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Sample records for heparinase-modified tissue factor-activated

  1. Mechanisms of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activation in Cancer Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Makiko; Kataoka, Hiroaki, E-mail: mejina@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Section of Oncopathology and Regenerative Biology, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2014-09-29

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) plays critical roles in cancer progression through its specific receptor, MET. HGF/SF is usually synthesized and secreted as an inactive proform (pro-HGF/SF) by stromal cells, such as fibroblasts. Several serine proteases are reported to convert pro-HGF/SF to mature HGF/SF and among these, HGF activator (HGFA) and matriptase are the most potent activators. Increased activities of both proteases have been observed in various cancers. HGFA is synthesized mainly by the liver and secreted as an inactive pro-form. In cancer tissues, pro-HGFA is likely activated by thrombin and/or human kallikrein 1-related peptidase (KLK)-4 and KLK-5. Matriptase is a type II transmembrane serine protease that is expressed by most epithelial cells and is also synthesized as an inactive zymogen. Matriptase activation is likely to be mediated by autoactivation or by other trypsin-like proteases. Recent studies revealed that matriptase autoactivation is promoted by an acidic environment. Given the mildly acidic extracellular environment of solid tumors, matriptase activation may, thus, be accelerated in the tumor microenvironment. HGFA and matriptase activities are regulated by HGFA inhibitor (HAI)-1 (HAI-1) and/or HAI-2 in the pericellular microenvironment. HAIs may have an important role in cancer cell biology by regulating HGF/SF-activating proteases.

  2. Procoagulant Phospholipids and Tissue Factor Activity in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Intracerebral Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Van Dreden

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain contains large amounts of tissue factor, the major initiator of the coagulation cascade. Neuronal apoptosis after intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH leads to the shedding of procoagulant phospholipids (PPLs. The aim of this study was to investigate the generation of PPL, tissue factor activity (TFa, and D-Dimer (D-Di in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF at the acute phase of ICH in comparison with other brain diseases and to examine the relationship between these factors and the outcome of ICH. CSF was collected from 112 patients within 48 hours of hospital admission. Thirty-one patients with no neurological or biochemical abnormalities were used to establish reference range in the CSF (“controls”. Thirty had suffered an ICH, and 51 other neurological diagnoses [12: ventricular drainage following brain surgery, 13: viral meningitis, 15: bacterial meningitis, and 11 a neurodegenerative disease (NDD]. PPL was measured using a factor Xa-based coagulation assay and TFa by one home test. PPL, D-Di, and TFa were significantly higher (P<0.001 in the CSF of patients with ICH than in controls. TFa levels were significantly (P<0.05 higher in ICH than in patients with meningitides or NDD. Higher levels (P<0.05 of TFa were observed in patients with ICH who died than in survivors. TFa measurement in the CSF of patients with ICH could constitute a new prognostic marker.

  3. Hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cell tissue factor activates the coagulation cascade in endotoxemic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Pawlinski, Rafal; Wang, Jian-Guo; Owens, A. Phillip; Williams, Julie; Antoniak, Silvio; Tencati, Michael; Luther, Thomas; Rowley, Jesse W.; Low, Elizabeth N.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Mackman, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the primary activator of the coagulation cascade. During endotoxemia, TF expression leads to disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, the relative contribution of TF expression by different cell types to the activation of coagulation has not been defined. In this study, we investigated the effect of either a selective inhibition of TF expression or cell type-specific deletion of the TF gene (F3) on activation of coagulation in a mouse model of endotoxemia. We fou...

  4. Tissue factor activates allosteric networks in factor VIIa through structural and dynamic changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jesper Jonasson; Persson, E.; Olsen, O. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tissue factor (TF) promotes colocalization of enzyme (factorVIIa) and substrate (FX or FIX), and stabilizes the active conformation of FVIIa. Details on how TF induces structural and dynamic changes in the catalytic domain of FVIIa to enhance its efficiency remain elusive. Objective......: To elucidate the activation of allosteric networks in the catalytic domain of the FVIIa protease it is when bound to TF.MethodsLong-timescale molecular dynamics simulations of FVIIa, free and in complex with TF, were executed and analyzed by dynamic network analysis. Results: Allosteric paths of correlated...

  5. Elevated thrombin-forming capacity of tissue factor-activated cord compared with adult plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvirn, G; Gallistl, S; Rehak, T; Jürgens, G; Muntean, W

    2003-08-01

    Clinically observed excellent hemostasis in neonates despite low levels of clotting factors is not completely understood so far. Therefore, we investigated whether physiological low levels of the inhibitor protein C (PC) facilitate thrombin formation in tissue factor (TF)-activated plasma samples. PC was activated by endogenously generated thrombin after addition of soluble thrombomodulin (TM). The capability of activated PC (APC) to suppress thrombin formation was significantly more pronounced in adult than in cord plasma. Addition of 4 nm of TM decreased the thrombin potential (TP) in cord plasma by 10%, and in adult plasma by 52% in the presence of 5 pm TF. We demonstrate that this low anticoagulant action of PC is attributable to the low levels of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and antithrombin (AT) physiologically present in cord plasma. Addition of 4 nm TM decreased the TP by 58% in cord plasma adjusted to contain TFPI and AT at adult levels in the presence of 5 pm TF. Thus, the combined low anticoagulant action of the three inhibitors APC, TFPI, and AT in cord plasma allows enhanced thrombin formation associated with shorter clotting times compared with adult plasma when low amounts of TF are applied to initiate clot formation. Although our laboratory experiments do not allow definite conclusions for various clinical situations, our data might contribute to explain excellent hemostasis in neonates despite low levels of procoagulants.

  6. Tissue factor activated thromboelastography correlates to clinical signs of bleeding in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiinberg, Bo; Jensen, Asger Lundorff; Rozanski, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    and may well be of value in the workup of dogs suspected of having a haemostatic disorder. This study was undertaken to evaluate prospectively how tissue factor (TF) activated TEG correlated to clinical signs of bleeding in dogs, compared to a routine coagulation profile. A prospective case-control study...... was performed over a 2 year period from 2004-2006. Eligible dogs were those where the primary clinician requested a coagulation profile to evaluate haemostasis. The dogs were simultaneously evaluated with a TF-activated TEG assay. Twenty-seven dogs, characterised as hypo-coagulable based on the TEG parameter G......, the coagulation profile had a PPV between 50-81% and a NPV between 92-93% for detection of bleeding, depending on the observer. In conclusion, a TF-activated TEG G value 

  7. Hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cell tissue factor activates the coagulation cascade in endotoxemic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlinski, Rafal; Wang, Jian-Guo; Owens, A. Phillip; Williams, Julie; Antoniak, Silvio; Tencati, Michael; Luther, Thomas; Rowley, Jesse W.; Low, Elizabeth N.; Weyrich, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the primary activator of the coagulation cascade. During endotoxemia, TF expression leads to disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, the relative contribution of TF expression by different cell types to the activation of coagulation has not been defined. In this study, we investigated the effect of either a selective inhibition of TF expression or cell type-specific deletion of the TF gene (F3) on activation of coagulation in a mouse model of endotoxemia. We found that inhibition of TF on either hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic cells reduced plasma thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) levels 8 hours after administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, plasma TAT levels were significantly reduced in endotoxemic mice lacking the TF gene in either myeloid cells (TFflox/flox,LysMCre mice) or in both endothelial cells (ECs) and hematopoietic cells (TFflox/flox,Tie-2Cre mice). However, deletion of the TF gene in ECs alone had no effect on LPS-induced plasma TAT levels. Similar results were observed in mice lacking TF in vascular smooth muscle cells. Finally, we found that mouse platelets do not express TF pre-mRNA or mRNA. Our data demonstrate that in a mouse model of endotoxemia activation of the coagulation cascade is initiated by TF expressed by myeloid cells and an unidentified nonhematopoietic cell type(s). PMID:20410508

  8. Effects of freezing on tissue factor activity in a thromboelastography assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Jennifer L; Flatland, Bente; Reed, Ann

    2014-09-01

    Human recombinant tissue factor (TF) can be used to activate viscoelastic coagulation assays. Although the package insert indicates that TF should not be frozen, published scientific data are not available. Ability to store frozen aliquots of TF would increase laboratory efficiency and decrease costs associated with performing TF-activated assays. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of freezing and storage time on TF's ability to activate commercially available quality control material in thromboelastography (TEG). TF was diluted and frozen at -20°C and -70°C for 72 hours, one week, 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months, and used for TEG after thawing. TF activation of control material was also assessed after TF storage at room temperature for 0, 24, and 48 hours. Time to fibrin formation (R), rate of clot formation (K and angle α), and clot strength (MA) were measured, and ANOVA used to identify differences. There were no significant differences in mean α and MA regardless of storage time or temperature. Means for R were not significantly increased at any time point after storage at room temperature or -70°C, but significant increases in mean R were observed after storage at -20°C starting after one week and continuing up to 6 months. TF can be stored at room temperature for at least 48 hours, stored at -20°C for 72 hours, and stored at -70°C for up to 6 months without significant loss of activity for TEG. © 2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and European Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  9. Analysis of factor XIa, factor IXa and tissue factor activity in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupp, Jeffrey W; Prior, Shannon M; Jo, Daniel Y; Moffatt, Lauren T; Mann, Kenneth G; Butenas, Saulius

    2017-10-09

    An elevated procoagulant activity observed in trauma patients is, in part, related to tissue factor (TF) located on blood cells and microparticles. However, analysis of trauma patient plasma indicates that there are other contributor(s) to the procoagulant activity. We hypothesize that factor (F)XIa and FIXa are responsible for an additional procoagulant activity in burn patients. Multiple time-point plasma samples from 56 burn patients (total number of samples was 471; up to 20 time-points/patient collected in 3 weeks following admission) were evaluated in a thrombin generation assay using inhibitory antibodies to TF, FIXa and FXIa. Due to the limited volume of some samples, not all were analyzed for all three proteins. At admission, 10 of 53 patients (19%) had active TF, 53 of 55 (96%) had FXIa and 48 of 55 (87%) had FIXa in their plasma. 34 patients of 56 enrolled (61%) showed TF activity at one or more time-points. All patients had FXIa and 96% had FIXa at one or more time-points. Overall, TF was observed in 99 of 455 samples analyzed (22%), FXIa in 424 of 471 (90%) and FIXa in 244 of 471 (52%). The concentration of TF was relatively low and varied between 0 and 2.1pM, whereas that of FXIa was higher, exceeding 100pM in some samples. The majority of samples with FIXa had it at sub-nanomolar concentrations. No TF, FXIa and FIXa activity was detected in plasma from healthy individuals. For the first time reported, the majority of plasma samples from burn patients have active FXIa and FIXa, with a significant fraction of them having active TF. The concentration of all three proteins varies in a wide range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of monocytes and antibiotic treatment on tissue factor activity of endocardial vegetations in rabbits infected with Streptococcus sanguis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancsi, M J; Veltrop, M H; Bertina, R M; Thompson, J

    1996-01-01

    A main feature in the pathogenesis of bacterial endocarditis is the activation of the coagulation system via the extrinsic pathway, resulting in the formation of infected endocardial vegetations. Earlier studies gave indirect evidence that monocytes play an important role in the procoagulant response during the course of the disease. In this study, we assessed the role of monocytes more directly. We compared weights and tissue factor activities (TFA) of endocardial vegetations of normal rabbits infected with Streptococcus sanguis with those of rabbits which were treated with the cytostatic drug etoposide (Vepesid; Bristol-Myers Squibb B.V.) to induce a selective monocytopenia. Furthermore, the importance of the presence of bacteria was determined through the influence of antibiotic treatment on TFA, vegetational weight, and infection of the vegetations. The TFA of the vegetations was measured chromogenically by monitoring the factor VII-dependent activation of factor X with an amidolytic assay for factor Xa. We found that the degree of infection and the weight of vegetations of rabbits treated with the cytostatic drug etoposide did not differ from that of untreated rabbits. Their TFA, however, was significantly lower than the TFA of vegetations of rabbits not treated with etoposide. We also found that, as with the monocytopenic rabbits, the weight of the vegetations was not reduced in penicillin G-treated rabbits. The degree of infection and TFA, however, were significantly lower. We conclude that monocytes indeed are involved in the activation of the coagulation system during the course of bacterial endocarditis and that the degree of infection is positively correlated to the TFA of the vegetations. PMID:8550190

  11. Tissue factor activity in women with preeclampsia or SGA: a potential explanation for the excessive thrombin generation in these syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erez, Offer; Romero, Roberto; Vaisbuch, Edi; Than, Nandor Gabor; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Gotsch, Francesca; Mittal, Pooja; Dong, Zhong; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Kim, Chong Jai; Nhan-Chang, Chia-Ling; Kim, Sun Kwon; Yeo, Lami; Mazor, Moshe; Hassan, Sonia S

    2017-05-19

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the activity of tissue factor (TF) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in the plasma of women with preeclampsia (PE) and small for gestational age (SGA) neonate differ from that of normal pregnant women and whether they are related to specific placental lesions. This cross-sectional study included the following groups: (1) normal pregnancy (n = 68); (2) PE (n= 128); and (3) SGA (n = 56). Maternal plasma TF and TFPI activity was determined with chromogenic assays. (1) The median maternal plasma TF activity, but not TFPI activity, differed among the study groups (p SGA fetuses (p = .002); (3) among patients with PE, those with distal villous hypoplasia had a higher median maternal TF activity than those without these placental lesions (p = .018); and (4) following adjustment for confounding variables, maternal plasma TF and TFPI activity were not associated with an SGA neonate. Plasma TF activity is higher in women with PE than in those with SGA or normal pregnancies. We propose that these changes may be responsible, at least in part, for the increased in-vivo thrombin generation observed in this obstetrical syndrome.

  12. Tissue factor activity and ECM-related gene expression in human aortic endothelial cells grown on electrospun biohybrid scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jingjia; Gerstenhaber, Jonathan A; Lazarovici, Philip; Lelkes, Peter I

    2013-05-13

    All blood vessels are lined with a quiescent endothelium, which aids in regulating regular blood flow and avoiding thrombus formation. Current attempts at replacing diseased blood vessels frequently fail due to the intrinsic thrombogenicity of the materials used as vascular grafts. In extending our previous work where we introduced a new candidate scaffolds for vascular grafts electrospun from a blend solution of PLGA, gelatin, and elastin (PGE), this study aimed to evaluate the potential of PGE scaffolds to support nonthrombogenic monolayers of primary isolates of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs), as assessed by a combination of biochemical, molecular, and bioinformatics-based analyses. After 24 h of culture on 3-D fibrous PGE scaffolds, HAECs formed a confluent, nonthrombogenic, and physiologically competent monolayer, as assessed by tissue factor (TF) gene expression and protein activity assays. The levels of TF mRNA/protein activity in HAECs grown on PGE scaffolds were similar to those on gelatin or collagen IV-coated 2-D surfaces. In addition, bioinformatics-based analysis of a focused microarray containing 84 ECM-related cDNA probes demonstrated that HAECs essentially expressed a histotypic ECM-related "transcriptome" on PGE scaffolds, where cells were more quiescent than cells cultured on 2-D coverslips coated with gelatin (a well-known "inert" substrate for conventional EC culture), but less so than on 2-D PGE films. These data suggest an important role for nanorough substrates (PGE films) in passivating endothelial cells and confirm the crucial effect of substrate composition in this process. Principal component analysis of microarray data on the above substrates (including collagen IV) implied that substrate composition plays a greater role than surface topography in affecting the endothelial ECM-related "transcriptome". Taken together, our findings suggest that electrospun PGE scaffolds are potentially suitable for application in small diameter

  13. BMP-1/tolloid-like proteinases synchronize matrix assembly with growth factor activation to promote morphogenesis and tissue remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadon-Le Goff, Sandrine; Hulmes, David J S; Moali, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-1 (BMP-1)/tolloid-like proteinases, here called BTPs, include the proteases originally identified for their roles in the C-terminal maturation of fibrillar procollagens ("procollagen C-proteinase"). Though numerous other substrates have since been discovered, the BTPs remain the main proteases involved in extracellular matrix assembly with little or no implication in matrix degradation. During the same period however, the BTPs have also become established as important proteases in the activation of growth factors, including TGF-β1, BMP-2/-4, GDF-8/-11 and IGFs, as well as the release of anti-angiogenic fragments from parent proteins. The BTPs are therefore key players in many pathophysiological processes such as morphogenesis, tissue repair and tumor progression. This mini-review summarizes our current knowledge of the functions of BTPs, their substrates and unusual mechanisms of regulation, and discusses their potential as new targets for future therapies. Copyright © 2015 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Predictive value of microparticle-associated tissue factor activity for permeability glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Antonio; Miscia, Sebastiano; Centurione, Maria Antonietta; Di Pietro, Roberta; Centurione, Lucia

    2016-11-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) protein 1, which is also known as permeability glycoprotein (Pgp), and tissue factor (TF) are recurrently overexpressed on the surface of cancer cells, likely in response to stimuli such as chemotherapy. Microparticles (MPs) released from cancer cells into the bloodstream express tumour markers on their surface that may be useful as predictive biomarkers for evaluating disease progression. The present study measured the level of TF/factor VII (FVII)-dependent coagulation of MPs isolated from the plasma of cancer patients with various tumours, who were undergoing chemotherapy. Furthermore, Pgp expression on the surface of MPs was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. A total of 50 cancer patients, as well as 10 healthy volunteers, were enrolled in the present study. MP-associated TF/FVII-dependent coagulation pathways were evaluated as the effect of an anti-FVII antibody on the time to thrombin generation, as compared with controls treated with saline. The significantly lengthened times of coagulation [obtained in 20/50 samples (36.5 ± 16%) after treatment with anti-FVIIa when compared with controls] suggest the presence of TF activity is associated with circulating MPs. Furthermore, the 20 MP/TF-positive samples were associated with Pgp overexpression on their surface. Conversely, in the remaining samples (n=30), treatment with the anti-FVIIa antibody did not significantly lengthen the time to clotting (measurement of plasma MP-associated TF activity as a predictive biomarker may provide novel therapeutic perspectives to improve the prognosis and effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in patients who are at a high-risk of Pgp-mediated MDR.

  15. Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-2 prevents shedding of matriptase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian R; Steffensen, Simon D R; Nielsen, Nis Valentin Ladefoged

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-2 (HAI-2) is an inhibitor of many proteases in vitro, including the membrane-bound serine protease, matriptase. Studies of knock-out mice have shown that HAI-2 is essential for placental development only in mice expressing matriptase, suggesting that HAI...

  16. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  17. BMP-1/tolloid-like proteinases synchronize matrix assembly with growth factor activation to promote morphogenesis and tissue remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Vadon-Le Goff, Sandrine; Hulmes, David J. S.; Moali, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-1 (BMP-1)/tolloid-like proteinases, here called BTPs, include the proteases originally identified for their roles in the C-terminal maturation of fibrillar procollagens ("procollagen C-proteinase"). Though numerous other substrates have since been discovered, the BTPs remain the main proteases involved in extracellular matrix assembly with little or no implication in matrix degradation. During the same period however, the BTPs have also become established as importa...

  18. Tissue tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue tests are widely used in horticulture practice and have in comparison with soil or substrate testing advantages as well disadvantages in comparison with soil testing. One of the main advantages of tissue tests is the certainty that analysed nutrients in plant tissues are really present in the

  19. Tissue types (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports ... binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue provides a covering (skin, the linings of the ...

  20. Tissue Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Leemput, Koen; Puonti, Oula

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods for automatically segmenting magnetic resonance images of the brain have seen tremendous advances in recent years. So-called tissue classification techniques, aimed at extracting the three main brain tissue classes (white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid), are now...... well established. In their simplest form, these methods classify voxels independently based on their intensity alone, although much more sophisticated models are typically used in practice. This article aims to give an overview of often-used computational techniques for brain tissue classification...

  1. Tissue Classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The project began as a e ort to support InLight and Lumidigm. With the sale of the companies to a non-New Mexico entity, the project then focused on supporting a new company Medici Technologies. The Small Business (SB) is attempting to quantify glucose in tissue using a series of short interferometer scans of the nger. Each scan is produced from a novel presentation of the nger to the device. The intent of the project is to identify and, if possible, implement improved methods for classi cation, feature selection, and training to improve the performance of predictive algorithms used for tissue classi cation.

  2. Hypoperfusion in severely injured trauma patients is associated with reduced coagulation factor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jan O; Scarpelini, Sandro; Pinto, Ruxandra; Tien, Homer C; Callum, Jeannie; Rizoli, Sandro B

    2011-11-01

    II, VII, IX, X, and XI may differ. Preservation of coagulation factor activity in the majority of normally and moderately hypoperfused patients suggests that aggressive administration of plasma is probably only indicated in severely hypoperfused patients. Markers of hypoperfusion, such as base deficit, might be better and more readily available predictors of who require coagulation support than international normalized ratio or activated partial thromboplastin time.

  3. Investigation of the effect of kaolin and tissue factor-activated citrated whole blood, on clot forming variables, as evaluated by thromboelastograph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Per Ingemar; Bochsen, L.; Andersen, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Thrombelastograph (TEG; Haemoscope Corp.) analyzes clot formation in whole blood (WB) and treatment based on this analysis has been shown to reduce transfusion requirements in liver and cardiac surgery when compared to conventional coagulation analysis. Implementing TEG as a routine...

  4. Cyclic mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast proliferation and autocrine growth factor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J E; Mitchell, J J; Absher, P M; Baldor, L; Geller, H A; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Hamblin, M J; Vacek, P; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    Cellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia and increased extracellular matrix deposition are features of tissue hypertrophy resulting from increased work load. It is known, for example, that mechanical forces play a critical role in lung development, cardiovascular remodeling following pressure overload, and skeletal muscle growth. The mechanisms involved in these processes, however, remain unclear. Here we examined the effect of mechanical deformation on fibroblast function in vitro. IMR-90 human fetal lung fibroblasts grown on collagen-coated silastic membranes were subjected to cyclical mechanical deformation (10% increase in culture surface area; 1 Hz) for up to 5 days. Cell number was increased by 39% after 2 days of deformation (1.43 +/- .01 x 10(5) cells/membrane compared with control, 1.03 +/- 0.02 x 10(5) cells; mean +/- SEM; P < 0.02) increasing to 163% above control by 4 days (2.16 +/- 0.16 x 10(5) cells compared with 0.82 +/- 0.03 x 10(5) cells; P < 0.001). The medium from mechanically deformed cells was mitogenic for IMR-90 cells, with maximal activity in the medium from cells mechanically deformed for 2 days (stimulating cell replication by 35% compared with media control; P < 0.002). These data suggest that mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast replication and that this effect is mediated by the release of autocrine growth factors.

  5. Placental regulation of peptide hormone and growth factor activity by proMBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Kathrin; Glerup, Simon

    2011-06-01

    The gene PRG2, encoding the proform of eosinophil major basic protein (proMBP), is one of the most highly expressed genes during human pregnancy, and low proMBP levels predict Down syndrome and poor pregnancy outcome. Reminiscent of a magnet, the primary structure of proMBP is extremely charge polarized, consisting of an N-terminal acidic propiece followed by a highly basic MBP domain in the C-terminal. Many tissues synthesize and secrete full-length proMBP, but only distinct cell types of the immune system process and store mature MBP in intracellular granules. MBP is released upon degranulation of eosinophil leukocytes and is toxic to bacteria, parasites, and mammalian cells. In contrast, proMBP is apparently nontoxic and functions in the inhibition of proteolysis and prohormone conversion. Recent research has revealed the complexity of proMBP biology and shed light on the process of MBP generation. ProMBP specifically forms disulfide-mediated, covalent complexes with the metzincin metalloproteinase pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPPA) and the prohormone angiotensinogen (AGT). In both processes, PAPPA and AGT have reduced biological activity in the resulting complexes. In addition, proMBP is a component of high-molecular-weight AGT and, therefore, is potentially involved in the development of preeclampsia and in pregnancy-induced hypertension.

  6. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W

    2008-09-01

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic.

  7. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, David W [Bone and Joint Research Group, Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, General Hospital, University of Southampton, SO16 6YD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Hindoostuart@googlemail.com

    2008-09-01

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic.

  8. American Association of Tissue Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brightest in Tissue Banking FIND AATB ACCREDITED TISSUE BANK INSTITUTIONS SEARCH STANDARDS FOR TISSUE BANKING ACCESS CERTIFIED TISSUE BANK SPECIALISTS (CTBS) MANAGE QDEW Workshop | Baltimore, MD Save ...

  9. Multiplexed lasing in tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Qiushu; Fan, Xudong

    2017-02-01

    Biolasers are an emerging technology for next generation biochemical detection and clinical applications. Progress has recently been made to achieve lasing from biomolecules and single living cells. Tissues, which consist of cells embedded in extracellular matrix, mimic more closely the actual complex biological environment in a living body and therefore are of more practical significance. Here, we developed a highly versatile tissue laser platform, in which tissues stained with fluorophores are sandwiched in a high-Q Fabry-Pérot microcavity. Distinct lasing emissions from muscle and adipose tissues stained respectively with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY), and hybrid muscle/adipose tissue with dual-staining were achieved with a threshold of only 10 μJ/mm2. Additionally, we investigated how tissue structure/geometry, tissue thickness, and staining dye concentration affect the tissue laser. It is further found that, despite large fluorescence spectral overlap between FITC and BODIPY in tissues, their lasing emissions could be clearly distinguished and controlled due to their narrow lasing bands and different lasing thresholds, thus enabling highly multiplexed detection. Our tissue laser platform can be broadly applicable to various types of tissues/diseases. It provides a new tool for a wide range of biological and biomedical applications, such as diagnostics/screening of tissues and identification/monitoring of biological transformations in tissue engineering.

  10. Laser/tissue interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dederich, D N

    1991-01-01

    When laser light impinges on tissue, it can reflect, scatter, be absorbed, or transmit to the surrounding tissue. Absorption controls to a great degree the extent to which reflection, scattering and transmission occur, and wavelength is the primary determinant of absorption. The CO2 laser is consistently absorbed by most materials and tissues and the Nd-YAG laser wavelength is preferentially absorbed in pigmented tissues. The factors which determine the initial tissue effect include the laser wavelength, laser power, laser waveform, tissue optical properties, and tissue thermal properties. There are almost an infinite number of combinations of these factors possible, many of which would result in unacceptable damage to the tissues. This underscores the need to thoroughly test any particular combination of these factors on the conceptual, in-vitro, and in-vivo level before a treatment is offered.

  11. Plant tissue culture techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Dieter Illg

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell and tissue culture in a simple fashion refers to techniques which utilize either single plant cells, groups of unorganized cells (callus or organized tissues or organs put in culture, under controlled sterile conditions.

  12. FRD tissue archive

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The fishery genetics tissue collection has over 80,000 tissues stored in 95% ethanol representing fishes and invertebrates collected globally but with a focus on the...

  13. Adipose tissue fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Buechler, Christa; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Eisinger, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity causes a major interest in white adipose tissue biology. Adipose tissue cells are surrounded by extracellular matrix proteins whose composition and remodeling is of crucial importance for cell function. The expansion of adipose tissue in obesity is linked to an inappropriate supply with oxygen and hypoxia development. Subsequent activation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) inhibits preadipocyte differentiation and initiates adipose tissue fibrosis. The...

  14. Bioreactors for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huang-Chi; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2006-09-01

    Bioreactors are essential in tissue engineering, not only because they provide an in vitro environment mimicking in vivo conditions for the growth of tissue substitutes, but also because they enable systematic studies of the responses of living tissues to various mechanical and biochemical cues. The basic principles of bioreactor design are reviewed, the bioreactors commonly used for the tissue engineering of cartilage, bone and cardiovascular systems are assessed in terms of their performance and usefulness. Several novel bioreactor types are also reviewed.

  15. Vascularization Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouwkema, Jeroen; Rivron, N.C.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering has been an active field of research for several decades now. However, the amount of clinical applications in the field of tissue engineering is still limited. One of the current limitations of tissue engineering is its inability to provide sufficient blood supply in the initial

  16. Tertiary lymphoid tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Caro, Giuseppe; Marchesi, Federica

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes influence colorectal cancer progression. We have recently documented that tertiary lymphoid tissue in the colorectal cancer microenvironment orchestrates lymphocyte infiltration and that tertiary lymphoid tissue and lymphocytes cooperate in a coordinated antitumor immune response to improve patient outcome. Thus, tertiary lymphoid tissue represents a potential target in the design of tailored immune-based therapeutic approaches. PMID:25083321

  17. Development of tissue bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R P Narayan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of tissue banking is as old as the use of skin grafting for resurfacing of burn wounds. Beneficial effects of tissue grafts led to wide spread use of auto and allograft for management of varied clinical conditions like skin wounds, bone defects following trauma or tumor ablation. Availability of adequate amount of tissues at the time of requirement was the biggest challenge that forced clinicians to find out techniques to preserve the living tissue for prolonged period of time for later use and thus the foundation of tissue banking was started in early twentieth century. Harvesting, processing, storage and transportation of human tissues for clinical use is the major activity of tissue banks. Low temperature storage of processed tissue is the best preservation technique at present. Tissue banking organization is a very complex system and needs high technical expertise and skilled personnel for proper functioning in a dedicated facility. A small lapse/deviation from the established protocol leads to loss of precious tissues and or harm to recipients as well as the risk of transmission of deadly diseases and tumors. Strict tissue transplant acts and stringent regulations help to streamline the whole process of tissue banking safe for recipients and to community as whole.

  18. Adipose tissue fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechler, Christa; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Eisinger, Kristina

    2015-05-15

    The increasing prevalence of obesity causes a major interest in white adipose tissue biology. Adipose tissue cells are surrounded by extracellular matrix proteins whose composition and remodeling is of crucial importance for cell function. The expansion of adipose tissue in obesity is linked to an inappropriate supply with oxygen and hypoxia development. Subsequent activation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) inhibits preadipocyte differentiation and initiates adipose tissue fibrosis. Thereby adipose tissue growth is limited and excess triglycerides are stored in ectopic tissues. Stressed adipocytes and hypoxia contribute to immune cell immigration and activation which further aggravates adipose tissue fibrosis. There is substantial evidence that adipose tissue fibrosis is linked to metabolic dysfunction, both in rodent models and in the clinical setting. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma agonists and adiponectin both reduce adipose tissue fibrosis, inflammation and insulin resistance. Current knowledge suggests that antifibrotic drugs, increasing adipose tissue oxygen supply or HIF-1 antagonists will improve adipose tissue function and thereby ameliorate metabolic diseases.

  19. Cell and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    “Cell and Tissue Engineering” introduces the principles and new approaches in cell and tissue engineering. It includes both the fundamentals and the current trends in cell and tissue engineering, in a way useful both to a novice and an expert in the field. The book is composed of 13 chapters all of which are written by the leading experts. It is organized to gradually assemble an insight in cell and tissue function starting form a molecular nano-level, extending to a cellular micro-level and finishing at the tissue macro-level. In specific, biological, physiological, biophysical, biochemical, medical, and engineering aspects are covered from the standpoint of the development of functional substitutes of biological tissues for potential clinical use. Topics in the area of cell engineering include cell membrane biophysics, structure and function of the cytoskeleton, cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and mechanotransduction. In the area of tissue engineering the focus is on the in vitro cultivation of ...

  20. Regeneration of periodontal tissues: guided tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Cristina C; Cochran, David L

    2010-01-01

    The concept that only fibroblasts from the periodontal ligament or undifferentiated mesenchymal cells have the potential to re-create the original periodontal attachment has been long recognized. Based on this concept, guided tissue regeneration has been applied with variable success to regenerate periodontal defects. Quantitative analysis of clinical outcomes after guided tissue regeneration suggests that this therapy is a successful and predictable procedure to treat narrow intrabony defects and class II mandibular furcations, but offers limited benefits in the treatment of other types of periodontal defects.

  1. DNA from keratinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Camilla F.; Olsen, Maja E.; Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    2011-01-01

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient...... genetic analyses, the fact that sampling generally causes minimal visual damage to valuable specimens. Even when freshly sampled, however, the DNA quantity and quality in the fully keratinized parts of such tissues is extremely poor in comparison to other tissues such as blood and muscle – although little...... systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear...

  2. Tissue engineering in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Salih, Vehid M; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    of this review is to inform practitioners with the most updated information on tissue engineering and its potential applications in dentistry. The authors used "PUBMED" to find relevant literature written in English and published from the beginning of tissue engineering until today. A combination of keywords was used as the search terms e.g., "tissue engineering", "approaches", "strategies" "dentistry", "dental stem cells", "dentino-pulp complex", "guided tissue regeneration", "whole tooth", "TMJ", "condyle", "salivary glands", and "oral mucosa". Abstracts and full text articles were used to identify causes of craniofacial tissue loss, different approaches for craniofacial reconstructions, how the tissue engineering emerges, different strategies of tissue engineering, biomaterials employed for this purpose, the major attempts to engineer different dental structures, finally challenges and future of tissue engineering in dentistry. Only those articles that dealt with the tissue engineering in dentistry were selected. There have been a recent surge in guided tissue engineering methods to manage periodontal diseases beyond the traditional approaches. However, the predictable reconstruction of the innate organisation and function of whole teeth as well as their periodontal structures remains challenging. Despite some limited progress and minor successes, there remain distinct and important challenges in the development of reproducible and clinically safe approaches for oral tissue repair and regeneration. Clearly, there is a convincing body of evidence which confirms the need for this type of treatment, and public health data worldwide indicates a more than adequate patient resource. The future of these therapies involving more biological approaches and the use of dental tissue stem cells is promising and advancing. Also there may be a significant interest of their application and wider potential to treat disorders beyond the craniofacial region. Considering the

  3. Adipose tissue macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutens, Lily; Stienstra, Rinke

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation originating from the adipose tissue is considered to be one of the main driving forces for the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in obese individuals. Although a plethora of different immune cells shapes adipose tissue inflammation, this review is specifically

  4. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Examples of connective tissue diseases include lupus , scleroderma , rheumatoid arthritis , Sjögren's syndrome , myositis and vasculitis . There are many people who have features of connective tissue disease, however, they do not fulfill the diagnostic criteria established for any one disease. In such ...

  5. Engineering Vascularized Adipose Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Verseijden (Femke)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractA large portion of the plastic and reconstructive surgical procedures performed each year is aimed at repairing soft tissue defects, which result for example from traumatic injury or tumor resections. Large soft tissue defects, lead to a change in function and ‘normal’ body contour,

  6. Tissue engineered aortic valve

    OpenAIRE

    Dohmen, P M

    2012-01-01

    Several prostheses are available to replace degenerative diseased aortic valves with unique advantages and disadvantages. Bioprotheses show excellent hemodynamic behavior and low risk of thromboembolic complications, but are limited by tissue deterioration. Mechanical heart valves have extended durability, but permanent anticoagulation is mandatory. Tissue engineering created a new generation heart valve, which overcome limitations of biological and mechanical heart valves due to remodelling,...

  7. Quantitative analysis of tissue deformation dynamics reveals three characteristic growth modes and globally aligned anisotropic tissue deformation during chick limb development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Yoshihiro; Kuroiwa, Atsushi; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-level characterization of deformation dynamics is crucial for understanding organ morphogenetic mechanisms, especially the interhierarchical links among molecular activities, cellular behaviors and tissue/organ morphogenetic processes. Limb development is a well-studied topic in vertebrate organogenesis. Nevertheless, there is still little understanding of tissue-level deformation relative to molecular and cellular dynamics. This is mainly because live recording of detailed cell behaviors in whole tissues is technically difficult. To overcome this limitation, by applying a recently developed Bayesian approach, we here constructed tissue deformation maps for chick limb development with high precision, based on snapshot lineage tracing using dye injection. The precision of the constructed maps was validated with a clear statistical criterion. From the geometrical analysis of the map, we identified three characteristic tissue growth modes in the limb and showed that they are consistent with local growth factor activity and cell cycle length. In particular, we report that SHH signaling activity changes dynamically with developmental stage and strongly correlates with the dynamic shift in the tissue growth mode. We also found anisotropic tissue deformation along the proximal-distal axis. Morphogenetic simulation and experimental studies suggested that this directional tissue elongation, and not local growth, has the greatest impact on limb shaping. This result was supported by the novel finding that anisotropic tissue elongation along the proximal-distal axis occurs independently of cell proliferation. Our study marks a pivotal point for multi-scale system understanding in vertebrate development. PMID:25858459

  8. DENTAL PULP TISSUE ENGINEERING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, FF; Conde, MCM; Cavalcanti, B; Casagrande, L; Sakai, V; Nör, JE

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp is a highly specialized mesenchymal tissue, which have a restrict regeneration capacity due to anatomical arrangement and post-mitotic nature of odontoblastic cells. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial material cause loss of a significant amount of dentin leaving as life-lasting sequelae a non-vital and weakened tooth. However, regenerative endodontics is an emerging field of modern tissue engineering that demonstrated promising results using stem cells associated with scaffolds and responsive molecules. Thereby, this article will review the most recent endeavors to regenerate pulp tissue based on tissue engineering principles and providing insightful information to readers about the different aspects enrolled in tissue engineering. Here, we speculate that the search for the ideal combination of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenic factors for dental pulp tissue engineering may be extended over future years and result in significant advances in other areas of dental and craniofacial research. The finds collected in our review showed that we are now at a stage in which engineering a complex tissue, such as the dental pulp, is no longer an unachievable and the next decade will certainly be an exciting time for dental and craniofacial research. PMID:21519641

  9. Rapporteur report: other tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, Z

    2003-01-01

    This report covers the session devoted to 'other tissues'. It considers the effects of internal electric fields such as those induced by exposure to weak, extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields, on cardiac physiology, neuroendocrine (pineal) function and on the processes of tissue repair and embryonic development. Summaries are provided for each of the papers presented, and the major aspects of the plenary session are discussed. Overall, these tissues and processes were not considered to be sensitive to the direct effects of weak ELF fields, although indirect effects may occur via field induced changes to the central nervous system.

  10. Rapporteur report: Other tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sienkiewicz, Z

    2003-07-01

    This report covers the session devoted to other tissues. It considers the effects of internal electric fields such as those induced by exposure to weak, extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields, on cardiac physiology, neuroendocrine (pineal) function and on the processes of tissue repair and embryonic development. Summaries are provided for each of the papers presented, and the major aspects of the plenary session are discussed. Overall, these tissues and processes were not considered to be sensitive to the direct effects of weak ELF fields, although indirect effects may occur via field induced changes to the central nervous system. (author)

  11. Skeletal muscle tissue engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bach, A. D; Beier, J. P; Stern‐Staeter, J; Horch, R. E

    2004-01-01

    The reconstruction of skeletal muscle tissue either lost by traumatic injury or tumor ablation or functional damage due to myopathies is hampered by the lack of availability of functional substitution...

  12. Breast reconstruction - natural tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscle flap; TRAM; Latissimus muscle flap with a breast implant; DIEP flap; DIEAP flap; Gluteal free flap; Transverse upper gracilis flap; TUG; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with natural tissue; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction ...

  13. Synovial tissue research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orr, Carl; Sousa, Elsa; Boyle, David L

    2017-01-01

    The synovium is the major target tissue of inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis. The study of synovial tissue has advanced considerably throughout the past few decades from arthroplasty and blind needle biopsy to the use of arthroscopic and ultrasonographic technologies that enable...... easier visualization and improve the reliability of synovial biopsies. Rapid progress has been made in using synovial tissue to study disease pathogenesis, to stratify patients, to discover biomarkers and novel targets, and to validate therapies, and this progress has been facilitated by increasingly...... diverse and sophisticated analytical and technological approaches. In this Review, we describe these approaches, and summarize how their use in synovial tissue research has improved our understanding of rheumatoid arthritis and identified candidate biomarkers that could be used in disease diagnosis...

  14. Tissue Culture in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Duray, Paul H.; Hatfill, Steven J.

    1997-01-01

    Attempts to simulate normal tissue micro-environments in vitro have been thwarted by the complexity and plasticity of the extracellular matrix, which is important in regulating cytoskeletal and nuclear matrix proteins. Gravity is one of the problems, tending to separate components that should be kept together. For space shuttle experiments, NASA engineers devised a double-walled rotating bioreactor, which is proving to be a useful tissue culture device on earth as well as in space.

  15. Bypassing damaged nervous tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Shneider, M N

    2016-01-01

    We show the principal ability of bypassing damaged demyelinated portions of nervous tissue, thereby restoring its normal function for the passage of action potentials. We carry out a theoretical analysis on the basis of the synchronization mechanism of action potential propagation along a bundle of neurons, proposed recently in [1]. And we discuss the feasibility of implement a bypass to restore damaged nervous tissue and creating an artificial neuron network.

  16. β-Catenin, a Transcription Factor Activated by Canonical Wnt Signaling, Is Expressed in Sensory Neurons of Calves Latently Infected with Bovine Herpesvirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yilin; Hancock, Morgan; Workman, Aspen; Doster, Alan; Jones, Clinton

    2016-01-06

    Like many Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily members, bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) expresses an abundant transcript in latently infected sensory neurons, the latency-related (LR)-RNA. LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) that inhibits apoptosis, interacts with Notch family members, interferes with Notch-mediated transcription, and stimulates neurite formation in cells expressing Notch. An LR mutant virus containing stop codons at the amino terminus of ORF2 does not reactivate from latency or replicate efficiently in certain tissues, indicating that LR gene products are important. In this study, β-catenin, a transcription factor activated by the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, was frequently detected in ORF2-positive trigeminal ganglionic neurons of latently infected, but not mock-infected, calves. Conversely, the lytic cycle regulatory protein (BoHV-1 infected cell protein 0, or bICP0) was not frequently detected in β-catenin-positive neurons in latently infected calves. During dexamethasone-induced reactivation from latency, mRNA expression levels of two Wnt antagonists, Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) and secreted Frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2), were induced in bovine trigeminal ganglia (TG), which correlated with reduced β-catenin protein expression in TG neurons 6 h after dexamethasone treatment. ORF2 and a coactivator of β-catenin, mastermind-like protein 1 (MAML1), stabilized β-catenin protein levels and stimulated β-catenin-dependent transcription in mouse neuroblastoma cells more effectively than MAML1 or ORF2 alone. Neuroblastoma cells expressing ORF2, MAML1, and β-catenin were highly resistant to cell death following serum withdrawal, whereas most cells transfected with only one of these genes died. The Wnt signaling pathway interferes with neurodegeneration but promotes neuronal differentiation, suggesting that stabilization of β-catenin expression by ORF2 promotes neuronal survival and differentiation. Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) is an important pathogen of

  17. Tissue-like phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioni, John V.; De Grand, Alec M.

    2007-10-30

    The invention is based, in part, on the discovery that by combining certain components one can generate a tissue-like phantom that mimics any desired tissue, is simple and inexpensive to prepare, and is stable over many weeks or months. In addition, new multi-modal imaging objects (e.g., beads) can be inserted into the phantoms to mimic tissue pathologies, such as cancer, or merely to serve as calibration standards. These objects can be imaged using one, two, or more (e.g., four) different imaging modalities (e.g., x-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence) simultaneously.

  18. Skeletal muscle connective tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline

      The connective tissue content of skeletal muscle is believed to be the major factor responsible for defining the eating quality of different meat cuts, although attempts to correlate quantifications based on traditional histological methods have not as yet been able to prove this relation...... composition, the organizational structure of connective tissue, the role of connective tissue in muscle contraction and the generation of force, metabolic regulation of arterial structure focusing on associated collagen changes, and a new highly-specific technique for following in three-dimensions changes...... in the structure of fibrous collagen and myofibers at high-resolution. The results demonstrate that the collagen composition in the extra cellular matrix of Gadus morhua fish muscle is much more complex than previously anticipated, as it contains type III, IV, V  and VI collagen in addition to type I. The vascular...

  19. Peripheral tissue oximetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Hessel, Trine Witzner; Greisen, Gorm

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of regional tissue oxygenation (rStO2) by near infrared spectroscopy enables non-invasive end-organ oxygen balance monitoring and could be a valuable tool in intensive care. However, the diverse absolute values and dynamics of different devices, and overall poor repeatability of measur......Estimation of regional tissue oxygenation (rStO2) by near infrared spectroscopy enables non-invasive end-organ oxygen balance monitoring and could be a valuable tool in intensive care. However, the diverse absolute values and dynamics of different devices, and overall poor repeatability...

  20. Plant Tissue Culture Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert Alan

    Plant tissue culture has developed into a valid botanical discipline and is considered a key area of biotechnology, but it has not been a key component of the science curriculum because of the expensive and technical nature of research in this area. This manual presents a number of activities that are relatively easy to prepare and perform. The…

  1. NASA Bioreactor tissue culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  2. Plant Tissue Culture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 8. Plant Tissue Culture - Historical Developments and Applied Aspects. H R Dagla. General Article Volume 17 Issue 8 August 2012 pp 759-767. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Targeting adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haas Bodo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two different types of adipose tissues can be found in humans enabling them to respond to starvation and cold: white adipose tissue (WAT is generally known and stores excess energy in the form of triacylglycerol (TG, insulates against cold, and serves as a mechanical cushion. Brown adipose tissue (BAT helps newborns to cope with cold. BAT has the capacity to uncouple the mitochondrial respiratory chain, thereby generating heat rather than adenosine triphosphate (ATP. The previously widely held view was that BAT disappears rapidly after birth and is no longer present in adult humans. Using positron emission tomography (PET, however, it was recently shown that metabolically active BAT occurs in defined regions and scattered in WAT of the adult and possibly has an influence on whole-body energy homeostasis. In obese individuals adipose tissue is at the center of metabolic syndrome. Targeting of WAT by thiazolidinediones (TZDs, activators of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ a ‘master’ regulator of fat cell biology, is a current therapy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Since its unique capacity to increase energy consumption of the body and to dissipate surplus energy as heat, BAT offers new perspectives as a therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Recent discoveries of new signaling pathways of BAT development give rise to new therapeutic possibilities in order to influence BAT content and activity.

  4. Targeting adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Bodo; Schlinkert, Paul; Mayer, Peter; Eckstein, Niels

    2012-10-27

    Two different types of adipose tissues can be found in humans enabling them to respond to starvation and cold: white adipose tissue (WAT) is generally known and stores excess energy in the form of triacylglycerol (TG), insulates against cold, and serves as a mechanical cushion. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) helps newborns to cope with cold. BAT has the capacity to uncouple the mitochondrial respiratory chain, thereby generating heat rather than adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The previously widely held view was that BAT disappears rapidly after birth and is no longer present in adult humans. Using positron emission tomography (PET), however, it was recently shown that metabolically active BAT occurs in defined regions and scattered in WAT of the adult and possibly has an influence on whole-body energy homeostasis. In obese individuals adipose tissue is at the center of metabolic syndrome. Targeting of WAT by thiazolidinediones (TZDs), activators of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) a 'master' regulator of fat cell biology, is a current therapy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Since its unique capacity to increase energy consumption of the body and to dissipate surplus energy as heat, BAT offers new perspectives as a therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Recent discoveries of new signaling pathways of BAT development give rise to new therapeutic possibilities in order to influence BAT content and activity.

  5. Soft Tissue Extramedullary Plasmacytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Ruiz Santiago

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the uncommon case of a subcutaneous fascia-based extramedullary plasmacytoma in the leg, which was confirmed by the pathology report and followed up until its remission. We report the differential diagnosis with other more common soft tissue masses. Imaging findings are nonspecific but are important to determine the tumour extension and to plan the biopsy.

  6. Myocardial tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Hedeer; Lyon, Alex R; Harding, Sian E; Ali, Nadire N; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2008-01-01

    Regeneration of the infarcted myocardium after a heart attack is one of the most challenging aspects in tissue engineering. Suitable cell sources and optimized biocompatible materials must be identified. In this review, we briefly discuss the current therapeutic options available to patients with heart failure post-myocardial infarction. We describe the various strategies currently proposed to encourage myocardial regeneration, with focus on the achievements in myocardial tissue engineering (MTE). We report on the current cell types, materials and methods being investigated for developing a tissue-engineered myocardial construct. Generally, there is agreement that a 'vehicle' is required to transport cells to the infarcted heart to help myocardial repair and regeneration. Suitable cell source, biomaterials, cell environment and implantation time post-infarction remain obstacles in the field of MTE. Research is being focused on optimizing natural and synthetic biomaterials for tissue engineering. The type of cell and its origin (autologous or derived from embryonic stem cells), cell density and method of cell delivery are also being explored. The possibility is being explored that materials may not only act as a support for the delivered cell implants, but may also add value by changing cell survival, maturation or integration, or by prevention of mechanical and electrical remodelling of the failing heart.

  7. Tissue culture and neurotoxicology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooisma, J.

    1982-01-01

    Application of tissue culture in neurotoxicology may serve two purposes. First, they may be used to unravel the mechanism of action of neurotoxic compounds and secondly, they may be used for the screening of neurotoxic agents. Studies belonging to the first group can be subdivided into those aiming

  8. Plant Tissue Culture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    closely linked with the discovery and characterization of plant hormones, and has facilitated our understanding of plant growth and development. Furthermore, the ability to grow plant cells and tissues in culture and to control their development forms the basis of many practical applications in agriculture, horticulture indus-.

  9. Nicotine and periodontal tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malhotra Ranjan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use has been recognized to be a significant risk factor for the development and progression of periodontal disease. Its use is associated with increased pocket depths, loss of periodontal attachment, alveolar bone and a higher rate of tooth loss. Nicotine, a major component and most pharmacologically active agent in tobacco is likely to be a significant contributing factor for the exacerbation of periodontal diseases. Available literature suggests that nicotine affects gingival blood flow, cytokine production, neutrophil and other immune cell function; connective tissue turnover, which can be the possible mechanisms responsible for overall effects of tobacco on periodontal tissues. Inclusion of tobacco cessation as a part of periodontal therapy encourages dental professionals to become more active in tobacco cessation counseling. This will have far reaching positive effects on our patients′ oral and general health.

  10. Subcutaneous adipose tissue classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sbarbati

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The developments in the technologies based on the use of autologous adipose tissue attracted attention to minor depots as possible sampling areas. Some of those depots have never been studied in detail. The present study was performed on subcutaneous adipose depots sampled in different areas with the aim of explaining their morphology, particularly as far as regards stem niches. The results demonstrated that three different types of white adipose tissue (WAT can be differentiated on the basis of structural and ultrastructural features: deposit WAT (dWAT, structural WAT (sWAT and fibrous WAT (fWAT. dWAT can be found essentially in large fatty depots in the abdominal area (periumbilical. In the dWAT, cells are tightly packed and linked by a weak net of isolated collagen fibers. Collagenic components are very poor, cells are large and few blood vessels are present. The deep portion appears more fibrous then the superficial one. The microcirculation is formed by thin walled capillaries with rare stem niches. Reinforcement pericyte elements are rarely evident. The sWAT is more stromal; it is located in some areas in the limbs and in the hips. The stroma is fairly well represented, with a good vascularity and adequate staminality. Cells are wrapped by a basket of collagen fibers. The fatty depots of the knees and of the trochanteric areas have quite loose meshes. The fWAT has a noteworthy fibrous component and can be found in areas where a severe mechanic stress occurs. Adipocytes have an individual thick fibrous shell. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates evident differences among subcutaneous WAT deposits, thus suggesting that in regenerative procedures based on autologous adipose tissues the sampling area should not be randomly chosen, but it should be oriented by evidence based evaluations. The structural peculiarities of the sWAT, and particularly of its microcirculation, suggest that it could represent a privileged source for

  11. Reptile Soft Tissue Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, Nicola; Mans, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The surgical approach to reptiles can be challenging. Reptiles have unique physiologic, anatomic, and pathologic differences. This may result in frustrating surgical experiences. However, recent investigations provided novel, less invasive, surgical techniques. The purpose of this review was to describe the technical aspects behind soft tissue surgical techniques that have been used in reptiles, so as to provide a general guideline for veterinarians working with reptiles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stereolithography in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Shelby A; Goering, Peter L; Narayan, Roger J

    2014-03-01

    Several recent research efforts have focused on use of computer-aided additive fabrication technologies, commonly referred to as additive manufacturing, rapid prototyping, solid freeform fabrication, or three-dimensional printing technologies, to create structures for tissue engineering. For example, scaffolds for tissue engineering may be processed using rapid prototyping technologies, which serve as matrices for cell ingrowth, vascularization, as well as transport of nutrients and waste. Stereolithography is a photopolymerization-based rapid prototyping technology that involves computer-driven and spatially controlled irradiation of liquid resin. This technology enables structures with precise microscale features to be prepared directly from a computer model. In this review, use of stereolithography for processing trimethylene carbonate, polycaprolactone, and poly(D,L-lactide) poly(propylene fumarate)-based materials is considered. In addition, incorporation of bioceramic fillers for fabrication of bioceramic scaffolds is reviewed. Use of stereolithography for processing of patient-specific implantable scaffolds is also discussed. In addition, use of photopolymerization-based rapid prototyping technology, known as two-photon polymerization, for production of tissue engineering scaffolds with smaller features than conventional stereolithography technology is considered.

  13. Controlled ultrasonic tissue erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Charles

    2003-04-01

    Controlled ultrasonic tissue erosion has many clinical applications, including the placement of very precise sharply defined perforations in biological interfaces and membranes with focused ultrasound. With carefully chosen acoustic parameters, tissue can be rapidly eroded away at a constant etching rate. The maximum erosion rate for minimal propagated energy is obtained by using very short high intensity pulses. The etching rate is higher with shorter pulse durations. For short pulses less than 10 cycles of the drive frequency, an optimum pulse repetition rate exists which maximizes the etching rate. Higher gas saturation in the surrounding medium reduces the etching rate and reduces the spatial sharpness of the holes produced. Most of the erosion appears to be produced in the first several cycles of the therapy pulse. For example, a series of short (about 3 cycles) focused pulses of 2100 W/cm2 (Isppa) at 788 kHz can erode a very well defined 2 mm diameter hole in a 1 mm thick sample of fresh pork atrial posterior wall in about 1 min at the optimum pulse repetition rate (about 18 kHz). Controlled ultrasonic tissue erosion may provide an effective image guided noninvasive tool in treatment of neonatal patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Without the mixing of oxygenated blood across perforations placed in the atrial septum, these infants do not survive.

  14. Membrane-to-nucleus signaling links insulin-like growth factor-1- and stem cell factor-activated pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujiro Hayashi

    Full Text Available Stem cell factor (mouse: Kitl, human: KITLG and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1, acting via KIT and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R, respectively, are critical for the development and integrity of several tissues. Autocrine/paracrine KITLG-KIT and IGF1-IGF1R signaling are also activated in several cancers including gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST, the most common sarcoma. In murine gastric muscles, IGF1 promotes Kitl-dependent development of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC, the non-neoplastic counterpart of GIST, suggesting cooperation between these pathways. Here, we report a novel mechanism linking IGF1-IGF1R and KITLG-KIT signaling in both normal and neoplastic cells. In murine gastric muscles, the microenvironment for ICC and GIST, human hepatic stellate cells (LX-2, a model for cancer niches, and GIST cells, IGF1 stimulated Kitl/KITLG protein and mRNA expression and promoter activity by activating several signaling pathways including AKT-mediated glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibition (GSK3i. GSK3i alone also stimulated Kitl/KITLG expression without activating mitogenic pathways. Both IGF1 and GSK3i induced chromatin-level changes favoring transcriptional activation at the Kitl promoter including increased histone H3/H4 acetylation and H3 lysine (K 4 methylation, reduced H3K9 and H3K27 methylation and reduced occupancy by the H3K27 methyltransferase EZH2. By pharmacological or RNA interference-mediated inhibition of chromatin modifiers we demonstrated that these changes have the predicted impact on KITLG expression. KITLG knock-down and immunoneutralization inhibited the proliferation of GIST cells expressing wild-type KIT, signifying oncogenic autocrine/paracrine KITLG-KIT signaling. We conclude that membrane-to-nucleus signaling involving GSK3i establishes a previously unrecognized link between the IGF1-IGF1R and KITLG-KIT pathways, which is active in both physiologic and oncogenic contexts and can be exploited for therapeutic purposes.

  15. Soft tissue sparganosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ki Soon; Lee, Yul; Chung, Soo Young; Park, Choong Ki; Lee, Kwan Sup [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, In Hwan; Suh, Hyoung Sim [Daelin S. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-11-15

    Sparganosis is a rare tissue-parasitic infestation caused by a plerocercoid tapeworm larva(sparganum), genus Spirometra. The most common clinical presentation of sparganosis is a palpable subcutaneous mass or masses. Fifteen simple radiographs and 10 ultrasosnograms of 17 patients with operatively verified subcutaneous sparganosis were retrospectively analyzed to find its radiologic characteristics for preoperative diagnosis of sparganosis. The location of the subcutaneous sparganosis were lower extremity, abdominal wall, breast, inguinal region and scrotum in order of frequency. The simple radiographs showed linear or elongated calcification with or without nodular elongated shaped soft tissue mass shadows in 8 patients, soft tissue mass shadow only in 2 patients and lateral abdominal wall thickening in 1 patient. But no specific findings was noted in 4 patients with small abdominal and inguinal masses. We could classify the subcutaneous sparganosis by ultrasound into 2 types: one is long band-like hypoechoic structures, corresponding to the subcutaneous tunnel-like tracks formed by migration of sparganum larva and the order is elongated or ovoid hyperechoic nodules, representing granulomas. Long band-like hypoechoic structures within or associated with mixed echoic granulomatous masses were noted in 6 patients and elongated or ovoid hypoechoic mass or masses were noted in 4 patients. In conclusion, sparganosis should be considered when these radiologic findings-irregular linear calcifications on simple radiograph and long band-like hypoechoic structures on ultrasonography, corresponding to the subcutaneous tunnel-like tracks formed by migration of sparganum larva are noted in the patients who have subcutaneous palpable mass or masses. And radiologic examination especially ultrasonography is very helpful to diagnose sparganosis.

  16. [Human brown adipose tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Kirsi A; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    Adult humans have heat-producing and energy-consuming brown adipose tissue in the clavicular region of the neck. There are two types of brown adipose cells, the so-called classic and beige adipose cells. Brown adipose cells produce heat by means of uncoupler protein 1 (UCP1) from fatty acids and sugar. By applying positron emission tomography (PET) measuring the utilization of sugar, the metabolism of brown fat has been shown to multiply in the cold, presumably influencing energy consumption. Active brown fat is most likely present in young adults, persons of normal weight and women, least likely in obese persons.

  17. TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF CARTILAGINOUS TISSUES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Ar; Gu, Wy

    2009-02-01

    Cartilaginous tissues, such as articular cartilage and intervertebral disc, are avascular tissues which rely on transport for cellular nutrition. Comprehensive knowledge of transport properties in such tissues is therefore necessary in the understanding of nutritional supply to cells. Furthermore, poor cellular nutrition in cartilaginous tissues is believed to be a primary source of tissue degeneration, which may result in osteoarthritis (OA) or disc degeneration. In this mini-review, we present an overview of the current status of the study of transport properties and behavior in cartilaginous tissues. The mechanisms of transport in these tissues, as well as experimental approaches to measuring transport properties and results obtained are discussed. The current status of bioreactors used in cartilage tissue engineering is also presented.

  18. Microbiota of human breast tissue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urbaniak, Camilla; Cummins, Joanne; Brackstone, Muriel; Macklaim, Jean M; Gloor, Gregory B; Baban, Chwanrow K; Scott, Leslie; O'Hanlon, Deidre M; Burton, Jeremy P; Francis, Kevin P; Tangney, Mark; Reid, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    .... We decided to investigate whether there is a microbiome within the mammary tissue. Using 16S rRNA sequencing and culture, we analyzed breast tissue from 81 women with and without cancer in Canada and Ireland...

  19. Engineering vascularized skeletal muscle tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Macdonald, Mara; Garfein, Evan S.; Kohane, Daniel S.; Darland, Diane C.; Marini, Robert; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Mulligan, Richard C.; D'Amore, Patricia A.; Langer, Robert

    2005-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in engineering thick, complex tissues such as muscle is the need to vascularize the tissue in vitro. Vascularization in vitro could maintain cell viability during tissue growth, induce structural organization and promote vascularization upon implantation. Here we describe

  20. Banking brain tissue for research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klioueva, Natasja; Bovenberg, Jasper; Huitinga, I.

    2017-01-01

    Well-characterized human brain tissue is crucial for scientific breakthroughs in research of the human brain and brain diseases. However, the collection, characterization, management, and accessibility of brain human tissue are rather complex. Well-characterized human brain tissue is often provided

  1. Optical sensing for tissue differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, Daniel James; Evers, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy (OS) is a tissue sensing technique that could enhance cancer diagnosis and treatment in the near future. With OS, tissue is illuminated with a selected light spectrum. Different tissue types can be distinguished from each other based on specific changes in the reflected light

  2. Procoagulant, tissue factor-bearing microparticles in bronchoalveolar lavage of interstitial lung disease patients: an observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Novelli

    Full Text Available Coagulation factor Xa appears involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Through its interaction with protease activated receptor-1, this protease signals myofibroblast differentiation in lung fibroblasts. Although fibrogenic stimuli induce factor X synthesis by alveolar cells, the mechanisms of local posttranslational factor X activation are not fully understood. Cell-derived microparticles are submicron vesicles involved in different physiological processes, including blood coagulation; they potentially activate factor X due to the exposure on their outer membrane of both phosphatidylserine and tissue factor. We postulated a role for procoagulant microparticles in the pathogenesis of interstitial lung diseases. Nineteen patients with interstitial lung diseases and 11 controls were studied. All subjects underwent bronchoalveolar lavage; interstitial lung disease patients also underwent pulmonary function tests and high resolution CT scan. Microparticles were enumerated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid with a solid-phase assay based on thrombin generation. Microparticles were also tested for tissue factor activity. In vitro shedding of microparticles upon incubation with H₂O₂ was assessed in the human alveolar cell line, A549 and in normal bronchial epithelial cells. Tissue factor synthesis was quantitated by real-time PCR. Total microparticle number and microparticle-associated tissue factor activity were increased in interstitial lung disease patients compared to controls (84±8 vs. 39±3 nM phosphatidylserine; 293±37 vs. 105±21 arbitrary units of tissue factor activity; mean±SEM; p<.05 for both comparisons. Microparticle-bound tissue factor activity was inversely correlated with lung function as assessed by both diffusion capacity and forced vital capacity (r² = .27 and .31, respectively; p<.05 for both correlations. Exposure of lung epithelial cells to H₂O₂ caused an increase in microparticle-bound tissue factor

  3. Housekeeping and tissue-specific genes in mouse tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Amand Jonny

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to characterize the housekeeping and tissue-specific genes in 15 mouse tissues by using the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE strategy which indicates the relative level of expression for each transcript matched to the tag. Results Here, we identified constantly expressed housekeeping genes, such as eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2, which is expressed in all tissues without significant difference in expression levels. Moreover, most of these genes were not regulated by experimental conditions such as steroid hormones, adrenalectomy and gonadectomy. In addition, we report previously postulated housekeeping genes such as peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and beta-actin, which are expressed in all the tissues, but with significant difference in their expression levels. We have also identified genes uniquely detected in each of the 15 tissues and other tissues from public databases. Conclusion These identified housekeeping genes could represent appropriate controls for RT-PCR and northern blot when comparing the expression levels of genes in several tissues. The results reveal several tissue-specific genes highly expressed in testis and pituitary gland. Furthermore, the main function of tissue-specific genes expressed in liver, lung and bone is the cell defence, whereas several keratins involved in cell structure function are exclusively detected in skin and vagina. The results from this study can be used for example to target a tissue for agent delivering by using the promoter of tissue-specific genes. Moreover, this study could be used as basis for further researches on physiology and pathology of these tissues.

  4. Tissue response: biomaterials, dental implants, and compromised osseous tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu RS, Arvind; Ogle, Orrett

    2015-04-01

    Tissue response represents an important feature in biocompatibility in implant procedures. This review article highlights the fundamental characteristics of tissue response after the implant procedure. This article also highlights the tissue response in compromised osseous conditions. Understanding the histologic events after dental implants in normal and abnormal bone reinforces the concept of case selection in dental implants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of routine fixation of tissues with rapid tissue fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Meenakshi; Bansal, Rani; Gupta, Mamta; Bharat, Vinay

    2013-12-01

    Conventional formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue provides superior cellular morphology and long-term storage. Problems with formalin fixation comprise delay of fixation and variations in the duration of fixation. Microwave assisted tissue fixation removes the use of noxious and potentially toxic formalin that decreases the turnaround time and creates a personnel friendly workflow. The present study was conducted over a period of two years. One hundred and forty paired tissue sections were taken including both neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissues. One of the paired tissues was fixed in formalin and the other was fixed by using microwave irradiation in phosphate buffered saline. Both were then processed by conventional method. Each slide was examined and rated for the adequacy of fixation by two pathologists in a blinded fashion using 7 parameters: Cellular outline, cytoplasmic detail, nuclear detail, erythrocyte integrity, lymphocyte appearance, overall morphology and overall staining. Statistical analysis showed that sections obtained from microwave fixed tissues were comparable to that of routinely fixed tissue. The p-values of all parameters were not significant except for the overall morphology for which p-value was significant owing to loss of tissue in some cases. Microwave irradiation substantially shortened the time from specimen reception to diagnosis (turnaround time) and allowed same-day tissue processing and diagnosis of specimens without compromising the overall quality of the histologic section.

  6. Computational Modeling in Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges in tissue engineering is the translation of biological knowledge on complex cell and tissue behavior into a predictive and robust engineering process. Mastering this complexity is an essential step towards clinical applications of tissue engineering. This volume discusses computational modeling tools that allow studying the biological complexity in a more quantitative way. More specifically, computational tools can help in:  (i) quantifying and optimizing the tissue engineering product, e.g. by adapting scaffold design to optimize micro-environmental signals or by adapting selection criteria to improve homogeneity of the selected cell population; (ii) quantifying and optimizing the tissue engineering process, e.g. by adapting bioreactor design to improve quality and quantity of the final product; and (iii) assessing the influence of the in vivo environment on the behavior of the tissue engineering product, e.g. by investigating vascular ingrowth. The book presents examples of each...

  7. Bioprinting for Neural Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Anand, Shivesh; Shah, Twisha; Tasoglu, Savas

    2018-01-01

    Bioprinting is a method by which a cell-encapsulating bioink is patterned to create complex tissue architectures. Given the potential impact of this technology on neural research, we review the current state-of-the-art approaches for bioprinting neural tissues. While 2D neural cultures are ubiquitous for studying neural cells, 3D cultures can more accurately replicate the microenvironment of neural tissues. By bioprinting neuronal constructs, one can precisely control the microenvironment by specifically formulating the bioink for neural tissues, and by spatially patterning cell types and scaffold properties in three dimensions. We review a range of bioprinted neural tissue models and discuss how they can be used to observe how neurons behave, understand disease processes, develop new therapies and, ultimately, design replacement tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bioencapsulation technologies in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Rebecca L.; Zhang, Wujie; Ma, Xiaojun; Cui, Zhanfeng; Ren, Weiping; Markel, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Bioencapsulation technologies have played an important role in the developing successes of tissue engineering. Besides offering immunoisolation, they also show promise for cell/tissue banking and the directed differentiation of stem cells, by providing a unique microenvironment. This review describes bioencapsulation technologies and summarizes their recent progress in research into tissue engineering. The review concludes with a brief outlook regarding future research directions in this field. PMID:27716872

  9. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy.

  10. Computational modeling of epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Rod

    2009-01-01

    There is an extensive literature on the computational modeling of epithelial tissues at all levels from subcellular to whole tissue. This review concentrates on behavior at the individual cell to whole tissue level, and particularly on organizational aspects, and provides an indication of where information from other areas, such as the modeling of angiogenesis, is relevant. The skin, and the lining of all of the body cavities (lung, gut, cervix, bladder etc) are epithelial tissues, which in a topological sense are the boundary between inside and outside the body. They are thin sheets of cells (usually of the order of 0.5 mm thick) without extracellular matrix, have a relatively simple structure, and contain few types of cells. They have important barrier, secretory and transport functions, which are essential for the maintenance of life, so homeostasis and wound healing are important aspects of the behavior of epithelial tissues. Carcinomas originate in epithelial tissues.There are essentially two approaches to modeling tissues--to start at the level of the tissue (i.e., a length scale of the order of 1 mm) and develop generalized equations for behavior (a continuum approach); or to start at the level of the cell (i.e., a length scale of the order of 10 µm) and develop tissue behavior as an emergent property of cellular behavior (an individual-based approach). As will be seen, these are not mutually exclusive approaches, and they come in a variety of flavors.

  11. Steroid biosynthesis in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehan; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Vihma, Veera

    2015-11-01

    Tissue-specific expression of steroidogenic enzymes allows the modulation of active steroid levels in a local manner. Thus, the measurement of local steroid concentrations, rather than the circulating levels, has been recognized as a more accurate indicator of the steroid action within a specific tissue. Adipose tissue, one of the largest endocrine tissues in the human body, has been established as an important site for steroid storage and metabolism. Locally produced steroids, through the enzymatic conversion from steroid precursors delivered to adipose tissue, have been proven to either functionally regulate adipose tissue metabolism, or quantitatively contribute to the whole body's steroid levels. Most recently, it has been suggested that adipose tissue may contain the steroidogenic machinery necessary for the initiation of steroid biosynthesis de novo from cholesterol. This review summarizes the evidence indicating the presence of the entire steroidogenic apparatus in adipose tissue and discusses the potential roles of local steroid products in modulating adipose tissue activity and other metabolic parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Biomechanical properties of soft tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yanjun; Xu, Chuanqing; Yang, Jian; Xu, Xiaohu

    2003-06-01

    Viscoelasticity is the primary mechanical property of bio-soft tissues. It has been widely applied in basic research of biological tissues including cornea, lung, heart and blood vessels. Along with the development of tissue engineering research, the evaluation of soft tissue viscoelasticity is becoming more and more important. In this paper, using the Whittaker function, we give an approximate power series of the exponential integral E 1( X) and the parameters C, ⦦1 and ⦦2 of the generalized relaxation function G(t) and generalized creep function J(t). With expanded skin as an example, the relationship between stress relaxation, creep and stress-strain finite deformation are studied.

  13. Three Dimensional Optic Tissue Culture and Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Aten, Laurie A. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Caldwell, Delmar R. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Fitzgerald, Wendy S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process for artificially producing three-dimensional optic tissue has been developed. The optic cells are cultured in a bioireactor at low shear conditions. The tissue forms as normal, functional tissue grows with tissue organization and extracellular matrix formation.

  14. Tissue engineering of cartilages using biomatrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melrose, J.; Chuang, C.; Whitelock, J.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an exciting new cross-disciplinary methodology which applies the principles of engineering and structure-function relationships between normal and pathological tissues to develop biological substitute to restore, maintain or improve tissue function. Tissue engineering theref...

  15. Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Cell Therapies Artificial and Biohybrid Organs Regenerative Medicine / Tissue Engineering Based on the field of cell transplantation (started in...potential Amniocentesis: amniotic fluid that bathes the fetus in the womb during pregnancy Placenta: the tissue in the womb that houses the baby

  16. Biomaterials for tissue engineering: summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, L.; Mikos, A. G.; Gibbons, D. F.; Picciolo, G. L.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    This article summarizes presentations and discussion at the workshop "Enabling Biomaterial Technology for Tissue Engineering," which was held during the Fifth World Biomaterials Congress in May 1996. Presentations covered the areas of material substrate architecture, barrier effects, and cellular response, including analysis of biomaterials challenges involved in producing specific tissue-engineered products.

  17. Obtaining corneal tissue for keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Martínez-Cantullera, A; Calatayud Pinuaga, M

    2016-10-01

    Cornea transplant is the most common tissue transplant in the world. In Spain, tissue donation activities depend upon transplant coordinator activities and the well-known Spanish model for organ and tissue donation. Tissue donor detection system and tissue donor evaluation is performed mainly by transplant coordinators using the Spanish model on donation. The evaluation of a potential tissue donor from detection until recovery is based on an exhaustive review of the medical and social history, physical examination, family interview to determine will of the deceased, and a laboratory screening test. Corneal acceptance criteria for transplantation have a wider spectrum than other tissues, as donors with active malignancies and infections are accepted for kearatoplasty in most tissue banks. Corneal evaluation during the whole process is performed to ensure the safety of the donor and the recipient, as well as an effective transplant. Last step before processing, corneal recovery, must be performed under standard operating procedures and in a correct environment. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Gene therapy for tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, Kenneth R

    2003-02-01

    Tissue repair and regeneration are the normal biological responses of many different tissues in the body to injury. During the healing process, profound changes occur in cell composition and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation. Fibroblasts and equivalent reparative cells migrate to the wounded area and subsequently proliferate. These cells and reparative cells from the surrounding tissue are responsible for the rapid repair which results in tissue regeneration. Growth factors, one of which is transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), stimulate fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells to proliferate and synthesize ECM proteins. This process of early repair provides a rapid way to restore new tissue and mechanical integrity. This early tissue repair process is normally followed by involution, which requires the production and activation of proteases, tissue maturation and remodeling, reorganization and finally regeneration. Alternately, failure to replace the critical components of the ECM, including elastin and basement membrane, results in abnormal regeneration of the epithelial cell layer. Although remodeling should occur during healing, provisional repair may be followed by excessive synthesis and deposition of collagen, which results in irreversible fibrosis and scarring. This excessive fibrosis which occurs in aberrant healing is at least in part mediated by persistent TGF-beta. Because of the central role of collagen in the wound healing process, the pharmacological control of collagen synthesis has been of paramount importance as a possible way to abrogate aberrant healing and prevent irreversible fibrosis. Fibrosis is an abnormal response to tissue injury. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Mechanical device for tissue regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herder, J.L.; Maij, E.

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a mechanical device for tissue- regeneration inside a patient, comprising means (2, 3) to place a scaffold for the tissue under mechanical stress. Said means comprise a first device-part (2) and a second device-part (3) which parts are arranged to be movable with respect to

  20. Visceral adipose tissue is associated with microstructural brain tissue damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widya, Ralph L; Kroft, Lucia J M; Altmann-Schneider, Irmhild; van den Berg-Huysmans, Annette A; van der Bijl, Noortje; de Roos, Albert; Lamb, Hildo J; van Buchem, Mark A; Slagboom, P Eline; van Heemst, Diana; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2015-05-01

    Obesity has been associated with microstructural brain tissue damage. Different fat compartments demonstrate different metabolic and endocrine behaviors. The aim was to investigate the individual associations between abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and microstructural integrity in the brain. This study comprised 243 subjects aged 65.4 ± 6.7 years. The associations between abdominal VAT and SAT, assessed by CT, and magnetization transfer imaging markers of brain microstructure for gray and white matter were analyzed and adjusted for confounding factors. VAT was associated with normalized MTR peak height in gray (β -0.216) and white matter (β -0.240) (both P  0.05). Stepwise linear regression analysis showed that only VAT was associated with normalized MTR peak height in gray and white matter (both P VAT rather than SAT is associated with microstructural brain tissue damage in elderly individuals. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  1. [Muscles and connective tissue: histology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delage, J-P

    2012-10-01

    Here, we give some comments about the DVD movies "Muscle Attitudes" from Endovivo productions, the movies up lighting some loss in the attention given to studies on the connective tissue, and especially them into muscles. The main characteristics of the different components in the intra-muscular connective tissue (perimysium, endomysium, epimysium) are shown here with special references to their ordered architecture and special references to their spatial distributions. This connective tissue is abundant into the muscles and is in continuity with the muscles in vicinity, with their tendons and their sheath, sticking the whole on skin. This connective tissue has also very abundant connections on the muscles fibres. It is then assumed that the connective tissue sticks every organs or cells of the locomotion system. Considering the elastic properties of the collagen fibres which are the most abundant component of connective tissue, it is possible to up light a panel of connective tissue associated functions such as the transmission of muscle contractions or the regulation of protein and energetic muscles metabolism. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  2. Force transmission in epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Claudia G; Martin, Adam C

    2016-03-01

    In epithelial tissues, cells constantly generate and transmit forces between each other. Forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton regulate tissue shape and structure and also provide signals that influence cells' decisions to divide, die, or differentiate. Forces are transmitted across epithelia because cells are mechanically linked through junctional complexes, and forces can propagate through the cell cytoplasm. Here, we review some of the molecular mechanisms responsible for force generation, with a specific focus on the actomyosin cortex and adherens junctions. We then discuss evidence for how these mechanisms promote cell shape changes and force transmission in tissues. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Phosphorylation of the type II transmembrane serine protease, TMPRSS13, in hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 and -2-mediated cell-surface localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Andrew S; Varela, Fausto A; Hyland, Thomas E; Schoenbeck, Andrew J; White, Jordan M; Tanabe, Lauren M; Todi, Sokol V; List, Karin

    2017-09-08

    TMPRSS13 is a member of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family. Although various TTSPs have been characterized in detail biochemically and functionally, the basic properties of TMPRSS13 remain unclear. Here, we investigate the activation, inhibition, post-translational modification, and localization of TMPRSS13. We show that TMPRSS13 is a glycosylated, active protease and that its own proteolytic activity mediates zymogen cleavage. Full-length, active TMPRSS13 exhibits impaired cell-surface expression in the absence of the cognate Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors, hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI)-1 or HAI-2. Concomitant presence of TMPRSS13 with either HAI-1 or -2 mediates phosphorylation of residues in the intracellular domain of the protease, and it coincides with efficient transport of the protease to the cell surface and its subsequent shedding. Cell-surface labeling experiments indicate that the dominant form of TMPRSS13 on the cell surface is phosphorylated, whereas intracellular TMPRSS13 is predominantly non-phosphorylated. These data provide novel insight into the cellular properties of TMPRSS13 and highlight phosphorylation of TMPRSS13 as a novel post-translational modification of this TTSP family member and potentially other members of this family of proteases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Molecular, cellular, and tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Known as the bible of biomedical engineering, The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition, sets the standard against which all other references of this nature are measured. As such, it has served as a major resource for both skilled professionals and novices to biomedical engineering. Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Engineering, the fourth volume of the handbook, presents material from respected scientists with diverse backgrounds in molecular biology, transport phenomena, physiological modeling, tissue engineering, stem cells, drug delivery systems, artificial organs, and personalized medicine. More than three dozen specific topics are examined, including DNA vaccines, biomimetic systems, cardiovascular dynamics, biomaterial scaffolds, cell mechanobiology, synthetic biomaterials, pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, nanobiomaterials for tissue engineering, biomedical imaging of engineered tissues, gene therapy, noninvasive targeted protein and peptide drug deliver...

  5. Adipose tissue remodeling and obesity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Kai; Kusminski, Christine M; Scherer, Philipp E

    2011-01-01

    To fulfill its role as the major energy-storing tissue, adipose has several unique properties that cannot be seen in any other organ, including an almost unlimited capacity to expand in a non-transformed state...

  6. Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rare. Common heritable disorders of connective tissue include: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome mostly affects the skin and joints. Connective ... of America, Inc. Website: https://www.debra.org Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation Website: https://www.ednf.org/ National ...

  7. Endoscopic subsurface imaging in tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Staggs, M; Radousky, H B

    2001-02-12

    The objective of this work is to develop endoscopic subsurface optical imaging technology that will be able to image different tissue components located underneath the surface of the tissue at an imaging depth of up to 1 centimeter. This effort is based on the utilization of existing technology and components developed for medical endoscopes with the incorporation of the appropriate modifications to implement the spectral and polarization difference imaging technique. This subsurface imaging technique employs polarization and spectral light discrimination in combination with image processing to remove a large portion of the image information from the outer layers of the tissue which leads to enhancement of the contrast and image quality of subsurface tissue structures.

  8. Tissue Harmonic Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joachim

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for tissue harmonic synthetic aperture imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of synthetic aperture imaging in ultrasound, which has shown great potentials in the clinic. Suggestions for synthetic aperture tissue...... system complexity compared to conventional synthetic aperture techniques. In this project, SASB is sought combined with a pulse inversion technique for 2nd harmonic tissue harmonic imaging. The advantages in tissue harmonic imaging (THI) are expected to further improve the image quality of SASB....... The first part of the scientific contribution investigates an implementation of pulse inversion for THI on the experimental ultrasound system SARUS. The technique is initially implemented for linear array transducers and then expanded for convex array transducers. The technique is evaluated based on spatial...

  9. Cadherin mechanotransduction in tissue remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twiss, F.; de Rooij, J.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical forces are increasingly recognized as central factors in the regulation of tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. Central to the transduction of mechanical information into biochemical signaling is the contractile actomyosin cytoskeleton. Fluctuations in actomyosin contraction are sensed

  10. Polymeric Nanofibers in Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Rebecca L.; Kasper, F. Kurtis

    2011-01-01

    Polymeric nanofibers can be produced using methods such as electrospinning, phase separation, and self-assembly, and the fiber composition, diameter, alignment, degradation, and mechanical properties can be tailored to the intended application. Nanofibers possess unique advantages for tissue engineering. The small diameter closely matches that of extracellular matrix fibers, and the relatively large surface area is beneficial for cell attachment and bioactive factor loading. This review will update the reader on the aspects of nanofiber fabrication and characterization important to tissue engineering, including control of porous structure, cell infiltration, and fiber degradation. Bioactive factor loading will be discussed with specific relevance to tissue engineering. Finally, applications of polymeric nanofibers in the fields of bone, cartilage, ligament and tendon, cardiovascular, and neural tissue engineering will be reviewed. PMID:21699434

  11. Microdissection of stained archival tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S K; Douglas-Jones, A G; Morgan, J M

    1997-08-01

    In many tissues the preinvasive stage of neoplastic progression can be identified histologically as dysplasia or in situ disease. There is much interest in defining the molecular events associated with the early stages of neoplasia. Retrieval of histologically recognisable preinvasive neoplastic tissue uncontaminated by inflammatory or stromal cells is important for genetic studies using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. A novel method for microdissection is described in which 10 microns sections are dewaxed, stained with haematoxylin and eosin, dried, covered with Sellotape, and the tissue cut out using a scalpel blade under direct visual control. The method is quick, eliminates problems of operator tremor, preserves the architecture of the micro-dissected tissue (for photographic documentation) and requires no special equipment. The presence of Sellotape and adhesive in the reaction mixture has no detrimental effect on the ability to extract DNA or to perform PCR.

  12. Microdissection of stained archival tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, S K; Douglas-Jones, A G; Morgan, J M

    1997-01-01

    In many tissues the preinvasive stage of neoplastic progression can be identified histologically as dysplasia or in situ disease. There is much interest in defining the molecular events associated with the early stages of neoplasia. Retrieval of histologically recognisable preinvasive neoplastic tissue uncontaminated by inflammatory or stromal cells is important for genetic studies using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. A novel method for microdissection is described in which 10 microns...

  13. Trabectedin in Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Petek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue sarcomas are a group of rare tumors derived from mesenchymal tissue, accounting for about 1% of adult cancers. There are over 60 different histological subtypes, each with their own unique biological behavior and response to systemic therapy. The outcome for patients with metastatic soft tissue sarcoma is poor with few available systemic treatment options. For decades, the mainstay of management has consisted of doxorubicin with or without ifosfamide. Trabectedin is a synthetic agent derived from the Caribbean tunicate, Ecteinascidia turbinata. This drug has a number of potential mechanisms of action, including binding the DNA minor groove, interfering with DNA repair pathways and the cell cycle, as well as interacting with transcription factors. Several phase II trials have shown that trabectedin has activity in anthracycline and alkylating agent-resistant soft tissue sarcoma and suggest use in the second- and third-line setting. More recently, trabectedin has shown similar progression-free survival to doxorubicin in the first-line setting and significant activity in liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma subtypes. Trabectedin has shown a favorable toxicity profile and has been approved in over 70 countries for the treatment of metastatic soft tissue sarcoma. This manuscript will review the development of trabectedin in soft tissue sarcomas.

  14. [Soft tissue rheumatism in erderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepański, Leszek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of soft, peri-articular tissues are a common cause of musculoskeletal pain in elderly patients. Nevertheless, most physicians underestimate the role of soft tissue rheumatism in the pathomechanism of the pain. The impairments of soft tissue can not be diagnosed by X-rays examinations, whereas degenerative lesions of joints are easy diagnosed using this method even despite of their uncertain role in producing the symptoms. The incidence of pain syndromes originated from soft tissues differ regarding to the age of patients. In young subjects the incidence of all of them is generally low. Syndromes provoked by overloading during work: repetitive strain syndrome, canal tunnel syndrome, tennis elbow, golfers elbow, shoulder tendon coin disorders and myofascial pain syndrome are common in middle-aged patients. The morbidity of fibromialgia syndrome is also lower in old people probably as the result of diminished numbers and degenerative changes in nociceptive fibers. The syndromes prevailing in elderly patients include trochanteric syndrome and the pain syndromes provoked by muscle spasm depended on posture abnormalities. In the soft tissue pain syndrome prevention adapted to old age kinesitherapy and avoiding muscle overloading are recommended. Soft tissue pain syndromes are usually treated with non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs. In local pain syndromes better results can be obtained by local treatment. Local injections of glikocorticosteroids are usually very effective and safe.

  15. Tissue Banking: Current procedures, ethical consideration and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tissue banking provides safe and effective cells and tissues for transplantation in reconstruction surgery. Bone, amnion, skin, cartilage, heart valves and xenograft tissues are the most commonly used biological tissues. Acquisition of tissue is dependent on elaborate donor screening criteria based on medical and social ...

  16. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Tissue Engineered Bone Tissue Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bressan Eriberto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone tissue engineering strategies are emerging as attractive alternatives to autografts and allografts in bone tissue reconstruction, in particular thanks to their association with nanotechnologies. Nanostructured biomaterials, indeed, mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM of the natural bone, creating an artificial microenvironment that promotes cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. At the same time, the possibility to easily isolate mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from different adult tissues together with their multi-lineage differentiation potential makes them an interesting tool in the field of bone tissue engineering. This review gives an overview of the most promising nanostructured biomaterials, used alone or in combination with MSCs, which could in future be employed as bone substitutes. Recent works indicate that composite scaffolds made of ceramics/metals or ceramics/polymers are undoubtedly more effective than the single counterparts in terms of osteoconductivity, osteogenicity and osteoinductivity. A better understanding of the interactions between MSCs and nanostructured biomaterials will surely contribute to the progress of bone tissue engineering.

  17. Soft tissue engineering with micronized-gingival connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Sawako; Sumita, Yoshinori; Ohba, Seigo; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Asahina, Izumi

    2018-01-01

    The free gingival graft (FGG) and connective tissue graft (CTG) are currently considered to be the gold standards for keratinized gingival tissue reconstruction and augmentation. However, these procedures have some disadvantages in harvesting large grafts, such as donor-site morbidity as well as insufficient gingival width and thickness at the recipient site post-treatment. To solve these problems, we focused on an alternative strategy using micronized tissue transplantation (micro-graft). In this study, we first investigated whether transplantation of micronized gingival connective tissues (MGCTs) promotes skin wound healing. MGCTs (≤100 µm) were obtained by mincing a small piece (8 mm 3 ) of porcine keratinized gingiva using the RIGENERA system. The MGCTs were then transplanted to a full skin defect (5 mm in diameter) on the dorsal surface of immunodeficient mice after seeding to an atelocollagen matrix. Transplantations of atelocollagen matrixes with and without micronized dermis were employed as experimental controls. The results indicated that MGCTs markedly promote the vascularization and epithelialization of the defect area 14 days after transplantation compared to the experimental controls. After 21 days, complete wound closure with low contraction was obtained only in the MGCT grafts. Tracking analysis of transplanted MGCTs revealed that some mesenchymal cells derived from MGCTs can survive during healing and may function to assist in wound healing. We propose here that micro-grafting with MGCTs represents an alternative strategy for keratinized tissue reconstruction that is characterized by low morbidity and ready availability. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Melanin content of hamster tissues, human tissues, and various melanomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, K.P.; Fairchild, R.G.; Slatkin, D.N.; Greenberg, D.; Packer, S.; Atkins, H.L.; Hannon, S.J.

    1981-02-01

    Melanin content (percentage by weight) was determined in both pigmented and nonpigmented tissues of Syrian golden hamsters bearing Greene melanoma. Melanin content was also measured in various other melanoma models (B-16 in C57 mice, Harding-Passey in BALB/c mice, and KHDD in C3H mice) and in nine human melanomas, as well as in selected normal tissues. The purpose was to evaluate the possible efficacy of chlorpromazine, which is known to bind to melanin, as a vehicle for boron transport in neutron capture therapy. Successful therapy would depend upon selective uptake and absolute concentration of borated compounds in tumors; these parameters will in turn depend upon melanin concentration in melanomas and nonpigmented ''background'' tissues. Hamster whole eyes, hamster melanomas, and other well-pigmented animal melanomas were found to contain 0.3 to 0.8% melanin by weight, whereas human melanomas varied from 0.1 to 0.9% (average, 0.35%). Other tissues, with the exception of skin, were lower in content by a factor of greater than or equal to30. Melanin pigment was extracted from tissues, and the melanin content was determined spectrophotometrically. Measurements were found to be sensitive to the presence of other proteins. Previous procedures for isolating and quantifying melanin often neglected the importance of removing proteins and other interfering nonmelanic substances.

  19. Inhibition of transforming growth factor-activated kinase 1 (TAK1 blocks and reverses epithelial to mesenchymal transition of mesothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Strippoli

    Full Text Available Peritoneal fibrosis is a frequent complication of peritoneal dialysis following repeated low grade inflammatory and pro-fibrotic insults. This pathological process may lead to ultrafiltration failure and eventually to the discontinuing of the therapy. Fibrosis is linked to epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT of the peritoneal mesothelial cells, which acquire invasive and fibrogenic abilities. Here, we analyzed the role of the transforming growth factor-activated kinase-1 (TAK1 in the EMT of primary mesothelial cells from human peritoneum. The inhibition of TAK1 in mesenchymal-like mesothelial cells from the effluents of patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis led to the reacquisition of the apical to basolateral polarity, to increased expression of epithelial and to down-regulation of mesenchymal markers. TAK1 inhibition also resulted in decreased migratory/invasive abilities of effluent-derived mesothelial cells. Simultaneous inhibition of ERK1/2 and TAK1 pathways did not lead to an additive effect in the reacquisition of the epithelial phenotype. Inhibition of TAK1 also blocked EMT in vitro and reduced the levels of PAI-1, which is involved in fibrosis and invasion. Analysis of signalling pathways downstream of TAK1 involved in EMT induction, showed that TAK1 inhibition reduced the transcriptional activity of NF-κB and Smad3, as well as the phosphorylation of c-jun, while enhancing Smad1-5-8 activity. These results demonstrate that TAK1 is a cross-point in a network including different pro-EMT transcription factors, such as NF-κB, Snail, AP-1 and Smads. The identification of TAK1 as a main biochemical mediator of EMT and fibrosis in mesothelial cells from human peritoneum and the study of signalling pathways induced by its activity may be relevant in the design of new therapies aimed to counteract peritoneal fibrosis.

  20. Identification of the matriptase second CUB domain as the secondary site for interaction with hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor type-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Kuniyo; Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Yasumoto, Makoto; Kojima, Kenji; Mochida, Seiya; Fushiki, Tohru

    2010-10-22

    Matriptase is a type II transmembrane serine protease comprising 855 amino acid residues. The extracellular region of matriptase comprises a noncatalytic stem domain (containing two tandem repeats of complement proteases C1r/C1s-urchin embryonic growth factor-bone morphogenetic protein (CUB) domain) and a catalytic serine protease domain. The stem domain of matriptase contains site(s) for facilitating the interaction of this protease with the endogenous inhibitor, hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor type-1 (HAI-1). The present study aimed to identify these site(s). Analyses using a secreted variant of recombinant matriptase comprising the entire extracellular domain (MAT), its truncated variants, and a recombinant HAI-1 variant with an entire extracellular domain (HAI-1-58K) revealed that the second CUB domain (CUB domain II, Cys(340)-Pro(452)) likely contains the site(s) of interest. We also found that MAT undergoes cleavage between Lys(379) and Val(380) within CUB domain II and that the C-terminal residues after Val(380) are responsible for facilitating the interaction with HAI-1-58K. A synthetic peptide corresponding to Val(380)-Asp(390) markedly increased the matriptase-inhibiting activity of HAI-1-58K, whereas the peptides corresponding to Val(380)-Val(389) and Phe(382)-Asp(390) had no effect. HAI-1-58K precipitated with immobilized streptavidin resins to which a synthetic peptide Val(380)-Pro(392) with a biotinylated lysine residue at its C terminus was bound, suggesting direct interaction between CUB domain II and HAI-1. These results led to the identification of the matriptase CUB domain II, which facilitates the primary inhibitory interaction between this protease and HAI-1.

  1. Identification of the Matriptase Second CUB Domain as the Secondary Site for Interaction with Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activator Inhibitor Type-1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Kuniyo; Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Yasumoto, Makoto; Kojima, Kenji; Mochida, Seiya; Fushiki, Tohru

    2010-01-01

    Matriptase is a type II transmembrane serine protease comprising 855 amino acid residues. The extracellular region of matriptase comprises a noncatalytic stem domain (containing two tandem repeats of complement proteases C1r/C1s-urchin embryonic growth factor-bone morphogenetic protein (CUB) domain) and a catalytic serine protease domain. The stem domain of matriptase contains site(s) for facilitating the interaction of this protease with the endogenous inhibitor, hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor type-1 (HAI-1). The present study aimed to identify these site(s). Analyses using a secreted variant of recombinant matriptase comprising the entire extracellular domain (MAT), its truncated variants, and a recombinant HAI-1 variant with an entire extracellular domain (HAI-1–58K) revealed that the second CUB domain (CUB domain II, Cys340–Pro452) likely contains the site(s) of interest. We also found that MAT undergoes cleavage between Lys379 and Val380 within CUB domain II and that the C-terminal residues after Val380 are responsible for facilitating the interaction with HAI-1–58K. A synthetic peptide corresponding to Val380–Asp390 markedly increased the matriptase-inhibiting activity of HAI-1–58K, whereas the peptides corresponding to Val380–Val389 and Phe382–Asp390 had no effect. HAI-1–58K precipitated with immobilized streptavidin resins to which a synthetic peptide Val380–Pro392 with a biotinylated lysine residue at its C terminus was bound, suggesting direct interaction between CUB domain II and HAI-1. These results led to the identification of the matriptase CUB domain II, which facilitates the primary inhibitory interaction between this protease and HAI-1. PMID:20682770

  2. Tissue engineering the mandibular condyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Detamore, Michael S

    2007-08-01

    Tissue engineering provides the revolutionary possibility for curing temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. Although characterization of the mandibular condyle has been extensively studied, tissue engineering of the mandibular condyle is still in an inchoate stage. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of advances relevant to tissue engineering of mandibular cartilage and bone, and to serve as a reference for future research in this field. A concise anatomical overview of the mandibular condyle is provided, and the structure and function of the mandibular condyle are reviewed, including the cell types, extracellular matrix (ECM) composition, and biomechanical properties. Collagens and proteoglycans are distributed heterogeneously (topographically and zonally). The complexity of collagen types (including types I, II, III, and X) and cell types (including fibroblast-like cells, mesenchymal cells, and differentiated chondrocytes) indicates that mandibular cartilage is an intermediate between fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. The fibrocartilaginous fibrous zone at the surface is separated from hyaline-like mature and hypertrophic zones below by a thin and highly cellular proliferative zone. Mechanically, the mandibular condylar cartilage is anisotropic under tension (stiffer anteroposteriorly) and heterogeneous under compression (anterior region stiffer than posterior). Tissue engineering of mandibular condylar cartilage and bone is reviewed, consisting of cell culture, growth factors, scaffolds, and bioreactors. Ideal engineered constructs for mandibular condyle regeneration must involve two distinct yet integrated stratified layers in a single osteochondral construct to meet the different demands for the regeneration of cartilage and bone tissues. We conclude this review with a brief discussion of tissue engineering strategies, along with future directions for tissue engineering the mandibular condyle.

  3. Bioactive glass in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Bal, B. Sonny; Fu, Qiang; Jung, Steven B.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in biomaterials processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed. PMID:21421084

  4. Tissue-electronics interfaces: from implantable devices to engineered tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiner, Ron; Dvir, Tal

    2018-01-01

    Biomedical electronic devices are interfaced with the human body to extract precise medical data and to interfere with tissue function by providing electrical stimuli. In this Review, we outline physiologically and pathologically relevant tissue properties and processes that are important for designing implantable electronic devices. We summarize design principles for flexible and stretchable electronics that adapt to the mechanics of soft tissues, such as those including conducting polymers, liquid metal alloys, metallic buckling and meandering architectures. We further discuss technologies for inserting devices into the body in a minimally invasive manner and for eliminating them without further intervention. Finally, we introduce the concept of integrating electronic devices with biomaterials and cells, and we envision how such technologies may lead to the development of bionic organs for regenerative medicine.

  5. Stages of Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tissue Sarcoma Treatment Childhood Vascular Tumors Treatment Research Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma Go to Health Professional Version ...

  6. Bioreactor design for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pörtner, Ralf; Nagel-Heyer, Stephanie; Goepfert, Christiane; Adamietz, Peter; Meenen, Norbert M

    2005-09-01

    Bioreactor systems play an important role in tissue engineering, as they enable reproducible and controlled changes in specific environmental factors. They can provide technical means to perform controlled studies aimed at understanding specific biological, chemical or physical effects. Furthermore, bioreactors allow for a safe and reproducible production of tissue constructs. For later clinical applications, the bioreactor system should be an advantageous method in terms of low contamination risk, ease of handling and scalability. To date the goals and expectations of bioreactor development have been fulfilled only to some extent, as bioreactor design in tissue engineering is very complex and still at an early stage of development. In this review we summarize important aspects for bioreactor design and provide an overview on existing concepts. The generation of three dimensional cartilage-carrier constructs is described to demonstrate how the properties of engineered tissues can be improved significantly by combining biological and engineering knowledge. In the future, a very intimate collaboration between engineers and biologists will lead to an increased fundamental understanding of complex issues that can have an impact on tissue formation in bioreactors.

  7. Ectopic mammary tissue in vulva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Momčilo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ectopic mammary gland tissue is a residual tissue that persists during the embryologic development along ectodermal primitive milk streaks. Incomplete involution anywhere along the primitive milk streak can result in accessory or ectopic mammary tissue. Case report. A woman, 27-year old, admitted to Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic Kragujevac for surgery, of goose-egg size, vulva tumor, of elastic consistency. Menarche started in 12 years of age, with the regular menstrual cycle, without previous gynecological diseases. The woman had one pregnancy terminated by cesarean section because of the multiple (twin pregnancy. Excision of the tumor was completely done in the total endotracheal anesthesia. Pathohistologic (PH findings was: Dysplasia fibrosa cystica simplex mammae, with focuses of sclerosing adenosis. Expression of estrogen (ER and progesterone receptors (PR were positive. Conclusion. Ectopic mammary tissue in vulva in adult period is very rarely seen, and can be changed pathologically as well as normally positioned breast tissue into benign cystic changes, benign tumors, adenomas and fibroadenomas and tumors. Cells with low ER/PR receptor level grow independently of estrogene stimulation and they could be resistant to hormonal therapy effects.

  8. Cryobanking of human ovarian tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macklon, Kirsten Tryde; Ernst, Erik; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2014-01-01

    Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is one way of preserving fertility in young women with a malignant disease or other disorders that require gonadotoxic treatment. The purpose of the study was to explore how many women remained interested in continued cryostorage of their ovarian tissue beyond a...... women with ovarian tissue cryobanked requested continued cryostorage after an initial period of at least 5 years. The main reason for requesting disposal was successful completion of a family.......Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is one way of preserving fertility in young women with a malignant disease or other disorders that require gonadotoxic treatment. The purpose of the study was to explore how many women remained interested in continued cryostorage of their ovarian tissue beyond...... an initial 5-year period. Between 1999 and 2006, a total of 201 girls and young women had one ovary cryopreserved for fertility preservation in Denmark. One hundred of these met our inclusion criteria, which included a follow-up period of at least 5 years, and were mailed a questionnaire. The response rate...

  9. Interface dynamics of competing tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podewitz, Nils; Jülicher, Frank; Gompper, Gerhard; Elgeti, Jens

    2016-08-01

    Tissues can be characterized by their homeostatic stress, i.e. the value of stress for which cell division and cell death balance. When two different tissues grow in competition, a difference of their homeostatic stresses determines which tissue grows at the expense of the second. This then leads to the propagation of the interface separating the tissues. Here, we study structural and dynamical properties of this interface by combining continuum theory with mesoscopic simulations of a cell-based model. Using a simulation box that moves with the interface, we find that a stationary state exists in which the interface has a finite width and propagates with a constant velocity. The propagation velocity in the simulations depends linearly on the homeostatic stress difference, in excellent agreement with the analytical predictions. This agreement is also seen for the stress and velocity profiles. Finally, we analyzed the interface growth and roughness as a function of time and system size. We estimated growth and roughness exponents, which differ from those previously obtained for simple tissue growth.

  10. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-01-01

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be ste...

  11. Differential procoagulant activity of microparticles derived from monocytes, granulocytes, platelets and endothelial cells: impact of active tissue factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shustova, Olga N; Antonova, Olga A; Golubeva, Nina V; Khaspekova, Svetlana G; Yakushkin, Vladimir V; Aksuk, Svetlana A; Alchinova, Irina B; Karganov, Mikhail Y; Mazurov, Alexey V

    2017-07-01

    : Microparticles released by activated/apoptotic cells exhibit coagulation activity as they express phosphatidylserine and some of them - tissue factor. We compared procoagulant properties of microparticles from monocytes, granulocytes, platelets and endothelial cells and assessed the impact of tissue factor in observed differences. Microparticles were sedimented (20 000g, 30 min) from the supernatants of activated monocytes, monocytic THP-1 cells, granulocytes, platelets and endothelial cells. Coagulation activity of microparticles was examined using plasma recalcification assay. The size of microparticles was evaluated by dynamic light scattering. Tissue factor activity was measured by its ability to activate factor X. All microparticles significantly accelerated plasma coagulation with the shortest lag times for microparticles derived from monocytes, intermediate - for microparticles from THP-1 cells and endothelial cells, and the longest - for microparticles from granulocytes and platelets. Average diameters of microparticles ranged within 400-600 nm. The largest microparticles were produced by endothelial cells and granulocytes, smaller - by monocytes, and the smallest - by THP-1 cells and platelets. The highest tissue factor activity was detected in microparticles from monocytes, lower activity - in microparticles from endothelial cells and THP-1 cells, and no activity - in microparticles from platelets and granulocytes. Anti-tissue factor antibodies extended coagulation lag times for microparticles from monocytes, endothelial cells and THP-1 cells and equalized them with those for microparticles from platelets and granulocytes. Higher coagulation activity of microparticles from monocytes, THP-1 cells and endothelial cells in comparison with microparticles from platelets and granulocytes is determined mainly by the presence of active tissue factor.

  12. [Functional morphology of pulp tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, H; Schaeg, G; Türk, R

    1989-01-01

    As compared with mesenchyme no genuine defense cells are developed in the tissue of the dental pulp and the nervous tissue. This is a further hint for the common development from ectoderm. The three dimensional meshwork of pulpa fibroblasts ("mesectoderm") is structured by elongated cell processes connected with each other by a variety of special cell junctions ("electronic cell coupling"). Metabolites from the microcirculation and neuropeptides from vegetative axons influence the activity of fibroblasts synthetizing groundsubstance. The meshwork of the groundsubstance has exclusion effects concerning molecules with a distinct molecular weight and charge. Thus a primitive defense system is established. With this the role of a newly described cell type of the dental pulp, the "lymphocytic pericyte" is discussed. Because of the poor capacity of the pulpa tissue for immunological reactions pathologically disorders may easily become chronically spreading their antigenic components throughout the body.

  13. Tension, contraction and tissue morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, Natalie C; Martin, Adam C

    2017-12-01

    D'Arcy Thompson was a proponent of applying mathematical and physical principles to biological systems, an approach that is becoming increasingly common in developmental biology. Indeed, the recent integration of quantitative experimental data, force measurements and mathematical modeling has changed our understanding of morphogenesis - the shaping of an organism during development. Emerging evidence suggests that the subcellular organization of contractile cytoskeletal networks plays a key role in force generation, while on the tissue level the spatial organization of forces determines the morphogenetic output. Inspired by D'Arcy Thompson's On Growth and Form, we review our current understanding of how biological forms are created and maintained by the generation and organization of contractile forces at the cell and tissue levels. We focus on recent advances in our understanding of how cells actively sculpt tissues and how forces are involved in specific morphogenetic processes. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Mammalian Cell Tissue Culture Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Katy; May, Kristin M

    2016-06-01

    Cultured tissues and cells are used extensively in physiological and pharmacological studies. In vitro cultures provide a means of examining cells and tissues without the complex interactions that would be present if the whole organism were studied. A number of special skills are required in order to preserve the structure, function, behavior, and biology of cells in culture. This unit describes the basic skills required to maintain and preserve cell cultures: maintaining aseptic technique, preparing media with the appropriate characteristics, passaging, freezing and storage, recovering frozen stocks, and counting viable cells. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Lipase: Localization in Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, M S; Moskowitz, A A

    1965-07-02

    Certain problems usually associated with the histochemistry of lipases are obviated by a technique that utilizes the endogenous blood chylomicrons and the cellular stores of triglyceride as substrates for the histochemical demonstration of lipolytic enzyme activity in situ. In spreads of mesenteric adipose tissue, the technique makes it possible to distinguish between lipoprotein lipase activity at sites in the capillaries and lipolysis occurring in the adipocytes. The selective anatomic lolization of the lipase reaction correlated with the functional state of the tissue, and the absence of reaction product in control mesenteries from starved mice or in heat-inactivated controls, support the validity of this histochemical reaction.

  16. Raman Spectroscopy of Ocular Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Gellermann, Warner

    The optically transparent nature of the human eye has motivated numerous Raman studies aimed at the non-invasive optical probing of ocular tissue components critical to healthy vision. Investigations include the qualitative and quantitative detection of tissue-specific molecular constituents, compositional changes occurring with development of ocular pathology, and the detection and tracking of ocular drugs and nutritional supplements. Motivated by a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cataract formation in the aging human lens, a great deal of work has centered on the Raman detection of proteins and water content in the lens. Several protein groups and the hydroxyl response are readily detectable. Changes of protein compositions can be studied in excised noncataractous tissue versus aged tissue preparations as well as in tissue samples with artificially induced cataracts. Most of these studies are carried out in vitro using suitable animal models and conventional Raman techniques. Tissue water content plays an important role in optimum light transmission of the outermost transparent ocular structure, the cornea. Using confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to non-invasively measure the water to protein ratio as a measure of hydration status and to track drug-induced changes of the hydration levels in the rabbit cornea at various depths. The aqueous humor, normally supplying nutrients to cornea and lens, has an advantageous anterior location for Raman studies. Increasing efforts are pursued to non-invasively detect the presence of glucose and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotic drugs in this medium. In retinal tissue, Raman spectroscopy proves to be an important tool for research into the causes of macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible vision disorders and blindness in the elderly. It has been possible to detect the spectral features of advanced glycation and advanced lipooxydation end products in

  17. History of plant tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Plant tissue culture, or the aseptic culture of cells, tissues, organs, and their components under defined physical and chemical conditions in vitro, is an important tool in both basic and applied studies as well as in commercial application. It owes its origin to the ideas of the German scientist, Haberlandt, at the beginning of the twentieth century. The early studies led to root cultures, embryo cultures, and the first true callus/tissue cultures. The period between the 1940s and the 1960s was marked by the development of new techniques and the improvement of those that were already in use. It was the availability of these techniques that led to the application of tissue culture to five broad areas, namely, cell behavior (including cytology, nutrition, metabolism, morphogenesis, embryogenesis, and pathology), plant modification and improvement, pathogen-free plants and germplasm storage, clonal propagation, and product (mainly secondary metabolite) formation, starting in the mid-1960s. The 1990s saw continued expansion in the application of the in vitro technologies to an increasing number of plant species. Cell cultures have remained an important tool in the study of basic areas of plant biology and biochemistry and have assumed major significance in studies in molecular biology and agricultural biotechnology in the twenty-first century. The historical development of these in vitro technologies and their applications is the focus of this chapter.

  18. Spectroscopic characterization of cardiovascular tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, R H; Isner, J M; Gauthier, T; Nakagawa, K; Cerio, F; Hanlon, E; Gaffney, E; Rouse, E; DeJesus, S

    1988-01-01

    We present results of a series of laser spectroscopic measurements on in vitro samples of cardiovascular tissue. These include laser Raman scattering, Fourier transform infrared, plasma emission and fluorescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results of these spectroscopic measurements are discussed in terms of their implications for the field of laser angioplasty.

  19. Imaging of soft tissue tumors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schepper, A. M. A. de; Vanhoenacker, F; Parizel, P. M; Gielen, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    ... studies. The scientific value of the BSTNR increased with the installation of a peer-review group of pathologists, all of whom shared a large amount of experience in soft tissue tumor pathology. They reviewed the pathological findings of all malignant tumors, all exceptional tumors, and all tumors in which there was a discordance between...

  20. Epigenetics in plant tissue culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, M.J.M.; Klerk, de G.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Plants produced vegetatively in tissue culture may differ from the plants from which they have been derived. Two major classes of off-types occur: genetic ones and epigenetic ones. This review is about epigenetic aberrations. We discuss recent studies that have uncovered epigenetic modifications at

  1. Biomaterials in myocardial tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Lewis A; Chiu, Loraine L Y; Feric, Nicole; Fu, Lara; Radisic, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the developed world, and as such there is a pressing need for treatment options. Cardiac tissue engineering emerged from the need to develop alternative sources and methods of replacing tissue damaged by cardiovascular diseases, as the ultimate treatment option for many who suffer from end-stage heart failure is a heart transplant. In this review we focus on biomaterial approaches to augmenting injured or impaired myocardium, with specific emphasis on: the design criteria for these biomaterials; the types of scaffolds - composed of natural or synthetic biomaterials or decellularized extracellular matrix - that have been used to develop cardiac patches and tissue models; methods to vascularize scaffolds and engineered tissue; and finally, injectable biomaterials (hydrogels) designed for endogenous repair, exogenous repair or as bulking agents to maintain ventricular geometry post-infarct. The challenges facing the field and obstacles that must be overcome to develop truly clinically viable cardiac therapies are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Fundamentals of bladder tissue engineering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    W. Mahfouz

    issues with primary human urothelial and bladder muscle cells [22]. Naturally derived materials and acellular .... being able to dif- ferentiate into connective tissues, skeletal muscle cells, and cells of the vascular system [57]. ... hypertrophy in a cryo-injured rodent bladder model [60]. AFPS cells represent a new class of stem ...

  3. Gradient polymers for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Gunnewiek, Michel

    2015-01-01

    With increasing life expectancy, there is an constant demand for finding solutions to restore damaged or diseased tissues and organs. Regenerative medicine holds the promise to create continuous body-part replacements through the combination of cells, biological factors, and synthetic scaffolds.

  4. Fundamentals of bladder tissue engineering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    W. Mahfouz

    properties of native tissue (adhesive cues, mass transport, surface texture and composition). Types of biomaterials. Generally speaking, three major types of biomaterials have been ..... Some of them are universal, whereas others are specific for certain cell types. Growth factors can accelerate the reproduction of MSCs and.

  5. Biomaterials in myocardial tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Lewis A.; Chiu, Loraine L. Y.; Feric, Nicole; Fu, Lara; Radisic, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the developed world, and as such there is a pressing need for treatment options. Cardiac tissue engineering emerged from the need to develop alternate sources and methods of replacing tissue damaged by cardiovascular diseases, as the ultimate treatment option for many who suffer from end-stage heart failure is a heart transplant. In this review we focus on biomaterial approaches to augment injured or impaired myocardium with specific emphasis on: the design criteria for these biomaterials; the types of scaffolds—composed of natural or synthetic biomaterials, or decellularized extracellular matrix—that have been used to develop cardiac patches and tissue models; methods to vascularize scaffolds and engineered tissue, and finally injectable biomaterials (hydrogels)designed for endogenous repair, exogenous repair or as bulking agents to maintain ventricular geometry post-infarct. The challenges facing the field and obstacles that must be overcome to develop truly clinically viable cardiac therapies are also discussed. PMID:25066525

  6. Tissue vibration in prolonged running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Stirling, Lisa M; Federolf, Peter; Nigg, Benno M

    2011-01-04

    The impact force in heel-toe running initiates vibrations of soft-tissue compartments of the leg that are heavily dampened by muscle activity. This study investigated if the damping and frequency of these soft-tissue vibrations are affected by fatigue, which was categorized by the time into an exhaustive exercise. The hypotheses were tested that (H1) the vibration intensity of the triceps surae increases with increasing fatigue and (H2) the vibration frequency of the triceps surae decreases with increasing fatigue. Tissue vibrations of the triceps surae were measured with tri-axial accelerometers in 10 subjects during a run towards exhaustion. The frequency content was quantified with power spectra and wavelet analysis. Maxima of local vibration intensities were compared between the non-fatigued and fatigued states of all subjects. In axial (i.e. parallel to the tibia) and medio-lateral direction, most local maxima increased with fatigue (supporting the first hypothesis). In anterior-posterior direction no systematic changes were found. Vibration frequency was minimally affected by fatigue and frequency changes did not occur systematically, which requires the rejection of the second hypothesis. Relative to heel-strike, the maximum vibration intensity occurred significantly later in the fatigued condition in all three directions. With fatigue, the soft tissue of the triceps surae oscillated for an extended duration at increased vibration magnitudes, possibly due to the effects of fatigue on type II muscle fibers. Thus, the protective mechanism of muscle tuning seems to be reduced in a fatigued muscle and the risk of potential harm to the tissue may increase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 21 CFR 878.4010 - Tissue adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue adhesive. 878.4010 Section 878.4010 Food... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4010 Tissue adhesive. (a) Tissue adhesive for the topical approximation of skin—(1) Identification. A tissue adhesive for the topical...

  8. 3D Bioprinting of Vascularized Human Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Kolesky, David Barry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manufacture human tissues that replicate the spatial, mechano-chemical, and temporal aspects of biological tissues would enable myriad applications, including drug screening, disease modeling, and tissue repair and regeneration. However, given the complexity of human tissues, this is a daunting challenge. Current biofabrication methods are unable to fully recapitulate the form and function of human tissues, which are composed of multiple cell types, extracellular matrices, and ...

  9. 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Dylan Jack; Tan, Yu; Jia, Jia; Yao, Hai; Mei, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to fabricate functional tissue for applications in regenerative medicine and drug testing. More recently, 3D printing has shown great promise in tissue fabrication with a structural control from micro- to macro-scale by using a layer-by-layer approach. Whether through scaffold-based or scaffold-free approaches, the standard for 3D printed tissue engineering constructs is to provide a biomimetic structural environment that facilitates tissue formation and promotes host ...

  10. Biomechanics and mechanobiology in functional tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilak, Farshid; Butler, David L.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Baaijens, Frank P.T.

    2014-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering continues to expand and mature, and several products are now in clinical use, with numerous other preclinical and clinical studies underway. However, specific challenges still remain in the repair or regeneration of tissues that serve a predominantly biomechanical function. Furthermore, it is now clear that mechanobiological interactions between cells and scaffolds can critically influence cell behavior, even in tissues and organs that do not serve an overt biomechanical role. Over the past decade, the field of “functional tissue engineering” has grown as a subfield of tissue engineering to address the challenges and questions on the role of biomechanics and mechanobiology in tissue engineering. Originally posed as a set of principles and guidelines for engineering of load-bearing tissues, functional tissue engineering has grown to encompass several related areas that have proven to have important implications for tissue repair and regeneration. These topics include measurement and modeling of the in vivo biomechanical environment; quantitative analysis of the mechanical properties of native tissues, scaffolds, and repair tissues; development of rationale criteria for the design and assessment of engineered tissues; investigation of the effects biomechanical factors on native and repair tissues, in vivo and in vitro; and development and application of computational models of tissue growth and remodeling. Here we further expand this paradigm and provide examples of the numerous advances in the field over the past decade. Consideration of these principles in the design process will hopefully improve the safety, efficacy, and overall success of engineered tissue replacements. PMID:24818797

  11. Heterotopic pancreatic tissue in gallbladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylhin Joana Lopez Marcano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The heterotopic pancreas (PH is the atypical presence of pancreatic tissue without any anatomic or vascular continuity with the pancreas. PH is a rare condition that can be observed at any level of the gastrointestinal tract and even in other organs. Histopathological characterization of PH allows surgeons to distinguish it from other lesions. Although it is usually a benign and asymptomatic disease, it can occasionally cause complications (obstruction, hemorrhage, inflammation, or malignant transformation. In conclusion, localization in the gallbladder in the few cases of PH is very rare. We present two cases in which, after cholecystectomy indicated by other causes, in the pathological study of the surgical specimen, type 2 pancreatic tissue was found according to the Heinrich classification. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(4.000: 250-253

  12. Tissue engineering the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Ryan G; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2013-04-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) results from the loss of a highly specialized organ, the small intestine. SBS and its current treatments are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Production of tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) from the patient's own cells could restore normal intestinal function via autologous transplantation. Improved understanding of intestinal stem cells and their niche have been coupled with advances in tissue engineering techniques. Originally described by Vacanti et al of Massachusetts General Hospital, TESI has been produced by in vivo implantation of organoid units. Organoid units are multicellular clusters of epithelium and mesenchyme that may be harvested from native intestine. These clusters are loaded onto a scaffold and implanted into the host omentum. The scaffold provides physical support that permits angiogenesis and vasculogenesis of the developing tissue. After a period of 4 weeks, histologic analyses confirm the similarity of TESI to native intestine. TESI contains a differentiated epithelium, mesenchyme, blood vessels, muscle, and nerve components. To date, similar experiments have proved successful in rat, mouse, and pig models. Additional experiments have shown clinical improvement and rescue of SBS rats after implantation of TESI. In comparison with the group that underwent massive enterectomy alone, rats that had surgical anastomosis of TESI to their shortened intestine showed improvement in postoperative weight gain and serum B12 values. Recently, organoid units have been harvested from human intestinal samples and successfully grown into TESI by using an immunodeficient mouse host. Current TESI production yields approximately 3 times the number of cells initially implanted, but improvements in the scaffold and blood supply are being developed in efforts to increase TESI size. Exciting new techniques in stem cell biology and directed cellular differentiation may generate additional sources of autologous intestinal

  13. Endoscopic tissue diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, Gavin C

    2008-09-01

    The extremely poor outcome in patients with cholangiocarcinoma, in large part, reflects the late presentation of these tumors and the challenging nature of establishing a tissue diagnosis. Establishing a diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma requires obtaining evidence of malignancy from sampling of the epithelium of the biliary tract, which has proven to be challenging. Although endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration performs slightly better than endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in diagnosing cholangiocarcinoma, both endoscopic approaches demonstrate disappointing performance characteristics.

  14. Exercise and soft tissue injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, L E

    1994-02-01

    Once the almost exclusive domain of the orthopaedic surgeon, sports injuries are now being seen with increasing frequency by other specialists, including rheumatologists. It is therefore important for rheumatologists to be able to diagnose and manage the various musculoskeletal conditions that are associated with physical activity. Soft tissue injuries are a very common cause of morbidity in both competitive and recreational athletes. Most of these conditions are provoked by muscle-tendon overload (or overuse) that is usually the result of excessive training or improper training techniques. However, despite an emerging literature on the natural history of soft tissue overuse syndromes, relatively little is known about the causes, incidence and outcome of many of these injuries. Of the methodologically robust epidemiological studies that have been done, most have focused on habitual distance runners. In this population, it has been reported that the incidence of injury can be as high as 50% or more, and that overtraining and the presence of previous injury are the most significant predictors of future injury. In other popular forms of exercise, such as walking, swimming, cycling, aerobics and racquet sports, injuries are also reported with high frequency but, to date, no prospective studies have examined actual incidences in these populations, and risk factors for injury in these activities remain speculative. Several of the more commonly occurring soft tissue injuries (such as rotator cuff tendinitis, lateral and medial epicondylitis, patellar tendinitis, the iliotibial band friction syndrome, Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis) exemplify the overuse concept and are therefore highlighted in this review. The management of these, and most other, exercise-related soft tissue injuries is directed towards promptly restoring normal function and preventing re-injury.

  15. Adipose Tissue Immunity and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria eCatalan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and altered immune response are important components of obesity and contribute greatly to the promotion of obesity-related metabolic complications, especially cancer development. Adipose tissue expansion is associated with increased infiltration of various types of immune cells from both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Thus, adipocytes and infiltrating immune cells secrete proinflammatory adipokines and cytokines providing a microenvironment favourable for tumour growth. Accumulation of B and T cells in adipose tissue precedes macrophage infiltration causing a chronic low-grade inflammation. Phenotypic switching towards M1 macrophages and Th1 T cells constitutes an important mechanism described in the obese state correlating with increased tumour growth risk. Other possible synergic mechanisms causing a dysfunctional adipose tissue include fatty acid-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and hypoxia. Recent investigations have started to unravel the intricacy of the cross-talk between tumour cell/immune cell/adipocyte. In this sense, future therapies should take into account the combination of anti-inflammatory approaches that target the tumour microenvironment with more sophisticated and selective anti-tumoural drugs.

  16. Tissue-engineered bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petite, H; Viateau, V; Bensaïd, W; Meunier, A; de Pollak, C; Bourguignon, M; Oudina, K; Sedel, L; Guillemin, G

    2000-09-01

    Bone lesions above a critical size become scarred rather than regenerated, leading to nonunion. We have attempted to obtain a greater degree of regeneration by using a resorbable scaffold with regeneration-competent cells to recreate an embryonic environment in injured adult tissues, and thus improve clinical outcome. We have used a combination of a coral scaffold with in vitro-expanded marrow stromal cells (MSC) to increase osteogenesis more than that obtained with the scaffold alone or the scaffold plus fresh bone marrow. The efficiency of the various combinations was assessed in a large segmental defect model in sheep. The tissue-engineered artificial bone underwent morphogenesis leading to complete recorticalization and the formation of a medullary canal with mature lamellar cortical bone in the most favorable cases. Clinical union never occurred when the defects were left empty or filled with the scaffold alone. In contrast, clinical union was obtained in three out of seven operated limbs when the defects were filled with the tissue-engineered bone.

  17. Iatrogenic trauma to oral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcelik, Onur; Haytac, M Cenk; Akkaya, Murat

    2005-10-01

    Iatrogenic trauma can be defined as any trauma that has been induced by the dentist's activity, manner, or therapy. The aim of this article is to present traumatic oral tissue lesions of iatrogenic origin. Thirteen cases of chemical (due to ferric sulfate and formocresol), physical (due to orthodontic wires and appliances), and thermal (due to electrosurgery) injuries to the oral tissues are reported. Chemical, physical, and thermal injuries in the oral, gingival, or palatinal mucosa of iatrogenic origin can exhibit various clinical features. The management of traumatic injuries is dependent on the severity of the involvement in the periodontal tissues. While, in most cases, the elimination of the offending agent and symptomatic therapy were sufficient, in severe cases, or when the injury resulted in permanent defects, periodontal surgery and regenerative therapy may be necessary. The skill, experience, and up-to-date knowledge of dentists are the main factors to prevent possible iatrogenic traumas. Although "To err is human," careful practice is very important for the principle "Primum non nocere" ("First do no harm").

  18. Tissue/blood partition coefficients for xenon in various adipose tissue depots in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J; Jelnes, Rolf; Astrup, A

    1987-01-01

    Tissue/blood partition coefficients (lambda) for xenon were calculated for subcutaneous adipose tissue from the abdominal wall and the thigh, and for the perirenal adipose tissue after chemical analysis of the tissues for lipid, water and protein content. The lambda in the perirenal tissue...

  19. Assessment of tissue ingrowth rates in polyurethane scaffolds for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramrattan, Navin N.; Heijkants, Ralf G.J.C.; Tienen, Tony G. van; Schouten, Arend Jan; Veth, Rene P.H.; Buma, Pieter; Ramrattan, [No Value

    The continuous development of new biomaterials for tissue engineering and the enhancement of tissue ingrowth into existing scaffolds, using growth factors, create the necessity for developing adequate tools to assess tissue ingrowth rates into porous biomaterials. Current histomorphometric

  20. Tissue culture of ornamental cacti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Pérez-Molphe-Balch

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cacti species are plants that are well adapted to growing in arid and semiarid regions where the main problem is water availability. Cacti have developed a series of adaptations to cope with water scarcity, such as reduced leaf surface via morphological modifications including spines, cereous cuticles, extended root systems and stem tissue modifications to increase water storage, and crassulacean acid metabolism to reduce transpiration and water loss. Furthermore, seeds of these plants very often exhibit dormancy, a phenomenon that helps to prevent germination when the availability of water is reduced. In general, cactus species exhibit a low growth rate that makes their rapid propagation difficult. Cacti are much appreciated as ornamental plants due to their great variety and diversity of forms and their beautiful short-life flowers; however, due to difficulties in propagating them rapidly to meet market demand, they are very often over-collected in their natural habitats, which leads to numerous species being threatened, endangered or becoming extinct. Therefore, plant tissue culture techniques may facilitate their propagation over a shorter time period than conventional techniques used for commercial purposes; or may help to recover populations of endangered or threatened species for their re-introduction in the wild; or may also be of value to the preservation and conservation of the genetic resources of this important family. Herein we present the state-of-the-art of tissue culture techniques used for ornamental cacti and selected suggestions for solving a number of the problems faced by members of the Cactaceae family.

  1. Photoacoustic characterization of ovarian tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Andres; Gamelin, John; Guo, Puyun; Yan, Shikui; Sanders, Mary; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2009-02-01

    Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of all gynecologic cancers with a five-year survival rate of only 30%. Because current imaging techniques (ultrasound, CT, MRI, PET) are not capable of detecting ovarian cancer early, most diagnoses occur in later stages (III/IV). Thus many women are not correctly diagnosed until the cancer becomes widely metastatic. On the other hand, while the majority of women with a detectable ultrasound abnormality do not harbor a cancer, they all undergo unnecessary oophorectomy. Hence, new imaging techniques that can provide functional and molecular contrasts are needed for improving the specificity of ovarian cancer detection and characterization. One such technique is photoacoustic imaging, which has great potential to reveal early tumor angiogenesis through intrinsic optical absorption contrast from hemoglobin or extrinsic contrast from conjugated agents binding to appropriate molecular receptors. To better understand the cancer disease process of ovarian tissue using photoacoustic imaging, it is necessary to first characterize the properties of normal ovarian tissue. We have imaged ex-vivo ovarian tissue using a 3D co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system. The system is capable of volumetric imaging by means of electronic focusing. Detecting and visualizing small features from multiple viewing angles is possible without the need for any mechanical movement. The results show strong optical absorption from vasculature, especially highly vascularized corpora lutea, and low absorption from follicles. We will present correlation of photoacoustic images from animals with histology. Potential application of this technology would be the noninvasive imaging of the ovaries for screening or diagnostic purposes.

  2. Hydrodynamic theory of tissue shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Popović, Marko; Merkel, Matthias; Etournay, Raphaël; Eaton, Suzanne; Jülicher, Frank; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    We propose a hydrodynamic theory to describe shear flows in developing epithelial tissues. We introduce hydrodynamic fields corresponding to state properties of constituent cells as well as a contribution to overall tissue shear flow due to rearrangements in cell network topology. We then construct a constitutive equation for the shear rate due to topological rearrangements. We identify a novel rheological behaviour resulting from memory effects in the tissue. We show that anisotropic deformation of tissue and cells can arise from two distinct active cellular processes: generation of active stress in the tissue, and actively driven cellular rearrangements. These two active processes result in distinct cellular and tissue shape changes, depending on boundary conditions applied on the tissue. Our findings have consequences for the understanding of tissue morphogenesis during development.

  3. Organ printing: tissue spheroids as building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Vladimir; Visconti, Richard P; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Forgacs, Gabor; Drake, Christopher J; Markwald, Roger R

    2009-04-01

    Organ printing can be defined as layer-by-layer additive robotic biofabrication of three-dimensional functional living macrotissues and organ constructs using tissue spheroids as building blocks. The microtissues and tissue spheroids are living materials with certain measurable, evolving and potentially controllable composition, material and biological properties. Closely placed tissue spheroids undergo tissue fusion - a process that represents a fundamental biological and biophysical principle of developmental biology-inspired directed tissue self-assembly. It is possible to engineer small segments of an intraorgan branched vascular tree by using solid and lumenized vascular tissue spheroids. Organ printing could dramatically enhance and transform the field of tissue engineering by enabling large-scale industrial robotic biofabrication of living human organ constructs with "built-in" perfusable intraorgan branched vascular tree. Thus, organ printing is a new emerging enabling technology paradigm which represents a developmental biology-inspired alternative to classic biodegradable solid scaffold-based approaches in tissue engineering.

  4. Biomimetic strategies for engineering composite tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy; Robinson, Jennifer; Lu, Helen

    2016-08-01

    The formation of multiple tissue types and their integration into composite tissue units presents a frontier challenge in regenerative engineering. Tissue-tissue synchrony is crucial in providing structural support for internal organs and enabling daily activities. This review highlights the state-of-the-art in composite tissue scaffold design, and explores how biomimicry can be strategically applied to avoid over-engineering the scaffold. Given the complexity of biological tissues, determining the most relevant parameters for recapitulating native structure-function relationships through strategic biomimicry will reduce the burden for clinical translation. It is anticipated that these exciting efforts in composite tissue engineering will enable integrative and functional repair of common soft tissue injuries and lay the foundation for total joint or limb regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Brown Adipose Tissue: Function and Physiological Significance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    CANNON, BARBARA; NEDERGAARD, JAN

    2004-01-01

    .... Brown Adipose Tissue: Function and Physiological Significance. Physiol Rev 84: 277–359, 2004; 10.1152/physrev.00015.2003.—The function of brown adipose tissue is to transfer energy from food into heat...

  6. SE Marine Mammal Histology/Tissue data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples are collected from stranded marine mammals in the Southeastern United States. These tissue samples are examined histologically and evaluated to...

  7. Tissue engineering for skeletal muscle regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzi, Roberto; Bearzi, Claudia; Mauretti, Arianna; Bernardini, Sergio; Cannata, Stefano; Gargioli, Cesare

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells and regenerative medicine have obtained a remarkable consent from the scientific community for their promising ability to recover aged, injured and diseased tissue. However, despite the noteworthy potential, hurdles currently hinder their use and clinical application: cell survival, immune response, tissue engraftment and efficient differentiation. Hence a new interdisciplinary scientific approach, such as tissue engineering, is going deep attempts to mimic neo-tissue-genesis as we...

  8. Advanced tissue engineering in periodontal Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Ali Banihashemrad

    2014-01-01

    The old wishes of people were to regenerate lost tissues of periodontium that this fact is achieved by gen and cell therapy .Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammation around the tooth by microbes that causes destruction of supporting structure of tissue of tooth such as alveolar bone, cementum and periodontal ligament. For treatment of periodontal diseases we can use the biomaterials which help to regenerate the periodontal tissues like; autogenous bone grafts, allograft, guided tissue re...

  9. Laser Ablatin of Dental Hard Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seka, W.; Rechmann, P.; Featherstone, J.D.B.; Fried, D.

    2007-07-31

    This paper discusses ablation of dental hard tissue using pulsed lasers. It focuses particularly on the relevant tissue and laser parameters and some of the basic ablation processes that are likely to occur. The importance of interstitial water and its phase transitions is discussed in some detail along with the ablation processes that may or may not directly involve water. The interplay between tissue parameters and laser parameters in the outcome of the removal of dental hard tissue is discussed in detail.

  10. Organ printing: Tissue spheroids as building blocks☆

    OpenAIRE

    Mironov, Vladimir; Visconti, Richard P.; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Forgacs, Gabor; Drake, Christopher J.; Markwald, Roger R.

    2009-01-01

    Organ printing can be defined as layer-by-layer additive robotic biofabrication of three-dimensional functional living macrotissues and organ constructs using tissue spheroids as building blocks. The microtissues and tissue spheroids are living materials with certain measurable, evolving and potentially controllable composition, material and biological properties. Closely placed tissue spheroids undergo tissue fusion — a process that represents a fundamental biological and biophysical princip...

  11. Infrared Microspectroscopy Of Pathologic Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Timothy J.; Engler, Walter F.; Ventre, Kathleen M.

    1989-12-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a powerful technique by which to characterize the conformations of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids (1). Previously we have demonstrated that infrared spectroscopy can be used to characterize the secondary structure of abnormal protein accumulation products, known as amyloid, which are often found in association with medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (2). The utility of the technique was highly limited by the fact that essentially the entire specimen had to consist of this abnormal protein for infrared spectroscopic analysis to be useful. The development of high quality microscopes capable of both light microscopic and infrared characterization of materials has enabled us to extend our earlier use of infrared spectroscopy to diseases and tissues in which the abnormal region of interest is only a few hundred square micrometers in area. Tissue for spectroscopic examination is mounted on microscope slides which have been prepared by acid washing, plating with gold or gold-palladium alloy (3) and coating with high molecular weight poly-L-lysine. Sections of tissue which have been previously embedded in paraffin are cut with a microtome at 4 to 5 micrometers thickness, floated onto a bath of distilled water, picked up on the microscope slide, and allowed to dry overnight. Paraffin is removed by soaking the slides in two changes of xylene, and then the sections are rehydrated by placing them in absolute alcohol, then in fifty percent alcohol, and finally in water. Sections may then be stained using standard histologic stains, such as hematoxylin and eosin, then once again dehydrated with alcohol. After drying, the sections are covered with an index-matching fluid, such as Fluorolube, which allows a relatively good visual microscopic examination of the tissue when the microscope is used in reflectance mode. High quality reflectance infrared spectra may be easily obtained when the tissue is prepared and mounted in this way (Figure 1

  12. Multimodal phantom of liver tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena K Chmarra

    Full Text Available Medical imaging plays an important role in patients' care and is continuously being used in managing health and disease. To obtain the maximum benefit from this rapidly developing technology, further research is needed. Ideally, this research should be done in a patient-safe and environment-friendly manner; for example, on phantoms. The goal of this work was to develop a protocol and manufacture a multimodal liver phantom that is suitable for ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging modalities. The proposed phantom consists of three types of mimicked soft tissues: liver parenchyma, tumors, and portal veins, that are made of six ingredients: candle gel, sephadex®, agarose, glycerol, distilled water, and silicone string. The entire procedure is advantageous, since preparation of the phantom is simple, rather cost-effective, and reasonably quick - it takes around 2 days. Besides, most of the phantom's parts can be reused to manufacture a new phantom. Comparison of ultrasound images of real patient's liver and the developed phantom shows that the phantom's liver tissue and its structures are well simulated.

  13. Tissue Engineering of Corneal Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Yamagami

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs do not replicate after wounding. Therefore, corneal endothelial deficiency can result in irreversible corneal edema. Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK allows selective replacement of the diseased corneal endothelium. However, DSAEK requires a donor cornea and the worldwide shortage of corneas limits its application. This review presents current knowledge on the tissue engineering of corneal endothelium using cultured HCECs. We also provide our recent work on tissue engineering for DSAEK grafts using cultured HCECs. We reconstructed DSAEK grafts by seeding cultured DiI-labelled HCECs on collagen sheets. Then HCEC sheets were transplanted onto the posterior stroma after descemetorhexis in the DSAEK group. Severe stromal edema was detected in the control group, but not in the DSAEK group throughout the observation period. Fluorescein microscopy one month after surgery showed numerous DiI-labelled cells on the posterior corneal surface in the DSAEK group. Frozen sections showed a monolayer of DiI-labelled cells on Descemet’s membrane. These findings indicate that cultured adult HCECs, transplanted with DSAEK surgery, maintain corneal transparency after transplantation and suggest the feasibility of performing DSAEK with HCECs to treat endothelial dysfunction.

  14. Hormone Profiling in Plant Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2017-01-01

    Plant hormones are for a long time known to act as chemical messengers in the regulation of physiological processes during a plant's life cycle, from germination to senescence. Furthermore, plant hormones simultaneously coordinate physiological responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. To study the hormonal regulation of physiological processes, three main approaches have been used (1) exogenous application of hormones, (2) correlative studies through measurements of endogenous hormone levels, and (3) use of transgenic and/or mutant plants altered in hormone metabolism or signaling. A plant hormone profiling method is useful to unravel cross talk between hormones and help unravel the hormonal regulation of physiological processes in studies using any of the aforementioned approaches. However, hormone profiling is still particularly challenging due to their very low abundance in plant tissues. In this chapter, a sensitive, rapid, and accurate method to quantify all the five "classic" classes of plant hormones plus other plant growth regulators, such as jasmonates, salicylic acid, melatonin, and brassinosteroids is described. The method includes a fast and simple extraction procedure without time consuming steps as purification or derivatization, followed by optimized ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis. This protocol facilitates the high-throughput analysis of hormone profiling and is applicable to different plant tissues.

  15. Human tissue in systems medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caie, Peter D; Schuur, Klaas; Oniscu, Anca; Mullen, Peter; Reynolds, Paul A; Harrison, David J

    2013-12-01

    Histopathology, the examination of an architecturally artefactual, two-dimensional and static image remains a potent tool allowing diagnosis and empirical expectation of prognosis. Considerable optimism exists that the advent of molecular genetic testing and other biomarker strategies will improve or even replace this ancient technology. A number of biomarkers already add considerable value for prediction of whether a treatment will work. In this short review we argue that a systems medicine approach to pathology will not seek to replace traditional pathology, but rather augment it. Systems approaches need to incorporate quantitative morphological, protein, mRNA and DNA data. A significant challenge for clinical implementation of systems pathology is how to optimize information available from tissue, which is frequently sub-optimal in quality and amount, and yet generate useful predictive models that work. The transition of histopathology to systems pathophysiology and the use of multiscale data sets usher in a new era in diagnosis, prognosis and prediction based on the analysis of human tissue. © 2013 The Authors. FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of FEBS.

  16. Flocking Transition in Confluent Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoluzzi, Matteo; Giavazzi, Fabio; Macchi, Marta; Scita, Giorgio; Cerbino, Roberto; Manning, Lisa; Marchetti, Cristina

    The emerging of collective migration in biological tissues plays a pivotal role in embryonic morphogenesis, wound healing and cancer invasion. While many aspects of single cell movements are well established, the mechanisms leading to coherent displacements of cohesive cell groups are still poorly understood. Some of us recently proposed a Self-Propelled Voronoi (SPV) model of dense tissues that combines self-propelled particle models and vertex models of confluent cell layers and exhibits a liquid-solid transition as a function of cell shape and cell motility. We now examine the role of cell polarization on collective cell dynamics by introducing an orientation mechanism that aligns cell polarization with local cell motility. The model predicts a density-independent flocking transition tuned by the strength of the aligning interaction, with both solid and liquid flocking states existing in different regions of parameter space. MP and MCM were supported by the Simons Foundation Targeted Grant in the Mathematical Modeling of Living Systems Number: 342354 and by the Syracuse Soft Matter Program.

  17. Nanotechnology in bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Graham G; McArdle, Adrian; Tevlin, Ruth; Momeni, Arash; Atashroo, David; Hu, Michael S; Feroze, Abdullah H; Wong, Victor W; Lorenz, Peter H; Longaker, Michael T; Wan, Derrick C

    2015-07-01

    Nanotechnology represents a major frontier with potential to significantly advance the field of bone tissue engineering. Current limitations in regenerative strategies include impaired cellular proliferation and differentiation, insufficient mechanical strength of scaffolds, and inadequate production of extrinsic factors necessary for efficient osteogenesis. Here we review several major areas of research in nanotechnology with potential implications in bone regeneration: 1) nanoparticle-based methods for delivery of bioactive molecules, growth factors, and genetic material, 2) nanoparticle-mediated cell labeling and targeting, and 3) nano-based scaffold construction and modification to enhance physicochemical interactions, biocompatibility, mechanical stability, and cellular attachment/survival. As these technologies continue to evolve, ultimate translation to the clinical environment may allow for improved therapeutic outcomes in patients with large bone deficits and osteodegenerative diseases. Traditionally, the reconstruction of bony defects has relied on the use of bone grafts. With advances in nanotechnology, there has been significant development of synthetic biomaterials. In this article, the authors provided a comprehensive review on current research in nanoparticle-based therapies for bone tissue engineering, which should be useful reading for clinicians as well as researchers in this field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Advances of radiation sterilisation in tissue banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Norimah

    2017-10-11

    Under the auspices of the IAEA tissue banking programme on "Radiation Sterilisation of Tissue Graft" conducted from 1985 to 2004, many scientists and surgeons were involved in various regional research and development (R&D) projects mainly in dealing with radiation dose selection, radiation effects on human tissues and quality system in radiation sterilisation. New findings on radiation effects, tissue processing and preservation were shared during the regional and interregional meetings and workshops. Many tissue banks started to use radiation (25 kGy) to sterilize tissue grafts for tissue safety and efficacy and still continue to use it. The IAEA Code of Practice for Radiation Sterilization of Tissues Allografts developed in 2007 offered simpler methods to conduct radiation dose setting and dose validation experiments for tissue grafts. Advances in dose selection and dose mapping are continued under the quality management system when banks need to be certified to continue their operation. The combination of good tissue processing and preservation as well as good radiation practice will ensure the tissue products are properly sterilised thus safe and of high quality. Experience in meeting challenges in using radiation sterilisation and achievements reported by the tissue bankers are shared here.

  19. Enoxacin penetration into human prostatic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, M G; Roy, R; Lessard, C; Foucault, P

    1988-01-01

    Concurrent enoxacin concentrations in serum and prostatic tissue were determined in 14 patients. The mean ratios of enoxacin concentration in tissue over concentration in serum were 1.4 +/- 0.2 (standard error of the mean). The levels in serum and prostatic tissue were above the MICs for most urinary pathogens. PMID:3196004

  20. Scientific and industrial status of tissue engineering ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tissue engineering is a newly emerging field targeting many unresolved health problems. So far, the achievements of this technology in the production of different tissue engineered substitutes were promising. This review is intended to describe, briefly and in a simple language, what tissue engineering is, what the ...

  1. Multiparametric tissue abnormality characterization using manifold regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batmanghelich, Kayhan; Wu, Xiaoying; Zacharaki, Evangelia; Markowitz, Clyde E.; Davatzikos, Christos; Verma, Ragini

    2008-03-01

    Tissue abnormality characterization is a generalized segmentation problem which aims at determining a continuous score that can be assigned to the tissue which characterizes the extent of tissue deterioration, with completely healthy tissue being one end of the spectrum and fully abnormal tissue such as lesions, being on the other end. Our method is based on the assumptions that there is some tissue that is neither fully healthy or nor completely abnormal but lies in between the two in terms of abnormality; and that the voxel-wise score of tissue abnormality lies on a spatially and temporally smooth manifold of abnormality. Unlike in a pure classification problem which associates an independent label with each voxel without considering correlation with neighbors, or an absolute clustering problem which does not consider a priori knowledge of tissue type, we assume that diseased and healthy tissue lie on a manifold that encompasses the healthy tissue and diseased tissue, stretching from one to the other. We propose a semi-supervised method for determining such as abnormality manifold, using multi-parametric features incorporated into a support vector machine framework in combination with manifold regularization. We apply the framework towards the characterization of tissue abnormality to brains of multiple sclerosis patients.

  2. Dielectric characterisation of human tissue samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Nennie, F.; Deiana, D.; Veen, A.J. van der; Monni, S.

    2014-01-01

    The electrical properties of tissues samples are required for investigation and simulation purposes in biomedical applications of EM sensors. While available open literature mostly deals with ex-vivo characterization of isolated tissues, knowledge on dielectric properties of these tissues in their

  3. Comparative Histology of Plasma Treated Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, Kyle

    2009-10-01

    Atmospheric plasmas applied in surgical settings have unique characteristics found in histological results from animal tissue studies. This is evident in both ex vivo bench tissue tests and in vivo fresh tissue. Examples of these histological features are presented as results of a comparative study between plasma treated, common medical argon coagulation, and electrosurgery.

  4. Gentamicin concentrations in human subcutaneous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Hanne; Kallehave, Finn Lasse; Kolmos, Hans Jørn Jepsen

    1996-01-01

    Wound infections frequently originate from the subcutaneous tissue. The effect of gentamicin in subcutaneous tissue has, however, normally been evaluated from concentrations in blood or wound fluid. The aim of the present study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of gentamicin in hu...... the presence of sufficient concentrations in the adipose tissue to be effective against common bacteria....

  5. Extracellular matrix and tissue engineering applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, H.A.M.; Moroni, Lorenzo; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a key component during regeneration and maintenance of tissues and organs, and it therefore plays a critical role in successful tissue engineering as well. Tissue engineers should recognise that engineering technology can be deduced from natural repair processes. Due to

  6. Piezoelectric materials for tissue regeneration: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Amir Hossein; Jaffe, Michael; Arinzeh, Treena Livingston

    2015-09-01

    The discovery of piezoelectricity, endogenous electric fields and transmembrane potentials in biological tissues raised the question whether or not electric fields play an important role in cell function. It has kindled research and the development of technologies in emulating biological electricity for tissue regeneration. Promising effects of electrical stimulation on cell growth and differentiation and tissue growth has led to interest in using piezoelectric scaffolds for tissue repair. Piezoelectric materials can generate electrical activity when deformed. Hence, an external source to apply electrical stimulation or implantation of electrodes is not needed. Various piezoelectric materials have been employed for different tissue repair applications, particularly in bone repair, where charges induced by mechanical stress can enhance bone formation; and in neural tissue engineering, in which electric pulses can stimulate neurite directional outgrowth to fill gaps in nervous tissue injuries. In this review, a summary of piezoelectricity in different biological tissues, mechanisms through which electrical stimulation may affect cellular response, and recent advances in the fabrication and application of piezoelectric scaffolds will be discussed. The discovery of piezoelectricity, endogenous electric fields and transmembrane potentials in biological tissues has kindled research and the development of technologies using electrical stimulation for tissue regeneration. Piezoelectric materials generate electrical activity in response to deformations and allow for the delivery of an electrical stimulus without the need for an external power source. As a scaffold for tissue engineering, growing interest exists due to its potential of providing electrical stimulation to cells to promote tissue formation. In this review, we cover the discovery of piezoelectricity in biological tissues, its connection to streaming potentials, biological response to electrical stimulation and

  7. Hardwiring Stem Cell Communication through Tissue Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tianchi; Greco, Valentina; Myung, Peggy

    2016-03-10

    Adult stem cells across diverse organs self-renew and differentiate to maintain tissue homeostasis. How stem cells receive input to preserve tissue structure and function largely relies on their communication with surrounding cellular and non-cellular elements. As such, how tissues are organized and patterned not only reflects organ function, but also inherently hardwires networks of communication between stem cells and their environment to direct tissue homeostasis and injury repair. This review highlights how different methods of stem cell communication reflect the unique organization and function of diverse tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hardwiring stem cell communication through tissue structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tianchi; Greco, Valentina; Myung, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells across diverse organs self-renew and differentiate to maintain tissue homeostasis. How stem cells receive input to preserve tissue structure and function largely relies on their communication with surrounding cellular and non-cellular elements. As such, how tissues are organized and patterned not only reflects organ function but also inherently hardwires networks of communication between stem cells and their environment to direct tissue homeostasis and injury repair. This review highlights how different methods of stem cell communication reflect the unique organization and function of diverse tissues. PMID:26967287

  9. Diffusion of cloxacillin into synovial tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattie, H; De Marie, S; Slaghuis, G; Rozing, P M; Van Strijen, E

    1992-01-01

    After a 30 min i.v. infusion of 1 g cloxacillin, the concentrations of this antibiotic were measured in plasma and synovial tissue samples from 11 patients undergoing total hip replacement. Assuming passive distribution between plasma and tissue the rate constants of distribution were estimated. The mean half-life of distribution was 22 min. The concentration of free drug in synovial tissue was estimated to be 77% of the total tissue concentration. The maximum tissue drug concentration after an i.v. bolus dose is predicted to occur at about 37 min. PMID:1389954

  10. Soft tissue aneurysmal bone cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.L.; Gielen, J.L.; Delrue, F.; De Schepper, A.M.A. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650, Edegem (Belgium); Salgado, R. [Department of Pathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650, Edegem (Belgium)

    2004-08-01

    A soft tissue aneurysmal bone cyst located in the right gluteus medius of a 21-year-old man is reported. On conventional radiography, the lesion demonstrated a spherically trabeculated mass with a calcific rim. On CT scan, it showed a well-organized peripheral calcification resembling a myositis ossificans. On MRI, it presented as a multilocular, cystic lesion with fluid-fluid levels. The lesion had no solid components except for intralesional septa. Although findings on imaging and histology were identical to those described in classical aneurysmal bone cyst, diagnosis was delayed because of lack of knowledge of this entity and its resemblance to the more familiar post-traumatic heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans). (orig.)

  11. Elastic modulus of hard tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Benny; Wagner, H Daniel

    2012-02-23

    This work aims at evaluating the elastic modulus of hard biological tissues by considering their staggered platelet micro-structure. An analytical expression for the effective modulus along the stagger direction is formulated using three non-dimensional structural variables. Structures with a single staggered hierarchy (e.g. collagen fibril) are first studied and predictions are compared with the experimental results and finite element simulations from the literature. A more complicated configuration, such as an array of fibrils, is analyzed next. Finally, a mechanical model is proposed for tooth dentin, in which variations in the multi-scale structural hierarchy are shown to significantly affect the macroscopic mechanical properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tissue Biopsies in Diabetes Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Gaster, Michael; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2007-01-01

    resistance of glucose disposal and glycogen synthesis in this tissue are hallmark features of type 2 diabetes in humans (2,3). During the past two decades, we have carried out more than 1200 needle biopsies of skeletal muscle to study the cellular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes....... Together with morphological studies, measurement of energy stores and metabolites, enzyme activity and phosphorylation, gene and protein expression in skeletal muscle biopsies have revealed a variety of cellular abnormalities in patients with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. The possibility to establish...... and gene expression profiling on skeletal muscle biopsies have pointed to abnormalities in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in type 2 diabetes. These novel insights will inevitably cause a renewed interest in studying skeletal muscle. This chapter reviews our experience to date and gives a thorough...

  13. Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are the building blocks for all other cells in an organism. The human body has about 200 different types of cells and any of those cells can be produced by a stem cell. This fact emphasizes the significance of stem cells in transplantational medicine, regenerative therapy and bioengineering. Whether embryonic or adult, these cells can be used for the successful treatment of a wide range of diseases that were not treatable before, such as osteogenesis imperfecta in children, different forms of leukemias, acute myocardial infarction, some neural damages and diseases, etc. Bioengineering, e.g. successful manipulation of these cells with multipotential capacity of differentiation toward appropriate patterns and precise quantity, are the prerequisites for successful outcome and treatment. By combining in vivo and in vitro techniques, it is now possible to manage the wide spectrum of tissue damages and organ diseases. Although the stem-cell therapy is not a response to all the questions, it provides more...

  14. Morphogenesis of Growing Soft Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervaux, Julien; Ben Amar, Martine

    2008-08-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to a noteworthy property of some soft tissues: their ability to grow. Many attempts have been made to model this behavior in biology, chemistry, and physics. Using the theory of finite elasticity, Rodriguez has postulated a multiplicative decomposition of the geometric deformation gradient into a growth-induced part and an elastic one needed to ensure compatibility of the body. In order to fully explore the consequences of this hypothesis, the equations describing thin elastic objects under finite growth are derived. Under appropriate scaling assumptions for the growth rates, the proposed model is of the Föppl von Kármán type. As an illustration, the circumferential growth of a free hyperelastic disk is studied.

  15. Microbial Biofilms and Breast Tissue Expanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa J. Karau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously developed and validated a vortexing-sonication technique for detection of biofilm bacteria on the surface of explanted prosthetic joints. Herein, we evaluated this technique for diagnosis of infected breast tissue expanders and used it to assess colonization of breast tissue expanders. From April 2008 to December 2011, we studied 328 breast tissue expanders at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Of seven clinically infected breast tissue expanders, six (85.7% had positive cultures, one of which grew Propionibacterium species. Fifty-two of 321 breast tissue expanders (16.2%, 95% CI, 12.3–20.7% without clinical evidence of infection also had positive cultures, 45 growing Propionibacterium species and ten coagulase-negative staphylococci. While vortexing-sonication can detect clinically infected breast tissue expanders, 16 percent of breast tissue expanders appear to be asymptomatically colonized with normal skin flora, most commonly, Propionibacterium species.

  16. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Active dynamics of tissue shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Marko; Nandi, Amitabha; Merkel, Matthias; Etournay, Raphaël; Eaton, Suzanne; Jülicher, Frank; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2017-03-01

    We present a hydrodynamic theory to describe shear flows in developing epithelial tissues. We introduce hydrodynamic fields corresponding to state properties of constituent cells as well as a contribution to overall tissue shear flow due to rearrangements in cell network topology. We then construct a generic linear constitutive equation for the shear rate due to topological rearrangements and we investigate a novel rheological behaviour resulting from memory effects in the tissue. We identify two distinct active cellular processes: generation of active stress in the tissue, and actively driven topological rearrangements. We find that these two active processes can produce distinct cellular and tissue shape changes, depending on boundary conditions applied on the tissue. Our findings have consequences for the understanding of tissue morphogenesis during development.

  18. Elastomer genome: Reverse tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheiko, Sergei S.

    Soft elastic materials enable the creation of implants, substrates, and haptic robotic digits with mechanical properties matching those of biological tissues. Currently, polymer gels are the only viable class of synthetic materials with a Young's modulus below 100 kPa. However, the liquid fraction in the gels causes practical troubles including phase separation and solvent leakage on deformation. Herein, we have created bottlebrush and comb-like networks that are superelastic (λ = 1-12) and ultrasoft (G =102 - 105 Pa), even in the absence of solvent. The brush-like architecture causes an increase in the diameter of individual polymer molecules, but unlike typical filaments, the molecules remain flexible. This enables a significant decrease in the entanglement density, which reduces the limit of stiffness in dry polymer materials by 1000 times and has opened up new applications not available to stiffer materials or materials with liquid fractions. The comb-like architecture offers three independently controlled parameters - side-chain length, grafting density, and crosslink density - that allow for combinatorial variations of elastomer mechanical properties impossible for conventional linear chain elastomers, e.g. simultaneously increasing rigidity and elasticity. Based on this materials design platform, we have prepared elastomers that closely match the mechanical behaviour of biological tissue. Furthermore, this architecture affords many chain-ends that are amendable for chemical modifications and enhance molecular mobility, which directly affects vital physical properties ranging from glass transition and crystallization temperatures to adhesion and permeability. This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation (DMR-1407645 and DMR-1436201).

  19. [Tissue engineering of parathyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovino, F; Armano, G; Auriemma, P P; Sergio, R; De Sena, G; Capuozzo, V; Rosso, F; Marino, G; Papale, F; Grimaldi, A; Barbarisi, A

    2010-01-01

    The postoperative hypoparathyroidism is a not rare complication after total thyroidectomy and/or total parathyroidectomy. Attempts to transplant parathyroid tissue began in 1975 with the work of Wells, but still today results are disappointing. However, with the development of tissue engineering techniques, some experimental approaches to build artificial parathyroid are been made. Bioengineered device, actively secreting PTH, for transplant in patients with iatrogenic hypoparathyroidism is unavailable. Parathyroid cells were obtained from three chronic uremic patients in hemodialysis, operated for secondary hyperparathyroidism. Cell cultures in RPMI medium were subsequently seeded on collagen scaffold (three-dimensional matrix with slow biodegradation). Collagen is the major component of the extracellular matrix and thus is a good substrate for cell adhesion and growth. Culture media, with a low calcium concentration, were optimised to physiologically stimulate parathyroid hormone secretion. Cell cultures were morphologically observed in optical and electron (ESEM) microscopy and metabolically assayed by MTT method until the tenth week. Besides, concentration of parathyroid hormone in the culture medium has been measured for several weeks. After 24 hours of culture in RPMI, cells extracted from human parathyroid glands were nearly all adherent and organised in clusters to resemble the glandular organization. The cellular population consisted predominantly of parathyroid cells (90-95%). On collagen scaffolds, cells maintains an epithelial-like morphology also after 10 weeks, colonizing the scaffold surface and keeping a good proliferative rate with a discrete production of parathyroid hormone. The use of parathyroid cells extracted from patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism was certainly an appropriate choice that enabled us to achieve these results, that albeit partial bode well for the experimental in vivo animal model. The bioengineered scaffolds when

  20. Adipose tissue and reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Hannah; Castracane, V Daniel; Mantzoros, Christos

    2017-11-16

    The understanding of adipose tissue role has evolved from that of a depot energy storage organ to a dynamic endocrine organ. While genetics, sexual phenotype and sex steroids can impact the mass and distribution of adipose tissue, there is a counter-influence of white adipocytes on reproduction. This primarily occurs via the secretion of adipokines, the most studied of which- leptin and adiponectin- are highlighted in this article. Leptin, the "satiety hormone" primarily acts on the hypothalamus via pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons to translate acute changes in nutrition and energy expenditure, as well as chronic adipose accumulation into changes in appetite and potentially mediate insulin resistance via shared pathway and notably impacting reproductive health via influence on GnRH secreting neurons. Meanwhile, adiponectin is notable for its action in mediating insulin sensitivity, with receptors found at every level of the reproductive axis. Both have been examined in the context of physiologic and pathologic reproductive conditions. Leptin has been shown to influence puberty, pregnancy, hypothalamic amenorrhea, and lipodystrophy, and with a potential therapeutic role for both metabolic and reproductive health. Adiponectin mediates the relative state of insulin resistance in pregnancy, and has been implicated in conditions such as polycystic ovary syndrome and reproductive malignancies. There are numerous other adipokines, including resistin, visfatin, chemerin and retinol binding protein-4, which may also play roles in reproductive health and disease states. The continued examination of these and other adipokines in both normal reproduction and reproductive pathologies represents an important avenue for continued study. Here, we seek to provide a broad, yet comprehensive overview of many facets of these relationships and highlight areas of consideration for clinicians and future study. Copyright © 2017

  1. Electromechanical Properties of Bone Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regimbal, Raymond L.

    Discrepancies between calculated and empirical properties of bone are thought to be due to a general lack of consideration for the extent and manner(s) with which bone components interact at the molecular level. For a bone component in physiological fluid or whenever two phases are in contact, there is a region between the bulk phases called the electrical double layer which is marked by a separation of electric charges. For the purpose of studying electrical double layer interactions, the method of particle microelectrophoresis was used to characterize bone and its major constituents on the basis of the net charge they bear when suspended in ionic media of physiological relevance. With the data presented as pH versus zeta (zeta ) potential, the figures reveal an isoelectric point (IEP) for bone mineral near pH 8.6, whereas intact and EDTA demineralized bone tissue both exhibit IEPs near pH 5.1. While these data demonstrate the potential for a significant degree of coulombic interaction between the bone mineral and organic constituent double layers, it was also observed that use of inorganic phosphate buffers, as a specific marker for bone mineral, resulted in (1) an immediate reversal, from positive to negative, of the bone mineral zeta potential (2) rendered the zeta potential of intact bone more negative in a manner linearly dependent on both time and temperature and (3) had no affect on demineralized bone (P load for a 3 day period. While it is thus demonstrated that the major inorganic and organic phases of bone are electromechanically coupled, a thermodynamic consideration of the data suggests that the nature of the bond is to preserve mineral and organic phase electroneutralities by participating in electrical double layer interactions. The results are discussed in terms of bone mechanical modeling, electrokinetic properties, aging, tissue-implant compatibility and the etiologies of bone pathologic conditions.

  2. Ultrasonic Histotripsy for Tissue Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahk, K. J.; Dhar, D. K.; Malago, M.; Saffari, N.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has been considered and investigated as a promising and alternative method to liver transplantation for treating liver-based metabolic disorder in newborns over the past two decades. Although some clinical trials have been conducted and shown clinical benefits and outcomes, it is difficult to deliver and achieve a desired level of integration and transplantation of hepatocytes in the liver parenchyma. To overcome this problem, this work introduces an alternative method to a portal-infused-hepatocyte cell transplantation. To improve the level of engraftment of transplantable hepatocytes, these are injected directly into cavities generated by ultrasonic histotripsy. Histotripsy is an extracorporeal noninvasive technique which has been recently developed using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for inducing tissue fractionation with no coagulative necrosis. The exact mechanisms for the tissue fractionation are not well understood yet; but the possible mechanisms are thought to be a combination of nonlinear wave propagation effect, explosive bubble growth and ultrasonic atomization. The main objectives of this work are to demonstrate the feasibility of this new cell therapy and evaluate and distinguish between the different types of cavitation activity for either a thermally or a mechanically induced lesion. In the present work, numerical studies on the bubble dynamics (the Gilmore-Akulichev bubble model coupled with the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov equation) and both ex- and in vivo liver experiments are conducted with histological analysis (haematoxylin and eosin stain). The numerical and the experimental results suggest that (a) the acoustic emissions emitted during the thermal ablation and the histotripsy exposure can be distinguished both numerically and experimentally and (b) the proposed cell therapy may potentially form an effective and safe clinical treatment for replacing and correcting disordered hepatocytes, although the

  3. Materials for engineering vascularized adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Chieh; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Uriel, Shiri; Brey, Eric M

    2011-05-01

    Loss of adipose tissue can occur due to congenital and acquired lipoatrophies, trauma, tumor resection, and chronic disease. Clinically, it is difficult to regenerate or reconstruct adipose tissue. The extensive microvsacular network present in adipose, and the sensitivity of adipocytes to hypoxia, hinder the success of typical tissue transfer procedures. Materials that promote the formation of vascularized adipose tissue may offer alternatives to current clinical treatment options. A number of synthetic and natural biomaterials common in tissue engineering have been investigated as scaffolds for adipose regeneration. While these materials have shown some promise they do not account for the unique extracellular microenvironment of adipose. Adipose derived hydrogels more closely approximate the physical and chemical microenvironment of adipose tissue, promote preadipocyte differentiation and vessel assembly in vitro, and stimulate vascularized adipose formation in vivo. The combination of these materials with techniques that promote rapid and stable vascularization could lead to new techniques for engineering stable, vascularized adipose tissue for clinical application. In this review we discuss materials used for adipose tissue engineering and strategies for vascularization of these scaffolds. Materials that promote formation of vascularized adipose tissue have the potential to serve as alternatives or supplements to existing treatment options, for adipose defects or deficiencies resulting from chronic disease, lipoatrophies, trauma, and tumor resection. Copyright © 2009 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modeling Tissue Growth Within Nonwoven Scaffolds Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jeffrey S.; Alexander, David L.J.; Russell, Stephen J.; Ingham, Eileen; Ramshaw, John A.M.; Werkmeister, Jerome A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we present a novel approach for predicting tissue growth within the pores of fibrous tissue engineering scaffolds. Thin nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate scaffolds were prepared to characterize tissue growth within scaffold pores, by mouse NR6 fibroblast cells. On the basis of measurements of tissue lengths at fiber crossovers and along fiber segments, mathematical models were determined during the proliferative phase of cell growth. Tissue growth at fiber crossovers decreased with increasing interfiber angle, with exponential relationships determined on day 6 and 10 of culture. Analysis of tissue growth along fiber segments determined two growth profiles, one with enhanced growth as a result of increased tissue lengths near the fiber crossover, achieved in the latter stage of culture. Derived mathematical models were used in the development of a software program to visualize predicted tissue growth within a pore. This study identifies key pore parameters that contribute toward tissue growth, and suggests models for predicting this growth, based on fibroblast cells. Such models may be used in aiding scaffold design, for optimum pore infiltration during the tissue engineering process. PMID:20687775

  5. Multiscale mechanical modeling of soft biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2008-10-01

    Soft biological tissues include both native and artificial tissues. In the human body, tissues like the articular cartilage, arterial wall, and heart valve leaflets are examples of structures composed of an underlying network of collagen fibers, cells, proteins and molecules. Artificial tissues are less complex than native tissues and mainly consist of a fiber polymer network with the intent of replacing lost or damaged tissue. Understanding of the mechanical function of these materials is essential for many clinical treatments (e.g. arterial clamping, angioplasty), diseases (e.g. arteriosclerosis) and tissue engineering applications (e.g. engineered blood vessels or heart valves). This thesis presents the derivation and application of a multiscale methodology to describe the macroscopic mechanical function of soft biological tissues incorporating directly their structural architecture. The model, which is based on volume averaging theory, accounts for structural parameters such as the network volume fraction and orientation, the realignment of the fibers in response to strain, the interactions among the fibers and the interactions between the fibers and the interstitial fluid in order to predict the overall tissue behavior. Therefore, instead of using a constitutive equation to relate strain to stress, the tissue microstructure is modeled within a representative volume element (RVE) and the macroscopic response at any point in the tissue is determined by solving a micromechanics problem in the RVE. The model was applied successfully to acellular collagen gels, native blood vessels, and electrospun polyurethane scaffolds and provided accurate predictions for permeability calculations in isotropic and oriented fiber networks. The agreement of model predictions with experimentally determined mechanical properties provided insights into the mechanics of tissues and tissue constructs, while discrepancies revealed limitations of the model framework.

  6. Bioprinting for vascular and vascularized tissue biofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Pallab; Ayan, Bugra; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2017-03-15

    Bioprinting is a promising technology to fabricate design-specific tissue constructs due to its ability to create complex, heterocellular structures with anatomical precision. Bioprinting enables the deposition of various biologics including growth factors, cells, genes, neo-tissues and extra-cellular matrix-like hydrogels. Benefits of bioprinting have started to make a mark in the fields of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and pharmaceutics. Specifically, in the field of tissue engineering, the creation of vascularized tissue constructs has remained a principal challenge till date. However, given the myriad advantages over other biofabrication methods, it becomes organic to expect that bioprinting can provide a viable solution for the vascularization problem, and facilitate the clinical translation of tissue engineered constructs. This article provides a comprehensive account of bioprinting of vascular and vascularized tissue constructs. The review is structured as introducing the scope of bioprinting in tissue engineering applications, key vascular anatomical features and then a thorough coverage of 3D bioprinting using extrusion-, droplet- and laser-based bioprinting for fabrication of vascular tissue constructs. The review then provides the reader with the use of bioprinting for obtaining thick vascularized tissues using sacrificial bioink materials. Current challenges are discussed, a comparative evaluation of different bioprinting modalities is presented and future prospects are provided to the reader. Biofabrication of living tissues and organs at the clinically-relevant volumes vitally depends on the integration of vascular network. Despite the great progress in traditional biofabrication approaches, building perfusable hierarchical vascular network is a major challenge. Bioprinting is an emerging technology to fabricate design-specific tissue constructs due to its ability to create complex, heterocellular structures with anatomical precision

  7. Engineering complex orthopaedic tissues via strategic biomimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Dovina; Mosher, Christopher Z; Boushell, Margaret K; Lu, Helen H

    2015-03-01

    The primary current challenge in regenerative engineering resides in the simultaneous formation of more than one type of tissue, as well as their functional assembly into complex tissues or organ systems. Tissue-tissue synchrony is especially important in the musculoskeletal system, wherein overall organ function is enabled by the seamless integration of bone with soft tissues such as ligament, tendon, or cartilage, as well as the integration of muscle with tendon. Therefore, in lieu of a traditional single-tissue system (e.g., bone, ligament), composite tissue scaffold designs for the regeneration of functional connective tissue units (e.g., bone-ligament-bone) are being actively investigated. Closely related is the effort to re-establish tissue-tissue interfaces, which is essential for joining these tissue building blocks and facilitating host integration. Much of the research at the forefront of the field has centered on bioinspired stratified or gradient scaffold designs which aim to recapitulate the structural and compositional inhomogeneity inherent across distinct tissue regions. As such, given the complexity of these musculoskeletal tissue units, the key question is how to identify the most relevant parameters for recapitulating the native structure-function relationships in the scaffold design. Therefore, the focus of this review, in addition to presenting the state-of-the-art in complex scaffold design, is to explore how strategic biomimicry can be applied in engineering tissue connectivity. The objective of strategic biomimicry is to avoid over-engineering by establishing what needs to be learned from nature and defining the essential matrix characteristics that must be reproduced in scaffold design. Application of this engineering strategy for the regeneration of the most common musculoskeletal tissue units (e.g., bone-ligament-bone, muscle-tendon-bone, cartilage-bone) will be discussed in this review. It is anticipated that these exciting efforts will

  8. Engineering Complex Orthopaedic Tissues via Strategic Biomimicry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Dovina; Mosher, Christopher Z.; Boushell, Margaret K.; Lu, Helen H.

    2014-01-01

    The primary current challenge in regenerative engineering resides in the simultaneous formation of more than one type of tissue, as well as their functional assembly into complex tissues or organ systems. Tissue-tissue synchrony is especially important in the musculoskeletal system, whereby overall organ function is enabled by the seamless integration of bone with soft tissues such as ligament, tendon, or cartilage, as well as the integration of muscle with tendon. Therefore, in lieu of a traditional single-tissue system (e.g. bone, ligament), composite tissue scaffold designs for the regeneration of functional connective tissue units (e.g. bone-ligament-bone) are being actively investigated. Closely related is the effort to re-establish tissue-tissue interfaces, which is essential for joining these tissue building blocks and facilitating host integration. Much of the research at the forefront of the field has centered on bioinspired stratified or gradient scaffold designs which aim to recapitulate the structural and compositional inhomogeneity inherent across distinct tissue regions. As such, given the complexity of these musculoskeletal tissue units, the key question is how to identify the most relevant parameters for recapitulating the native structure-function relationships in the scaffold design. Therefore, the focus of this review, in addition to presenting the state-of-the-art in complex scaffold design, is to explore how strategic biomimicry can be applied in engineering tissue connectivity. The objective of strategic biomimicry is to avoid over-engineering by establishing what needs to be learned from nature and defining the essential matrix characteristics that must be reproduced in scaffold design. Application of this engineering strategy for the regeneration of the most common musculoskeletal tissue units (e.g. bone-ligament-bone, muscle-tendon-bone, cartilage-bone) will be discussed in this review. It is anticipated that these exciting efforts will

  9. Keratoconus: Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Karamichos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus (KC is a bilateral, asymmetric, corneal disorder that is characterized by progressive thinning, steepening, and potential scarring. The prevalence of KC is stated to be 1 in 2000 persons worldwide; however, numbers vary depending on size of the study and regions. KC appears more often in South Asian, Eastern Mediterranean, and North African populations. The cause remains unknown, although a variety of factors have been considered. Genetics, cellular, and mechanical changes have all been reported; however, most of these studies have proven inconclusive. Clearly, the major problem here, like with any other ocular disease, is quality of life and the threat of vision loss. While most KC cases progress until the third or fourth decade, it varies between individuals. Patients may experience periods of several months with significant changes followed by months or years of no change, followed by another period of rapid changes. Despite the major advancements, it is still uncertain how to treat KC at early stages and prevent vision impairment. There are currently limited tissue engineering techniques and/or “smart” biomaterials that can help arrest the progression of KC. This review will focus on current treatments and how biomaterials may hold promise for the future.

  10. Tissue Regeneration: A Silk Road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Dave; Mou, Xiaoyang; Hu, Xiao

    2016-08-05

    Silk proteins are natural biopolymers that have extensive structural possibilities for chemical and mechanical modifications to facilitate novel properties, functions, and applications in the biomedical field. The versatile processability of silk fibroins (SF) into different forms such as gels, films, foams, membranes, scaffolds, and nanofibers makes it appealing in a variety of applications that require mechanically superior, biocompatible, biodegradable, and functionalizable biomaterials. There is no doubt that nature is the world's best biological engineer, with simple, exquisite but powerful designs that have inspired novel technologies. By understanding the surface interaction of silk materials with living cells, unique characteristics can be implemented through structural modifications, such as controllable wettability, high-strength adhesiveness, and reflectivity properties, suggesting its potential suitability for surgical, optical, and other biomedical applications. All of the interesting features of SF, such as tunable biodegradation, anti-bacterial properties, and mechanical properties combined with potential self-healing modifications, make it ideal for future tissue engineering applications. In this review, we first demonstrate the current understanding of the structures and mechanical properties of SF and the various functionalizations of SF matrices through chemical and physical manipulations. Then the diverse applications of SF architectures and scaffolds for different regenerative medicine will be discussed in detail, including their current applications in bone, eye, nerve, skin, tendon, ligament, and cartilage regeneration.

  11. Skin and Soft Tissue Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan; Salinas, Robert C; Agudelo Higuita, Nelson Ivan

    2015-09-15

    Skin and soft tissue infections result from microbial invasion of the skin and its supporting structures. Management is determined by the severity and location of the infection and by patient comorbidities. Infections can be classified as simple (uncomplicated) or complicated (necrotizing or nonnecrotizing), or as suppurative or nonsuppurative. Most community-acquired infections are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and beta-hemolytic streptococcus. Simple infections are usually monomicrobial and present with localized clinical findings. In contrast, complicated infections can be mono- or polymicrobial and may present with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The diagnosis is based on clinical evaluation. Laboratory testing may be required to confirm an uncertain diagnosis, evaluate for deep infections or sepsis, determine the need for inpatient care, and evaluate and treat comorbidities. Initial antimicrobial choice is empiric, and in simple infections should cover Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species. Patients with complicated infections, including suspected necrotizing fasciitis and gangrene, require empiric polymicrobial antibiotic coverage, inpatient treatment, and surgical consultation for debridement. Superficial and small abscesses respond well to drainage and seldom require antibiotics. Immunocompromised patients require early treatment and antimicrobial coverage for possible atypical organisms.

  12. Olaratumab for soft tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyssonneau, Diego; Italiano, Antoine

    2017-08-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare malignant tumors. Unfortunately, the first-line doxorubicin-based treatment has not been improved since the 1970s. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor alpha (PDGFR-α) and its ligands are co-expressed in many types of cancer, including sarcomas. They are involved in stimulating growth and regulating stromal-derived fibroblasts and angiogenesis. PDGFR-α and its ligand may play an important role in tumorigenesis and be a potential target in the treatment of sarcomas. Olaratumab is a fully human IgG1-type anti-PDGFR-α monoclonal antibody with a high affinity and a low 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50). Areas covered: The authors review the role of olaratumab in the treatment of STS by focusing on the recent, randomized Phase II JDGD trial that challenged patients with unresectable or metastatic STS with doxorubicin in the presence or absence of olaratumab. This trial showed a great improvement in overall survival (OS), with an increase in survival from 14.7 months to 26.5 months for patients in the experimental arm and showed acceptable toxicity. Expert opinion: Results seem promising. However, it must be qualified, as the study includes several uncertainties. These uncertainties should be addressed by the ongoing Phase 3 JGDJ confirmatory trial, for which the final efficacy analysis is expected by 2019.

  13. Tissue Factor Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulius Butenas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue factor (TF is an integral membrane protein that is essential to life. It is a component of the factor VIIa-TF complex enzyme and plays a primary role in both normal hemostasis and thrombosis. With a vascular injury, TF becomes exposed to blood and binds plasma factor VIIa, and the resulting complex initiates a series of enzymatic reactions leading to clot formation and vascular sealing. Many cells, both healthy, and tumor cells, produce detectable amounts of TF, especially when they are stimulated by various agents. Despite the relative simplicity and small size of TF, there are numerous contradictory reports about the synthesis and presentation of TF on blood cells and circulation in normal blood either on microparticles or as a soluble protein. Another subject of controversy is related to the structure/function of TF. It has been almost commonly accepted that cell-surface-associated TF has low (if any activity, that is, is “encrypted” and requires specific conditions/reagents to become active, that is, “decrypted.” However there is a lack of agreement related to the mechanism and processes leading to alterations in TF function. In this paper TF structure, presentation, and function, and controversies concerning these features are discussed.

  14. Heart Regeneration with Engineered Myocardial Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Vivek K.; Andreadis, Stelios T.; Murry, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and regenerative therapies that replace damaged myocardium could benefit millions of patients annually. The many cell types in the heart, including cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and cardiac fibroblasts, communicate via intercellular signaling and modulate each other’s function. Although much progress has been made in generating cells of the cardiovascular lineage from human pluripotent stem cells, a major challenge now is creating the tissue architecture to integrate a microvascular circulation and afferent arterioles into such an engineered tissue. Recent advances in cardiac and vascular tissue engineering will move us closer to the goal of generating functionally mature tissue. Using the biology of the myocardium as the foundation for designing engineered tissue and addressing the challenges to implantation and integration, we can bridge the gap from bench to bedside for a clinically tractable engineered cardiac tissue. PMID:24819474

  15. Tissue engineering for skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Roberto; Bearzi, Claudia; Mauretti, Arianna; Bernardini, Sergio; Cannata, Stefano; Gargioli, Cesare

    2012-07-01

    Stem cells and regenerative medicine have obtained a remarkable consent from the scientific community for their promising ability to recover aged, injured and diseased tissue. However, despite the noteworthy potential, hurdles currently hinder their use and clinical application: cell survival, immune response, tissue engraftment and efficient differentiation. Hence a new interdisciplinary scientific approach, such as tissue engineering, is going deep attempts to mimic neo-tissue-genesis as well as stem cell engraftment amelioration. Skeletal muscle tissue engineering represents a great potentiality in medicine for muscle regeneration exploiting new generation injectable hydrogel as scaffold supporting progenitor/stem cells for muscle differentiation reconstructing the natural skeletal muscle tissue architecture influenced by matrix mechanical and physical property and by a dynamic environment.

  16. Tissue refractometry using Hilbert phase microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Niyom; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Lessard, Mark D; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S; Popescu, Gabriel

    2007-12-15

    We present, for the first time to our knowledge, quantitative phase images associated with unstained 5 mum thick tissue slices of mouse brain, spleen, and liver. The refractive properties of the tissue are retrieved in terms of the average refractive index and its spatial variation. We find that the average refractive index varies significantly with tissue type, such that the brain is characterized by the lowest value and the liver by the highest. The spatial power spectra of the phase images reveal power law behavior with different exponents for each tissue type. This approach opens a new possibility for stain-free characterization of tissues, where the diagnostic power is provided by the intrinsic refractive properties of the biological structure. We present results obtained for liver tissue affected by a lysosomal storage disease and show that our technique can quantify structural changes during this disease development.

  17. Imaging of musculoskeletal soft tissue infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turecki, Marcin B.; Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Holden, Dean A.; Hunter, Tim B.; Rogers, Lee F. [University of Arizona HSC, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Stubbs, Alana Y. [Southern Arizona VA Health Care System, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Graham, Anna R. [University of Arizona HSC, Department of Pathology, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Prompt and appropriate imaging work-up of the various musculoskeletal soft tissue infections aids early diagnosis and treatment and decreases the risk of complications resulting from misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis. The signs and symptoms of musculoskeletal soft tissue infections can be nonspecific, making it clinically difficult to distinguish between disease processes and the extent of disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of soft tissue infections. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, radiography and nuclear medicine studies are considered ancillary. This manuscript illustrates representative images of superficial and deep soft tissue infections such as infectious cellulitis, superficial and deep fasciitis, including the necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis/soft tissue abscess, septic bursitis and tenosynovitis on different imaging modalities, with emphasis on MRI. Typical histopathologic findings of soft tissue infections are also presented. The imaging approach described in the manuscript is based on relevant literature and authors' personal experience and everyday practice. (orig.)

  18. Macrophages in tissue repair, regeneration, and fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Thomas A.; Vannella, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory monocytes and resident tissue macrophages are key regulators of tissue repair, regeneration, and fibrosis. Following tissue injury, monocytes and macrophages undergo marked phenotypic and functional changes to play critical roles during the initiation, maintenance, and resolution phases of tissue repair. Disturbances in macrophage function can lead to aberrant repair, with uncontrolled inflammatory mediator and growth factor production, deficient generation of anti-inflammatory macrophages, or failed communication between macrophages and epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stem or tissue progenitor cells all contributing to a state of persistent injury, which may lead to the development of pathological fibrosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that instruct macrophages to adopt pro-inflammatory, pro-wound healing, pro-fibrotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic, pro-resolving, and tissue regenerating phenotypes following injury, and highlight how some of these mechanisms and macrophage activation states could be exploited therapeutically. PMID:26982353

  19. Using Polymeric Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alida Abruzzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the high occurrence of cardiovascular disease and increasing numbers of patients requiring vascular access, there is a significant need for small-diameter (<6 mm inner diameter vascular graft that can provide long-term patency. Despite the technological improvements, restenosis and graft thrombosis continue to hamper the success of the implants. Vascular tissue engineering is a new field that has undergone enormous growth over the last decade and has proposed valid solutions for blood vessels repair. The goal of vascular tissue engineering is to produce neovessels and neoorgan tissue from autologous cells using a biodegradable polymer as a scaffold. The most important advantage of tissue-engineered implants is that these tissues can grow, remodel, rebuild, and respond to injury. This review describes the development of polymeric materials over the years and current tissue engineering strategies for the improvement of vascular conduits.

  20. Nanomaterials for Cardiac Myocyte Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Amezcua

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Since their synthesizing introduction to the research community, nanomaterials have infiltrated almost every corner of science and engineering. Over the last decade, one such field has begun to look at using nanomaterials for beneficial applications in tissue engineering, specifically, cardiac tissue engineering. During a myocardial infarction, part of the cardiac muscle, or myocardium, is deprived of blood. Therefore, the lack of oxygen destroys cardiomyocytes, leaving dead tissue and possibly resulting in the development of arrhythmia, ventricular remodeling, and eventual heart failure. Scarred cardiac muscle results in heart failure for millions of heart attack survivors worldwide. Modern cardiac tissue engineering research has developed nanomaterial applications to combat heart failure, preserve normal heart tissue, and grow healthy myocardium around the infarcted area. This review will discuss the recent progress of nanomaterials for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications through three main nanomaterial approaches: scaffold designs, patches, and injectable materials.

  1. Nanomaterials for Cardiac Myocyte Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amezcua, Rodolfo; Shirolkar, Ajay; Fraze, Carolyn; Stout, David A

    2016-07-19

    Since their synthesizing introduction to the research community, nanomaterials have infiltrated almost every corner of science and engineering. Over the last decade, one such field has begun to look at using nanomaterials for beneficial applications in tissue engineering, specifically, cardiac tissue engineering. During a myocardial infarction, part of the cardiac muscle, or myocardium, is deprived of blood. Therefore, the lack of oxygen destroys cardiomyocytes, leaving dead tissue and possibly resulting in the development of arrhythmia, ventricular remodeling, and eventual heart failure. Scarred cardiac muscle results in heart failure for millions of heart attack survivors worldwide. Modern cardiac tissue engineering research has developed nanomaterial applications to combat heart failure, preserve normal heart tissue, and grow healthy myocardium around the infarcted area. This review will discuss the recent progress of nanomaterials for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications through three main nanomaterial approaches: scaffold designs, patches, and injectable materials.

  2. Methadone Recycling Sustains Drug Reservoir in Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Oscar A; Fudin, Jeffrey; Daly, Annemarie; Schiesser, William E; Boston, Raymond C

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesize that there is a tissue store of methadone content in humans that is not directly accessible, but is quantifiable. Further, we hypothesize the mechanism by which methadone content is sustained in tissue stores involves methadone uptake, storage, and release from tissue depots in the body (recycling). Accordingly, we hypothesize that such tissue stores, in part, determine plasma methadone levels. We studied a random sample of six opioid-naïve healthy subjects. We performed a clinical trial simulation in silico using pharmacokinetic modeling. We found a large tissue store of methadone content whose size was much larger than methadone's size in plasma in response to a single oral dose of methadone 10 mg. The tissue store measured 13-17 mg. This finding could only be explained by the contemporaneous storage of methadone in tissue with dose recycling. We found that methadone recycles 2-5 times through an inaccessible extravascular compartment (IAC), from an accessible plasma-containing compartment (AC), before exiting irreversibly. We estimate the rate of accumulation (or storage) of methadone in tissue was 0.029-7.29 mg/h. We predict 39 ± 13% to 83 ± 6% of methadone's tissue stores "spillover" into the circulation. Our results indicate that there exists a large quantifiable tissue store of methadone in humans. Our results support the notion that methadone in humans undergoes tissue uptake, storage, release into the circulation, reuptake from the circulation, and re-release into the circulation, and that spillover of methadone from tissue stores, in part, maintain plasma methadone levels in humans.

  3. Modified elastic tissue-Masson trichrome stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, W

    1984-07-01

    A combined elastic tissue-Masson technique is presented which stains elastic fibers of all sizes, nuclei and connective tissue. The modified elastic tissue stain consists of hematoxylin, ferric chloride and Verhoeff's iodine; nuclei and elastic fibers are stained blue-black in six minutes without differentiation. By contrast, cytoplasmic elements are stained red, (Biebrich scarlet-acid fuchsin) and collagen is stained green (light green) or blue (aniline blue). The entire staining procedure takes approximately one hour.

  4. Subepithelial connective tissue graft: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Alcarás Saraiva; Edson Alves de Campos; Rodrigo Cavassim; Shelon Cristina de Souza Pinto; Lucas Amaral Fontanari; Guilherme José Pimentel Lopes Oliveira; José Eduardo Cezar Sampaio

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and objective: Marginal tissue recession represents a common condition in Periodontology. Miller's Classes I and II recessions, in which the etiological factors are well diagnosed and eliminated, show great predictability of total coverage when the technique of subepithelial connective tissue graft is used. This technique success has been mainly attributed to the double blood supply for graft's nutrition, originating from the connective tissue of both the periosteum and flap. Cas...

  5. Graphene based scaffolds on bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadjou, Nasrin; Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Khalilzadeh, Balal

    2017-11-02

    Tissue engineering has been emerging as a valid approach to the current therapies for bone regeneration/substitution. Tissue-engineered bone constructs have the potential to alleviate the demand arising from the shortage of suitable autograft and allograft materials for augmenting bone healing. Scaffolds play a central role in tissue engineering research, they not only provide as structural support for specific cells but also provide as the templates to guide new tissue growth and construction. In this survey we describe application of graphene based nano-biomaterials for bone tissue engineering. In this article, application of different graphene based materials on construction of manufacture scaffolds for bone tissue engineering was discussed. It begins by giving the reader a brief background on tissue engineering, followed by a comprehensive description of all the relevant components of graphene based materials, going from materials to scaffolds and from cells to tissue engineering strategies that will lead to "engineered" bone. In this survey, more recent studies on the effects of graphene on surface modifications of scaffold materials was discused. The ability of graphene to improve the biological properties of scaffold materials, and its ability to promote the adhesion, proliferation, and osteoblasts have been demonstrated in several studies which we discuss in this survey article. We further highlight how the properties of graphene are being exploited for scaffolds in bone tissue engineering, comprehensively surveying recent experimental works featuring graphene and graphene derivatives. Bone tissue engineering, for the purpose of this survey, is the use of a scaffolding material to either induce formation of bone from the surrounding tissue or to act as a carrier or template for implanted bone cells or other agents. Materials used as bone tissue-engineered scaffolds may be injectable or rigid, the latter requiring an operative implantation procedure.

  6. [Diagnosis of calcified deposits in soft tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybier, M; Laredo, J D; Parlier, C; Champsaur, P

    1997-01-01

    Calcific deposit within soft tissues is frequently a clue for diagnosis. The radiological analysis of a calcific deposit within soft tissues includes the following aspects: the basic structure of the calcification, the grade of differentiation of the calcification, the site of the calcification, the number of calcific deposits, the shape of the calcification, the changes in the adjacent non-calcified soft tissues and in the adjacent bone, the course of the clinical signs, the course of the radiological abnormalities.

  7. Printing and Prototyping of Tissues and Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, Brian

    2012-11-01

    New manufacturing technologies under the banner of rapid prototyping enable the fabrication of structures close in architecture to biological tissue. In their simplest form, these technologies allow the manufacture of scaffolds upon which cells can grow for later implantation into the body. A more exciting prospect is the printing and patterning in three dimensions of all the components that make up a tissue (cells and matrix materials) to generate structures analogous to tissues; this has been termed bioprinting. Such techniques have opened new areas of research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  8. Scalable robotic biofabrication of tissue spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehesz, A Nagy; Hajdu, Z; Visconti, R P; Markwald, R R; Mironov, V [Advanced Tissue Biofabrication Center, Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Brown, J [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Beaver, W [York Technical College, Rock Hill, SC (United States); Da Silva, J V L, E-mail: mironovv@musc.edu [Renato Archer Information Technology Center-CTI, Campinas (Brazil)

    2011-06-15

    Development of methods for scalable biofabrication of uniformly sized tissue spheroids is essential for tissue spheroid-based bioprinting of large size tissue and organ constructs. The most recent scalable technique for tissue spheroid fabrication employs a micromolded recessed template prepared in a non-adhesive hydrogel, wherein the cells loaded into the template self-assemble into tissue spheroids due to gravitational force. In this study, we present an improved version of this technique. A new mold was designed to enable generation of 61 microrecessions in each well of a 96-well plate. The microrecessions were seeded with cells using an EpMotion 5070 automated pipetting machine. After 48 h of incubation, tissue spheroids formed at the bottom of each microrecession. To assess the quality of constructs generated using this technology, 600 tissue spheroids made by this method were compared with 600 spheroids generated by the conventional hanging drop method. These analyses showed that tissue spheroids fabricated by the micromolded method are more uniform in diameter. Thus, use of micromolded recessions in a non-adhesive hydrogel, combined with automated cell seeding, is a reliable method for scalable robotic fabrication of uniform-sized tissue spheroids.

  9. Tissue banking training courses: Polish experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Artur; Gut, Grzegorz; Uhrynowska-Tyszkiewicz, Izabela; Olender, Ewa

    2013-03-01

    Personnel directly involved in the donation, procurement, testing, processing, preservation, storage and distribution of human tissues and cells should be appropriately qualified and provided with timely and relevant training according to EU directives. In the time of new tissue and cells regulations implementation such a training system existed in Poland only at a local level. The first training programme outlines for various groups of health professionals engaged in tissue banking practice was created in co-operation with the Institute for LifeLong Learning at University of Barcelona in 2006. This initial training courses were financially supported by EU Transition Facility Programme 2004. Then, starting from 2006, based on previous experience, system of advanced training courses was created. This training programme was financially supported by the National Programme for the Development of Transplantation Medicine 2006-2009-POLGRAFT financed by Polish Ministry of Health. During 2006 and 2007 first set of tissue banking initial training courses were provided according to TF 2004 project. Over 200 pathologists, forensic medicine specialists and other medical doctors responsible for donor screening and classification, medical directors of tissue establishments, technical staff; tissue graft users: orthopaedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, cardiosurgeons and ophthalmologists were trained. Between 2006 and 2009 there were organized 8 advanced tissue banking training courses according to POLGRAFT programme. There were organized both theoretical and practical courses on various aspects of tissue for over 350 persons. We present our experience in organisation of international and national tissue banking training courses.

  10. Guided tissue regeneration in periapical surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Louis; Chen, Melody Y-H; Ricucci, Domenico; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2010-04-01

    Tissue regeneration by using membrane barriers and bone grafting materials in periapical surgery is an example of tissue engineering technology. Membrane barriers and/or bone grafts are often used to enhance periapical new bone formation. However, the periapical tissues also consist of the periodontal ligament (PDL) and cementum. For regeneration of the periapical tissues after periapical surgery, one of the important requirements is recruitment and differentiation of progenitor/stem cells into committed pre-osteoblasts, pre-PDL cells, and pre-cementoblasts. Homing of progenitor/stem cells into the wounded periapical tissues is regulated by factors such as stromal cell-derived factor 1, growth factors/cytokines, and by microenvironmental cues such as adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix and associated noncollagenous molecules. Tissue regeneration after injury appears to recapitulate the pathway of normal embryonic tissue development. Multiple tissue regeneration involves a complex interaction between different cells, extracellular matrix, growth/differentiation factors, and microenvironmental cues. Little is known concerning the biologic mechanisms that regulate temporal and spatial relationship between alveolar bone, PDL, and cementum regeneration during periapical wound healing. Simply applying a membrane barrier and/or bone graft during periapical surgery might not result in complete regeneration of the periapical tissues. It has not been clearly demonstrated that these biomaterials are capable of recruiting progenitor/stem cells and inducing these undifferentiated mesenchymal cells to differentiate into PDL cells and cementoblasts after periapical surgery. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Microgravity cultivation of cells and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, L. E.; Pellis, N.; Searby, N.; de Luis, J.; Preda, C.; Bordonaro, J.; Vunjak-Novakovic, G.

    1999-01-01

    In vitro studies of cells and tissues in microgravity, either simulated by cultivation conditions on earth or actual, during spaceflight, are expected to help identify mechanisms underlying gravity sensing and transduction in biological organisms. In this paper, we review rotating bioreactor studies of engineered skeletal and cardiovascular tissues carried out in unit gravity, a four month long cartilage tissue engineering study carried out aboard the Mir Space Station, and the ongoing laboratory development and testing of a system for cell and tissue cultivation aboard the International Space Station.

  12. Cartilage tissue engineering: its potential and uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Catherine K; Li, Wan-Ju; Mauck, Robert L; Tuan, Rocky S

    2006-01-01

    The prevalent nature of osteoarthritis, a cartilage degenerative disease that results in the erosion of joint surfaces and loss of mobility, underscores the importance of developing functional articular cartilage replacement. Recent research efforts have focused on tissue engineering as a promising approach for cartilage regeneration and repair. Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary research area that incorporates both biological and engineering principles for the purpose of generating new, living tissues to replace the diseased/damaged tissue and restore tissue/organ function. This review surveys and highlights the current concepts and recent progress in cartilage tissue engineering, and discusses the challenges and potential of this rapidly advancing field of biomedical research. Cartilage tissue engineering is critically dependent on selection of appropriate cells (differentiated or progenitor cells); fabrication and utilization of biocompatible and mechanically suitable scaffolds for cell delivery; stimulation with chondrogenically bioactive molecules introduced in the form of recombinant proteins or via gene transfer; and application of dynamic, mechanical loading regimens for conditioning of the engineered tissue constructs, including the design of specialized biomechanically active bioreactors. Cell selection, scaffold design and biological stimulation remain the challenges of function tissue engineering. Successful regeneration or replacement of damaged or diseased cartilage will depend on future advances in our understanding of the biology of cartilage and stem cells and technological development in engineering.

  13. Tissue polarimetry: concepts, challenges, applications, and outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Nirmalya; Vitkin, I Alex

    2011-11-01

    Polarimetry has a long and successful history in various forms of clear media. Driven by their biomedical potential, the use of the polarimetric approaches for biological tissue assessment has also recently received considerable attention. Specifically, polarization can be used as an effective tool to discriminate against multiply scattered light (acting as a gating mechanism) in order to enhance contrast and to improve tissue imaging resolution. Moreover, the intrinsic tissue polarimetry characteristics contain a wealth of morphological and functional information of potential biomedical importance. However, in a complex random medium-like tissue, numerous complexities due to multiple scattering and simultaneous occurrences of many scattering and polarization events present formidable challenges both in terms of accurate measurements and in terms of analysis of the tissue polarimetry signal. In order to realize the potential of the polarimetric approaches for tissue imaging and characterization/diagnosis, a number of researchers are thus pursuing innovative solutions to these challenges. In this review paper, we summarize these and other issues pertinent to the polarized light methodologies in tissues. Specifically, we discuss polarized light basics, Stokes-Muller formalism, methods of polarization measurements, polarized light modeling in turbid media, applications to tissue imaging, inverse analysis for polarimetric results quantification, applications to quantitative tissue assessment, etc.

  14. Segmentation and Quantitative Analysis of Epithelial Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigouy, Benoit; Umetsu, Daiki; Eaton, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Epithelia are tissues that regulate exchanges with the environment. They are very dynamic and can acquire virtually any shape; at the cellular level, they are composed of cells tightly connected by junctions. Most often epithelia are amenable to live imaging; however, the large number of cells composing an epithelium and the absence of informatics tools dedicated to epithelial analysis largely prevented tissue scale studies. Here we present Tissue Analyzer, a free tool that can be used to segment and analyze epithelial cells and monitor tissue dynamics.

  15. Medical image of the week: granulation tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 57 year old woman presented with a tickling sensation in the back of throat and intermittent bleeding from the healing stoma one month after decannulation of her tracheostomy tube. On bronchoscopy a granuloma with surrounding granulation tissue was present in the subglottic space (Figure 1. Argon plasma coagulation (APC was performed to cauterize the granulation tissue (Figure 2. Formation of granulation tissue after tracheostomy is a common complication which can result in tracheal stenosis. APC and electrocautery using flexible bronchoscopy has been shown to safely and effectively remove the granulation tissue.

  16. Adipose tissue: cell heterogeneity and functional diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve Ràfols, Montserrat

    2014-02-01

    There are two types of adipose tissue in the body whose function appears to be clearly differentiated. White adipose tissue stores energy reserves as fat, whereas the metabolic function of brown adipose tissue is lipid oxidation to produce heat. A good balance between them is important to maintain energy homeostasis. The concept of white adipose tissue has radically changed in the past decades, and is now considered as an endocrine organ that secretes many factors with autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine functions. In addition, we can no longer consider white adipose tissue as a single tissue, because it shows different metabolic profiles in its different locations, with also different implications. Although the characteristic cell of adipose tissue is the adipocyte, this is not the only cell type present in adipose tissue, neither the most abundant. Other cell types in adipose tissue described include stem cells, preadipocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and endothelial cells. The balance between these different cell types and their expression profile is closely related to maintenance of energy homeostasis. Increases in adipocyte size, number and type of lymphocytes, and infiltrated macrophages are closely related to the metabolic syndrome diseases. The study of regulation of proliferation and differentiation of preadipocytes and stem cells, and understanding of the interrelationship between the different cell types will provide new targets for action against these diseases. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Principles, Techniques, and Applications of Tissue Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Lawrence A.; Kartalov, Emil P.; Shibata, Darryl; Taylor, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The principle of tissue microfluidics and its resultant techniques has been applied to cell analysis. Building microfluidics to suit a particular tissue sample would allow the rapid, reliable, inexpensive, highly parallelized, selective extraction of chosen regions of tissue for purposes of further biochemical analysis. Furthermore, the applicability of the techniques ranges beyond the described pathology application. For example, they would also allow the posing and successful answering of new sets of questions in many areas of fundamental research. The proposed integration of microfluidic techniques and tissue slice samples is called "tissue microfluidics" because it molds the microfluidic architectures in accordance with each particular structure of each specific tissue sample. Thus, microfluidics can be built around the tissues, following the tissue structure, or alternatively, the microfluidics can be adapted to the specific geometry of particular tissues. By contrast, the traditional approach is that microfluidic devices are structured in accordance with engineering considerations, while the biological components in applied devices are forced to comply with these engineering presets.

  18. VISUALIZATION OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE IMPEDANCE PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Bankov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Investigation the opportunity for measurement of biological tissue impedance to visualize its parameters.Materials and methods. Studies were undertook on the experimental facility, consists of registrating measuring cell, constructed from flat inductors system, formed in oscillatory circuit, herewith investigated biological tissue is the part of this oscillatory circuit. An excitation of oscillatory circuit fulfilled by means of exciter inductor which forms impulse complex modulated electromagnetic field (ICM EMF. The measurement process and visualizations provided by set of certificated instruments: a digital oscillograph AKTAKOM ADS-2221MV, a digital generator АКТАКОМ AWG-4150 (both with software and a gauge RLC E7-22. Comparative dynamic studies of fixed volume and weight pig’s blood, adipose tissue, muscular tissue impedance were conducted by contact versus contactless methods. Contactless method in contrast to contact method gives opportunity to obtain the real morphological visualization of biological tissue irrespective of their nature.Results. Comparison of contact and contactless methods of impedance measurement shows that the inductance to capacitance ratio X(L / X(C was equal: 17 – for muscular tissue, 4 – for blood, 1 – for adipose tissue. It demonstrates the technical correspondence of both impedance registration methods. If propose the base relevance of X (L and X (C parameters for biological tissue impedance so contactless measurement method for sure shows insulating properties of adipose tissue and high conductivity for blood and muscular tissue in fixed volume-weight parameters. Registration of biological tissue impedance complex parameters by contactless method with the help of induced ICM EMF in fixed volume of biological tissue uncovers the most important informative volumes to characterize morphofunctional condition of biological tissue namely X (L / X (C.Conclusion. Contactless method of biological

  19. Detection of tissue factor antigen and coagulation activity in coronary artery thrombi isolated from patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullio Palmerini

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Although ruptured atherosclerotic plaques have been extensively analyzed, the composition of thrombi causing arterial occlusion in patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction has been less thoroughly investigated. We sought to investigate whether coagulant active tissue factor can be retrieved in thrombi of patients with STEMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention. METHODS: Nineteen patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction referred for primary percutaneous coronary intervention were enrolled in this study. Coronary thrombi aspirated from coronary arteries were routinely processed for paraffin embedding and histological evaluation (4 patients or immediately snap frozen for evaluation of tissue factor activity using a modified aPTT test (15 patients. Immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblotting was also performed in 12 patients. RESULTS: Thrombi aspirated from coronary arteries showed large and irregular areas of tissue factor staining within platelet aggregates, and in close contact with inflammatory cells. Some platelet aggregates stained positive for tissue factor, whereas others did not. Monocytes consistently stained strongly for tissue factor, neutrophils had a more variable and irregular tissue factor staining, and red blood cells did not demonstrate staining for tissue factor. Median clotting time of plasma samples containing homogenized thrombi incubated with a monoclonal antibody that specifically inhibits tissue factor-mediated coagulation activity (mAb 5G9 were significantly longer than their respective controls (88.9 seconds versus 76.5 seconds, respectively; p<0.001. Tissue factor was also identified by immunoprecipitation in 10 patients, with significant variability among band intensities. CONCLUSIONS: Active tissue factor is present in coronary artery thrombi of patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction, suggesting that it contributes to

  20. New diagnostic modalities in soft tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, S

    1999-01-01

    Molecular and cytogenetic analysis of soft tissue sarcoma has provided a vast amount of new genetic information over the past 10 years. Recent advances in genetic technology, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and positional cloning techniques have greatly increased the rate of new discoveries and soon may bring cytogenetic and molecular analysis to standard pathology laboratories. Karotypic analysis of soft tissue tumors have demonstrated specific cytogenetic aberrations which have proved to be extremely useful diagnostically and have solidified and improved soft tissue tumor classification systems. Objective and reproducible prognostication in soft tissue sarcoma remains problematic. Presently, the grade and size of the sarcoma are the most important factors used to estimate risk of relapse and overall survival. Assigning a pathologic grade to an individual sarcoma as a means of predicting clinical behavior is often difficult with a 40% discordance rate even between expert sarcoma pathologists. There is mounting evidence that the composition of membrane phospholipid in tumor tissue is an important indicator of a tumor's cellularity, proliferative capacity, and differentiation state. However, there is a lack of information on the biochemical determinants of sarcoma proliferation and differentiation. To address these problems, novel quantitative ex vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have been applied to determine the biochemical changes in tissue lipid for soft tissue sarcoma. The biochemical changes in tissue lipid have been found to correlate with sarcoma cellularity, growth rate, and differentiation. Continued prospective NMR analysis of tissue lipid biochemistry in soft tissue tumors will permit the development of a clinically relevant biochemical system of prognostic determinants for soft tissue sarcoma in the future.

  1. A Novel Albumin-Based Tissue Scaffold for Autogenic Tissue Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei-Shan; -Liang Lee, I.; Yu, Wei-Lin; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Jane, Wann-Neng; Shen, Hsin-Hsin

    2014-07-01

    Tissue scaffolds provide a framework for living tissue regeneration. However, traditional tissue scaffolds are exogenous, composed of metals, ceramics, polymers, and animal tissues, and have a defined biocompatibility and application. This study presents a new method for obtaining a tissue scaffold from blood albumin, the major protein in mammalian blood. Human, bovine, and porcine albumin was polymerised into albumin polymers by microbial transglutaminase and was then cast by freeze-drying-based moulding to form albumin tissue scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy and material testing analyses revealed that the albumin tissue scaffold possesses an extremely porous structure, moderate mechanical strength, and resilience. Using a culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a model, we showed that MSCs can be seeded and grown in the albumin tissue scaffold. Furthermore, the albumin tissue scaffold can support the long-term osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. These results show that the albumin tissue scaffold exhibits favourable material properties and good compatibility with cells. We propose that this novel tissue scaffold can satisfy essential needs in tissue engineering as a general-purpose substrate. The use of this scaffold could lead to the development of new methods of artificial fabrication of autogenic tissue substitutes.

  2. Local aromatase activity in human breast tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, J H; Daroszewski, J; Milewicz, A; Blankenstein, M A

    1993-03-01

    The presence of oestradiol in malignant breast cells is considered to be an important factor in the promotion of growth of the tumor. Therefore the regulation of the local high intra-tissue oestradiol concentrations, regardless of plasma concentrations, has been investigated. Experimental evidence suggests that in situ biosynthesis of oestrogens is at least partly responsible for the local accumulation of these steroids. In this paper we report further data on measurements in fatty and tumor tissues of local aromatase activities and of concentrations of substrates and products of this enzyme. Data are given on localization of aromatase and on steroid concentrations in tumors and in adipose tissues dissected from different quadrants of breasts with malignant tumors. In adipose tissues small variations in steroid concentrations in fatty tissues were found. No tumor-directed gradients in the adipose tissue-concentrations of the androgens dehydro-epiandrosterone, 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol, 4-androstene-3,17-dione and testosterone and of the oestrogens oestradiol, oestrone and their sulfates could be detected. Furthermore no consistent pattern could be recognized in the aromatase activities in the fatty tissues dissected from tumor-bearing and non-affected quadrants of the same breast. No correlations between aromatase activity measured in vitro and product concentrations in vivo were found. Therefore the mechanisms for regulation of the local oestradiol levels in breast tissues remain unknown.

  3. Injectable silk foams for soft tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellas, Evangelia; Lo, Tim J; Fournier, Eric P; Brown, Joseph E; Abbott, Rosalyn D; Gil, Eun S; Marra, Kacey G; Rubin, J Peter; Leisk, Gary G; Kaplan, David L

    2015-02-18

    Soft tissue fillers are needed for restoration of a defect or augmentation of existing tissues. Autografts and lipotransfer have been under study for soft tissue reconstruction but yield inconsistent results, often with considerable resorption of the grafted tissue. A minimally invasive procedure would reduce scarring and recovery time as well as allow the implant and/or grafted tissue to be placed closer to existing vasculature. Here, the feasibility of an injectable silk foam for soft tissue regeneration is demonstrated. Adipose-derived stem cells survive and migrate through the foam over a 10-d period in vitro. The silk foams are also successfully injected into the subcutaneous space in a rat and over a 3-month period integrating with the surrounding native tissue. The injected foams are palpable and soft to the touch through the skin and returning to their original dimensions after pressure is applied and then released. The foams readily absorb lipoaspirate making the foams useful as a scaffold or template for existing soft tissue filler technologies, useful either as a biomaterial alone or in combination with the lipoaspirate. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Plant Tissue Culture in a Bag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Describes the use of an oven bag as a sterile chamber for culture initiation and tissue transfer. Plant tissue culture is an ideal tool for introducing students to plants, cloning, and experimental design. Includes materials, methods, discussion, and conclusion sections. (SAH)

  5. 3D Bioprinting for Vascularized Tissue Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Dylan; Jia, Jia; Yost, Michael; Markwald, Roger; Mei, Ying

    2017-01-01

    3D bioprinting holds remarkable promise for rapid fabrication of 3D tissue engineering constructs. Given its scalability, reproducibility, and precise multi-dimensional control that traditional fabrication methods do not provide, 3D bioprinting provides a powerful means to address one of the major challenges in tissue engineering: vascularization. Moderate success of current tissue engineering strategies have been attributed to the current inability to fabricate thick tissue engineering constructs that contain endogenous, engineered vasculature or nutrient channels that can integrate with the host tissue. Successful fabrication of a vascularized tissue construct requires synergy between high throughput, high-resolution bioprinting of larger perfusable channels and instructive bioink that promotes angiogenic sprouting and neovascularization. This review aims to cover the recent progress in the field of 3D bioprinting of vascularized tissues. It will cover the methods of bioprinting vascularized constructs, bioink for vascularization, and perspectives on recent innovations in 3D printing and biomaterials for the next generation of 3D bioprinting for vascularized tissue fabrication.

  6. Tissue-engineered trachea: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jia Xian; Liau, Ling Ling; Aminuddin, Bin Saim; Ruszymah, Bt Hj Idrus

    2016-12-01

    Tracheal replacement is performed after resection of a portion of the trachea that was impossible to reconnect via direct anastomosis. A tissue-engineered trachea is one of the available options that offer many advantages compared to other types of graft. Fabrication of a functional tissue-engineered trachea for grafting is very challenging, as it is a complex organ with important components, including cartilage, epithelium and vasculature. A number of studies have been reported on the preparation of a graftable trachea. A laterally rigid but longitudinally flexible hollow cylindrical scaffold which supports cartilage and epithelial tissue formation is the key element. The scaffold can be prepared via decellularization of an allograft or fabricated using biodegradable or non-biodegradable biomaterials. Commonly, the scaffold is seeded with chondrocytes and epithelial cells at the outer and luminal surfaces, respectively, to hasten tissue formation and improve functionality. To date, several clinical trials of tracheal replacement with tissue-engineered trachea have been performed. This article reviews the formation of cartilage tissue, epithelium and neovascularization of tissue-engineered trachea, together with the obstacles, possible solutions and future. Furthermore, the role of the bioreactor for in vitro tracheal graft formation and recently reported clinical applications of tracheal graft were also discussed. Generally, although encouraging results have been achieved, however, some obstacles remain to be resolved before the tissue-engineered trachea can be widely used in clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nanomaterials for Craniofacial and Dental Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G; Zhou, T; Lin, S; Shi, S; Lin, Y

    2017-07-01

    Tissue engineering shows great potential as a future treatment for the craniofacial and dental defects caused by trauma, tumor, and other diseases. Due to the biomimetic features and excellent physiochemical properties, nanomaterials are of vital importance in promoting cell growth and stimulating tissue regeneration in tissue engineering. For craniofacial and dental tissue engineering, the frequently used nanomaterials include nanoparticles, nanofibers, nanotubes, and nanosheets. Nanofibers are attractive for cell invasion and proliferation because of their resemblance to extracellular matrix and the presence of large pores, and they have been used as scaffolds in bone, cartilage, and tooth regeneration. Nanotubes and nanoparticles improve the mechanical and chemical properties of scaffold, increase cell attachment and migration, and facilitate tissue regeneration. In addition, nanofibers and nanoparticles are also used as a delivery system to carry the bioactive agent in bone and tooth regeneration, have better control of the release speed of agent upon degradation of the matrix, and promote tissue regeneration. Although applications of nanomaterials in tissue engineering remain in their infancy with numerous challenges to face, the current results indicate that nanomaterials have massive potential in craniofacial and dental tissue engineering.

  8. Optical Properties of Bruised Apple Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the optical properties of apple tissue, especially bruised tissue, can help us prevent or mitigate bruise occurrence during harvest and postharvest operations, and develop an effective method for detecting bruises during sorting and grading. This research was aimed at determining the o...

  9. Degradable Adhesives for Surgery and Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Vrushali; Becker, Matthew L

    2017-10-09

    This review highlights the research on degradable polymeric tissue adhesives for surgery and tissue engineering. Included are a comprehensive listing of specific uses, advantages, and disadvantages of different adhesive groups. A critical evaluation of challenges affecting the development of next generation materials is also discussed, and insights into the outlook of the field are explored.

  10. Adipose Tissue Biology: An Update Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is a major health problem in most countries in the world today. It increases the risk of diabetes, heart disease, fatty liver and some form of cancer. Adipose tissue biology is currently one of the “hot” areas of biomedical science, as fundamental for the development of novel therapeutics for obesity and its related disorders.CONTENT: Adipose tissue consist predominantly of adipocytes, adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs, vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, fibroblast, macrophages, and extracellular matrix. Adipose tissue metabolism is extremely dynamic, and the supply of and removal of substrates in the blood is acutely regulated according to the nutritional state. Adipose tissue possesses the ability to a very large extent to modulate its own metabolic activities including differentiation of new adipocytes and production of blood vessels as necessary to accommodate increasing fat stores. At the same time, adipocytes signal to other tissue to regulate their energy metabolism in accordance with the body's nutritional state. Ultimately adipocyte fat stores have to match the body's overall surplus or deficit of energy. Obesity causes adipose tissue dysfunction and results in obesity-related disorders. SUMMARY: It is now clear that adipose tissue is a complex and highly active metabolic and endocrine organ. Undestanding the molecular mechanisms underlying obesity and its associated disease cluster is also of great significance as the need for new and more effective therapeutic strategies is more urgent than ever.  KEYWORDS: obesity, adipocyte, adipose, tissue, adipogenesis, angiogenesis, lipid droplet, lipolysis, plasticity, dysfunction.

  11. Coronal tissue loss in endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A O; Shaba, O P; Dosumu, O O; Ajayi, D M

    2012-12-01

    To categorize the endodontically treated teeth according to the extent of coronal tissue loss in order to determine the appropriate restoration required. A two year descriptive study was done at the Conservative Clinic of the Department of Restorative Dentistry, Dental Centre, University College Hospital, Ibadan. Successful endodontically treated teeth were assessed and categorized according to the extent of tissue loss based on standard criteria proposed by Smith and Schuman. Two hundred and ninety endodontically treated teeth were assessed for success both clinically and radiographically. Eighty (27.6%) were anterior teeth, 78 (26.9%) were premolars while 132 (45.5%) were molars. Dental caries was found to be the most common (61.4%) indication for endodontic treatment and caused more coronal tissue damage (moderate and significant) when compared with other indications for endodontic treatment. Two hundred and twenty seven (78.3%) endodontically treated teeth had moderate coronal tissue loss, 41 (14.1%) had minimal damage while 22 (7.6%) had significant tissue damage. Dental caries was the most common indication for endodontic treatment of the posterior teeth while trauma was the most common indication for the anterior teeth. Majority of the endodontically treated teeth that were evaluated for tissue loss had moderate coronal tissue damage. It is therefore recommended that proper and prompt evaluation of the remaining coronal tooth tissue following successful endodontic treatment be carried out in order to determine the appropriate definitive restoration required that will be easy for the clinician and less expensive to the patients.

  12. Nonlinear spectral imaging of biological tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palero, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis demonstrates live high resolution 3D imaging of tissue in its native state and environment. The nonlinear interaction between focussed femtosecond light pulses and the biological tissue results in the emission of natural autofluorescence and second-harmonic signal.

  13. Nonlinear spectral imaging of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palero, J. A.

    2007-07-01

    The work presented in this thesis demonstrates live high resolution 3D imaging of tissue in its native state and environment. The nonlinear interaction between focussed femtosecond light pulses and the biological tissue results in the emission of natural autofluorescence and second-harmonic signal. Because biological intrinsic emission is generally very weak and extends from the ultraviolet to the visible spectral range, a broad-spectral range and high sensitivity 3D spectral imaging system is developed. Imaging the spectral characteristics of the biological intrinsic emission reveals the structure and biochemistry of the cells and extra-cellular components. By using different methods in visualizing the spectral images, discrimination between different tissue structures is achieved without the use of any stain or fluorescent label. For instance, RGB real color spectral images of the intrinsic emission of mouse skin tissues show blue cells, green hair follicles, and purple collagen fibers. The color signature of each tissue component is directly related to its characteristic emission spectrum. The results of this study show that skin tissue nonlinear intrinsic emission is mainly due to the autofluorescence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), flavins, keratin, melanin, phospholipids, elastin and collagen and nonlinear Raman scattering and second-harmonic generation in Type I collagen. In vivo time-lapse spectral imaging is implemented to study metabolic changes in epidermal cells in tissues. Optical scattering in tissues, a key factor in determining the maximum achievable imaging depth, is also investigated in this work.

  14. [Radiotherapy of adult soft tissue sarcoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Péchoux, C; Moureau-Zabotto, L; Llacer, C; Ducassou, A; Sargos, P; Sunyach, M P; Thariat, J

    2016-09-01

    Incidence of soft tissue sarcoma is low and requires multidisciplinary treatment in specialized centers. The objective of this paper is to report the state of the art regarding indications and treatment techniques of main soft tissue sarcoma localisations. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. 75 FR 5115 - Tissue Paper From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... existence and availability of substitute products; and the level of competition among the Domestic Like... of a five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on certain tissue paper products from... antidumping duty order on certain tissue paper products from China would be likely to lead to continuation or...

  16. Heat generation in laser irradiated tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, A J; Pearce, J A; Diller, K R; Yoon, G; Cheong, W F

    1989-02-01

    Many medical applications involving lasers rely upon the generation of heat within the tissue for the desired therapeutic effect. Determination of the absorbed light energy in tissue is difficult in many cases. Although UV wavelengths of the excimer laser and 10.6 microns wavelength of the CO2 laser are absorbed within the first 20 microns of soft tissue, visible and near infrared wavelengths are scattered as well as absorbed. Typically, multiple scattering is a significant factor in the distribution of light in tissue and the resulting heat source term. An improved model is presented for estimating heat generation due to the absorption of a collimated (axisymmetric) laser beam and scattered light at each point r and z in tissue. Heat generated within tissue is a function of the laser power, the shape and size of the incident beam and the optical properties of the tissue at the irradiation wavelength. Key to the calculation of heat source strength is accurate estimation of the light distribution. Methods for experimentally determining the optical parameters of tissue are discussed in the context of the improved model.

  17. Tissue ultrasound absorption measurement with MRI calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Hunt, J W; Foster, F S; Plewes, D B

    1999-01-01

    The renewed interest in the use of high intensity focused ultrasound (US) for minimally invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided thermal therapy has stimulated a review of the interaction mechanisms of US with tissue. Although the study of tissue US properties has been conducted extensively, agreements on the measured values of tissue US absorption are poor. We propose a noninvasive approach to measure tissue US absorption based on a form of MRI calorimetry. US absorption is measured in a small tissue sample through a knowledge of the US intensity distribution incident on the tissue and an MRI measurement of total absorbed energy arising from US exposure. US absorption measurements were conducted at room temperature for ex-vivo bovine liver tissue at 1 MHz, which led to a measured US absorption coefficient of 0.058 Np/cm or 0.504 dB/cm. Because this approach is noninvasive, the experimental complications exhibited in earlier studies are not present. Furthermore, this approach can be applied over a range of frequencies, tissues, and temperatures, which will aid in understanding of biothermal effects of high intensity US to improve thermal therapy.

  18. Walnut tissue culture: research and field applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose M. Lopez

    2004-01-01

    Vitrotech Biotecnologia Vegetal began researching propagating Juglans regia (English walnut) and various Juglans hybrids by tissue culture in 1993 and has operated on a commercial scale since 1996. Since this time, more than one and a half million walnuts of different species have been propagated and field planted. Tissue cultured...

  19. Synovial tissue analysis in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bresnihan, B.; Tak, P. P.

    1999-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis, synovial tissue is easily accessible for systematic analysis. Blind needle biopsy is a simple and safe procedure, but is restricted to smaller tissue samples. Arthroscopic biopsy is also safe but is more complicated as it allows access to most sites in the joint and provides

  20. PATMA: parser of archival tissue microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Roszkowiak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tissue microarrays are commonly used in modern pathology for cancer tissue evaluation, as it is a very potent technique. Tissue microarray slides are often scanned to perform computer-aided histopathological analysis of the tissue cores. For processing the image, splitting the whole virtual slide into images of individual cores is required. The only way to distinguish cores corresponding to specimens in the tissue microarray is through their arrangement. Unfortunately, distinguishing the correct order of cores is not a trivial task as they are not labelled directly on the slide. The main aim of this study was to create a procedure capable of automatically finding and extracting cores from archival images of the tissue microarrays. This software supports the work of scientists who want to perform further image processing on single cores. The proposed method is an efficient and fast procedure, working in fully automatic or semi-automatic mode. A total of 89% of punches were correctly extracted with automatic selection. With an addition of manual correction, it is possible to fully prepare the whole slide image for extraction in 2 min per tissue microarray. The proposed technique requires minimum skill and time to parse big array of cores from tissue microarray whole slide image into individual core images.

  1. PATMA: parser of archival tissue microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowiak, Lukasz; Lopez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Tissue microarrays are commonly used in modern pathology for cancer tissue evaluation, as it is a very potent technique. Tissue microarray slides are often scanned to perform computer-aided histopathological analysis of the tissue cores. For processing the image, splitting the whole virtual slide into images of individual cores is required. The only way to distinguish cores corresponding to specimens in the tissue microarray is through their arrangement. Unfortunately, distinguishing the correct order of cores is not a trivial task as they are not labelled directly on the slide. The main aim of this study was to create a procedure capable of automatically finding and extracting cores from archival images of the tissue microarrays. This software supports the work of scientists who want to perform further image processing on single cores. The proposed method is an efficient and fast procedure, working in fully automatic or semi-automatic mode. A total of 89% of punches were correctly extracted with automatic selection. With an addition of manual correction, it is possible to fully prepare the whole slide image for extraction in 2 min per tissue microarray. The proposed technique requires minimum skill and time to parse big array of cores from tissue microarray whole slide image into individual core images.

  2. Dynamics of cancerous tissue correlates with invasiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Ann-Katrine Vransø; Wullkopf, Lena; Christensen, Amalie; Leijnse, Natascha; Tarp, Jens Magelund; Mathiesen, Joachim; Erler, Janine Terra; Oddershede, Lene Broeng

    2017-03-01

    Two of the classical hallmarks of cancer are uncontrolled cell division and tissue invasion, which turn the disease into a systemic, life-threatening condition. Although both processes are studied, a clear correlation between cell division and motility of cancer cells has not been described previously. Here, we experimentally characterize the dynamics of invasive and non-invasive breast cancer tissues using human and murine model systems. The intrinsic tissue velocities, as well as the divergence and vorticity around a dividing cell correlate strongly with the invasive potential of the tissue, thus showing a distinct correlation between tissue dynamics and aggressiveness. We formulate a model which treats the tissue as a visco-elastic continuum. This model provides a valid reproduction of the cancerous tissue dynamics, thus, biological signaling is not needed to explain the observed tissue dynamics. The model returns the characteristic force exerted by an invading cell and reveals a strong correlation between force and invasiveness of breast cancer cells, thus pinpointing the importance of mechanics for cancer invasion.

  3. 2010 Great Lakes Human Health Fish Tissue Study Fish Tissue Data Dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Office of Science and Technology (OST) is providing the fish tissue results from the 2010 Great Lakes Human Health Fish Tissue Study (GLHHFTS). This document includes the “data dictionary” for Mercury, PFC, PBDE and PCBs.

  4. Effects of crosslinking degree of an acellular biological tissue on its tissue regeneration pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huang-Chien; Chang, Yen; Hsu, Cheng-Kuo; Lee, Meng-Horng; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2004-08-01

    It was reported that acellular biological tissues can provide a natural microenvironment for host cell migration and may be used as a scaffold for tissue regeneration. To reduce antigenicity, biological tissues have to be fixed with a crosslinking agent before implantation. As a tissue-engineering scaffold, it is speculated that the crosslinking degree of an acellular tissue may affect its tissue regeneration pattern. In the study, a cell extraction process was employed to remove the cellular components from bovine pericardia. The acellular tissues then were fixed with genipin at various known concentrations to obtain varying degrees of crosslinking. It was shown in the in vitro degradation study that after fixing with genipin, the resistance against enzymatic degradation of the acellular tissue increased significantly with increasing its crosslinking degree. In the in vivo subcutaneous study, it was found that cells (inflammatory cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and red blood cells) were able to infiltrate into acellular tissues. Generally, the depth of cell infiltration into the acellular tissue decreased with increasing its crosslinking degree. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was accompanied by degradation of the acellular tissue. Due to early degradation, no tissue regeneration was observed within fresh (without crosslinking) and the 30%-degree-crosslinking acellular tissues. This is because the scaffolds provided by these two samples were already completely degraded before the infiltrated cells began to secrete their own extracellular matrix. In contrast, tissue regeneration (fibroblasts, neo-collagen fibrils, and neo-capillaries) was observed for the 60%- and 95%-degree-crosslinking acellular tissues by the histological examination, immunohistological staining, transmission electron microscopy, and denaturation temperature measurement. The 95%-degree-crosslinking acellular tissue was more resistant against enzymatic degradation than its 60%-degree

  5. Models of Fixation and Tissue Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizzle, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Fixation and processing of tissue to paraffin blocks are used to permit tissues to be cut thinly (4 to 5 µm); cutting thin sections of tissue and staining them histochemically or immunohistochemically are necessary to permit tissues to be viewed adequately as to their structures (e.g., subcellular components and surrounding stroma) using a bright field microscope. Over the last century, anatomists and pathologists have used fixation in 10% neutral buffered formalin (10% NBF) as the fixative of choice. Also, both human and veterinary pathologists have trained using fixation in 10% NBF so these professionals have been and are reluctant to change the microscopic appearance of diagnostic tissues by using a different type of fixation; in addition, the effects of tissue processing on the microscopic appearance of tissue has essentially been ignored in most studies. Because of the use of 10% NBF by pathologists, archives of paraffin blocks contain essentially paraffin blocks only fixed in 10% NBF. Thus, if retrospective studies use archival paraffin blocks to correlate the molecular features of diseases with the outcomes of diseases, the studies must be based upon using tissue fixed in 10% NBF. Studies of how fixation in 10% NBF interacts with histochemical and immunohistochemical staining are very limited in number and most are based upon relatively long times of fixation in 10% NBF (≥ 36 hours). Current times of fixation in 10% NBF have been reduced to fixation in 10% NBF and its interaction with tissue processing at any time of fixation, especially short times of fixation. Even less is known about how fixation of tissues in 10% NBF interact with more modern assays using immunohistochemistry, real time quantitative PCR, and techniques which depend upon the analysis of proteins extracted from paraffin blocks such as analysis by multiplex immunoassays or by mass spectrometry. In general, multiple antibody-antigen combinations are reported not to work in tissues fixed

  6. Bone tissue bioprinting for craniofacial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Pallab; Ozbolat, Veli; Ayan, Bugra; Dhawan, Aman; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2017-11-01

    Craniofacial (CF) tissue is an architecturally complex tissue consisting of both bone and soft tissues with significant patient specific variations. Conditions of congenital abnormalities, tumor resection surgeries, and traumatic injuries of the CF skeleton can result in major deficits of bone tissue. Despite advances in surgical reconstruction techniques, management of CF osseous deficits remains a challenge. Due its inherent versatility, bioprinting offers a promising solution to address these issues. In this review, we present and analyze the current state of bioprinting of bone tissue and highlight how these techniques may be adapted to serve regenerative therapies for CF applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2424-2431. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. OXavidin for Tissue Targeting Biotinylated Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita De Santis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Avidin is a glycoprotein from hen egg white that binds biotin with very high affinity. Here we describe OXavidin, a product containing aldehyde groups, obtained by ligand-assisted sugar oxidation of avidin by sodium periodate. OXavidin chemically reacts with cellular and tissue proteins through Schiff's base formation thus residing in tissues for weeks while preserving the biotin binding capacity. The long tissue residence of OXavidin as well as that of OXavidin/biotinylated agent complex occurs in normal and neoplastic tissues and immunohistochemistry shows a strong and homogenous stromal localization. Once localized in tissue/tumor, OXavidin becomes an “artificial receptor” for intravenous injected biotin allowing tumor targeting with biotinylated therapeutics like radioisotopes or toxins. Moreover, present data also suggest that OXavidin might be useful for the homing of biotinylated cells. Overall, OXavidin exhibits a remarkable potential for many different therapeutic applications.

  8. Soft tissue biotype affects implant success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Angie; Fu, Jia-Hui; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2011-06-01

    The influence of tissue biotype in natural dentition is already well demonstrated in the literature, with numerous articles showing that thicker tissue is a preferred biotype for optimal surgical and prosthetic outcomes. In this same line of thought, current studies are directed to explore whether mucosal thickness would have similar implications around dental implants. The purpose of this review was to investigate the effects of soft tissue biotype in relation to success of implant therapy. The influence of tissue biotype was divided into 3 main categories: its relationship with periimplant mucosa and the underlying bone, immediate implant placement, and restorative outcomes. Soft tissue biotype is an important parameter to consider in achieving esthetic implant restoration, improving immediate implant success, and preventing future mucosal recession.

  9. The Adipose Tissue in Farm Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauerwein, Helga; Bendixen, Emoke; Restelli, Laura

    2014-01-01

    and immune cells. The scientific interest in adipose tissue is largely based on the worldwide increasing prevalence of obesity in humans; in contrast, obesity is hardly an issue for farmed animals that are fed according to their well-defined needs. Adipose tissue is nevertheless of major importance...... in these animals, as the adipose percentage of the bodyweight is a major determinant for the efficiency of transferring nutrients from feed into food products and thus for the economic value from meat producing animals. In dairy animals, the importance of adipose tissue is based on its function as stromal...... and metabolic disorders. We herein provide a general overview of adipose tissue functions and its importance in farm animals. This review will summarize recent achievements in farm animal adipose tissue proteomics, mainly in cattle and pigs, but also in poultry, i.e. chicken and in farmed fish. Proteomics...

  10. Multispectral tissue characterization for intestinal anastomosis optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Shademan, Azad; Le, Hanh N. D.; Decker, Ryan; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal anastomosis is a surgical procedure that restores bowel continuity after surgical resection to treat intestinal malignancy, inflammation, or obstruction. Despite the routine nature of intestinal anastomosis procedures, the rate of complications is high. Standard visual inspection cannot distinguish the tissue subsurface and small changes in spectral characteristics of the tissue, so existing tissue anastomosis techniques that rely on human vision to guide suturing could lead to problems such as bleeding and leakage from suturing sites. We present a proof-of-concept study using a portable multispectral imaging (MSI) platform for tissue characterization and preoperative surgical planning in intestinal anastomosis. The platform is composed of a fiber ring light-guided MSI system coupled with polarizers and image analysis software. The system is tested on ex vivo porcine intestine tissue, and we demonstrate the feasibility of identifying optimal regions for suture placement.

  11. Aloe Vera for Tissue Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shekh; Carter, Princeton; Bhattarai, Narayan

    2017-01-01

    Aloe vera, also referred as Aloe barbadensis Miller, is a succulent plant widely used for biomedical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. Aloe vera has been used for thousands of years. However, recent significant advances have been made in the development of aloe vera for tissue engineering applications. Aloe vera has received considerable attention in tissue engineering due to its biodegradability, biocompatibility, and low toxicity properties. Aloe vera has been reported to have many biologically active components. The bioactive components of aloe vera have effective antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immune-modulatory effects that promote both tissue regeneration and growth. The aloe vera plant, its bioactive components, extraction and processing, and tissue engineering prospects are reviewed in this article. The use of aloe vera as tissue engineering scaffolds, gels, and films is discussed, with a special focus on electrospun nanofibers. PMID:28216559

  12. Spectroscopic Monitoring of Kidney Tissue Ischemic Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Fitzgerald, J T; Michalopoulou, A P; Troppmann, C

    2004-03-11

    Noninvasive evaluation of tissue viability of donor kidneys used for transplantation is an issue that current technology is not able to address. In this work, we explore optical spectroscopy for its potential to assess the degree of ischemic damage in kidney tissue. We hypothesized that ischemic damage to kidney tissue will give rise to changes in its optical properties which in turn may be used to asses the degree of tissue injury. The experimental results demonstrate that the autofluorescence intensity of the injured kidney is decreasing as a function of time exposed to ischemic injury. Changes were also observed in the NIR light scattering intensities most probably arising from changes due to injury and death of the tissue.

  13. Aloe Vera for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shekh; Carter, Princeton; Bhattarai, Narayan

    2017-02-14

    Aloe vera, also referred as Aloe barbadensis Miller, is a succulent plant widely used for biomedical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. Aloe vera has been used for thousands of years. However, recent significant advances have been made in the development of aloe vera for tissue engineering applications. Aloe vera has received considerable attention in tissue engineering due to its biodegradability, biocompatibility, and low toxicity properties. Aloe vera has been reported to have many biologically active components. The bioactive components of aloe vera have effective antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immune-modulatory effects that promote both tissue regeneration and growth. The aloe vera plant, its bioactive components, extraction and processing, and tissue engineering prospects are reviewed in this article. The use of aloe vera as tissue engineering scaffolds, gels, and films is discussed, with a special focus on electrospun nanofibers.

  14. Origin and Functions of Tissue Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelman, Slava; Lavine, Kory J.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are distributed in tissues throughout the body and contribute to both homeostasis and disease. Recently, it has become evident that most adult tissue macrophages originate during embryonic development and not from circulating monocytes. Each tissue has its own composition of embryonically derived and adult-derived macrophages, but it is unclear whether macrophages of distinct origins are functionally interchangeable or have unique roles at steady state. This new understanding also prompts reconsideration of the function of circulating monocytes. Classical Ly6chi monocytes patrol the extravascular space in resting organs, and Ly6clo nonclassical monocytes patrol the vasculature. Inflammation triggers monocytes to differentiate into macrophages, but whether resident and newly recruited macrophages possess similar functions during inflammation is unclear. Here, we define the tools used for identifying the complex origin of tissue macrophages and discuss the relative contributions of tissue niche versus ontological origin to the regulation of macrophage functions during steady state and inflammation. PMID:25035951

  15. Extremity reconstruction using nonreplantable tissue ("spare parts").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Robert C; Neumeister, Michael W; Ostric, Srdjan Andrei; Engineer, Nitin J

    2007-04-01

    After a severe digital or extremity injury, the replantation surgeon should always seek to make the best use out of what tissue is available for reconstruction. Exercising sound surgical judgment and being creative allow the surgeon to restore function to critical areas of the hand or extremity by the judicious use of available tissues that would otherwise be discarded. The use of "spare parts" should, therefore, always be considered to facilitate digital or extremity reconstruction when routine replantation is not possible or is likely to produce a poor functional result. The surgeon should always try to use available nonreplantable tissue to preserve length, obtain soft tissue coverage, or most importantly improve the function of remaining less injured digits. This article presents several case studies that illustrate the principals of spare parts reconstruction performed at the time of the initial debridement using nonreplantable tissue to provide coverage or improve function.

  16. Grating-based tomography of human tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Mehlin, Andrea; Herzen, Julia; Lang, Sabrina; Holme, Margaret; Zanette, Irene; Hieber, Simone; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; Pfeiffer, Franz; Weitkamp, Timm

    2012-07-01

    The development of therapies to improve our health requires a detailed knowledge on the anatomy of soft tissues from the human body down to the cellular level. Grating-based phase contrast micro computed tomography using synchrotron radiation provides a sensitivity, which allows visualizing micrometer size anatomical features in soft tissue without applying any contrast agent. We show phase contrast tomography data of human brain, tumor vessels and constricted arteries from the beamline ID 19 (ESRF) and urethral tissue from the beamline W2 (HASYLAB/DESY) with micrometer resolution. Here, we demonstrate that anatomical features can be identified within brain tissue as well known from histology. Using human urethral tissue, the application of two photon energies is compared. Tumor vessels thicker than 20 μm can be perfectly segmented. The morphology of coronary arteries can be better extracted in formalin than after paraffin embedding.

  17. Ectopic Thyroid Tissue With Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rodriguez, Laura; Dharia, Rahil; Massey, Becky

    2016-02-01

    Ectopic thyroid gland is a rare occurrence with a prevalence of 1 per 100,000 to 300,000 people. Hashimoto's thyroiditis involving ectopic thyroid tissue is particularly unusual. We describe the presentation, workup, surgical management, and brief review of the literature. Retroactive review of an 83-year-old white female patient record. As a case report, this project was exempt from institutional review board approval. We present a case of ectopic thyroid tissue located in the strap muscles with concurrent Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This tissue initially was believed to represent metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma. Whenever ectopic thyroid tissue is encountered, the gravest concern is metastatic thyroid cancer. The possibility of benign thyroid tissue should not be excluded even if the thyroid histology initially appears to be malignant in nature.

  18. Studying cytokinesis in Drosophila epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, D; Bellaïche, Y

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial tissue cohesiveness is ensured through cell-cell junctions that maintain both adhesion and mechanical coupling between neighboring cells. During development, epithelial tissues undergo intensive cell proliferation. Cell division, and particularly cytokinesis, is coupled to the formation of new adhesive contacts, thereby preserving tissue integrity and propagating cell polarity. Remarkably, the geometry of the new interfaces is determined by the combined action of the dividing cell and its neighbors. To further understand the interplay between the dividing cell and its neighbors, as well as the role of cell division for tissue morphogenesis, it is important to analyze cytokinesis in vivo. Here we present methods to perform live imaging of cell division in Drosophila epithelial tissues and discuss some aspects of image processing and analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ceftibuten concentrations in human tonsillar tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, F; Pintucci, J P; Demartini, G; Dugnani, S

    1996-12-01

    In a study designed to determine ceftibuten concentrations in tonsillar tissue, subjects scheduled to undergo tonsillectomy were administered 400 mg of ceftibuten in a single oral dose. Between 2 and 24 h after the dose was given, tonsillar tissue samples were taken during surgery and assayed for ceftibuten. Mean concentrations in tonsillar tissue 4.4 h and 24.6 h after the 400 mg dose were 5.3 +/- 2.7 and 0.3 +/- mg/g, respectively. Concurrent mean serum concentrations were 7.42 +/- 1.66 and 0.15 +/- 0.13 mg/ml, respectively. The apparent half-life of drug in the tissue was 5.3 h. The presence of high ceftibuten concentrations in tonsillar tissue suggests that a once-daily regimen may be effective in treating tonsillitis and pharyngitis.

  20. Live birth after ovarian tissue transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D. M.; Yeoman, R. R.; Battaglia, D. E.; Stouffer, R. L.; Zelinski-Wooten, M. B.; Fanton, J. W.; Wolf, D. P.

    2004-03-01

    Radiation and high-dose chemotherapy may render women with cancer prematurely sterile, a side-effect that would be avoided if ovarian tissue that had been removed before treatment could be made to function afterwards. Live offspring have been produced from transplanted ovarian tissue in mice and sheep but not in monkeys or humans, although sex steroid hormones are still secreted. Here we describe the successful transplantation of fresh ovarian tissue to a different site in a monkey, which has led to the birth of a healthy female after oocyte production, fertilization and transfer to a surrogate mother. The ectopically grafted tissue functions without surgical connection to major blood vessels and sets the stage for the transplantation of cryopreserved ovarian tissue in humans.

  1. Aloe Vera for Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekh Rahman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aloe vera, also referred as Aloe barbadensis Miller, is a succulent plant widely used for biomedical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. Aloe vera has been used for thousands of years. However, recent significant advances have been made in the development of aloe vera for tissue engineering applications. Aloe vera has received considerable attention in tissue engineering due to its biodegradability, biocompatibility, and low toxicity properties. Aloe vera has been reported to have many biologically active components. The bioactive components of aloe vera have effective antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immune-modulatory effects that promote both tissue regeneration and growth. The aloe vera plant, its bioactive components, extraction and processing, and tissue engineering prospects are reviewed in this article. The use of aloe vera as tissue engineering scaffolds, gels, and films is discussed, with a special focus on electrospun nanofibers.

  2. Dentin Matrix Proteins in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Sriram; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dentin and bone are mineralized tissue matrices comprised of collagen fibrils and reinforced with oriented crystalline hydroxyapatite. Although both tissues perform different functionalities, they are assembled and orchestrated by mesenchymal cells that synthesize both collagenous and noncollagenous proteins albeit in different proportions. The dentin matrix proteins (DMPs) have been studied in great detail in recent years due to its inherent calcium binding properties in the extracellular matrix resulting in tissue calcification. Recent studies have shown that these proteins can serve both as intracellular signaling proteins leading to induction of stem cell differentiation and also function as nucleating proteins in the extracellular matrix. These properties make the DMPs attractive candidates for bone and dentin tissue regeneration. This chapter will provide an overview of the DMPs, their functionality and their proven and possible applications with respect to bone tissue engineering.

  3. Xylem tissue specification, patterning, and differentiation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Mathias; Smith, Rebecca; Ellis, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Vascular plants (Tracheophytes) have adapted to a variety of environments ranging from arid deserts to tropical rainforests, and now comprise >250,000 species. While they differ widely in appearance and growth habit, all of them share a similar specialized tissue system (vascular tissue) for transporting water and nutrients throughout the organism. Plant vascular systems connect all plant organs from the shoot to the root, and are comprised of two main tissue types, xylem and phloem. In this review we examine the current state of knowledge concerning the process of vascular tissue formation, and highlight important mechanisms underlying key steps in vascular cell type specification, xylem and phloem tissue patterning, and, finally, the differentiation and maturation of specific xylem cell types.

  4. Histological observation for needle-tissue interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yoshiyuki; Koseki, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    We histologically investigated tissue fractures and deformations caused by ex vivo needle insertions. The tissue was formalin-fixed while the needle remained in the tissue. Following removal of the needle, the tissue was microtomed, stained, and observed microscopically. This method enabled observations of cellular and tissular conditions where deformations caused by needle insertions were approximately preserved. For this study, our novel method presents preliminary findings related with tissue fractures and the orientation of needle blade relative to muscle fibers. When the needle blade was perpendicular to the muscle fiber, transfiber fractures and relatively large longitudinal deformations occurred. When the needle blade was parallel to the muscle fiber, interfiber fractures and relatively small longitudinal deformations occurred. This made a significant difference in the resistance force of the needle insertions.

  5. Quantifying tissue heterogeneity using quadtree decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, K; Hoffman, E A; Tawhai, M H

    2012-01-01

    Volumetric computed tomography (CT) imaging provides a three-dimensional map of image intensities from which lung soft tissue density distribution can be estimated. The information gained from analyzing these images can prove valuable in diagnosis of conditions where lung tissue is damaged or has degenerated, and it is also necessary for modeling lung tissue mechanics. This paper presents a new technique for quantifying heterogeneity based on individual CT images, and investigates the heterogeneity of lung tissue in a group of healthy young subjects. It is intended that development of this technique leads to a standard model of classifying heterogeneity in lung tissue, while taking into account variables such as different imaging platforms and resolutions, and the position of the patient during imaging.

  6. Hydrostatic Pressure in Articular Cartilage Tissue Engineering: From Chondrocytes to Tissue Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Elder, Benjamin D.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage has a poor intrinsic healing response, and neither the innate healing response nor current clinical treatments can restore its function. Therefore, articular cartilage tissue engineering is a promising approach for the regeneration of damaged tissue. Because cartilage is exposed to mechanical forces during joint loading, many tissue engineering strategies use exogenous stimuli to enhance the biochemical or biomechanical properties of the engineered tissue. Hydrostatic pressure (HP) ...

  7. The importance of establishing an international network of tissue banks and regional tissue processing centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Pedraza, Jorge

    2014-03-01

    During the past four decades, many tissue banks have been established across the world with the aim of supplying sterilized tissues for clinical use and research purposes. Between 1972 and 2005, the International Atomic Energy Agency supported the establishment of more than sixty of these tissue banks in Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific, Africa and Eastern Europe; promoted the use of the ionizing radiation technique for the sterilization of the processed tissues; and encouraged cooperation between the established tissue banks during the implementation of its program on radiation and tissue banking at national, regional and international levels. Taking into account that several of the established tissue banks have gained a rich experience in the procurement, processing, sterilization, storage, and medical use of sterilized tissues, it is time now to strengthen further international and regional cooperation among interested tissue banks located in different countries. The purpose of this cooperation is to share the experience gained by these banks in the procurement, processing, sterilization, storage, and used of different types of tissues in certain medical treatments and research activities. This could be done through the establishment of a network of tissue banks and a limited number of regional tissue processing centers in different regions of the world.

  8. Difference in volatile composition between the pericarp tissue and inner tissue of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous studies have reported the volatile profiles in the whole fruit or pericarp tissue of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit; however, information is limited on the volatile composition in the inner tissue and its contribution to tomato aroma. For this, the pericarps and inner tissues of “Money...

  9. Association of intraoperative tissue oxygenation with suspected risk factors for tissue hypoxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, R. J.; Schwarte, L. A.; Hakenberg, O. W.; Scheeren, T. W. L.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue hypoxia may cause organ dysfunction, but not much is known about tissue oxygenation in the intraoperative setting. We studied microcirculatory tissue oxygen saturation (StO(2)) to determine representative values for anesthetized patients undergoing urological surgery and to test the

  10. Scaffolding in tissue engineering: general approaches and tissue-specific considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, B.P.; Leong, K. W.

    2008-01-01

    Scaffolds represent important components for tissue engineering. However, researchers often encounter an enormous variety of choices when selecting scaffolds for tissue engineering. This paper aims to review the functions of scaffolds and the major scaffolding approaches as important guidelines for selecting scaffolds and discuss the tissue-specific considerations for scaffolding, using intervertebral disc as an example.

  11. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture...

  12. Stokes-polarimetry imaging of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Paul J.

    A novel Stokes-polarimetry imaging system and technique was developed to quantify fully the polarization properties of light remitted from tissue. The uniqueness of the system and technique is established in the incident polarization. Here, the diffuse illumination is varied and controlled with the intention to improve the visibility of tissue structures. Since light retains some polarization even after multiple-scattering events, the polarization of remitted light depends upon the interactions within the material. Differentiation between tissue structures is accomplished by two-dimensional mapping of the imaged area using metrics such as the degree of linear polarization, degree of circular polarization, ellipticity, and Stokes parameters. While Stokes-polarimetry imaging can be applied to a variety of tissues and conditions, this thesis focuses on tissue types associated with the disease endometriosis. The current standard in diagnosing endometriosis is visual laparoscopy with tissue biopsy. The documented correlation between laparoscopy inspection and histological confirmation of suspected lesions was at best 67%. Endometrial lesions vary greatly in their appearance and depth of infiltration. Although laparoscopy permits tissue to be assessed by color and texture, to advance beyond the state-of-the-art, a new imaging modality involving polarized light was investigated; in particular, Stokes-polarimetry imaging was used to determine the polarization signature of light that interacted with tissue. Basic science studies were conducted on rat tails embedded within turbid gelatin. The purpose of these experiments was to determine how identification of sub-surface structures could be improved. Experimental results indicate image contrast among various structures such as tendon, soft tissue and intervertebral discs. Stokes-polarimetry imaging experiments were performed on various tissues associated with endometriosis to obtain a baseline characterization for each

  13. Tissue banking, biovigilance and the notify library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, D Michael

    2017-06-30

    This issue is dedicated to the contributions of Professor Glyn O. Phillips to the field of tissue banking and the advancement of science in general. The use of ionizing radiation to sterilize medical products drew the interest of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). A meeting in 1976 in Athens Greece to present work on the effects of sterilizing radiation doses upon the antigenic properties of proteins and biologic tissues was my first introduction of Professor Phillips and the role that he was to play in Tissue Banking (Friedlaender, in Phillips GO, Tallentine AN (eds) Radiation sterilization. Irradiated tissues and their potential clinical use. The North E. Wales Institute, Clwyd, p 128, 1978). The IAEA sponsored subsequent meetings in the Republic of Korea, Czechoslovakia and Rangoon, the later including a visit to the tissue bank by Professor Phillips. His advocacy resulted in multiple workshops and teaching opportunities in a variety of countries, one of which led to the establishment of the Asia Pacific Surgical Tissue Banking Association in 1989 (Phillips and Strong, in Phillips GO, Strong DM, von Versen R, Nather A (eds) Advances in tissue banking, vol 3. World Scientific, Singapore, pp 403-417, 1999).

  14. Multiscale Characterization of Engineered Cardiac Tissue Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Nancy K; Johnsen, Nicholas E; Core, Jason Q; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-11-01

    In a properly contracting cardiac muscle, many different subcellular structures are organized into an intricate architecture. While it has been observed that this organization is altered in pathological conditions, the relationship between length-scales and architecture has not been properly explored. In this work, we utilize a variety of architecture metrics to quantify organization and consistency of single structures over multiple scales, from subcellular to tissue scale as well as correlation of organization of multiple structures. Specifically, as the best way to characterize cardiac tissues, we chose the orientational and co-orientational order parameters (COOPs). Similarly, neonatal rat ventricular myocytes were selected for their consistent architectural behavior. The engineered cells and tissues were stained for four architectural structures: actin, tubulin, sarcomeric z-lines, and nuclei. We applied the orientational metrics to cardiac cells of various shapes, isotropic cardiac tissues, and anisotropic globally aligned tissues. With these novel tools, we discovered: (1) the relationship between cellular shape and consistency of self-assembly; (2) the length-scales at which unguided tissues self-organize; and (3) the correlation or lack thereof between organization of actin fibrils, sarcomeric z-lines, tubulin fibrils, and nuclei. All of these together elucidate some of the current mysteries in the relationship between force production and architecture, while raising more questions about the effect of guidance cues on self-assembly function. These types of metrics are the future of quantitative tissue engineering in cardiovascular biomechanics.

  15. Soft tissue and esthetic considerations around implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joann Pauline George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The health of the peri – implant tissues play an important in the long term outcome of dental implants. The absence of keratinized gingiva (KG may be a risk factor for developing recession or peri –implantitis. However there is still ambiguity in the need for keratinized gingiva around dental implants. The preservation and reconstruction of soft tissue around dental implants is an integral component of dental Implantology. There is no long-term evidence whether augmented soft tissues can be maintained over time and are able to influence the peri-implant bone levels. Among the various soft tissue augmentation techniques Apically positioned flap with vestibuloplasty , Free gingival grafts and Connective tissue grafts are documented as the most predictable methods to increase the width of KG. Autogenous grafts increase the soft tissue thickness and improve aesthetics compared to non-grafted sites. The aim of this review is to critically discuss the need for KG around implants and the techniques to preserve and augment KG. It is difficult to arrive at a definitive conclusion due to scarcity of well designed studies in literature. Reliable evidence is lacking to suggest the ideal soft tissue augmentation/preservation techniques. Long term randomized controlled clinical trials are needed to provide a clearer image.

  16. [In vitro construction of skeletal muscle tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yuya; Takeuchi, Shoji

    In conventional culture methods using culture dishes, myotubes formed by fusion of myoblasts adhere to the surface of the culture dishes. Because the adherence causes interruption of myotube contractions and immobilization of myotubes from the culture dishes, the conventional culture methods have limitations to applications of the myotubes into drug developments and medical treatments. In order to avoid their adherence, many researchers have proposed in vitro construction of skeletal muscle tissues which both ends are fixed to anchors. The skeletal muscle tissues achieve their contractions freely according to electrical stimulations or optical stimulations, and transfer of them to other experimental setup by releasing them form the anchors. By combining the skeletal muscle tissues with force sensors, the skeletal muscle tissues are available to drug screening tests based on contractile force as a functional index. Furthermore, survival of the skeletal muscle tissues are demonstrated by implantation of them to animals. Thus, in vitro constructed skeletal muscle tissues is now recognized as attractive tools in medical fields. This review will summarize fabrication methods, properties and medical applicability of the skeletal muscle tissues.

  17. Nonspecificity of Chronic Soft Tissue Pain Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldon Tunks

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent (or chronic pain occurs with a prevalence of about 10% in the adult population, and chronic soft tissue pain is especially problematic. Criteria for diagnosis of these soft tissue pain disorders appear to suffer from specificity problems, even though they appear to be sensitive in distinguishing normal from soft tissue pain sufferers. A few decades ago the term 'neuraesthenia' was used as a diagnosis in individuals who now would probably be diagnosed as suffering from fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and anxiety disorders with fatigue. Soft tissue pain provokes skepticism, especially among third-party payers, and controversy among clinicians. Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated sex differences in the prevalence of widespread pain and multiple tender points, which are distributed variably throughout the adult population and tend to be correlated with subjective symptoms. Although there is a tendency for these syndromes to persist, follow-up studies show that they tend to vary in extent and sometimes show remissions over longer follow-up, casting doubt about the distinctions between chronic diffuse pains and localized chronic soft tissue pains. Because both accidents and soft tissue pains are relatively prevalent problems, the possibility of chance coincidence of accident and chronic soft tissue pain in an individual creates the need to be cautious in attributing these syndromes to specific accidents in medicolegal situations. At the same time, the available evidence does not support a generally dismissive attitude towards these patients.

  18. Adipose Tissue Remodeling as Homeostatic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Itoh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has accumulated indicating that obesity is associated with a state of chronic, low-grade inflammation. Obese adipose tissue is characterized by dynamic changes in cellular composition and function, which may be referred to as “adipose tissue remodeling”. Among stromal cells in the adipose tissue, infiltrated macrophages play an important role in adipose tissue inflammation and systemic insulin resistance. We have demonstrated that a paracrine loop involving saturated fatty acids and tumor necrosis factor-α derived from adipocytes and macrophages, respectively, aggravates obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation. Notably, saturated fatty acids, which are released from hypertrophied adipocytes via the macrophage-induced lipolysis, serve as a naturally occurring ligand for Toll-like receptor 4 complex, thereby activating macrophages. Such a sustained interaction between endogenous ligands derived from parenchymal cells and pathogen sensors expressed in stromal immune cells should lead to chronic inflammatory responses ranging from the basal homeostatic state to diseased tissue remodeling, which may be referred to as “homeostatic inflammation”. We, therefore, postulate that adipose tissue remodeling may represent a prototypic example of homeostatic inflammation. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying homeostatic inflammation may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic strategies to prevent or treat obesity-related complications.

  19. Trends in Tissue Engineering for Blood Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judee Grace Nemeno-Guanzon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, cardiovascular diseases continue to increase and affect not only human health but also the economic stability worldwide. The advancement in tissue engineering is contributing a lot in dealing with this immediate need of alleviating human health. Blood vessel diseases are considered as major cardiovascular health problems. Although blood vessel transplantation is the most convenient treatment, it has been delimited due to scarcity of donors and the patient’s conditions. However, tissue-engineered blood vessels are promising alternatives as mode of treatment for blood vessel defects. The purpose of this paper is to show the importance of the advancement on biofabrication technology for treatment of soft tissue defects particularly for vascular tissues. This will also provide an overview and update on the current status of tissue reconstruction especially from autologous stem cells, scaffolds, and scaffold-free cellular transplantable constructs. The discussion of this paper will be focused on the historical view of cardiovascular tissue engineering and stem cell biology. The representative studies featured in this paper are limited within the last decade in order to trace the trend and evolution of techniques for blood vessel tissue engineering.

  20. Photon-tissue interaction model for quantitative assessment of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Yup; Lloyd, William R.; Wilson, Robert H.; Chandra, Malavika; McKenna, Barbara; Simeone, Diane; Scheiman, James; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we describe a direct fit photon-tissue interaction model to quantitatively analyze reflectance spectra of biological tissue samples. The model rapidly extracts biologically-relevant parameters associated with tissue optical scattering and absorption. This model was employed to analyze reflectance spectra acquired from freshly excised human pancreatic pre-cancerous tissues (intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), a common precursor lesion to pancreatic cancer). Compared to previously reported models, the direct fit model improved fit accuracy and speed. Thus, these results suggest that such models could serve as real-time, quantitative tools to characterize biological tissues assessed with reflectance spectroscopy.

  1. Viscoelastic Properties of Human Tracheal Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safshekan, Farzaneh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Abdouss, Majid; Shadmehr, Mohammad B

    2017-01-01

    The physiological performance of trachea is highly dependent on its mechanical behavior, and therefore, the mechanical properties of its components. Mechanical characterization of trachea is key to succeed in new treatments such as tissue engineering, which requires the utilization of scaffolds which are mechanically compatible with the native human trachea. In this study, after isolating human trachea samples from brain-dead cases and proper storage, we assessed the viscoelastic properties of tracheal cartilage, smooth muscle, and connective tissue based on stress relaxation tests (at 5% and 10% strains for cartilage and 20%, 30%, and 40% for smooth muscle and connective tissue). After investigation of viscoelastic linearity, constitutive models including Prony series for linear viscoelasticity and quasi-linear viscoelastic, modified superposition, and Schapery models for nonlinear viscoelasticity were fitted to the experimental data to find the best model for each tissue. We also investigated the effect of age on the viscoelastic behavior of tracheal tissues. Based on the results, all three tissues exhibited a (nonsignificant) decrease in relaxation rate with increasing the strain, indicating viscoelastic nonlinearity which was most evident for cartilage and with the least effect for connective tissue. The three-term Prony model was selected for describing the linear viscoelasticity. Among different models, the modified superposition model was best able to capture the relaxation behavior of the three tracheal components. We observed a general (but not significant) stiffening of tracheal cartilage and connective tissue with aging. No change in the stress relaxation percentage with aging was observed. The results of this study may be useful in the design and fabrication of tracheal tissue engineering scaffolds.

  2. Dental tissue regeneration - a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, A-H; Yelick, P C

    2011-01-01

    with today's 21st century technological advancements, it is expected that individuals will either retain their natural teeth or obtain functional tooth replacements throughout their entire life. Modern dental therapies for the replacement of missing teeth largely utilize partial or complete dentures and titanium implants capped with prosthetic crowns. Although these prostheses serve a purpose, they are not equivalent, neither in function nor aesthetics, to natural teeth. Recent progress in dental tissue engineering has lent significant credibility to the concept that biological replacement teeth therapies may soon be available to replace missing teeth. in this review, we summarize the emerging concepts of whole-tooth replacement strategies, using postnatal dental stem cells (DSCs) and dental tissue engineering approaches. we provide a thorough and extensive review of the literature. current approaches to achieve clinically relevant biological replacement tooth therapies rely on the cultivation of DSCs capable of relaying odontogenic induction signals, through dental epithelial-mesenchymal cell interactions. DSC expansion and differentiation can be achieved by programming progenitor stem cells to adopt dental lineages, using instructive, bioengineered scaffold materials. Periodontal ligament regeneration in particular has demonstrated significant progress recently, despite the somewhat unpredictable clinical outcomes, with regard to its capacity to augment conventional metallic dental implants and as an important component for whole-tooth tissue engineering. Following recent advances made in DSC and tissue engineering research, various research groups are in the midst of performing 'proof of principle' experiments for whole-tooth regeneration, with associated functional periodontal tissues. This mini-review focuses on recent and promising developments in the fields of pulp and periodontal tissue DSCs that are of particular relevance for dental tissue and whole

  3. Hypertrophic Obesity and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over the past 50 years, scientists have recognized that not all adipose tissue is alike, and that health risk is associated with the location as well as the amount of body fat. Different depots are sufficiently distinct with respect to fatty-acid storage and release as to probably play unique roles in human physiology. Whether fat redistribution causes metabolic disease or whether it is a marker of underlying processes that are primarily responsible is an open question. CONTENT: The limited expandability of the subcutaneous adipose tissue leads to inappropriate adipose cell expansion (hypertrophic obesity with local inflammation and a dysregulated and insulin-resistant adipose tissue. The inability to store excess fat in the subcutaneous adipose tissue is a likely key mechanism for promoting ectopic fat accumulation in tissues and areas where fat can be stored, including the intra-abdominal and visceral areas, in the liver, epi/pericardial area, around vessels, in the myocardium, and in the skeletal muscles. Many studies have implicated ectopic fat accumulation and the associated lipotoxicity as the major determinant of the metabolic complications of obesity driving systemic insulin resistance, inflammation, hepatic glucose production, and dyslipidemia. SUMMARY: In summary, hypertrophic obesity is due to an impaired ability to recruit and differentiate available adipose precursor cells in the subcutaneous adipose tissue. Thus, the subcutaneous adipose tissue may be particular in its limited ability in certain individuals to undergo adipogenesis during weight increase. Inability to promote subcutaneous adipogenesis under periods of affluence would favor lipid overlow and ectopic fat accumulation with negative metabolic consequences. KEYWORDS: obesity, adipogenesis, subcutaneous adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, adipocyte dysfunction.

  4. Tissue identification during Pneumoperitoneum in laparoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yin; Tseng, Chi-Yang

    2015-03-01

    Pneumoperitoneum is the beginning procedure of laparoscopy to enlarge the abdominal cavity in order to allow the surgical instruments to insert for surgical purpose. However, the insertion of Veress needle is a blind fashion that could cause blood vessels or visceral injury without attention and results in undetectable internal bleeding. Seriously it may cause a life-threatened complication. We have developed a method that can monitor the tissue reflective spectrum, which can be used for tissue discrimination, in real time during the puncture of the Veress needle. The system includes a modified Veress needle which containes an optical bundle, a light spectrum analyzing and control unit. Therefore, the tissue reflective spectrum can be vivid observed and analyzed through the fiber optical technology during the procedure of the Veress needle insertion. In this study, we have measured the reflective spectra of various porcine abdominal tissues. The features of their spectra were analyzed and characterized to build up the data base and create an algorithm for tissue discrimination in laparoscopy. The results showed that the correlation coefficient (r) of the reflective spectrum can be 0.79-0.95 for the wavelength range of 350-1000 nm and 0.85-0.98 for the wavelength range of 350-650 nm in the same tissue of various samples which were obtained from different days. An alternative way for tissue discrimination is achieved through a decision making tree according to the characteristics of tissue spectrum. For single blind test the success rate is nearly 100%. It seems that both the algorithms mentioned above for tissue discrimination are all very promising. Therefore, these algorithms will be applied to in vivo study in animal in the near future.

  5. Trace element concentrations in cetacean liver tissues archived in the National Marine Mammal Tissue Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, E A; Demiralp, R; Becker, P R; Greenberg, R R; Koster, B J; Wise, S A

    1995-12-08

    The National Biomonitoring Specimen Bank (NBSB), a collaborative project of several U.S. government agencies, includes marine mammal tissues collected for the Alaska Marine Mammal Tissue Archival Project (AMMTAP) and the National Marine Mammal Tissue Bank (NMMTB). Tissues were collected from 139 animals representing 13 species of marine mammals from around the U.S. Recently, concentrations for up to 30 elements in liver tissues of nine long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas), six harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), and four white-sided dolphins (Lagenorhynchus acutus) from the NMMTB were measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Results from analyses of these tissues are presented, compared with results for liver tissues from other marine mammals from the AMMTAP, and compared with published values.

  6. Localization of IAA transporting tissue by tissue printing and autoradiography. [Coleus; maize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mee-Rye Cha; Evans, M.L.; Hangarter, R.P. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States))

    1991-05-01

    Tissue printing on nitrocellulose membranes provides a useful technique for visualizing anatomical details of tissue morphology of cut ends of stem segments. Basal ends of Coleus stem and corn coleoptile segments that were transporting {sup 14}C-IAA were gently blotted onto DEAE-nitrocellulose for several minutes to allow {sup 14}C-IAA to efflux from the tissue. Because of the anion exchange properties of DEAE-nitrocellulose the {sup 14}C-IAA remains on the membrane at the point it leaves the transporting tissue. Autoradiography of the DEAE membrane allowed indirect visualization of the tissues preferentially involved in auxin transport. The authors observed that polar transport through the stem segments occurred primarily through or in association with vascular tissues. However, in Coleus stems, substantial amounts of the label appeared to move through the tissue by diffusion as well as by active transport.

  7. Soft tissue balancing in total shoulder replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Maike; Hoy, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty is now capable of recreating near anatomic reproduction of native bony shoulder anatomy, but the function and longevity of anatomic shoulder replacement is dependent on a competent soft tissue envelope and adequate motoring of all musculo-tendinous units about the shoulder. Balancing the soft tissues requires understanding of the anatomy and pathology, as well as technical skills. The advent of reverse shoulder biomechanics has brought with it special requirements of understanding of the soft tissue elements still left in the shoulder despite major rotator cuff deficiency.

  8. Quantification and validation of soft tissue deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Thomas Hammershaimb; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Christensen, Lars Bager

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for soft tissue deformation derived empirically from 10 pig carcases. The carcasses are subjected to deformation from a known single source of pressure located at the skin surface, and the deformation is quantified by means of steel markers injected into the tissue. The steel...... markers are easy to distinguish from the surrounding soft tissue in 3D computed tomography images. By tracking corresponding markers using methods from point-based registration, we are able to accurately quantify the magnitude and propagation of the induced deformation. The deformation is parameterised...

  9. Vascularization of soft tissue engineering constructs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel Carletto, Rodrigo

    with mechanical properties in the range of soft tissues has not been fully achieved. My project focused on the fabrication and the active perfusion of hydrogel constructs with multi-dimensional vasculature and controlled mechanical properties targeting soft tissues. Specifically, the initial part of the research...... nanotechnology-based paradigm for engineering vascularised liver tissue for transplantation”) and the Danish National Research Foundation and Villum Foundation’s Center for Intelligent Drug delivery and sensing Using microcontainers and Nanomechanics (Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF122)....

  10. Tracing molecular dephasing in biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokim, M.; Carruba, C.; Ganikhanov, F.

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrate the quantitative spectroscopic characterization and imaging of biological tissue using coherent time-domain microscopy with a femtosecond resolution. We identify tissue constituents and perform dephasing time (T2) measurements of characteristic Raman active vibrations. This was shown in subcutaneous mouse fat embedded within collagen rich areas of the dermis and the muscle connective tissue. The demonstrated equivalent spectral resolution (methods for characterization of biological media. This provides with the important dimensions and parameters in biological media characterization and can become an effective tool in detecting minute changes in the bio-molecular composition and environment that is critical for molecular level diagnosis.

  11. Effects of microwave radiation on living tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surrell, J.A.; Alexander, R.C.; Cohle, S.D.; Lovell, F.R. Jr.; Wehrenberg, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    Prompted by an alleged case of child abuse resulting from microwave oven burns and the discovery of one other case, an animal model was chosen to explore microwave burn characteristics upon living, perfusing tissue. Anesthetized piglets were exposed to radiation from a standard household microwave oven for varying lengths of time, sufficient to result in full-thickness skin and visceral burns. Characteristic burn patterns were grossly identified. Biopsies studied with both light and electron microscopy demonstrated a pattern of relative layered tissue sparing. Layered tissue sparing is characterized by burned skin and muscle, with relatively unburned subcutaneous fat between these two layers. These findings have important forensic and patient care implications.

  12. Lipolysis in human adipose tissue during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Lorentsen, Jeanne; Isaksson, Fredrik

    2002-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue lipolysis was studied in vivo by Fick's arteriovenous (a-v) principle using either calculated (microdialysis) or directly measured (catheterization) adipose tissue venous glycerol concentration. We compared results during steady-state (rest and prolonged continuous...... exercise), as well as during non-steady-state (onset of exercise and early exercise) experimental settings. Fourteen healthy women [age: 74 +/- 1 (SE) yr] were studied at rest and during 60-min continuous bicycling at 60% of peak O(2) uptake. Calculated and measured subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue...

  13. Chemometric endogenous fluorescence for tissue diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Run; Vasquez, Kevin; Xu, M.

    2017-02-01

    Endogenous fluorescence is a powerful technique for probing both structure and function of tissue. We show that enabling wide-field fluorescence microscopy with chemometrics can significantly enhance the performance of tissue diagnosis with endogenous fluorescence. The spatial distribution and absolute concentration of fluorophores is uncovered with non-negative factorization aided by the spatial diversity from microscopic autofluorescence color images. Fluorescence quantification in terms of its absolute concentration map avoids issues dependent on specific measurement approach or systems and yields biologically meaningful data. The standardization of endogenous fluorescence in terms of absolute concentration will facilitate its translation to the clinics and simplifies the assessment of competing methods relating to tissue fluorescence.

  14. Bioreactor Technology in Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsching, H.; Hansmann, J.

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering is a fast evolving field of biomedical science and technology to manufacture viable blood vessels, heart valves, myocar-dial substitutes and vascularised complex tissues. In consideration of the specific role of the haemodynamics of human circulation, bioreactors are a fundamental of this field. The development of perfusion bioreactor technology is a consequence of successes in extracorporeal circulation techniques, to provide an in vitro environment mimicking in vivo conditions. The bioreactor system should enable an automatic hydrodynamic regime control. Furthermore, the systematic studies regarding the cellular responses to various mechanical and biochemical cues guarantee the viability, bio-monitoring, testing, storage and transportation of the growing tissue.

  15. Advances in Tissue-engineered Oral Mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fan Hao; Shao, Xiao Lin; Song, Yu; Zhang, Tao

    2017-12-20

    The large defect of oral and maxillofacial region doesn't only affect the function and aesthetics but also has an adverse impact on patients' psychology. The traditional way to restore the defects are limited by donor site and secondary trauma. In recent years,the oral mucosal tissue engineering has developed rapidly and provides a new solution for craniofacial reconstruction. Tissue-engineered oral mucosa is an ideal substitute of oral mucosa. It can be used in clinical settings and in vitro experiments. This articles review the recent advances in tissue-engineered oral mucosa and its applications.

  16. Hypergranulation tissue: a nontraumatic method of management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A; Rolstad, B S

    1994-06-01

    Granulation tissue above the periwound area is usually considered an impediment to wound healing. Although there is very little in the literature regarding hypergranulation tissue, the fact that there are numerous treatments by various wound clinicians demonstrates the recognition of its presence as a clinical problem. The paucity of published information prompted the authors to design a study to collect objective data on a treatment method they had found useful in their practices. This article explores the issue of hypergranulation and offers a nontraumatic method of management. A prospective non-controlled correlational study was undertaken with ten patients and twelve wounds using a polyurethane foam dressing to reduce hypergranulation tissue. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in height of 2 mm of granulation tissue from initial measurements to measurements taken two weeks later (p < 0.01).

  17. Validity of Tissue Microarray by Immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hiromi; Takayama, Tatsuya; Takaoka, Naohisa; Tan, Cheng; Igarashi, Hisaki; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Ozono, Seiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Tissue microarrays (TMAs) extract designated areas of tissue paraffin blocks in several units that are millimeters in diameter in a cylindrical fashion, array dozens of these tissue specimens, and then re-embed them. Here, a TMA was utilized to analyze renal cell carcinoma (RCC) specimens with anti-FABP7 and anti-Brn2 antibodies. Paraffin-embedded specimens from 114 RCC patients were immunostained with anti-FABP7 and anti-Brn2 antibodies to examine the rate of agreement between the staining of TMA grafts compared to conventional tissue slice grafts. The staining area of the tumor was also examined. The positive ratio of anti-FABP7 was 74% and of anti-Brn2 was 57%. The rate of agreement of each antibody was 100% regardless of tumor size before extraction. Immunostaining of TMA slices might be effective for the analysis of RCC specimens.

  18. Aging changes in organs - tissue - cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004012.htm Aging changes in organs, tissues, and cells To use ... lose some function as you age during adulthood. Aging changes occur in all of the body's cells, ...

  19. Tissue disposition of bifenthrin in the rat

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Tissue disposition of bifenthrin in the rat and oral and intravenous administration. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Hughes , M., D. Ross...

  20. Vascularization regenerative medicine and tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brey, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    A Complex and Growing Field The study of vascularization in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) and its applications is an emerging field that could revolutionize medical approaches for organ and tissue replacement, reconstruction, and regeneration. Designed specifically for researchers in TERM fields, Vascularization: Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering provides a broad overview of vascularization in TERM applications. This text summarizes research in several areas, and includes contributions from leading experts in the field. It defines the difficulties associated with multicellular processes in vascularization and cell-source issues. It presents advanced biomaterial design strategies for control of vascular network formation and in silico models designed to provide insight not possible in experimental systems. It also examines imaging methods that are critical to understanding vascularization in engineered tissues, and addresses vascularization issues within the context of specific...

  1. DNA from keratinous tissue. Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Camilla Friis; Olsen, Maia E.; Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    2012-01-01

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient...... systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear...... and mitochondrial DNA appear to be present in almost all hair and nail samples, the quality of DNA, both in quantity and length of amplifiable DNA fragments, vary considerably not just by species, but by individual, and even within individual between hair types....

  2. Tissue polarimetry: concepts, challenges, applications, and outlook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghosh, Nirmalya; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2011-01-01

    Polarimetry has a long and successful history in various forms of clear media. Driven by their biomedical potential, the use of the polarimetric approaches for biological tissue assessment has also recently received considerable attention...

  3. Graphene-based materials for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Su Ryon; Li, Yi-Chen; Jang, Hae Lin; Khoshakhlagh, Parastoo; Akbari, Mohsen; Nasajpour, Amir; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Tamayol, Ali; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Graphene and its chemical derivatives have been a pivotal new class of nanomaterials and a model system for quantum behavior. The material's excellent electrical conductivity, biocompatibility, surface area and thermal properties are of much interest to the scientific community. Two-dimensional graphene materials have been widely used in various biomedical research areas such as bioelectronics, imaging, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. In this review, we will highlight the recent applications of graphene-based materials in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In particular, we will discuss the application of graphene-based materials in cardiac, neural, bone, cartilage, skeletal muscle, and skin/adipose tissue engineering. We will also discuss the potential risk factors of graphene-based materials in tissue engineering. In conclusion, we will outline the opportunities in the usage of graphene-based materials for clinical applications. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. NCI’s Cooperative Human Tissue Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quality biospecimens are a foundational resource for cancer research. One of NCI’s longest running biospecimen programs is the Cooperative Human Tissue Network, a resource mainly for basic discovery and early translational research.

  5. SEM investigation of heart tissue samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, R; Amoroso, M [Physics Department, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies (Trinidad and Tobago)

    2010-07-01

    We used the scanning electron microscope to examine the cardiac tissue of a cow (Bos taurus), a pig (Sus scrofa), and a human (Homo sapiens). 1mm{sup 3} blocks of left ventricular tissue were prepared for SEM scanning by fixing in 96% ethanol followed by critical point drying (cryofixation), then sputter-coating with gold. The typical ridged structure of the myofibrils was observed for all the species. In addition crystal like structures were found in one of the samples of the heart tissue of the pig. These structures were investigated further using an EDVAC x-ray analysis attachment to the SEM. Elemental x-ray analysis showed highest peaks occurred for gold, followed by carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium. As the samples were coated with gold for conductivity, this highest peak is expected. Much lower peaks at carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium suggest that a cystallized salt such as a carbonate was present in the tissue before sacrifice.

  6. Tissue adhesives for closure of surgical incisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumville, Jo C; Coulthard, Paul; Worthington, Helen V; Riley, Philip; Patel, Neil; Darcey, James; Esposito, Marco; van der Elst, Maarten; van Waes, Oscar J F

    2014-11-28

    Sutures (stitches), staples and adhesive tapes have been used for many years as methods of wound closure, but tissue adhesives have entered clinical practice more recently. Closure of wounds with sutures enables the closure to be meticulous, but the sutures may show tissue reactivity and can require removal. Tissue adhesives offer the advantages of an absence of risk of needlestick injury and no requirement to remove sutures later. Initially, tissue adhesives were used primarily in emergency room settings, but this review looks at the use of tissue adhesives in the operating room/theatre where surgeons are using them increasingly for the closure of surgical skin incisions. To determine the effects of various tissue adhesives compared with conventional skin closure techniques for the closure of surgical wounds. In March 2014 for this second update we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. We did not restrict the search and study selection with respect to language, date of publication or study setting. Only randomised controlled trials were eligible for inclusion. We conducted screening of eligible studies, data extraction and risk of bias assessment independently and in duplicate. We expressed results as random-effects models using mean difference for continuous outcomes and risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes. We investigated heterogeneity, including both clinical and methodological factors. This second update of the review identified 19 additional eligible trials resulting in a total of 33 studies (2793 participants) that met the inclusion criteria. There was low quality evidence that sutures were significantly better than tissue adhesives for reducing the risk of wound breakdown (dehiscence; RR 3.35; 95% CI 1.53 to 7

  7. Fossilization of Soft Tissue in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Derek E. G.; Kear, Amanda J.

    1993-03-01

    Some of the most remarkable fossils preserve cellular details of soft tissues. In many of these, the tissues have been replaced by calcium phosphate. This process has been assumed to require elevated concentrations of phosphate in sediment pore waters. In decay experiments modern shrimps became partially mineralized in amorphous calcium phosphate, preserving cellular details of muscle tissue, particularly in a system closed to oxygen. The source for the formation of calcium phosphate was the shrimp itself. Mineralization, which was accompanied by a drop in pH, commenced within 2 weeks and increased in extent for at least 4 to 8 weeks. This mechanism halts the normal loss of detail of soft-tissue morphology before fossilization. Similar closed conditions would prevail where organisms are rapidly overgrown by microbial mats.

  8. Aetiological factors behind adipose tissue inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Scholten, Bernt J; Andresen, Erik N; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive research into the biological mechanisms behind obesity-related inflammation, knowledge of environmental and genetic factors triggering such mechanisms is limited. In the present narrative review we present potential determinants of adipose tissue inflammation and suggest ways...

  9. A Hybrid Tissue-Engineered Heart Valve

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alavi, S Hamed; Kheradvar, Arash

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the efforts to develop and test the first hybrid tissue-engineered heart valve whose leaflets are composed of an extra-thin superelastic Nitinol mesh tightly enclosed by uniform...

  10. Carcass or Tissue Packaging and Shipping

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — SOP on proper shipping of wildlife tissues to labs. Provides stepwise instructions and guidance on how to collect and ship wildlife carcasses, carcass parts, or...

  11. SEM investigation of heart tissue samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, R.; Amoroso, M.

    2010-07-01

    We used the scanning electron microscope to examine the cardiac tissue of a cow (Bos taurus), a pig (Sus scrofa), and a human (Homo sapiens). 1mm3 blocks of left ventricular tissue were prepared for SEM scanning by fixing in 96% ethanol followed by critical point drying (cryofixation), then sputter-coating with gold. The typical ridged structure of the myofibrils was observed for all the species. In addition crystal like structures were found in one of the samples of the heart tissue of the pig. These structures were investigated further using an EDVAC x-ray analysis attachment to the SEM. Elemental x-ray analysis showed highest peaks occurred for gold, followed by carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium. As the samples were coated with gold for conductivity, this highest peak is expected. Much lower peaks at carbon, oxygen, magnesium and potassium suggest that a cystallized salt such as a carbonate was present in the tissue before sacrifice.

  12. Tissue Testing Can Spot Zika at Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_166828.html Tissue Testing Can Spot Zika at Birth: CDC Just 1 in 10 possible ... June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to the Zika virus in pregnancy can wreak havoc on babies, ...

  13. Cytological studies of lunar treated tissue cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    An electron microscopic study was made of botanical materials, particularly pine tissues, treated with lunar materials collected by Apollo 12 quarantine mission. Results show unusual structural changes within several of the treated tissues. The bodies, as yet unidentified, resemble virus particles observed within infected plant cells. Although the size and shape of the structures are comparable to rod shaped virus particles such as Tobacco mosaic, the numerical distribution, affinity for stains, and intercellular location are different.

  14. 3D Bioprinting for Engineering Complex Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition...

  15. Introduction to regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, J-F; Decot, V; Huseltein, C; He, X; Zhang, L; Magdalou, J; Li, Y P; Menu, P; Li, N; Wang, Y Y; de Isla, N; Bensoussan, D

    2012-01-01

    Human tissues don't regenerate spontaneously, explaining why regenerative medicine and cell therapy represent a promising alternative treatment (autologous cells or stem cells of different origins). The principle is simple: cells are collected, expanded and introduced with or without modification into injured tissues or organs. Among middle-term therapeutic applications, cartilage defects, bone repair, cardiac insufficiency, burns, liver or bladder, neurodegenerative disorders could be considered.

  16. Soft tissue trauma and scar revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Steven R; Sjogren, Phayvanh P

    2014-11-01

    Numerous techniques and treatments have been described for scar revision, with most studies focusing on the adult population. A comprehensive review of the literature reveals a paucity of references related specifically to scar revision in children. This review describes the available modalities in pediatric facial scar revision. The authors have integrated current practices in soft tissue trauma and scar revision, including closure techniques and materials, topical therapy, steroid injection, cutaneous laser therapy, and tissue expanders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. On Materials for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domian, Ibrahim J; Yu, Hanry; Mittal, Nikhil

    2017-01-01

    In this essay the authors argue that chamber pressure dominates the biomechanics of the contraction cycle of the heart, while tissue stiffness dominates the relaxation cycle. This appears to be an under-recognized challenge in cardiac tissue engineering. Optimal approaches will involve constructing chambers or modulating the stiffness of the scaffold/substrate in synchrony with the beating cycle. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Xenografting of adult mammalian testis tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregui, Lucía; Rathi, Rahul; Zeng, Wenxian; Honaramooz, Ali; Gomendio, Montserrat; Roldan, Eduardo R S; Dobrinski, Ina

    2008-06-01

    Xenografting of testis tissue from immature males from several mammalian species to immunodeficient mouse hosts results in production of fertilization-competent sperm. However, the efficiency of testis tissue xenografting from adult donors has not been critically evaluated. Testis tissue xenografting from sexually mature animals could provide an option to preserve the genetic material from valuable males when semen for cryopreservation cannot be collected. To assess the potential use of this technique for adult individuals, testes from adult animals of six species (pig, goat, cattle, donkey, horse and rhesus monkey) were ectopically grafted to host mice. Grafts were recovered and analyzed at three time points: less than 12 weeks, between 12 and 24 weeks and more than 24 weeks after grafting. Histological analysis of the grafts revealed effects of species and donor tissue maturity: all grafts from species with greater daily sperm production (pig and goat) were found to have degenerated tubules or grafts were completely degenerated. None of the xenografts from mature adult bull and monkeys contained differentiated spermatogenic cells when examined more than 12 weeks post-grafting but tubules with Sertoli cells only remained. In grafts from a young adult bull, Sertoli cells persisted much longer than with the mature adult grafts. In grafts from a young adult horse, spermatogenesis proceeded to meiosis. In grafts from a young adult donkey and monkey, however, complete spermatogenesis was found in the grafts. These results show that testis tissue grafts from mature adult donors did not support germ cell differentiation but seminiferous tubules with Sertoli cells only survived in some species. The timing and progression of tubular degeneration after grafting of adult testis tissue appear to be related to the intensity of spermatogenesis at the time of grafting. Testis tissue from sub-adult donors survives better as xenograft than tissue from mature adult donors, and

  19. Direct plasma interaction with living tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Gregory

    For some time, plasma has been used in medicine to cauterize or cut tissue using heat and mechanical energy. In the recent decade, some researchers around the world have started to investigate how gas jets that pass through thermal plasma can be employed in medicine. This thesis presents the first investigation of biomedical uses of non-thermal plasma discharge which comes in direct contact with living tissue. It is demonstrated that the direct application of non-thermal plasma in air can cause rapid deactivation of bacteria on surfaces of tissues without causing any visible tissue damage. Medical need for such a device is discussed. Construction and operation of various types of non-thermal plasma power supplies and many types of treatment electrodes are presented as well. Application of this plasma to living organisms is shown to be safe from both the electrical perspective and from the biological perspective. Biological safety is revealed through a series of differential skin toxicity trials on human cadaver tissue, live hairless mouse skin tissue, live pig skin tissue, and finally in an open wound model on pigs. Direct non-thermal plasma in air is shown to deactivate bacteria about 100 times faster than indirect application using jets. A series of experiments reveal that this effectiveness is due to the ability of direct discharge to bring charges to tissue surfaces. It is demonstrated that neither ultraviolet (UV) radiation nor neutral active species such as hydroxyl radicals or ozone produced in plasma are responsible for the main effect on bacteria. Although much additional work remains on establishing detailed mechanism by which charges from plasma achieve this effect, the work carried out in this thesis clearly demonstrates that direct application of non-thermal plasma in air can be a very useful tool in medicine.

  20. Vitamine E et physiologie du tissu adipeux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landrier Jean-François

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E constitutes a family of eight molecules well-known for its antioxidant properties and its essentiality in fertility. Its ability to regulate gene expression is more and more described and could be a major actor of its biological activity. Adipose tissue which is the main store site of vitamin E within the body is also subjected to the regulatory effect of vitamin E. These regulations could strongly impact adipose tissue physiology.

  1. Biomimetic electrospun nanofibrous structures for tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xianfeng; Ding, Bin; Li, Bingyun

    2013-01-01

    Biomimetic nanofibrous scaffolds mimicking important features of the native extracellular matrix provide a promising strategy to restore functions or achieve favorable responses for tissue regeneration. This review provides a brief overview of current state-of-the-art research designing and using biomimetic electrospun nanofibers as scaffolds for tissue engineering. It begins with a brief introduction of electrospinning and nanofibers, with a focus on issues related to the biomimetic design a...

  2. Introduction to tissue engineering applications and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Birla, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Covering a progressive medical field, Tissue Engineering describes the innovative process of regenerating human cells to restore or establish normal function in defective organs. As pioneering individuals look ahead to the possibility of generating entire organ systems, students may turn to this textbook for a comprehensive understanding and preparation for the future of regenerative medicine. This book explains chemical stimulations, the bioengineering of specific organs, and treatment plans for chronic diseases. It is a must-read for tissue engineering students and practitioners.

  3. Perivascular Adipose Tissue and Cardiometabolic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Meiliana; Andi Wijaya

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with insulin resistance, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease, but the mechanisms underlying these associations are incompletely understood. Microvascular dysfunction may play an important role in the pathogenesis of both insulin resistance and hypertension in obesity. CONTENT: Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) is a local deposit of adipose tissue surrounding the vasculature. PVAT is present throughout the body and has been shown to have a local effect o...

  4. Dermatological application of tissue-tolerable plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Klebes, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-tolerable plasma (TTP) has recently developed into an interdisciplinary and innovative field of research. Due to its promising properties new perspectives in medicine and promising applications in dermatology are possible. In the first phase of the investigations it was shown that TTP can be applied on human skin without any risk in terms of electrical safety, temperature, UV radiation, or free radicals. Moreover it is effective in tissue disinfection. Subsequently, antibacterial...

  5. Tissue expansion: Concepts, techniques and unfavourable results

    OpenAIRE

    Milind S Wagh; Varun Dixit

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of tissue expansion is observed in nature all the time. The same properties of the human skin to stretch and expand and yield extra skin if placed under continuous stress over a prolonged period of time has been utilised for reconstructive purposes with the help of a silicon balloon inserted under the skin and progressively filled with saline. The technique of tissue expansion is now more than three decades old and has been a value addition to our armamentarium in reconstructiv...

  6. Extramedullary Plasmacytoma of Soft Tissues and Gingiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrit Kaur Kaler

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP is a rare plasma cell neoplasm of soft tissue without bone marrow involvement or other systemic characteristics of multiple myeloma. It accounts for 3% of all plasma cell tumors. Multiple extramedullary plasmacytoma is defined when there is more than one extramedullary tumor of clonal plasma cells and such presentation has not been described earlier. We report such rare case of multiple extramedullary plasmacytoma involving multiple soft tissues in chest, abdomen, mandible, maxilla, and gingiva.

  7. European quality system for tissue banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyalich, M; Navarro, A; Koller, J; Loty, B; de Guerra, A; Cornu, O; Vabels, G; Fornasari, P M; Costa, A N; Siska, I; Hirn, M; Franz, N; Miranda, B; Kaminski, A; Uhrynowska, I; Van Baare, J; Trias, E; Fernández, C; de By, T; Poniatowski, S; Carbonell, R

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this project were to analyze the factors that influence quality and safety of tissues for transplantation and to develop the method to ensure standards of quality and safety in relation to tissue banking as demanded by European Directive 2004/23/EC and its technical annexes. It is organized in 4 Working Groups, the objectives of each one being focused in a specific area. The Guide of Recommendations for Tissue Banking is structured into 4 parts: (1) quality systems that apply to tissue banking and general quality system requirements, (2) regulatory framework in Europe, (3) standards available, and (4) recommendations of the fundamental quality and safety keypoints. This Working Group handled design of a multinational musculoskeletal tissue registry prototype. This Working Group handled design and validation of a specialized training model structured into online and face-to-face courses. The model was improved with suggestions from students, and 100% certification was obtained. The Guide for Auditing Tissue Establishments provides guidance for auditors, a self-assessment questionnaire, and an audit report form. The effectiveness and sustainability of the outputs were assessed. Both guides are useful for experienced tissue establishments and auditors and also for professionals that are starting in the field. The registry prototype proves it is possible to exchange tissues between establishments throughout Europe. The training model has been effective in educating staff and means having professionals with excellent expertise. Member states could adapt/adopt it. The guides should be updated periodically and perhaps a European organization should take responsibility for this and even create a body of auditors.

  8. Tissue culture of trees. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodds, J.H. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    The book is designed for students and research scientists. Apart from an introduction and conclusions by the editor, there are 9 chapters by various authors covering: the tissue culture of conifers, broadleaves, coconut, date and oil palm, ornamental trees, temperate fruit trees, and citrus; the influence of physical factors on xylem differentation in vitro; the use of protoplast technology; and tissue culture conservation. A short glossary is provided.

  9. Composite Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Min Wang

    2006-01-01

    Biomaterial and scaffold development underpins the advancement of tissue engineering. Traditional scaffolds based on biodegradable polymers such as poly(lactic acid) and poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) are weak and non-osteoconductive. For bone tissue engineering, polymer-based composite scaffolds containing bioceramics such as hydroxyapatite can be produced and used. The bioceramics can be either incorporated in the scaffolds as a dispersed secondary phase or form a thin coating on the po...

  10. Chitin-based materials in tissue engineering: applications in soft tissue and epithelial organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tsung-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Chitin-based materials and their derivatives are receiving increased attention in tissue engineering because of their unique and appealing biological properties. In this review, we summarize the biomedical potential of chitin-based materials, specifically focusing on chitosan, in tissue engineering approaches for epithelial and soft tissues. Both types of tissues play an important role in supporting anatomical structures and physiological functions. Because of the attractive features of chitin-based materials, many characteristics beneficial to tissue regeneration including the preservation of cellular phenotype, binding and enhancement of bioactive factors, control of gene expression, and synthesis and deposition of tissue-specific extracellular matrix are well-regulated by chitin-based scaffolds. These scaffolds can be used in repairing body surface linings, reconstructing tissue structures, regenerating connective tissue, and supporting nerve and vascular growth and connection. The novel use of these scaffolds in promoting the regeneration of various tissues originating from the epithelium and soft tissue demonstrates that these chitin-based materials have versatile properties and functionality and serve as promising substrates for a great number of future applications.

  11. Space Radiation Program Element Tissue Sharing Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.; Mayeaux, B M.; Huff, J. L.; Simonsen, L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the years, a large number of animal experiments have been conducted at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory and other facilities under the support of the NASA Space Radiation Program Element (SRPE). Studies using rodents and other animal species to address the space radiation risks will remain a significant portion of the research portfolio of the Element. In order to maximize scientific return of the animal studies, the SRPE has recently released the Space Radiation Tissue Sharing Forum. The Forum provides access to an inventory of investigator-stored tissue samples and enables both NASA SRPE members and NASA-funded investigators to exchange information regarding stored and future radiobiological tissues available for sharing. Registered users may review online data of available tissues, inquire about tissues posted, or request tissues for an upcoming study using an online form. Investigators who have upcoming sacrifices are also encouraged to post the availability of samples using the discussion forum. A brief demo of the forum will be given during the presentation

  12. 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean V; Atala, Anthony

    2014-08-01

    Additive manufacturing, otherwise known as three-dimensional (3D) printing, is driving major innovations in many areas, such as engineering, manufacturing, art, education and medicine. Recent advances have enabled 3D printing of biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components into complex 3D functional living tissues. 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine to address the need for tissues and organs suitable for transplantation. Compared with non-biological printing, 3D bioprinting involves additional complexities, such as the choice of materials, cell types, growth and differentiation factors, and technical challenges related to the sensitivities of living cells and the construction of tissues. Addressing these complexities requires the integration of technologies from the fields of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics and medicine. 3D bioprinting has already been used for the generation and transplantation of several tissues, including multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, tracheal splints, heart tissue and cartilaginous structures. Other applications include developing high-throughput 3D-bioprinted tissue models for research, drug discovery and toxicology.

  13. Stem cells in bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Jeong Min [Department of Preventive and Social Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Chul; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun; Hwang, Yu-Shik [Department of Maxillofacial Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Mantalaris, Anathathios, E-mail: yshwang@khu.ac.k [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Bone tissue engineering has been one of the most promising areas of research, providing a potential clinical application to cure bone defects. Recently, various stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs), adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) have received extensive attention in the field of bone tissue engineering due to their distinct biological capability to differentiate into osteogenic lineages. The application of these stem cells to bone tissue engineering requires inducing in vitro differentiation of these cells into bone forming cells, osteoblasts. For this purpose, efficient in vitro differentiation towards osteogenic lineage requires the development of well-defined and proficient protocols. This would reduce the likelihood of spontaneous differentiation into divergent lineages and increase the available cell source for application to bone tissue engineering therapies. This review provides a critical examination of the various experimental strategies that could be used to direct the differentiation of ESC, BM-MSC, UCB-MSC, ADSC, MDSC and DPSC towards osteogenic lineages and their potential applications in tissue engineering, particularly in the regeneration of bone. (topical review)

  14. Transcranial light-tissue interaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulakh, Kavleen; Zakaib, Scott; Willmore, William G.; Ye, Winnie N.

    2016-03-01

    The penetration depth of light plays a crucial role in therapeutic medical applications. In order to design effective medical photonic devices, an in-depth understanding of light's ability to penetrate tissues (including bone, skin, and fat) is necessary. The amount of light energy absorbed or scattered by tissues affects the intensity of light reaching an intended target in vivo. In this study, we examine the transmittance of light through a variety of cranial tissues for the purpose of determining the efficacy of neuro stimulation using a transcranial laser. Tissue samples collected from a pig were irradiated with a pulsed laser. We first determine the optimal irradiation wavelength of the laser to be 808nm. With varying peak and average power of the laser, we found an inverse and logarithmic relationship between the penetration depth and the intensity of the light. After penetrating the skin and skull of the pig, the light decreases in intensity at a rate of approximately 90.8 (+/-0.4) percent for every 5 mm of brain tissue penetrated. We also found the correlation between the irradiation time and dosage, using three different lasers (with peak power of 500, 1000, and 1500mW respectively). These data will help deduce what laser power is required to achieve a clinically-realistic model for a given irradiation time. This work is fundamental and the experimental data can be used to supplement existing and future research on the effects of laser light on brain tissue for the design of medical devices.

  15. Beta adrenergic receptors in human cavernous tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhabuwala, C.B.; Ramakrishna, C.V.; Anderson, G.F.

    1985-04-01

    Beta adrenergic receptor binding was performed with /sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol on human cavernous tissue membrane fractions from normal tissue and transsexual procedures obtained postoperatively, as well as from postmortem sources. Isotherm binding studies on normal fresh tissues indicated that the receptor density was 9.1 fmoles/mg. with a KD of 23 pM. Tissue stored at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours, then at 4C in saline solution for 19 to 20 hours before freezing showed no significant changes in receptor density or affinity, and provided evidence for the stability of postmortem tissue obtained within the same time period. Beta receptor density of 2 cavernous preparations from transsexual procedures was not significantly different from normal control tissues, and showed that high concentrations of estrogen received by these patients had no effect on beta adrenergic receptor density. Displacement of /sup 125/iodocyanopindolol by 5 beta adrenergic agents demonstrated that 1-propranolol had the greatest affinity followed by ICI 118,551, zinterol, metoprolol and practolol. When the results of these displacement studies were subjected to Scatfit, non- linear regression line analysis, a single binding site was described. Based on the relative potency of the selective beta adrenergic agents it appears that these receptors were of the beta 2 subtype.

  16. The materials used in bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tereshchenko, V. P., E-mail: tervp@ngs.ru; Kirilova, I. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Larionov, P. M. [Novosibirsk Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics n.a. Ya.L. Tsivyan, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    Bone tissue engineering looking for an alternative solution to the problem of skeletal injuries. The method is based on the creation of tissue engineered bone tissue equivalent with stem cells, osteogenic factors, and scaffolds - the carriers of these cells. For production of tissue engineered bone equivalent is advisable to create scaffolds similar in composition to natural extracellular matrix of the bone. This will provide optimal conditions for the cells, and produce favorable physico-mechanical properties of the final construction. This review article gives an analysis of the most promising materials for the manufacture of cell scaffolds. Biodegradable synthetic polymers are the basis for the scaffold, but it alone cannot provide adequate physical and mechanical properties of the construction, and favorable conditions for the cells. Addition of natural polymers improves the strength characteristics and bioactivity of constructions. Of the inorganic compounds, to create cell scaffolds the most widely used calcium phosphates, which give the structure adequate stiffness and significantly increase its osteoinductive capacity. Signaling molecules do not affect the physico-mechanical properties of the scaffold, but beneficial effect is on the processes of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Biodegradation of the materials will help to fulfill the main task of bone tissue engineering - the ability to replace synthetic construct by natural tissues that will restore the original anatomical integrity of the bone.

  17. Dynamic compressive response of bovine liver tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervin, Farhana; Chen, Weinong W; Weerasooriya, Tusit

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to experimentally determine the strain rate effects on the compressive stress-strain behavior of bovine liver tissues. Fresh liver tissues were used to make specimens for mechanical loading. Experiments at quasi-static strain rates were conducted at 0.01 and 0.1 s(-1). Intermediate-rate experiments were performed at 1, 10, and 100 s(-1). High strain rate (1000, 2000, and 3000 s(-1)) experiments were conducted using a Kolsky bar modified for soft material characterization. A hollow transmission bar with semi-conductor strain gages was used to sense the weak forces from the soft specimens. Quartz-crystal force transducers were used to monitor valid testing conditions on the tissue specimens. The experiment results show that the compressive stress-strain response of the liver tissue is non-linear and highly rate-sensitive, especially when the strain rate is in the Kolsky bar range. The tissue stiffens significantly with increasing strain rate. The responses from liver tissues along and perpendicular to the liver surface were consistent, indicating isotropic behavior. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bioactive polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Scott; Shelke, Namdev B.; Hoshino, Kazunori; Rudraiah, Swetha; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of engineered scaffolds have been created for tissue engineering using polymers, ceramics and their composites. Biomimicry has been adopted for majority of the three-dimensional (3D) scaffold design both in terms of physicochemical properties, as well as bioactivity for superior tissue regeneration. Scaffolds fabricated via salt leaching, particle sintering, hydrogels and lithography have been successful in promoting cell growth in vitro and tissue regeneration in vivo. Scaffold systems derived from decellularization of whole organs or tissues has been popular due to their assured biocompatibility and bioactivity. Traditional scaffold fabrication techniques often failed to create intricate structures with greater resolution, not reproducible and involved multiple steps. The 3D printing technology overcome several limitations of the traditional techniques and made it easier to adopt several thermoplastics and hydrogels to create micro-nanostructured scaffolds and devices for tissue engineering and drug delivery. This review highlights scaffold fabrication methodologies with a focus on optimizing scaffold performance through the matrix pores, bioactivity and degradation rate to enable tissue regeneration. Review highlights few examples of bioactive scaffold mediated nerve, muscle, tendon/ligament and bone regeneration. Regardless of the efforts required for optimization, a shift in 3D scaffold uses from the laboratory into everyday life is expected in the near future as some of the methods discussed in this review become more streamlined. PMID:28653043

  19. The Facial Adipose Tissue: A Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglikov, Ilja; Trujillo, Oscar; Kristen, Quick; Isac, Kerelos; Zorko, Julia; Fam, Maria; Okonkwo, Kasie; Mian, Asima; Thanh, Hyunh; Koban, Konstantin; Sclafani, Anthony P; Steinke, Hanno; Cotofana, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    Recent advantages in the anatomical understanding of the face have turned the focus toward the subcutaneous and deep facial fat compartments. During facial aging, these fat-filled compartments undergo substantial changes along with other structures in the face. Soft tissue filler and fat grafting are valid methods to fight the signs of facial aging, but little is known about their precise effect on the facial fat. This narrative review summarizes the current knowledge about the facial fat compartments in terms of anatomical location, histologic appearance, immune-histochemical characteristics, cellular interactions, and therapeutic options. Three different types of facial adipose tissue can be identified, which are located either superficially (dermal white adipose tissue) or deep (subcutaneous white adipose tissue): fibrous (perioral locations), structural (major parts of the midface), and deposit (buccal fat pad and deep temporal fat pad). These various fat types differ in the size of the adipocytes and the collagenous composition of their extracellular matrix and thus in their mechanical properties. Minimal invasive (e.g., soft tissue fillers or fat grafting) and surgical interventions aiming to restore the youthful face have to account for the different fat properties in various facial areas. However, little is known about the macro- and microscopic characteristics of the facial fat tissue in different compartments and future studies are needed to reveal new insights to better understand the process of aging and how to fight its signs best. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Distribution of norovirus in oyster tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dapeng; Wu, Qingping; Kou, Xiaoxia; Yao, Lin; Zhang, Jumei

    2008-12-01

    To study the distribution of norovirus (NV) in oyster tissues. Five monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against VP1 were selected from Balb/c mice. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to detect native NV in different tissues of artificially contaminated oysters using the MAbs. The data showed that the gills and the digestive glands are efficient tissues for accumulation of the NV. In addition, the NV was found on the cilia of the mantle after filtering. In our study, only NV RNA in the gills could be detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. NV was bioaccumulated in the gills, stomach, digestive diverticula and cilia of the mantle. Furthermore, the results suggested that the viral load of the gills and the digestive glands is heavier than that of the other tissues. This, to our knowledge, is the first paper to report the distribution of NV in oyster tissues by immunoassay after artificial contamination. Further understanding of the NV distribution in oyster may help us to sample appropriate tissues for detection of the virus.

  1. A multiview boosting approach to tissue segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Jin Tae; Xu, Sheng; Pinto, Peter A.; Turkbey, Baris; Bernardo, Marcelino; Choyke, Peter L.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2014-04-01

    Digitized histopathology images have a great potential for improving or facilitating current assessment tools in cancer pathology. In order to develop accurate and robust automated methods, the precise segmentation of histologic objects such epithelium, stroma, and nucleus is necessary, in the hopes of information extraction not otherwise obvious to the subjective eye. Here, we propose a multivew boosting approach to segment histology objects of prostate tissue. Tissue specimen images are first represented at different scales using a Gaussian kernel and converted into several forms such HSV and La*b*. Intensity- and texture-based features are extracted from the converted images. Adopting multiview boosting approach, we effectively learn a classifier to predict the histologic class of a pixel in a prostate tissue specimen. The method attempts to integrate the information from multiple scales (or views). 18 prostate tissue specimens from 4 patients were employed to evaluate the new method. The method was trained on 11 tissue specimens including 75,832 epithelial and 103,453 stroma pixels and tested on 55,319 epithelial and 74,945 stroma pixels from 7 tissue specimens. The technique showed 96.7% accuracy, and as summarized into a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) plot, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.983 (95% CI: 0.983-0.984) was achieved.

  2. Bioactive polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Stratton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A variety of engineered scaffolds have been created for tissue engineering using polymers, ceramics and their composites. Biomimicry has been adopted for majority of the three-dimensional (3D scaffold design both in terms of physicochemical properties, as well as bioactivity for superior tissue regeneration. Scaffolds fabricated via salt leaching, particle sintering, hydrogels and lithography have been successful in promoting cell growth in vitro and tissue regeneration in vivo. Scaffold systems derived from decellularization of whole organs or tissues has been popular due to their assured biocompatibility and bioactivity. Traditional scaffold fabrication techniques often failed to create intricate structures with greater resolution, not reproducible and involved multiple steps. The 3D printing technology overcome several limitations of the traditional techniques and made it easier to adopt several thermoplastics and hydrogels to create micro-nanostructured scaffolds and devices for tissue engineering and drug delivery. This review highlights scaffold fabrication methodologies with a focus on optimizing scaffold performance through the matrix pores, bioactivity and degradation rate to enable tissue regeneration. Review highlights few examples of bioactive scaffold mediated nerve, muscle, tendon/ligament and bone regeneration. Regardless of the efforts required for optimization, a shift in 3D scaffold uses from the laboratory into everyday life is expected in the near future as some of the methods discussed in this review become more streamlined.

  3. Monitoring soft tissue coagulation by optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihachev, A.; Lihacova, I.; Heinrichs, H.; Spigulis, J.; Trebst, T.; Wehner, M.

    2017-12-01

    Laser tissue welding (LTW) or laser tissue soldering (LTS) is investigated since many years for treatment of incisions, wound closure and anastomosis of vessels [1, 2]. Depending on the process, a certain temperature in the range between 65 °C to 85 °C must be reached and held for a few seconds. Care has to be taken not to overheat the tissue, otherwise necrosis or tissue carbonization may occur and will impair wound healing. Usually the temperature is monitored during the process to control the laser power [3]. This requires either bulky equipment or expensive and fragile infrared fibers to feed the temperature signal to an infrared detector. Alternatively, changes in tissue morphology can be directly observed by analysis of spectral reflectance. We investigate spectral changes in the range between 400 nm to 900 nm wavelength. Characteristic spectral changes occur when the temperature of tissue samples increase above 70 °C which is a typical setpoint value for temperature control of coagulation. We conclude that simple spectroscopy in the visible range can provide valuable information during LTS and LTW and probably replace the delicate measurement of temperature. A major advantage is that optical measurements can be performed using standard optical fibers and can be easily integrated into a surgical tool.

  4. Automated clinical annotation of tissue bank specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, John R; Gupta, Rajnish; Nie, Yimin; Patel, Ashokkumar A; Becich, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    Modern, molecular bio-medicine is driving a growing demand for extensively annotated tissue bank specimens. With careful clinical, pathologic and outcomes annotation, samples can be better matched to the research question at hand and experimental results better understood and verified. However, the difficulty and expense of detailed specimen annotation is well beyond the capability of most banks and has made access to well documented tissue a major limitation in medical re-search. In this context, we have implemented automated annotation of banked tissue by integrating data from three clinical systems--the cancer registry, the pathology LIS and the tissue bank inventory system--through a classical data warehouse environment. The project required modification of clinical systems, development of methods to identify patients between and map data elements across systems and the creation of de-identified data in data marts for use by researchers. The result has been much more extensive and accurate initial tissue annotation with less effort in the tissue bank, as well as dynamic ongoing annotation as the cancer registry follows patients over time.

  5. A Hybrid Tissue-Engineered Heart Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, S Hamed; Kheradvar, Arash

    2015-06-01

    This study describes the efforts to develop and test the first hybrid tissue-engineered heart valve whose leaflets are composed of an extra-thin superelastic Nitinol mesh tightly enclosed by uniform tissue layers composed of multiple cell types. The trileaflet Nitinol mesh scaffolds underwent three-dimensional cell culture with smooth muscle and fibroblast/myofibroblast cells enclosing the mesh, which were finally covered by an endothelial cell layer. Quantitative and qualitative assays were performed to analyze the microstructure of the tissues. A tissue composition almost similar to that of natural heart valve leaflets was observed. The function of the valves and their Nitinol scaffolds were tested in a heart flow simulator that confirmed the trileaflet valves open and close robustly under physiologic flow conditions with an effective orifice area of 75%. The tissue-metal attachment of the leaflets once exposed to physiologic flow rates was tested and approved. Our preliminary results indicate that the novel hybrid approach with nondegradable scaffold for engineering heart valves is viable and may address the issues associated with current tissue-engineered valves developed with degradable scaffolds. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of Lung Tissue Using Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, J. L.; Barrera, R.; Miranda, J.

    2002-08-01

    In this work a comparative study is presented of the contents of metals in lung tissue from healthy patients and with lung cancer, by means of two analytical techniques: Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The samples of cancerous tissue were taken from 26 autopsies made to individuals died in the National Institute of Respiratory Disease (INER), 22 of cancer and 4 of other non-cancer biopsies. When analyzing the entirety of the samples, in the cancerous tissues, there were increments in the concentrations of S (4%), K (635%), Co (85%) and Cu (13%). Likewise, there were deficiencies in the concentrations of Cl (59%), Ca (6%), Fe (26%) and Zn (7%). Only in the cancerous tissues there were appearances of P, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Br and Sr. The tissue samples were classified according to cancer types (adenocarcinomas, epidermoides and of small cell carcinoma), personal habits (smokers and alcoholic), genetic predisposition and residence place. There was a remarkable decrease in the concentration of Ca and a marked increment in the Cu in the epidermoide tissue samples with regard to those of adenocarcinoma or of small cells cancer. Also, decrements were detected in K and increments of Fe, Co and Cu in the sample belonging to people that resided in Mexico City with regard to those that resided in the State of Mexico.

  7. Ocular tissue engineering: current and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamichos, D

    2015-02-17

    Tissue engineering (TE) is a concept that was first emerged in the early 1990s to provide solutions to severe injured tissues and/or organs [1]. The dream was to be able to restore and replace the damaged tissue with an engineered version which would ultimately help overcome problems such as donor shortages, graft rejections, and inflammatory responses following transplantation. While an incredible amount of progress has been made, suggesting that TE concept is viable, we are still not able to overcome major obstacles. In TE, there are two main strategies that researchers have adopted: (1) cell-based, where cells are been manipulated to create their own environment before transplanted to the host, and (2) scaffold-based, where an extracellular matrix is created to mimic in vivo structures. TE approaches for ocular tissues are available and have indeed come a long way, over the last decades; however more clinically relevant ocular tissue substitutes are needed. Figure 1 highlights the importance of TE in ocular applications and indicates the avenues available based on each tissue.[...].

  8. Gene expression analysis distinguishes tissue specific and gender related functions among adult Ascaris suum tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengyuan; Gao, Xin; Martin, John; Yin, Yong; Abubucker, Sahar; Rash, Amy C.; Li, Ben-Wen; Nash, Bill; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Jasmer, Douglas P.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2013-01-01

    Over a billion people are infected by Ascaris spp. intestinal parasites. To clarify functional differences among tissues of adult A. suum, we compared gene expression by various tissues of these worms by expression microarray methods.. The A. suum genome was sequenced and assembled to allow generation of microarray elements. Expression of over 40,000 60-mer elements was investigated in a variety of tissues from both male and female adult worms. Nearly 50 percent of the elements for which signal was detected exhibited differential expression among different tissues. The unique profile of transcripts identified for each tissue clarified functional distinctions among tissues, such as chitin binding in the ovary and peptidase activity in the intestines. Interestingly, hundreds of gender-specific elements were characterized in multiple non-reproductive tissues of female or male worms, with most prominence of gender differences in intestinal tissue. A. suum genes from the same family were frequently expressed differently among tissues. Transcript abundance for genes specific to A. suum, by comparison to Caenorhabditis elegans, varied to a greater extent among tissues than for genes conserved between A. suum and C. elegans. Analysis using C. elegans protein interaction data identified functional modules conserved between these two nematodes, resulting in identification of functional predictions of essential subnetworks of protein interactions and how these networks may vary among nematode tissues. A notable finding was very high module similarity between adult reproductive tissues and intestine. Our results provide the most comprehensive assessment of gene expression among tissues of a parasitic nematode to date. PMID:23572074

  9. Alternative Polyadenylation Directs Tissue-Specific miRNA Targeting in Caenorhabditis elegans Somatic Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazie, Stephen M; Geissel, Heather C; Wilky, Henry; Joshi, Rajan; Newbern, Jason; Mangone, Marco

    2017-06-01

    mRNA expression dynamics promote and maintain the identity of somatic tissues in living organisms; however, their impact in post-transcriptional gene regulation in these processes is not fully understood. Here, we applied the PAT-Seq approach to systematically isolate, sequence, and map tissue-specific mRNA from five highly studied Caenorhabditis elegans somatic tissues: GABAergic and NMDA neurons, arcade and intestinal valve cells, seam cells, and hypodermal tissues, and studied their mRNA expression dynamics. The integration of these datasets with previously profiled transcriptomes of intestine, pharynx, and body muscle tissues, precisely assigns tissue-specific expression dynamics for 60% of all annotated C. elegans protein-coding genes, providing an important resource for the scientific community. The mapping of 15,956 unique high-quality tissue-specific polyA sites in all eight somatic tissues reveals extensive tissue-specific 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) isoform switching through alternative polyadenylation (APA) . Almost all ubiquitously transcribed genes use APA and harbor miRNA targets in their 3'UTRs, which are commonly lost in a tissue-specific manner, suggesting widespread usage of post-transcriptional gene regulation modulated through APA to fine tune tissue-specific protein expression. Within this pool, the human disease gene C. elegans orthologs rack-1 and tct-1 use APA to switch to shorter 3'UTR isoforms in order to evade miRNA regulation in the body muscle tissue, resulting in increased protein expression needed for proper body muscle function. Our results highlight a major positive regulatory role for APA, allowing genes to counteract miRNA regulation on a tissue-specific basis. Copyright © 2017 Blazie et al.

  10. Tissue factor-expressing monocytes inhibit fibrinolysis through a TAFI-mediated mechanism, and make clots resistant to heparins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, Fabrizio; Ammollo, Concetta T.; Semeraro, Nicola; Colucci, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Background Thrombin is the main activator of the fibrinolysis inhibitor TAFI (thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor) and heightened clotting activation is believed to impair fibrinolysis through the increase of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor activation. However, the enhancement of thrombin generation by soluble tissue factor was reported to have no effect on plasma fibrinolysis and it is not known whether the same is true for cell-associated tissue factor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tissue factor-expressing monocytes on plasma fibrinolysis in vitro. Design and Methods Tissue factor expression by human blood mononuclear cells (MNC) and monocytes was induced by LPS stimulation. Fibrinolysis was spectrophotometrically evaluated by measuring the lysis time of plasma clots containing LPS-stimulated or control cells and a low concentration of exogenous tissue plasminogen activator. Results LPS-stimulated MNC (LPS-MNC) prolonged fibrinolysis time as compared to unstimulated MNC (C-MNC) in contact-inhibited but not in normal citrated plasma. A significantly prolonged lysis time was observed using as few as 30 activated cells/μL. Fibrinolysis was also impaired when clots were generated on adherent LPS-stimulated monocytes. The antifibrinolytic effect of LPS-MNC or LPS-monocytes was abolished by an anti-tissue factor antibody, by an antibody preventing thrombin-mediated thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor activation, and by a TAFIa inhibitor (PTCI). Assays of thrombin and TAFIa in contact-inhibited plasma confirmed the greater generation of these enzymes in the presence of LPS-MNC. Finally, the profibrinolytic effect of unfractionated heparin and enoxaparin was markedly lower (~50%) in the presence of LPS-MNC than in the presence of a thromboplastin preparation displaying an identical tissue factor activity. Conclusions Our data indicate that LPS-stimulated monocytes inhibit fibrinolysis through a tissue factor

  11. TRANSPLANTATION AND POTENTIAL IMMORTALITY OF MAMMALIAN TISSUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Leo

    1926-01-01

    1. Serial transplantation of tumors made it possible in 1901 and following years to draw the conclusion that various mammalian tissues have potential immortality. Serial transplantations of normal tissues did not succeed at first, because the homoioreaction on the part of the lymphocytes and connective tissue of the host injures the transplant. 2. In continuation of these experiments we found that cartilage of the rat can be transplanted serially to other rats at least for a period of 3 years. At the end of that time great parts of the transplanted cartilage and perichondrium are alive. 3. Not only the cartilage of young rats can be homoiotransplanted, but also the cartilage of very old rats which are nearing the end of life. By using such animals we have been able to obtain cartilage and perichondrium approaching an age of 6 years which is almost double the average age of a rat. 4. We found that cartilage can be homoiotransplanted more readily than other tissues for the following reasons: (a) While in principle the homoioreaction towards cartilage is the same as against other tissues, cartilage elicits this reaction with less intensity; (b) cartilage is better able to resist the invasion of lymphocytes and connective tissue than the majority of other tissues; (c) a gradual adaptation between transplant and host seems to take place in the case of cartilage transplantation, as a result of which the lymphocytic reaction on the part of the host tissue decreases progressively the longer the cartilage is kept in the strange host. 5. At time of examination we not only found living transplanted cartilage tissue, but also perichondrial tissue, which in response to a stimulus apparently originating in the necrotic central cartilage, had been proliferating and replacing it. These results suggest that it may perhaps be possible under favorable conditions to keep cartilage alive indefinitely through serial transplantations. 6. At the same time these experiments permit the

  12. Corneal donor tissue preparation for endothelial keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Maria A; Titus, Michael; Mavin, Kyle; Shtein, Roni M

    2012-06-12

    Over the past ten years, corneal transplantation surgical techniques have undergone revolutionary changes. Since its inception, traditional full thickness corneal transplantation has been the treatment to restore sight in those limited by corneal disease. Some disadvantages to this approach include a high degree of post-operative astigmatism, lack of predictable refractive outcome, and disturbance to the ocular surface. The development of Descemet's stripping endothelial keratoplasty (DSEK), transplanting only the posterior corneal stroma, Descemet's membrane, and endothelium, has dramatically changed treatment of corneal endothelial disease. DSEK is performed through a smaller incision; this technique avoids 'open sky' surgery with its risk of hemorrhage or expulsion, decreases the incidence of postoperative wound dehiscence, reduces unpredictable refractive outcomes, and may decrease the rate of transplant rejection. Initially, cornea donor posterior lamellar dissection for DSEK was performed manually resulting in variable graft thickness and damage to the delicate corneal endothelial tissue during tissue processing. Automated lamellar dissection (Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty, DSAEK) was developed to address these issues. Automated dissection utilizes the same technology as LASIK corneal flap creation with a mechanical microkeratome blade that helps to create uniform and thin tissue grafts for DSAEK surgery with minimal corneal endothelial cell loss in tissue processing. Eye banks have been providing full thickness corneas for surgical transplantation for many years. In 2006, eye banks began to develop methodologies for supplying precut corneal tissue for endothelial keratoplasty. With the input of corneal surgeons, eye banks have developed thorough protocols to safely and effectively prepare posterior lamellar tissue for DSAEK surgery. This can be performed preoperatively at the eye bank. Research shows no significant difference in

  13. Detection of Tissue Factor Antigen and Coagulation Activity in Coronary Artery Thrombi Isolated from Patients with ST-Segment Elevation Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerini, Tullio; Tomasi, Luciana; Barozzi, Chiara; Della Riva, Diego; Mariani, Andrea; Taglieri, Nevio; Leone, Ornella; Ceccarelli, Claudio; De Servi, Stefano; Branzi, Angelo; Genereux, Philippe; Stone, Gregg W.; Ahamed, Jasimuddin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although ruptured atherosclerotic plaques have been extensively analyzed, the composition of thrombi causing arterial occlusion in patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction has been less thoroughly investigated. We sought to investigate whether coagulant active tissue factor can be retrieved in thrombi of patients with STEMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Methods Nineteen patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction referred for primary percutaneous coronary intervention were enrolled in this study. Coronary thrombi aspirated from coronary arteries were routinely processed for paraffin embedding and histological evaluation (4 patients) or immediately snap frozen for evaluation of tissue factor activity using a modified aPTT test (15 patients). Immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblotting was also performed in 12 patients. Results Thrombi aspirated from coronary arteries showed large and irregular areas of tissue factor staining within platelet aggregates, and in close contact with inflammatory cells. Some platelet aggregates stained positive for tissue factor, whereas others did not. Monocytes consistently stained strongly for tissue factor, neutrophils had a more variable and irregular tissue factor staining, and red blood cells did not demonstrate staining for tissue factor. Median clotting time of plasma samples containing homogenized thrombi incubated with a monoclonal antibody that specifically inhibits tissue factor-mediated coagulation activity (mAb 5G9) were significantly longer than their respective controls (88.9 seconds versus 76.5 seconds, respectively; pthrombi of patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction, suggesting that it contributes to activate the coagulation cascade ensuing in coronary thrombosis. PMID:24349079

  14. Tissue/blood partition coefficients for xenon in various adipose tissue depots in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J; Jelnes, Rolf; Astrup, A

    1987-01-01

    Tissue/blood partition coefficients (lambda) for xenon were calculated for subcutaneous adipose tissue from the abdominal wall and the thigh, and for the perirenal adipose tissue after chemical analysis of the tissues for lipid, water and protein content. The lambda in the perirenal tissue...... was found to correlate linearly to the relative body weight (RBW) in per cent with the regression equation lambda = 0.045 . RBW + 0.99. The subcutaneous lambda on the abdomen correlated linearly to the local skinfold thickness (SFT) with the equation lambda = 0.22 SFT + 2.99. Similarly lambda on the thigh...... correlated to SFT with the equation lambda = 0.20 . SFT + 4.63. It is concluded that the previously accepted lambda value of 10 is generally too high in perirenal as well as in subcutaneous tissue. Thus, by application of the present regression equations, it is possible to obtain more exact estimates...

  15. Management of peri-implant soft tissue defect with connective tissue graft - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohinder Panwar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of dental implants to replace missing and nonrestorable teeth has increased significantly in the past two decades. The health of peri-implant tissues plays an important role in the long-term success of dental implants. Soft tissue dehiscence around dental implants has frequently been reported which may lead to poor oral hygiene, plaque accumulation, inflamed gingiva, compromised esthetics, and further progression to peri-implantitis. The coverage of exposed implants is aimed to provide adequate keratinized tissue around dental implant. Complete coverage of mucosal defect around the dental implants is still a challenging prospect. This case report describes correction of soft tissue defect and building up of keratinized tissue in relation to implant in the maxillary right first premolar region with subepithelial connective tissue graft along with coronally advanced flap.

  16. Pulp and periodontal tissue repair - regeneration or tissue metaplasia after dental trauma. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jens O

    2012-02-01

    Healing subsequent to dental trauma is known to be very complex, a result explained by the variability of the types of dental trauma (six luxations, nine fracture types, and their combinations). On top of that, at least 16 different cellular systems get involved in more severe trauma types each of them with a different potential for healing with repair, i.e. (re-establishment of tissue continuity without functional restitution) and regeneration (where the injured or lost tissue is replaced with new tissue with identical tissue anatomy and function) and finally metaplasia (where a new type of tissue replaces the injured). In this study, a review is given of the impact of trauma to various dental tissues such as alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, cementum, Hertvigs epithelial root sheath, and the pulp. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. The influence of freezing and tissue porosity on the material properties of vegetable tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Ralfs, J D

    2002-01-01

    Tissue porosity and fluid flow have been shown to be important parameters affecting the mechanical and sensorial behaviour of edible plant tissues. The quantity of fluid and the manner with which it was released on compression of the plant tissue were also important regarding the sensory perception and a good indication of any structural damage resulting from freezing, for example. Potato, carrot and Chinese water chestnut were used to study the effects freezing has on model plant tissues. Mechanical and structural measurements of the plant tissue were correlated with sensory analysis. Conventional freezing was shown to cause severe structural damage predominantly in the form of cavities between or through cells, resulting in decreases in mechanical strength and stiffness, and samples that were perceived in the mouth as 'soft' and 'wet'. The location and size of the cavities formed from ice crystals, depended on the particular plant tissue being frozen, the processing it was subjected to prior to freezing, th...

  18. Functions of Periostin in dental tissues and its role in periodontal tissues' regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Li, Minqi

    2017-12-01

    The goal of periodontal regenerative therapy is to predictably restore the tooth's supporting periodontal tissues and form a new connective tissue attachment of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibers and new alveolar bone. Periostin is a matricellular protein so named for its expression primarily in the periosteum and PDL of adult mice. Its biological functions have been widely studied in areas such as cardiovascular physiology and oncology. Despite being initially identified in the dental tissues and bone, investigations of Periostin functions in PDL and alveolar-bone-related physiopathology are less abundant. Recently, several studies have suggested that Periostin may be an important regulator of periodontal tissue formation. By promoting collagen fibrillogenesis and the migration of fibroblasts and osteoblasts, Periostin might play a pivotal part in regeneration of the PDL and alveolar bone following periodontal surgery. The aim of this article is to provide an extensive review of the implications of Periostin in periodontal tissue biology and its potential use in periodontal tissue regeneration.

  19. Stratified scaffold design for engineering composite tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Christopher Z; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Lu, Helen H

    2015-08-01

    A significant challenge to orthopaedic soft tissue repair is the biological fixation of autologous or allogeneic grafts with bone, whereby the lack of functional integration between such grafts and host bone has limited the clinical success of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and other common soft tissue-based reconstructive grafts. The inability of current surgical reconstruction to restore the native fibrocartilaginous insertion between the ACL and the femur or tibia, which minimizes stress concentration and facilitates load transfer between the soft and hard tissues, compromises the long-term clinical functionality of these grafts. To enable integration, a stratified scaffold design that mimics the multiple tissue regions of the ACL interface (ligament-fibrocartilage-bone) represents a promising strategy for composite tissue formation. Moreover, distinct cellular organization and phase-specific matrix heterogeneity achieved through co- or tri-culture within the scaffold system can promote biomimetic multi-tissue regeneration. Here, we describe the methods for fabricating a tri-phasic scaffold intended for ligament-bone integration, as well as the tri-culture of fibroblasts, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts on the stratified scaffold for the formation of structurally contiguous and compositionally distinct regions of ligament, fibrocartilage and bone. The primary advantage of the tri-phasic scaffold is the recapitulation of the multi-tissue organization across the native interface through the layered design. Moreover, in addition to ease of fabrication, each scaffold phase is similar in polymer composition and therefore can be joined together by sintering, enabling the seamless integration of each region and avoiding delamination between scaffold layers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Heart tissue grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Lisa Freed and Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, both of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), have taken the first steps toward engineering heart muscle tissue that could one day be used to patch damaged human hearts. Cells isolated from very young animals are attached to a three-dimensional polymer scaffold, then placed in a NASA bioreactor. The cells do not divide, but after about a week start to cornect to form a functional piece of tissue. Here, a transmission electron micrograph of engineered tissue shows a number of important landmarks present in functional heart tissue: (A) well-organized myofilaments (Mfl), z-lines (Z), and abundant glycogen granules (Gly); and (D) intercalcated disc (ID) and desmosomes (DES). The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: MIT

  1. Tissue damage thresholds during therapeutic electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Ludwig, Kip A.; Welle, Cristin G.; Takmakov, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Recent initiatives in bioelectronic modulation of the nervous system by the NIH (SPARC), DARPA (ElectRx, SUBNETS) and the GlaxoSmithKline Bioelectronic Medicines effort are ushering in a new era of therapeutic electrical stimulation. These novel therapies are prompting a re-evaluation of established electrical thresholds for stimulation-induced tissue damage. Approach. In this review, we explore what is known and unknown in published literature regarding tissue damage from electrical stimulation. Main results. For macroelectrodes, the potential for tissue damage is often assessed by comparing the intensity of stimulation, characterized by the charge density and charge per phase of a stimulus pulse, with a damage threshold identified through histological evidence from in vivo experiments as described by the Shannon equation. While the Shannon equation has proved useful in assessing the likely occurrence of tissue damage, the analysis is limited by the experimental parameters of the original studies. Tissue damage is influenced by factors not explicitly incorporated into the Shannon equation, including pulse frequency, duty cycle, current density, and electrode size. Microelectrodes in particular do not follow the charge per phase and charge density co-dependence reflected in the Shannon equation. The relevance of these factors to tissue damage is framed in the context of available reports from modeling and in vivo studies. Significance. It is apparent that emerging applications, especially with microelectrodes, will require clinical charge densities that exceed traditional damage thresholds. Experimental data show that stimulation at higher charge densities can be achieved without causing tissue damage, suggesting that safety parameters for microelectrodes might be distinct from those defined for macroelectrodes. However, these increased charge densities may need to be justified by bench, non-clinical or clinical testing to provide evidence of device

  2. Special Issue on "MEMS/NEMS Fabricated Tissue Scaffolding Devices".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gou-Jen

    2014-06-05

    Over the past decade, tissue engineering in the field of medicine has proven to provide alternative therapies for tissue or organ implants, especially providing a functional implantation and avoiding immune rejection of tissues and organs. [...].

  3. Efficacy of ovarian tissue cryopreservation in a major European center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastings, L.; Liebenthron, J.; Westphal, J.R.; Beerendonk, C.C.M.; Ven, H. van de; Meinecke, B.; Montag, M.; Braat, D.D.M.; Peek, R.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of cryopreservation and thawing of ovarian tissue from oncological patients opting for fertility preservation on ovarian tissue viability. METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, the ovarian tissue viability before and after cryopreservation and thawing was

  4. [Biofabrication: new approaches for tissue regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horch, Raymund E; Weigand, Annika; Wajant, Harald; Groll, Jürgen; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Arkudas, Andreas

    2018-01-29

    The advent of Tissue Engineering (TE) in the early 1990ies was fostered by the increasing need for functional tissue and organ replacement. Classical TE was based on the combination of carrier matrices, cells and growth factors to reconstitute lost or damaged tissue and organs. Despite considerable results in vitro and in experimental settings the lack of early vascularization has hampered its translation into daily clinical practice so far. A new field of research, called "biofabrication" utilizing latest 3D printing technologies aims at hierarchically and spatially incorporating different cells, biomaterials and molecules into a matrix to alleviate a directed maturation of artificial tissue. A literature research of the relevant publications regarding biofabrication and bioprinting was performed using the PubMed data base. Relevant papers were selected and evaluated with secondary analysis of specific citations on the bioprinting techniques. 180 relevant papers containing the key words were identified and evaluated. Basic principles into the developing field of bioprinting technology could be discerned. Key elements comprise the high-throughput assembly of cells and the fabrication of complex and functional hierarchically organized tissue constructs. Five relevant technological principles for bioprinting were identified, such as stereolithography, extrusion-based printing, laser-assisted printing, inkjet-based printing and nano-bioprinting. The different technical methods of 3D printing were found to be associated with various positive but also negative effects on cells and proteins during the printing process. Research efforts in this field obviously aim towards the development of optimizing the so called bioinks and the printing technologies. This review details the evolution of the classical methods of TE in Regenerative Medicine into the evolving field of biofabrication by bioprinting. The advantages of 3D bioprinting over traditional tissue engineering

  5. Planarian immobilization, partial irradiation, and tissue transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedelhoefer, Otto C; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2012-08-06

    The planarian, a freshwater flatworm, has proven to be a powerful system for dissecting metazoan regeneration and stem cell biology. Planarian regeneration of any missing or damaged tissues is made possible by adult stem cells termed neoblasts. Although these stem cells have been definitively shown to be pluripotent and singularly capable of reconstituting an entire animal, the heterogeneity within the stem cell population and the dynamics of their cellular behaviors remain largely unresolved. Due to the large number and wide distribution of stem cells throughout the planarian body plan, advanced methods for manipulating subpopulations of stem cells for molecular and functional study in vivo are needed. Tissue transplantation and partial irradiation are two methods by which a subpopulation of planarian stem cells can be isolated for further study. Each technique has distinct advantages. Tissue transplantation allows for the introduction of stem cells, into a naïve host, that are either inherently genetically distinct or have been previously treated pharmacologically. Alternatively, partial irradiation allows for the isolation of stem cells within a host, juxtaposed to tissue devoid of stem cells, without the introduction of a wound or any breech in tissue integrity. Using these two methods, one can investigate the cell autonomous and non-autonomous factors that control stem cell functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Both tissue transplantation and partial irradiation have been used historically in defining many of the questions about planarian regeneration that remain under study today. However, these techniques have remained underused due to the laborious and inconsistent nature of previous methods. The protocols presented here represent a large step forward in decreasing the time and effort necessary to reproducibly generate large numbers of grafted or partially irradiated animals with efficacies approaching 100 percent. We cover the

  6. Tissue composition changes and secondary lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylke, E S; Ward, L C; Meerkin, J D; Nery, L; Kilbreath, S L

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of dominance and severity on tissue composition changes with lymphedema using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and to determine the relationships between the DXA-determined tissue volumes and the clinical outcomes determined by perometry and bioimpedance spectroscopy. Fifty-six women with secondary lymphedema and 44 women without a history of breast cancer or lymphedema underwent measurement of their upper limbs with DXA, perometry, and bioimpedance spectroscopy. Whether the affected side was the dominant or nondominant arm influenced inter-limb tissue volumes differences (F=16.31 to 35.14; all pPerometry-measured volumes and BIS ratios were moderately to highly correlated with inter-limb fat, volume, and total tissue differences found by DXA (r=0.39 to 0.86). The direction and magnitude of limb composition changes in those with lymphedema are impacted by whether the affected side is the dominant or nondominant limb, as well as the severity of the condition. The stage of tissue composition change may impact on the diagnosis and monitoring as well as treatment of secondary lymphedema.

  7. 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition, controlled cell distributions, vascularization, and innervation within complex 3D tissues. While no one-size-fits-all approach to bioprinting has emerged, it remains an on-demand, versatile fabrication technique that may address the growing organ shortage as well as provide a high-throughput method for cell patterning at the micrometer scale for broad biomedical engineering applications. In this review, we introduce the basic principles, materials, integration strategies and applications of bioprinting. We also discuss the recent developments, current challenges and future prospects of 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues. Combined with recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell technologies, 3D-bioprinted tissue models could serve as an enabling platform for high-throughput predictive drug screening and more effective regenerative therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Measurement of tissue viscoelasticity with ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. F.; Alizad, A.

    2017-02-01

    Tissue properties such as elasticity and viscosity have been shown to be related to such tissue conditions as contraction, edema, fibrosis, and fat content among others. Magnetic Resonance Elastography has shown outstanding ability to measure the elasticity and in some cases the viscosity of tissues, especially in the liver, providing the ability to stage fibrotic liver disease similarly to biopsy. We discuss ultrasound methods of measuring elasticity and viscosity in tissues. Many of these methods are becoming widely available in the extant ultrasound machines distributed throughout the world. Some of the methods to be discussed are in the developmental stage. The advantages of the ultrasound methods are that the imaging instruments are widely available and that many of the viscoelastic measurements can be made during a short addition to the normal ultrasound examination time. In addition, the measurements can be made by ultrasound repetitively and quickly allowing evaluation of dynamic physiologic function in circumstances such as muscle contraction or artery relaxation. Measurement of viscoelastic tissue mechanical properties will become a consistent part of clinical ultrasound examinations in our opinion.

  9. Computational Laser Spectroscopy in a Biological Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gantri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical spectroscopic study of visible and infrared laser radiation in a biological tissue. We derive a solution of a general two-dimensional time dependent radiative transfer equation in a tissue-like medium. The used model is suitable for many situations especially when the external source is time-dependent or continuous. We use a control volume-discrete ordinate method associated with an implicit three-level second-order time differencing scheme. We consider a very thin rectangular biological-tissue-like medium submitted to a visible or a near infrared light sources. The RTE is solved for a set of different wavelength source. All sources are assumed to be monochromatic and collimated. The energetic fluence rate is computed at a set of detector points on the boundaries. According to the source type, we investigate either the steady-state or transient response of the medium. The used model is validated in the case of a heterogeneous tissue-like medium using referencing experimental results from the literature. Also, the developed model is used to study changes on transmitted light in a rat-liver tissue-like medium. Optical properties depend on the source wavelength and they are taken from the literature. In particular, light-transmission in the medium is studied for continuous wave and for short pulse.

  10. Circadian clocks are resounding in peripheral tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey A Ptitsyn

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are prevalent in most organisms. Even the smallest disturbances in the orchestration of circadian gene expression patterns among different tissues can result in functional asynchrony, at the organism level, and may to contribute to a wide range of physiologic disorders. It has been reported that as many as 5%-10% of transcribed genes in peripheral tissues follow a circadian expression pattern. We have conducted a comprehensive study of circadian gene expression on a large dataset representing three different peripheral tissues. The data have been produced in a large-scale microarray experiment covering replicate daily cycles in murine white and brown adipose tissues as well as in liver. We have applied three alternative algorithmic approaches to identify circadian oscillation in time series expression profiles. Analyses of our own data indicate that the expression of at least 7% to 21% of active genes in mouse liver, and in white and brown adipose tissues follow a daily oscillatory pattern. Indeed, analysis of data from other laboratories suggests that the percentage of genes with an oscillatory pattern may approach 50% in the liver. For the rest of the genes, oscillation appears to be obscured by stochastic noise. Our phase classification and computer simulation studies based on multiple datasets indicate no detectable boundary between oscillating and non-oscillating fractions of genes. We conclude that greater attention should be given to the potential influence of circadian mechanisms on any biological pathway related to metabolism and obesity.

  11. STRETCHING IMPACTS INFLAMMATION RESOLUTION IN CONNECTIVE TISSUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrueta, Lisbeth; Muskaj, Igla; Olenich, Sara; Butler, Taylor; Badger, Gary J.; Colas, Romain A.; Spite, Matthew; Serhan, Charles N.; Langevin, Helene M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute inflammation is accompanied from its outset by the release of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), including resolvins, that orchestrate the resolution of local inflammation. We showed earlier that, in rats with subcutaneous inflammation of the back induced by carrageenan, stretching for 10 minutes twice daily reduced inflammation and improved pain, two weeks after carrageenan injection. In this study, we hypothesized that stretching of connective tissue activates local pro-resolving mechanisms within the tissue in the acute phase of inflammation. In rats injected with carrageenan and randomized to stretch vs. no stretch for 48 hours, stretching reduced inflammatory lesion thickness and neutrophil count, and increased resolvin (RvD1) concentrations within lesions. Furthermore, subcutaneous resolvin injection mimicked the effect of stretching. In ex vivo experiments, stretching of connective tissue reduced the migration of neutrophils and increased tissue RvD1 concentration. These results demonstrate a direct mechanical impact of stretching on inflammation-regulation mechanisms within connective tissue. PMID:26588184

  12. Nonlinear noise waves in soft biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Gurbatov, S. N.; Demin, I. Yu.

    2013-09-01

    The study of intense waves in soft biological tissues is necessary both for diagnostics and therapeutic aims. Tissue represents an inherited medium with frequency-dependent dissipative properties, in which waves are described by nonlinear integro-differential equations. The equations for such waves are well known. Their group analysis has been performed, and a number of exact solutions have been found. However, statistical problems for nonlinear waves in tissues have hardly been studied. As well, for medical applications, both intense noise waves and waves with fluctuating parameters can be used. In addition, statistical solutions are simpler in structure than regular solutions; they are useful for understanding the physics of processes. Below a general approach is described for solving nonlinear statistical problems applied to the considered mathematical models of biological tissues. We have calculated the dependences of the intensities of the narrowband noise harmonics on distance. For wideband noise, we have calculated the dependence of the spectral integral intensity on distance. In all cases, wave attenuation is determined both by the specific dissipative properties of the tissue and the nonlinearity of the medium.

  13. Applications of MEMS technologies in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puleo, Christopher M; Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2007-12-01

    The success of therapeutic strategies within the fields of regenerative medicine, including tissue engineering, biomaterials engineering, and cell and tissue transplantation science, relies on researchers' understanding of the complex cellular microenvironments that occur within functional tissue. Microfabricated biomedical platforms provide tools for researchers to study cellular response to various stimuli with micro- and nanoscale spatial control. Initial studies utilizing relatively passive means of microenvironmental control have provided the fundamental knowledge required to begin to design microculture platforms that closely mimic these biological systems. In this review, we discuss second-generation cell and tissue culture platforms that utilize active components, borrowed from work in the development of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). These microsystems offer the unprecedented opportunity to fabricate culture platforms designed to match tissue-specific growth parameters. In addition, the adoption of MEMS components opens up the door for future integration with the burgeoning field of microanalytical systems, providing analytical platforms that retain the sensitivity and resolution required within low-volume, microfluidic culture technologies.

  14. Fibroblasts as maestros orchestrating tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Almeida, Raquel; Soares, Raquel; Granja, Pedro L

    2017-01-20

    Fibroblasts constitute a dynamic and versatile population of cells of mesenchymal origin, implicated in both regenerative strategies and pathological conditions. Despite being frequently associated to disease development, particularly through the establishment of fibrotic tissue, fibroblasts hold great potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. They are responsible for synthesizing and depositing extracellular matrix components, allowing other cells to settle and migrate along a three-dimensional support and thereby generating an organ-specific architecture. Additionally, they produce bioactive molecules that are involved in several physiological processes, including angiogenesis and tissue repair. Although there seems to be much still to unveil about these fascinating cells they have been attracting increasing interest and are now being intensively explored as a cell source to develop bioengineered tissue constructs or to improve stem cell-based technologies. This review intends to highlight the potential of fibroblasts in orchestrating tissue regeneration, as well as to contribute to uncover uncharted prospective applications of these cells. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Isolation of microbodies from plant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, A H; Beevers, H

    1971-11-01

    Specialized microbodies have previously been isolated and characterized from fatty seedling tissues (glyoxysomes) and leaves (leaf peroxisomes). We have now examined 11 other plant tissues, including tubers, fruits, roots, shoots, and petals, and find that all contain particulate catalase, a distinctive common enzyme component of microbodies. On linear sucrose gradients the catalase activity peaks sharply at a higher equilibrium density (1.20 to 1.25 gram per cm(3) in the various tissues) than the mitochondria (1.17 to 1.20). Only small amounts of protein are recovered in the fractions containing catalase, although a definite band is visible in preparations from some tissues, e.g., potato. As in the preparations from castor bean endosperm and spinach leaves for which comparable data are provided, the distribution of glycolate oxidase and uricase follows closely that of catalase on the gradients. The preparations from potato lack glyoxylate reductase and the transaminases, typical enzymes of leaf peroxisomes, and the distinctive enzymes of glyoxysomes are missing. Nonspecialized microbodies with limited enzyme composition can thus be isolated from a variety of plant tissues.

  16. Ageing, adipose tissue, fatty acids and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pararasa, Chathyan; Bailey, Clifford J; Griffiths, Helen R

    2015-04-01

    A common feature of ageing is the alteration in tissue distribution and composition, with a shift in fat away from lower body and subcutaneous depots to visceral and ectopic sites. Redistribution of adipose tissue towards an ectopic site can have dramatic effects on metabolic function. In skeletal muscle, increased ectopic adiposity is linked to insulin resistance through lipid mediators such as ceramide or DAG, inhibiting the insulin receptor signalling pathway. Additionally, the risk of developing cardiovascular disease is increased with elevated visceral adipose distribution. In ageing, adipose tissue becomes dysfunctional, with the pathway of differentiation of preadipocytes to mature adipocytes becoming impaired; this results in dysfunctional adipocytes less able to store fat and subsequent fat redistribution to ectopic sites. Low grade systemic inflammation is commonly observed in ageing, and may drive the adipose tissue dysfunction, as proinflammatory cytokines are capable of inhibiting adipocyte differentiation. Beyond increased ectopic adiposity, the effect of impaired adipose tissue function is an elevation in systemic free fatty acids (FFA), a common feature of many metabolic disorders. Saturated fatty acids can be regarded as the most detrimental of FFA, being capable of inducing insulin resistance and inflammation through lipid mediators such as ceramide, which can increase risk of developing atherosclerosis. Elevated FFA, in particular saturated fatty acids, maybe a driving factor for both the increased insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease risk and inflammation in older adults.

  17. Novel cancerization marker, TP53, and its role in distinguishing normal tissue adjacent to cancerous tissue from normal tissue adjacent to benign tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Guo-Yan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histopathological and molecular heterogeneity of normal tissue adjacent to cancerous tissue (NTAC and normal tissue adjacent to benign tissue (NTAB, and the availability of limited specimens make deciphering the mechanisms of carcinogenesis challenging. Our goal was to identify histogenetic biomarkers that could be reliably used to define a transforming fingerprint using RNA in situ hybridization. Methods We evaluated 15 tumor-related RNA in situ hybridization biomarkers using tumor microarray and samples of seven tumor-adjacent normal tissues from 314 patients. Biomarkers were determined using comprehensive statistical methods (significance of support vector machine-based artificial intelligence and area under curve scoring of classification distribution. Results TP53 was found to be a most reliable index (P -7; area under curve >87% for distinguishing NTAC from NTAB, according to the results of a significance panel (BCL10, BECN1, BRCA2, FITH, PTCH11 and TP53. Conclusions The genetic alterations in TP53 between NTAC and NTAB may provide new insight into the field of cancerization and tumor transformation.

  18. Novel cancerization marker, TP53, and its role in distinguishing normal tissue adjacent to cancerous tissue from normal tissue adjacent to benign tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The histopathological and molecular heterogeneity of normal tissue adjacent to cancerous tissue (NTAC) and normal tissue adjacent to benign tissue (NTAB), and the availability of limited specimens make deciphering the mechanisms of carcinogenesis challenging. Our goal was to identify histogenetic biomarkers that could be reliably used to define a transforming fingerprint using RNA in situ hybridization. Methods We evaluated 15 tumor-related RNA in situ hybridization biomarkers using tumor microarray and samples of seven tumor-adjacent normal tissues from 314 patients. Biomarkers were determined using comprehensive statistical methods (significance of support vector machine-based artificial intelligence and area under curve scoring of classification distribution). Results TP53 was found to be a most reliable index (P 87%) for distinguishing NTAC from NTAB, according to the results of a significance panel (BCL10, BECN1, BRCA2, FITH, PTCH11 and TP53). Conclusions The genetic alterations in TP53 between NTAC and NTAB may provide new insight into the field of cancerization and tumor transformation. PMID:23170979

  19. Recombinant protein scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkmeister, Jerome A; Ramshaw, John A M

    2012-02-01

    New biological materials for tissue engineering are now being developed using common genetic engineering capabilities to clone and express a variety of genetic elements that allow cost-effective purification and scaffold fabrication from these recombinant proteins, peptides or from chimeric combinations of these. The field is limitless as long as the gene sequences are known. The utility is dependent on the ease, product yield and adaptability of these protein products to the biomedical field. The development of recombinant proteins as scaffolds, while still an emerging technology with respect to commercial products, is scientifically superior to current use of natural materials or synthetic polymer scaffolds, in terms of designing specific structures with desired degrees of biological complexities and motifs. In the field of tissue engineering, next generation scaffolds will be the key to directing appropriate tissue regeneration. The initial period of biodegradable synthetic scaffolds that provided shape and mechanical integrity, but no biological information, is phasing out. The era of protein scaffolds offers distinct advantages, particularly with the combination of powerful tools of molecular biology. These include, for example, the production of human proteins of uniform quality that are free of infectious agents and the ability to make suitable quantities of proteins that are found in low quantity or are hard to isolate from tissue. For the particular needs of tissue engineering scaffolds, fibrous proteins like collagens, elastin, silks and combinations of these offer further advantages of natural well-defined structural scaffolds as well as endless possibilities of controlling functionality by genetic manipulation.

  20. Connective tissue: Vascular and hematological (blood) support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvino, Nick

    2003-01-01

    Connective Tissue (CT) is a ubiquitous component of all major tissues and structures of the body (50% of all body protein is CT), including that of the blood, vascular, muscle, tendon, ligament, fascia, bone, joint, IVD's (intervertebral discs) and skin. Because of its ubiquitous nature, CT is an often overlooked component of any essential nutritional program that may address the structure, and/or function of these tissues. The central role of CT in the health of a virtually all cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems, is discussed. General nutritional CT support strategies, as well as specific CT support strategies that focus on blood, vascular, structural system (eg, muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, bone, and joints), integument (skin) and inflammatory and immune mediation will be discussed here and will deal with connective tissue dynamics and dysfunction. An overview of the current scientific understanding and possible options for naturally enhancing the structure and function of CT through the application of these concepts will be discussed in this article, with specific attention on the vascular and hematological systems.

  1. Adipose tissue remodeling in pathophysiology of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Jeong; Wu, Yuanyuan; Fried, Susan K

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that adipose tissue undergoes a continuous process of remodeling that is pathologically accelerated in the obese state. Contrary to earlier dogma, adipocytes die and are replaced by newly differentiated ones. This review will summarize recent advances of our knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate adipose tissue remodeling and highlight the influences of obesity, depot, and sex, as well as the relevance of rodent models to humans. A substantial literature now points to the importance of dynamic changes in adipocyte and immune cell turnover, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling in regulating the expandability and functional integrity of this tissue. In obesity, the macrophages are recruited, surrounding dead adipocytes and polarized toward an inflammatory phenotype. The number of dead adipocytes is closely associated with the pathophysiological consequences of obesity, including insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. Further, there are substantial depot, sex and species differences in the extent of remodeling. Adipose tissue undergoes a continuous remodeling process that normally maintains tissue health, but may spin out of control and lead to adipocyte death in association with the recruitment and activation of macrophages, and systemic insulin resistance.

  2. Imaging challenges in biomaterials and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Alyssa A; Anastasio, Mark A; Larson, Jeffery C; Brey, Eric M

    2013-09-01

    Biomaterials are employed in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) in order to enhance the regeneration or replacement of tissue function and/or structure. The unique environments resulting from the presence of biomaterials, cells, and tissues result in distinct challenges in regards to monitoring and assessing the results of these interventions. Imaging technologies for three-dimensional (3D) analysis have been identified as a strategic priority in TERM research. Traditionally, histological and immunohistochemical techniques have been used to evaluate engineered tissues. However, these methods do not allow for an accurate volume assessment, are invasive, and do not provide information on functional status. Imaging techniques are needed that enable non-destructive, longitudinal, quantitative, and three-dimensional analysis of TERM strategies. This review focuses on evaluating the application of available imaging modalities for assessment of biomaterials and tissue in TERM applications. Included is a discussion of limitations of these techniques and identification of areas for further development. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Tissue Engineering in Regenerative Dental Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiral Jhaveri-Desai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is amongst the latest exciting technologies having impacted the field of dentistry. Initially considered as a futuristic approach, tissue engineering is now being successfully applied in regenerative surgery. This article reviews the important determinants of tissue engineering and how they contribute to the improvement of wound healing and surgical outcomes in the oral region. Furthermore, we shall address the clinical applications of engineering involving oral and maxillofacial surgical and periodontal procedures along with other concepts that are still in experimental phase of development. This knowledge will aid the surgical and engineering researchers to comprehend the collaboration between these fields leading to extounding dental applications and to ever-continuing man-made miracles in the field of human science.

  4. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer.

  5. Cartilage tissue engineering for degenerative joint disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesic, Dobrila; Whiteside, Robert; Brittberg, Mats; Wendt, David; Martin, Ivan; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre

    2006-05-20

    Pain in the joint is often due to cartilage degeneration and represents a serious medical problem affecting people of all ages. Although many, mostly surgical techniques, are currently employed to treat cartilage lesions, none has given satisfactory results in the long term. Recent advances in biology and material science have brought tissue engineering to the forefront of new cartilage repair techniques. The combination of autologous cells, specifically designed scaffolds, bioreactors, mechanical stimulations and growth factors together with the knowledge that underlies the principles of cell biology offers promising avenues for cartilage tissue regeneration. The present review explores basic biology mechanisms for cartilage reconstruction and summarizes the advances in the tissue engineering approaches. Furthermore, the limits of the new methods and their potential application in the osteoarthritic conditions are discussed.

  6. Biomechanics and mechanobiology in osteochondral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, L A; O'Brien, F J; Prendergast, P J

    2008-09-01

    Osteochondral tissues are those that form the synovial joints, namely cartilage and bone, including sub-chondral bone. The biomechanical purpose of synovial joints is to provide lubricated contact between the moving surfaces with as little frictional forces as possible. This is achieved by separating the cartilage layers by a thin film of fluid and supporting the cartilage layers by a bony trabecular network that becomes dense and more calcified immediately underneath the cartilage layer. Each tissue's biomechanical behavior is well understood after several decades of research and this behavior is briefly reviewed here, as are the concepts relating to the mechanical induction of cartilage degradation (osteoarthritis) with a discussion of clinical strategies for repair. Focusing on tissue-engineering strategies, the following concepts are reviewed: scaffolds, bioreactors and computational simulations, with an analysis of how these elements may be combined in future.

  7. Tissue Staining (Chromoscopy of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Brian Fennerty

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue staining, or chomoscopy, is used as an adjunctive technique during gastrointestinal endoscopy. Chemical agents are applied to the gastrointestinal mucosal surface to identify specific epithelia or to enhance the mucosal surface characteristics of the gastrointestinal epithelium. This aids in the recognition of subtle lesions (ie, polyps or allows directed targeting of biopsies (ie, sprue or Barrett’s esophagus to increase the yield of endoscopic diagnostic accuracy. The four endoscopic tissue-staining techniques in use are vital staining, contrast staining (chromoscopy, reactive staining and tattooing. Some of the agents used for endoscopic tissue staining and the uses of chromoscopy in identifying pathology of the esophagus, stomach, small bowel and colon during endoscopy are discussed.

  8. [PROGRESS IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUE ENGINEERING SCAFFOLD MATERIALS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaojuan; Xi, Tingfei; Zheng, Yufeng

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the progress in biological tissue engineering scaffold materials and the clinical application, as well as product development status. Based on extensive investigation in the status of research and application of biological tissue engineering scaffold materials, a comprehensive analysis was made. Meanwhile, a detailed analysis of research and product development was presented. Considerable progress has been achieved in research, products transformation, clinical application, and supervision of biological scaffold for tissue engineering. New directions, new technology, and new products are constantly emerging. With the continuous progress of science and technology and continuous improvement of life sciences theory, the new direction and new focus still need to be continuously adjusted in order to meet the clinical needs. From the aspect of industrial transformation feasibility, acellular scaffolds and extracellular matrix are the most promising new growth of both research and product development in this field.

  9. Lipophilic Micronutrients and Adipose Tissue Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Tourniaire

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Lipophilic micronutrients (LM constitute a large family of molecules including several vitamins (A, D, E, K and carotenoids. Their ability to regulate gene expression is becoming increasingly clear and constitutes an important part of nutrigenomics. Interestingly, adipose tissue is not only a main storage site for these molecules within the body, but it is also subjected to the regulatory effects of LM. Indeed, several gene regulations have been described in adipose tissue that could strongly impact its biology with respect to the modulation of adipogenesis, inflammatory status, or energy homeostasis and metabolism, among others. The repercussions in terms of health effects of such regulations in the context of obesity and associated pathologies represent an exciting and emerging field of research. The present review will focus on the regulatory effects of vitamin A, D, E and K as well as carotenoids on adipose tissue biology and physiology, notably in the context of obesity and associated disorders.

  10. Damage Models for Soft Tissues: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenguang

    Damage to soft tissues in the human body has been investigated for applications in healthcare, sports, and biomedical engineering. This paper reviews and classifies damage models for soft tissues to summarize achievements, identify new directions, and facilitate finite element analysis. The main ideas of damage modeling methods are illustrated and interpreted. A few key issues related to damage models, such as experimental data curve-fitting, computational effort, connection between damage and fractures/cracks, damage model applications, and fracture/crack extension simulation, are discussed. Several new challenges in the field are identified and outlined. This review can be useful for developing more advanced damage models and extending damage modeling methods to a variety of soft tissues.

  11. Developing 3D microstructures for tissue engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan

    casting process to generate various large scale tissue engineering constructs with single pore geometry with the desired mechanical stiffness and porosity. In addition, a new technique was developed to fa bricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue-engineering applications where 3D printing...... of a hydrogel to create an additional interpenetrating network (IPN) of hydrogel nanodeposits. Biocompatible IPNs of silicone elastomer with poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) and Poly(ethylene glycol) methylether acrylate (PEGMEA) hydrogel 3D scaffolds were produced in this way. The model drug...... of hiPSC-derived DE cells cultured for 25 days in a 3D perfusion bioreactor system with an array of 16 small-scale tissue-bioreactors with integrated dual-pore pore scaffolds and flow rates. Hepatic differentiation and functionality of hiPSC-derived hepatocytes were successfully assessed and compared...

  12. Synthetic aperture tissue and flow ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav

    This Ph.D. project was carried out at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging, Technical University of Denmark. The goal was to improve existing imaging techniques in order to make them suitable for real-time three-dimensional ultrasound scanning. This dissertation focuses on the synthetic aperture...... imaging applied to medical ultrasound. It is divided into two major parts: tissue and blood flow imaging. Tissue imaging using synthetic aperture algorithms has been investigated for about two decades, but has not been implemented in medical scanners yet. Among the other reasons, the conventional scanning...... and beamformation methods are adequate for the imaging modalities in clinical use - the B-mode imaging of tissue structures, and the color mapping of blood flow. The acquisition time, however, is too long, and these methods fail to perform real-time three-dimensional scans. The synthetic transmit aperture...

  13. Biomimetic electrospun nanofibers for tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Susan; Li Bojun; Ma Zuwei; Wei He; Chan Casey; Ramakrishna, Seeram [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative (NUSNNI), Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore)

    2006-09-15

    Nanofibers exist widely in human tissue with different patterns. Electrospinning nanotechnology has recently gained a new impetus due to the introduction of the concept of biomimetic nanofibers for tissue regeneration. The advanced electrospinning technique is a promising method to fabricate a controllable continuous nanofiber scaffold similar to the natural extracellular matrix. Thus, the biomedical field has become a significant possible application field of electrospun fibers. Although electrospinning has developed rapidly over the past few years, electrospun nanofibers are still at a premature research stage. Further comprehensive and deep studies on electrospun nanofibers are essential for promoting their biomedical applications. Current electrospun fiber materials include natural polymers, synthetic polymers and inorganic substances. This review briefly describes several typically electrospun nanofiber materials or composites that have great potential for tissue regeneration, and describes their fabrication, advantages, drawbacks and future prospects. (topical review)

  14. Complicated Electrical Activities in Cardiac Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiau, Yuo-Hsien; Hsueh, Ming-Pin; Hseu, Shu-Shya; Yien, Huey-Wen

    It has become widely accepted that ventricular fibrillation, the most dangerous cardiac arrhythmias, is a major cause of death in the industrialized world. Alternans and conduction block have recently been related to the progression from ventricular tachycardia to ventricular fibrillation. From the point of view in cellular electrophysiology, ventricular tachycardia is the formation of reentrant wave in cardiac tissue. And ventricular fibrillation arises from subsequent breakdown of reentrant wave into multiple drifting and meandering spiral waves. In this paper, we numerically study pulse and vortex dynamics in cardiac tissue. Our numerical results include 1:1 normal sinus rhythm, 2:1 conduction block, complete conduction block, spiral wave, and spiral breakup. All of our numerical findings can be corresponding to clinical measurements in electrocardiogram. Various electrical activities in cardiac tissue will be discussed in detail in the present manuscript.

  15. Stem Cell-Based Dental Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Zivkovic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of biological and biomaterial sciences profiled tissue engineering as a new and powerful tool for biological replacement of organs. The combination of stem cells and suitable scaffolds is widely used in experiments today, in order to achieve partial or whole organ regeneration. This review focuses on the use of tissue engineering strategies in tooth regeneration, using stem cells and stem cells/scaffold constructs. Although whole tooth regeneration is still not possible, there are promising results. However, to achieve this goal, it is important to understand and further explore the mechanisms underlying tooth development. Only then will we be able to mimic the natural processes with the use of stem cells and tissue engineering techniques.

  16. Soft-tissue considerations in esthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, H I

    1991-08-01

    The marriage of periodontics with esthetic/restorative dentistry, or the "perio-esthetic connection," may be the most critical interdisciplinary relationship in contemporary dental practice. The foundation provided by healthy, well-contoured, biologically sound, symmetrical supporting tissues significantly enhances the cosmetic and functional value of restorative and prosthetic reconstruction. Conversely, the finest restorative fabrication can be markedly diminished by unhealthy, poorly maintained gingival and periodontal tissues. The remarkable advances in the materials sciences have enabled us to restore the dentition to natural function and appearance, but, as with a portrait, the esthetic results are either enhanced or diminished by the boundaries of the frame. This paper focuses on the marginal and attached gingival tissues and the relationship of the lip line, without delving into the various surgical modalities currently available.

  17. Models of defibrillation of cardiac tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinsky, V.; Pumir, A.

    1998-03-01

    Heterogeneities, such as gap junctions, defects in periodical cellular lattices, intercellular clefts and fiber curvature allow one to understand the effect of an electric field in cardiac tissue. They induce membrane potential variations even in the bulk of the myocardium, with a characteristic sawtooth shape. The sawtooth potential, induced by heterogeneities at large scales (tissue strands) can be more easily observed, and lead to stronger effects than the one induced at the cellular level. In the generic model of propagation in cardiac tissue (FitzHugh), 4 mechanisms of defibrillation were found, two mechanisms based on excitation (EA,EM), and two—on de-excitation (DA,DM). The lowest electric field is required by an EM mechanism. In the Beeler-Reuter ionic model, mechanism DM is impossible. We critically review the experimental basis of the theory and propose new experiments.

  18. Ketamine inhibits transcription factors activator protein 1 and nuclear factor-kappaB, interleukin-8 production, as well as CD11b and CD16 expression: studies in human leukocytes and leukocytic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welters, Ingeborg D; Hafer, Georg; Menzebach, Axel; Mühling, Jörg; Neuhäuser, Christoph; Browning, Paul; Goumon, Yannick

    2010-03-01

    Recent data indicate that ketamine exerts antiinflammatory actions. However, little is known about the signaling mechanisms involved in ketamine-induced immune modulation. In this study, we investigated the effects of ketamine on lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of transcription factors activator protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) in human leukocyte-like cell lines and in human blood neutrophils. Electric mobility shift assays were used to investigate ketamine's effects on nuclear binding activity of both transcription factors in U937 cells, and a whole blood flow cytometric technique was used for AP-1 and NF-kappaB determination in leukocytes. Cell lines with different expression patterns of opioid and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors were used for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to investigate receptors involved in ketamine signaling. Ketamine's effect on interleukin-8 production was assessed in a whole blood assay. Ketamine inhibited both transcription factors in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects did not depend on opiate or N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Ketamine also reduced interleukin-8 production in whole blood and expression of CD11b and CD16 on neutrophils. The immunoinhibitory effects of ketamine are at least in part caused by inhibition of transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1, which regulate production of proinflammatory mediators. However, signaling mechanisms different from those present in the central nervous system are responsible for ketamine-mediated immunomodulation.

  19. Phosphoproteome and transcription factor activity profiling identify actions of the anti-inflammatory agent UTL-5g in LPS stimulated RAW 264.7 cells including disrupting actin remodeling and STAT-3 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Nicholas J; Stemmer, Paul M; Chen, Ben; Valeriote, Frederick; Gao, Xiaohua; Guatam, Subhash C; Shaw, Jiajiu

    2017-09-15

    UTL-5g is a novel small-molecule TNF-alpha modulator. It reduces cisplatin-induced side effects by protecting kidney, liver, and platelets, thereby increasing tolerance for cisplatin. UTL-5g also reduces radiation-induced acute liver toxicity. The mechanism of action for UTL-5g is not clear at the present time. A phosphoproteomic analysis to a depth of 4943 phosphopeptides and a luminescence-based transcription factor activity assay were used to provide complementary analyses of signaling events that were disrupted by UTL-5g in RAW 264.7 cells. Transcriptional activity downstream of the interferon gamma, IL-6, type 1 Interferon, TGF-β, PKC/Ca2+ and the glucocorticoid receptor pathways were disrupted by UTL-5g. Phosphoproteomic analysis indicated that hyperphosphorylation of proteins involved in actin remodeling was suppressed by UTL-5g (gene set analysis, FDR 5g. This global characterization of UTL-5g activity in a macrophage cell line discovered that it disrupts selected aspects of LPS signaling including Stat3 activation and actin remodeling providing new insight on how UTL-5g acts to reduce cisplatin-induced side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanisms of lymphatic regeneration after tissue transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Yan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Lymphedema is the chronic swelling of an extremity that occurs commonly after lymph node resection for cancer treatment. Recent studies have demonstrated that transfer of healthy tissues can be used as a means of bypassing damaged lymphatics and ameliorating lymphedema. The purpose of these studies was to investigate the mechanisms that regulate lymphatic regeneration after tissue transfer.Nude mice (recipients underwent 2-mm tail skin excisions that were either left open or repaired with full-thickness skin grafts harvested from donor transgenic mice that expressed green fluorescent protein in all tissues or from LYVE-1 knockout mice. Lymphatic regeneration, expression of VEGF-C, macrophage infiltration, and potential for skin grafting to bypass damaged lymphatics were assessed.Skin grafts healed rapidly and restored lymphatic flow. Lymphatic regeneration occurred beginning at the peripheral edges of the graft, primarily from ingrowth of new lymphatic vessels originating from the recipient mouse. In addition, donor lymphatic vessels appeared to spontaneously re-anastomose with recipient vessels. Patterns of VEGF-C expression and macrophage infiltration were temporally and spatially associated with lymphatic regeneration. When compared to mice treated with excision only, there was a 4-fold decrease in tail volumes, 2.5-fold increase in lymphatic transport by lymphoscintigraphy, 40% decrease in dermal thickness, and 54% decrease in scar index in skin-grafted animals, indicating that tissue transfer could bypass damaged lymphatics and promote rapid lymphatic regeneration.Our studies suggest that lymphatic regeneration after tissue transfer occurs by ingrowth of lymphatic vessels and spontaneous re-connection of existing lymphatics. This process is temporally and spatially associated with VEGF-C expression and macrophage infiltration. Finally, tissue transfer can be used to bypass damaged lymphatics and promote rapid lymphatic regeneration.

  1. Visual enhancement of fascial tissue in endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, Thomas; Behrens, Alexander; Bolz, Matthias; Aach, Til

    2008-03-01

    A colon resection, necessary in case of colon cancer, can be performed minimally invasively by laparoscopy. Before the affected part of the colon can be removed, however, the colon must be mobilized. A good technique for mobilizing the colon is to use Gerota's fascia as a guiding structure, i. e. to dissect along this fascia, without harming it. The challenge of this technique is that Gerota's fascia is usually difficult to distinguish from other tissue. In this paper, we present an approach to enhance the visual contrast between fatty tissue covered by Gerota's fascia and uncovered fatty tissue, and the contrast of both structures to the remaining soft tissue in real time (50 fields per second). As fasciae are whitish transparent tissues, they cannot be identified by means of their color itself. Instead, we found that their most prominent feature to distinguish is the color saturation. To enhance their visible contrast, we applied a non-linear transformation to the saturation. An off-line evaluation was carried out consulting two specialists in laparoscopic colon resection. We presented them four scenes from two different interventions in which our enhancement was applied together with the original scenes. These scenes did not only contain situations where Gerota's fascia had to be found, but also situations where aerosol from ultrasonically activated scissors inhibited the clear vision, or situations where critical structures such as the ureter or nerves had to be identified under fascial tissue. The surgeons stated that our algorithm clearly offered an information gain in all of the presented scenes, and that it did not impair the clear vision in case of aerosol or the visibility of critical structures. So the colon mobilization could be carried out easier, faster, and safer. In the subsequent clinical on-line evaluation, the specialists confirmed the positive effect of the proposed algorithm on the visibility of Gerota's fascia.

  2. Chemical sterilization of allograft dermal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Abigail; Vaynshteyn, Edward; Kowalski, John B; Ngo, Manh-Dan; Merritt, Karen; Osborne, Joel; Chnari, Evangelia

    2017-12-01

    Common terminal sterilization methods are known to alter the natural structure and properties of soft tissues. One approach to providing safe grafts with preserved biological properties is the combination of a validated chemical sterilization process followed by an aseptic packaging process. This combination of processes is an accepted method for production of sterile healthcare products as described in ANSI/AAMI ST67:2011. This article describes the validation of the peracetic acid and ethanol-based (PAAE) chemical sterilization process for allograft dermal tissues at the Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation (MTF, Edison, NJ). The sterilization capability of the PAAE solution used during routine production of aseptically processed dermal tissue forms was determined based on requirements of relevant ISO standards, ISO 14161:2009 and ISO 14937:2009. The resistance of spores of Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium sporogenes, Mycobacterium terrae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecium, and Staphylococcus aureus to the chemical sterilization process employed by MTF was determined. Using a worst-case scenario testing strategy, the D value was calculated for the most resistant microorganism, Bacillus. The 12D time parameter determined the minimum time required to achieve a SAL of 10 -6 . Microbiological performance qualification demonstrated a complete kill of 10 6 spores at just a quarter of the full cycle time. The validation demonstrated that the PAAE sterilization process is robust, achieves sterilization of allograft dermal tissue to a SAL 10 -6 , and that in combination with aseptic processing secures the microbiological safety of allograft dermal tissue while avoiding structural and biochemical tissue damage previously observed with other sterilization methods such as ionizing irradiation.

  3. Tissue Sampling and Processing for Histopathology Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaoui, Mohamed; Bauchet, Anne-Laure; Fiette, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    Histological procedures aim at providing good-quality sections that can be used for a light microscopic evaluation of tissue. These are applicable to identify either spontaneous or diseases-induced changes. Routinely, tissues are fixed with neutral formalin 10%, embedded in paraffin, and manually sectioned with a microtome to obtain 4-5 μm thick paraffin sections. Dewaxed sections are then stained with HE&S (hematoxylin-eosin and saffron) or can be used for other purposes (special stains, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, etc.). During this processing, many steps and procedures are critical to ensure standard and interpretable sections. This chapter provides key recommendations to efficiently achieve this objective.

  4. Passive mechanical properties of ovine rumen tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Stephen J.; Cater, John E.; Walker, Cameron G.; Amirapu, Satya; Waghorn, Garry C.; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical and structural properties of ovine rumen tissue have been determined using uniaxial tensile testing of tissue from four animals at five rumen locations and two orientations. Animal and orientation did not have a significant effect on the stress-strain response, but there was a significant difference between rumen locations. Histological studies showed two orthogonal muscle layers in all regions except the reticulum, which has a more isotropic structure. A quasi-linear viscoelastic model was fitted to the relaxation stage for each region. Model predictions of the ramp stage had RMS errors of 13-24% and were within the range of the experimental data.

  5. Oriented Collagen Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Yoshihiro; Kosaka, Toru; Kuwahara, Go; Mikami, Hiroshi; Saku, Taro; Kodama, Shohta

    2012-01-01

    Oriented collagen scaffolds were developed in the form of sheet, mesh and tube by arraying flow-oriented collagen string gels and dehydrating the arrayed gels. The developed collagen scaffolds can be any practical size with any direction of orientation for tissue engineering applications. The birefringence of the collagen scaffolds was quantitatively analyzed by parallel Nicols method. Since native collagen in the human body has orientations such as bone, cartilage, tendon and cornea, and the orientation has a special role for the function of human organs, the developed various types of three-dimensional oriented collagen scaffolds are expected to be useful biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicines. PMID:28817059

  6. Lymphoid neoplasia following connective tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, P M; Witrak, G A; Conn, D L

    1979-02-01

    A retrospective review was undertaken to ascertain whether there are distinctive histopathologic features of the lymphoid neoplasms that occur in patients with previous connective tissue disease. Of 29 patients studied, 12 had malignant lymphoma with diffuse large-cell cytomorphology. Only 1 of these 12 had an immunoblastic cell type. The remaining 17 patients had neoplasia of a widely diverse nature. Six had lymphocytic lymphoma (one nodular poorly differentiated, three diffuse poorly differentiated, and three diffuse well differentiated), two had Hodgkin's disease, three had plasma cell myeloma, and six had chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Data fail to confirm a relationship between lymphoid proliferations with immunoblastic morphology and connective tissue diseases.

  7. The autologus graft of epithelial tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minaee B

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available With the intention of research about culture and autologus graft of epithelial tissue we used 4 french Albino Rabbits with an average age of 2 months. After reproduction on the support in EMEM (Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium we used this for graft after 4 weeks. This region which grafted total replaced. After fixation of this sample and passing them through various process, histological sections were prepared. These sections were stained with H & E and masson's trichrome and studied by light microscope. We succeeded in graft. We hope in the near future by using the method of epithelium tissue culture improving to treat burned patients.

  8. NONSPECIFIC INFECTIONS OF THE BONE TISSUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Golubovic

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis represents an inflammation of the bone tissue caused by microorganisms. The cause of the inflammation can be bacteria, viruses and parasites. The bone infections are divided into specific and nonspecific. Regarding the course they take, they can be of acute or chronic form. Nonspecific bone infections are analyzed, namely, hematogenic and exogenous osteomyelitis. The most frequent complications of osteomyelitis are bone infection recidivism, pathological fractures, infection penetration into the joint, malign tissue alteration and amyloidosis as a consequence of the chronic infection.

  9. Oriented Collagen Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohta Kodama

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oriented collagen scaffolds were developed in the form of sheet, mesh and tube by arraying flow-oriented collagen string gels and dehydrating the arrayed gels. The developed collagen scaffolds can be any practical size with any direction of orientation for tissue engineering applications. The birefringence of the collagen scaffolds was quantitatively analyzed by parallel Nicols method. Since native collagen in the human body has orientations such as bone, cartilage, tendon and cornea, and the orientation has a special role for the function of human organs, the developed various types of three-dimensional oriented collagen scaffolds are expected to be useful biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicines.

  10. Oriented Collagen Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Yoshihiro; Kosaka, Toru; Kuwahara, Go; Mikami, Hiroshi; Saku, Taro; Kodama, Shohta

    2012-03-16

    Oriented collagen scaffolds were developed in the form of sheet, mesh and tube by arraying flow-oriented collagen string gels and dehydrating the arrayed gels. The developed collagen scaffolds can be any practical size with any direction of orientation for tissue engineering applications. The birefringence of the collagen scaffolds was quantitatively analyzed by parallel Nicols method. Since native collagen in the human body has orientations such as bone, cartilage, tendon and cornea, and the orientation has a special role for the function of human organs, the developed various types of three-dimensional oriented collagen scaffolds are expected to be useful biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicines.

  11. Cellular immunotherapy for soft tissue sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Steven Eric; Fishman, Mayer; Conley, Anthony P.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry; Antonia, Scott; Chiappori, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Soft tissue sarcomas are rare neoplasms, with approximately 9,000 new cases in the United States every year. Unfortunately, there is little progress in the treatment of metastatic soft tissue sarcomas in the past two decades beyond the standard approaches of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Immunotherapy is a modality complementary to conventional therapy,. It is appealing because functional anti-tumor activity could affect both local-regional and systemic disease and act over a prolonged period of time. In this report, we review immunotherapeutic investigative strategies being developed, including several tumor vaccine, antigen vaccine, and dendritic cell vaccine strategies. PMID:22401634

  12. Soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooper, T M

    2012-02-03

    A retrospective review of 33 cases of soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity presenting over a 10 year period was undertaken. The history, patterns of referral, diagnostic investigations, procedures undertaken and outcomes were studied. We found there was a frequent delay in diagnosis and sometimes misinterpretation of biopsy specimens. Patients were seen by a variety of specialists from disciplines such as general surgery, plastic surgery, orthopaedic surgery and rheumatology. Considerable progress has been made in the treatment of soft tissue sarcomas, often allowing local control of the tumour without amputation. We believe there should be early referral of patients having these tumours to a centre where a combined multidisciplinary approach can be undertaken.

  13. Emergent material properties of developing epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Pedro F; Duque, Julia; Étienne, Jocelyn; Martinez-Arias, Alfonso; Blanchard, Guy B; Gorfinkiel, Nicole

    2015-11-23

    Force generation and the material properties of cells and tissues are central to morphogenesis but remain difficult to measure in vivo. Insight is often limited to the ratios of mechanical properties obtained through disruptive manipulation, and the appropriate models relating stress and strain are unknown. The Drosophila amnioserosa epithelium progressively contracts over 3 hours of dorsal closure, during which cell apices exhibit area fluctuations driven by medial myosin pulses with periods of 1.5-6 min. Linking these two timescales and understanding how pulsatile contractions drive morphogenetic movements is an urgent challenge. We present a novel framework to measure in a continuous manner the mechanical properties of epithelial cells in the natural context of a tissue undergoing morphogenesis. We show that the relationship between apicomedial myosin fluorescence intensity and strain during fluctuations is consistent with a linear behaviour, although with a lag. We thus used myosin fluorescence intensity as a proxy for active force generation and treated cells as natural experiments of mechanical response under cyclic loading, revealing unambiguous mechanical properties from the hysteresis loop relating stress to strain. Amnioserosa cells can be described as a contractile viscoelastic fluid. We show that their emergent mechanical behaviour can be described by a linear viscoelastic rheology at timescales relevant for tissue morphogenesis. For the first time, we establish relative changes in separate effective mechanical properties in vivo. Over the course of dorsal closure, the tissue solidifies and effective stiffness doubles as net contraction of the tissue commences. Combining our findings with those from previous laser ablation experiments, we show that both apicomedial and junctional stress also increase over time, with the relative increase in apicomedial stress approximately twice that of other obtained measures. Our results show that in an epithelial

  14. Tissue engineering applications in periodontics: Alternate god

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Chugh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available "Tissue engineering" also referred as regenerative medicine indicates a new interdisciplinary initiative, which has the goal of growing tissues or organs directly from a single cell taken from an individual. Originally coined to denote the construction in the laboratory of a device containing viable cells and biologic mediators in a synthetic or biologic matrix that could be implanted in patients to facilitate regeneration. However, the term has crept into clinical armory of periodontists and has attained certain halo and glamour even when used in mundane and prosaic situations. Thus, this paper critically evaluates its role and application in clinical scenario.

  15. Lung tissue classification using wavelet frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Sage, Daniel; Hidki, Asmâa; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Unser, Michael; Müller, Henning

    2007-01-01

    We describe a texture classification system that identifies lung tissue patterns from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images of patients affected with interstitial lung diseases (ILD). This pattern recognition task is part of an image-based diagnostic aid system for ILDs. Five lung tissue patterns (healthy, emphysema, ground glass, fibrosis and microdules) selected from a multimedia database are classified using the overcomplete discrete wavelet frame decompostion combined with grey-level histogram features. The overall multiclass accuracy reaches 92.5% of correct matches while combining the two types of features, which are found to be complementary.

  16. Protein-Based Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Ashley C; Williams, Danielle M; Regan, Lynne J

    2016-01-01

    The tunable mechanical and structural properties of protein-based hydrogels make them excellent scaffolds for tissue engineering and repair. Moreover, using protein-based components provides the option to insert sequences associated with promoting both cellular adhesion to the substrate and overall cell growth. Protein-based hydrogel components are appealing for their structural designability, specific biological functionality, and stimuli-responsiveness. Here we present highlights in the field of protein-based hydrogels for tissue engineering applications including design requirements, components, and gel types.

  17. Multiphoton nanosurgery in cells and tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, Iris; Stracke, Frank; Sauer, Daniel; Martin, Sven; König, Karsten

    2006-02-01

    Near infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser microscopes enable the user to perform highly precise nanosurgery. Tissue components, cells and single organelles of cells inside tumor-sphaeroids and tissues can be precisely manipulated and optically knocked out without collateral damage. In addition, the monitoring effects of nanosurgery in situ using two photon excitation of auto fluorescence of endogenous fluorophores can be performed quite easily with a sub-cellular resolution. This method may become a useful instrument for nano manipulation and nano-surgery in several fields of life sciences.

  18. Mechano-transduction: from molecules to tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth L Pruitt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available External forces play complex roles in cell organization, fate, and homeostasis. Changes in these forces, or how cells respond to them, can result in abnormal embryonic development and diseases in adults. How cells sense and respond to these mechanical stimuli requires an understanding of the biophysical principles that underlie changes in protein conformation and result in alterations in the organization and function of cells and tissues. Here, we discuss mechano-transduction as it applies to protein conformation, cellular organization, and multi-cell (tissue function.

  19. The use of animal tissues alongside human tissue: Cultural and ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaw, Anu; Jones, D Gareth; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and research facilities often use cadaveric material alongside animal tissues, although there appear to be differences in the way we handle, treat, and dispose of human cadaveric material compared to animal tissue. This study sought to analyze cultural and ethical considerations and provides policy recommendations on the use of animal tissues alongside human tissue. The status of human and animal remains and the respect because of human and animal tissues were compared and analyzed from ethical, legal, and cultural perspectives. The use of animal organs and tissues is carried out within the context of understanding human anatomy and function. Consequently, the interests of human donors are to be pre-eminent in any policies that are enunciated, so that if any donors find the presence of animal remains unacceptable, the latter should not be employed. The major differences appear to lie in differences in our perceptions of their respective intrinsic and instrumental values. Animals are considered to have lesser intrinsic value and greater instrumental value than humans. These differences stem from the role played by culture and ethical considerations, and are manifested in the resulting legal frameworks. In light of this discussion, six policy recommendations are proposed, encompassing the nature of consent, respect for animal tissues as well as human remains, and appropriate separation of both sets of tissues in preparation and display. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Growing tissues in real and simulated microgravity: new methods for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimm, D.; Wehland, M.; Pietsch, J.; Aleshcheva, G.; Wise, P.; van Loon, J.; Ulbrich, C.; Magnusson, N.E.; Infanger, M.; Bauer, J.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering in simulated (s-) and real microgravity (r-μg) is currently a topic in Space medicine contributing to biomedical sciences and their applications on Earth. The principal aim of this review is to highlight the advances and accomplishments in the field of tissue engineering that

  1. Growing Tissues in Real and Simulated Microgravity: New Methods for Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimm, D.; Wehland, M.; Pietsch, J.; Aleshcheva, G.; Wise, P.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Ulbrich, C.; Magnusson, N.E.; Infanger, M.; Bauer, J.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering in simulated (s-) and real microgravity (r-μg) is currently a topic in Space medicine contributing to biomedical sciences and their applications on Earth. The principal aim of this review is to highlight the advances and accomplishments in the field of tissue engineering that

  2. Ontology-based, Tissue MicroArray oriented, image centered tissue bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viti Federica

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue MicroArray technique is becoming increasingly important in pathology for the validation of experimental data from transcriptomic analysis. This approach produces many images which need to be properly managed, if possible with an infrastructure able to support tissue sharing between institutes. Moreover, the available frameworks oriented to Tissue MicroArray provide good storage for clinical patient, sample treatment and block construction information, but their utility is limited by the lack of data integration with biomolecular information. Results In this work we propose a Tissue MicroArray web oriented system to support researchers in managing bio-samples and, through the use of ontologies, enables tissue sharing aimed at the design of Tissue MicroArray experiments and results evaluation. Indeed, our system provides ontological description both for pre-analysis tissue images and for post-process analysis image results, which is crucial for information exchange. Moreover, working on well-defined terms it is then possible to query web resources for literature articles to integrate both pathology and bioinformatics data. Conclusions Using this system, users associate an ontology-based description to each image uploaded into the database and also integrate results with the ontological description of biosequences identified in every tissue. Moreover, it is possible to integrate the ontological description provided by the user with a full compliant gene ontology definition, enabling statistical studies about correlation between the analyzed pathology and the most commonly related biological processes.

  3. Automated Detection of Connective Tissue by Tissue Counter Analysis and Classification and Regression Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Smolle

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of the CART (Classification and Regression Tree procedure for the recognition of microscopic structures in tissue counter analysis. Methods: Digital microscopic images of H&E stained slides of normal human skin and of primary malignant melanoma were overlayed with regularly distributed square measuring masks (elements and grey value, texture and colour features within each mask were recorded. In the learning set, elements were interactively labeled as representing either connective tissue of the reticular dermis, other tissue components or background. Subsequently, CART models were based on these data sets. Results: Implementation of the CART classification rules into the image analysis program showed that in an independent test set 94.1% of elements classified as connective tissue of the reticular dermis were correctly labeled. Automated measurements of the total amount of tissue and of the amount of connective tissue within a slide showed high reproducibility (r=0.97 and r=0.94, respectively; p < 0.001. Conclusions: CART procedure in tissue counter analysis yields simple and reproducible classification rules for tissue elements.

  4. Live tissue versus simulation training for emergency procedures: Is simulation ready to replace live tissue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Stephen L; Bukoski, Alex; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Llerena, Luis; Armstrong, John H; Strayhorn, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Training of emergency procedures is challenging and application is not routine in all health care settings. The debate over simulation as an alternative to live tissue training continues with legislation before Congress to banish live tissue training in the Department of Defense. Little evidence exists to objectify best practice. We sought to evaluate live tissue and simulation-based training practices in 12 life-saving emergency procedures. In the study, 742 subjects were randomized to live tissue or simulation-training. Assessments of self-efficacy, cognitive knowledge, and psychomotor performance were completed pre- and post-training. Affective response to training was assessed through electrodermal activity. Subject matter experts gap analysis of live tissue versus simulation completed the data set. Subjects demonstrated pre- to post-training gains in self-efficacy, cognitive knowledge, psychomotor performance, and affective response regardless of training modality (P Affective response was greatest in live tissue training (P abandonment of live tissue training is not warranted. We maintain that combined live tissue and simulation-based training add value and should be continued. Congressional mandates may accelerate simulation development and improve performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Skin and tissue bank: Operational model for the recovery and preservation of tissues and skin allografts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Flores, Francisco; Sandoval-Zamora, Hugo; Machuca-Rodriguez, Catalina; Barrera-López, Araceli; García-Cavazos, Ricardo; Madinaveitia-Villanueva, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Tissue storage is a medical process that is in the regulation and homogenisation phase in the scientific world. The international standards require the need to ensure safety and efficacy of human allografts such as skin and other tissues. The activities of skin and tissues banks currently involve their recovery, processing, storage and distribution, which are positively correlated with technological and scientific advances present in current biomedical sciences. A description is presented of the operational model of Skin and Tissue Bank at INR as successful case for procurement, recovery and preservation of skin and tissues for therapeutic uses, with high safety and biological quality. The essential and standard guidelines are presented as keystones for a tissue recovery program based on scientific evidence, and within an ethical and legal framework, as well as to propose a model for complete overview of the donation of tissues and organ programs in Mexico. Finally, it concludes with essential proposals for improving the efficacy of transplantation of organs and tissue programs. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. A hydrogel bioink toolkit for mimicking native tissue biochemical and mechanical properties in bioprinted tissue constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skardal, Aleksander; Devarasetty, Mahesh; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Mead, Ivy; Bishop, Colin; Shupe, Thomas; Lee, Sang Jin; Jackson, John; Yoo, James; Soker, Shay; Atala, Anthony

    2015-10-01

    Advancement of bioprinting technology is limited by the availability of materials that both facilitate bioprinting logistics as well as support cell viability and function by providing tissue-specific cues. Herein we describe a modular hyaluronic acid (HA) and gelatin-based hydrogel toolbox comprised of a 2-crosslinker, 2-stage polymerization technique, and the capability to provide tissue specific biochemically and mechanically accurate signals to cells within biofabricated tissue constructs. First, we prepared and characterized several tissue-derived decellularized extracellular matrix-based solutions, which contain complex combinations of growth factors, collagens, glycosaminoglycans, and elastin. These solutions can be incorporated into bioinks to provide the important biochemical cues of different tissue types. Second, we employed combinations of PEG-based crosslinkers with varying molecular weights, geometries (linear, 4-arm, and 8-arm), and functional groups to yield hydrogel bioinks that supported extrusion bioprinting and the capability to achieve final construct shear stiffness values ranging from approximately 100 Pa to 20 kPa. Lastly, we integrated these hydrogel bioinks with a 3-D bioprinting platform, and validated their use by bioprinting primary liver spheroids in a liver-specific bioink to create in vitro liver constructs with high cell viability and measurable functional albumin and urea output. This hydrogel bioink system has the potential to be a versatile tool for biofabrication of a wide range of tissue construct types. Biochemical and mechanical factors both have important implications in guiding the behavior of cells in vivo, yet both realms are rarely considered together in the context of biofabrication in vitro tissue construct models. We describe a modular hydrogel system that (1) facilitates extrusion bioprinting of cell-laden hydrogels, (2) incorporates tissue-specific factors derived from decellularized tissue extracellular matrix

  7. Practical experience in post-mortem tissue donation in consideration of the European tissue law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbe, Thomas; Braun, Christian; Wulff, Birgit; Schröder, Ann Sophie; Püschel, Klaus; Bratzke, Hansjürgen; Parzeller, Markus

    2010-03-01

    In consequence of the European guidelines of safety and quality standards for the donation, retrieval, storing and distribution of human tissues and cells the purpose of tissue transplantation was implemented into German legislation in May 2007. The law came into effect on August 1st 2007 considering of the European rules. The Institutes for Legal Medicine of the University of Frankfurt/Main and the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf developed a model for tissue retrieval. The Institute of Legal Medicine (I.f.R.) at the University Medical Center Hamburg cooperates with the German Institute of Cell and Tissue Replacement (Deutsches Institut für Zell--und Gewebeersatz DIZG). Potential post-mortem tissue donors (PMTD) among the deceased are selected by standardized sets of defined criteria. The procedure is guided by the intended exclusion criteria of the tissue regulation draft (German Transplant Law TPG GewV) in accordance with the European Guideline (2006/17/EC). Following the identification of the donor and subsequent removal of tissue, the retrieved samples were sent to the DIZG, a non-profit tissue bank according to the tissue regulation. Here the final processing into transplantable tissue grafts takes place, which then results in the allocation of tissue to hospitals in Germany and other European countries. The Center of Legal Medicine at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Medical Center Frankfurt/Main cooperates since 2000 with Tutogen, a pharmaceutical company. Harvesting of musculoskeletal tissues follows corresponding regulations. To verify the outcome of PMTD at the I.f.R. Hamburg, two-statistic analysis over 12 and 4 months have been implemented. Our results have shown an increasing number of potential appropriate PMTD within the second inquiry interval but a relatively small and unvaryingly rate of successful post-mortem tissue retrievals similar to the first examination period. Thus, the aim of the model developed by the I.f.R. is to

  8. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues, including tissue microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summersgill, Brenda M; Shipley, Janet M

    2010-01-01

    Formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) material is frequently the most convenient readily available source of diseased tissue, including tumors. Multiple cores of FFPE material are being used increasingly to construct tissue microarrays (TMAs) that enable simultaneous analyses of many archival samples. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an important approach to analyze FFPE material for specific genetic aberrations that may be associated with tumor types or subtypes, cellular morphology, and disease prognosis. Annealing, or hybridization of labeled nucleic acid sequences, or probes, to detect and locate one or more complementary nucleic acid sequences within fixed tissue sections allows the detection of structural (translocation/inversion) and numerical (deletion/gain) aberrations and their localization within tissues. The robust protocols described include probe preparation, hybridization, and detection and take 2-3 days to complete. A protocol is also described for the stripping of probes for repeat FISH in order to maximize the use of scarce tissue resources.

  9. A Mutation in fat2 Uncouples Tissue Elongation from Global Tissue Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurich, Franziska; Dahmann, Christian

    2016-03-22

    Global tissue rotation was proposed as a morphogenetic mechanism controlling tissue elongation. In Drosophila ovaries, global tissue rotation of egg chambers coincides with egg chamber elongation. Egg chamber rotation was put forward to result in circumferential alignment of extracellular fibers. These fibers serve as molecular corsets to restrain growth of egg chambers perpendicular to the anteroposterior axis, thereby leading to the preferential egg chamber elongation along this axis. The atypical cadherin Fat2 is required for egg chamber elongation, rotation, and the circumferential alignment of extracellular fibers. Here, we have generated a truncated form of Fat2 that lacks the entire intracellular region. fat2 mutant egg chambers expressing this truncated protein fail to rotate yet display normal extracellular fiber alignment and properly elongate. Our data suggest that global tissue rotation, even though coinciding with tissue elongation, is not a necessary prerequisite for elongation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Distribution of a major connective tissue protein, fibronectin, in normal human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenman, S; Vaheri, A

    1978-04-01

    Fibronectin is a major surface-associated glycoprotein of cultured fibroblasts and it is also present in human plasma. Antiserum specific for human fibronectin was used to study the distribution of fibronectin in normal adult human tissues. The protein was detected (a) characteristically in various basement membranes including capillary walls: (b) around individual smooth muscle cells and in the sarcolemma of striated muscle fibers; and (c) in the stroma of lymphatic tissue and as thin fibers in loose connective tissue. The distribution of fibronectin was distinct from that of collagen and elastic fibers, but was very similar to reticulin, as demonstrated by conventional histological staining. The results indicate that fibronectin is a major component of connective tissue matrix. The distribution also indicates that most types of adherent cells abut fibronectin-containing structures. This supports the possible role of fibronectin in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in tissues.

  11. The interplay between tissue growth and scaffold degradation in engineered tissue constructs

    KAUST Repository

    O’Dea, R. D.

    2012-09-18

    In vitro tissue engineering is emerging as a potential tool to meet the high demand for replacement tissue, caused by the increased incidence of tissue degeneration and damage. A key challenge in this field is ensuring that the mechanical properties of the engineered tissue are appropriate for the in vivo environment. Achieving this goal will require detailed understanding of the interplay between cell proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and scaffold degradation. In this paper, we use a mathematical model (based upon a multiphase continuum framework) to investigate the interplay between tissue growth and scaffold degradation during tissue construct evolution in vitro. Our model accommodates a cell population and culture medium, modelled as viscous fluids, together with a porous scaffold and ECM deposited by the cells, represented as rigid porous materials. We focus on tissue growth within a perfusion bioreactor system, and investigate how the predicted tissue composition is altered under the influence of (1) differential interactions between cells and the supporting scaffold and their associated ECM, (2) scaffold degradation, and (3) mechanotransduction-regulated cell proliferation and ECM deposition. Numerical simulation of the model equations reveals that scaffold heterogeneity typical of that obtained from μCT scans of tissue engineering scaffolds can lead to significant variation in the flow-induced mechanical stimuli experienced by cells seeded in the scaffold. This leads to strong heterogeneity in the deposition of ECM. Furthermore, preferential adherence of cells to the ECM in favour of the artificial scaffold appears to have no significant influence on the eventual construct composition; adherence of cells to these supporting structures does, however, lead to cell and ECM distributions which mimic and exaggerate the heterogeneity of the underlying scaffold. Such phenomena have important ramifications for the mechanical integrity of

  12. Adaptive Breast Radiation Therapy Using Modeling of Tissue Mechanics: A Breast Tissue Segmentation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juneja, Prabhjot, E-mail: Prabhjot.Juneja@icr.ac.uk [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Harris, Emma J. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Kirby, Anna M. [Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Evans, Philip M. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To validate and compare the accuracy of breast tissue segmentation methods applied to computed tomography (CT) scans used for radiation therapy planning and to study the effect of tissue distribution on the segmentation accuracy for the purpose of developing models for use in adaptive breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients receiving postlumpectomy radiation therapy for breast cancer underwent CT imaging in prone and supine positions. The whole-breast clinical target volume was outlined. Clinical target volumes were segmented into fibroglandular and fatty tissue using the following algorithms: physical density thresholding; interactive thresholding; fuzzy c-means with 3 classes (FCM3) and 4 classes (FCM4); and k-means. The segmentation algorithms were evaluated in 2 stages: first, an approach based on the assumption that the breast composition should be the same in both prone and supine position; and second, comparison of segmentation with tissue outlines from 3 experts using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Breast datasets were grouped into nonsparse and sparse fibroglandular tissue distributions according to expert assessment and used to assess the accuracy of the segmentation methods and the agreement between experts. Results: Prone and supine breast composition analysis showed differences between the methods. Validation against expert outlines found significant differences (P<.001) between FCM3 and FCM4. Fuzzy c-means with 3 classes generated segmentation results (mean DSC = 0.70) closest to the experts' outlines. There was good agreement (mean DSC = 0.85) among experts for breast tissue outlining. Segmentation accuracy and expert agreement was significantly higher (P<.005) in the nonsparse group than in the sparse group. Conclusions: The FCM3 gave the most accurate segmentation of breast tissues on CT data and could therefore be used in adaptive radiation therapy-based on tissue modeling. Breast tissue

  13. Is p53 Involved in Tissue-Specific Insulin Resistance Formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strycharz, Justyna; Drzewoski, Jozef; Szemraj, Janusz

    2017-01-01

    p53 constitutes an extremely versatile molecule, primarily involved in sensing the variety of cellular stresses. Functional p53 utilizes a plethora of mechanisms to protect cell from deleterious repercussions of genotoxic insults, where senescence deserves special attention. While the impressive amount of p53 roles has been perceived solely by the prism of antioncogenic effect, its presence seems to be vastly connected with metabolic abnormalities underlain by cellular aging, obesity, and inflammation. p53 has been found to regulate multiple biochemical processes such as glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, lipolysis, lipogenesis, β-oxidation, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen synthesis. Notably, p53-mediated metabolic effects are totally up to results of insulin action. Accumulating amount of data identifies p53 to be a factor activated upon hyperglycemia or excessive calorie intake, thus contributing to low-grade chronic inflammation and systemic insulin resistance. Prominent signs of its actions have been observed in muscles, liver, pancreas, and adipose tissue being associated with attenuation of insulin signalling. p53 is of crucial importance for the regulation of white and brown adipogenesis simultaneously being a repressor for preadipocyte differentiation. This review provides a profound insight into p53-dependent metabolic actions directed towards promotion of insulin resistance as well as presenting experimental data regarding obesity-induced p53-mediated metabolic abnormalities. PMID:28194257

  14. Tissue localization and partial characterization of pheromone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    trometry, and was found to be 3900 Da, same as that of known H. zea-PBAN. Radiochemical bioassay con- firmed the pheromonotropic effect of the isolated neuropeptide in this insect. [Ajitha V S and Muraleedharan D 2005 Tissue localization and partial characterization of pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide.

  15. Breast Tissue Metabolism by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R; Sharma, Uma

    2017-06-07

    Metabolic alterations are known to occur with oncogenesis and tumor progression. During malignant transformation, the metabolism of cells and tissues is altered. Cancer metabolism can be studied using advanced technologies that detect both metabolites and metabolic activities. Identification, characterization, and quantification of metabolites (metabolomics) are important for metabolic analysis and are usually done by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or by mass spectrometry. In contrast to the magnetic resonance imaging that is used to monitor the tumor morphology during progression of the disease and during therapy, in vivo NMR spectroscopy is used to study and monitor tumor metabolism of cells/tissues by detection of various biochemicals or metabolites involved in various metabolic pathways. Several in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo NMR studies using ¹H and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) nuclei have documented increased levels of total choline containing compounds, phosphomonoesters and phosphodiesters in human breast cancer tissues, which is indicative of altered choline and phospholipid metabolism. These levels get reversed with successful treatment. Another method that increases the sensitivity of substrate detection by using nuclear spin hyperpolarization of 13C-lableled substrates by dynamic nuclear polarization has revived a great interest in the study of cancer metabolism. This review discusses breast tissue metabolism studied by various NMR/MRS methods.

  16. Substituted Indoleacetic Acids Tested in Tissue Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1978-01-01

    Monochloro substituted IAA inhibited shoot induction in tobacco tissue cultures about as much as IAA. Dichloro substituted IAA inhibited shoot formation less. Other substituted IAA except 5-fluoro- and 5-bromoindole-3-acetic acid were less active than IAA. Callus growth was quite variable...

  17. Hype and expectations in tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, A.J.M.; Hoek, M.E. van; Leeuwen, E. van; Dekkers, W.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Scientific progress and the development of new technologies often incite enthusiasm, both in scientists and the public at large, and this is especially apparent in discussions of emerging medical technologies, such as tissue engineering (TE). Future-oriented narratives typically discuss potential

  18. Electrolytes in Selected Tissues of Heterobranchus bidorsalis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ± 30.39g SD) was exposed to cypermethrin (0.0005, 0.0075, 0.010, 0.125 and 0.0150ppm) for 23 days to determine the effect of exposure on cations (sodium, Na+, potassium, K+) and anion, Cl- in the gill, kidney, liver and muscle tissue.

  19. Scientific and industrial status of tissue engineering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-12-28

    Dec 28, 2007 ... as medicine, biology, biochemistry and biomaterials — at different levels. The integration can be optimized if the conditions allow physical and temporal closeness of scientists in appropriate clusters. In addition, the high industrial orientation of tissue engineering requires very close cooperation of academic ...

  20. Identification, tissue distribution and evaluation of brain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    mechanisms regulating feeding in order to improve its performance in captivity. The objectives of this study were to clone NPY cDNA, evaluate the mRNA levels in different tissues of flounder, and also evaluate brain NPY expression to associate food intake with NPY expression levels. A 597 bp NPY cDNA was cloned from ...

  1. Modelling Brain Tissue using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrby, Tim Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion MRI, or diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), is a technique that measures the restricted diffusion of water molecules within brain tissue. Different reconstruction methods quantify water-diffusion anisotropy in the intra- and extra-cellular spaces of the neural environment. Fibre tracking...

  2. Injectable hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, R.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising method for the regeneration of cartilage defects. This approach generally involves the use of a three-dimensional scaffold which can act as a temporary artificial extracellular matrix (ECM) for healthy cartilage cells, chondrocytes. Hydrogels represent a class of

  3. Breast Tissue Metabolism by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naranamangalam R. Jagannathan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic alterations are known to occur with oncogenesis and tumor progression. During malignant transformation, the metabolism of cells and tissues is altered. Cancer metabolism can be studied using advanced technologies that detect both metabolites and metabolic activities. Identification, characterization, and quantification of metabolites (metabolomics are important for metabolic analysis and are usually done by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR or by mass spectrometry. In contrast to the magnetic resonance imaging that is used to monitor the tumor morphology during progression of the disease and during therapy, in vivo NMR spectroscopy is used to study and monitor tumor metabolism of cells/tissues by detection of various biochemicals or metabolites involved in various metabolic pathways. Several in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo NMR studies using 1H and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS nuclei have documented increased levels of total choline containing compounds, phosphomonoesters and phosphodiesters in human breast cancer tissues, which is indicative of altered choline and phospholipid metabolism. These levels get reversed with successful treatment. Another method that increases the sensitivity of substrate detection by using nuclear spin hyperpolarization of 13C-lableled substrates by dynamic nuclear polarization has revived a great interest in the study of cancer metabolism. This review discusses breast tissue metabolism studied by various NMR/MRS methods.

  4. [White adipose tissue dysfunction observed in obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Ewa; Zieliński, Andrzej

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is a disease with continuingly increasing prevalence. It occurs worldwide independently of age group, material status or country of origin. At these times the most common reasons for obesity are bad eating habits and dramatic reduction of physical activity, which cause the energy imbalance of organism. Fundamental alteration observed in obese subjects is white adipose tissue overgrowth, which is linked to increased incidence of obesity-related comorbidities, such as: cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes or digestive tract diseases. What is more, obesity is also a risk factor for some cancers. Special risk for diseases linked to excessive weight is associated with overgrowth of visceral type of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue, which is the main energy storehouse in body and acts also as an endocrine organ, undergoes both the morphological and the functional changes in obesity, having a negative impact on whole body function. In this article we summarize the most important alterations in morphology and function of white adipose tissue, observed in obese subjects. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  5. Osteochondral tissue engineering: current strategies and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukavarapu, Syam P; Dorcemus, Deborah L

    2013-01-01

    Osteochondral defect management and repair remain a significant challenge in orthopedic surgery. Osteochondral defects contain damage to both the articular cartilage as well as the underlying subchondral bone. In order to repair an osteochondral defect the needs of the bone, cartilage and the bone-cartilage interface must be taken into account. Current clinical treatments for the repair of osteochondral defects have only been palliative, not curative. Tissue engineering has emerged as a potential alternative as it can be effectively used to regenerate bone, cartilage and the bone-cartilage interface. Several scaffold strategies, such as single phase, layered, and recently graded structures have been developed and evaluated for osteochondral defect repair. Also, as a potential cell source, tissue specific cells and progenitor cells are widely studied in cell culture models, as well with the osteochondral scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. Novel factor strategies being developed, including single factor, multi-factor, or controlled factor release in a graded fashion, not only assist bone and cartilage regeneration, but also establish osteochondral interface formation. The field of tissue engineering has made great strides, however further research needs to be carried out to make this strategy a clinical reality. In this review, we summarize current tissue engineering strategies, including scaffold design, bioreactor use, as well as cell and factor based approaches and recent developments for osteochondral defect repair. In addition, we discuss various challenges that need to be addressed in years to come. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bone tumor and soft tissue sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Jesus Garcia Filho

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available When we evaluate a rheumatologic patient we have to think aboutthe differential diagnosis among primary bone tunors, secondarybone tumors and soft tissue sarcomas. Muscle skeletal tumors,like rheumatologic diseases, have a predilection for old patients.Their knowledge is very important for a correct diagnosis andtreatment.

  7. Electrospun polyurethane membranes for Tissue Engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Laís P; Rodrigues, Ana Amélia; Macedo, Milton; Jardini, André L; Maciel Filho, Rubens

    2017-03-01

    Tissue Engineering proposes, among other things, tissue regeneration using scaffolds integrated with biological molecules, growth factors or cells for such regeneration. In this research, polyurethane membranes were prepared using the electrospinning technique in order to obtain membranes to be applied in Tissue Engineering, such as epithelial, drug delivery or cardiac applications. The influence of fibers on the structure and morphology of the membranes was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the structure was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and the thermal stability was analyzed by thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). In vitro cells attachment and proliferation was investigated by SEM, and in vitro cell viability was studied by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays and Live/Dead® assays. It was found that the membranes present an homogeneous morphology, high porosity, high surface area/volume ratio, it was also observed a random fiber network. The thermal analysis showed that the membrane degradation started at 254°C. In vitro evaluation of fibroblasts cells showed that fibroblasts spread over the membrane surface after 24, 48 and 72h of culture. This study supports the investigation of electrospun polyurethane membranes as biocompatible scaffolds for Tissue Engineering applications and provides some guidelines for improved biomaterials with desired properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling bipolar stimulation of cardiac tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galappaththige, Suran K.; Gray, Richard A.; Roth, Bradley J.

    2017-09-01

    Unipolar stimulation of cardiac tissue is often used in the design of cardiac pacemakers because of the low current required to depolarize the surrounding tissue at rest. However, the advantages of unipolar over bipolar stimulation are not obvious at shorter coupling intervals when the tissue near the pacing electrode is relatively refractory. Therefore, this paper analyzes bipolar stimulation of cardiac tissue. The strength-interval relationship for bipolar stimulation is calculated using the bidomain model and a recently developed parsimonious ionic current model. The strength-interval curves obtained using different electrode separations and arrangements (electrodes placed parallel to the fibers versus perpendicular to the fibers) indicate that bipolar stimulation results in more complex activation patterns compared to unipolar stimulation. An unusually low threshold stimulus current is observed when the electrodes are close to each other (a separation of 1 mm) because of break excitation. Unlike for unipolar stimulation, anode make excitation is not present during bipolar stimulation, and an abrupt switch from anode break to cathode make excitation can cause dramatic changes in threshold with very small changes in the interval. These results could impact the design of implantable pacemakers and defibrillators.

  9. (Musa spp.) using intercalary meristematic tissues

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... Fine cross sections (0.4-0.6 mm thickness) of intercalary meristematic tissues were excised from ... The explants were micro-wounded by bombarding with naked gold particles (BioRad, 1 µm) at 3102.6 ... recovery, after which these explants were used for co-cultivation with Agrobacterium culture. Effect of ...

  10. Biomaterials and tissue engineering in reconstructive surgery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In spite of some good successes and excellent materials, there are still serious limitations to the performance of implants today, and the paper explains these limitations and develops this theme in order to describe the recent innovations in tissue engineering, which involves a different approach to reconstruction of the body.

  11. Molar Tissue in Spleen: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maral Mokhtari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An invasive mole is a rare form of gestational trophoblastic disease in which the molar tissue invades into the deep myometrium, cervical stroma, blood vessels or extrauterine sites. This report is of an invasive mole of spleen that has originated from an ectopic pregnancy, which was primarily though to be a choriocarcinoma.

  12. Ultrasonographic findings of benign soft tissue tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Sung; Oh, Dong Heon; Jung, Tae Gun; Kim, Yong Kil; Kwon, Jung Hyeok [Dongkang Genernal Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    To clarify the characteristic sonographic features of benign soft tissue tumors and to evaluate the usefulness of sonographic imaging. We retrospectively reviewed ultrasonographic images of 70 cases in 68 patients with histologically proved benign soft tissue tumors. The tumors include 33 lipomas, 11 hemangiomas, 11 lymphangiomas, 7 neurilemmomas, 4 epidermoid cysts, 2 fibromas, 1 mesenchymoma, and 1 myxoma. The sonographic appearances of the lesions were mainly solid in 53 cases(33 lipomas, 8 hemangiomas, 2 lymphangiomas, 7 neurilemmomas, 2 fibromas and 1 mesenchymoma), mainly cystic in 14 cases(1 hemangioma, 8 lymphangiomas, 4 epidermoid cysts, and 1 myxomal), and mixed in 3 cases(2 hemangiomas and 1 lymphangioma). Although an accurate histologic prediction could not be made in most cases, certain patterns appeared to be characteristic of specific tumor types. 26 cases(78%) of lipoma were seen as lentiform, iso- or hyperechoic, solid mass. Hemangioma had variable appearance and characteristic calcifications were seen in 3 cases. Unicameral or multiseptated cystic mass with variable thickness of echogenic septa and solid portion was the characteristic finding of lymhangioma. Neurilemmoma showed lobulated, oval to round , relatively hypoechoic mass or with without internal cystic portion. Sonographic evaluation of benign soft tissue tumors is useful in demonstrating the location, size, extent, and internal characteristic of the mass. A relatively confident diagnosis can made when the characteristic features of the benign soft tissue tumor are present on sonographic imaging.

  13. Biodegradable Microfluidic Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    bonding multiple microfluidic layers. Introduction Overcoming the problems of nutrient transport is critical in the design of tissue engineering...an intrinsic vascular network within these scaffolds. More specifically, the application of microfabrication and BioMEMS technology has been focused

  14. Tissue regenerating functions of coagulation factor XIII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, C; Kvist, P H; Seidelin, J B

    2013-01-01

    -receptor 2 and the αVβ3 integrin is important for angiogenesis supporting formation of granulation tissue. Chronic inflammatory conditions involving bleeding and activation of the coagulation cascade have been shown to lead to reduced FXIII levels in plasma. Of particular importance for this review...

  15. Molecular diagnostics of soft tissue tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Julia A; Cushman-Vokoun, Allison M

    2011-05-01

    Soft tissue pathology encompasses a remarkably diverse assortment of benign and malignant soft tissue tumors. Rendering a definitive diagnosis is complicated not only by the large volume of existing histologic subtypes (>100) but also frequently by the presence of overlapping clinical, histologic, immunohistochemical, and/or radiographic features. During the past 3 decades, mesenchymal tumor-specific, cytogenetic and molecular genetic abnormalities have demonstrated an increasingly important, ancillary role in mesenchymal tumor diagnostics. To review molecular diagnostic tools available to the pathologist to further classify specific soft tissue tumor types and recurrent aberrations frequently examined. Advantages and limitations of individual approaches will also be highlighted. Previously published review articles, peer-reviewed research publications, and the extensive cytogenetic and molecular diagnostic experience of the authors to include case files of The University of Nebraska Medical Center. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic assays are used routinely for diagnostic purposes in soft tissue pathology and represent a powerful adjunct to complement conventional microscopy and clinicoradiographic evaluation in the formulation of an accurate diagnosis. Care should be taken, however, to recognize the limitations of these approaches. Ideally, more than one technical approach should be available to a diagnostic laboratory to compensate for the shortcomings of each approach in the assessment of individual specimens.

  16. Reparative inflammation takes charge of tissue regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karin, Michael; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation underlies many chronic and degenerative diseases, but it also mitigates infections, clears damaged cells and initiates tissue repair. Many of the mechanisms that link inflammation to damage repair and regeneration in mammals are conserved in lower organisms, indicating that it is an

  17. MAXILLOFACIAL SOFT TISSUE INJURIES IN NAIROBI, KENYA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-09

    Sep 9, 2012 ... Perodontology, Community and Preventive Dentistry, University of Nairobi, P. O. Box 19676-00202, Nairobi, Kenya. MAXILLOFACIAL SOFT TISSUE INJURIES IN NAIROBI, KENYA ..... dog- bites in which the peak incidence occurred in children aged less than ten years with an exponential decrease in ...

  18. Histopathology of Tilapia tissues harbouring Clinostomum tilapiae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tissues obtained from infected Oreochromis niloticus were processed sectioned and stained with haemotoxylin and eosin. Good sections were selected, studied and photographed. The histopathology revealed a proliferation of eosinophiles at the secondary lamellar of the gills. The site of attachment on the fish skin ...

  19. A continuous growth model for plant tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorg, Behruz; Krupinski, Pawel; Jönsson, Henrik

    2016-12-01

    Morphogenesis in plants and animals involves large irreversible deformations. In plants, the response of the cell wall material to internal and external forces is determined by its mechanical properties. An appropriate model for plant tissue growth must include key features such as anisotropic and heterogeneous elasticity and cell dependent evaluation of mechanical variables such as turgor pressure, stress and strain. In addition, a growth model needs to cope with cell divisions as a necessary part of the growth process. Here we develop such a growth model, which is capable of employing not only mechanical signals but also morphogen signals for regulating growth. The model is based on a continuous equation for updating the resting configuration of the tissue. Simultaneously, material properties can be updated at a different time scale. We test the stability of our model by measuring convergence of growth results for a tissue under the same mechanical and material conditions but with different spatial discretization. The model is able to maintain a strain field in the tissue during re-meshing, which is of particular importance for modeling cell division. We confirm the accuracy of our estimations in two and three-dimensional simulations, and show that residual stresses are less prominent if strain or stress is included as input signal to growth. The approach results in a model implementation that can be used to compare different growth hypotheses, while keeping residual stresses and other mechanical variables updated and available for feeding back to the growth and material properties.

  20. Lipidomics in tissues, cells and subcellular compartments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horn, Patrick J; Chapman, Kent D

    2012-01-01

    ...‐infusion MS, localization of lipids in tissues and cells by laser desorption/ionization MS, and even profiling of lipids in individual subcellular compartments by direct‐organelle MS. Applications of these approaches to achieve improved understanding of plant lipid metabolism, compartmentation and function are discussed.

  1. Growing And Assembling Cells Into Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David A.; Schwarz, Ray P.; Lewis, Marian L.; Cross, John H.; Huls, M. Helen

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory process for growth and assembly of mammalian cells into tissue-like masses demonstrated with hamster and rat cells. New process better able to provide culture environment with reduced fluid shear stress, freedom for three-dimensional spatial orientation of particles suspended in culture medium, and localization of particles of different or similar sedimentation properties in similar spatial region.

  2. [National guideline 'Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heineman, M.J.; Beerendonk, C.C.M.; Kaandorp, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of children and young adults with cancer increasingly results in cure, but for a number of female patients this is at the expense of infertility. For women and girls with cancer and the wish to have children in the future, cryopreservation of ovarian tissue may be a solution in the

  3. Gentamicin concentrations in human subcutaneous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Hanne; Kallehave, Finn Lasse; Kolmos, Hans Jørn Jepsen

    1996-01-01

    in human subcutaneous adipose tissue by a microdialysis technique. Seven healthy young volunteers each had four microdialysis probes placed in the fat (subcutaneous) layer of the abdominal skin. After the administration of a 240-mg gentamicin intravenous bolus, consecutive measurements of the drug...

  4. Cell–scaffold interaction within engineered tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Haiping; Liu, Yuanyuan, E-mail: Yuanyuan_liu@shu.edu.cn; Jiang, Zhenglong; Chen, Weihua; Yu, Yongzhe; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-05-01

    The structure of a tissue engineering scaffold plays an important role in modulating tissue growth. A novel gelatin–chitosan (Gel–Cs) scaffold with a unique structure produced by three-dimensional printing (3DP) technology combining with vacuum freeze-drying has been developed for tissue-engineering applications. The scaffold composed of overall construction, micro-pore, surface morphology, and effective mechanical property. Such a structure meets the essential design criteria of an ideal engineered scaffold. The favorable cell–matrix interaction supports the active biocompatibility of the structure. The structure is capable of supporting cell attachment and proliferation. Cells seeded into this structure tend to maintain phenotypic shape and secreted large amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) and the cell growth decreased the mechanical properties of scaffold. This novel biodegradable scaffold has potential applications for tissue engineering based upon its unique structure, which acts to support cell growth. - Highlights: • The scaffold is not only for providing a surface for cell residence but also for determining cell phenotype and retaining structural integrity. • The mechanical property of scaffold can be affected by activities of cell. • The scaffold provides a microenvironment for cell attachment, growth, and migration.

  5. Tissue Engineering Strategies in Ligament Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caglar Yilgor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ligaments are dense fibrous connective tissues that connect bones to other bones and their injuries are frequently encountered in the clinic. The current clinical approaches in ligament repair and regeneration are limited to autografts, as the gold standard, and allografts. Both of these techniques have their own drawbacks that limit the success in clinical setting; therefore, new strategies are being developed in order to be able to solve the current problems of ligament grafting. Tissue engineering is a novel promising technique that aims to solve these problems, by producing viable artificial ligament substitutes in the laboratory conditions with the potential of transplantation to the patients with a high success rate. Direct cell and/or growth factor injection to the defect site is another current approach aiming to enhance the repair process of the native tissue. This review summarizes the current approaches in ligament tissue engineering strategies including the use of scaffolds, their modification techniques, as well as the use of bioreactors to achieve enhanced regeneration rates, while also discussing the advances in growth factor and cell therapy applications towards obtaining enhanced ligament regeneration.

  6. Pigments in avocado tissue and oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Ofelia B O; Wong, Marie; McGhie, Tony K; Vather, Rosheila; Wang, Yan; Requejo-Jackman, Cecilia; Ramankutty, Padmaja; Woolf, Allan B

    2006-12-27

    Pigments are important contributors to the appearance and healthful properties of both avocado fruits and the oils extracted from these fruits. This study determined carotenoid and chlorophyll pigment concentrations in the skin and three sections of the flesh (outer dark green, middle pale green, and inner yellow flesh-nearest the seed) and anthocyanin concentrations in the skin of Hass avocado during ripening at 20 degrees C. Pigments were extracted from frozen tissue with acetone and measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Pigments were also measured in the oil extracted from freeze-dried tissue sections by an accelerated solvent extraction system using hexane. Carotenoids and chlorophylls identified in the skin, flesh, and oil were lutein, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, neoxanthin, violaxanthin, zeaxanthin, antheraxanthin, chlorophylls a and b, and pheophytins a and b with the highest concentrations of all pigments in the skin. Chlorophyllides a and b were identified in the skin and flesh tissues only. As the fruit ripened and softened, the skin changed from green to purple/black, corresponding to changes in skin hue angle, and a concomitant increase in cyanidin 3-O-glucoside and the loss of chlorophyllide a. In flesh tissue, chroma and lightness values decreased with ripening, with no changes in hue angle. The levels of carotenoids and chlorophylls did not change significantly during ripening. As fruit ripened, the total chlorophyll level in the oil from the flesh sections remained constant but declined in the oil extracted from the skin.

  7. Lysyl oxidase and adipose tissue dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastel, Emilie; Price, Emily; Sjöholm, Kajsa

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is an enzyme crucial for collagen fibre crosslinking and thus for fibrosis development. Fibrosis is characterised by a surplus of collagen fibre accumulation and is amongst others also a feature of obesity-associated dysfunctional adipose tissue (AT) which...

  8. Determinants of human adipose tissue gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viguerie, Nathalie; Montastier, Emilie; Maoret, Jean-José

    2012-01-01

    Weight control diets favorably affect parameters of the metabolic syndrome and delay the onset of diabetic complications. The adaptations occurring in adipose tissue (AT) are likely to have a profound impact on the whole body response as AT is a key target of dietary intervention. Identification ...

  9. Cell Source for Tissue and Organ Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Yuan, Yuyu; Yoo, James J.

    Organ printing, a novel approach in tissue engineering, applies computer-driven deposition of cells, growth factors, biomaterials layer-by-layer to create complex 3D tissue or organ constructs. This emerging technology shows great promise in regenerative medicine, because it may help to address current crisis of tissue and organ shortage for transplantation. Organ printing is developing fast, and there are exciting new possibilities in this area. Successful cell and organ printing requires many key elements. Among these, the choice of appropriate cells for printing is vital. This chapter surveys available cell sources for cell and organ printing application and discusses factors that affect cell choice. Special emphasis is put on several important factors, including the proposed printing system and bioprinters, the assembling method, and the target tissues or organs, which need to be considered to select proper cell sources and cell types. In this chapter, characterizations of the selected cells to justify and/or refine the cell selection will also be discussed. Finally, future prospects in this field will be envisioned.

  10. Confocal Raman Microscopy; applications in tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Apeldoorn, Aart A.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation describes the use of confocal Raman microscopy and spectroscopy in the field of tissue engineering. Moreover, it describes the combination of two already existing technologies, namely scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy in one apparatus for the enhancement

  11. Soft tissue Burkitt's lymphoma: radiological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Barredo, R; Fernández Echevarría, M A; del Riego, M; Canga, A

    1998-01-01

    An unusual case is reported of a soft tissue mass in the lower extremity, without bone involvement, in an 85-year-old woman; the histopathological diagnosis was Burkitt's lymphoma. Pertinent clinical history, histological examination, and imaging procedures allowed early diagnosis. To our knowledge, the radiological findings in Burkitt's lymphoma with this unusual clinical presentation have not been described previously.

  12. Optical diffusion property of chicken tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Patricia S.; Flamholz, Alex; Wong, Peter K.; Lieberman, David H.; Cheung, Tak D.; Itoka, Harriet; Minott, Troy; Quizhpi, Janie; Rodriguez, Jacquelin

    2004-11-01

    Chicken tissue acts as a turbid medium in optical wavelength. Optical characterization data of fresh chicken dark and white meat were studied using the theory of light diffusion. The gaussian-like transmission profile was used to determine the transport mean free path and absorption. The refractive index, a fundamental parameter, was extracted via transmission correlation function analysis without using index-matching fluid. The variation in refractive index also produced various small shifts in the oscillatory feature of the intensity spatial correlation function at distance shorter than the transport mean free path. The optical system was calibrated with porous silicate slabs containing different water contents and also with a solid alumina slab. The result suggested that the selective scattering/absorption of myoglobin and mitochondria in the dark tissues is consistent with the transmission data. The refractive index was similar for dark and white tissues at the He-Ne wavelength and suggested that the index could serve as a marker for quality control. Application to chicken lunchmeat samples revealed that higher protein and lower carbohydrate would shift the correlation toward smaller distance. The pure fat refractive index was different from that of the meat tissue. Application of refractive index as a fat marker is also discussed

  13. Experimental superficial candidiasis on tissue models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatilake, J A M S; Samaranayake, L P

    2010-07-01

    Candida species are common pathogens causing superficial mycoses primarily affecting the mucosa and the skin in humans. Crucial steps during pathogenesis of superficial candidiasis comprise fungal adhesion, colonisation and subsequent penetration of the respective tissues. Exploring these pathological events and perhaps fungal and tissue responses towards drug treatment is imperative in the management of this infection. Unfortunately, pathological biopsies of superficial candidiasis do not exhibit the early changes in the host-pathogen interaction as the tissues are already invaded by the fungi. In vivo experimental assessments of pathological processes of superficial candidiasis are also limited because of the difficulties in providing reproducible and comparable conditions in the host environment. Conversely, in vitro models have helped studying fungal-host interactions under more defined and controlled conditions. Some common in vitro models used to simulate superficial candidiasis are chick chorioallantoic membrane, mucosal explants and single layer or multiple layer cell cultures. Interestingly, these experimental approaches share advantages as well as disadvantages when compared with in vivo conditions. Hence, this review intends to discuss about the experimental superficial candidiasis produced in various tissue models and their advantages as well as disadvantages with a particular reference to further improvement of validity and reliability of such experiments.

  14. Breast Tissue Metabolism by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R.; Sharma, Uma

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are known to occur with oncogenesis and tumor progression. During malignant transformation, the metabolism of cells and tissues is altered. Cancer metabolism can be studied using advanced technologies that detect both metabolites and metabolic activities. Identification, characterization, and quantification of metabolites (metabolomics) are important for metabolic analysis and are usually done by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or by mass spectrometry. In contrast to the magnetic resonance imaging that is used to monitor the tumor morphology during progression of the disease and during therapy, in vivo NMR spectroscopy is used to study and monitor tumor metabolism of cells/tissues by detection of various biochemicals or metabolites involved in various metabolic pathways. Several in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo NMR studies using 1H and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) nuclei have documented increased levels of total choline containing compounds, phosphomonoesters and phosphodiesters in human breast cancer tissues, which is indicative of altered choline and phospholipid metabolism. These levels get reversed with successful treatment. Another method that increases the sensitivity of substrate detection by using nuclear spin hyperpolarization of 13C-lableled substrates by dynamic nuclear polarization has revived a great interest in the study of cancer metabolism. This review discusses breast tissue metabolism studied by various NMR/MRS methods. PMID:28590405

  15. Temperature Effects on Brain Tissue in Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid, Badar; Gilchrist, Michael; 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2012.04.005

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research has been carried out for at least 50 years to understand the mechanical properties of brain tissue in order to understand the mechanisms of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The observed large variability in experimental results may be due to the inhomogeneous nature of brain tissue and to the broad range of test conditions. However, test temperature is also considered as one of the factors influencing the properties of brain tissue. In this research, the mechanical properties of porcine brain have been investigated at 22C (room temperature) and at 37C (body temperature) while maintaining a constant preservation temperature of approximately 4-5C. Unconfined compression tests were performed at dynamic strain rates of 30 and 50/s using a custom made test apparatus. There was no significant difference (p = 0.8559 - 0.9290) between the average engineering stresses of the brain tissue at the two different temperature conditions. The results of this study should help to understand the behavior of bra...

  16. Cardio-adipose tissue cross-talk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Søren; Jensen, Jan Skov; Bjerre, Mette

    2014-01-01

    increases adiponectin secretion, indicating that NPs may improve adipose tissue function and in this way function as a cardio-protective agent in HF. Accordingly we investigated the interplay between plasma adiponectin, plasma proBNP, and development of HF. METHODS AND RESULTS: We prospectively followed...

  17. Fundamentals of bladder tissue engineering | Mahfouz | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tissue engineering relies upon three essential pillars; the scaffold, the cells seeded on scaffolds and lastly the environmental conditions, including growth factors, cytokines and extracellular matrix (ECM) which promote angiogenesis and neurogenesis of the regenerated organs. The choice of the scaffold and the type of ...

  18. Does bariatric surgery improve adipose tissue function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frikke-Schmidt, H.; O’Rourke, R. W.; Lumeng, C. N.; Sandoval, D. A.; Seeley, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment for obesity. Not only do these types of surgeries produce significant weight loss but also they improve insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolic function. The aim of this review is to explore how altered physiology of adipose tissue may contribute to the potent metabolic effects of some of these procedures. This includes specific effects on various fat depots, the function of individual adipocytes and the interaction between adipose tissue and other key metabolic tissues. Besides a dramatic loss of fat mass, bariatric surgery shifts the distribution of fat from visceral to the subcutaneous compartment favoring metabolic improvement. The sensitivity towards lipolysis controlled by insulin and catecholamines is improved, adipokine secretion is altered and local adipose inflammation as well as systemic inflammatory markers decreases. Some of these changes have been shown to be weight loss independent, and novel hypothesis for these effects includes include changes in bile acid metabolism, gut microbiota and central regulation of metabolism. In conclusion bariatric surgery is capable of improving aspects of adipose tissue function and do so in some cases in ways that are not entirely explained by the potent effect of surgery. PMID:27272117

  19. The endocrine function of adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner de Jesus Pinto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently it is considered the adipose tissue as a dynamic structure involved in many physiological and metabolic processes, produces and releases a variety of active peptides known by the generic name of adipokines that act performing endocrine, paracrine and autocrine. Furthermore, numbers expressed receptors that respond allows the afferent signals from endocrine organs, and also central nervous system. In 1987, the adipose tissue has been identified as the major site of metabolism of steroid hormones, thereafter, in 1994, it was recognized as an endocrine organ and the leptin being an early secretory products identified. In addition other biologically active substances were being isolated, such as adiponectin, resistin, TNF-a, interleukin-6 and others. The adipokines derived from adipose tissue modulate many metabolic parameters such as control of food intake, energy balance and peripheral insulin sensitivity, for example. Thus, the altered secretion of adipokines by adipose tissue may have metabolic effects may present complex relations with the pathophysiological process of obesity, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, atherosclerosis and Diabetes mellitus. The understanding of the molecular processes occurring in the adipocytes may provide new tools for the treatment of pathophysiological conditions such as, for example, metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes mellitus.

  20. Fat tissue, aging, and cellular senescence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tchkonia, T.; Morbeck, D.E.; Zglinicki, T. von; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Lustgarten, J.; Scrable, H.; Khosla, S.; Jensen, M.D.; Kirkland, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Fat tissue, frequently the largest organ in humans, is at the nexus of mechanisms involved in longevity and age-related metabolic dysfunction. Fat distribution and function change dramatically throughout life. Obesity is associated with accelerated onset of diseases common in old age, while fat