand, Per; Rohrlack, Thomas; Beattie, Kenneth A

    2003-01-01

    The fate of dissolved microcystin-LR was studied in laboratory experiments using surface water taken from a eutrophic lake. Based on initial range finding, a concentration of 50 microg l(-1) dissolved 14C-microcystin-LR was selected for subsequent time-course experiments. The first was performed ...... fractions. The study demonstrated that biodegradation of dissolved microcystin-LR occurred in water collected at a lake surface with carbon dioxide as a major end-product....

  6. Hydrazine inhalation hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yung Hsiang; Chong, C H; Ng, W T; Lim, D

    2007-10-01

    Abstract Hydrazine is a hazardous chemical commonly used as a reactant in rocket and jet fuel cells. Animal studies have demonstrated hepatic changes after hydrazine inhalation. Human case reports of hydrazine inhalation hepatotoxicity are rare. We report a case of mild hepatotoxicity following brief hydrazine vapour inhalation in a healthy young man, which resolved completely on expectant management.

  7. Monitoring of microcystin-LR in Luvuvhu River catchment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main aim of this study is to assess the levels of microcystin-LR in Luvuvhu River catchment and to assess the physicochemical parameters that may promote the growth of cyanobacteria. The level of microcystin-LR in some of the sampling sites was <0.18 ìg/l except for one site (Luvuvhu River just before the confluence ...

  8. Hot and toxic: Temperature regulates microcystin release from cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Jeremy T; Wyatt, Kevin H; Doll, Jason C; Rubenstein, Eric M; Rober, Allison R

    2018-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating toxin release by cyanobacteria are poorly understood despite the threat cyanotoxins pose to water quality and human health globally. To determine the potential for temperature to regulate microcystin release by toxin-producing cyanobacteria, we evaluated seasonal patterns of water temperature, cyanobacteria biomass, and extracellular microcystin concentration in a eutrophic freshwater lake dominated by Planktothrix agardhii. We replicated seasonal variation in water temperature in a concurrent laboratory incubation experiment designed to evaluate cause-effect relationships between temperature and toxin release. Lake temperature ranged from 3 to 27°C and cyanobacteria biomass increased with warming up to 18°C, but declined rapidly thereafter with further increases in temperature. Extracellular microcystin concentration was tightly coupled with temperature and was most elevated between 20 and 25°C, which was concurrent with the decline in cyanobacteria biomass. A similar trend was observed in laboratory incubations where productivity-specific microcystin release was most elevated between 20 and 25°C and then declined sharply at 30°C. We applied generalized linear mixed modeling to evaluate the strength of water temperature as a predictor of cyanobacteria abundance and microcystin release, and determined that warming≥20°C would result in a 36% increase in microcystin release when Chlorophyll a was ≤50μgl -1 . These results show a temperature threshold for toxin release in P. agardhii, which demonstrates a potential to use water temperature to forecast bloom severity in eutrophic lakes where blooms can persist year-round with varying degrees of toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Microcystin Prevalence throughout Lentic Waterbodies in Coastal Southern California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith D. A. Howard

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Toxin producing cyanobacterial blooms have increased globally in recent decades in both frequency and intensity. Despite the recognition of this growing risk, the extent and magnitude of cyanobacterial blooms and cyanotoxin prevalence is poorly characterized in the heavily populated region of southern California. Recent assessments of lentic waterbodies (depressional wetlands, lakes, reservoirs and coastal lagoons determined the prevalence of microcystins and, in some cases, additional cyanotoxins. Microcystins were present in all waterbody types surveyed although toxin concentrations were generally low across most habitats, as only a small number of sites exceeded California’s recreational health thresholds for acute toxicity. Results from passive samplers (Solid Phase Adsorption Toxin Tracking (SPATT indicated microcystins were prevalent throughout lentic waterbodies and that traditional discrete samples underestimated the presence of microcystins. Multiple cyanotoxins were detected simultaneously in some systems, indicating multiple stressors, the risk of which is uncertain since health thresholds are based on exposures to single toxins. Anatoxin-a was detected for the first time from lakes in southern California. The persistence of detectable microcystins across years and seasons indicates a low-level, chronic risk through both direct and indirect exposure. The influence of toxic cyanobacterial blooms is a more complex stressor than presently recognized and should be included in water quality monitoring programs.

  10. Detoxification of microcystin-LR in water by Portulaca oleracea cv.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Takatoshi; Okuhata, Hiroshi; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Jeon, Bong-Seok; Park, Ho-Dong

    2014-03-01

    Microcystin-LR (0.02 μg/ml) in the hydroculture medium of Portulaca oleracea cv., became below the detection level (<0.0001 μg/ml) by HPLC analysis after 7 days. The toxicity of microcystin estimated with protein phosphatase inhibition assay, however, remained at 37% of the initial level, indicating that microcystin-LR was transformed by P. oleracea cv. into unknown compound(s) of lower toxicity. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Search for all MCs in networks with unreliable nodes and arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, W.-C.

    2003-01-01

    A simple method is proposed to search for all minimal cutsets (MCs ) for imperfect networks reliability subject to both arc and node failures under the condition that all of the MCs in the network with perfect nodes are given in advance. The proposed method does not require re-enumeration for all of the MCs for additional node failure consideration. All of the MC candidates found in the proposed algorithm are actual MCs without any need for further verification. This algorithm is more effective than the existing algorithm in which every MC candidate is not verified as a MC. No identical MCs are found using the proposed algorithm, which does not duplicate MCs and is more efficient than the existing methods. Only simple concepts are used to implement the proposed algorithm, which makes it easier to understand and implement. With considering unreliable nodes, the proposed method is also more realistic and valuable for reliability analysis in an existing network. The correctness of the proposed algorithm will be analyzed and proven. One example is used to illustrate how all MCs are generated in a network with arc and node failures solved using the proposed algorithm

  12. Efficacy of several treatment in removing cyanobacterial blooms and microcystins; Efectividad de diversos tratamientos de agua en el control de floraciones de cianobacterias de floraciones de cianobacterias y liberacion de sus toxinas (microcistinas)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno Navarro, I. M.; Carmean Fernandez, A. M.

    2003-07-01

    A revision of the different techniques of dri king water treatment employed for the control of cyanobacteria blooms and the release of the toxins that they produce, microcystins, has been performed. Some treatments inhibit the cyanobacteria forth, such as chemical treatment, filtration membranes and domestic filters. However, treatments such as UV irradiation, activated charcola, reverse osmosis, chlorine, permanganate, ozone, photocatalitic oxidation and hydrogen peroxide, are the procedures more often employed in order to destroy MCs. Among these techniques, activated charcoal and ozonization are considered to be the most effective methods to destroy this kind of toxins. (Author) 38 refs.

  13. Phytotoxicity associated to microcystins: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MC Bittencourt-Oliveira

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MC are the most studied toxins of cyanobacteria since they are widely distributed and account for several cases of human and animal poisoning, being potent inhibitors of the serine/threonine protein phosphatases 1 (PP1 and 2A (PP2A. The phosphatases PP1 and PP2A are also present in plants, which may also suffer adverse effects due to the inhibition of these enzymes. In aquatic plants, biomass reduction is usually observed after absorption of cyanotoxins, which can bioaccumulate in its tissues. In terrestrial plants, the effects caused by microcystins vary from inhibition to stimulation as the individuals develop from seedling to adult, and include reduction of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, oxidative stress, decreased photosynthetic activity and even cell apoptosis, as well as bioaccumulation in plant tissues. Thus, the irrigation of crop plants by water contaminated with microcystins is not only an economic problem but becomes a public health issue because of the possibility of food contamination, and this route of exposure requires careful monitoring by the responsible authorities.

  14. Microcystin-LR in surface water of Ponjavica river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natić Dejan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Cyanobacterial toxins befall a group of various compounds according to chemical structure and health effects on people and animals. The most significant in this large group of compounds are microcystins. Their presence in water used for human consumption causes serious health problems, liver beeing the target organ. Microcystins are spread all over the world. Waterblooms of cyanobacterias and their cyanotoxins are also common in the majority of surface waters in Serbia. The aim of this study was to propose HPLC method for determination of mikrocystin-LR, to validate the method and to use it for determination of microcystin-LR in the surface water of the river Ponjavica. The Ponjavica is very eutrophic water and has ideal conditions for the cyanobacterial growth. Methods. Sample of water form the Ponjavica river were collected during the summer 2008. Coupled columns (HLB, Sep-Pak, were used for sample preparation and HPLC/PDA method was used for quantification of microcystin- LR. Results. Parameters of validation show that the proposed method is simple, fast, sensitive (0.1 mg/L and selective with the yield of 89%-92%. The measuring uncertainty of

  15. Recurrent adenylation domain replacement in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laakso Kati

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microcystins are small cyclic heptapeptide toxins produced by a range of distantly related cyanobacteria. Microcystins are synthesized on large NRPS-PKS enzyme complexes. Many structural variants of microcystins are produced simulatenously. A recombination event between the first module of mcyB (mcyB1 and mcyC in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster is linked to the simultaneous production of microcystin variants in strains of the genus Microcystis. Results Here we undertook a phylogenetic study to investigate the order and timing of recombination between the mcyB1 and mcyC genes in a diverse selection of microcystin producing cyanobacteria. Our results provide support for complex evolutionary processes taking place at the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains which recognize and activate the amino acids found at X and Z positions. We find evidence for recent recombination between mcyB1 and mcyC in strains of the genera Anabaena, Microcystis, and Hapalosiphon. We also find clear evidence for independent adenylation domain conversion of mcyB1 by unrelated peptide synthetase modules in strains of the genera Nostoc and Microcystis. The recombination events replace only the adenylation domain in each case and the condensation domains of mcyB1 and mcyC are not transferred together with the adenylation domain. Our findings demonstrate that the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains are recombination hotspots in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster. Conclusion Recombination is thought to be one of the main mechanisms driving the diversification of NRPSs. However, there is very little information on how recombination takes place in nature. This study demonstrates that functional peptide synthetases are created in nature through transfer of adenylation domains without the concomitant transfer of condensation domains.

  16. Can microcystins affect zooplankton structure community in tropical eutrophic reservoirs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. S. V. Paes

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of our study was to assess whether cyanotoxins (microcystins can affect the composition of the zooplankton community, leading to domination of microzooplankton forms (protozoans and rotifers. Temporal variations in concentrations of microcystins and zooplankton biomass were analyzed in three eutrophic reservoirs in the semi-arid northeast region of Brazil. The concentration of microcystins in water proved to be correlated with the cyanobacterial biovolume, indicating the contributions from colonial forms such as Microcystis in the production of cyanotoxins. At the community level, the total biomass of zooplankton was not correlated with the concentration of microcystin (r2 = 0.00; P > 0.001, but in a population-level analysis, the biomass of rotifers and cladocerans showed a weak positive correlation. Cyclopoid copepods, which are considered to be relatively inefficient in ingesting cyanobacteria, were negatively correlated (r2 = – 0.01; P > 0.01 with the concentration of cyanotoxins. Surprisingly, the biomass of calanoid copepods was positively correlated with the microcystin concentration (r2 = 0.44; P > 0.001. The results indicate that allelopathic control mechanisms (negative effects of microcystin on zooplankton biomass do not seem to substantially affect the composition of mesozooplankton, which showed a constant and high biomass compared to the microzooplankton (rotifers. These results may be important to better understand the trophic interactions between zooplankton and cyanobacteria and the potential effects of allelopathic compounds on zooplankton.

  17. Microcystin-LR equivalent concentrations in fish tissue during a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of a decomposing cyanobacteria bloom on water quality and the accumulation of microcystin-LR equivalent toxin in fish at Loskop Dam were studied in May 2012. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] was used to confirm the presence of microcystin-LR equivalent in the water and to determine the ...

  18. The presence of the cyanobacterial toxin microcystin in black band disease of corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Laurie L; Sekar, Raju; Myers, Jamie L; Gantar, Miroslav; Voss, Joshua D; Kaczmarsky, Longin; Remily, Elizabeth R; Boyer, Gregory L; Zimba, Paul V

    2007-07-01

    Black band disease (BBD) is a migrating, cyanobacterial dominated, sulfide-rich microbial mat that moves across coral colonies lysing coral tissue. While it is known that BBD sulfate-reducing bacteria contribute to BBD pathogenicity by production of sulfide, additional mechanisms of toxicity may be involved. Using HPLC/MS, the cyanotoxin microcystin was detected in 22 field samples of BBD collected from five coral species on nine reefs of the wider Caribbean (Florida Keys and Bahamas). Two cyanobacterial cultures isolated from BBD, Geitlerinema and Leptolyngbya sp. contained microcystin based on HPLC/MS, with toxic activity confirmed using the protein phosphatase inhibition assay. The gene mcyA from the microcystin synthesis complex was detected in two field samples and from both BBD cyanobacterial cultures. Microcystin was not detected in six BBD samples from a different area of the Caribbean (St Croix, USVI) and the Philippines, suggesting regional specificity for BBD microcystin. This is the first report of the presence of microcystin in a coral disease.

  19. Cyanobacteria produce a high variety of hepatotoxic peptides in lichen symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasalainen, Ulla; Fewer, David P.; Jokela, Jouni; Wahlsten, Matti; Sivonen, Kaarina; Rikkinen, Jouko

    2012-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic associations between fungi and photosynthetic algae or cyanobacteria. Microcystins are potent toxins that are responsible for the poisoning of both humans and animals. These toxins are mainly associated with aquatic cyanobacterial blooms, but here we show that the cyanobacterial symbionts of terrestrial lichens from all over the world commonly produce microcystins. We screened 803 lichen specimens from five different continents for cyanobacterial toxins by amplifying a part of the gene cluster encoding the enzyme complex responsible for microcystin production and detecting toxins directly from lichen thalli. We found either the biosynthetic genes for making microcystins or the toxin itself in 12% of all analyzed lichen specimens. A plethora of different microcystins was found with over 50 chemical variants, and many of the variants detected have only rarely been reported from free-living cyanobacteria. In addition, high amounts of nodularin, up to 60 μg g−1, were detected from some lichen thalli. This microcystin analog and potent hepatotoxin has previously been known only from the aquatic bloom-forming genus Nodularia. Our results demonstrate that the production of cyanobacterial hepatotoxins in lichen symbiosis is a global phenomenon and occurs in many different lichen lineages. The very high genetic diversity of the mcyE gene and the chemical diversity of microcystins suggest that lichen symbioses may have been an important environment for diversification of these cyanobacteria. PMID:22451908

  20. Sublethal microcystin exposure and biochemical outcomes among hemodialysis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth D Hilborn

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are commonly-occurring contaminants of surface waters worldwide. Microcystins, potent hepatotoxins, are among the best characterized cyanotoxins. During November, 2001, a group of 44 hemodialysis patients were exposed to microcystins via contaminated dialysate. Serum microcystin concentrations were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay which measures free serum microcystin LR equivalents (ME. We describe serum ME concentrations and biochemical outcomes among a subset of patients during 8 weeks following exposure. Thirteen patients were included; 6 were males, patients' median age was 45 years (range 16-80, one was seropositive for hepatitis B surface antigen. The median serum ME concentration was 0.33 ng/mL (range: <0.16-0.96. One hundred thirty nine blood samples were collected following exposure. Patients' biochemical outcomes varied, but overall indicated a mixed liver injury. Linear regression evaluated each patient's weekly mean biochemical outcome with their maximum serum ME concentration; a measure of the extrinsic pathway of clotting function, prothrombin time, was negatively and significantly associated with serum ME concentrations. This group of exposed patients' biochemical outcomes display evidence of a mixed liver injury temporally associated with microcystin exposure. Interpretation of biochemical outcomes are complicated by the study population's underlying chronic disease status. It is clear that dialysis patients are a distinct 'at risk' group for cyanotoxin exposures due to direct intravenous exposure to dialysate prepared from surface drinking water supplies. Careful monitoring and treatment of water supplies used to prepare dialysate is required to prevent future cyanotoxin exposure events.

  1. Effects of thermal treatments during cooking, microwave oven and boiling, on the unconjugated microcystin concentration in muscle of fish (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Guillén, Remedios; Prieto, Ana I; Moreno, Isabel; Soria, Ma Eugenia; Cameán, Ana M

    2011-09-01

    Understanding the factors that contribute to the risk from fish consumption is a relevant public health concern due to potential adverse effects of cyanobacterial toxins. The aim of this work was to study the influence of two usual cooking practices, microwave oven and boiling, on the microcystin (MCs) concentration in fish muscle (Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus) spiked with a stock solution (500 μL) containing a mixture of three toxins (MC-LR, MC-RR, and MC-YR) (1.5 μg/mL of each toxin). Two different variables were investigated: time of cooking in the microwaves treatment (1 or 5 min), and way of boiling, "boiled muscle" or "continuously heated muscle". All samples were then lyophilized and MCs were extracted and purified (Oasis HLB cartridge) and quantified by HPLC-MS. Furthermore, the waters in which the samples boiled were also analyzed after their purification. The results suggest a reduction on MC-LR (36%) and MC-YR (24.6%) in samples cooked in the microwave for 5 min. Major changes were found when the fish was cooked by the continuous boiling, with a decrease of 45.0% (MC-RR), 56.4% (MC-YR) and 59.3% (MC-LR). More studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms involved when aquatic food is submitted to usual cooking practices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of a microcystin extraction method specific for enzyme inhibition assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla Miguel, E.; Simienk, H.; Calvin Tienza, V.; Razquin Casquero, P.; Peleato Sanchez, M. L.; Mata Vallespin, L.

    2009-01-01

    A method for the determination of intracellular and dissolved microcystins in non treated water is proposed. The results obtained with this method, based on a phosphatase inhibition assay, are compared with those for HPLC- UV. Potential interferences of the phosphatase inhibition assays like pigments or the endogenous phosphatase activity present in cyanobacteria did not have any adverse effect on assay results. Besides, the recovery of microcystins in field samples with the proposed method was found to be high than 90% in all tested samples. A number of samples from different origins and appearances were also analyzed for their microcystin content. (Author) 27 refs

  3. Estimating microcystin levels at recreational sites in western Lake Erie and Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francy, Donna S.; Brady, Amie M. G.; Ecker, Christopher D.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Struffolino, Pamela; Loftin, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cyanoHABs) and associated toxins, such as microcystin, are a major global water-quality issue. Water-resource managers need tools to quickly predict when and where toxin-producing cyanoHABs will occur. This could be done by using site-specific models that estimate the potential for elevated toxin concentrations that cause public health concerns. With this study, samples were collected at three Ohio lakes to identify environmental and water-quality factors to develop linear-regression models to estimate microcystin levels. Measures of the algal community (phycocyanin, cyanobacterial biovolume, and cyanobacterial gene concentrations) and pH were most strongly correlated with microcystin concentrations. Cyanobacterial genes were quantified for general cyanobacteria, general Microcystis and Dolichospermum, and for microcystin synthetase (mcyE) for Microcystis, Dolichospermum, and Planktothrix. For phycocyanin, the relations were different between sites and were different between hand-held measurements on-site and nearby continuous monitor measurements for the same site. Continuous measurements of parameters such as phycocyanin, pH, and temperature over multiple days showed the highest correlations to microcystin concentrations. The development of models with high R2values (0.81–0.90), sensitivities (92%), and specificities (100%) for estimating microcystin concentrations above or below the Ohio Recreational Public Health Advisory level of 6 μg L−1 was demonstrated for one site; these statistics may change as more data are collected in subsequent years. This study showed that models could be developed for estimates of exceeding a microcystin threshold concentration at a recreational freshwater lake site, with potential to expand their use to provide relevant public health information to water resource managers and the public for both recreational and drinking waters.

  4. Detection of freshwater cyanotoxins and measurement of masked microcystins in tilapia from Southeast Asian aquaculture farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Brett; Maul, Ronald; Campbell, Katrina; Elliott, Christopher T

    2017-06-01

    Recently, there has been a rise in freshwater harmful algal blooms (HABs) globally, as well as increasing aquaculture practices. HABs can produce cyanotoxins, many of which are hepatotoxins. An ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for nine cyanotoxins across three classes including six microcystins, nodularin, cylindrospermopsin and anatoxin-a. The method was used to analyse free cyanotoxin(s) in muscle (n = 34), liver (n = 17) and egg (n = 9) tissue samples of 34 fish sourced from aquaculture farms in Southeast Asia. Conjugated microcystin was analysed by Lemieux oxidation to ascertain the total amount of microcystin present in muscle. Some tilapia accumulated free microcystin-LR in the muscle tissue at a mean of 15.45 μg/kg dry weight (dw), with total microcystin levels detected at a mean level of 110.1 μg/kg dw, indicating that the amount of conjugated or masked microcystin present in the fish muscle accounted for 85% of the total. Higher levels of cyanotoxin were detected in the livers, with approximately 60% of those tested being positive for microcystin-LR and microcystin-LF, along with cylindrospermopsin. Two fish from one of the aquaculture farms contained cylindrospermopsin in the eggs; the first time this has been reported. The estimated daily intake for free and total microcystins in fish muscle tissue was 2 and 14 times higher, respectively, than the tolerable daily intake value. This survey presents the requirement for further monitoring of cyanotoxins, including masked microcystins, in aquaculture farming in these regions and beyond, along with the implementation of guidelines to safeguard human health. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  5. The Effect of Cyanobacterial Biomass Enrichment by Centrifugation and GF/C Filtration on Subsequent Microcystin Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley Rogers

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins are cyclic peptides produced by multiple cyanobacterial genera. After accumulation in the liver of animals they inhibit eukaryotic serine/threonine protein phosphatases, causing liver disease or death. Accurate detection/quantification of microcystins is essential to ensure safe water resources and to enable research on this toxin. Previous methodological comparisons have focused on detection and extraction techniques, but have not investigated the commonly used biomass enrichment steps. These enrichment steps could modulate toxin production as recent studies have demonstrated that high cyanobacterial cell densities cause increased microcystin levels. In this study, three microcystin-producing strains were processed using no cell enrichment steps (by direct freezing at three temperatures and with biomass enrichment (by centrifugation or GF/C filtration. After extraction, microcystins were analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. All processing methods tested, except GF/C filtration, resulted in comparable microcystin quotas for all strains. The low yields observed for the filtration samples were caused by adsorption of arginine-containing microcystins to the GF/C filters. Whilst biomass enrichment did not affect microcystin metabolism over the time-frame of normal sample processing, problems associated with GF/C filtration were identified. The most widely applicable processing method was direct freezing of samples as it could be utilized in both field and laboratory environments.

  6. Presence of the Cyanotoxin Microcystin in Arctic Lakes of Southwestern Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica V. Trout-Haney

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria and their toxins have received significant attention in eutrophic temperate and tropical systems where conspicuous blooms of certain planktonic taxa release toxins into fresh water, threatening its potability and safe use for recreation. Although toxigenic cyanobacteria are not confined to high nutrient environments, bloom-forming species, or planktonic taxa, these other situations are studied les often studied. For example, toxin production in picoplankton and benthic cyanobacteria—the predominant photoautotrophs found in polar lakes—is poorly understood. We quantified the occurrence of microcystin (MC, a hepatotoxic cyanotoxin across 18 Arctic lakes in southwestern Greenland. All of the focal lakes contained detectable levels of MC, with concentrations ranging from 5 ng·L−1 to >400 ng·L−1 during summer, 2013–2015. These concentrations are orders of magnitude lower than many eutrophic systems, yet the median lake MC concentration in Greenland (57 ng·L−1 was still 6.5 times higher than the median summer MC toxicity observed across 50 New Hampshire lakes between 1998 and 2008 (8.7 ng·L−1. The presence of cyanotoxins in these Greenlandic lakes demonstrates that high latitude lakes can support toxigenic cyanobacteria, and suggests that we may be underestimating the potential for these systems to develop high levels of cyanotoxins in the future.

  7. Microcystin Detection Characteristics of Fluorescence Immunochromatography and High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyo, Dong Jin; Park, Geun Young; Choi, Jong Chon; Oh, Chang Suk

    2005-01-01

    Different detection characteristics of fluorescence immunochromatography method and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the analysis of cyanobacterial toxins were studied. In particular, low and high limits of detection, detection time and reproducibility and detectable microcystin species were compared when fluorescence immunochromatography method and high performance liquid chromatography method were applied for the detection of microcystin (MC), a cyclic peptide toxin of the freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. A Fluorescence immunochromatography assay system has the unique advantages of short detection time and low detection limit, and high performance liquid chromatography detection method has the strong advantage of individual quantifications of several species of microcystins

  8. Mcs2 and a novel CAK subunit Pmh1 associate with Skp1 in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamps, Sophie; Westerling, Thomas; Pihlak, Arno; Tafforeau, Lionel; Vandenhaute, Jean; Maekelae, Tomi P.; Hermand, Damien

    2004-01-01

    The Mcs6 CDK together with its cognate cyclin Mcs2 represents the CDK-activating kinase (CAK) of fission yeast Cdc2. We have attempted to determine complexes in which Mcs6 and Mcs2 mediate this and possible other functions. Here we characterize a novel interaction between Mcs2 and Skp1, a component of the SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F box protein) ubiquitin ligase. Furthermore, we identify a novel protein termed Pmh1 through its association with Skp1. Pmh1 associates with the Mcs6-Mcs2 complex, enhancing its kinase activity, and represents the apparent homolog of metazoan Mat1. Association of Mcs2 or Pmh1 with Skp1 does not appear to be involved in proteolytic degradation, as these complexes do not contain Pcu1, and levels of Mcs2 or Pmh1 are not sensitive to inhibition of SCF and the 26S proteasome. The identified interactions between Skp1 and two regulatory CAK subunits may reflect a novel mechanism to modulate activity and specificity of the Mcs6 kinase

  9. Risk prediction of hepatotoxicity in paracetamol poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Anselm; Graudins, Andis

    2017-09-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen) poisoning is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the developed world. A paracetamol treatment nomogram has been used for over four decades to help determine whether patients will develop hepatotoxicity without acetylcysteine treatment, and thus indicates those needing treatment. Despite this, a small proportion of patients still develop hepatotoxicity. More accurate risk predictors would be useful to increase the early detection of patients with the potential to develop hepatotoxicity despite acetylcysteine treatment. Similarly, there would be benefit in early identification of those with a low likelihood of developing hepatotoxicity, as this group may be safely treated with an abbreviated acetylcysteine regimen. To review the current literature related to risk prediction tools that can be used to identify patients at increased risk of hepatotoxicity. A systematic literature review was conducted using the search terms: "paracetamol" OR "acetaminophen" AND "overdose" OR "toxicity" OR "risk prediction rules" OR "hepatotoxicity" OR "psi parameter" OR "multiplication product" OR "half-life" OR "prothrombin time" OR "AST/ALT (aspartate transaminase/alanine transaminase)" OR "dose" OR "biomarkers" OR "nomogram". The search was limited to human studies without language restrictions, of Medline (1946 to May 2016), PubMed and EMBASE. Original articles pertaining to the theme were identified from January 1974 to May 2016. Of the 13,975 articles identified, 60 were relevant to the review. Paracetamol treatment nomograms: Paracetamol treatment nomograms have been used for decades to help decide the need for acetylcysteine, but rarely used to determine the risk of hepatotoxicity with treatment. Reported paracetamol dose and concentration: A dose ingestion >12 g or serum paracetamol concentration above the treatment thresholds on the paracetamol nomogram are associated with a greater risk of hepatotoxicity. Paracetamol elimination half

  10. Non-competitive ELISA with broad specificity for microcystins and nodularins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana Akter

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Simple and cost-effective methods with sufficient sensitivities for preliminary screening of cyanobacterial toxins are in high demand for assessing water quality and safety. We have recently developed a highly sensitive and rapid time-resolved fluorometry based non-competitive immunoassay for detection of microcystins and nodularins. The assay is based on a synthetic broad-specific anti-immunocomplex antibody SA51D1 capable of recognizing the immunocomplex formed by a generic anti-Adda monoclonal antibody (mAb bound to either microcystins or nodularins. Using the same antibody pair, here we describe a very simple and cost-efficient non-competitive ELISA test for microcystins and nodularins based on conventional alkaline phosphatase (AP activity measurement. The recombinant SA51D1 single-chain fragment of antibody variable domain (scFv was produced as a fusion with bacterial alkaline phosphatase in Escherichia coli. After one step affinity purification through His-tag, the scFv-AP fusion protein could directly be used in the assay. For the assay, toxin standard/sample, biotinylated anti-Adda mAb and the scFv-AP were incubated together for one hour on streptavidin-coated microtiter wells, washed and AP activity was then measured by incubating (1 h at 37 ˚C with chromogenic substrate para-nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP. The assay was capable of detecting all the eleven tested toxin variants (microcystin-LR, -dmLR, -RR, -dmRR, -YR, LA -LY, -LF -LW, -WR, and nodularin-R below WHO guide line value of 1 µg L-1. The detection limit (based on blank+3SD response for microcystin-LR was ~0.2 µg L-1. The assay was verified using spiked (0.25 - 4 µg L-1 of microcystin-LR tap, river and lake water samples with recoveries from 64 to 101%. The assay showed good correlation (r2>0.9 with four reference methods for its performance in detecting extracted intracellular microcystin/nodularin from 17 natural surface water samples. The described easy-to-perform assay

  11. Detection and quantification of microcystins (cyanobacterial hepatotoxins) with recombinant antibody fragments isolated from a naïve human phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhiney, J; Lawton, L A; Porter, A J

    2000-12-01

    Single-chain antibody fragments against the cyanobacterial hepatotoxin microcystin-LR were isolated from a naive human phage display library and expressed in Escherichia coli. In competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the most sensitive antibody clone selected from the library detected free microcystin-LR with an IC(50) value of 4 microM. It was found to cross react with three other microcystin variants - microcystin-RR, microcystin-LW and microcystin-LF - and detected microcystins in extracts of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa, found to contain the toxins by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The quantification of microcystins in these extracts by ELISA and HPLC showed good correlation. Although the antibody isolated in this study was considerably less sensitive than the polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies already available for microcystin detection, phage display technology represents a cheaper, more rapid alternative for the production of anti-microcystin antibodies than the methods currently in use.

  12. Review article: herbal and dietary supplement hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunchorntavakul, C; Reddy, K R

    2013-01-01

    Herbal and dietary supplements are commonly used throughout the World. There is a tendency for underreporting their ingestion by patients and the magnitude of their use is underrecognised by Physicians. Herbal hepatotoxicity is not uncommonly encountered, but the precise incidence and manifestations have not been well characterised. To review the epidemiology, presentation and diagnosis of herbal hepatotoxicity. This review will mainly discuss single ingredients and complex mixtures of herbs marketed under a single label. A Medline search was undertaken to identify relevant literature using search terms including 'herbal', 'herbs', 'dietary supplement', 'liver injury', 'hepatitis' and 'hepatotoxicity'. Furthermore, we scanned the reference lists of the primary and review articles to identify publications not retrieved by electronic searches. The incidence rates of herbal hepatotoxicity are largely unknown. The clinical presentation and severity can be highly variable, ranging from mild hepatitis to acute hepatic failure requiring transplantation. Scoring systems for the causality assessment of drug-induced liver injury may be helpful, but have not been validated for herbal hepatotoxicity. Hepatotoxicity features of commonly used herbal products, such as Ayurvedic and Chinese herbs, black cohosh, chaparral, germander, greater celandine, green tea, Herbalife, Hydroxycut, kava, pennyroyal, pyrrolizidine alkaloids, skullcap, and usnic acid, have been individually reviewed. Furthermore, clinically significant herb-drug interactions are also discussed. A number of herbal medicinal products are associated with a spectrum of hepatotoxicity events. Advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis and the risks involved are needed to improve herbal medicine safety. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. [Investigation of toxigenic microcystis and microcystin pollution in Huayuankou Conservation Pool of Yellow River].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Haiqun; Ba, Yue; Cheng, Xuemin; Wang, Guangzhou

    2007-09-01

    To investigate the contaminative, condition of planktonic algae, cyanobacteria, toxigenic microcystis and microcystin in Huayuankou Conservation Pool of Yellow River. From March 2005 to January 2006, water samples were taken 15 times by 2. 5L plastic sampler from Huayuankou Conservation Pool. The density of algae were counted by using blood cell counter. Phycocyanin intergenic spacer region (PC-IGS) and microcystin synthetase gene B (mcyB) of toxigenic microcystis was identified by the whole cell PCR. The concentration of microcystin was determined by ELISA kit. The positive results of PCR and ELISA were compared. Bacillariophyta, chlorophyta, cyanophyta (cyanobacteria) and euglenophyta were main algaes in Huayuankou conservation pool, and the dominant algae and cell density changed seasonally. Algae cell density and cyanobacteria cell density were higher in summer and autumn than in spring and winter. From July to November, 2005, PC-IGS and mcyB were detected positively by whole cell PCR. Microcystin was positively detected from July, the concentration of microcystin changed from 0 to 0.25microg/L, it was more higher in summer than other seasons. Toxigenic microcystis and microcystin could be detected in Huayuankou Conservation Pool of Yellow River. Whole cell PCR could be used to identify toxigenic microcystis.

  14. Microcystin-LR induces anoikis resistance to the hepatocyte uptake transporter OATP1B3-expressing cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hiroyuki; Takumi, Shota; Ikema, Satoshi; Mizoue, Nozomi; Hotta, Yuki; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Sugiyama, Yasumasa; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Komatsu, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    Microcystin-LR is a cyclic peptide released by several bloom-forming cyanobacteria. Understanding the mechanism of microcystin-LR toxicity is important, because of the both potencies of its acute cytotoxicity and tumor-promoting activity in hepatocytes of animals and humans. Recently, we have reported that the expression of human hepatocyte uptake transporter OATP1B3 was critical for the selective uptake of microcystin-LR into hepatocytes and for induction of its fatal cytotoxicity. In this study, we demonstrated a novel function of microcystin-LR which induced bipotential changes including anoikis resistance and cytoskeleton reorganization to OATP1B3-transfected HEK293 cells (HEK293-OATP1B3). After exposure to microcystin-LR, HEK293-OATP1B3 cells were divided to the floating cells and remaining adherent cells. After collection and reseeding the floating cells into a fresh flask, cells were confluently proliferated (HEK293-OATP1B3-FL) under the microcystin-LR-free condition. Both the proliferated HEK293-OATP1B3-FL and remaining adherent HEK293-OATP1B3-AD cells changed the character with down- and up-regulation of E-cadherin, respectively. Additionally, these cells acquired resistance to microcystin-LR. These results suggest that microcystin-LR could be associated with not only tumor promotion, but also epithelial–mesenchymal transition-mediated cancer metastasis. Furthermore, microcystin-LR might induce the cytoskeleton reorganization be accompanied epithelial–mesenchymal transition

  15. A Global Analysis of the Relationship between Concentrations of Microcystins in Water and Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie M. Flores

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria, the primary bloom-forming organisms in fresh water, elicit a spectrum of problems in lentic systems. The most immediate concern for people and animals are cyanobacterial toxins, which have been detected at variable concentrations in water and fish around the world. Cyanotoxins can transfer through food webs, potentially increasing the risk of exposure to people who eat fish from affected waters, yet little is known about how cyanotoxins fluctuate in wild fish tissues. We collated existing studies on cyanotoxins in fish and fresh water from lakes around the world into a global dataset to test the hypothesis that cyanotoxin concentrations in fish increase with water toxin concentrations. We limited our quantitative analysis to microcystins because data on other cyanotoxins in fish were sparse, but we provided a qualitative summary of other cyanotoxins reported in wild, freshwater fish tissues. We found a positive relationship between intracellular microcystin in water samples and microcystin in fish tissues that had been analyzed by assay methods (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and protein phosphatase inhibition assay. We expected microcystin to be found in increasingly higher concentrations from carnivorous to omnivorous to planktivorous fishes. We found, however, that omnivores generally had the highest tissue microcystin concentrations. Additionally, we found contrasting results for the level of microcystin in different tissue types depending on the toxin analysis method. Because microcystin and other cyanotoxins have the potential to impact public health, our results underline the current need for comprehensive and uniform detection methods for the analysis of cyanotoxins in complex matrices.

  16. Combined toxicity of microcystin-LR and copper on lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Steinman, Alan D; Wan, Xiang; Xie, Liqiang

    2018-05-10

    Microcystins and copper commonly co-exist in the natural environment, but their combined toxicity remains unclear, especially in terrestrial plants. The present study investigated the toxicity effects of microcystin-LR (0, 5, 50, 500, 1000 μg L -1 ) and copper (0, 50, 500, 1000, 2000 μg L -1 ), both individually and in mixture, on the germination, growth and oxidative response of lettuce. The bioaccumulation of microcystin-LR and copper was also evaluated. Results showed that the decrease in lettuce germination induced by copper alone was not significantly different from that induced by the mixture, and the combined toxicity assessment showed a simple additive effect. Lettuce growth was not significantly reduced by microcystin-LR alone, whereas it was significantly reduced by copper alone and the mixture when copper concentration was higher than 500 μg L -1 . High concentrations of microcystin-LR (1000 μg L -1 ) and copper (≥50 μg L -1 ),as well as their mixture (≥50 + 500 μg L -1 ), induced oxidative stress in lettuce. A synergistic effect on the growth and antioxidative system of lettuce was observed when exposed to low concentrations of the mixture (≤50 + 500 μg L -1 ), whereas an antagonistic effect was observed at high concentrations (≥1000 + 2000 μg L -1 ). Moreover, the interaction of microcystin-LR and copper can increase their accumulation in lettuce. Our results suggest that the toxicity effects of microcystin-LR and copper are exacerbated when they co-exist in the natural environment at low concentrations, which not only negatively affects plant growth but also poses a potential risk to human health via the food chain. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Effects of cell-bound microcystins on survival and feeding of Daphnia spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrlack, T; Dittmann, E; Börner, T

    2001-01-01

    The influence of cell-bound microcystins on the survival time and feeding rates of six Daphnia clones belonging to five common species was studied. To do this, the effects of the microcystin-producing Microcystis strain PCC7806 and its mutant, which has been genetically engineered to knock out mi...

  18. Presumptive Iatrogenic Microcystin-Associated Liver Failure and Encephalopathy in a Holsteiner Gelding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelman, N S; Engiles, J B; Murphy, L; Vudathala, D; Johnson, A L

    2016-09-01

    An 8-year-old Holsteiner gelding was presented for evaluation of anorexia, obtundation, icterus, and mild colic signs of 48 hours duration. History, physical examination, and initial diagnostics were suggestive of hepatic disease and encephalopathy. Microcystin toxicosis was suspected based on historical administration of a cyanobacteria supplement, associated serum biochemistry abnormalities, and characteristic histopathological changes. Microcystin contamination was confirmed in both supplement containers fed to the horse. Fulminant hepatic failure and encephalopathy progressed resulting in euthanasia. Necropsy findings were consistent with microcystin induced liver failure. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  19. [Screening of hepatotoxicity fraction of Genkwa Flos and study on UPLC fingerprint of hepatotoxicity fraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yang; Geng, Lu-Lu; Zhuang, He-Fei; Meng, Xia; Peng, Ying; Bi, Kai-Shun; Chen, Xiao-Hui

    2013-01-01

    To look for the active fraction of ethanol extract of Genkwa Flos (EGF) induced hepatotoxicity and develop an UPLC fingerprint of the active fraction. Target fraction of EGF induced hepatotoxicity was guided by the serum biochemical and histopathology methods. The UPLC method was applied to establish the chromatographic fingerprint. The separation was achieved on a BEH C18 column (2.1 mm x 50 mm, 1.7 microm) with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and water containing 0.05% phosphate acid running gradient elution. The detection was carried out at 210 nm and the analysis was finished within 10 min. The chloroform phase of EGF could be responsible for the hepatotoxicity of this herb. The common mode of the UPLC fingerprint was set up under the established condition. There were 17 common peaks in fourteen batches of herbs, eight of which were identified, and the similar degrees of the fourteen batches to the common mode were between 0.890-0.999. It is easy to locate the chloroform extraction of EGF with hepatotoxicity. And the UPLC fingerprint was developed for the above fraction, which could provide valuable references for safe and effective clinical use of EGF.

  20. SOBER-MCS: Sociability-Oriented and Battery Efficient Recruitment for Mobile Crowd-Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazel Anjomshoa

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The Internet of Things (IoT concept is aiming at being an integral part of the next generation networking services by introducing pervasiveness and ubiquitous interconnectivity of uniquely-identifiable objects. The massive availability of personalized smart devices such as smartphones and wearables enable their penetration into the IoT ecosystem with their built-in sensors, particularly in Mobile Crowd-Sensing (MCS campaigns. The MCS systems achieve the objectives of the large-scale non-dedicated sensing concept in the IoT if a sufficient number of participants are engaged to the collaborative data acquisition process. Therefore, user recruitment is a key challenge in MCS, which requires effective incentivization of cooperative, truthful and trustworthy users. A grand concern for the participants is the battery drain on the mobile devices. It is a known fact that battery drain in a smartphone is a function of the user activity, which can be modeled under various contexts. With this in mind, we propose a new social activity-aware recruitment policy, namely Sociability-Oriented and Battery-Efficient Recruitment for Mobile Crowd-Sensing (SOBER-MCS. SOBER-MCS uses sociability and the residual power of the participant smartphones as two primary criteria in the selection of participating devices. The former is an indicator of the participant willingness toward sensing campaigns, whereas the latter is used to prioritize personal use over crowd-sensing under critical battery levels. We use sociability profiles that were obtained in our previous work and use those values to simulate the sociability behavior of a large pool of participants in an MCS environment. Through simulations, we show that SOBER-MCS is able to introduce battery savings up to 18.5% while improving user and platform utilities by 12% and 20%, respectively.

  1. SOBER-MCS: Sociability-Oriented and Battery Efficient Recruitment for Mobile Crowd-Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjomshoa, Fazel; Kantarci, Burak

    2018-05-17

    The Internet of Things (IoT) concept is aiming at being an integral part of the next generation networking services by introducing pervasiveness and ubiquitous interconnectivity of uniquely-identifiable objects. The massive availability of personalized smart devices such as smartphones and wearables enable their penetration into the IoT ecosystem with their built-in sensors, particularly in Mobile Crowd-Sensing (MCS) campaigns. The MCS systems achieve the objectives of the large-scale non-dedicated sensing concept in the IoT if a sufficient number of participants are engaged to the collaborative data acquisition process. Therefore, user recruitment is a key challenge in MCS, which requires effective incentivization of cooperative, truthful and trustworthy users. A grand concern for the participants is the battery drain on the mobile devices. It is a known fact that battery drain in a smartphone is a function of the user activity, which can be modeled under various contexts. With this in mind, we propose a new social activity-aware recruitment policy, namely Sociability-Oriented and Battery-Efficient Recruitment for Mobile Crowd-Sensing (SOBER-MCS). SOBER-MCS uses sociability and the residual power of the participant smartphones as two primary criteria in the selection of participating devices. The former is an indicator of the participant willingness toward sensing campaigns, whereas the latter is used to prioritize personal use over crowd-sensing under critical battery levels. We use sociability profiles that were obtained in our previous work and use those values to simulate the sociability behavior of a large pool of participants in an MCS environment. Through simulations, we show that SOBER-MCS is able to introduce battery savings up to 18.5% while improving user and platform utilities by 12% and 20%, respectively.

  2. Eutrophication and Warming Boost Cyanobacterial Biomass and Microcystins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Lürling

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Eutrophication and warming are key drivers of cyanobacterial blooms, but their combined effects on microcystin (MC concentrations are less studied. We tested the hypothesis that warming promotes cyanobacterial abundance in a natural plankton community and that eutrophication enhances cyanobacterial biomass and MC concentrations. We incubated natural seston from a eutrophic pond under normal, high, and extreme temperatures (i.e., 20, 25, and 30 °C with and without additional nutrients added (eutrophication mimicking a pulse as could be expected from projected summer storms under climate change. Eutrophication increased algal- and cyanobacterial biomass by 26 and 8 times, respectively, and led to 24 times higher MC concentrations. This effect was augmented with higher temperatures leading to 45 times higher MC concentrations at 25 °C, with 11 times more cyanobacterial chlorophyll-a and 25 times more eukaryote algal chlorophyll-a. At 30 °C, MC concentrations were 42 times higher, with cyanobacterial chlorophyll-a being 17 times and eukaryote algal chlorophyll-a being 24 times higher. In contrast, warming alone did not yield more cyanobacteria or MCs, because the in situ community had already depleted the available nutrient pool. MC per potential MC producing cell declined at higher temperatures under nutrient enrichments, which was confirmed by a controlled experiment with two laboratory strains of Microcystis aeruginosa. Nevertheless, MC concentrations were much higher at the increased temperature and nutrient treatment than under warming alone due to strongly promoted biomass, lifting N-imitation and promotion of potential MC producers like Microcystis. This study exemplifies the vulnerability of eutrophic urban waters to predicted future summer climate change effects that might aggravate cyanobacterial nuisance.

  3. DisoMCS: Accurately Predicting Protein Intrinsically Disordered Regions Using a Multi-Class Conservative Score Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiheng Wang

    Full Text Available The precise prediction of protein intrinsically disordered regions, which play a crucial role in biological procedures, is a necessary prerequisite to further the understanding of the principles and mechanisms of protein function. Here, we propose a novel predictor, DisoMCS, which is a more accurate predictor of protein intrinsically disordered regions. The DisoMCS bases on an original multi-class conservative score (MCS obtained by sequence-order/disorder alignment. Initially, near-disorder regions are defined on fragments located at both the terminus of an ordered region connecting a disordered region. Then the multi-class conservative score is generated by sequence alignment against a known structure database and represented as order, near-disorder and disorder conservative scores. The MCS of each amino acid has three elements: order, near-disorder and disorder profiles. Finally, the MCS is exploited as features to identify disordered regions in sequences. DisoMCS utilizes a non-redundant data set as the training set, MCS and predicted secondary structure as features, and a conditional random field as the classification algorithm. In predicted near-disorder regions a residue is determined as an order or a disorder according to the optimized decision threshold. DisoMCS was evaluated by cross-validation, large-scale prediction, independent tests and CASP (Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction tests. All results confirmed that DisoMCS was very competitive in terms of accuracy of prediction when compared with well-established publicly available disordered region predictors. It also indicated our approach was more accurate when a query has higher homologous with the knowledge database.The DisoMCS is available at http://cal.tongji.edu.cn/disorder/.

  4. Mitochondrial–Lysosomal Axis in Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Moles

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Acetaminophen (APAP toxicity is the most common cause of acute liver failure and a major indication for liver transplantion in the United States and Europe. Although significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying APAP hepatotoxicity, there is still an urgent need to find novel and effective therapies against APAP-induced acute liver failure. Hepatic APAP metabolism results in the production of the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI, which under physiological conditions is cleared by its conjugation with glutathione (GSH to prevent its targeting to mitochondria. APAP overdose or GSH limitation leads to mitochondrial NAPQI-protein adducts formation, resulting in oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and necrotic cell death. As mitochondria are a major target of APAP hepatotoxicity, mitochondrial quality control and clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria through mitophagy, emerges as an important strategy to limit oxidative stress and the engagement of molecular events leading to cell death. Recent evidence has indicated a lysosomal–mitochondrial cross-talk that regulates APAP hepatotoxicity. Moreover, as lysosomal function is essential for mitophagy, impairment in the fusion of lysosomes with autophagosomes-containing mitochondria may compromise the clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria, resulting in exacerbated APAP hepatotoxicity. This review centers on the role of mitochondria in APAP hepatotoxicity and how the mitochondrial/lysosomal axis can influence APAP-induced liver failure.

  5. Recreational Exposure to Low Concentrations of Microcystins During an Algal Bloom in a Small Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Sung Cheng

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We measured microcystins in blood from people at risk for swallowing water or inhaling spray while swimming, water skiing, jet skiing, or boating during an algal bloom. We monitored water samples from a small lake as a Microcystis aeruginosa bloom developed. We recruited 97 people planning recreational activities in that lake and seven others who volunteered to recreate in a nearby bloom-free lake. We conducted our field study within a week of finding a 10-μg/L microcystin concentration. We analyzed water, air, and human blood samples for water quality, potential human pathogens, algal taxonomy, and microcystin concentrations. We interviewed study participants for demographic and current health symptom information. Water samples were assayed for potential respiratory viruses (adenoviruses and enteroviruses, but none were detected. We did find low concentrations of Escherichia coli, indicating fecal contamination. We found low levels of microcystins (2 μg/L to 5 μg/L in the water and (<0.1 ng/m3 in the aerosol samples. Blood levels of microcystins for all participants were below the limit of detection (0.147μg/L. Given this low exposure level, study participants reported no symptom increases following recreational exposure to microcystins. This is the first study to report that water-based recreational activities can expose people to very low concentrations of aerosol-borne microcystins; we recently conducted another field study to assess exposures to higher concentrations of these algal toxins.

  6. Guidance values for microcystins in water and cyanobacterial supplement products (blue-green algal supplements): a reasonable or misguided approach?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, Daniel; Hoeger, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews current scientific knowledge on the toxicity and carcinogenicity of microcystins and compares this to the guidance values proposed for microcystins in water by the World Health Organization, and for blue-green algal food supplements by the Oregon State Department of Health. The basis of the risk assessment underlying these guidance values is viewed as being critical due to overt deficiencies in the data used for its generation: (i) use of one microcystin congener only (microcystin-LR), while the other presently known nearly 80 congeners are largely disregarded, (ii) new knowledge regarding potential neuro and renal toxicity of microcystins in humans and (iii) the inadequacies of assessing realistic microcystin exposures in humans and especially in children via blue-green algal food supplements. In reiterating the state-of-the-art toxicology database on microcystins and in the light of new data on the high degree of toxin contamination of algal food supplements, this review clearly demonstrates the need for improved kinetic data of microcystins in humans and for discussion concerning uncertainty factors, which may result in a lowering of the present guidance values and an increased routine control of water bodies and food supplements for toxin contamination. Similar to the approach taken previously by authorities for dioxin or PCB risk assessment, the use of a toxin equivalent approach to the risk assessment of microcystins is proposed

  7. Cyanotoxin bioaccumulation in freshwater fish, Washington State, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, F Joan; Johnson, Art; Hamel, Kathy; Preece, Ellen

    2015-11-01

    Until recently, exposure pathways of concern for cyanotoxins have focused on recreational exposure, drinking water, and dermal contact. Exposure to cyanotoxins through fish consumption is a relatively new area of investigation. To address this concern, microcystins and other cyanotoxins were analyzed in fish collected from nine Washington lakes with recurrent toxic blooms using two types of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Microcystins or microcystin-like compounds were elevated in fish liver relative to muscle and other tissues (liver>gut>muscle). Microcystin concentrations in fish fillet samples using anti-Adda ELISA (range 6.3-11 μg/kg wet weight) were consistently higher in all fish species than concentrations using anti-microcystin (MC)-leucine-arginine (LR) ELISA (range 0.25-2.4 μg/kg wet weight). MC-leucine-alanine (LA) was the only variant detected in fish (2.5-12 μg/kg in four livers) among the nine variants analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Fish fillets showed no accumulation of the MCs targeted by LC-MS/MS. Other cyanotoxins analyzed (anatoxin-a, saxitoxin, domoic acid, and okadaic acid) were not detected in fish. Based on this and evidence from other studies, we believe that people can safely consume two 8-oz fish fillet meals per week from lakes with blooms producing MCs (clean the fish and discard viscera).

  8. Microcystin Biosynthesis and mcyA Expression in Geographically Distinct Microcystis Strains under Different Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Boron Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Srivastava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Roles of nutrients and other environmental variables in development of cyanobacterial bloom and its toxicity are complex and not well understood. We have monitored the photoautotrophic growth, total microcystin concentration, and microcystins synthetase gene (mcyA expression in lab-grown strains of Microcystis NIES 843 (reference strain, KW (Wangsong Reservoir, South Korea, and Durgakund (Varanasi, India under different nutrient regimes (nitrogen, phosphorus, and boron. Higher level of nitrogen and boron resulted in increased growth (avg. 5 and 6.5 Chl a mg/L, resp., total microcystin concentrations (avg. 1.185 and 7.153 mg/L, resp., and mcyA transcript but its expression was not directly correlated with total microcystin concentrations in the target strains. Interestingly, Durgakund strain had much lower microcystin content and lacked microcystin-YR variant over NIES 843 and KW. It is inferred that microcystin concentration and its variants are strain specific. We have also examined the heterotrophic bacteria associated with cyanobacterial bloom in Durgakund Pond and Wangsong Reservoir which were found to be enriched in Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria and that could influence the bloom dynamics.

  9. Human fatalities from cyanobacteria: chemical and biological evidence for cyanotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, W W; Azevedo, S M; An, J S; Molica, R J; Jochimsen, E M; Lau, S; Rinehart, K L; Shaw, G R; Eaglesham, G K

    2001-01-01

    An outbreak of acute liver failure occurred at a dialysis center in Caruaru, Brazil (8 degrees 17' S, 35 degrees 58' W), 134 km from Recife, the state capital of Pernambuco. At the clinic, 116 (89%) of 131 patients experienced visual disturbances, nausea, and vomiting after routine hemodialysis treatment on 13-20 February 1996. Subsequently, 100 patients developed acute liver failure, and of these 76 died. As of December 1996, 52 of the deaths could be attributed to a common syndrome now called Caruaru syndrome. Examination of phytoplankton from the dialysis clinic's water source, analyses of the clinic's water treatment system, plus serum and liver tissue of clinic patients led to the identification of two groups of cyanobacterial toxins, the hepatotoxic cyclic peptide microcystins and the hepatotoxic alkaloid cylindrospermopsin. Comparison of victims' symptoms and pathology using animal studies of these two cyanotoxins leads us to conclude that the major contributing factor to death of the dialyses patients was intravenous exposure to microcystins, specifically microcystin-YR, -LR, and -AR. From liver concentrations and exposure volumes, it was estimated that 19.5 microg/L microcystin was in the water used for dialysis treatments. This is 19.5 times the level set as a guideline for safe drinking water supplies by the World Health Organization. PMID:11485863

  10. Comparative Studies on the pH Dependence of DOW of Microcystin-RR and -LR Using LC-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaodao Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MCs are well known worldwide as hepatotoxins produced by cyanobacteria, but little is known about the physicochemical properties of these compounds. The dependence of the n-octanol/water distribution ratio (DOW of MC-RR and -LR to pH was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (LC-MS. There was a remarkable difference in such relationships between MC-RR and -LR. The log DOW of MC-LR decreased from 1.63 at pH 1.0 to -1.26 at pH 6.5, and stabilized between -1.04 and -1.56 at a pH of 6.5~12.0; log DOW of MC-RR varied between -1.24 and -0.67 at a pH of 1.00~4.00, and stabilized between -1.20 and -1.54 at a pH of 4.00~12.00. The difference of hydrophobicity in acidic condition between MC-RR and -LR is important, not only for the analytical method of both toxins, but perhaps also for understanding the difference of toxicity to animals between the two toxins.

  11. The uptake kinetics and immunotoxic effects of microcystin-LR in human and chicken peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankoff, Anna; Carmichael, Wayne W.; Grasman, Keith A.; Yuan, Moucun

    2004-01-01

    Microcystin-LR is a cyanobacterial heptapeptide that presents acute and chronic hazards to animal and human health. We investigated the influence of this toxin on human and chicken immune system modulation in vitro. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were treated with microcystin-LR at environmentally relevant doses of 1, 10 and 25 μg/ml for 12, 24, 48, 72 h (for proliferation assay cells were treated for 72 h). T-cell and B-cell proliferation as well as apoptosis and necrosis were determined in human and chicken samples. IL-2 and IL-6 production by human lymphocytes also was measured. In addition, uptake kinetics of microcystin-LR into human and chicken peripheral blood lymphocytes were calculated by Liquid Chromatography (LS) /Mass Spectrometry (MS) analysis. At the highest dose microcystin-LR decreased T-cell proliferation and all doses of microcystin-LR inhibited B-cell proliferation. The frequency of apoptotic and necrotic cells increased in a dose and time-dependent manner. Human lymphocytes responded to stimulation with microcystin-LR by increased production of IL-6 and decreased production of IL-2. Human lymphocytes were able to uptake from 0.014 to 1.663 μg/ml and chicken lymphocytes from 0.035 to 1.733 μg/ml of the microcystin-LR added to the cultures, depending on the treatment time and dose. In conclusion, microcystin-LR acted as an immunomodulator in cytokine production and down-regulated lymphocyte functions by induction of apoptosis and necrosis. However, further studies dealing with the influence of microcystin-LR on expression cytokine genes and transcription factors are necessary to confirm these hypotheses

  12. Significance of microcystin production by benthic communities in water treatment systems of arid zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, I; Aboal, M; Zafra, E; Campillo, D

    2008-02-01

    The study of the dynamics of phytobenthic and phytoplankton communities was undertaken, during a year, in the regulation reservoir associated with a water treatment plant (WTP), which provides the city of Murcia (Spain) with drinking water. Water samples were collected in different stages of the treatment. In the reservoir, the presence of dissolved and intracellular microcystins is constant, both in benthos and in plankton. The collected samples show a positive correlation between the dissolved microcystins and the benthic ones in the reservoir itself, as well as in an upstream reservoir (Ojós Reservoir). The treatment process (ozone+clarification+ozone+activated carbon) is very effective in the removal of toxins, and the drinking water produced is totally free of microcystins. The incorporation of the benthic communities in the routine check for the presence of microcystins is recommended, since it is not compulsory according to the current legislation.

  13. Pulsed nitrogen supply induces dynamic changes in the amino acid compositionand microcystin production of the harmful cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Waal, D.B.; Ferreruela, G.; Tonk, L.; Van Donk, E.; Huisman, J.; Visser, P.M.; Matthijs, H.C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Planktothrix agardhii is a widespread harmful cyanobacterium of eutrophic waters, and can produce the hepatotoxins [Asp3]microcystin-LR and [Asp3]microcystin-RR. These two microcystin variants differ in their first variable amino acid position, which is occupied by either leucine (L) or arginine

  14. Hepatotoxicity with antituberculosis drugs: the risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, K.; Samo, A.H.; Jairamani, K.L.; Talib, A.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the severity and frequency of hepatotoxicity caused by different antituberculosis (ATT) drugs and to evaluate whether concurrence of risk factors influence the antituberculosis drug induced hepatotoxicity. This prospective cohort study was conducted in Medical Unit-V and OPD department of Civil Hospital Karachi from July 2004 to July 2005. A total of 339 patients diagnosed of active tuberculosis infection with normal pretreatment liver function were monitored clinically as well as biochemically. Their data were collected on proforma and patients were treated with Isoniazid, Rifampicin and Pyrazinamide. Duration after which derangement in function, if any, occurred and time taken for normalization was noted. Treatment was altered as needed, with exclusion of culprit drug. Finally data was analyzed by SPSS version 10.0. ATT induced hepatotoxicity was seen in 67 (19.76%) out of 339 patients. Females were more affected as compared to males (26.3% vs. 19.7%). BMI (kg/m2) of 91% of diseased group were less than 18.5 (p<0.01) most of them were anemic having low albumin level suggestive of lean body mass. Hepatotoxicity was more severe in AFB smear positive patients. Concomitant use of alcohol, paracetamol and low serum cholesterol were proved as predisposing factors. Isoniazid (37 patients (55.21%), p<0.01) was the main culprit followed by Rifampicin (23 patients, 34.21%) and Pyrazinamide (7 patients, 10.5%). Most of the patients (61%) developed the hepatotoxicity within two weeks of starting antituberculosis therapy with mild to moderate alteration in ALT and AST. ATT-induced hepatitis is significantly more frequent and more severe in patients with hepatotoxicity risk factors. (author)

  15. Theoretical spectroscopic study of the conjugate microcystin-LR-europium cryptate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Julio G.; Dutra, Jose Diogo L.; Costa Junior, Nivan B. da; Freire, Ricardo O., E-mail: rfreire@ufs.br [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica; Alves Junior, Severino; Sa, Gilberto F. de [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica Fundamental

    2013-02-15

    In this work, theoretical tools were used to study spectroscopic properties of the conjugate microcystin-LR-europium cryptate. The Sparkle/AM1 model was applied to predict the geometry of the system and the INDO/S-CIS model was used to calculate the excited state energies. Based on the Judd-Ofelt theory, the intensity parameters were predicted and a theoretical model based on the theory of the 4f-4f transitions was applied to calculate energy transfer and backtransfer rates, radiative and non-radiative decay rates, quantum efficiency and quantum yield. A detailed study of the luminescent properties of the conjugate Microcystin-LR-europium cryptate was carried out. The results show that the theoretical quantum yield of luminescence of 23% is in good agreement with the experimental value published. This fact suggests that this theoretical protocol can be used to design new systems in order to improve their luminescence properties. The results suggest that this luminescent system may be a good conjugate for using in assay ELISA for detection by luminescence of the Microcystin-LR in water. (author)

  16. Diverse taxa of cyanobacteria produce β-N-methylamino-l-alanine, a neurotoxic amino acid

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Paul Alan; Banack, Sandra Anne; Murch, Susan J.; Rasmussen, Ulla; Tien, Georgia; Bidigare, Robert Richard; Metcalf, James S.; Morrison, Louise F.; Codd, Geoffrey A.; Bergman, Birgitta

    2005-01-01

    Cyanobacteria can generate molecules hazardous to human health, but production of the known cyanotoxins is taxonomically sporadic. For example, members of a few genera produce hepatotoxic microcystins, whereas production of hepatotoxic nodularins appears to be limited to a single genus. Production of known neurotoxins has also been considered phylogenetically unpredictable. We report here that a single neurotoxin, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine, may be produced by all known groups of cyanobacteria...

  17. Chitosan-cellulose composite materials: Preparation, Characterization and application for removal of microcystin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Chieu D., E-mail: chieu.tran@marquette.edu [Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Duri, Simon [Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Delneri, Ambra; Franko, Mladen [Laboratory for Environmental Research, University of Nova Gorica, Vipavska 13, 5001 Nova Gorica (Slovenia)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: •A novel and recyclable synthetic method using an ionic liquid, a Green Solvent. •Ecocomposite materials were synthesized from cellulose (CEL) and chitosan (CS). •Adding CEL into CS substantially increases tensile strength of the composite. •The composite is much better adsorbent for cyanotoxins than other materials. •The composite can be reused because adsorbed microcystin can be desorbed. -- Abstract: We developed a simple and one-step method to prepare biocompatible composites from cellulose (CEL) and chitosan (CS). [BMIm{sup +}Cl{sup −}], an ionic liquid (IL), was used as a green solvent to dissolve and prepare the [CEL + CS] composites. Since majority (>88%) of IL used was recovered for reuse by distilling the aqueous washings of [CEL + CS], the method is recyclable. XRD, FTIR, NIR, {sup 13}C CP-MAS-NMR and SEM were used to monitor the dissolution and to characterize the composites. The composite was found to have combined advantages of their components: superior mechanical strength (from CEL) and excellent adsorption capability for microcystin-LR, a deadly toxin produced by cyanobacteria (from CS). Specifically, the mechanical strength of the composites increased with CEL loading; e.g., up to 5× increase in tensile strength was achieved by adding 80% of CEL into CS. Kinetic results of adsorption confirm that unique properties of CS remain intact in the composite, i.e., it is not only a very good adsorbent for microcystin but also is better than all other available adsorbents. For example, it can adsorb 4× times more microcystin than the best reported adsorbent. Importantly, the microcystin adsorbed can be quantitatively desorbed to enable the composite to be reused with similar adsorption efficiency.

  18. Chitosan-cellulose composite materials: Preparation, Characterization and application for removal of microcystin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Chieu D.; Duri, Simon; Delneri, Ambra; Franko, Mladen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •A novel and recyclable synthetic method using an ionic liquid, a Green Solvent. •Ecocomposite materials were synthesized from cellulose (CEL) and chitosan (CS). •Adding CEL into CS substantially increases tensile strength of the composite. •The composite is much better adsorbent for cyanotoxins than other materials. •The composite can be reused because adsorbed microcystin can be desorbed. -- Abstract: We developed a simple and one-step method to prepare biocompatible composites from cellulose (CEL) and chitosan (CS). [BMIm + Cl − ], an ionic liquid (IL), was used as a green solvent to dissolve and prepare the [CEL + CS] composites. Since majority (>88%) of IL used was recovered for reuse by distilling the aqueous washings of [CEL + CS], the method is recyclable. XRD, FTIR, NIR, 13 C CP-MAS-NMR and SEM were used to monitor the dissolution and to characterize the composites. The composite was found to have combined advantages of their components: superior mechanical strength (from CEL) and excellent adsorption capability for microcystin-LR, a deadly toxin produced by cyanobacteria (from CS). Specifically, the mechanical strength of the composites increased with CEL loading; e.g., up to 5× increase in tensile strength was achieved by adding 80% of CEL into CS. Kinetic results of adsorption confirm that unique properties of CS remain intact in the composite, i.e., it is not only a very good adsorbent for microcystin but also is better than all other available adsorbents. For example, it can adsorb 4× times more microcystin than the best reported adsorbent. Importantly, the microcystin adsorbed can be quantitatively desorbed to enable the composite to be reused with similar adsorption efficiency

  19. Herbal hepatotoxicity: a tabular compilation of reported cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Rolf; Wolff, Albrecht; Frenzel, Christian; Schulze, Johannes; Eickhoff, Axel

    2012-11-01

    Herbal hepatotoxicity is a field that has rapidly grown over the last few years along with increased use of herbal products worldwide. To summarize the various facets of this disease, we undertook a literature search for herbs, herbal drugs and herbal supplements with reported cases of herbal hepatotoxicity. A selective literature search was performed to identify published case reports, spontaneous case reports, case series and review articles regarding herbal hepatotoxicity. A total of 185 publications were identified and the results compiled. They show 60 different herbs, herbal drugs and herbal supplements with reported potential hepatotoxicity, additional information including synonyms of individual herbs, botanical names and cross references are provided. If known, details are presented for specific ingredients and chemicals in herbal products, and for references with authors that can be matched to each herbal product and to its effect on the liver. Based on stringent causality assessment methods and/or positive re-exposure tests, causality was highly probable or probable for Ayurvedic herbs, Chaparral, Chinese herbal mixture, Germander, Greater Celandine, green tea, few Herbalife products, Jin Bu Huan, Kava, Ma Huang, Mistletoe, Senna, Syo Saiko To and Venencapsan(®). In many other publications, however, causality was not properly evaluated by a liver-specific and for hepatotoxicity-validated causality assessment method such as the scale of CIOMS (Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences). This compilation presents details of herbal hepatotoxicity, assisting thereby clinical assessment of involved physicians in the future. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Pulsed nitrogen supply induces dynamic changes in the amino acid composition and microcystin production of the harmful cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Waal, D.B.; Ferreruela, G.; Tonk, L.; van Donk, E.; Huisman, J.; Visser, P.M.; Matthijs, H.C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Planktothrix agardhii is a widespread harmful cyanobacterium of eutrophic waters, and can produce the hepatotoxins [Asp3]microcystin-LR and [Asp3]microcystin-RR. These two microcystin variants differ in their first variable amino acid position, which is occupied by either leucine (L) or arginine

  1. Associations between chlorophyll a and various microcystin health advisory concentrations [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W. Hollister

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms (cHABs are associated with a wide range of adverse health effects that stem mostly from the presence of cyanotoxins. To help protect against these impacts, several health advisory levels have been set for some toxins. In particular, one of the more common toxins, microcystin, has several advisory levels set for drinking water and recreational use. However, compared to other water quality measures, field measurements of microcystin are not commonly available due to cost and advanced understanding required to interpret results. Addressing these issues will take time and resources. Thus, there is utility in finding indicators of microcystin that are already widely available, can be estimated quickly and in situ, and used as a first defense against high levels of microcystin. Chlorophyll a is commonly measured, can be estimated in situ, and has been shown to be positively associated with microcystin. In this paper, we use this association to provide estimates of chlorophyll a concentrations that are indicative of a higher probability of exceeding select health advisory concentrations for microcystin. Using the 2007 National Lakes Assessment and a conditional probability approach, we identify chlorophyll a concentrations that are more likely than not to be associated with an exceedance of a microcystin health advisory level. We look at the recent US EPA health advisories for drinking water as well as the World Health Organization levels for drinking water and recreational use and identify a range of chlorophyll a thresholds. A 50% chance of exceeding one of the specific advisory microcystin concentrations of 0.3, 1, 1.6, and 2 μg/L is associated with chlorophyll a concentration thresholds of 23, 68, 84, and 104 μg/L, respectively. When managing for these various microcystin levels, exceeding these reported chlorophyll a concentrations should be a trigger for further testing and possible management action.

  2. Quantification of microcystin-producing microcystis in freshwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total Microcystis spp (microcystinproducing and non-producing strains) were quantified in the three selected study areas with the determination of the copy numbers of the phycocyanin (PC) operon. Microcystin-producing gene copy numbers were quantified using specific primer pair, amplifying the mcyB gene. Microcystis ...

  3. Effects of microcystins contamination on soil enzyme activities and microbial community in two typical lakeside soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Steinman, Alan D; Su, Xiaomei; Xie, Liqiang

    2017-12-01

    A 30-day indoor incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of different concentrations of microcystin (1, 10, 100 and 1000 μg eq. MC-LR L -1 ) on soil enzyme activity, soil respiration, physiological profiles, potential nitrification, and microbial abundance (total bacteria, total fungi, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea) in two lakeside soils in China (Soil A from the lakeside of Lake Poyanghu at Jiujiang; Soil B from the lakeside of Lake Taihu at Suzhou). Of the enzymes tested, only phenol oxidase activity was negatively affected by microcystin application. In contrast, dehydrogenase activity was stimulated in the 1000 μg treatment, and a stimulatory effect also occurred with soil respiration in contaminated soil. The metabolic profiles of the microbial communities indicated that overall carbon metabolic activity in the soils treated with high microcystin concentrations was inhibited, and high concentrations of microcystin also led to different patterns of potential carbon utilization. High microcystin concentrations (100, 1000 μg eq. MC-LR L -1 in Soil A; 10, 100 1000 μg eq. MC-LR L -1 in Soil B) significantly decreased soil potential nitrification rate. Furthermore, the decrease in soil potential nitrification rate was positively correlated with the decrease of the amoA gene abundance, which corresponds to the ammonia-oxidizing bacterial community. We conclude that application of microcystin-enriched irrigation water can significantly impact soil microbial community structure and function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamics of Total Microcystin LR Concentration in Three Subtropical Hydroelectric Generation Reservoirs in Uruguay, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Piana, Mauricio; Fabián, Daniel; Piccardo, Andrea; Chalar, Guillermo

    2017-10-01

    This study analyzed the temporal dynamics of total microcystin LR concentrations between the years of 2012 and 2015 in the Bonete, Baygorria and Palmar hydroelectric generation reservoirs in the central region of the Negro River, Uruguay. The three reservoirs showed differents total microcystin LR concentration, with no significant differences among them. Over 20 sampling dates, the three reservoirs exhibited total microcystin LR concentrations on eight occasions that corresponded to a slight to moderate human health risk according to WHO guideline values for recreational waters. By determining the concentration of microcystin LR in cyanobacterial biomass, we identified cyanobacterial populations that occurred over time with varying degrees of toxin production (maximal 85.4 µg/mm 3 ). The microcystin LR concentration in Bonete was positively correlated with temperature (r = 0.587) and cyanobacterial biomass (r = 0.736), in Baygorria with cyanobacterial biomass (r = 0.521), and in Palmar with temperature (r = 0.500) and negatively correlated with ammonia (r = -0.492). Action is needed to reduce the presence of toxic cyanobacteria in these systems. A decrease in the use of agrochemicals and management changes in the reservoir basins could be successful long-term measures.

  5. Characterization of Enzymatic Activity of MlrB and MlrC Proteins Involved in Bacterial Degradation of Cyanotoxins Microcystins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziga, Dariusz; Zielinska, Gabriela; Wladyka, Benedykt; Bochenska, Oliwia; Maksylewicz, Anna; Strzalka, Wojciech; Meriluoto, Jussi

    2016-03-16

    Bacterial degradation of toxic microcystins produced by cyanobacteria is a common phenomenon. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is rudimentary. In this paper several novel discoveries regarding the action of the enzymes of the mlr cluster responsible for microcystin biodegradation are presented using recombinant proteins. In particular, the predicted active sites of the recombinant MlrB and MlrC were analyzed using functional enzymes and their inactive muteins. A new degradation intermediate, a hexapeptide derived from linearized microcystins by MlrC, was discovered. Furthermore, the involvement of MlrA and MlrB in further degradation of the hexapeptides was confirmed and a corrected biochemical pathway of microcystin biodegradation has been proposed.

  6. Characterization of Enzymatic Activity of MlrB and MlrC Proteins Involved in Bacterial Degradation of Cyanotoxins Microcystins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Dziga

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial degradation of toxic microcystins produced by cyanobacteria is a common phenomenon. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is rudimentary. In this paper several novel discoveries regarding the action of the enzymes of the mlr cluster responsible for microcystin biodegradation are presented using recombinant proteins. In particular, the predicted active sites of the recombinant MlrB and MlrC were analyzed using functional enzymes and their inactive muteins. A new degradation intermediate, a hexapeptide derived from linearized microcystins by MlrC, was discovered. Furthermore, the involvement of MlrA and MlrB in further degradation of the hexapeptides was confirmed and a corrected biochemical pathway of microcystin biodegradation has been proposed.

  7. Eutrophication and warming boost cyanobacterial biomass and microcystins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lurling, Miguel; Oosterhout, Jean; Faassen, Els

    2017-01-01

    Eutrophication and warming are key drivers of cyanobacterial blooms, but their combined effects on microcystin (MC) concentrations are less studied. We tested the hypothesis that warming promotes cyanobacterial abundance in a natural plankton community and that eutrophication enhances cyanobacterial

  8. MCS precipitation and downburst intensity response to increased aerosol concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavner, M.; Cotton, W. R.; van den Heever, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are important contributors to rainfall in the High Plains of the United States as well as producers of severe weather such as hail, tornados and straight-line wind events known as derechos. Past studies have shown that changes in aerosol concentrations serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) alter the MCS hydrometeor characteristics which in turn modify precipitation yield, downdraft velocity, cold-pool strength, storm propagation and the potential for severe weather to occur. In this study, the sensitivity of MCS precipitation characteristics and convective downburst velocities associated with a derecho to changes in CCN concentrations were examined by simulating a case study using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). The case study of the 8 May 2009 "Super-Derecho" MCS was chosen since it produced a swath of widespread wind damage in association with an embedded large-scale bow echo, over a broad region from the High Plains of western Kansas to the foothills of the Appalachians. The sensitivity of the storm to changes in CCN concentrations was examined by conducting a set of three simulations which differed in the initial aerosol concentration based on output from the 3D chemical transport model, GEOS-Chem. Results from this study indicate that while increasing CCN concentrations led to an increase in precipitation rates, the changes to the derecho strength were not linear. A moderate increase in aerosol concentration reduced the derecho strength, while the simulation with the highest aerosol concentrations increased the derecho intensity. These changes are attributed to the impact of enhanced CCN concentration on the production of convective downbursts. An analysis of aerosol loading impacts on these MCS features will be presented.

  9. Presence of microcystin during events of algal blooms in Araruama Lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manildo Marcião de Oliveira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Algal blooms are phenomena produced by anthropogenic activities, despite the possible natural causes. In Araruama Lagoon, blooms occurred in 2005 and in subsequent years, causing profound changes in phytoplankton communities. These episodes triggered events of extensive fish mortality associated with low levels of dissolved oxygen. Another adverse effect associated with blooms is the production of harmful toxins such as phycotoxins produced by eukaryotic microalgae and cyanotoxins produced by cyanobacteria. Samples of fish (mullet and menhaden and seston showed levels of microcystin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, also a seston sample (São Pedro d'Aldeia on 08/22/2007, in a period not related to fish mortality, showed cells which contained genes encoding microcystin synthetase, an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of microcystin. The succession of microalgae with the concomitant presence of potentially toxic cyanobacteria draws attention to the risk of chronic exposure by the population that uses fish as their main protein source.

  10. Hepatotoxicity and the present herbal hepatoprotective scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Priyankar Dey; Manas Ranjan Saha; Arnab Sen

    2013-01-01

    Most of the metabolic and physiological processes of our body as well as the detoxification of various drugs and xenobiotic chemicals occur in the liver. During this detoxification process, the reactive chemical intermediates damage the liver severely. There are several commercially available drugs, consumption of which results in idiosyncratic drug reaction mediated hepatotoxicity. Drug induced hepatotoxicity is a burning problem in this regard and several drugs are withdrawn from the market...

  11. Comparative Measurement of Microcystins in Diverse Surface Waters using ADDA-ELISA, LC-MS/MS, and MMPB Technical

    Science.gov (United States)

    The measurement of microcystins, cyanotoxins associated with cyanobacterial blooms which are increasingly prevalent in inland waters, is complicated by the diversity of congeners which have been observed in the environment. At present, more than 150 microcystin congeners have bee...

  12. Comparative measurement of microcystins in diverse surface waters using ADDA-ELISA, LC-MS/MS, and MMPB techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    The measurement of microcystins, cyanotoxins associated with cyanobacterial blooms which are increasingly prevalent in inland waters, is complicated by the diversity of congeners which have been observed in the environment. At present, more than 150 microcystin congeners have bee...

  13. Pseudodiarrhoea in zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas) exposed to microcystins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhel, Guillaume; Davenport, John; O'Halloran, John; Culloty, Sarah; Ramsay, Ruth; James, Kevin; Furey, Ambrose; Allis, Orla

    2006-03-01

    Microcystins are produced by bloom-forming cyanobacteria and pose significant health and ecological problems. In this study we show that zebra mussels respond differently to different strains of Microcystis aeruginosa, and that a highly toxic strain causes zebra mussels to produce large quantities of mucous pseudofaeces, 'pseudodiarrhoea', that are periodically expelled hydraulically through the pedal gape by shell valve adductions rather than by the normal ciliary tracts. Analysis of the pseudofaecal ejecta showed that the proportion of Microcystis aeruginosa relative to Asterionella formosa was high in the pseudofaeces and even higher in the 'pseudodiarrhoea' when a mixed diet was given to the mussels. This confirms that very toxic Microcystis aeruginosa were preferentially being rejected by comparison with the non-toxic diatom in the pseudofaeces and even more so in the 'pseudodiarrhoea'. Such selective rejection was not observed with low or non-toxic strains and would therefore tend to enhance the presence of toxic Microcystis aeruginosa in mixed Microcystis aeruginosa cyanobacterial blooms, as well as transferring toxins from the water column to the benthos. The observed acute irritant response to the toxin represents the first demonstration of an adverse sublethal effect of microcystins on invertebrate ecophysiology. Our results also suggest that it could be a specific response to microcystin-LF, a little studied toxin variant.

  14. CytoMCS: A Multiple Maximum Common Subgraph Detection Tool for Cytoscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon; Baumbach, Jan

    2017-01-01

    such analyses we have developed CytoMCS, a Cytoscape app for computing inexact solutions to the maximum common edge subgraph problem for two or more graphs. Our algorithm uses an iterative local search heuristic for computing conserved subgraphs, optimizing a squared edge conservation score that is able...... to detect not only fully conserved edges but also partially conserved edges. It can be applied to any set of directed or undirected, simple graphs loaded as networks into Cytoscape, e.g. protein-protein interaction networks or gene regulatory networks. CytoMCS is available as a Cytoscape app at http://apps.cytoscape.org/apps/cytomcs....

  15. An Evaluation of Hepatotoxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatic dysfunction in the cancer unit has a significant impact on patient outcomes. The therapeutic application of anthracycline antibiotics are limited by side‑effects mainly myelosuppression, chronic cardiotoxicity, and hepatotoxicity. Aim: To assess the risk of Hepatotoxicity in breast cancer patients receiving ...

  16. Improving microcystin monitoring relevance in recreative waters: A regional case-study (Brittany, Western France, Europe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitois, Frédéric; Vezie, Chantal; Thoraval, Isabelle; Baurès, Estelle

    2016-05-01

    Cyanobacteria and their toxins are known as a health hazard in recreative and distributed waters. Monitoring data from 2004 to 2011 were collected at regional scale to characterize exposition parameters to microcystins in Brittany (Western France). The data show that cyanobacteria populations are experiencing a composition shift leading to a longer duration of cell densities higher than WHO alert levels 2 and 3. Microcystins however appear to be more frequently detected with subacute concentrations in low cell density samples than in high cell density samples or during bloom episodes. Positive relations are described between microcystin concentrations, detection frequencies and cyanobacteria biovolumes, allowing for a novel definition of alert levels and decision framework following WHO recommendations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Environmental influence on cyanobacteria abundance and microcystin toxin production in a shallow temperate lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tammy A; Rollwagen-Bollens, Gretchen; Bollens, Stephen M; Faber-Hammond, Joshua J

    2015-04-01

    The increasing frequency of harmful cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater systems is a commonly recognized problem due to detrimental effects on water quality. Vancouver Lake, a shallow, tidally influenced lake in the flood plain of the Columbia River within the city of Vancouver, WA, USA, has experienced numerous summertime cyanobacterial blooms, dominated by Aphanizomenon sp. and Anabaena sp. Cyanobacteria abundance and toxin (microcystin) levels have been monitored in this popular urban lake for several years; however, no previous studies have identified which cyanobacteria species produce toxins, nor analyzed how changes in environmental variables contribute to the fluctuations in toxic cyanobacteria populations. We used a suite of molecular techniques to analyze water samples from Vancouver Lake over two summer bloom cycles (2009 and 2010). Both intracellular and extracellular microcystin concentrations were measured using an ELISA kit. Intracellular microcystin concentrations exceeded WHO guidelines for recreational waters several times throughout the sampling period. PCR results demonstrated that Microcystis sp. was the sole microcystin-producing cyanobacteria species present in Vancouver Lake, although Microcystis sp. was rarely detected in microscopical counts. qPCR results indicated that the majority of the Microcystis sp. population contained the toxin-producing gene (mcyE), although Microcystis sp. abundance rarely exceeded 1 percent of overall cyanobacteria abundance. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) revealed that PO4-P was the main environmental variable influencing the abundance of toxic and non-toxic cyanobacteria, as well as intracellular microcystin concentrations. Our study underscores the importance of using molecular genetic techniques, in addition to traditional microscopy, to assess the importance of less conspicuous species in the dynamics of harmful algal blooms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bioaccumulation of microcystins in invasive bivalves: A case study from the boreal lagoon ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aistė Paldavičienė

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study we present the first report on the bioaccumulation of microcystins (MC in zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha from the eutrophic brackish water Curonian Lagoon. The bioaccumulation capacity was related to age structure of mussels and ambient environmental conditions. We also discuss the relevant implications of these findings for biomonitoring of toxic cyanobacteria blooms in the Curonian Lagoon and potential consequences for D. polymorpha cultivation activities considered for the futures as remediation measure. Samples for the analysis were collected twice per year, in June and September, in 2006, 2007 and 2008, from two sites within the littoral zone of the lagoon. The highest microcystin concentrations were measured in mussels larger than 30 mm length and sampled in 2006 (when a severe toxic cyanobacteria bloom occurred. In the following years, a consistent reduction in bioaccumulated MC concentration was noticed. However, certain amount of microcystin was recorded in mussel tissues in 2007 and 2008, when no cyanotoxins were reported in the phytoplankton. Considering high depuration rates and presence of cyanotoxins in the bottom sediments well after the recorded toxic blooms, we assume mechanism of secondary contamination when microcystin residuals could be uptaken by mussels with resuspended sediment particles.

  19. Hepatotoxicity evaluation of traditional Chinese medicines using a computational molecular model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pan; Liu, Bin; Wang, Chunya

    2017-11-01

    Liver injury caused by traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) is reported from many countries around the world. TCM hepatotoxicity has attracted worldwide concerns. This study aims to develop a more applicable and optimal tool to evaluate TCM hepatotoxicity. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis was performed based on published data and U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Liver Toxicity Knowledge Base (LTKB). Eleven herbal ingredients with proven liver toxicity in the literature were added into the dataset besides chemicals from LTKB. The finally generated QSAR model yielded a sensitivity of 83.8%, a specificity of 70.1%, and an accuracy of 80.2%. Among the externally tested 20 ingredients from TCMs, 14 hepatotoxic ingredients were all accurately identified by the QSAR model derived from the dataset containing natural hepatotoxins. Adding natural hepatotoxins into the dataset makes the QSAR model more applicable for TCM hepatotoxicity assessment, which provides a right direction in the methodology study for TCM safety evaluation. The generated QSAR model has the practical value to prioritize the hepatotoxicity risk of TCM compounds. Furthermore, an open-access international specialized database on TCM hepatotoxicity should be quickly established.

  20. [Hepatotoxicity associated with the use of Herbalife].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóhannsson, Magnús; Ormarsdóttir, Sif; Olafsson, Sigurdur

    2010-03-01

    Many herbal products are known to be hepatotoxic. In a recent survey in Iceland concerning adverse reactions related to herbal medicines, Herbalife products were implicated in the majority of the reported cases of hepatotoxicity. The clinical presentations of five cases of Herbalife related liver injury during the period of 1999-2008 are analysed. Causality was assessed by using the WHO-UMC system for causality assessment and the RUCAM method. Of the five cases there were four females and one male; median age was 46 years (range 29-78). Herbalife had been used for 1 to 7 months prior to presentation. Four patients presented with a hepatocellular and one with a cholestatic reaction. Median values were for bilirubin 190 micromol/L (range: 26-311; ref. Herbalife products. Hepatotoxicity due to herbal remedies is an important differential diagnosis in the diagnostic work-up of liver injury.

  1. Activity and Transcriptional Responses of Hepatopancreatic Biotransformation and Antioxidant Enzymes in the Oriental River Prawn Macrobrachium nipponense Exposed to Microcystin-LR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julin Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MCs are a major group of cyanotoxins with side effects in many organisms; thus, compounds in this group are recognized as potent stressors and health hazards in aquatic ecosystems. In order to assess the toxicity of MCs and detoxification mechanism of freshwater shrimp Macrobrachium nipponense, the full-length cDNAs of the glutathione S-transferase (gst and catalase (cat genes were isolated from the hepatopancreas. The transcription level and activity changes in the biotransformation enzyme (glutathione S-transferase (GST and antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx in the hepatopancreas of M. nipponense exposed to MC-LR (0.2, 1, 5, and 25 μg/L for 12, 24, 72 and 96 h were analyzed. The results showed that the isolated full-length cDNAs of cat and gst genes from M. nipponense displayed a high similarity to other crustaceans, and their mRNAs were mainly expressed in the hepatopancreas. MC-LR caused significant increase of GST activity following 48–96 h (p < 0.05 and an increase in SOD activity especially in 24- and 48-h exposures. CAT activity was activated when exposed to MC-LR in 12-, 24- and 48-h exposures and then it was inhibited at 96-h exposure. There was no significant effect on GPx activity after the 12- and 24-h exposures, whereas it was significantly stimulated after the 72- and 96-h exposures (p < 0.05. The transcription was altered similarly to enzyme activity, but the transcriptional response was generally more immediate and had greater amplitude than enzymatic response, particularly for GST. All of the results suggested that MC-LR can induce antioxidative modulation variations in M. nipponense hepatopancreas in order to eliminate oxidative damage.

  2. Detection of free and covalently bound microcystins in animal tissues by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neffling, Milla-Riina; Lance, Emilie; Meriluoto, Jussi

    2010-01-01

    Microcystins are cyanobacterial hepatotoxins capable of accumulation into animal tissues. The toxins act by inhibiting specific protein phosphatases and both non-covalent and covalent interactions occur. The 2-methyl-3-methoxy-4-phenylbutyric acid (MMPB) method determines the total, i.e. the sum of free and protein-bound microcystin in tissues. The aim of the method development in this paper was to tackle the problems with the MMPB methodology: the rather laborious workflow and the loss of material during different steps of the method. In the optimised workflow the oxidation recovery was of acceptable level (29-40%), the extraction efficiency good (62-97%), but the signal suppression effect from the matrix remained severe in our system (16-37% signal left). The extraction efficiency for the determination of the free, extractable microcystins, was found to be good, 52-100%, depending on the sample and the toxin variant and concentration. - The study concerns method development for the LC-MS-MS analysis of both free and protein-bound microcystin in tissue materials.

  3. Detection of free and covalently bound microcystins in animal tissues by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neffling, Milla-Riina, E-mail: mneffling@gmail.co [Department of Biochemistry and Pharmacy, Abo Akademi University, Tykistoekatu 6 A, Biocity 3rd floor, FI-20520, Turku (Finland); Lance, Emilie [UMR CNRS Ecobio 6553, University of Rennes 1, Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042, Rennes Cedex (France); Meriluoto, Jussi [Department of Biochemistry and Pharmacy, Abo Akademi University, Tykistoekatu 6 A, Biocity 3rd floor, FI-20520, Turku (Finland)

    2010-03-15

    Microcystins are cyanobacterial hepatotoxins capable of accumulation into animal tissues. The toxins act by inhibiting specific protein phosphatases and both non-covalent and covalent interactions occur. The 2-methyl-3-methoxy-4-phenylbutyric acid (MMPB) method determines the total, i.e. the sum of free and protein-bound microcystin in tissues. The aim of the method development in this paper was to tackle the problems with the MMPB methodology: the rather laborious workflow and the loss of material during different steps of the method. In the optimised workflow the oxidation recovery was of acceptable level (29-40%), the extraction efficiency good (62-97%), but the signal suppression effect from the matrix remained severe in our system (16-37% signal left). The extraction efficiency for the determination of the free, extractable microcystins, was found to be good, 52-100%, depending on the sample and the toxin variant and concentration. - The study concerns method development for the LC-MS-MS analysis of both free and protein-bound microcystin in tissue materials.

  4. MCS and sub-band selection for downlink interference coordination in LTE-A Femtocells

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz Medina, Olga; Agustín de Dios, Adrián; Vidal Manzano, José

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a decentralized algorithm for interference coordination in LTE-A networks, based on the exchange of information (pricing) at control plane level. In our approach, every user equipment (UE) report the maximum modulation and coding scheme (MCS) that can be used within several sets (sub-bands) of available resource blocks, along with a parameter (cost) that measures the MCS degradation due to the transmission from an interfering neighbor. Through the e...

  5. Analysis of Microcystins in Cyanobacterial Blooms from Freshwater Bodies in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Turner

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater bodies in England are currently monitored reactively, with samples containing more than 20,000 cells/mL of potentially toxin-producing species by light microscopy resulting in action by the water body owner. Whilst significantly reducing the risk of microcystin exposure, there is little data describing the levels of these toxins present in cyanobacterial blooms. This study focused on the quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis of microcystins in freshwater samples, collected across England during 2016 and found to contain potentially toxin-producing cyanobacteria. More than 50% of samples contained quantifiable concentrations of microcystins, with approximately 13% exceeding the WHO medium health threshold of 20 μg/L. Toxic samples were confirmed over a nine-month period, with a clear increase in toxins during late summer, but with no apparent geographical patterns. No statistical relationships were found between total toxin concentrations and environmental parameters. Complex toxin profiles were determined and profile clusters were unrelated to cyanobacterial species, although a dominance of MC-RR was determined in water samples from sites associated with lower rainfall. 100% of samples with toxins above the 20 μg/L limit contained cell densities above 20,000 cells/mL or cyanobacterial scum, showing the current regime is suitable for public health. Conversely, with only 18% of cell density threshold samples having total microcystins above 20 μg/L, there is the potential for reactive water closures to unnecessarily impact upon the socio-economics of the local population. In the future, routine analysis of bloom samples by LC-MS/MS would provide a beneficial confirmatory approach to the current microscopic assessment, aiding both public health and the needs of water users and industry.

  6. SISTEM PENGEMBANGAN KENDALI FUZZY LOGIC BERBASIS MIKROKONTROLER KELUARGA MCS51 (PetraFuz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiang Thiang

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Fuzzy Logic Development Tool called PetraFuz which has been developed at Control System Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, Petra Christian University. The system consists of a hardware target based on MCS51 microcontroller and a software support running under PC Windows. The system is targeted for developing fuzzy logic based systems. It supports fuzzy logic design, evaluation, assembly language generator and downloading process to the target hardware to perform on-line fuzzy process. Process action and fuzzy parameters could be transferred to PC monitor via RS-232 serial communication, this on-line process parameters is used for fuzzy tuning, i.e. fuzzy if-then rules and fuzzy membership functions. The PetraFuz tool helps very much for Fuzzy system developments, it could reduce development time significantly. The tool could spur the development of fuzzy systems based on microcontroller systems such as fuzzy control systems, fuzzy information processing, etc. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Makalah ini menyajikan sebuah sistem pengembangan kendali fuzzy logic (PetraFuz, Petra Fuzzy Development System yang dikembangkan oleh laboratorium Sistem Kontrol, Jurusan Teknik Elektro, Universitas Kristen Petra Surabaya. Sistem ini terdiri dari perangkat keras sistem mikrokontroler MCS51 dan perangkat lunak pendukung yang berjalan pada PC. Sistem PetraFuz digunakan untuk mengembangkan sistem berbasis fuzzy logic utamanya pada bidang kendali. Kemampuan sistem meliputi pengembangan pada fase perancangan kendali, evaluasi kendali, pembentukan program bahasa assembly MCS51 dan proses downloading program menuju target sistem mikrokontroler MCS51 untuk dieksekusi melakukan kendali pada plant yang nyata. Aksi kendali dapat diakuisi oleh program PC melalui komunikasi serial RS232 sehingga respon kendali dapat digambarkan pada layar monitor untuk dilakukan analisis lebih lanjut yang diperlukan pada proses tuning if-then fuzzy rules

  7. Associations between chlorophyll a and various microcystin-LR health advisory concentrations [version 1; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W. Hollister

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms (cHABs are associated with a wide range of adverse health effects that stem mostly from the presence of cyanotoxins. To help protect against these impacts, several health advisory levels have been set for some toxins. In particular, one of the more common toxins, microcystin-LR, has several advisory levels set for drinking water and recreational use. However, compared to other water quality measures, field measurements of microcystin-LR are not commonly available due to cost and advanced understanding required to interpret results. Addressing these issues will take time and resources. Thus, there is utility in finding indicators of microcystin-LR that are already widely available, can be estimated quickly and in situ, and used as a first defense against high concentrations of microcystin-LR. Chlorophyll a is commonly measured, can be estimated in situ, and has been shown to be positively associated with microcystin-LR. In this paper, we use this association to provide estimates of chlorophyll a concentrations that are indicative of a higher probability of exceeding select health advisory concentrations for microcystin-LR. Using the 2007 National Lakes Assessment and a conditional probability approach, we identify chlorophyll a concentrations that are more likely than not to be associated with an exceedance of a microcystin-LR health advisory level. We look at the recent US EPA health advisories for drinking water as well as the World Health Organization levels for drinking water and recreational use and identify a range of chlorophyll a thresholds. A 50% chance of exceeding one of the microcystin-LR advisory concentrations of 0.3, 1, 1.6, and 2 g/L is associated with chlorophyll a concentration thresholds of 23.4, 67.0, 83.5, and 105.8, respectively. When managing for these various microcystin-LR levels, exceeding these reported chlorophyll a concentrations should be a trigger for

  8. Activation of Nrf2 protects against triptolide-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    Full Text Available Triptolide, the major active component of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f. (TWHF, has a wide range of pharmacological activities. However, the toxicities of triptolide, particularly the hepatotoxicity, limit its clinical application. The hepatotoxicity of triptolide has not been well characterized yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 in triptolide-induced toxicity and whether activation of Nrf2 could protect against triptolide-induced hepatotoxicity. The results showed that triptolide caused oxidative stress and cell damage in HepG2 cells, and these toxic effects could be aggravated by Nrf2 knockdown or be counteracted by overexpression of Nrf2. Treatment with a typical Nrf2 agonist, sulforaphane (SFN, attenuated triptolide-induced liver dysfunction, structural damage, glutathione depletion and decrease in antioxidant enzymes in BALB/C mice. Moreover, the hepatoprotective effect of SFN on triptolide-induced liver injury was associated with the activation of Nrf2 and its downstream targets. Collectively, these results indicate that Nrf2 activation protects against triptolide-induced hepatotoxicity.

  9. Antioxidant Effect of Curcumin Against Microcystin- LR-Induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of curcumin on microcystin-LR (MC-LR)- induced renal oxidative damage in Balb/c mice. Methods: 40 male Balb/c mice were assigned randomly to 4 groups each having 10 mice. One group served as normal (saline treated) while another group was used as curcumin control. The third ...

  10. Sequence and batch language programs and alarm related C Programs for the 242-A MCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    A Distributive Process Control system was purchased by Project B-534, 242-A Evaporator/Crystallizer Upgrades. This control system, called the Monitor and Control system (MCS), was installed in the 242-A evaporator located in the 200 East Area. The purpose of the MCS is to monitor and control the Evaporator and monitor a number of alarms and other signals from various Tank Farm facilities. Applications software for the MCS was developed by the Waste Treatment Systems Engineering (WTSE) group of Westinghouse. The standard displays and alarm scheme provide for control and monitoring, but do not directly indicate the signal location or depict the overall process. To do this, WTSE developed a second alarm scheme

  11. Degradation of cyanotoxins (microcystin) in drinking water using photoelectrooxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A C A; Rodrigues, M A S; Xavier, J L N; Gazulla, V; Meneguzzi, A; Bernardes, A M

    2015-05-01

    The discharge of sewage and industrial effluents containing high concentrations of pollutants in water bodies increases eutrophication. Cyanobacteria, some of the organisms whose growth is promoted by high nutrient concentrations, are resistant and produce several types of toxins, known as cyanotoxins, highly harmful to human beings. Current water treatment systems for the public water supply are not efficient in degradation of toxins. Advanced oxidation processes (AOP) have been tested for the removal of cyanotoxins, and the results have been positive. This study examines the application of photoelectrooxidation in the degradation of cyanotoxins (microcystins). The performance of the oxidative processes involved was evaluated separately: Photocatalysis, Electrolysis and Photoelectrooxidation. Results showed that the electrical current and UV radiation were directly associated with toxin degradation. The PEO system is efficient in removing cyanotoxins, and the reduction rate reached 99%. The final concentration of toxin was less than 1 µg/L of microcystin in the treated solution.

  12. Degradation of cyanotoxins (microcystin in drinking water using photoelectrooxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ACA Garcia

    Full Text Available The discharge of sewage and industrial effluents containing high concentrations of pollutants in water bodies increases eutrophication. Cyanobacteria, some of the organisms whose growth is promoted by high nutrient concentrations, are resistant and produce several types of toxins, known as cyanotoxins, highly harmful to human beings. Current water treatment systems for the public water supply are not efficient in degradation of toxins. Advanced oxidation processes (AOP have been tested for the removal of cyanotoxins, and the results have been positive. This study examines the application of photoelectrooxidation in the degradation of cyanotoxins (microcystins. The performance of the oxidative processes involved was evaluated separately: Photocatalysis, Electrolysis and Photoelectrooxidation. Results showed that the electrical current and UV radiation were directly associated with toxin degradation. The PEO system is efficient in removing cyanotoxins, and the reduction rate reached 99%. The final concentration of toxin was less than 1 µg/L of microcystin in the treated solution.

  13. Assessment of microcystins in lake water and fish (Mugilidae, Liza sp.) in the largest Spanish coastal lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, Susana; Fernández, Francisca; Ouahid, Youness; Barón-Sola, Ángel

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria dominance and cyanotoxin production can become major threats to humans and aquatic life, especially in warm shallow lakes, which are often dominated by cyanobacteria. This study investigates the occurrence and distribution of microcystins (MCYST) in water, cell-bound and in the tissues of the commercial mugilid Liza sp. in the largest, coastal, Spanish Mediterranean lake (Albufera of Valencia). This is the first report concerning microcystin accumulation in tissues of mugilid fish species. Considerable amounts of microcystins were found in the water and seston, which correlated with development of Microcystis aeruginosa populations in the lake. The MCYST concentrations found in Lake Albufera (mean 1.7 and 17 μg/L and maximum 16 and 120 μg/L in water and seston, respectively) exceeded by one to two orders of magnitude the guideline levels proposed by the World Health Organization and were higher than that reported in other lakes of the Mediterranean zone. The presence of MCYST was found in all the fishes studied and accumulated differently among tissues of the commercial species Liza sp. Toxin accumulation in fish tissues showed that although the target organ for MCYST was the liver, high concentrations of microcystins were also found in other analysed tissues (liver>intestine>gills>muscle). Human tolerable daily intake for microcystins is assessed relative to the WHO guidelines, and potential toxicological risks for humans, wildlife and related ecosystems of the lake are discussed.

  14. Antituberculosis drugs and hepatotoxicity among hospitalized patients in Jos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samson E Isa

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Hepatotoxicity due to first-line anti-TBs, whether based on clinical features alone or backed by liver chemistry, is common among hospitalized patients in our environment. Studies to determine the predictors of hepatotoxicity to guide clinical interventions aimed at the prevention or timely identification of cases are needed.

  15. Mapping of Mcs30, a new mammary carcinoma susceptibility quantitative trait locus (QTL30 on rat chromosome 12: identification of fry as a candidate Mcs gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Ren

    Full Text Available Rat strains differ dramatically in their susceptibility to mammary carcinogenesis. On the assumption that susceptibility genes are conserved across mammalian species and hence inform human carcinogenesis, numerous investigators have used genetic linkage studies in rats to identify genes responsible for differential susceptibility to carcinogenesis. Using a genetic backcross between the resistant Copenhagen (Cop and susceptible Fischer 344 (F344 strains, we mapped a novel mammary carcinoma susceptibility (Mcs30 locus to the centromeric region on chromosome 12 (LOD score of ∼8.6 at the D12Rat59 marker. The Mcs30 locus comprises approximately 12 Mbp on the long arm of rat RNO12 whose synteny is conserved on human chromosome 13q12 to 13q13. After analyzing numerous genes comprising this locus, we identified Fry, the rat ortholog of the furry gene of Drosophila melanogaster, as a candidate Mcs gene. We cloned and determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the 13 kbp Fry mRNA. Sequence analysis indicated that the Fry gene was highly conserved across evolution, with 90% similarity of the predicted amino acid sequence among eutherian mammals. Comparison of the Fry sequence in the Cop and F344 strains identified two non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, one of which creates a putative, de novo phosphorylation site. Further analysis showed that the expression of the Fry gene is reduced in a majority of rat mammary tumors. Our results also suggested that FRY activity was reduced in human breast carcinoma cell lines as a result of reduced levels or mutation. This study is the first to identify the Fry gene as a candidate Mcs gene. Our data suggest that the SNPs within the Fry gene contribute to the genetic susceptibility of the F344 rat strain to mammary carcinogenesis. These results provide the foundation for analyzing the role of the human FRY gene in cancer susceptibility and progression.

  16. Hepatotoxic constituents and toxicological mechanism of Xanthium strumarium L. fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Li-Ming; Zhang, Qiao-Yan; Han, Ping; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Yan, Rong-Di; Wang, Yang; Rahman, Khalid; Jia, Min; Han, Ting; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2014-03-14

    In the recent years, the international community has attached increasing importance to possible toxicity associated with Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). And hepatotoxicity is one of the major concerns, a fundamental pathological process induced by toxicant. This paper is in an attempt to identify the hepatotoxic components in Xanthium strumarium L. fruits (XSF) and interpret the toxicological mechanism induced by XSF. XSF extract was prepared and seven characteristic components were isolated and identified in XSF water extracts. We evaluated their hepatotoxicity effect on cell proliferation and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in L-02 and BRL liver cell line. An integrated metabonomics study using high-resolution (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy combined with multivariate statistical analysis was undertake to elucidate the hepatotoxicity mechanism induced in rats by XSF. The urine and serum metabolites were measured after treatment of rats with XSF (7.5, 15.0 and 30.0 g/kg/day) for 5 days. The results showed that atractyloside, carboxyatractyloside, 4'-desulphate-atractyloside and XSF induced significant cytotoxic effects in both L-02 and BRL liver cell lines, indicating that atractyloside, carboxyatractyloside, and 4'-desulphate-atractyloside were the toxic components of XSF. When rats were treated with XSF at 30.0 g/kg the hepatotoxicity was reflected in the changes observed in serum biochemical profiles and by the histopathological examination of the liver. The levels of VLDL/LDL, 3-HB, lactate, acetate, acetone and glutamate in serum were increased in this group, while d-glucose, choline and valine were decreased. The elevation in the levels of succinate, citrate, 2-oxo-glutamate, glycine, 3-HB, acetate, lactate, hippurate, dimethylglycine, methylamine, dimethylamine, phenylalanine and tryptophan was observed in urine, in contrast a reduction in the intensities of taurine, d-glucose, N-acetyl-glucoprotein and trimethylamine

  17. Using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a protein phosphatase inhibition assay (PPIA) for the detection of microcystins and nodularins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, W W; An, J

    1999-01-01

    Cyanotoxins produced by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) include potent neurotoxins and hepatotoxins. The hepatotoxins include cyclic peptide microcystins and nodularins plus the alkaloid cylindrospermopsins. Among the cyanotoxins the microcystins have proven to be the most widespread, and are most often implicated in animal and human poisonings. This paper presents a practical guide to two widely used methods for detecting and quantifying microcystins and nodularins in environmental samples-the enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and the protein phosphatase inhibition assay (PPIA).

  18. Comparison of plateletpheresis on the Fresenius AS.TEC 204 and Haemonetics MCS 3p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Sudha

    2007-02-01

    This is an attempt at comparing two cell separators for plateletpheresis, namely the Fresenius AS.TEC 204 and Haemonetics MCS 3p, at a tertiary care center in India. Donors who weighed between 55-75 kg, who had a hematocrit of 41-43%, and platelet counts of 250x10(3)-400x10(3)/microl were selected for the study. The comparability of the donors who donated on the two cell separators were analysed by t-test independent samples and no significant differences were found (P>0.05). The features compared were time taken for the procedure, volume processed on the separators, adverse reactions of the donors, quality control of the product, separation efficiency of the separators, platelet loss in the donors after the procedure, and the predictor versus the actual yield of platelets given by the cell separator. The volume processed to get a target yield of >3x10(11) was equal to 2.8-3.2 l and equal in both the cell separators. Symptoms of citrate toxicity were seen in 4 and 2.5% of donors who donated on the MCS 3p and the AS.TEC 204, respectively, and 3 and 1% of donors, respectively, had vasovagal reactions. All the platelet products collected had a platelet count of >3x10(11); 90% of the platelet products collected on the AS.TEC 204 attained the predicted yield that was set on the cell separator where as 75% of the platelet products collected on the MCS 3p attained the target yield. Quality control of the platelets collected on both the cell separators complied with the standards except that 3% of the platelets collected on the MCS 3p had a visible red cell contamination. The separation efficiency of the MCS 3p was higher, 50-52% as compared to the 40-45% on the AS.TEC 204. A provision of double venous access, less adverse reactions, negligible RBC contamination with a better predictor yield of platelets makes the AS.TEC 204 a safer and more reliable alternative than the widely used Haemonetics MCS 3p. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Hepatotoxicity of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pajaree Sriuttha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are the most widely used medication in several countries, including Thailand. NSAIDs have been associated with hepatic side effects; however, the frequency of these side effects is uncertain. Aim of the Review. To systematically review published literature on randomized, controlled trials that assessed the risk of clinically significant hepatotoxicity associated with NSAIDs. Methods. Searches of bibliographic databases EMBASE, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library were conducted up to July 30, 2016, to identify randomized controlled trials of ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, piroxicam, meloxicam, mefenamic acid, indomethacin, celecoxib, and etoricoxib in adults with any disease that provide information on hepatotoxicity outcomes. Results. Among the 698 studies, 18 studies met the selection criteria. However, only 8 studies regarding three NSAIDs (celecoxib, etoricoxib, and diclofenac demonstrated clinically significant hepatotoxic evidence based on hepatotoxicity justification criteria. Of all the hepatotoxicity events found from the above-mentioned three NSAIDs, diclofenac had the highest proportion, which ranged from 0.015 to 4.3 (×10−2, followed by celecoxib, which ranged from 0.13 to 0.38 (×10−2, and etoricoxib, which ranged from 0.005 to 0.930 (×10−2. Conclusion. Diclofenac had higher rates of hepatotoxic evidence compared to other NSAIDs. Hepatotoxic evidence is mostly demonstrated as aminotransferase elevation, while liver-related hospitalization or discontinuation was very low.

  20. Xenobiotics-induced hepatotoxicity and an influence of HLA typisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žunić Miodrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increased reporting of cases of drug-induced liver injuries, reflects the growing number of new agents introduced into clinical practice in the last decades. It should be added to the modernization of industries, and new chemicals which it applied. Drug-induced liver injuries make up a persisting and challenging problem for physicians, health agencies and pharmaceutical firms. Research objectives: The aim of the study is the determination of the most common causes of drug-induced liver injury in our surroundings. We compared the importance of hepatotoxic action of drugs in relation to other noxa in human environment. We determinated the importance of the body sensitivity on the acting agents. We also examined the importance of different drugs in the development of hepatotoxicity, regardless the dose. Materials and methods: We analyzed 52 patients with a diagnosis of hepa-totoxic liver injury (medical history, detailed clinical evaluation of patients, histopathological analysis of the liver, abdominal ultra sound, laboratory determination of standard liver function tests and followed up for 12 months. In the period from 01.04. 2005 to 01.04.2009, in these patients of the Institute of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade, we monitored liver functional tests and morphological findings. We used biological markers relevant for the differential diagnosis, monitoring of disease progression and response to therapy. The results of the patients with hepatotoxic liver injury were compared with the values of the findings of the 52 patients in the control group, with the diagnosis of chronic viral hepatitis, hospitalized in the same institution during the same time. Results: The causes of toxic liver damage in our study were following agents, classified into groups: Industrial toxins (8 patients, Food and beverages (9 pts, Antirheumatics and analgesics (6 pts, Antiarrhythmic drugs (4 pts Antilipemic (4 pts

  1. The cyanobacteria toxins, microcystins – emerging risks to human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialysis patients appear to be at increased risk for exposure to cyanobacteria toxins; episodes of microcystin (MCYST) exposure via dialysate during 1996 and 2001 have been previously reported. During 2001, as many as 44 renal insufficiency patients were exposed to contaminated d...

  2. No evidence demonstrating hepatotoxicity associated with hydroxycitric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sidney J Stohs; Harry G Preuss; Sunny E Ohia; Gilbert R Kaats; Carl L Keen; Lonnie D Williams; George A Burdock

    2009-01-01

    Although a number of cases of hepatotoxicity are associated with the use of Hydroxycut weight management products,it has been alleged that their effects are primarily due to the presence of hydroxycitric acid (HCA,as Super CitriMax) in the formulations.However,while these products contain up to 20 different ingredients,some do not contain HCA.Case studies reported to date have not considered in depth the literature on the numerous animal and human studies that have been conducted on the safety and efficacy of HCA.No HCAassociated hepatotoxicity or treatment-related adverse effects have been reported in these studies,and thus it is premature to make the assumptions presented in the recent case studies regarding Hydroxycut.If it is established in well controlled studies that the use of these formulations with and/or without HCA can result in the occurrence or progression of hepatotoxicity,additional studies should be conducted to characterize the causative factor(s).

  3. Effect of amlodipine, lisinopril and allopurinol on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesreen E.M. Mohammed

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: Amlodipine, lisinopril or allopurinol can protect against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity, showing mechanistic roles of calcium channels, angiotensin converting enzyme and xanthine oxidase enzyme in the pathogenesis of hepatotoxicity induced by acetaminophen.

  4. Designing a machinery control system (MCS) security testbed

    OpenAIRE

    Desso, Nathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Industrial control systems (ICS) face daily cyber security threats, can have a significant impact to the security of our nation, and present a difficult challenge to defend. Critical infrastructures, including military systems like the machinery control systems (MCS) found onboard modern U.S. warships, are affected because of their use of commercial automation solutions. The increase of automated control systems within the U.S. Navy sa...

  5. Comprehensive insights into microcystin-LR effects on hepatic lipid metabolism using cross-omics technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zongyao; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Wu, Bing; Yin, Jinbao; Yu, Yunjiang; Yang, Liuyan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Use of cross-omics technologies to evaluate toxic effects of microcystin-LR. • Disturbance of hepatic lipid metabolism by oral exposure to microcystin-LR. • Crucial roles of gut microbial community shift in the metabolic disturbance induced by microcystin-LR. - Abstract: Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) can induce hepatic tissue damages and molecular toxicities, but its effects on lipid metabolism remain unknown. This study investigated the effects of MC-LR exposure on mice lipid metabolism and uncovered the underlying mechanism through metabonomic, transcriptomic and metagenomic analyses after administration of mice with MC-LR by gavage for 28 d. Increased liver weight and abdominal fat weight, and evident hepatic lipid vacuoles accumulation were observed in the mice fed with 0.2 mg/kg/d MC-LR. Serum nuclear magnetic resonance analysis showed that MC-LR treatment altered the levels of serum metabolites including triglyceride, unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) and very low density lipoprotein. Digital Gene Expression technology was used to reveal differential expression of hepatic transcriptomes, demonstrating that MC-LR treatment disturbed hepatic UFA biosynthesis and activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathways via Pparγ, Fabp1 and Fabp2 over-expression. Metagenomic analyses of gut microbiota revealed that MC-LR exposure also increased abundant ratio of Firmicutes vs. Bacteroidetes in gut and altered biosynthetic pathways of various microbial metabolic and pro-inflammatory molecules. In conclusion, oral MC-LR exposure can induce hepatic lipid metabolism disorder mediated by UFA biosynthesis and PPAR activation, and gut microbial community shift may play an important role in the metabolic disturbance.

  6. Comprehensive insights into microcystin-LR effects on hepatic lipid metabolism using cross-omics technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zongyao [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Center for Environmental Health Research, South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, The Ministry of Environmental Protection of PRC, Guangzhou 510655 (China); Zhang, Xu-Xiang, E-mail: zhangxx@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Wu, Bing; Yin, Jinbao [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Yu, Yunjiang [Center for Environmental Health Research, South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, The Ministry of Environmental Protection of PRC, Guangzhou 510655 (China); Yang, Liuyan, E-mail: yangly@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-09-05

    Highlights: • Use of cross-omics technologies to evaluate toxic effects of microcystin-LR. • Disturbance of hepatic lipid metabolism by oral exposure to microcystin-LR. • Crucial roles of gut microbial community shift in the metabolic disturbance induced by microcystin-LR. - Abstract: Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) can induce hepatic tissue damages and molecular toxicities, but its effects on lipid metabolism remain unknown. This study investigated the effects of MC-LR exposure on mice lipid metabolism and uncovered the underlying mechanism through metabonomic, transcriptomic and metagenomic analyses after administration of mice with MC-LR by gavage for 28 d. Increased liver weight and abdominal fat weight, and evident hepatic lipid vacuoles accumulation were observed in the mice fed with 0.2 mg/kg/d MC-LR. Serum nuclear magnetic resonance analysis showed that MC-LR treatment altered the levels of serum metabolites including triglyceride, unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) and very low density lipoprotein. Digital Gene Expression technology was used to reveal differential expression of hepatic transcriptomes, demonstrating that MC-LR treatment disturbed hepatic UFA biosynthesis and activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathways via Pparγ, Fabp1 and Fabp2 over-expression. Metagenomic analyses of gut microbiota revealed that MC-LR exposure also increased abundant ratio of Firmicutes vs. Bacteroidetes in gut and altered biosynthetic pathways of various microbial metabolic and pro-inflammatory molecules. In conclusion, oral MC-LR exposure can induce hepatic lipid metabolism disorder mediated by UFA biosynthesis and PPAR activation, and gut microbial community shift may play an important role in the metabolic disturbance.

  7. SNPs in Multi-Species Conserved Sequences (MCS as useful markers in association studies: a practical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pericak-Vance Margaret A

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although genes play a key role in many complex diseases, the specific genes involved in most complex diseases remain largely unidentified. Their discovery will hinge on the identification of key sequence variants that are conclusively associated with disease. While much attention has been focused on variants in protein-coding DNA, variants in noncoding regions may also play many important roles in complex disease by altering gene regulation. Since the vast majority of noncoding genomic sequence is of unknown function, this increases the challenge of identifying "functional" variants that cause disease. However, evolutionary conservation can be used as a guide to indicate regions of noncoding or coding DNA that are likely to have biological function, and thus may be more likely to harbor SNP variants with functional consequences. To help bias marker selection in favor of such variants, we devised a process that prioritizes annotated SNPs for genotyping studies based on their location within Multi-species Conserved Sequences (MCSs and used this process to select SNPs in a region of linkage to a complex disease. This allowed us to evaluate the utility of the chosen SNPs for further association studies. Previously, a region of chromosome 1q43 was linked to Multiple Sclerosis (MS in a genome-wide screen. We chose annotated SNPs in the region based on location within MCSs (termed MCS-SNPs. We then obtained genotypes for 478 MCS-SNPs in 989 individuals from MS families. Results Analysis of our MCS-SNP genotypes from the 1q43 region and comparison to HapMap data confirmed that annotated SNPs in MCS regions are frequently polymorphic and show subtle signatures of selective pressure, consistent with previous reports of genome-wide variation in conserved regions. We also present an online tool that allows MCS data to be directly exported to the UCSC genome browser so that MCS-SNPs can be easily identified within genomic regions of

  8. Analysis of intracellular and extracellular microcystin variants in sediments and pore waters by accelerated solvent extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastepa, Arthur; Pick, Frances R; Blais, Jules M; Saleem, Ammar

    2015-05-04

    The fate and persistence of microcystin cyanotoxins in aquatic ecosystems remains poorly understood in part due to the lack of analytical methods for microcystins in sediments. Existing methods have been limited to the extraction of a few extracellular microcystins of similar chemistry. We developed a single analytical method, consisting of accelerated solvent extraction, hydrophilic-lipophilic balance solid phase extraction, and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, suitable for the extraction and quantitation of both intracellular and extracellular cyanotoxins in sediments as well as pore waters. Recoveries of nine microcystins, representing the chemical diversity of microcystins, and nodularin (a marine analogue) ranged between 75 and 98% with one, microcystin-RR (MC-RR), at 50%. Chromatographic separation of these analytes was achieved within 7.5 min and the method detection limits were between 1.1 and 2.5 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw). The robustness of the method was demonstrated on sediment cores collected from seven Canadian lakes of diverse geography and trophic states. Individual microcystin variants reached a maximum concentration of 829 ng g(-1) dw on sediment particles and 132 ng mL(-1) in pore waters and could be detected in sediments as deep as 41 cm (>100 years in age). MC-LR, -RR, and -LA were more often detected while MC-YR, -LY, -LF, and -LW were less common. The analytical method enabled us to estimate sediment-pore water distribution coefficients (K(d)), MC-RR had the highest affinity for sediment particles (log K(d)=1.3) while MC-LA had the lowest affinity (log K(d)=-0.4), partitioning mainly into pore waters. Our findings confirm that sediments serve as a reservoir for microcystins but suggest that some variants may diffuse into overlying water thereby constituting a new route of exposure following the dissipation of toxic blooms. The method is well suited to determine the fate and persistence of different

  9. AK-SYS: An adaptation of the AK-MCS method for system reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauriat, W.; Gayton, N.

    2014-01-01

    A lot of research work has been proposed over the last two decades to evaluate the probability of failure of a structure involving a very time-consuming mechanical model. Surrogate model approaches based on Kriging, such as the Efficient Global Reliability Analysis (EGRA) or the Active learning and Kriging-based Monte-Carlo Simulation (AK-MCS) methods, are very efficient and each has advantages of its own. EGRA is well suited to evaluating small probabilities, as the surrogate can be used to classify any population. AK-MCS is built in relation to a given population and requires no optimization program for the active learning procedure to be performed. It is therefore easier to implement and more likely to spend computational effort on areas with a significant probability content. When assessing system reliability, analytical approaches and first-order approximation are widely used in the literature. However, in the present paper we rather focus on sampling techniques and, considering the recent adaptation of the EGRA method for systems, a strategy is presented to adapt the AK-MCS method for system reliability. The AK-SYS method, “Active learning and Kriging-based SYStem reliability method”, is presented. Its high efficiency and accuracy are illustrated via various examples

  10. Growth and microcystin production of a Brazilian Microcystis aeruginosa strain (LTPNA 02 under different nutrient conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Bortoli

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are prokaryotic and photosynthetic organisms, which can produce a wide range of bioactive compounds with different properties; including a variety of toxic compounds, also known as cyanotoxins. In this work, we describe the isolation of seven cyanobacterial strains from two reservoirs in São Paulo State, Brazil. Seven different chemical variants of microcystins (MC-RR, MC-LR, MC-YR, MC-LF, MC-LW, and two demethylated variants, dm-MC-RR and dm-MC-LR were detected in three of the ten isolated strains. One particular Microcystis aeruginosa strain (LTPNA 02 was chosen to evaluate its growth by cell count, and its toxin production under seven different nutritional regimes. We observed different growth behaviors in the logarithmic growth period for only three experiments (p < 0.05. The total growth analysis identified four experiments as different from the control (p < 0.01. Three microcystin variants (MC-RR, MC-LR and MC-YR were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. At the experimental end, the toxin content was unchanged when comparing cell growth in ASM-1 (N:P = 1, MLA and BG-11 (N:P = 10 medium. In all other experiments, the lowest microcystin production was observed from cells grown in Bold 3N medium during the exponential growth phase. The highest microcystin content was observed in cultures using BG-11(N:P = 100 medium.

  11. Identification of Toxic Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids and Their Common Hepatotoxicity Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinmiao Yan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids (PAs are currently one of the most important botanical hepatotoxic ingredients. Glutathion (GSH metabolism is the most reported pathway involved in hepatotoxicity mechanism of PAs. We speculate that, for different PAs, there should be a common mechanism underlying their hepatotoxicity in GSH metabolism. Computational methods were adopted to test our hypothesis in consideration of the limitations of current experimental approaches. Firstly, the potential targets of 22 PAs (from three major PA types in GSH metabolism were identified by reverse docking; Secondly, glutathione S-transferase A1 (GSTA1 and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1 targets pattern was found to be a special characteristic of toxic PAs with stepwise multiple linear regressions; Furthermore, the molecular mechanism underlying the interactions within toxic PAs and these two targets was demonstrated with the ligand-protein interaction analysis; Finally, GSTA1 and GPX1 were proved to be significant nodes in GSH metabolism. Overall, toxic PAs could be identified by GSTA1 and GPX1 targets pattern, which suggests their common hepatotoxicity mechanism: the interfering of detoxication in GSH metabolism. In addition, all the strategies developed here could be extended to studies on toxicity mechanism of other toxins.

  12. Identification of Toxic Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids and Their Common Hepatotoxicity Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xinmiao; Kang, Hong; Feng, Jun; Yang, Yiyan; Tang, Kailin; Zhu, Ruixin; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao; Cao, Zhiwei

    2016-03-07

    Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids (PAs) are currently one of the most important botanical hepatotoxic ingredients. Glutathion (GSH) metabolism is the most reported pathway involved in hepatotoxicity mechanism of PAs. We speculate that, for different PAs, there should be a common mechanism underlying their hepatotoxicity in GSH metabolism. Computational methods were adopted to test our hypothesis in consideration of the limitations of current experimental approaches. Firstly, the potential targets of 22 PAs (from three major PA types) in GSH metabolism were identified by reverse docking; Secondly, glutathione S-transferase A1 (GSTA1) and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) targets pattern was found to be a special characteristic of toxic PAs with stepwise multiple linear regressions; Furthermore, the molecular mechanism underlying the interactions within toxic PAs and these two targets was demonstrated with the ligand-protein interaction analysis; Finally, GSTA1 and GPX1 were proved to be significant nodes in GSH metabolism. Overall, toxic PAs could be identified by GSTA1 and GPX1 targets pattern, which suggests their common hepatotoxicity mechanism: the interfering of detoxication in GSH metabolism. In addition, all the strategies developed here could be extended to studies on toxicity mechanism of other toxins.

  13. Hepatotoxicity During Maintenance Therapy and Prognosis in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Maria S.; Nygaard, Ulrikka; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity is a known toxicity to treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Hepatotoxicity occurs during maintenance therapy and is caused by metabolites of 6-Mercaptopurine (6 MP) and Methotrexate (MTX). Our objective was to investigate the association between alanine...

  14. Detection of free and covalently bound microcystins in animal tissues by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neffling, Milla-Riina; Lance, Emilie; Meriluoto, Jussi

    2010-03-01

    Microcystins are cyanobacterial hepatotoxins capable of accumulation into animal tissues. The toxins act by inhibiting specific protein phosphatases and both non-covalent and covalent interactions occur. The 2-methyl-3-methoxy-4-phenylbutyric acid (MMPB) method determines the total, i.e. the sum of free and protein-bound microcystin in tissues. The aim of the method development in this paper was to tackle the problems with the MMPB methodology: the rather laborious workflow and the loss of material during different steps of the method. In the optimised workflow the oxidation recovery was of acceptable level (29-40%), the extraction efficiency good (62-97%), but the signal suppression effect from the matrix remained severe in our system (16-37% signal left). The extraction efficiency for the determination of the free, extractable microcystins, was found to be good, 52-100%, depending on the sample and the toxin variant and concentration. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Predicting Hepatotoxicity of Drug Metabolites Via an Ensemble Approach Based on Support Vector Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yin; Liu, Lili; Lu, Dong; Cai, Yudong; Zheng, Mingyue; Luo, Xiaomin; Jiang, Hualiang; Chen, Kaixian

    2017-11-20

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major cause of drug withdrawal. The chemical properties of the drug, especially drug metabolites, play key roles in DILI. Our goal is to construct a QSAR model to predict drug hepatotoxicity based on drug metabolites. 64 hepatotoxic drug metabolites and 3,339 non-hepatotoxic drug metabolites were gathered from MDL Metabolite Database. Considering the imbalance of the dataset, we randomly split the negative samples and combined each portion with all the positive samples to construct individually balanced datasets for constructing independent classifiers. Then, we adopted an ensemble approach to make prediction based on the results of all individual classifiers and applied the minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance (mRMR) feature selection method to select the molecular descriptors. Eventually, for the drugs in the external test set, a Bayesian inference method was used to predict the hepatotoxicity of a drug based on its metabolites. The model showed the average balanced accuracy=78.47%, sensitivity =74.17%, and specificity=82.77%. Five molecular descriptors characterizing molecular polarity, intramolecular bonding strength, and molecular frontier orbital energy were obtained. When predicting the hepatotoxicity of a drug based on all its metabolites, the sensitivity, specificity and balanced accuracy were 60.38%, 70.00%, and 65.19%, respectively, indicating that this method is useful for identifying the hepatotoxicity of drugs. We developed an in silico model to predict hepatotoxicity of drug metabolites. Moreover, Bayesian inference was applied to predict the hepatotoxicity of a drug based on its metabolites which brought out valuable high sensitivity and specificity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Enhancement of acetaminophen overdosage-induced hepatotoxicity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    paracetamol) overdosage-induced hepatotoxicity in three groups of albino Wistar rats. Administration of the minimum toxic dose of paracetamol (150mg/kg body weight) to animals (group II) produced significantly (P≤0.05) higher levels of alanine ...

  17. Inactivation Kinetics of the Cyanobacterial Toxin Microcystin-LR by Free Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide, the increasing occurrence of toxins produced by cyanobacteria in water bodies used as source waters for drinking water has become an important public health issue. Microcystin-LR is one of the most commonly found cyanotoxins. A detailed evaluation of the free chlorine ...

  18. Improved quantitative analysis of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films using MCs{sup +}-SIMS depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jihye; Kim, Seon Hee; Lee, Kang-Bong; Lee, Yeonhee [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Advanced Analysis Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byoung Koun [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Clean Energy Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The chalcopyrite semiconductor, Cu(InGa)Se{sub 2} (CIGS), is popular as an absorber material for incorporation in high-efficiency photovoltaic devices because it has an appropriate band gap and a high absorption coefficient. To improve the efficiency of solar cells, many research groups have studied the quantitative characterization of the CIGS absorber layers. In this study, a compositional analysis of a CIGS thin film was performed by depth profiling in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with MCs{sup +} (where M denotes an element from the CIGS sample) cluster ion detection, and the relative sensitivity factor of the cluster ion was calculated. The emission of MCs{sup +} ions from CIGS absorber elements, such as Cu, In, Ga, and Se, under Cs{sup +} ion bombardment was investigated using time-of-flight SIMS (TOF-SIMS) and magnetic sector SIMS. The detection of MCs{sup +} ions suppressed the matrix effects of varying concentrations of constituent elements of the CIGS thin films. The atomic concentrations of the CIGS absorber layers from the MCs{sup +}-SIMS exhibited more accurate quantification compared to those of elemental SIMS and agreed with those of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Both TOF-SIMS and magnetic sector SIMS depth profiles showed a similar MCs{sup +} distribution for the CIGS thin films. (orig.)

  19. Toxicity and genotoxicity in Astyanax bimaculatus (Characidae induced by microcystins from a bloom of Microcystis spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Rocha Pavan da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of genotoxicity in fish caused by cyanobacterial microcystins can be useful both in determining the sensitivity of native species, as well as comparing exposure routes. The genotoxicity caused by the microcystins LR and LA from a bloom collected in a eutrophic lake, was revealed in the fish Astyanax bimaculatus, a native species from South America. LC50 (72 h was determined as 242.81 µg L-1 and LD50 (72 h as 49.19 µg kg-1 bw. There was a significant increase of DNA damage in peripheral erythrocytes, following intraperitoneal injection (ip with tested concentrations of 24.58 µg kg-1 bw and 36.88 µg kg-1 bw, as well as through body exposure to a concentration of 103.72 µg L-1. Micronucleus (MN induction was observed after ip injections of 24.58 µg kg-1 bw and 36.88 µg kg-1 bw for 72 h, as well as following body exposure for 72 at 103.72 µg L-1. Thus, both exposure routes resulted in MN induction and DNA damage. Apoptosis-necrosis testing was carried out only by ip injection with concentrations of 24.58 µg -1 bw and 36.88 µg kg-1 bw. Exposure to microcystins at lower concentrations induced more apoptosis than necrosis in peripheral erythrocytes, whereas exposure at higher concentrations gave rise to both conditions. Thus, Astyanax bimaculatus can be considered as a species sensitive to the genotoxic effects caused by microcystins.

  20. Diverse taxa of cyanobacteria produce beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine, a neurotoxic amino acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Paul Alan; Banack, Sandra Anne; Murch, Susan J; Rasmussen, Ulla; Tien, Georgia; Bidigare, Robert Richard; Metcalf, James S; Morrison, Louise F; Codd, Geoffrey A; Bergman, Birgitta

    2005-04-05

    Cyanobacteria can generate molecules hazardous to human health, but production of the known cyanotoxins is taxonomically sporadic. For example, members of a few genera produce hepatotoxic microcystins, whereas production of hepatotoxic nodularins appears to be limited to a single genus. Production of known neurotoxins has also been considered phylogenetically unpredictable. We report here that a single neurotoxin, beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine, may be produced by all known groups of cyanobacteria, including cyanobacterial symbionts and free-living cyanobacteria. The ubiquity of cyanobacteria in terrestrial, as well as freshwater, brackish, and marine environments, suggests a potential for wide-spread human exposure.

  1. Diverse taxa of cyanobacteria produce β-N-methylamino-l-alanine, a neurotoxic amino acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Paul Alan; Banack, Sandra Anne; Murch, Susan J.; Rasmussen, Ulla; Tien, Georgia; Bidigare, Robert Richard; Metcalf, James S.; Morrison, Louise F.; Codd, Geoffrey A.; Bergman, Birgitta

    2005-01-01

    Cyanobacteria can generate molecules hazardous to human health, but production of the known cyanotoxins is taxonomically sporadic. For example, members of a few genera produce hepatotoxic microcystins, whereas production of hepatotoxic nodularins appears to be limited to a single genus. Production of known neurotoxins has also been considered phylogenetically unpredictable. We report here that a single neurotoxin, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine, may be produced by all known groups of cyanobacteria, including cyanobacterial symbionts and free-living cyanobacteria. The ubiquity of cyanobacteria in terrestrial, as well as freshwater, brackish, and marine environments, suggests a potential for wide-spread human exposure. PMID:15809446

  2. Degradation of natural toxins by phthalocyanines-example of cyanobacterial toxin, microcystin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jančula, D.; Blahová, L.; Karásková, M.; Maršálek, Blahoslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 2 (2010), s. 273-278 ISSN 0273-1223 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0571 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : microcystin * phthalocyanine * singled oxygen Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.056, year: 2010

  3. Limited Stability of Microcystins in Oligopeptide Compositions of Microcystis aeruginosa (Cyanobacteria: Implications in the Definition of Chemotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsy Agha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of diverse oligopeptides in cyanobacteria, including the cyanotoxins microcystins, has been recently used to classify individual clones into sub-specific oligopeptide chemotypes, whose composition and dynamics modulate microcystin concentrations in cyanobacterial blooms. Cyanobacterial chemotyping allows the study of the ecology of chemotypical subpopulations, which have been shown to possess dissimilar ecological traits. However, the stability of chemotypes under changing abiotic conditions is usually assumed and has not been assessed in detail. We monitored oligopeptide patterns of three strains of Microcystis aeruginosa under different nutrient and light conditions. MALDI-TOF MS revealed alterations in the microcystins signatures under N and P poor conditions and high light intensities (150 and 400 μmol photons m−2s−1. Variations in the general oligopeptide composition were caused by a gradual disappearance of microcystins with low relative intensity signals from the fingerprint. The extent of such variations seems to be closely related to physiological stress caused by treatments. Under identical clonal compositions, alterations in the oligopeptide fingerprint may be misinterpreted as apparent shifts in chemotype succession. We discuss the nature of such variations, as well as the consequent implications in the use of cyanobacterial chemotyping in studies at the subpopulation level and propose new guidance for the definition of chemotypes as a consistent subpopulation marker.

  4. Fusion of hyperspectral remote sensing data for near real-time monitoring of microcystin distribution in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannah, Benjamin; Chang, Ni-Bin

    2013-09-01

    Urban growth and agricultural production have caused an influx of nutrients into Lake Erie, leading to eutrophic zones. These conditions result in the formation of algal blooms, some of which are toxic due to the presence of Microcystis (a cyanobacteria), which produces the hepatotoxin microcystin. Microcystis has a unique advantage over its competition as a result of the invasive zebra mussel population that filters algae out of the water column except for the toxic Microcystis. The toxin threatens human health and the ecosystem, and it is a concern for water treatment plants using the lake water as a tap water source. This presentation demonstrates the prototype of a near real-time early warning system using Integrated Data Fusion techniques with the aid of both hyperspectral remote sensing data to determine spatiotemporal microcystin concentrations. The temporal resolution of MODIS is fused with the higher spatial and spectral resolution of MERIS to create synthetic images on a daily basis. As a demonstration, the spatiotemporal distributions of microcystin within western Lake Erie are reconstructed using the band data from the fused products and applied machine-learning techniques. Analysis of the results through statistical indices confirmed that the this type of algorithm has better potential to accurately estimating microcystin concentrations in the lake, which is better than current two band models and other computational intelligence models.

  5. Comparison of Protein Phosphatase Inhibition Assay with LC-MS/MS for Diagnosis of Microcystin Toxicosis in Veterinary Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline E. Moore

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins are acute hepatotoxins of increasing global concern in drinking and recreational waters and are a major health risk to humans and animals. Produced by cyanobacteria, microcystins inhibit serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 (PP1. A cost-effective PP1 assay using p-nitrophenyl phosphate was developed to quickly assess water and rumen content samples. Significant inhibition was determined via a linear model, which compared increasing volumes of sample to the log-transformed ratio of the exposed rate over the control rate of PP1 activity. To test the usefulness of this model in diagnostic case investigations, samples from two veterinary cases were tested. In August 2013 fifteen cattle died around two ponds in Kentucky. While one pond and three tested rumen contents had significant PP1 inhibition and detectable levels of microcystin-LR, the other pond did not. In August 2013, a dog became fatally ill after swimming in Clear Lake, California. Lake water samples collected one and four weeks after the dog presented with clinical signs inhibited PP1 activity. Subsequent analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS detected microcystin congeners -LR, -LA, -RR and -LF but not -YR. These diagnostic investigations illustrate the advantages of using functional assays in combination with LC-MS/MS.

  6. Identification of metabolites, clinical chemistry markers and transcripts associated with hepatotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Buness

    Full Text Available Early and accurate pre-clinical and clinical biomarkers of hepatotoxicity facilitate the drug development process and the safety monitoring in clinical studies. We selected eight known model compounds to be administered to male Wistar rats to identify biomarkers of drug induced liver injury (DILI using transcriptomics, metabolite profiling (metabolomics and conventional endpoints. We specifically explored early biomarkers in serum and liver tissue associated with histopathologically evident acute hepatotoxicity. A tailored data analysis strategy was implemented to better differentiate animals with no treatment-related findings in the liver from animals showing evident hepatotoxicity as assessed by histopathological analysis. From the large number of assessed parameters, our data analysis strategy allowed us to identify five metabolites in serum and five in liver tissue, 58 transcripts in liver tissue and seven clinical chemistry markers in serum that were significantly associated with acute hepatotoxicity. The identified markers comprised metabolites such as taurocholic acid and putrescine (measured as sum parameter together with agmatine, classical clinical chemistry markers like AST (aspartate aminotransferase, ALT (alanine aminotransferase, and bilirubin, as well as gene transcripts like Igfbp1 (insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 and Egr1 (early growth response protein 1. The response pattern of the identified biomarkers was concordant across all types of parameters and sample matrices. Our results suggest that a combination of several of these biomarkers could significantly improve the robustness and accuracy of an early diagnosis of hepatotoxicity.

  7. Liver inflammation during monocrotaline hepatotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copple, Bryan L.; Ganey, Patricia E.; Roth, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Monocrotaline (MCT) is a pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) plant toxin that causes hepatotoxicity in humans and animals. Human exposure occurs from consumption of contaminated grains and herbal teas and medicines. Intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) of 300 mg/kg MCT in rats produced time-dependent hepatic parenchymal cell (HPC) injury beginning at 12 h. At this time, an inflammatory infiltrate consisting of neutrophils (PMNs) appeared in areas of hepatocellular injury, and activation of the coagulation system occurred. PMN accumulation was preceded by up-regulation of the PMN chemokines cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in the liver. The monocyte chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), was also upregulated. Inhibition of Kupffer cell function with gadolinium chloride (GdCl 3 ) significantly reduced CINC-1 protein in plasma after MCT treatment but had no effect on hepatic PMN accumulation. Since inflammation can contribute to either pathogenesis or resolution of tissue injury, we explored inflammatory factors as a contributor to MCT hepatotoxicity. To test the hypothesis that PMNs contribute to MCT-induced HPC injury, rats were depleted of PMNs with a rabbit anti-PMN serum prior to MCT treatment. Anti-PMN treatment reduced hepatic PMN accumulation by 80% but had no effect on MCT-induced HPC injury or activation of the coagulation system. To test the hypothesis that Kupffer cells and/or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are required for MCT-induced HPC injury, rats were treated with either GdCl 3 to inhibit Kupffer cell function or pentoxifylline (PTX) to prevent synthesis of TNF-α. Neither treatment prevented MCT-induced HPC injury. Results from these studies suggest that PMNs, Kupffer cells and TNF-α are not critical mediators of MCT hepatotoxicity. Accordingly, although inflammation occurs in the liver after MCT treatment, it is not required for HPC injury and possibly occurs secondary to

  8. Effect of anemia on hepatotoxicity of HAART in HIV patients in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatotoxicity is a relevant adverse effect of highly active antiretroviral Treatment owing to its frequency, and it can cause interruption of therapy, hepatitis, and death. There is dearth of information on hepatotoxicity arising from highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in anemic patients. Anemia is the most ...

  9. Cyanobacteria and microcystin contamination in untreated and treated drinking water in Ghana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Addico, G.N.D.; Hardege, J. D.; Kohoutek, J.; Degraft-Johnson, K. A. A.; Babica, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2017), s. 92-106 ISSN 1947-573X Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Ghana * microcystin * drinking water treatment Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7)

  10. Toxin content and cytotoxicity of algal dietary supplements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heussner, A.H.; Mazija, L. [Human and Environmental Toxicology, University of Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Fastner, J. [Federal Environmental Agency, Section II 3.3—Drinking-water resources and treatment, Berlin (Germany); Dietrich, D.R., E-mail: daniel.dietrich@uni-konstanz.de [Human and Environmental Toxicology, University of Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz (Germany)

    2012-12-01

    Blue-green algae (Spirulina sp., Aphanizomenon flos-aquae) and Chlorella sp. are commercially distributed as organic algae dietary supplements. Cyanobacterial dietary products in particular have raised serious concerns, as they appeared to be contaminated with toxins e.g. microcystins (MCs) and consumers repeatedly reported adverse health effects following consumption of these products. The aim of this study was to determine the toxin contamination and the in vitro cytotoxicity of algae dietary supplement products marketed in Germany. In thirteen products consisting of Aph. flos-aquae, Spirulina and Chlorella or mixtures thereof, MCs, nodularins, saxitoxins, anatoxin-a and cylindrospermopsin were analyzed. Five products tested in an earlier market study were re-analyzed for comparison. Product samples were extracted and analyzed for cytotoxicity in A549 cells as well as for toxin levels by (1) phosphatase inhibition assay (PPIA), (2) Adda-ELISA and (3) LC–MS/MS. In addition, all samples were analyzed by PCR for the presence of the mcyE gene, a part of the microcystin and nodularin synthetase gene cluster. Only Aph. flos-aquae products were tested positive for MCs as well as the presence of mcyE. The contamination levels of the MC-positive samples were ≤ 1 μg MC-LR equivalents g{sup −1} dw. None of the other toxins were found in any of the products. However, extracts from all products were cytotoxic. In light of the findings, the distribution and commercial sale of Aph. flos-aquae products, whether pure or mixed formulations, for human consumption appear highly questionable. -- Highlights: ► Marketed algae dietary supplements were analyzed for toxins. ► Methods: Phosphatase inhibition assay (PPIA), Adda-ELISA, LC-MS/MS. ► Aph. flos-aquae products all tested positive for microcystins. ► Products tested negative for nodularins, saxitoxins, anatoxin-a, cylindrospermopsin. ► Extracts from all products were cytotoxic.

  11. Land use patterns, ecoregion, and microcystin relationships in U.S. lakes and reservoirs: a preliminary evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, John R.; Manis, Erin E.; Loftin, Keith A.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Pollard, Amina I.; Mitchell, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    A statistically significant association was found between the concentration of total microcystin, a common class of cyanotoxins, in surface waters of lakes and reservoirs in the continental U.S. with watershed land use using data from 1156 water bodies sampled between May and October 2007 as part of the USEPA National Lakes Assessment. Nearly two thirds (65.8%) of the samples with microcystin concentrations ≥1.0 μg/L (n = 126) were limited to three nutrient and water quality-based ecoregions (Corn Belt and Northern Great Plains, Mostly Glaciated Dairy Region, South Central Cultivated Great Plains) in watersheds with strong agricultural influence. canonical correlation analysis (CCA) indicated that both microcystin concentrations and cyanobacteria abundance were positively correlated with total nitrogen, dissolved organic carbon, and temperature; correlations with total phosphorus and water clarity were not as strong. This study supports a number of regional lake studies that suggest that land use practices are related to cyanobacteria abundance, and extends the potential impacts of agricultural land use in watersheds to include the production of cyanotoxins in lakes.

  12. Hepatotoxicity in HIV-infected children and adolescents on antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cecília Montes Gil

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Adverse drug reactions are a significant problem in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART. We determined liver enzyme elevation frequencies in HIV-infected children and adolescents receiving ART, and their association with risk factors. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study, at the Pediatrics Immunodeficiency Division, University Hospital, Universidade Estadual de Campinas. METHODS: Medical records of 152 children and adolescents (54.6% male; median age 7.48 years were analyzed, with a mean of 2.6 liver enzyme determinations per patient. Clinically, patients were classified in categories N (6, A (29, B (78 and C (39. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase were evaluated. Hepatotoxicity was scored as grade 1 (1.1-4.9 times upper limit of normality, ULN, grade 2 (5.0-9.9 times ULN, grade 3 (10.0-15.0 times ULN and grade 4 (> 15.0 times ULN. To assess hepatotoxicity risk factors, odds ratios (OR and adjusted odds ratios (aOR for age, gender, TCD4+ cell count, viral load and medication usage were calculated. RESULTS: We observed grade 1 hepatotoxicity in 19.7 % (30/152 patients. No cases of grade 2, 3 or 4 were detected. There was a significant association between hepatotoxicity and use of sulfonamides (OR, 3.61; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.50-8.70; aOR, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.44-8.85 and antituberculous agents (OR, 9.23; 95% CI, 1.60-53.08; aOR, 9.05; 95% CI, 1.48-55.25. No toxicity was associated with ART. CONCLUSIONS: One fifth of patients experienced mild hepatotoxicity, attributed to antituberculous agents and sulfonamides. Our results suggest that ART was well tolerated.

  13. Using H2O2 treatments for the degradation of cyanobacteria and microcystins in a shallow hypertrophic reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Theodoti; Kormas, Konstantinos; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Laspidou, Chrysi

    2016-11-01

    Toxins produced by cyanobacteria in freshwater ecosystems constitute a serious health risk worldwide for humans that may use the affected water bodies for recreation, drinking water, and/or irrigation. Cyanotoxins have also been deemed responsible for loss of animal life in many places around the world. This paper explores the effect of H 2 O 2 treatments on cyanobacteria and microcystins in natural samples from a hypertrophic reservoir in microcosm experiments. According to the results, cyanobacteria were more easily affected by H 2 O 2 than by other phytoplanktonic groups. This was shown by the increase in the fractions of chlorophyll-a (a proxy for phytoplankton) and chlorophyll-b (a proxy for green algae) over total phytoplankton pigments and the decrease in the fraction of phycocyanin (a proxy for cyanobacteria) over total phytoplankton pigments. Thus, while an overall increase in phytoplankton occurred, a preferential decrease in cyanobacteria was observed with H 2 O 2 treatments over a few hours. Moreover, significant degradation of total microcystins was observed under H 2 O 2 treatments, while more microcystins were degraded when UV radiation was used in combination with H 2 O 2 . The combination of H 2 O 2 and ultraviolet (UV) treatment in natural samples resulted in total microcystin concentrations that were below the World Health Organization limit for safe consumption of drinking water of 1 μg/L. Although further investigation into the effects of H 2 O 2 addition on ecosystem function must be performed, our results show that the application of H 2 O 2 could be a promising method for the degradation of microcystins in reservoirs and the reduction of public health risks related to the occurrence of harmful algal blooms.

  14. Analysis of 90 cases of antithyroid drug-induced severe hepatotoxicity over 13 years in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Li, Lin-Fa; Xu, Qin; Zhang, Jun; Weng, Wan-Wen; Zhu, Yang-Jun; Dong, Meng-Jie

    2015-03-01

    Antithyroid drug (ATD)-induced severe hepatotoxicity is a rare but serious complication of ATD therapy. The characteristics of severe hepatotoxicity have been reported in only a small number of patients. Ninety patients with ATD-induced severe hepatotoxicity presenting during a 13 year period (2000-2013) who were about to undergo nuclear medicine therapy with (131)I from a sample of 8864 patients with hyperthyroidism were studied, and the outcomes were evaluated. The mean age of the patients with ATD-induced severe hepatotoxicity was 41.6±12.5 years (mean±standard deviation), and the female to male ratio was 2.2:1. The methimazole (MMI) dose given at the onset was 19.1±7.4 mg/day. The propylthiouracil (PTU) dose given at the onset was 212.8±105.0 mg/day. ATD-induced severe hepatotoxicity occurred in 63.3%, 75.6%, and 81.1% of patients within 4, 8, and 12 weeks of the onset of ATD therapy, respectively. The types of severe hepatotoxicity did not differ significantly between the MMI and PTU groups (p=0.188). The frequency of the cholestatic type in the MMI group (35.3%, 18/51) was higher than that in the PTU group (17.9%, 7/39), but these frequencies were not significantly different (p=0.069). The patients who were treated with (131)I received an average dose of 279.1±86.1 MBq (n=84). Therapy was successful in 60 of the 67 patients (89.6%). The success rate was equivalent (p=0.696) between the groups receiving MMI (91.7%, 33/36) and PTU (87.1%, 27/31). Severe hepatotoxicity tends to occur within the first three months after the onset of ATD therapy. The type of ATD-induced severe hepatotoxicity did not differ between the MMI and PTU groups. (131)I therapy is an effective treatment approach for patients with ATD-induced severe hepatotoxicity.

  15. Hepatotoxicity induced by methimazole in a previously healthy patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallelli, Luca; Staltari, Orietta; Palleria, Caterina; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Ferraro, Maria

    2009-09-01

    We report a case of hepatotoxicity induced by methimazole treatment in a patient affected by hyperthyroidism. A 54-year-old man, presented to our observation for palpitations, excessive sweating, weakness, heat intolerance and weight loss. On physical examination, his blood pressure was 140/90 mmHg and heart beat was 100/min regular. He had mild tremors and left exophthalmos. Laboratory test revealed a significant increase in serum thyroid hormone levels with a decrease in thyroid stimulating hormone levels. A diagnosis of hyperthyroidism was made and he began treatment with methimazole (30 mg/day). Fourteen days later, he returned for the development of scleral icterus, followed by dark urine, and abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant. Laboratory examinations and liver biopsy performed a diagnosis of cholestatic hepatitis, secondary to methimazole usage. Methimazole was promptly withdrawn and cholestyramine, ursodeoxycholic acid, and chlorpheniramine were given. After five days, abdominal pain resolved and laboratory parameters returned to normal. Naranjo probability scale indicated a probable relationship between hepatotoxicity and methimazole therapy. In conclusion physicians should be aware the risk of hepatotoxicity related with methimazole.

  16. Application of Modbus communication protocol and float-point display in MCS51 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Xiangcheng; Liu Shaozhen

    2010-01-01

    As its widely opening and easy performance, Modbus communication protocol has a great advantage in field bus using. Details are given on a method to implement Modbus communication protocol based on MCS51 system, and the advantage of uVision integrated environment. The design realizes Modbus RTU mode communication, meanwhile the problem of synchronization in communication is solved. And float-point operation and display are achieved by format print. All of this are carried out under uVision integrated environment. The result approves that the response ratio of Modbus communication is 100%. The design shows the advantage of uVision integrated environment and MCS51 system. And also gives solution to the occasion where communication interface and low cost are required. (authors)

  17. Iron based sustainable greener technologies to treat cyanobacteria and microcystin-LR in water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sharma, V. K.; Chen, L.; Maršálek, Blahoslav; Zbořil, R.; O'Shea, K. E.; Dionysiou, D. D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2017), s. 107-114 ISSN 1606-9749 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : detoxification * microcystin * oxidation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Environmental biotechnology Impact factor: 0.573, year: 2016

  18. Hepatotoxicity of illegal home-made alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökce, Hasan; Akcan, Ramazan; Celikel, Adnan; Zeren, Cem; Ortanca, Ibrahim; Demirkiran, Sumeyra

    2016-10-01

    Alcohol-related hepatotoxicity is not only caused by excessive alcohol consumption but also caused and even accelerated by hepatotoxic ingredients other than ethanol. Concentrations of hepatotoxic substances might be significantly high, particularly in illegally produced home-made alcohols. In this study we aim to analyze the hepatotoxic effects of a home-made alcohol traditionally called "bogma raki" in Turkey. Fifty Wistar albino male rats were used. Five groups were randomly formed with ten animals in each. Besides laboratory diets, groups were fed as follows: Group 1 (control group) distilled water; Group 2 bogma raki with distilled water (%44 (v/v), 9.2 ml/kg/day); Group 3 bogma raki with distilled water (%44 (v/v), 9.2 ml/kg/day)+walnut (10 g/kg/day); Group 4 whisky with distilled water (%40 (v/v), 9.2 ml/kg/day); Group 5 distilled water + walnut (10 g/kg/day), for 28 days. The toxicological analysis of The spirits were analyzed using Hewlett-Packard (Palo Alto, CA) GC/MS system with HP 6890 gas chromatograph, an HP 5972 mass selective detector (MSD) and an HP 6890 automatic liquid sampler GC/MS; the pressure of the carrier gas helium was 6.0 bar and the split value with a ratio of 1:100. The injection unit temperature set to 250 °C and MS quadrupole temperature set to 280 °C. The MS quadrupole detector ionization energy set to 70 eV. The initial column temperature was 60 °C (for 4 min) programmed by 6 °C/min to final temperature 160 °C and kept for 8 min at 160 °C. Utilized whisky and bogma raki samples were analyzed for the amounts of trans-anethole, ethanol, methanol, 1-propanolol, butanol, 2-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanolol (isobutanol) and 3-methylbutanol (isoamyl alcohol). Histopathological changes in liver tissues were graded as follows; normal = 0 (illegally produced raki sample (%v/v) was as follows: trans-anethole %1.93, ethanol %95.70, 2-methyl-1-propanolol (isobutanol) %0.19, asetic acid %0.25, 3-methylbutanol (isoamyl

  19. [Hepatotoxicity in healthy infants exposed to nevirapine during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iveli, Pablo; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Soler-Palacín, Pere; Martín-Nalda, Andrea; Rovira-Girabal, Núria; Fortuny-Guasch, Clàudia; Figueras-Nadal, Concepció

    2016-01-01

    The use of nevirapine in HIV-infected pregnant women is discouraged due to its potential to cause hepatotoxicity. There is limited information available on the toxicity in non-HIV infected newborn exposed to this drug during pregnancy. The aim of the study is to determine the extent of hepatotoxicity in the newborn exposed to nevirapine and HIV during pregnancy. A cross-sectional, observational, multicenter study was conducted on a cohort of healthy infants born to HIV-infected mothers, in whom the first determination of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), before 6weeks of age, was collected. Patients were allocated to 2groups according to exposure to nevirapine during pregnancy. Hepatotoxicity was rated according to the AIDS Table for Grading the Severity of Adult and Pediatric Adverse Events (DAIDS). This study included 160newborns from 159pregnancies (88exposed to nevirapine-based regimens and 71 exposed to protease inhibitors-based therapies). No cases of hepatotoxicity were observed according to the DAIDS Table for Grading. Two cases of ALT above normal values (2.8%; 95%CI: 0.3-9.8%) were observed in patients not exposed to nevirapine, and one case (1.1%; 95%CI: 0.0-6.1%) in the group exposed to nevirapine (P=.585). The lack of differences between groups suggests that highly active antiretroviral treatment regimens including nevirapine administered during pregnancy do not involve a higher risk of liver disease compared to other treatment combinations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  20. First report of an Anabaena Bory strain containing microcystin-LR in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In South Africa, little is known about the production of microcystin by the genus Anabaena Bory. In April 2012, during a cyanobacterial bloom event in Theewaterskloof Dam, Western Cape province, the plankton was sampled on 10 occasions. The dominant algae belonged to the genus Anabaena, a family of filamentous ...

  1. Plasma extraction rate and collection efficiency during therapeutic plasma exchange with Spectra Optia in comparison with Haemonetics MCS+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Catherine; Gericke, Marion; Smith, Richard; Hermans, Cedric

    2011-01-01

    For therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), continuous and intermittent flow separators are known to be efficient. This study was undertaken to compare the performances of the Spectra Optia, a continuous flow centrifugal apheresis system recently developed by CaridianBCT, with the Haemonetics Multicomponents System (MCS)+ apheresis system based on intermittent flow centrifugation. The primary objective of the study was to compare the time required to exchange one total plasma volume with both separators. The secondary objectives were to determine the plasma exchange efficiency, the plasma extraction rate, the percentage of target exchange volume achieved, and the loss of cellular components. The study involved prospectively paired comparison of 16 TPE on each device performed in patients with chronic diseases treated with TPE. The time required to exchange 1 total plasma volume was 182 ± 36 minutes for MCS+ procedures and 100 ± 20 minutes for the Spectra Optia procedures (P higher plasma extraction rate was achieved (30.2 ± 4.3 vs 16.8 ± 3.4 mL/min, respectively, P exchange efficiency was slightly better with the Spectra Optia compared with the MCS+ procedures (83.4 ± 7.0 vs 80.0 ± 8.5%, P higher extraction rate and exchange efficiency than the MCS+ allowing to remove the same amount of plasma in less time, by processing less blood. It also removes significantly less platelets than the MCS+ separator. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Hepatotoxicity of amiodarone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J

    1986-01-01

    of the hepatotoxicity of amiodarone is given. It is concluded that solid evidence exists of hepatic injury due to amiodarone treatment, including steatosis, alterations resembling alcoholic hepatitis, cholestatic hepatitis and micronodular cirrhosis of the liver. Patients receiving amiodarone should be regularly......Amiodarone has proved very effective in the treatment of otherwise resistant cardiac tachyarrhythmias. The use of amiodarone has, however, been limited due to its serious side-effects. A patient with cholestatic hepatitis due to amiodarone treatment is presented below and a review...... screened with respect to hepatic enzyme levels. Therapy should be discontinued on the suspicion of cholestatic injury or hepatomegaly....

  3. The impact of MCS models and EFAC values on the dose simulation for a proton pencil beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shih-Kuan; Chiang, Bing-Hao; Lee, Chung-Chi; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Hong, Ji-Hong; Chao, Tsi-Chian

    2017-01-01

    The Multiple Coulomb Scattering (MCS) model plays an important role in accurate MC simulation, especially for small field applications. The Rossi model is used in MCNPX 2.7.0, and the Lewis model in Geant4.9.6.p02. These two models may generate very different angular and spatial distributions in small field proton dosimetry. Beside angular and spatial distributions, step size is also an important issue that causes path length effects. The Energy Fraction (EFAC) value can be used in MCNPX 2.7.0 to control step sizes of MCS. In this study, we use MCNPX 2.7.0, Geant4.9.6.p02, and one pencil beam algorithm to evaluate the effect of dose deposition because of different MCS models and different EFAC values in proton disequilibrium situation. Different MCS models agree well with each other under a proton equilibrium situation. Under proton disequilibrium situations, the MCNPX and Geant4 results, however, show a significant deviation (up to 43%). In addition, the path length effects are more significant when EFAC is equal to 0.917 and 0.94 in small field proton dosimetry, and using a 0.97 EFAC value is the best for both accuracy and efficiency - Highlights: • MCS and EFAC are important in accurate MC simulation for proton pencil beams. • Bragg curves of MCNPX and Geant4 have a dose deviation up to 43%. • Lateral profiles from MCNPX is wider than those from Geant4. • Large EFAC caused path length effect, but no effects on lateral profiles. • 0.97 EFAC value is the best for both accuracy and efficiency.

  4. Detection of microcystin and other cyanotoxins in lakes at Isle Royale National Park, Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, and Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, northern Michigan, 2012–13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Lori M.; Brennan, Angela K.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Loftin, Keith A.; Johnson, Heather E.; VanderMeulen, David D.; Lafrancois, Brenda Moraska

    2017-12-05

    Although cyanotoxins released during algal blooms have become an increasing concern in surface waters across the United States, the presence of cyanotoxins in northern Michigan lakes had not been evaluated in detail. The U.S. Geological Survey and National Park Service (NPS) led a 2-year study (2012 and 2013) to determine the presence of microcystin and other algal toxins in several inland lakes at Isle Royale National Park (hereafter referred to as ISRO, Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore (hereafter referred to as PIRO), and Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (hereafter referred to as SLBE). Samples also were collected at four sites in Lake Michigan within the SLBE. The two analytical techniques used in the study were enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for microcystin, cylindrospermopsin, and saxitoxin; and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) for a larger suite of algal toxins. Neither cylindrospermopsin nor saxitoxin were detected in the 211 samples. Microcystin was detected in 31 percent of samples (65 of 211 samples) analyzed by the ELISA method, but no sample results exceeded the World Health Organization recreational health advisory standard for microcystin (10 micrograms per liter [µg/L]). However, about 10 percent of the samples (21 of 211 samples) that were collected from PIRO and SLBE and were analyzed by ELISA for microcystin had concentrations greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drinking water 10-day health advisory of 0.3 µg/L for children preschool age and younger (less than 6-years old). One sample collected in 2012 from SLBE exceeded the EPA drinking water 10-day health advisory of 1.6 µg/L for school-age children through adults (6-years old and older). In 2012, the highest concentration of 2.7 µg/L was detected in Florence Lake within SLBE. Many visitors enjoy recreation in or on the water and camp in the backcountry at these national parks where the most common source of drinking water

  5. Are We Underestimating Benthic Cyanotoxins? Extensive Sampling Results from Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique A. Cantoral Uriza

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MCs are potent hepatotoxins, and their presence in water bodies poses a threat to wildlife and human populations. Most of the available information refers to plankton, and much less is known about microcystins in other habitats. To broaden our understanding of the presence and environmental distribution of this group of toxins, we conducted extensive sampling throughout Spain, under a range of conditions and in distinct aquatic and terrestrial habitats. More than half of the tested strains were toxic; concentrations of the hepatotoxin were low compared with planktic communities, and the number of toxic variants identified in each sample of the Spanish strains ranged from 1–3. The presence of microcystins LF and LY (MC-LF and MC-LY in the tested samples was significant, and ranged from 21.4% to 100% of the total microcystins per strain. These strains were only detected in cyanobacteria Oscillatoriales and Nostocales. We can report, for the first time, seven new species of microcystin producers in high mountain rivers and chasmoendolithic communities. This is the first report of these species in Geitlerinema and the confirmation of Anatoxin-a in Phormidium uncinatum. Our findings show that microcystins are widespread in all habitat types, including both aerophytic and endolithic peat bogs and that it is necessary to identify all the variants of microcystins in aquatic bodies as the commonest toxins sometimes represent a very low proportion of the total.

  6. Are We Underestimating Benthic Cyanotoxins? Extensive Sampling Results from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantoral Uriza, Enrique A; Asencio, Antonia D; Aboal, Marina

    2017-11-28

    Microcystins (MCs) are potent hepatotoxins, and their presence in water bodies poses a threat to wildlife and human populations. Most of the available information refers to plankton, and much less is known about microcystins in other habitats. To broaden our understanding of the presence and environmental distribution of this group of toxins, we conducted extensive sampling throughout Spain, under a range of conditions and in distinct aquatic and terrestrial habitats. More than half of the tested strains were toxic; concentrations of the hepatotoxin were low compared with planktic communities, and the number of toxic variants identified in each sample of the Spanish strains ranged from 1-3. The presence of microcystins LF and LY (MC-LF and MC-LY) in the tested samples was significant, and ranged from 21.4% to 100% of the total microcystins per strain. These strains were only detected in cyanobacteria Oscillatoriales and Nostocales. We can report, for the first time, seven new species of microcystin producers in high mountain rivers and chasmoendolithic communities. This is the first report of these species in Geitlerinema and the confirmation of Anatoxin-a in Phormidium uncinatum . Our findings show that microcystins are widespread in all habitat types, including both aerophytic and endolithic peat bogs and that it is necessary to identify all the variants of microcystins in aquatic bodies as the commonest toxins sometimes represent a very low proportion of the total.

  7. Toxicology of microcystins with reference to cases of human intoxications and epidemiological investigations of exposures to cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirčev, Zorica; Drobac, Damjana; Tokodi, Nada; Mijović, Biljana; Codd, Geoffrey A; Meriluoto, Jussi

    2017-02-01

    Blooms of cyanobacteria have been documented throughout history, all over the world. Mass populations of these organisms typically present hazards to human health and are known for the production of a wide range of highly toxic metabolites-cyanotoxins, of which among the most common and most investigated are the microcystins. The toxicity of the family of microcystin congeners to animal and cell models has received much attention; however, less is known about their negative effects on human health, whether via acute or chronic exposure. Useful information may be acquired through epidemiological studies since they can contribute to knowledge of the relationships between cyanotoxins and human health in environmental settings. The aim of this review is to compile and evaluate the available published reports and epidemiological investigations of human health incidents associated with exposure to mass populations of cyanobacteria from throughout the world and to identify the occurrence and likely role of microcystins in these events. After an initial screening of 134 publications, 42 publications (25 on the chronic and 17 on the acute effects of cyanotoxins) describing 33 cases of poisonings by cyanobacterial toxins in 11 countries were reviewed. The countries were Australia, China, Sri Lanka, Namibia, Serbia, Sweden, UK, Portugal, Brazil, USA, and Canada. At least 36 publications link cyanobacteria/cyanotoxins including microcystins to adverse human health effects. The studies were published between 1960 and 2016. Although the scattered epidemiological evidence does not provide a definitive conclusion, it can serve as additional information for the medical assessment of the role of microcystins in cancer development and other human health problems. This paper discusses the major cases of cyanotoxin poisonings as well as the strengths, weaknesses, and importance of the performed epidemiological research. This study also proposes some recommendations for future

  8. A spontaneous mutant of microcystin biosynthesis: genetic characterization and effect on Daphnia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabernick, M.; Rohrlack, T.; Christoffersen, K.

    2001-01-01

    . Regardless of microcystin content, both Daphnia exhibited significantly reduced ingestion rates when fed with either strain of M. aeruginosa compared with the green alga Scenedesmus acutus. A disruption of the molting process in both Daphnia spp. was noted when these species were fed with MRC cells...

  9. Anti-tuberculosis therapy-induced hepatotoxicity among Ethiopian HIV-positive and negative patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getnet Yimer

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available To assess and compare the prevalence, severity and prognosis of anti-TB drug induced hepatotoxicity (DIH in HIV positive and HIV negative tuberculosis (TB patients in Ethiopia.In this study, 103 HIV positive and 94 HIV negative TB patients were enrolled. All patients were evaluated for different risk factors and monitored biochemically and clinically for development of DIH. Sub-clinical hepatotoxicity was observed in 17.3% of the patients and 8 out of the 197 (4.1% developed clinical hepatotoxicity. Seven of the 8 were HIV positive and 2 were positive for HBsAg.Sub-clinical hepatotoxicity was significantly associated with HIV co-infection (p = 0.002, concomitant drug intake (p = 0.008, and decrease in CD4 count (p = 0.001. Stepwise restarting of anti TB treatment was also successful in almost all the patients who developed clinical DIH. We therefore conclude that anti-TB DIH is a major problem in HIV-associated TB with a decline in immune status and that there is a need for a regular biochemical and clinical follow up for those patients who are at risk.

  10. Accuracy of the paracetamol-aminotransferase multiplication product to predict hepatotoxicity in modified-release paracetamol overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Anselm; Sivilotti, Marco L A; Graudins, Andis

    2017-06-01

    The paracetamol-aminotransferase multiplication product (APAP × ALT) is a risk predictor of hepatotoxicity that is somewhat independent of time and type of ingestion. However, its accuracy following ingestion of modified-release formulations is not known, as the product has been derived and validated after immediate-release paracetamol overdoses. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the accuracy of the multiplication product to predict hepatotoxicity in a cohort of patients with modified-release paracetamol overdose. We assessed all patients with modified-release paracetamol overdose presenting to our hospital network from October 2009 to July 2016. Ingestion of a modified-release formulation was identified by patient self-report or retrieval of the original container. Hepatotoxicity was defined as peak alanine aminotransferase ≥1000 IU/L, and acute liver injury (ALI) as a doubling of baseline ALT to more than 50 IU/L. Of 1989 paracetamol overdose presentations, we identified 73 modified-release paracetamol exposures treated with acetylcysteine. Five patients developed hepatotoxicity, including one who received acetylcysteine within eight hours of an acute ingestion. No patient with an initial multiplication product paracetamol overdose treated with acetylcysteine, the paracetamol-aminotransferase multiplication product demonstrated similar accuracy and temporal profile to previous reports involving mostly immediate-release formulations. Above a cut-point of 10,000 mg/L × IU/L, it was very strongly associated with the development of acute liver injury and hepatotoxicity, especially when calculated more than eight hours post-ingestion. When below 1500 mg/L × IU/L the likelihood of developing hepatotoxicity was very low. Persistently high serial multiplication product calculations were associated with the greatest risk of hepatotoxicity.

  11. An SPR biosensor for the detection of microcystins in drinking water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herranz, S.; Bocková, Markéta; Marazuela, M. D.; Homola, Jiří; Moreno-Bondi, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 398, č. 6 (2010), s. 2625-2634 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701; GA MŠk OC09058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Microcystin-LR * Label-free biosensor * Surface plasmon resonance Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.841, year: 2010

  12. Risk of hepatotoxicity associated with the use of telithromycin: a signal detection using data mining algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Guo, Jeff J; Healy, Daniel P; Lin, Xiaodong; Patel, Nick C

    2008-12-01

    With the exception of case reports, limited data are available regarding the risk of hepatotoxicity associated with the use of telithromycin. To detect the safety signal regarding the reporting of hepatotoxicity associated with the use of telithromycin using 4 commonly employed data mining algorithms (DMAs). Based on the Adverse Events Reporting System (AERS) database of the Food and Drug Administration, 4 DMAs, including the reporting odds ratio (ROR), the proportional reporting ratio (PRR), the information component (IC), and the Gamma Poisson Shrinker (GPS), were applied to examine the association between the reporting of hepatotoxicity and the use of telithromycin. The study period was from the first quarter of 2004 to the second quarter of 2006. The reporting of hepatotoxicity was identified using the preferred terms indexed in the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities. The drug name was used to identify reports regarding the use of telithromycin. A total of 226 reports describing hepatotoxicity associated with the use of telithromycin were recorded in the AERS. A safety problem of telithromycin associated with increased reporting of hepatotoxicity was clearly detected by 4 algorithms as early as 2005, signaling the problem in the first quarter by the ROR and the IC, in the second quarter by the PRR, and in the fourth quarter by the GPS. A safety signal was indicated by the 4 DMAs suggesting an association between the reporting of hepatotoxicity and the use of telithromycin. Given the wide use of telithromycin and serious consequences of hepatotoxicity, clinicians should be cautious when selecting telithromycin for treatment of an infection. In addition, further observational studies are required to evaluate the utility of signal detection systems for early recognition of serious, life-threatening, low-frequency drug-induced adverse events.

  13. Rocuronium is more hepatotoxic than succinylcholine in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Martin; Piel, Ines; Haubner, Cristof; Richter, Georg; Mann, Miriam; Nöldge-Schomburg, Gabriele; Mencke, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    The development of liver failure is a major problem in critically ill patients. The hepatotoxicity of many drugs, as one important reason for liver failure, is poorly screened for in human models. Rocuronium and succinylcholine are neuromuscular blocking agents used for tracheal intubation and for rapid-sequence induction. We used an in-vitro test with a permanent cell line and compared rocuronium and succinylcholine for hepatotoxicity. In-vitro study. A basic science laboratory, University Hospital Rostock, Germany. The basic test compound is the permanent human liver cell line HepG2/C3A. In a standardised microtitre plate assay the toxicity of different concentrations of rocuronium, succinylcholine and plasma control was tested. After two incubation periods of 3 days, the viability of cells (XTT test, lactate dehydrogenase release and trypan blue staining), micro-albumin synthesis and the cytochrome 1A2 activity (metabolism of ethoxyresorufin) were measured. Differences between rocuronium and succinylcholine were assessed using the Kruskal-Wallis one-way test and two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test. Rocuronium, but not succinylcholine, led to a significant dose-dependent decrease of viability, albumin synthesis and cytochrome 1A2 activity of test cells. An in-vitro test with a cell line showed hepatotoxicity of rocuronium that was dose-dependent. Further studies are needed to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the effects of rocuronium on hepatic cellular integrity. Not suitable.

  14. Warming affects growth rates and microcystin production in tropical bloom-forming microcystis strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, Trung; Dao, Thanh Son; Vo, Truong Giang; Lürling, Miquel

    2018-01-01

    Warming climate is predicted to promote cyanobacterial blooms but the toxicity of cyanobacteria under global warming is less well studied. We tested the hypothesis that raising temperature may lead to increased growth rates but to decreased microcystin (MC) production in tropical Microcystis

  15. Histomorphological effects of isoniazid induced hepatotoxicity in male albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humayun, F.; Zareen, N.

    2017-01-01

    To observe the histomorphological changes of isoniazid induced hepatotoxicity in male albino mice. Methodology: This experimental study was carried out at University of Health Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan from January to December 2013. Forty male albino mice selected by simple random technique, were divided into two groups; A-Control, and B-experimental. Group A comprised of 15, while Group B comprised 25 mice. Both the groups were kept under identical conditions and diet. However, experimental group was treated with an additional oral hepatotoxic dose of isoniazid i.e. 100mg/kg bodyweight daily for 30 days. After 30 days, the animals were sacrificed and livers were dissected out. Gross comparison of the organ and stained sections were histologically compared for morphological differences between the groups. Fischer Exact test was used to analyze the qualitative data and a p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Group A animals showed the normal liver architecture. Whereas, those of Group B showed deranged hepatic histomorphology. Conclusion: Hepatotoxic dose of Isoniazid caused histomorphological alterations in the liver of male albino mice. (author)

  16. Type 2 diabetic rats are sensitive to thioacetamide hepatotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Dnyanmote, Ankur V.; Warbritton, Alan; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2006-01-01

    Previously, we reported high hepatotoxic sensitivity of type 2 diabetic (DB) rats to three dissimilar hepatotoxicants. Additional work revealed that a normally nonlethal dose of CCl 4 was lethal in DB rats due to inhibited compensatory tissue repair. The present study was conducted to investigate the importance of compensatory tissue repair in determining the final outcome of hepatotoxicity in diabetes, using another structurally and mechanistically dissimilar hepatotoxicant, thioacetamide (TA), to initiate liver injury. A normally nonlethal dose of TA (300 mg/kg, ip), caused 100% mortality in DB rats. Time course studies (0 to 96 h) showed that in the non-DB rats, liver injury initiated by TA as assessed by plasma alanine or aspartate aminotransferase and hepatic necrosis progressed up to 48 h and regressed to normal at 96 h resulting in 100% survival. In the DB rats, liver injury rapidly progressed resulting in progressively deteriorating liver due to rapidly expanding injury, hepatic failure, and 100% mortality between 24 and 48 h post-TA treatment. Covalent binding of 14 C-TA-derived radiolabel to liver tissue did not differ from that observed in the non-DB rats, indicating similar bioactivation-based initiation of hepatotoxicity. S-phase DNA synthesis measured by [ 3 H]-thymidine incorporation, and advancement of cells through the cell division cycle measured by PCNA immunohistochemistry, were substantially inhibited in the DB rats compared to the non-DB rats challenged with TA. Thus, inhibited cell division and compromised tissue repair in the DB rats resulted in progressive expansion of liver injury culminating in mortality. In conclusion, it appears that similar to type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes also increases sensitivity to dissimilar hepatotoxicants due to inhibited compensatory tissue repair, suggesting that sensitivity to hepatotoxicity in diabetes occurs in the absence as well as presence of insulin

  17. Exacerbation of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by the anthelmentic drug fenbendazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Carol R; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2012-02-01

    Fenbendazole is a broad-spectrum anthelmintic drug widely used to prevent or treat nematode infections in laboratory rodent colonies. Potential interactions between fenbendazole and hepatotoxicants such as acetaminophen are unknown, and this was investigated in this study. Mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing fenbendazole (8-12 mg/kg/day) for 7 days prior to treatment with acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) or phosphate buffered saline. In mice fed a control diet, acetaminophen administration resulted in centrilobular hepatic necrosis and increases in serum transaminases, which were evident within 12 h. Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was markedly increased in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, as measured histologically and by significant increases in serum transaminase levels. Moreover, in mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet, but not the control diet, 63% mortality was observed within 24 h of acetaminophen administration. Fenbendazole by itself had no effect on liver histology or serum transaminases. To determine if exaggerated hepatotoxicity was due to alterations in acetaminophen metabolism, we analyzed sera for the presence of free acetaminophen and acetaminophen-glucuronide. We found that there were no differences in acetaminophen turnover. We also measured cytochrome P450 (cyp) 2e1, cyp3a, and cyp1a2 activity. Whereas fenbendazole had no effect on the activity of cyp2e1 or cyp3a, cyp1a2 was suppressed. A prolonged suppression of hepatic glutathione (GSH) was also observed in acetaminophen-treated mice fed the fenbendazole-containing diet when compared with the control diet. These data demonstrate that fenbendazole exacerbates the hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen, an effect that is related to persistent GSH depletion. These findings are novel and suggest a potential drug-drug interaction that should be considered in experimental protocols evaluating mechanisms of hepatotoxicity in rodent colonies treated with fenbendazole.

  18. [Nevirapine related hepatotoxicity: the prevalence and risk factors in a cohort of ART naive Han Chinese with AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shi-cheng; Gui, Xi-en; Deng, Li-ping; Zhang, Yong-xi; Yan, Ya-jun; Rong, Yu-ping; Liang, Ke; Yang, Rong-rong

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the incidence of hepatotoxicity in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients on combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART) containing nevirapine (NVP) and to assess the risk factors and its impact on cART. 330 AIDS patients from March 2003 to June 2008 at local county were enrolled and a retrospective study using Kaplan-meier survival and Multivariate logistic regression modeling was conducted. 267 out of 330 patients received NVP based cART and 63 cases received EFV-based cART. The deference of prevalences of hepatotoxicity between the two groups is statistically significant (Chi2 = 6.691, P = 0.01). 133 out of 267 (49.8%) patients on NVP based cART had at least one episode of ALT elevation during a median 21 months (interquartile ranges, IQR 6, 37) follow-up time, amounts for 28.5 cases per 100 person-years. Baseline ALT elevation (OR = 14.368, P = 0.017)and HCV co-infection (OR = 3.009, P = 0.000) were risk factors for cART related hepatotoxicity, while greatly increased CD4+ T(CD4) cell count was protective against hepatotoxicity development (OR = 0.996, P = 0.000). Patients co-infected with HCV received NVP-based cART had the higher probability of hepatotoxicity than those without HCV co-infection (Log rank: Chi2 = 16.764, P = 0.000). 23 out of the 133 subjects (17.3%) with NVP related hepatotoxicity discontinued cART temporarily or shifted NVP to efavirenz. NVP related hepatotoxicity was common among ARV naive HIV infected subjects in our cohort. Baseline ALT elevation and HCV co-infection were associated statistically with the development of hepatotoxicity. Hepatotoxicity led to discontinuing cART temporarily or switching to other regimens in some subjects. It suggested that NVP should be used with caution in patients co-infected with HCV among whom anti-HCV therapy before cART initiation may contribute to minimizing the probability of NVP associated hepatotoxicity.

  19. Cyanobacterial and microcystins dynamics following the application of hydrogen peroxide to waste stabilisation ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, D. J.; Ghadouani, A.; Ivey, G. N.

    2013-06-01

    Cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins are a risk to human and ecological health, and a hindrance to biological wastewater treatment. This study investigated the use of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for the removal of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins from within waste stabilization ponds (WSPs). The daily dynamics of cyanobacteria and microcystins (commonly occurring cyanotoxins) were examined following the addition of H2O2 to wastewater within both the laboratory and at the full scale within a maturation WSP, the final pond in a wastewater treatment plant. Hydrogen peroxide treatment at concentrations ≥ 0.1 mg H2O2 μg-1 total phytoplankton chlorophyll a led to the lysis of cyanobacteria, in turn releasing intracellular microcystins to the dissolved state. In the full-scale trial, dissolved microcystins were then degraded to negligible concentrations by H2O2 and environmental processes within five days. A shift in the phytoplankton assemblage towards beneficial Chlorophyta species was also observed within days of H2O2 addition. However, within weeks, the Chlorophyta population was significantly reduced by the re-establishment of toxic cyanobacterial species. This re-establishment was likely due to the inflow of cyanobacteria from ponds earlier in the treatment train, suggesting that whilst H2O2 may be a suitable short-term management technique, it must be coupled with control over inflows if it is to improve WSP performance in the longer term.

  20. Cyanobacterial and microcystins dynamics following the application of hydrogen peroxide to waste stabilisation ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Barrington

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins are a risk to human and ecological health, and a hindrance to biological wastewater treatment. This study investigated the use of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 for the removal of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins from within waste stabilization ponds (WSPs. The daily dynamics of cyanobacteria and microcystins (commonly occurring cyanotoxins were examined following the addition of H2O2 to wastewater within both the laboratory and at the full scale within a maturation WSP, the final pond in a wastewater treatment plant. Hydrogen peroxide treatment at concentrations ≥ 0.1 mg H2O2 μg−1 total phytoplankton chlorophyll a led to the lysis of cyanobacteria, in turn releasing intracellular microcystins to the dissolved state. In the full-scale trial, dissolved microcystins were then degraded to negligible concentrations by H2O2 and environmental processes within five days. A shift in the phytoplankton assemblage towards beneficial Chlorophyta species was also observed within days of H2O2 addition. However, within weeks, the Chlorophyta population was significantly reduced by the re-establishment of toxic cyanobacterial species. This re-establishment was likely due to the inflow of cyanobacteria from ponds earlier in the treatment train, suggesting that whilst H2O2 may be a suitable short-term management technique, it must be coupled with control over inflows if it is to improve WSP performance in the longer term.

  1. Amelioration of lead-induced hepatotoxicity by Allium sativum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-07

    Jan 7, 2010 ... The efficacy of garlic (Allium sativum) to reduce hepatotoxicity induced by ..... fatty acids having double bonds, largely present in the phospholipids of .... disulfide, and diallyl disulfide, possess antioxidant prop- erties and can ...

  2. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maes, Michaël [Department of In Vitro Toxicology and Dermato-Cosmetology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vinken, Mathieu, E-mail: mvinken@vub.ac.be [Department of In Vitro Toxicology and Dermato-Cosmetology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Jaeschke, Hartmut [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. - Highlights: • The murine APAP model is very close to what is observed in patients. • The Gal/ET model is useful to study TNFα-mediated apoptotic signaling mechanisms. • Fas receptor activation is an effective model of apoptosis and secondary necrosis. • The ConA model is a relevant model of auto-immune hepatitis and viral hepatitis. • Multiple time point evaluation needed in experimental models of acute liver injury.

  3. Enhancement of the predicted drug hepatotoxicity in gel entrapped hepatocytes within polysulfone-g-poly (ethylene glycol) modified hollow fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Chong; Zhang Guoliang; Meng Qin

    2010-01-01

    Collagen gel-based 3D cultures of hepatocytes have been proposed for evaluation of drug hepatotoxicity because of their more reliability than traditional monolayer culture. The collagen gel entrapment of hepatocytes in hollow fibers has been proven to well reflect the drug hepatotoxicity in vivo but was limited by adsorption of hydrophobic drugs onto hollow fibers. This study aimed to investigate the impact of hollow fibers on hepatocyte performance and drug hepatotoxicity. Polysulfone-g-poly (ethylene glycol) (PSf-g-PEG) hollow fiber was fabricated and applied for the first time to suppress the drug adsorption. Then, the impact of hollow fibers was evaluated by detecting the hepatotoxicity of eight selected drugs to gel entrapped hepatocytes within PSf and PSf-g-PEG hollow fibers, or without hollow fibers. The hepatocytes in PSf-g-PEG hollow fiber showed the highest sensitivity to drug hepatotoxicity, while those in PSf hollow fiber and cylindrical gel without hollow fiber underestimated the hepatotoxicity due to either drug adsorption or low hepatic functions. Therefore, the 3D culture of gel entrapped hepatocytes within PSf-g-PEG hollow fiber would be a promising tool for investigation of drug hepatotoxicity in vitro.

  4. Hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects of Cuscuta chinensis against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Feng-Lin; Wu, Tzu-Hui; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2007-04-20

    Tu-Si-Zi, the seeds of Cuscuta chinensis Lam. (Convolvulaceae), is a traditional Chinese medicine that is commonly used to nourish and improve the liver and kidney conditions in China and other Asian countries. As oxidative stress promotes the development of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity, the aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the hepatoprotective effect and antioxidant activities of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of C chinensis on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. The C chinensis ethanolic extract at an oral dose of both 125 and 250mg/kg showed a significant hepatoprotective effect relatively to the same extent (PCuscuta chinensis can prevent hepatic injuries from APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in rats and this is likely mediated through its antioxidant activities.

  5. Herbal hepatotoxicity: suspected cases assessed for alternative causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Rolf; Schulze, Johannes; Schwarzenboeck, Alexander; Eickhoff, Axel; Frenzel, Christian

    2013-09-01

    Alternative explanations are common in suspected drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and account for up to 47.1% of analyzed cases. This raised the question of whether a similar frequency may prevail in cases of assumed herb-induced liver injury (HILI). We searched the Medline database for the following terms: herbs, herbal drugs, herbal dietary supplements, hepatotoxic herbs, herbal hepatotoxicity, and herb-induced liver injury. Additional terms specifically addressed single herbs and herbal products: black cohosh, Greater Celandine, green tea, Herbalife products, Hydroxycut, kava, and Pelargonium sidoides. We retrieved 23 published case series and regulatory assessments related to hepatotoxicity by herbs and herbal dietary supplements with alternative causes. The 23 publications comprised 573 cases of initially suspected HILI; alternative causes were evident in 278/573 cases (48.5%). Among them were hepatitis by various viruses (9.7%), autoimmune diseases (10.4%), nonalcoholic and alcoholic liver diseases (5.4%), liver injury by comedication (DILI and other HILI) (43.9%), and liver involvement in infectious diseases (4.7%). Biliary and pancreatic diseases were frequent alternative diagnoses (11.5%), raising therapeutic problems if specific treatment is withheld; pre-existing liver diseases including cirrhosis (9.7%) were additional confounding variables. Other diagnoses were rare, but possibly relevant for the individual patient. In 573 cases of initially assumed HILI, 48.5% showed alternative causes unrelated to the initially incriminated herb, herbal drug, or herbal dietary supplement, calling for thorough clinical evaluations and appropriate causality assessments in future cases of suspected HILI.

  6. Geographical patterns in cyanobacteria distribution: climate influence at regional scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitois, Frédéric; Thoraval, Isabelle; Baurès, Estelle; Thomas, Olivier

    2014-01-28

    Cyanobacteria are a component of public health hazards in freshwater environments because of their potential as toxin producers. Eutrophication has long been considered the main cause of cyanobacteria outbreak and proliferation, whereas many studies emphasized the effect of abiotic parameters (mainly temperature and light) on cell growth rate or toxin production. In view of the growing concerns of global change consequences on public health parameters, this study attempts to enlighten climate influence on cyanobacteria at regional scale in Brittany (NW France). The results show that homogeneous cyanobacteria groups are associated with climatic domains related to temperature, global radiation and pluviometry, whereas microcystins (MCs) occurrences are only correlated to local cyanobacteria species composition. As the regional climatic gradient amplitude is similar to the projected climate evolution on a 30-year timespan, a comparison between the present NW and SE situations was used to extrapolate the evolution of geographical cyanobacteria distribution in Brittany. Cyanobacteria composition should shift toward species associated with more frequent Microcystins occurrences along a NW/SE axis whereas lakes situated along a SW/NE axis should transition to species (mainly Nostocales) associated with lower MCs detection frequencies.

  7. Effects of ebselen on radiocontrast media-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basarslan, Fatmagul; Yilmaz, Nigar; Davarci, Isil; Akin, Mustafa; Ozgur, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Cahide; Ulutas, Kemal Turker

    2013-09-01

    Oxidative stress is accepted as a potential responsible mechanism in the pathogenesis of radiocontrast media (RCM)-induced hepatotoxicity. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the protective effects of ebselen against RCM-induced hepatotoxicity by measuring tissue oxidant/antioxidant parameters and histological changes in rats. Wistar albino rats were randomly separated into four groups consisting of eight rats per group. Normal saline was given to the rats in control group (group 1). RCM was given to the rats in group 2, and both RCM and ebselen were given to the rats in group 3. Only ebselen was given to the rats in group 4. Liver sections of the killed animals were analyzed to measure the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), as well as histopathological changes. In RCM group, SOD and CAT levels were found increased. In RCM-ebselen group, MDA, SOD and CAT levels were found decreased. In RCM-ebselen group, however, GSH-Px activities of liver tissue increased. All these results indicated that ebselen produced a protective mechanism against RCM-induced hepatotoxicity and took part in oxidative stress.

  8. Toxicogenomic analysis identifies the apoptotic pathway as the main cause of hepatotoxicity induced by tributyltin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mi; Feng, Mei; Fu, Ling-Ling; Ji, Lin-Dan; Zhao, Jin-Shun; Xu, Jin

    2016-11-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is one of the most widely used organotin biocides, which has severe endocrine-disrupting effects on marine species and mammals. Given that TBT accumulates at higher levels in the liver than in any other organ, and it acts mainly as a hepatotoxic agent, it is important to clearly delineate the hepatotoxicity of TBT. However, most of the available studies on TBT have focused on observations at the cellular level, while studies at the level of genes and proteins are limited; therefore, the molecular mechanisms of TBT-induced hepatotoxicity remains largely unclear. In the present study, we applied a toxicogenomic approach to investigate the effects of TBT on gene expression in the human normal liver cell line HL7702. Gene expression profiling identified the apoptotic pathway as the major cause of hepatotoxicity induced by TBT. Flow cytometry assays confirmed that medium- and high-dose TBT treatments significantly increased the number of apoptotic cells, and more cells underwent late apoptosis in the high-dose TBT group. The genes encoding heat shock proteins (HSPs), kinases and tumor necrosis factor receptors mediated TBT-induced apoptosis. These findings revealed novel molecular mechanisms of TBT-induced hepatotoxicity, and the current microarray data may also provide clues for future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Microcystin uptake and biochemical responses in the freshwater clam Corbicula leana P. exposed to toxic and non-toxic Microcystis aeruginosa: Evidence of tolerance to cyanotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thanh-Luu; Shimizu, Kazuya; Dao, Thanh-Son; Hong-Do, Lan-Chi; Utsumi, Motoo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the accumulation and adverse effects of toxic and non-toxic Microcystis in the edible clam Corbicula leana . Treated clams were exposed to toxic Microcystis at 100 μg of MC (microcystin)-LR eq  L -1 for 10 days. The experimental organism was then placed in toxin-free water and fed on non-toxic Microcystis for the following 10 days for depuration. Filtering rates (FRs) by C. leana of toxic and non-toxic Microcystis and of the green alga Chlorella vulgaris as a control were estimated. Adverse effects were evaluated though the activity of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). Clam accumulated MCs (up to 12.7 ± 2.5 μg g -1 dry weight (DW) of free MC and 4.2 ± 0.6 μg g -1 DW of covalently bound MC). Our results suggest that although both toxic and non-toxic cyanobacteria caused adverse effects by inducing the detoxification and antioxidant defense system, the clam was quite resistant to cyanotoxins. The estimated MC concentration in C. leana was far beyond the World Health Organization's (WHO) provisional tolerable daily intake (0.04 μg kg -1  day -1 ), suggesting that consuming clams harvested during cyanobacterial blooms carries a high health risk.

  10. Microcystin uptake and biochemical responses in the freshwater clam Corbicula leana P. exposed to toxic and non-toxic Microcystis aeruginosa: Evidence of tolerance to cyanotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh-Luu Pham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the accumulation and adverse effects of toxic and non-toxic Microcystis in the edible clam Corbicula leana. Treated clams were exposed to toxic Microcystis at 100 μg of MC (microcystin-LReq L−1 for 10 days. The experimental organism was then placed in toxin-free water and fed on non-toxic Microcystis for the following 10 days for depuration. Filtering rates (FRs by C. leana of toxic and non-toxic Microcystis and of the green alga Chlorella vulgaris as a control were estimated. Adverse effects were evaluated though the activity of catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione S-transferase (GST. Clam accumulated MCs (up to 12.7 ± 2.5 μg g−1 dry weight (DW of free MC and 4.2 ± 0.6 μg g−1 DW of covalently bound MC. Our results suggest that although both toxic and non-toxic cyanobacteria caused adverse effects by inducing the detoxification and antioxidant defense system, the clam was quite resistant to cyanotoxins. The estimated MC concentration in C. leana was far beyond the World Health Organization's (WHO provisional tolerable daily intake (0.04 μg kg−1 day−1, suggesting that consuming clams harvested during cyanobacterial blooms carries a high health risk.

  11. Ginger for Prevention of Antituberculosis-induced Gastrointestinal Adverse Reactions Including Hepatotoxicity: A Randomized Pilot Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrani, Zahra; Shojaei, Esphandiar; Khalili, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the potential benefits of ginger in preventing antituberculosis drug-induced gastrointestinal adverse reactions including hepatotoxicity have been evaluated in patients with tuberculosis. Patients in the ginger and placebo groups (30 patients in each group) received either 500 mg ginger (Zintoma)(®) or placebo one-half hour before each daily dose of antituberculosis drugs for 4 weeks. Patients' gastrointestinal complaints (nausea, vomiting, dyspepsia, and abdominal pain) and antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity were recorded during the study period. In this cohort, nausea was the most common antituberculosis drug-induced gastrointestinal adverse reactions. Forty eight (80%) patients experienced nausea. Nausea was more common in the placebo than the ginger group [27 (90%) vs 21 (70%), respectively, p = 0.05]. During the study period, 16 (26.7%) patients experienced antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Patients in the ginger group experienced less, but not statistically significant, antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity than the placebo group (16.7% vs 36.7%, respectively, p = 0.07). In conclusion, ginger may be a potential option for prevention of antituberculosis drug-induced gastrointestinal adverse reactions including hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Herbalife hepatotoxicity: Evaluation of cases with positive reexposure tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Rolf; Frenzel, Christian; Schulze, Johannes; Schwarzenboeck, Alexander; Eickhoff, Axel

    2013-07-27

    To analyze the validity of applied test criteria and causality assessment methods in assumed Herbalife hepatotoxicity with positive reexposure tests. We searched the Medline database for suspected cases of Herbalife hepatotoxicity and retrieved 53 cases including eight cases with a positive unintentional reexposure and a high causality level for Herbalife. First, analysis of these eight cases focused on the data quality of the positive reexposure cases, requiring a baseline value of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) Herbalife in these eight cases were probable (n = 1), unlikely (n = 4), and excluded (n = 3). Confounding variables included low data quality, alternative diagnoses, poor exclusion of important other causes, and comedication by drugs and herbs in 6/8 cases. More specifically, problems were evident in some cases regarding temporal association, daily doses, exact start and end dates of product use, actual data of laboratory parameters such as ALT, and exact dechallenge characteristics. Shortcomings included scattered exclusion of hepatitis A-C, cytomegalovirus and Epstein Barr virus infection with only globally presented or lacking parameters. Hepatitis E virus infection was considered in one single patient and found positive, infections by herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus were excluded in none. Only one case fulfilled positive reexposure test criteria in initially assumed Herbalife hepatotoxicity, with lower CIOMS based causality gradings for the other cases than hitherto proposed.

  13. Incidence and risk of regorafenib-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Zhao, Hong

    2017-10-13

    Regorafenib, an oral multi-kinase inhibitor, has been approved for the treatments of several malignancies. Unlike traditional cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, regorafenib therapy often induces a distinct profile of adverse events (AEs) including hepatotoxicity. Here we conducted an up-to-date meta-analysis to assess the incidence and risk of regorafenib related hepatic toxicities. PubMed and Embase database were reviewed from inception to June 2017 for relevant trials. Eligible studies include subjects with solid tumors treated with 160 mg of regorafenib daily during the first three week of each four-week cycle, and adequate safety data reporting the elevation of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bilirubin. Statistical analyses were conducted to calculate the summary incidence and relative risk (RR). A total of 2,213 subjects from 14 trials were included. The incidences of regorafenib-associated all-grade and high-grade hepatotoxicity were: bilirubin elevation: 23% and 5%; AST elevation: 32% and 6%; ALT elevation: 27% and 5%; ALP elevation: 31% and 2%. Regorafenib-treated subjects had a significant increased risk of all-grade (RR = 3.10; 95% CI, 2.22-4.34) and high-grade (RR = 1.74; 95% CI, 1.09-2.80) bilirubin elevation; all-grade (RR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.00) and high-grade (RR = 1.79; 95% CI, 1.00-3.22) AST elevation; all-grade (RR = 1.82; 95% CI, 1.25-2.64) and high-grade (RR = 3.07; 95% CI, 1.30-7.22) ALT elevation; and all-grade (RR = 2.11; 95% CI, 1.01-4.40) ALP elevation. Our results suggest that regorafenib is associated with an increased risk of hepatic toxicities. Hepatotoxicity examination at regular intervals should be advised to clinicians.

  14. Protective effect of the edible brown alga Ecklonia stolonifera on doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity in primary rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyun Ah; Kim, Jae-I; Choung, Se Young; Choi, Jae Sue

    2014-08-01

    As part of our efforts to isolate anti-hepatotoxic agents from marine natural products, we screened the ability of 14 edible varieties of Korean seaweed to protect against doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity in primary rat hepatocytes. Among the crude extracts of two Chlorophyta (Codium fragile and Capsosiphon fulvescens), seven Phaeophyta (Undaria pinnatifida, Sargassum thunbergii, Pelvetia siliquosa, Ishige okamurae, Ecklonia cava, Ecklonia stolonifera and Eisenia bicyclis), five Rhodophyta (Chondrus ocellatus, Gelidium amansii, Gracilaria verrucosa, Symphycladia latiuscula and Porphyra tenera), and the extracts of Ecklonia stolonifera, Ecklonia cava, Eisenia bicyclis and Pelvetia siliquosa exhibited significant protective effects on doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity, with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 15.0 μg/ml, respectively. Since Ecklonia stolonifera exhibits a significant protective potential and is frequently used as foodstuff, we isolated six phlorotannins, including phloroglucinol (1), dioxinodehydroeckol (2), eckol (3), phlorofucofuroeckol A (4), dieckol (5) and triphloroethol-A (6). Phlorotannins 2 ∼ 6 exhibited potential protective effects on doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity, with corresponding EC50 values of 3.4, 8.3, 4.4, 5.5 and 11.5 μg/ml, respectively. The results clearly demonstrated that the anti-hepatotoxic effects of Ecklonia stolonifera and its isolated phlorotannins are useful for further exploration and development of therapeutic modalities for treatment of hepatotoxicity. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  15. From individual coping strategies to illness codification: the reflection of gender in social science research on multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Geneviève; Lippel, Katherine

    2014-09-10

    Emerging fields such as environmental health have been challenged, in recent years, to answer the growing methodological calls for a finer integration of sex and gender in health-related research and policy-making. Through a descriptive examination of 25 peer-reviewed social science papers published between 1996 and 2011, we explore, by examining methodological designs and theoretical standpoints, how the social sciences have integrated gender sensitivity in empirical work on Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS). MCS is a "diagnosis" associated with sensitivities to chronic and low-dose chemical exposures, which remains contested in both the medical and institutional arenas, and is reported to disproportionately affect women. We highlighted important differences between papers that did integrate a gender lens and those that did not. These included characteristics of the authorship, purposes, theoretical frameworks and methodological designs of the studies. Reviewed papers that integrated gender tended to focus on the gender roles and identity of women suffering from MCS, emphasizing personal strategies of adaptation. More generally, terminological confusions in the use of sex and gender language and concepts, such as a conflation of women and gender, were observed. Although some men were included in most of the study samples reviewed, specific data relating to men was undereported in results and only one paper discussed issues specifically experienced by men suffering from MCS. Papers that overlooked gender dimensions generally addressed more systemic social issues such as the dynamics of expertise and the medical codification of MCS, from more consistently outlined theoretical frameworks. Results highlight the place for a critical, systematic and reflexive problematization of gender and for the development of methodological and theoretical tools on how to integrate gender in research designs when looking at both micro and macro social dimensions of environmental

  16. PENGEMBANGAN SISTEM EKSPERIMEN VISKOSITAS BERBASIS PERSONAL KOMPUTER DAN MIKROKONTROLER MCS-51

    OpenAIRE

    Yohandri Yohandri

    2010-01-01

    In this work, viscosity experiment system based on personal computer and microcontroller MCS-51 has been developed. The new model of viscosity experiment system is purposed to perfom the time and viscosity calculation automatically on the personal computer. The graph and statical analysis are used to determine characteristics of LDR sensor and experiment system such as sensitivity, accuracy, and precision. There were four main results of this research as follow : 1). LDR sensor resistance dec...

  17. Exposure to crude microcystins via intraperitoneal injection, but not ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-06-14

    Jun 14, 2012 ... injection, but not oral gavage, causes hepatotoxicity in ducks. Xiao-Yu ... 1College of Life Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007, China. 2Institute of ..... The resulting imbalance in protein phosphorylation disrupts the ... This work was supported by the National Science Foun- dation of ...

  18. Assessment of uptake and phytotoxicity of cyanobacterial extracts containing microcystins or cylindrospermopsin on parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) and coriander (Coriandrum sativum L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana L; Azevedo, Joana; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2017-01-01

    Blooms of harmful cyanobacteria that synthesize cyanotoxins are increasing worldwide. Agronomic plants can uptake these cyanotoxins and given that plants are ultimately ingested by humans, this represents a public health problem. In this research, parsley and coriander grown in soil and watered through 7 days with crude extracts containing microcystins (MCs) or cylindrospermopsin (CYN) in 0.1-1 μg mL -1 concentration range were evaluated concerning their biomass, biochemical parameters and uptake of cyanotoxins. Although biomass, chlorophylls (a and b), carotenoids and glutathione-S-transferase of parsley and coriander exposed to the crude extracts containing MC or CYN had shown variations, these values were not statistically significantly different. Protein synthesis is not inhibited in coriander exposed to MC or CYN and in parsley exposed to MC. Also, glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in parsley and coriander was not affected by exposure to MC, and in coriander, the CYN did not induce statistically significant differences in these two antioxidative enzymes. Only parsley showed statistically significant increase in protein content exposed to 0.5 μg CYN mL -1 (3.981 ± 0.099 mg g -1 FW) compared to control (2.484 ± 0.145 mg g -1 FW), statistically significant decrease in GR exposed to 0.1 μg CYN mL -1 (0.684 ± 0.117 nmol min -1  mg -1 protein) compared to control (1.30 ± 0.06 nmol min -1  mg -1 protein) and statistically significant increase in GPx exposed to 1 μg CYN mL -1 (0.054 ± 0.026 nmol min -1  mg -1 protein) compared to 0.5 μg CYN mL -1 (0.003 ± 0.001 nmol min -1  mg -1 protein). These changes may be due to the induction of defensive mechanisms by plants by the presence of toxic compounds in the soil or probably to a low generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, the parsley and coriander leaves and stems after 10 days of exposure did not accumulate microcystins or

  19. The organic anion transport polypeptide 1d1 (Oatp1d1) mediates hepatocellular uptake of phalloidin and microcystin into skate liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Abt, F; Hammann-Hänni, A; Stieger, B; Ballatori, N; Boyer, J L

    2007-02-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (rodent Oatp; human OATP) mediate cellular uptake of numerous organic compounds including xenobiotic toxins into mammalian hepatocytes. In the little skate Leucoraja erinacea a liver-specific Oatp (Oatp1d1, also called sOatp) has been identified and suggested to represent an evolutionarily ancient precursor of the mammalian liver OATP1B1 (human), Oatp1b2 (rat), and OATP1B3 (human). The present study tested whether Oatp1d1 shares functional transport activity of the xenobiotic oligopeptide toxins phalloidin and microcystin with the mammalian liver Oatps/OATPs. The phalloidin analogue [(3)H]-demethylphalloin was taken up into skate hepatocytes with high affinity (Km approximately 0.4 microM), and uptake could be inhibited by phalloidin and a variety of typical Oatp/OATP substrates such as bromosulfophthalein, bile salts, estrone-3-sulfate, cyclosporine A and high concentrations of microcystin-LR (Ki approximately 150 microM). When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes Oatp1d1 increased uptake of demethylphalloin (Km approximately 2.2 microM) and microcystin-LR (Km approximately 27 microM) 2- to 3-fold over water-injected oocytes, whereas the alternative skate liver organic anion transporter, the dimeric Ostalpha/beta, exhibited no phalloidin and only minor microcystin-LR transport. Also, the closest mammalian Oatp1d1 orthologue, the human brain and testis OATP1C1, did not show any phalloidin transport activity. These results demonstrate that the evolutionarily ancient Oatp1d1 is able to mediate uptake of cyclic oligopeptide toxins into skate liver. The findings support the notion that Oatp1d1 is a precursor of the liver-specific mammalian Oatps/OATPs and that its transport properties are closely associated with certain forms of toxic liver injury such as for example protein phosphatase inhibition by the water-borne toxin microcystin.

  20. The organic anion transport polypeptide 1d1 (Oatp1d1) mediates hepatocellular uptake of phalloidin and microcystin into skate liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier-Abt, F.; Hammann-Haenni, A.; Stieger, B.; Ballatori, N.; Boyer, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (rodent Oatp; human OATP) mediate cellular uptake of numerous organic compounds including xenobiotic toxins into mammalian hepatocytes. In the little skate Leucoraja erinacea a liver-specific Oatp (Oatp1d1, also called sOatp) has been identified and suggested to represent an evolutionarily ancient precursor of the mammalian liver OATP1B1 (human), Oatp1b2 (rat), and OATP1B3 (human). The present study tested whether Oatp1d1 shares functional transport activity of the xenobiotic oligopeptide toxins phalloidin and microcystin with the mammalian liver Oatps/OATPs. The phalloidin analogue [ 3 H]-demethylphalloin was taken up into skate hepatocytes with high affinity (Km ∼ 0.4 μM), and uptake could be inhibited by phalloidin and a variety of typical Oatp/OATP substrates such as bromosulfophthalein, bile salts, estrone-3-sulfate, cyclosporine A and high concentrations of microcystin-LR (Ki ∼ 150 μM). When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes Oatp1d1 increased uptake of demethylphalloin (Km ∼ 2.2 μM) and microcystin-LR (Km ∼ 27 μM) 2- to 3-fold over water-injected oocytes, whereas the alternative skate liver organic anion transporter, the dimeric Ostα/β, exhibited no phalloidin and only minor microcystin-LR transport. Also, the closest mammalian Oatp1d1 orthologue, the human brain and testis OATP1C1, did not show any phalloidin transport activity. These results demonstrate that the evolutionarily ancient Oatp1d1 is able to mediate uptake of cyclic oligopeptide toxins into skate liver. The findings support the notion that Oatp1d1 is a precursor of the liver-specific mammalian Oatps/OATPs and that its transport properties are closely associated with certain forms of toxic liver injury such as for example protein phosphatase inhibition by the water-borne toxin microcystin

  1. TAMH: A Useful In Vitro Model for Assessing Hepatotoxic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madison Davis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro models for hepatotoxicity can be useful tools to predict in vivo responses. In this review, we discuss the use of the transforming growth factor-α transgenic mouse hepatocyte (TAMH cell line, which is an attractive model to study drug-induced liver injury due to its ability to retain a stable phenotype and express drug-metabolizing enzymes. Hepatotoxicity involves damage to the liver and is often associated with chemical exposure. Since the liver is a major site for drug metabolism, drug-induced liver injury is a serious health concern for certain agents. At the molecular level, various mechanisms may protect or harm the liver during drug-induced hepatocellular injury including signaling pathways and endogenous factors (e.g., Bcl-2, GSH, Nrf2, or MAPK. The interplay between these and other pathways in the hepatocyte can change upon drug or drug metabolite exposure leading to intracellular stress and eventually cell death and liver injury. This review focuses on mechanistic studies investigating drug-induced toxicity in the TAMH line and how alterations to hepatotoxic mechanisms in this model relate to the in vivo situation. The agents discussed herein include acetaminophen (APAP, tetrafluoroethylcysteine (TFEC, flutamide, PD0325901, lapatinib, and flupirtine.

  2. Advancing Predictive Hepatotoxicity at the Intersection of Experimental, in Silico, and Artificial Intelligence Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Keith; Bruckner, Dylan M; Dordick, Jonathan S

    2018-06-18

    Adverse drug reactions, particularly those that result in drug-induced liver injury (DILI), are a major cause of drug failure in clinical trials and drug withdrawals. Hepatotoxicity-mediated drug attrition occurs despite substantial investments of time and money in developing cellular assays, animal models, and computational models to predict its occurrence in humans. Underperformance in predicting hepatotoxicity associated with drugs and drug candidates has been attributed to existing gaps in our understanding of the mechanisms involved in driving hepatic injury after these compounds perfuse and are metabolized by the liver. Herein we assess in vitro, in vivo (animal), and in silico strategies used to develop predictive DILI models. We address the effectiveness of several two- and three-dimensional in vitro cellular methods that are frequently employed in hepatotoxicity screens and how they can be used to predict DILI in humans. We also explore how humanized animal models can recapitulate human drug metabolic profiles and associated liver injury. Finally, we highlight the maturation of computational methods for predicting hepatotoxicity, the untapped potential of artificial intelligence for improving in silico DILI screens, and how knowledge acquired from these predictions can shape the refinement of experimental methods.

  3. Herbal hepatotoxicity in traditional and modern medicine: actual key issues and new encouraging steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Rolf; Eickhoff, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Plants are natural producers of chemical substances, providing potential treatment of human ailments since ancient times. Some herbal chemicals in medicinal plants of traditional and modern medicine carry the risk of herb induced liver injury (HILI) with a severe or potentially lethal clinical course, and the requirement of a liver transplant. Discontinuation of herbal use is mandatory in time when HILI is first suspected as diagnosis. Although, herbal hepatotoxicity is of utmost clinical and regulatory importance, lack of a stringent causality assessment remains a major issue for patients with suspected HILI, while this problem is best overcome by the use of the hepatotoxicity specific CIOMS (Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences) scale and the evaluation of unintentional reexposure test results. Sixty five different commonly used herbs, herbal drugs, and herbal supplements and 111 different herbs or herbal mixtures of the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) are reported causative for liver disease, with levels of causality proof that appear rarely conclusive. Encouraging steps in the field of herbal hepatotoxicity focus on introducing analytical methods that identify cases of intrinsic hepatotoxicity caused by pyrrolizidine alkaloids, and on omics technologies, including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and assessing circulating micro-RNA in the serum of some patients with intrinsic hepatotoxicity. It remains to be established whether these new technologies can identify idiosyncratic HILI cases. To enhance its globalization, herbal medicine should universally be marketed as herbal drugs under strict regulatory surveillance in analogy to regulatory approved chemical drugs, proving a positive risk/benefit profile by enforcing evidence based clinical trials and excellent herbal drug quality.

  4. Herbal hepatotoxicity in traditional and modern medicine: actual key issues and new encouraging steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Rolf; Eickhoff, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Plants are natural producers of chemical substances, providing potential treatment of human ailments since ancient times. Some herbal chemicals in medicinal plants of traditional and modern medicine carry the risk of herb induced liver injury (HILI) with a severe or potentially lethal clinical course, and the requirement of a liver transplant. Discontinuation of herbal use is mandatory in time when HILI is first suspected as diagnosis. Although, herbal hepatotoxicity is of utmost clinical and regulatory importance, lack of a stringent causality assessment remains a major issue for patients with suspected HILI, while this problem is best overcome by the use of the hepatotoxicity specific CIOMS (Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences) scale and the evaluation of unintentional reexposure test results. Sixty five different commonly used herbs, herbal drugs, and herbal supplements and 111 different herbs or herbal mixtures of the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) are reported causative for liver disease, with levels of causality proof that appear rarely conclusive. Encouraging steps in the field of herbal hepatotoxicity focus on introducing analytical methods that identify cases of intrinsic hepatotoxicity caused by pyrrolizidine alkaloids, and on omics technologies, including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and assessing circulating micro-RNA in the serum of some patients with intrinsic hepatotoxicity. It remains to be established whether these new technologies can identify idiosyncratic HILI cases. To enhance its globalization, herbal medicine should universally be marketed as herbal drugs under strict regulatory surveillance in analogy to regulatory approved chemical drugs, proving a positive risk/benefit profile by enforcing evidence based clinical trials and excellent herbal drug quality. PMID:25954198

  5. Herbal hepatotoxicity in traditional and modern medicine: Actual key issues and new encouraging steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf eTeschke

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants are natural producers of chemical substances, providing potential treatment of human ailments since ancient times. Some herbal chemicals in medicinal plants of traditional and modern medicine carry the risk of herb induced liver injury (HILI with a severe or potentially lethal clinical course, and the requirement of a liver transplant. Discontinuation of herbal use is mandatory in time when HILI is first suspected as diagnosis. Although herbal hepatotoxicity is of utmost clinical and regulatory importance, lack of a stringent causality assessment remains a major issue for patients with suspected HILI, while this problem is best overcome by the use of the hepatotoxicity specific CIOMS (Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences scale and the evaluation of unintentional reexposure test results. Sixty five different commonly used herbs, herbal drugs, and herbal supplements and 111 different herbs or herbal mixtures of the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM are reported causative for liver disease, with levels of causality proof that appear rarely conclusive. Encouraging steps in the field of herbal hepatotoxicity focus on introducing analytical methods that identify cases of intrinsic hepatotoxicity caused by pyrrolizidine alkaloids, and on omics technologies, including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and assessing circulating micro-RNA in the serum of some patients with intrinsic hepatotoxicity. It remains to be established whether these new technologies can identify idiosyncratic HILI cases. To enhance its globalization, herbal medicine should universally be marketed as herbal drugs under strict regulatory surveillance in analogy to regulatory approved chemical drugs, proving a positive risk/benefit profile by enforcing evidence based clinical trials and excellent herbal drug quality.

  6. Hepatotoxic and Nephrotoxic Effects of Petroleum Fumes on Petrol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR SULEIMAN

    Hepatotoxic and Nephrotoxic Effects of Petroleum Fumes on Petrol Attendants in Ibadan, Nigeria. *1A.L. Ogunneye ... inhalation of petrol fumes is associated with adverse effect on the kidney and liver function. ..... neurotoxicity in mice. African ...

  7. Experimental additions of aluminum sulfate and ammonium nitrate to in situ mesocosms to reduce cyanobacterial biovolume and microcystin concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ted D.; Wilhelm, Frank M.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Loftin, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitrogen additions to increase the total nitrogen:total phosphorus (TN:TP) ratio may reduce cyanobacterial biovolume and microcystin concentration in reservoirs. In systems where TP is >100 μg/L, however, nitrogen additions to increase the TN:TP ratio could cause ammonia, nitrate, or nitrite toxicity to terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Reducing phosphorus via aluminum sulfate (alum) may be needed prior to nitrogen additions aimed at increasing the TN:TP ratio. We experimentally tested this sequential management approach in large in situ mesocosms (70.7 m3) to examine effects on cyanobacteria and microcystin concentration. Because alum removes nutrients and most seston from the water column, alum treatment reduced both TN and TP, leaving post-treatment TN:TP ratios similar to pre-treatment ratios. Cyanobacterial biovolume was reduced after alum addition, but the percent composition (i.e., relative) cyanobacterial abundance remained unchanged. A single ammonium nitrate (nitrogen) addition increased the TN:TP ratio 7-fold. After the TN:TP ratio was >50 (by weight), cyanobacterial biovolume and abundance were reduced, and chrysophyte and cryptophyte biovolume and abundance increased compared to the alum treatment. Microcystin was not detectable until the TN:TP ratio was <50. Although both treatments reduced cyanobacteria, only the nitrogen treatment seemed to stimulate energy flow from primary producers to zooplankton, which suggests that combining alum and nitrogen treatments may be a viable in-lake management strategy to reduce cyanobacteria and possibly microcystin concentrations in high-phosphorus systems. Additional studies are needed to define best management practices before combined alum and nitrogen additions are implemented as a reservoir management strategy.

  8. To Set Up a Logistic Regression Prediction Model for Hepatotoxicity of Chinese Herbal Medicines Based on Traditional Chinese Medicine Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongjie; Li, Tianhao; Zhan, Sha; Pan, Meilan; Ma, Zhiguo; Li, Chenghua

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To establish a logistic regression (LR) prediction model for hepatotoxicity of Chinese herbal medicines (HMs) based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory and to provide a statistical basis for predicting hepatotoxicity of HMs. Methods. The correlations of hepatotoxic and nonhepatotoxic Chinese HMs with four properties, five flavors, and channel tropism were analyzed with chi-square test for two-way unordered categorical data. LR prediction model was established and the accuracy of the prediction by this model was evaluated. Results. The hepatotoxic and nonhepatotoxic Chinese HMs were related with four properties (p 0.05). There were totally 12 variables from four properties and five flavors for the LR. Four variables, warm and neutral of the four properties and pungent and salty of five flavors, were selected to establish the LR prediction model, with the cutoff value being 0.204. Conclusions. Warm and neutral of the four properties and pungent and salty of five flavors were the variables to affect the hepatotoxicity. Based on such results, the established LR prediction model had some predictive power for hepatotoxicity of Chinese HMs. PMID:27656240

  9. Licochalcone A Upregulates Nrf2 Antioxidant Pathway and Thereby Alleviates Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongming Lv

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetaminophen (APAP overdose-induced fatal hepatotoxicity is majorly characterized by overwhelmingly increased oxidative stress while enhanced nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 is involved in prevention of hepatotoxicity. Although Licochalcone A (Lico A upregulates Nrf2 signaling pathway against oxidative stress-triggered cell injury, whether it could protect from APAP-induced hepatotoxicity by directly inducing Nrf2 activation is still poorly elucidated. This study aims to explore the protective effect of Lico A against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity and its underlying molecular mechanisms. Our findings indicated that Lico A effectively decreased tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP- and APAP-stimulated cell apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species generation and increased various anti-oxidative enzymes expression, which is largely dependent on upregulating Nrf2 nuclear translocation, reducing the Keap1 protein expression, and strengthening the antioxidant response element promoter activity. Meanwhile, Lico A dramatically protected against APAP-induced acute liver failure by lessening the lethality; alleviating histopathological liver changes; decreasing the alanine transaminase and aspartate aminotransferase levels, malondialdehyde formation, myeloperoxidase level and superoxide dismutase depletion, and increasing the GSH-to-GSSG ratio. Furthermore, Lico A not only significantly modulated apoptosis-related protein by increasing Bcl-2 expression, and decreasing Bax and caspase-3 cleavage expression, but also efficiently alleviated mitochondrial dysfunction by reducing c-jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation and translocation, inhibiting Bax mitochondrial translocation, apoptosis-inducing factor and cytochrome c release. However, Lico A-inhibited APAP-induced the lethality, histopathological changes, hepatic apoptosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction in WT mice were evidently abrogated in Nrf2-/- mice. These

  10. Hypolipidemic Effect of Psidium guajava Leaf Extract Against Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, K; Rengarajan, R L; Radhakrishnan, R; Anand, A Vijaya

    2018-01-01

    Plant-based natural extracts cure several diseases in human. However, the extract of Psidium guajava leaf is not yet evaluated on changes of lipid profile in hepatic disease affected rats. The present study was aimed to evaluate the mitigation effect of the ethanolic extract of P. guajava leaf and its isolated quercetin fraction on hepatotoxic rats. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) was injected to rats for hepatic disease induction and silymarin drug was used as positive control to compare plant ethanolic extract. The lipid profiles were assessed in both plasma and liver tissue of diseased and control rats. Levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, phospholipids, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were increased and the level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was decreased in CCl 4 -induced hepatotoxic rats. The treatment of P. guajava (100, 200, and 300 mg/kg, bw) and isolated quercetin fraction (20 mg/kg, bw) doses decreased the elevated levels of all these parameters in diseased rats and restored the normal concentration of HDL-C. The results of the present study concluded that the P. guajava leaf and its isolated quercetin fraction can significantly regulate lipid metabolism in CCl 4 -induced hepatotoxic rats and decrease the disease rate. Psidium guajava leaf extract reduces the hepatotoxicity and disease rate in ratsQuercetin fraction of leaf extract significantly regulates lipid profile in hepatic diseased rats. Abbreviations used: CCl 4 : Carbon tetrachloride; FFA: Free fatty acids; HDL-C: High-density lipoprotein cholesterol; LCAT: Lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase; LDL-C: Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; PL: Phospholipids; TC: Total cholesterol; TG: Triglycerides; VLDL-C: Very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

  11. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in mice: Effect of age, frailty and exposure type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Alice E.; Mitchell, Sarah J.; Mach, John; Huizer-Pajkos, Aniko; McKenzie, Catriona; Jones, Brett; Cogger, Victoria; Le Couteur, David G.; de Cabo, Rafael; Hilmer, Sarah N.

    2018-01-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used analgesic that can cause severe hepatotoxicity in overdose. Despite old age and frailty being associated with extensive and long-term utilization of acetaminophen and a high prevalence of adverse drug reactions, there is limited information on the risks of toxicity from acetaminophen in old age and frailty. This study aimed to assess changes in the risk and mechanisms of hepatotoxicity from acute, chronic and sub-acute acetaminophen exposure with old age and frailty in mice. Young and old male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either acute (300 mg/kg via oral gavage), chronic (100 mg/kg/day in diet for six weeks) or sub-acute (250 mg/kg, t.i.d., for three days) acetaminophen, or saline control. Pre-dosing mice were scored for the mouse clinical frailty index, and after dosing serum and liver tissue were collected for assessment of toxicity and mechanisms. There were no differences with old age or frailty in the degree of hepatotoxicity induced by acute, chronic or subacute acetaminophen exposure as assessed by serum liver enzymes and histology. Age-related changes in the acetaminophen toxicity pathways included increased liver GSH concentrations, increased NQO1 activity and an increased pro- and anti-inflammatory response to acetaminophen in old age. Frailty-related changes included a negative correlation between frailty index and serum protein, albumin and ALP concentrations for some mouse groups. In conclusion, although there were changes in some pathways that would be expected to influence susceptibility to acetaminophen toxicity, there was no overall increase in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity with old age or frailty in mice. PMID:26615879

  12. Comparative Hepatotoxicity of Fluconazole, Ketoconazole, Itraconazole, Terbinafine, and Griseofulvin in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoza, Star; Moyo, Ishmael; Ncube, Denver

    2017-01-01

    Oral ketoconazole was recently the subject of regulatory safety warnings because of its association with increased risk of inducing hepatic injury. However, the relative hepatotoxicity of antifungal agents has not been clearly established. The aim of this study was to compare the hepatotoxicity induced by five commonly prescribed oral antifungal agents. Rats were treated with therapeutic oral doses of griseofulvin, fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, and terbinafine. After 14 days, only ketoconazole had significantly higher ALT levels ( p = 0.0017) and AST levels ( p = 0.0008) than the control group. After 28 days, ALT levels were highest in the rats treated with ketoconazole followed by itraconazole, fluconazole, griseofulvin, and terbinafine, respectively. The AST levels were highest in the rats treated with ketoconazole followed by itraconazole, fluconazole, terbinafine, and griseofulvin, respectively. All drugs significantly elevated ALP levels after 14 days and 28 days of treatment ( p terbinafine, and griseofulvin. However, histopathological changes revealed that fluconazole was the most hepatotoxic, followed by ketoconazole, itraconazole, terbinafine, and griseofulvin, respectively. Given the poor correlation between liver enzymes and the extent of liver injury, it is important to confirm liver injury through histological examination.

  13. Microcystin-LR and Cylindrospermopsin Induced Alterations in Chromatin Organization of Plant Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Máthé, Csaba; Mikóné Hamvas, Márta; Vasas, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce metabolites with diverse bioactivities, structures and pharmacological properties. The effects of microcystins (MCYs), a family of peptide type protein-phosphatase inhibitors and cylindrospermopsin (CYN), an alkaloid type of protein synthesis blocker will be discussed in this review. We are focusing mainly on cyanotoxin-induced changes of chromatin organization and their possible cellular mechanisms. The particularities of plant cells explain the importance of such studi...

  14. Microcystin-LR Induces Apoptosis via NF-κB /iNOS Pathway in INS-1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Shen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial toxins, especially the microcystins, are found in eutrophied waters throughout the world, and their potential to impact on human and animal health is a cause for concern. Microcystin-LR (MC-LR is one of the common toxic microcystin congeners and occurs frequently in diverse water systems. Recent work suggested that apoptosis plays a major role in the toxic effects induced by MC-LR in hepatocytes. However, the roles of MC-LR in pancreatic beta cells have not been fully established. The aim of the present study was to assess possible in vitro effects of MC-LR on cell apoptosis in the rat insulinoma cell line, INS-1. Our results demonstrated that MC-LR promoted selectively activation of NF-κB (increasing nuclear p50/p65 translocation and increased the mRNA and protein levels of induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. The chronic treatment with MC-LR stimulated nitric oxide (NO production derived from iNOS and induced apoptosis in a dose dependent manner in INS-1 cells. Meanwhile, this effect was inhibited by the NF-κB inhibitor PDTC, which reversed the apoptosis induced by MC-LR. Our observations indicate that MC-LR induced cell apoptosis via an iNOS-dependent pathway. A well-known nuclear transcription factor, NF-κB, is activated and mediates intracellular nitric oxide synthesis. We suggest that the apoptosis induced by chronic MC-LR in vivo presents a possible cause of β-cell dysfunction, as a key environmental factor in the development of diabetes mellitus.

  15. Production of a broad specificity antibody for the development and validation of an optical SPR screening method for free and intracellular microcystins and nodularin in cyanobacteria cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Shauna; Meneely, Julie P; Greer, Brett; Campbell, Katrina; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Elliott, Christopher T

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive broad specificity monoclonal antibody was produced and characterised for microcystin detection through the development of a rapid surface plasmon resonance (SPR) optical biosensor based immunoassay. The antibody displayed the following cross-reactivity: MC-LR 100%; MC-RR 108%; MC-YR 68%; MC-LA 69%; MC-LW 71%; MC-LF 68%; and Nodularin 94%. Microcystin-LR was covalently attached to a CM5 chip and with the monoclonal antibody was employed in a competitive 4 min injection assay to detect total microcystins in water samples below the WHO recommended limit (1 µg/L). A 'total microcystin' level was determined by measuring free and intracellular concentrations in cyanobacterial culture samples as this toxin is an endotoxin. Glass bead beating was used to lyse the cells as a rapid extraction procedure. This method was validated according to European Commission Decision 96/23/EC criteria. The method was proven to measure intracellular microcystin levels, the main source of the toxin, which often goes undetected by other analytical procedures and is advantageous in that it can be used for the monitoring of blooms to provide an early warning of toxicity. It was shown to be repeatable and reproducible, with recoveries from spiked samples ranging from 74 to 123%, and had % CVs below 10% for intra-assay analysis and 15% for inter-assay analysis. The detection capability of the assay was calculated as 0.5 ng/mL for extracellular toxins and 0.05 ng/mL for intracellular microcystins. A comparison of the SPR method with LC-MS/MS was achieved by testing six Microcystis aeruginosa cultures and this study yielded a correlation R(2) value of 0.9989. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Early predictors of severe acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in a paediatric population referred to a tertiary paediatric department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedeland, Rikke Lindgaard; Andersen, Jesper; Askbo, Natasha Louise Friis

    2014-01-01

    -acetylcysteine treatment on hepatotoxicity and the incidence of nephrotoxicity. METHODS: We carried out a retrospective case study on 25 children aged 11-16 years with severe acetaminophen poisoning. RESULTS: Initial biochemical parameters predicted hepatotoxicity, defined as the maximum levels of the international...

  17. Debating the legitimacy of a contested environmental illness: a case study of multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Tarryn

    2010-11-01

    More than 20years after it was first identified, the anomalous condition, multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS), remains immersed in controversy, with a continuing debate over its causation being played out in the medico-scientific community and in the courts. This article examines why sceptical and supportive experts disagree over the condition's legitimacy as an organic condition. Drawing on ethnographic research conducted in Perth, Western Australia, the author scrutinises the decision-making practices of 16 experts (eight sceptical and eight supportive of a chemical explanation). Both groups were found to use evidence-based, inductive reasoning. However, sceptical experts tended to use a different set of evidence requirements, exhibited more faith in the efficiency of the current biomedical paradigm regarding toxicity and were less likely to acknowledge uncertainty in their field. All the experts recognised a spectrum of beliefs about the causal mechanisms of MCS. However, when they were engaged in litigation as expert witnesses due to their supportive or sceptical tendency, the oppositional legal system polarised their opinions and exacerbated the perceived divide between them. Ultimately, the adversarial medico-legal process inhibits genuine dialogue between some of the key players in the MCS debate, thus impeding understanding and consensus about the condition. © 2010 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2010 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Production of cyanopeptolins, anabaenopeptins, and microcystins by the harmful cyanobacteria Anabaena 90 and Microcystis PCC 7806

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonk, L.; Welker, M.; Huisman, J.; Visser, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of light intensity, temperature, and phosphorus limitation on the peptide production of the cyanobacteria Microcystis PCC 7806 and Anabaena 90. Microcystis PCC 7806 produced two microcystin variants and three cyanopeptolins, whereas Anabaena 90 produced four

  19. The Possible Efficacy of Artichoke in Fluconazole Related Hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although fluconazole related hepatotoxicity (FRH is rare, mortal acute hepatic necrosis and jaundice were reported in immunocompromised states such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS and bone marrow transplant (BMT. We present a case of a patient with multiple sclerosis who developed hepatotoxicity with the use of a single 150 mg fluconazole tablet for fungal vaginitis, 10 days after methylprednisolone pulse treatment. Our patient’s alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST levels were decreased, 1200 U/L and 800 U/L, respectively, and bilirubin levels were consistent at 37 mg/dL. Artichoke which has anticholestatic and antioxidant properties was used by our patient. She consumed a 30 mg artichoke leaf extract tea 3 times a day. The bilirubin levels significantly declined at the end of the first week and all liver function tests were normalized within 2 months.

  20. Curcumin Attenuates Hepatotoxicity Induced by Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layasadat Khorsandi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Zinc oxide nanoparticles (NZnO are increasingly used in modern life. Most metal nanoparticles have adverse effects on the liver. Aims: To explore the protective action of curcumin (Cur against hepatotoxicity induced by NZnO in rats. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Control group animals received normal saline, while the Cur group animals were treated with 200 mg/kg of Cur orally for 21 days. NZnO-intoxicated rats received 50 mg/kg of NZnO for 14 days by gavage method. In the NZnO+Cur group, rats were pretreated with Cur for 7 days before NZnO administration. Plasma activities of Alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were measured as biomarkers of hepatotoxicity. Hepatic levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx activities were measured for detection of oxidative stress in liver tissue. Histological changes and apoptosis in liver tissue were studied by using Hematoxylin-eosin staining and the transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL method. Results: NZnO induced a significant increase in plasma AST (2.8-fold, ALT (2.7-fold and ALP (1.97-fold activity in comparison to the control group (p<0.01. NZnO increased MDA content and reduced SOD and GPx activities. NZnO caused liver damage including centrilobular necrosis and microvesicular steatosis. The percentage of apoptosis in hepatocytes was increased in NZnO-treated rats (p<0.01. Pre-treatment of Cur significantly reduced lipid peroxidation (39%, increased SOD (156% and GPx (26% activities, and attenuated ALT (47%, AST (41% and ALP (30% activities. Pre-treatment with Cur also decreased the histology changes and apoptotic index of hepatocytes (p<0.05. Conclusion: These findings indicate that Cur effectively protects against NZnO-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. However, future studies are required to propose Cur as a potential protective agent against hepatotoxicity

  1. The lipid lowering drug lovastatin protects against doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henninger, Christian; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Huelsenbeck, Stefanie; Grösch, Sabine; Schad, Arno; Lackner, Karl J.; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Liver is the main detoxifying organ and therefore the target of high concentrations of genotoxic compounds, such as environmental carcinogens and anticancer drugs. Here, we investigated the usefulness of lovastatin, which is nowadays widely used for lipid lowering purpose, as a hepatoprotective drug following the administration of the anthracycline derivative doxorubicin in vivo. To this end, BALB/c mice were exposed to either a single high dose or three consecutive low doses of doxorubicin. Acute and subacute hepatotoxicities were analyzed with or without lovastatin co-treatment. Lovastatin protected the liver against doxorubicin-induced acute pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic stress responses as indicated by an attenuated mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), respectively. Hepatoprotection by lovastatin was due to a reduced induction of DNA damage following doxorubicin treatment. The statin also mitigated subacute anthracycline-provoked hepatotoxicity as shown on the level of doxorubicin- and epirubicin-stimulated CTGF mRNA expression as well as histopathologically detectable fibrosis and serum concentration of marker enzymes of hepatotoxicity (GPT/GLDH). Kidney damage following doxorubicin exposure was not detectable under our experimental conditions. Moreover, lovastatin showed multiple inhibitory effects on doxorubicin-triggered hepatic expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response, drug transport, DNA repair, cell cycle progression and cell death. Doxorubicin also stimulated the formation of ceramides. Ceramide production, however, was not blocked by lovastatin, indicating that hepatoprotection by lovastatin is independent of the sphingolipid metabolism. Overall, the data show that lovastatin is hepatoprotective following genotoxic stress induced by anthracyclines. Based on the data, we hypothesize that statins might be suitable to lower hepatic injury following anthracycline

  2. The lipid lowering drug lovastatin protects against doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henninger, Christian [Institute of Toxicology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, D-55131 Mainz (Germany); Institute of Toxicology, University Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Universitätsstrasse 1, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Huelsenbeck, Stefanie [Institute of Toxicology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, D-55131 Mainz (Germany); Grösch, Sabine [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt, Theodor Stern Kai 7, D-60590 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Schad, Arno [Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, D-55131 Mainz (Germany); Lackner, Karl J. [Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, D-55131 Mainz (Germany); Kaina, Bernd [Institute of Toxicology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, D-55131 Mainz (Germany); Fritz, Gerhard, E-mail: fritz@uni-duesseldorf.de [Institute of Toxicology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, D-55131 Mainz (Germany); Institute of Toxicology, University Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Universitätsstrasse 1, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Liver is the main detoxifying organ and therefore the target of high concentrations of genotoxic compounds, such as environmental carcinogens and anticancer drugs. Here, we investigated the usefulness of lovastatin, which is nowadays widely used for lipid lowering purpose, as a hepatoprotective drug following the administration of the anthracycline derivative doxorubicin in vivo. To this end, BALB/c mice were exposed to either a single high dose or three consecutive low doses of doxorubicin. Acute and subacute hepatotoxicities were analyzed with or without lovastatin co-treatment. Lovastatin protected the liver against doxorubicin-induced acute pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic stress responses as indicated by an attenuated mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), respectively. Hepatoprotection by lovastatin was due to a reduced induction of DNA damage following doxorubicin treatment. The statin also mitigated subacute anthracycline-provoked hepatotoxicity as shown on the level of doxorubicin- and epirubicin-stimulated CTGF mRNA expression as well as histopathologically detectable fibrosis and serum concentration of marker enzymes of hepatotoxicity (GPT/GLDH). Kidney damage following doxorubicin exposure was not detectable under our experimental conditions. Moreover, lovastatin showed multiple inhibitory effects on doxorubicin-triggered hepatic expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response, drug transport, DNA repair, cell cycle progression and cell death. Doxorubicin also stimulated the formation of ceramides. Ceramide production, however, was not blocked by lovastatin, indicating that hepatoprotection by lovastatin is independent of the sphingolipid metabolism. Overall, the data show that lovastatin is hepatoprotective following genotoxic stress induced by anthracyclines. Based on the data, we hypothesize that statins might be suitable to lower hepatic injury following anthracycline

  3. Detection of free and covalently bound microcystins in different tissues (liver, intestines, gills, and muscles) of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry: Method characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadel-Six, Sabrina; Moyenga, David; Magny, Stéphanie; Trotereau, Sophie; Edery, Marc; Krys, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    So far only a few publications have explored the development of extraction methods of cyanotoxin extracted from complex matrices. With regard to cyanobacterial microcystins (MCs), the data on the contamination of the flesh of aquatic organisms is hard to compare and very limited due to the lack of validated methods. In recent years, evidence that both free and bound fractions of toxin are found in these tissues has highlighted the need to develop effective methods of quantification. Several techniques do exist, but only the Lemieux oxidation has so far been used to investigate complex tissue matrices. In this study, protocols based on the Lemieux approach were adapted for the quantitative chemical analysis of free MC-LR and MMPB derived from bound toxin in the tissues of juvenile trout gavaged with MC-LR. Afterwards, the NF V03 110 guideline was used to characterize the protocols elaborated and evaluate their effectiveness. -- Highlights: • We adapted the quantitative chemical analysis of free and total MC for the tissues of trout. • We characterize with the NF V03 110 guideline the protocols for free MC-LR and MMPB. • We quantify the free MC-LR and MMPB in the tissues of trout gavaged with MC-LR. -- We develop and characterize with the guideline NF V03 110 the protocols for the extraction and quantification of the free and total MC for different matrices

  4. Potential protective effect of honey against paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galal, Reem M; Zaki, Hala F; Seif El-Nasr, Mona M; Agha, Azza M

    2012-11-01

    Paracetamol overdose causes severe hepatotoxicity that leads to liver failure in both humans and experimental animals. The present study investigates the protective effect of honey against paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar albino rats. We have used silymarin as a standard reference hepatoprotective drug. Hepatoprotective activity was assessed by measuring biochemical parameters such as the liver function enzymes, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Equally, comparative effects of honey on oxidative stress biomarkers such as malondialdyhyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were also evaluated in the rat liver homogenates.  We estimated the effect of honey on serum levels and hepatic content of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) because the initial event in paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity has been shown to be a toxic-metabolic injury that leads to hepatocyte death, activation of the innate immune response and upregulation of inflammatory cytokines. Paracetamol caused marked liver damage as noted by significant increased activities of serum AST and ALT as well as the level of Il-1β. Paracetamol also resulted in a significant decrease in liver GSH content and GPx activity which paralleled an increase in Il-1β and MDA levels. Pretreatment with honey and silymarin prior to the administration of paracetamol significantly prevented the increase in the serum levels of hepatic enzyme markers, and reduced both oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines. Histopathological evaluation of the livers also revealed that honey reduced the incidence of paracetamol-induced liver lesions. Honey can be used as an effective hepatoprotective agent against paracetamol-induced liver damage.

  5. Application of rain scanner SANTANU and transportable weather radar in analyze of Mesoscale Convective System (MCS) events over Bandung, West Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, G. A.; Sinatra, T.; Trismidianto; Fathrio, I.

    2018-05-01

    Simultaneous observation of transportable weather radar LAPAN-GMR25SP and rain-scanner SANTANU were conducted in Bandung and vicinity. The objective is to observe and analyse the weather condition in this area during rainy and transition season from March until April 2017. From the observation result reported some heavy rainfall with hail and strong winds occurred on March 17th and April 19th 2017. This events were lasted within 1 to 2 hours damaged some properties and trees in Bandung. Mesoscale convective system (MCS) are assumed to be the cause of this heavy rainfall. From two radar data analysis showed a more local convective activity in around 11.00 until 13.00 LT. This local convective activity are showed from the SANTANU observation supported by the VSECT and CMAX of the Transportable radar data that signify the convective activity within those area. MCS activity were observed one hour after that. This event are confirm by the classification of convective-stratiform echoes from radar data and also from the high convective index from Tbb Himawari 8 satellite data. The different MCS activity from this two case study is that April 19 have much more MCS activity than in March 17, 2017.

  6. Impact of microcystin containing diets on physiological performance of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) concerning stress and growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ziková, A.; Trubiroha, A.; Wiegand, C.; Wuertz, S.; Rennert, B.; Pflugmacher, S.; Kopp, Radovan; Mareš, J.; Kloas, W.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 3 (2010), s. 561-568 ISSN 0730-7268 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : microcystin * Nile tilapia * physiological performance Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.026, year: 2010

  7. Protective effect of rutin in comparison to silymarin against induced hepatotoxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kasi Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of rutin (RTN in comparison to silymarin (SLM against acetaminophen (APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar albino rats (n=24 of 3 months age were equally divided into four groups. Group 1 served as normal control. Hepatotoxicity was induced in the remaining three groups with administration of 500 mg/kg po APAP from day 1-3. Groups 2, 3, and 4 were subsequently administered orally with distilled water, 25 mg/kg of SLM, and 20 mg/kg of RTN, respectively, for 11 days. The mean body weights and biomarkers of hepatotoxicity were estimated on day 0, 4 (confirmation of toxicity, and 15 (at the end of treatment. Hematological parameters were evaluated on day 4 and 15. Antioxidant profile and adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases were assessed at the end of the experiment. Liver tissues were subjected to histopathology and transmission electron microscopy after the sacrifice on day 15. Results: Antioxidant profile, ATPases, and hematological and sero-biochemical parameters were significantly altered, and histopathological changes were noticed in the liver of toxic control group. These changes were reversed in groups 3 and 4 that were administered with SLM and RTN, respectively. Conclusion: The results of the present investigation enunciated that SLM has potent hepatoprotective activity though the RTN was found superior in restoring the pathological alterations in paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar albino rats.

  8. Comparative Hepatotoxicity Test of Cadmium and Lead in Rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Adverse environmental impacts include contamination of water, soil, and phytotoxicity from excessive heavy metals dispersed from mines and smelter sites leading to potential risk to human health. This study investigated the comparative hepatotoxicity test of mining pond waters used for domestic purposes in ...

  9. Bee sting therapy-induced hepatotoxicity: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqutub, Adel Nazmi; Masoodi, Ibrahim; Alsayari, Khalid; Alomair, Ahmed

    2011-10-27

    The use of bee venom as a therapeutic agent for the relief of joint pains dates back to Hippocrates, and references to the treatment can be found in ancient Egyptian and Greek medical writings as well. Also known as apitherapy, the technique is widely used in Eastern Europe, Asia, and South America. The beneficial effects of bee stings can be attributed to mellitinin, an anti-inflammatory agent, known to be hundred times stronger than cortisone. Unfortunately, certain substances in the bee venom trigger allergic reactions which can be life threatening in a sensitized individual. Multiple stings are known to cause hemolysis, kidney injury, hepatotoxicity and myocardial infarction. The toxicity can be immediate or can manifest itself only weeks after the exposure. We describe hepatotoxicity in a 35-year-old female, following bee sting therapy for multiple sclerosis. She presented to our clinic 3 wk after therapy with a history of progressive jaundice. The patient subsequently improved, and has been attending our clinic now for the last 9 mo.

  10. Comparative Hepatotoxicity of Fluconazole, Ketoconazole, Itraconazole, Terbinafine, and Griseofulvin in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Star Khoza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral ketoconazole was recently the subject of regulatory safety warnings because of its association with increased risk of inducing hepatic injury. However, the relative hepatotoxicity of antifungal agents has not been clearly established. The aim of this study was to compare the hepatotoxicity induced by five commonly prescribed oral antifungal agents. Rats were treated with therapeutic oral doses of griseofulvin, fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, and terbinafine. After 14 days, only ketoconazole had significantly higher ALT levels (p=0.0017 and AST levels (p=0.0008 than the control group. After 28 days, ALT levels were highest in the rats treated with ketoconazole followed by itraconazole, fluconazole, griseofulvin, and terbinafine, respectively. The AST levels were highest in the rats treated with ketoconazole followed by itraconazole, fluconazole, terbinafine, and griseofulvin, respectively. All drugs significantly elevated ALP levels after 14 days and 28 days of treatment (p<0.0001. The liver enzyme levels suggested that ketoconazole had the highest risk in causing liver injury followed by itraconazole, fluconazole, terbinafine, and griseofulvin. However, histopathological changes revealed that fluconazole was the most hepatotoxic, followed by ketoconazole, itraconazole, terbinafine, and griseofulvin, respectively. Given the poor correlation between liver enzymes and the extent of liver injury, it is important to confirm liver injury through histological examination.

  11. Possible hepatotoxicity of chronic marijuana usage

    OpenAIRE

    Borini, Paulo; Guimarães, Romeu Cardoso; Borini, Sabrina Bicalho

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: Hepatotoxicity is a potential complication from the usage of various illicit drugs, possibly consequent to their liver metabolism, but information on this is scarce in the medical literature. OBJECTIVE: To study the occurrence of clinical and laboratory hepatic alterations in chronic marijuana users, from the use of marijuana on its own or in association with other legal or illicit drugs. TYPE OF STUDY: transversal study SETTING: Hospital Espírita de Marília, Marília, São Paulo, Braz...

  12. Dynamics of Protein Phosphatase Gene Expression in Corbicula fluminea Exposed to Microcystin-LR and to Toxic Microcystis aeruginosa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Vasconcelos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the in vivo effects of microcystins on gene expression of several phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPP in the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea with two different exposure scenarios. Clams were exposed for 96 h to 5 µg L−1 of dissolved microcystin-LR and the relative changes of gene expression of three different types of PPP (PPP1, 2 and 4 were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed a significant induction of PPP2 gene expression in the visceral mass. In contrast, the cyanotoxin did not cause any significant changes on PPP1 and PPP4 gene expression. Based on these results, we studied alterations in transcriptional patterns in parallel with enzymatic activity of C. fluminea for PPP2, induced by a Microcystis aeruginosa toxic strain (1 × 105 cells cm−3 during 96 h. The relative changes of gene expression and enzyme activity in visceral mass were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and colorimetric assays respectively. The clams exhibited a significant reduction of PPP2 activity with a concomitant enhancement of gene expression. Considering all the results we can conclude that the exposure to an ecologically relevant concentration of pure or intracellular microcystins (-LR promoted an in vivo effect on PPP2 gene expression in C. fluminea.

  13. Removal of microcystin-LR from drinking water using a bamboo-based charcoal adsorbent modified with chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hangjun; Zhu, Guoying; Jia, Xiuying; Ding, Ying; Zhang, Mi; Gao, Qing; Hu, Ciming; Xu, Shuying

    2011-01-01

    A new kind of low-cost syntactic adsorbent from bamboo charcoal and chitosan was developed for the removal of microcystin-LR from drinking water. Removal efficiency was higher for the syntactic adsorbent when the amount of bamboo charcoal was increased. The optimum dose ratio of bamboo charcoal to chitosan was 6:4, and the optimum amount was 15 mg/L; equilibrium time was 6 hr. The adsorption isotherm was non-linear and could be simulated by the Freundlich model (R2 = 0.9337). Adsorption efficiency was strongly affected by pH and natural organic matter (NOM). Removal efficiency was 16% higher at pH 3 than at pH 9. Efficiency rate was reduced by 15% with 25 mg/L NOM (UV254 = 0.089 cm(-1)) in drinking water. This study demonstrated that the bamboo charcoal modified with chitosan can effectively remove microcystin-LR from drinking water.

  14. Co-Occurrence of Microcystins and Taste-and-Odor Compounds in Drinking Water Source and Their Removal in a Full-Scale Drinking Water Treatment Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Muhua; Xu, Xiangen; Liu, Feifei; Ke, Fan; Li, Wenchao

    2018-01-01

    The co-occurrence of cyanotoxins and taste-and-odor compounds are a growing concern for drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) suffering cyanobacteria in water resources. The dissolved and cell-bound forms of three microcystin (MC) congeners (MC-LR, MC-RR and MC-YR) and four taste-and-odor compounds (geosmin, 2-methyl isoborneol, β-cyclocitral and β-ionone) were investigated monthly from August 2011 to July 2012 in the eastern drinking water source of Lake Chaohu. The total concentrations of microcystins and taste-and-odor compounds reached 8.86 μg/L and 250.7 ng/L, respectively. The seasonal trends of microcystins were not consistent with those of the taste-and-odor compounds, which were accompanied by dominant species Microcystis and Dolichospermum. The fate of the cyanobacteria and metabolites were determined simultaneously after the processes of coagulation/flocculation, sedimentation, filtration and chlorination in the associated full-scale DWTP. The dissolved fractions with elevated concentrations were detected after some steps and the breakthrough of cyanobacteria and metabolites were even observed in finished water. Chlorophyll-a limits at intake were established for the drinking water source based on our investigation of multiple metabolites, seasonal variations and their elimination rates in the DWTP. Not only microcystins but also taste-and-odor compounds should be taken into account to guide the management in source water and in DWTPs. PMID:29301296

  15. Predicting cyanobacterial abundance, microcystin, and geosmin in a eutrophic drinking-water reservoir using a 14-year dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ted D.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2017-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms degrade water quality in drinking water supply reservoirs by producing toxic and taste-and-odor causing secondary metabolites, which ultimately cause public health concerns and lead to increased treatment costs for water utilities. There have been numerous attempts to create models that predict cyanobacteria and their secondary metabolites, most using linear models; however, linear models are limited by assumptions about the data and have had limited success as predictive tools. Thus, lake and reservoir managers need improved modeling techniques that can accurately predict large bloom events that have the highest impact on recreational activities and drinking-water treatment processes. In this study, we compared 12 unique linear and nonlinear regression modeling techniques to predict cyanobacterial abundance and the cyanobacterial secondary metabolites microcystin and geosmin using 14 years of physiochemical water quality data collected from Cheney Reservoir, Kansas. Support vector machine (SVM), random forest (RF), boosted tree (BT), and Cubist modeling techniques were the most predictive of the compared modeling approaches. SVM, RF, and BT modeling techniques were able to successfully predict cyanobacterial abundance, microcystin, and geosmin concentrations <60,000 cells/mL, 2.5 µg/L, and 20 ng/L, respectively. Only Cubist modeling predicted maxima concentrations of cyanobacteria and geosmin; no modeling technique was able to predict maxima microcystin concentrations. Because maxima concentrations are a primary concern for lake and reservoir managers, Cubist modeling may help predict the largest and most noxious concentrations of cyanobacteria and their secondary metabolites.

  16. Synergistic drug-cytokine induction of hepatocellular death as an in vitro approach for the study of inflammation-associated idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D.; King, Bracken M.; Hasan, Maya A.; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G.; Farazi, Paraskevi A.; Hendriks, Bart S.; Griffith, Linda G.; Sorger, Peter K.; Tidor, Bruce; Xu, Jinghai J.

    2009-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity represents a major problem in drug development due to inadequacy of current preclinical screening assays, but recently established rodent models utilizing bacterial LPS co-administration to induce an inflammatory background have successfully reproduced idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity signatures for certain drugs. However, the low-throughput nature of these models renders them problematic for employment as preclinical screening assays. Here, we present an analogous, but high-throughput, in vitro approach in which drugs are administered to a variety of cell types (primary human and rat hepatocytes and the human HepG2 cell line) across a landscape of inflammatory contexts containing LPS and cytokines TNF, IFNγ, IL-1α, and IL-6. Using this assay, we observed drug-cytokine hepatotoxicity synergies for multiple idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants (ranitidine, trovafloxacin, nefazodone, nimesulide, clarithromycin, and telithromycin) but not for their corresponding non-toxic control compounds (famotidine, levofloxacin, buspirone, and aspirin). A larger compendium of drug-cytokine mix hepatotoxicity data demonstrated that hepatotoxicity synergies were largely potentiated by TNF, IL-1α, and LPS within the context of multi-cytokine mixes. Then, we screened 90 drugs for cytokine synergy in human hepatocytes and found that a significantly larger fraction of the idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants (19%) synergized with a single cytokine mix than did the non-hepatotoxic drugs (3%). Finally, we used an information theoretic approach to ascertain especially informative subsets of cytokine treatments for most highly effective construction of regression models for drug- and cytokine mix-induced hepatotoxicities across these cell systems. Our results suggest that this drug-cytokine co-treatment approach could provide a useful preclinical tool for investigating inflammation-associated idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity.

  17. Chlorination and ozonation differentially reduced the microcystin content and tumour promoting activity of a complex cyanobacterial extract

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sovadinová, I.; Babica, Pavel; Adamovský, O.; Alpatova, A.; Tarabara, V.; Upham, B. L.; Bláha, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2017), s. 107-120 ISSN 1947-573X Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : microcystin * chlorination * ozonation * water treatment * toxicity Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7)

  18. A Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-based Biosensor for Monitoring Microcystin-LR in Sources of Drinking Water Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multi-walled carbon nanotube-based electrochemical biosensor is developed for monitoring microcystin-LR (MC-LR), a toxic cyanobacterial toxin, in sources of drinking water supplies. The biosensor electrodes are fabricated using dense, mm-long multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) arrays gro...

  19. Analyses of cyanobacterial toxins (microcystins, cylindrospermopsins) in the reservoirs of the Czech Republic and evaluation of health risks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bláhová, Lucie; Babica, Pavel; Adamovský, Ondřej; Kohoutek, Jiří; Maršálek, Blahoslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2008), s. 223-227 ISSN 1610-3653 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : microcystins * cylindrospermopsin * health risks Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.366, year: 2008

  20. Sequence and batch language programs and alarm-related ``C`` programs for the 242-A MCS. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, J.F.

    1995-03-01

    A Distributive Process Control system was purchased by Project B-534, ``242-A Evaporator/Crystallizer Upgrades``. This control system, called the Monitor and Control System (MCS), was installed in the 242-A Evaporator located in the 200 East Area. The purpose of the MCS is to monitor and control the Evaporator and monitor a number of alarms and other signals from various Tank Farm facilities. Applications software for the MCS was developed by the Waste Treatment Systems Engineering (WTSE) group of Westinghouse. The standard displays and alarm scheme provide for control and monitoring, but do not directly indicate the signal location or depict the overall process. To do this, WTSE developed a second alarm scheme which uses special programs, annunciator keys, and process graphics. The special programs are written in two languages; Sequence and Batch Language (SABL), and ``C`` language. The WTSE-developed alarm scheme works as described below: SABL relates signals and alarms to the annunciator keys, called SKID keys. When an alarm occurs, a SABL program causes a SKID key to flash, and if the alarm is of yellow or white priority then a ``C`` program turns on an audible horn (the D/3 system uses a different audible horn for the red priority alarms). The horn and flashing key draws the attention of the operator.

  1. Relations between DNA- and RNA-based molecular methods for cyanobacteria and microcystin concentration at Maumee Bay State Park Lakeside Beach, Oregon, Ohio, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Erin A.; Loftin, Keith A.; Struffolino, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Water samples were collected from Maumee Bay State Park Lakeside Beach, Oregon, Ohio, during the 2012 recreational season and analyzed for selected cyanobacteria gene sequences by DNA-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and RNA-based quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results from the four DNA assays (for quantifying total cyanobacteria, total Microcystis, and Microcystis and Planktothrix strains that possess the microcystin synthetase E (mcyE) gene) and two RNA assays (for quantifying Microcystis and Planktothrix genera that are expressing the microcystin synthetase E (mcyE) gene) were compared to microcystin concentration results determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Concentrations of the target in replicate analyses were log10 transformed. The average value of differences in log10 concentrations for the replicates that had at least one detection were found to range from 0.05 to >0.37 copy per 100 milliliters (copy/100 mL) for DNA-based methods and from >0.04 to >0.17 copy/100 mL for RNA-based methods. RNA has a shorter half-life than DNA; consequently, a 24-hour holding-time study was done to determine the effects of holding time on RNA concentrations. Holding-time comparisons for the RNA-based Microcystis toxin mcyE assay showed reductions in the number of copies per 100 milliliters over 24 hours. The log difference between time 2 hours and time 24 hours was >0.37 copy/100 mL, which was higher than the analytical variability (log difference of >0.17 copy/100 mL). Spearman’s correlation analysis indicated that microcystin toxin concentrations were moderately to highly related to DNA-based assay results for total cyanobacteria (rho=0.69), total Microcystis (rho=0.74), and Microcystis strains that possess the mcyE gene (rho=0.81). Microcystin toxin concentrations were strongly related with RNA-based assay results for Microcystis mcyE gene expression (rho=0.95). Correlation analysis could

  2. Isolation, Identification and Phenotypic Characterization of Microcystin-Degrading Bacteria from Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, A.; Mou, X. J.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Erie, the smallest and warmest lake among the Laurentian Great Lakes, is known for its problem of eutrophication and frequent occurrence of harmful cyanobacterial blooms (CyanoHABs). One major harmful effect of CyanoHABs is the production of cyanotoxins, especially microcystins. Microcystins (MC) are a group of hepatotoxins and the predominant variant of them is MC-LR. Field measurements and lab experiments indicate that MC degradation in Lake Erie is mainly carried out by indigenous bacteria. However, our knowledge on taxa involved in this process is very limited. This study aimed to fill this knowledge gap using a culture-dependent approach. Water and surface sediment samples were collected from Lake Erie in 2014 and 2015 and enriched with MC-LR. Cells were plated on a number of culturing media. The obtained pure bacterial cultures were screened for MC degrading abilities by MT2 BIO-LOG assays and by growing cells in liquid media containing MC-LR as the sole carbon source. In the latter experiment, MC concentrations were measured using HPLC. Isolates showing positive MC degradation activities in the screening steps were designated MC+ bacteria and characterized based on their phenotypic properties, including colony pigmentation, elevation, opacity, margin, gram nature and motility. The taxonomic identity of MC+ bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene full-length DNA sequencing. The presence of mlrA, a gene encoding MC cleavage pathway, was detected by PCR. Our culturing efforts obtained 520 pure cultures; 44 of them were identified as MC+. These MC+ isolates showed diversity in taxonomic identities and differed in their morphology, gram nature, colony characteristics and motility. PCR amplification of mlrA gene yield negative results for all MC+ isolates, indicating that the primers that were used may not be ubiquitous enough to cover the heterogeneity of mlrA genes or, more likely, alternative degradative genes/pathways were employed by Lake Erie bacteria

  3. The Effects of Bitter Kola Supplemented Diet on Hepatotoxicity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    supplemented rat chow and mercury contaminated water, group V animals were ... hepatotoxic effects of the heavy metal indirectly assessed by measurement of the serum levels of alkaline .... III vs V: Group IV vs V.P-values less than 0.05.

  4. The non-protein coding breast cancer susceptibility locus Mcs5a acts in a non-mammary cell-autonomous fashion through the immune system and modulates T-cell homeostasis and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Bart M G; Sharma, Deepak; Samuelson, David J; Woditschka, Stephan; Mau, Bob; Haag, Jill D; Gould, Michael N

    2011-08-16

    Mechanisms underlying low-penetrance, common, non-protein coding variants in breast cancer risk loci are largely undefined. We showed previously that the non-protein coding mammary carcinoma susceptibility locus Mcs5a/MCS5A modulates breast cancer risk in rats and women. The Mcs5a allele from the Wistar-Kyoto (WKy) rat strain consists of two genetically interacting elements that have to be present on the same chromosome to confer mammary carcinoma resistance. We also found that the two interacting elements of the resistant allele are required for the downregulation of transcript levels of the Fbxo10 gene specifically in T-cells. Here we describe mechanisms through which Mcs5a may reduce mammary carcinoma susceptibility. We performed mammary carcinoma multiplicity studies with three mammary carcinoma-inducing treatments, namely 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU) carcinogenesis, and mammary ductal infusion of retrovirus expressing the activated HER2/neu oncogene. We used mammary gland and bone marrow transplantation assays to assess the target tissue of Mcs5a activity. We used immunophenotyping assays on well-defined congenic rat lines carrying susceptible and resistant Mcs5a alleles to identify changes in T-cell homeostasis and function associated with resistance. We show that Mcs5a acts beyond the initial step of mammary epithelial cell transformation, during early cancer progression. We show that Mcs5a controls susceptibility in a non-mammary cell-autonomous manner through the immune system. The resistant Mcs5a allele was found to be associated with an overabundance of gd T-cell receptor (TCR)+ T-cells as well as a CD62L (L-selectin)-high population of all T-cell classes. In contrast to in mammary carcinoma, gdTCR+ T-cells are the predominant T-cell type in the mammary gland and were found to be overabundant in the mammary epithelium of Mcs5a resistant congenic rats. Most of them simultaneously expressed the CD4, CD8, and CD161

  5. Motor cortex stimulation(MCS) for intractable complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type II: PSM analysis of Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y. A.; Son, B. C.; Yoo, I. R.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, E. N.; Park, Y. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Sohn, H. S.; Chung, S. K. [College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    We had experienced a patient with intractable CRPS in whom statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of cerebral perfusion explained the mechanism of pain control by MCS. A 43-year-old man presented spontaneous severe burning pain in his left hand and forearm and allodynia over the left arm and left hemibody. After the electrodes for neuromodulation therapy were inserted in the central sulcus, the baseline and stimulation brain perfusion SPECT using Tc-99m ECD were obtained within two days. The differences between the baseline and stimulation SPECT images, estimated at every voxel using t-statistics using SPM-99 software, were considered significant at a threshold of uncorrected P values less than 0.01. Among several areas significantly activated following pain relief with MCS, ipsilateral pyramidal tract in the cerebral peduncle might be related to the mechanism of pain control with MCS through efferent motor pathway. The result suggested that corticospinal neurons themselves or motor cortex efferent pathway maintained by the presence of intact corticospinal neurons could play an important role in producing pain control after MCS. This study would helpful in understanding of neurophysiology.

  6. Motor cortex stimulation(MCS) for intractable complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type II: PSM analysis of Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y. A.; Son, B. C.; Yoo, I. R.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, E. N.; Park, Y. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Sohn, H. S.; Chung, S. K.

    2001-01-01

    We had experienced a patient with intractable CRPS in whom statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of cerebral perfusion explained the mechanism of pain control by MCS. A 43-year-old man presented spontaneous severe burning pain in his left hand and forearm and allodynia over the left arm and left hemibody. After the electrodes for neuromodulation therapy were inserted in the central sulcus, the baseline and stimulation brain perfusion SPECT using Tc-99m ECD were obtained within two days. The differences between the baseline and stimulation SPECT images, estimated at every voxel using t-statistics using SPM-99 software, were considered significant at a threshold of uncorrected P values less than 0.01. Among several areas significantly activated following pain relief with MCS, ipsilateral pyramidal tract in the cerebral peduncle might be related to the mechanism of pain control with MCS through efferent motor pathway. The result suggested that corticospinal neurons themselves or motor cortex efferent pathway maintained by the presence of intact corticospinal neurons could play an important role in producing pain control after MCS. This study would helpful in understanding of neurophysiology

  7. Using of Daphnia pulex, Artemia salina and Tubifex tubifex for cyanobacterial microcystins toxicity detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselková, I.; Maršálek, Blahoslav

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 6 (2000), s. 637-643 ISSN 0006-3088 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK6005114 Grant - others:Cyanotox project ENVA(XX) CT98 0802; Cyanotox project ENVA(XX) EU DG-XII Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : cyanobacteria * microcystin * toxins * Slovakia Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.165, year: 2000

  8. Hepatotoxic and Nephrotoxic Effects of Petroleum Fumes on Petrol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic effects of petroleum fumes on male and female petrol attendants. Investigations had been carried out on thirty (30) adult petrol attendants from different filling stations in Ibadan metropolis of Nigeria with ten (10) healthy adults as control. All the ...

  9. Influence of extraction methods on the hepatotoxicity of Azadirachta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of extraction methods: Cold aqueous (CA) hot aqueous (HA) and alcoholic extraction (AE) methods on the hepatotoxic effect of Azadirachta indica bark extract (ABC) was investigated using albino rats. A total of forty eight rats were divided into three groups of sixteen rats equally for the extraction methods.

  10. The crucial protective role of glutathione against tienilic acid hepatotoxicity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiya, Takayoshi; Mori, Kazuhiko; Hattori, Chiharu; Kai, Kiyonori; Kataoka, Hiroko; Masubuchi, Noriko; Jindo, Toshimasa; Manabe, Sunao

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the hepatotoxic potential of tienilic acid in vivo, we administered a single oral dose of tienilic acid to Sprague-Dawley rats and performed general clinicopathological examinations and hepatic gene expression analysis using Affymetrix microarrays. No change in the serum transaminases was noted at up to 1000 mg/kg, although slight elevation of the serum bile acid and bilirubin, and very mild hepatotoxic changes in morphology were observed. In contrast to the marginal clinicopathological changes, marked upregulation of the genes involved in glutathione biosynthesis [glutathione synthetase and glutamate-cysteine ligase (Gcl)], oxidative stress response [heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1] and phase II drug metabolism (glutathione S-transferase and UDP glycosyltransferase 1A6) were noted after 3 or 6 h post-dosing. The hepatic reduced glutathione level decreased at 3-6 h, and then increased at 24 or 48 h, indicating that the upregulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated gene and the late increase in hepatic glutathione are protective responses against the oxidative and/or electrophilic stresses caused by tienilic acid. In a subsequent experiment, tienilic acid in combination with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of Gcl caused marked elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) with extensive centrilobular hepatocyte necrosis, whereas BSO alone showed no hepatotoxicity. The elevation of ALT by this combination was observed at the same dose levels of tienilic acid as the upregulation of the Nrf2-regulated genes by tienilic acid alone. In conclusion, these results suggest that the impairment of glutathione biosynthesis may play a critical role in the development of tienilic acid hepatotoxicity through extensive oxidative and/or electrophilic stresses

  11. Microcystin-LR equivalent concentrations in fish tissue during a postbloom Microcystis exposure in Loskop Dam, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nchabeleng, T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a decomposing cyanobacteria bloom on water quality and the accumulation of microcystin-LR equivalent toxin in fish at Loskop Dam were studied in May 2012. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] was used to confirm the presence...

  12. Climate change and regulation of hepatotoxin production in Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehringer, Michelle M; Wannicke, Nicola

    2014-04-01

    Harmful, bloom-forming cyanobacteria (CyanoHABs) are occurring with increasing regularity in freshwater and marine ecosystems. The most commonly occurring cyanobacterial toxins are the hepatotoxic microcystin and nodularin. These cyclic hepta- and pentapeptides are synthesised nonribosomally by the gene products of the toxin gene clusters mcy and nda, respectively. Understanding of the regulation of hepatotoxin production is incomplete, although there is strong evidence supporting the roles of iron, light, higher nitrate availability and inorganic carbon in modulating microcystin levels. The majority of these studies have focused on the unicellular freshwater, microcystin-producing strain of Microcystis aeruginosa, with little attention being paid to terrestrial or marine toxin producers. This review intends to investigate the regulation of microcystin and nodularin production in unicellular and filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria against the background of changing climate conditions. Special focus is given to diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacteria, for example Nodularia spumigena, capable of regulating their nitrogen levels by actively fixing dinitrogen. By combining data from significant studies, an overall scheme of the regulation of toxin production is presented, focussing specifically on nodularin production in diazotrophs against the background of increasing carbon dioxide concentrations and temperatures envisaged under current climate change models. Furthermore, the risk of sustaining and spreading CyanoHABs in the future ocean is evaluated. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The profound effects of microcystin on cardiac antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial function and cardiac toxicity in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Tong; Xie Ping; Liu Ying; Li Guangyu; Xiong Qian; Hao Le; Li Huiying

    2009-01-01

    Deaths from microcystin toxication have widely been attributed to hypovolemic shock due to hepatic interstitial hemorrhage, while some recent studies suggest that cardiogenic complication is also involved. So far, information on cardiotoxic effects of MC has been rare and the underlying mechanism is still puzzling. The present study examined toxic effects of microcystins on heart muscle of rats intravenously injected with extracted MC at two doses, 0.16LD 50 (14 μg MC-LReq kg -1 body weight) and 1LD 50 (87 μg MC-LReq kg -1 body weight). In the dead rats, both TTC staining and maximum elevations of troponin I levels confirmed myocardial infarction after MC exposure, besides a serious interstitial hemorrhage in liver. In the 1LD 50 dose group, the coincident falls in heart rate and blood pressure were related to mitochondria dysfunction in heart, while increases in creatine kinase and troponin I levels indicated cardiac cell injury. The corresponding pathological alterations were mainly characterized as loss of adherence between cardiac myocytes and swollen or ruptured mitochondria at the ultrastructural level. MC administration at a dose of 1LD 50 not only enhanced activities and up-regulated mRNA transcription levels of antioxidant enzymes, but also increased GSH content. At both doses, level of lipid peroxides increased obviously, suggesting serious oxidative stress in mitochondria. Simultaneously, complex I and III were significantly inhibited, indicating blocks in electron flow along the mitochondrial respiratory chain in heart. In conclusion, the findings of this study implicate a role for MC-induced cardiotoxicity as a potential factor that should be considered when evaluating the mechanisms of death associated with microcystin intoxication in Brazil

  14. Colorimetric test for the monitoring of microcystins in cyanobacterial culture and environmental samples from southeast - Brazil Teste colorimétrico usado para o monitoramento de microcistina em cultivo de cianobactérias e em amostras de florações ambientais do sudeste do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa P.S. Almeida

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins are hepatotoxic heptapeptides produced by some cyanobacterial genera under determined physico-chemical conditions in the environment, which are responsible for the intoxication and death of animals and humans. The detection of microcystins in potable water or recreational water is not carried out routinely in the majority of Brazilian states. The protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 inhibition test is a simple, rapid and reproducible colorimetric method. The applicability of the PP1 inhibition test was tested using Microcystis aeruginosa (strain 1, UFRJ- toxin producer grown under controlled light and temperature condition (12/12h light/dark using 30 muE.m².s-1 at 23ºC in a bioreactor. The total concentrations of P (24, 6 and 4 muM and Fe (4 and 1 muM were varied in ASM-1medium and their effects on the growth rates and toxin production were analyzed. A standard curve of PP1 inhibition by microcystin-LR reached detection limit of 0.01 ng.mL-1. Under the highest concentrations of P (24 muM and Fe (4 muM, the production of microcystin was detected throughout the growth experiment. The highest concentration of microcystin was observed at 6 muM P while at 1 muM Fe, PP1 inhibition was not detected. Samples from environmental blooms in water reservoirs used for human and animal consumption, from southeast Brazil (Belo Horizonte/MG, were tested and quantified for microcystin presence by the PP1 colorimetric test. The concentration of microcystin varied from undetectable to 100 ng.mL-1 in the environmental samples with Microcistis flos-aquae as the predominant cyanobacterial strain.Microcistinas (MC são heptapeptídeos de ação neuro e hepatotóxica produzidas por alguns gêneros de cianobactérias em determinadas condições físico-químicas do ambiente e são responsáveis pela morte e intoxicação de animais e humanos. A detecção de MC em água destinada ao consumo no Brasil ainda não é realizada na maioria dos estados brasileiros. O

  15. Chlorpromazine-induced hepatotoxicity during inflammation is mediated by TIRAP-dependent signaling pathway in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhi, Adarsh; Guo, Tao; Shah, Pranav; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Ghose, Romi

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a major component of idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs). To understand the molecular mechanism of inflammation-mediated IADRs, we determined the role of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway in idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of the anti-psychotic drug, chlorpromazine (CPZ). Activation of TLRs recruits the first adaptor protein, Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) to the TIR domain of TLRs leading to the activation of the downstream kinase, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK). Prolonged activation of JNK leads to cell-death. We hypothesized that activation of TLR2 by lipoteichoic acid (LTA) or TLR4 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) will augment the hepatotoxicity of CPZ by TIRAP-dependent mechanism involving prolonged activation of JNK. Adult male C57BL/6, TIRAP +/+ and TIRAP −/− mice were pretreated with saline, LPS (2 mg/kg) or LTA (6 mg/kg) for 30 min or 16 h followed by CPZ (5 mg/kg) or saline (vehicle) up to 24 h. We found that treatment of mice with CPZ in presence of LPS or LTA leads to ∼ 3–4 fold increase in serum ALT levels, a marked reduction in hepatic glycogen content, significant induction of serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and prolonged JNK activation, compared to LPS or LTA alone. Similar results were observed in TIRAP +/+ mice, whereas the effects of LPS or LTA on CPZ-induced hepatotoxicity were attenuated in TIRAP −/− mice. For the first time, we show that inflammation-mediated hepatotoxicity of CPZ is dependent on TIRAP, and involves prolonged JNK activation in vivo. Thus, TIRAP-dependent pathways may be targeted to predict and prevent inflammation-mediated IADRs. -- Highlights: ► Inflammation augments the toxicity of an idiosyncratic hepatotoxin chlorpromazine. ► Activation of Toll-like receptors by LPS or LTA induces chlorpromazine toxicity. ► Sustained stress kinase (JNK) activation is associated with chlorpromazine toxicity. ► These studies provide novel mechanistic

  16. Chlorpromazine-induced hepatotoxicity during inflammation is mediated by TIRAP-dependent signaling pathway in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, Adarsh, E-mail: adarsh.gandhi@nih.gov [University of Houston, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, 1441 Moursund Street, Room 517, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Guo, Tao, E-mail: tguo4@jhu.edu [University of Houston, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, 1441 Moursund Street, Room 517, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Shah, Pranav [University of Houston, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, 1441 Moursund Street, Room 517, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Moorthy, Bhagavatula [Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, 1102 Bates Avenue, Suite 530, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Ghose, Romi, E-mail: rghose@uh.edu [University of Houston, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, 1441 Moursund Street, Room 517, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Inflammation is a major component of idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs). To understand the molecular mechanism of inflammation-mediated IADRs, we determined the role of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway in idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of the anti-psychotic drug, chlorpromazine (CPZ). Activation of TLRs recruits the first adaptor protein, Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) to the TIR domain of TLRs leading to the activation of the downstream kinase, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK). Prolonged activation of JNK leads to cell-death. We hypothesized that activation of TLR2 by lipoteichoic acid (LTA) or TLR4 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) will augment the hepatotoxicity of CPZ by TIRAP-dependent mechanism involving prolonged activation of JNK. Adult male C57BL/6, TIRAP{sup +/+} and TIRAP{sup −/−} mice were pretreated with saline, LPS (2 mg/kg) or LTA (6 mg/kg) for 30 min or 16 h followed by CPZ (5 mg/kg) or saline (vehicle) up to 24 h. We found that treatment of mice with CPZ in presence of LPS or LTA leads to ∼ 3–4 fold increase in serum ALT levels, a marked reduction in hepatic glycogen content, significant induction of serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and prolonged JNK activation, compared to LPS or LTA alone. Similar results were observed in TIRAP{sup +/+} mice, whereas the effects of LPS or LTA on CPZ-induced hepatotoxicity were attenuated in TIRAP{sup −/−} mice. For the first time, we show that inflammation-mediated hepatotoxicity of CPZ is dependent on TIRAP, and involves prolonged JNK activation in vivo. Thus, TIRAP-dependent pathways may be targeted to predict and prevent inflammation-mediated IADRs. -- Highlights: ► Inflammation augments the toxicity of an idiosyncratic hepatotoxin chlorpromazine. ► Activation of Toll-like receptors by LPS or LTA induces chlorpromazine toxicity. ► Sustained stress kinase (JNK) activation is associated with chlorpromazine toxicity. ► These studies

  17. Antioxidant modulation of nevirapine induced hepatotoxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awodele Olufunsho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available HIV/AIDS related mortality has been dramatically reduced by the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART. However, ART presents with associated adverse effects. One of such adverse effects is hepatotoxicity observed with nevirapine (NVP containing ART. Since previous studies showed that NVP hepatotoxicity may be due to oxidative stress via generation of oxidative radicals, this study sought to evaluate the protective effects of antioxidants in alleviating NVP induced hepatotoxicity. Rats were divided into 6 groups with 8 animals per group and received doses of the antioxidants jobelyn (10.7 mg/kg/day, vitamin C (8 mg/kg/day, vitamin E (5 mg/kg/day and/or NVP (6 mg/kg/day for 60 days. The animals were sacrificed on day 61 by cervical dislocation, blood samples were collected for biochemical and hematological examination. The liver of the sacrificed animals was weighed and subjected to histopathological examination. There was a statistically significant (p<0.05 elevation in MDA level observed in the NVP group as compared with control. The results further showed non-significant decreases in the levels of MDA in the NVP plus antioxidant groups, except vitamin C, when compared with the NVP alone group. Vitamin E and Vitamin E plus C treated groups showed significantly (p<0.05 higher levels of SOD, CAT and GSH. The results also showed statistically significantly (p<0.05 lower levels of ALT and AST in the antioxidant treated groups There was an observed significantly (p<0.05 higher level of TP and urea in the antioxidant treated rats. A significantly (p<0.05 higher white blood cell count was observed in the antioxidant groups. Histopathological assessment of the liver extracted from the rats showed no visible pathology across the groups. Observations from this study suggest a potentially positive modulatory effect of antioxidants and may be indicative for the inclusion of antioxidants in nevirapine containing ART.

  18. Zingiber officinale Roscoe prevents acetaminophen-induced acute hepatotoxicity by enhancing hepatic antioxidant status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajith, T A; Hema, U; Aswathy, M S

    2007-11-01

    A large number of xenobiotics are reported to be potentially hepatotoxic. Free radicals generated from the xenobiotic metabolism can induce lesions of the liver and react with the basic cellular constituents - proteins, lipids, RNA and DNA. Hepatoprotective activity of aqueous ethanol extract of Zingiber officinale was evaluated against single dose of acetaminophen-induced (3g/kg, p.o.) acute hepatotoxicity in rat. Aqueous extract of Z. officinale significantly protected the hepatotoxicity as evident from the activities of serum transaminase and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and ALP activities were significantly (pHepatic lipid peroxidation was enhanced significantly (pofficinale (200 and 400mg/kg, p.o.) prior to acetaminophen significantly declines the activities of serum transaminases and ALP. Further the hepatic antioxidant status was enhanced in the Z. officinale plus acetaminophen treated group than the control group. The results of the present study concluded that the hepatoprotective effect of aqueous ethanol extract of Z. officinale against acetaminophen-induced acute toxicity is mediated either by preventing the decline of hepatic antioxidant status or due to its direct radical scavenging capacity.

  19. Solar photo-Fenton treatment of microcystin-LR in aqueous environment: Transformation products and toxicity in different water matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transformation products and toxicity patterns of microcystin-LR (MC-LR), a common cyanotoxin in freshwaters, during degradation by solar photo-Fenton process were studied in the absence and presence of two major water components, namely fulvic acid and alkalinity. The transformat...

  20. Destruction of microcystins by conventional and advanced oxidation processes: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Virender K.; Triantis, Theodoros M.; Antoniou, Maria G.

    2012-01-01

    oxidants is strongly affected by water quality parameters like pH, DOC and oxidant dose. Although there is a general trend for MCs oxidation (ozone>permanganate>chlorine>>>chlorine-based oxidants), the selection of the appropriate oxidant for toxin elimination during water treatment should be assessed...

  1. Analysis of the use of microcystin-contaminated water in the growth and nutritional quality of the root-vegetable, Daucus carota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, J; Azevedo, J; Freitas, M; Pinto, E; Almeida, A; Vasconcelos, V; Campos, A

    2017-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are often observed in freshwaters and may reflect the increased eutrophication of these environments and alterations in climate. Cyanotoxins, such as microcystins (MCs), are an effective threat to many life forms, ranging from plants to humans. Despite the research conducted to date on cyanotoxins, the risks associated to the use of contaminated water in agriculture require further elucidation. To tackle this aim, a research was conducted with the root-vegetable Daucus carota. The specific aims of this work were the following: (i) to evaluate the effects of MC-LR on the plant growth and photosynthesis; (ii) to evaluate the nutritional quality of carrot roots; and (iii) to measure bioaccumulation. To this purpose, young carrots were grown in soil during 1 month in natural conditions and exposed to Mycrocystis aeruginosa aqueous extracts containing environmentally realistic concentrations of MC-LR (10 and 50 MC-LR μg/L). The results showed that MC-LR may decrease root growth after 28 days of exposure to 50 μg/L and increase photosynthetic efficiency. We also observed changes in mineral and vitamin content in carrots as a result of the exposure to contaminated water. Moreover, MC-LR was detected in carrot roots by ELISA at very low concentration 5.23 ± 0.47 ng MC eq./g FW. The soil retained 52.7 % of the toxin potentially available for plants. This result could be attributed to MC-LR adsorption by soil particles or due to microbial degradation of the toxin. We conclude that the prolonged use of MC-LR-contaminated water may affect crop growth, alter the nutritional value of vegetable products, and potentiate contamination.

  2. Silymarin nanoparticle prevents paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Suvadra Das, Partha Roy, Runa Ghosh Auddy, Arup MukherjeeDepartment of Chemical Technology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, West Bengal, IndiaAbstract: Silymarin (Sm is a polyphenolic component extracted from Silybum marianum. It is an antioxidant, traditionally used as an immunostimulant, hepatoprotectant, and dietary supplement. Relatively recently, Sm has proved to be a valuable chemopreventive and a useful antineoplastic agent. Medical success for Sm is, however, constrained by very low aqueous solubility and associated biopharmaceutical limitations. Sm flavonolignans are also susceptible to ion-catalyzed degradation in the gut. Proven antihepatotoxic activity of Sm cannot therefore be fully exploited in acute chemical poisoning conditions like that in paracetamol overdose. Moreover, a synchronous delivery that is required for hepatic regeneration is difficult to achieve by itself. This work is meant to circumvent the inherent limitations of Sm through the use of nanotechnology. Sm nanoparticles (Smnps were prepared by nanoprecipitation in polyvinyl alcohol stabilized Eudragit RS100® polymer (Rohm Pharma GmbH, Darmstadt, Germany. Process parameter optimization provided 67.39% entrapment efficiency and a Gaussian particle distribution of average size 120.37 nm. Sm release from the nanoparticles was considerably sustained for all formulations. Smnps were strongly protective against hepatic damage when tested in a paracetamol overdose hepatotoxicity model. Nanoparticles recorded no animal death even when administered after an established paracetamol-induced hepatic necrosis. Preventing progress of paracetamol hepatic damage was traced for an efficient glutathione regeneration to a level of 11.3 µmol/g in hepatic tissue due to Smnps.Keywords: silymarin, paracetamol, nanoparticle, glutathione, mouse hepatotoxicity

  3. Risk assessment of hepatotoxicity among tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS-coinfected patients under tuberculosis treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Williams Ngouleun; Prosper Cabral Biapa Nya; Anatole Constant Pieme; Phelix Bruno Telefo

    2016-01-01

    Objective/background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a worldwide public health problem. It is a contagious and grave disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Current drugs such as isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and rifampicin used for the treatment of tuberculosis are potentially hepatotoxic and can lead to drug hepatitis. In order to improve the follow-up of TB patients in Cameroon, we carried out a study which aimed to evaluate the hepatotoxicity risk factors associated with anti-TB drugs. Methods:...

  4. NMR-based metabonomic analysis of the hepatotoxicity induced by combined exposure to PCBs and TCDD in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Chunfeng; Wang Yimei; Sheng Zhiguo; Liu Gang; Fu Ze; Zhao Jing; Zhao Jun; Yan Xianzhong; Zhu Benzhan; Peng Shuangqing

    2010-01-01

    A metabonomic approach using 1 H NMR spectroscopy was adopted to investigate the metabonomic pattern of rat urine after oral administration of environmental endocrine disruptors (EDs) polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo- p-dioxin (TCDD) alone or in combination and to explore the possible hepatotoxic mechanisms of combined exposure to PCBs and TCDD. 1 H NMR spectra of urines collected 24 h before and after exposure were analyzed via pattern recognition by using principal component analysis (PCA). Serum biochemistry and liver histopathology indicated significant hepatotoxicity in the rats of the combined group. The PCA scores plots of urinary 1 H NMR data showed that all the treatment groups could be easily distinguished from the control group, so could the PCBs or TCDD group and the combined group. The loadings plots of the PCA revealed remarkable increases in the levels of lactate, glucose, taurine, creatine, and 2-hydroxy-isovaleric acid and reductions in the levels of 2-oxoglutarate, citrate, succinate, hippurate, and trimethylamine-N-oxide in rat urine after exposure. These changes were more striking in the combined group. The changed metabolites may be considered possible biomarker for the hepatotoxicity. The present study demonstrates that combined exposure to PCBs and TCDD induced significant hepatotoxicity in rats, and mitochondrial dysfunction and fatty acid metabolism perturbations might contribute to the hepatotoxicity. There was good conformity between changes in the urine metabonomic pattern and those in serum biochemistry and liver histopathology. These results showed that the NMR-based metabonomic approach may provide a promising technique for the evaluation of the combined toxicity of EDs.

  5. Hepatotoxicity associated with illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids in doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimini, R; Rotolo, M C; Mastrobattista, L; Mortali, C; Minutillo, A; Pichini, S; Pacifici, R; Palmi, I

    2017-03-01

    Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS) abuse and misuse is nowadays a harmful habit involving both professional or recreational athletes, as well as general population. AAS are also frequently present in over-the-counter dietary supplements without being declared in the list of ingredients, leaving consumers unaware of the risks of adverse effects. Indeed, health risks of AAS consumption in pharmaceutical preparations or dietary complements seem still underestimated and under-reported. The variety of complications due to AAS misuse involves cardiovascular, central nervous, musculoskeletal and genitourinary systems of both males and females; psychiatric and behavioral effects, damages to metabolic system, skin and mainly liver. For instance, relevant concern has been raised by the AAS hepatotoxicity including adenoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, cholestasis, and peliosis hepatis. The present review reports the information available on the hepatotoxic effects of AAS use in professional and amateur athletes.

  6. Accuracy of the paracetamol-aminotransferase product to predict hepatotoxicity in paracetamol overdose treated with a 2-bag acetylcysteine regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Anselm; Sivilotti, Marco L A; Gunja, Naren; McNulty, Richard; Graudins, Andis

    2018-03-01

    Paracetamol concentration is a highly accurate risk predictor for hepatotoxicity following overdose with known time of ingestion. However, the paracetamol-aminotransferase multiplication product can be used as a risk predictor independent of timing or ingestion type. Validated in patients treated with the traditional, "three-bag" intravenous acetylcysteine regimen, we evaluated the accuracy of the multiplication product in paracetamol overdose treated with a two-bag acetylcysteine regimen. We examined consecutive patients treated with the two-bag regimen from five emergency departments over a two-year period. We assessed the predictive accuracy of initial multiplication product for the primary outcome of hepatotoxicity (peak alanine aminotransferase ≥1000IU/L), as well as for acute liver injury (ALI), defined peak alanine aminotransferase ≥2× baseline and above 50IU/L). Of 447 paracetamol overdoses treated with the two-bag acetylcysteine regimen, 32 (7%) developed hepatotoxicity and 73 (16%) ALI. The pre-specified cut-off points of 1500 mg/L × IU/L (sensitivity 100% [95% CI 82%, 100%], specificity 62% [56%, 67%]) and 10,000 mg/L × IU/L (sensitivity 70% [47%, 87%], specificity of 97% [95%, 99%]) were highly accurate for predicting hepatotoxicity. There were few cases of hepatotoxicity irrespective of the product when acetylcysteine was administered within eight hours of overdose, when the product was largely determined by a high paracetamol concentration but normal aminotransferase. The multiplication product accurately predicts hepatotoxicity when using a two-bag acetylcysteine regimen, especially in patients treated more than eight hours post-overdose. Further studies are needed to assess the product as a method to adjust for exposure severity when testing efficacy of modified acetylcysteine regimens.

  7. Microcystin kinetics (bioaccumulation, elimination) and biochemical responses in common carp and silver carp exposed to toxic cyanobacterial blooms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamovský, Ondřej; Kopp, R.; Hilscherová, Klára; Babica, Pavel; Palíková, M.; Pašková, Veronika; Navrátil, S.; Maršálek, Blahoslav; Bláha, Luděk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 12 (2007), s. 2687-2693 ISSN 0730-7268 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0571 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : microcystin * carp * toxicokinetics Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.309, year: 2007

  8. CyanoHAB occurrence and water irrigation cyanotoxin contamination: ecological impacts and potential health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqrane, Sana; Oudra, Brahim

    2009-12-01

    The world-wide occurrence of harmful cyanobacteria blooms "CyanoHAB" in fresh and brackish waters creates problems for all life forms. During CyanoHAB events, toxic cyanobacteria produce cyanotoxins at high levels that can cause chronic and sub-chronic toxicities to animals, plants and humans. Cyanotoxicity in eukaryotes has been mainly focused on animals, but during these last years, data, related to cyanotoxin (mainly microcystins, MCs) impact on both aquatic and terrestrials crop plants irrigated by water containing these toxins, have become more and more available. This last cited fact is gaining importance since plants could in a direct or indirect manner contribute to cyanotoxin transfer through the food chain, and thus constitute a potent health risk source. The use of this contaminated irrigation water can also have an economical impact which appears by a reduction of the germination rate of seeds, and alteration of the quality and the productivity of crop plants. The main objective of this work was to discuss the eventual phytotoxicity of cyanotoxins (microcystins) as the major agricultural impacts induced by the use of contaminated water for plant irrigation. These investigations confirm the harmful effects (ecological, eco-physiological, socio-economical and sanitary risk) of dissolved MCs on agricultural plants. Thus, cyanotoxin phytotoxicity strongly suggests a need for the surveillance of CyanoHAB and the monitoring of water irrigation quality as well as for drinking water.

  9. Cascade filtration (CF) with the Haemonetics MCS+: a new technical adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbonesi, M; Bo, A; De Luigi, M C; Bruni, R; Stura, P; Sanfilippo, B; Varinelli, I

    2001-03-01

    CF was introduced in clinical medicine in 1980. Up to now, exclusively two-vein procedures have been carried out with some limitations to expansion of this technique. In this report we describe the very first application of single-needle CF carried out with Haemonetics MCS + apparatus. Twenty procedures were completed without any untoward effect in patients suffering from TTP, post-hepatitic cryoblobulinemia, familial hypercholesterolemia and acute Guillan-Barrè Syndrome. From 1 to 4 sessions were carried out per patient with the expected laboratory and clinical results. The only limit is the procedure time that averages 231 +/- 48 min., approximately 40% longer than two needle procedures.

  10. Antioxidative response of the three macrophytes Ceratophyllum demersum, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata to a time dependent exposure of cell-free crude extracts containing three microcystins from cyanobacterial blooms of Lake Amatitlán, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Oliva, Claudia Suseth; Contardo-Jara, Valeska; Pflugmacher, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    Microcystins (MCs) produced by cyanobacteria in natural environments are a potential risk to the integrity of ecosystems. In this study, the effects of cyanobacterial cell-free crude extracts from a Microcystis aeruginosa bloom containing three MC-congeners MC-LR, -RR, and -YR at environmental relevant concentrations of 49.3±2.9, 49.8±5.9, and 6.9±3.8μg/L, respectively, were evaluated on Ceratophyllum demersum (L.), Egeria densa (Planch.), and Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.). Effects on photosynthetic pigments (total chlorophyll (chl), chl a, chl b, and carotenoids), enzymatic defense led by catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and glutathione reductase (GR), and biotransformation enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) were measured after 1, 4, and 8h and after 1, 3, 7, and 14 days of exposure. Results show that in all exposed macrophytes, photosynthetic pigments were negatively affected. While chl a and total chl decreased with increasing exposure time, a parallel increase in chl b was observed after 8h. Concomitant increase of ∼5, 16, and 34% of antioxidant carotenoid concentration in exposed C. demersum, E. densa, and H. verticillata, respectively, was also displayed. Enzymatic antioxidant defense systems in all exposed macrophytes were initiated within the first hour of exposure. In exposed E. densa, highest values of CAT and GR activities were observed after 4 and 8h, respectively, while in exposed H. verticillata highest value of POD activity was observed after 8h. An early induction with a significant increase of biotransformation enzyme GST was observed in E. densa after 4h and in C. demersum and H. verticillata after 8h. These results are the first to show rapid induction of stress and further possible MC biotransformation (based on the activation of GST enzymatic activity included in MC metabolization during the biotransformation mechanism) in macrophytes exposed to crude extract containing a mixture of MCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  11. Role of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as risk factor for drug-induced hepatotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, Julie; Begriche, Karima; Moreau, Caroline; Fromenty, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Background Obesity is often associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which refers to a large spectrum of hepatic lesions including fatty liver, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. Different investigations showed or suggested that obesity and NAFLD are able to increase the risk of hepatotoxicity of different drugs. Some of these drugs could induce more frequently an acute hepatitis in obese individuals whereas others could worsen pre-existing NAFLD. Aim The main objective of the present review was to collect the available information regarding the role of NAFLD as risk factor for drug-induced hepatotoxicity. For this purpose, we performed a data-mining analysis using different queries including drug-induced liver injury (or DILI), drug-induced hepatotoxicity, fatty liver, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (or NAFLD), steatosis and obesity. The main data from the collected articles are reported in this review and when available, some pathophysiological hypotheses are put forward. Relevance for patients Drugs that could pose a potential risk in obese patients include compounds belonging to different pharmacological classes such as acetaminophen, halothane, methotrexate, rosiglitazone, stavudine and tamoxifen. For some of these drugs, experimental investigations in obese rodents confirmed the clinical observations and unveiled different pathophysiological mechanisms which could explain why these pharmaceuticals are particularly hepatotoxic in obesity and NAFLD. Other drugs such as pentoxifylline, phenobarbital and omeprazole might also pose a risk but more investigations are required to determine whether this risk is significant or not. Because obese people often take several drugs for the treatment of different obesity-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia and coronary heart disease, it is urgent to identify the main pharmaceuticals that can cause acute hepatitis on a fatty liver background or induce NAFLD worsening

  12. The protective effect of vildagliptin in chronic experimental cyclosporine A-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sherbeeny, Nagla A; Nader, Manar A

    2016-03-01

    The study examined the effect of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, vildagliptin, in cyclosporine (CsA)-induced hepatotoxicity. Rats were divided into 4 groups treated for 28 days: control (vehicle), vildagliptin (10 mg/kg, orally), CsA (20 mg/kg, s.c.), and CsA-vildagliptin group. Liver function was assessed by measuring serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gamma glutamyltransferase (γGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and albumin, and histopathological changes of liver were examined. Oxidative stress markers were evaluated. Assessment of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity in hepatic nuclear extract, serum DPP-4, and expression of Bax and Bcl2 were also done. CsA-induced hepatotoxicity was evidenced by increase in serum levels of AST, ALT, and γGT; a decrease in serum albumin; and a significant alteration in hepatic architecture. Also, significant increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione (GSH) levels, increased expression Bax proteins with deceased expression of Bcl2, and increased hepatic activity of NF-κB and serum DPP-4 level were observed upon CsA treatment. Vildagliptin significantly improved all altered parameters induced by CsA administration. Vildagliptin has the potential to protect the liver against CsA-induced hepatotoxicity by reducing oxidative stress, DPP-4 activity, apoptosis, and inflammation.

  13. Hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of 3-bromopyruvate in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qiong; Sun, Yiming; Jin, Qili; Li, Qixiang; Wang, Qing; Liu, Hao; Zhao, Surong

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of 3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) in mice. Fifteen nude mice were grafted subcutaneously in the left flank with MDA-MB-231 cells, then all mice were divided into control group (PBS), 3BP group (8 mg/kg), positive group (DNR: 0.8 mg/kg) when tumor volume reached approximately 100 mm3. 28 days later, tumors, livers and kidneys were stored in 4 % formalin solution and stained with hematoxylin and eosin staining. The Kunming mice experiment included control group (PBS), 3BP group (4mg/kg; 8mg/kg; 16mg/kg), positive group (DNR: 0.8 mg/kg). 24 hours later, the blood were used for the determination of hepatic damage serum biomarkers. Livers were stored in 4 % formalin solution for the later detection. 3BP at the dose of 8mg/kg had a good effect on inhibiting tumor growth in nude mice and did not damage liver and kidney tissues. Kunming mice experiment showed 3BP at the dose of 16mg/kg did damage to liver tissues. 3-Bromopyruvate at the dose of suppressing tumor growth did not exhibit hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in nude mice, and the effect on liver was confirmed in Kunming mice.

  14. SU-E-T-325: The New Evaluation Method of the VMAT Plan Delivery Using Varian DynaLog Files and Modulation Complexity Score (MCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateoka, K [Proton Treatment Center, Radiation Therapy Research Institute, Social Medical Corporation Teishinkai, Sapporo (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo, JP (Japan); Fujimomo, K; Hareyama, M [Proton Treatment Center, Radiation Therapy Research Institute, Social Medical Corporation Teishinkai, Sapporo (Japan); Saitou, Y; Nakazawa, T; Abe, T; Nakata, A; Yano, M [Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo, JP (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate the use of Varian DynaLog files to verify VMAT plans delivery and modulation complexity score (MCS) of VMAT. Methods: Delivery accuracy of machine performance was quantified by multileaf collimator (MLC) position errors, gantry angle errors and fluence delivery accuracy for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The relationship between machine performance and plan complexity were also investigated using the modulation complexity score (MCS). Plan and Actual MLC positions, gantry angles and delivered fraction of monitor units were extracted from Varian DynaLog files. These factors were taken from the record and verify system of MLC control file. Planned and delivered beam data were compared to determine leaf position errors and gantry angle errors. Analysis was also performed on planned and actual fluence maps reconstructed from those of the DynaLog files. This analysis was performed for all treatment fractions of 5 prostate VMAT plans. The analysis of DynaLog files have been carried out by in-house programming in Visual C++. Results: The root mean square of leaf position and gantry angle errors were about 0.12 and 0.15, respectively. The Gamma of planned and actual fluence maps at 3%/3 mm criterion was about 99.21. The gamma of the leaf position errors were not directly related to plan complexity as determined by the MCS. Therefore, the gamma of the gantry angle errors were directly related to plan complexity as determined by the MCS. Conclusion: This study shows Varian dynalog files for VMAT plan can be diagnosed delivery errors not possible with phantom based quality assurance. Furthermore, the MCS of VMAT plan can evaluate delivery accuracy for patients receiving of VMAT. Machine performance was found to be directly related to plan complexity but this is not the dominant determinant of delivery accuracy.

  15. Unusual Synchronous Methimazole-Induced Agranulocytosis and Severe Hepatotoxicity in Patient with Hyperthyroidism: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Qin; Sheng, Guo-ping; Weng, Wan-wen; Dong, Meng-jie

    2015-01-01

    Context. To report a patient with hyperthyroidism who developed concurrent occurrence of agranulocytosis and severe hepatotoxicity after taking methimazole (MMI). Case. A 51-year-old Chinese male was diagnosed as hyperthyroidism with normal white blood count and liver function. After 4 weeks' treatment with MMI 20 mg/d, it developed to agranulocytosis and severe cholestatic hepatotoxicity. The patient's symptoms and laboratory abnormalities disappeared after the withdrawal of MMI; his white blood count and liver function recover to normal in 2 weeks and 5 weeks, respectively. 296 MBq dose of 131I was given to the patient 3 weeks after the withdrawal of MMI and his thyroid function was back to normal in 6 months. As we know through literature review, only 5 previous cases reported the synchronous ATD-induced agranulocytosis and severe hepatotoxicity in patients with hyperthyroidism. Methods. Review of the patient's clinical course. Literature review of cases of hyperthyroidism with agranulocytosis and severe hepatotoxicity demonstrated that these complications occurred after taking antithyroid drug (ATD). Conclusions. Patient with hyperthyroidism can have synchronous ATD-induced agranulocytosis and severe hepatotoxicity. This case is extremely rare, but the adverse effects with ATDs is clinically significant. The clinicians need to be careful about this and monitor biochemical of patients who take ATDs. PMID:26060496

  16. Unusual Synchronous Methimazole-Induced Agranulocytosis and Severe Hepatotoxicity in Patient with Hyperthyroidism: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context. To report a patient with hyperthyroidism who developed concurrent occurrence of agranulocytosis and severe hepatotoxicity after taking methimazole (MMI. Case. A 51-year-old Chinese male was diagnosed as hyperthyroidism with normal white blood count and liver function. After 4 weeks’ treatment with MMI 20 mg/d, it developed to agranulocytosis and severe cholestatic hepatotoxicity. The patient’s symptoms and laboratory abnormalities disappeared after the withdrawal of MMI; his white blood count and liver function recover to normal in 2 weeks and 5 weeks, respectively. 296 MBq dose of 131I was given to the patient 3 weeks after the withdrawal of MMI and his thyroid function was back to normal in 6 months. As we know through literature review, only 5 previous cases reported the synchronous ATD-induced agranulocytosis and severe hepatotoxicity in patients with hyperthyroidism. Methods. Review of the patient’s clinical course. Literature review of cases of hyperthyroidism with agranulocytosis and severe hepatotoxicity demonstrated that these complications occurred after taking antithyroid drug (ATD. Conclusions. Patient with hyperthyroidism can have synchronous ATD-induced agranulocytosis and severe hepatotoxicity. This case is extremely rare, but the adverse effects with ATDs is clinically significant. The clinicians need to be careful about this and monitor biochemical of patients who take ATDs.

  17. Effects of UV-B radiation on microcystin production of a toxic strain of Microcystis aeruginosa and its competitiveness against a non-toxic strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhen; Kong, Fanxiang; Shi, Xiaoli; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • UV-B radiation showed higher inhibition to non-toxin producing than toxin-producing strains on growth and photosynthetic activity. • Both intracellular and extracellular MC contents decreased markedly under UV-B radiation. • Higher resistance to UV-B radiation helped toxin-producing M. aeruginosa to predominate in the competition. - Abstract: Microcystins (MCs) produced by toxic cyanobacteria pose a health hazard to humans and animals. Some environmental factors can alter the MC concentrations by affecting the abundance of toxin-producing strains in a cyanobacteria population and/or their toxin production. In this study, we designed a monoculture and competition experiment to investigate the impacts of UV-B radiation on MC production and the competition between toxin and non-toxin producing strains of Microcystis aeruginosa. UV-B radiation resulted in higher inhibition of the growth and photosynthetic activity of the non-toxin producing strain relative to that observed for the toxin-producing strain. Both intracellular and extracellular MC contents decreased markedly when the toxin-producing strain was exposed to UV-B radiation. In addition, a quantitative real-time PCR assay revealed that the ratio of toxin-producing M. aeruginosa under UV-B exposure was higher than that under PAR alone at an early stage of the experiment. However, its abundance under UV-B exposure was lower compared with the PAR alone treatment after day 12. Our study demonstrated that UV-B radiation has a great impact on the abundance of the toxin-producing strain in the Microcystis population and their toxin production, which suggests that the fluctuation of UV-B radiation affects the MC level of cyanobacteria blooms

  18. Effects of UV-B radiation on microcystin production of a toxic strain of Microcystis aeruginosa and its competitiveness against a non-toxic strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhen, E-mail: zhyang@niglas.ac.cn; Kong, Fanxiang, E-mail: fxkong@niglas.ac.cn; Shi, Xiaoli; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Min

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • UV-B radiation showed higher inhibition to non-toxin producing than toxin-producing strains on growth and photosynthetic activity. • Both intracellular and extracellular MC contents decreased markedly under UV-B radiation. • Higher resistance to UV-B radiation helped toxin-producing M. aeruginosa to predominate in the competition. - Abstract: Microcystins (MCs) produced by toxic cyanobacteria pose a health hazard to humans and animals. Some environmental factors can alter the MC concentrations by affecting the abundance of toxin-producing strains in a cyanobacteria population and/or their toxin production. In this study, we designed a monoculture and competition experiment to investigate the impacts of UV-B radiation on MC production and the competition between toxin and non-toxin producing strains of Microcystis aeruginosa. UV-B radiation resulted in higher inhibition of the growth and photosynthetic activity of the non-toxin producing strain relative to that observed for the toxin-producing strain. Both intracellular and extracellular MC contents decreased markedly when the toxin-producing strain was exposed to UV-B radiation. In addition, a quantitative real-time PCR assay revealed that the ratio of toxin-producing M. aeruginosa under UV-B exposure was higher than that under PAR alone at an early stage of the experiment. However, its abundance under UV-B exposure was lower compared with the PAR alone treatment after day 12. Our study demonstrated that UV-B radiation has a great impact on the abundance of the toxin-producing strain in the Microcystis population and their toxin production, which suggests that the fluctuation of UV-B radiation affects the MC level of cyanobacteria blooms.

  19. Pediatric peripheral blood progenitor cell collection: haemonetics MCS 3P versus COBE Spectra versus Fresenius AS104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambi, F; Faulkner, L B; Azzari, C; Gelli, A M; Tamburini, A; Tintori, V; Lippi, A A; Tucci, F; Bernini, G; Genovese, F

    1998-01-01

    An increasing number of apheresis machines are becoming available for peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) collection in children. At the Children's Hospital of Florence (Italy), three apheresis machines were evaluated: MCS 3P (Haemonetics) (10 procedures in 4 patients, aged 10-12 years, weight 23.5-64 kg), Spectra, (COBE) (8 procedures in 3 patients, aged 4-17 years, weight 19-59 kg), and AS104 (Fresenius) (24 procedures in 9 patients, aged 2-16 years, weight 13.6-60 kg). For PBPC quantitative analysis, CD34 cytofluorimetry was employed. Relevant variables analyzed included efficiency of CD34+ cell extraction and enrichment, mononuclear cell purity and red cell contamination of the apheresis components, and platelet count decreases after leukapheresis. No significant differences in CD34+ cell-extraction abilities were found. However, the AS104 provided consistently purer leukapheresis components in terms of mononuclear cell and CD34+ cell enrichment (441 +/- 59%, vs. 240 +/- 35% and 290 +/- 42% for MCS 3P and Spectra, respectively). Postapheresis platelet counts dropped the least with the AS104. The smallest patient who underwent apheresis with MCS 3P (the only machine working on discontinuous flow and hence with greater volume shifts) weighed 23.5 kg and tolerated the procedure well, with no signs of hemodynamic instability. No significant complications were observed. All machines seem to have comparable PBPC extraction efficiency, but the AS104 seems to give the component with the greatest PBPC enrichment. This feature might be relevant for further ex vivo cell processing (CD34+ cell selection, expansion, and so on).

  20. Oxidation of microcystin-LR by the Fenton process : Kinetics, degradation intermediates, water quality and toxicity assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Jeong-Ann; Yang, Boram; Park, Chanhyuk; Choi, Jae-Woo; van Genuchten, Case M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413489647; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2017-01-01

    The Fenton process was assessed as a cost-effective technology for the removal of Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) among UV, UV/H2O2, and Fenton process according to efficiency and electrical energy per order (EE/O). The determined practical concentrations of the Fenton reagents were 5 mg/L Fe(II) and 5 mg/L

  1. Management of a toxic cyanobacterium bloom (Planktothrix rubescens) affecting an Italian drinking water basin: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogialli, Sara; Nigro di Gregorio, Federica; Lucentini, Luca; Ferretti, Emanuele; Ottaviani, Massimo; Ungaro, Nicola; Abis, Pier Paolo; Cannarozzi de Grazia, Matteo

    2013-01-02

    An extraordinary bloom of Planktothrix rubescens, which can produce microcystins (MCs), was observed in early 2009 in the Occhito basin, used even as a source of drinking water in Southern Italy. Several activities, coordinated by a task force, were implemented to assess and manage the risk associated to drinking water contaminated by cyanobacteria. Main actions were: evaluation of analytical protocols for screening and confirmatory purpose, monitoring the drinking water supply chain, training of operators, a dedicated web site for risk communication. ELISA assay was considered suitable for health authorities as screening method for MCs and to optimize frequency of sampling according to alert levels, and as internal control for the water supplier. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method able to quantify 9 MCs was optimized with the aim of supporting health authorities in a comprehensive risk evaluation based on the relative toxicity of different congeners. Short, medium, and long-term corrective actions were implemented to mitigate the health risk. Preoxidation with chlorine dioxide followed by flocculation and settling have been shown to be effective in removing MCs in the water treatment plant. Over two years, despite the high levels of cyanobacteria (up to 160 × 10(6) cells/L) and MCs (28.4 μg/L) initially reached in surface waters, the drinking water distribution was never limited.

  2. Hesperidin protects against cyclophosphamide-induced hepatotoxicity by upregulation of PPARγ and abrogation of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ayman M

    2014-09-01

    The most important reason for the non-approval and withdrawal of drugs by the Food and Drug Administration is hepatotoxicity. Therefore, this study was undertaken to evaluate the protective effects of hesperidin against cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats. The rats received a single intraperitoneal dose of CYP of 200 mg/kg body mass, followed by treatment with hesperidin, orally, at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg for 11 consecutive days. CYP induced hepatic damage, as evidenced by the significantly elevated levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines, serum transaminases, liver lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide. As a consequence, there was reduced glutathione content, and the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, were markedly reduced. In addition, CYP administration induced a considerable downregulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and upregulation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression. Hesperidin, in a dose-dependent manner, rejuvenated the altered markers to an almost normal state. In conclusion, hesperidin showed a potent protective effect against CYP-induced oxidative stress and inflammation leading to hepatotoxicity. The study suggests that hesperidin exerts its protective effect against CYP-induced hepatotoxicity through upregulation of hepatic PPARγ expression and abrogation of inflammation and oxidative stress.

  3. The dynamics of toxic microcystis strains and microcystin production in two hypertrofic South African reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Barnard, Sandra; Conradie, Karin Ronel

    2012-01-01

    The South African impoundments of Hartbeespoort and Roodeplaat experience excessive blooms of Microcystis species each year. Microcystins, produced primarily by strains of cyanobacteria belonging to the genera Microcystis, Anabaena and Planktothrix, are harmful cyanobacterial hepatotoxins. These bloom-forming cyanobacteria form toxic and non-toxic strains that co-occur and are visually indistinguishable, but can be identified and quantified molecularly. We described the relationships between ...

  4. Risk of combined exposure of birds to cyanobacterial biomass containing microcystins, acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and anticoagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondracek, Karel; Bandouchova, Hana; Damkova, Veronika; Hilscherova, Klara; Kral, Jiri; Osickova, Jitka; Mlcakova, Veronika; Pohanka, Miroslav; Skochova, Hana; Vitula, Frantisek; Treml, Frantisek; Pikula, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that a combination of cyanobacterial biomass containing microcystins, acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and anticoagulant can enhance avian toxic effects produced by single exposures only. A total of 48 two-month-old Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica) with average body weight of 160 g were randomly divided into 8 experimental groups of six birds and sex ratio of 1:1. Experimental groups of control Japanese quails (C) and birds exposed to single and combined sub-lethal doses of paraoxon (P), bromadiolone (B), and microcystins in cyanobacterial biomass (M) included: C, P, P+B, B, B+M, P+M, M, and P+B+M. During the 10-day exposure birds in the respective groups received biomass containing 61.62 µg microcystins daily (i.e. 26.54 µg MC-RR, 7.62 µg MC-YR and 27.39 µg MC-LR), two 250 μg/kg doses of paraoxon, and two 500 mg/kg doses of bromadiolone. Group responses were compared using standard plasma biochemistry and antioxidant/oxidative stress parameters in tissues. While single and double combinations of toxicants induced responses in individual biochemical parameters measured and evaluated using univariate statistical analysis, those in the triple exposure were most extensive. The principal component analysis of antioxidant/oxidative stress parameters (glutathione reductase, lipid peroxidation, and ferric reducing antioxidant power) in tissues (liver, kidney, heart, brain, lungs, gonads, and pectoralis major muscle) clearly separated the triple group (P+B+M) from all single and double exposure groups and the control and indicated thus marked joint effects in the overall pattern of antioxidant/oxidative stress responses of this group. The separation was driven by the modification of the ferric reducing antioxidant power levels in heart and brain and the cardiac lipid peroxidation level, in particular. This experiment contributes to the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of combined sub

  5. Hepatotoxicity associated with sulfasalazine in inflammatory arthritis: A case series from a local surveillance of serious adverse events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rankin Elizabeth

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous reporting systems for adverse drug reactions (ADRs are handicapped by under-reporting and limited detail on individual cases. We report an investigation from a local surveillance for serious adverse drug reactions associated with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs that was triggered by the occurrence of liver failure in two of our patients. Methods Serious ADR reports have been solicited from local clinicians by regular postcards over the past seven years. Patients', who had hepatotoxicity on sulfasalazine and met a definition of a serious ADR, were identified. Two clinicians reviewed structured case reports and assessed causality by consensus and by using a causality assessment instrument. The likely frequency of hepatotoxicity with sulfasalazine was estimated by making a series of conservative assumptions. Results Ten cases were identified: eight occurred during surveillance. Eight patients were hospitalised, two in hepatic failure – one died after a liver transplant. All but one event occurred within 6 weeks of treatment. Seven patients had a skin rash, three eosinophilia and one interstitial nephritis. Five patients were of Black British of African or Caribbean descent. Liver enzymes showed a hepatocellular pattern in four cases and a mixed pattern in six. Drug-related hepatotoxicity was judged probable or highly probable in 8 patients. The likely frequency of serious hepatotoxicity with sulfasalazine was estimated at 0.4% of treated patients. Conclusion Serious hepatotoxicity associated with sulfasalazine appears to be under-appreciated and intensive monitoring and vigilance in the first 6 weeks of treatment is especially important.

  6. Potential Use of Chemoprotectants against the Toxic Effects of Cyanotoxins: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Guillén, Remedios; Puerto, María; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Prieto, Ana I; Pichardo, Silvia; Jos, Ángeles; Campos, Alexandre; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Cameán, Ana M

    2017-05-23

    Cyanobacterial toxins, particularly microcystins (MCs) and cylindrospermopsin (CYN), are responsible for toxic effects in humans and wildlife. In order to counteract or prevent their toxicity, various strategies have been followed, such as the potential application of chemoprotectants. A review of the main substances evaluated for this aim, as well as the doses and their influence on cyanotoxin-induced toxicity, has been performed. A search of the literature shows that research on MCs is much more abundant than research on CYN. Among chemoprotectants, antioxidant compounds are the most extensively studied, probably because it is well known that oxidative stress is one of the toxic mechanisms common to both toxins. In this group, vitamin E seems to have the strongest protectant effect for both cyanotoxins. Transport inhibitors have also been studied in the case of MCs, as CYN cellular uptake is not yet fully elucidated. Further research is needed because systematic studies are lacking. Moreover, more realistic exposure scenarios, including cyanotoxin mixtures and the concomitant use of chemoprotectants, should be considered.

  7. [Constitutional syndrome associated to metformin induced hepatotoxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Poza Gómez, Gema; Rivero Fernández, Miguel; Vázquez Romero, Manuel; Angueira Lapeña, Teresa; Arranz de la Mata, Gemma; Boixeda de Miquel, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    Metformin is an oral antidiabetic agent frequently used to manage type II diabetes. This drug produces nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms in 5-20% of patients and, more rarely, has also been associated with severe adverse effects such as lactic acidosis. Only a few isolated cases of hepatotoxicity due to this drug have been documented. We report the case of an 83-year-old man with constitutional syndrome and hepatic biochemical alterations, which were attributed to metformin after ruling out an oncologic etiology and observing complete clinical and biochemical resolution after withdrawal of the drug.

  8. Hepatotoxicity in hyperthyroid patient after consecutive methimazole and propylthiouracil therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gomez-Peralta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Methimazole (MMI and propylthiouracil (PTU are widely used antithyroid drugs (ATD that have been approved for the treatment of hyperthyroidism. Hepatotoxicity may be induced by these drugs, though they exert dissimilar incidence rates of hepatotoxicity and, possibly, with different underlying pathogenic mechanisms. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman with no relevant medical history diagnosed with hyperthyroidism due to Graves’ disease, who developed two episodes of acute hepatitis concurrent with the consecutive administration of two different ATDs, first MMI and then PTU. Given the impossibility of administering ATDs, it was decided to perform a total thyroidectomy because the patient was found to be euthyroid at that point. Pathological anatomy showed diffuse hyperplasia and a papillary thyroid microcarcinoma of 2 mm in diameter. Subsequent clinical check-ups were normal. This case suggests the importance of regular monitoring of liver function for hyperthyroid patients. Due to the potential severity of this side effect, it is recommended to determine baseline liver function prior to initiation of treatment.

  9. Evaluation of the zebrafish embryo as an alternative model for hepatotoxicity testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Marja

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we showed the applicability of the zebrafish embryo as an alternative model for hepatotoxicity testing using analysis of mechanisms through toxicogenomics. By applying a variety of toxicogenomics techniques, we were able to characterize specific responses. NGS revealed that

  10. Modulatory effects of dietary inclusion of garlic (Allium sativum) on gentamycin-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademiluyi, Adedayo O; Oboh, Ganiyu; Owoloye, Tosin R; Agbebi, Oluwaseun J

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the ameliorative effect of dietary inclusion of garlic (Allium sativum) on gentamycin-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Adult male rats were randomly divided into four groups with six animals in each group. Groups 1 and 2 were fed basal diet while Groups 3 and 4 were fed diets containing 2% and 4% garlic respectively for 27 d prior to gentamycin administration. Hepatotoxicity was induced by the intraperitoneal administration of gentamycin (100 mg/kg body weight) for 3 d. The liver and plasma were studied for hepatotoxicity and antioxidant indices. Gentamycin induces hepatic damage as revealed by significant (P<0.05) elevation of liver damage marker enzymes (aspartate transaminase and alanine aminotransferase) and reduction in plasma albumin level. Gentamycin also caused a significant (P<0.05) alteration in plasma and liver enzymatic (catalase, glutathione and super oxygen dehydrogenises) and non-enzymatic (glutathione and vitamin C) antioxidant indices with concomitant increase in the malondialdehyde content; however, there was a significant (P<0.05) restoration of the antioxidant status coupled with significant (P<0.05) decrease in the tissues' malondialdehyde content, following consumption of diets containing garlic. These results suggest that dietary inclusion of garlic powder could protect against gentamycin-induced hepatotoxicity, improve antioxidant status and modulate oxidative stress; a function attributed to their phenolic constituents.

  11. Regression analysis of MCS Intensity and peak ground motion data in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faenza, L.; Michelini, A.

    2009-04-01

    Intensity scales are historically important because no instrumentation is necessary, and useful measurements of earthquake shaking can be made by an unequipped observer. The use of macroseismics data are essential for the revision of historical seismicity and of great importance for seismic hazard assessment of vulnerable areas. The procedure ShakeMap (Wald et al., Earthquake Spectra., 15, 1999) provides instrumentally based estimates of intensity maps. In Italy, intensities have been hitherto reported through the use of the MCS (Mercalli, Cancani Sieberg) intensity scale. The DBMI2004 (and the most recent DBMI08) report intensities for earthquakes in Italy that date back to Roman age. In order to exploit fully the potential of such a long intensity catalogue for past large events and with the aim of presenting ShakeMaps using an intensity scale consistent with that of the past, we have ri-calibrated the relationships between MCS intensity and observed peak ground motion (PGM) values in terms of both peak-ground acceleration and peak-ground velocities. To this end, we have used the two most updataed and complete dataset available for Italy - the strong motion Itaca database and the DBMI08 macroseismic database. In this work we have first assembled a data set consisting of PGM-intensity pairs and we have then determined the most suitable regressions parameters. Many tests have been made to quantify the accuracy and robustness of the results. The new instrumental intensity scale is going to be adopted for mapping the level of shaking resulting from earthquakes in Italy replacing the instrumental Modified Mercalli scale currently in use (Michelini et al., SRL, 79, 2008) and to determine shakemaps for historical events.

  12. Possible hepatotoxicity of chronic marijuana usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Borini

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Hepatotoxicity is a potential complication from the usage of various illicit drugs, possibly consequent to their liver metabolism, but information on this is scarce in the medical literature. OBJECTIVE: To study the occurrence of clinical and laboratory hepatic alterations in chronic marijuana users, from the use of marijuana on its own or in association with other legal or illicit drugs. TYPE OF STUDY: transversal study SETTING: Hospital Espírita de Marília, Marília, São Paulo, Brazil PARTICIPANTS: The study was made among 123 patients interned in the Hospital Espírita de Marília from October 1996 to December 1998, divided into 3 groups: 26 (21% using only marijuana, 83 (67.5% using marijuana and crack, and 14 (11.4% consuming marijuana and alcohol. PROCEDURES AND MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Patients were examined clinically with special emphasis on types of drugs used, drug intake route, age when consumption began, length and pattern of usage, presence of tattooing, jaundice, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. Serum determinations of total proteins, albumin, globulin, total and fractions of bilirubin, aspartate (AST and alanine (ALT aminotransferases, alkaline phosphatase (AP, gamma-glutamyltransferase and prothrombin activity were performed. RESULTS: Among users of only marijuana, hepatomegaly was observed in 57.7% and splenomegaly in 73.1%, and slightly elevated AST (42.3%, ALT (34.6% and AP (53.8%. The three groups did not differ significantly in the prevalence of hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and hepatosplenomegaly. The group using both marijuana and alcohol showed the highest prevalence of alterations and highest levels of aminotransferases. Mean AP levels were above normal in all groups. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic marijuana usage, on its own or in association with other drugs, was associated with hepatic morphologic and enzymatic alterations. This indicates that cannabinoids are possible hepatotoxic substances.

  13. Influence of Cyanobacterial Bloom on Freshwater Biocoenosis. Use of Bioassays for Cyanobacterial Microcystins Toxicity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piontek, Marlena; Czyżewska, Wanda

    2017-03-01

    The issues presented in this study concern a very important problem of the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms in surface water used for water supply purposes. The objective of this study was to analyze the occurrence of cyanotoxic risk in the catchment area of the Obrzyca River (including Sławskie lake which is the beginning of the river), which is a source of drinking water for the inhabitants of Zielona Góra. In order to evaluate toxicity of cyanobacterial bloom it was conducted toxicological testing using aquatic invertebrates (Daphnia magna, Dugesia tigrina) and heterotrophic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas fluorescens). Test samples were collected from May to October, 2012. The most toxic was a sample collected from Lake Sławskie on 20th October when cyanobacteria bloom with a predominance of Microcystis aeruginosa occurred and the amount of microcystins was the largest. The methanol extract of the sample was toxic only above a concentration of 6·103 mg·dm-3. The lethal concentration (48-h LC 50) for Daphnia magna was 3.09·103 and for Dugesia tigrina (240-h LC 50) 1.51·103 mg·dm-3 of microcystins (MC-LR, MC-YR and MC-RR). The same extract stimulated growth of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis cells.

  14. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Benzochromenopyrimidinones as Cholinesterase Inhibitors and Potent Antioxidant, Non-Hepatotoxic Agents for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Dgachi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report herein the straightforward two-step synthesis and biological assessment of novel racemic benzochromenopyrimidinones as non-hepatotoxic, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors with antioxidative properties. Among them, compound 3Bb displayed a mixed-type inhibition of human acetylcholinesterase (IC50 = 1.28 ± 0.03 μM, good antioxidant activity, and also proved to be non-hepatotoxic on human HepG2 cell line.

  15. The 2015 Middle Childhood Survey (MCS) of mental health and well-being at age 11 years in an Australian population cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurens, Kristin R; Tzoumakis, Stacy; Dean, Kimberlie; Brinkman, Sally A; Bore, Miles; Lenroot, Rhoshel K; Smith, Maxwell; Holbrook, Allyson; Robinson, Kim M; Stevens, Robert; Harris, Felicity; Carr, Vaughan J; Green, Melissa J

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The Middle Childhood Survey (MCS) was designed as a computerised self-report assessment of children’s mental health and well-being at approximately 11 years of age, conducted with a population cohort of 87 026 children being studied longitudinally within the New South Wales (NSW) Child Development Study. Participants School Principals provided written consent for teachers to administer the MCS in class to year 6 students at 829 NSW schools (35.0% of eligible schools). Parent or child opt-outs from participation were received for 4.3% of children, and MCS data obtained from 27 808 children (mean age 11.5 years, SD 0.5; 49.5% female), representing 85.9% of students at participating schools. Findings to date Demographic characteristics of participating schools and children are representative of the NSW population. Children completed items measuring Social Integration, Prosocial Behaviour, Peer Relationship Problems, Supportive Relationships (at Home, School and in the Community), Empathy, Emotional Symptoms, Conduct Problems, Aggression, Attention, Inhibitory Control, Hyperactivity-Inattention, Total Difficulties (internalising and externalising psychopathology), Perceptual Sensitivity, Psychotic-Like Experiences, Personality, Self-esteem, Daytime Sleepiness and Connection to Nature. Distributions of responses on each item and construct demarcate competencies and vulnerabilities within the population: most children report mental health and well-being, but the population distribution spanned the full range of possible scores on every construct. Future plans Multiagency, intergenerational linkage of the MCS data with health, education, child protection, justice and early childhood development records took place late in 2016. Linked data were used to elucidate patterns of risk and protection across early and middle child development, and these data will provide a foundation for future record linkages in the cohort that will track mental and physical health

  16. Microcystin-LR nanobody screening from an alpaca phage display nanobody library and its expression and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chongxin; Yang, Ying; Liu, Liwen; Li, Jianhong; Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Cunzheng; Liu, Xianjin

    2018-04-30

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) is a type of biotoxin that pollutes the ecological environment and food. The study aimed to obtain new nanobodies from phage nanobody library for determination of MC-LR. The toxin was conjugated to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), respectively, then the conjugates were used as coated antigens for enrichment (coated MC-LR-KLH) and screening (coated MC-LR-BSA) of MC-LR phage nanobodies from an alpaca phage display nanobody library. The antigen-specific phage particles were enriched effectively with four rounds of biopanning. At the last round of enrichment, total 20 positive monoclonal phage nanobodies were obtained from the library, which were analyzed after monoclonal phage enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), colony PCR and DNA sequencing. The most three positive nanobody genes, ANAb12, ANAb9 and ANAb7 were cloned into pET26b vector, then the nanobodies were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 respectively. After being purified, the molecular weight (M.W.) of all nanobodies were approximate 15kDa with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The purified nanobodies, ANAb12, ANAb9 and ANAb7 were used to establish the indirect competitive ELISA (IC-ELISA) for MC-LR, and their half-maximum inhibition concentrations (IC 50 ) were 0.87, 1.17 and 1.47μg/L, their detection limits (IC 10 ) were 0.06, 0.08 and 0.12μg/L, respectively. All of them showed strong cross-reactivity (CRs) of 82.7-116.9% for MC-RR, MC-YR and MC-WR, and weak CRs of less than 4.56% for MC-LW, less than 0.1% for MC-LY and MC-LF. It was found that all the IC-ELISAs for MC-LR spiked in tap water samples detection were with good accuracy, stability and repeatability, their recoveries were 84.0-106.5%, coefficient of variations (CVs) were 3.4-10.6%. These results showed that IC-ELISA based on the nanobodies from the alpaca phage display antibody library were promising for high sensitive determination of multiple

  17. Characteristics of competitive uptake between Microcystin-LR and natural organic matter (NOM) fractions using strongly basic anion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Fuhar; Barbeau, Benoit; Mohseni, Madjid

    2018-03-29

    Microcystins are the most commonly occurring cyanotoxins, and have been extensively studied across the globe. In the present study, a strongly basic anion exchange resin was employed to investigate the removal of Microcystin-LR (MCLR), one of the most toxic microcystin variants. Factors influencing the uptake behavior included the MCLR and resin concentrations, resin dosage, and natural organic matter (NOM) characteristics, specifically, the charge density and molecular weight distribution of source water NOM. Equivalent background concentration (EBC) was employed to evaluate the competitive uptake between NOM and MCLR. The experimental data were compared with different mathematical and physical models and pore diffusion was determined as the rate-limiting step. The resin dose/solute concentration ratio played a key role in the MCLR uptake process and MCLR removal was attributed primarily to electrostatic attractions. Charge density and molecular weight distribution of the background NOM fractions played a major role in MCLR removal at lower resin dosages (200 mg/L ∼ 1 mL/L and below), where a competitive uptake was observed due to the limited exchange sites. Further, evidences of pore blockage and site reduction were also observed in the presence of humics and larger molecular weight organic fractions, where a four-fold reduction in the MCLR uptake was observed. Comparable results were obtained for laboratory studies on synthetic laboratory water and surface water under similar conditions. Given their excellent performance and low cost, anion exchange resins are expected to present promising potentials for applications involving the removal of removal of algal toxins and NOM from surface waters. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Unexpected paracetamol (acetaminophen) hepatotoxicity at standard dosage in two older patients: time to rethink 1 g four times daily?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ging, Patricia; Mikulich, Olga; O'Reilly, Katherine M A

    2016-07-01

    We present two cases of acute hepatotoxicity associated with elevated paracetamol (acetaminophen) levels in older patients. Both patients were receiving a standard European dose of oral paracetamol (2 × 500 mg QDS) with no risk factors for slowed metabolism (weight paracetamol can be hepatotoxic. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Tissue distribution, excretion and hepatic biotransformation of microcystin-LR in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, N.A.; Pace, J.G.; Matson, C.F.; Miura, G.A.; Lawrence, W.B.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution, excretion and hepatic metabolism of [3H]microcystin-LR (sublethal i.v.) were measured in mice. Plasma elimination was biexponential with alpha- and beta-phase half-lives of 0.8 and 6.9 min, respectively. At 60 min, liver contained 67 +/- 4% of dose. Through the 6-day study the amount of hepatic radioactivity did not change whereas 23.7 +/- 1.7% of the dose was excreted; 9.2 +/- 1.0% in urine and 14.5 +/- 1.1% in feces. Approximately 60% of the urine and fecal radiolabel 6 and 12 hr postinjection was the parent toxin. Hepatic cytosol, which contained 70 +/- 2% of the hepatic radiolabel (1 hr through 6 days), was prepared for high-performance liquid chromatography analysis by heat denaturation, pronase digestion and C18 Sep Pak extraction. At 1 hr, 35 +/- 2% of the radiolabel was insoluble or C18 Sep Pak-bound; 43 +/- 3% was associated with a peak of retention time (rt) 6.6 min, and 16 +/- 3% with the parent toxin (rt 9.4 min). After 6 days, 8 +/- 1% was C18 Sep Pak-bound or insoluble; 5 +/- 0% occurred at rt 6.6 min, 17 +/- 1% with parent and 60 +/- 2% was associated with rt 8.1 min. Two other peaks, rt 4.9 and 5.6 min, appeared transiently. Analysis of hepatic cytosol by desalting chromatography under nondenaturing and denaturing conditions revealed that all of the radiolabel was associated with cytosolic components, and 83 +/- 5% was bound covalently through 1 day. By day 6 the amount of covalently bound isotope decreased to 42 +/- 11%. This is the first study to describe the long-term hepatic retention of microcystin toxin and documents putative detoxication products

  20. CyanoHAB Occurrence and Water Irrigation Cyanotoxin Contamination: Ecological Impacts and Potential Health Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqrane, Sana; Oudra, Brahim

    2009-01-01

    The world-wide occurrence of harmful cyanobacteria blooms “CyanoHAB” in fresh and brackish waters creates problems for all life forms. During CyanoHAB events, toxic cyanobacteria produce cyanotoxins at high levels that can cause chronic and sub-chronic toxicities to animals, plants and humans. Cyanotoxicity in eukaryotes has been mainly focused on animals, but during these last years, data, related to cyanotoxin (mainly microcystins, MCs) impact on both aquatic and terrestrials crop plants irrigated by water containing these toxins, have become more and more available. This last cited fact is gaining importance since plants could in a direct or indirect manner contribute to cyanotoxin transfer through the food chain, and thus constitute a potent health risk source. The use of this contaminated irrigation water can also have an economical impact which appears by a reduction of the germination rate of seeds, and alteration of the quality and the productivity of crop plants. The main objective of this work was to discuss the eventual phytotoxicity of cyanotoxins (microcystins) as the major agricultural impacts induced by the use of contaminated water for plant irrigation. These investigations confirm the harmful effects (ecological, eco-physiological, socio-economical and sanitary risk) of dissolved MCs on agricultural plants. Thus, cyanotoxin phytotoxicity strongly suggests a need for the surveillance of CyanoHAB and the monitoring of water irrigation quality as well as for drinking water. PMID:22069535

  1. Hepatotoxicity by Dietary Supplements: A Tabular Listing and Clinical Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cortés, Miren; Robles-Díaz, Mercedes; Ortega-Alonso, Aida; Medina-Caliz, Inmaculada; Andrade, Raul J

    2016-04-09

    Dietary supplements (DS) are extensively consumed worldwide despite unproven efficacy. The true incidence of DS-induced liver injury (DSILI) is unknown but is probably under-diagnosed due to the general belief of safety of these products. Reported cases of herbals and DS-induced liver injury are increasing worldwide. The aim of this manuscript is to report a tabular listing with a description of DS associated with hepatotoxicity as well as review the phenotype and severity of DSILI. Natural remedies related to hepatotoxicity can be divided into herbal product-induced liver injury and DS-induced liver injury. In this article, we describe different DS associated with liver injury, some of them manufactured DS containing several ingredients (Herbalife™ products, Hydroxycut™, LipoKinetix™, UCP-1 and OxyELITE™) while others have a single ingredient (green tea extract, linoleic acid, usnic acid, 1,3-Dimethylamylamine, vitamin A, Garcinia cambogia and ma huang). Additional DS containing some of the aforementioned ingredients implicated in liver injury are also covered. We have also included illicit androgenic anabolic steroids for bodybuilding in this work, as they are frequently sold under the denomination of DS despite being conventional drugs.

  2. Hepatotoxicity by Dietary Supplements: A Tabular Listing and Clinical Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miren García-Cortés

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary supplements (DS are extensively consumed worldwide despite unproven efficacy. The true incidence of DS-induced liver injury (DSILI is unknown but is probably under-diagnosed due to the general belief of safety of these products. Reported cases of herbals and DS-induced liver injury are increasing worldwide. The aim of this manuscript is to report a tabular listing with a description of DS associated with hepatotoxicity as well as review the phenotype and severity of DSILI. Natural remedies related to hepatotoxicity can be divided into herbal product-induced liver injury and DS-induced liver injury. In this article, we describe different DS associated with liver injury, some of them manufactured DS containing several ingredients (Herbalife™ products, Hydroxycut™, LipoKinetix™, UCP-1 and OxyELITE™ while others have a single ingredient (green tea extract, linoleic acid, usnic acid, 1,3-Dimethylamylamine, vitamin A, Garcinia cambogia and ma huang. Additional DS containing some of the aforementioned ingredients implicated in liver injury are also covered. We have also included illicit androgenic anabolic steroids for bodybuilding in this work, as they are frequently sold under the denomination of DS despite being conventional drugs.

  3. Hepatotoxicity by Dietary Supplements: A Tabular Listing and Clinical Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cortés, Miren; Robles-Díaz, Mercedes; Ortega-Alonso, Aida; Medina-Caliz, Inmaculada; Andrade, Raul J.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary supplements (DS) are extensively consumed worldwide despite unproven efficacy. The true incidence of DS-induced liver injury (DSILI) is unknown but is probably under-diagnosed due to the general belief of safety of these products. Reported cases of herbals and DS-induced liver injury are increasing worldwide. The aim of this manuscript is to report a tabular listing with a description of DS associated with hepatotoxicity as well as review the phenotype and severity of DSILI. Natural remedies related to hepatotoxicity can be divided into herbal product-induced liver injury and DS-induced liver injury. In this article, we describe different DS associated with liver injury, some of them manufactured DS containing several ingredients (Herbalife™ products, Hydroxycut™, LipoKinetix™, UCP-1 and OxyELITE™) while others have a single ingredient (green tea extract, linoleic acid, usnic acid, 1,3-Dimethylamylamine, vitamin A, Garcinia cambogia and ma huang). Additional DS containing some of the aforementioned ingredients implicated in liver injury are also covered. We have also included illicit androgenic anabolic steroids for bodybuilding in this work, as they are frequently sold under the denomination of DS despite being conventional drugs. PMID:27070596

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Hepatic Tissue of Cyprinus carpio L. Exposed to Cyanobacterial Blooms in Lake Taihu, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinlin; Wang, Xiaorong; Shan, Zhengjun; Yang, Liuyan; Zhou, Junying; Bu, Yuanqin

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of industry and agriculture and associated pollution, the cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Taihu have become a major threat to aquatic wildlife and human health. In this study, the ecotoxicological effects of cyanobacterial blooms on cage-cultured carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) in Meiliang Bay of Lake Taihu were investigated. Microcystins (MCs), major cyanobacterial toxins, have been detected in carp cultured at different experimental sites of Meiliang Bay. We observed that the accumulation of MCs in carp was closely associated with several environmental factors, including temperature, pH value, and density of cyanobacterial blooms. The proteomic profile of carp liver exposed to cyanobacterial blooms was analyzed using two-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry. The toxic effects of cyanobacterial blooms on carp liver were similar to changes caused by MCs. MCs were transported into liver cells and induced the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). MCs and ROS inhibited protein phosphatase and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), directly or indirectly resulting in oxidative stress and disruption of the cytoskeleton. These effects further interfered with metabolic pathways in the liver through the regulation of series of related proteins. The results of this study indicated that cyanobacterial blooms pose a major threat to aquatic wildlife in Meiliang Bay in Lake Taihu. These results provided evidence of the molecular mechanisms underlying liver damage in carp exposed to cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:24558380

  5. Histological and immunohistochemical effects of Curcuma longa on activation of rat hepatic stellate cells after cadmium induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mansy, A A; Mazroa, S A; Hamed, W S; Yaseen, A H; El-Mohandes, E A

    2016-01-01

    The liver is a target for toxic chemicals such as cadmium (Cd). When the liver is damaged, hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are activated and transformed into myofibroblast-like cells, which are responsible for liver fibrosis. Curcuma longa has been reported to exert a hepato-protective effect under various pathological conditions. We investigated the effects of C. longa administration on HSC activation in response to Cd induced hepatotoxicity. Forty adult male albino rats were divided into: group 1 (control), group 2 (Cd treated), group 3 (C. longa treated) and group 4 (Cd and C. longa treated). After 6 weeks, liver specimens were prepared for light and electron microscopy examination of histological changes and immunohistochemical localization of alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) as a specific marker for activated HSC. Activated HSC with a positive αSMA immune reaction were not detected in groups 1 and 3. Large numbers of activated HSC with αSMA immune reactions were observed in group 2 in addition to Cd induced hepatotoxic changes including excess collagen deposition in thickened portal triads, interlobular septa with hepatic lobulation, inflammatory cell infiltration, a significant increase in Kupffer cells and degenerated hepatocytes. In group 4, we observed a significant decrease in HSC that expressed αSMA with amelioration of the hepatotoxic changes. C. longa administration decreased HSC activation and ameliorated hepatotoxic changes caused by Cd in adult rats.

  6. Use of Arctium lappa Extract Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kott, Attalla Farag; Bin-Meferij, Mashael Mohammed

    2015-12-01

    Severe destructive hepatic injuries can be induced by acetaminophen overdose and may lead to acute hepatic failure. To investigate the ameliorative effects of Arctium lappa root extract on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Rats were divided into 4 groups: normal control group, Arctium lappa extract group, acetaminophen-injected group, and acetaminophen treated with Arctium lappa extract group. The treatment with Arctium lappa extract reduced serum alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase in the acetaminophen group when compared with the control group. DNA fragments in the acetaminophen-injected group were also significantly increased (P Arctium lappa treatment (12.97±0.89 nmol/mg) when compared with the acetaminophen-treated-only group (12.97±0.89 nmol/mg). Histopathologic examination revealed that acetaminophen administration produced hepatic cell necrosis, infiltrate of lymphocytes, and vacuolation that were associated with the acetaminophen-treated animal group, but the degree of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity was mediated by treatment with Arctium lappa extract. Arctium lappa can prevent most of the hepatic tissue damage caused by acetaminophen overdose in rats.

  7. Screening for main components associated with the idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of a tonic herb, Polygonum multiflorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyu; Niu, Ming; Bai, Zhaofang; Zhang, Congen; Zhao, Yanling; Li, Ruiyu; Tu, Can; Li, Huifang; Jing, Jing; Meng, Yakun; Ma, Zhijie; Feng, Wuwen; Tang, Jinfa; Zhu, Yun; Li, Jinjie; Shang, Xiaoya; Zou, Zhengsheng; Xiao, Xiaohe; Wang, Jiabo

    2017-06-01

    The main constituents of a typical medicinal herb, Polygonum multiflorum (Heshouwu in Chinese), that induces idiosyncratic liver injury remain unclear. Our previous work has shown that cotreatment with a nontoxic dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and therapeutic dose of Heshouwu can induce liver injury in rats, whereas the solo treatment cannot induce observable injury. In the present work, using the constituent "knock-out" and "knock-in" strategy, we found that the ethyl acetate (EA) extract of Heshouwu displayed comparable idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity to the whole extract in LPS-treated rats. Results indicated a significant elevation of plasma alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and liver histologic changes, whereas other separated fractions failed to induce liver injury. The mixture of EA extract with other separated fractions induced comparable idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity to the whole extract in LPS-treated rats. Chemical analysis further revealed that 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxy trans-stilbene-2-O-β-glucoside (trans-SG) and its cis-isomer were the two major compounds in EA extract. Furthermore, the isolated cis-, and not its trans-isomer, displayed comparable idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity to EA extract in LPS-treated rats. Higher contents of cis-SG were detected in Heshouwu liquor or preparations from actual liver intoxication patients associated with Heshouwu compared with general collected samples. In addition, plasma metabolomics analysis showed that cis-SG-disturbing enriched pathways remarkably differed from trans-SG ones in LPS-treated rats. All these results suggested that cis-SG was closely associated with the idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of Heshouwu. Considering that the cis-trans isomerization of trans-SG was mediated by ultraviolet light or sunlight, our findings serve as reference for controlling photoisomerization in drug discovery and for the clinical use of Heshouwu and stilbene-related medications.

  8. Cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins in fishponds and their effects on fish tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobac, Damjana; Tokodi, Nada; Lujić, Jelena; Marinović, Zoran; Subakov-Simić, Gordana; Dulić, Tamara; Važić, Tamara; Nybom, Sonja; Meriluoto, Jussi; Codd, Geoffrey A; Svirčev, Zorica

    2016-05-01

    Cyanobacteria can produce toxic metabolites known as cyanotoxins. Common and frequently investigated cyanotoxins include microcystins (MCs), nodularin (NOD) and saxitoxins (STXs). During the summer of 2011 extensive cyanobacterial growth was found in several fishponds in Serbia. Sampling of the water and fish (common carp, Cyprinus carpio) was performed. Water samples from 13 fishponds were found to contain saxitoxin, microcystin, and/or nodularin. LC-MS/MS showed that MC-RR was present in samples of fish muscle tissue. Histopathological analyses of fish grown in fishponds with cyanotoxin production showed histopathological damage to liver, kidney, gills, intestines and muscle tissues. This study is among the first so far to report severe hyperplasia of intestinal epithelium and severe degeneration of muscle tissue of fish after cyanobacterial exposure. These findings emphasize the importance of cyanobacterial and cyanotoxin monitoring in fishponds in order to recognize cyanotoxins and their potential effects on fish used for human consumption and, further, on human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Suppression of Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Hepatotoxicity by Liver-Specific Inhibition of NF-κB

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    Mitsuhiro Machitani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase-specific replication-competent adenoviruses (Ads, i.e., TRADs, which possess an E1 gene expression cassette driven by the human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, are promising agents for cancer treatment. However, even though oncolytic Ads, including TRAD, are intratumorally administered, they are disseminated from the tumor to systemic circulation, causing concern about oncolytic Ad-mediated hepatotoxicity (due mainly to leaky expression of Ad genes in liver. We reported that inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB leads to the suppression of replication-incompetent Ad vector-mediated hepatotoxicity via reduction of the leaky expression of Ad genes in liver. Here, to develop a TRAD with an improved safety profile, we designed a TRAD that carries a liver-specific promoter-driven dominant-negative IκBα (DNIκBα expression cassette (TRAD-DNIκBα. Compared with a conventional TRAD, TRAD-DNIκBα showed hepatocyte-specific inhibition of NF-κB signaling and significantly reduced Ad gene expression and replication in the normal human hepatocyte cell line. TRAD-induced hepatotoxicity was largely suppressed in mice following intravenous administration of TRAD-DNIκBα. However, the replication profiles and oncolytic activities of TRAD-DNIκBα were comparable with those of the conventional TRAD in human non-hepatic tumor cells. These results indicate that oncolytic Ads containing the liver-specific DNIκBα expression cassette have improved safety profiles without inhibiting oncolytic activities.

  10. Scientific and Regulatory Perspectives in Herbal and Dietary Supplement Associated Hepatotoxicity in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark I. Avigan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the United States (US, the risk of hepatotoxicity linked to the widespread use of certain herbal products has gained increased attention among regulatory scientists. Based on current US law, all dietary supplements sold domestically, including botanical supplements, are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA as a special category of foods. Under this designation, regulatory scientists do not routinely evaluate the efficacy of these products prior to their marketing, despite the content variability and phytochemical complexity that often characterizes them. Nonetheless, there has been notable progress in the development of advanced scientific methods to qualitatively and quantitatively measure ingredients and screen for contaminants and adulterants in botanical products when hepatotoxicity is recognized.

  11. Imidazopyranotacrines as Non-Hepatotoxic, Selective Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors, and Antioxidant Agents for Alzheimer′s Disease Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houssem Boulebd

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein we describe the synthesis and in vitro biological evaluation of thirteen new, racemic, diversely functionalized imidazo pyranotacrines as non-hepatotoxic, multipotent tacrine analogues. Among these compounds, 1-(5-amino-2-methyl-4-(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-4H-pyrano[2,3-b]quinolin-3-ylethan-1-one (4 is non-hepatotoxic (cell viability assay on HepG2 cells, a selective but moderately potent EeAChE inhibitor (IC50 = 38.7 ± 1.7 μM, and a very potent antioxidant agent on the basis of the ORAC test (2.31 ± 0.29 μmol·Trolox/μmol compound.

  12. A review of the evidence concerning hepatic glutathione depletion and susceptibility to hepatotoxicity after paracetamol overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalsi SS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sarbjeet S Kalsi1,2, Paul I Dargan2–4, W Stephen Waring5, David M Wood2–41Emergency Department, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 2Clinical Toxicology, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 3King’s Health Partners, London, UK; 4King’s College London, London, UK; 5York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, York, UKAbstract: Paracetamol (acetaminophen poisoning is common throughout the world. The management of nonstaggered (acute paracetamol overdose is based on the plasma paracetamol concentration plotted on a treatment nomogram. In the UK there are two treatment lines on this nomogram, with the lower treatment line used for individuals felt to be at ‘high risk’ of paracetamol-related hepatotoxicity either as a result of induction of cytochrome P450 isoenzymes or reduction of intrahepatic glutathione. In this article we review the risk factors that, in current guidelines, are felt to increase risk due to a reduction in intrahepatic glutathione concentrations. Based on our review of the published literature, we feel that cystic fibrosis, acute viral illness, malnutrition, and eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa are likely to be associated with reduction in intrahepatic glutathione concentrations, and that this risk is likely to be related to malnutrition secondary to the disease. Chronic hepatitis C infection is also associated with reduced glutathione concentrations, although this appears to be independent of any associated malnutrition. Ageing and acute fasting are not associated with an increased risk of paracetamol-related hepatotoxicity due to reductions in glutathione concentrations. Finally, the evidence for HIV infection is inconclusive, particularly as the majority of studies were conducted in the pre-anti-viral treatment (HAART era; however it is likely that patients with symptomatic HIV/AIDS have reduced glutathione concentrations due to associated malnutrition. Although

  13. The Relation between Hepatotoxicity and the Total Coumarin Intake from Traditional Japanese Medicines Containing Cinnamon Bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Naohiro; Kainuma, Mosaburo; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kubota, Toshio; Sugawara, Naoko; Uchida, Aiko; Ozono, Sahoko; Yamamuro, Yuki; Furusyo, Norihiro; Ueda, Koso; Tahara, Eiichi; Shimazoe, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamon bark is commonly used in traditional Japanese herbal medicines (Kampo medicines). The coumarin contained in cinnamon is known to be hepatotoxic, and a tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 0.1 mg/kg/day, has been quantified and used in Europe to insure safety. Risk assessments for hepatotoxicity by the cinnamon contained in foods have been reported. However, no such assessment of cinnamon bark has been reported and the coumarin content of Kampo medicines derived from cinnamon bark is not yet known. To assess the risk for hepatotoxicity by Kampo medicines, we evaluated the daily coumarin intake of patients who were prescribed Kampo medicines and investigated the relation between hepatotoxicity and the coumarin intake. The clinical data of 129 outpatients (18 male and 111 female, median age 58 years) who had been prescribed keishibukuryogankayokuinin (TJ-125) between April 2008 and March 2013 was retrospectively investigated. Concurrent Kampo medicines and liver function were also surveyed. In addition to TJ-125, the patients took some of the other 32 Kampo preparations and 22 decoctions that include cinnamon bark. The coumarin content of these Kampo medicines was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). TJ-125 had the highest daily content of coumarin (5.63 mg/day), calculated from the daily cinnamon bark dosage reported in the information leaflet inserted in each package of Kampo medicine. The coumarin content in 1g cinnamon bark decoction was 3.0 mg. The daily coumarin intake of the patients was 0.113 (0.049-0.541) mg/kg/day, with 98 patients (76.0%) exceeding the TDI. Twenty-three patients had an abnormal change in liver function test value, but no significant difference was found in the incidence of abnormal change between the group consuming less than the TDI value (6/31, 19.4%) and the group consuming equal to or greater than the TDI value (17/98, 17.3%). In addition, no abnormal change related to cinnamon bark was found for individual

  14. Improved Hepatoprotective Effect of Liposome-Encapsulated Astaxanthin in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Hepatotoxicity

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    Chun-Hung Chiu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced acute hepatotoxicity is significantly associated with oxidative stress. Astaxanthin (AST, a xanthophyll carotenoid, is well known for its potent antioxidant capacity. However, its drawbacks of poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability have limited its utility. Liposome encapsulation is considered as an effective alternative use for the improvement of bioavailability of the hydrophobic compound. We hypothesized that AST encapsulated within liposomes (LA apparently shows improved stability and transportability compared to that of free AST. To investigate whether LA administration can efficiently prevent the LPS-induced acute hepatotoxicity, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = six per group were orally administered liposome-encapsulated AST at 2, 5 or 10 mg/kg-day (LA-2, LA-5, and LA-10 for seven days and then were LPS-challenged (i.p., 5 mg/kg. The LA-10 administered group, but not the other groups, exhibited a significant amelioration of serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, creatinine (CRE, hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, IL-6, and hepatic nuclear NF-κB and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, suggesting that LA at a 10 mg/kg-day dosage renders hepatoprotective effects. Moreover, the protective effects were even superior to that of positive control N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 200 mg/kg-day. Histopathologically, NAC, free AST, LA-2 and LA-5 partially, but LA-10 completely, alleviated the acute inflammatory status. These results indicate that hydrophobic AST after being properly encapsulated by liposomes improves bioavailability and can also function as potential drug delivery system in treating hepatotoxicity.

  15. Microcystin-LR removal from aqueous solutions using a magnetically separable N-doped TiO2 nanocomposite under visible light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The performance of magnetically separable N-doped TiO2 was found to be significantly improved when compared with a non-magnetic N-doped TiO2 for the aqueous removal of cyanotoxin Microcystin-LR. The observed enhanced photocatalytic activity may be related to the presence of ferri...

  16. Influence of Cyanobacterial Bloom on Freshwater Biocoenosis. Use of Bioassays for Cyanobacterial Microcystins Toxicity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piontek Marlena

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The issues presented in this study concern a very important problem of the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms in surface water used for water supply purposes. The objective of this study was to analyze the occurrence of cyanotoxic risk in the catchment area of the Obrzyca River (including Sławskie lake which is the beginning of the river, which is a source of drinking water for the inhabitants of Zielona Góra. In order to evaluate toxicity of cyanobacterial bloom it was conducted toxicological testing using aquatic invertebrates (Daphnia magna, Dugesia tigrina and heterotrophic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test samples were collected from May to October, 2012. The most toxic was a sample collected from Lake Sławskie on 20th October when cyanobacteria bloom with a predominance of Microcystis aeruginosa occurred and the amount of microcystins was the largest. The methanol extract of the sample was toxic only above a concentration of 6·103 mg·dm-3. The lethal concentration (48-h LC 50 for Daphnia magna was 3.09·103 and for Dugesia tigrina (240-h LC 50 1.51·103 mg·dm-3 of microcystins (MC-LR, MC-YR and MC-RR. The same extract stimulated growth of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis cells.

  17. Monitoring toxic cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins (microcystins and cylindrospermopsins) in four recreational reservoirs (Khon Kaen, Thailand).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somdee, Theerasak; Kaewsan, Tunyaluk; Somdee, Anchana

    2013-11-01

    The toxic cyanobacterial communities of four recreational reservoirs (Bueng Kaen Nakhon, Bueng Thung Sang, Bueng Nong Khot, and Bueng See Than) in Amphur Muang, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand, were investigated. Water samples were collected via monthly sampling from June to October 2011 for the study on the diversity and density of toxic cyanobacteria and toxin quantification. The main toxic cyanobacteria present in these reservoirs were Aphanocapsa sp., Cylindrospermopsis sp., Leptolyngbya sp., Limnothrix sp., Microcystis sp., Oscillatoria sp., Planktolyngbya sp., Planktotrix sp., and Pseudanabaena sp. The dominant bloom-forming genera in the water samples from Bueng Nong Khot and Bueng See Than were Microcystis sp. and Cylindrospermopsis sp., respectively. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for cyanotoxins were performed to detect and quantify microcystins and cylindrospermopsins, with the highest average microcystins content (0.913 μgL(-1)) being found in the sample collected from Bueng Nong Khot and the highest average cylindrospermopsins content (0.463 μgL(-1)) being found in the sample collected from Bueng See Than. The application of 16S rRNA analyses to cyanobacterial isolates BKN2, BNK1, BNK2, and BST1 indicated that these isolates are most closely related to Limnothrix planctonica (JQ004026) (98% similarity), Leptolyngbya sp. (FM177494) (99% similarity), Microcystis aeruginosa (DQ887510) (99% similarity), and Limnothrix redekei (FM177493) (99% similarity), respectively.

  18. Mechanism Profiling of Hepatotoxicity Caused by Oxidative Stress Using Antioxidant Response Element Reporter Gene Assay Models and Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Marlene Thai; Huang, Ruili; Sedykh, Alexander; Wang, Wenyi; Xia, Menghang; Zhu, Hao

    2016-05-01

    Hepatotoxicity accounts for a substantial number of drugs being withdrawn from the market. Using traditional animal models to detect hepatotoxicity is expensive and time-consuming. Alternative in vitro methods, in particular cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) studies, have provided the research community with a large amount of data from toxicity assays. Among the various assays used to screen potential toxicants is the antioxidant response element beta lactamase reporter gene assay (ARE-bla), which identifies chemicals that have the potential to induce oxidative stress and was used to test > 10,000 compounds from the Tox21 program. The ARE-bla computational model and HTS data from a big data source (PubChem) were used to profile environmental and pharmaceutical compounds with hepatotoxicity data. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed based on ARE-bla data. The models predicted the potential oxidative stress response for known liver toxicants when no ARE-bla data were available. Liver toxicants were used as probe compounds to search PubChem Bioassay and generate a response profile, which contained thousands of bioassays (> 10 million data points). By ranking the in vitro-in vivo correlations (IVIVCs), the most relevant bioassay(s) related to hepatotoxicity were identified. The liver toxicants profile contained the ARE-bla and relevant PubChem assays. Potential toxicophores for well-known toxicants were created by identifying chemical features that existed only in compounds with high IVIVCs. Profiling chemical IVIVCs created an opportunity to fully explore the source-to-outcome continuum of modern experimental toxicology using cheminformatics approaches and big data sources. Kim MT, Huang R, Sedykh A, Wang W, Xia M, Zhu H. 2016. Mechanism profiling of hepatotoxicity caused by oxidative stress using antioxidant response element reporter gene assay models and big data. Environ Health Perspect 124:634-641;

  19. Potential synergistic effects of microcystins and bacterial lipopolysaccharides on life history traits of Daphnia galeata raised on low and high food levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dionisio Pires, L.M.; Sarpe, D.; Brehm, Michaela; Ibelings, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    Metastudies have found no consistent effects of the cyanobacterial toxin microcystin on Daphnia, and there are discrepancies between field observations and experiments. Confounding factors include absence or presence of alternative high quality food or the presence of bioactive compounds, other than

  20. The 2015 Middle Childhood Survey (MCS) of mental health and well-being at age 11 years in an Australian population cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurens, Kristin R; Tzoumakis, Stacy; Dean, Kimberlie; Brinkman, Sally A; Bore, Miles; Lenroot, Rhoshel K; Smith, Maxwell; Holbrook, Allyson; Robinson, Kim M; Stevens, Robert; Harris, Felicity; Carr, Vaughan J; Green, Melissa J

    2017-06-23

    The Middle Childhood Survey (MCS) was designed as a computerised self-report assessment of children's mental health and well-being at approximately 11 years of age, conducted with a population cohort of 87 026 children being studied longitudinally within the New South Wales (NSW) Child Development Study. School Principals provided written consent for teachers to administer the MCS in class to year 6 students at 829 NSW schools (35.0% of eligible schools). Parent or child opt-outs from participation were received for 4.3% of children, and MCS data obtained from 27 808 children (mean age 11.5 years, SD 0.5; 49.5% female), representing 85.9% of students at participating schools. Demographic characteristics of participating schools and children are representative of the NSW population. Children completed items measuring Social Integration, Prosocial Behaviour, Peer Relationship Problems, Supportive Relationships (at Home, School and in the Community), Empathy, Emotional Symptoms, Conduct Problems, Aggression, Attention, Inhibitory Control, Hyperactivity-Inattention, Total Difficulties (internalising and externalising psychopathology), Perceptual Sensitivity, Psychotic-Like Experiences, Personality, Self-esteem, Daytime Sleepiness and Connection to Nature. Distributions of responses on each item and construct demarcate competencies and vulnerabilities within the population: most children report mental health and well-being, but the population distribution spanned the full range of possible scores on every construct. Multiagency, intergenerational linkage of the MCS data with health, education, child protection, justice and early childhood development records took place late in 2016. Linked data were used to elucidate patterns of risk and protection across early and middle child development, and these data will provide a foundation for future record linkages in the cohort that will track mental and physical health, social and educational/occupational outcomes into

  1. Ameliorative effect of vitamin C against hepatotoxicity induced by emamectin benzoate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaldoun Oularbi, H; Richeval, C; Lebaili, N; Zerrouki-Daoudi, N; Baha, M; Djennas, N; Allorge, D

    2017-07-01

    In the present study, we aimed to assess the potential protective effect of ascorbic acid (AA) against emamectin benzoate (EMB)-induced hepatotoxicity. For this purpose, biochemical, histopathological and analytical investigations were performed. Male Wistar rats were distributed into three groups, that is, a control group, an EMB group given 10 mg EMB/kg body weight (BW) by gavage and an EMB + AA group given 10 mg EMB/kg BW and vitamin C intraperitoneally (200 mg/kg). The duration of the treatment was 28 days and the duration of the study was 42 days. There was a statistically significant increase of all hepatic biomarkers, that is, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyltransferase activities, and glycemia, in EMB-treated group when compared with the control group. Light microscopic observations revealed variable signs of hepatotoxicity in the EMB group, which were represented by alteration of normal hepatic architecture, inflammatory cell infiltration, hepatocellular steatosis and foci of necrosis at 28 and 42 days post-treatment. However, co-treatment with vitamin C reduced EMB-related liver toxicity and diminished the abnormal biochemical and architectural damage. Emamectin B1a and B1b residues were detectable in all plasma samples of treated rats at 14, 21 and 28 days of treatment. The drug liver tissue concentration was significantly lower in EMB + AA group compared with EMB group at 28 and 42 days. In conclusion, the findings of the present study clearly indicate a significant protective action of vitamin C against EMB hepatotoxicity.

  2. Integrating multiple omics to unravel mechanisms of Cyclosporin A induced hepatotoxicity in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, Van den W.F.P.M.; Ruiz Aracama, Ainhoa; Summeren, Van Anke; Jennen, D.G.J.; Gaj, Stan; Coonen, M.L.J.; Brauers, Karen; Wodzig, W.K.W.H.; Delft, van J.H.M.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve attrition rates of candidate-drugs there is a need for a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying drug-induced hepatotoxicity. We aim to further unravel the toxicological response of hepatocytes to a prototypical cholestatic compound by integrating transcriptomic and

  3. Biochemical parameters of blood plasma and content of microcystins in tissues of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) from hypertrophic pond with cyanobacterial water bloom

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopp, Radovan; Mareš, J.; Palíková, M.; Navrátil, S.; Kubíček, Z.; Ziková, A.; Hlávková, J.; Bláha, Luděk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 15 (2009), s. 1683-1693 ISSN 1355-557X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : microcystin * aquaculture * biochemistry Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.099, year: 2009

  4. [Hepatox: database on hepatotoxic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinton, A; Latry, P; Biour, M

    1993-01-01

    Hepatox is a data base on the hepatotoxic drugs file published every year in Gastroentérologie Clinique et Biologique. The program was developed under Omnis 7 for Apple computers, and under Visual Basic Professional Toolkit and Code Base for IBM PC and compatibles computers. The data base includes forms of 866 drugs identified by their approved name and those of their 1,300 corresponding proprietary names in France; drugs are distributed among 104 pharmacological classes. It is possible to have instantaneously access to the card of a drug identified by its approved name. Acceding to a drug identified by its proprietary name gives a list of the approved name of its components; going from a name of this list to the correspondent card of hepatoxicity is immediate. It is easy to extract lists of drugs responsible of a type of hepatic injury, and a table of types of hepatic injuries induced by the drugs of a pharmacological class.

  5. Role of suppressed hepatocellular regeneration and Ca2+ in chlordecone-potentiated CCl4 hepatotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism by which the chlorinated pesticide chlordecone (CD; Kepone) potentiates CCl 4 -induced hepatotoxicity and lethality was investigated. It was hypothesized that perturbations in Ca 2+ homeostasis, greater than those observed with a low dose of CCl 4 alone, in concert with a suppression of hepatocellular regeneration induced by CD alone or by CD + CCl 4 are responsible, at least in part, for CD-potentiated CCl 4 hepatotoxicity. Ca 2+ homeostasis was evaluated by measuring total cell Ca 2+ and 45 Ca 2+ uptake in viable isolated hepatocyte suspension obtained from normal and CD-pretreated rats receiving CCl 4 in vivo. In the normal rats in vivo CCL challenge did not affect 45 Ca 2+ uptake by viable isolated hepatocytes. In contrast, 45 Ca 2+ uptake was inhibited in viable isolated hepatocytes obtained from rats exposed to CD + CCl 4

  6. Dynamics of Large-Scale Solar-Wind Streams Obtained by the Double Superposed Epoch Analysis: 2. Comparisons of CIRs vs. Sheaths and MCs vs. Ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolaev, Y. I.; Lodkina, I. G.; Nikolaeva, N. S.; Yermolaev, M. Y.

    2017-12-01

    This work is a continuation of our previous article (Yermolaev et al. in J. Geophys. Res. 120, 7094, 2015), which describes the average temporal profiles of interplanetary plasma and field parameters in large-scale solar-wind (SW) streams: corotating interaction regions (CIRs), interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs including both magnetic clouds (MCs) and ejecta), and sheaths as well as interplanetary shocks (ISs). As in the previous article, we use the data of the OMNI database, our catalog of large-scale solar-wind phenomena during 1976 - 2000 (Yermolaev et al. in Cosmic Res., 47, 2, 81, 2009) and the method of double superposed epoch analysis (Yermolaev et al. in Ann. Geophys., 28, 2177, 2010a). We rescale the duration of all types of structures in such a way that the beginnings and endings for all of them coincide. We present new detailed results comparing pair phenomena: 1) both types of compression regions ( i.e. CIRs vs. sheaths) and 2) both types of ICMEs (MCs vs. ejecta). The obtained data allow us to suggest that the formation of the two types of compression regions responds to the same physical mechanism, regardless of the type of piston (high-speed stream (HSS) or ICME); the differences are connected to the geometry ( i.e. the angle between the speed gradient in front of the piston and the satellite trajectory) and the jumps in speed at the edges of the compression regions. In our opinion, one of the possible reasons behind the observed differences in the parameters in MCs and ejecta is that when ejecta are observed, the satellite passes farther from the nose of the area of ICME than when MCs are observed.

  7. The Ameliorative Effects of L-2-Oxothiazolidine-4-Carboxylate on Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ho Shin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the ameliorative effects and the mechanism of action of L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylate (OTC on acetaminophen (APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Mice were randomly divided into six groups: normal control group, APAP only treated group, APAP + 25 mg/kg OTC, APAP + 50 mg/kg OTC, APAP + 100 mg/kg OTC, and APAP + 100 mg/kg N-acetylcysteine (NAC as a reference control group. OTC treatment significantly reduced serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in a dose dependent manner. OTC treatment was markedly increased glutathione (GSH production and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px activity in a dose dependent manner. The contents of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal in liver tissues were significantly decreased by administration of OTC and the inhibitory effect of OTC was similar to that of NAC. Moreover, OTC treatment on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity significantly reduced the formation of nitrotyrosin and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling positive areas of liver tissues in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, the activity of caspase-3 in liver tissues was reduced by administration of OTC in a dose dependent manner. The ameliorative effects of OTC on APAP-induced liver damage in mice was similar to that of NAC. These results suggest that OTC has ameliorative effects on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice through anti-oxidative stress and anti-apoptotic processes.

  8. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitic (NASH) mice are protected from higher hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen upon induction of PPARα with clofibrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Bhave, Vishakha S.; Mitra, Mayurranjan S.; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to investigate if the hepatotoxic sensitivity in nonalcoholic steatohepatitic mice to acetaminophen (APAP) is due to downregulation of nuclear receptor PPARα via lower cell division and tissue repair. Male Swiss Webster mice fed methionine and choline deficient diet for 31 days exhibited NASH. On the 32nd day, a marginally toxic dose of APAP (360 mg/kg, ip) yielded 70% mortality in steatohepatitic mice, while all non steatohepatitic mice receiving the same dose survived. 14 C-APAP covalent binding, CYP2E1 protein, and enzyme activity did not differ from the controls, obviating increased APAP bioactivation as the cause of amplified APAP hepatotoxicity. Liver injury progressed only in steatohepatitic livers between 6 and 24 h. Cell division and tissue repair assessed by 3 H-thymidine incorporation and PCNA were inhibited only in the steatohepatitic mice given APAP suggesting that higher sensitivity of NASH liver to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity was due to lower tissue repair. The hypothesis that impeded liver tissue repair in steatohepatitic mice was due to downregulation of PPARα was tested. PPARα was downregulated in NASH. To investigate whether downregulation of PPARα in NASH is the critical mechanism of compromised liver tissue repair, PPARα was induced in steatohepatitic mice with clofibrate (250 mg/kg for 3 days, ip) before injecting APAP. All clofibrate pretreated steatohepatitic mice receiving APAP exhibited lower liver injury, which did not progress and the mice survived. The protection was not due to lower bioactivation of APAP but due to higher liver tissue repair. These findings suggest that inadequate PPARα expression in steatohepatitic mice sensitizes them to APAP hepatotoxicity

  9. Trifluoperazine inhibits acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and hepatic reactive nitrogen formation in mice and in freshly isolated hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Banerjee

    Full Text Available The hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen (APAP occurs by initial metabolism to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine which depletes GSH and forms APAP-protein adducts. Subsequently, the reactive nitrogen species peroxynitrite is formed from nitric oxide (NO and superoxide leading to 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins. Toxicity occurs with inhibited mitochondrial function. We previously reported that in hepatocytes the nNOS (NOS1 inhibitor NANT inhibited APAP toxicity, reactive nitrogen and oxygen species formation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. In this work we examined the effect of trifluoperazine (TFP, a calmodulin antagonist that inhibits calcium induced nNOS activation, on APAP hepatotoxicity and reactive nitrogen formation in murine hepatocytes and in vivo. In freshly isolated hepatocytes TFP inhibited APAP induced toxicity, reactive nitrogen formation (NO, GSNO, and 3-nitrotyrosine in protein, reactive oxygen formation (superoxide, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, decreased ATP production, decreased oxygen consumption rate, and increased NADH accumulation. TFP did not alter APAP induced GSH depletion in the hepatocytes or the formation of APAP protein adducts which indicated that reactive metabolite formation was not inhibited. Since we previously reported that TFP inhibits the hepatotoxicity of APAP in mice without altering hepatic APAP-protein adduct formation, we examined the APAP treated mouse livers for evidence of reactive nitrogen formation. 3-Nitrotyrosine in hepatic proteins and GSNO were significantly increased in APAP treated mouse livers and decreased in the livers of mice treated with APAP plus TFP. These data are consistent with a hypothesis that APAP hepatotoxicity occurs with altered calcium metabolism, activation of nNOS leading to increased reactive nitrogen formation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Keywords: Acetaminophen, Neuronal nitric oxide, Oxidative stress, Mitochondria

  10. Incidence of antituberculosis-drug-induced hepatotoxicity and associated risk factors among tuberculosis patients in Dawro Zone, South Ethiopia: A cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Wondwossen Abera,; Waqtola Cheneke,; Gemeda Abebe,

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antituberculosis drugs cause hepatotoxicity in some individuals leading to acute liver failure, which results in death. Such phenomena limit the clinical use of drugs, contributing to treatment failure that possibly causes drug resistance. Furthermore, associated risk factors for the development of antituberculosis-drug-induced hepatotoxicity (anti-TB-DIH) are found to be controversial among different study findings. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted from May 20...

  11. A critical analysis of the hepatotoxicity cases described in the literature related to Herbalife (r products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Ailton Duque Zambrone

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the hepatotoxicity cases described in the literature, attributed to the consumption of Herbalife(r products, and to determine whether a causal relationship exists between the reported cases of liver injury and the use of these products. A literature search was performed on the PubMed, LILACS and PAHO databases. Seven publications reporting a total of 53 cases of hepatotoxicity linked to the use of Herbalife(r products were retrieved. All of the studies lacked sufficient information to some degree, whether related to patients' history, concomitant use of medication and/or other compounds (including alcohol, observations on interrupted use (dechallenge, results found with markers, viral serology and autoantibodies or observations concerning re-exposure to the products. In addition to these items, the lack of clear information on the type of products evaluated and their respective composition is an important factor to be considered. Furthermore, data quality was also questionable due to the presence of confounding factors, absence of proper exclusion of alternative explanations, and the use of questionable methods for attributing causality. Hence, an association between hepatotoxicity and consumption of these products cannot be proven based on the data collected and rigorous scientific analysis.

  12. Abrogation of cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity in mice by xanthorrhizol is related to its effect on the regulation of gene transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwan Kim, Seong; Ok Hong, Kyoung; Chung, Won-Yoon; Kwan Hwang, Jae; Park, Kwang-Kyun

    2004-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used anticancer drug, but at high dose, it can produce undesirable side effects such as hepatotoxicity. Because Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb. (Zingiberaceae) has been traditionally used to treat liver disorders, the protective effect of xanthorrhizol, which is isolated from C. xanthorrhiza, on cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity was evaluated in mice. The pretreatment of xanthorrhizol (200 mg/kg/day, po) for 4 days prevented the hepatotoxicity induced by cisplatin (45 mg/kg, ip) with statistical significance. Interestingly, it abrogated cisplatin-induced DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB), which consequently affected mRNA expression levels of NF-κB-dependent genes, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), even in part. It also attenuated the cisplatin-suppressed DNA-binding activity of activator protein 1 (AP-1). Using differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (DDRT-PCR), seven upregulated genes including S100 calcium binding protein A9 (S100A9) mRNA and antigenic determinant for rec-A protein mRNA and five downregulated genes including caseinolytic protease X (ClpX) mRNA and ceruloplasmin (CP) mRNA by cisplatin were identified. Although these mRNA expression patterns were not totally consistent with gel shift patterns, altered expression levels by cisplatin were reversed by the pretreatment of xanthorrhizol. In conclusion, the ability of xanthorrhizol to regulate the DNA-binding activities of transcription factors, NF-κB and AP-1, could be one possible mechanism to elucidate the preventive effect of xanthorrhizol on cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, genes identified in this study could be helpful to understand the mechanism of cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity. Finally, the combination treatment of xanthorrhizol and cisplatin may provide more advantage than single treatment of cisplatin in cancer therapy

  13. Use of Arctium lappa Extract Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    El-Kott, Attalla Farag; Bin-Meferij, Mashael Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Severe destructive hepatic injuries can be induced by acetaminophen overdose and may lead to acute hepatic failure. Objective: To investigate the ameliorative effects of Arctium lappa root extract on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: Rats were divided into 4 groups: normal control group, Arctium lappa extract group, acetaminophen-injected group, and acetaminophen treated with Arctium lappa extract group. Results: The treatment with Arctium lappa extract reduc...

  14. Engineered andrographolide nanosystems for smart recovery in hepatotoxic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy P

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Partha Roy,1,2 Suvadra Das,1 Runa Ghosh Auddy,1,3 Arup Mukherjee1,3 1Division of Pharmaceutical and Fine Chemicals Technology, Department of Chemical Technology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India; 2Faculty of Technology (Pharmaceutical, Universiti Malaysia, Pahang, Malaysia; 3Centre for Research in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, India Abstract: Andrographolide (AG is one of the most potent labdane diterpenoid-type free radical scavengers available from plant sources. The compound is the principal bioactive component in Andrographis paniculata leaf extracts, and is responsible for anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and immunomodulatory activity. The application of AG in therapeutics, however, is severely constrained, due to its low aqueous solubility, short biological half-life, and poor cellular permeability. Engineered nanoparticles in biodegradable polymer systems were therefore conceived as one solution to aid in further drug-like applications of AG. In this study, a cationic modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid nanosystem was applied for evaluation against experimental mouse hepatotoxic conditions. Biopolymeric nanoparticles of hydrodynamic size of 229.7±17.17 nm and ζ-potential +34.4±1.87 mV facilitated marked restoration in liver functions and oxidative stress markers. Superior dissolution for bioactive AG, hepatic residence, and favorable cytokine regulation in the liver tissues are some of the factors responsible for the newer nanosystem-assisted rapid recovery. Keywords: andrographolide, engineered nanosystems, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, cytokine regulation, hepatotoxicity

  15. Effects of the naturally-occurring contaminant microcystins on the Azolla filiculoides-Anabaena azollae symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, A L; Monteiro, B; Azevedo, J; Campos, A; Osório, H; Vasconcelos, V

    2015-08-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) contaminate aquatic ecosystems and are responsible for animal poisoning worldwide. We conducted a toxicity test with the aquatic fern and the biofertilizer, Azolla filiculoides. The sporophytes were exposed to three concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 1μgmL(-1)) of a microcystin (MC) cyanobacterial crude extract and purified MC-LR. The growth of A. filiculoides decreased only at 1μgmL(-1) crude extract concentration while with MC-LR it decreased at all the tested concentrations, indicating that the presence of other compounds in the crude extract altered toxicity and stimulated the fern growth at lower concentrations (0.01 and 0.1μgmL(-1)). Both phycoerythrocyanin and allophycocyanin levels decreased in all the concentrations of crude extract and MC-LR. The phycocyanin had a marked increase at 0.1μgmL(-1) crude extract concentration and a marked decrease at 1μgmL(-1) MC-LR concentration. These changes in the phycobiliprotein content indicate a shift in the antenna pigments of the cyanobionts of A. filiculoides. The changes in two oxidative stress enzymes, glutathione reductase for the crude extract assay and glutathione peroxidase for MC-LR assay, points towards the induction of stress defense responses. The low bioconcentration factor in both crude extract and MC-LR treatments can suggest the low uptake of microcystins, and indicates that the aquatic fern can be used as a biofertilizer and as animal feed but is not suitable for MC phytoremediation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hepatotoxic effects of fenofibrate in spontaneously hypertensive rats expressing human C-reactive protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škop, V.; Trnovská, J.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Marková, I.; Malínská, H.; Kazdová, L.; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Kůdela, M.; Pravenec, Michal; Šilhavý, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 6 (2016), s. 891-899 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14325 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : fenofibrate * rosuvastatin * C-reactive protein * transgenic * spontaneously hypertensive rat * inflammation * hepatotoxic Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  17. The enhanced atorvastatin hepatotoxicity in diabetic rats was partly attributed to the upregulated hepatic Cyp3a and SLCO1B1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Nan; Hu, Mengyue; Ling, Zhaoli; Liu, Peihua; Wang, Fan; Xu, Ping; Zhong, Zeyu; Sun, Binbin; Zhang, Mian; Li, Feng; Xie, Qiushi; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Liver injury is a common adverse effect of atorvastatin. This study aimed to investigate atorvastatin-induced hepatotoxicity in diabetic rats induced by high-fat diet combined with streptozotocin. The results showed that 40 mg/kg atorvastatin was lethal to diabetic rats, whose mean survival time was 6.2 days. Severe liver injury also occurred in diabetic rats treated with 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg atorvastatin. The in vitro results indicated that atorvastatin cytotoxicity in hepatocytes of diabetic rats was more severe than normal and high-fat diet feeding rats. Expressions and activities of hepatic Cyp3a and SLCO1B1 were increased in diabetic rats, which were highly correlated with hepatotoxicity. Antioxidants (glutathione and N-Acetylcysteine), Cyp3a inhibitor ketoconazole and SLCO1B1 inhibitor gemfibrozil suppressed cytotoxicity and ROS formation in primary hepatocytes of diabetic rats. In HepG2 cells, up-regulations of CYP3A4 and SLCO1B1 potentiated hepatotoxicity and ROS generation, whereas knockdowns of CYP3A4 and SLCO1B1 as well as CYP3A4/SLCO1B1 inhibitions showed the opposite effects. Phenobarbital pretreatment was used to induce hepatic Cyp3a and SLCO1B1 in rats. Phenobarbital aggravated atorvastatin-induced hepatotoxicity, while decreased plasma exposure of atorvastatin. All these findings demonstrated that the upregulations of hepatic Cyp3a and SLCO1B1 in diabetic rats potentiated atorvastatin-induced hepatotoxicity via increasing ROS formation. PMID:27624558

  18. Inertial Microfluidic Cell Stretcher (iMCS): Fully Automated, High-Throughput, and Near Real-Time Cell Mechanotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yanxiang; Davis, Steven P; Yang, Fan; Paulsen, Kevin S; Kumar, Maneesh; Sinnott DeVaux, Rebecca; Wang, Xianhui; Conklin, Douglas S; Oberai, Assad; Herschkowitz, Jason I; Chung, Aram J

    2017-07-01

    Mechanical biomarkers associated with cytoskeletal structures have been reported as powerful label-free cell state identifiers. In order to measure cell mechanical properties, traditional biophysical (e.g., atomic force microscopy, micropipette aspiration, optical stretchers) and microfluidic approaches were mainly employed; however, they critically suffer from low-throughput, low-sensitivity, and/or time-consuming and labor-intensive processes, not allowing techniques to be practically used for cell biology research applications. Here, a novel inertial microfluidic cell stretcher (iMCS) capable of characterizing large populations of single-cell deformability near real-time is presented. The platform inertially controls cell positions in microchannels and deforms cells upon collision at a T-junction with large strain. The cell elongation motions are recorded, and thousands of cell deformability information is visualized near real-time similar to traditional flow cytometry. With a full automation, the entire cell mechanotyping process runs without any human intervention, realizing a user friendly and robust operation. Through iMCS, distinct cell stiffness changes in breast cancer progression and epithelial mesenchymal transition are reported, and the use of the platform for rapid cancer drug discovery is shown as well. The platform returns large populations of single-cell quantitative mechanical properties (e.g., shear modulus) on-the-fly with high statistical significances, enabling actual usages in clinical and biophysical studies. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Hepato-toxic effect of diuron in albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, R C; Kumar, S

    1999-05-01

    Tumour initiating/promoting effect of diuron, a widely used substituted urea herbicide, was studied in rats using liver tumour model. Chronic exposure to diuron at a dose of 250 mg/kg body wt resulted in high mortality and weight loss in treated animals. The animals which received diuron + HCH treatment showed an increase in size and weight of liver as compared to controls. Liver tumours were not observed in any of the treated group whereas some significant histological changes were seen in diuron treated rat liver. Diuron thus has been found to be hepatotoxic albeit neither tumour initiating nor promoting in rat liver tumorigenesis assay system.

  20. Bisphenol A Induces Hepatotoxicity through Oxidative Stress in Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab K. Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are cytotoxic agents that lead to significant oxidative damage. Bisphenol A (BPA is a contaminant with increasing exposure to it and exerts both toxic and estrogenic effects on mammalian cells. Due to limited information concerning the effect of BPA on liver, this study investigates whether BPA causes hepatotoxicity by induction of oxidative stress in liver. Rats were divided into five groups: The first four groups, BPA (0.1, 1, 10, 50 mg/kg/day were administrated orally to rats for four weeks. The fifth group was taken water with vehicle. The final body weights in the 0.1 mg group showed a significant decrease compared to control group. Significant decreased levels of reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and catalase activity were found in the 50 mg BPA group compared to control groups. High dose of BPA (50 mg/kg significantly increased the biochemical levels of ALT, ALP and total bilirubin. BPA effect on the activity of antioxidant genes was confirmed by real time PCR in which the expression levels of these genes in liver tissue were significantly decrease compared to control. Data from this study demonstrate that BPA generate ROS and reduce the antioxidant gene expression that causes hepatotoxicity.

  1. Food Color Induced Hepatotoxicity in Swiss Albino Rats, Rattus norvegicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Beenam; Sharma, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    Certain dietary constituents can induce toxicity and play a critical role in the development of several hepatic disorders. Tartrazine, metanil yellow and sunset yellow are widely used azo dyes in food products, so the present study is aimed to investigate the food color induced hepatotoxicity in Swiss albino rats. Swiss albino rats were divided into four groups, each group having six animals. Group I served as control, Group II, Group III and Group IV were administered with 25, 50 and 75 mg/kg body weight blend of sunset yellow, metanil yellow and tartrazine for 30 days. Hepatotoxicity in rats treated with a blend of these food colors was studied by assessing parameters such as serum total protein, serum albumin, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as well as hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA). The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) were assessed. Significantly increased concentrations of serum total protein, serum albumin, serum ALP and hepatic MDA and significantly lowered levels of SOD, reduced GSH and CAT in the liver tissue of treated animals were observed when compared with control animals. The alteration in the liver includes necrosis of hepatocytes, infiltration and vacuolation. The result indicates that consumption of food color in diet induces liver tissue damage. The used doses of food color were mostly attributable to hepatocellular damage and drastic alteration in antioxidant defense system.

  2. Quantifying the hepatotoxic risk of alcohol consumption in patients with rheumatoid arthritis taking methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Jenny H; Warner, Alexander; Costello, Ruth; Lunt, Mark; Verstappen, Suzanne M M; Dixon, William G

    2017-09-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who take methotrexate (MTX) are advised to limit their alcohol intake due to potential combined hepatotoxicity. However, data are limited to support this. The aim of this study was to quantify the risk of developing abnormal liver blood tests at different levels of alcohol consumption, using routinely collected data from primary care. Patients with RA in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink starting MTX between 1987 and 2016 were included. Hepatotoxicity was defined as transaminitis: alanine transaminase or aspartate aminotransferase more than three times the upper limit of normal. Crude rates of transaminitis were calculated per 1000 person-years, categorised by weekly alcohol consumption in units. Cox proportional hazard models tested the association between alcohol consumption and transaminitis univariately, then age and gender adjusted. 11 839 patients were included, with 530 episodes of transaminitis occurring in 47 090 person-years follow-up. Increased weekly alcohol consumption as a continuous variable was associated with increased risk of transaminitis, adjusted HR (95% CI) per unit consumed 1.01 (1.00 to 1.02); consuming between 15 and 21 units was associated with a possible increased risk of hepatotoxicity, while drinking >21 units per week significantly increased rates of transaminitis, adjusted HR (95% CI) 1.85 (1.17 to 2.93). Weekly alcohol consumption of risk of transaminitis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Gene expression profiling in the liver of CD-1 mice to characterize the hepatotoxicity of triazole fungicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, Amber K.; Bao, Wenjun; Ren, Hongzu; Schmid, Judith E.; Tully, Douglas B.; Wood, Carmen; Rockett, John C.; Narotsky, Michael G.; Sun, Guobin; Lambert, Guy R.; Thai, S.-F.; Wolf, Douglas C.; Nesnow, Stephen; Dix, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Four triazole fungicides used in agricultural or pharmaceutical applications were examined for hepatotoxic effects in mouse liver. Besides organ weight, histopathology, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme induction, DNA microarrays were used to generate gene expression profiles and hypotheses on potential mechanisms of action for this class of chemicals. Adult male CD-1 mice were exposed daily for 14 days to fluconazole, myclobutanil, propiconazole, or triadimefon at three dose levels by oral gavage. Doses were based on previous studies that resulted in liver hypertrophy or hepatotoxicity. All four triazoles caused hepatocyte hypertrophy, and all except triadimefon increased relative liver/body weight ratios at the middle and high dose levels. CYP enzyme activities were also induced by all four triazoles at the middle and high doses as measured by the dealkylations of four alkoxyresorufins, although some differences in substrate specificity were observed. Consistent with this common histopathology and biochemistry, several CYP and xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME) genes were differentially expressed in response to all four (Cyp2d26 and Cyp3a11), or three of the four (Cyp2c40, Cyp2c55, Ces2, Slco1a4) triazoles. Differential expression of numerous other CYP and XME genes discriminated between the various triazoles, consistent with differences in CYP enzyme activities, and indicative of possible differences in mechanisms of hepatotoxicity or dose response. Multiple isoforms of Cyp1a, 2b, 2c, 3a, and other CYP and XME genes regulated by the nuclear receptors constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) were differentially expressed following triazole exposure. Based on these results, we expanded on our original hypothesis that triazole hepatotoxicity was mediated by CYP induction, to include additional XME genes, many of which are modulated by CAR and PXR

  4. Dynamics of microcystins-LR and -RR in the phytoplanktivorous silver carp in a sub-chronic toxicity experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Liqiang; Xie Ping; Ozawa, Kazuhiko; Honma, Takamitsu; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Park, Ho-Dong

    2004-01-01

    A sub-chronic toxicity experiment was conducted to examine tissue distribution and depuration of two microcystins (microcystin-LR and microcystin -RR) in the phytoplanktivorous filter-feeding silver carp during a course of 80 days. Two large tanks (A, B) were used, and in Tank A, the fish were fed naturally with fresh Microcystis viridis cells (collected from a eutrophic pond) throughout the experiment, while in Tank B, the food of the fish were M. viridis cells for the first 40 days and then changed to artificial carp feed. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) was used to measure MC-LR and MC-RR in the M. viridis cells, the seston, and the intestine, blood, liver and muscle tissue of silver carp at an interval of 20 days. MC-RR and MC-LR in the collected Microcystis cells varied between 268-580 and 110-292 μg g -1 DW, respectively. In Tank A, MC-RR and MC-LR varied between 41.5-99.5 and 6.9-15.8 μg g -1 DW in the seston, respectively. The maximum MC-RR in the blood, liver and muscle of the fish was 49.7, 17.8 and 1.77 μg g -1 DW, respectively. No MC-LR was detectable in the muscle and blood samples of the silver carp in spite of the abundant presence of this toxin in the intestines (for the liver, there was only one case when a relatively minor quantity was detected). These findings contrast with previous experimental results on rainbow trout. Perhaps silver carp has a mechanism to degrade MC-LR actively and to inhibit MC-LR transportation across the intestines. The depuration of MC-RR concentrations occurred slowly than uptakes in blood, liver and muscle, and the depuration rate was in the order of blood>liver>muscle. The grazing ability of silver carp on toxic cyanobacteria suggests an applicability of using phytoplanktivorous fish to counteract cyanotoxin contamination in eutrophic waters. - Silver carp are tolerant of cyanobacterial toxins, and might be used to control toxic algal blooms in highly eutrophic lakes

  5. Cell Lysis and Detoxification of Cyanotoxins Using a Novel Combination of Microbubble Generation and Plasma Microreactor Technology for Ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandhal, Jagroop; Siswanto, Anggun; Kuvshinov, Dmitriy; Zimmerman, William B; Lawton, Linda; Edwards, Christine

    2018-01-01

    There has been a steady rise in the incidences of algal blooms globally, and worryingly, there is increasing evidence that changes in the global climate are leading to a shift toward cyanobacterial blooms. Many cyanobacterial genera are harmful, producing several potent toxins, including microcystins, for which there are over 90 described analogues. There are a wide range of negative effects associated with these toxins including gastroenteritis, cytotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity. Although a variety of oxidation based treatment methods have been described, ozonation and advanced oxidation are acknowledged as most effective as they readily oxidise microcystins to non-toxic degradation products. However, most ozonation technologies have challenges for scale up including high costs and sub-optimum efficiencies, hence, a low cost and scalable ozonation technology is needed. Here we designed a low temperature plasma dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with an incorporated fluidic oscillator for microbubble delivery of ozone. Both technologies have the potential to drastically reduce the costs of ozonation at scale. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed very rapid (cyanotoxins.

  6. Bees' Honey Attenuation of Metanil-Yellow-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L.; Sayed, Ahmed Amir Radwan

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the protective effect of bees' honey against metanil-yellow-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Rats were divided into 7 groups: control group; three groups treated with 50, 100, and 200?mg/kg metanil yellow, and three groups treated with metanil yellow plus 2.5?mg ? kg?1 ? day?1 bees' honey for 8 weeks. The obtained data showed that the antioxidant/anti-inflammatory activity of bees' honey reduced the oxidative stress in the liver tissue and downregulated th...

  7. Food Color Induced Hepatotoxicity in Swiss Albino Rats, Rattus norvegicus

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, Beenam; Sharma, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Certain dietary constituents can induce toxicity and play a critical role in the development of several hepatic disorders. Tartrazine, metanil yellow and sunset yellow are widely used azo dyes in food products, so the present study is aimed to investigate the food color induced hepatotoxicity in Swiss albino rats. Materials and Methods: Swiss albino rats were divided into four groups, each group having six animals. Group I served as control, Group II, Group III and Group IV were ad...

  8. A retrospective review of methotrexate-induced hepatotoxicity among patients with psoriasis in a tertiary dermatology center in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Lim Chui; Lee, Yin Yin; Lee, Chew Kek; Wong, Su-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a common and efficacious systemic agent used for the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis. Nevertheless, its use is associated with the risk of hepatotoxicity. This study was performed to study the association of MTX dose with regards to hepatotoxicity as evidenced by deranged transaminases. This was a retrospective review of patients with psoriasis on MTX from 2000 to 2009 at the outpatient dermatology clinic, University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC). We analyzed patients' demography, serial laboratory investigations, liver ultrasounds, and liver biopsies of patients on MTX. Sixty-six of 710 (9.30%) patients with psoriasis were prescribed MTX throughout the 10-year period. Among them 57.6% developed deranged transaminases, with six requiring MTX withdrawal due to hepatotoxicity. The mean cumulative dose of MTX at the detection of liver enzyme derangement was 552.3 ± 596.1 mg. A high proportion of patients on MTX had deranged transaminases. However, the number of serious events was low. We concluded from this study that the use of MTX is relatively safe in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  9. The protective effects of vitamin C on hepatotoxicity induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Ki Jung; Park, Sung Kwang; Cho, Heung Lae; Kang, Ki Mun; Chai, Gyu Young; Chung, Duck Wha; Kang, Jin Soon

    2004-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the protective effects of vitamin C on the hepatotoxicity induced by radiation. The Spraque Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups; the control group, the radiation exposed group, and the radiation and vitamin C-treated group. SOD activity catalase, malondialdehyde and liver enzymes were analyzed to assess the antioxidant effects of vitamin C. The increased level of malondialdehyde and the decreased catalase activity that were induced by radiation were improved after vitamin C but were was no statistical significance among three groups. The superoxide dismutase activity of the liver was increased by vitamin C, but there were no statistically significant differences between the vitamin C-treated group and the non vitamin C-treated group. The level of liver enzymes in sera such as glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, lactate dehyrogenase and alkaline phosphatase were remarkably elevated by radiation. The levels of those enzymes were decreased in the vitamin C-treated group and statistical significance was noted for the GPT level (ρ < 0.01). On the electromicrographic findings, the hepatic cell destruction was considerably decreased in the vitamin C-treated group. Vitamin C is thought to be an effective antioxidant against the hepatotoxicity induced by radiation

  10. Metabolomics approaches for discovering biomarkers of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beger, Richard D.; Sun, Jinchun; Schnackenberg, Laura K.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity are two major reasons that drugs are withdrawn post-market, and hence it is of major concern to both the FDA and pharmaceutical companies. The number of cases of serious adverse effects (SAEs) in marketed drugs has climbed faster than the number of total drug prescriptions issued. In some cases, preclinical animal studies fail to identify the potential toxicity of a new chemical entity (NCE) under development. The current clinical chemistry biomarkers of liver and kidney injury are inadequate in terms of sensitivity and/or specificity, prompting the need to discover new translational specific biomarkers of organ injury. Metabolomics along with genomics and proteomics technologies have the capability of providing translational diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers specific for early stages of liver and kidney injury. Metabolomics has several advantages over the other omics platforms such as ease of sample preparation, data acquisition and use of biofluids collected through minimally invasive procedures in preclinical and clinical studies. The metabolomics platform is reviewed with particular emphasis on applications involving drug-induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Analytical platforms for metabolomics, chemometrics for mining metabolomics data and the applications of the metabolomics technologies are covered in detail with emphasis on recent work in the field.

  11. Moringa oleifera-based diet protects against nickel-induced hepatotoxicity in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen Adeyemi, Oluyomi; Sokolayemji Aroge, Cincin; Adewumi Akanji, Musbau

    2017-01-01

    Multiple health-promoting effects have been attributed to the consumption of Moringa oleifera leaves, as part of diet without adequate scientific credence. This study evaluated the effect of M. oleifera-based diets on nickel (Ni) - induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Male rats assigned into six groups were given oral administration of 20 mg/kg body weight nickel sulfate in normal saline and either fed normal diet orM. oleifera-based diets for 21 days. All animals were sacrificed under anesthesia 24 hours after the last treatment. Ni exposure elevated the rat plasma activities of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase significantly. Ni exposure also raised the levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol while depleting the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. Further, Ni exposure raised rat plasma malondialdehyde but depleted reduced glutathione concentrations. The histopathological presentations revealed inflammation and cellular degeneration caused by Ni exposure. We show evidence thatM. oleifera-based diets protected against Ni-induced hepatotoxicity by improving the rat liver function indices, lipid profile as well as restoring cellular architecture and integrity. Study lends credence to the health-promoting value ofM. oleifera as well as underscores its potential to attenuate hepatic injury. PMID:28808207

  12. Leflunomide for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice: Incidence and severity of hepatotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Roon, Eric N.; Jansen, Tim L.Th.A.; Houtman, Nella M.; Spoelstra, Piet; Brouwers, Jacobus R.B.J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Leflunomide is a novel disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD). Because of reports on possible hepatotoxicity and adaptations in the recommendations for monitoring liver function during leflunomide treatment, we conducted a study to evaluate the incidence and severity of

  13. Survival, recovery and microcystin release of Microcystis aeruginosa in cold or dark condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Gan, Nanqin; Liu, Jin; Zheng, Lingling; Li, Lin; Song, Lirong

    2017-03-01

    Microcystis often dominates phytoplankton in eutrophic lakes and must survive a long period of cold or dark conditions. However, the survival strategies of Microcystis to withstand cold or dark stress are less well known. In this study, we conducted experiments on the responses of two toxic Microcystis aeruginosa strains (FACHB-905 and FACHB-915) and their microcystin release in conditions of low temperature (15°C or 4°C, with illumination) or darkness, and subsequent recovery in standard conditions (25°C with illumination). On exposure to 15°C, a small decrease in cell viability was observed, but the cell number increased gradually, suggesting that M. aeruginosa FACHB-905 and FACHB-915 cells seem in general tolerant in 15°C. Interestingly, our results show that a higher carotenoid content and microcystin release potentially enhance the fitness of surviving cells at 15°C. M. aeruginosa cells exposed to lower temperature light stress (4°C) did not completely lose viability and retained the ability to reinitiate growth. In darkness, the maximum quantum yield ( F v/ F m) and the maximum electron transport rate (ETRmax) values and cell viability of M. aeruginosa cells gradually decreased with time. During the recovery period, the photosynthetic efficiency of M. aeruginosa reverted to the normal level. Additionally, M. aeruginosa FACHB-905 and FACHB-915 exposed to low temperature had increased caspase-3-like activity and DNA fragmentation, which suggests the occurrence of a type of cell death in M. aeruginosa cells under cold stress similar to programmed cell death. Overall, our findings could confer certain advantages on the Microcystis for surviving cold or dark conditions encountered in the annual cycle, and help explain its repeated occurrence in water blooms in large and shallow lakes.

  14. METHOD 544. DETERMINATION OF MICROCYSTINS AND NODULARIN IN DRINKING WATER BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY (LC/MS/MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Method 544 is an accurate and precise analytical method to determine six microcystins (including MC-LR) and nodularin in drinking water using solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC/MS/MS). The advantage of this SPE-LC/MS/MS is its sensi...

  15. Risk assessment of hepatotoxicity among tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS-coinfected patients under tuberculosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngouleun, Williams; Biapa Nya, Prosper Cabral; Pieme, Anatole Constant; Telefo, Phelix Bruno

    2016-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a worldwide public health problem. It is a contagious and grave disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Current drugs such as isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and rifampicin used for the treatment of tuberculosis are potentially hepatotoxic and can lead to drug hepatitis. In order to improve the follow-up of TB patients in Cameroon, we carried out a study which aimed to evaluate the hepatotoxicity risk factors associated with anti-TB drugs. The studies were performed on 75 participants who had visited the Loum District Hospital located in the littoral region of Cameroon for their routine consultation. Participants have been selected based on pre-established criteria of inclusion and exclusion. Prior to the informed consent signature, patients were given compelling information about the objective and the result output of the study. They were questioned about antioxidant food and alcohol consumption as well as some clinical signs of hepatotoxicity such as fever, nausea, vomiting, and tiredness. The collected blood was tested for the determination of biochemical markers (transaminases and C-reactive protein) using standard spectrophotometric methods. Biochemical analysis of samples showed a significant increase (pfactors, antioxidant food consumption significantly reduced the liver injury patient percentage for the above parameters, whereas an opposite situation was observed with alcohol consumption between TB-coinfection and TB patients. Regarding the C-reactive protein results, the percentage of positive tests was very high among coinfected patients (40%) compared with the control (15%). The interactions between parameters related to alcohol consumption and intake of antioxidant foods showed a slight decrease in activity compared with interactions without food. The results showed that human immunodeficiency virus status and alcohol consumption constitutes aggravating factors for the occurrence of hepatic toxicity. In addition, the consumption of

  16. Serum phosphate is an early predictor of outcome in severe acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars E; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Hypophosphatemia is frequently observed in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and may be involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic failure. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of serial measurements of serum phosphate in patients with severe acetaminophen poisoning. Prospect......Hypophosphatemia is frequently observed in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and may be involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic failure. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of serial measurements of serum phosphate in patients with severe acetaminophen poisoning...... Hospital (KCH) criteria. Phosphate concentrations were significantly higher in nonsurvivors than in survivors at 48 to 72 hours after overdose (mean 2.65 +/- 1.18 mmol/L vs. 0.68 +/- 0.22 mmol/L, P L vs. 0.59 +/- 0.23 mmol/L, P ...). A threshold phosphate concentration of 1.2 mmol/L at 48 to 96 hours after overdose had sensitivity 89%, specificity 100%, accuracy 98%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 98%. The phosphate criteria had higher sensitivity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values than...

  17. Protective Effects of Essential Oils as Natural Antioxidants against Hepatotoxicity Induced by Cyclophosphamide in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheweita, Salah A; El-Hosseiny, Lobna S; Nashashibi, Munther A

    2016-01-01

    Clinical application of cyclophosphamide (CP) as an anticancer drug is often limited due to its toxicity. CP is metabolized mainly in the liver by cytochrome P450 system into acrolein which is the proximate toxic metabolite. Many different natural antioxidants were found to alleviate the toxic effects of various toxic agents via different mechanisms. Therefore, the present study aimed at investigating the role of essential oils extracted from fennel, cumin and clove as natural antioxidants in the alleviation of hepatotoxicity induced by CP through assessment of hepatotoxicity biomarkers (AST, ALT, ALP), histopathology of liver tissues as well as other biochemical parameters involved in the metabolism of CP. The data of the present study showed that treatment of male mice with cyclophosphamide (2.5 mg/Kg BW) as repeated dose for 28 consecutive days was found to induce hepatotoxicity through the elevation in the activities of AST, ALT, and ALP. Combined administration of any of these oils with CP to mice partially normalized the altered hepatic biochemical markers caused by CP, whereas administration of fennel, clove or cumin essential oils alone couldn't change liver function indices. Moreover, CP caused histological changes in livers of mice including swelling and dilation in sinusoidal space, inflammation in portal tract and hepatocytes, as well as, hyperplasia in Kuppfer cells. However, co-administration of any of the essential oils with CP alleviated to some extent the changes caused by CP but not as the normal liver. CP was also found to induce free radical levels (measured as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) and inhibited the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and catalase as well as activities and protein expressions of both glutathione S-transferase (GSTπ) and glutathione peroxidase. Essential oils restored changes in activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, GR, GST, and GPx) caused by CP to their normal levels compared

  18. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) for multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS): Results from a randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauge, Christian Riise; Rasmussen, Alice; Piet, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    the effects of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) for individuals with MCS. Methods The intention-to-treat sample (ITT) included 69 individuals who had been randomized to either MBCT or treatment as usual (TAU). The primary outcome measure was the Quick Environmental Exposure and Sensitivity Inventory...

  19. Fructose diet alleviates acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sungjoon; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Chlipala, George; Green, Stefan; Lee, Hyunwoo; Chang, Eugene B; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used analgesic and antipyretic that can cause hepatotoxicity due to production of toxic metabolites via cytochrome P450 (Cyp) 1a2 and Cyp2e1. Previous studies have shown conflicting effects of fructose (the major component in Western diet) on the susceptibility to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. To evaluate the role of fructose-supplemented diet in modulating the extent of APAP-induced liver injury, male C57BL/6J mice were given 30% (w/v) fructose in water (or regular water) for 8 weeks, followed by oral administration of APAP. APAP-induced liver injury (determined by serum levels of liver enzymes) was decreased by two-fold in mice pretreated with fructose. Fructose-treated mice exhibited (~1.5 fold) higher basal glutathione levels and (~2 fold) lower basal (mRNA and activity) levels of Cyp1a2 and Cyp2e1, suggesting decreased bioactivation of APAP and increased detoxification of toxic metabolite in fructose-fed mice. Hepatic mRNA expression of heat shock protein 70 was also found increased in fructose-fed mice. Analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons from the cecal samples of vehicle groups showed that the fructose diet altered gut bacterial community, leading to increased α-diversity. The abundance of several bacterial taxa including the genus Anaerostipes was found to be significantly correlated with the levels of hepatic Cyp2e1, Cyp1a2 mRNA, and glutathione. Together, these results suggest that the fructose-supplemented diet decreases APAP-induced liver injury in mice, in part by reducing metabolic activation of APAP and inducing detoxification of toxic metabolites, potentially through altered composition of gut microbiota.

  20. The current state of serum biomarkers of hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Josef; Ratner, Marcia; Shaw, Martin; Bailey, Wendy; Schomaker, Shelli

    2008-03-20

    The level of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity reflects damage to hepatocytes and is considered to be a highly sensitive and fairly specific preclinical and clinical biomarker of hepatotoxicity. However, an increase in serum ALT activity level has also been associated with other organ toxicities, thus, indicating that the enzyme has specificity beyond liver in the absence of correlative histomorphologic alteration in liver. Thus, unidentified non-hepatic sources of serum ALT activity may inadvertently influence the decision of whether to continue development of a novel pharmaceutical compound. To assess the risk of false positives due to extraneous sources of serum ALT activity, additional biomarkers are sought with improved specificity for liver function compared to serum ALT activity alone. Current published biomarker candidates are reviewed herein and compared with ALT performance in preclinical and on occasion, clinical studies. An examination of the current state of hepatotoxic biomarkers indicates that serum F protein, arginase I, and glutathione-S-transferase alpha (GSTalpha) levels, all measured by ELISA, may show utility, however, antibody availability and high cost per run may present limitations to widespread applicability in preclinical safety studies. In contrast, the enzymatic markers sorbitol dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, paraxonase, malate dehydrogenase, and purine nucleoside phosphorylase are all readily measured by photometric methods and use reagents that work across preclinical species and humans and are commercially available. The published literature suggests that these markers, once examined collectively in a large qualification study, could provide additional information relative to serum ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) values. Since these biomarkers are found in the serum/plasma of treated humans and rats, they have potential to be utilized as bridging markers to monitor acute drug-induced liver injury in

  1. The current state of serum biomarkers of hepatotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozer, Josef; Ratner, Marcia; Shaw, Martin; Bailey, Wendy; Schomaker, Shelli

    2008-01-01

    The level of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity reflects damage to hepatocytes and is considered to be a highly sensitive and fairly specific preclinical and clinical biomarker of hepatotoxicity. However, an increase in serum ALT activity level has also been associated with other organ toxicities, thus, indicating that the enzyme has specificity beyond liver in the absence of correlative histomorphologic alteration in liver. Thus, unidentified non-hepatic sources of serum ALT activity may inadvertently influence the decision of whether to continue development of a novel pharmaceutical compound. To assess the risk of false positives due to extraneous sources of serum ALT activity, additional biomarkers are sought with improved specificity for liver function compared to serum ALT activity alone. Current published biomarker candidates are reviewed herein and compared with ALT performance in preclinical and on occasion, clinical studies. An examination of the current state of hepatotoxic biomarkers indicates that serum F protein, arginase I, and glutathione-S-transferase alpha (GSTα) levels, all measured by ELISA, may show utility, however, antibody availability and high cost per run may present limitations to widespread applicability in preclinical safety studies. In contrast, the enzymatic markers sorbitol dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, paraxonase, malate dehydrogenase, and purine nucleoside phosphorylase are all readily measured by photometric methods and use reagents that work across preclinical species and humans and are commercially available. The published literature suggests that these markers, once examined collectively in a large qualification study, could provide additional information relative to serum ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) values. Since these biomarkers are found in the serum/plasma of treated humans and rats, they have potential to be utilized as bridging markers to monitor acute drug-induced liver injury in early

  2. Fructose diet alleviates acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungjoon Cho

    Full Text Available Acetaminophen (APAP is a commonly used analgesic and antipyretic that can cause hepatotoxicity due to production of toxic metabolites via cytochrome P450 (Cyp 1a2 and Cyp2e1. Previous studies have shown conflicting effects of fructose (the major component in Western diet on the susceptibility to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. To evaluate the role of fructose-supplemented diet in modulating the extent of APAP-induced liver injury, male C57BL/6J mice were given 30% (w/v fructose in water (or regular water for 8 weeks, followed by oral administration of APAP. APAP-induced liver injury (determined by serum levels of liver enzymes was decreased by two-fold in mice pretreated with fructose. Fructose-treated mice exhibited (~1.5 fold higher basal glutathione levels and (~2 fold lower basal (mRNA and activity levels of Cyp1a2 and Cyp2e1, suggesting decreased bioactivation of APAP and increased detoxification of toxic metabolite in fructose-fed mice. Hepatic mRNA expression of heat shock protein 70 was also found increased in fructose-fed mice. Analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons from the cecal samples of vehicle groups showed that the fructose diet altered gut bacterial community, leading to increased α-diversity. The abundance of several bacterial taxa including the genus Anaerostipes was found to be significantly correlated with the levels of hepatic Cyp2e1, Cyp1a2 mRNA, and glutathione. Together, these results suggest that the fructose-supplemented diet decreases APAP-induced liver injury in mice, in part by reducing metabolic activation of APAP and inducing detoxification of toxic metabolites, potentially through altered composition of gut microbiota.

  3. Removal of cyanobacterial toxins by sediment passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruetzmacher, G.; Boettcher, G.; Chorus, I.; Bartel, H.

    2003-04-01

    Cyanbacterial toxins ("Cyanotoxins") comprise a wide range of toxic substances produced by cyanobacteria ("blue-green algae"). Cyanobacteria occur in surface water word wide and can be found in high concentrations during so-called algal blooms when conditions are favourable (e.g. high nutrient levels, high temperatures). Some cyanobacteria produce hepato- or neurotoxins, of which the hepatotoxic microcystins are the most common in Germany. The WHO guideline value for drinking water was set at 1 μg/L. However, maximum concentrations in surface water can reach 25 mg/L, so that a secure method for toxin elimination has to be found when this water is used as source water for drinking water production. In order to assess if cyanotoxins can be removed by sediment passage the German Federal Environmental Agency (UBA) conducted laboratory- and field scale experiments as well as observations on bank filtration field sites. Laboratory experiments (batch- and column experiments for adsorption and degradation parameters) were conducted in order to vary a multitude of experimental conditions. These experiments were followed by field scale experiments on the UBA's experimental field in Berlin. This plant offers the unique possibility to conduct experiments on the behaviour of various agents - such as harmful substances - during infiltration and bank filtration under well-defined conditions on a field scale, and without releasing these substances to the environment. Finally the development of microcystin concentrations was observed between infiltrating surface water and a drinking water well along a transsecte of observation wells. The results obtained show that infiltration and bank filtration normally seem to be secure treatment methods for source water contaminated by microcystins. However, elimination was shown to be difficult under the following circumstances: - dying cyanobacterial population due to insufficient light and / or nutrients, low temperatures or application of

  4. Hepatoprotective effect of leaves of aqueous ethanol extract of Cestrum nocturnum against paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Imran Qadir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The hepatoprotective activities of Cestrum nocturnum (Queen of Night was evaluated against the paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity in the mice. Aqueous ethanol (30:70 extract of plant was obtained by maceration. Results showed that aqueous ethanol extract of C. nocturnum (250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg produced significant (p<0.05 hepatoprotective activities against paracetamol induced liver injury in Swiss albino mice. Histopathalogical studied of liver further supported the hepatoprotective effects of C. notrunum. Phyto-chemical screening showed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, terpenes, phenolic compounds, carbohydrates and volatile oils. Most of the flavonoids have hepatoprotective activity. Therefore, the hepatoprotective activity of C. nocturnum may be due to the presence of flavonoids and phenolic components. It was concluded from the present study that aqueous ethanol extract of leaves of C. nocturnum has hepatoprotective activity against the paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity in albino mice.

  5. Oral Delivery of Curcumin Polymeric Nanoparticles Ameliorates CCl4-Induced Subacute Hepatotoxicity in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Marslin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin is the major bioactive compound of Curcuma longa, an important medicinal plant used in traditional herbal formulations since ancient times. In the present study, we report that curcumin nanoparticles (ηCur protects Wistar rats against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced subacute hepatotoxicity. Nanoparticles of sizes less than 220 nm with spherical shape were prepared using PLGA and PVA respectively as polymer and stabilizer. Test animals were injected via intraperitoneal route with 1 mL/kg CCl4 (8% in olive oil twice a week over a period of 8 weeks to induce hepatotoxicity. On the days following the CCl4 injection, test animals were orally administered with either curcumin or its equivalent dose of ηCur. Behavioural observation, biochemical analysis of serum and histopathological examination of liver of the experimental animals indicated that ηCur offer significantly higher hepatoprotection compared to curcumin.

  6. Predictivity of dog co-culture model, primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells for the detection of hepatotoxic drugs in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atienzar, Franck A.; Novik, Eric I.; Gerets, Helga H.; Parekh, Amit; Delatour, Claude; Cardenas, Alvaro; MacDonald, James; Yarmush, Martin L.; Dhalluin, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Drug Induced Liver Injury (DILI) is a major cause of attrition during early and late stage drug development. Consequently, there is a need to develop better in vitro primary hepatocyte models from different species for predicting hepatotoxicity in both animals and humans early in drug development. Dog is often chosen as the non-rodent species for toxicology studies. Unfortunately, dog in vitro models allowing long term cultures are not available. The objective of the present manuscript is to describe the development of a co-culture dog model for predicting hepatotoxic drugs in humans and to compare the predictivity of the canine model along with primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. After rigorous optimization, the dog co-culture model displayed metabolic capacities that were maintained up to 2 weeks which indicates that such model could be also used for long term metabolism studies. Most of the human hepatotoxic drugs were detected with a sensitivity of approximately 80% (n = 40) for the three cellular models. Nevertheless, the specificity was low approximately 40% for the HepG2 cells and hepatocytes compared to 72.7% for the canine model (n = 11). Furthermore, the dog co-culture model showed a higher superiority for the classification of 5 pairs of close structural analogs with different DILI concerns in comparison to both human cellular models. Finally, the reproducibility of the canine system was also satisfactory with a coefficient of correlation of 75.2% (n = 14). Overall, the present manuscript indicates that the dog co-culture model may represent a relevant tool to perform chronic hepatotoxicity and metabolism studies. - Highlights: • Importance of species differences in drug development. • Relevance of dog co-culture model for metabolism and toxicology studies. • Hepatotoxicity: higher predictivity of dog co-culture vs HepG2 and human hepatocytes

  7. Predictivity of dog co-culture model, primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells for the detection of hepatotoxic drugs in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atienzar, Franck A., E-mail: franck.atienzar@ucb.com [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium); Novik, Eric I. [H mu rel Corporation, 675 U.S. Highway 1, North Brunswick, NJ 08902 (United States); Gerets, Helga H. [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium); Parekh, Amit [H mu rel Corporation, 675 U.S. Highway 1, North Brunswick, NJ 08902 (United States); Delatour, Claude; Cardenas, Alvaro [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium); MacDonald, James [Chrysalis Pharma Consulting, LLC, 385 Route 24, Suite 1G, Chester, NJ 07930 (United States); Yarmush, Martin L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Dhalluin, Stéphane [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium)

    2014-02-15

    Drug Induced Liver Injury (DILI) is a major cause of attrition during early and late stage drug development. Consequently, there is a need to develop better in vitro primary hepatocyte models from different species for predicting hepatotoxicity in both animals and humans early in drug development. Dog is often chosen as the non-rodent species for toxicology studies. Unfortunately, dog in vitro models allowing long term cultures are not available. The objective of the present manuscript is to describe the development of a co-culture dog model for predicting hepatotoxic drugs in humans and to compare the predictivity of the canine model along with primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. After rigorous optimization, the dog co-culture model displayed metabolic capacities that were maintained up to 2 weeks which indicates that such model could be also used for long term metabolism studies. Most of the human hepatotoxic drugs were detected with a sensitivity of approximately 80% (n = 40) for the three cellular models. Nevertheless, the specificity was low approximately 40% for the HepG2 cells and hepatocytes compared to 72.7% for the canine model (n = 11). Furthermore, the dog co-culture model showed a higher superiority for the classification of 5 pairs of close structural analogs with different DILI concerns in comparison to both human cellular models. Finally, the reproducibility of the canine system was also satisfactory with a coefficient of correlation of 75.2% (n = 14). Overall, the present manuscript indicates that the dog co-culture model may represent a relevant tool to perform chronic hepatotoxicity and metabolism studies. - Highlights: • Importance of species differences in drug development. • Relevance of dog co-culture model for metabolism and toxicology studies. • Hepatotoxicity: higher predictivity of dog co-culture vs HepG2 and human hepatocytes.

  8. Food Color Induced Hepatotoxicity in Swiss Albino Rats, Rattus norvegicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Beenam; Sharma, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Certain dietary constituents can induce toxicity and play a critical role in the development of several hepatic disorders. Tartrazine, metanil yellow and sunset yellow are widely used azo dyes in food products, so the present study is aimed to investigate the food color induced hepatotoxicity in Swiss albino rats. Materials and Methods: Swiss albino rats were divided into four groups, each group having six animals. Group I served as control, Group II, Group III and Group IV were administered with 25, 50 and 75 mg/kg body weight blend of sunset yellow, metanil yellow and tartrazine for 30 days. Hepatotoxicity in rats treated with a blend of these food colors was studied by assessing parameters such as serum total protein, serum albumin, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as well as hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA). The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) were assessed. Results: Significantly increased concentrations of serum total protein, serum albumin, serum ALP and hepatic MDA and significantly lowered levels of SOD, reduced GSH and CAT in the liver tissue of treated animals were observed when compared with control animals. The alteration in the liver includes necrosis of hepatocytes, infiltration and vacuolation. Conclusion: The result indicates that consumption of food color in diet induces liver tissue damage. The used doses of food color were mostly attributable to hepatocellular damage and drastic alteration in antioxidant defense system. PMID:26862277

  9. High Dose Atorvastatin Associated with Increased Risk of Significant Hepatotoxicity in Comparison to Simvastatin in UK GPRD Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan T Clarke

    Full Text Available Occasional risk of serious liver dysfunction and autoimmune hepatitis during atorvastatin therapy has been reported. We compared the risk of hepatotoxicity in atorvastatin relative to simvastatin treatment.The UK GPRD identified patients with a first prescription for simvastatin [164,407] or atorvastatin [76,411] between 1997 and 2006, but with no prior record of liver disease, alcohol-related diagnosis, or liver dysfunction. Incident liver dysfunction in the following six months was identified by biochemical value and compared between statin groups by Cox regression model adjusting for age, sex, year treatment started, dose, alcohol consumption, smoking, body mass index and comorbid conditions.Moderate to severe hepatotoxicity [bilirubin >60μmol/L, AST or ALT >200U/L or alkaline phosphatase >1200U/L] developed in 71 patients on atorvastatin versus 101 on simvastatin. Adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] for all atorvastatin relative to simvastatin was 1.9 [95% confidence interval 1.4-2.6]. High dose was classified as 40-80mg daily and low dose 10-20mg daily. Hepatotoxicity occurred in 0.44% of 4075 patients on high dose atorvastatin [HDA], 0.07% of 72,336 on low dose atorvastatin [LDA], 0.09% of 44,675 on high dose simvastatin [HDS] and 0.05% of 119,732 on low dose simvastatin [LDS]. AHRs compared to LDS were 7.3 [4.2-12.7] for HDA, 1.4 [0.9-2.0] for LDA and 1.5 [1.0-2.2] for HDS.The risk of hepatotoxicity was increased in the first six months of atorvastatin compared to simvastatin treatment, with the greatest difference between high dose atorvastatin and low dose simvastatin. The numbers of events in the analyses were small.

  10. High Dose Atorvastatin Associated with Increased Risk of Significant Hepatotoxicity in Comparison to Simvastatin in UK GPRD Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Alan T.; Johnson, Paul C. D.; Hall, Gillian C.; Ford, Ian; Mills, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Occasional risk of serious liver dysfunction and autoimmune hepatitis during atorvastatin therapy has been reported. We compared the risk of hepatotoxicity in atorvastatin relative to simvastatin treatment. Methods The UK GPRD identified patients with a first prescription for simvastatin [164,407] or atorvastatin [76,411] between 1997 and 2006, but with no prior record of liver disease, alcohol-related diagnosis, or liver dysfunction. Incident liver dysfunction in the following six months was identified by biochemical value and compared between statin groups by Cox regression model adjusting for age, sex, year treatment started, dose, alcohol consumption, smoking, body mass index and comorbid conditions. Results Moderate to severe hepatotoxicity [bilirubin >60μmol/L, AST or ALT >200U/L or alkaline phosphatase >1200U/L] developed in 71 patients on atorvastatin versus 101 on simvastatin. Adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] for all atorvastatin relative to simvastatin was 1.9 [95% confidence interval 1.4–2.6]. High dose was classified as 40–80mg daily and low dose 10–20mg daily. Hepatotoxicity occurred in 0.44% of 4075 patients on high dose atorvastatin [HDA], 0.07% of 72,336 on low dose atorvastatin [LDA], 0.09% of 44,675 on high dose simvastatin [HDS] and 0.05% of 119,732 on low dose simvastatin [LDS]. AHRs compared to LDS were 7.3 [4.2–12.7] for HDA, 1.4 [0.9–2.0] for LDA and 1.5 [1.0–2.2] for HDS. Conclusions The risk of hepatotoxicity was increased in the first six months of atorvastatin compared to simvastatin treatment, with the greatest difference between high dose atorvastatin and low dose simvastatin. The numbers of events in the analyses were small. PMID:26983033

  11. Effects of N-acetyl cysteine on oxidative stress and TNF-α gene expression in diclofenac-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Ali; Heidarian, Esfandiar; Nikoukar, Morteza

    2017-10-01

    The consumption of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, such as diclofenac, can lead to hepatotoxicity. In the present study, protective effect of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) on diclofenac-induced hepatotoxicity was investigated. Thirty-two male rats were divided into four groups. Group 1 (control group) was treated with normal saline (1 ml/kg, i.p.) for 4 d. Group 2 (test without treatment) received diclofenac only (50 mg/kg, i.p.) for 4 d. Groups 3 and 4 received diclofenac (50 mg/kg, i.p.) plus NAC (150 mg/kg, p.o) and silymarin (100 mg/kg, p.o) for 4 d, respectively. At the end of experiment, serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lipid profile, uric acid, protein carbonyl content, MDA, liver TNF-α, ferric-reducing antioxidant power, liver catalase, superoxide dismutase, vitamin C, and histopathological examination were done. In group 2, diclofenac caused a significant increase (p diclofenac-induced hepatotoxicity in rats due to not only reduces liver inflammatory cells, TNF-α, serum MDA, and PC but also through increases liver vitamin C, catalase, and superoxide dismutase activities.

  12. Integrative cross-omics analysis in primary mouse hepatocytes unravels mechanisms of cyclosporin A-induced hepatotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, W.F.P.M.; Summeren, van A.; Lommen, A.; Coonen, M.L.J.; Brauers, K.; Herwijnen, van M.; Wodzig, W.K.W.H.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is responsible for drug metabolism and drug-induced hepatotoxicity is the most frequent reason for drug withdrawal, indicating that better pre-clinical toxicity tests are needed. In order to bypass animal models for toxicity screening, we exposed primary mouse hepatocytes for exploring the

  13. Fumonisin B1 hepatotoxicity in mice is attenuated by depletion of Kupffer cells by gadolinium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Quanren; Kim, Jiyoung; Sharma, Raghubir P.

    2005-01-01

    Fumonisin B 1 (FB 1 ) is a toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxin produced by Fusarium verticillioides found on corn worldwide. The biological effects of FB 1 are attributed to sphingolipid metabolism disruption as a result of ceramide synthase inhibition. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) is an important modulator of FB 1 hepatotoxicity. Kupffer cells are major source of cytokine production in liver. In the present study we investigated the effects of Kupffer cell depletion by gadolinium on FB 1 hepatotoxicity in female BALB/c mice. Mice were given saline or 50 mg/kg of gadolinium chloride once via the tail vein; 16 h later they were treated with subcutaneous injections of vehicle or 2.25 mg/kg/day FB 1 in saline for three successive days. Gadolinium significantly attenuated FB 1 -induced increases in the activities of circulating alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and reduced the FB 1 -induced hepatocyte apoptosis and free sphinganine accumulation in liver. Both gadolinium and FB 1 treatments individually increased the expression of selected cell signal factors; e.g., TNFα, TNF receptor 1, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, lymphotoxin β, interferon γ, and transforming growth factor β1; gadolinium chloride did not alter FB 1 -induced expression of the above genes. Results indicated that Kupffer cells play a role in FB 1 hepatotoxicity. Decreased FB 1 -induced sphinganine accumulation and increased protective TNFα signaling by gadolinium chloride may in part account for its ameliorating effect on FB 1 liver damage

  14. Potential Role of Activated Nonparenchymal Cells in Acetaminophen-Induced Potentiation of Hepatotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-14

    ALT is either being degraded or the activity is inhibited by something in the 133 media. AST activity in cocultures of NPCs and hepatocytes was... Paracetamol Hepatotoxicity: IN VITRO Studies in Isolated Mouse Hepatocytes. Toxicology Letters. 2229: 37-48. Casini, A. M., P. A. Ferrali and M...Acute Liver Necrosis Following Overdose of Paracetamol . British Medical Journal. 2: 497-499. Decker, T., M. L. Lohmann-Matthes, U. Karck, T. Peters

  15. The hepatotoxic potential of a Prudhoe Bay crude oil: effect on mouse liver weight and composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.; Irfan, M.; Rahimtula, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    The hepatotoxic properties of a Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil (PBCO) were evaluated in mice. Administration of PBCO (5.0 m1/kg body wt, daily for 2 days) to mice resulted in an increase in (i) liver wet and dry weight, (ii) hepatic total proteins RNA, glycogen and lotal lipids, and (iii) individual lipids such as cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids. Hepatic protein biosynthesis, determined in vivo by administration of L-[ 14 C] Leucine was increased in PBCO exposed in mice. The rate of 3 H incorporation from 3 H 2 O was significantly enhanced in liver fatty acids, cholesterol, triglycerides and thus ultimately in total lipids. Also, an increase in 3 H incorporation was noticed in hepatic glycogen after PBCO administration. The results suggest that PBCO may induce hepatotoxicity by altering the intermediary metabolism of biochemical constituents. (author) 39 refs

  16. Accumulation and detoxication responses of the gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis to single and combined exposures to natural (cyanobacteria) and anthropogenic (the herbicide RoundUp(®) Flash) stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Emilie; Desprat, Julia; Holbech, Bente Frost; Gérard, Claudia; Bormans, Myriam; Lawton, Linda A; Edwards, Christine; Wiegand, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Freshwater gastropods are increasingly exposed to multiple stressors in the field such as the herbicide glyphosate in Roundup formulations and cyanobacterial blooms either producing or not producing microcystins (MCs), potentially leading to interacting effects. Here, the responses of Lymnaea stagnalis to a 21-day exposure to non-MC or MC-producing (33μgL(-1)) Planktothrix agardhii alone or in combination with the commercial formulation RoundUp(®) Flash at a concentration of 1μgL(-1) glyphosate, followed by 14days of depuration, were studied via i) accumulation of free and bound MCs in tissues, and ii) activities of anti-oxidant (catalase CAT) and biotransformation (glutathione-S-transferase GST) enzymes. During the intoxication, the cyanobacterial exposure induced an early increase of CAT activity, independently of the MC content, probably related to the production of secondary cyanobacterial metabolites. The GST activity was induced by RoundUp(®) Flash alone or in combination with non MC-producing cyanobacteria, but was inhibited by MC-producing cyanobacteria with or without RoundUp(®) Flash. Moreover, MC accumulation in L. stagnalis was 3.2 times increased when snails were concomitantly exposed to MC-producing cyanobacteria with RoundUp(®), suggesting interacting effects of MCs on biotransformation processes. The potent inhibition of detoxication systems by MCs and RoundUp(®) Flash was reversible during the depuration, during which CAT and GST activities were significantly higher in snails previously exposed to MC-producing cyanobacteria with or without RoundUp(®) Flash than in other conditions, probably related to the oxidative stress caused by accumulated MCs remaining in tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolomics of Hydrazine-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats for Discovering Potential Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuoling An

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic pathway disturbances associated with drug-induced liver injury remain unsatisfactorily characterized. Diagnostic biomarkers for hepatotoxicity have been used to minimize drug-induced liver injury and to increase the clinical safety. A metabolomics strategy using rapid-resolution liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (RRLC-MS/MS analyses and multivariate statistics was implemented to identify potential biomarkers for hydrazine-induced hepatotoxicity. The global serum and urine metabolomics of 30 hydrazine-treated rats at 24 or 48 h postdosing and 24 healthy rats were characterized by a metabolomics approach. Multivariate statistical data analyses and receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were performed to identify the most significantly altered metabolites. The 16 most significant potential biomarkers were identified to be closely related to hydrazine-induced liver injury. The combination of these biomarkers had an area under the curve (AUC > 0.85, with 100% specificity and sensitivity, respectively. This high-quality classification group included amino acids and their derivatives, glutathione metabolites, vitamins, fatty acids, intermediates of pyrimidine metabolism, and lipids. Additionally, metabolomics pathway analyses confirmed that phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan biosynthesis as well as tyrosine metabolism had great interactions with hydrazine-induced liver injury in rats. These discriminating metabolites might be useful in understanding the pathogenesis mechanisms of liver injury and provide good prospects for drug-induced liver injury diagnosis clinically.

  18. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in a murine model of tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (autoprotection)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, Meeghan A.; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Lawton, Michael P.; Manautou, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 h later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 h later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430 2 GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. - Highlights: • Differential expression of genes in mice resistant to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. • Increased gene expression of Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 and Galectin-3. • Decrease in MAT1A expression and compensatory hepatocellular regeneration. • Two distinct gene expression

  19. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in a murine model of tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (autoprotection)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, Meeghan A., E-mail: meeghan.oconnor@boehringer-ingelheim.com [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3092 (United States); Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc., 900 Ridgebury Road, Ridgefield, CT 06877-0368 (United States); Koza-Taylor, Petra, E-mail: petra.h.koza-taylor@pfizer.com [Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Campion, Sarah N., E-mail: sarah.campion@pfizer.com [Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Aleksunes, Lauren M., E-mail: aleksunes@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Rutgers University, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Gu, Xinsheng, E-mail: xinsheng.gu@uconn.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3092 (United States); Enayetallah, Ahmed E., E-mail: ahmed.enayetallah@pfizer.com [Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Lawton, Michael P., E-mail: michael.lawton@pfizer.com [Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Manautou, José E., E-mail: jose.manautou@uconn.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3092 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 h later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 h later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430{sub 2} GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. - Highlights: • Differential expression of genes in mice resistant to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. • Increased gene expression of Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 and Galectin-3. • Decrease in MAT1A expression and compensatory hepatocellular regeneration. • Two distinct gene

  20. Risk assessment of hepatotoxicity among tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS-coinfected patients under tuberculosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Ngouleun

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The results showed that human immunodeficiency virus status and alcohol consumption constitutes aggravating factors for the occurrence of hepatic toxicity. In addition, the consumption of antioxidant foods simultaneously with TB drugs help in reducing the hepatotoxic effects of these drugs.

  1. Hibiscus vitifolius (Linn.) root extracts shows potent protective action against anti-tubercular drug induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Anbu Jeba Sunilson John; Mohan, Syam; Chellappan, Dinesh Kumar; Kalusalingam, Anandarajagopal; Ariamuthu, Saraswathi

    2012-05-07

    The roots of Hibiscus vitifolius Linn. (Malvaceae) is used for the treatment of jaundice in the folklore system of medicine in India. This study is an attempt to evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of the roots of Hibiscus vitifolius against anti-tubercular drug induced hepatotoxicity. Hepatotoxicity was induced in albino rats of either sex by oral administration of a combination of three anti-tubercular drugs. Petroleum ether, chloroform, methanol and aqueous extracts of roots of Hibiscus vitifolius (400mg/kg/day) were evaluated for their possible hepatoprotective potential. All the extracts were found to be safe up to a dose of 2000mg/kg. Among the four extracts studied, oral administration of methanol extract of Hibiscus vitifolius at 400mg/kg showed significant difference in all the parameters when compared to control. There was a significant (PHibiscus vitifolius have potent hepatoprotective activity, thereby justifying its ethnopharmacological claim. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Severe hepatotoxicity following ingestion of Herbalife nutritional supplements contaminated with Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, Felix; Droz, Sara; Patsenker, Eleonora; Bögli-Stuber, Katja; Aebi, Beat; Leib, Stephen L

    2009-01-01

    Nutritional supplements are widely used. Recently, liver injury after consumption of Herbalife preparations was reported but the underlying pathogenesis remained cryptic. Two patients presented with cholestatic hepatitis and pruritus, and cirrhosis, respectively. Viral, alcoholic, metabolic, autoimmune, neoplastic, vascular liver diseases and synthetic drugs as the precipitating causes of liver injury were excluded. However, both patients reported long-term consumption of Herbalife products. All Herbalife products were tested for contamination with drugs, pesticides, heavy metals, and softeners, and examined for microbial contamination according to standard laboratory procedures. Bacteria isolated from the samples were identified as Bacillus subtilis by sequencing the 16S rRNA and gyrB genes. Causality between consumption of Herbalife products and disease according to CIOMS was scored "probable" in both cases. Histology showed cholestatic and lobular/portal hepatitis with cirrhosis in one patient, and biliary fibrosis with ductopenia in the other. No contamination with chemicals or heavy metals was detected, and immunological testing showed no drug hypersensitivity. However, samples of Herbalife products ingested by both patients showed growth of Bacillus subtilis of which culture supernatants showed dose- and time-dependent hepatotoxicity. Two novel incidents of severe hepatic injury following intake of Herbalife products contaminated with Bacillus subtilis emphasize its potential hepatotoxicity.

  3. Lack of Direct Cytotoxicity of Extracellular ATP against Hepatocytes: Role in the Mechanism of Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Yuchao; Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Kos, Milan; McGill, Mitchell R.; Dorko, Kenneth; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is a major cause of acute liver failure in many countries. Mechanistic studies in mice and humans have implicated formation of a reactive metabolite, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidant stress as critical events in the pathophysiology of APAP-induced liver cell

  4. Fast screening and quantitation of microcystins in microalgae dietary supplement products and water by liquid chromatography coupled to time of flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortelli, Didier; Edder, Patrick; Cognard, Emmanuelle; Jan, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, commonly called 'blue-green algae', may accumulate in surface water supplies as 'blooms' and may concentrate on the surface as blue-green 'scums'. Some species of cyanobacteria produce toxins and are of relevance to water supplies and to microalgae dietary supplements. To ensure the safety of drinking water and blue-green algae products, analyses are the only way to determine the presence or absence of toxins. This paper shows the use of ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to orthogonal acceleration time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometry for the detection and quantitation of microcystins. The method presented is very sensitive, simple, fast, robust and did not require fastidious clean-up step. Limits of detection of 0.1 μg L -1 in water and 0.1-0.2 μg g -1 in microalgae samples were achieved. Method performances were satisfactory and appropriate for monitoring of water and dietary supplements. The method was applied in routine to samples taken from Swiss market or buy on internet website. Among 19 samples, six showed the presence of microcystins LR and LA at harmful levels

  5. IDENTIFICATION OF MICROCYSTIN TOXINS FROM A STRAIN OF MICROCYSTIS AERUGINOSA BY LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY INTRODUCTION INTO A HYBRID LINEAR ION TRAP-FOURIER TRANSFORM ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE MASS SPECTROMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cyclic heptapeptide microcystin toxins produced by a strain of Microcystis aeruginosa that has not been investigated previously were separated by liquid chromatography and identified by high-accuracy m/z measurements of their [M + H]+ ions and the fragment i...

  6. Adaptive MCS selection and resource planning for energy-efficient communication in LTE-M based IoT sensing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Nhu-Ngoc; Park, Minho; Kim, Joongheon; Cho, Sungrae

    2017-01-01

    As an important part of IoTization trends, wireless sensing technologies have been involved in many fields of human life. In cellular network evolution, the long term evolution advanced (LTE-A) networks including machine-type communication (MTC) features (named LTE-M) provide a promising infrastructure for a proliferation of Internet of things (IoT) sensing platform. However, LTE-M may not be optimally exploited for directly supporting such low-data-rate devices in terms of energy efficiency since it depends on core technologies of LTE that are originally designed for high-data-rate services. Focusing on this circumstance, we propose a novel adaptive modulation and coding selection (AMCS) algorithm to address the energy consumption problem in the LTE-M based IoT-sensing platform. The proposed algorithm determines the optimal pair of MCS and the number of primary resource blocks (#PRBs), at which the transport block size is sufficient to packetize the sensing data within the minimum transmit power. In addition, a quantity-oriented resource planning (QORP) technique that utilizes these optimal MCS levels as main criteria for spectrum allocation has been proposed for better adapting to the sensing node requirements. The simulation results reveal that the proposed approach significantly reduces the energy consumption of IoT sensing nodes and #PRBs up to 23.09% and 25.98%, respectively.

  7. In Vitro Model for Hepatotoxicity Studies Based on Primary Human Hepatocyte Cultivation in a Perfused 3D Bioreactor System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöspel, Fanny; Jacobs, Frank; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; De Bondt, An; van den Wyngaert, Ilse; Snoeys, Jan; Monshouwer, Mario; Richter, Marco; Strahl, Nadja; Seehofer, Daniel; Zeilinger, Katrin

    2016-04-16

    Accurate prediction of the potential hepatotoxic nature of new pharmaceuticals remains highly challenging. Therefore, novel in vitro models with improved external validity are needed to investigate hepatic metabolism and timely identify any toxicity of drugs in humans. In this study, we examined the effects of diclofenac, as a model substance with a known risk of hepatotoxicity in vivo, in a dynamic multi-compartment bioreactor using primary human liver cells. Biotransformation pathways of the drug and possible effects on metabolic activities, morphology and cell transcriptome were evaluated. Formation rates of diclofenac metabolites were relatively stable over the application period of seven days in bioreactors exposed to 300 µM diclofenac (300 µM bioreactors (300 µM BR)), while in bioreactors exposed to 1000 µM diclofenac (1000 µM BR) metabolite concentrations declined drastically. The biochemical data showed a significant decrease in lactate production and for the higher dose a significant increase in ammonia secretion, indicating a dose-dependent effect of diclofenac application. The microarray analyses performed revealed a stable hepatic phenotype of the cells over time and the observed transcriptional changes were in line with functional readouts of the system. In conclusion, the data highlight the suitability of the bioreactor technology for studying the hepatotoxicity of drugs in vitro.

  8. In Vitro Model for Hepatotoxicity Studies Based on Primary Human Hepatocyte Cultivation in a Perfused 3D Bioreactor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Knöspel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of the potential hepatotoxic nature of new pharmaceuticals remains highly challenging. Therefore, novel in vitro models with improved external validity are needed to investigate hepatic metabolism and timely identify any toxicity of drugs in humans. In this study, we examined the effects of diclofenac, as a model substance with a known risk of hepatotoxicity in vivo, in a dynamic multi-compartment bioreactor using primary human liver cells. Biotransformation pathways of the drug and possible effects on metabolic activities, morphology and cell transcriptome were evaluated. Formation rates of diclofenac metabolites were relatively stable over the application period of seven days in bioreactors exposed to 300 µM diclofenac (300 µM bioreactors (300 µM BR, while in bioreactors exposed to 1000 µM diclofenac (1000 µM BR metabolite concentrations declined drastically. The biochemical data showed a significant decrease in lactate production and for the higher dose a significant increase in ammonia secretion, indicating a dose-dependent effect of diclofenac application. The microarray analyses performed revealed a stable hepatic phenotype of the cells over time and the observed transcriptional changes were in line with functional readouts of the system. In conclusion, the data highlight the suitability of the bioreactor technology for studying the hepatotoxicity of drugs in vitro.

  9. Strain differences of cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar-Imamichi and Fischer 344 rats: involvement of cadmium accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Hideaki; Takamure, Yasutaka; Shimada, Akinori; Yasutake, Akira; Waalkes, Michael P.; Imamura, Yorishige

    2004-01-01

    We previously reported that Wistar-Imamichi (WI) rats have a strong resistance to cadmium (Cd)-induced lethality compared to other strains such as Fischer 344 (Fischer) rats. The present study was designed to establish biochemical and histological differences in Cd toxicity in WI and Fischer rats, and to clarify the mechanistic basis of these strain differences. A single Cd (4.5 mg/kg, s.c.) treatment caused a significant increase in serum alanine aminotransferase activity, indicative of hepatotoxicity, in Fischer rats, but did not in WI rats. This difference in hepatotoxic response to Cd was supported by pathological analysis. After treatment with Cd at doses of 3.0, 3.5 and 4.5 mg/kg, the hepatic and renal accumulation of Cd was significantly lower in the WI rats than in the Fischer rats, indicating a kinetic mechanism for the observed strain differences in Cd toxicity. Thus, the remarkable resistance to Cd-induced hepatotoxicity in WI rats is associated, at least in part, with a lower tissue accumulation of the metal. Hepatic and renal zinc (Zn) contents after administration were similarly lower in WI than in Fischer rats. When Zn was administered in combination with Cd to Fischer rats, it decreased Cd contents in the liver and kidney, and exhibited a significant protective effect against the toxicity of Cd. We propose the possibility that Zn transporter plays an important role in the strain difference of Cd toxicity in WI and Fischer rats

  10. Hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity of gasoline fumes in albino rats

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    Folarin O. Owagboriaye

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Toxic effects of gasoline fumes have been reported, but evidence of its hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity are rare. Therefore, this study assesses hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity of gasoline fumes on forty Albino rats randomly assigned to five experimental treatments (T with eight rats per treatment (T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5. T1(Control was housed in a section of experimental animal house free from gasoline fumes while T2, T3, T4 and T5 were exposed to gasoline fumes in exposure chambers for one, three, five and nine hours daily respectively for twelve weeks. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and histopathological examination of the liver tissues were used as diagnostic markers to assess liver dysfunction. Genotoxicity test was conducted on the lung tissues using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting polymerase chain reaction (RAPD PCR technique. Significant increase (p < 0.05 in the level of ALT, AST and ALP for T2, T3, T4 and T5 compared to T1 were recorded. Photomicrograph examination of the liver sections of T1 showed hepatic tissue with normal liver cell architecture while that of T2, T3, T4 and T5 revealed degenerative changes in the ultrastructural integrity of the hepatic cells. Genotoxicity test revealed DNA bands at a reducing intensity from T1 to T5. Dendrogram showed DNA damage in the lungs of T3, T4 and T5 were closely similar and the genotoxic impact was more in T3. Frequent exposure to gasoline fumes was observed to induce hepatoxicity and genotoxicity, hence impairing the normal liver function and gene structure.

  11. Computed tomography of the brain, hepatotoxic drugs and high alcohol consumption in male alcoholic patients and a random sample from the general male population

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    Muetzell, S. (Univ. Hospital of Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Family Medicine)

    1992-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the brain was performed in a random sample of a total of 195 men and 211 male alcoholic patients admitted for the first time during a period of two years from the same geographically limited area of Greater Stockholm as the sample. Laboratory tests were performed, including liver and pancreatic tests. Toxicological screening was performed and the consumption of hepatotoxic drugs was also investigated. The groups were then subdivided with respect to alcohol consumption and use of hepatotoxic drugs: group IA, men from the random sample with low or moderate alcohol consumption and no use of hepatotoxic drugs; IB, men from the random sample with low or moderate alcohol consumption with use of hepatotoxic drugs; IIA, alcoholic inpatients with use of alcohol and no drugs; and IIB, alcoholic inpatients with use of alcohol and drugs. Group IIB was found to have a higher incidence of cortical and subcortical changes than group IA. Group IB had a higher incidence of subcortical changes than group IA, and they differed only in drug use. Groups IIN and IIA only differed in drug use, and IIB had a higher incidence of brian damage except for anterior horn index and wide cerebellar sulci indicating vermian atrophy. Significantly higher serum levels of bilirubin, GGT, ASAT, ALAT, CK LD, and amylase were found in IIB. The results indicate that drug use influences the incidence of cortical and subcortical aberrations, except anterior horn index. It is concluded that the groups with alcohol abuse who used hepatotoxic drugs showed a picture of cortical changes (wide transport sulci and clear-cut of high-grade cortical changes) and also of subcortical aberrations, expressed as an increased widening on the third ventricle.

  12. Computed tomography of the brain, hepatotoxic drugs and high alcohol consumption in male alcoholic patients and a random sample from the general male population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muetzell, S.

    1992-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the brain was performed in a random sample of a total of 195 men and 211 male alcoholic patients admitted for the first time during a period of two years from the same geographically limited area of Greater Stockholm as the sample. Laboratory tests were performed, including liver and pancreatic tests. Toxicological screening was performed and the consumption of hepatotoxic drugs was also investigated. The groups were then subdivided with respect to alcohol consumption and use of hepatotoxic drugs: group IA, men from the random sample with low or moderate alcohol consumption and no use of hepatotoxic drugs; IB, men from the random sample with low or moderate alcohol consumption with use of hepatotoxic drugs; IIA, alcoholic inpatients with use of alcohol and no drugs; and IIB, alcoholic inpatients with use of alcohol and drugs. Group IIB was found to have a higher incidence of cortical and subcortical changes than group IA. Group IB had a higher incidence of subcortical changes than group IA, and they differed only in drug use. Groups IIN and IIA only differed in drug use, and IIB had a higher incidence of brian damage except for anterior horn index and wide cerebellar sulci indicating vermian atrophy. Significantly higher serum levels of bilirubin, GGT, ASAT, ALAT, CK LD, and amylase were found in IIB. The results indicate that drug use influences the incidence of cortical and subcortical aberrations, except anterior horn index. It is concluded that the groups with alcohol abuse who used hepatotoxic drugs showed a picture of cortical changes (wide transport sulci and clear-cut of high-grade cortical changes) and also of subcortical aberrations, expressed as an increased widening on the third ventricle

  13. Evaluation of Five Treatment Plants for the Removal of Microcystins in Drinking Water

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    Manuel Álvarez Cortiñas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In Galicia there are supplies that collect water from reservoirs showing growth of cyanobacteria that could produce toxins. The drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs of these supplies should provide adequate treatment and be subjected to maintenance. WHO guidelines make recommendations on the most suitable treatments for removing microcystins. The Department of Health developed a protocol of action against these events jointly with water basin authorities. 4 reservoirs and five treatment plants were identified for this study. The treatments of the plants, the maintenance carried out at the DWTPs and the results for sestonic and dissolved toxins analyzed by the Public Health Laboratory of Galicia in the reservoirs near the point of collection, before the treatment plants and after them, during the 2013-2014 biennium were evaluated.

  14. The MCS macroseismic survey of the Emilia 2012 earthquakes

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    Paolo Galli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of the inhabitants of northern Italy were woken up during the night of May 20, 2012, by the Mw 6.1 earthquake [QRCMT 2012] that occurred in the eastern Po Plain. The mainshock was preceded a few hours before by a Mw 4.3 shock, and it was followed by a dozen Ml >4 aftershocks in May and June, amongst which 11 had Ml ≥4.5. On May 29, 2012, a second Mw 6.0 mainshock struck roughly the same area [QRCMT 2012], which resulted in further victims, most of whom were caught under the collapse of industrial warehouses. Such earthquakes are an unexpected event in this region, as testified by the lack of local epicenters in the Italian seismic catalog [Rovida et al. 2011: CPTI11 from now] and by the consequent low level of the local seismic classification (seismic zone 3 [DPC 2012]. Apart from the warehouses and hundreds of old, crumbling farmsteads, severe damage was focused on ancient, tall buildings, such as churches, bell towers, castles, towers and palaces. Residential buildings generally suffered only light and/or moderate effects, apart from some exceptional cases. Using the Mercalli–Cancani–Sieberg (MCS scale [Sieberg 1930], we began a macroseismic survey in the early morning of May 20, 2012, that ultimately included visits to almost 200 localities, 52 of which were carried out before the second mainshock. […

  15. Efficacy of free glutathione and niosomal glutathione in the treatment of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in cats

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    L.A. Denzoin Vulcano

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Acetaminophen (APAP administration results in hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats. The response to three different treatments against APAP poisoning was evaluated. Free glutathione (GSH (200mg/kg, niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg and free amino acids (180 mg/kg of N-acetylcysteine and 280 mg/kg of methionine were administered to cats that were intoxicated with APAP (a single dose of 150 mg/kg, p.o.. Serum concentration of alanine aminotransferase (ALT along with serum, liver and erythrocyte concentration of GSH and methemoglobin percentage were measured before and 4, 24 and 72 hours after APAP administration. Free GSH (200 mg/kg and niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg were effective in reducing hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats intoxicated with a dose of 150 mg/kg APAP. We conclude that both types of treatments can protect the liver and haemoglobin against oxidative stress in APAP intoxicated cats. Furthermore, our results showed that treatment with niosomal GSH represents an effective therapeutic approach for APAP poisoning.

  16. Lupus-prone NZBWF1/J mice, defective in cytokine signaling, are resistant to fumonisin hepatotoxicity despite accumulation of liver sphinganine

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    Sharma, Raghubir P [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7389 (United States); Quanren, He [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7389 (United States); Riley, Ronald T [Toxicology and Mycotoxin Research Unit, USDA-ARS, Athens, GA 30604 (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Fumonisin B{sub 1} (FB{sub 1}) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium verticillioides, commonly present in corn and other cereals. Exposure to FB{sub 1} causes organ-specific diseases in various species, e.g., equine leukoencephalomalacia and porcine pulmonary edema; in mice the response is hepatotoxicity. We earlier reported that ceramide synthase inhibition by FB{sub 1}, the initial biochemical effect of this mycotoxin, results in modulation of cytokine network in response to accumulated free sphingoid bases. In the current study we used NZB/NZW-F1 (NZBW) mice that have modified cytokine expression and develop lupus beginning at 5 months of age. The NZBW and C57BL/6J (CBL) mice (appropriate control) were given five daily subcutaneous injections of either saline or 2.25 mg FB{sub 1}/kg/day and euthanized 24 h after the last treatment. Peripheral leukocyte counts were higher after exposure to FB{sub 1} in CBL but not in NZBW. FB{sub 1} treatment caused increases of plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity in CBL mice indicating hepatotoxicity; no elevation of circulating liver enzymes was recorded in NZBW mice. Hepatotoxic responses were confirmed by microscopic evaluation of apoptotic cells. The FB{sub 1}-induced proliferation of cells observed in CBL strain was abolished in NZBW animals. The sphinganine accumulation in liver after FB{sub 1} was equal in both strains of mice. The NZBW strain lacked the FB{sub 1}-induced increases in the expression of liver tumor necrosis factor {alpha}, interferon {gamma}, receptor interacting protein (RIP), and tumor necrosis factor {alpha}-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), observed in CBL. Results confirmed our hypothesis that initial altered sphingolipid metabolism caused by FB{sub 1} leads to perturbation of liver cytokine network and ultimate cellular injury; the mice deficient in cytokine signaling are refractory to FB{sub 1} hepatotoxicity.

  17. Lupus-prone NZBWF1/J mice, defective in cytokine signaling, are resistant to fumonisin hepatotoxicity despite accumulation of liver sphinganine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Raghubir P.; He Quanren; Riley, Ronald T.

    2005-01-01

    Fumonisin B 1 (FB 1 ) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium verticillioides, commonly present in corn and other cereals. Exposure to FB 1 causes organ-specific diseases in various species, e.g., equine leukoencephalomalacia and porcine pulmonary edema; in mice the response is hepatotoxicity. We earlier reported that ceramide synthase inhibition by FB 1 , the initial biochemical effect of this mycotoxin, results in modulation of cytokine network in response to accumulated free sphingoid bases. In the current study we used NZB/NZW-F1 (NZBW) mice that have modified cytokine expression and develop lupus beginning at 5 months of age. The NZBW and C57BL/6J (CBL) mice (appropriate control) were given five daily subcutaneous injections of either saline or 2.25 mg FB 1 /kg/day and euthanized 24 h after the last treatment. Peripheral leukocyte counts were higher after exposure to FB 1 in CBL but not in NZBW. FB 1 treatment caused increases of plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity in CBL mice indicating hepatotoxicity; no elevation of circulating liver enzymes was recorded in NZBW mice. Hepatotoxic responses were confirmed by microscopic evaluation of apoptotic cells. The FB 1 -induced proliferation of cells observed in CBL strain was abolished in NZBW animals. The sphinganine accumulation in liver after FB 1 was equal in both strains of mice. The NZBW strain lacked the FB 1 -induced increases in the expression of liver tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, receptor interacting protein (RIP), and tumor necrosis factor α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), observed in CBL. Results confirmed our hypothesis that initial altered sphingolipid metabolism caused by FB 1 leads to perturbation of liver cytokine network and ultimate cellular injury; the mice deficient in cytokine signaling are refractory to FB 1 hepatotoxicity

  18. Cyanobacterial occurrence and detection of microcystins and saxitoxins in reservoirs of the Brazilian semi-arid

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    Jessica Roberts Fonseca

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim:The rapid spread of cyanobacteria in water sources and reservoirs has caused serious environmental damage and public health problems, and consists in a problem that challenges the institutions responsible for providing water to the population. In this study, the quantification of microcystin, saxitoxins and cyanobacteria levels was performed over 3 years in the semi-arid reservoirs of Rio Grande do Norte (Brazil. In addition, we analyzed the seasonal distribution of cyanotoxins and the percentage of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins which were above the limit established by Brazilian law.MethodsThe study was conducted between 2009 and 2011 in four dams with six sites: Armando Ribeiro Gonçalves (ARG in Itajá, San Rafael (SR and Jucurutu; Passagem das Traíras (PT; Itans and Gargalheiras (GARG. Cyanobacteria presence were quantified and identified and the presence of microcystins (MCYs and saxitoxins (STXs was investigated by ELISA.ResultsThe densities of cyanobacteria were found to be above the permitted in 76% of cases. The ELISA results showed that of the 128 samples analyzed, 27% were above the maximum allowed by the Brazilian Ministry of Health Order 2914/2011. A seasonal pattern for the presence of MCYs was found (0.00227 to 24.1954 µg.L–1, with the highest values in the rainy season. There was no clear seasonal pattern for STXs (0.003 to 0.766 µg.L–1.ConclusionsThis study showed the importance of establishing a water quality monitoring for human consumption and its potability standards since the concentration of MCYs in some samples was above the maximum limit allowed by Brazilian law, thus posing a risk to public health since the conventional water treatment is not able to eliminate these potent hepatotoxins.

  19. Strategy for Hepatotoxicity Prediction Induced by Drug Reactive Metabolites Using Human Liver Microsome and Online 2D-Nano-LC-MS Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Yue; Wu, Jian-Lin; Yan, Xiaojing; Guo, Ming-Quan; Liu, Ning; Zhou, Hua; Liu, Liang; Li, Na

    2017-12-19

    Hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of drug withdrawal from the market; thus, the assessment of potential drug induced liver injury (DILI) in preclinical trials is necessary. More and more research has shown that the covalent modification of drug reactive metabolites (RMs) for cellular proteins is a possible reason for DILI. Unfortunately, so far no appropriate method can be employed to evaluate this kind of DILI due to the low abundance of RM-protein adducts in complex biological samples. In this study, we proposed a mechanism-based strategy to solve this problem using human liver microsomes (HLMs) and online 2D nano-LC-MS analysis. First, RM modification patterns and potential modified AA residues are determined using HLM and model amino acids (AAs) by UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS. Then, a new online 2D-nano-LC-Q-TOF-MS method is established and applied to separate the digested modified microsomal peptides from high abundance peptides followed by identification of RM-modified proteins using Mascot, in which RM modification patterns on specific AA residues are added. Finally, the functions and relationship with hepatotoxicity of the RM-modified proteins are investigated using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) to predict the possible DILI. Using this strategy, 21 proteins were found to be modified by RMs of toosendanin, a hepatotoxic drug with complex structure, and some of them have been reported to be associated with hepatotoxicity. This strategy emphasizes the identification of drug RM-modified proteins in complex biological samples, and no pretreatment is required for the drugs. Consequently, it may serve as a valuable method to predict potential DILI, especially for complex compounds.

  20. Microscale 3D Liver Bioreactor for In Vitro Hepatotoxicity Testing under Perfusion Conditions

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    Nora Freyer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The accurate prediction of hepatotoxicity demands validated human in vitro models that can close the gap between preclinical animal studies and clinical trials. In this study we investigated the response of primary human liver cells to toxic drug exposure in a perfused microscale 3D liver bioreactor. The cellularized bioreactors were treated with 5, 10, or 30 mM acetaminophen (APAP used as a reference substance. Lactate production significantly decreased upon treatment with 30 mM APAP (p < 0.05 and ammonia release significantly increased in bioreactors treated with 10 or 30 mM APAP (p < 0.0001, indicating APAP-induced dose-dependent toxicity. The release of prostaglandin E2 showed a significant increase at 30 mM APAP (p < 0.05, suggesting an inflammatory reaction towards enhanced cellular stress. The expression of genes involved in drug metabolism, antioxidant reactions, urea synthesis, and apoptosis was differentially influenced by APAP exposure. Histological examinations revealed that primary human liver cells in untreated control bioreactors were reorganized in tissue-like cell aggregates. These aggregates were partly disintegrated upon APAP treatment, lacking expression of hepatocyte-specific proteins and transporters. In conclusion, our results validate the suitability of the microscale 3D liver bioreactor to detect hepatotoxic effects of drugs in vitro under perfusion conditions.

  1. Microscale 3D Liver Bioreactor for In Vitro Hepatotoxicity Testing under Perfusion Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyer, Nora; Greuel, Selina; Knöspel, Fanny; Gerstmann, Florian; Storch, Lisa; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Foster Harris, Jennifer; Iyer, Rashi; Schubert, Frank; Zeilinger, Katrin

    2018-03-15

    The accurate prediction of hepatotoxicity demands validated human in vitro models that can close the gap between preclinical animal studies and clinical trials. In this study we investigated the response of primary human liver cells to toxic drug exposure in a perfused microscale 3D liver bioreactor. The cellularized bioreactors were treated with 5, 10, or 30 mM acetaminophen (APAP) used as a reference substance. Lactate production significantly decreased upon treatment with 30 mM APAP ( p < 0.05) and ammonia release significantly increased in bioreactors treated with 10 or 30 mM APAP ( p < 0.0001), indicating APAP-induced dose-dependent toxicity. The release of prostaglandin E2 showed a significant increase at 30 mM APAP ( p < 0.05), suggesting an inflammatory reaction towards enhanced cellular stress. The expression of genes involved in drug metabolism, antioxidant reactions, urea synthesis, and apoptosis was differentially influenced by APAP exposure. Histological examinations revealed that primary human liver cells in untreated control bioreactors were reorganized in tissue-like cell aggregates. These aggregates were partly disintegrated upon APAP treatment, lacking expression of hepatocyte-specific proteins and transporters. In conclusion, our results validate the suitability of the microscale 3D liver bioreactor to detect hepatotoxic effects of drugs in vitro under perfusion conditions.

  2. Possible hepatotoxic consequence of nevirapine use in juvenile albino rats

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    Elias Adikwu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Context: Nevirapine (NVP is used in human immunodeficiency virus exposed neonates. This could present safety concern due to decreased liver metabolizing enzymes activity and renal clearance in neonates. Aims: To determine the hepatotoxic effect of NVP in juvenile albino rats. Methods: Juvenile albino rats were weighed, divided into groups and treated orally with 4-32 mg/kg/day of NVP for 14 days including a recovery group. The control groups were treated with water (placebo and normal saline (solvent. At the end of NVP treatment, rats were weighed and sacrificed, blood was collected and serum extracted. Serum was analyzed for alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, total bilirubin (TB and conjugated bilirubin (CB. The liver was harvested via dissection, weighed and evaluated for AST, ALT, ALP, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione (GSH, malondialdehyde (MDA levels and histological damage. Results: The body, absolute and relative liver weights of rats in NVP treated groups were not significantly different (p>0.05 when compared to placebo. However, serum levels of AST, ALT, ALP, TB and CB were significantly increased (p<0.05 in a dose-dependent manner in NVP-treated groups. Furthermore, liver levels of ALT, ALP, AST and MDA were significantly increased (p<0.05 while SOD, CAT, and GSH were decreased in a dose dependent manner in NVP-treated groups. NVP-treated rats were characterized by varying degrees of hepatic morphological alterations. However, in the recovery group, the effects of NVP were reversed. Conclusions: This study observed dose-dependent and reversible hepatotoxicity in nevirapine- treated juvenile albino rats.

  3. Precision-cut liver slices as an ex vivo model to study idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity in mouse and human

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadi, Mackenzie; Chen, Yixi; Emmen, Harry; Stitzinger, Miranda; Groothuis, Genoveva

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) related to hepatotoxicity and drug hypersensitivity are responsible for the top two of toxicity-related drug withdrawals and there are no adequate translational strategies to predict safety. Idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs) are ADRs that are rare and

  4. [Individualized clinical treatment from the prospective of hepatotoxicity of non-toxic traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nan; Chen, Juan; Hou, Xue-Feng; Song, Jie; Feng, Liang; Jia, Xiao-Bin

    2017-04-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine has a long history in clinical application, and been proved to be safe and effective. In recent years, the toxicity and side-effects caused by the western medicine have been attracted much attention. As a result, increasing people have shifted their attention to traditional Chinese medicine. Nonetheless, due to the natural origin of traditional Chinese medicine and the lack of basic knowledge about them, many people mistakenly consider the absolute safety of traditional Chinese medicine, except for well-known toxic ones, such as arsenic. However, according to the clinical practices and recent studies, great importance shall be attached to the toxicity of non-toxic traditional Chinese medicine, in particular the hepatotoxicity. Relevant studies indicated that the toxicity of non-toxic traditional Chinese medicine is closely correlated with individual gene polymorphism and constitution. By discussing the causes and mechanisms of the hepatotoxicity induced by non-toxic traditional Chinese medicine in clinical practices, we wrote this article with the aim to provide new ideas for individualized clinical therapy of traditional Chinese medicine and give guidance for rational and safe use of traditional Chinese medicine. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  5. Microcystin production in epiphytic cyanobacteria on submerged macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Zakaria A; Al Shehri, Abdulrahman M

    2010-06-15

    Cyanotoxins have been largely studied in planktonic and benthic cyanobacteria, but microcystin (MCYST) production in epiphytic cyanobacteria has not been reported yet. The present study reports for the first time the MCYST production in epiphytic cyanobacteria on submerged macrophytes. During this study, four common submerged macrophytes in eutrophic pond in Saudi Arabia were surveyed for the presence of toxic epiphytic cyanobacteria. The results showed that chlorophyll-a and total biovolume of epiphytic cyanobacteria differed significantly among submerged plants with highest values obtained in Stratiotes aloides and lowest in Elodea canadensis. Epiphytic materials collected from Ceratophyllum demersum and S. aloides had higher species diversities than materials collected from E. canadensis and Myriophyllum verticillatum. The cyanobacteria, Merismopedia tenuissima and Leptolyngbya boryana were recorded with a high abundance in epiphytic materials collected from all submerged macrohpytes. Based on Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), these two species were found to produce MCYSTs (MCYSTs) with concentrations of 1438 and 630 microg g(-1) dry weight, respectively. HPLC analysis of the methanolic extracts of the two species showed that M. tenuissima extract contained MCYST-RR and -LR/demethyl LR plus 3 minor unidentified MCYSTs, while L. boryana extract contained MCYST-YR, -LR/demethyl LR, and 2 minor unidentified MCYSTs. This study suggests that epiphytic species should be considered during monitoring of toxic cyanobacteria in water sources. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fumonisin B{sub 1} hepatotoxicity in mice is attenuated by depletion of Kupffer cells by gadolinium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Quanren [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7389 (United States); Kim, Jiyoung [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7389 (United States); Sharma, Raghubir P [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7389 (United States)

    2005-02-01

    Fumonisin B{sub 1} (FB{sub 1}) is a toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxin produced by Fusarium verticillioides found on corn worldwide. The biological effects of FB{sub 1} are attributed to sphingolipid metabolism disruption as a result of ceramide synthase inhibition. Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF{alpha}) is an important modulator of FB{sub 1} hepatotoxicity. Kupffer cells are major source of cytokine production in liver. In the present study we investigated the effects of Kupffer cell depletion by gadolinium on FB{sub 1} hepatotoxicity in female BALB/c mice. Mice were given saline or 50 mg/kg of gadolinium chloride once