WorldWideScience

Sample records for hemifacial atrophy case

  1. Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy with Morphea of Cheek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Auluck

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma is a rare collagen disorder in which fibrosis of skin, subcutaneous tissues and muscles can occur with occasional involvement of bones. Localized scleroderma is a benign condition but can cause significant deformity when it affects the face. We report a case of localized scleroderma of the face causing progressive hemifacial atrophy.

  2. Hemifacial atrophy treated with autologous fat transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi Vijay

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A 23-year-old male developed right hemifacial atrophy following marphea profunda. Facial asymmetry due to residual atrophy was treated with autologous fat harvested from buttocks with marked cosmetic improvement.

  3. Progressive hemifacial atrophy with ciliary body atrophy and ocular hypotony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Ashwini Kini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive hemifacial atrophy (PHA is a disease of unknown etiology affecting one-half of the face. Ocular involvement is uncommon. Atrophy of iris is rare, with only a few cases of partial atrophy being reported in the literature. We report a case of total atrophy of iris and ciliary body with associated ocular hypotony in a 16-year-old girl with PHA. We believe this is the first reported case of complete atrophy of iris and ciliary body in PHA. Ocular hypotony in PHA was thought to be due to intra-ocular inflammation. However in our case it appears to be secondary to severe atrophy of the ciliary body.

  4. Hemifacial microsomia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapur R

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Hemifacial microsomia is a congenital malformation in which there is a deficiency in the amount of hard and soft tissue on one side of the face. It is primarily a syndrome of the first branchial arch, involving underdevelopment of the temporomandibular joint, mandibular ramus, masticatory muscles and the ear. The affected ear may have an external soft-tissue malformation in addition to being lower set than on the contra lateral side. Hearing loss may result from underdevelopment of the osseous components of the auditory system and a diminished or absent external auditory meatus. Occasionally, second branchial arch defects involving the facial nerve and facial muscles coexist with Hemifacial microsomia. Radiographic examination in case of Hemifacial microsomia is of limited value because of superimposition of normal and abnormal bony structures. The skeletal and soft-tissue findings of a patient with Hemifacial microsomia who underwent three-dimensional computerized tomography is presented here to improve our knowledge and diagnostic skill of this uncommon entity.

  5. Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy and Linear Scleroderma En Coup de Sabre: A Spectrum of the Same Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Khamaganova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar clinical and histhopathological features in progressive hemifacial atrophy and linear scleroderma en coup de sabre are well known. Trauma may predispose to the development of both diseases. The lack of association with anti-Borrelia antibodies was shown in both cases as well. The otolaryngological and endocrine disorders may be associated findings in both diseases. However, there are certain differences in neurological and ophthalmological changes in the diseases.

  6. Use of various free flaps in progressive hemifacial atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Rongmin; Heo, Chanyeong; Kim, Baek-kyu

    2011-11-01

    Romberg disease is an uncommon condition manifested by progressive hemifacial atrophy of the skin, soft tissue, and bone. Facial asymmetry with soft tissue deficiency in Romberg disease causes a significant disability affecting the social life and can bring about many psychological problems. The aim of surgical treatment is cosmetic amelioration of the defect. Several conventional reconstructive procedures have been used for correcting facial asymmetry. They include fat injections, dermal fat grafts, filler injections, cartilage and bone grafts, and pedicled and free flaps. We report our experiences with 11 patients involving 11 free flaps with a minimum 1-year follow-up. All patients were classified as having moderate to severe atrophy. The average age at disease onset was 4.5 years; the average duration of atrophy was 5.2 years. No patients were operated on with a quiescent interval of less than 1 year. The average age at operation was 20.1 years, ranging from 10 to 55 years. Reconstruction was performed using 4 groin dermofat free flaps, 4 latissimus dorsi muscle free flaps, and 3 other perforator flaps. To achieve the finest symmetrical and aesthetic results, several ancillary procedures were performed in 4 patients. These procedures included Le Fort I leveling osteotomy, sagittal split ramus osteotomy, reduction malarplasty and angle plasty, rib and calvarial bone graft, correction of alopecia, and additional fat graft. All patients were satisfied with the results. We believe that a free flap transfer is the requisite treatment modality for severe degree of facial asymmetry in Romberg disease.

  7. Hemifacial Microsomia: A Case Report and Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhini Madi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemifacial Microsomia is a developmental craniofacial anomaly typically displaying reduced growth and development of half of the face as a result of abnormal development of first and second branchial arches. The patients with Hemifacial Microsomia usually exhibit unilateral involvement of the face but occasionally might involve both the sides. Cases which show vertebral anomalies and epibulbar dermoids have been considered to form a separate category within this condition . The condition is now known to be extremely complex and heterogenous. Here we present a case of Hemifacial Microsomia with its characteristic clinical and radiographic features that will help us in diagnosing and differentiating this rare entity from other closely related syndromes [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 625-635

  8. Parry-Romberg syndrome (progressive hemifacial atrophy) with spasmodic dysphonia--a rare association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugundhan, K; Selvakumar, C J; Gunasekaran, K; Thiruvarutchelvan, K; Sivakumar, S; Anguraj, M; Arun, S

    2014-04-01

    Parry-Romberg syndrome is a rare clinical entity characterised by progressive hemifacial atrophy with appearance of 'saber'. Various neurological and otorhinolaryngological disorders are associated with this syndrome. The association of Parry -Romberg syndrome with Spasmodic dysphonia has rarely been reported. A 37 year old female presented with progressive atrophy of tissues of left side of face for 10 years and change in voice for 1 year. On examination, wasting and atrophy of tissues including tongue was noted on left side of the face. ENT examination revealed adductor spasmodic dysphonia. We report the rare association of Parry -Romberg syndrome with spasmodic dysphonia.

  9. Espasmo hemifacial familiar: relato de dois casos Familial hemifacial spasm: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EGBERTO REIS BARBOSA

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam os achados clínicos e angiográficos de dois casos de espasmo hemifacial familiar. Esta é a quinta descrição sobre esse tema na literatura e apresenta mãe e filha com idades de 76 e 51 anos respectivamente, nas quais o lado esquerdo foi o acometido. Exames de angiorressonância realizados nas pacientes revelaram dolicobasilar com origem lateralizada à esquerda para ambos os casos. Também demonstraram artéria cerebelar póstero-inferior muito desenvolvida e irregularidades murais nas artérias vertebrais e basilar sugestivas de arteriosclerose na mãe e vasos intracranianos levemente alongados na filha. Dados de revisão da literatura e sobre a etiologia do espasmo hemifacial são enfocados.The authors report the clinical and angiographical findings of two cases of familial hemifacial spasm. This is the fifth description in the literature and presents mother and daughter at the ages of 76 and 51 respectively, in whom the left side was affected. They underwent exams of angioresonance that showed dolichobasilar with left side origin in both patients. The exams also demonstrated postero-inferior cerebellar artery very developed and irregularities in the walls of the vertebral and basilar arteries suggestive of arteriosclerosis in the mother and slightly elongated intracranial vessels in the daughter. Literature review and etiology data of the hemifacial spasm are focused.

  10. Hemifacial spasm due to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa AbdelHamid, MD

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemifacial spasm (HFS happens because of vascular compression of the facial nerve at the root exit zone. Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD is a very rare cause of HFS. VBD is diagnosed by computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance imaging. Here, we report a case of 65-year-old female patient with HFS due to VBD. We discuss the complications and the treatment options for the case.

  11. Decompression of the facial nerve in cases of hemifacial spasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Kettel

    1954-12-01

    Full Text Available Among 11 patients a complete cure was obtained in one case, a fair result in 4 cases, while in 6 cases the effect of the operation has only been temporary and full recurrence has taken place. Even if decompression has thus resulted in a few recoveries and improvements, the results in the majority of cases have been disappointing. Everything points to hemifacial spasm being due to a disorder of the lower motor neuron. Intracranial lesions in the vicinity of the facial nerve are known to have resulted in irritation and spasm. It may be perfectly true that the majority of cases of hemifacial spasm are due to a lesion, the nature of which may vary, in the Fallopian canal near the stylomastoid foramen, not least the postparalytic following Bell's palsy. But the disappointing results of decompression seems to indicate that at the time of operation irreparable damage to the nerve has in the majority of cases been already done. Consequently I gave up decompression in cases of hemifacial spasm some years ago. Good results from injections of alcohol into the nerve have been reported13 but I prefer selective sections of the branches to the muscles involved as described by German and Greenwood8.

  12. Nonsurgical Treatment of Hemifacial Microsomia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Mahtab; Farzan, Arash

    2015-11-01

    Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is a birth defect involving craniofacial structures derived from the first and second branchial arches. Although it is a relatively uncommon malformation, it is the second most common craniofacial birth defect after cleft lip and palate (CL/P). This is a case report about the successful orthodontic treatment of a patient with mild hemifacial microsomia (HFM), using a non-surgical orthopedic and orthodontic treatment approach. The aim of this approach was to make the best noninvasive modality to treat HFM. A 7-year-old boy with a mild HFM presented with a convex profile and slight chin deviation. Orthopedic treatment performed using a hybrid functional and high pulls headgear. Treatment continued by fixed orthodontic straight wire appliance to achieve perfect occlusion. Excellent esthetic and functional results achieved; total treatment duration was about 72 months.

  13. Hemifacial microsomia: clinicoradiological insight and report of a case

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hemifacial microsomia is a congenital malformation characterized by deficiency in the amount of hard and soft tissue on one side of the face. It is primarily a syndrome of the first branchial arch, involving underdevelopment of the temporomandibular joint, masticatory muscles, mandibular ramus, ear and, ...

  14. Idiopathic hemifacial spasm responsive to zonisamide: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gallelli, Luca; Palleria, Caterina; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2009-01-01

    We describe a patient with idiopathic hemifacial spasm (HFS) that was responsive to zonisamide treatment. A 65-year-old woman presented with a 4-year history of left-sided HFS developing gradually, starting from the upper facial muscles. After several analyses, the diagnosis of idiopathic HFS was made, and the clonazepam treatment (0.5 mg every 8 hours) was started, without a complete remission of symptoms. Therefore, zonisamide (150 mg twice a day for a 6-week period) was added, with a complete resolution. The rechallenge with zonisamide after its dechallenge confirmed its effectiveness. During follow-up, the patient remained symptom-free, with no adverse drug reactions. We suggest that zonisamide could represent a useful therapeutic option in the treatment of idiopathic HFS.

  15. The Clinical Observation on 10 cases of patients with Hemifacial Spasm Treated by Soyeom Pharmacupuncture at G20(Pungji

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Heo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The main purpose of this research is to evaluate the effect of treatment with Soyeom Pharmacupuncture at G20(Punji for ten patients with hemifacial spasm. Methods : We have treated them with acupuncture treatment and Soyeom Pharmacupuncture at G20(Pungji, and evaluated the effect by Scott`s scale. Results : After treatment, the grades of spasm intensity classified by Scott`s description were improved in 9 cases. Conclusion : This data suggested that Soyeom Pharmacupuncture at G20(Pungji for hemifacial spasm was effective and will be attempted to the patients with it.

  16. Hemifacial spasm; The value of vertebral angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hak Seok; Kim, Myung Soon; Han, Yong Pyo

    1992-01-01

    In order to evaluate the value of vertebral angiography in assesment of hemifacial spasm, We reviewed retrospectively the vertebral angiography of 28 patients (30 cases) with surgically proved hemifacial spasm but normal CT scans of posterior fossa. There were 9 males and 19 females. Angiography revealed vascular focus of hemifacial spasm located at anterior inferior cerebellar artery , posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and vertebral artery in 19, 9, and 2 cases respectively. Right side was involved in 20 cases. All involved vessels were elongated, tortuous, and dilated. In conclusion, vertebral angiography was valuable in evaluating hemifacial spasm of vascular origin in the posterior fossa

  17. Case of Rapid Progression of Hemiatrophy on the Face: A New Clinical Entity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisashi Nomura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A lot of diseases, including lupus profundus, morphea, lipodystrophy, and Parry-Romberg syndrome, may manifest progressive hemifacial atrophy. These diseases usually progress slowly and rapid progression of atrophy is extremely rare. We report a case of elderly-onset rapid progression of hemifacial atrophy only in three weeks. Our case did not meet variable differential diagnoses. We discuss the clinical character of the patient against the past of literature and suppose it may be a new clinical entity.

  18. A case of hepatic atrophy by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, Takumi; Ku, Yonson; Saitoh, Yoichi

    1994-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman was treated with 60 Co irradiation (total dose 6000 rads) focused on the right side porta hepatis under the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma in 1975. Seventeen years after the treatment, she was admitted to our institution because of dull pain at right hypochondriac region. Adominal CT demonstrated an extreme hepatic atrophy and tumor mass in the right lobe of the liver. In November, 1991 right trisegmentectomy was performed under the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. Laparotomy revealed the extreme atrophy of the right lobe and associated hypertrophy of the left lobe of the liver. In this case radiation hepatitis occurred after irradiation to the liver and it was followed by the extreme hepatic atrophy as a long term effect of high dose irradiation on the liver. (author)

  19. Espasmo hemifacial: resultados do tratamento cirúrgico em 14 casos Hemifacial spasm: report of 14 cases submitted to surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui R. D. Carvalho

    1973-06-01

    Full Text Available Quatorze pacientes com espasmo hemifacial foram submetidos a exploração cirúrgica e neurolise do 7º par craniano no ângulo ponto-cerebelar. Em 7 pacientes havia indubitável compressão do nervo facial por alça anômala da artéria cerebelar anterior e inferior sendo que um paciente também apresentava malformação de Arnold-Chiari. Em um paciente havia aracnoidite envolvendo o nervo. Em 6 outros, o nervo achava-se aparentemente livre. Houve alívio imediato e duradouro do espasmo em 10 pacientes, 2 permaneceram inalterados e um apresentou recidiva após 10 meses. Houve um óbito no pós-operatório imediato, conseqüente a traumatismo craniano por queda do paciente.Fourteen patients with hemifacial spasm were submitted to surgical exposure and neurolysis of the seventh nerve at the cerebellopontine angle. Seven patients had an anomalous anterior inferior cerebellar artery pulsating on the nerve, being present in one patient also Arnold-Chiari malformation. Another patient had chronic arachnoiditis involving the facial nerve. In 6 patients no abnormalities were found in the posterior fossa. There was complete relief of the spasm in 10 patients, 2 were unchanged, 1 had recurrence 10 months later and 1 died in the post-operative period due to head injury sustained during a fall.

  20. Successful surgical treatment of intractable hemifacial spasm: A case report and review of cerebellar hamartomas of the floor of the fourth ventricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph H. Miller

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hamartomas involving the floor of the fourth ventricle and cerebellum are rare, but can be associated with medically recalcitrant hemifacial spasm. These lesions present early in the neonatal or infantile period and respond well to surgical excision. Case Report: A 3-month-old white male presented with recurrent left hemifacial spasm, left eye deviation, and absent movement of the extremities. The patient was found to have a left eccentric lesion in the floor of the fourth ventricle and cerebellum. The patient showed no improvement with medical therapy by 6 months of age. He was taken to the operating room for suboccipital craniotomy and removal of the posterior arch of C1 followed by intralesional recording of epileptogenic activity and gross total resection of the lesion. After histologic analysis, the lesion was determined to be ectopic cerebral tissue consistent with a hamartoma. Postoperative MRI showed complete removal of the lesion, and the patient exhibited complete remission of his hemifacial spasm and associated symptoms. Conclusions: Hamartomas involving the floor of the fourth ventricle can present with hemifacial spasm and respond well to surgical excision. Keywords: Cerebellar, Seizure, Epilepsy, Hamartoma

  1. Hemifacial spasm in a patient with neurofibromatosis and Arnold-Chiari malformation: a unique case association Espasmo hemifacial em paciente com neurofibromatose e malformação de Arnold-Chiari: uma associação rara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Carvalho Felício

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association of hemifacial spasm (HFS, Chiari type I malformation (CIM and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 has not been described yet. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 31-year-old woman with NF1 who developed a right-sided HFS. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI a CIM was seen without syringomyelia. The patient has been successfully treated with botulinum toxin type A injections for 5 years without major side effects. CONCLUSION:Clinical features of HFS, CMI and NF1 are highlighted together with their possible relationship. Also, therapeutic strategies are also discussed.INTRODUÇÃO: A associação entre espasmo hemifacial (EHF, malformação de Chiari tipo I (MCI e neurofibromatose tipo I (NFI ainda não foi descrita. RELATO DO CASO: Relatamos o caso de mulher com 31 anos com NFI que desenvolveu EHF à direita. Na ressonância magnética (RM foi observada MCI sem seringomielia associada. A paciente foi tratada com sucesso com toxina botulínica tipo A por 5 anos sem efeitos colaterais. CONCLUSÃO: Ressaltamos as características clínicas do EHF, MCI e NFI assim como uma possível relação entre elas. Além disto, discutimos também estratégias terapêuticas.

  2. Lipomatosis: a diverse form of hemifacial hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Preeti Chawla; Umarji, Hemant R.; Arora, Aman; Ramaswami, Easwaran

    2012-01-01

    A case of hemifacial hyperplasia that presented with muscular, skeletal, and dental hyperplasia along with lipomatous infiltration was described. Advanced imaging was useful in identifying the lipomatous infiltration present in the lesion, which raises the possibility of lipomatosis having a diverse presentation in hemifacial hyperplasia. As there was a scarcity of related literature in the field of dentomaxillofacial radiology, this report would make us familiar with its computed tomographic and magnetic resonance image findings.

  3. Clinical application of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in progressive hemifacial atrophy (Parry-Romberg disease) with microfat grafting techniques using 3-dimensional computed tomography and 3-dimensional camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kyung Suk; Oh, Tae Suk; Kim, Hoon; Chung, In Wook; Lee, Kang Woo; Lee, Hyo Bo; Park, Eun Jung; Jung, Jae Seob; Shin, Il Seob; Ra, Jeong Chan; Choi, Jong Woo

    2012-09-01

    Parry-Romberg disease is a rare condition that results in progressive hemifacial atrophy, involving the skin, dermis, subcutaneous fat, muscle, and, finally, cartilage and bone. Patients have been treated with dermofat or fat grafts or by microvascular free flap transfer. We hypothesized that adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) may improve the results of microfat grafting through enhancing angiogenesis. We evaluated the utility of ASC in microfat grafting of patients with Parry-Romberg disease by measuring the change in the hemifacial volumes after injection of ASCs with microfat grafts or microfat grafts alone. In April 2008, this investigation was approved by the Korean Food and Drug Administration and the institutional review board of the Asan Medical Center (Seoul, Korea) that monitor investigator-initiated trials. Between May 2008 and January 2009, 10 volunteers with Parry-Romberg disease (5 men and 5 women; mean age, 28 y) were recruited; 5 received ASC and microfat grafts and 5 received microfat grafts only. The mean follow-up period was 15 months. Adipose-derived stem cells were obtained from abdominal fat by liposuction and were cultured for 2 weeks. On day 14, patients were injected with fat grafts alone or plus (in the test group) 1 × 10 ASCs. Patients were evaluated postoperatively using a 3-dimensional camera and 3-dimensional CT scans, and grafted fat volumes were objectively calculated. Successful outcomes were evident in all 5 patients receiving microfat grafts and ASCs, and the survival of grafted fat was better than in patients receiving microfat grafts alone. Before surgery, the mean difference between ipsilateral and contralateral hemiface volume in patients receiving microfat grafts and ASCs was 21.71 mL decreasing to 4.47 mL after surgery. Overall resorption in this ASC group was 20.59%. The mean preoperative difference in hemiface volume in those receiving microfat grafts alone was 8.32 mL decreasing to 3.89 mL after surgery. Overall

  4. MICROVASCULAR DECOMPRESSION FOR HEMIFACIAL SPASM--TECHNICAL NOTES AND COMPLICATION PRE VENTION: EXPERIENCE OF 338 CASES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵卫国; 沈建康; 成侃; 胡锦清; 濮春华; 卞留贯; 孙青芳; 朱军

    2003-01-01

    Objective To summarize our clinical experience of microvascular decompression (MVD) for medically intractable hemifacial spasm(HFS) patients with emphasis on microsurgical manipulation and to improve cure rate and avoid surgical complications.MethodsThree hundred and thirty eight patients with HFS underwent MVD under general anesthesia. With the help of "zero retraction" technique, prosthesis can be properly inserted between offending vessel loop and affected facial nerve REZ in a "rolling ball" fashion under operative microscope.ResultsSurgical intervention achieved high relief rate of 91.4% and no major complications, with low recurrence rate of only 3.2% after averaging more than two years follow up (M=32 months).ConclusionIt is possible to approach to the facial nerve REZ with "zero retraction", which is fundamentally important to clear from cranial nerve and cerebellar injury. Skilled microsurgical technique along with correct recognition and mobilization of offending vessels are a must to assure MVD a highly efficacious and low risk treatment of choice for HFS patients.

  5. Acute hemifacial dystonia possibly induced by clebopride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Domenico; Plastino, Massimiliano; Marcello, Maria Giovanna; Mungari, Pasquale; Fava, Antonietta

    2009-01-01

    Dystonic reactions produce twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal posturing. Severe dystonic reactions have been shown to occur in concert with numerous medications. This report details the case of a patient who developed hemifacial dystonia as acute side reaction from administration of clebopride for dyspeptic prophylaxis. When the drug was immediately stopped, the dystonic posture disappeared completely within 2 weeks. The use of clebopride may be associated with not only a reversible or persistent parkinsonism syndrome but also hemifacial dystonia; therefore, attention must be drawn to this possible side effect.

  6. Hemifacial spasm: conservative and surgical treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstengel, Christian; Matthes, Marc; Baldauf, Jörg; Fleck, Steffen; Schroeder, Henry

    2012-10-01

    Hemifacial spasm is a neuromuscular movement disorder characterized by brief or persistent involuntary contractions of the muscles innervated by the facial nerve. Its prevalence has been estimated at 11 cases per 100 000 individuals. Among the patients who were operated on by our team, the mean interval from diagnosis to surgery was 8.2 years, and more than half of them learned of the possibility of surgical treatment only through a personal search for information on the condition. These facts motivated us to write this article to raise the awareness of hemifacial spasm and its neurosurgical treatment among physicians who will encounter it. This review article is based on a selective literature search and on our own clinical experience. Hemifacial spasm is usually caused by an artery compressing the facial nerve at the root exit zone of the brainstem. 85-95% of patients obtain moderate or marked relief from local injections of botulinum toxin (BTX), which must be repeated every 3 to 4 months. Alternatively, microvascular decompression has a success rate of about 85%. Local botulinum-toxin injection is a safe and well-tolerated symptomatic treatment for hemifacial spasm. In the long term, however, lasting relief can only be achieved by microvascular decompression, a microsurgical intervention with a relatively low risk and a high success rate.

  7. A case of dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Sadanari; Komiya, Tadatoshi

    1988-01-01

    A clinical case of dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA) was reported. We established several aspects on the basis of MRI findings and a neuro-otological study. A 47-year-old woman had gait disturbance, involuntary movements, speech disturbance, and memory disturbance at the age of 42. She was admitted to the hospital because of worsening of the gait disturbance. Neurological examinations showed choreo-athetosis of the face, neck and upper extremities, mental disturbance, and scanning speech. However, she had neither ocular disturbance nor epilepsy or myoclonus. On the MRI-CT, an atrophy of midbrain and pontine tegmentum was observed. The neuro-otological study showed gaze nystagmus at the horizontal gaze, rebound nystagmus, hypometria of the saccade, saccadic pursuit, reduction of the optokinetic nystagmus, and increase in caloric nystagmus by means of visual input. A severe atrophy of the brainstem tegmentum and a mild atrophy of the cerebellar hemisphere and cerebral cortex are regarded as neuro-radiological features of DRPLA. Moreover, tegmental atrophy is related to ocular disturbance as a clinical feature. Various neuro-otological findings reveal many systems of ocular movements, i.e., a smooth pursuit system, a saccade system, and a vestibulo-ocular reflex system, involving flocculus. DRPLA can be clinically diagnosed by means of clinical features, MRI findings, and neuro-otological findings. A variety of neuro-otological abnormalities may indicate a progression of the ocular disturbance and a variety of lesions. (author)

  8. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly with neurogenic muscular atrophy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scola Rosana Herminia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 3-1/2-year-old girl with hypotonia, multiple joint contractures, hip luxation, arachnodactyly, adducted thumbs, dolichostenomelia, and abnormal external ears suggesting the diagnosis of congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA. The serum muscle enzimes were normal and the needle electromyography showed active and chronic denervation. The muscle biopsy demonstrated active and chronic denervation compatible with spinal muscular atrophy. Analysis of exons 7 and 8 of survival motor neuron gene through polymerase chain reaction did not show deletions. Neurogenic muscular atrophy is a new abnormality associated with CCA, suggesting that CCA is clinically heterogeneous.

  9. Crossed cerebellar atrophy in cases with cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo; Iwabuchi, Sadamu.

    1989-01-01

    Crossed cerebellar atrophy (CCA) was investigated by X-ray CT to establish the incidence, mechanism, and the relation to cerebral lesions in 130 cases of unilateral supratentorial cerebrovascular diseases. The 130 cases consisted of 83 males and 47 females with cerebral infarction (65 cases) and cerebral hemorrhage (65 cases). The patients' average age was 57.6 years. Crossed cerebellar atrophy was demonstrated in 8 cases (6.2%), 6 of whom had massive cerebral infarction in the middle cerebral artery area (9.2% of the 65 cases of cerebral infarction. The six cases of CCA caused by cerebral infarction had lesions in the frontal and temporal lobes. Two had a cerebral hemorrhage in the putamen and in the thalamus, respectively, accounting for 3.1% of the 65 cases of cerebral hemorrhage. Of the 2 cases, one had putaminal hemorrhage, and the other had thalamic hemorrhage. Cerebrovascular stroke had occured in these patients with CCA more than 2 months previously. In 5 of the 8 cases of CCA, atrophy was present in the basis pedunculi and the basis pontis on the side of the cerebral lesion. However, neither dilation nor deformity of the fourth ventricle was present in any of the patients, suggesting that none of the CCA patients had atrophy of the dentate nucleus. The CCA patients had massive cerebral lesion in the frontal and temporal lobes or atrophy of the basis pedunculi and basis pontis, suggesting the presence of the transsynaptic degeneration of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway. In the case of the thalamic hemorrhage, who had not hemorrhagic lesion in the frontal and temporal lobes, atrophy of the basis peduncli and basis pontis was not observed. Though dilation or deformity of the fourth ventricle is not observed in this case, presence of the degeneration of the dentate-rubro-thalamic pathway cannot be denied. CCA seems to be caused by both the transsynaptic degeneration of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway and the dentate-rubro-thalamic pathway. (J.P.N.)

  10. A case of multiple system atrophy-parkinsonian type with stuttering- and palilalia-like dysfluencies and putaminal atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yoshikazu; Umezaki, Toshiro; Uehara, Taira; Yamaguchi, Hiroo; Yamashita, Koji; Hiwatashi, Akio; Sawatsubashi, Motohiro; Adachi, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Yumi; Murakami, Daisuke; Kira, Jun-Ichi; Nakagawa, Takashi

    2017-11-14

    Both developmental and acquired stuttering are related to the function of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical loop, which includes the putamen. Here, we present a case of stuttering- and palilalia-like dysfluencies that manifested as an early symptom of multiple system atrophy-parkinsonian type (MSA-P) and bilateral atrophy of the putamen. The patient was a 72-year-old man with no history of developmental stuttering who presented with a stutter for consultation with our otorhinolaryngology department. The patient was diagnosed with MSA-P based on parkinsonism, autonomic dysfunction, and bilateral putaminal atrophy revealed by T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Treatment with levodopa improved both the motor functional deficits related to MSA-P and stuttering-like dysfluencies while reading; however, the palilalia-like dysfluencies were much less responsive to levodopa therapy. The patient died of aspiration pneumonia two years after his first consultation at our hospital. In conclusion, adult-onset stuttering- and palilalia-like dysfluencies warrant careful examination of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical loop, and especially the putamen, using neuroimaging techniques. Acquired stuttering may be related to deficits in dopaminergic function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy, and deafness: A case of Wolfram (DIDMOAD) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Nasrollah; Bashardoust, Bahman; Zakeri, Anahita; Salehifar, Azita; Tavosi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    To report a case of Wolfram syndrome (WS) characterized by diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, progressive optic atrophy, and deafness. A 19-year-old female patient, a known case of diabetes mellitus type I from six years before, presented with progressive vision loss since four years earlier. On fundoscopic examination, she had bilateral optic atrophy without diabetic retinopathy. The patient also had diabetes insipidus, neurosensory deafness, and neurogenic bladder. WS should be considered a differential diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus who present with optic atrophy, and it is necessary to perform a hearing test as well as collecting 24-h urine output.

  12. Facial hemiatrophy: Review of literature and a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha S Tijare

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A case report of hemifacial atrophy is presented in this paper. It is also known as Parry-Romberg syndrome, is an uncommon degenerative and poorly understood condition. It is characterized by progressive atrophy of the skin, subcutaneous tissue, muscle, cartilage or bone; the condition can leave a marked deformity on one side of the face. The incidence and the cause of this alteration is debatable. The most common complications that appear in association to this health disorder are: trigeminal neuritis, facial paresthesia, severe headache and epilepsy. Now, plastic surgery with graft of autogenous fat can be performed, after stabilization of the disease, to correct the deformity. Orthodontic treatment can help in the correction of any associated malformation. This presentation gives a review of concern literature about the etiology, physiopathology, differential diagnosis and treatment of hemifacial atrophy.

  13. Cerebellar atrophy related to chronic exposure to toluene: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito Pereira Damasceno

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available A 31-year-old woman presented slowly progressing ataxia and neurasthenic symptoms after 14-year occupational exposure to low concentration toluene vapour. Examination disclosed only cerebellar signs. Cognitive functions were normal except moderate visuo-spatial and constructive deficit CT imaging showed severe pancerebellar atrophy without pathological signs in other brain structures. Two years after she was removed from workplace, CT imaging and ataxia showed no worsening, while visuo-constructive function improved. The authors warn against possible neurotoxic risk associated with this kind of exposure.

  14. Atrophy of the brachialis muscle after a displaced clavicle fracture in an Ironman triathlete: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knechtle Patrizia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Clavicle fractures are frequent injuries in athletes and midshaft clavicle fractures in particular are well-known injuries in Ironman triathletes. In 2000, Auzou et al. described the mechanism leading to an isolated truncular paralysis of the musculocutaneous nerve after a shoulder trauma. It is well-known that nerve palsies can lead to an atrophy of the associated muscle if they persist for months or even longer. In this case report we describe a new case of an Ironman triathlete suffering from a persistent isolated atrophy of the brachialis muscle. The atrophy occurred following a displaced midshaft clavicle fracture acquiring while falling off his bike after hitting a duck during a competition.

  15. REHABILITATION OF SEVERELY ATROPHIED UPPER JAW WITH INTRAOSSAL DENTAL IMPLANTS - clinical case

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Chenchev; Radka Cholakova; Cvetan Cvetanov; Ir. Mitarcheva

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this presentation is to show the difficulty in prosthetization of a clinical case with a pronounced atrophy of the upper jaw and the various types and nature of restrictions imposed by the requirements of the patient. Methods: The clinical analysis, surgical protocol and prosthetic solution are presented in the treatment of 72 year-old woman with a pronounced atrophy of the upper jaw. OPG, standard CT of the upper jaw was used in the planning and a special surgical t...

  16. Aquatic Therapy for a Child with Type III Spinal Muscular Atrophy: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Yasser; Gropack, Stacy Jaffee

    2010-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons. This case report describes an aquatic therapy program and the outcomes for a 3-year-old girl with type III SMA. Motor skills were examined using the 88-item Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales…

  17. Treatment of hemifacial spasm with botulinum A toxin. Results and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnering, R S

    1986-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm is characterized by unilateral, periodic, tonic contractions of facial muscles, thought to be caused by mechanical compression at the root-exit zone of the facial nerve. Electrophysiologic abnormalities such as ectopic excitation and synkinesis are typical. Although posterior fossa microsurgical nerve decompression is successful in bringing about relief of the spasm in most cases, it carries a risk to hearing. As an alternative treatment, 15 patients with hemifacial spasm were given a total of 41 sets of injections with botulinum A toxin, with a mean follow-up of 14.3 +/- 1.1 months. Relief of symptoms lasted a mean of 108.3 +/- 4.2 days. Mild transient lagophthalmos and ptosis were the only complications. Although the exact mechanism of its action and beneficial effect is speculative at this time, botulinum A toxin appears to offer an effective, safe alternative to more radical intracranial surgery for patients with hemifacial spasm.

  18. Gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina with hyper-ornithinemia responsive to vitamin B6: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javadzadeh Alireza

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gyrate atrophy of the retina and choroid is a rare autosomal recessive inherited disease, characterized by progressive chorioretinal atrophy that results in progressive deterioration of peripheral and night vision and leading to blindness. Case presentation This report presents a case of a 28-year-old man consulting for a progressive fall of visual acuity with hemeralopia. Eye fundoscopy showed regions of confluent rounded chorioretinal atrophy. The visual field and retinal angiography were altered. A high level of plasma ornithine (629 nmol/mL was detected and a diagnosis of gyrate atrophy of the retina and choroid was made. The patient was treated with high dose Pyridoxine supplement (300 mg/d for 6 months and the ornithine level of his serum was successfully reduced. Conclusion The exact mechanism of chorioretinal atrophy in hyper-ornithinemia is not known and a small percentage of the affected people respond to Vitamin B6 supplementation.

  19. A case of burn encephalopathy with reversible brain atrophy on brain computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Hisaaki; Suzuki, Koh-ichirou; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Kido, Kun-ichi; Sato, Masaharu; Fujii, Chiho; Kohama, Akitsugu

    1985-01-01

    We present an interesting case of burn encephalopathy. The patient is a three-year-old girl with second to third degree and 30 % scald burn. She developed central nervous symptom on the second day with high fever and systemic convulsions and was transferred to our clinic on the third day from a local hospital. Her level of consciousness was 30 to 100 (3-3-9 formula) and she developed extra-pyramidal involuntary movement; these neurological signs persisted untill 66th day when she spoke for the first time since admission. Her EEG showed diffuse brain dysfunction and CT showed marked brain atrophy. She began to improve after around 50 days systematically as well as neurologically and was discharged after four months. EEG, CT findings and neurological signs were normal 1.5 years later. We could not find a case of reversible brain atrophy in the reports on burn encephalopathy or other neurological disorders except for the cases of long-term steroid administration on autoimmune diseases or ACTH therapy on infantile spasm. In our case, the reversible brain atrophy might be caused by the rise of endogenous steroid under burn stress, or transient malfunction of cerebro-spinal fluid absorption, or some other causes. (author)

  20. REHABILITATION OF SEVERELY ATROPHIED UPPER JAW WITH INTRAOSSAL DENTAL IMPLANTS - clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Chenchev

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this presentation is to show the difficulty in prosthetization of a clinical case with a pronounced atrophy of the upper jaw and the various types and nature of restrictions imposed by the requirements of the patient. Methods: The clinical analysis, surgical protocol and prosthetic solution are presented in the treatment of 72 year-old woman with a pronounced atrophy of the upper jaw. OPG, standard CT of the upper jaw was used in the planning and a special surgical template was fabricated, helping us to find intraoperatively the exact locations of implants. The preliminary analysis of the number, height and diameter of intraossal implants helped us to find the exact prosthetic solution in this clinical case. The preparation of the implant bed was done by conical osteotomy in order to expand and condense the existing bone, which allowed us to use endoossal implants with a possible maximum size in a very limited maxillary volume and the reluctance of the patient to use other methods and surgical techniques. Conical threaded and self-tapping intraossal implants were used, placed according to a classic two-stage methodology with a flap and a long-term functional loading after a period of four months.Results and Conclusion: The applied surgical and prosthetic solution allowed us to achieve a good functional and aesthetic rehabilitation in this case of severe atrophy of the upper jaw, following a number of restrictions imposed on us by the reluctance of the patient to use other surgical solutions. This shows that in the case of severe atrophy of the upper jaw, a good clinical result can be achieved. For this reason, the use of CT,a well-planned surgical template, sufficient preparation ,the maximum use of available bone volume and the choice of a good prosthetic solution is very important.

  1. A clinical case of dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsube, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro; Shimada, Yasuo.

    1987-01-01

    Dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA) has been described as an atypical type of spino-cerebellar degeneration by J.K. Smith (1958). Choreo-athetoid movement characterizes the DRPLA. We here report a case of DRPLA that was suspected from clinical symptoms and CT brain examinations. Case report: A 36-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of involuntary movements of the extremities in July, 1978. He had epileptic seizures since the age of 25. Since then, his intelligence had gradually been getting worse. At the same time, dysarthria (slow and slurred speech) also appeared. The neurological examination on admission revealed choreo-athetoid movements, with ataxia of the extremities, trancal ataxia, ataxic speech, moderate dementia, and a disturbance of the smooth-pursuit eye movements. He could not maintain his eye position in a steady gaze, but nystagmus was absent. A brain CT scan revealed a marked atrophy of the upper brain stem and cerebellar peduncle. The cerebral atrophy was mild, and caudate nuclei were spared. The electroencephalograph showed a slow, diffuse, high-voltage wave, with an associated spike and waves. The cerebrospinal fluid examination was normal. An electrophysiological examination revealed no myoclonus in the extremities. These clinical findings suggested that this case is a pseudo-Huntington form of DRPLA. (author)

  2. Parry-Romberg syndrome: findings in advanced magnetic resonance imaging sequences - case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Rafael Alfenas de; Ribeiro, Bruno Niemeyer de Freitas, E-mail: alfenas85@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de radiologia; Ribeiro, Renato Niemeyer de Freitas [Hospital de Clinica de Jacarepagua, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho, Lais Balbi de [Universidade Presidente Antonio Carlos (Unipac), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    Parry-Romberg syndrome is a rare disease characterized by progressive hemifacial atrophy associated with other systemic changes, including neurological symptoms. Currently, there are few studies exploring the utilization of advanced magnetic resonance sequences in the investigation of this disease. The authors report the case of a 45-year-old patient and describe the findings at structural magnetic resonance imaging and at advanced sequences, correlating them with pathophysiological data. (author)

  3. A case report of Parry Romberg Syndrome initially presenting as periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Greig; Culshaw, Shauna; Armas, Jose; Savarrio, Lee; Goodall, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Parry Romberg Syndrome (PRS) is a rare disorder of progressive hemifacial atrophy, involving soft tissues, fat and occasionally bone. It can co-exist with presentations of Morphea. We describe an unusual case of persistent periodontal and alveolar destruction associated with PRS. A 56-year-old African female initially presented with persistent periodontal destruction, which showed minimal response to conventional periodontal treatment. After non-surgical treatment, surgical debridement follow...

  4. [Microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm. Ten years of experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revuelta-Gutiérrez, Rogelio; Vales-Hidalgo, Lourdes Olivia; Arvizu-Saldaña, Emiliano; Hinojosa-González, Ramón; Reyes-Moreno, Ignacio

    2003-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm characterized by involuntary paroxistic contractions of the face is more frequent on left side and in females. Evolution is progressive and in a few cases may disappear. Management includes medical treatment, botulinum toxin, and microvascular decompression of the nerve. We present the results of 116 microvascular decompressions performed in 88 patients over 10 years. All patients had previous medical treatment. All patients were operated on with microsurgical technique by asterional craniotomy. Vascular compression was present in all cases with one exception. Follow-up was from 1 month to 133 months. Were achieved excellent results in 70.45% of cases after first operation, good results in 9.09%, and poor results in 20.45% of patients. Long-term results were excellent in 81.82%, good in 6.82%, and poor in 11.36% of patients. Hypoacusia and transitory facial palsy were the main complications. Hemifacial spasm is a painless but disabling entity. Medical treatment is effective in a limited fashion. Injection of botulinum toxin has good response but benefit is transitory. Microvascular decompression is treatment of choice because it is minimally invasive, not destructive, requires minimum technical support, and yields best long-term results.

  5. [A girl with congenital hemifacial hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, S.M. van den; Wolvius, E.B.; Adrichem, L.N. van; Baat, C. de

    2006-01-01

    A girl with congenital hemifacial hypertrophy had been observed and treated by a multidisciplinary team for craniofacial disorders in an academic medical centre since birth. At the age of 8 she was treated on account of considerable facial asymmetry and multiple intraoral problems. The two-step

  6. Clinico-MRI study of hemispheric disorder in long-term follow-up cases of multiple system atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Miwa, Shigeru; Matsuoka, Yukihiko; Konagaya, Yoko

    1998-01-01

    Twelve cases of multiple system atrophy (MSA) were studied for clinical and MRI findings of the cerebral hemispheric involvement. The subjects consisted of five olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) type and seven striatonigral degeneration (SND) type. The age at onset was 56.7±8.0 (M±SD) years, duration of illness at the first MRI study 3.2±1.1 years, duration of illness at the last study 8.1±2.2 years, and the following up duration 4.9±2.0 years. The grasping phenomenon was observed in 70% of the cases examined, snout reflex in 80%, slowness of verbal response in 88%, and decrease of spontaneous speech in 100%. Three cases finally fell into the state of mutism. Three out of ten cases were categorized as dementia by HDS-R (Hasegawa Dementia Scale-Revised) test. Besides the progression of the pontocerebellar atrophy and putaminal changes, MRI study revealed progressive frontal lobe atrophy in most cases. At six years after the onset, SND type showed significantly higher incidence of conspicuous frontal lobe atrophy and dilatation of the Sylvian fissure than OPCA type. Cerebral ventricular dilatation was common feature, and atrophy of the temporal and occipital lobes were observed in several cases. We indicated the possible involvement of the cerebral hemisphere, especially the frontal lobe, and higher nervous function in MSA. (author)

  7. Clinico-MRI study of hemispheric disorder in long-term follow-up cases of multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Miwa, Shigeru; Matsuoka, Yukihiko [Suzuka National Hospital, Mie (Japan); Konagaya, Yoko

    1998-12-01

    Twelve cases of multiple system atrophy (MSA) were studied for clinical and MRI findings of the cerebral hemispheric involvement. The subjects consisted of five olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) type and seven striatonigral degeneration (SND) type. The age at onset was 56.7{+-}8.0 (M{+-}SD) years, duration of illness at the first MRI study 3.2{+-}1.1 years, duration of illness at the last study 8.1{+-}2.2 years, and the following up duration 4.9{+-}2.0 years. The grasping phenomenon was observed in 70% of the cases examined, snout reflex in 80%, slowness of verbal response in 88%, and decrease of spontaneous speech in 100%. Three cases finally fell into the state of mutism. Three out of ten cases were categorized as dementia by HDS-R (Hasegawa Dementia Scale-Revised) test. Besides the progression of the pontocerebellar atrophy and putaminal changes, MRI study revealed progressive frontal lobe atrophy in most cases. At six years after the onset, SND type showed significantly higher incidence of conspicuous frontal lobe atrophy and dilatation of the Sylvian fissure than OPCA type. Cerebral ventricular dilatation was common feature, and atrophy of the temporal and occipital lobes were observed in several cases. We indicated the possible involvement of the cerebral hemisphere, especially the frontal lobe, and higher nervous function in MSA. (author)

  8. Vaginal Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an Endocrinologist Search Featured Resource Menopause Map™ View Vaginal Atrophy October 2017 Download PDFs English Editors Christine ... during this time, including vaginal dryness. What is vaginal atrophy? Vaginal atrophy (also referred to as vulvovaginal ...

  9. Familial adult spinal muscular atrophy associated with the VAPB gene: report of 42 cases in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Kosac

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Familial spinal muscular atrophy (FSMA associated with the vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAPB gene is a rare autosomal dominant disease with late onset and slow progression. We studied 10 of 42 patients from 5 families by taking clinical histories and performing physical exams, electrophysiological studies, and genetic tests. All patients presented late onset disease with slow progression characterized by fasciculations, proximal weakness, amyotrophy, and hypoactive deep tendon reflex, except two who exhibited brisk reflex. Two patients showed tongue fasciculations and respiratory insufficiency. Electrophysiological studies revealed patterns of lower motor neuron disease, and genetic testing identified a P56S mutation of the VAPB gene. Although it is a rare motor neuron disease, FSMA with this mutation might be much more prevalent in Brazil than expected, and many cases may be undiagnosed. Genetic exams should be performed whenever it is suspected in Brazil.

  10. Beyond the midbrain atrophy: wide spectrum of structural MRI finding in cases of pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Keita; Tokumaru, Aya M.; Shimoji, Keigo; Murayama, Shigeo; Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Morimoto, Satoru; Aiba, Ikuko; Nakagawa, Motoo; Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Shibamoto, Yuta; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Hashizume, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    Recently, it has been recognized that pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) cases are classified into various clinical subtypes with non-uniform symptoms and imaging findings. This article reviews essential imaging findings, general information, and advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for PSP and presents these MRI findings of pathologically proven typical and atypical PSP cases for educational purposes. With the review of literatures, notably including atypical pathologically proven PSP cases, MRI and clinical information of 15 pathologically proven typical and atypical PSP cases were retrospectively evaluated. In addition to typical symptoms, PSP patients can exhibit atypical symptoms including levodopa-responsive parkinsonism, pure akinesia, non-fluent aphasia, corticobasal syndrome, and predominant cerebellar ataxia. As well as clinical symptoms, the degree of midbrain atrophy, a well-known imaging hallmark, is not consistent in atypical PSP cases. This fact has important implications for the limitation of midbrain atrophy as a diagnostic imaging biomarker of PSP pathology. Additional evaluation of other imaging findings including various regional atrophies of the globus pallidus, frontal lobe, cerebral peduncle, and superior cerebellar peduncle is essential for the diagnosis of atypical PSP cases. It is necessary for radiologists to recognize the wide clinical and radiological spectra of typical and atypical PSP cases. (orig.)

  11. Beyond the midbrain atrophy: wide spectrum of structural MRI finding in cases of pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Keita; Tokumaru, Aya M.; Shimoji, Keigo [Tokyo Metropolitan Medical Center of Gerontology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Murayama, Shigeo; Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Morimoto, Satoru [Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Department of Neurology, Tokyo (Japan); Aiba, Ikuko [National Hospital Organization Higashi Nagoya National Hospital, Department of Neurology, Nagoya (Japan); Nakagawa, Motoo; Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Shibamoto, Yuta [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Nagoya (Japan); Matsukawa, Noriyuki [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Nagoya (Japan); Hashizume, Yoshio [Fukushimura Hospital, Choju Medical Institute, Toyohashi (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Recently, it has been recognized that pathologically proven progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) cases are classified into various clinical subtypes with non-uniform symptoms and imaging findings. This article reviews essential imaging findings, general information, and advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for PSP and presents these MRI findings of pathologically proven typical and atypical PSP cases for educational purposes. With the review of literatures, notably including atypical pathologically proven PSP cases, MRI and clinical information of 15 pathologically proven typical and atypical PSP cases were retrospectively evaluated. In addition to typical symptoms, PSP patients can exhibit atypical symptoms including levodopa-responsive parkinsonism, pure akinesia, non-fluent aphasia, corticobasal syndrome, and predominant cerebellar ataxia. As well as clinical symptoms, the degree of midbrain atrophy, a well-known imaging hallmark, is not consistent in atypical PSP cases. This fact has important implications for the limitation of midbrain atrophy as a diagnostic imaging biomarker of PSP pathology. Additional evaluation of other imaging findings including various regional atrophies of the globus pallidus, frontal lobe, cerebral peduncle, and superior cerebellar peduncle is essential for the diagnosis of atypical PSP cases. It is necessary for radiologists to recognize the wide clinical and radiological spectra of typical and atypical PSP cases. (orig.)

  12. Neuroelectrophysiological indexes and clinical characteristics of patients with peroneal muscular atrophy: Retrospective analysis of 24 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changchun Su; Qinbao Qin

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peroneal muscular atrophy (PMA) is characterized by insidious onset, gradually progressive course of disease, very mild disability degree and easily subjecting to missed diagnosis and misdiagnosis.Nerve conductive velocity is helpful in the diagnosis of atypical cases.OBJECTIVE: To retrospectively analyze the characteristics of clinical manifestation, electromyogram (EMG),motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity of patients with PMA.DESIGN: Retrospective case analysis.SETTING: Department of Neurology, Guangzhou First People's Hospital.PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-four patients with PMA, including 16 males and 8 females, aged 5-68 years old,admitted to Guangzhou First People's Hospital between March 1996 and January 2006 were recruited.Informed consents were obtained from all the patients.METHODS: All the patients subjected to EMG and detection of nerve conduction velocity at distal end of four extremities with a Keypoint evoked potential/ EMG instrument (Denmark). Sensory and motor conduction velocity, EMG changes of upper and lower extremities were observed, and relationship of neuroelectrophysiological characteristics and clinical symptoms was analyzed.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in sensory and motor conduction velocity, EMG and clinical manifestations of 24 patients.RESULTS: ① All the patients suffered from insidious onset and gradually progressive course of PMA.Muscular atrophy of lower extremity was found in 14 patients, and that of upper extremity in 5 patients. ② Routine nerve conduction study showed that sensory and motor conduction velocity were stepped down,especially in 16 patients with type Ⅰ PMA (demyelinating pattern, nerve conduction velocity below normal level 50%). Motor nerve conduction velocity of median nerve, ulnar nerve, common peroneal nerve and tibial nerve averaged 34.8 m/s, 37.2 m/s, 16.5 m/s and 17.4 m/s, respectively; Sensory nerve conduction velocity of median nerve, ulnar nerve and sural nerve averaged 27.9%, 24.6 m

  13. Diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy, and deafness: A case of Wolfram (DIDMOAD syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrollah Maleki

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: WS should be considered a differential diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus who present with optic atrophy, and it is necessary to perform a hearing test as well as collecting 24-h urine output.

  14. Hard and Soft Tissue Management of a Localized Alveolar Ridge Atrophy with Autogenous Sources and Biomaterials: A Challenging Clinical Case

    OpenAIRE

    C. Maiorana; D. Andreoni; P. P. Poli

    2016-01-01

    Particularly in the premaxillary area, the stability of hard and soft tissues plays a pivotal role in the success of the rehabilitation from both a functional and aesthetic aspect. The present case report describes the clinical management of a localized alveolar ridge atrophy in the area of the upper right canine associated with a thin gingival biotype with a lack of keratinized tissue. An autogenous bone block harvested from the chin associated with heterologous bone particles was used to re...

  15. Optic atrophy, necrotizing anterior scleritis and keratitis presenting in association with Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papageorgiou Konstantinos I

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report a case of optic atrophy, necrotizing anterior scleritis and keratitis presenting in a patient with Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome. Case presentation A 43-year-old woman developed streptococcal toxic shock syndrome secondary to septic arthritis of her right ankle. Streptococcus pyogenes (b-haemolyticus Group A was isolated from blood cultures and joint aspirate. She was referred for ophthalmology review as her right eye became injected and the pupil had become unresponsive to light whilst she was in the Intensive Therapy Unit (ITU. The iris appeared atrophic and was mid-dilated with no direct or consensual response to light. Three zones of sub-epithelial opacification where noted in the cornea. There where extensive posterior synechiae. Indirect ophthalmoscopy showed a pale right disc. The vision was reduced to hand movements (HM. A diagnosis of optic atrophy was made secondary to post-streptococcal uveitis. She subsequently developed a necrotizing anterior scleritis. Conclusion This case illustrates a previously unreported association of optic atrophy, necrotizing anterior scleritis and keratitis in a patient with post-streptococcal uveitis. This patient had developed Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome secondary to septic arthritis. We recommend increased awareness of the potential risks of these patients developing severe ocular involvement.

  16. An unusual organ involvement in a case of Werner Syndrome: thyroid atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Altay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Werner Syndrome (WS is a premature aging disease that begins in adolescence or early adulthood and results in the appearance of old age by 30-40 years of age. Some endocrinological abnormalities were manifested in this rare disease, such as hypogonadism, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia. In this article, we present a nineteen years-old female patient who had been diagnosed as WS two years ago because of type 2 diabetes mellitus, osteopenia, hyperlipidemia, cataract, gray hair, and skin atrophy. Subclinical hypothyroidism was detected at her laboratory tests. Thyroid ultrasonography (USG showed thyroid atrophy. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of both lobes confirmed this diagnose and excluded some infiltrative diseases such as amyloidosis. It should be kept in mind that thyroid atrophy could be seen in WS and, therefore, detailed thyroid examination including thyroid USG and close follow up should be performed in all patients with WS. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(2.000: 144-146

  17. [Duodenal villous atrophy associated with Mycophenolate mofetil: report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Oscar; Villaseca, Miguel; Sierralta, Armando; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2010-05-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an immunosupressor agent frequently used in patients after bone marrow or solid organ transplants. The most common adverse reactions of the drug are gastrointestinal, specially diarrhea and vomiting. We report a 53-year-old male, that received a heart transplant receiving immunosuppression with cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisone. Six months after the transplant, the patient started with diarrhea, anorexia and weight loss. A duodenal biopsy showed villous atrophy. Celiac disease and the presence of parasites were discarded. Mycophenolate mofetil was discontinued and one week later, diarrhea subsided. Two months later the patient was asymptomatic and recovered weight. A new duodenal biopsy showed absence of villous atrophy.

  18. Efficacy of levetiracetam in primary hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Saito, Yu; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Yano, Satoshi; Ishigaki, Seiichiro; Kato, Hirotaka; Murakami, Hidetomo; Ono, Kenjiro

    2016-12-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a peripherally-induced movement disorder characterized by the involuntary, unilateral, intermittent, irregular, tonic or clonic contractions of muscles innervated by the ipsilateral facial nerve. Kindling-like hyperactivity of the facial nucleus induced by constant stimulation of compressing artery is considered as the predominant mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of HFS. As a treatment for HFS, microsurgical decompression and botulinum toxin injection have been shown to be highly successful. Anticonvulsant drugs relieve HFS in some patients; however, the use of such drugs is limited owing to their side effects, predominantly in elderly patients. We experienced two elderly HFS patients who exhibited a marked response to levetiracetam (LEV) without side effects. Although the exact underlying pharmacological mechanism remains unknown, we assume anti-kindling effect as one of the important pharmacological mechanism underlying the effect of LEV against HFS. Moreover, LEV is considered to be suitable for use in elderly patients because of its good tolerability. In addition, the lack of hepatic induction or inhibition makes it an easy and safe drug when used in addition to other anticonvulsants. Although the long-term benefit remains unknown, LEV may represent an alternative treatment for elderly HFS patients who are unable to undergo or decline surgical intervention and/or botulinum toxin injections or are intolerant to other anticonvulsants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Posterior cortical atrophy - a prototypical case of dementia beginning with visual symptoms: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Ferreira Caixeta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Dementia presenting with prominent higher order visual symptoms may be observed in a range of neurodegenerative conditions and is often challenging to diagnose. We describe a case of progressive dementia presenting with prominent visual cortical symptoms. A 55-year-old, right-handed, woman with early onset of visual impairment not associated with anterior visual pathology, presenting with dyslexia, visual agnosia, Balint's syndrome, and spatial disorientation. Ophthalmologists should consider this condition especially in presenile patients with slowly progressive higher-order visual symptoms. Although described in association with different conditions, it may also occur in Alzheimer disease.

  20. Hemifacial Pain and Hemisensory Disturbance Referred from Occipital Neuralgia Caused by Pathological Vascular Contact of the Greater Occipital Nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Byung-chul; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2017-01-01

    Here we report a unique case of chronic occipital neuralgia caused by pathological vascular contact of the left greater occipital nerve. After 12 months of left-sided, unremitting occipital neuralgia, a hypesthesia and facial pain developed in the left hemiface. The decompression of the left greater occipital nerve from pathological contacts with the occipital artery resulted in immediate relief for hemifacial sensory change and facial pain, as well as chronic occipital neuralgia. Although re...

  1. Rehabilitation and nutritional support for sarcopenic dysphagia and tongue atrophy after glossectomy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashida, Nao; Shamoto, Hiroshi; Maeda, Keisuke; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Suzuki, Motoyuki; Fujii, Takashi

    2017-03-01

    Swallowing dysfunction is related to long-term weight loss and reduced body mass index in patients with head and neck cancer. We describe a 76-y-old woman who had severe sarcopenic dysphagia and atrophy of the reconstructed tongue for 17 mo after subtotal glossectomy due to tongue cancer and lost 14 kg during that period. Upon admission, the patient received diagnoses of malnutrition in the context of social or environmental circumstances with insufficient energy intake, loss of muscle mass, localized fluid accumulation, weight loss, and sarcopenia due to reduced skeletal muscle mass (skeletal muscle index protein intake to 70.3 g/d by supplying sufficient excess energy, and provided physical therapy and dysphagia rehabilitation to improve sarcopenia, atrophy of the reconstructed tongue, and dysphagia. After 20 mo of treatment, she was considered to be no longer malnourished (11 kg weight gain) and without sarcopenia (skeletal muscle index 4.01 cm 2 /m 2 ), and the volume of the reconstructed tongue was increased. Sarcopenia and atrophy of the reconstructed tongue may cause dysphagia after glossectomy due to tongue cancer. Additionally, nutritional support and rehabilitation could improve such dysphagia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Epidermoid cyst causing hemifacial spasm epidermoid cyst in cerebellopontine angle presenting with hemifacial spasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Alemdar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemifacial Spasm (HS occurs idiopathically or secondary to the lesions compressing the root exit zone of the facial nerve symptomatically. Symptomatic HS is generally due to vascular compression. We report on a 23-year-old male with right sided HS for a month. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain revealed a well-demarcated epidermoid cyst in the right cerebellopontine cistern. It was hypointense on T1-weighted imaging, hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging without contrast enhancement, hyperintense on DWI, and slightly hypointense on ADC relative to the brain. Although it caused shifting of the pons and medulla to the left side and compression of the right cerebellar peduncles and fourth ventricle, the sole symptom of the patient was HS. Clinicians are advised to request MRI/scan for brainstem lesions from the patients with HS. Epidermoid cysts in cerebellopontine cistern may present with HS as the sole symptom.

  3. Hard and Soft Tissue Management of a Localized Alveolar Ridge Atrophy with Autogenous Sources and Biomaterials: A Challenging Clinical Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Maiorana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Particularly in the premaxillary area, the stability of hard and soft tissues plays a pivotal role in the success of the rehabilitation from both a functional and aesthetic aspect. The present case report describes the clinical management of a localized alveolar ridge atrophy in the area of the upper right canine associated with a thin gingival biotype with a lack of keratinized tissue. An autogenous bone block harvested from the chin associated with heterologous bone particles was used to replace the missing bone, allowing for a prosthetic driven implant placement. Soft tissues deficiency was corrected by means of a combined epithelialized and subepithelial connective tissue graft. The 3-year clinical and radiological follow-up demonstrated symmetric gingival levels of the upper canines, with physiological peri-implant probing depths and bone loss. Thus, the use of autogenous tissues combined with biomaterials might be considered a reliable technique in case of highly aesthetic demanding cases.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... difficulty breathing. Children with this type often have joint deformities (contractures) that impair movement. In severe cases, ... Proximal spinal muscular atrophy Washington University, St. Louis: Neuromuscular Disease Center: Spinal Muscular Atrophy Patient Support and ...

  5. Cerebellar atrophy in epileptic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taneva, N.

    1991-01-01

    52 patients with epileptic seizures of different form, frequency and duration who had received long term treatment with anticonvulsive drugs were examined on Siretom 2000, a brain scanner of II generation. 6 standard incisions were made in all patients in the area of cerebellum, side ventricules and high convexity. Additional scanning with an incision width of 5 mm was made when pathological changes were detected. There were found 3 cases of cerebellar atrophy, 3 - cerebral atrophy, 1 - combined atrophy and 4 - with other changes. It was difficult to establish any relation between the rerebellar atrophy and the type of anticonvulsant used because treatment had usually been complex. 1 fig., 1 tab., 4 refs

  6. Childhood optic atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, A V; Repka, M X

    2000-02-01

    To determine the causes, and relative incidence of the common causes, of optic nerve atrophy in children under 10 years old and to compare prevalent aetiologies with those given in previous studies. The Wilmer Information System database was searched to identify all children, diagnosed between 1987 and 1997 with optic atrophy, who were under 10 years old at diagnosis. The medical records of these children were reviewed retrospectively A total of 272 children were identified, Complications from premature birth were the most frequent aetiology of optic atrophy (n = 44, 16%); 68% of these premature infants having a history of intraventricular haemorrhage. Tumour was the second most common aetiology (n = 40, 15%). The most frequent tumour was pilocytic astrocytoma (50%), followed by craniopharyngioma (17%). Hydrocephalus, unrelated to tumour, was the third most common aetiology (n = 26, 10%). In 114 cases (42%), the cause of optic atrophy became manifest in the perinatal period and/or could be attributed to adverse events in utero. A cause was not determined in 4% of cases. In the last decade, prematurity and hydrocephalus appear to have become important causes of optic atrophy in childhood. This trend is probably the result of improved survival of infants with extremely low birth weight.

  7. Computed tomography in alcoholic cerebellar atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubek, A; Lee, K [Hvidovre Hospital Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Radiology; Municipal Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Neurology)

    1979-01-01

    This is a controlled CT evaluation of the infratentorial region in 41 male alcoholics under age 35. Criteria for the presence of atrophy are outlined. Twelve patients had cerebellar atrophy. Vermian atrophy was present in all. Atrophy of the cerebellar hemispheres was demonstrated in eight patients as well. The results are statistically significant when compared to an age-matched group of 40 non-alcoholic males among whom two cases of vermian atrophy were found. There were clinical signs of alcoholic cerebellar atrophy in one patient only. The disparity between the clinical and the radiological data are discussed with reference to previous pneumoencephalographic findings. (orig.) 891 AJ/orig. 892 MKO.

  8. Botulinum Toxin and Muscle Atrophy: A Wanted or Unwanted Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Paul D; Couto, Rafael A; Isakov, Raymond; Yoo, Donald B; Azizzadeh, Babak; Guyuron, Bahman; Zins, James E

    2016-04-01

    While the facial rejuvenating effect of botulinum toxin type A is well known and widespread, its use in body and facial contouring is less common. We first describe its use for deliberate muscle volume reduction, and then document instances of unanticipated and undesirable muscle atrophy. Finally, we investigate the potential long-term adverse effects of botulinum toxin-induced muscle atrophy. Although the use of botulinum toxin type A in the cosmetic patient has been extensively studied, there are several questions yet to be addressed. Does prolonged botulinum toxin treatment increase its duration of action? What is the mechanism of muscle atrophy and what is the cause of its reversibility once treatment has stopped? We proceed to examine how prolonged chemodenervation with botulinum toxin can increase its duration of effect and potentially contribute to muscle atrophy. Instances of inadvertent botulinum toxin-induced atrophy are also described. These include the "hourglass deformity" secondary to botulinum toxin type A treatment for migraine headaches, and a patient with atrophy of multiple facial muscles from injections for hemifacial spasm. Numerous reports demonstrate that muscle atrophy after botulinum toxin type A treatment occurs and is both reversible and temporary, with current literature supporting the notion that repeated chemodenervation with botulinum toxin likely responsible for both therapeutic and incidental temporary muscle atrophy. Furthermore, duration of response may be increased with subsequent treatments, thus minimizing frequency of reinjection. Practitioners should be aware of the temporary and reversible effect of botulinum toxin-induced muscle atrophy and be prepared to reassure patients on this matter. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Clinical phenotype and genetic mutation of one case with head tremor and cerebellar atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-ming XIE

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To make the diagnosis for a patient presented with head tremor and cerebellar atrophy by integrating clinical features and accessory examination with genetic testing and to explore the interpretation of genetic testing results.  Methods A 30-year-old male patient's medical information, clinical pheontype, family history and accessory examinations were collected. The next?generation sequencing (NGS of exons in 3994 causative genes of Mendelian inheritance diseases and the family tree verification were carried out. China Human Phenotype Ontology (CHPO, Phenomizer, Ensembl and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM database were used to interpret the genetic test results.  Results The patient carried heterozygous mutation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 19 (SCA19 related KCND3 gene c.1057A > G (p. Ser353Gly, but his parents did not carry this mutation. The patient also carried heterozygous mutation of parkinsonism type 20 (PARK20 related SYNJ1 gene c.4436C > T (p.Thr1479Ile which was also seen in his mother. Phenotypic similarity analysis showed the patient's phenotype was correspond with the phenotype of SCA19, and the variation locus of KCND3 gene c.1057A > G was highly conservative with homologous gene in different species.  Conclusions By means of the integration of clinical phenotype with the result of genetic test, KCND3 gene c.1057A > G (p.Ser353Gly carried in the patient is the pathogenic mutation. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.07.007

  10. Blink reflexes and lateral spreading in patients with synkinesia after Bell's palsy and in hemifacial spasm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekhof, J. L.; Aramideh, M.; Speelman, J. D.; Devriese, P. P.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    We compared various electrodiagnostical tests in patients with hemifacial spasm and in patients who developed synkinesia after Bell's palsy. We examined the evoked blink reflexes in the orbicularis oculi (o. oculi) and orbicularis oris (o. oris) muscles in 23 patients with hemifacial spasm (HFS), in

  11. Case of possible multiple system atrophy with a characteristic imaging finding of open bladder neck during storage phase as an initial sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Haga, Nobuhiro; Ogawa, Soichiro; Matsuoka, Kanako; Koguchi, Tomoyuki; Akaihata, Hidenori; Hata, Junya; Kataoka, Masao; Ishibashi, Kei; Kojima, Yoshiyuki

    2017-11-01

    Multiple system atrophy is a neurodegenerative disease that affects autonomic and motor systems. Patients with multiple system atrophy usually experience lower urinary tract symptoms, which sometimes appear as an initial symptom before the emergence of the generalized symptoms. An open bladder neck during the filling phase on video urodynamic study is one characteristic imaging finding after the diagnosis of multiple system atrophy, but has not previously been reported at an early phase of the disease. We report a case in which an open bladder neck was observed on several imaging modalities before generalized symptoms emerged. Because occult neurogenic bladder might exist in patients whose lower urinary tract symptoms are resistant to pharmacotherapy, we report this case to raise awareness of the importance of sufficient imaging evaluations. An open bladder neck might be an important imaging finding for diagnosing multiple system atrophy, irrespective of the presence of generalized symptoms. This finding could help avoid false diagnosis and unnecessary treatment. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. Segmental sandwich osteotomy and tunnel technique for three-dimensional reconstruction of the jaw atrophy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagata, Mario; Sgaramella, Nicola; Ferrieri, Ivo; Corvo, Giovanni; Tartaro, Gianpaolo; D'Amato, Salvatore

    2017-12-01

    A three-dimensionally favourable mandibular bone crest is desirable to be able to successfully implant placement to meet the aesthetic and functional criteria in the implant-prosthetic rehabilitation. Several surgical procedures have been advocated for bone augmentation of the atrophic mandible, and the sandwich osteotomy is one of these techniques. The aim of the present case report was to assess the suitability of segmental mandibular sandwich osteotomy combined with a tunnel technique of soft tissue. Based on our knowledge, nobody described before the sandwich osteotomy with tunnel technique to improve the healing of the wound and meet the dimensional requirements of preimplant bone augmentation in cases of a severely atrophic mandible. A 59-year-old woman with a severely atrophied right mandible was treated with the sandwich osteotomy technique filled with autologous bone graft harvested by a cortical bone collector from the ramus. Clinical examination revealed that the mandible was edentulous bilaterally from the first molar to the second molar region. Radiographically, atrophy of the mandibular alveolar ridge in the same teeth site was observed. We began to treat the right side. A horizontal osteotomy of the edentulous mandibular bone was then made with a piezoelectric device after tunnel technique of the soft tissue. The segmental mandibular sandwich osteotomy (SMSO) was finished by two (mesial and distal) slightly divergent vertical osteotomies. The entire bone fragment was displaced cranially, and the desirable position was obtained. The gap was filled completely with autologous bone chips harvested from the mandibular ramus through a cortical bone collector. No barrier membranes were used to protect the grafts. The vertical incisions were closing with interruptive suturing of the flaps with a resorbable material. In this way, the suture will not fall on the osteotomy line of the jaw; the result will be a better predictability of soft and hard tissue

  13. Unilateral pigmented paravenous retinochoroidal atrophy with retinitis pigmentosa in the contralateral eye: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichiro Aoki

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions and importance: Simultaneous manifestation of PPRCA and RP observed in this case is rare and supports a shared genetic basis between the two diseases. Further genetic investigations are needed to elucidate the etiology and to properly manage PPRCA.

  14. A rare case of unifocal, unilateral pigmented paravenous retinochoroidal atrophy (PPRCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meleha Ahmad

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions and importance: PPRCA is typically bilateral and symmetric, affecting primarily the outer retina and choroid. However, in rare cases, this disease can present unilaterally and/or unifocally, with degeneration extending to the inner retinal layers.

  15. Reconstruction of a Severely Atrophied Alveolar Ridge by Computer-Aided Gingival Simulation and 3D-Printed Surgical Guide: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, In-Seok; Lee, Mi-Ran; Ryu, Jae-Jun; Lee, Ui-Lyong

    Dental implants positioned in severely atrophied anterior maxillae require esthetic or functional compromises. This case report describes the rehabilitation of a severely atrophied alveolar ridge with a three-dimensional (3D) computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) surgical guide. A 50-year-old woman had a severely atrophied anterior maxilla with unfavorably positioned dental implants. Functional and esthetic prosthodontic restoration was difficult to achieve. An anterior segmental osteotomy was planned to reposition the dental implants. A 3D surgical guide was designed for precise relocation of the segment. The surgical guide firmly grasped the impression copings of the dental implants, minimizing surgical errors. Three-dimensional gingival simulation was used preoperatively to estimate the appropriate position of the gingiva. Rigid fixation to the surrounding bone allowed immobilization of the implant-bone segment. Satisfactory esthetic and functional outcomes were attained 6 months after surgery. Finally, a severely atrophied alveolar ridge with unfavorably positioned dental implants was recovered with minimal esthetic and functional deterioration using gingival simulation and a 3D CAD/CAM surgical guide.

  16. Duodenal Villous Atrophy in a TTG-Negative Patient Taking Olmesartan: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasha Kulai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmesartan, an angiotensin II receptor antagonist used to treat hypertension, is associated with few adverse effects. Here, a case of severe sprue-like enteropathy and acute kidney injury is described in a 68-year-old male taking olmesartan for 3-4 years. He presented to hospital with a five-week history of diarrhea, vomiting, and a 20 lb weight loss. Anti-TTG was negative with a normal IgA. Biopsies of the distal duodenum and duodenal cap revealed marked blunting of the villi with near complete villous atrophy of the biopsies from the bulb. There was an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes as well as neutrophils in the surface epithelium. The patient’s diarrhea improved upon discontinuation of olmesartan and he returned to his previous weight. Repeat endoscopy four months later demonstrated complete resolution of inflammatory change with normal villous architecture. Long-term olmesartan use is associated with severe sprue-like enteropathy. The mechanism of intestinal injury is unknown. Duodenal biopsy results may mimic other enteropathies such as celiac disease. Physicians should consider medications as potential etiologies of enteropathy.

  17. Treatment of a patient with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) with chiropractic manipulation and Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS): A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francio, Vinicius T; Boesch, Ron; Tunning, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare progressive neurodegenerative syndrome which unusual symptoms include deficits of balance, bodily orientation, chronic pain syndrome and dysfunctional motor patterns. Current research provides minimal guidance on support, education and recommended evidence-based patient care. This case reports the utilization of chiropractic spinal manipulation, dynamic neuromuscular stabilization (DNS), and other adjunctive procedures along with medical treatment of PCA. A 54-year-old male presented to a chiropractic clinic with non-specific back pain associated with visual disturbances, slight memory loss, and inappropriate cognitive motor control. After physical examination, brain MRI and PET scan, the diagnosis of PCA was recognized. Chiropractic spinal manipulation and dynamic neuromuscular stabilization were utilized as adjunctive care to conservative pharmacological treatment of PCA. Outcome measurements showed a 60% improvement in the patient's perception of health with restored functional neuromuscular pattern, improvements in locomotion, posture, pain control, mood, tolerance to activities of daily living (ADLs) and overall satisfactory progress in quality of life. Yet, no changes on memory loss progression, visual space orientation, and speech were observed. PCA is a progressive and debilitating condition. Because of poor awareness of PCA by physicians, patients usually receive incomplete care. Additional efforts must be centered on the musculoskeletal features of PCA, aiming enhancement in quality of life and functional improvements (FI). Adjunctive rehabilitative treatment is considered essential for individuals with cognitive and motor disturbances, and manual medicine procedures may be consider a viable option.

  18. Hemifacial microsomia: management of the vertical ramus compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Yves Mommaerts

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemifacial microsomia and Goldenhar syndrome pose unique challenges to the craniofacial surgeon. The O.M.E.N.S. classification provides a description of the craniofacial features. For the "M" of O.M.E.N.S. (the mandible, the Pruzansky-Kaban classification provides therapeutic guidelines for joint and face reconstruction. A sequence of standard procedures, including temporomandibular joint reconstruction, facial rotation surgery, gluteal fat grafting, and patient-specific titanium implantation, each have their intricacies. The author provides his expert opinion, acquired over thirty years of experience, with an emphasis on descriptions of and solutions for ten problematic issues.

  19. Hemifacial Display of Emotion in the Resting State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Mandal

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The human face at rest displays distinguishable asymmetries with some lateralization of emotion or expression. The asymmetrical nature of the resting face was examined by preparing hemifacial composites, left–left, right–right, along with normal facial orientation. The left side and right side composites were constructed by using the lateral half of one side of the face and its mirror-reversal. The left side facial composites were found to be more emotional than the right side or normal facial orientations of neutral expressions.

  20. Ramus marginalis mandibulae nervus facialis palsy in hemifacial microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, A; Mariani, G; Vernucci, R A

    2008-12-01

    The paralysis of the ramus marginalis mandibulae nervus facialis may occur in Hemifacial Microsomia (HM); the combination of both HM and palsy contributes to an elongation of the mandibular body. This study explores a possible correlation between neurological deficit, muscular atony, and structural deficiency. Of 58 patients with HM who had come to the University of Rome (Sapienza) Pre-surgical Orthodontics Unit, 4 patients were afflicted with Hemifacial Microsomia and ramus marginalis mandibulae nervus palsy; these patients underwent physical, neurological, opthamologic and systemic examinations. The results were then analysed in order to determine a possible correlation between neuro-muscular and structural deficit. Electroneurographic and electromyographic examinations were performed to estimate facial nerve and muscles involvement. Neuroelectrographic exam showed a damage of the nervous motor fibres of the facial nerve ipsilateral to HM, with an associated damage of the muscular function, while neuro-muscular functions on the healthy side were normal. The peripheral nervous and muscular deficits affect the function of facial soft tissues and the growth of mandibular body with an asymmetry characterised by a hypodevelopment of the ramus (due to the HM) and by an elongation of the mandibular body (due to ramus marginalis mandibulae nerve palsy), so that the chin deviation is contralateral to HM. In these forms, a neurological examination is necessary to assess the neurological damage on the HM side. Neuromuscular deficiency can also contribute to a relapse tendency after a surgical-orthodontic treatment.

  1. Diffuse chorioretinal atrophy after a single standard low- dose intravitreal melphalan injection in a child with retinoblastoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, An- Ning; Kao, Ling-Yuh; Liu, Laura; Wang, Nan-Kai

    2016-03-15

    Controlling retinoblastoma with seeding is challenging despite advances in treatment modalities. Intravitreal melphalan is an alternative to external beam radiation or enucleation for recurrent or refractory vitreous seeds. Significant ocular side effects following intravitreal melphalan injections are uncommon. Complications have been reported in eyes receiving higher concentrations of melphalan and repetitive injections. We report a case in which diffuse chorioretinal atrophy was developed at the injection site after a single, standard low-dose intravitreal melphalan injection. A 12-month-old female child without a family history of retinoblastoma presented with unilateral group C retinoblastoma in her right eye. A solitary tumour with retinal breaks on the tumour surface, and vitreous seeds overlying the tumour were observed at the 8 o'clock position of the retina. After two cycles of intra-arterial chemotherapy with melphalan, the main tumour displayed significant regression, but the vitreous seeds overlying the main tumour were still active. Because of the persistence of vitreous seeds and the inadequate response to intra-arterial melphalan treatment, intravitreal melphalan (8 μg in 0.05 mL) was injected using a 32-gauge needle 2.5 mm from the 5 o'clock position of the limbus, the meridian opposite to the vitreous seeds. After 1 month, the retina around the injection site demonstrated diffuse retinal pigment epithelium alterations with dense hard exudates. Although the main retinal mass, and vitreous seeds resolved, the hard exudates persisted for more than 2 years after the single low-dose melphalan injection. Intravitreal melphalan injections should be cautiously used for eyes with refractory seeds, particularly when multiple injections are required to control retinoblastoma seeds. Dose- related retinal toxicity could occur in pre-treated eyes even when a relatively low standard dose is used. Such patients should be followed up closely to monitor the

  2. Gyrate atrophy of choroid and retina with myopia, cataract and systemic proximal myopathy: A rare case report from rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surekha Bangal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractGyrate atrophy is a rare metabolic disease with autosomal recessive inheritance pattern characterised by hyperornithinemia and typical ocular findings. This report presents a 17-year-old intellectually challenged girl consulting for a progressive fall of visual acuity with night blindness. Fundus examination showed patches of chorioretinal atrophy with typical scalloped borders and peri vascular pigmentation in the equatorial region. Fundus fluroscein angiography revealed characteristic staining pattern. Other ocular associations included myopia and posterior sub capsular cataract. Progressive systemic proximal myopathy was one of the associated features. Dietary supplementation of vitamin B6 was advised.

  3. A Case of Adult-Onset Alexander Disease Featuring Severe Atrophy of the Medulla Oblongata and Upper Cervical Cord on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezu, Tadahiro; Ito, Shoichi; Kanai, Kazuaki; Masuda, Saeko; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Adult-onset Alexander disease (AOAD) has been increasingly recognized since the identification of the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene mutation in 2001. We report on a 56-year-old man who was genetically confirmed as AOAD with the glial fibrillary acidic protein mutation of p.M74T. He developed spastic tetraparesis, sensory disturbances in four limbs, and mild cognitive impairment without apparent dysarthria and dysphagia. The case was characterized by severe atrophy of the medulla oblongata and upper cervical cord with intramedullary signal intensity changes on magnetic resonance imaging. While AOAD is diverse in clinical presentation, the peculiar magnetic resonance imaging findings of marked atrophy of the medulla oblongata and cervical cord are thought to be highly suggestive of the diagnosis of AOAD. PMID:23185175

  4. Hemifacial Pain and Hemisensory Disturbance Referred from Occipital Neuralgia Caused by Pathological Vascular Contact of the Greater Occipital Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Byung-Chul; Choi, Jin-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Here we report a unique case of chronic occipital neuralgia caused by pathological vascular contact of the left greater occipital nerve. After 12 months of left-sided, unremitting occipital neuralgia, a hypesthesia and facial pain developed in the left hemiface. The decompression of the left greater occipital nerve from pathological contacts with the occipital artery resulted in immediate relief for hemifacial sensory change and facial pain, as well as chronic occipital neuralgia. Although referral of pain from the stimulation of occipital and cervical structures innervated by upper cervical nerves to the frontal head of V1 trigeminal distribution has been reported, the development of hemifacial sensory change associated with referred trigeminal pain from chronic occipital neuralgia is extremely rare. Chronic continuous and strong afferent input of occipital neuralgia caused by pathological vascular contact with the greater occipital nerve seemed to be associated with sensitization and hypersensitivity of the second-order neurons in the trigeminocervical complex, a population of neurons in the C2 dorsal horn characterized by receiving convergent input from dural and cervical structures.

  5. Severe brain atrophy after long-term survival seen in siblings with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and a mutation in the optineurin gene: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hiroki; Kobatake, Keitaro; Matsumoto, Masayasu; Morino, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kawakami, Hideshi

    2011-12-12

    Previous studies have shown widespread multisystem degeneration in patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who develop a total locked-in state and survive under mechanical ventilation for a prolonged period of time. However, the disease progressions reported in these studies were several years after disease onset. There have been no reports of long-term follow-up with brain imaging of patients with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis at an advanced stage of the disease. We report the cases of siblings with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with homozygous deletions of the exon 5 mutation of the gene encoding optineurin, in whom brain computed tomography scans were followed up for more than 20 years. The patients were a Japanese brother and sister. The elder sister was 33 years of age at the onset of disease, which began with muscle weakness of her left lower limb. Two years later she required mechanical ventilation. She became bedridden at the age of 34, and died at the age of 57. A computed tomography scan of her brain at the age of 36 revealed no abnormality. Atrophy of her brain gradually progressed. Ten years after the onset of mechanical ventilation, atrophy of her whole brain, including the cerebral cortex, brain stem and cerebellum, markedly progressed. Her younger brother was 36 years of age at the onset of disease, which presented as muscle weakness of his left upper limb. One year later, he showed dysphagia and dysarthria, and tracheostomy ventilation was performed. He became bedridden at the age of 37 and died at the age of 55. There were no abnormal intracranial findings on brain computed tomography scans obtained at the age of 37 years. At the age of 48 years, computed tomography scans showed marked brain atrophy with ventricular dilatation. Subsequently, atrophy of the whole brain rapidly progressed as in his elder sister. We conclude that a homozygous deletion-type mutation in the optineurin gene may be associated with widespread

  6. Seronegative Intestinal Villous Atrophy: A Diagnostic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is the most important cause of intestinal villous atrophy. Seronegative intestinal villous atrophy, including those that are nonresponsive to a gluten-free diet, is a diagnostic challenge. In these cases, before establishing the diagnosis of seronegative celiac disease, alternative etiologies of atrophic enteropathy should be considered. Recently, a new clinical entity responsible for seronegative villous atrophy was described—olmesartan-induced sprue-like enteropathy. Herein, we report two uncommon cases of atrophic enteropathy in patients with arterial hypertension under olmesartan, who presented with severe chronic diarrhea and significant involuntary weight loss. Further investigation revealed intestinal villous atrophy and intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Celiac disease and other causes of villous atrophy were ruled out. Drug-induced enteropathy was suspected and clinical improvement and histologic recovery were verified after olmesartan withdrawal. These cases highlight the importance for clinicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for olmesartan as a precipitant of sprue-like enteropathy.

  7. Severe brain atrophy after long-term survival seen in siblings with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and a mutation in the optineurin gene: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueno Hiroki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Previous studies have shown widespread multisystem degeneration in patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who develop a total locked-in state and survive under mechanical ventilation for a prolonged period of time. However, the disease progressions reported in these studies were several years after disease onset. There have been no reports of long-term follow-up with brain imaging of patients with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis at an advanced stage of the disease. We report the cases of siblings with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with homozygous deletions of the exon 5 mutation of the gene encoding optineurin, in whom brain computed tomography scans were followed up for more than 20 years. Case presentation The patients were a Japanese brother and sister. The elder sister was 33 years of age at the onset of disease, which began with muscle weakness of her left lower limb. Two years later she required mechanical ventilation. She became bedridden at the age of 34, and died at the age of 57. A computed tomography scan of her brain at the age of 36 revealed no abnormality. Atrophy of her brain gradually progressed. Ten years after the onset of mechanical ventilation, atrophy of her whole brain, including the cerebral cortex, brain stem and cerebellum, markedly progressed. Her younger brother was 36 years of age at the onset of disease, which presented as muscle weakness of his left upper limb. One year later, he showed dysphagia and dysarthria, and tracheostomy ventilation was performed. He became bedridden at the age of 37 and died at the age of 55. There were no abnormal intracranial findings on brain computed tomography scans obtained at the age of 37 years. At the age of 48 years, computed tomography scans showed marked brain atrophy with ventricular dilatation. Subsequently, atrophy of the whole brain rapidly progressed as in his elder sister. Conclusion We conclude that a homozygous deletion

  8. Quantitative MRI study of progressive cerebral atrophy in multiple system atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Matsuoka, Yukihiko; Konagaya, Yoko

    2002-01-01

    We investigated cerebral atrophy in multiple system atrophy (MSA) by quantitative analysis of MRI. The subjects were 28 patients with MSA (14 striato-nigral degeneration; SND, 14 olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy; OPCA. 106 MRI examinations were performed totally) and 85 normal persons for control. The ratios of the ventral pons to the infratentorial space in the sagittal section, the putamen, cerebrum, frontal lobe and parietal and occipital lobes to the intracranial space in the horizontal section, and the temporal lobe to the intracranial space in the coronal section were measured. In the early stage of the disease, OPCA showed significant atrophy of the ventral pons compared with SND, and conversely, SND demonstrated significantly smaller putamen than that in OPCA. According to the progression of the disease, the atrophy of these neural tissues progressed, which resulted in so significant differences between SND and OPCA. The cerebral atrophy was observed in 17 MSA patients. The atrophy of the frontal lobe was much frequent and prominent to that in the temporal lobe and parietal and occipital lobes. SND showed higher incidence of the cerebral atrophy than OPCA in the early stage of the disease. In long period follow-up cases, one case showed cerebral atrophy in earlier stage, and another case in late stage. We indicated the involvement of the cerebral hemispheres in MSA, especially the frontal lobe. (author)

  9. Quantitative MRI study of progressive cerebral atrophy in multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Matsuoka, Yukihiko [Suzuka National Hospital, Suzuka, Mie (Japan); Konagaya, Yoko [JR Tokai General Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    We investigated cerebral atrophy in multiple system atrophy (MSA) by quantitative analysis of MRI. The subjects were 28 patients with MSA (14 striato-nigral degeneration; SND, 14 olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy; OPCA. 106 MRI examinations were performed totally) and 85 normal persons for control. The ratios of the ventral pons to the infratentorial space in the sagittal section, the putamen, cerebrum, frontal lobe and parietal and occipital lobes to the intracranial space in the horizontal section, and the temporal lobe to the intracranial space in the coronal section were measured. In the early stage of the disease, OPCA showed significant atrophy of the ventral pons compared with SND, and conversely, SND demonstrated significantly smaller putamen than that in OPCA. According to the progression of the disease, the atrophy of these neural tissues progressed, which resulted in so significant differences between SND and OPCA. The cerebral atrophy was observed in 17 MSA patients. The atrophy of the frontal lobe was much frequent and prominent to that in the temporal lobe and parietal and occipital lobes. SND showed higher incidence of the cerebral atrophy than OPCA in the early stage of the disease. In long period follow-up cases, one case showed cerebral atrophy in earlier stage, and another case in late stage. We indicated the involvement of the cerebral hemispheres in MSA, especially the frontal lobe. (author)

  10. Cortical atrophy and hypofibrinogenemia due to FGG and TBCD mutations in a single family: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Joshi; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Vinayan, K P; Yesodharan, Dhanya; Remesh, Preetha; Gahl, William A; Malicdan, May Christine V

    2018-05-16

    Blended phenotypes or co-occurrence of independent phenotypically distinct conditions are extremely rare and are due to coincidence of multiple pathogenic mutations, especially due to consanguinity. Hereditary fibrinogen deficiencies result from mutations in the genes FGA, FGB, and FGG, encoding the three different polypeptide chains that comprise fibrinogen. Neurodevelopmental abnormalities have not been associated with fibrinogen deficiencies. In this study, we report an unusual patient with a combination of two independently inherited genetic conditions; fibrinogen deficiency and early onset cortical atrophy. The study describes a male child from consanguineous family presented with hypofibrinogenemia, diffuse cortical atrophy, microcephaly, hypertonia and axonal motor neuropathy. Through a combination of homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, we identified bi-allelic pathogenic mutations in two genes: a homozygous novel truncating mutation in FGG (c.554del; p.Lys185Argfs*14) and a homozygous missense mutation in TBCD (c.1423G > A;p.Ala475Thr). Loss of function mutations in FGG have been associated with fibrinogen deficiency, while the c.1423G > A mutation in TBCD causes a novel syndrome of neurodegeneration and early onset encephalopathy. Our study highlights the importance of homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing in molecular prenatal diagnosis, especially when multiple gene mutations are responsible for the phenotype.

  11. Brain atrophy during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju; Yamada, Kenji; Yamada, Susumu; Ono, Shuichi; Takeda, Shunpei; Hatazawa, Jun; Ito, Masatoshi; Kubota, Kazuo

    1985-01-01

    Age-related brain atrophy was investigated in thousands of persons with no neurologic disturbances using X-CT and NMR-CT. Brain atrophy was minimal in 34-35 years old in both sexes, increased exponentially to the increasing age after 34-35 years, and probably resulted in dementia, such as vascular or multi-infarct dementia. Brain atrophy was significantly greater in men than in women at all ages. Brain volumes were maximal in 34-35 years old in both sexes with minimal individual differences which increased proportionally to the increasing age. Remarkable individual differences in the extent of brain atrophy (20 - 30 %) existed among aged subjects. Progression of brain atrophy was closely related to loss of mental activities independently of their ages. Our longitudinal study has revealed that the most important factors promoting brain atrophy during aging was the decrease in the cerebral blood flow. We have classified brain atrophy into sulcal and cisternal enlargement type (type I), ventricular enlargement type (type II) and mixed type (type III) according to the clinical study using NMR-CT. Brain atrophy of type I progresses significantly in almost all of the geriatric disorders. This type of brain atrophy progresses significantly in heavy smokers and drinkers. Therefore this type of brain atrophy might be caused by the decline in the blood flow in anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Brain atrophy of type II was caused by the disturbance of cerebrospinal fluid circulation after cerebral bleeding and subarachnoid bleeding. Brain atrophy of type III was seen in vascular dementia or multi-infarct dementia which was caused by loss of brain matter after multiple infarction, and was seen also in dementia of Alzheimer type in which degeneration of nerve cells results in brain atrophy. NMR-CT can easily detect small infarction (lacunae) and edematous lesions resulting from ischemia and hypertensive encephalopathy. (J.P.N.)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of vascular compression in trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaseki, Yoshishige; Horikoshi, Tohru; Omata, Tomohiro; Sugita, Masao; Nukui, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Hajime; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Hideo; Tsuji, Reizou.

    1991-01-01

    We show how neurosurgical planning can benefit from the better visualization of the precise vascular compression of the nerve provided by the oblique-sagittal and gradient-echo method (OS-GR image) using magnetic resonance images (MRI). The scans of 3 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and of 15 with hemifacial spasm (HFS) were analyzed for the presence and appearance of the vascular compression of the nerves. Imaging sequences consisted of an OS-GR image (TR/TE: 200/20, 3-mm-thick slice) cut along each nerve shown by the axial view, which was scanned at the angle of 105 degrees taken between the dorsal line of the brain stem and the line corresponding to the pontomedullary junction. In the OS-GR images of the TN's, the vascular compressions of the root entry zone (REZ) of the trigeminal nerve were well visualized as high-intensity lines in the 2 cases whose vessels were confirmed intraoperatively. In the other case, with atypical facial pain, vascular compression was confirmed at the rostral distal site on the fifth nerve, apart from the REZ. In the 15 cases of HFS, twelve OS-GR images (80%) demonstrated vascular compressions at the REZ of the facial nerves from the direction of the caudoventral side. During the surgery for these 12 cases, in 11 cases (excepting the 1 case whose facial nerve was not compressed by any vessels), vascular compressions were confirmed corresponding to the findings of the OS-GR images. Among the 10 OS-GR images on the non-affected side, two false-positive findings were visualized. It is concluded that OS-GR images obtained by means of MRI may serve as a useful planning aid prior to microvascular decompression for cases of TN and HFS. (author)

  13. Maxillary-driven simultaneous maxillo-mandibular distraction for hemifacial microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideo; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Tamada, Ikkei; Ogata, Hisao; Kishi, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Teruo

    2011-12-01

    We treat hemifacial microsomia with a combination of surgery and orthodontic treatment during the growth period, resulting in early improvement in facial asymmetry and the induction of normal growth. We previously used gradual distraction of the mandibular ramus for Pruzansky's type II classification (Pruzansky, 1969). In type II cases, the maxilla should also be treated actively as, using this technique, improvement of the occlusal plane is difficult to achieve, resulting in a cross bite and difficulties in post-operative orthodontic treatment-especially in older patients. Morphologically, the mandibular angle region of the operative side is flat, and the angle of the mouth remains elevated. We performed mandibular-driven simultaneous maxillo-mandibular distraction while the occlusion was maintained using intermaxillary anchorage. However, mandibular-driven distraction tended to elongate the face because the mandible only elongated downwards and the mandibular ramus did not reach the glenoid. Furthermore, external distraction devices produce significant distress for patients until removal of the device and cause scars on the face. We developed a new internal distraction device with a variable angle and performed maxillary-driven simultaneous maxillo-mandibular distraction using this device. The result was morphologically satisfactory and solved the above problems. Because the patient was in the growth period, careful follow-up and induction to normal growth were important while the inferior growth of the affected side was monitored. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Hemifacial Spasm on Intraocular Pressure Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicik, Erdogan; Yildirim, Rengin; Arici, Ceyhun; Dikkaya, Funda; Arslan, Osman Sevki

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of hemifacial spasm (HFS) on intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement. Twenty-four consecutive patients with HFS and 25 age- and gender-matched randomly selected eyes of healthy volunteers underwent corneal pachymetry and IOP measurements using Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT) and noncontact tonometer (NCT). IOP measurements were performed before (during HFS) and 2 weeks after Botox injections in HFS patients and in healthy volunteers without Botox injections. There was no statistical difference between involved eye side and uninvolved eye side of HFS patients in measured central corneal thickness. Similarly, no difference was found between involved eye side of HFS patients and controls. There were no statistically significant differences comparing IOP values before treatment and levels measured at 2 weeks of Botox injections, either with GAT ( p = 0.33, 0.11) or NCT ( p = 0.80, 0.43) devices in the involved eyes and uninvolved eyes of patients with HFS, respectively. There were also no significant differences in these parameters (GAT ( p = 0.63) and NCT ( p = 0.54)) in controls. Contractions in facial muscles may not lead to significant increase in IOP in HFS patients. This result may help clinical decision making in the treatment of glaucoma patients with HFS. This trial is registered with NCT03390803.

  15. Brain atrophy during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju; Takeda, Shumpei; Hatazawa, Jun

    1985-01-01

    Age-related brain atrophy was investigated in thousands of persons with no neurologic disturbances using X-CT and NMR-CT and following results were obtained. Brain atrophy was minimal in 34 -- 35 years old in both sexes, increased exponentially to the increasing age after 34 -- 35 years, and probably resulted in dementia, such as vascular or multiinfarct dementia. Brain atrophy was significantly greater in men than in women at all ages. Brain volumes were maximal in 34 -- 35 years old in both sexes with minimal individual differences which increased proportionally to the increasing age. Remarkable individual differences in the extents of brain atrophy (20 -- 30 %) existed among aged subjects. Some aged subjects had little or no atrophy of their brains, as seen in young subjects, and others had markedly shrunken brains associated with senility. From these results there must be pathological factors promoting brain atrophy with a great individual difference. We have studied the relation of intelligence to brain volume, and have ascertained that progression of brain atrophy was closely related to loss of mental activities independently of their ages. Our longitudinal study has revealed that the most important factors promoting brain atrophy during aging was decrease in the cerebral blood flow. MNR-CT can easily detected small infarction (lacunae) and edematous lesions resulting from ischemia and hypertensive encephalopathy, while X-CT can not. Therefore NMR-CT is very useful for detection of subtle changes in the brain. (J.P.N.)

  16. Persistent hemifacial spasm after microvascular decompression: a risk assessment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Aalap; Horowitz, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm (HFS) provides resolution of disabling symptoms such as eyelid twitching and muscle contractions of the entire hemiface. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of patient demographics and spasm characteristics on long-term outcomes, with or without intraoperative lateral spread response (LSR) as an additional variable in a risk assessment model. A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the associations of pre-operative patient characteristics, as well as intraoperative LSR and need for a staged procedure on the presence of persistent or recurrent HFS at the time of hospital discharge and at follow-up. A risk assessment model was constructed with the inclusion of six clinically or statistically significant variables from the univariate analyses. A receiving operator characteristic curve was generated, and area under the curve was calculated to determine the strength of the predictive model. A risk assessment model was first created consisting of significant pre-operative variables (Model 1) (age >50, female gender, history of botulinum toxin use, platysma muscle involvement). This model demonstrated borderline predictive value for persistent spasm at discharge (AUC .60; p=.045) and fair predictive value at follow-up (AUC .75; p=.001). Intraoperative variables (e.g. LSR persistence) demonstrated little additive value (Model 2) (AUC .67). Patients with a higher risk score (three or greater) demonstrated greater odds of persistent HFS at the time of discharge (OR 1.5 [95%CI 1.16-1.97]; p=.035), as well as greater odds of persistent or recurrent spasm at the time of follow-up (OR 3.0 [95%CI 1.52-5.95]; p=.002) Conclusions: A risk assessment model consisting of pre-operative clinical characteristics is useful in prognosticating HFS persistence at follow-up.

  17. Bone dysplasia with optic atrophy, vascular malformation and seizures in a 14-year-old girl - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuleta-Bosak, E.; Kluczewska, E.; Gibinska, E.; Jamroz, E.; Augustyn, D.; Gluszkiewicz, E.

    2007-01-01

    The heritable skeletal dysplasias or osteochondrodysplasias are a large heterogeneous group of disorders associated with abnormal shape, growth, or integrity of bones. Osteopetrosis is a collective term for a range of sclerosing bone diseases with various degree of defective remodeling. Increased bone density is the predominant radiologic feature. The skull is often involved with basal sclerosis and the sinuses are obliterated. The most serious consequences of the osteopetroses are seen in the nervous system. Because of perturbed remodeling of the skull bones, many aspects of the brain and cranial nerve function are endangered. Cranial nerves, blood vessels and the spinal cord may be compressed by progressive occlusion of cranial foramina. Carious, misplaced teeth, dysplastic fingernails, tendency to pathologic fractures are the other clinical manifestations. The authors present a 14-year-old girl with dysmorphic features, optic atrophy, CNS vessel malformation, pathologic fractures and seizures. The girl had a wide range of clinical and radiographic symptoms of bone dysplasias together with a giant left internal carotid artery aneurysm and epilepsy. On the basis of clinical and radiological features, a disease belonging to the group of skeletal dysplasias was recognized in our patient. The configuration of the presented symptoms does not allow at the moment strict classification to hitherto determined forms of dysplasia. This leads to the necessity of extending diagnostics, especially by molecular tests, and further long-lasting observations, which perhaps would allow classification of the presented syndrome to one of the known groups, or determination of a new clinical entity. (author)

  18. Dominant optic atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenaers Guy

    2012-07-01

    bilateral, mild, otherwise unexplained visual loss related to optic discs pallor or atrophy, and typically occurring in the context of a family history of DOA. Optical Coherence Tomography further discloses non-specific thinning of retinal nerve fiber layer, but a normal morphology of the photoreceptors layers. Abnormal visual evoked potentials and pattern ERG may also reflect the dysfunction of the RGCs and their axons. Molecular diagnosis is provided by the identification of a mutation in the OPA1 gene (75% of DOA patients or in the OPA3 gene (1% of patients. Prognosis Visual loss in DOA may progress during puberty until adulthood, with very slow subsequent chronic progression in most of the cases. On the opposite, in DOA patients with associated extra-ocular features, the visual loss may be more severe over time. Management To date, there is no preventative or curative treatment in DOA; severely visually impaired patients may benefit from low vision aids. Genetic counseling is commonly offered and patients are advised to avoid alcohol and tobacco consumption, as well as the use of medications that may interfere with mitochondrial metabolism. Gene and pharmacological therapies for DOA are currently under investigation.

  19. [An autopsied case of dominantly affecting upper motor neuron with atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes--with special reference to primary lateral sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konagaya, M; Sakai, M; Iida, M; Hashizume, Y

    1995-04-01

    In this paper, the autopsy findings of a 78-year-old man mimicking primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) are reported. His clinical symptoms were slowly progressive spasticity, pseudobulbar palsy and character change. He died of sepsis 32 months after protracting the disease. The autopsy revealed severe atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes. The histological findings were severe neuronal loss with gliosis in the precentral gyrus and left temporal lobe tip, loss of Betz cell, prominent demyelination throughout of the corticospinal tract, axonal swelling in the cerebral peduncule, severe degeneration of the amygdala, mild degeneration of the Ammon horn, normal substantia nigra, a few neuronal cells with central chromatolysis in the facial nerve nucleus and very mild neuronal cell loss in the spinal anterior horn. The anterior horn cell only occasionally demonstrated Bunina body by H & E and cystatin-C stainings, as well as, skein-like inclusion by ubiquitin staining. Thus, this is a case of uncommon amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) dominantly affecting the upper motor neuron including the motor cortex and temporal limbic system. In analysis of nine cases of putative primary lateral sclerosis in the literature, six cases showed loss of Betz cell in the precentral gyrus, and four cases very mild involvement of the lower motor neuron such as central chromatolysis and eosinophilic inclusion body. Degeneration of the limbic system was observed in two cases. We indicated a possible subgroup with concomitant involvement in the motor cortex and temporal lobe in motor neuron disease dominantly affecting the upper motor neuron.

  20. Hemifacial spasm : Intraoperative electromyographic monitoring as a guide for microvascular decompression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, JJA; Mustafa, MK; van Weerden, TW

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Microvascular decompression is the logical and well-accepted treatment of choice for hemifacial spasm (HFS). In experienced hands, good to excellent results can be obtained. However, sometimes the exact site of the vascular compression is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze

  1. Hemifacial spasm in a patient with basilar artery dolichoectasia caused by uncontrolled hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon S. Crabtree

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A 47-year-old male presented with a 2-year history of hemifacial spasm. Magnetic resonance imaging performed showed his tortuous basilar artery with nerve compression, and the patient was treated conservatively with botulinum toxin injections with complete resolution of symptoms. This rare disease was caused by his long history of hypertension, which led to his major basilar artery dolichoectasia.

  2. Evaluation of hepatic atrophy after transcatheter arterial embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hwan Hoon; Lee, Mee Ran; Oh, Min Cheol; Park, Chul Min; Seol, Hae Young; Cha, In Ho

    1995-01-01

    Hepatic atrophy has been recognized as a complication of hepatic and biliary disease but we have often found it in follow up CT after transcatheter arterial embolization (TACE). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of hepatic atrophy after TACE. Of 53 patients who had TACE. We evaluated the relationship between the incidence of hepatic atrophy and the number of TACE, and also evaluated the average number of TACE in patients with hepatic atrophy. Of 20 patients who had received more than average number of TACE for development of hepatic atrophy (2 times with portal vein obstruction, 2.7 times without portal vein obstruction in this study), we evaluated the relationship between the lipiodol uptake pattern of tumor and the incidence of hepatic atrophy. There were 8 cases of hepatic atrophy (3 with portal vein obstruction, 5 without portal vein obstruction), average number for development of hepatic atrophy were 2.5 times. As the number of TACE were increased, the incidence of hepatic atrophy were also increased. Of 20 patients who received more than average number of TACE for development of hepatic atrophy, we noted 6 cases of hepatic atrophy in 11 patients with dense homogenous lipiodol uptake pattern of tumor and noted only 1 case of hepatic atrophy in 9 patient with inhomogenous lipiodol uptake pattern. Hepatic atrophy was one of the CT findings after TACE even without portal vein obstruction. Average number of TACE was 2.5 times and risk factors for development of hepatic atrophy were portal vein obstruction, increased number of TACE, and dense homogenous lipiodol uptake pattern of tumor

  3. Nonsurgical treatment of hemifacial microsomia by therapeutic ultrasound and hybrid functional appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek El-Bialy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Tarek El-Bialy1, Ali Hasan2, Ahmad Janadas3, Tarik Albaghdadi41Division of Orthodontics, Department of Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; 2Division of Orthodontics, Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry; 3Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry; 4Division of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdul Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaAim: Conventional treatment of patients with hemifacial microsomia involves orthognathic surgery and/or distraction osteogenesis of the mandible. Previous reports showed that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS enhances mandibular growth in growing rabbits and monkeys. In monkeys, LIPUS enhanced mandibular growth when combined with functional jaw orthopedic appliances. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate if LIPUS could enhance mandibular growth in children with hemifacial microsomia.Methods: Five children (age range 3–11 years with hemifacial microsomia were treated with hybrid jaw orthopedic functional appliances and treatment of the affected mandibular condyle by LIPUS for 20 minutes per day.Results: The results showed that after one year of treatment, significant improvement of the underdeveloped side of patients’ faces and mandibles was recognized both clinically and radiographically.Discussion: Although improvement took a longer time than did a surgical approach, optimizing this technique may achieve better results in a shorter treatment time. A randomized controlled clinical trial to investigate the effect of optimized LIPUS application or functional appliances in the treatment of hemifacial microsomia is warranted.Keywords: hemifacial microsomia, LIPUS, non-surgical treatment, children

  4. Differentiating non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease from controls and hemifacial spasm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hui Yong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Non-motor symptoms (NMS are important manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD that reduce patients' health-related quality of life. Some NMS may also be caused by age-related changes, or manifested as a psychological reaction to a chronic neurological condition. This case-control study compared the NMS burden among PD patients, healthy controls and hemifacial spasm (HFS patients. In addition, we determined the NMS that discriminated between PD and non-PD subjects. METHODS: 425 subjects were recruited from a tertiary hospital in Singapore (200 PD patients, 150 healthy controls and 75 HFS patients. NMS burden in subjects was measured using the Non-Motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS. RESULTS: NMSS total score was significantly higher in PD patients (37.9±2.6 compared to healthy controls (11.2±0.9 (p<0.0001 and HFS patients (18.0±2.1 (p<0.0001. In addition, NMSS total score was significantly higher in HFS patients compared to healthy controls (p = 0.003. PD patients experienced a higher NMS burden than healthy controls in all domains, and a higher NMS burden than HFS patients in all but attention/memory and urinary domains. NMS burden for HFS and healthy controls differed only in the sleep/fatigue and urinary domains. Using stepwise logistic regression, problems of 'constipation', 'restless legs', 'dribbling saliva', 'altered interest in sex' and 'change in taste or smell' were found to have significant discriminative power in differentiating between PD patients and healthy controls and between PD patients and HFS patients. CONCLUSION: PD patients experienced a greater overall NMS burden compared to both healthy controls and HFS patients. HFS patients demonstrated a higher NMS burden than controls, and some NMS may be common to chronic neurological conditions while others are more specific to PD. Differentiating patients using NMS domains may help refine the clinical management of NMS in PD patients.

  5. Prevalence of Bruxism in Hemifacial-Spasm Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ella, Bruno; Guillaud, Etienne; Langbour, Nicolas; Guehl, Dominique; Burbaud, Pierre

    2017-06-01

    A previous study reported an increased prevalence of bruxism (25%) in patients with cranio-cervical dystonia (CCD) compared to normal controls (13%). CCD can affect the muscles of the head and neck. Besides the CCD affecting these muscles, hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a form of peripheral myoclonus due to a neurovascular conflict affecting the muscles of the face. The fact that they affect the same muscle regions could lead to other links in clinical manifestations such as bruxism, which is more common in patients with CCD than in the normal population. The aim was to study the prevalence of bruxism in patients with HFS. Patients with HFS were enrolled in the department of clinical neurophysiology (Bordeaux University Hospital) over a 6-month period. They were paired regarding age, the absence of neurological pathology or neuroleptics intake. To be included in the study, patients needed to have had unilateral involuntary facial muscle contractions affecting one hemiface. A hetero-questionnaire and a clinicial study were performed. The diagnostic criteria of bruxism included parafunction items such as grinding and clenching and at least one of the following clinical signs: abnormal tooth wear, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain, TMJ clicking, muscle hypertonia (masseter or temporal muscles). Additional epidemiological data were collected including age, sex, disease duration, stress, and sleep disorders. Stress symptoms inventory included symptoms like depression, strong heartbeat, dry mouth, anger, inability to concentrate, weakness, fatigability, insomnia, headache, and excessive sweating. The sleep disorder diagnosis included at least two of the symptoms described in the ICSD-3. All these criteria were recorded as either present (scored "1") or absent (scored "0"). The prevalence of bruxism in the two groups (normal and HFS) was not significantly different (p = 0.37). The rate was not significantly different between sleep and awake bruxism (p = 0.15) in both groups

  6. Complete rupture of the distal semimembranosus tendon with secondary hamstring muscles atrophy: MR findings in two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varela, J.R.; Rodriguez, E.; Soler, R.; Gonzalez, J.; Pombo, S.

    2000-01-01

    Complete rupture of the hamstring muscles is a rare injury. The proximal musculo-tendinous junction is the most frequent site of rupture. We present two cases of complete rupture of the distal semimenbranosus tendon, which clinically presented as soft-tissue masses. MR imaging permitted the correct diagnosis. There has been only one other such case reported. (orig.)

  7. Complete rupture of the distal semimembranosus tendon with secondary hamstring muscles atrophy: MR findings in two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela, J.R.; Rodriguez, E.; Soler, R.; Gonzalez, J.; Pombo, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain)

    2000-06-01

    Complete rupture of the hamstring muscles is a rare injury. The proximal musculo-tendinous junction is the most frequent site of rupture. We present two cases of complete rupture of the distal semimenbranosus tendon, which clinically presented as soft-tissue masses. MR imaging permitted the correct diagnosis. There has been only one other such case reported. (orig.)

  8. Extensive distribution of glial cytoplasmic inclusions in an autopsied case of multiple system atrophy with a prolonged 18-year clinical course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masui, Kenta; Nakata, Yukako; Fujii, Naoki; Iwaki, Toru

    2012-02-01

    We describe herein an autopsied case of multiple system atrophy (MSA) with prolonged clinical course of 18 years, and evaluate the extent of neurodegeneration and glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) in the entire brain of this rare case. A 64-year-old woman presented with typical neurological symptoms and imaging features of MSA. Thereafter, she became bedridden, and breathing was assisted through a tracheostomy for 12 years. She died at the age of 82 after 18 years from the initial symptom. Post mortem examination revealed severe neurodegeneration in the inferior olive, pontine nuclei, substantia nigra, locus ceruleus, putamen and cerebellum. Notably, phosphorylated α-synuclein (p-α-syn)-positive GCIs were found in these areas, but their number was very low. In contrast, the density of GCIs was much higher in such regions as the tectum/tegmentum of the brainstem, pyramidal tracts, neocortices and limbic system, which usually contain a small number of GCIs. Another constituent of GCIs, ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-associated autophagy substrate p62, were also positive in some GCIs, and distribution of Ub/p62 immunoreactivity was proportionate to that of p-α-syn+ GCIs despite the very long duration of the disease. Furthermore, this case had complicated hypoxic encephalopathy, but p-α-syn+ GCIs were also found in the damaged white matter, indicating the contribution of α-syncleinopathy as well as hypoxic effect to the secondary myelin and axonal loss in the white matter. Together, this rare case suggests the contribution of the disease duration to the prevalence of GCIs, and the possible involvement of the limbic system in extensive-stage disease. © 2011 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  9. MRI study of degenerative process in multiple system atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo

    1995-01-01

    The characteristic morphological changes of the brainstem and cerebellar regions of multiple system atrophy (MSA) were studied by MRI in varing subtypes, that is olivoponto cerebellar atrophy (OPCA: 23 cases), striatonigral degeneration (SND: 7 cases) and Shy-Drager's syndrome (SDS: 9 cases). OPCA was characterized by atrophy of the entire regions of the brainstem and the cerebellum. SND and SDS tended to show atrophy similar in type but lessin extent to OPCA. The common lesions in MSA were atrophy of the pontine base and cerebellum, and dilation of the fourth ventricle. Atrophy of the pontine base was more dominant in the inferior part than in the superior part, and cerebellar atrophy was more dominant in the superior part than in the inferior part, indicating that degeneration of the pontocerebellar pathway proceeds principally along fibers connecting the inferior part of the pons and the superior part of the cerebellum. Dilation of the fourth ventricle indicated atrophy of the middle cerebellar peduncle. In almost all the cases of OPCA and about a half the cases of SND and SDS, the pontine base and the middle cerebellar peduncle appeared as high signal intensity on T 2 weighted image and as low intensity on T 1 , suggesting degeneration and demyelination. In a few cases of OPCA, the dorsolateral part of the putamen were demonstrated as low signal intensity on T 2 weighted image. (author)

  10. MRI study of degenerative process in multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-02-01

    The characteristic morphological changes of the brainstem and cerebellar regions of multiple system atrophy (MSA) were studied by MRI in varing subtypes, that is olivoponto cerebellar atrophy (OPCA: 23 cases), striatonigral degeneration (SND: 7 cases) and Shy-Drager`s syndrome (SDS: 9 cases). OPCA was characterized by atrophy of the entire regions of the brainstem and the cerebellum. SND and SDS tended to show atrophy similar in type but lessin extent to OPCA. The common lesions in MSA were atrophy of the pontine base and cerebellum, and dilation of the fourth ventricle. Atrophy of the pontine base was more dominant in the inferior part than in the superior part, and cerebellar atrophy was more dominant in the superior part than in the inferior part, indicating that degeneration of the pontocerebellar pathway proceeds principally along fibers connecting the inferior part of the pons and the superior part of the cerebellum. Dilation of the fourth ventricle indicated atrophy of the middle cerebellar peduncle. In almost all the cases of OPCA and about a half the cases of SND and SDS, the pontine base and the middle cerebellar peduncle appeared as high signal intensity on T{sub 2} weighted image and as low intensity on T{sub 1}, suggesting degeneration and demyelination. In a few cases of OPCA, the dorsolateral part of the putamen were demonstrated as low signal intensity on T{sub 2} weighted image. (author).

  11. A patient with an odontoid fracture and atrophy of the tongue: a case report and systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuitwaard, Krista; Vandertop, William P.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic hypoglossal nerve palsy is a rare entity and has rarely been described in association with an odontoid fracture. CASE DESCRIPTION: We present a patient with a posttraumatic odontoid fracture who developed selective weakness of his arms and a unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy.

  12. Three-dimensional photogrammetry for surgical planning of tissue expansion in hemifacial microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaratne, Yasas S N; Lo, John; Zwahlen, Roger A; Cheung, Lim K

    2010-12-01

    We aim to illustrate the applications of 3-dimensional (3-D) photogrammetry for surgical planning and longitudinal assessment of the volumetric changes in hemifacial microsomia. A 3-D photogrammetric system was employed for planning soft tissue expansion and transplantation of a vascularized scapular flap for a patient with hemifacial microsomia. The facial deficiency was calculated by superimposing a mirror of the normal side on the preoperative image. Postsurgical volumetric changes were monitored by serial superimposition of 3-D images. A total of 31 cm(3) of tissue expansion was achieved within a period of 4 weeks. A scapular free flap measuring 8 cm × 5 cm was transplanted to augment the facial deficiency. Postsurgical shrinkage of the flap was observed mainly in the first 3 months and it was minimal thereafter. 3-D photogrammetry can be used as a noninvasive objective tool for assessing facial deformity, planning, and postoperative follow-up of surgical correction of facial asymmetry.

  13. Precise positioning of an intraoral distractor using augmented reality in patients with hemifacial microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Miao; Hou, Yikang; Xu, Yourong; Shen, Congcong; Zhu, Ming; Xie, Le; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Yan; Chai, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Through three-dimensional real time imaging, augmented reality (AR) can provide an overlay of the anatomical structure, or visual cues for specific landmarks. In this study, an AR Toolkit was used for distraction osteogenesis with hemifacial microsomia to define the mandibular osteotomy line and assist with intraoral distractor placement. 20 patients with hemifacial microsomia were studied and were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Pre-operative computed tomography was used in both groups, whereas AR was used in the experimental group. Afterwards, pre- and post-operative computed tomographic scans of both groups were superimposed, and several measurements were made and analysed. Both the conventional method and AR technique achieved proper positioning of the osteotomy planes, although the AR was more accurate. The difference in average vertical distance from the coronoid and condyle process to the pre- and post-operative cutting planes was significant (p 0.05) was observed in the average angle between the two planes. The difference in deviations between the intersection points of the overlaid mandible across two cutting planes was also significant (p Augmented reality tools such as the AR Toolkit may be helpful for precise positioning of intraoral distractors in patients with hemifacial microsomia in craniofacial surgery. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. CT findings of brain atrophy after chemotherapy in acute leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jun; Park, Seog Hee; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic University Medicine College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-10-15

    A study was performed to evaluate the atrophic changes of the central nerve system after chemotherapy in the patients with acute leukemia. The computed tomographic findings and medical records of 20 proven acute leukemia patients under 35 years-old who developed various CNS symptoms and signs during and/or after 2 courses of chemotherapy were reviewed. The results were as follows: 1. Age distribution was from 14 to 5 years (mean was 26 years). Male was 15. 2. Presenting clinical symptoms and signs were headache (16/20), nausea and vomiting (11/20) and loss of consciousness (5/20). 3. Brain atrophy was noted in 16 patients including cortical and subcortical atrophy 15 cases and subcortical atrophy 1 case. 4. Two cases of hemorrhage, one each of intracranial hematoma and chronic subdural hematoma were found in addition to brain atrophy. This showed that chemotherapeutic agents cause brain atrophy in a considerable number of the patients with symptomatic acute leukemia.

  15. Spinal Muscular Atrophy FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease), cystic fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Approximately 1 in 50 Americans, or about 6 ... Pediatric Neuromuscular Clinical Research Network ( PNCR ) and the Muscular ... is the SMN2 gene? Muscle weakness and atrophy in SMA results from the ...

  16. Scrotal Swelling and Testicular Atrophy due to Schistosomiasis in a 9-Year-Old Boy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter F. Rambau

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a communicable disease which commonly involves urinary bladder causing hematuria, or large bowel causing bloody stool. The common species encountered in this lake region surrounding Lake Victoria in Tanzania are Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni. Complications can lead to portal hypertension due portal fibrosis in liver, and fibrosis in lung can lead to pulmonary hypertension; this commonly seen with S. mansoni. Major complications of S. maeametobium are chronic cystitis with squamous metaplasia with subsequent development of squamous cell carcinoma. Involvement of spinal cord causing paraplegia has been observed in S. haematobium. Other unusual pathology of schistosomiasis has been described, such as involvement of the appendix, ovary, prostate, and cervix. Here, we present a case of schistosomiasis in a 9-year-old boy who presented with left scrotal pain for one year which was accompanied by scrotal swelling; surgical exploration was done, and the finding was hydrocele and atrophic testes with nodules on the surface. Histological examination reveals atrophic testis and heavy active granulomatous inflammation with schistosoma eggs consistent with Schistosoma haematobium in the tunica vaginalis.

  17. Multimodal Image-Based Virtual Reality Presurgical Simulation and Evaluation for Trigeminal Neuralgia and Hemifacial Spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shujing; Zhang, Jiashu; Zhao, Yining; Hou, Yuanzheng; Xu, Xinghua; Zhang, Zhizhong; Kikinis, Ron; Chen, Xiaolei

    2018-05-01

    To address the feasibility and predictive value of multimodal image-based virtual reality in detecting and assessing features of neurovascular confliction (NVC), particularly regarding the detection of offending vessels, degree of compression exerted on the nerve root, in patients who underwent microvascular decompression for nonlesional trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm (HFS). This prospective study includes 42 consecutive patients who underwent microvascular decompression for classic primary trigeminal neuralgia or HFS. All patients underwent preoperative 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with T2-weighted three-dimensional (3D) sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions, 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, and 3D T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced sequences in combination, whereas 2 patients underwent extra experimental preoperative 7.0-T MRI scans with the same imaging protocol. Multimodal MRIs were then coregistered with open-source software 3D Slicer, followed by 3D image reconstruction to generate virtual reality (VR) images for detection of possible NVC in the cerebellopontine angle. Evaluations were performed by 2 reviewers and compared with the intraoperative findings. For detection of NVC, multimodal image-based VR sensitivity was 97.6% (40/41) and specificity was 100% (1/1). Compared with the intraoperative findings, the κ coefficients for predicting the offending vessel and the degree of compression were >0.75 (P < 0.001). The 7.0-T scans have a clearer view of vessels in the cerebellopontine angle, which may have significant impact on detection of small-caliber offending vessels with relatively slow flow speed in cases of HFS. Multimodal image-based VR using 3D sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions in combination with 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography sequences proved to be reliable in detecting NVC

  18. Simplifying the Treatment of Bone Atrophy in the Posterior Regions: Combination of Zygomatic and Wide-Short Implants—A Case Report with 2 Years of Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Faot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The rehabilitation of maxillary and mandibular bone atrophy represents one of the main challenges of modern oral implantology because it requires a variety of procedures, which not only differ technically, but also differ in their results. In the face of limitations such as deficiencies in the height and thickness of the alveolar structure, prosthetic rehabilitation has sought to avoid large bone reconstruction through bone grafting; this clinical behavior has become a treatment system based on evidence from clinical scientific research. In the treatment of atrophic maxilla, the use of zygomatic implants has been safely applied as a result of extreme technical rigor and mastery of this surgical skill. For cases of posterior mandibular atrophy, short implants with a large diameter and a combination of short and long implants have been recommended to improve biomechanical resistance. These surgical alternatives have demonstrated a success rate similar to that of oral rehabilitation with the placing of conventional implants, allowing the adoption of immediate loading protocol, a decrease in morbidity, simplification and speed of the treatment, and cost reduction. This case report presents complete oral rehabilitation in a patient with bilateral bone atrophy in the posterior regions of the maxilla and mandible with the goal of developing and increasing posterior occlusal stability during immediate loading.

  19. CT features of olivopontocerebellar atrophy in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.D.; Gururaj, A.K.; Jeans, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    Between 1990 and 1992, 14 children were seen in whom a clinical diagnosis of olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) had been made. The majority of patients presented with cerebellar ataxia and hypotonia. Five children had a family history of a similar illness in first-degree relatives. All cases had undergone clinical and neurologic examinations, routine laboratory tests and cranial CT. CT features were graded to quantitative the degree of atrophy in each cerebellar hemisphere, vermis and brain stem. All patients had varying degrees of atrophic changes of cerebellum, brain stem and cerebrum. These CT features appear to be distinctive enough to enable the diagnosis of OPCA to be made. (orig.)

  20. Progressive cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warabi, Yoko; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Isozaki, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    We report two cases of neuromyelitis optica patients with progressive cerebral atrophy. The patients exhibited characteristic clinical features, including elderly onset, secondary progressive tetraparesis and cognitive impairment, abnormally elevated CSF protein and myelin basic protein levels, and extremely highly elevated serum anti-AQP-4 antibody titer. Because neuromyelitis optica pathology cannot switch from an inflammatory phase to the degenerative phase until the terminal phase, neuromyelitis optica rarely appears as a secondary progressive clinical course caused by axonal degeneration. However, severe intrathecal inflammation and massive destruction of neuroglia could cause a secondary progressive clinical course associated with cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica patients. © The Author(s), 2015.

  1. Age-related macular degeneration with choroidal neovascularization in the setting of pre-existing geographic atrophy and ranibizumab treatment. Analysis of a case series and revision paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Hage Amaro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To report the response of choroidal neovascularization (CNV to intravitreal ranibizumab treatment in the setting of age-related macular degeneration (AMD with extensive pre-existing geographic atrophy (GA and a revision paper. METHODS: This is a revision paper and a retrospective case series of 10 eyes in nine consecutive patients from a photographic database. The patients were actively treated with ranibizumab for neovascular AMD with extensive pre-existing GA. Patients were included if they had GA at or adjacent to the foveal center that was present before the development of CNV. The best corrected visual acuity and optical coherence tomography (OCT analysis of the central macular thickness were recorded for each visit. Serial injections of ranibizumab were administered until there was resolution of any subretinal fluid clinically or on OCT. Data over the entire follow-up period were analyzed for overall visual and OCT changes. All patients had been followed for at least 2 years since diagnosis. RESULTS: The patients received an average of 6 ± 3 intravitreal injections over the treatment period. Eight eyes had reduced retinal thickening on OCT. On average, the central macular thickness was reduced by 94 ± 101 µm. Eight eyes had improvement of one or more lines of vision, where as one eye had dramatic vision loss and one had no change. The average treatment outcome for all patients was -0.07 ± 4.25 logMAR units, which corresponded to a gain of 0.6 ± 4.4 lines of Snellen acuity. The treatment resulted in a good anatomic response with the disappearance of the subretinal fluid, improved visual acuity, and stabilized final visual results. CONCLUSION: The results of this case series suggest that the use of an intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF agent (ranibizumab for CNV in AMD with extensive pre-existing GA is effective. Our results are not as striking as published results from large-scale trials of anti

  2. Spastic paretic hemifacial contracture as a presenting feature of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsis, Georgios; Breza, Marianthi; Evangelopoulos, Maria-Eleftheria; Anagnostouli, Maria; Andreadou, Elisavet; Karagiorgis, Georgios; Kokotis, Panagiotis; Kilidireas, Costas; Karandreas, Nikolaos

    2017-04-01

    Spastic paretic hemifacial contracture (SPHC) is characterized by sustained unilateral contraction of the facial muscles associated with mild ipsilateral facial paresis. Rarely described in the context of multiple sclerosis (MS), it has never been reported as presenting symptom of MS. Two patients developed SPHC within the context of a clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of MS. EMG revealed continuous resting activity of irregularly firing motor unit potentials, associated with impaired recruitment upon voluntary contraction. SPHC remitted fully in both patients. SPHC, a rare but distinct clinical and EMG entity, can occasionally be the presenting feature of MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Acquired alopecia, mental retardation, short stature, microcephaly, and optic atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, R. C.; Renckens-Wennen, E. G.

    1990-01-01

    We report on a female patient who had acquired total alopecia, short stature, microcephaly, optic atrophy, severe myopia, and mental retardation. A survey of published reports failed to show an identical patient, despite various similar cases

  4. Muscular atrophy in diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Gadeberg, P C; Brock, B

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic patients with polyneuropathy develop motor dysfunction. To establish whether motor dysfunction is associated with muscular atrophy the ankle dorsal and plantar flexors of the non-dominant leg were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in 8 patients with symptomatic neuropathy, in 8 non...... confirmed that the atrophy predominated distally. We conclude that muscular atrophy underlies motor weakness at the ankle in diabetic patients with polyneuropathy and that the atrophy is most pronounced in distal muscles of the lower leg indicating that a length dependent neuropathic process explains...

  5. Espasmo hemifacial e impressão basilar associados a malformação de arnold-chiari relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Baldoino Leal Filho

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam o caso de uma paciente com espasmo hemifacial e impressão basilar associados a malformação de Arnold-Chiari. Com a descompressão cirúrgica da fossa posterior, empregada no tratamento da impressão basilar, houve melhora do quadro clínico e o espasmo hemifacial se reduziu quanto à frequência, duração e intensidade. É enfatizada a necessidade do tratamento etiológico do espasmo hemifacial, antes de se recorrer à toxina botulínica.

  6. [Mandibular-driven simultaneous maxillo-mandibular distraction for hemifacial microsomia with rapid prototyping technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Quan-Wen; Song, Hui-Feng; Xu, Ming-Huo; Liu, Chun-Ming; Chai, Jia-Ke

    2013-11-01

    To explore the clinical application of mandibular-driven simultaneous maxillo-mandihular distraction to correct hemifacial microsomia with rapid prototyping technology. The patient' s skull resin model was manufactured with rapid prototyping technology. The osteotomy was designed on skull resin model. According to the preoperative design, the patients underwent Le Fort I osteotomy and mandibular ramus osteotomy. The internal mandible distractor was embedded onto the osteotomy position. The occlusal titanium pin was implanted. Distraction were carried out by mandibular-driven simultaneous maxillo-mandihular distraction 5 days after operation. The distraction in five patients was complete as designed. No infection and dysosteogenesis happened. The longest distance of distraction was 28 mm, and the shortest distance was 16 mm. The facial asymmetry deformity was significantly improved at the end of distraction. The ocelusal plane of patients obviously improved. Rapid prototyping technology is helpful to design precisely osteotomy before operation. Mandibular-driven simultaneous maxillo-mandibular distraction can correct hemifacial microsomia. It is worth to clinical application.

  7. Is the Supraspinatus Muscle Atrophy Truly Irreversible after Surgical Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Sae Hoon; Tae, Suk-Kee; Yoon, Jong Pil; Choi, Jung-Ah

    2013-01-01

    Background Atrophy of rotator cuff muscles has been considered an irreversible phenomenon. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether atrophy is truly irreversible after rotator cuff repair. Methods We measured supraspinatus muscle atrophy of 191 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative multidetector computed tomography images, taken at least 1 year after operation. The occupation ratio was calculated using Photoshop CS3 software. We compared the change between pre- and postoperative occupation ratios after modifying the preoperative occupation ratio. In addition, possible relationship between various clinical factors and the change of atrophy, and between the change of atrophy and cuff integrity after surgical repair were evaluated. Results The mean occupation ratio was significantly increased postoperatively from 0.44 ± 0.17 to 0.52 ± 0.17 (p < 0.001). Among 191 patients, 81 (42.4%) showed improvement of atrophy (more than a 10% increase in occupation ratio) and 33 (17.3%) worsening (more than a 10% decrease). Various clinical factors such as age tear size, or initial degree of atrophy did not affect the change of atrophy. However, the change of atrophy was related to repair integrity: cuff healing failure rate of 48.5% (16 of 33) in worsened atrophy; and 22.2% (18 of 81) in improved atrophy (p = 0.007). Conclusions The supraspinatus muscle atrophy as measured by occupation ratio could be improved postoperatively in case of successful cuff repair. PMID:23467404

  8. Orphan disease: Cherubism, optic atrophy, and short stature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Jeevanandham

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year-old female presented with complaints of progressive visual impairment in both her eyes. On clinical examination, she was short for her age and her ophthalmoscopic examination revealed bilateral optic atrophy. Computed tomography of the patient revealed multiple expansile lytic lesions of mandible suggesting cherubism. The optic atrophy was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging, which additionally revealed bilateral retrocerebellar arachnoid cysts. This association of cherubism with optic atrophy and short stature was grouped as orphan disease by National Institutes of Health and only one case was reported in the literature so far.

  9. Orphan disease: Cherubism, optic atrophy, and short stature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevanandham, Balaji; Ramachandran, Rajoo; Dhanapal, Vignesh; Subramanian, Ilanchezhian; Sai, Venkata

    2018-01-01

    A 12-year-old female presented with complaints of progressive visual impairment in both her eyes. On clinical examination, she was short for her age and her ophthalmoscopic examination revealed bilateral optic atrophy. Computed tomography of the patient revealed multiple expansile lytic lesions of mandible suggesting cherubism. The optic atrophy was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging, which additionally revealed bilateral retrocerebellar arachnoid cysts. This association of cherubism with optic atrophy and short stature was grouped as orphan disease by National Institutes of Health and only one case was reported in the literature so far.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: optic atrophy type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nerve Atrophy Encyclopedia: Visual Acuity Test Health Topic: Color Blindness Health Topic: Optic Nerve Disorders Genetic and Rare ... Disease InfoSearch: Optic atrophy 1 Kids Health: What's Color Blindness? MalaCards: autosomal dominant optic atrophy, classic form Merck ...

  11. The inheritance of peripapillary atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Healey, Paul R.; Mitchell, Paul; Gilbert, Clare E.; Lee, Anne J.; Ge, Dongliang; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    PURPOSE. To estimate the relative importance of genes and environment in peripapillary atrophy type beta (beta-PPA) in a classic twin study. METHODS. Female twin pairs (n = 506) aged 49 to 79 years were recruited from the St. Thomas' UK Adult Twin Registry. Peripapillary atrophy was identified from

  12. Cerebellar and cerebral atrophy in trichothiodystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Sargent, Michael A.; Poskitt, Kenneth J. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Prendiville, Julie S. [British Columbia Children' s Hospital, Division of Paediatric Dermatology, Department of Paediatrics, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    Trichothiodystrophy is a rare neuroectodermal disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance that is characterized by brittle hair, nail dysplasia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, and gonadal failure. We describe a female patient whose cranial MRI revealed almost total lack of myelination in the supratentorial white matter, which is similar to the previously described cases. In addition, there was progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy, which has not been well documented in association with trichothiodystrophy. (orig.)

  13. Prefabricated Cervical Skin Flaps for Hemi-Facial Resurfacing: Elucidating the Natural History of Postoperative Edema Using Indocyanine Green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Min, Peiru; Sadigh, Parviz; Grassetti, Luca; Lazzeri, Davide; Torresetti, Matteo; Marsili, Riccardo; Feng, Shaoqing; Liu, Ningfei; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2018-02-01

    The increases in capillary wall permeability and capillary hydrostatic pressure are considered to be the causes for the acute swelling seen in flaps; however, disruption of the circulating flap lymphatics could be another contributory factor. In this study we monitor the development of flap edema in a series of 18 prefabricated flaps and aim to delineate the natural history of this phenomenon by use of lymphography. Postoperative swelling was monitored in a series of 18 pre-expanded prefabricated cervical skin flaps used for hemi-facial burns-scar resurfacing. Time to spontaneous resolution, presence or absence of venous congestion, and clinical outcome were recorded. In two cases, indocyanine-green (ICG) lymphography was used to monitor the dermal backflow pattern until swelling had completely resolved. Average moving velocity of ICG after injection as well as flap thickness was also recorded over the follow-up period. The average moving velocity of ICG in the flap lymphatics improved from 0.48 cm/min to 1.5 cm/min in the first 12 days after flap transfer. The dermal backflow pattern was stardust in the first 12 days, indicating moderate lymphedema, transforming to splash from week three, and a robust collecting lymphatic vessel occurring from the fifth month, indicating mild lymphedema and lymphatic channel recovery, respectively. Transient swelling was observed in all prefabricated flaps in our series. We postulate that this is mostly secondary to lymphatic disruption that subsides as lymphangiogenesis takes place. ICG lymphography is an inexpensive, safe, and easy-to-use imaging technology that could be used in the monitoring of postoperative lymphedema seen in prefabricated flaps.

  14. Acute hemifacial ischemia as a late complication of carotid stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Domanin, MD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Concerns about carotid artery stenting (CAS center primarily on procedural complications like acute occlusion, stroke, and long-term intrastent restenosis. External carotid artery (ECA thrombosis is observed during CAS follow-up, but it often remains asymptomatic or, at worst, results in jaw claudication. We report here a case of late occlusion of the ECA after CAS with symptoms of acute homolateral facial ischemia as well as pain, cyanosis, tongue numbness, and skin coldness. The patient was submitted to local thrombolysis and balloon angioplasty with regression of symptoms after recanalization. With this report, we add a caveat about blockage of the ECA ostium during CAS.

  15. Brain atrophy and dementia from the aspect of CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkuni, Michiko

    1979-01-01

    Two major causes of dementia in the elderly are reported to be the degeneration of brain and cerebrovascular diseases. Recently, CT findings of cerebrovascular diseases and brain atrophy have been noticed, because they rather clearly show these changes. The authors examined the view of atrophy frequently observed on the dementia in the elderly. The results obtained are as follows: 1) In accordance with the increase of age the appearance of the view of atrophy increased in frequency and that of extreme brain atrophy also increased. 2) As the age increased, the average value of the width of the 3rd ventricle tended to increase. 3) In the cases accompanied with the view of cerebrovascular diseases remarkable ventricular dilatation was frequently observed, and in the very old dilatations of cerebral sulci, central fissure and Sylvian fissure were observed of all cases. 4) Of the group of severe dementia the view of extreme brain atrophy was observed in the major. However, there was no significant difference on the lesion of atrophy between the cases. The results mentioned above include some exceptional points respectively, so further investigation will be necessary from the qualitative and quantitative points of view. (author)

  16. Unilateral hypoglossal nerve atrophy as a late complication of radiation therapy of head and neck carcinoma: a report of four cases and a review of the literature on peripheral and cranial nerve damages after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, V.S.T.; Schulz, M.D.

    1975-01-01

    The case histories of four patients who developed hemiatrophy of the tongue from 3 to 9 years after a course of curative radiation therapy for carcinomas of the head and neck are presented. These patients were subsequently followed from 1 1 / 2 to 6 years without local recurrence of the tumor, distant metastasis, or involvement of other cranial nerves, indicative of only a unilateral hypoglossal nerve atrophy. A review of the literature showed that peripheral and cranial nerve damages after radiation therapy have been reported for the optic nerve, hypoglossal nerve, oculomotor nerve, abducens nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve, brachial plexus nerves, and peripheral nerves of the extremities. Review of clinical and experimental data indicated that in most cases, the damages were probably caused by extensive connective tissue fibrosis around and infiltrating the nerve trunks. Three possible types of peripheral and cranial nerve damages after radiation therapy are identified. (U.S.)

  17. Hypoxic ischemia encephalopathy leading to external hydrocephalus and the cerebral atrophy: mechanism and differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhenglin; Mo Xiaorong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: It is a study of the mechanism and differential diagnosis of the infant external hydrocephalus and cerebral atrophy. Methods: In total 84 cases of neonatal hypoxic ischemia encephalopathy followed by infant external hydrocephalus were investigated, among which 26 patients gradually were found having developed cerebral atrophy in follow up. Results: Characteristic dilation of the frontal-parietal subarachnoid space and the adjacent cistern was noted on the CT images of the external hydrocephalus. CT revealed the enlarged ventricle besides the dilated subarachnoid space in the cases of cerebral atrophy, while these two entities were indistinguishable on CT in the early stage. Conclusion: Clinical manifestations make a major differential diagnosis of the external hydrocephalus and cerebral atrophy: tic and mild delayed development of locomotion over major presentation of external hydrocephalus, while cerebral atrophy is featured by remarkable dysnoesia and severe delayed development of locomotion. In addition, hemiplegia and increased muscular tension are presented in a few cases of cerebral atrophy

  18. [The effect of mandibular distraction on the maxilla growth in children with hemifacial microsomia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Renkai; Tang, Xiaojun; Shi, Lei; Yin, Lin; Yang, Bin; Yin, Hongyu; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-11-01

    To analyze the effect of mandibular distraction on the maxilla growth in children with hemifacial microsomia through measurement with the posterior-anterior cephalometric X-ray films and Three-dimensional CT reconstruction images. The deviation angular of maxilla occlusion plane and nasal base plane from the infra-orbital plane were measured on the posterior-anterior cephalometric X-ray films in 22 patients before and half a year after operation. The vertical distance from the midpoint of 5th teeth alveolar and the lowest point of maxillary sinus to reference plane were measured on 3D reconstruction images in 15 patients. The data were statistically analyzed. On posterior-anterior cephalometric X-ray films, the cant of occlusion plane were significantly reduced (P maxillary sinus on normal side. Distraction osteogenesis of mandible can promote the growth of the maxilla in children with HFM, the accelerated growth parts include alveolar bone and maxillary sinus.

  19. Espasmo hemifacial: resultados do tratamento cirúrgico em 14 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui R. D. Carvalho

    1973-06-01

    Full Text Available Quatorze pacientes com espasmo hemifacial foram submetidos a exploração cirúrgica e neurolise do 7º par craniano no ângulo ponto-cerebelar. Em 7 pacientes havia indubitável compressão do nervo facial por alça anômala da artéria cerebelar anterior e inferior sendo que um paciente também apresentava malformação de Arnold-Chiari. Em um paciente havia aracnoidite envolvendo o nervo. Em 6 outros, o nervo achava-se aparentemente livre. Houve alívio imediato e duradouro do espasmo em 10 pacientes, 2 permaneceram inalterados e um apresentou recidiva após 10 meses. Houve um óbito no pós-operatório imediato, conseqüente a traumatismo craniano por queda do paciente.

  20. A fetus with hemifacial microsomia and sirenomelia. The same mesodermal defect spectrum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Valdez, Jaime Asael; Estrada-Juárez, Higinio; Moreno-Verduzco, Elsa Romelia; Aguinaga-Ríos, Mónica

    2013-04-01

    Sirenomelia is the most severe malformation complex affecting the human caudal pole, although its etiology is unclear, a primary defect of blastogenesis has been proposed. Studies consider sirenomelia as the most severe form of caudal dysgenesis, VACTERL association, or axial mesodermal dysplasia, although others still support the idea of a different pathologic entity. We report the prenatal, clinical, and pathologic features of a fetus with cleft lip and palate, microtia, cardiac, renal and intestinal malformations, radial aplasia, and sirenomelia. Karyotype, chromosomal breakage studies, and SHH sequence analysis were normal. The occurrence of cephalic, midline-paramedial, and caudal malformations in the same patient imply the diagnosis of hemifacial microsomia and sirenomelia. These entities are part of the same mesodermal malformation spectrum and the clinical presentation depends on environmental and genetic interactions in embrionic development. Future clinical and genome wide studies will help to better delineate this spectrum.

  1. Iodine 123-labeled meta-iodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy in the cases of idiopathic Parkinson`s disease, multiple system atrophy, and progressive supranuclear palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshita, Mitsuhiro; Hayashi, Michiyuki; Hirai, Shunsaku [Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital (Japan)

    1997-06-01

    To investigate cardiac sympathetic function in Parkinson`s disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy was performed in 25 patients with PD, 25 patients with MSA, 14 patients with PSP, and 20 control subjects. In planar imaging studies, the heart-to-mediastinum average count ratio (H/M) was calculated for both early and delayed images. The mean value of H/M in patients with PD was significantly lower than in those with MSA, PSP, or no disease. Regardless of disease severity or intensity of anti-parkinsonian pharmacotherapy, mean values for H/M were always low in patients with PD. The mean values of H/M in patients with MSA and PSP were significantly lower than in controls. There was no significant difference between the mean value of H/M in MSA with orthostatic hypotension (OH) and that in MSA without OH, and also there was no significant difference between the mean value of H/M in MSA with striatonigral degeneration and that in MSA with olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Although the mean value of H/M in PSP with amitriptyline treatment was significantly lower than that in PSP patients without amitriptyline treatment, there was no significant difference between the mean value of H/M in PSP patients without amitriptyline treatment and that in controls. There was no correlation between H/M and disease duration in those three akinetic-rigid disorders that we have studied here. Thus, PD may have an abnormality of cardiac sympathetic function which has not been detected by previous cardiovascular autonomic studies. Particularly in early stages, {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy may help to differentiate PD from MSA and PSP. (K.H.)

  2. Correlation of clinical course with MRI findings in olivo-pontocerebellar atrophy and late-cortical cerebellar atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Morishita, Shinji; Konagaya, Yoko; Takayanagi, Tetsuya; Iwasaki, Satoru

    1989-01-01

    We quantitatively analyzed 1.5 T MRI in 36 cases of sporadic spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and 30 control cases without intracranial lesions, using graphic analyzer. SCD consisted of 21 olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA) and 15 late cortical cerebellar atrophy (LCCA). There was negative correlation between vermian size and the duration of illness both in OPCA (r=0.8960, p<0.001) and LCCA (r=0.7756, p<0.01), but the progression rate in OPCA was three times greater than that in LCCA. LCCA was suggested the preclinical vermian atrophy by the statistical regression study. In OPCA, the duration of illness also revealed significant correlations with atrophy of ventral pons (r=0.8308, p<0.001) and also cerebellar hemisphere (medial hemiphere; r=0.7278, p<0.001. lateral hemisphere; r=0.6039, p<0.01). OPCA showed diffuse atrophy of cerebellar hemisphere, whereas LCCA showed medial dominant atrophy. OPCA demonstrated significant correlation between the fourth ventricle dilatation and the duration of illness (r=0.6005, p<0.01). A discriminant study significantly separated OPCA, LCCA and control each other by sizes of ventral pons and cerebellar vermis (p<0.001). In T2 weighted MRI, 10 cases out of 14 LCCA did not show hypointensity in dentate nucleus in spite of normal appearance in the other portions usually decreased intensity. The dentate nucleus of OPCA showed a significant atrophy. The insidence of putaminal hypointensity in OPCA was significantly greater than that of control group (ki-quare=6.476, p<0.05). There were no atrophies in red nucleus and tegmentum of midbrain, which indicated minimum involvement in cerebellar efferent system both in OPCA and LCCA. We concluded that the quantitative and qualitative analysis of high field MRI is useful in clinical discrimination between OPCA and LCCA. (author)

  3. Sexual well-being in patients with blepharospasm, spasmodic torticollis and hemifacial spasm: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Perozzo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mood, anxiety and other psychological symptoms are common in dystonic patients suffering from blepharospam (BSP and spasmodic torticollis (ST. Since sexual well-being is an important aspect of mental health, here, we investigated whether these patients may also experience a worsening of their sexual life. In particular, quality of sexual life was evaluated in patients suffering from BSP (N=30, ST (N=30, and in a control group of patient with Hemifacial spasm (HFS; N=30, undergoing botulinum toxin type A therapy. A group of 30 age-matched healthy volunteers constituted an additional control group. Patients were evaluated just before the periodic injection of botulinum toxin. Sexual functioning was assessed using the Sexual Functioning Inventory (SFI, a reduced form of the Gollombok Rust Inventory, previously employed in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Depression (Beck Depression Inventory and anxiety (STAI-X1/X2 were also assessed. Results revealed that sexual functioning was significantly affected in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS with respect to healthy controls. Dystonic patients manifested more sexual dysfunction than patients with HFS. Overall, females had a poorer quality of sexual life than males and, among females, women with BSP were the most dysfunctional. Psychological symptoms were present in patients with dystonia, but not in patients with HFS. As discussed in the paper, several factors might be taken into account to explain worse quality of sexual life in patients with dystonia compared to patients with hemifacial spasm. Among them an important role might be played by the central origin of dystonia pathophysiology (i.e. altered activity of cortico-striato-thalamic-cortical circuits. Future investigations are necessary to further explore these preliminary findings, considering that this is the first time that sexual well-being is evaluated in patients with BSP, ST and HFS, and comparable data are not available.

  4. Hemifacial Microsomia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2017-01-01

    Jan 1, 2017 ... Goldenhar syndrome is a variant of HFM, which includes vertebral anomalies and ... maxillary teeth and carious left central and lateral incisors. Figure 3: ... condition and proposed treatment were explained to the patient and ...

  5. Hemifacial Spasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the face (facial). The disorder occurs in both men and women, although it more frequently affects middle-aged or elderly women. It is much more ... the face (facial). The disorder occurs in both men and women, although it more frequently affects middle-aged or elderly women. It is much more ...

  6. [A case of an anti-Ma2 antibody-positive patient presenting with variable CNS symptoms mimicking multiple system atrophy with a partial response to immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Wataru; Iwanaga, Yasutaka; Yamamoto, Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    A 70-year-old man with a 5-month history of progressive bradykinesia of the bilateral lower extremities was admitted to our hospital. At the age of 64, he underwent proximal gastrectomy for gastric cancer. He also had a history of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord since the age of 67, which was successfully treated with vitamin B12 therapy. Four weeks before admission to our hospital, he admitted himself to his former hospital complaining of walking difficulty. Two weeks later, however, his symptoms progressed rapidly; he was immobilized for two weeks and did not respond to the vitamin therapy. On admission to our hospital, he showed moderate paralysis of the lower extremities, cog-wheel rigidity of the four extremities, and dystonic posture of his left hand. He also showed orthostatic hypotension and vesicorectal disorders. Blood examination and cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed no remarkable abnormalities. Electroencephalography showed frontal dominant, high voltage, sharp waves. His brain and spinal MRI revealed no notable abnormalities. We suspected autoimmune disease and commenced one course of intravenous methylprednisolone therapy, resulting in improvement of the parkinsonism and orthostatic hypotension. Based on these results, we investigated possible neural antigens and detected anti-Ma2 antibody. In addition to limbic encephalitis, anti-Ma2 antibody-positive neural disorders are characterized by rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorders or parkinsonism. Here, we report an anti-Ma2 antibody positive patient presenting variable CNS symptoms mimicking multiple system atrophy, who responded to immunotherapy.

  7. Scleroderma and dentistry: Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Shantanu; Kalkur, Chaithra; Sattur, Atul P; Bornstein, Michael M; Melton, Fred

    2016-10-24

    Scleroderma is a chronic connective tissue disorder with unknown etiology. It is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix in the connective tissues causing vascular disturbances which can result in tissue hypoxia. These changes are manifested as atrophy of the skin and/or mucosa, subcutaneous tissue, muscles, and internal organs. Such changes can be classified into two types, namely, morphea (localized) and diffuse (systemic). Morphea can manifest itself as hemifacial atrophy (Parry-Romberg syndrome) although this remains debatable. Hence, we present a case of morphea, associated with Parry-Romberg syndrome, and a second case with the classical signs of progressive systemic sclerosis. Case one: A 20-year-old man of Dravidian origin presented to our out-patient department with a complaint of facial asymmetry, difficulty in speech, and loss of taste sensation over the last 2 years. There was no history of facial trauma. After physical and radiological investigations, we found gross asymmetry of the left side of his face, a scar on his chin, tongue atrophy, relative microdontia, thinning of the ramus/body of his mandible, and sclerotic lesions on his trunk. Serological investigations were positive for antinuclear antibody for double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid and mitochondria. A biopsy was suggestive of morphea. Hence, our final diagnosis was mixed morphea with Parry-Romberg syndrome. Case two: A 53-year-old woman of Dravidian origin presented to our out-patient department with a complaint of gradually decreasing mouth opening over the past 7 years. Her medical history was noncontributory. On clinical examination, we found her perioral, neck, and hand skin to be sclerotic. Also, her fingers exhibited bilateral telangiectasia. An oral examination revealed completely edentulous arches as well as xerostomia and candidiasis. Her serological reports were positive for antinuclear antibodies against centromere B, Scl-70, and Ro-52. A hand and

  8. Cisternography contribution in the cortical atrophy diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calegaro, J.U.M.; Balallai, N.; Suzuki, K.

    1975-01-01

    A 37 years-old woman suffered a car accident. On admission to hospital she presented: torpor, the right pupil greater than the left, both reacting to light, and left hemiparesis with homologous Babinski reflex. She was submitted to carotid arteriogram an air-contrast study without significant findings. Eletroencephalographic examination showed diffuse parenquimatous involvement of left cerebral hemisphery. Scinticisternography demonstrated delayed reabsorption of the radioactive tracer in both frontal areas. A subsequent trepanation made the diagnosis of cortical atrophy in the areas mentioned above. This case shows aditional information concerning anatomic detail provided by isotope cisternography, that eventually can't be detected by air-contrast study [pt

  9. Cisternography contribution in the cortical atrophy diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calegaro, J U.M. [Centro de Analises Clinicas e Medicina Nuclear, Londrina (Brazil); Balallai, N; Suzuki, K [Instituto de Neurologia e Neurocirurgia, Londrina (Brazil)

    1975-01-01

    A 37 years-old woman suffered a car accident. On admission to hospital she presented: torpor, the right pupil greater than the left, both reacting to light, and left hemiparesis with homologous Babinski reflex. She was submitted to carotid arteriogram an air-contrast study without significant findings. Eletroencephalographic examination showed diffuse parenquimatous involvement of left cerebral hemisphery. Scinticisternography demonstrated delayed reabsorption of the radioactive tracer in both frontal areas. A subsequent trepanation made the diagnosis of cortical atrophy in the areas mentioned above. This case shows aditional information concerning anatomic detail provided by isotope cisternography, that eventually can't be detected by air-contrast study.

  10. Preliminary study on computer automatic quantification of brain atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chuanfu; Zhou Kangyuan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the variability of normal brain volume with the sex and age, and put forward an objective standard for computer automatic quantification of brain atrophy. Methods: The cranial volume, brain volume and brain parenchymal fraction (BPF) of 487 cases of brain atrophy (310 males, 177 females) and 1901 cases of normal subjects (993 males, 908 females) were calculated with the newly developed algorithm of automatic quantification for brain atrophy. With the technique of polynomial curve fitting, the mathematical relationship of BPF with age in normal subjects was analyzed. Results: The cranial volume, brain volume and BPF of normal subjects were (1 271 322 ± 128 699) mm 3 , (1 211 725 ± 122 077) mm 3 and (95.3471 ± 2.3453)%, respectively, and those of atrophy subjects were (1 276 900 ± 125 180) mm 3 , (1 203 400 ± 117 760) mm 3 and BPF(91.8115 ± 2.3035)% respectively. The difference of BPF between the two groups was extremely significant (P 0.05). The expression P(x)=-0.0008x 2 + 0.0193x + 96.9999 could accurately describe the mathematical relationship between BPF and age in normal subject (lower limit of 95% CI y=-0.0008x 2 +0.0184x+95.1090). Conclusion: The lower limit of 95% confidence interval mathematical relationship between BPF and age could be used as an objective criteria for automatic quantification of brain atrophy with computer. (authors)

  11. Simultaneous display of MRA and MPR in detecting vascular compression for trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm: comparison with oblique sagittal views of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbab, A.S.; Aoki, S.; Yoshikawa, T.; Kumagai, H.; Araki, T.; Nishiyama, Y.; Nagaseki, Y.; Nukui, H.

    2000-01-01

    A new technique, simultaneous display of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), was performed by a workstation to identify the involved vessels in patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) or hemifacial spasm (HFS), and the results were compared with those of oblique sagittal MRI technique. Twelve patients with either HFS or TN were prospectively assessed by simultaneous display of MRA and MPR, and oblique sagittal techniques, to point out the neurovascular compression and to identify the involved vessels. Three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) images were acquired to create MRA and MPR. Oblique sagittal views were also created and displayed on films. A total of 15 vessels in 12 patients were identified as compressing vessels during surgery. Simultaneous display of MRA and MPR technique pointed out the presence of vessels at and/or around root entry/exit zone (REZ) in all 12 patients, but proper identification by the name of the individual vessel was correct in 13 of 15 cases. However, oblique sagittal technique indicated the presence of vessels at and/or around REZ in 11 patients, but only 8 of 14 vessels were correctly identified. Our new method, simultaneous display of MRA-MPR, facilitated correct identification of the involved vessels compared with the oblique sagittal view method. (orig.)

  12. Combined maxillary and mandibular distraction osteogenesis in patients with hemifacial microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Anna, Eduardo Franzotti; Lau, Geórgia W T; Marquezan, Mariana; de Souza Araújo, Mônica Tirre; Polley, John W; Figueroa, Alvaro A

    2015-05-01

    Hemifacial microsomia is a deformity of variable expressivity with unilateral hypoplasia of the mandible and the ear. In this study, we evaluated skeletal soft tissue changes after bimaxillary unilateral vertical distraction. Eight patients (4 preadolescents 4 adolescents) each with a grade II mandibular deformity underwent a LeFort I osteotomy and an ipsilateral horizontal mandibular ramus osteotomy. A semiburied distraction device was placed over the ramus, and intermaxillary fixation was applied. Anteroposterior cephalometric and frontal photographic analyses were conducted before and after distraction. Statistics were used to analyze the preoperative and postoperative changes. Cephalometrically, the nasal floor and the occlusal and gonial plane angles decreased. The ratios of affected-unaffected ramus and gonial angle heights improved by 15% and 20%, respectively. The position of menton moved toward the midline. The photographic analysis showed a decrease of the nasal and commissure plane angles, and the chin moved to the unaffected side. The parallelism between the horizontal skeletal and soft tissue planes improved, with an increase in the affected side ramus height and correction of the chin point toward the midline. Simultaneous maxillary and mandibular distraction improved facial balance and symmetry. Patients in the permanent dentition with fixed orthodontic appliances and well-aligned dental arches responded well to this intervention. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural brain alterations in hemifacial spasm: A voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ye; Yu, Tian; Wei, Yongxu; Sun, Kun; Zhao, Weiguo; Yu, Buwei

    2016-02-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is characterized by involuntary, irregular clonic or tonic movement of muscles innervated by the facial nerve. We evaluated structural reorganization in brain gray matter and white matter and whether neuroplasticity is linked to clinical features in HFS patients. High-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data were acquired by 3.0 T MRI from 42 patients with HFS and 30 healthy subjects. The severity of the spasm was assessed according to Jankovic disability rating scale. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis were performed to identify regional grey matter volume (GMV) changes and whole-brain microstructural integrity disruption measured by fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD). The VBM analysis showed that patients with HFS reduced GMV in the right inferior parietal lobule and increased GMV in the cerebellar lobule VIII, when compared with healthy subjects. Furthermore, within the HFS disease group, GMV decreased with the disease duration in the right inferior parietal lobule. TBSS did not identify group differences in diffusivity parameters. While no white matter integrity disruption was detected in the brain of patients with HFS, our study identified evident GMV changes in brain areas which were known to be involved in motor control. Our results suggest that HFS, a chronic neurovascular conflict disease, is related to structural reorganization in the brain. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Botulinum toxin A is effective to treat tension-type headache caused by hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuma, Atsushi; Nagata, Eiichiro; Yasuda, Takashi; Kouchi, Maiko; Nakayama, Taira; Honma, Kazunari; Tokuoka, Kentaro; Kitagawa, Yasuhisa; Nogawa, Shigeru; Takizawa, Shunya

    2017-10-01

    We examined the relationship between hemifacial spasm (HFS; a form of cranio-cervical dystonia) and chronic primary headache, including tension-type headache (TTH). We also examined whether botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A) therapy for HFS ameliorates concomitant TTH. Fifty-one HFS patients receiving BoNT/A therapy were recruited. Patients' characteristics (including age, gender, chronic headache history, exercise habits, stiff neck, cervical spondylolysis history), stress factors, worsening/new onset of headache associated with HFS, and dose of BoNT/A were examined. We diagnosed headache types according to The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition, beta. Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6) scores for headache severity were compared between the 6-week baseline before BoNT/A therapy and 6-week follow-up after BoNT/A therapy. Of 51 patients with HFS, 17 (33.3%) reported worsening or new onset of headache (especially TTH) associated with HFS (Group-S), and 34 were not aware of headache (Group-N). Twelve patients (70.6%) in group-S reported improvement of headache after BoNT/A therapy. NRS (from 7 [5-9] to 0 [0-5], pheadache (odds ratio 28.53: 2.96-275.10, pheadache, especially TTH, is associated with HFS. BoNT/A therapy for HFS may also be indirectly effective for treatment of TTH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Treatment of hemifacial spasm with botulinum toxin type a: effective, long lasting and well tolerated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Pierre Mette Batisti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hemifacial spasm (HFS is a common movement disorder characterized by involuntary tonic or clonic contractions of the muscles innervated by the facial nerve. Objective To evaluate the long-term effect of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A in the treatment of HFS. Methods A retrospective analysis of patients treated at the Movement Disorders Outpatient Clinic in the Neurology Service, Hospital de Clínicas, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, from 2009 to 2013 was carried out. A total of 550 BTX-A injections were administered to 100 HFS patients. Results Mean duration of improvement following each injection session was 3.1 months, mean latency to detection of improvement was 7.1 days and mean success rate was 94.7%. Patients were evaluated at an interval of 5.8 months after each application. Adverse effects, which were mostly minor, were observed in 37% of the patients at least once during follow-up. The most frequent was ptosis (35.1%. Conclusion Treatment of HFS with BTX-A was effective, sustainable and safe and had minimal, well-tolerated side effects.

  16. Altered spontaneous brain activity in patients with hemifacial spasm: a resting-state functional MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tu

    Full Text Available Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has been used to detect the alterations of spontaneous neuronal activity in various neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases, but rarely in hemifacial spasm (HFS, a nervous system disorder. We used resting-state fMRI with regional homogeneity (ReHo analysis to investigate changes in spontaneous brain activity of patients with HFS and to determine the relationship of these functional changes with clinical features. Thirty patients with HFS and 33 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Compared with controls, HFS patients had significantly decreased ReHo values in left middle frontal gyrus (MFG, left medial cingulate cortex (MCC, left lingual gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus (STG and right precuneus; and increased ReHo values in left precentral gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, right brainstem, and right cerebellum. Furthermore, the mean ReHo value in brainstem showed a positive correlation with the spasm severity (r = 0.404, p = 0.027, and the mean ReHo value in MFG was inversely related with spasm severity in HFS group (r = -0.398, p = 0.028. This study reveals that HFS is associated with abnormal spontaneous brain activity in brain regions most involved in motor control and blinking movement. The disturbances of spontaneous brain activity reflected by ReHo measurements may provide insights into the neurological pathophysiology of HFS.

  17. Detection of brain atrophy due to ACTH or corticosteroid therapy with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Isamu; Takei, Tadao; Oota, Hideomi; Maekawa, Kihei.

    1981-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or corticosteroids seemed to cause brain atrophy in intants. We studied the atrophy which was caused by these drugs with computed tomography (CT). 1) Nine cases of infantile spasms examined before, during and after ACTH therepy with CT. Brain atrophy on CT was observed immediately after the completion of ACTH therapy. The brain atrophy receded slightly after several months. It was more marked in younger patients, in cases treated by hight doses of ACTH and in cases where brain atrophy had already been obserbed before ACTH therapy. 2) Twenty cases of infantile spasms or Lennox Gastaut syndrome were examined after ACTH therapy with CT. Brain atrophy was observed in twelve cases. Main features of brain atrophy were the enlargement of sylvian fissure and the widening of subarachnoid space at the frontal or temporal region. Mental retardation was observed in eighteen cases. 3) Two cases of nephrotic syndrome were treated with pulse therapy of prednisolone. CT was carried out before and after treatment. Atrophy of cerebrum was observed in these cases. 4) A case of infantile spasms treated with anticonvulsants without ACTH was studied by electroencephalography (EEG) and CT. The abnormal pattern of EEG was markedly corrected, while brain atrophy on CT was not observed after the therapy. Because of these observations the use of ACTH has to be reconsidered. ACTH should be the drug of second choice for the therapy of infantile spasms and should be used in case other anticonvulsants have no effect. ACTH should be used at lower dosages and for shorter periods of time. (author)

  18. Detection of brain atrophy due to ACTH or corticosteroid therapy with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamai, I.; Takei, T. (National Sagamihara Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan)); Oota, H.; Maekawa, K.

    1981-07-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or corticosteroids seemed to cause brain atrophy in infants. We studied the atrophy which was caused by these drugs with computed tomography (CT). 1) Nine cases of infantile spasms examined before, during and after ACTH therapy with CT. Brain atrophy on CT was observed immediately after the completion of ACTH therapy. The brain atrophy receded slightly after several months. It was more marked in younger patients, in cases treated by high doses of ACTH and in cases where brain atrophy had already been observed before ACTH therapy. 2) Twenty cases of infantile spasms or Lennox Gastaut syndrome were examined after ACTH therapy with CT. Brain atrophy was observed in twelve cases. Main features of brain atrophy were the enlargement of sylvian fissure and the widening of subarachnoid space at the frontal or temporal region. Mental retardation was observed in eighteen cases. 3) Two cases of nephrotic syndrome were treated with pulse therapy of prednisolone. CT was carried out before and after treatment. Atrophy of cerebrum was observed in these cases. 4) A case of infantile spasms treated with anticonvulsants without ACTH was studied by electroencephalography (EEG) and CT. The abnormal pattern of EEG was markedly corrected, while brain atrophy on CT was not observed after the therapy. Because of these observations the use of ACTH has to be reconsidered. ACTH should be the drug of second choice for the therapy of infantile spasms and should be used in case other anticonvulsants have no effect. ACTH should be used at lower dosages and for shorter periods of time.

  19. Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome with crossed cerebellar atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay M. Khaladkar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome is a rare condition with classical, clinical and radiological changes – mental retardation, hemiparesis, facial asymmetry, seizures and cerebral hemiatrophy with calvarial changes. Contralateral cerebellar atrophy is rare and occurs if insult occurs after 1 month of age. We report a case of a 6-year-old female child presenting with right-sided hemiparesis, convulsions and left cerebral hemiatrophy with an old infarct in left middle cerebral artery (MCA territory, ipsilateral calvarial thickening and right (crossed cerebellar atrophy.

  20. Multiple systems atrophy: Differentiation and findings by Magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas Velez, Sergio Alberto; Alzate Betancur, Catalina Maria

    2006-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neuro degenerative disorder of undetermined cause, characterized clinically by Parkinson's, autonomic, cerebellar or pyramidal sing and symptoms. lts differentiation from Parkinson's disease may be difficult, mainly in the early stages owing to overlapping features. Magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated usefulness in MSA diagnosis and in differentiation with Parkinson's disease. One case with magnetic resonance findings is described

  1. Frontal lobe atrophy in motor neuron diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, J A; Hudson, A J

    1994-08-01

    Neuronal degeneration in the precentral gyrus alone cannot account for the occurrence of spastic paresis in motor neuron diseases. To look for more extensive cortical atrophy we measured MRIs of the upper parts of the frontal and parietal lobes in 11 sporadic cases of classical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), eight patients with primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) and an age- and sex-matched group of 49 neurologically normal people. None of the patients had overt dementia or other mental diseases. In PLS there is progressive spastic paresis but in contrast to ALS there is no lower motor neuron degeneration. The surface area of the precentral gyri and the amount of underlying white matter in PLS were consistently approximately 75% of the normal size. By contrast, there was some shrinkage of the precentral gyri in some of the ALS patients but the mean measurements for the group did not differ significantly from the controls. Anterior to the precentral sulci, the cortical surface area in PLS was approximately 85% of that of the controls, with correspondingly reduced white matter. In ALS the cortical surface areas of the anterior frontal lobes did not differ from those of the controls, but the amount of underlying white matter was reduced almost as much in ALS as it was in PLS. The measured changes in the frontal lobes suggest that in PLS there is simultaneous atrophy of the primary, premotor and supplementary motor areas of the cortex, with consequent degeneration of corticospinal and corticoreticular axons descending through the underlying white matter. These changes could account for the progressive upper motor neuron syndrome. In ALS, with no significant frontal cortical atrophy, the shrinkage of the white matter may be due to degeneration of axons projecting to the frontal cortex from elsewhere. Deprivation of afferents could explain the diminution of motor functions of the frontal lobes in ALS and also the changes in word fluency, judgement and attention that

  2. Challenges in the management of massive intraorbital and hemifacial arteriovenous malformation as causing life-threatening epistaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anura Michelle Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Arteriovenous malformations are congenital lesions that may evolve with time and manifest in a plethora of presentations. They can occur as torrential epistaxis when it extensively involves the facial region. Multi-imaging modalities are available to assist in characterizing the structure of the lesion as well as its location and extent. This complex disease requires a multidisciplinary team approach with preoperative embolization and surgery. We present a rare cause of life-threatening epistaxis in a gentleman with a longstanding orbital and hemifacial arteriovenous malformation and discuss the complexities involved in its management.

  3. Challenges in the management of massive intraorbital and hemifacial arteriovenous malformation as causing life-threatening epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Anura Michelle; Kalimuthu, Santhi; Pathmanathan, Sitra Siri; Narayanan, Prepageran; Zainal Abidin, Zurina; Azmi, Khairul; Khalil, Alizan

    2017-04-01

    Arteriovenous malformations are congenital lesions that may evolve with time and manifest in a plethora of presentations. They can occur as torrential epistaxis when it extensively involves the facial region. Multi-imaging modalities are available to assist in characterizing the structure of the lesion as well as its location and extent. This complex disease requires a multidisciplinary team approach with preoperative embolization and surgery. We present a rare cause of life-threatening epistaxis in a gentleman with a longstanding orbital and hemifacial arteriovenous malformation and discuss the complexities involved in its management. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  4. Combined Bimaxillary Distraction Osteogenesis Associated with Orthognathic Surgery for Hemifacial Microsomia in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanghang; Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Li; Chen, Qianming; Shao, Jun; Luo, En

    2017-06-01

    Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is one of the most common congenital craniofacial asymmetries. Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is always recommended as an effective option for the treatment of HFM, but some studies showed that the asymmetry remained after DO. In comparison with DO, stable clinical outcomes could be achieved by orthognathic surgery approach as well. However, soft tissue expansion cannot be performed. In this study, we aim to assess the radiographic and clinical results of bimaxillary DO associated with staged orthognathic surgery in the treatment of craniofacial asymmetry for adult HFM patients. Twelve HFM patients who had been treated with bimaxillary DO and secondary orthognathic surgery between 2006 and 2013 were included in this study. Bimaxillary DO and staged orthognathic surgery were performed according to the particular condition. Clinical and cephalometric photographs were carried out pre- and postoperatively to evaluate the outcomes. No significant complications occurred postoperatively. Excellent cosmetic outcomes such as notable improvement in facial pattern and occlusion were achieved. Cephalometrically, the height ratios of the affected/unaffected ramus were improved by 23.81% on average, and the photographic analysis demonstrated a rotation of the chin point toward the mid-line. Moreover, the occlusal cant was corrected from the slant to level by 8.95° on average. The application of bimaxillary DO associated with staged orthognathic surgery in correcting the asymmetry of adult patients with HFM could have satisfactory aesthetic results, and it should be considered an alternative option for these patients. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  5. Severe Hemifacial Spasm is a Predictor of Severe Indentation and Facial Palsy after Microdecompression Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Boo Suk; Cho, Jin Whan; Park, Kwan; Kwon, Soonwook; Kim, Ye Sel; Kim, Ji Sun; Youn, Jinyoung

    2018-04-27

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is mostly caused by the compression of the facial nerve by cerebral vessels, but the significance of spasm severity remains unclear. We investigated the clinical significance of spasm severity in patients with HFS who underwent microvascular decompression (MVD). We enrolled 636 patients with HFS who underwent MVD between May 2010 and December 2013 at Samsung Medical Center (SMC), Seoul, Korea. Subjects were divided into two groups based on spasm severity: severe (SMC grade 3 or 4) and mild (SMC grade 1 or 2). We compared demographic, clinical, and surgical data between these two groups. The severe-spasm group was older and had a longer disease duration at the time of MVD compared to the mild-spasm group. Additionally, hypertension and diabetes mellitus were more common in the severe-spasm group than in the mild-spasm group. Regarding surgical findings, there were more patients with multiple offending vessels and more-severe indentations in the severe-spasm group than in the mild-spasm group. Even though the surgical outcomes did not differ, the incidence of delayed facial palsy after MVD was higher in the severe-spasm group than in the mild-spasm group. Logistic regression analysis showed that severe-spasm was correlated with longer disease duration, hypertension, severe indentation, multiple offending vessels, and delayed facial palsy after MVD. Spasm severity does not predict surgical outcomes, but it can be used as a marker of pathologic compression in MVD for HFS, and be considered as a predictor of delayed facial palsy after MVD. Copyright © 2018 Korean Neurological Association.

  6. Development of a morphing technique for predicting the position and size of an artificial ear in hemifacial microsomia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, Trevor J; Richards, Robin; Scott, Brendan J J

    2014-01-01

    People with hemifacial microsomia may be missing an ear on the affected side of the face. The principal aim of the study was to develop a morphing technique and to determine whether it could be used to appropriately position an artificial ear, as well as to give an indication of prosthesis size in comparison with the natural ear. Comparisons also were made between the artificial ears being worn by the patients with their natural ears. Data from stereophotogrammetry images of the faces of 10 people were converted into stereolithographic format. Anthropometric points on the face and ear of the unaffected side were plotted. By a process of scaling, the distance between facial landmarks on the unaffected side was estimated for the affected side so as to identify where the morphed ear would be positioned once generated. Generally, the morphed ears appeared to be in acceptable positions. There was a statistically significant difference between the position of the morphed and natural ears (P = .011), as well as the artificial and natural ears (P = .001), but this was unlikely to have any clinical implications. There were no significant differences among the sizes of the natural, morphed, and artificial ears (P = .072). Morphing appears to offer a more precise way of planning the positioning and construction of an artificial ear on patients with hemifacial microsomia than traditional methods. Differences in facial shape on either side of the face may impact on the process. This requires further study.

  7. Olmesartan-Induced Enteropathy: An Unusual Cause of Villous Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Eusébio

    2016-03-01

    Olmesartan is an angiotensin receptor blocker commonly prescribed for the management of hypertension. Spruelike enteropathy associated with this drug is a recently described entity with few cases reported. It presents with chronic diarrhea and intestinal villous atrophy and should be included in its differential diagnosis. This case intends to alert clinicians for the possibility of this event in a patient on treatment with this drug.

  8. Prepontine Schwannoma Presenting With Atypical Facial Symptoms - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Kumar Bali

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Face is an important landmark and any pathological condition affecting it has tremendous bearing on psychological make up of the patient. This report describes a rare case of a young female who presented with Hemifacial dysaesthesia complicated by ipsilateral masticatory complex dyskinesia.

  9. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia da Silva, Mari N.; Millington, Rebecca S.; Bridge, Holly; James-Galton, Merle; Plant, Gordon T.

    2017-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical) visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions. PMID:28861031

  10. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari N. Maia da Silva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions.

  11. Three-dimensional short-range MR angiography and multiplanar reconstruction images in the evaluation of neurovascular compression in hemifacial spasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong; Lee, Jae Gue; Rhee, Bong Arm [Kyunghee Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of three-dimensional(3D) short-range MR angiography(MRA) and multiplanar reconstruction(MPR) imaging in hemifacial spasm(HS). Materials and Methods : Two hundreds patients with HS were studied using a 1.5T MRI system with a 3D time-of-flight(TOF) MRA sequence. To reconstruct short-range MRA, 6-10 source images near the 7-8th cranial nerve complex were processed using a maximum-intensity projection technique. In addition, an MPR technique was used to investigate neurovascular compression. We observed the relationship between the root-exit zone(REZ) of the 7th cranial nerve and compressive vessel, and identified the compressive vessels on symptomatic sides. To investigate neurovascular contact, asymptomatic contralateral sides were also evaluated. Results : MRI showed that in 197 of 200 patients there was vascular compression or contact with the facial nerve REZ on symptomatic sides. One of the three remaining patients was suffering from acoustic neurinoma on the symptomatic side, while in two patients there were no definite abnormal findings.Compressive vessels were demonstrated in all 197 patients; 80 cases involved the anterior inferior cerebellar artery(AICA), 74 the posterior cerebellar artery(PICA), 13 the vertebral artery(VA), 16 the VA and AICA, eight the VA and PICA, and six the AICA and PICA. In all 197 patients, compressive vessels were reconstructed on one 3D short-range MRA image without discontinuation from vertebral or basilar arteries. 3D MPR studies provided additional information such as the direction of compression and course of the compressive vessel. In 31 patients there was neurovascular contact on the contralateral side at the 7-8th cranial nerve complex. Conclusion : Inpatients with HS, 3D short-range MRA and MPR images are excellent and very helpful for the investigation of neurovascular compression and the identification of compressive vessels.

  12. Three-dimensional short-range MR angiography and multiplanar reconstruction images in the evaluation of neurovascular compression in hemifacial spasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong; Lee, Jae Gue; Rhee, Bong Arm

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of three-dimensional(3D) short-range MR angiography(MRA) and multiplanar reconstruction(MPR) imaging in hemifacial spasm(HS). Materials and Methods : Two hundreds patients with HS were studied using a 1.5T MRI system with a 3D time-of-flight(TOF) MRA sequence. To reconstruct short-range MRA, 6-10 source images near the 7-8th cranial nerve complex were processed using a maximum-intensity projection technique. In addition, an MPR technique was used to investigate neurovascular compression. We observed the relationship between the root-exit zone(REZ) of the 7th cranial nerve and compressive vessel, and identified the compressive vessels on symptomatic sides. To investigate neurovascular contact, asymptomatic contralateral sides were also evaluated. Results : MRI showed that in 197 of 200 patients there was vascular compression or contact with the facial nerve REZ on symptomatic sides. One of the three remaining patients was suffering from acoustic neurinoma on the symptomatic side, while in two patients there were no definite abnormal findings.Compressive vessels were demonstrated in all 197 patients; 80 cases involved the anterior inferior cerebellar artery(AICA), 74 the posterior cerebellar artery(PICA), 13 the vertebral artery(VA), 16 the VA and AICA, eight the VA and PICA, and six the AICA and PICA. In all 197 patients, compressive vessels were reconstructed on one 3D short-range MRA image without discontinuation from vertebral or basilar arteries. 3D MPR studies provided additional information such as the direction of compression and course of the compressive vessel. In 31 patients there was neurovascular contact on the contralateral side at the 7-8th cranial nerve complex. Conclusion : Inpatients with HS, 3D short-range MRA and MPR images are excellent and very helpful for the investigation of neurovascular compression and the identification of compressive vessels

  13. Carbocalcitonin treatment in Sudeck's atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuti, R.; Vattimo, A.; Martini, G.; Turchetti, V.; Righi, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The efficacy of new calcitonin, the amino analog of eel calcitonin (carboCT) on Sudeck's atrophy of the foot was investigated in 14 patients. CarboCT was administered at the dose of 40 Medical Research Council (MRC) units per day, and the duration of treatment was two to ten months. No adverse effects were noted. Bone pain and local edema decreased associated with improvement of motility. CarboCT induced a slight decrease in plasma calcium, plasma phosphate, and 24-hour urinary calcium excretion. An increase in cAMP/Cr ratio, an index of parathyroid function, was also observed (probably a manifestation of the hypocalcemic effect of calcitonin and secondary parathyroid stimulation). The whole body retention of 99mTc-MDP represents a valuable index of bone turnover, it decreased progressively and significantly on treatment. A dynamic study of local bone uptake of 99mTC-MDP was performed in eight patients. After carboCT therapy, statistically significant decreases in local blood flow, early uptake, and delayed uptake were appreciated in the involved foot. These findings lead to the conclusion that carboCT is effective in the treatment of Sudeck's atrophy

  14. Carbocalcitonin treatment in Sudeck's atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuti, R; Vattimo, A; Martini, G; Turchetti, V; Righi, G A

    1987-02-01

    The efficacy of new calcitonin, the amino analog of eel calcitonin (carboCT) on Sudeck's atrophy of the foot was investigated in 14 patients. CarboCT was administered at the dose of 40 Medical Research Council (MRC) units per day, and the duration of treatment was two to ten months. No adverse effects were noted. Bone pain and local edema decreased associated with improvement of motility. CarboCT induced a slight decrease in plasma calcium, plasma phosphate, and 24-hour urinary calcium excretion. An increase in cAMP/Cr ratio, an index of parathyroid function, was also observed (probably a manifestation of the hypocalcemic effect of calcitonin and secondary parathyroid stimulation). The whole body retention of 99mTc-MDP represents a valuable index of bone turnover, it decreased progressively and significantly on treatment. A dynamic study of local bone uptake of 99mTC-MDP was performed in eight patients. After carboCT therapy, statistically significant decreases in local blood flow, early uptake, and delayed uptake were appreciated in the involved foot. These findings lead to the conclusion that carboCT is effective in the treatment of Sudeck's atrophy.

  15. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Andrew P

    2018-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an adult-onset degenerative disorder of the neuromuscular system resulting in slowly progressive weakness and atrophy of the proximal limb and bulbar muscles. The disease is caused by the expansion of a CAG/glutamine tract in the amino-terminus of the androgen receptor. That SBMA exclusively affects males reflects the fact that critical pathogenic events are hormone-dependent. These include translocation of the polyglutamine androgen receptor from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and unfolding of the mutant protein. Studies of the pathology of SBMA subjects have revealed nuclear aggregates of the mutant androgen receptor, loss of lower motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord, and both neurogenic and myopathic changes in skeletal muscle. Mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis include toxicity in both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle, where effects on transcription, intracellular transport, and mitochondrial function have been documented. Therapies to treat SBMA patients remain largely supportive, although experimental approaches targeting androgen action or promoting degradation of the mutant androgen receptor protein or the encoding RNA are under active study. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Immunomodulatory effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a swine hemi-facial allotransplantation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yur-Ren Kuo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In this study, we investigated whether the infusion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, combined with transient immunosuppressant treatment, could suppress allograft rejection and modulate T-cell regulation in a swine orthotopic hemi-facial composite tissue allotransplantation (CTA model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Outbred miniature swine underwent hemi-facial allotransplantation (day 0. Group-I (n = 5 consisted of untreated control animals. Group-II (n = 3 animals received MSCs alone (given on days -1, +1, +3, +7, +14, and +21. Group-III (n = 3 animals received CsA (days 0 to +28. Group-IV (n = 5 animals received CsA (days 0 to +28 and MSCs (days -1, +1, +3, +7, +14, and +21. The transplanted face tissue was observed daily for signs of rejection. Biopsies of donor tissues and recipient blood sample were obtained at specified predetermined times (per 2 weeks post-transplant or at the time of clinically evident rejection. Our results indicated that the MSC-CsA group had significantly prolonged allograft survival compared to the other groups (P<0.001. Histological examination of the MSC-CsA group displayed the lowest degree of rejection in alloskin and lymphoid gland tissues. TNF-α expression in circulating blood revealed significant suppression in the MSC and MSC-CsA treatment groups, as compared to that in controls. IHC staining showed CD45 and IL-6 expression were significantly decreased in MSC-CsA treatment groups compared to controls. The number of CD4+/CD25+ regulatory T-cells and IL-10 expressions in the circulating blood significantly increased in the MSC-CsA group compared to the other groups. IHC staining of alloskin tissue biopsies revealed a significant increase in the numbers of foxp3(+T-cells and TGF-β1 positive cells in the MSC-CsA group compared to the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that MSCs significantly prolong hemifacial CTA survival. Our data indicate the MSCs did not

  17. Computed tomographic myelography characteristics of spinal cord atrophy in juvenile muscular atrophy of the upper extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabuki, Norio; Mitomo, Masanori; Miura, Takashi; Hashimoto, Tsutomu; Kawai, Ryuji; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1991-01-01

    Although atrophy of the lower cervical and upper thoracic cord in juvenile muscular atrophy of distal upper extremity has been reported, the atrophic patterns of the cord, especially in the transverse section, have not been studied extensively. The aim of this study is to clarify the atrophic patterns of the cord by CT myelography (CTM) and to discuss the pathogenesis of cord atrophy. Sixteen patients with juvenile muscular atrophy of distal upper extremity were examined by CTM. Atrophy of the lower cervical and upper thoracic cord, consistent with the segmental weakness, was seen in all patients. Flattening of the ventral convexity was a characteristic atrophic pattern of the cord. Bilateral cord atrophy was commonly observed; 8/12 patients with unilateral clinical form and all 4 patients with bilateral form showed bilateral cord atrophy with dominance on the clinical side. There was no correlation between the degree of cord atrophy and duration of symptoms. Flattening of the ventral convexity, associated with purely motor disturbances, reflects selective atrophy of the anterior horns in the cord, which is attributable to chronic ischemia. Cord atrophy proved to precede clinical manifestations. The characteristic atrophy of the cord provides useful information to confirm the diagnosis without long-term observation. (author). 21 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  18. Evolution of Cerebral Atrophy in a Patient with Super Refractory Status Epilepticus Treated with Barbiturate Coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Newey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Status epilepticus is associated with neuronal breakdown. Radiological sequelae of status epilepticus include diffusion weighted abnormalities and T2/FLAIR cortical hyperintensities corresponding to the epileptogenic cortex. However, progressive generalized cerebral atrophy from status epilepticus is underrecognized and may be related to neuronal death. We present here a case of diffuse cerebral atrophy that developed during the course of super refractory status epilepticus management despite prolonged barbiturate coma. Methods. Case report and review of the literature. Case. A 19-year-old male with a prior history of epilepsy presented with focal clonic seizures. His seizures were refractory to multiple anticonvulsants and eventually required pentobarbital coma for 62 days and midazolam coma for 33 days. Serial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed development of cerebral atrophy at 31 days after admission to our facility and progression of the atrophy at 136 days after admission. Conclusion. This case highlights the development and progression of generalized cerebral atrophy in super refractory status epilepticus. The cerebral atrophy was noticeable at 31 days after admission at our facility which emphasizes the urgency of definitive treatment in patients who present with super refractory status epilepticus. Further research into direct effects of therapeutic coma is warranted.

  19. Regional cerebral blood flow and brain atrophy in senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Shoutai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Kitani, Mituhiro; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between the reduction of cerebal blood flow and brain atrophy in SDAT, these were measured in 13 cases of senile dementia of Alzheimer type, and compared to 15 cases of multi-infarct Dementia, 39 cases of lacunar infarction without dementia (non-demented CVD group) and 69 cases of aged normal control. Brain atrophy was evaluated by two-dimensional method on CT film by digitizer and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured by 133 Xe inhalation method. The degree of brain atrophy in SDAT was almost similar of that of MID. But it was more severe than that of non-demented group. MID showed the lowest rCBF among these groups. SDAT showed significantly lower rCBF than that of aged control, but rCBF in SDAT was equal to that of lacunar stroke without dementia. Focal reduction of cerebral blood flow in bilateral fronto-parietal and left occipital regions were observed in SDAT. Verbal intelligence score (Hasegawa's score) correlated with rCBF and brain atrophy index in MID, and a tendency of correlation between rCBF and brain atrophy in MID was also observed. However, there was no correlation among those indices in SDAT. These findings suggest that the loss of brain substance dose not correspond to the reduction of rCBF in SDAT and simultaneous measurement of rCBF and brain atrophy was useful to differ SDAT from MID. (author)

  20. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2008-01-01

    appearance were examined using optical coherence tomography (OCT), automated perimetry and electroretinography (ERG). RESULTS: Both patients demonstrated photoreceptor atrophy corresponding to partial or complete scotomata with reduced or extinct electroretinographic responses. Attenuation or complete loss...... of all the segments composing the photoreceptor layer was found by OCT. Full-field ERG revealed affection of the 30 Hz flicker responses and subnormal photopic responses in both patients and subnormal scotopic responses in case 1. Multifocal electroretinography (mERG) revealed localized outer retinal...

  1. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2008-01-01

    examined using optical coherence tomography (OCT), automated perimetry and electroretinography (ERG). Both patients demonstrated photoreceptor atrophy corresponding to partial or complete scotomata with reduced or extinct electroretinographic responses. Attenuation or complete loss of all the segments...... composing the photoreceptor layer was found by OCT. Full-field ERG revealed affection of the 30 Hz flicker responses and subnormal photopic responses in both patients and subnormal scotopic responses in case 1. Multifocal electroretinography (mERG) revealed localized outer retinal dysfunction. The field...

  2. [Histological changes of gastric atrophy and intestinal metaplasia after Helicobacter pylori eradication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yonggu; Jeon, Yong Cheol; Koo, Tai Yeon; Cho, Hyun Seok; Byun, Tae Jun; Kim, Tae Yeob; Lee, Hang Lak; Eun, Chang Soo; Lee, Oh Young; Han, Dong Soo; Sohn, Joo Hyun; Yoon, Byung Chul

    2007-11-01

    Long-term Helicobater pylori infection results in atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia, and increases the risk of gastric cancer. However, it is still controversial that eradication of H. pylori improves atrophy or metaplasia. Therefore, we investigated histological changes after the H. pylori eradication in patients with atrophy or metaplasia. One hundred seven patients who received successful eradication of H. pylori infection in Hanyang University, Guri Hospital from March 2001 to April 2006, were enrolled. Antral biopsy was taken before the eradication to confirm the H. pylori infection and grade of atrophy or metaplasia by updated Sydney System. After a certain period of time, antral biopsy was repeatedly taken to confirm the eradication and investigate histological changes of atrophy or metaplasia. Mean age of the patients was 55.3+/-11.3, and average follow-up period was 28.7+/-13.9 months. Endoscopic diagnosis included gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, non-ulcer antral gastritis. Atrophy was observed in 41 of 91 and their average score was 0.73+/-0.92. After the eradication of H. pylori, atrophy was improved (0.38+/-0.70, p=0.025). However, metaplasia which was observed in 49 of 107, did not significantly improve during the follow-up period. Newly developed atrophy (7 of 38) or metaplasia (18 of 49) was observed in patients who without atrophy or metaplasia initially. Their average scores were slightly lower than those of cases with pre-existing atrophy or metaplasia without statistical significance. After the eradication of H. pylori infection, atrophic gastritis may be improved, but change of intestinal metaplasia is milder and may take longer duration for improvement.

  3. Prominent microglial activation in cortical white matter is selectively associated with cortical atrophy in primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohm, Daniel T; Kim, Garam; Gefen, Tamar; Rademaker, Alfred; Weintraub, Sandra; Bigio, Eileen; Mesulam, M-Marsel; Rogalski, Emily; Geula, Changiz

    2018-04-21

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a clinical syndrome characterized by selective language impairments associated with focal cortical atrophy favouring the language dominant hemisphere. PPA is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), and significant accumulation of activated microglia. Activated microglia can initiate an inflammatory cascade that may contribute to neurodegeneration, but their quantitative distribution in cortical white matter and their relationship with cortical atrophy are unknown. We investigated white matter activated microglia and their association with grey matter atrophy in 10 PPA cases with either AD or FTLD-TDP pathology. Activated microglia were quantified with optical density measures of HLA-DR immunoreactivity in two regions with peak cortical atrophy, and one non-atrophied region within the language dominant hemisphere of each PPA case. Non-atrophied contralateral homologues of the language dominant regions were examined for hemispheric asymmetry. Qualitatively, greater densities of activated microglia were observed in cortical white matter when compared to grey matter. Quantitative analyses revealed significantly greater densities of activated microglia in the white matter of atrophied regions compared to non-atrophied regions in the language dominant hemisphere (p<0.05). Atrophied regions of the language dominant hemisphere also showed significantly more activated microglia compared to contralateral homologues (p<0.05). White matter activated microglia accumulate more in atrophied regions in the language dominant hemisphere of PPA. While microglial activation may constitute a response to neurodegenerative processes in white matter, the resultant inflammatory processes may also exacerbate disease progression and contribute to cortical atrophy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. [Effectiveness of magnetotherapy in optic nerve atrophy. A preliminary study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobina, L V; Orlovskaia, L S; Sokov, S L; Sabaeva, G F; Kondé, L A; Iakovlev, A A

    1990-01-01

    Magnetotherapy effects on visual functions (vision acuity and field), on retinal bioelectric activity, on conductive vision system, and on intraocular circulation were studied in 88 patients (160 eyes) with optic nerve atrophy. A Soviet Polyus-1 low-frequency magnetotherapy apparatus was employed with magnetic induction of about 10 mT, exposure 7-10 min, 10-15 sessions per course. Vision acuity of patients with its low (below 0.04 diopters) values improved in 50 percent of cases. The number of patients with vision acuity of 0.2 diopters has increased from 46 before treatment to 75. Magnetotherapy improved ocular hemodynamics in patients with optic nerve atrophy, it reduced the time of stimulation conduction along the vision routes and stimulated the retinal ganglia cells. The maximal effect was achieved after 10 magnetotherapy sessions. A repeated course carried out in 6-8 months promoted a stabilization of the process.

  5. Evaluation of supra- and infratentorial brain atrophy by computerized tomography in spinocerebellar degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroko; Asano, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Takatoshi; Hirao, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Yasushi; Sobue, Itsuro

    1986-01-01

    Measurement of various parameters of supra- and infratentorial brain atrophy in computerized tomographs of 142 cases of spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and 100 age and sex matched controls was carried out in order to investigate whether these parameters would correspond to the subtypes of this disease and differing grades of various clinical manifestations. One supra- and all infratentorial parameters of SCD showed statistically significant atrophy with a risk of P < 0.005. Among the subtypes, OPCA had a more severely atrophied pons than LCCA (P < 0.005), Menzel (P < 0.05) and SSP (P < 0.01). There was a correlation between the distribution of symptoms like gait, speech, ataxia of extremities and ocular movement disorders, and distribution and degree of infratentorial atrophy with statistical significance (P < 0.05 ∼ P < 0.005). The degree of atrophy of the pons and the width of the IV ventricle were directly proportional to the duration of the illness in cases of less than 10 years, but not to those of over 10 years. Follow-up CT scan was done for 24 patients, 12 within 3 years, 12 after the lapse of 3 years. The latter group showed statistically significant atrophy between the 1st and 2nd scans in several parameters, but there was no significance between those of the former group. (author)

  6. Evaluation of supra- and infratentorial brain atrophy by computerized tomography in spinocerebellar degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Hiroko; Asano, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Takatoshi; Hirao, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Yasushi; Sobue, Itsuro

    1986-08-01

    Measurement of various parameters of supra- and infratentorial brain atrophy in computerized tomographs of 142 cases of spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and 100 age and sex matched controls was carried out in order to investigate whether these parameters would correspond to the subtypes of this disease and differing grades of various clinical manifestations. One supra- and all infratentorial parameters of SCD showed statistically significant atrophy with a risk of P < 0.005. Among the subtypes, OPCA had a more severely atrophied pons than LCCA (P < 0.005), Menzel (P < 0.05) and SSP (P < 0.01). There was a correlation between the distribution of symptoms like gait, speech, ataxia of extremities and ocular movement disorders, and distribution and degree of infratentorial atrophy with statistical significance (P < 0.05 -- P < 0.005). The degree of atrophy of the pons and the width of the IV ventricle were directly proportional to the duration of the illness in cases of less than 10 years, but not to those of over 10 years. Follow-up CT scan was done for 24 patients, 12 within 3 years, 12 after the lapse of 3 years. The latter group showed statistically significant atrophy between the 1st and 2nd scans in several parameters, but there was no significance between those of the former group.

  7. Diagnosis of multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2018-05-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) may be difficult to distinguish clinically from other disorders, particularly in the early stages of the disease. An autonomic-only presentation can be indistinguishable from pure autonomic failure. Patients presenting with parkinsonism may be misdiagnosed as having Parkinson disease. Patients presenting with the cerebellar phenotype of MSA can mimic other adult-onset ataxias due to alcohol, chemotherapeutic agents, lead, lithium, and toluene, or vitamin E deficiency, as well as paraneoplastic, autoimmune, or genetic ataxias. A careful medical history and meticulous neurological examination remain the cornerstone for the accurate diagnosis of MSA. Ancillary investigations are helpful to support the diagnosis, rule out potential mimics, and define therapeutic strategies. This review summarizes diagnostic investigations useful in the differential diagnosis of patients with suspected MSA. Currently used techniques include structural and functional brain imaging, cardiac sympathetic imaging, cardiovascular autonomic testing, olfactory testing, sleep study, urological evaluation, and dysphagia and cognitive assessments. Despite advances in the diagnostic tools for MSA in recent years and the availability of consensus criteria for clinical diagnosis, the diagnostic accuracy of MSA remains sub-optimal. As other diagnostic tools emerge, including skin biopsy, retinal biomarkers, blood and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and advanced genetic testing, a more accurate and earlier recognition of MSA should be possible, even in the prodromal stages. This has important implications as misdiagnosis can result in inappropriate treatment, patient and family distress, and erroneous eligibility for clinical trials of disease-modifying drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Neurosyphilis with dementia and bilateral hippocampal atrophy on brain magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrabian, S.; Raycheva, M.; Traykova, M.; Stankova, T.; Penev, L.; Georgieva-Kozarova, G.; Grigorova, O.; Traykov, L.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Background: This article reports a rare case of active neurosyphilis in a 33-years-old man with mild to moderate dementia and marked hippocampal atrophy, mimicking early onset Alzheimer's disease. Few number of cases described bilateral hippocampal atrophy mimicking Alzheimer's disease in neurosyphilis. Case presentation: The clinical feature is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and behavioral changes for the last 18 months. Neuropsychological examination revealed mild to moderate dementia (MMSE=16) with impaired memory, attention and executive dysfunction. Pyramidal, extrapyramidal signs, dysarthria and impairment in coordination were documented. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical atrophy with marked bilateral hippocampal atrophy. The diagnosis of active neurosyphilis was based on positive results of Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test - Treponema Pallidum. Hemagglutination reactions in blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis and elevated protein levels. High dose intravenous penicillin therapy was administered. During the follow up examination at 6 month, the clinical signs, and neuropsychological examinations, and cerebrospinal fluid samples showed improvement. Conclusion: This case underlines the importance of early diagnosis of neurosyphilis. The results suggest that neurosyphilis should be considered when magnetic resonance imaging results indicate mesiotemporal abnormalities and hippocampal atrophy. Neurosyphilis is a treatable condition and needs early aggressive antibiotic therapy

  9. Consideration of the method of image diagnosis with respect to frontal lobe atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.; Sugawara, K.; Narita, Y.; Namura, I.

    1996-12-01

    Proposes a segmentation method for a quantitative image diagnosis as a means of realizing an objective diagnosis of the frontal lobe atrophy. From the data obtained on the grade of membership, the fractal dimensions of the cerebral tissue [cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), gray matter, and white matter] and the contours are estimated. The mutual relationship between the degree of atrophy and the fractal dimension has been analyzed based on the estimated fractal dimensions. Using a sample of 42 male and female cases, ranging In age from 50's to 70's, it has been concluded that the frontal lobe atrophy can be quantified by regarding it as an expansion of CSF region on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Furthermore, when the process of frontal lobe atrophy is separated into early and advanced stages, the volumetric change of CSF and white matter in frontal lobe displays meaningful differences between the two stages, demonstrating that the fractal dimension of CSF rises with the progress of atrophy. Moreover, an interpolation method for three-dimensional (3-D) shape reconstruction of the region of diagnostic interest is proposed and 3-D shape visualization, with respect to the degree and form of atrophy, is performed on the basis of the estimated fractal dimension of the segmented cerebral tissue.

  10. Frontal parenchymal atrophy measures in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Laura; Zivadinov, Robert; Grop, Attilio; Zorzon, Marino

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether, in a cross-sectional study, the normalized measures of whole and regional brain atrophy correlate better with tests assessing the cognitive function than the absolute brain atrophy measures. The neuropsychological performances and disability have been assessed in 39 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). T1- and T2-lesion load (LL) of total brain and frontal lobes (FLs) were measured using a reproducible semiautomated technique. The whole brain volume and the regional brain parenchymal volume (RBPV) of FLs were obtained using a computerized interactive program, which incorporates semiautomated and automated segmentation processes. Normalized measures of brain atrophy, i.e., brain parenchymal fraction (BPF) and regional brain parenchymal fraction (RBPF) of FLs, were calculated. The scan-rescan, inter- and intrarater coefficient of variation (COV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) have been estimated. The RBPF of FLs showed an acceptable level of reproducibility which ranged from 1.7% for intrarater variability to 3.2% for scan-rescan variability. The mean ICC was 0.88 (CI 0.82-0.93). The RBPF of FLs demonstrated stronger magnitudes of correlation with neuropsychological functioning, disability and quantitative MRI lesion measures than RBPV. These differences were statistically significant: PColor Word Interference test, Pcognitive functions, whereas BPAV did not. The correlation analysis results were supported by the results of multiple regression analysis which showed that only the normalized brain atrophy measures were associated with tests exploring the cognitive functions. These data suggest that RBPF is a reproducible and sensitive method for measuring frontal parenchymal atrophy. The normalized measures of whole and regional brain parenchymal atrophy should be preferred to absolute measures in future studies that correlate neuropsychological performances and brain atrophy measures

  11. Atrofia muscular proximal neurogenica hereditaria (doença de Wohlfart-Kugelberg-Welander: estudo clinico, eletromiografico e anatomo-patologico de 3 irmãos Hereditary proximal neurogenic muscular atrophy (Wohlfart-Kugelberg-Welander disease: report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos R. G. de Freitas

    1976-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam os casos de três irmãos com fraqueza e amiotrofia proximal dos membros de início na infância. Os estudos eletromiográficos e de biópsias musculares revelaram alterações do tipo neurogênico de permeio com alterações miogênicas. Fazem consideração sobre esta singular associação, considerando as alterações do tipo miopático como secundárias à denervação de longa duração. O estudo histopatológico medular, em um dos pacientes, revelou degeneração das células motoras das pontas anteriores, constituindo, assim, o 4.° estudo de autópsia da doença de Wohlfart-Kugelberg-Welander, na literatura.The cases of three brothers with proximal weakness and muscles atrophies beginning in childhood are reported. Muscles biopsies and electromyographic studies have shown neurogenic pattern of atrophy and a dystrophy-like picture. It is concluded that this histological and eletromyographic picture can occur in pure partial denervation of long standing. The histopathologic study of the spinal cord of one patient revealed degenerative changes and loss of anterior horn ganglion cells. This is the fourth case of Wohlfar -Kugelberg-Welander disease with postmortem examination.

  12. Toxina botulínica no blefaroespasmo, no espasmo hemifacial e na distonia cervical: resultados em 33 pacientes Botulinum toxin in blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm and cervical dystonia: results in 33 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Ap. Novis

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available Avaliamos os resultados terapêuticos obtidos com o emprego de toxina botulínica do tipo A em 33 pacientes com distonia (12 com blefaroespamo; 10 com espasmo hemifacial e 11 com torcicolo espasmódico. Utilizamos uma escala de pontuação de gravidade antes de cada aplicação, sendo reavaliados duas semanas após, seguindo a mesma escala. Entre os com blefaroespasmo, oito eram mulheres e quatro homens; a média de idade foi 57,7 anos; a média do tempo de doença de quatro anos; três tinham história similar na família; nove eram essenciais e três fizeram uso de neurolépticos (distonia tardia. A dose média empregada ficou em 51,3 U, com a duração média do efeito benéfico de 2,8 meses. Do total de 22 aplicações (injeções e reinjeções, 14 (63,7% tiveram resultado ótimo, 5 (22,7% bom e três (13,6% nulo. Naqueles com espasmo hemifacial, oito eram mulheres e dois homens; a média de idade foi 52,6 anos; a média do tempo de doença 7,4 anos; oito eram essenciais e dois pós-páralíticos. A dose média empregada ficou em 32 U. Do total de 15 aplicações, todos (100% tiveram resultado ótimo, com a duração média do efeito benéfico de 3,4 meses. Nos pacientes com distonia cervical, oito eram homens e três mulheres; a média de idade foi 44,2 anos; a média do tempo de doença 12,2 anos; seis eram essenciais, três fizeram uso de neuroléptico e dois tinham história familiar. A dose média empregada ficou em 238,6 U, com a duração média do efeito benéfico de 4,7 meses. Do total de 20 aplicações, 18 (90% tiveram resultado bom, 1 (5% regular e 1 (5% nulo. Ptose palpebral, paresia facial e disfagia foram os efeitos colaterais mais encontrados. Concluímos que a toxina botulínica revelou-se eficaz no tratamento destas condições.The effects of botulinum toxin type A were studied in 33 patients with dystonia (12 blepharospasms, 10 hemifacial spasms and 11 spasmodic torticollis. A rate scale was used to evaluate the severity

  13. Stress in Parents of a Child with Hemifacial Microsomia: The Role of Child Characteristics and Parental Coping Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongkosuwito, Edwin; van der Vlies, Lieneke; Kraaij, Vivian; Garnefski, Nadia; van Neck, Han; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Hovius, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Objective Examine stress levels of parents of children with hemifacial microsomia (HFM) and the relationship of parental stress to child characteristics and cognitive coping strategies. Design Prospective cross-sectional study. Participants and Setting Parents with a child (age 3-19 years) with HFM (N = 31) were recruited through the Department of Orthodontics and the Craniofacial Center, Sophia-Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Intervention and Outcome Measures The adapted and shortened Dutch version of the parental stress index (NOSI-K) was used to measure parental stress, and the cognitive emotion-regulation questionnaire was used to measure cognitive coping strategies. Pearson correlations and a multiple regression analysis were performed. Results The hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed associations between increased parental stress and learning difficulties and use of acceptance as a coping strategy. This suggests that problems other than the characteristic visual appearance of the child's face in HFM have a greater influence on parental stress. Conclusions Learning difficulties of the child with HFM and parental acceptance affect stress in parents with a child with HFM the most and are important in the search for a targeted tailoring of intervention for parents with high levels of parental stress.

  14. Asian over-representation among patients with hemifacial spasm compared to patients with cranial-cervical dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuncheng; Davidson, Anthony L; Pan, Tianhong; Jankovic, Joseph

    2010-11-15

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a common movement disorder, but its prevalence in different populations has not been elucidated. We reviewed all patients with HFS currently followed at the Baylor College of Medicine Movement Disorders Clinic and compared their demographic and clinical data with a control group of patients with cranial-cervical dystonia (CD). In contrast to patients with CD (N=145, mean age 48.64±13.61 years), of whom 117 (80.69%) were Caucasians, 13 (8.97%) Hispanic, 10 (6.90%) African-American, and 5 (3.45%) were of Asian origin, there were 81 (61.36%) Caucasians, 24 (18.18%) Hispanic, 13 (9.85%) African-Americans, and 14 (10.61%) Asians in the HFS group (N=132, mean age 49.33±13.25). Although there was no statistical difference in the age and gender distribution between the two groups, the frequency of Asians in HFS group was 3.1 times higher than that in CD group (Pmovement disorder. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Progression of Posterior Cortical Atrophy to Corticobasal Syndrome: Lumping or Splitting Neurodegenerative Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Giorelli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posterior cortical atrophy is a clinical syndrome that is characterized by the progressive loss of visuospatial integration and is associated with neurodegenerative conditions.Case Report: We describe a 60‐year‐old female with simultanagnosia, oculomotor apraxia, and optic ataxia for which she received an initial clinical diagnosis of posterior cortical atrophy. Three years later, she developed Balint's syndrome, Gerstmann's syndrome, left alien hand syndrome, smooth asymmetric (left rigidity, cortical sensory loss, and spontaneous myoclonic jerks of the left arm, which suggested a final diagnosis of corticobasal syndrome.Discussion: This case report indicates that corticobasal syndrome may present with visuospatial deficits.

  16. The Risk of Vocal Fold Atrophy after Serial Corticosteroid Injections of the Vocal Fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lucy L; Giraldez-Rodriguez, Laureano A; Johns, Michael M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to illustrate the risk of vocal fold atrophy in patients who receive serial subepithelial steroid injections for vocal fold scar. This study is a retrospective case report of two patients who underwent a series of weekly subepithelial infusions of 10 mg/mL dexamethasone for benign vocal fold lesion. Shortly after the procedures, both patients developed a weak and breathy voice. The first patient was a 53-year-old man with radiation-induced vocal fold stiffness. Six injections were performed unilaterally, and 1 week later, he developed unilateral vocal fold atrophy with new glottal insufficiency. The second patient was a 67-year-old woman with severe vocal fold inflammation related to laryngitis and calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophagean dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia (CREST) syndrome. Five injections were performed bilaterally, and 1 week later, she developed bilateral vocal fold atrophy with a large midline glottal gap during phonation. In both cases, the steroid-induced vocal atrophy resolved spontaneously after 4 months. Serial subepithelial steroid infusions of the vocal folds, although safe in the majority of patients, carry the risk of causing temporary vocal fold atrophy when given at short intervals. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Association between anti-endomysial antibody and total intestinal villous atrophy in children with coeliac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgenc F

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is growing evidence to suggest that detection of anti-gliadin antibody (AGA and anti-endomysial antibody (EmA can serve as sensitive markers of the degree of histological abnormalities in patients with coeliac disease. AIM: To evaluate the association between the presence of AGA and EmA and villous atrophy in intestinal biopsies of children with suspected coeliac disease. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Intestinal samples of 46 children with failure to thrive, chronic diarrhoea, malabsorption and short stature with either AGA and/or EmA positivity were evaluated, retrospectively. The diagnosis of coeliac disease was based on ESPGHAN criteria. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Patients with total villous atrophy who fulfilled the ESPGHAN criteria for the diagnosis of coeliac disease were diagnosed to have coeliac disease. Nine patients without villous atrophy were taken as negative controls for this study. AGA-IgA was measured both by immunoflourescence (IF and ELISA and EmA-IgA by IF while patients were on normal diet. Relationship between autoantibody positivity and intestinal total villous atrophy was evaluated. RESULTS: Overall positivity for AGA IgA was 85% (39/46 by IF+ELISA and EmA positivity was 85% (39/46 by IF within the study group. Histological examination revealed total villous atrophy with lymphocyte infiltration and crypt hyperplasia in 37 (80% patients. AGA IgA was positive in 14 (38% and 31 (84% of these children by ELISA and IF, respectively. EmA positivity was detected in 35/37 (95% cases with atrophy and 4/9 (44% without atrophy (p=0.002. Thirty out of 37 (81% patients with villous atrophy had both AGA IgA (IF and EmA positivity (p=0.186. All of the sixteen patients that had both positive AGA IgA (ELISA+IF and EmA had total villous atrophy (p=0.037. CONCLUSION: A significant association between total villous atrophy and EmA positivity has been documented in this study.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myoclonic epilepsy Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... boxes. Description Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME) is a neurological condition that causes ...

  19. Qualidade de vida e custos diretos em pacientes com blefaroespasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial, tratados com toxina botulínica-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osaki Midori Hentona

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os custos e a qualidade de vida dos pacientes com blefaroespasmo essencial e espasmo hemifacial, submetidos à terapia com a toxina botulínica-A. MÉTODOS: Vinte e oito pacientes, sendo 16 com blefaroespasmo essencial e 12 com espasmo hemifacial, tratados com toxina botulínica-A, foram avaliados por meio de dois instrumentos: o SF-36 e a Escala de Disfunção de Blefaroespasmo. Os custos foram calculados segundo o número de unidades da toxina utilizadas por cada paciente no período de um ano. RESULTADOS: O custo total direto foi estimado em 1081,62 reais por ano (±89,39 para blefaroespasmo essencial e 618,06 reais por ano (±60,06 para espasmo hemifacial, para tratamento ambulatorial (p<0,001. Antes do tratamento, todos os domínios do SF-36 foram significantemente piores em ambas as doenças. Sob tratamento efetivo com toxina botulínica-A, os aumentos nos índices do SF-36 evidenciaram mudanças nas taxas de saúde geral da população em estudo, com diferença estatisticamente significante entre as respostas pré e pós-tratamento (p<0,05. Relacionando-se o SF-36 com Escala de Disfunção de Blefaroespasmo, foram observadas nos casos de blefaroespasmo essencial, relações significantes positivas (capacidade funcional, estado geral, aspecto emocional e aspectos sociais, ao passo que nos pacientes com espasmo hemifacial não foi encontrada nenhuma correlação. CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo demonstra notável impacto negativo das doenças na qualidade de vida desses pacientes, e uma significante melhora em ambas as doenças após tratamento com toxina botulínica-A. Além disso, os dados fornecem subsídios para justificar o alto custo da aquisição da toxina botulínica-A, devido a seus consideráveis benefícios para a qualidade de vida.

  20. Brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanoto, Masafumi, E-mail: mkanoto@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Hosoya, Takaaki, E-mail: thosoya@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Toyoguchi, Yuuki, E-mail: c-elegans_0201g@mail.goo.ne.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Oda, Atsuko, E-mail: a.oda@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease (CPNBD) resembles multiple sclerosis (MS) on patient background and image findings, and therefore is difficult to diagnose. The purpose is to identify the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of CPNBD and to clarify the differences between the MRI findings of CPNBD and those of MS. Materials and methods: The subjects consist of a CPNBD group (n = 4; 1 male and 3 females; mean age, 51 y.o.), a MS group (n = 19; 3 males and 16 females; mean age, 45 y.o.) and a normal control group (n = 23; 10 males and 13 females; mean age, 45 y.o.). Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were retrospectively evaluated in each subjects. In middle sagittal brain MR images, the prepontine distance was measured as an indirect index of brain stem and cerebellar atrophy and the pontine and mesencephalic distance was measured as a direct index of brain stem atrophy. These indexes were statistically analyzed. Results: Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were seen in all CPNBD cases. Prepontine distance was significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.05), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Pontine and mesencephalic distance were significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 respectively), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease should be considered in patients with brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in addition to leukoencephalopathy similar to that seen in multiple sclerosis.

  1. Brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanoto, Masafumi; Hosoya, Takaaki; Toyoguchi, Yuuki; Oda, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease (CPNBD) resembles multiple sclerosis (MS) on patient background and image findings, and therefore is difficult to diagnose. The purpose is to identify the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of CPNBD and to clarify the differences between the MRI findings of CPNBD and those of MS. Materials and methods: The subjects consist of a CPNBD group (n = 4; 1 male and 3 females; mean age, 51 y.o.), a MS group (n = 19; 3 males and 16 females; mean age, 45 y.o.) and a normal control group (n = 23; 10 males and 13 females; mean age, 45 y.o.). Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were retrospectively evaluated in each subjects. In middle sagittal brain MR images, the prepontine distance was measured as an indirect index of brain stem and cerebellar atrophy and the pontine and mesencephalic distance was measured as a direct index of brain stem atrophy. These indexes were statistically analyzed. Results: Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were seen in all CPNBD cases. Prepontine distance was significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.05), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Pontine and mesencephalic distance were significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 respectively), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease should be considered in patients with brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in addition to leukoencephalopathy similar to that seen in multiple sclerosis

  2. Assessment of vaginal atrophy: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, M. A.; Limpens, J.; Roovers, J. P. W. R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an evidence-based definition of vaginal atrophy (VA) and present an overview of subjective and objective measurements of VA applicable in clinical practice and research. A systematic literature search was performed in MEDLINE and EMBASE to identify studies

  3. Cube propagation for focal brain atrophy estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru; Sørensen, Lauge; Darkner, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Precise and robust whole brain, ventricle, and hippocampal atrophy measurements are important as they serve as biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease. They are used as secondary outcomes in drug trials, and they correlate with the cognitive scores. When two successive scans are non-linearly aligned...

  4. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreesen, JCFM; Bras, M; de Die-Smulders, C; Dumoulin, JCM; Cobben, JM; Evers, JLH; Smeets, HJM; Geraedts, JPM

    After Duchenne muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common severe neuromuscular disease in childhood. Since 1995, homozygous deletions in exon 7 of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene have been described in >90-95% of SMA patients. However, the presence of a highly

  5. Comparison between MRI and 3D-SSP in olivopontocerebellar atrophy and cortical cerebellar atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Hirotoshi; Kanda, Fumio; Hosaka, Kayo; Fujii, Masahiko; Chihara, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    We compared images of three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections (3D-SSP) of SPECT with MRI images in spinocerebellar degeneration patients (13 olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) and 7 cortical cerebellar atrophy (CCA)). We analyzed a brain blood flow pattern with an image of statistics by 123 I-IMP SPECT. In OPCA patients, a blood flow reduction was more remarkable in 3D-SSP than a degree of cerebellar atrophy in MRI. In patients with CCA, the cerebellum showed little blood flow reduction in 3D-SSP despite of apparent atrophy in MRI. Simultaneous examination both MRI and 3D-SSP might be useful for differential diagnosis of spinocerebellar degenerations. (author)

  6. [Infantile spinal atrophy: our experience in the last 25 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid Rodríguez, A; Martínez Martínez, P L; Ramos Fernández, J M; Urda Cardona, A; Martínez Antón, J

    2015-03-01

    To determine the incidence of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in our study population and genetic distribution and epidemiological and clinical characteristics and to analyze the level of care and development. Retrospective descriptive study of patients treated in our hospital in the past 25 years (from 1987 to early 2013), with a clinical and neurophysiological diagnosis of SMA. A total of 37 patients were found, representing an incidence for our reference population and year of 1 case per 10,000 live births. Males predominated (male/female ratio: 1.6/1). The type of SMA diagnosed more frequently was, type i (26 cases), followed by type ii (9 cases), one case with SMA type iii, and one case of spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1). The most frequent genetic alteration was homozygous deletion of exons 7 and 8 of SMN1 gene in 31 cases, while five patients had atypical genetics. The median survival for type i was 8.0 months and 15.8 years for type ii. The incidence in our population remains stable at around 1/10.000. Most cases presented with, predominantly male, typical genetics. In approximately 1/10 patients the genetic alteration was different from the classical one to the SMN gene. The prevalence of AME unrelated SMN gene was 1/37. The level of care has increased in line with social and welfare demands in recent years. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Picture agnosia as a characteristic of posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Azusa; Midorikawa, Akira; Koyama, Shinichi; Futamura, Akinori; Hieda, Sotaro; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2012-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a degenerative disease characterized by progressive visual agnosia with posterior cerebral atrophy. We examine the role of the picture naming test and make a number of suggestions with regard to diagnosing PCA as atypical dementia. We investigated 3 cases of early-stage PCA with 7 control cases of Alzheimer disease (AD). The patients and controls underwent a naming test with real objects and colored photographs of familiar objects. We then compared rates of correct answers. Patients with early-stage PCA showed significant inability to recognize photographs compared to real objects (F = 196.284, p = 0.0000) as measured by analysis of variants. This difficulty was also significant to AD controls (F = 58.717, p = 0.0000). Picture agnosia is a characteristic symptom of early-stage PCA, and the picture naming test is useful for the diagnosis of PCA as atypical dementia at an early stage. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Cleft characteristics and treatment outcomes in hemifacial microsomia compared to non-syndromic cleft lip/palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentino, K M; Valstar, A; Padwa, B L

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with hemifacial microsomia (HFM) and cleft lip/palate (CL/P), and to compare them to a historic cohort of patients with non-syndromic CL/P treated at the same centre. A retrospective review of patients with HFM and CL/P was performed; the main outcome measures assessed were cleft type/side, surgical outcome, midfacial retrusion, and speech. Twenty-six patients (13 male, 13 female; mean age 22.7±14.9, range 1-52 years) with cleft lip with/without cleft palate (CL±P) were identified: three with cleft lip (12%), two with cleft lip and alveolus and an intact secondary palate (8%), and 21 with cleft lip and palate (CLP) (81%; 15 unilateral and six bilateral). Four patients (19%) had a palatal fistula after palatoplasty. Twelve of 22 patients aged >5 years (55%) had midfacial retrusion and two (9%) required a pharyngeal flap for velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Fisher's exact test demonstrated a higher frequency of complete labial clefting (P=0.004), CLP (P=0.009), midfacial retrusion (P=0.0009), and postoperative palatal fistula (P=0.03) in HFM compared to non-syndromic CL±P. There was no difference in VPI prevalence. This study revealed that patients with HFM and CL±P have more severe forms of orofacial clefting than patients with non-syndromic CL±P. Patients with HFM and CL±P have more severe midfacial retrusion and a higher palatal fistula rate compared to patients with non-syndromic CL±P. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of offending vessele in trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm using SPGR-MRI and 3D-TOF-MRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Yoshikazu; Shiotani, Masahiro; Karasawa, Hidetake; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Naganuma, Yoshikazu

    1996-01-01

    We investigated 100 consecutive patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and 53 patients with hemifacial spasm (HFS) concerning the anatomical relationship between the root entry (exit) zone (REZ) of cranial nerve and the offending artery, using spoiled GRASS MRI (SPGR-MRI) and three dimensional-time of fly-MRA (MRA). In 67 of 100 (67%) patients with TN, this new radiological method, SPGR-MRI and MRA demonstrated the relationship between the fifth cranial nerve root and offending artery causing neurovascular compression (NVC), and in 46 of 53 (87%) with HFS, demonstrated the similar relationship between seventh and eighth nerve complex and offending artery. Microvascular decompression (MVD) was performed in 10 with HFS, and NVC of the REZ of the facial nerve caused by the offending artery was exactly predicted by SPGR-MRI and MRA in 9 (90%). The combination of SPGR-MRI and MRA is very useful for demonstrating NVC as the cause of TN and HFS. On the other hand, we investigated asymptomatic 206 trigemimal and 253 facial nerves about the relationship between their REZ and the surrounding structures using the similar method. The contact of REZ of cranial nerve with surrounding artery is demonstrated in 31.6% of trigeminal nerves and in 22.5% of facial nerves. These results indicate that the contact of REZ of cranial nerve with surrounding artery is not rare in healthy subjects, though causing TN and HFS in particular patients. In this context, we discussed the difference between the contact which is asymptomatic and the compression which is symptomatic. (author)

  10. Abdominal rectus muscle atrophy and midline shift after colostomy creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Lucas; Deerenberg, Eva B; van Dijk, Sven M; Lamme, Bas; Koning, Anton H; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; Jeekel, Johannes; Lange, Johan F

    2014-04-01

    Incisional hernia (IH) can be attributed to multiple factors. The presence of a parastomal hernia has shown to be a risk factor for IH after midline laparotomy. Our hypothesis is that this increased risk of IH may be caused by changes in biomechanical forces, such as midline shift to the contralateral side of the colostomy owing to decreased restraining forces at the site of the colostomy, and left abdominal rectus muscle (ARM) atrophy owing to intercostal nerve damage. Patients were selected if they underwent end-colostomy via open operation between 2004 and 2011. Patients were eligible if computed tomography (CT) had been performed postoperatively. If available, preoperative CTs were collected for case-control analyses. Midline shift was measured using V-scope application in the I-space, a CAVE-like virtual reality system. For the ARM atrophy hypothesis, measurements of ARM were performed at the level of colostomy, and 3 and 8 cm cranial and caudal of the colostomy. Postoperative CT were available for 77 patients; of these patients, 30 also had a preoperative CT. Median follow-up was 19 months. A mean shift to the right side was identified after preoperative and postoperative comparison; from -1.3 ± 4.6 to 2.1 ± 9.3 (P = .043). Furthermore, during rectus muscle measurements, a thinner left ARM was observed below the level of colostomy. Creation of a colostomy alters the abdominal wall. Atrophy of the left ARM was seen caudal to the level of the colostomy, and a midline shift to the right side was evident on CT. These changes may explain the increased rate of IH after colostomy creation. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapidly worsening bulbar symptoms in a patient with spinobulbar muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Diaz-Abad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease affects muscles and motor neurons, manifesting as weakness and wasting of bulbar, facial, and proximal limb muscles due to loss of anterior horn cells in the brain and spinal cord. We present the case of a patient with X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy with rapidly worsening bulbar symptoms caused by laryngopharyngeal irritation associated with a viral upper respiratory tract infection, seasonal allergies and laryngopharyngeal reflux, who dramatically improved with multimodality therapy.

  12. Mitochondrial Myopathy: A Rare Cause of Early-Onset Vocal Fold Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Bock, Jonathan M.; Peltier, Amanda C.; Oh, Shin J.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We present the second published case of laryngeal involvement in mitochondrial myopathy. Methods A patient with laryngeal involvement of mitochondrial myopathy is presented, together with a literature review. Results A 41-year-old man presented with progressive breathy dysphonia. His brother had mitochondrial myopathy. Biopsy of the biceps muscle demonstrated cytochrome C oxidase–negative ragged blue fibers confirming mitochondrial myopathy. Videostroboscopy showed marked vocal fold atrophy, but subsequent injection laryngoplasty did not significantly improve the patient’s voice, despite improved postoperative glottic closure. Conclusions Mitochondrial myopathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe early-onset vocal fold atrophy. PMID:23577570

  13. Retinal pigment epithelial atrophy following indocyanine green dye-assisted surgery for serous macular detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Nazimul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To report subretinal migration of indocyanine green dye (ICG and subsequent retinal pigment epithelial (RPE atrophy during macular surgery for serous macular detachment. A 65-year-old woman presented with residual epiretinal membrane and serous detachment of the macula following vitreoretinal surgery for epiretinal membrane. She underwent resurgery with ICG-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling and intraocular tamponade. Intraoperatively a large area of subretinal ICG was seen with subsequent RPE mottling and atrophy of the macula in the area involved during follow-up. This case demonstrates that subretinal migration of ICG is possible and can be toxic to RPE.

  14. Transverse facial cleft: A series of 17 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L K Makhija

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transverse facial cleft (Tessier type 7 or congenital macrostomia is a rare congenital anomaly seldom occurring alone and is frequently associated with deformities of the structures developing from the first and second branchial arches. The reported incidence of No. 7 cleft varies from 1 in 60,000 to 1 in 300,000 live births. Material and Methods: Seventeen patients of transeverse facial cleft who presented to us in last 5 years were included in the study. Their history regarding familial and environmental predispositions was recorded. The cases were analysed on basis of sex, laterality, severity, associated anomalies and were graded according to severity. They were operated by z plasty technique and were followed up for 2 years to look for effectiveness of the technique and its complications. Result: Out of the seventeen patients of transverse cleft, none had familial predilection or any environmental etiology like antenatal radiological exposure or intake of drugs of teratogenic potential. Most of the patients (9/17 were associated with hemifacial microsomia and 1 patient was associated with Treacher Colin′s Syndrome. Out of the 6 cases of Grade I clefts, 4 were isolated transverse clefts and of the 10 patients of Grade II clefts, 7 were associated with hemifacial microsomia. We encountered only one case of Grade III Transverse Cleft which was not only associated with hemifacial microsomia but also had cardiac anomaly. Out of the17 cases, 15 were operated and in most of them the outcome was satisfactory.

  15. Genomic deletions in OPA1 in Danish patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almind, Gitte J; Grønskov, Karen; Milea, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA, Kjer disease, MIM #165500) is the most common form of hereditary optic neuropathy. Mutations in OPA1 located at chromosome 3q28 are the predominant cause for ADOA explaining between 32 and 89% of cases. Although deletions of OPA1 were recently reported...

  16. Bilateral optical nerve atrophy secondary to lateral occipital lobe infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Junfeng; Wei, Shihui

    2013-06-01

    To report a phenomenon of optical nerve atrophy secondary to lateral occipital lobe infarction. Two successive patients with unilateral occipital lobe infarction who experienced bilateral optical nerve atrophy during the follow-up underwent cranial imaging, fundus photography, and campimetry. Each patient was diagnosed with occipital lobe infarction by cranial MRI. During the follow-up, a bilateral optic atrophy was revealed, and campimetry showed a right homonymous hemianopia of both eyes with concomitant macular division. Bilateral optic atrophy was related to occipital lobe infarction, and a possible explanation for the atrophy was transneuronal degeneration caused by occipital lobe infarction.

  17. Cerebral atrophy in Parkinson's disease - represented in CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, H.; Schneider, E.; Hacker, H.; Fischer, P.A.; Frankfurt Univ.

    1979-01-01

    To clarify the importance of brain atrophy in relation to the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, 173 patients were examined by computed tomography (CT). In 51.4% of the CT findings, brain atrophy was considered to be pathological. Statistically significant relations of age and sex were found with regard to the extent and localization of brain atrophy. Cortical atrophy also showed a significant dependence on duration of disease. Linear measurements at the lateral ventricles and the third ventricle lead us to assume that brain atrophy in Parkinson's patients is more prevalent than in normal patients within the scope of age involution. (orig.)

  18. Cerebral atrophy in Parkinson's disease - represented in CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, H; Schneider, E; Hacker, H; Fischer, P A [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Frankfurt Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Neurologie)

    1979-01-01

    To clarify the importance of brain atrophy in relation to the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, 173 patients were examined by computed tomography (CT). In 51.4% of the CT findings, brain atrophy was considered to be pathological. Statistically significant relations of age and sex were found with regard to the extent and localization of brain atrophy. Cortical atrophy also showed a significant dependence on duration of disease. Linear measurements at the lateral ventricles and the third ventricle lead us to assume that brain atrophy in Parkinson's patients is more prevalent than in normal patients within the scope of age involution.

  19. Shining a light on posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Boeve, Bradley F; Cappa, Stefano F; Dickerson, Bradford C; Dubois, Bruno; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Lehmann, Manja; Mendez, Mario F; Pijnenburg, Yolande; Ryan, Natalie S; Scheltens, Philip; Shakespeare, Tim; Tang-Wai, David F; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Bain, Lisa; Carrillo, Maria C; Fox, Nick C

    2013-07-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a clinicoradiologic syndrome characterized by progressive decline in visual processing skills, relatively intact memory and language in the early stages, and atrophy of posterior brain regions. Misdiagnosis of PCA is common, owing not only to its relative rarity and unusual and variable presentation, but also because patients frequently first seek the opinion of an ophthalmologist, who may note normal eye examinations by their usual tests but may not appreciate cortical brain dysfunction. Seeking to raise awareness of the disease, stimulate research, and promote collaboration, a multidisciplinary group of PCA research clinicians formed an international working party, which had its first face-to-face meeting on July 13, 2012 in Vancouver, Canada, prior to the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. Copyright © 2013 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sensorimotor gating deficits in multiple system atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Biernat, Heidi Bryde; Nikolic, Miki

    2014-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the auditory blink reflex is a measure of sensorimotor gating, which reflects an organism's ability to filter out irrelevant sensory information. PPI has never been studied in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), although sensorimotor deficits are frequently a...... associated with synucleinopathies. We investigated whether alterations in PPI were more pronounced in MSA compared with Parkinson's disease (PD), idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) and healthy controls....

  1. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-03-03

    translucent, hyper-or hypopigmented or erythematous-to- violaceous in color. In addition, epidermal changes may be absent or include atrophy, hyperkeratosis, or telangiectasia [2]. In our case the diagnosis of cutaneous sarcoidosis is ...

  2. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haaker G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gerrit Haaker, Albert Fujak Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective "survival motor neuron" (SMN protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Keywords: spinal muscular atrophy, scoliosis, contractures, fractures, lung function, treatment, rehabilitation, surgery, ventilation, nutrition, perioperative management

  3. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bonaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic organ that is maintained by multiple pathways regulating cell and protein turnover. During muscle atrophy, proteolytic systems are activated, and contractile proteins and organelles are removed, resulting in the shrinkage of muscle fibers. Excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with poor prognosis in several diseases, including myopathies and muscular dystrophies, as well as in systemic disorders such as cancer, diabetes, sepsis and heart failure. Muscle loss also occurs during aging. In this paper, we review the key mechanisms that regulate the turnover of contractile proteins and organelles in muscle tissue, and discuss how impairments in these mechanisms can contribute to muscle atrophy. We also discuss how protein synthesis and degradation are coordinately regulated by signaling pathways that are influenced by mechanical stress, physical activity, and the availability of nutrients and growth factors. Understanding how these pathways regulate muscle mass will provide new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of muscle atrophy in metabolic and neuromuscular diseases.

  4. Relation between reflux of bile acids into the stomach and gastric mucosal atrophy, intestinal metaplasia in biopsy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Tsukui, Taku

    2012-05-01

    During endoscopic examinations we collected fluid in the stomach that included reflux fluid from the duodenum, and assessed the effect of quantitatively determined bile acids on glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia using biopsy specimens. A total of 294 outpatients were enrolled in this study. Total bile acid concentration was measured by an enzyme immunoassay. Glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia scores were graded according to the Updated Sydney System. An effect of refluxed bile acids on atrophy and intestinal metaplasia was shown in the high-concentration reflux group in comparison with the control group. However, when the odds ratios (ORs) were calculated according to whether Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection was present, no significant associations were shown between reflux bile acids and atrophy in either the H. pylori-positive cases or -negative cases. The same was true for intestinal metaplasia in the H. pylori-positive cases, whereas intestinal metaplasia was more pronounced in the high-concentration reflux group in the H. pylori-negative cases (OR 2.4, 95%CI 1.1-5.6). We could not clarify the effect of the reflux of bile acids into the stomach in the progression of atrophy. High-concentration bile acids had an effect on the progression of intestinal metaplasia in the H. pylori-negative cases.

  5. Descompresión microvascular en espasmo hemifacial: Reporte de 13 casos y revisión de la literatura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campero, Alvaro; Herreros, Isabel Cuervo-Arango; Barrenechea, Ignacio; Andjel, Germán; Ajler, Pablo; Rhoton, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Objetivo: El propósito del presente trabajo es presentar los resultados de 13 pacientes con diagnóstico de espasmo hemifacial (EHF), en los cuales se realizó una descompresión microvascular (DMV). Material y Método: Desde Junio de 2005 a Mayo de 2014, 13 pacientes con diagnóstico de EHF fueron intervenidos quirúrgicamente, realizando una DMV. Se evaluó: edad, sexo, tiempo de evolución de la sintomatología, hallazgos intraoperatorios y resultados postoperatorios. Resultados: De los 13 pacientes intervenidos, 7 fueron mujeres y 6 varones. La media de edad fue de 53 años. El tiempo medio entre el inicio de la sintomatología y la intervención quirúrgica osciló entre 3 y 9 años. En todos los casos el EHF era típico, uno de ellos con neuralgia trigeminal concomitante, observándose en todos compresión neurovascular intraoperatoria. Por orden decreciente de frecuencia la causa de la compresión fue arteria cerebelosa anteroinferior, arteria cerebelosa posteroinferior, arteria dolicomega basilar y arteria dolicomega vertebral. El seguimiento postoperatorio fue en promedio de 24 meses. El 62% presentó desaparición postquirúrgica inmediata de la sintomatología preoperatoria, el 30% desaparición tras un período de 3 semanas a 2 meses (8% con mejoría parcial), y en el 8% no hubo mejoría. En cuanto a las complicaciones postoperatorias: 3 pacientes presentaron paresia facial II-III en la escala de House-Brackman (se recuperaron en un período de 6 meses), y 1 paciente presentó fístula de líquido cefalorraquídeo. Ninguno de los pacientes de la serie presentaron hipoacusia transitorio o permanente. Conclusión: La DMV como tratamiento del EHF es un procedimiento efectivo y seguro, que permite la resolución completa de la patología en la mayoría de los casos. PMID:27127708

  6. Will Preoperative Atrophy and Fatty Degeneration of the Shoulder Muscles Improve after Rotator Cuff Repair in Patients with Massive Rotator Cuff Tears?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yamaguchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, retear rate after repair for massive cuff tear have been improved through devised suture techniques. However, reported retear rate is relevant to preoperative atrophy and fatty degeneration. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether preoperative atrophy and fatty degeneration of rotator cuff muscles improve by successful repair. Twenty-four patients with massive rotator cuff tear were evaluated on the recovery of atrophy and fatty degeneration of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle after surgery. Atrophy was classified by the occupation ratio and fatty degeneration by modified Goutallier's classification. Both were assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI before and after the operation. When the cuff was well repaired, improvement of the atrophy and fatty degeneration were observed in a half and a one-fourth of the cases, respectively. In retear cases, however, atrophy and fatty degeneration became worse. Improvement of atrophy and fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles may be expected in the cases with successful achievement of rotator cuff repair for large and massive tear.

  7. Novel in vitro platform to investigate myotube atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Oelkrug, Christopher; Horn, Katharina; Makert, Gustavo R.; Schubert, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The electrical current exclusion (ECE) principle provides an alternative to common methods of cell diameter measurement and especially in atrophy and cancer associated cachexia research. C2C12 myoblasts were differentiated into myotubes and treated with 100 μM dexamethasone to induce atrophy in vitro. Subsequently, they were incubated for 24 h with media containing different concentrations of curcumin and/or branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in order to counteract atrophy. After treatment wi...

  8. Lipomatous muscle atrophy caused by irradiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhomberg, W.; Hergan, K.

    1990-01-01

    As compared to other organs and tissues liable to sustain delayed injury from radiotherapy, the musculature seems to be a hard-wearing, radiation-resistant organ. Apart from the possibility of inducing Myodegeneratio cordis, muscles are merely threatened, as far as is known today, by possible fibrosis in the surrounding area. Certainly, extremely high doses of more than 100 Gy occasionally may trigger necrosis and atrophies in tissues. The article reports on a patient suffering from carcinoma of the bladder who developed muscle and tendon degeneration following telecobalt irradiation after a latency period of eight years, forcing him ultimately to quit work. (orig.) [de

  9. Cardiac atrophy after bed rest and spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Franco, F.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Peshock, R. M.; Weatherall, P. T.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac muscle adapts well to changes in loading conditions. For example, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy may be induced physiologically (via exercise training) or pathologically (via hypertension or valvular heart disease). If hypertension is treated, LV hypertrophy regresses, suggesting a sensitivity to LV work. However, whether physical inactivity in nonathletic populations causes adaptive changes in LV mass or even frank atrophy is not clear. We exposed previously sedentary men to 6 (n = 5) and 12 (n = 3) wk of horizontal bed rest. LV and right ventricular (RV) mass and end-diastolic volume were measured using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2, 6, and 12 wk of bed rest; five healthy men were also studied before and after at least 6 wk of routine daily activities as controls. In addition, four astronauts were exposed to the complete elimination of hydrostatic gradients during a spaceflight of 10 days. During bed rest, LV mass decreased by 8.0 +/- 2.2% (P = 0.005) after 6 wk with an additional atrophy of 7.6 +/- 2.3% in the subjects who remained in bed for 12 wk; there was no change in LV mass for the control subjects (153.0 +/- 12.2 vs. 153.4 +/- 12.1 g, P = 0.81). Mean wall thickness decreased (4 +/- 2.5%, P = 0.01) after 6 wk of bed rest associated with the decrease in LV mass, suggesting a physiological remodeling with respect to altered load. LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 14 +/- 1.7% (P = 0.002) after 2 wk of bed rest and changed minimally thereafter. After 6 wk of bed rest, RV free wall mass decreased by 10 +/- 2.7% (P = 0.06) and RV end-diastolic volume by 16 +/- 7.9% (P = 0.06). After spaceflight, LV mass decreased by 12 +/- 6.9% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, cardiac atrophy occurs during prolonged (6 wk) horizontal bed rest and may also occur after short-term spaceflight. We suggest that cardiac atrophy is due to a physiological adaptation to reduced myocardial load and work in real or simulated microgravity and demonstrates the plasticity

  10. Avaliação fonoaudiológica na atrofia de múltiplos sistemas: estudo com cinco pacientes Multiple system atrophy speech assessment: study of five cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Botelho Knopp

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A atrofia de múltiplos sistemas (AMS é caracterizada pela presença de sinais parkinsonianos, cerebelares, autonômicos e piramidais, em várias combinações. O aparecimento de disartria e disfagia no primeiro ano de manifestação de parkinsonismo, sugere o diagnóstico de AMS. O objetivo deste estudo foi o de caracterizar do ponto de vista fonoaudiológico os distúrbios da fala e da voz dos pacientes com AMS. Foram selecionados cinco pacientes, com idade média de 51,2 anos e com diagnóstico provável de AMS. Cada paciente foi submetido a avaliação neurológica e fonoaudiológica. Esta última foi composta dos seguintes itens: anamnese; avaliação miofuncional e avaliação perceptivo-auditiva da fala. Os sintomas de fala e voz apareceram 1,1 ano após o início dos sintomas motores e a disartrofonia apresentada por todos os pacientes foi a do tipo mista, mesclando os componentes hipocinético, atáxico e espástico, com predomínio do primeiro. Nossos achados são diferentes daqueles comumente vistos em pacientes com a doença de Parkinson, onde o componente hipocinético é o único achado. Os dados levantados indicam que a avaliação fonoaudiológica é importante no diagnóstico diferencial e no planejamento terapêutico da AMS.Multiple system atrophy (MSA is characterized by parkinsonian, cerebellar and pyramidal features along with autonomic dysfunction in different combinations. Onset of dysarthria during the first year of the manifestation of a parkinsonian syndrome suggests the diagnosis of MSA. The aim of this study was to characterize the voice and the speech of patients with MSA. We studied five MSA patients with a mean age of 51.2 years. Each patient was submitted to a neurological and a specific speech and voice assessment. The latter consisted of the following: clinical interview, myofunctional examination, and perceptual speech evaluation. Speech and voice complaints occurred at an average time of 1.1 year after the

  11. CT findings of cervical spondylosis associated with muscle atrophy in the upper extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torigoe, Yasuyuki [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-11-01

    The shape, site and size of osteophytes in cervical spondylosis associated with muscle atrophy were studied by CT to know their relation with pathogenesis. Subjects were: muscle atrophy group (30 cases, 59.5-year-old in a mean, operation was performed on 26), spondylosis group (20, 60.0 year-old) and normal group (10, 60.2-year-old). Their cervical vertebral regions were subjected to the scout roentgenography, CT and myelography. Osteophytes were measured on the x-ray film copied from CT-monitoring image. In the muscle atrophy group, about the shape around vertebral foramen, the occipitofrontal diameter of vertebral canal was found larger than in spondylosis group. Osteophytes were often localized at the outer position of paramedian site, of which constriction was rather smaller. The shape of the vertebral arch was keen. Clinically, the muscle atrophy group was considered to be of myelosis under such conditions as having less affective lesion on spinal cord. (H.O.)

  12. Significance of frontal cortical atrophy in Parkinson's disease: computed tomographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Sang; Suh, Jung Ho; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Dong Ik [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Fifty-five patients with Parkinson's disease were evaluated clinically and with brain computed tomography (CT) in order to determine the incidence of frontal cortical and subcortical atrophy. Twenty cases of age-related healthy control group were also scanned. The CT criteria of frontal cortical atrophy that was used in this study were the maximum width of frontal hemispheric cortical sulci and width of anterior interhemispheric fissure between frontal lobes comparing with maximum width of hemispheric cortical sulci except frontal lobes. And the criteria of frontal subcortical atrophy were bifrontal index bicaudate index, and Evans index. The results are as follows: 1. Cortical atrophic changes in Parkinson's disease were more prominent in frontal lobe rather than other causes of cortical atrophy. 2. Frontal cortical and subcortical atrophic changes were also more prominent in Parkinson's disease rather than age-related control group. 3. Subcortical atrophic changes in frontal lobe were always associated with cortical atrophic changes. 4. Changes of basal ganglia were hardly seen in Parkinson's disease. 5. Cortical atrophic changes in frontal lobe must be the one of significant findings in Parkinson's disease.

  13. Significance of frontal cortical atrophy in Parkinson's disease: computed tomographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Sang; Suh, Jung Ho; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Dong Ik

    1987-01-01

    Fifty-five patients with Parkinson's disease were evaluated clinically and with brain computed tomography (CT) in order to determine the incidence of frontal cortical and subcortical atrophy. Twenty cases of age-related healthy control group were also scanned. The CT criteria of frontal cortical atrophy that was used in this study were the maximum width of frontal hemispheric cortical sulci and width of anterior interhemispheric fissure between frontal lobes comparing with maximum width of hemispheric cortical sulci except frontal lobes. And the criteria of frontal subcortical atrophy were bifrontal index bicaudate index, and Evans index. The results are as follows: 1. Cortical atrophic changes in Parkinson's disease were more prominent in frontal lobe rather than other causes of cortical atrophy. 2. Frontal cortical and subcortical atrophic changes were also more prominent in Parkinson's disease rather than age-related control group. 3. Subcortical atrophic changes in frontal lobe were always associated with cortical atrophic changes. 4. Changes of basal ganglia were hardly seen in Parkinson's disease. 5. Cortical atrophic changes in frontal lobe must be the one of significant findings in Parkinson's disease

  14. Abnormal pain perception in patients with Multiple System Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ory-Magne, F; Pellaprat, J; Harroch, E; Galitzsky, M; Rousseau, V; Pavy-Le Traon, A; Rascol, O; Gerdelat, A; Brefel-Courbon, C

    2018-03-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease or Multiple System Atrophy frequently experience painful sensations. The few studies investigating pain mechanisms in Multiple System Atrophy patients have reported contradictory results. In our study, we compared pain thresholds in Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls and evaluated the effect of l-DOPA on pain thresholds. We assessed subjective and objective pain thresholds (using a thermotest and RIII reflex), and pain tolerance in OFF and ON conditions, clinical pain, motor and psychological evaluation. Pain was reported in 78.6% of Multiple System Atrophy patients and in 37.5% of Parkinson's disease patients. In the OFF condition, subjective and objective pain thresholds were significantly lower in Multiple System Atrophy patients than in healthy controls (43.8 °C ± 1.3 vs 45.7 °C ± 0.8; p = 0.0005 and 7.4 mA ± 3.8 vs 13.7 mA ± 2.8; p = 0.002, respectively). They were also significantly reduced in Multiple System Atrophy compared to Parkinson's disease patients. No significant difference was found in pain tolerance for the 3 groups and in the effect of l-DOPA on pain thresholds in Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson's disease patients. In the ON condition, pain tolerance tended to be reduced in Multiple System Atrophy versus Parkinson's disease patients (p = 0.05). Multiple System Atrophy patients had an increase in pain perception compared to Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls. The l-DOPA effect was similar for pain thresholds in Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson's disease patients, but tended to worsen pain tolerance in Multiple System Atrophy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Serum cholinesterase activity in infantile and juvenile spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebroj-Dobosz, I; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, I

    1989-09-01

    Serum acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and pseudocholinesterase (ChE) activity in infantile and juvenile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) was determined. The total AChE activity was either normal or decreased in the childhood SMA (Type 1), the other SMA groups and disease controls (ALS, X-linked SMA). In the majority of SMA Type 1 cases (6/7 tested) an absence of the asymmetric A12 form was found. This was accompanied by changes in the other asymmetric and globular forms. The latter was, however, not specific for SMA Type 1 cases. The ChE activity was increased in the majority of SMA cases as well as disease controls. The asymmetric A12 ChE form was increased in all SMA Type 3 cases, the values of this form in SMA Type 1 was variable. A change in the ChE globular forms in SMA Type 1 and SMA Type 2 was a frequent finding. It is suggested that the absence of the asymmetric A12 AChE form in SMA Type 1 arises because of muscle cell immaturity and undeveloped muscle-nerve interactions. The reason of ChE changes is obscure.

  16. [Clinical feature of chronic compressive optic neuropathy without optic atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Libin; Shi, Jitong; Liu, Wendong; Kang, Jun; Wang, Ningli

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the clinical feature of the chronic compressive optic neuropathy without optic atrophy. Retrospective cases series study. The clinical data of 25 patients (37 eyes) with chronic compressive optic neuropathy without optic atrophy, treated in Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, from October, 2005 to March, 2014, were collected. Those patients had been showing visual symptoms for 6 months or longer, but missed diagnosed or misdiagnosed as other eye diseases due to their normal or slightly changed fundi. The collected data including visual acuities, visual fields, neuroimaging and/or pathologic diagnosis were analyzed. Among the 25 patients, there were 5 males and 20 females, and their ages range from 9 to 74 years [average (47.5 ± 13.4) years]. All patients suffered progressive impaired vision in single eye or both eyes, without exophthalmos or abnormal eye movements. Except one patient had a headache, other patients did not show systemic symptoms. The corrected visual acuities were between HM to 1.0, and their appearances of optic discs and colors of fundi were normal. After neuroimaging and/or pathological examination, it was proven that 14 patients suffered tuberculum sellae meningiomas, 5 patients with hypophysoma, 3 patient with optic nerve sheath meningioma in orbital apex, 1 patient with cavernous hemangioma, 1 patient with vascular malformation in orbital apex and 1 patient with optic nerve glioma. Among the 19 patients whose suffered occupied lesions of saddle area, 14 patients underwent visual field examinations, and only 4 patients showed classic visual field defects caused by optic chiasmal lesions. Occult progressive visual loss was the most important clinical feature of the disease.

  17. Consensus Definition for Atrophy Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration on OCT: Classification of Atrophy Report 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadda, Srinivas R; Guymer, Robyn; Holz, Frank G; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Curcio, Christine A; Bird, Alan C; Blodi, Barbara A; Bottoni, Ferdinando; Chakravarthy, Usha; Chew, Emily Y; Csaky, Karl; Danis, Ronald P; Fleckenstein, Monika; Freund, K Bailey; Grunwald, Juan; Hoyng, Carel B; Jaffe, Glenn J; Liakopoulos, Sandra; Monés, Jordi M; Pauleikhoff, Daniel; Rosenfeld, Philip J; Sarraf, David; Spaide, Richard F; Tadayoni, Ramin; Tufail, Adnan; Wolf, Sebastian; Staurenghi, Giovanni

    2018-04-01

    To develop consensus terminology and criteria for defining atrophy based on OCT findings in the setting of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Consensus meeting. Panel of retina specialists, image reading center experts, retinal histologists, and optics engineers. As part of the Classification of Atrophy Meetings (CAM) program, an international group of experts surveyed the existing literature, performed a masked analysis of longitudinal multimodal imaging for a series of eyes with AMD, and reviewed the results of this analysis to define areas of agreement and disagreement. Through consensus discussions at 3 meetings over 12 months, a classification system based on OCT was proposed for atrophy secondary to AMD. Specific criteria were defined to establish the presence of atrophy. A consensus classification system for atrophy and OCT-based criteria to identify atrophy. OCT was proposed as the reference standard or base imaging method to diagnose and stage atrophy. Other methods, including fundus autofluorescence, near-infrared reflectance, and color imaging, provided complementary and confirmatory information. Recognizing that photoreceptor atrophy can occur without retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy and that atrophy can undergo an evolution of different stages, 4 terms and histologic candidates were proposed: complete RPE and outer retinal atrophy (cRORA), incomplete RPE and outer retinal atrophy, complete outer retinal atrophy, and incomplete outer retinal atrophy. Specific OCT criteria to diagnose cRORA were proposed: (1) a region of hypertransmission of at least 250 μm in diameter, (2) a zone of attenuation or disruption of the RPE of at least 250 μm in diameter, (3) evidence of overlying photoreceptor degeneration, and (4) absence of scrolled RPE or other signs of an RPE tear. A classification system and criteria for OCT-defined atrophy in the setting of AMD has been proposed based on an international consensus. This classification is a more complete

  18. Evaluating Alzheimer's disease progression using rate of regional hippocampal atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edit Frankó

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by neurofibrillary tangle and neuropil thread deposition, which ultimately results in neuronal loss. A large number of magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported a smaller hippocampus in AD patients as compared to healthy elderlies. Even though this difference is often interpreted as atrophy, it is only an indirect measurement. A more direct way of measuring the atrophy is to use repeated MRIs within the same individual. Even though several groups have used this appropriate approach, the pattern of hippocampal atrophy still remains unclear and difficult to relate to underlying pathophysiology. Here, in this longitudinal study, we aimed to map hippocampal atrophy rates in patients with AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI and elderly controls. Data consisted of two MRI scans for each subject. The symmetric deformation field between the first and the second MRI was computed and mapped onto the three-dimensional hippocampal surface. The pattern of atrophy rate was similar in all three groups, but the rate was significantly higher in patients with AD than in control subjects. We also found higher atrophy rates in progressive MCI patients as compared to stable MCI, particularly in the antero-lateral portion of the right hippocampus. Importantly, the regions showing the highest atrophy rate correspond to those that were described to have the highest burden of tau deposition. Our results show that local hippocampal atrophy rate is a reliable biomarker of disease stage and progression and could also be considered as a method to objectively evaluate treatment effects.

  19. Corpus callosum atrophy in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Kristian Steen; Garde, Ellen; Skimminge, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have found atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unclear whether callosal atrophy is already present in the early stages of AD, and to what extent it may be associated with other structural changes in the brain......, such as age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) and progression of the disease....

  20. Progression of retinal pigment epithelial atrophy in antiangiogenic therapy of neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Christopher; Wedl, Manuela; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-06-01

    To monitor retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) atrophy progression during antiangiogenic therapy of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) over 2 years using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT). Prospective interventional case series. setting: Clinical practice. Thirty patients (31 eyes) with treatment-naïve neovascular AMD. Standard intravitreal therapy (0.5 mg ranibizumab) was administered monthly during the first year and pro re nata (PRN; as-needed) during the second year. Spectral-domain (SD) OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (selectively imaging the RPE) examinations were performed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months using a standardized protocol. RPE-related changes were evaluated using a semi-automated polarization-sensitive OCT segmentation algorithm and correlated with SD OCT and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) findings. RPE response, geographic atrophy (GA) progression. Atrophic RPE changes included RPE thinning, RPE porosity, focal RPE atrophy, and development of GA. Early RPE loss (ie, RPE porosity, focal atrophy) increased progressively during initial monthly treatment and remained stable during subsequent PRN-based therapy. GA developed in 61% of eyes at month 24. Mean GA area increased from 0.77 mm(2) at 12 months to 1.10 mm(2) (standard deviation = 1.09 mm(2)) at 24 months. Reactive accumulation of RPE-related material at the lesion borders increased until month 3 and subsequently decreased. Progressive RPE atrophy and GA developed in the majority of eyes. RPE migration signifies certain RPE plasticity. Polarization-sensitive OCT specifically images RPE-related changes in neovascular AMD, contrary to conventional imaging methods. Polarization-sensitive OCT allows for precisely monitoring the sequence of RPE-related morphologic changes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Regional cerebral blood flow and brain atrophy in senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT). Comparing with multi-infarct dementia (MID), and aged control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, K; Kobayashi, S; Yamaguchi, S; Kitani, M; Tsunematsu, T

    1987-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between the reduction of cerebal blood flow and brain atrophy in SDAT, these were measured in 13 cases of senile dementia of Alzheimer type, and compared to 15 cases of multi-infarct Dementia, 39 cases of lacunar infarction without dementia (non-demented CVD group) and 69 cases of aged normal control. Brain atrophy was evaluated by two-dimensional method on CT film by digitizer and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured by /sup 133/Xe inhalation method. The degree of brain atrophy in SDAT was almost similar of that of MID. But it was more severe than that of non-demented group. MID showed the lowest rCBF among these groups. SDAT showed significantly lower rCBF than that of aged control, but rCBF in SDAT was equal to that of lacunar stroke without dementia. Focal reduction of cerebral blood flow in bilateral fronto-parietal and left occipital regions were observed in SDAT. Verbal intelligence score (Hasegawa's score) correlated with rCBF and brain atrophy index in MID, and a tendency of correlation between rCBF and brain atrophy in MID was also observed. However, there was no correlation among those indices in SDAT. These findings suggest that the loss of brain substance dose not correspond to the reduction of rCBF in SDAT and simultaneous measurement of rCBF and brain atrophy was useful to differ SDAT from MID.

  2. Bilateral congenital absence of flexor pollicis longus with thumb hypoplasia and thenar atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Sehgal, Harsha; Bano, Shahina; Parmar, Pranjali R; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Congenital absence of flexor pollicis longus with or without associated anomalies of thenar muscles and thumb is of rare occurrence. Inability to flex the interphalangeal joint of the thumb and absent dorsal wrinkles and flexion creases of the thumb are important clues to the diagnosis. Routine radiography and cross-sectional imaging help to confirm and document the condition. This article presents an extremely rare case of bilateral congenital absence of flexor pollicis longus tendon with thumb hypoplasia and thenar atrophy

  3. Fluid biomarkers in multiple system atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurens, Brice; Constantinescu, Radu; Freeman, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing research efforts, no reliable biomarker currently exists for the diagnosis and prognosis of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Such biomarkers are urgently needed to improve diagnostic accuracy, prognostic guidance and also to serve as efficacy measures or surrogates of target...... engagement for future clinical trials. We here review candidate fluid biomarkers for MSA and provide considerations for further developments and harmonization of standard operating procedures. A PubMed search was performed until April 24, 2015 to review the literature with regard to candidate blood...... and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for MSA. Abstracts of 1760 studies were retrieved and screened for eligibility. The final list included 60 studies assessing fluid biomarkers in patients with MSA. Most studies have focused on alpha-synuclein, markers of axonal degeneration or catecholamines. Their results...

  4. Features of brain atrophy in Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, I; Melamed, E; Gomori, J M

    1985-03-01

    Multiple parameters for brain volume and mass were studied in 85 parkinsonian patients and in 149 normal controls aged 24 to 89 using CT scanning. In controls there was reduction in brain substance with advancing age. Increased brain atrophy in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) was mainly observed in the younger age group of 24 to 49. This included parameters evaluating the size of the lateral and third ventricles and the size of the subarachnoid space in the frontal interhemispheric and Sylvian fissures. With computed canonical correlation analysis a formula was obtained which expressed the tendency of the atrophic process in PD to involve the areas surrounding the third ventricle and the mesial aspect of the frontal lobes more than during normal aging.

  5. Dental implants for severely atrophied jaws due to ectodermal dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to present the successful esthetical and functional rehabilitation of partial anodontia in a case of severe ectodermal dysplasia with complete atrophy of the jaws. A 17-year-old male with Class III malocclusion with partial anodontia sought dental implant treatment. His expectation was that of Class I occlusion. The challenge in the case was to match the expectation, reality, and the clinical possibilities. Ridge augmentation was performed with a combination of rib graft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2. Simultaneously, 6 implants (Nobel Biocare™ - Tapered Groovy were placed in maxillary arch and 10 in the mandible. Simultaneous placement ensured faster and better osseointegration though a mild compromise of the primary stability was observed initially. After adequate healing, Customized Zirconia Procera™ system was used to build the framework. Zirconia crown was cemented to the framework. Radiological and clinical evidence of osseointegration was observed in all 16 dental implants. Successful conversion of Class III to Class I occlusion was achieved with the combination of preprosthetic alveolar ridge augmentation, Procera™ Implant Bridge system. Abnormal angulations and or placement of dental implants would result in failure of the implant. Hence conversion of Class III to Class I occlusion needs complete and complex treatment planning so that the entire masticatory apparatus is sufficiently remodeled. Planning should consider the resultant vectors that would otherwise result in failure of framework or compromise the secondary stability of the dental implant during function. A successful case of rehabilitation of complex partial anodontia is presented.

  6. Choroidal Round Hyporeflectivities in Geographic Atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Corbelli

    Full Text Available In geographic atrophy (GA, choroidal vessels typically appear on structural optical coherence tomography (OCT as hyperreflective round areas with highly reflective borders. We observed that some GA eyes show choroidal round hyporeflectivities with highly reflective borders beneath the atrophy, and futher investigated the charcteristcs by comparing structural OCT, indocyanine green angiography (ICGA and OCT angiography (OCT-A.Round hyporeflectivities were individuated from a pool of patients with GA secondary to non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration consecutively presenting between October 2015 and March 2016 at the Medical Retina & Imaging Unit of the University Vita-Salute San Raffaele. Patients underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination including ICGA, structural OCT and OCT-A. The correspondence between choroidal round hyporeflectivities beneath GA on structural OCT and ICGA and OCT-A imaging were analyzed.Fifty eyes of 26 consecutive patients (17 females and 9 males; mean age 76.8±6.2 years with GA were included. Twenty-nine round hyporeflectivities have been found by OCT in choroidal layers in 21 eyes of 21 patients (42.0%; estimated prevalence of 57.7%. All 29 round hyporeflectivities showed constantly a hyperreflective border and a backscattering on structural OCT, and appeared as hypofluorescent in late phase ICGA and as dark foci with non detectable flow in the choroidal segmentation of OCT-A. Interestingly, the GA area was greater in eyes with compared to eyes without round hyporeflectivities (9.30±5.74 and 5.57±4.48mm2, respectively; p = 0.01.Our results suggest that most round hyporeflectivities beneath GA may represent non-perfused or hypo-perfused choroidal vessels with non-detectable flow.

  7. Choroidal Round Hyporeflectivities in Geographic Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbelli, Eleonora; Sacconi, Riccardo; De Vitis, Luigi Antonio; Carnevali, Adriano; Rabiolo, Alessandro; Querques, Lea; Bandello, Francesco; Querques, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    In geographic atrophy (GA), choroidal vessels typically appear on structural optical coherence tomography (OCT) as hyperreflective round areas with highly reflective borders. We observed that some GA eyes show choroidal round hyporeflectivities with highly reflective borders beneath the atrophy, and futher investigated the charcteristcs by comparing structural OCT, indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) and OCT angiography (OCT-A). Round hyporeflectivities were individuated from a pool of patients with GA secondary to non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration consecutively presenting between October 2015 and March 2016 at the Medical Retina & Imaging Unit of the University Vita-Salute San Raffaele. Patients underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination including ICGA, structural OCT and OCT-A. The correspondence between choroidal round hyporeflectivities beneath GA on structural OCT and ICGA and OCT-A imaging were analyzed. Fifty eyes of 26 consecutive patients (17 females and 9 males; mean age 76.8±6.2 years) with GA were included. Twenty-nine round hyporeflectivities have been found by OCT in choroidal layers in 21 eyes of 21 patients (42.0%; estimated prevalence of 57.7%). All 29 round hyporeflectivities showed constantly a hyperreflective border and a backscattering on structural OCT, and appeared as hypofluorescent in late phase ICGA and as dark foci with non detectable flow in the choroidal segmentation of OCT-A. Interestingly, the GA area was greater in eyes with compared to eyes without round hyporeflectivities (9.30±5.74 and 5.57±4.48mm2, respectively; p = 0.01). Our results suggest that most round hyporeflectivities beneath GA may represent non-perfused or hypo-perfused choroidal vessels with non-detectable flow.

  8. Different atrophy-hypertrophy transcription pathways in muscles affected by severe and mild spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millino Caterina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with mutations of the survival motor neuron gene SMN and is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy caused by degeneration of spinal motor neurons. SMN has a role in neurons but its deficiency may have a direct effect on muscle tissue. Methods We applied microarray and quantitative real-time PCR to study at transcriptional level the effects of a defective SMN gene in skeletal muscles affected by the two forms of SMA: the most severe type I and the mild type III. Results The two forms of SMA generated distinct expression signatures: the SMA III muscle transcriptome is close to that found under normal conditions, whereas in SMA I there is strong alteration of gene expression. Genes implicated in signal transduction were up-regulated in SMA III whereas those of energy metabolism and muscle contraction were consistently down-regulated in SMA I. The expression pattern of gene networks involved in atrophy signaling was completed by qRT-PCR, showing that specific pathways are involved, namely IGF/PI3K/Akt, TNF-α/p38 MAPK and Ras/ERK pathways. Conclusion Our study suggests a different picture of atrophy pathways in each of the two forms of SMA. In particular, p38 may be the regulator of protein synthesis in SMA I. The SMA III profile appears as the result of the concurrent presence of atrophic and hypertrophic fibers. This more favorable condition might be due to the over-expression of MTOR that, given its role in the activation of protein synthesis, could lead to compensatory hypertrophy in SMA III muscle fibers.

  9. Head and Arm Tremor in X-linked Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Aicua

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: X‐linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is a rare adult‐onset neuronopathy. Although tremor is known to occur in this disease, the number of reported cases of SBMA with tremor is rare, and the number with videotaped documentation is exceedingly rare. Our aim was to describe/document the characteristic signs of tremor in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.Case Report: We report a case of a 58‐year‐old male with a positive family history of tremor. On examination, the patient had jaw and hand tremors but he also exhibited gynecomastia, progressive bulbar paresis, and wasting and weakness primarily in the proximal limb muscles. The laboratory tests revealed an elevated creatine phosphokinase. Genetic testing was positive for X‐SBMA, with 42 CAG repeats.Discussion: Essential tremor is one of the most common movement disorders, yet it is important for clinicians to be aware of the presence of other distinguishing features that point to alternative diagnoses. The presence of action tremor associated with muscle atrophy and gynecomastia should lead to a suspicion of SBMA.

  10. Automated analysis of whole skeletal muscle for muscular atrophy detection of ALS in whole-body CT images: preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Naoki; Ieda, Kosuke; Zhou, Xiangrong; Yamada, Megumi; Kato, Hiroki; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Toshiharu; Inuzuka, Takashi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) causes functional disorders such as difficulty in breathing and swallowing through the atrophy of voluntary muscles. ALS in its early stages is difficult to diagnose because of the difficulty in differentiating it from other muscular diseases. In addition, image inspection methods for aggressive diagnosis for ALS have not yet been established. The purpose of this study is to develop an automatic analysis system of the whole skeletal muscle to support the early differential diagnosis of ALS using whole-body CT images. In this study, the muscular atrophy parts including ALS patients are automatically identified by recognizing and segmenting whole skeletal muscle in the preliminary steps. First, the skeleton is identified by its gray value information. Second, the initial area of the body cavity is recognized by the deformation of the thoracic cavity based on the anatomical segmented skeleton. Third, the abdominal cavity boundary is recognized using ABM for precisely recognizing the body cavity. The body cavity is precisely recognized by non-rigid registration method based on the reference points of the abdominal cavity boundary. Fourth, the whole skeletal muscle is recognized by excluding the skeleton, the body cavity, and the subcutaneous fat. Additionally, the areas of muscular atrophy including ALS patients are automatically identified by comparison of the muscle mass. The experiments were carried out for ten cases with abnormality in the skeletal muscle. Global recognition and segmentation of the whole skeletal muscle were well realized in eight cases. Moreover, the areas of muscular atrophy including ALS patients were well identified in the lower limbs. As a result, this study indicated the basic technology to detect the muscle atrophy including ALS. In the future, it will be necessary to consider methods to differentiate other kinds of muscular atrophy as well as the clinical application of this detection method for early ALS

  11. Reviewing the options for local estrogen treatment of vaginal atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindahl SH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sarah H Lindahl Sutter East Bay Medical Foundation, SEBMF – Diablo Division, Castro Valley, CA, USA Background: Vaginal atrophy is a chronic condition with symptoms that include vaginal dryness, pain during sex, itching, irritation, burning, and discharge, as well as various urinary problems. Up to 45% of postmenopausal women may be affected, but it often remains underreported and undertreated. This article aims to review the current recommendations for treatment of vaginal atrophy, and current data on the effectiveness and safety of local vaginal estrogen therapies. Methods: Literature regarding vaginal atrophy (2007–2012 was retrieved from PubMed and summarized, with emphasis on data related to the treatment of vaginal atrophy with local vaginal estrogen therapy. Results: Published data support the effectiveness and endometrial safety of low-dose local estrogen therapies. These results further support the general recommendation by the North American Menopause Society that a progestogen is not needed for endometrial protection in patients using low-dose local vaginal estrogen. Benefits of long-term therapy for vaginal atrophy include sustained relief of symptoms as well as physiological improvements (eg, decreased vaginal pH and increased blood flow, epithelial thickness, secretions. Conclusion: Currently available local vaginal estrogen therapies are well tolerated and effective in relieving symptoms of vaginal atrophy. Recent data support the endometrial safety of low-dose regimens for up to 1 year. Keywords: menopause, estrogen, local estrogen therapy, vaginal atrophy

  12. Clinical variability in hereditary optic neuropathies: Two novel mutations in two patients with dominant optic atrophy and Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Dominant optic atrophy (DOA) and Wolfram syndrome share a great deal of clinical variability, including an association with hearing loss and the presence of optic atrophy at similar ages. The objective of this paper was to discuss the phenotypic variability of these syndromes with respect to the presentation of two clinical cases. We present two patients, each with either DOA or Wolfram syndrome, and contribute to the research literature through our findings of two novel mutations. The overlapping of several clinical characteristics in hereditary optic neuropathies can complicate the differential diagnosis. Future studies are needed to better determine the genotype-phenotype correlation for these diseases.

  13. Deformation-Based Atrophy Estimation for Alzheimer’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) - the most common form of dementia, is a term used for accelerated memory loss and cognitive abilities enough to severely hamper day-to-day activities. One of the most globally accepted markers for AD is atrophy, in mainly the brain parenchyma. The goal of the PhD project...... and a new way to estimate atrophy from a deformation field. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed solution but applying it on the publicly available Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging data (ADNI) initiative and compare to existing state-of-art atrophy estimation methods....

  14. Brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis: therapeutic, cognitive and clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Multiple sclerosis (MS was always considered as a white matter inflammatory disease. Today, there is an important body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that gray matter involvement and the neurodegenerative mechanism are at least partially independent from inflammation. Gray matter atrophy develops faster than white matter atrophy, and predominates in the initial stages of the disease. The neurodegenerative mechanism creates permanent damage and correlates with physical and cognitive disability. In this review we describe the current available evidence regarding brain atrophy and its consequence in MS patients.

  15. Anterior pituitary lobe atrophy as late complication of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Dragan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS is acute infective multisystemic disease followed by febrility, hemorrhages and acute renal insufficiency. Bleeding in the anterior pituitary lobe leading to tissue necrosis occurs in acute stage of severe clinical forms of HFRS, while atrophy of the anterior pituitary lobe with diminution of the gland function occurs after recovery stage. Case report. We presented a patient with the development of chronic renal insufficiency and hypopituitarism as complication that had been diagnosed six years after Hantavirus infection. Magnetic resonance of the pituitary gland revealed atrophy and empty sella turcica. Conclusion. Regarding frequency of this viral infection and its endemic character in some parts of our country partial and/or complete loss of pituitary function should be considered during the late stage of HFRS.

  16. Radiation-induced splenic atrophy in patients with Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dailey, M.O.; Coleman, C.N.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1980-01-01

    Effective treatment of Hodgkin's disease requires the determination of the extent of the disease. This usually involves staging laparotomy, which includes splenectomy and biopsies of the para-aortic lymph nodes, liver, and bone marrow. Absence of the spleen predisposes a person to fulminant septicemia from encapsulated bacteria, a risk even greater in patients undergoing treatment for Hodgkin's disease. For this reason, some investigators have suggested that spleens not be removed for diagnosis but, rather, that they be included within the fields of radiation, which would preserve normal splenic function. We present a case of fatal spontaneous pneumococcal sepsis in a patient with splenic atrophy; the sepsis occurred 12 years after successful treatment of Hodgkin's disease by total nodal and splenic irradiation. A retrospective study of patients treated for Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas indicated that atrophy and functional asplenia may be an important sequela of splenic irradiation

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aotsuka, Akiyo; Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Hirayama, Keizo [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Ikehira, Hiroo; Hashimoto, Takahiro

    1992-08-01

    We studied 18 patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) by high field strength MRI: 6 striatonigral degeneration (SND), 4 Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS), and 8 olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA). We also studied 30 Parkinson's disease (PD) and 10 age-matched controls. The diagnosis of SND, SDS, and OPCA were based on criteria after Hirayama et al (1985). Bradykinesia, rigidity, and tremor were assessed with the summed scores of the signs used as the extrapyramidal scores. The mean extrapyramidal scores were not significantly different in patients with SND, SDS, OPCA, and PD. MRI studies were performed on 1.5 tesla MRI unit, using a T[sub 2]-weighted spin echo pulse sequence (TR2500 ms/TE40 ms). The width of the pars compacta signal in all subjects was measured by the method of Duguid et al (1986). Intensity profiles were made on a straight line perpendicular to the pars compacta through the center of the red nucleus on an image of the midbrain. We measured the width of the valley at half-height between the peaks of an index of the width of the pars compacta signal. The mean widths of the pars compacta signal were: 2.8[+-]0.4 mm (SND), 2.8[+-]0.7 mm (SDS), 3.6[+-]0.6 mm (OPCA), 2.7[+-]0.3 mm (PD), and 4.3[+-]0.6 mm (control). The mean widths of the pars compacta signal in PD, SND, and SDS were significantly narrower than that in the control group (p<0.05), while the OPCA group was not significantly narrower. The results may indicate that the time course of nigral involvement is milder in OPCA than in SND and SDS. The extrapyramidal signs in OPCA may be attributed mainly to the degeneration of the putamen rather than to that of the substantia nigra. Abnormal hypointensity in the posterolateral putamen was found in only one SND patient and in two OPCA patients, even though this finding has been frequently observed in MSA. Since no PD patients exhibited this finding, it may of some value in differentiating MSA from PD. (author).

  18. Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sagara, Atsunobu; Arakawa, Kazuhiko; Sugiyama, Ryoto; Hirosaki, Akiko; Takase, Kazuhide; Jo, Ara; Sato, Ken; Chiba, Yoshihiko; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Matoba, Motohiro; Narita, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is the most common side effect of chemotherapy. However, the mechanisms of “muscle fatigue” induced by anti-cancer drugs are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the muscle-atrophic effect of cisplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, in mice. C57BL/6J mice were treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 4 consecutive days. On Day 5, hindlimb and quadriceps muscles were isolated from mice. The loss of body weight and food intake under the administration of cisplatin was the same as those in a dietary restriction (DR) group. Under the present conditions, the administration of cisplatin significantly decreased not only the muscle mass of the hindlimb and quadriceps but also the myofiber diameter, compared to those in the DR group. The mRNA expression levels of muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) were significantly and further increased by cisplatin treated group, compared to DR. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of myostatin and p21 were significantly upregulated by the administration of cisplatin, compared to DR. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a, which leads to the blockade of the upregulation of MuRF1 and MAFbx, was significantly and dramatically decreased by cisplatin. These findings suggest that the administration of cisplatin increases atrophic gene expression, and may lead to an imbalance between protein synthesis and protein degradation pathways, which would lead to muscle atrophy. This phenomenon could, at least in part, explain the mechanism of cisplatin-induced muscle fatigue. - Highlights: • Cisplatin decreased mass and myofiber diameter in quadriceps muscle. • The mRNA of MAFbx, MuRF1 and FOXO3 were increased by the cisplatin. • The mRNA of myostatin and p21 were upregulated by cisplatin. • The phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a was decreased by cisplatin

  19. Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Hiroyasu, E-mail: sakai@hoshi.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Division of Pharmacy Professional Development and Research, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Sagara, Atsunobu; Arakawa, Kazuhiko; Sugiyama, Ryoto; Hirosaki, Akiko; Takase, Kazuhide; Jo, Ara [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Sato, Ken [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Division of Pharmacy Professional Development and Research, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Chiba, Yoshihiko [Department of Biology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Yamazaki, Mitsuaki [Department of Anesthesiology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama-shi, Toyama 9300194 (Japan); Matoba, Motohiro [Department of Palliative Medicine and Psychooncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 1040045 (Japan); Narita, Minoru, E-mail: narita@hoshi.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Fatigue is the most common side effect of chemotherapy. However, the mechanisms of “muscle fatigue” induced by anti-cancer drugs are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the muscle-atrophic effect of cisplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, in mice. C57BL/6J mice were treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 4 consecutive days. On Day 5, hindlimb and quadriceps muscles were isolated from mice. The loss of body weight and food intake under the administration of cisplatin was the same as those in a dietary restriction (DR) group. Under the present conditions, the administration of cisplatin significantly decreased not only the muscle mass of the hindlimb and quadriceps but also the myofiber diameter, compared to those in the DR group. The mRNA expression levels of muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) were significantly and further increased by cisplatin treated group, compared to DR. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of myostatin and p21 were significantly upregulated by the administration of cisplatin, compared to DR. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a, which leads to the blockade of the upregulation of MuRF1 and MAFbx, was significantly and dramatically decreased by cisplatin. These findings suggest that the administration of cisplatin increases atrophic gene expression, and may lead to an imbalance between protein synthesis and protein degradation pathways, which would lead to muscle atrophy. This phenomenon could, at least in part, explain the mechanism of cisplatin-induced muscle fatigue. - Highlights: • Cisplatin decreased mass and myofiber diameter in quadriceps muscle. • The mRNA of MAFbx, MuRF1 and FOXO3 were increased by the cisplatin. • The mRNA of myostatin and p21 were upregulated by cisplatin. • The phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a was decreased by cisplatin.

  20. Treating dyspareunia caused by vaginal atrophy: a review of treatment options using vaginal estrogen therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SA Kingsberg

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available SA Kingsberg¹, S Kellogg², M Krychman³1University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University Cleveland OH, USA; 2The Pelvic and Sexual Health Institute of Philadelphia, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, USA; 3Southern California Center for Sexual Health and Survivorship Medicine, Newport Beach, CA, USAAbstract: Vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA and dryness are common symptoms of the decline in endogenous production of estrogen at menopause and often result in dyspareunia. Yet while 10% to 40% of women experience discomfort due to VVA, it is estimated that only 25% seek medical help. The main goals of treatment for vaginal atrophy are to improve symptoms and to restore vaginal and vulvar anatomic changes. Treatment choices for postmenopausal dyspareunia resulting from vulvovaginal atrophy will depend on the underlying etiology and might include individualized treatment. A number of forms of vaginal estrogen and manner of delivery are currently available to treat moderate to severe dyspareunia caused by VVA. They all have been shown to be effective and are often the preferred treatment due to the targeted efficacy for urogenital tissues while resulting in only minimal systemic absorption. Both healthcare professionals and patients often find it difficult to broach the subject of sexual problems associated with VVA. However, with minimal effort to initiate a conversation about these problems, healthcare providers can provide useful information to their postmenopausal patients in order to help them each choose the optimal treatment for their needs and symptoms.Keywords: dyspareunia, postmenopausal vulvovaginal atrophy, vaginal estrogen therapy

  1. Facilitating text reading in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Keir X X; Rajdev, Kishan; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Leff, Alexander P; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-07-28

    We report (1) the quantitative investigation of text reading in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), and (2) the effects of 2 novel software-based reading aids that result in dramatic improvements in the reading ability of patients with PCA. Reading performance, eye movements, and fixations were assessed in patients with PCA and typical Alzheimer disease and in healthy controls (experiment 1). Two reading aids (single- and double-word) were evaluated based on the notion that reducing the spatial and oculomotor demands of text reading might support reading in PCA (experiment 2). Mean reading accuracy in patients with PCA was significantly worse (57%) compared with both patients with typical Alzheimer disease (98%) and healthy controls (99%); spatial aspects of passages were the primary determinants of text reading ability in PCA. Both aids led to considerable gains in reading accuracy (PCA mean reading accuracy: single-word reading aid = 96%; individual patient improvement range: 6%-270%) and self-rated measures of reading. Data suggest a greater efficiency of fixations and eye movements under the single-word reading aid in patients with PCA. These findings demonstrate how neurologic characterization of a neurodegenerative syndrome (PCA) and detailed cognitive analysis of an important everyday skill (reading) can combine to yield aids capable of supporting important everyday functional abilities. This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PCA, 2 software-based reading aids (single-word and double-word) improve reading accuracy. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Forced oscillation technique in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauld, Leanne M; Keeling, Lucy A; Shackleton, Claire E; Sly, Peter D

    2014-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) causes respiratory compromise that is difficult to assess in young children. The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is commercially available for children as young as 2 years of age and is nonvolitional. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of FOT in young children with SMA. Children with SMA aged resistance at 8 Hz (Rrs8) (mean z score, +0.66; SD, 1.34; P = .12) were abnormal. Four children performed spirometry. Linear relationships to Xrs8 exist: FVC (R2, 0.54), unassisted PCF (R2, 0.33), assisted PCF (R2, 0.43), and AHI (R2, 0.32). Over 12 months, Xrs8z score worsened (rate of change of +1.08, P change +0.51, P .05) was found between clinical characteristics and FOT values. FOT is feasible in young children with SMA, with abnormal values of reactance and resistance on grouped data, worsening over 12 months. Xrs8 is related to respiratory tests used to monitor progress in SMA (FVC, PCF, AHI). Further research on the value of FOT in managing individuals is warranted.

  3. Facilitating text reading in posterior cortical atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajdev, Kishan; Shakespeare, Timothy J.; Leff, Alexander P.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We report (1) the quantitative investigation of text reading in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), and (2) the effects of 2 novel software-based reading aids that result in dramatic improvements in the reading ability of patients with PCA. Methods: Reading performance, eye movements, and fixations were assessed in patients with PCA and typical Alzheimer disease and in healthy controls (experiment 1). Two reading aids (single- and double-word) were evaluated based on the notion that reducing the spatial and oculomotor demands of text reading might support reading in PCA (experiment 2). Results: Mean reading accuracy in patients with PCA was significantly worse (57%) compared with both patients with typical Alzheimer disease (98%) and healthy controls (99%); spatial aspects of passages were the primary determinants of text reading ability in PCA. Both aids led to considerable gains in reading accuracy (PCA mean reading accuracy: single-word reading aid = 96%; individual patient improvement range: 6%–270%) and self-rated measures of reading. Data suggest a greater efficiency of fixations and eye movements under the single-word reading aid in patients with PCA. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate how neurologic characterization of a neurodegenerative syndrome (PCA) and detailed cognitive analysis of an important everyday skill (reading) can combine to yield aids capable of supporting important everyday functional abilities. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PCA, 2 software-based reading aids (single-word and double-word) improve reading accuracy. PMID:26138948

  4. Depression and anxiety in multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L-Y; Cao, B; Zou, Y-T; Wei, Q-Q; Ou, R-W; Zhao, B; Wu, Y; Shang, H-F

    2018-01-01

    It has been noticed that the patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) can accompany with depression and anxiety. This study aimed to establish the incidence and determinants of depression and anxiety symptoms in Chinese MSA patients. A total of 237 MSA patients were enrolled in the study. Neuropsychological assessment was performed using Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-24 items and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale. We found that 62.0% and 71.7% patients had at least mild depression and anxiety symptoms, respectively. The severity of depression of MSA patients was associated with lower educational years (P=.024), longer disease duration (Panxiety was associated with increased disease duration (Panxiety were female gender, longer disease duration, and disease severity. Depression and anxiety symptoms are common in patients with MSA. Neurologists should pay attention to depression and anxiety in patients with MSA, especially in female patients and those with longer disease duration and severe disease condition. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Biochemical adaptations of antigravity muscle fibers to disuse atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Studies are presented in four parts of this report. The four parts include; (1) studies to gain information on the molecular basis of atrophy by antigravity muscle; (2) studies on the work capacity of antigravity muscles during atrophy and during recovery from atrophy; (3) studies on recovery of degenerated antigravity fibers after removal of hind-limb casts; and (4) studies on the atrophy and recovery of bone. The philosophy of these studies was to identify the time sequence of events in the soleus muscle of the rat following immobilization of the hind limbs, so that the length of the soleus muscle within the fixed limb is less than its resting length. In two separate studies, no decline in the weight of the soleus muscle could be detected during the first 72 hours of limb immobilization.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... newborn period. Gyrate atrophy usually does not affect intelligence; however, abnormalities may be observed in brain imaging ... generated when protein is broken down by the body. In addition to its role in the urea ...

  7. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powers, Scott K.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Murphy, Kate T.; Reid, Michael B.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Numerous health problems including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal

  8. A survey of the therapeutic effects of Vitamin E suppositories on vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aazam Parnan Emamverdikhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Menopause is associated with various complications such as depression, sleep disorders, and genitourinary atrophy. Vaginal atrophy occurs due to the loss of steroid hormones, and its major symptoms include vaginal dryness, itching, dyspareunia, and bleeding after intercourse. According to the literature, vitamin E plays a key role in estrogen stability. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of vitamin E suppositories and conjugated estrogen vaginal cream on vaginal atrophy. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 52 postmenopausal women, who were referred to a gynecology clinic in 2013, were recruited and randomly divided into two groups (26 cases per group. One group received 100 IU of vitamin E suppositories (n = 26, whereas the other group applied 0.5 g of conjugated estrogen cream for 12 weeks. Vaginal maturation value (VMV was compared between the two groups before and after the intervention. VMV ≤ 55 was regarded as a cut-off point for vaginal atrophy. Treatment success was defined as a 10-unit increase in VMV, compared to the baseline value. Data were analyzed by Friedman test and Mann-Whitney test. P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The mean VMV in the vitamin E group before the treatment and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment was 43.78 ± 13.75, 69.07 ± 22.75, 77.86 ± 21.79, and 80.59 ± 19.23, respectively. The corresponding values in the estrogen cream group were 42.86 ± 14.40, 86.98 ± 12.58, 92.65 ± 15, and 91.57 ± 14.10, respectively. VMV significantly improved in both the treatment groups after the intervention, compared to the preintervention period (P < 0.001. Treatment success was reported in both groups, although estrogen cream (100% appeared to be more effective after 4 weeks of treatment, compared to vitamin E suppositories (76.9% (P = 0.01. Conclusions: Based on the findings, use of vitamin E suppositories could improve the laboratory criteria

  9. Progression and prognosis in multiple system atrophy: an analysis of 230 Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hirohisa; Saito, Yufuko; Terao, Shinichi; Ando, Tetsuo; Kachi, Teruhiko; Mukai, Eiichiro; Aiba, Ikuko; Abe, Yuji; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Doyu, Manabu; Hirayama, Masaaki; Sobue, Gen

    2002-05-01

    We investigated the disease progression and survival in 230 Japanese patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA; 131 men, 99 women; 208 probable MSA, 22 definite; mean age at onset, 55.4 years). Cerebellar dysfunction (multiple system atrophy-cerebellar; MSA-C) predominated in 155 patients, and parkinsonism (multiple system atrophy-parkinsonian; MSA-P) in 75. The median time from initial symptom to combined motor and autonomic dysfunction was 2 years (range 1-10). Median intervals from onset to aid-requiring walking, confinement to a wheelchair, a bedridden state and death were 3, 5, 8 and 9 years, respectively. Patients manifesting combined motor and autonomic involvement within 3 years of onset had a significantly increased risk of not only developing advanced disease stage but also shorter survival (P bedridden state, P bedridden state (P = 0.03) and death (P bedridden state and survival were no worse. Gender was not associated with differences in worsening of function or survival. On MRI, a hyperintense rim at the lateral edge of the dorsolateral putamen was seen in 34.5% of cases, and a 'hot cross bun' sign in the pontine basis (PB) in 63.3%. These putaminal and pontine abnormalities became more prominent as MSA-P and MSA-C features advanced. The atrophy of the cerebellar vermis and PB showed a significant correlation particularly with the interval following the appearance of cerebellar symptoms in MSA-C (r = 0.71, P r = 0.76 and P < 0.01, respectively), but the relationship between atrophy and functional status was highly variable among the individuals, suggesting that other factors influenced the functional deterioration. Atrophy of the corpus callosum was seen in a subpopulation of MSA, suggesting hemispheric involvement in a subgroup of MSA patients. The present study suggested that many factors are involved in the progression of MSA but, most importantly, the interval from initial symptom to combined motor and autonomic dysfunction can predict functional

  10. Abnormalities of fixation, saccade and pursuit in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Timothy J; Kaski, Diego; Yong, Keir X X; Paterson, Ross W; Slattery, Catherine F; Ryan, Natalie S; Schott, Jonathan M; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-07-01

    The clinico-neuroradiological syndrome posterior cortical atrophy is the cardinal 'visual dementia' and most common atypical Alzheimer's disease phenotype, offering insights into mechanisms underlying clinical heterogeneity, pathological propagation and basic visual phenomena (e.g. visual crowding). Given the extensive attention paid to patients' (higher order) perceptual function, it is surprising that there have been no systematic analyses of basic oculomotor function in this population. Here 20 patients with posterior cortical atrophy, 17 patients with typical Alzheimer's disease and 22 healthy controls completed tests of fixation, saccade (including fixation/target gap and overlap conditions) and smooth pursuit eye movements using an infrared pupil-tracking system. Participants underwent detailed neuropsychological and neurological examinations, with a proportion also undertaking brain imaging and analysis of molecular pathology. In contrast to informal clinical evaluations of oculomotor dysfunction frequency (previous studies: 38%, current clinical examination: 33%), detailed eyetracking investigations revealed eye movement abnormalities in 80% of patients with posterior cortical atrophy (compared to 17% typical Alzheimer's disease, 5% controls). The greatest differences between posterior cortical atrophy and typical Alzheimer's disease were seen in saccadic performance. Patients with posterior cortical atrophy made significantly shorter saccades especially for distant targets. They also exhibited a significant exacerbation of the normal gap/overlap effect, consistent with 'sticky fixation'. Time to reach saccadic targets was significantly associated with parietal and occipital cortical thickness measures. On fixation stability tasks, patients with typical Alzheimer's disease showed more square wave jerks whose frequency was associated with lower cerebellar grey matter volume, while patients with posterior cortical atrophy showed large saccadic intrusions

  11. Orphan disease: Cherubism, optic atrophy, and short stature

    OpenAIRE

    Balaji Jeevanandham; Rajoo Ramachandran; Vignesh Dhanapal; Ilanchezhian Subramanian; Venkata Sai

    2018-01-01

    A 12-year-old female presented with complaints of progressive visual impairment in both her eyes. On clinical examination, she was short for her age and her ophthalmoscopic examination revealed bilateral optic atrophy. Computed tomography of the patient revealed multiple expansile lytic lesions of mandible suggesting cherubism. The optic atrophy was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging, which additionally revealed bilateral retrocerebellar arachnoid cysts. This association of cherubism wit...

  12. MRI of the spinocerebellar degeneration (multiple system atrophy, Holmes type, and Menzel-Joseph type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Eiichiro; Makino, Naoki.

    1991-01-01

    We have analyzed MRI in 33 patients with several forms of spinocerebellar degeneration; 17 with multiple system atrophy, 10 with Holmes type, and 6 with Menzel-Joseph type. The MRIs were obtained using a 1.5-T GEMR System. Patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated: atrophy of the brain stem, particularly basis pontis; decreased signal intensity of the white matter of pons; atrophy of the white matter of cerebellum; atrophy and decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions; and atrophy of the cerebrum. Patients with Holmes type showed: atrophy of the cerebellum; atrophy of the vermis more than hemispheres; and nuclei of the cerebellum with no decreased intensity on T 2 -weighted sequences. Patients with Menzel-Joseph type demonstrated moderate atrophy of the brain stem and mild atrophy of the white matter of cerebellum. MRI is a useful diagnostic tool in the management of the spinocerebellar degeneration. (author)

  13. Therapeutic advances in multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poewe, Werner; Mahlknecht, Philipp; Krismer, Florian

    2015-09-15

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) are relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative diseases leading to severe disability and ultimately death within less than 10 y. Despite increasing efforts in basic and clinical research, effective therapies for these atypical parkinsonian disorders are lacking. Although earlier small clinical studies in MSA and PSP mainly focused on symptomatic treatment, advances in the understanding of the molecular underpinnings of these diseases and in the search for biomarkers have paved the way for the first large and well-designed clinical trials aiming at disease modification. Targets of intervention in these trials have included α-synuclein inclusion pathology in the case of MSA and tau-related mechanisms in PSP. Since 2013, four large randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind disease-modification trials have been completed and published, using rasagiline (MSA), rifampicin (MSA), tideglusib (PSP), or davunetide (PSP). All of these failed to demonstrate signal efficacy with regard to the primary outcome measures. In addition, two randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials have studied the efficacy of droxidopa in the symptomatic treatment of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, including patients with MSA, with positive results in one trial. This review summarizes the design and the outcomes of these and other smaller trials published since 2013 and attempts to highlight priority areas of future therapeutic research in MSA and PSP. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  14. Preoperative assessment of trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm using constructive interference in steady state-three-dimensional fourier transformation magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamakami, Iwao; Kobayashi, Eiichi; Hirai, Shinji; Yamaura, Akira [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-11-01

    Results of microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and hemifacial spasm (HFS) may be improved by accurate preoperative assessment of neurovascular relationships at the root entry/exit zone (REZ). Constructive interference in steady state (CISS)-three-dimensional Fourier transformation (3DFT) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was evaluated for visualizing the neurovascular relationships at the REZ. Fourteen patients with TN and eight patients with HFS underwent MR imaging using CISS-3DFT and 3D fast inflow with steady-state precession (FISP) sequences. Axial images of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) obtained by the two sequences were reviewed to assess the neurovascular relationships at the REZ of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Eleven patients subsequently underwent MVD. Preoperative MR imaging findings were related to surgical observations and results. CISS MR imaging provided excellent contrast between the cranial nerves, small vessels, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the CPA. CISS was significantly better than FISP for delineating anatomic detail in the CPA (trigeminal and facial nerves, petrosal vein) and abnormal neurovascular relationships responsible for TN and HFS (vascular contact and deformity at the REZ). Preoperative CISS MR imaging demonstrated precisely the neurovascular relationships at the REZ and identified the offending artery in all seven patients with TN undergoing MVD. CISS MR imaging has high resolution and excellent contrast between cranial nerves, small vessels, and CSF, so can precisely and accurately delineate normal and abnormal neurovascular relationships at the REZ in the CPA, and is a valuable preoperative examination for MVD. (author)

  15. Preoperative assessment of trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm using constructive interference in steady state-three-dimensional fourier transformation magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakami, Iwao; Kobayashi, Eiichi; Hirai, Shinji; Yamaura, Akira

    2000-01-01

    Results of microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and hemifacial spasm (HFS) may be improved by accurate preoperative assessment of neurovascular relationships at the root entry/exit zone (REZ). Constructive interference in steady state (CISS)-three-dimensional Fourier transformation (3DFT) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was evaluated for visualizing the neurovascular relationships at the REZ. Fourteen patients with TN and eight patients with HFS underwent MR imaging using CISS-3DFT and 3D fast inflow with steady-state precession (FISP) sequences. Axial images of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) obtained by the two sequences were reviewed to assess the neurovascular relationships at the REZ of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Eleven patients subsequently underwent MVD. Preoperative MR imaging findings were related to surgical observations and results. CISS MR imaging provided excellent contrast between the cranial nerves, small vessels, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the CPA. CISS was significantly better than FISP for delineating anatomic detail in the CPA (trigeminal and facial nerves, petrosal vein) and abnormal neurovascular relationships responsible for TN and HFS (vascular contact and deformity at the REZ). Preoperative CISS MR imaging demonstrated precisely the neurovascular relationships at the REZ and identified the offending artery in all seven patients with TN undergoing MVD. CISS MR imaging has high resolution and excellent contrast between cranial nerves, small vessels, and CSF, so can precisely and accurately delineate normal and abnormal neurovascular relationships at the REZ in the CPA, and is a valuable preoperative examination for MVD. (author)

  16. Braille alexia during visual hallucination in a blind man with selective calcarine atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kengo; Yasuda, Hitoshi; Haneda, Masakazu; Kashiwagi, Atsunori

    2003-04-01

    The case of a 56-year-old man who has been blind for 25 years due to retinal degeneration is herein described. The patient complained of elementary visual hallucination, during which it was difficult for him to read Braille. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed marked atrophy of the bilateral striate cortex. Visual hallucination as a release phenomenon of the primary visual cortex has never been reported to cause alexia for Braille. The present case supports the results of recent functional imaging studies of the recruitment of striate and prestriate cortex for Braille reading.

  17. Muscle atrophy reversed by growth factor activation of satellite cells in a mouse muscle atrophy model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hauerslev

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength.

  18. Correlation between Spectral Optical Coherence Tomography and Fundus Autofluorescence at the margins of Geographic Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, Manpreet; Kozak, Igor; Cheng, Lingyun; Bartsch, Dirk-Uwe G.; Yuson, Ritchie; Nigam, Nitin; Oster, Stephen F.; Mojana, Francesca; Freeman, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We studied the appearance of margins of Geographic atrophy in high- resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) images and correlate those changes with fundus autofluorescence imaging. Design Retrospective observational case study. Methods Patients with geographic atrophy secondary to dry age related macular degeneration (ARMD) were assessed by means of Spectral Domain OCT (Spectralis HRA/OCT; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany or OTI, Inc, Toronto, Canada) as well as Autofluoresence Imaging (HRA or Spectralis Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany): The outer retinal layer alterations were analyzed in the junctional zone between normal retina and atrophic retina, and correlated with corresponding fundus autofluorescence. Results 23 eyes of 16 patients aged between 62 years to 96 years were examined. There was a significant association between OCT findings and the fundus autofluorescence findings(r=0.67, pautofluorescence; Smooth margins on OCT correspond significantly to normal fundus autofluorescence. (Kappa-0.7348, pautofluorescence; secondary to increased lipofuscin may together serve as determinants of progression of geographic atrophy. PMID:19541290

  19. Performance of OCT segmentation procedures to assess morphology and extension in geographic atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Christopher; Ahlers, Christian; Sacu, Stefan; Mylonas, Georgios; Sayegh, Ramzi; Golbaz, Isabelle; Matt, Gerlinde; Stock, Géraldine; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2011-05-01

    Investigating segmentation procedures and morphological findings in time domain (TD) and current spectral domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) devices in patients with geographic atrophy (GA). Fifty eyes of 46 patients with GA secondary to AMD and 15 control eyes were examined in this prospective noninterventional comparative case series. All patients underwent Stratus (model 3000), Cirrus (Carl Zeiss Meditec), Spectralis (Spectralis HRA+OCT; Heidelberg Engineering) and 3D-OCT-1000 (Topcon). Automated segmentation analyses were compared. An overlay of scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) and three-dimensional retinal thickness (RT) maps were used to investigate whether areas of retinal thinning correspond to areas of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy. Geographic atrophy areas identified in SLO scans were significantly larger than areas of retinal thinning in RT maps. No convincing topographic correlation could be found between areas of retinal thinning and actual GA size as identified in SLO and fundus photography. Spectralis OCT showed significantly more mild and severe segmentation errors than 3D and Cirrus OCT. This study showed substantial limitations in identifying zones of GA reliably when using automatic segmentation procedures in current SD-OCT devices. This limitation should be addressed to visualize and document RPE loss realistically in a frequent disease like GA. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Acta Ophthalmol.

  20. Atrophy and structural covariance of the cholinergic basal forebrain in primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teipel, Stefan; Raiser, Theresa; Riedl, Lina; Riederer, Isabelle; Schroeter, Matthias L; Bisenius, Sandrine; Schneider, Anja; Kornhuber, Johannes; Fliessbach, Klaus; Spottke, Annika; Grothe, Michel J; Prudlo, Johannes; Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Straub, Sarah; Otto, Markus; Danek, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by profound destruction of cortical language areas. Anatomical studies suggest an involvement of cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) in PPA syndromes, particularly in the area of the nucleus subputaminalis (NSP). Here we aimed to determine the pattern of atrophy and structural covariance as a proxy of structural connectivity of BF nuclei in PPA variants. We studied 62 prospectively recruited cases with the clinical diagnosis of PPA and 31 healthy older control participants from the cohort study of the German consortium for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). We determined cortical and BF atrophy based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Patterns of structural covariance of BF with cortical regions were determined using voxel-based partial least square analysis. We found significant atrophy of total BF and BF subregions in PPA patients compared with controls [F(1, 82) = 20.2, p covariance analysis in healthy controls revealed associations of the BF nuclei, particularly the NSP, with left hemispheric predominant prefrontal, lateral temporal, and parietal cortical areas, including Broca's speech area (p covariance of the BF nuclei mostly with right but not with left hemispheric cortical areas (p covariance of the BF with left hemispheric cortical areas in healthy aging towards right hemispheric cortical areas in PPA, possibly reflecting a consequence of the profound and early destruction of cortical language areas in PPA. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. "THE RELATION OF HYPERHOMOCYSTEINEMIA TO COGNITIVE FUNCTION AND BRAIN ATROPHY IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghaffarpour

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment may be a common even at the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS. In this case-control study, we tried to find out the probable relationship between homocysteine levels and cerebral atrophy or cognitive impairment in patients with multiple sclerosis. One hundred fifty six patients who had MS according to McDonald diagnostic criteria were included in this study. Patients’ age, gender, and educational level, MS duration and clinical type, disability, cognitive function state based on minimental state examination (MMSE, presence of hyperhomocysteinemia, and brain atrophy were evaluated. There was no statistically significant relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia and cognitive status. Total homocysteine levels had a significant correlation with MMSE score only in those patients with elementary level of education. Also total homocysteine levels and overall cerebral atrophy did not indicate significant relationship according to those independent variables mentioned above except in the patients with EDSS less than 6. When intercaudate ratio > 0.10 was applied as a criterion for cerebral atrophy, we found that hyperhomocysteinemia related significantly to intercaudate ratio > 0.10 in females, aged between 21 and 30 years, MS duration ≤ 5 years, primary progressive MS and relapsing-remitting MS clinical types, EDSS ≤ 3 and elementary level of education. We suggest applying MMSE only for the first step of cognitive function survey. In the next steps, much more exact test must be used (e.g. MSNQ. Also we can not suggest measuring plasma homocysteine level as criterion for monitoring the cognitive function in patients with MS.

  2. Consensus classification of posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Murray, Melissa; Snowden, Julie S; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Dickerson, Bradford C; Vandenberghe, Rik; Ahmed, Samrah; Bak, Thomas H; Boeve, Bradley F; Butler, Christopher; Cappa, Stefano F; Ceccaldi, Mathieu; de Souza, Leonardo Cruz; Dubois, Bruno; Felician, Olivier; Galasko, Douglas; Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Hof, Patrick R; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Lehmann, Manja; Magnin, Eloi; Mendez, Mario F; Nestor, Peter J; Onyike, Chiadi U; Pelak, Victoria S; Pijnenburg, Yolande; Primativo, Silvia; Rossor, Martin N; Ryan, Natalie S; Scheltens, Philip; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Suárez González, Aida; Tang-Wai, David F; Yong, Keir X X; Carrillo, Maria; Fox, Nick C

    2017-08-01

    A classification framework for posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is proposed to improve the uniformity of definition of the syndrome in a variety of research settings. Consensus statements about PCA were developed through a detailed literature review, the formation of an international multidisciplinary working party which convened on four occasions, and a Web-based quantitative survey regarding symptom frequency and the conceptualization of PCA. A three-level classification framework for PCA is described comprising both syndrome- and disease-level descriptions. Classification level 1 (PCA) defines the core clinical, cognitive, and neuroimaging features and exclusion criteria of the clinico-radiological syndrome. Classification level 2 (PCA-pure, PCA-plus) establishes whether, in addition to the core PCA syndrome, the core features of any other neurodegenerative syndromes are present. Classification level 3 (PCA attributable to AD [PCA-AD], Lewy body disease [PCA-LBD], corticobasal degeneration [PCA-CBD], prion disease [PCA-prion]) provides a more formal determination of the underlying cause of the PCA syndrome, based on available pathophysiological biomarker evidence. The issue of additional syndrome-level descriptors is discussed in relation to the challenges of defining stages of syndrome severity and characterizing phenotypic heterogeneity within the PCA spectrum. There was strong agreement regarding the definition of the core clinico-radiological syndrome, meaning that the current consensus statement should be regarded as a refinement, development, and extension of previous single-center PCA criteria rather than any wholesale alteration or redescription of the syndrome. The framework and terminology may facilitate the interpretation of research data across studies, be applicable across a broad range of research scenarios (e.g., behavioral interventions, pharmacological trials), and provide a foundation for future collaborative work. Copyright © 2017 The Authors

  3. Wolfram Syndrome. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarała, Wojciech; Drachal, Elzbieta; Mazur, Artur; Korczowski, Bartosz; Szadkowska, Agnieszka; Zmysłowska, Agnieszka; Młynarski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative and genetic disorder, characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, caused by non-autoimmune loss of β cells, as well as optic atrophy; the disease is also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). Patients that demonstrate diabetes mellitus are also affected by: optic atrophy in the first decade of their life, diabetes insipidus and sensorineural deafness in the second decade, and urinary tract and neurological abnormalities in the third decade of their life. Patients with Wolfram syndrome usually die due to central respiratory failures caused by brain stem atrophy in their third or at the beginning of their fourth decade of life. The authors present a case of two female siblings with diagnosed Wolfram syndrome that have been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and urological abnormalities. Early diagnosis and adequate hormonal supplementation can improve their quality of life. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  4. LONG-TERM EVOLUTION OF DOME-SHAPED MACULA: Increased Macular Bulge is Associated With Extended Macular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudier, Guillaume; Gaudric, Alain; Gualino, Vincent; Massin, Pascale; Nardin, Mathieu; Tadayoni, Ramin; Speeg-Schatz, Claude; Gaucher, David

    2016-05-01

    Dome-shaped macula (DSM) may cause impaired vision. This study analyzed the long-term evolution of DSM, most particularly macular changes: serous retinal detachment, retinal pigment epithelium atrophy, and DSM bulge increase. Twenty-nine eyes presenting with DSM were retrospectively studied. Clinical data, color photographs, fluorescein angiographs, and optical coherence tomography examinations were reviewed. Patients were followed up from 6 months to 111 months (mean, 37.89 months). The height of the macular bulge, the size of retinal pigment epithelium macular atrophy, and serous retinal detachment progression were studied. Other macular changes were noted. Mean vision remained stable. Dome-shaped macula height increased significantly from 338.9 μm to 364.3 μm (P = 0.007). Serous retinal detachment was present initially in 15 of 29 eyes; it increased in 4 cases and resolved spontaneously in 7. Macular retinal pigment epithelium atrophy correlated with the bulge height (P = 0.015), and it enlarged during follow-up (1.12 vs. 1.34, P = 0.04). Other macular anomalies were present initially or appeared during follow-up: macular pucker, choroidal neovascularization (CNV), subretinal pigmentary clumps, and flat irregular pigmented epithelium detachment. A few treatments were proven in serous retinal detachment cases but were ineffective in restoring vision. In DSM, vision may be stable for years while macular changes progress: the macular bulge increases as does retinal pigment epithelium atrophy.

  5. Early and Degressive Putamen Atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Krämer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Putamen atrophy and its long-term progress during disease course were recently shown in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Here we investigated retrospectively the time point of atrophy onset in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS. 68 patients with RRMS and 26 healthy controls (HC were admitted to 3T MRI in a cross-sectional study. We quantitatively analyzed the putamen volume of individual patients in relation to disease duration by correcting for age and intracranial volume (ICV. Patient’s relative putamen volume (RPV, expressed in percent of ICV, was significantly reduced compared to HC. Based on the correlation between RPV and age, we computed the age-corrected RPV deviation (ΔRPV from HC. Patients showed significantly negative ΔRPV. Interestingly, the age-corrected ΔRPV depended logarithmically on disease duration: Directly after first symptom manifestation, patients already showed a reduced RPV followed by a further degressive volumetric decline. This means that atrophy progression was stronger in the first than in later years of disease. Putamen atrophy starts directly after initial symptom manifestation or even years before, and progresses in a degressive manner. Due to its important role in neurological functions, early detection of putamen atrophy seems necessary. High-resolution structural MRI allows monitoring of disease course.

  6. Predictive modeling of neuroanatomic structures for brain atrophy detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xintao; Guo, Lei; Nie, Jingxin; Li, Kaiming; Liu, Tianming

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we present an approach of predictive modeling of neuroanatomic structures for the detection of brain atrophy based on cross-sectional MRI image. The underlying premise of applying predictive modeling for atrophy detection is that brain atrophy is defined as significant deviation of part of the anatomy from what the remaining normal anatomy predicts for that part. The steps of predictive modeling are as follows. The central cortical surface under consideration is reconstructed from brain tissue map and Regions of Interests (ROI) on it are predicted from other reliable anatomies. The vertex pair-wise distance between the predicted vertex and the true one within the abnormal region is expected to be larger than that of the vertex in normal brain region. Change of white matter/gray matter ratio within a spherical region is used to identify the direction of vertex displacement. In this way, the severity of brain atrophy can be defined quantitatively by the displacements of those vertices. The proposed predictive modeling method has been evaluated by using both simulated atrophies and MRI images of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Application effect of hyperbaric oxygen in the patients with optic atrophy and influence for the hemodynamic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the application effect of hyperbaric oxygen in the patients with optic atrophy and influence degree for the hemodynamic parameters.METHODS: Fifty patients with optic atrophy in our hospital from January 2012 to January 2014 were objected, they were randomly divided into control group(conventional optic atrophy treatment groupand observation group(conventional treatment and hyperbaric oxygen treatment group, each group was 25 cases. Statistical analysis of two group before and after treatment eyesight, vision acuity, visual field defect and ophthalmic artery, central retinal artery blood flow parameters were undergone.RESULTS: The sight, visual field sensitivity and field vision defect of observation group were all better than those of control group at first, second and third course after the treatment, arteriae ophthalmica and arteriae centralis retinae EDV and PSV were all higher than those of control group, PI and RI were all lower than those of control group were all significant differences(PCONCLUSION: The application effect of hyperbaric oxygen in the patients with optic atrophy is better, and the influence of treatment method for the ocular hemodynamic parameters are more active.

  8. Brain atrophy in Huntington's disease: A CT-scan study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starkstein, S.E.; Folstein, S.E.; Brandt, J.; McDonnell, A.; Folstein, M.

    1989-01-01

    CT-scan measurements of cortical and subcortical atrophy were carried out in 34 patients with Huntington's disease (HD). While a significant correlation was observed between parameters of subcortical atrophy (bicaudate ratio, bifrontal ratio and third ventricular ratio) and duration of the disease, there was no significant correlation between these parameters and age. On the other hand, measurements of cortical atrophy (frontal fissure ratio and cortical sulci ratio) correlated significantly with age but not with duration of the disease. When a group of 24 HD patients were compared on CT-scan measurements with a group of 24 age-matched normal controls, significant differences were obtained for all the variables examined, but the bicaudate ratio showed the highest sensitivity and specificity. Even mildly affected patients, with duration of motor symptoms less than 3 years had higher bicaudate ratios than age-matched controls. (orig.)

  9. Can endurance exercise preconditioning prevention disuse muscle atrophy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Wiggs

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that exercise training can provide a level of protection against disuse muscle atrophy. Endurance exercise training imposes oxidative, metabolic, and heat stress on skeletal muscle which activates a variety of cellular signaling pathways that ultimately leads to the increased expression of proteins that have been demonstrated to protect muscle from inactivity –induced atrophy. This review will highlight the effect of exercise-induced oxidative stress on endogenous enzymatic antioxidant capacity (i.e., superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase, the role of oxidative and metabolic stress on PGC1-α, and finally highlight the effect heat stress and HSP70 induction. Finally, this review will discuss the supporting scientific evidence that these proteins can attenuate muscle atrophy through exercise preconditioning.

  10. Recommendations for the management of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturdee, D W; Panay, N; Ulrich, Lian

    2010-01-01

    for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) over recent years that has suggested an increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease and stroke. But, regardless of whether these scares are justified, local treatment of vaginal atrophy is not associated with these possible risks of systemic HRT. Other reasons...... dryness can be helped by simple lubricants but the best and most logical treatment for urogenital atrophy is to use local estrogen. This is safe, effective and with few contraindications. It is hoped that these guidelines and recommendations, produced to coincide with World Menopause Day 2010, will help...

  11. Atrophy of the corpus callosum correlates with white matter lesions in patients with cerebral ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meguro, K.; Yamadori, A.; Constans, J.M.; Courtheoux, P.; Theron, J.; Viader, F.

    2000-01-01

    Many studies of white matter high signal (WMHS) on T2-weighted MRI have disclosed that it is related to cerebral ischaemia and to brain atrophy. Atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) has also been studied in relation to ischaemia. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to ischaemia. We therefore assessed CC, WMHS and brain atrophy in patients with risk factors without strokes (the risk factor group) and in those with infarcts (the infarct group), to investigate the relationships between these factors. We studied 30 patients in the infarct group, 14 in the risk factor group, and 29 normal subjects. Using axial T1-weighted MRI, cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement (brain atrophy) were visually rated. Using axial T2-weighted MRI, WMHS was assessed in three categories: periventricular symmetrical, periventricular asymmetrical and subcortical. Using the mid-sagittal T1-weighted image, the CC was measured in its anterior, posterior, midanterior and midposterior portions. In the normal group, no correlations were noted between parameters. In the infarct group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy, and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After removing the effects of age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations were noted between some CC measures and subcortical WMHS. In the risk factor group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After allowance for age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations between some CC measures and periventricular WMHS remained. The hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to cerebral ischaemia was supported by other analyses. Namely, for correlations between the extent of infarcts and partial CC atrophy in patients with anterior middle cerebral artery (MCA) and with posterior MCA infarcts, there were significant correlations between the extent of infarct and midanterior CC atrophy in the former, and posterior

  12. Atrophy of the corpus callosum correlates with white matter lesions in patients with cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meguro, K.; Yamadori, A. [Section of Neuropsychology, Division of Disability Science, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, 980-8575 Sendai (Japan); Constans, J.M.; Courtheoux, P.; Theron, J. [MR Unit, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France); Viader, F. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France)

    2000-06-01

    Many studies of white matter high signal (WMHS) on T2-weighted MRI have disclosed that it is related to cerebral ischaemia and to brain atrophy. Atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) has also been studied in relation to ischaemia. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to ischaemia. We therefore assessed CC, WMHS and brain atrophy in patients with risk factors without strokes (the risk factor group) and in those with infarcts (the infarct group), to investigate the relationships between these factors. We studied 30 patients in the infarct group, 14 in the risk factor group, and 29 normal subjects. Using axial T1-weighted MRI, cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement (brain atrophy) were visually rated. Using axial T2-weighted MRI, WMHS was assessed in three categories: periventricular symmetrical, periventricular asymmetrical and subcortical. Using the mid-sagittal T1-weighted image, the CC was measured in its anterior, posterior, midanterior and midposterior portions. In the normal group, no correlations were noted between parameters. In the infarct group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy, and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After removing the effects of age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations were noted between some CC measures and subcortical WMHS. In the risk factor group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After allowance for age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations between some CC measures and periventricular WMHS remained. The hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to cerebral ischaemia was supported by other analyses. Namely, for correlations between the extent of infarcts and partial CC atrophy in patients with anterior middle cerebral artery (MCA) and with posterior MCA infarcts, there were significant correlations between the extent of infarct and midanterior CC atrophy in the former, and posterior

  13. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sluimer, Jasper D. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Alzheimer Centre, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Karas, Giorgos B.; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schijndel, Ronald van [VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Informatics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barnes, Josephine; Boyes, Richard G. [UCL, Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Cover, Keith S. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Olabarriaga, Silvia D. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fox, Nick C. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); UCL, Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Vrenken, Hugo [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-12-15

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 {+-} 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate atrophy rates in six regions: frontal, medial temporal, temporal (extramedial), parietal, occipital lobes and insular cortex. In MCI, the highest atrophy rate was observed in the medial temporal lobe, comparable with AD. AD patients showed even higher atrophy rates in the extramedial temporal lobe. Additionally, atrophy rates in frontal, parietal and occipital lobes were increased. Cox proportional hazard models showed that all regional atrophy rates predicted conversion to AD. Hazard ratios varied between 2.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-6.2) for occipital atrophy and 15.8 (95% CI = 3.5-71.8) for medial temporal lobe atrophy. In conclusion, atrophy spreads through the brain with development of AD. MCI is marked by temporal lobe atrophy. In AD, atrophy rate in the extramedial temporal lobe was even higher. Moreover, atrophy rates also accelerated in parietal, frontal, insular and occipital lobes. Finally, in nondemented elderly, medial temporal lobe atrophy was most predictive of progression to AD, demonstrating the involvement of this region in the development of AD. (orig.)

  14. Quantitative evaluation of tongue atrophy on midsagittal magnetic resonance images (MRIs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Akio; Oishi, Tomonari; Murai, Yoshiyuki; Tsukamoto, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Masato

    1992-01-01

    This study was undertaken mainly to establish the quantitative parameter to evaluate the tongue atrophy on midsagittal MRIs and to show the clinical usefulness of such quantitative evaluation. Midsagittal MRIs of the tongue of consecutive 103 patients were analyzed. They were classified into 67 patients showing normal size (group without atrophy), 11 patients showing atrophy (group with atrophy) and 25 patients showing unsatifactory MRIs with artifacts based on the routine evaluation. The patients in the group without atrophy did not show any pathologic processes to produce tongue atrophy on clinical findings. The area and perimeter of tongue and oral cavity, and the ratio of tongue area to oral cavity area and the ratio of tongue perimeter to oral cavity perimeter on midsagittal MRIs were obtained in each patient of groups with and without atrophy by using quantitative image analysis system. In the group without atrophy, regression analysis of the data on age was made and the 95% confidence interval of the data for age was obtained. No evidence that the tongue becomes atrophic with aging was obtained in the group without atrophy. Patients in the group with atrophy were best separated from those in the group without atrophy statistically when the ratio of tongue area to oral cavity area was regressed on age. Among 11 patients in the group with atrophy, 6 patients were not regarded as having tongue atrophy on clinical neurological examinations. Therefore, the evaluation of midsagittal MRIs is clinically useful. (author)

  15. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sluimer, Jasper D.; Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Scheltens, Philip; Karas, Giorgos B.; Barkhof, Frederik; Schijndel, Ronald van; Barnes, Josephine; Boyes, Richard G.; Cover, Keith S.; Olabarriaga, Silvia D.; Fox, Nick C.; Vrenken, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 ± 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate atrophy rates in six regions: frontal, medial temporal, temporal (extramedial), parietal, occipital lobes and insular cortex. In MCI, the highest atrophy rate was observed in the medial temporal lobe, comparable with AD. AD patients showed even higher atrophy rates in the extramedial temporal lobe. Additionally, atrophy rates in frontal, parietal and occipital lobes were increased. Cox proportional hazard models showed that all regional atrophy rates predicted conversion to AD. Hazard ratios varied between 2.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-6.2) for occipital atrophy and 15.8 (95% CI = 3.5-71.8) for medial temporal lobe atrophy. In conclusion, atrophy spreads through the brain with development of AD. MCI is marked by temporal lobe atrophy. In AD, atrophy rate in the extramedial temporal lobe was even higher. Moreover, atrophy rates also accelerated in parietal, frontal, insular and occipital lobes. Finally, in nondemented elderly, medial temporal lobe atrophy was most predictive of progression to AD, demonstrating the involvement of this region in the development of AD. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of both perfusion and atrophy in multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar type using brain SPECT alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Kuji, Ichiei; Seto, Akira; Ito, Kimiteru; Kikuta, Daisuke; Yamada, Minoru; Shimano, Yasumasa; Sato, Noriko

    2010-01-01

    Partial volume effects in atrophied areas should be taken into account when interpreting brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images of neurodegenerative diseases. To evaluate both perfusion and atrophy using brain SPECT alone, we developed a new technique applying tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to SPECT. After linear spatial normalization of brain perfusion SPECT using 99m Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer ( 99m Tc-ECD) to a Talairach space, high-dimension-warping was done using an original 99m Tc-ECD template. Contraction map images calculated from Jacobian determinants and spatially normalized SPECT images using this high-dimension-warping were compared using statistical parametric mapping (SPM2) between two groups of 16 multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar type (MSA-C) patients and 73 age-matched normal controls. This comparison was also performed in conventionally warped SPECT images. SPM2 demonstrated statistically significant contraction indicating local atrophy and decreased perfusion in the whole cerebellum and pons of MSA-C patients as compared to normal controls. Higher significance for decreased perfusion in these areas was obtained in high-dimension-warping than in conventional warping, possibly due to sufficient spatial normalization to a 99m Tc-ECD template in high-dimensional warping of severely atrophied cerebellum and pons. In the present high-dimension-warping, modification of tracer activity remained within 3% of the original tracer distribution. The present new technique applying TBM to brain SPECT provides information on both perfusion and atrophy at the same time thereby enhancing the role of brain perfusion SPECT

  17. Evaluation of both perfusion and atrophy in multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar type using brain SPECT alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuda Hiroshi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Partial volume effects in atrophied areas should be taken into account when interpreting brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT images of neurodegenerative diseases. To evaluate both perfusion and atrophy using brain SPECT alone, we developed a new technique applying tensor-based morphometry (TBM to SPECT. Methods After linear spatial normalization of brain perfusion SPECT using 99mTc-ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc-ECD to a Talairach space, high-dimension-warping was done using an original 99mTc-ECD template. Contraction map images calculated from Jacobian determinants and spatially normalized SPECT images using this high-dimension-warping were compared using statistical parametric mapping (SPM2 between two groups of 16 multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar type (MSA-C patients and 73 age-matched normal controls. This comparison was also performed in conventionally warped SPECT images. Results SPM2 demonstrated statistically significant contraction indicating local atrophy and decreased perfusion in the whole cerebellum and pons of MSA-C patients as compared to normal controls. Higher significance for decreased perfusion in these areas was obtained in high-dimension-warping than in conventional warping, possibly due to sufficient spatial normalization to a 99mTc-ECD template in high-dimensional warping of severely atrophied cerebellum and pons. In the present high-dimension-warping, modification of tracer activity remained within 3% of the original tracer distribution. Conclusions The present new technique applying TBM to brain SPECT provides information on both perfusion and atrophy at the same time thereby enhancing the role of brain perfusion SPECT

  18. Brain atrophy and lesion load predict long term disability in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popescu, Veronica; Agosta, Federica; Hulst, Hanneke E

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether brain atrophy and lesion volumes predict subsequent 10 year clinical evolution in multiple sclerosis (MS).......To determine whether brain atrophy and lesion volumes predict subsequent 10 year clinical evolution in multiple sclerosis (MS)....

  19. Global gray matter changes in posterior cortical atrophy: A serial imaging study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, M.; Barnes, J.; Ridgway, G.R.; Ryan, N.S.; Warrington, E.K.; Crutch, S.J.; Fox, N.C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative condition predominantly associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Cross-sectional imaging studies have shown different atrophy patterns in PCA patients compared with typical amnestic Alzheimer's disease (tAD) patients,

  20. CLINICAL AND RADIOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF PARRY-ROMBERG SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithula NAIR

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Parry-Romberg syndrome or progressive hemifacial atrophy is a craniofacial disorder characterized by slow and progressive atrophy, generally unilateral, of facial tissues including muscles, bones and skin. The coup de sabre is a clear line of demarcation seen between the normal and abnormal structures. The severity of the facial deformity is dependent on the age of onset of the disease. Cosmetic management is the only available treatment and has to be delayed until facial growth is completed. The present case report deals with a 43-year-old woman with progressive hemifacial atrophy which started from the age of 10 months. Despite almost complete involvement of the right paramedian area and the early age of onset, she had neither eye changes nor any dental malformations.

  1. X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease with long-term electrophysiological evaluation: case report Atrofia muscular bulbo-espinal ligada ao cromossomo X (doença de Kennedy com seguimento eletrofisiológico de longo prazo: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Aris Kouyoumdjian

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy or Kennedy's disease is an adult-onset motor neuronopathy caused by a CAG repeat expansion within the first exon of an androgen receptor gene. We report the case of a 66-year-old man, previously diagnosed with motor neuron disease (MND, who presented acute and reversible left vocal fold (dysphonia and pharyngeal paresis, followed by a slowly progressive weakness and also bouts of weakness, wasting and fasciculation on tongue, masseter, face, pharyngeal, and some proximal more than distal upper limb muscles, associated to bilateral hand tremor and mild gynecomastia. There were 5 electroneuromyography exams between 1989 and 2003 that revealed chronic reinnervation, some fasciculations (less than clinically observed and rare fibrillation potentials, and slowly progressive sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP abnormality, leading to absent/low amplitude potentials. PCR techniques of DNA analysis showed an abnormal number of CAG repeats, found to be 44 (normal 11-34. Our case revealed an acute and asymmetric clinical presentation related to bulbar motoneurons; low amplitude/absent SNAP with mild asymmetry; a sub-clinical or subtle involvement of proximal/distal muscles of both upper and lower limbs; and a probable evolution with bouts of acute dennervation, followed by an efficient reinnervation.Atrofia muscular bulbo-espinal ligada ao cromossomo X (doença de Kennedy é uma neuronopatia motora em adultos causada por expansões na repetição CAG no gene do receptor andrógeno. Neste relato, descreve-se o caso de homem de 66 anos, com diagnóstico prévio de doença do neurônio motor (DNM que apresentou quadro agudo e reversível de paresia de prega vocal (disfonia e de músculos faríngeos à esquerda; posteriormente seguiram-se surtos de fraqueza lentamente progressiva, atrofia e fasciculações em língua, masseter, face, faringe e membros superiores predominantemente proximal, associada a tremor

  2. Clinico-epidemiologic characteristics of spinal muscular atrophy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    Deletion;. Chromosome 5;. Mutations. Abstract Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by progressive hypotonia and muscular weakness because of progressive degeneration of alpha motor neuron from anterior horn cells in the spinal cord. It is inherited by an autosomal recessive pattern. The precise frequency of ...

  3. Carrier screening for spinal muscular atrophy in Italian population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SMA is necessary for effective clinical/prenatal diagnosis ... of SMA critical region in the group of 450 normal controls. ... izing and quality test are as described in Calì et al. .... nosis for spinal muscular atrophy: clinical laboratory analysis of.

  4. Axonal loss occurs early in dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milea, Dan; Sander, Birgit; Wegener, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study set out to investigate retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in relation to age in healthy subjects and patients with OPA1 autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional investigation of RNFL...

  5. Skeletal muscle training for spinal muscular atrophy type 3 (Protocol).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, B.; Montes, J.; Pol, W.L. van der; Groot, J.F. de

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by a genetic mutation in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene (5q11.2-q13.3) (Lefebvre 1995). With an incidence of one in 10,000 live births, it is the leading genetic cause of infant death (Lunn 2008;

  6. Acylated and unacylated ghrelin impair skeletal muscle atrophy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome associated with cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis, and several other disease states. It is characterized by weight loss, fatigue, loss of appetite, and skeletal muscle atrophy and is associated with poor patient prognosis, making it an important treatment target. Ghreli...

  7. Novel in vitro platform to investigate myotube atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelkrug, Christopher; Horn, Katharina; Makert, Gustavo R; Schubert, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The electrical current exclusion (ECE) principle provides an alternative to common methods of cell diameter measurement and especially in atrophy and cancer associated cachexia research. C2C12 myoblasts were differentiated into myotubes and treated with 100 μM dexamethasone to induce atrophy in vitro. Subsequently, they were incubated for 24 h with media containing different concentrations of curcumin and/or branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in order to counteract atrophy. After treatment with curcumin, an increase in cell diameter was detectable; the highest increase with 13.9 ± 0.4% was seen with 10 μM curcumin. The combination of curcumin and BCAAs showed an increase of 13.4 ± 1.2 %. Cell diameter measurement via the ECE showed that curcumin, and curcumin in combination with BCAAs, were able to restore atrophic C2C12 myotubes. Therefore, the application of ECE in muscle atrophy and also cancer-associated cachexia research allows rapid screening of novel compounds in order to test their efficacy in vitro. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Spinal Cord Gray Matter Atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, M-Ê; El Mendili, M M; Gros, C; Dupont, S M; Cohen-Adad, J; Pradat, P-F

    2018-01-01

    There is an emerging need for biomarkers to better categorize clinical phenotypes and predict progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This study aimed to quantify cervical spinal gray matter atrophy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and investigate its association with clinical disability at baseline and after 1 year. Twenty-nine patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 22 healthy controls were scanned with 3T MR imaging. Standard functional scale was recorded at the time of MR imaging and after 1 year. MR imaging data were processed automatically to measure the spinal cord, gray matter, and white matter cross-sectional areas. A statistical analysis assessed the difference in cross-sectional areas between patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and controls, correlations between spinal cord and gray matter atrophy to clinical disability at baseline and at 1 year, and prediction of clinical disability at 1 year. Gray matter atrophy was more sensitive to discriminate patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis from controls ( P = .004) compared with spinal cord atrophy ( P = .02). Gray matter and spinal cord cross-sectional areas showed good correlations with clinical scores at baseline ( R = 0.56 for gray matter and R = 0.55 for spinal cord; P amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Anaesthetic management of a patient with multiple system atrophy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare adult-onset neurodegenerative disease. Symptoms vary from autonomic dysfunction to Parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, in any combination. MSA affects many organ systems with many possible complications and makes perioperative management of a patient with this condition ...

  10. Prefrontal involvement related to cognitive impairment in progressive muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaphorst, J.; Tol, M.J. van; Groot, P.F.M.; Altena, E.; Werf, Y.D. van der; Majoie, C.B.; Kooi, A.J. van der; Berg, L.H. van den; Schmand, B.A.; Visser, M de; Veltman, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine brain activation patterns during verbal fluency performance in patients with progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). METHODS: fMRI was used to examine the blood oxygen level-dependent response during letter and category fluency performance in

  11. Prefrontal involvement related to cognitive impairment in progressive muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaphorst, Joost; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Groot, Paul F. C.; Altena, Ellemarije; van der Werf, Ysbrand D.; Majoie, Charles B.; van der Kooi, Anneke J.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Schmand, Ben; de Visser, Marianne; Veltman, Dick J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine brain activation patterns during verbal fluency performance in patients with progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: fMRI was used to examine the blood oxygen level-dependent response during letter and category fluency performance in

  12. Prefrontal involvement related to cognitive impairment in progressive muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaphorst, Joost; van Tol, Marie-José; Groot, Paul F. C.; Altena, Ellemarije; van der Werf, Ysbrand D.; Majoie, Charles B.; van der Kooi, Anneke J.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Schmand, Ben; de Visser, Marianne; Veltman, Dick J.

    2014-01-01

    To examine brain activation patterns during verbal fluency performance in patients with progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). fMRI was used to examine the blood oxygen level-dependent response during letter and category fluency performance in 18 patients with

  13. Mandibular atrophy and metabolic bone loss. Endocrinology, radiology and histomorphometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, L. L.; Bras, J.; Borgmeyer-Hoelen, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    In 11 edentulous patients with a severe atrophy of the mandible and submitted for ridge augmentation, endocrinological, radiological and histomorphometrical studies were carried out. The results showed that metabolic bone loss, histologically in nearly all patients characterized as a disturbance in

  14. Causative mutations for progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) in the dog

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostál, Jaromír; Horák, Pavel; Bechyňová, Renata; Přibáňová, M.; Stratil, Antonín; Schröffelová, D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2008), s. 55-58 ISSN 1803-4403. [Genetické dny /23./. České Budějovice, 10.09.2008-12.09.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : progressive retinal atrophy * dog Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  15. Brain atrophy at onset and physical disability in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate if brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS patients during the disease onset predicts long term disability. METHODS: MS patients with follow-up time of at least 7 years from disease onset and with baseline and second magnetic resonance 12 months later were included to measure brain atrophy. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS was categorized in three groups, EDSS=0, EDSS=1 and 2.5 and EDSS>2.5, and used as disability measure. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients were included. Mean atrophy during the first year in patients that reached an EDSS≥3 was -0.76±0.45 %, in patients with an EDSS between 1 and 2.5 was -0.59±0.56, while in patients with an EDSS of 0 it was -0.38±0.42 (p=0.003. DISCUSSION: Brain atrophy rates during the first year of disease were predictive of disease progression in our population.

  16. Benefits of Laser Therapy in Postmenopausal Vaginal Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brînzan, Daniela; Pǎiuşan, Lucian; Daşcǎu, Voicu; Furǎu, Gheorghe

    2011-08-01

    Maybe the worst aspect of menopause is the decline of the quality of the sexual life. The aim of the study is to demonstrate the beneficial effects of laser therapy in comparison with topical application of estrogen preparations, for the treatment of vaginal atrophy and sexual dysfunctions induced by menopause. A total of 50 menopausal patients were examined during a one year period. The methods used for objectifying vaginal atrophy and sexual dysfunctions were history taking, local clinical exam and PAP smear. From this group, 40 patients had vaginal atrophy with sexual dysfunctions. They have been treated differently, being included in four groups: patients treated with local estrogens, patients treated with intravaginal laser therapy, patients treated with both laser therapy and estrogens, patients treated with estrogens and placebo laser therapy. Therapeutic benefit, improvement of vaginal atrophy and quality of sexual life, were objectified by anamnesis (questionnaire), local and general clinical examination and PAP smear. The best results have been obtained, by far, in the 3rd group, followed by the women treated only with laser. In conclusion, we can say that laser therapy is the best way for solving the sexual inconveniences of menopause.

  17. Physical complaints in ageing persons with spinal muscular atrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, I.J.M. de; Witte, L.P de

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: While life expectancy is improving for persons with spinal muscular atrophy, new physical complaints may arise. To investigate this, we studied persons with a long duration and severe course (high functional limitations) of the disease. DESIGN: Cross-sectional descriptive study.

  18. Haptoglobin is required to prevent oxidative stress and muscle atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Bertaggia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress (OS plays a major role on tissue function. Several catabolic or stress conditions exacerbate OS, inducing organ deterioration. Haptoglobin (Hp is a circulating acute phase protein, produced by liver and adipose tissue, and has an important anti-oxidant function. Hp is induced in pro-oxidative conditions such as systemic inflammation or obesity. The role of systemic factors that modulate oxidative stress inside muscle cells is still poorly investigated. RESULTS: We used Hp knockout mice (Hp-/- to determine the role of this protein and therefore, of systemic OS in maintenance of muscle mass and function. Absence of Hp caused muscle atrophy and weakness due to activation of an atrophy program. When animals were stressed by acute exercise or by high fat diet (HFD, OS, muscle atrophy and force drop were exacerbated in Hp-/-. Depending from the stress condition, autophagy-lysosome and ubiquitin-proteasome systems were differently induced. CONCLUSIONS: Hp is required to prevent OS and the activation of pathways leading to muscle atrophy and weakness in normal condition and upon metabolic challenges.

  19. Ataxia-telangiectasia: the pattern of cerebellar atrophy on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavani, F.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Gatti, R.; Bingham, P.; Berry, G.T.; Sullivan, K.

    2003-01-01

    We describe MRI of the brain in 19 patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) and correlate the appearances with the degree of neurologic deficit. We examined 10 male and nine female patients; 17 were aged between 2 and 12 years (mean 8 years) but a woman and her brother were 35 and 38 years old, and had a variant of AT. Ataxia was the first recognized sign of the disease in every patient. We detected the following patterns of cerebellar atrophy: in the youngest patient, aged 2 years, the study was normal; in the five next youngest patients 3-7 years of age, the lateral cerebellum and superior vermis showed the earliest changes of atrophy; and all but one of the other patients had moderate to marked diffuse atrophy of vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. There were 12 patients aged 9 years and above; one, who was normal, was 9 years old. The five patients who at the time of examination were unable to walk all had diffuse atrophy involving both vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. (orig.)

  20. Characterization of disuse skeletal muscle atrophy and the efficacy of a novel muscle atrophy countermeasure during spaceflight and simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Andrea Marie

    Humans are an integral part of the engineered systems that will enable return to the Moon and eventually travel to Mars. Major advancements in countermeasure development addressing deleterious effects of microgravity and reduced gravity on the musculoskeletal system need to be made to ensure mission safety and success. The primary objectives of this dissertation are to advance the knowledge and understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy, and support development of novel countermeasures for disuse atrophy to enable healthy long-duration human spaceflight. Models simulating microgravity and actual spaceflight were used to examine the musculoskeletal adaptations during periods of unloading. Myostatin inhibition, a novel anti-atrophy drug therapy, and exercise were examined as a means of preventing and recovering from disuse atrophy. A combination of assays was used to quantify adaptation responses to unloading and examine efficacy of the countermeasures. Body and muscle masses were collected to analyze systemic changes due to treatments. Hindlimb strength and individual muscle forces were measured to demonstrate functional adaptations to treatments. Muscle fiber morphology and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression was examined to identify adaptations at the cellular level. Protein synthesis signals insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), Akt, and p70s6 kinase; and the degradation signals Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 were examined to identify adaptations at the molecular level that ultimately lead to muscle hypertrophy and atrophy. A time course study provided a thorough characterization of the adaptation of skeletal muscle during unloading in C57BL/6 mice, and baseline data for comparison to and evaluation of subsequent studies. Time points defining the on-set and endpoints of disuse muscle atrophy were identified to enable characterization of rapid vs. long-term responses of skeletal muscle to hindlimb suspension. Unloading-induced atrophy primarily resulted from increased protein

  1. Calculation of brain atrophy using computed tomography and a new atrophy measurement tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Zahid, Abdullah; Mikheev, Artem; Yang, Andrew Il; Samadani, Uzma; Rusinek, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine if brain atrophy can be calculated by performing volumetric analysis on conventional computed tomography (CT) scans in spite of relatively low contrast for this modality. Materials & Method: CTs for 73 patients from the local Veteran Affairs database were selected. Exclusion criteria: AD, NPH, tumor, and alcohol abuse. Protocol: conventional clinical acquisition (Toshiba; helical, 120 kVp, X-ray tube current 300mA, slice thickness 3-5mm). Locally developed, automatic algorithm was used to segment intracranial cavity (ICC) using (a) white matter seed (b) constrained growth, limited by inner skull layer and (c) topological connectivity. ICC was further segmented into CSF and brain parenchyma using a threshold of 16 Hu. Results: Age distribution: 25-95yrs; (Mean 67+/-17.5yrs.). Significant correlation was found between age and CSF/ICC(r=0.695, pautomated software and conventional CT. Compared to MRI, CT is more widely available, cheaper, and less affected by head motion due to ~100 times shorter scan time. Work is in progress to improve the precision of the measurements, possibly leading to assessment of longitudinal changes within the patient.

  2. Renal Atrophy Secondary to Chemoradiotherapy of Abdominal Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Gary Y.; May, Kilian Salerno; Iyer, Renuka V.; Chandrasekhar, Rameela M.A.; Wilding, Gregory E.; McCloskey, Susan A.; Khushalani, Nikhil I.; Yendamuri, Saikrishna S.; Gibbs, John F.; Fakih, Marwan; Thomas, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify factors predictive of renal atrophy after chemoradiotherapy of gastrointestinal malignancies. Methods and Materials: Patients who received chemotherapy and abdominal radiotherapy (RT) between 2002 and 2008 were identified for this study evaluating change in kidney size and function after RT. Imaging and biochemical data were obtained before and after RT in 6-month intervals. Kidney size was defined by craniocaudal measurement on CT images. The primarily irradiated kidney (PK) was defined as the kidney that received the greater mean kidney dose. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to predict risk for renal atrophy. Results: Of 130 patients, median age was 64 years, and 51.5% were male. Most primary disease sites were pancreas and periampullary tumors (77.7%). Median follow-up was 9.4 months. Creatinine clearance declined 20.89%, and size of the PK decreased 4.67% 1 year after completion of chemoradiation. Compensatory hypertrophy of the non-PK was not seen. Percentage volumes of the PK receiving ≥10 Gy (V 10 ), 15 Gy (V 15 ), and 20 Gy (V 20 ) were significantly associated with renal atrophy 1 year after RT (p = 0.0030, 0.0029, and 0.0028, respectively). Areas under the ROC curves for V 10 , V 15 , and V 20 to predict >5% decrease in PK size were 0.760, 0.760, and 0.762, respectively. Conclusions: Significant detriments in PK size and renal function were seen after abdominal RT. The V 10 , V 15 , and V 20 were predictive of risk for PK atrophy 1 year after RT. Analyses suggest the association of lower-dose renal irradiation with subsequent development of renal atrophy.

  3. Clinical and MRI correlation in multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negoro, Kiyoshi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-05-01

    By using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we studied 11 patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA): 5 olivo-pontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), 2 Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS), and 4 striatonigral degeneration (SND). The diagnoses of OPCA, SDS and SND were clinically made. The MR images were performed on 1.5 tesla MRI unit (Siemens Asahi Medical, Magnetom H15), using a T[sub 2]-weighted spin echo (SE) sequence (TR: 2000-3000 ms, TE: 80-90 ms), a T[sub 1]-weighted SE sequence (TR: 550, TE: 15), and a proton density-weighted (PD) SE sequence (TR: 2000-3000, TE: 12-22). In the patients with OPCA, MRI revealed cerebellar and brainstem atrophy and degeneration of pontine transverse fibers more marked than in the patients with SDS and SND. T[sub 2]-weighted images showed low intensity in posterolateral putamina in one OPCA patient and all of SDS and SND patients. PD images demonstrated the abnormal slit-like high signals in posterolateral putamina in three SND. The degree of cerebellar ataxia was not well correlated with cerebellar and brainstem atrophy and degeneration of pontine transverse fibers. There was a positive correlation between the atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem and the duration of cerebellar ataxia. In most of the patients with Parkinsonism, MRI demonstrated abnormal low signals in putamina on T[sub 2]-weighted images. There were positive correlations between the abnormal low signals putamina and the duration and severity of Parkinsonism. Though abnormal low signals in lateral putamina may be seen in normal aging and other disorders on T[sub 2]-weighted images, it is useful to evaluate Parkinsonism in MSA. We believe that the abnormal slit-like high signals in posterolateral putamina in MSA may suggest loss of neurons and gliosis. (author).

  4. Clinical and electroretinographic findings of progressive retinal atrophy in miniature schnauzer dogs of South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Man Bok; Park, Shin Ae; Kim, Se Eun; Park, Young Woo; Narfström, Kristina; Seo, Kangmoon

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the clinical and electroretinographic features of clinical cases of progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) in miniature schnauzer (MS) of South Korea. Sixty-six MS (14 normal and 52 affected) were included. All animals underwent routine ocular examinations. Electroretinogram (ERG) was recorded in the 14 normal and 15 affected dogs. For normal dogs, the mean age ± SD was 4.1 ± 2.4 years (1 to 9 years), and there were no ocular abnormalities on the basis of ocular examinations and ERG results. For the PRA-affected dogs, it was shown that the mean age ± SD was 4.3 ± 1.1 years (2 to 7 years), and 44 dogs (84.6%) were 3 to 5 years old. Most of the PRA-affected dogs had abnormal menace responses (98.1%) and pupillary light reflexes (PLRs, 88.5%); some dogs showed normal menace response (1.9%) and PLRs (11.5%). Ophthalmoscopic abnormalities in the affected group included one or more of the following changes: hyperreflectivity and discoloration of the tapetal area, attenuation of retinal vessels, depigmentation in non-tapetal area and optic disc atrophy. ERG in the affected dogs showed non-recordable responses in all cases tested with clinical signs of PRA. The present study showed that PRA in MS was mainly observed between the age of 3 to 5 years. ERG revealed abnormal rod and cone responses in affected dogs at the ages studied.

  5. Coenzyme Q10 Levels Are Decreased in the Cerebellum of Multiple-System Atrophy Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia V Schottlaender

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the levels of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 in brain tissue of multiple system atrophy (MSA patients differ from those in elderly controls and in patients with other neurodegenerative diseases.Flash frozen brain tissue of a series of 20 pathologically confirmed MSA patients [9 olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA type, 6 striatonigral degeneration (SND type, and 5 mixed type] was used for this study. Elderly controls (n = 37 as well as idiopathic Parkinson's disease (n = 7, dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 20, corticobasal degeneration (n = 15 and cerebellar ataxia (n = 18 patients were used as comparison groups. CoQ10 was measured in cerebellar and frontal cortex tissue by high performance liquid chromatography.We detected a statistically significant decrease (by 3-5% in the level of CoQ10 in the cerebellum of MSA cases (P = 0.001, specifically in OPCA (P = 0.001 and mixed cases (P = 0.005, when compared to controls as well as to other neurodegenerative diseases [dementia with Lewy bodies (P<0.001, idiopathic Parkinson's disease (P<0.001, corticobasal degeneration (P<0.001, and cerebellar ataxia (P = 0.001].Our results suggest that a perturbation in the CoQ10 biosynthetic pathway is associated with the pathogenesis of MSA but the mechanism behind this finding remains to be elucidated.

  6. Contribution of brain atrophy on CT and aging to intelligence level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Makoto

    1984-01-01

    Decrased intellectual functions due to senility have been much discussed in connection with aging or brain atophy alternatively. But this change should be analysed under multifactorial basis. Furthermore, variations between individuals should be taken into account in dealing with an advanced age group. In these regards, the author performed multivariate analysis on intellectual changes, aging and brain arophy demonstrated on brain CT. Clonological study was also performed to reveal the individual variations. The objects were consisted of 72 people, including the patients of more than 65 years of age who were hospitalized to a geriatrics hospital because of senile dementia, and, as a control group residents in a home for the aged nearby the hospital. Average age was 75.4 years old. Intellectual level was measured through Hasegawa's dementia rating scale. Ventricular enlargement was measured on brain CT to determine the severity of brain atrophy. These two factors and age were processed with multivariate analysis. And clonological study was made to the deviation of intellectual level vs. the change of ventricular enlargement. As the result, firstly, this simple analysing model was able to reveal some aspcts of the deteriolating phenomena of intellectual leve through double factorial basis, i.e. brain atrophy on CT and age. Secondly, the group showing greater changes in the brain atrophy on CT, which included one case with rapid deteriolation in dementia scale of more than 10 points, was distributed mainly around full marks or zero point in dementia scale. This result postulates that the range of the dementia scale should be expanded upwrds as well as downwards for the better explanation of the relation between intellectual deteriolation and above mentioned two factors. (author)

  7. Patchy Chorioretinal Atrophy Changes at the Posterior Pole After Ranibizumab for Myopic Choroidal Neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parravano, Mariacristina; Scarinci, Fabio; Gilardi, Marta; Querques, Lea; Varano, Monica; Oddone, Francesco; Bandello, Francesco; Querques, Giuseppe

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the potential role of ranibizumab treatment on the development or enlargement of chorioretinal atrophy (CRA) at the posterior pole in eyes with myopic choroidal neovascularization (mCNV). This observational case series included patients having high myopia spherical equivalent refractive error ≥ -6.00 diopters, axial length (AxL) ≥ 26.0 mm in both eyes, and mCNV treated with ranibizumab 0.5 mg in one eye, who were retrospectively enrolled. Areas of CRA in treated and fellow eyes were measured on fundus autofluorescence images at baseline, 12, and 24 months. The CRA hypoautofluorescent lesions were divided in two groups: perilesional atrophy, corresponding to area around the mCNV, and patchy extralesional atrophy, corresponding to CRA between the temporal vascular arcades. Thirty-six eyes of 18 patients were included. The mean perilesional CRA size significantly increased from baseline to 12 months (3.5 ± 10.6 mm2, P = 0.02) and 24 months (4.4 ± 11.7 mm2, P = 0.038) in the treated eye. In treated and not treated eyes, patchy extralesional CRA at the posterior pole increased significantly from baseline to 12 and 24 months follow-up. None of the fellow eyes developed mCNV. No significant relationship was found between the number of injections, AxL, age, and perilesional and patchy extralesional CRA in the treated and not treated eyes (P > 0.05). In eyes with pathologic myopia and mCNV, intravitreal injections of ranibizumab should not be considered as a contributing risk factor worsening the natural course of CRA, even though the risk of the perilesional CRA enlargement should be taken into account.

  8. Reversibility of Supraspinatus Muscle Atrophy in Tendon-Bone Healing After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Bok; Ryu, Ho Young; Hong, Jin Ho; Ko, Young Hoo; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2016-04-01

    To date, there are few reports of the definite reversibility of rotator cuff muscle atrophy after repair. To evaluate the reversibility of rotator cuff muscle atrophy after successful arthroscopic repair. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Included in this study were 47 patients (mean age, 61.2 ± 7.3 years; range, 49-73 years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and at 6-month and last follow-up. Patients who had confirmed rotator cuff healing (grades 1-3 according to the Sugaya classification) on both series of postoperative MRI were enrolled in the study. The mean time from the onset of symptoms to surgery was 24.7 ± 25.6 months (range, 3-120 months). The minimum follow-up was 2 years, and the mean follow-up duration was 41.8 ± 14.4 months. Serial changes in the supraspinatus muscle area on the most matching MRI scans (sagittal-oblique view) were evaluated. The area was measured by 2 independent observers. Both independent observers reported no significant difference in the area of the supraspinatus muscle between the preoperative time point and 6-month follow-up (observer 1: P = .135; observer 2: P = .189). However, there was a significant difference between the 6-month and last follow-up (mean, 41.8 months; observers 1 and 2: P .999) or from 6-month to final follow-up (P = .077). After successful arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, there was a slight (11.3%-13.9%) increase in muscle volume from preoperatively to final follow-up, as seen on serial MRI. Fatty infiltration according to the Goutallier grade was not reversed (P = .077). Some reversibility of supraspinatus muscle atrophy may exist in tendon-bone healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair; further follow-up is needed to better elucidate this result. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Unilateral mesial temporal atrophy after a systemic insult as a possible etiology of refractory temporal lobe epilepsy: case report Esclerose mesial temporal unilateral após insulto sistêmico como possível etiologia de epilepsia refratária do lobo temporal: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Cukiert

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Mesial temporal sclerosis is the main pathological substrate present in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and its presence is often related to the occurrence of febrile seizures in infancy. There is an on-going discussion on the nature of mesial temporal sclerosis as it related to epilepsy: cause or consequence. A previously normal child developed hyperosmolar coma after abdominal surgery at the age of 6. Three months afterwards he developed simple and complex partial seizures with an increasing frequency and refractory to multiple mono-and polytherapic drug regimens. He was evaluated for surgery at the age of 13. Ictal and interictal recordings showed left temporal lobe abnormalities. Early CT scaning suggested left temporal atrophy. MRI showed mesial temporal sclerosis. Neuropsichological testing showed verbal memory deficits and he passed a left carotid artery amytal injection. He was submitted to a cortico-amygdalo-hippocampectomy and has been seizure-free since then. The clinical data obtained from this patient suggest that at least in this case mesial temporal sclerosis would be related to the cause of epilepsy and not resultant from repeated seizure activity.A esclerose mesial temporal é o principal substrato anatomo-patológico envolvido na epilepsia refratária do lobo temporal e está frequentemente associada à ocorrência de convulsões febris na infância. Persiste até o momento intensa discussão se a esclerose mesial seria causa ou consequência da síndrome epiléptica. Uma criança previamente normal, desenvolveu coma hiperosmolar após intercorrência em cirurgia abdominal aos 6 anos de idade. Após 3 meses iniciaram-se crises parciais simples e complexas em frequência ascendente e refratárias a múltiplos esquemas terapêuticos em mono- e politerapia. Ele realizou investigação pré-operatória para epilepsia aos 13 anos de idade. Registros eletrencefalográficos de superfície ictais e interictais mostraram anormalidades

  10. Atomoxetine Prevents Dexamethasone-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesinkey, Sean R.; Korrapati, Midhun C.; Rasbach, Kyle A.; Beeson, Craig C.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy remains a clinical problem in numerous pathologic conditions. β2-Adrenergic receptor agonists, such as formoterol, can induce mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) to prevent such atrophy. Additionally, atomoxetine, an FDA-approved norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, was positive in a cellular assay for MB. We used a mouse model of dexamethasone-induced skeletal muscle atrophy to investigate the potential role of atomoxetine and formoterol to prevent muscle mass loss. Mice were administered dexamethasone once daily in the presence or absence of formoterol (0.3 mg/kg), atomoxetine (0.1 mg/kg), or sterile saline. Animals were euthanized at 8, 16, and 24 hours or 8 days later. Gastrocnemius muscle weights, changes in mRNA and protein expression of peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 α (PGC-1α) isoforms, ATP synthase β, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) 1 β subcomplex, 8, ND1, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), myostatin, muscle Ring-finger protein-1 (muscle atrophy), phosphorylated forkhead box protein O 3a (p-FoxO3a), Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and ribosomal protein S6 (rp-S6; muscle hypertrophy) in naive and muscle-atrophied mice were measured. Atomoxetine increased p-mTOR 24 hours after treatment in naïve mice, but did not change any other biomarkers. Formoterol robustly activated the PGC-1α-4-IGF1–Akt-mTOR-rp-S6 pathway and increased p-FoxO3a as early as 8 hours and repressed myostatin at 16 hours. In contrast to what was observed with acute treatment, chronic treatment (7 days) with atomoxetine increased p-Akt and p-FoxO3a, and sustained PGC-1α expression and skeletal muscle mass in dexamethasone-treated mice, in a manner comparable to formoterol. In conclusion, chronic treatment with a low dose of atomoxetine prevented dexamethasone-induced skeletal muscle wasting and supports a potential role in preventing muscle atrophy. PMID:25292181

  11. Spatiotemporal Propagation of the Cortical Atrophy: Population and Individual Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Koval

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Repeated failures in clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD have raised a strong interest for the prodromal phase of the disease. A better understanding of the brain alterations during this early phase is crucial to diagnose patients sooner, to estimate an accurate disease stage, and to give a reliable prognosis. According to recent evidence, structural alterations in the brain are likely to be sensitive markers of the disease progression. Neuronal loss translates in specific spatiotemporal patterns of cortical atrophy, starting in the enthorinal cortex and spreading over other cortical regions according to specific propagation pathways. We developed a digital model of the cortical atrophy in the left hemisphere from prodromal to diseased phases, which is built on the temporal alignment and combination of several short-term observation data to reconstruct the long-term history of the disease. The model not only provides a description of the spatiotemporal patterns of cortical atrophy at the group level but also shows the variability of these patterns at the individual level in terms of difference in propagation pathways, speed of propagation, and age at propagation onset. Longitudinal MRI datasets of patients with mild cognitive impairments who converted to AD are used to reconstruct the cortical atrophy propagation across all disease stages. Each observation is considered as a signal spatially distributed on a network, such as the cortical mesh, each cortex location being associated to a node. We consider how the temporal profile of the signal varies across the network nodes. We introduce a statistical mixed-effect model to describe the evolution of the cortex alterations. To ensure a spatiotemporal smooth propagation of the alterations, we introduce a constrain on the propagation signal in the model such that neighboring nodes have similar profiles of the signal changes. Our generative model enables the reconstruction of personalized

  12. Neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis after neck dissection and postoperative radiotherapy for oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinu; Shin, Eun Seow; Kim, Jeong Eon; Yoon, Sang Pil [Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Suk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Late complications of head and neck cancer survivors include neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis. We present an autopsy case of neck muscle atrophy and soft-tissue fibrosis (sternocleidomastoid, omohyoid, digastric, sternohyoid, sternothyroid, and platysma muscles) within the radiation field after modified radical neck dissection type I and postoperative radiotherapy for floor of mouth cancer. A 70-year-old man underwent primary tumor resection of the left floor of mouth, left marginal mandibulectomy, left modified radical neck dissection type I, and reconstruction with a radial forearm free flap. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy. The dose to the primary tumor bed and involved neck nodes was 63 Gy in 35 fractions over 7 weeks. Areas of subclinical disease (left lower neck) received 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Adjuvant chemotherapy was not administered.

  13. Myositis, Ganglioneuritis, and Myocarditis with Distinct Perifascicular Muscle Atrophy in a 2-Year-Old Male Boxer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Rossman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A 2-year-old male, intact Boxer was referred for chronic diarrhea, hyporexia, labored breathing, weakness and elevated creatine kinase, and alanine aminotransferase activities. Initial examination and diagnostics revealed a peripheral nervous system neurolocalization, atrial premature complexes, and generalized megaesophagus. Progressive worsening of the dog’s condition was noted after 36 h; the dog developed aspiration pneumonia, was febrile and oxygen dependent. The owners elected humane euthanasia. Immediately postmortem biopsies of the left cranial tibial and triceps muscles and the left peroneal nerve were obtained. Postmortem histology revealed concurrent myositis, myocarditis, endocarditis, and ganglioneuritis. Mixed mononuclear cell infiltrations and a distinct perifascicular pattern of muscle fiber atrophy was present in both muscles. This is a novel case of diffuse inflammatory myopathy with a distinct perifascicular pattern of atrophy in addition to endocarditis, myocarditis, and epicarditis.

  14. A novel method of quantifying brain atrophy associated with age-related hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jason Qian

    2017-01-01

    Audiometric evaluations and mini-mental state exams were obtained in 34 subjects over the age of 80 who have had brain MRIs in the past 6 years. CSF and parenchymal brain volumes (whole brain and by lobe were obtained through a novel, fully automated algorithm. Atrophy was calculated by taking the ratio of CSF to parenchyma. High frequency hearing loss was associated with disproportional temporal lobe atrophy relative to whole brain atrophy independent of age (r = 0.471, p = 0.005. Mental state was associated with frontoparietal atrophy but not to temporal lobe atrophy, which is consistent with known results. Our method demonstrates that hearing loss is associated with temporal lobe atrophy and generalized whole brain atrophy. Our algorithm is efficient, fully automated, and able to detect significant associations in a small cohort.

  15. Computer tomography investigation of epilepsy the brain atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taneva, N.

    1997-01-01

    The problem of brain atrophy in patients with epilepsy is often discussed in literature. The aim of the study is to present the results of computer tomography measurements of ventricular size and sulci of brain of 90 patients with various electro-clinical forms of epilepsy, including males and females at the age of 15 to 70 years. Computer tomography measurements were performed having in mind 6 parameters (frontal horn index, FHI; Huckman's number, HZ; cella media index,CMI; width of the third and the fourth ventricles; sulci). The results were compared to the CT measurements of a control group of 40 healthy males and females in the same age range.The obtained data indicate high percentage of subcortical atrophy among patients with epilepsy. Ventricular dilatation was found to be in light extent occurring most early in the frontal brain regions (frontal horns and lateral ventricles)., furthermore observed in the young age. (author)

  16. Study of brain atrophy using X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Masayoshi

    1987-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid space-cranial cavity ratio (CCR) of 811 subjects with no brain damage were investigated using X-ray computed tomography. Brain volume of healthy adults aged 20 - 59 years was almost constant and decreased gradually after 60 years. CCR of men aged 20 - 49 years kept constant value and increased with aging after 50 years. CCR of women aged 20 - 59 years kept equal value and CCR increased with aging after 60 years. Brain atrophy with aging was investigated in this study also. In retrospective study, CCR of patients in any age diagnosed brain atrophy in daily CT reports were beyond the normal range of CCR of healthy subjects aged 20 - 49 years. In 48 patients with Parkinson's disease, almost of CCR of them were included within normal range of CCR in age-matched control. (author)

  17. [Cutaneous atrophy and hypopigmentation secondary to intra-articular corticosteroid injection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loarte Pasquel, E P; Cabal García, A A

    2014-04-01

    Epicondylitis is the most common disease of the elbow. It is a tendinitis caused, in most cases, by repetitive motion of the forearm extensor muscles, and belongs to the group of occupational diseases that are related to work activity or sport. Intra-articular injections of glucocorticoids are often used by dermatologists, rheumatologists, orthopaedic surgeons, and primary care due to their ease of administration. However, this procedure has potential side effects. There are a limited number of case reports describing atrophy and hypopigmentation of the skin as a side effect. The general indications for glucocorticoid injections are monofocal and multifocal inflammatory disease, multifocal articular or soft tissue disease. It is more often used in more severe monofocal or multifocal inflammation, failure of drug treatment and/or rehabilitatory when other treatments are contraindicated. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. A young man with spinal muscular atrophy and impending respiratory arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Janine Penfield; Weisleder, Pedro

    2011-02-01

    From a statutory standpoint, the decision-making capacity of adolescents differs significantly from that of adults because adolescents are considered to lack the experience and judgment necessary to make legally binding decisions. Furthermore, in the case of minors, the principle of protection of life tends to outweigh the principle of autonomy. Here we present the hypothetical case of a 16-year-old boy with spinalmuscular atrophy type II who was admitted to the intensive care unit for severe respiratory distress. We focus on the tension that developed among the patient, his parents, and his physicians when the need for emergency mechanical ventilation became apparent. We review the legal and ethical premises under which adolescents are permitted to make legally binding decisions, ie, the emancipated minor and the mature minor doctrines. Finally, we discuss the concepts of protectionism and liberationism as they apply to adolescents' decision-making capacity.

  19. Hepatic parenchymal atrophy induction for intractable segmental bile duct injury after liver resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Shin; Park, Gil-Chun; Ha, Tae-Yong; Ko, Gi-Young; Gwon, Dong-Il; Choi, Young-Il; Song, Gi-Won; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2012-05-01

    Liver resection can result in various types of bile duct injuries but their treatment is usually difficult and often leads to intractable clinical course. We present an unusual case of hepatic segment III duct (B3) injury, which occurred after left medial sectionectomy for large hepatocellular carcinoma and was incidentally detected 1 week later due to bile leak. Since the pattern of this B3 injury was not adequate for operative biliary reconstruction, atrophy induction of the involved hepatic parenchyma was attempted. This treatment consisted of embolization of the segment III portal branch to inhibit bile production, induction of heavy adhesion at the bile leak site and clamping of the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) tube to accelerate segment III atrophy. This entire procedure, from liver resection to PTBD tube removal took 4 months. This patient has shown no other complication or tumor recurrence for 4 years to date. These findings suggest that percutaneous segmental portal vein embolization, followed by intentional clamping of external biliary drainage, can effectively control intractable bile leak from segmental bile duct injury.

  20. Palliative care in children with spinal muscular atrophy type I: What do they need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Salido, Alberto; de Paso-Mora, María García; Monleón-Luque, Manuel; Martino-Alba, Ricardo

    2015-04-01

    Our aim was to describe the clinical evolution and needs of children with spinal muscular atrophy type I treated in a domiciliary palliative care program. We undertook a retrospective chart review of nine consecutive patients. Descriptions of the clinical and demographic profile of children with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type I were referred to a pediatric palliative care team (PPCT). Six males and three females were admitted to the PPCT, all before six months of age, except for one afflicted with SMA type I with respiratory distress. The median time of attention was 57 days (range 1-150). The domiciliary attention mainly consisted of respiratory care. The patient with SMA type I with respiratory distress required domiciliary mechanical ventilation by tracheotomy. In all cases, a nasogastric tube (NT) was indicated. As end-of-life care, eight required morphine to manage the dyspnea, four received it only by enteral (oral or NT) administration, and four received it first by enteral administration with continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSI) later. Three of the four patients with CSI also received benzodiazepines. While they were attended by the PPCT, none required hospital admission. All the patients died at home except for the one attended to for just one day. Domiciliary care for these patients is possible. The respiratory morbidity and its management are the main issues. Application of an NT is useful to maintain nutritional balance. Morphine administration is necessary to manage the dyspnea. Palliative sedation is not always necessary.

  1. Impact of vulvovaginal health on postmenopausal women: a review of surveys on symptoms of vulvovaginal atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parish SJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sharon J Parish,1 Rossella E Nappi,2 Michael L Krychman,3 Susan Kellogg-Spadt,4 James A Simon,5 Jeffrey A Goldstein,6 Sheryl A Kingsberg7 1Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo University, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; 3Southern California Center for Sexual Health and Survivorship Medicine and Clinical Faculty University of California Irvine, Newport Beach and Irvine, CA, USA; 4Pelvic and Sexual Health Institute, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 5Obstetrics and Gynecology, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA; 6Novo Nordisk Inc, Princeton, NJ, USA; 7Departments of Reproductive Biology and Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Several recent, large-scale studies have provided valuable insights into patient perspectives on postmenopausal vulvovaginal health. Symptoms of vulvovaginal atrophy, which include dryness, irritation, itching, dysuria, and dyspareunia, can adversely affect interpersonal relationships, quality of life, and sexual function. While approximately half of postmenopausal women report these symptoms, far fewer seek treatment, often because they are uninformed about hypoestrogenic postmenopausal vulvovaginal changes and the availability of safe, effective, and well-tolerated treatments, particularly local vaginal estrogen therapy. Because women hesitate to seek help for symptoms, a proactive approach to conversations about vulvovaginal discomfort would improve diagnosis and treatment. Keywords: health care professional, hypoactive sexual desire disorder, local vaginal estrogen therapy, quality of life, urinary tract infection, vulvovaginal atrophy

  2. Interactive segmentation for geographic atrophy in retinal fundus images

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Noah; Smith, R. Theodore; Laine, Andrew F.

    2008-01-01

    Fundus auto-fluorescence (FAF) imaging is a non-invasive technique for in vivo ophthalmoscopic inspection of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of blindness in developed countries. Geographic atrophy (GA) is an advanced form of AMD and accounts for 12–21% of severe visual loss in this disorder [3]. Automatic quantification of GA is important for determining disease progression and facilitating clinical diagnosis of AMD. The problem of automatic segmentation of patho...

  3. The treatment of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy with ovestin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kicovic, P.M.; Cortesprieto, J.; Milojevic, S.; Haspels, A.A.; Aljinovic, A.

    1980-01-01

    Seventy-four postmenopausal women presenting with vaginal atrophy were treated with either Ovestin® vaginal cream (Group A, 23 women: 1 mg/day E3; Group B, 30 women: 0.5 mg/day E3) or vaginal suppositories (Group C, 21 women: 0.5 mg/day E3), applied daily for 3 wk (A and B) or 2 wk (C) before

  4. Advancing functional dysconnectivity and atrophy in progressive supranuclear palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse A. Brown

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome (PSP-S results from neurodegeneration within a network of brainstem, subcortical, frontal and parietal cortical brain regions. It is unclear how network dysfunction progresses and relates to longitudinal atrophy and clinical decline. In this study, we evaluated patients with PSP-S (n = 12 and healthy control subjects (n = 20 at baseline and 6 months later. Subjects underwent structural MRI and task-free functional MRI (tf-fMRI scans and clinical evaluations at both time points. At baseline, voxel based morphometry (VBM revealed that patients with mild-to-moderate clinical symptoms showed structural atrophy in subcortex and brainstem, prefrontal cortex (PFC; supplementary motor area, paracingulate, dorsal and ventral medial PFC, and parietal cortex (precuneus. Tf-fMRI functional connectivity (FC was examined in a rostral midbrain tegmentum (rMT-anchored intrinsic connectivity network that is compromised in PSP-S. In healthy controls, this network contained a medial parietal module, a prefrontal-paralimbic module, and a subcortical-brainstem module. Baseline FC deficits in PSP-S were most severe in rMT network integrative hubs in the prefrontal-paralimbic and subcortical-brainstem modules. Longitudinally, patients with PSP-S had declining intermodular FC between the subcortical-brainstem and parietal modules, while progressive atrophy was observed in subcortical-brainstem regions (midbrain, pallidum and posterior frontal (perirolandic cortex. This suggested that later-stage subcortical-posterior cortical change may follow an earlier-stage subcortical-anterior cortical disease process. Clinically, patients with more severe baseline impairment showed greater subsequent prefrontal-parietal cortical FC declines and posterior frontal atrophy rates, while patients with more rapid longitudinal clinical decline showed coupled prefrontal-paralimbic FC decline. VBM and FC can augment disease monitoring in PSP

  5. Patterns of regional cerebellar atrophy in genetic frontotemporal dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Bocchetta

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: There appears to be a differential pattern of cerebellar atrophy in the major genetic forms of FTD, being relatively spared in GRN, localized to the lobule VIIa-Crus I in the superior-posterior region of the cerebellum in C9orf72, the area connected via the thalamus to the prefrontal cortex and involved in cognitive function, and localized to the vermis in MAPT, the ‘limbic cerebellum’ involved in emotional processing.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy in myotonic dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Timchenko, Lubov

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) are multisystemic diseases that primarily affect skeletal muscle, causing myotonia, muscle atrophy, and muscle weakness. DM1 and DM2 pathologies are caused by expansion of CTG and CCTG repeats in non-coding regions of the genes encoding myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and Zinc finger protein 9 (ZNF9) respectively. These expansions cause DM pathologies through accumulation of mutant RNAs that alter RNA metabolism in p...

  7. Progressive Retinal Atrophy in the Border Collie: A new XLPRA

    OpenAIRE

    Vilboux, Thierry; Chaudieu, Gilles; Jeannin, Patricia; Delattre, Delphine; Hedan, Benoit; Bourgain, Catherine; Queney, Guillaume; Galibert, Francis; Thomas, Anne; André, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Several forms of progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) segregate in more than 100 breeds of dog with each PRA segregating in one or a few breeds. This breed specificity may be accounted for by founder effects and genetic drift, which have reduced the genetic heterogeneity of each breed, thereby facilitating the identification of causal mutations. We report here a new form of PRA segregating in the Border Collie breed. The clinical signs, including the loss of night vision and ...

  8. Motor features in posterior cortical atrophy and their imaging correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Natalie S; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Lehmann, Manja; Keihaninejad, Shiva; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Leung, Kelvin K; Fox, Nick C; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2014-12-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by impaired higher visual processing skills; however, motor features more commonly associated with corticobasal syndrome may also occur. We investigated the frequency and clinical characteristics of motor features in 44 PCA patients and, with 30 controls, conducted voxel-based morphometry, cortical thickness, and subcortical volumetric analyses of their magnetic resonance imaging. Prominent limb rigidity was used to define a PCA-motor subgroup. A total of 30% (13) had PCA-motor; all demonstrating asymmetrical left upper limb rigidity. Limb apraxia was more frequent and asymmetrical in PCA-motor, as was myoclonus. Tremor and alien limb phenomena only occurred in this subgroup. The subgroups did not differ in neuropsychological test performance or apolipoprotein E4 allele frequency. Greater asymmetry of atrophy occurred in PCA-motor, particularly involving right frontoparietal and peri-rolandic cortices, putamen, and thalamus. The 9 patients (including 4 PCA-motor) with pathology or cerebrospinal fluid all showed evidence of Alzheimer's disease. Our data suggest that PCA patients with motor features have greater atrophy of contralateral sensorimotor areas but are still likely to have underlying Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Motor features in posterior cortical atrophy and their imaging correlates☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Natalie S.; Shakespeare, Timothy J.; Lehmann, Manja; Keihaninejad, Shiva; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Leung, Kelvin K.; Fox, Nick C.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2014-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by impaired higher visual processing skills; however, motor features more commonly associated with corticobasal syndrome may also occur. We investigated the frequency and clinical characteristics of motor features in 44 PCA patients and, with 30 controls, conducted voxel-based morphometry, cortical thickness, and subcortical volumetric analyses of their magnetic resonance imaging. Prominent limb rigidity was used to define a PCA-motor subgroup. A total of 30% (13) had PCA-motor; all demonstrating asymmetrical left upper limb rigidity. Limb apraxia was more frequent and asymmetrical in PCA-motor, as was myoclonus. Tremor and alien limb phenomena only occurred in this subgroup. The subgroups did not differ in neuropsychological test performance or apolipoprotein E4 allele frequency. Greater asymmetry of atrophy occurred in PCA-motor, particularly involving right frontoparietal and peri-rolandic cortices, putamen, and thalamus. The 9 patients (including 4 PCA-motor) with pathology or cerebrospinal fluid all showed evidence of Alzheimer's disease. Our data suggest that PCA patients with motor features have greater atrophy of contralateral sensorimotor areas but are still likely to have underlying Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25086839

  10. The pathogenesis and treatment of cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kate T

    2016-02-15

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with significant functional impairment. In addition to a loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, many patients with cancer cachexia also experience cardiac atrophy, remodeling, and dysfunction, which in the field of cancer cachexia is described as cardiac cachexia. The cardiac alterations may be due to underlying heart disease, the cancer itself, or problems initiated by the cancer treatment and, unfortunately, remains largely underappreciated by clinicians and basic scientists. Despite recent major advances in the treatment of cancer, little progress has been made in the treatment of cardiac cachexia in cancer, and much of this is due to lack of information regarding the mechanisms. This review focuses on the cardiac atrophy associated with cancer cachexia, describing some of the known mechanisms and discussing the current and future therapeutic strategies to treat this condition. Above all else, improved awareness of the condition and an increased focus on identification of mechanisms and therapeutic targets will facilitate the eventual development of an effective treatment for cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Progressive Diaphragm Atrophy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glau, Christie L; Conlon, Thomas W; Himebauch, Adam S; Yehya, Nadir; Weiss, Scott L; Berg, Robert A; Nishisaki, Akira

    2018-02-05

    Diaphragm atrophy is associated with delayed weaning from mechanical ventilation and increased mortality in critically ill adults. We sought to test for the presence of diaphragm atrophy in children with acute respiratory failure. Prospective, observational study. Single-center tertiary noncardiac PICU in a children's hospital. Invasively ventilated children with acute respiratory failure. Diaphragm thickness at end-expiration and end-inspiration were serially measured by ultrasound in 56 patients (median age, 17 mo; interquartile range, 5.5-52), first within 36 hours of intubation and last preceding extubation. The median duration of mechanical ventilation was 140 hours (interquartile range, 83-201). At initial measurement, thickness at end-expiration was 2.0 mm (interquartile range, 1.8-2.5) and thickness at end-inspiration was 2.5 mm (interquartile range, 2-2.8). The change in thickness at end-expiration during mechanical ventilation between first and last measurement was -13.8% (interquartile range, -27.4% to 0%), with a -3.4% daily atrophy rate (interquartile range, -5.6 to 0%). Thickening fraction = ([thickness at end-inspiration - thickness at end-expiration]/thickness at end-inspiration) throughout the course of mechanical ventilation was linearly correlated with spontaneous breathing fraction (beta coefficient, 9.4; 95% CI, 4.2-14.7; p = 0.001). For children with a period of spontaneous breathing fraction less than 0.5 during mechanical ventilation, those with exposure to a continuous neuromuscular blockade infusion (n = 15) had a significantly larger decrease in thickness at end-expiration compared with children with low spontaneous breathing fraction who were not exposed to a neuromuscular blockade infusion (n = 18) (-16.4%, [interquartile range, -28.4% to -7.0%] vs -7.3%; [interquartile range, -10.9% to -0%]; p = 0.036). Diaphragm atrophy is present in children on mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure. Diaphragm contractility, measured as

  12. Liver atrophy after percutaneous transhepatic portal embolization occurs in two histological phases: Hepatocellular atrophy followed by apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwao, Yasuhito; Ojima, Hidenori; Kobayashi, Tatsushi; Kishi, Yoji; Nara, Satoshi; Esaki, Minoru; Shimada, Kazuaki; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Tanabe, Minoru; Kanai, Yae

    2017-11-18

    To clarify the histological changes associated with liver atrophy after percutaneous transhepatic portal embolization (PTPE) in pigs and humans. As a preliminary study, we performed pathological examinations of liver specimens from five pigs that had undergone PTPE in a time-dependent model of liver atrophy. In specimens from embolized lobes (EMB) and nonembolized lobes (controls), we measured the portal vein to central vein distance (PV-CV), the area and number of hepatocytes per lobule, and apoptotic activity using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay. Immunohistochemical reactivities were evaluated for light chain 3 (LC3) and lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2) as autophagy markers and for glutamine synthetase and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) as metabolic zonation markers. Samples from ten human livers taken 20-36 d after PTPE were similarly examined. PV-CVs and lobule areas did not differ between EMB and controls at day 0, but were lower in EMB than in controls at weeks 2, 4, and 6 ( P ≤ 0.001). Hepatocyte numbers were not significantly reduced in EMB at day 0 and week 2 but were reduced at weeks 4 and 6 ( P ≤ 0.05). Apoptotic activity was higher in EMB than in controls at day 0 and week 4. LC3 and LAMP2 staining peaked in EMB at week 2, with no significant difference between EMB and controls at weeks 4 and 6. Glutamine synthetase and CYP2E1 zonation in EMB at weeks 2, 4, and 6 were narrower than those in controls. Human results were consistent with those of porcine specimens. The mechanism of liver atrophy after PTPE has two histological phases: Hepatocellular atrophy is likely caused by autophagy in the first 2 wk and apoptosis thereafter.

  13. Analysis of voxel-based rCBF in patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy of multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Young Jin; Kang, Do Young; Park, Kyung Won; Kim, Sang Ho; Kim, Jae Woo [School of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy (OPCA) is one phenotype of multiple system atrophy (MSA) and is characterized neuropathologically by neuronal degeneration in the inferior olives, pons and cerebellar cortex. The diagnosis of OPCA requires clinical evaluation to exclude other diseases. And it's usually supported by atrophy of the cerebellum and brainstem visualized on CT or MRI. But there are some reports that the disease can occur without demonstrable atrophy in these anatomic studies. There are only a few reports about perfusion SPECT imaging in patients with OPCA. The aim of this study was to describe voxel-based rCBF of OPCA in comparison of healthy volunteers. We studied 5 patients with OPCA (1 men, 4 women: age 50.4{+-}9.6y) and age matched 13 healthy volunteers (4 men, 9 women: age 54.9{+-}6.6y). All subjects injected 20mCi of Tc-99m HMPAO and scanning was initiated 20 min after injection. Images were analyzed using SPM (SPM99) with Matlab 5.3. On visual analysis, in 3 patients with OPCA, SPECT image showed significant hypoperfusion in the cerebellum. In another 2 patients, diffuse hypoperfusion was found in the both cerebro-cerebellar hemispheres, untypical perfusion pattern in OPCA. So there is existed limitation to diagnosis by only visual analysis. On SPM analysis, in OPCA patients significantly decreased perfusion was present in culmen, tonsil, tuber in Lt. cerebellum and declive, tonsil, pyramid and inf. Semi-lunar lobule in Rt. cerebellum, Rt. inf. frontal gyrus and Rt. temporal lobe (p<0.001, uncorrected). We also performed individual analysis with SPM. Two of 5 patients have additional hypoperfusion brain lesions. In one patient, decreased perfusion found in Lt. temporal, both occipital lobe, Lt. parahippocampal gyrus. In another patient, decreased perfusion found in both frontal and parietal lobe. This study is one of a few trials analysis with SPM for OPCA. We defined the specific location of decreased perfusion in patients with OPCA.

  14. Feasibility of the Medial Temporal lobe Atrophy index (MTAi and derived methods for measuring atrophy of the medial temporal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco eConejo Bayón

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the Medial Temporal-lobe Atrophy index (MTAi, 2D-Medial Temporal Atrophy (2D-MTA, yearly rate of MTA (yrRMTA and yearly rate of relative MTA (yrRMTA are simple protocols for measuring the relative extent of atrophy in the MTL in relation to the global brain atrophy. Albeit preliminary studies showed interest of these methods in the diagnosis of AD, FTLD and correlation with cognitive impairment in PD, formal feasibility and validity studies remained pending. As a first step, we aimed to assess the feasibility. Mainly, we aimed to assess the reproducibility of measuring the areas needed to compute these indices. We also aimed to assess the efforts needed to start using these methods correctly. Methods: a series of 290 1.5T-MRI studies from 230 subjects ranging 65-85 years old who had been studied for cognitive impairment were used in this study. Six inexperienced tracers (IT plus one experienced tracer (ET traced the three areas needed to compute the indices. Finally, tracers underwent a short survey on their experience learning to compute the MTAi and experience of usage, including items relative to training time needed to understand and apply the MTAi, time to perform a study after training and overall satisfaction. Results: learning to trace the areas needed to compute the MTAi and derived methods is quick and easy. Results indicate very good intrarater ICC for the MTAi, good intrarater ICC for the 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA and also good interrater ICC for the MTAi, 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA.Conclusion: our data support that MTAi and derived methods (2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRTMA have good to very good intrarater and interrater reproducibility and may be easily implemented in clinical practice even if new users have no experience tracing the area of regions of interest.

  15. Analysis of voxel-based rCBF in patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy of multiple system atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Young Jin; Kang, Do Young; Park, Kyung Won; Kim, Sang Ho; Kim, Jae Woo

    2004-01-01

    Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy (OPCA) is one phenotype of multiple system atrophy (MSA) and is characterized neuropathologically by neuronal degeneration in the inferior olives, pons and cerebellar cortex. The diagnosis of OPCA requires clinical evaluation to exclude other diseases. And it's usually supported by atrophy of the cerebellum and brainstem visualized on CT or MRI. But there are some reports that the disease can occur without demonstrable atrophy in these anatomic studies. There are only a few reports about perfusion SPECT imaging in patients with OPCA. The aim of this study was to describe voxel-based rCBF of OPCA in comparison of healthy volunteers. We studied 5 patients with OPCA (1 men, 4 women: age 50.4±9.6y) and age matched 13 healthy volunteers (4 men, 9 women: age 54.9±6.6y). All subjects injected 20mCi of Tc-99m HMPAO and scanning was initiated 20 min after injection. Images were analyzed using SPM (SPM99) with Matlab 5.3. On visual analysis, in 3 patients with OPCA, SPECT image showed significant hypoperfusion in the cerebellum. In another 2 patients, diffuse hypoperfusion was found in the both cerebro-cerebellar hemispheres, untypical perfusion pattern in OPCA. So there is existed limitation to diagnosis by only visual analysis. On SPM analysis, in OPCA patients significantly decreased perfusion was present in culmen, tonsil, tuber in Lt. cerebellum and declive, tonsil, pyramid and inf. Semi-lunar lobule in Rt. cerebellum, Rt. inf. frontal gyrus and Rt. temporal lobe (p<0.001, uncorrected). We also performed individual analysis with SPM. Two of 5 patients have additional hypoperfusion brain lesions. In one patient, decreased perfusion found in Lt. temporal, both occipital lobe, Lt. parahippocampal gyrus. In another patient, decreased perfusion found in both frontal and parietal lobe. This study is one of a few trials analysis with SPM for OPCA. We defined the specific location of decreased perfusion in patients with OPCA

  16. Progression of regional grey matter atrophy in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinescu, Razvan V; Young, Alexandra L; Firth, Nicholas C; Jorge Cardoso, M; Tur, Carmen; De Angelis, Floriana; Cawley, Niamh; Brownlee, Wallace J; De Stefano, Nicola; Laura Stromillo, M; Battaglini, Marco; Ruggieri, Serena; Gasperini, Claudio; Filippi, Massimo; Rocca, Maria A; Rovira, Alex; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Vrenken, Hugo; Wottschel, Viktor; Leurs, Cyra E; Uitdehaag, Bernard; Pirpamer, Lukas; Enzinger, Christian; Ourselin, Sebastien; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A; Chard, Declan; Thompson, Alan J; Barkhof, Frederik; Alexander, Daniel C; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2018-01-01

    Abstract See Stankoff and Louapre (doi:10.1093/brain/awy114) for a scientific commentary on this article. Grey matter atrophy is present from the earliest stages of multiple sclerosis, but its temporal ordering is poorly understood. We aimed to determine the sequence in which grey matter regions become atrophic in multiple sclerosis and its association with disability accumulation. In this longitudinal study, we included 1417 subjects: 253 with clinically isolated syndrome, 708 with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, 128 with secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis, 125 with primary-progressive multiple sclerosis, and 203 healthy control subjects from seven European centres. Subjects underwent repeated MRI (total number of scans 3604); the mean follow-up for patients was 2.41 years (standard deviation = 1.97). Disability was scored using the Expanded Disability Status Scale. We calculated the volume of brain grey matter regions and brainstem using an unbiased within-subject template and used an established data-driven event-based model to determine the sequence of occurrence of atrophy and its uncertainty. We assigned each subject to a specific event-based model stage, based on the number of their atrophic regions. Linear mixed-effects models were used to explore associations between the rate of increase in event-based model stages, and T2 lesion load, disease-modifying treatments, comorbidity, disease duration and disability accumulation. The first regions to become atrophic in patients with clinically isolated syndrome and relapse-onset multiple sclerosis were the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus, followed by the middle cingulate cortex, brainstem and thalamus. A similar sequence of atrophy was detected in primary-progressive multiple sclerosis with the involvement of the thalamus, cuneus, precuneus, and pallidum, followed by the brainstem and posterior cingulate cortex. The cerebellum, caudate and putamen showed early atrophy in relapse

  17. Progression of regional grey matter atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshaghi, Arman; Marinescu, Razvan V; Young, Alexandra L; Firth, Nicholas C; Prados, Ferran; Jorge Cardoso, M; Tur, Carmen; De Angelis, Floriana; Cawley, Niamh; Brownlee, Wallace J; De Stefano, Nicola; Laura Stromillo, M; Battaglini, Marco; Ruggieri, Serena; Gasperini, Claudio; Filippi, Massimo; Rocca, Maria A; Rovira, Alex; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Vrenken, Hugo; Wottschel, Viktor; Leurs, Cyra E; Uitdehaag, Bernard; Pirpamer, Lukas; Enzinger, Christian; Ourselin, Sebastien; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A; Chard, Declan; Thompson, Alan J; Barkhof, Frederik; Alexander, Daniel C; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2018-06-01

    See Stankoff and Louapre (doi:10.1093/brain/awy114) for a scientific commentary on this article.Grey matter atrophy is present from the earliest stages of multiple sclerosis, but its temporal ordering is poorly understood. We aimed to determine the sequence in which grey matter regions become atrophic in multiple sclerosis and its association with disability accumulation. In this longitudinal study, we included 1417 subjects: 253 with clinically isolated syndrome, 708 with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, 128 with secondary-progressive multiple sclerosis, 125 with primary-progressive multiple sclerosis, and 203 healthy control subjects from seven European centres. Subjects underwent repeated MRI (total number of scans 3604); the mean follow-up for patients was 2.41 years (standard deviation = 1.97). Disability was scored using the Expanded Disability Status Scale. We calculated the volume of brain grey matter regions and brainstem using an unbiased within-subject template and used an established data-driven event-based model to determine the sequence of occurrence of atrophy and its uncertainty. We assigned each subject to a specific event-based model stage, based on the number of their atrophic regions. Linear mixed-effects models were used to explore associations between the rate of increase in event-based model stages, and T2 lesion load, disease-modifying treatments, comorbidity, disease duration and disability accumulation. The first regions to become atrophic in patients with clinically isolated syndrome and relapse-onset multiple sclerosis were the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus, followed by the middle cingulate cortex, brainstem and thalamus. A similar sequence of atrophy was detected in primary-progressive multiple sclerosis with the involvement of the thalamus, cuneus, precuneus, and pallidum, followed by the brainstem and posterior cingulate cortex. The cerebellum, caudate and putamen showed early atrophy in relapse-onset multiple

  18. Brain atrophy during aging. Quantitative studies with X-CT and NMR-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju; Yamada, Kenji; Yamada, Susumu; Ono, Shuichi; Takeda, Shunpei; Hatazawa, Jun; Ito, Masatoshi; Kubota, Kazuo

    1985-12-01

    Age-related brain atrophy was investigated in thousands of persons with no neurologic disturbances using X-CT and NMR-CT. Brain atrophy was minimal in 34-35 years old in both sexes, increased exponentially to the increasing age after 34-35 years, and probably resulted in dementia, such as vascular or multi-infarct dementia. Brain atrophy was significantly greater in men than in women at all ages. Brain volumes were maximal in 34-35 years old in both sexes with minimal individual differences which increased proportionally to the increasing age. Remarkable individual differences in the extent of brain atrophy (20 - 30 %) existed among aged subjects. Progression of brain atrophy was closely related to loss of mental activities independently of their ages. Our longitudinal study has revealed that the most important factors promoting brain atrophy during aging was the decrease in the cerebral blood flow. We have classified brain atrophy into sulcal and cisternal enlargement type (type I), ventricular enlargement type (type II) and mixed type (type III) according to the clinical study using NMR-CT. Brain atrophy of type I progresses significantly in almost all of the geriatric disorders. This type of brain atrophy progresses significantly in heavy smokers and drinkers. Therefore this type of brain atrophy might be caused by the decline in the blood flow in anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Brain atrophy of type II was caused by the disturbance of cerebrospinal fluid circulation after cerebral bleeding and subarachnoid bleeding. Brain atrophy of type III was seen in vascular dementia or multi-infarct dementia which was caused by loss of brain matter after multiple infarction, and was seen also in dementia of Alzheimer type in which degeneration of nerve cells results in brain atrophy. NMR-CT can easily detect small infarction (lacunae) and edematous lesions resulting from ischemia and hypertensive encephalopathy. (J.P.N.).

  19. Progressive atrophy of retinal pigment epithelium after trypan-blue-assisted ILM peeling for macular hole surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of progressive atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE after trypan-blue-assisted peeling of internal limiting membrane (ILM for macular hole surgery. A 68-year-old Caucasian female underwent a 20-g pars plana vitrectomy for a chronic stage-3 macular hole. The ILM was stained with 0.06% trypan blue (VisionBlue™, DORC Netherlands for 2 min after fluid air exchange. Dye was reapplied for another 2 min due to poor staining. The ILM was completely removed around the macular hole with forceps. RPE atrophy was noticed at the edge of the hole 1 month after surgery. It progressively increased in intensity and enlarged over 2 years. Her final visual acuity was counting fingers, significantly worse compared to her presenting visual acuity of 20/200. Progressive atrophy of RPE in our patient was most likely due to the toxicity of trypan blue. Reapplication of the dye may increase the likelihood of toxicity.

  20. Spinal cord lesion by minor trauma as an early sign of Multiple System Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Tavares Brum

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple System Atrophy (MSA is characterized clinically by parkinsonism, cerebellar, autonomic and corticospinal features of variable severity. When the presentation is only parkinsonism, the disease might be difficult to differentiate from Parkinson´s Disease (PD. We present a case of an 80-year-old man with previous diagnosis of PD. One year after diagnosis he had a whiplash cervical trauma due to a tricycle accident caused by a hole in the road. This low-energy trauma caused an unstable C4-C5 cervical fracture with spinal cord injury which required surgical decompression and stabilization. Neurological examination showed marked postural instability, no rest and postural tremor, finger tapping slowed on the right, spastic tetraparesis (ASIA D—predominantly on the left side—, brisk deep tendon reflexes in the upper and lower extremities and bilateral extensor plantar response. He also presented with vertical gaze restriction, mild hypometria in horizontal saccades, moderate dysphagia and dysphonia. As atypical parkinsonism was suspected he underwent an MRI which revealed conjunction of findings suggestive of parkinsonian-type multiple system atrophy (MSA. In our case we hypothesise that the loss of postural reflexes, as an early manifestation of MSA, did not allow the patient to have an effective reaction response to a low-energy trauma, resulting in a more severe injury. With this case report we speculate that the severe spinal lesions caused by minor accidents can be an early sign of postural instability, which may lead to clinical suspicion of neurodegenerative disorder manifested by postural reflexes impairment.

  1. Crossed cerebellar atrophy in children: a neurologic sequela of extreme prematurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollins, N.K.; Wen, T.S.; Dominguez, R.

    1995-01-01

    We retrospectively identified eight children, aged 8 months to 13 years, in whom cerebellar atrophy associated with cerebral injury was diagnosed on MR or CT, and reviewed their past medical history, neurologic findings, and neuroimaging studies. Seven patients were born extremely premature, EGA 25-28 weeks, and had severe perinatal intracranial hemorrhage. Neurologic problems include severe developmental delay in seven, spastic paresis in six, and seizures in five. Neuroimaging showed severe unilaterial holohemispheric atrophy in four, bilateral asymmetric holohemispheric atrophy in two, and left temporoparietal atrophy in one. Cerebellar atrophy was unilateral in five and bilateral but asymmetric in two. Gliosis of the atrophic cerebellum occurred in one patient. Sequential neuroimaging in one patient showed evolution of crossed cerebellar atrophy at 8 months of age. The final patient, a term infant, had an idiopathic perinatal left cerebral infarct. (orig./MG)

  2. Neuropsychological correlates of brain atrophy in Huntington's disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starkstein, S.E.; Brandt, J.; Bylsma, F.; Peyser, C.; Folstein, M.; Folstein, S.E.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging and a comprehensive cognitive evaluation were carried out in a series of 29 patients with mild to moderate Huntington's disease (HD). A factor analysis of the neuropsychological test scores provided three factors: A memory/speed-of-processing factor, a 'frontal' factor, and a response inhibition factor. The memory/speed factor correlated significantly with measures of caudate atrophy, frontal atrophy, and atrophy of the left (but not the right) sylvian cistern. There were no significant correlations between the 'frontal' or response inhibition factors and measures of cortical or subcortical brain atrophy. Our findings confirm that subcortical atrophy is significantly correlated with specific cognitive deficits in HD, and demonstrate that cortical atrophy also has important association with the cognitive deficits of patients with HD. (orig.)

  3. Cerebral blood flow and brain atrophy correlated by xenon contrast CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Y.; Meyer, J.S.; Tanahashi, N.; Rogers, R.L.; Tachibana, H.; Kandula, P.; Dowell, R.E.; Mortel, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    Correlations between cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured during stable xenon contrast CT scanning and standard CT indices of brain atrophy were investigated in the patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type, multi-infarct dementia and idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Compared to age-matched normal volunteers, significant correlations were found in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease between cortical and subcortical gray matter blood flow and brain atrophy estimated by the ventricular body ratio, and mild to moderate brain atrophy were correlated with stepwise CBF reductions. However, in patients with senile dementia of Alzheimer type and multi-infarct dementia, brain atrophy was not associated with stepwise CBF reductions. Overall correlations between brain atrophy and reduced CBF were weak. Mild degrees of brain atrophy are not always associated with reduced CBF

  4. Inhibition of interleukin-6 decreases atrogene expression and ameliorates tail suspension-induced skeletal muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakabe, Mitsutaka; Ota, Hidetaka; Iijima, Katsuya; Eto, Masato; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Akishita, Masahiro

    2018-01-01

    Background Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an inflammatory cytokine. Whether systemic IL-6 affects atrogene expression and disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy is unclear. Methods Tail-suspended mice were used as a disuse-induced muscle atrophy model. We administered anti-mouse IL-6 receptor antibody, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) and vitamin D to the mice and examined the effects on atrogene expression and muscle atrophy. Results Serum IL-6 levels were elevated in the mice. Inhibition of IL-6 receptor suppressed muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1) expression and prevented muscle atrophy. HMB and vitamin D inhibited the serum IL-6 surge, downregulated the expression of MuRF1 and atrogin-1 in the soleus muscle, and ameliorated atrophy in the mice. Conclusion Systemic IL-6 affects MuRF1 expression and disuse-induced muscle atrophy. PMID:29351340

  5. Inhibition of interleukin-6 decreases atrogene expression and ameliorates tail suspension-induced skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsutaka Yakabe

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is an inflammatory cytokine. Whether systemic IL-6 affects atrogene expression and disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy is unclear.Tail-suspended mice were used as a disuse-induced muscle atrophy model. We administered anti-mouse IL-6 receptor antibody, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB and vitamin D to the mice and examined the effects on atrogene expression and muscle atrophy.Serum IL-6 levels were elevated in the mice. Inhibition of IL-6 receptor suppressed muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1 expression and prevented muscle atrophy. HMB and vitamin D inhibited the serum IL-6 surge, downregulated the expression of MuRF1 and atrogin-1 in the soleus muscle, and ameliorated atrophy in the mice.Systemic IL-6 affects MuRF1 expression and disuse-induced muscle atrophy.

  6. Isolated and painless (? atrophy of the infraspinatus muscle: left handed versus right handed volleyball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago D. Gonçalves Côelho

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The suprascapular nerve originates from the upper trunk of the brachial plexus or less frequently from the root of C5. It runs a short way and crosses the suprascapular notch. It innervates the supraspinatus muscle and the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints. Then, it crosses the lateral edge of the spine of the scapula passing through the spinoglenoid notch, and innervates the infraspinatus muscle. These are potential sites of injury to the suprascapular nerve. Three cases of suprascapular nerve entrapment causing an isolated infraspinatus muscle atrophy in volleyball players were studied. It is suggested the hypothesis that the nature of the smash, in which the athlete uses the arm violently, more than does in volleyball service or in the art of reception, is the key to the pathogenesis of the lesion in volleyball players.

  7. Bilateral Iris Atrophy after the Femtosecond Assisted Laser In Situ Keratomileusis Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Olcay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report an unknown complication of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK surgery. Case Presentation. A 28-year-old female presented with photophobia and glare to our eye service. She stated in her medical history that she had undergone femtosecond assisted LASIK surgery in both eyes 15 months ago and her symptoms started just after this surgery. On admission, her best-corrected visual acuity was 10/10 in both eyes. She had mydriatic pupils with no direct light reflex. Examination of the anterior segment revealed bilateral iris atrophy projecting within the LASIK ablation zone and a transillumination defect was remarkable on the slit lamp examination. Conclusion. We hypothesized that this condition may have been caused by the abnormally increased IOP that resulted in ischemia in the iris vascular plexus during the suction process of surgery.

  8. Upper motor neuron predominant degeneration with frontal and temporal lobe atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konagaya, M; Sakai, M; Matsuoka, Y; Konagaya, Y; Hashizume, Y

    1998-11-01

    The autopsy findings of a 78-year-old man mimicking primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) are reported. He showed slowly progressive spasticity, pseudobulbar palsy and character change, and died 32 months after the onset of symptoms. Autopsy revealed severe atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes, remarkable neuronal loss and gliosis in the precentral gyrus, left temporal lobe pole and amygdala, mild degeneration of the Ammon's horn, degeneration of the corticospinal tract, and very mild involvement of the lower motor neurons. The anterior horn cells only occasionally demonstrated Bunina body by cystatin-C staining, and skein-like inclusions by ubiquitin staining. This is a peculiar case with concomitant involvement in the motor cortex and temporal lobe in motor neuron disease predominantly affecting the upper motor neuron.

  9. Usefulness of 3D-PRESTO imaging in evaluating putaminal abnormality in parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Keita; Kawaguchi, Takatsune; Kawai, Tatsuya; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta; Okita, Kenji; Yamawaki, Takemori

    2010-01-01

    Principles of echo shifting with a train of observations (PRESTO) sequence has long echo time which emphasizes the effect of T2* relaxation time and contribute to its high sensitivity to the susceptibility change. The aim of our study was to evaluate the ability of 3D-PRESTO sequence in detecting putaminal hypointensity in patients with parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy (MSA-P) and in discriminating between MSA-P and Parkinson's disease (PD). The signal intensity of the putamen and localization of abnormality were evaluated on 3D-PRESTO, T2*-weighted (T2*W), and T2-weighted (T2W) sequences in ten patients with MSA-P, 14 with PD, and ten controls. The putaminal signal intensity was assessed in all sequences and graded relative to the palladium. Atrophy of the putamen and posterolateral hyperintensity rim on T2W sequence were also evaluated in MSA-P patients. Putaminal hypointensity was more often seen in MSA-P than PD and controls on 3D-PRESTO sequence (p = 0.002) as well as on T2*W sequence (p = 0.003). 3D-PRESTO sequence could reveal lower intensity better than T2*W sequence in four of ten MSA-P cases. Hemi- or bilateral putaminal hypointensity, atrophy, and posterolateral hyperintensity rim were recognized in 90%, 70%, and 70% of ten MSA-P cases, respectively. Three cases revealed hypointensity on 3D-PRESTO sequence without posterolateral hyperintensity rim. Putaminal signal changes occurred in the posterolateral part with a striking lateral to medial gradient in all nine cases with putaminal hypointensity (nine out of nine, 100%). 3D-PRESTO sequence appears to be useful for depicting putaminal hypointensity in MSA-P patients and in differentiating MSA-P from PD. (orig.)

  10. Agrin mutations lead to a congenital myasthenic syndrome with distal muscle weakness and atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole, Sophie; Chaouch, Amina; Torbergsen, Torberg; Bauché, Stéphanie; de Bruyckere, Elodie; Fontenille, Marie-Joséphine; Horn, Morten A; van Ghelue, Marijke; Løseth, Sissel; Issop, Yasmin; Cox, Daniel; Müller, Juliane S; Evangelista, Teresinha; Stålberg, Erik; Ioos, Christine; Barois, Annie; Brochier, Guy; Sternberg, Damien; Fournier, Emmanuel; Hantaï, Daniel; Abicht, Angela; Dusl, Marina; Laval, Steven H; Griffin, Helen; Eymard, Bruno; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2014-09-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases resulting from impaired neuromuscular transmission. Their clinical hallmark is fatigable muscle weakness associated with a decremental muscle response to repetitive nerve stimulation and frequently related to postsynaptic defects. Distal myopathies form another clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of primary muscle disorders where weakness and atrophy are restricted to distal muscles, at least initially. In both congenital myasthenic syndromes and distal myopathies, a significant number of patients remain genetically undiagnosed. Here, we report five patients from three unrelated families with a strikingly homogenous clinical entity combining congenital myasthenia with distal muscle weakness and atrophy reminiscent of a distal myopathy. MRI and neurophysiological studies were compatible with mild myopathy restricted to distal limb muscles, but decrement (up to 72%) in response to 3 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation pointed towards a neuromuscular transmission defect. Post-exercise increment (up to 285%) was observed in the distal limb muscles in all cases suggesting presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses of muscle end-plate regions showed synaptic remodelling with denervation-reinnervation events. We performed whole-exome sequencing in two kinships and Sanger sequencing in one isolated case and identified five new recessive mutations in the gene encoding agrin. This synaptic proteoglycan with critical function at the neuromuscular junction was previously found mutated in more typical forms of congenital myasthenic syndrome. In our patients, we found two missense mutations residing in the N-terminal agrin domain, which reduced acetylcholine receptors clustering activity of agrin in vitro. Our findings expand the spectrum of congenital myasthenic syndromes due to agrin mutations and show an unexpected

  11. Exercise Therapy in Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy and Other Neuromuscular Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlqvist, Julia Rebecka; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    There is no curative treatment for most neuromuscular disorders. Exercise, as a treatment for these diseases, has therefore received growing attention. When executed properly, exercise can maintain and improve health and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes. In persons...... in patients with neuromuscular diseases associated with weakness and wasting. We review studies that have investigated different types of exercise in both myopathies and motor neuron diseases, with particular emphasis on training of persons affected by spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Finally, we provide...

  12. Neuropathology and Therapeutic Intervention in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhiko Banno

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is a hereditary motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the androgen receptor (AR. The histopathological finding in SBMA is loss of lower motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord as well as in the brainstem motor nuclei. Animal studies have revealed that the pathogenesis of SBMA depends on the level of serum testosterone, and that androgen deprivation mitigates neurodegeneration through inhibition of nuclear accumulation of the pathogenic AR. Heat shock proteins, ubiquitin-proteasome system and transcriptional regulation are also potential targets of therapy development for SBMA.

  13. Atrophy rates in asymptomatic amyloidosis: implications for Alzheimer prevention trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Abigail Andrews

    Full Text Available There is considerable interest in designing therapeutic studies of individuals at risk of Alzheimer disease (AD to prevent the onset of symptoms. Cortical β-amyloid plaques, the first stage of AD pathology, can be detected in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET, and several studies have shown that ~1/3 of healthy elderly have significant β-amyloid deposition. Here we assessed whether asymptomatic amyloid-PET-positive controls have increased rates of brain atrophy, which could be harnessed as an outcome measure for AD prevention trials. We assessed 66 control subjects (age = 73.5±7.3 yrs; MMSE = 29±1.3 from the Australian Imaging Biomarkers & Lifestyle study who had a baseline Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB PET scan and two 3T MRI scans ~18-months apart. We calculated PET standard uptake value ratios (SUVR, and classified individuals as amyloid-positive/negative. Baseline and 18-month MRI scans were registered, and brain, hippocampal, and ventricular volumes and annualized volume changes calculated. Increasing baseline PiB-PET measures of β-amyloid load correlated with hippocampal atrophy rate independent of age (p = 0.014. Twenty-two (1/3 were PiB-positive (SUVR>1.40, the remaining 44 PiB-negative (SUVR≤1.31. Compared to PiB-negatives, PiB-positive individuals were older (76.8±7.5 vs. 71.7±7.5, p<0.05 and more were APOE4 positive (63.6% vs. 19.2%, p<0.01 but there were no differences in baseline brain, ventricle or hippocampal volumes, either with or without correction for total intracranial volume, once age and gender were accounted for. The PiB-positive group had greater total hippocampal loss (0.06±0.08 vs. 0.02±0.05 ml/yr, p = 0.02, independent of age and gender, with non-significantly higher rates of whole brain (7.1±9.4 vs. 4.7±5.5 ml/yr and ventricular (2.0±3.0 vs. 1.1±1.0 ml/yr change. Based on the observed effect size, recruiting 384 (95%CI 195-1080 amyloid-positive subjects/arm will provide 80% power to detect 25

  14. New Frontiers in the Treatment of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, CL

    2018-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder, with a current estimated incidence of 1 in 11,000 live births. Although there is a variable phenotype, 60% of patients with SMA have type 1 disease. Typically diagnosed by the age of six months, this severe form of the condition is characterised by progressive weakness and the failure to meet motor milestones. There is an early need for permanent assisted ventilation, without which the median life expectancy is less than two years.\\r\

  15. Prefrontal involvement related to cognitive impairment in progressive muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaphorst, Joost; van Tol, Marie-José; Groot, Paul F C; Altena, Ellemarije; van der Werf, Ysbrand D; Majoie, Charles B; van der Kooi, Anneke J; van den Berg, Leonard H; Schmand, Ben; de Visser, Marianne; Veltman, Dick J

    2014-08-26

    To examine brain activation patterns during verbal fluency performance in patients with progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). fMRI was used to examine the blood oxygen level-dependent response during letter and category fluency performance in 18 patients with PMA, 21 patients with ALS, and 17 healthy control subjects, matched for age and education. fMRI results are reported at pfrontal gyrus (IFG, Brodmann area 45) during letter fluency, which was unaffected by performance, ARWMC, and IFG volume: patients with PMA showed lower activation than controls but higher than that of patients with ALS (ALSupper motor neuron signs. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Fronto-striatal atrophy correlates of neuropsychiatric dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia (FTD and Alzheimer's disease (AD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Seok Yi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Behavioural disturbances in frontotemporal dementia (FTD are thought to reflect mainly atrophy of cortical regions. Recent studies suggest that subcortical brain regions, in particular the striatum, are also significantly affected and this pathology might play a role in the generation of behavioural symptoms. Objective: To investigate prefrontal cortical and striatal atrophy contributions to behavioural symptoms in FTD. Methods: One hundred and eighty-two participants (87 FTD patients, 39 AD patients and 56 controls were included. Behavioural profiles were established using the Cambridge Behavioural Inventory Revised (CBI-R and Frontal System Behaviour Scale (FrSBe. Atrophy in prefrontal (VMPFC, DLPFC and striatal (caudate, putamen regions was established via a 5-point visual rating scale of the MRI scans. Behavioural scores were correlated with atrophy rating scores. Results: Behavioural and atrophy ratings demonstrated that patients were significantly impaired compared to controls, with bvFTD being most severely affected. Behavioural-anatomical correlations revealed that VMPFC atrophy was closely related to abnormal behaviour and motivation disturbances. Stereotypical behaviours were associated with both VMPFC and striatal atrophy. By contrast, disturbance of eating was found to be related to striatal atrophy only. Conclusion: Frontal and striatal atrophy contributed to the behavioural disturbances seen in FTD, with some behaviours related to frontal, striatal or combined fronto-striatal pathology. Consideration of striatal contributions to the generation of behavioural disturbances should be taken into account when assessing patients with potential FTD.

  17. Computed tomography of skeletal muscles in childhood spinal progressive muscular atrophies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Yumi; Osawa, Makiko; Sumida, Sawako; Shishikura, Keiko; Suzuki, Haruko; Fukuyama, Yukio; Kohno, Atsushi

    1992-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scanning of skeletal muscles was performed in patients with type 1 and type 2 spinal progressive muscular atrophy (SPMA) and Kugelberg-Welander disease (K-W) to delineate the characteristic CT features of each category. Marked muscular atrophy was observed in type 1 SPMA, and both muscular atrophy and intramuscular low density areas in type 2 SPMA, changes being more pronounced in older patients. In contrast, in K-W, muscular atrophy was slight, and intramuscular low density areas constituted the most prominent findings. These observations indicate that SPMA and K-W are each characterized by distinct CT findings. (author)

  18. Effect of Oenothera odorata Root Extract on Microgravity and Disuse-Induced Muscle Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hyeon Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle atrophy, a reduction of muscle mass, strength, and volume, results from reduced muscle use and plays a key role in various muscular diseases. In the microgravity environment of space especially, muscle atrophy is induced by muscle inactivity. Exposure to microgravity induces muscle atrophy through several biological effects, including associations with reactive oxygen species (ROS. This study used 3D-clinostat to investigate muscle atrophy caused by oxidative stress in vitro, and sciatic denervation was used to investigate muscle atrophy in vivo. We assessed the effect of Oenothera odorata root extract (EVP on muscle atrophy. EVP helped recover cell viability in C2C12 myoblasts exposed to microgravity for 24 h and delayed muscle atrophy in sciatic denervated mice. However, the expressions of HSP70, SOD1, and ceramide in microgravity-exposed C2C12 myoblasts and in sciatic denervated mice were either decreased or completely inhibited. These results suggested that EVP can be expected to have a positive effect on muscle atrophy by disuse and microgravity. In addition, EVP helped characterize the antioxidant function in muscle atrophy.

  19. Effect of Oenothera odorata Root Extract on Microgravity and Disuse-Induced Muscle Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Hyeon; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Park, Ji-Hyung; Kabayama, Kazuya; Opitz, Joerg; Lee, Kwang Ho; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle atrophy, a reduction of muscle mass, strength, and volume, results from reduced muscle use and plays a key role in various muscular diseases. In the microgravity environment of space especially, muscle atrophy is induced by muscle inactivity. Exposure to microgravity induces muscle atrophy through several biological effects, including associations with reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study used 3D-clinostat to investigate muscle atrophy caused by oxidative stress in vitro, and sciatic denervation was used to investigate muscle atrophy in vivo. We assessed the effect of Oenothera odorata root extract (EVP) on muscle atrophy. EVP helped recover cell viability in C2C12 myoblasts exposed to microgravity for 24 h and delayed muscle atrophy in sciatic denervated mice. However, the expressions of HSP70, SOD1, and ceramide in microgravity-exposed C2C12 myoblasts and in sciatic denervated mice were either decreased or completely inhibited. These results suggested that EVP can be expected to have a positive effect on muscle atrophy by disuse and microgravity. In addition, EVP helped characterize the antioxidant function in muscle atrophy.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease with a high incidence and is the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. SMA is primarily characterized by degeneration of the spinal motor neurons that leads to skeletal muscle atrophy followed by symmetric limb paralysis, respiratory failure, and death. In humans, mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1 gene shifts the load of expression of SMN protein to the SMN2 gene that produces low levels of full-length SMN protein because of alternative splicing, which are sufficient for embryonic development and survival but result in SMA. The molecular mechanisms of the (a regulation of SMN gene expression and (b degeneration of motor neurons caused by low levels of SMN are unclear. However, some progress has been made in recent years that have provided new insights into understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of SMA pathogenesis. In this review, we have briefly summarized recent advances toward understanding of the molecular mechanisms of regulation of SMN levels and signaling mechanisms that mediate neurodegeneration in SMA.

  1. Longitudinal association between hippocampus atrophy and episodic-memory decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbach, Tetiana; Pudas, Sara; Lundquist, Anders; Orädd, Greger; Josefsson, Maria; Salami, Alireza; de Luna, Xavier; Nyberg, Lars

    2017-03-01

    There is marked variability in both onset and rate of episodic-memory decline in aging. Structural magnetic resonance imaging studies have revealed that the extent of age-related brain changes varies markedly across individuals. Past studies of whether regional atrophy accounts for episodic-memory decline in aging have yielded inconclusive findings. Here we related 15-year changes in episodic memory to 4-year changes in cortical and subcortical gray matter volume and in white-matter connectivity and lesions. In addition, changes in word fluency, fluid IQ (Block Design), and processing speed were estimated and related to structural brain changes. Significant negative change over time was observed for all cognitive and brain measures. A robust brain-cognition change-change association was observed for episodic-memory decline and atrophy in the hippocampus. This association was significant for older (65-80 years) but not middle-aged (55-60 years) participants and not sensitive to the assumption of ignorable attrition. Thus, these longitudinal findings highlight medial-temporal lobe system integrity as particularly crucial for maintaining episodic-memory functioning in older age. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Carbocalcitonin treatment in Sudeck's atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuti, R.; Vattimo, A.; Martini, G.; Turchetti, V.; Righi, G.A.

    1987-02-01

    The efficacy of new calcitonin, the amino analog of eel calcitonin (carboCT) on Sudeck's atrophy of the foot was investigated in 14 patients. CarboCT was administered at the dose of 40 Medical Research Council (MRC) units per day, and the duration of treatment was two to ten months. No adverse effects were noted. Bone pain and local edema decreased associated with improvement of motility. CarboCT induced a slight decrease in plasma calcium, plasma phosphate, and 24-hour urinary calcium excretion. An increase in cAMP/Cr ratio, an index of parathyroid function, was also observed (probably a manifestation of the hypocalcemic effect of calcitonin and secondary parathyroid stimulation). The whole body retention of 99mTc-MDP represents a valuable index of bone turnover, it decreased progressively and significantly on treatment. A dynamic study of local bone uptake of 99mTC-MDP was performed in eight patients. After carboCT therapy, statistically significant decreases in local blood flow, early uptake, and delayed uptake were appreciated in the involved foot. These findings lead to the conclusion that carboCT is effective in the treatment of Sudeck's atrophy.

  3. Interactive segmentation for geographic atrophy in retinal fundus images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Noah; Smith, R Theodore; Laine, Andrew F

    2008-10-01

    Fundus auto-fluorescence (FAF) imaging is a non-invasive technique for in vivo ophthalmoscopic inspection of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of blindness in developed countries. Geographic atrophy (GA) is an advanced form of AMD and accounts for 12-21% of severe visual loss in this disorder [3]. Automatic quantification of GA is important for determining disease progression and facilitating clinical diagnosis of AMD. The problem of automatic segmentation of pathological images still remains an unsolved problem. In this paper we leverage the watershed transform and generalized non-linear gradient operators for interactive segmentation and present an intuitive and simple approach for geographic atrophy segmentation. We compare our approach with the state of the art random walker [5] algorithm for interactive segmentation using ROC statistics. Quantitative evaluation experiments on 100 FAF images show a mean sensitivity/specificity of 98.3/97.7% for our approach and a mean sensitivity/specificity of 88.2/96.6% for the random walker algorithm.

  4. Spinal Muscular Atrophy: More than a Disease of Motor Neurons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, L A; Burns, J K; Chardon, J Warman; Kothary, R; Parks, R J

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common genetically inherited neurodegenerative disease resulting in infant mortality. SMA is caused by genetic deletion or mutation in the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, which results in reduced levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein. SMN protein deficiency preferentially affects α- motor neurons, leading to their degeneration and subsequent atrophy of limb and trunk muscles, progressing to death in severe forms of the disease. More recent studies have shown that SMN protein depletion is detrimental to the functioning of other tissues including skeletal muscle, heart, autonomic and enteric nervous systems, metabolic/endocrine (e.g. pancreas), lymphatic, bone and reproductive system. In this review, we summarize studies discussing SMN protein's function in various cell and tissue types and their involvement in the context of SMA disease etiology. Taken together, these studies indicate that SMA is a multi-organ disease, which suggests that truly effective disease intervention may require body-wide correction of SMN protein levels. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy: study of the Wolfram syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Gómez, Bernardette; Reza-Albarrán, Alfredo Adolfo

    2017-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS), also known by the acronym DIDMOAD, is a rare and progresive hereditary disease of autosomal recessive inheritance which minimum ascertainment diagnostic criteria are the occurrence together of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy before 15 years of age. To describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular profile of WS in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico. We reviewed patients records who fulfill the minimum ascertainment diagnostic criteria of WS presenting between January 1987 and May 2015 in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico. Five patients fulfill the inclusion criteria (three male and two female). Diabetes mellitus was the first manifestation of the syndrome in all of them, with a mean age at diagnosis of 5.8 ± 2.71 years, while the WS diagnosis was established at a mean age of 15.8 ± 8.37 years. All the patients had optic atrophy and two of them presented with the complete DIDMOAD spectrum. We found new associations with autoimmune hepatitis and testicular cancer. This study shows the variability of clinical presentation of WS, as well as two new associations. Copyright: © 2017 SecretarÍa de Salud

  6. Local oestrogen for vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckling, J; Lethaby, A; Kennedy, R

    2006-10-18

    Vaginal atrophy is a frequent complaint of postmenopausal women; symptoms include vaginal dryness, itching, discomfort and painful intercourse. Systemic treatment for these symptoms in the form of oral hormone replacement therapy is not always necessary. An alternative choice is oestrogenic preparations administered vaginally (in the form of creams, pessaries, tablets and the oestradiol-releasing ring). The objective of this review was to compare the effectiveness, safety and acceptability of oestrogenic preparations for women who suffer from vaginal atrophy. We searched the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Register of trials (searched January 2006), The Cochrane Library (2006,Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2006), EMBASE (1980 to January 2006), Current Contents (1993 to January 2006, Biological Abstracts (1969 to 2006), Social Sciences Index (1980 to January 2006), PsycINFO (1972 to February 2006), CINAHL (1982 to January 2006) and reference list of articles. We also contacted manufacturers and researchers in the field. The inclusion criteria were randomised comparisons of oestrogenic preparations administered intravaginally in postmenopausal women for the treatment of symptoms resulting from vaginal atrophy or vaginitis. Thirty-seven trials were identified: of these 18 were excluded. Included trials were assessed for quality and two reviewer authors extracted data independently. The ratios for dichotomous outcomes and means for continuous outcomes were calculated. The outcomes analysed were categorised under the headings of: efficacy, safety and acceptability. Nineteen trials with 4162 women were included in this review. The overall quality of the studies was good, although not all trials measured the same outcomes. All trials measured efficacy, with various outcome measures. When comparing the efficacy of different oestrogenic preparations (in the form of creams, pessaries, tablets and the oestradiol-releasing vaginal ring) in relieving the

  7. Normalized regional brain atrophy measurements in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zivadinov, Robert; Locatelli, Laura; Stival, Barbara; Bratina, Alessio; Nasuelli, Davide; Zorzon, Marino; Grop, Attilio; Brnabic-Razmilic, Ozana

    2003-01-01

    There is still a controversy regarding the best regional brain atrophy measurements in multiple sclerosis (MS) studies. The aim of this study was to establish whether, in a cross-sectional study, the normalized measurements of regional brain atrophy correlate better with the MRI-defined regional brain lesions than the absolute measurements of regional brain atrophy. We assessed 45 patients with clinically definite relapsing-remitting (RR) MS (median disease duration 12 years), and measured T1-lesion load (LL) and T2-LL of frontal lobes and pons, using a reproducible semi-automated technique. The regional brain parenchymal volume (RBPV) of frontal lobes and pons was obtained by use of a computerized interactive program, which incorporates semi-automated and automated segmentation processes. A normalized measurement, the regional brain parenchymal fraction (RBPF), was calculated as the ratio of RBPV to the total volume of the parenchyma and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the frontal lobes and in the region of the pons. The total regional brain volume fraction (TRBVF) was obtained after we had corrected for the total volume of the parenchyma and the CSF in the frontal lobes and in the region of the pons for the total intracranial volume. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) for RBPF of the pons was 1% for intra-observer reproducibility and 1.4% for inter-observer reproducibility. Generally, the normalized measurements of regional brain atrophy correlated with regional brain volumes and disability better than did the absolute measurements. RBPF and TRBVF correlated with T2-LL of the pons (r=-0.37, P=0.011, and r= -0.40, P=0.0005 respectively) and with T1-LL of the pons (r=-0.27, P=0.046, and r=-0.31, P=0.04, respectively), whereas RBPV did not (r=-0.18, P = NS). T1-LL of the frontal lobes was related to RBPF (r=-0.32, P=0.033) and TRBVF (r=-0.29, P=0.05), but not to RBPV (R=-0.27, P= NS). There was only a trend of correlation between T2-LL of the frontal lobes and

  8. Young woman with a four-year history of epilepsy and progressive focal cortical atrophy — What is the diagnosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of disease progression in drug-refractory epilepsy is poorly understood. We report the case of a young woman with a four-year history of epilepsy that progressed rapidly as evidenced by the development of progressive focal cortical atrophy. She underwent biopsy that showed perinatal ischemia and a prominent inflammatory response, including T-cell infiltration and microglial activation. There was no consensus reached on the final diagnosis although the hypothesis of dual pathology (adult variant of Rasmussen's encephalitis and perinatal stroke was considered. The possible role of inflammation in the progression of epilepsy caused by a “static” lesion (perinatal stroke is discussed.

  9. Blood Pressure Control in Aging Predicts Cerebral Atrophy Related to Small-Vessel White Matter Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle C. Kern

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral small-vessel damage manifests as white matter hyperintensities and cerebral atrophy on brain MRI and is associated with aging, cognitive decline and dementia. We sought to examine the interrelationship of these imaging biomarkers and the influence of hypertension in older individuals. We used a multivariate spatial covariance neuroimaging technique to localize the effects of white matter lesion load on regional gray matter volume and assessed the role of blood pressure control, age and education on this relationship. Using a case-control design matching for age, gender, and educational attainment we selected 64 participants with normal blood pressure, controlled hypertension or uncontrolled hypertension from the Northern Manhattan Study cohort. We applied gray matter voxel-based morphometry with the scaled subprofile model to (1 identify regional covariance patterns of gray matter volume differences associated with white matter lesion load, (2 compare this relationship across blood pressure groups, and (3 relate it to cognitive performance. In this group of participants aged 60–86 years, we identified a pattern of reduced gray matter volume associated with white matter lesion load in bilateral temporal-parietal regions with relative preservation of volume in the basal forebrain, thalami and cingulate cortex. This pattern was expressed most in the uncontrolled hypertension group and least in the normotensives, but was also more evident in older and more educated individuals. Expression of this pattern was associated with worse performance in executive function and memory. In summary, white matter lesions from small-vessel disease are associated with a regional pattern of gray matter atrophy that is mitigated by blood pressure control, exacerbated by aging, and associated with cognitive performance.

  10. X-linked lethal infantile spinal muscular atrophy: From clinical description to molecular mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumbach, L.; Schiavi, A. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The proximal spinal muscular atrophies (PSMA), one of the most common forms of lower motor neuron disease in children, are characterized by progressive muscle weakness due to loss of anterior horn cells. All three autosomal recessive forms have been mapped to chromosome 5q11.2-11.3, implying an allelic association between these disorders. Recent evidence from our laboratories, as well as others, suggests that a distinct form of lethal neonatal spinal muscular atrophy, associated with early onset contractures, is determined by a gene on the X chromosome. We report our efforts in mapping this disease locus. Our original studies have focused on two unrelated multigenerational families with similar clinical presentations of severe hypotonia, muscle weakness, and a disease course similar to Werdnig Hoffman except for the additional finding of congenital or early onset contractures. Muscle biopsy and/or autopsy were indicative of anterior horn cell loss in affected males. Disease occurrence in each of the families was consistent with an X-linked recessive mode of inheritance. Subsequently, two additional families have been identified, as well as several sporadic male cases. Linkage analysis has been completed in one of these families using highly polymorphic repeats dispersed 10 cM on the X chromosome. Interpretation of results was achieved using an automated data acquisition program. Analysis of over 300 haplotypes generated using PCR-based DNA markers have identified two 16 cM regions on Xp with complete concordance to the disease phenotype. Our currents efforts are focused on the region surrounding the Kallman gene, in attempts to better define a candidate region, as well as analyze possible candidate genes within this region.

  11. Exercise training reverses skeletal muscle atrophy in an experimental model of VCP disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Nalbandian

    Full Text Available The therapeutic effects of exercise resistance and endurance training in the alleviation of muscle hypertrophy/atrophy should be considered in the management of patients with advanced neuromuscular diseases. Patients with progressive neuromuscular diseases often experience muscle weakness, which negatively impact independence and quality of life levels. Mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP gene lead to Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD and more recently affect 2% of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS-diagnosed cases.The present investigation was undertaken to examine the effects of uphill and downhill exercise training on muscle histopathology and the autophagy cascade in an experimental VCP mouse model carrying the R155H mutation. Progressive uphill exercise in VCP(R155H/+ mice revealed significant improvement in muscle strength and performance by grip strength and Rotarod analyses when compared to the sedentary mice. In contrast, mice exercised to run downhill did not show any significant improvement. Histologically, the uphill exercised VCP(R155H/+ mice displayed an improvement in muscle atrophy, and decreased expression levels of ubiquitin, P62/SQSTM1, LC3I/II, and TDP-43 autophagy markers, suggesting an alleviation of disease-induced myopathy phenotypes. There was also an improvement in the Paget-like phenotype.Collectively, our data highlights that uphill exercise training in VCP(R155H/+ mice did not have any detrimental value to the function of muscle, and may offer effective therapeutic options for patients with VCP-associated diseases.

  12. Endometrial safety of ultra-low-dose Vagifem 10 microg in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, L S G; Naessen, T; Elia, D

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the endometrial safety of a 10 microg estradiol vaginal tablet in the treatment of vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women.......The objective of the study was to evaluate the endometrial safety of a 10 microg estradiol vaginal tablet in the treatment of vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women....

  13. Intellectual enrichment lessens the effect of brain atrophy on learning and memory in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumowski, James F; Wylie, Glenn R; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; DeLuca, John

    2010-06-15

    Learning and memory impairments are prevalent among persons with multiple sclerosis (MS); however, such deficits are only weakly associated with MS disease severity (brain atrophy). The cognitive reserve hypothesis states that greater lifetime intellectual enrichment lessens the negative impact of brain disease on cognition, thereby helping to explain the incomplete relationship between brain disease and cognitive status in neurologic populations. The literature on cognitive reserve has focused mainly on Alzheimer disease. The current research examines whether greater intellectual enrichment lessens the negative effect of brain atrophy on learning and memory in patients with MS. Forty-four persons with MS completed neuropsychological measures of verbal learning and memory, and a vocabulary-based estimate of lifetime intellectual enrichment. Brain atrophy was estimated with third ventricle width measured from 3-T magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo MRIs. Hierarchical regression was used to predict learning and memory with brain atrophy, intellectual enrichment, and the interaction between brain atrophy and intellectual enrichment. Brain atrophy predicted worse learning and memory, and intellectual enrichment predicted better learning; however, these effects were moderated by interactions between brain atrophy and intellectual enrichment. Specifically, higher intellectual enrichment lessened the negative impact of brain atrophy on both learning and memory. These findings help to explain the incomplete relationship between multiple sclerosis disease severity and cognition, as the effect of disease on cognition is attenuated among patients with higher intellectual enrichment. As such, intellectual enrichment is supported as a protective factor against disease-related cognitive impairment in persons with multiple sclerosis.

  14. Dominant inherited distal spinal muscular atrophy with atrophic and hypertrophic calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R J; Sie, O G; van Weerden, T W

    The clinical, electrophysiological, radiological and morphological data of 3 members of a family with autosomal dominant distal spinal muscular atrophy (DSMA) are reported. One patient has the clinical picture of peroneal muscular atrophy with atrophic calves. His father and sister suffer from

  15. Infantile onset progressive cerebellar atrophy and anterior horn cell degeneration--a late onset variant of PCH-1?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Dorit; Michelson-Kerman, Marina; Vinkler, Chana; Blumkin, Lubov; Shalev, Stavit A; Lerman-Sagie, Tally

    2008-03-01

    Despite major recent advances in our understanding of developmental cerebellar disorders, classification and delineation of these disorders remains difficult. The term pontocerebellar hypoplasia is used when there is a structural defect, originating in utero of both pons and cerebellar hemispheres. The term olivopontocerebellar atrophy is used when the disorder starts later in life and the process is a primary degeneration of cerebellar neurons. Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1 is associated with spinal anterior horn cell degeneration, congenital contractures, microcephaly, polyhydramnion and respiratory insufficiency leading to early death. However, anterior horn cell degeneration has also been described in cases with later onset pontocerebellar atrophy and recently the spectrum has even been further extended to include the association of anterior horn cell degeneration and cerebellar atrophy without pontine involvement. We describe two siblings from a consanguineous Moslem Arabic family who presented with progressive degeneration of both the cerebellum and the anterior horn cells. The patients presented after 1 year of age with a slow neurodegenerative course that included both cognitive and motor functions. There is considerable phenotypic variability; the sister shows a much milder course. Both children are still alive at 6 and 9 years. The sister could still crawl and speak two word sentences at the age of 3 years while the brother was bedridden and only uttered guttural sounds at the same age. Our cases further extend the phenotype of the cerebellar syndromes with anterior horn cell involvement to include a childhood onset and protracted course and further prove that this neurodegenerative disorder may start in utero or later in life.

  16. Vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodsi Mohammad

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma most commonly presents with ipsilateral disturbances of acoustic, vestibular, trigeminal and facial nerves. Presentation of vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain is quite uncommon. Case presentation Among 156 cases of operated vestibular schwannoma, we found one case with unusual presentation of contralateral hemifacial pain. Conclusion The presentation of contralateral facial pain in the vestibular schwannoma is rare. It seems that displacement and distortion of the brainstem and compression of the contralateral trigeminal nerve in Meckel's cave by the large mass lesion may lead to this atypical presentation. The best practice in these patients is removal of the tumour, although persistent contralateral pain after operation has been reported.

  17. Porencephaly in dogs and cats: relationships between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and hippocampal atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Ai; Hanazono, Kiwamu; Miyoshi, Kenjirou; Nakade, Tetsuya

    2015-07-01

    Porencephaly is the congenital cerebral defect and a rare malformation and described few MRI reports in veterinary medicine. MRI features of porencephaly are recognized the coexistence with the unilateral/bilateral hippocampal atrophy, caused by the seizure symptoms in human medicine. We studied 2 dogs and 1 cat with congenital porencephaly to characterize the clinical signs and MRI, and to discuss the associated MRI with hippocampal atrophy. The main clinical sign was the seizure symptoms, and all had hippocampal atrophy at the lesion side or the larger defect side. There is association between hippocampal atrophy or the cyst volume and the severe of clinical signs, and it is suggested that porencephaly coexists with hippocampal atrophy as well as humans in this study.

  18. Differentiation of normal pressure hydrocephalus and cerebral atrophy by computed tomography and spinal infusion test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tans, J T.J. [Nijverheidsorganisatie TNO, The Hague (Netherlands). Dept. of Neurology and Research Unit TNO for Clinical Neurophysiology

    1979-01-01

    The diagnostic value of computed tomography (CT) and spinal infusion test (SIT) was investigated in 27 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) and 35 patients with cerebral atrophy. The most consistent CT finding of NPH was dilatation of the temporal horns, that of cerebral atrophy widening of the convexity sulci. However, 43% of patients with cerebral atrophy demonstrated no cortical atrophy. The SIT showed an excellent relation with isotope cisternography and continuous intracranial pressure recording. NPH and cerebral atrophy were correctly differentiated in 71% by CT and SIT. A normal SIT and a CT scan without the typical features of NPH exclude impairment of cerebrospinal fluid absorption. An abnormal SIT and a CT scan showing ventricular enlargement without dilatation of convexity sulci, require isotope cisternography and possibly intracranial pressure recording to determine the degree of the absorption deficit.

  19. A patient with posterior cortical atrophy possesses a novel mutation in the presenilin 1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia J Sitek

    Full Text Available Posterior cortical atrophy is a dementia syndrome with symptoms of cortical visual dysfunction, associated with amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles predominantly affecting visual association cortex. Most patients diagnosed with posterior cortical atrophy will finally develop a typical Alzheimer's disease. However, there are a variety of neuropathological processes, which could lead towards a clinical presentation of posterior cortical atrophy. Mutations in the presenilin 1 gene, affecting the function of γ-secretase, are the most common genetic cause of familial, early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Here we present a patient with a clinical diagnosis of posterior cortical atrophy who harbors a novel Presenilin 1 mutation (I211M. In silico analysis predicts that the mutation could influence the interaction between presenilin 1 and presenilin1 enhancer-2 protein, a protein partner within the γ-secretase complex. These findings along with published literature support the inclusion of posterior cortical atrophy on the Alzheimer's disease spectrum.

  20. A Patient with Posterior Cortical Atrophy Possesses a Novel Mutation in the Presenilin 1 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, Emilia J.; Narożańska, Ewa; Pepłońska, Beata; Filipek, Sławomir; Barczak, Anna; Styczyńska, Maria; Mlynarczyk, Krzysztof; Brockhuis, Bogna; Portelius, Erik; Religa, Dorota; Barcikowska, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy is a dementia syndrome with symptoms of cortical visual dysfunction, associated with amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles predominantly affecting visual association cortex. Most patients diagnosed with posterior cortical atrophy will finally develop a typical Alzheimer's disease. However, there are a variety of neuropathological processes, which could lead towards a clinical presentation of posterior cortical atrophy. Mutations in the presenilin 1 gene, affecting the function of γ-secretase, are the most common genetic cause of familial, early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Here we present a patient with a clinical diagnosis of posterior cortical atrophy who harbors a novel Presenilin 1 mutation (I211M). In silico analysis predicts that the mutation could influence the interaction between presenilin 1 and presenilin1 enhancer-2 protein, a protein partner within the γ-secretase complex. These findings along with published literature support the inclusion of posterior cortical atrophy on the Alzheimer's disease spectrum. PMID:23593396

  1. Computed tomographic (CT) study of the brains of 357 elderly demented patients. Clinical usefulness of CT measurements of brain atrophy and its correlation with mental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, Kazuhiko; Endo, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Kuzuya, Fumio

    1988-05-01

    It is well known that there is some limitation in the diagnostic effectiveness of brain computed tomography (CT) of dementia. Some investigators suggested certain correlation between brain atrophy and degree of psychological imparement in demented patients, but others did not agree with these suggestions. Authors have felt that the number of samples is very important in statistical analyses, thus they collected a great number of appropriate samples of dementia: that is, 59 of Alzheimer disease (AD), 120 of senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) and 178 of vascular dementia (VD), and compared these CT findings with those of 100 non-demented people. Firstly, we observed no relation between aging and brain atrophy in any type of dementia while there was a certain relation in non-demented people. Secondly, the female brain could easily become atrophic physiologically and was more severely atrophic in case of dementia compared with the male brain. Thirdly, it was impossible to differentiate SDAT from VD only by measuring values of dilatation of ventricles (maximum width of the third ventricle and cella media index) and sylvian fissures (''sylvian index''). Finally, it was observed that there was deep relation between the results of clinical assessments and the degree of brain atrophy in SDAT, because individual specificity in the type of atrophy was not variable in this type of dementia. Moreover all functions: that is, motor, intellectual, and emotional functions in SDAT patients, were impaired in the same degree respectively. From these results, authors could know many available characteristics of atrophy in the brains of demented patients through the following easy methods of measurement: linear measure method and ventricular-brain method, because we could analyse a sufficient number of samples.

  2. Recommendations for the management of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturdee, D W; Panay, N; Ulrich, Lian

    2010-01-01

    Unlike hot flushes and night sweats which resolve spontaneously in time, atrophic symptoms affecting the vagina and lower urinary tract are often progressive and frequently require treatment. The prevalence of vaginal dryness increases as a woman advances through the postmenopausal years, causing...... for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) over recent years that has suggested an increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease and stroke. But, regardless of whether these scares are justified, local treatment of vaginal atrophy is not associated with these possible risks of systemic HRT. Other reasons...... for the continued suffering in silence may be cultural and an understandable reluctance to discuss such matters, particularly with a male doctor, but the medical profession must also take much of the blame for failing to enquire of all postmenopausal women about the possibility of vaginal atrophic symptoms. Vaginal...

  3. Autonomic dysfunction in different subtypes of multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Claudia; Herting, Birgit; Prieur, Silke; Junghanns, Susann; Schweitzer, Katherine; Globas, Christoph; Schöls, Ludger; Reichmann, Heinz; Berg, Daniela; Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2008-09-15

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) can clinically be divided into the cerebellar (MSA-C) and the parkinsonian (MSA-P) variant. However, till now, it is unknown whether autonomic dysfunction in these two entities differs regarding severity and profile. We compared the pattern of autonomic dysfunction in 12 patients with MSA-C and 26 with MSA-P in comparison with 27 age- and sex-matched healthy controls using a standard battery of autonomic function tests and a structured anamnesis of the autonomic nervous system. MSA-P patients complained significantly more often about the symptoms of autonomic dysfunctions than MSA-C patients, especially regarding vasomotor, secretomotor, and gastrointestinal subsystems. However, regarding cardiovascular, sudomotor pupil, urogenital, and sleep subsystems, there were no significant quantitative or qualitative differences as analyzed by autonomic anamnesis and testing. Our results suggest that there are only minor differences in the pattern of autonomic dysfunction between the two clinical MSA phenotypes. (c) 2007 Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Recommendations of the Global Multiple System Atrophy Research Roadmap Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Ryan R; Krismer, Florian; Galpern, Wendy R; Wenning, Gregor K; Low, Phillip A; Halliday, Glenda; Koroshetz, Walter J; Holton, Janice; Quinn, Niall P; Rascol, Olivier; Shaw, Leslie M; Eidelberg, David; Bower, Pam; Cummings, Jeffrey L; Abler, Victor; Biedenharn, Judy; Bitan, Gal; Brooks, David J; Brundin, Patrik; Fernandez, Hubert; Fortier, Philip; Freeman, Roy; Gasser, Thomas; Hewitt, Art; Höglinger, Günter U; Huentelman, Matt J; Jensen, Poul H; Jeromin, Andreas; Kang, Un Jung; Kaufmann, Horacio; Kellerman, Lawrence; Khurana, Vikram; Klockgether, Thomas; Kim, Woojin Scott; Langer, Carol; LeWitt, Peter; Masliah, Eliezer; Meissner, Wassilios; Melki, Ronald; Ostrowitzki, Susanne; Piantadosi, Steven; Poewe, Werner; Robertson, David; Roemer, Cyndi; Schenk, Dale; Schlossmacher, Michael; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Seppi, Klaus; Shih, Lily; Siderowf, Andrew; Stebbins, Glenn T; Stefanova, Nadia; Tsuji, Shoji; Sutton, Sharon; Zhang, Jing

    2018-01-09

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with substantial knowledge gaps despite recent gains in basic and clinical research. In order to make further advances, concerted international collaboration is vital. In 2014, an international meeting involving leaders in the field and MSA advocacy groups was convened in Las Vegas, Nevada, to identify critical research areas where consensus and progress was needed to improve understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease. Eight topic areas were defined: pathogenesis, preclinical modeling, target identification, endophenotyping, clinical measures, imaging biomarkers, nonimaging biomarkers, treatments/trial designs, and patient advocacy. For each topic area, an expert served as a working group chair and each working group developed priority-ranked research recommendations with associated timelines and pathways to reach the intended goals. In this report, each groups' recommendations are provided. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Extent of hippocampal atrophy predicts degree of deficit in recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patai, Eva Zita; Gadian, David G; Cooper, Janine M; Dzieciol, Anna M; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-10-13

    Which specific memory functions are dependent on the hippocampus is still debated. The availability of a large cohort of patients who had sustained relatively selective hippocampal damage early in life enabled us to determine which type of mnemonic deficit showed a correlation with extent of hippocampal injury. We assessed our patient cohort on a test that provides measures of recognition and recall that are equated for difficulty and found that the patients' performance on the recall tests correlated significantly with their hippocampal volumes, whereas their performance on the equally difficult recognition tests did not and, indeed, was largely unaffected regardless of extent of hippocampal atrophy. The results provide new evidence in favor of the view that the hippocampus is essential for recall but not for recognition.

  6. Imaging geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, Arno P; Fleckenstein, Monika; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Brinkmann, Christian K; Holz, Frank G

    2011-01-01

    Advances in retinal imaging technology have largely contributed to the understanding of the natural history, prognostic markers and disease mechanisms of geographic atrophy (GA) due to age-related macular degeneration. There is still no therapy available to halt or slow the disease process. In order to evaluate potential therapeutic effects in interventional trials, there is a need for precise quantification of the GA progression rate. Fundus autofluorescence imaging allows for accurate identification and segmentation of atrophic areas and currently represents the gold standard for evaluating progressive GA enlargement. By means of high-resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, distinct microstructural alterations related to GA can be visualized. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Management of Vaginal Atrophy: Implications from the REVIVE Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Susan; Kingsberg, Sheryl; Krychman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA) is a chronic and progressive medical condition common in postmenopausal women. Symptoms of VVA such as dyspareunia, vaginal dryness, irritation, and itching can negatively impact sexual function and quality of life. The REVIVE (REal Women's VIews of Treatment Options for Menopausal Vaginal ChangEs) survey assessed knowledge about VVA and recorded attitudes about interactions with healthcare providers (HCPs) and available treatment options for VVA. The REVIVE survey identified unmet needs of women with VVA symptoms such as poor understanding of the condition, poor communication with HCPs despite the presence of vaginal symptoms, and concerns about the safety, convenience, and efficacy of available VVA treatments. HCPs can address these unmet needs by proactively identifying patients with VVA and educating them about the condition as well as discussing treatment preferences and available therapies for VVA.

  8. Splice-Switching Therapy for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina E. Meijboom

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a genetic disorder with severity ranging from premature death in infants to restricted motor function in adult life. Despite the genetic cause of this disease being known for over twenty years, only recently has a therapy been approved to treat the most severe form of this disease. Here we discuss the genetic basis of SMA and the subsequent studies that led to the utilization of splice switching oligonucleotides to enhance production of SMN protein, which is absent in patients, through a mechanism of exon inclusion into the mature mRNA. Whilst approval of oligonucleotide-based therapies for SMA should be celebrated, we also discuss some of the limitations of this approach and alternate genetic strategies that are currently underway in clinical trials.

  9. Astrocyte atrophy and immune dysfunction in self-harming macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kim M; Chiu, Kevin B; Sansing, Hope A; Inglis, Fiona M; Baker, Kate C; MacLean, Andrew G

    2013-01-01

    Self-injurious behavior (SIB) is a complex condition that exhibits a spectrum of abnormal neuropsychological and locomotor behaviors. Mechanisms for neuropathogenesis could include irregular immune activation, host soluble factors, and astrocyte dysfunction. We examined the role of astrocytes as modulators of immune function in macaques with SIB. We measured changes in astrocyte morphology and function. Paraffin sections of frontal cortices from rhesus macaques identified with SIB were stained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Morphologic features of astrocytes were determined using computer-assisted camera lucida. There was atrophy of white matter astrocyte cell bodies, decreased arbor length in both white and gray matter astrocytes, and decreased bifurcations and tips on astrocytes in animals with SIB. This was combined with a five-fold increase in the proportion of astrocytes immunopositive for TLR2. These results provide direct evidence that SIB induces immune activation of astrocytes concomitant with quantifiably different morphology.

  10. Quantitative evaluation of pontine atrophy using computer tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chida, K.; Kamikura, I.; Takasu, T.; Goto, N.

    1989-03-01

    Pontine volume was measured and evaluated by computer tomography (CT) in 37 healthy adults and in 29 adult autopsied brains who did not have chronic neurologic diseases. The pons was cut serially into 5 mm slices in the autopsied brains. In the CT examinations both 5 mm and 2 mm slices were studied. Pontine areas in horizontal planes were measured using an image analyzer, then pontine volume was calculated by accumulation of the mean value of the areas and cranio-caudal length. Pontine volume was approximately 19 cm/sup 3/ and pontine atrophy could be defined as less than 12 cm/sup 3/ (i.e. the mean - 2 SD) in both methods, which heretofore have not been reported.

  11. Progressive retinal atrophy in Shetland sheepdog is associated with a mutation in the CNGA1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiik, A C; Ropstad, E O; Ekesten, B; Karlstam, L; Wade, C M; Lingaas, F

    2015-10-01

    Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) is the collective name of a class of hereditary retinal dystrophies in the dog and is often described as the equivalent of retinitis pigmentosa in humans. PRA is characterized by visual impairment due to degeneration of the photoreceptors in the retina, usually leading to blindness. PRA has been reported in dogs from more than 100 breeds and can be genetically heterogeneous both between and within breeds. The disease can be subdivided by age at onset and rate of progression. Using genome-wide association with 15 Shetland Sheepdog (Sheltie) cases and 14 controls, we identified a novel PRA locus on CFA13 (Praw  = 8.55 × 10(-7) , Pgenome  = 1.7 × 10(-4) ). CNGA1, which is known to be involved in human cases of retinitis pigmentosa, was located within the associated region and was considered a likely candidate gene. Sequencing of this gene identified a 4-bp deletion in exon 9 (c.1752_1755delAACT), leading to a frameshift and a premature stop codon. The study indicated genetic heterogeneity as the mutation was present in all PRA-affected individuals in one large family of Shelties, whereas some other cases in the studied Sheltie population were not associated with this CNGA1 mutation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a mutation in CNGA1 causing PRA in dogs. © 2015 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  12. Depletion of catecholaminergic neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla in multiple systems atrophy with autonomic failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarroch, E. E.; Smithson, I. L.; Low, P. A.; Parisi, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    The ventrolateral portion of the intermediate reticular formation of the medulla (ventrolateral medulla, VLM), including the C1/A1 groups of catecholaminergic neurons, is thought to be involved in control of sympathetic cardiovascular outflow, cardiorespiratory interactions, and reflex control of vasopressin release. As all these functions are affected in patients with multiple systems atrophy (MSA) with autonomic failure, we sought to test the hypothesis that catecholaminergic (tyrosine hydroxylase [TH]-positive) neurons of the VLM are depleted in these patients. Medullas were obtained at autopsy from 4 patients with MSA with prominent autonomic failure and 5 patients with no neurological disease. Patients with MSA had laboratory evidence of severe adrenergic sudomotor and cardiovagal failure. Tissue was immersion fixed in 2% paraformaldehyde at 4 degrees C for 24 hours and cut into 1-cm blocks in the coronal plane from throughout the medulla. Serial 50-microm sections were collected and one section every 300 microm was stained for TH. There was a pronounced depletion of TH neurons in the rostral VLM in all cases of MSA. There was also significant reduction of TH neurons in the caudal VLM in 3 MSA patients compared with 3 control subjects. In 2 MSA cases and in 2 control subjects, the thoracic spinal cord was available for study. There was also depletion of TH fibers and sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPNs) in the 2 MSA cases examined. Thus, depletion of catecholaminergic neurons in the VLM may provide a substrate for some of the autonomic and endocrine manifestations of MSA.

  13. Postmenopausal vaginal atrophy: evaluation of treatment with local estrogen therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkin MJ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mary Jane Minkin,1 Ricardo Maamari,2 Suzanne Reiter3 1Department of Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 2Novo Nordisk Inc., Plainsboro, NJ, USA; 3Mid-County Health Center, Largo, FL, USA Abstract: Postmenopausal vaginal atrophy, resulting from decreased estrogen production, frequently requires treatment. Estrogen preparations provide the most effective treatment; local application is preferred to systemic drugs when treating only vaginal symptoms. As local estrogen therapies have comparable efficacy, this study aimed to understand treatment practices, assess experiences with different forms of local estrogen-delivering applicators, and evaluate satisfaction. Women who were US residents aged ≥18 years, menopausal (no spontaneous menstrual period for ≥1 year or with a double oophorectomy, and receiving local estrogen therapy for 1–6 months (vaginal cream [supplied with a reusable applicator] or vaginal tablets [supplied with a single-use/disposable applicator], completed an online questionnaire. Data from 200 women (100 cream users and 100 tablet users; mean therapy duration 3.48 months showed that most stored medication in the room in which it was applied (88% and applied it at bedtime (71%, a procedure for which cream users required, on average, more than twice the time of tablet users (5.08 minutes versus 2.48 minutes. Many cream users applied larger-than-prescribed amounts of cream, attempting to achieve greater efficacy (42%, or lower-than-recommended doses (45%, most frequently to avoid messiness (33% or leakage (30%. More tablet users (69% than cream users (14% were "extremely satisfied" with their applicator. Postmenopausal women using local estrogen therapy were generally more satisfied with the application of vaginal tablets than cream. Patient satisfaction may help to facilitate accurate dosing. Positive perceptions of medication will help to optimize treatment, which

  14. Therapeutic strategies for spinal muscular atrophy: SMN and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bowerman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a devastating neuromuscular disorder characterized by loss of motor neurons and muscle atrophy, generally presenting in childhood. SMA is caused by low levels of the survival motor neuron protein (SMN due to inactivating mutations in the encoding gene SMN1. A second duplicated gene, SMN2, produces very little but sufficient functional protein for survival. Therapeutic strategies to increase SMN are in clinical trials, and the first SMN2-directed antisense oligonucleotide (ASO therapy has recently been licensed. However, several factors suggest that complementary strategies may be needed for the long-term maintenance of neuromuscular and other functions in SMA patients. Pre-clinical SMA models demonstrate that the requirement for SMN protein is highest when the structural connections of the neuromuscular system are being established, from late fetal life throughout infancy. Augmenting SMN may not address the slow neurodegenerative process underlying progressive functional decline beyond childhood in less severe types of SMA. Furthermore, individuals receiving SMN-based treatments may be vulnerable to delayed symptoms if rescue of the neuromuscular system is incomplete. Finally, a large number of older patients living with SMA do not fulfill the present criteria for inclusion in gene therapy and ASO clinical trials, and may not benefit from SMN-inducing treatments. Therefore, a comprehensive whole-lifespan approach to SMA therapy is required that includes both SMN-dependent and SMN-independent strategies that treat the CNS and periphery. Here, we review the range of non-SMN pathways implicated in SMA pathophysiology and discuss how various model systems can serve as valuable tools for SMA drug discovery.

  15. White matter atrophy and cognitive dysfunctions in neuromyelitis optica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Blanc

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an inflammatory disease of central nervous system characterized by optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive acute transverse myelitis. NMO patients have cognitive dysfunctions but other clinical symptoms of brain origin are rare. In the present study, we aimed to investigate cognitive functions and brain volume in NMO. The study population consisted of 28 patients with NMO and 28 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex and educational level. We applied a French translation of the Brief Repeatable Battery (BRB-N to the NMO patients. Using SIENAx for global brain volume (Grey Matter, GM; White Matter, WM; and whole brain and VBM for focal brain volume (GM and WM, NMO patients and controls were compared. Voxel-level correlations between diminished brain concentration and cognitive performance for each tests were performed. Focal and global brain volume of NMO patients with and without cognitive impairment were also compared. Fifteen NMO patients (54% had cognitive impairment with memory, executive function, attention and speed of information processing deficits. Global and focal brain atrophy of WM but not Grey Matter (GM was found in the NMO patients group. The focal WM atrophy included the optic chiasm, pons, cerebellum, the corpus callosum and parts of the frontal, temporal and parietal lobes, including superior longitudinal fascicle. Visual memory, verbal memory, speed of information processing, short-term memory and executive functions were correlated to focal WM volumes. The comparison of patients with, to patients without cognitive impairment showed a clear decrease of global and focal WM, including brainstem, corticospinal tracts, corpus callosum but also superior and inferior longitudinal fascicles. Cognitive impairment in NMO patients is correlated to the decreased of global and focal WM volume of the brain. Further studies are needed to better understand the precise origin of cognitive impairment in

  16. Comparison with hippocampal atrophy and hypoperfusion in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, YA; Kim, SH; Chung, SK; Juh, RH; Sohn, HS; Suh, TS; Choe, BY

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Hypoperfusion and hippocampal atropy of the medial temporal lobe are peculiarity of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The manual ROI (region of interest) technique for hippocampal volume estimation is specific and sensitive for the detection of hippocampal atrophy. In patients with AD reported a significant correlation between hippocampal volume and hypoperfusion. This study investigated correlations between atrophy distinct medial temporal lobe structure and hypoperfusion in hippocampal volumetry. Methods: The hippocampi were individually outlined on Tl-weighted volumetry MRI and calculated with MATLAB in 12 patients with AD. All volume measurements were performed by a segmentation technique with a combination of tracing and thresholding. The volume of a given structure in each slice was obtained by automatically counting the number of pixels within the segmented regions and multiplying the number by a voxel size. In order to permit direct regional comparisons, both of each patient's Tc- 99m ECD SPECT was then registered to the patient's MRI. Delineation continued anteriorly in each contiguous slice reaching the head of the hippocampus, which was distinguished from the overlying amygdala by the presence of the alveus or uncal recess. The right hippocampus (RH) was measured first, followed by the left hippocampus (LH). The accuracy of registration was investigated in a validation study with developed brain phantom. Results:The mean total intracranial volume of the AD was significantly smaller volume (1492.9 cm 3 ) and hypo perfused than those in normal subjects. The mean hippocampal volumes were 2.01 cm 3 and l.99 cm 3 for the RH and LH. The correlations between volume and hypoperfusion in the affected hippocampi were found to be significant; especially the medial temporal lobe is markedly hypo perfused. Conclusion: Volumetry is the most sensitive tool for the detection of hippocampal abnormality in AD, and significant correlation between asymmetry in

  17. Analysis of MRI in chronic alcoholics with brain atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Sook; Kim, Myung Soon; Whang, Kum

    1997-01-01

    To quantitatively evaluate by MRI brain atrophy and abnormal parenchymal signal intensity on T2-weighted spin echo image in alcoholics. MRI of 24 alcoholic patients were retrospectively evaluated to measure brain atrophy (cerebral sulcal width, bifrontal horn distance, third ventricular width, fourth ventricular width, ambient cistern width, cerebellopontine angle cistern width, number of cerebellar sulci, and number of vermian sulci) and abnormal high signal lesions of brain parenchyma on T2-weighted spin echo image, and were compared with age matched controls (n=29). The alcoholics and controls were divided into two age groups, younger (30-49 years) and older (50-72 years), and statistical analysis was then performed. Axial and sagittal T1- and T2-weighted spin echo images were obtained using a 0.5 Tesla superconductive system. Statistical significant parameters in the supratentorial region were cerebral sulcal width, distance between lateral ends of frontal horns of both lateral ventricles, and third ventricular width (p < 0.05), and in the infratentorial region were fourth ventricular width, ambient cistern width, cerebellopontine angle cistern width, number of cerebellar sulci, and number of vermian sulci (p < 0.05). In the younger age group, statistical significant parameters were cerebral sulcal width, third ventricular width, ambient cistern width, cerebellopontine angle cistern width, number of cerebellar sulci, and number of vermian sulci (p < 0.05) and in the older group were cerebral sulcal width, bifrontal horn distance, third ventricular width, fourth ventricular width, number of cerebellar sulci, and number of vermian sulci (p < 0.05). Abnormal high signal intensity on T2-weighted spin echo images were seen in 46% of alcoholics (11/24) and in 13% of controls (3/29). High signal lesions in the older group were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Atrophic brain changes and periventricular high signal foci on T2-weighted spin echo image are

  18. Prominent fatigue in spinal muscular atrophy and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: evidence of activity-dependent conduction block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Yu-ichi; Misawa, Sonoko; Mori, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Naoki; Kanai, Kazuaki; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Isose, Sagiri; Nasu, Saiko; Sekiguchi, Yukari; Beppu, Minako; Ohmori, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Masanori; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2013-09-01

    To clarify whether patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) or spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) suffer disabling muscle fatigue, and whether activity-dependent conduction block (ADCB) contributes to their fatigue. ADCB is usually caused by reduced safety factor for impulse transmission in demyelinating diseases, whereas markedly increased axonal branching associated with collateral sprouting may reduce the safety factor in chronic lower motor neuron disorders. We assessed the fatigue severity scale (FSS) in 22 patients with SMA/SBMA, and in 100 disease controls (multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), and axonal neuropathy). We then performed stimulated-single fibre electromyography (s-SFEMG) in the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscle of 21 SMA/SBMA patients, 6 CIDP patients, and 10 normal subjects. The FSS score was the highest in SMA/SBMA patients [4.9 ± 1.1 (mean ± SD)], with 81% of them complaining of disabling fatigue, compared with normal controls (3.5 ± 1.0), whereas patients with multiple sclerosis (4.3 ± 1.6), myasthenia gravis (4.0 ± 1.6) or CIDP (4.3 ± 1.4) also showed higher FSS score. When 2000 stimuli were delivered at 20 Hz in s-SFEMG, conduction block of single motor axons developed in 46% of patients with SMA/SBMA, and 40% of CIDP patients, but in none of the normal controls. SMA/SBMA patients frequently suffer from disabling fatigue presumably caused by ADCB induced by voluntary activity. ADCB could be the mechanism for muscle fatigue in chronic lower motor neuron diseases. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Default mode network links to visual hallucinations: A comparison between Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciotti, Raffaella; Delli Pizzi, Stefano; Perfetti, Bernardo; Tartaro, Armando; Bonanni, Laura; Thomas, Astrid; Weis, Luca; Biundo, Roberta; Antonini, Angelo; Onofrj, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Studying default mode network activity or connectivity in different parkinsonisms, with or without visual hallucinations, could highlight its roles in clinical phenotypes' expression. Multiple system atrophy is the archetype of parkinsonism without visual hallucinations, variably appearing instead in Parkinson's disease (PD). We aimed to evaluate default mode network functions in multiple system atrophy in comparison with PD. Functional magnetic resonance imaging evaluated default mode network activity and connectivity in 15 multiple system atrophy patients, 15 healthy controls, 15 early PD patients matched for disease duration, 30 severe PD patients (15 with and 15 without visual hallucinations), matched with multiple system atrophy for disease severity. Cortical thickness and neuropsychological evaluations were also performed. Multiple system atrophy had reduced default mode network activity compared with controls and PD with hallucinations, and no differences with PD (early or severe) without hallucinations. In PD with visual hallucinations, activity and connectivity was preserved compared with controls and higher than in other groups. In early PD, connectivity was lower than in controls but higher than in multiple system atrophy and severe PD without hallucinations. Cortical thickness was reduced in severe PD, with and without hallucinations, and correlated only with disease duration. Higher anxiety scores were found in patients without hallucinations. Default mode network activity and connectivity was higher in PD with visual hallucinations and reduced in multiple system atrophy and PD without visual hallucinations. Cortical thickness comparisons suggest that functional, rather than structural, changes underlie the activity and connectivity differences. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  20. Characteristic MRI findings in multiple system atrophy: comparison of the three subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naka, H.; Ohshita, T.; Murata, Y.; Imon, Y.; Mimori, Y.; Nakamura, S. [Department of Internal Medicine, Hiroshima University School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    We reviewed MRI findings in 29 patients with probable multiple system atrophy (MSA) to see whether there were common and or less common neuroradiological findings in the various clinical subtypes. We divided the patients into three clinical subtypes according to initial and predominant symptoms: 14 with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), eight with the Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS) and seven with striatonigral degeneration (SND). The patients showed atrophy of the brain stem and cerebellum, high signal on T2-weighted images of the base of the pons and middle cerebellar peduncles, high and low signal on T2-weighted images of the putamen and atrophy of frontal and parietal lobes. The degree of atrophy of the middle cerebellar peduncle and cerebellum was greater in OPCA patients and a high-signal lateral rim to the putamen more frequent in SND. However, all findings were observed in all subtypes, and the degrees of atrophy of the putamen and pons and the frequency of high signal in the base of the pons were similar in the subtypes. We also found atrophy of the cerebral hemispheres, especially the frontal and parietal lobes, but its degree was not significantly different in the various subtypes. Our findings suggest that, although MSA can be divided clinically into three subtypes, most of the features on MRI are common and overlap in the subtypes, independently of the clinical presentation. (orig.)

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vis, J.B. de; Zwanenburg, J.J.; Kleij, L.A. van der; Spijkerman, J.M.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Biessels, G.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Petersen, E.T. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hvidovre Hospital, Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre (Denmark)

    2016-05-15

    To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T{sub 2} of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T{sub 1}-weighted and CSF MRI were performed. The first echo data of the CSF MRI sequence was used to obtain intracranial volume, CSF partial volume was measured voxel-wise to obtain CSF volume (V{sub CSF}) and the T{sub 2} of CSF (T{sub 2,CSF}) was calculated. The correlation between V{sub CSF} / T{sub 2,CSF} and brain atrophy scores [global cortical atrophy (GCA) and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA)] was evaluated. Relative total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular V{sub CSF} increased significantly with increased scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.83, 0.78 and 0.78 and R = 0.72, 0.62 and 0.86). Total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular T{sub 2} of the CSF increased significantly with higher scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.72, 0.70 and 0.49 and R = 0.60, 0.57 and 0.41). A fast, fully automated CSF MRI volumetric sequence is an alternative for qualitative atrophy scales. The T{sub 2} of the CSF is related to brain atrophy and could thus be a marker of neurodegenerative disease. (orig.)

  2. Potential hippocampal region atrophy in diabetes mellitus type 2. A voxel-based morphometry VSRAD study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiyama, Kazutoshi; Sugihara, Masaki; Wada, Akihiko

    2010-01-01

    Among diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) patients, the frequency of cognitive dysfunction is higher and the relative risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is approximately twice that of nondiabetics. Cognitive impairment symptoms of AD are induced by limbic system dysfunction, and an early-stage AD brain without dementia has the potential for atrophy in the hippocampal region. In this study, we estimated potential hippocampal region atrophy in DM2 and pursued the association between DM2 and cognitive impairment/AD. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed in 28 diabetics (14 men, 14 women; ages 59-79 years, mean 70.7 years) and 28 sex- and age- matched (±1 year) nondiabetics. Severity of gray matter loss in the hippocampal region and whole brain were investigated. Group analysis was performed using two-tailed unpaired t-test; significance was assumed with less than 1% (P<0.01) of the critical rate. There was a significant difference between diabetics and nondiabetics regarding the severity of hippocampal region atrophy and whole-brain atrophy. Only diabetics showed a positive correlation for severity of hippocampal region atrophy and whole-brain atrophy (rs=0.69, P<0.0001). Aged DM2 patients have the potential for hippocampal region atrophy, and its dysfunction can be related to the expression of a cognitive impairment that resembles AD. (author)

  3. Age-related infra-tentorial brain atrophy on CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitani, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Okada, Kazunori; Murata, Akihiro; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro

    1985-01-01

    We had reported that the brain atrophy progressed significantly with advancing age using the two dimensional CT measurement by digitizer which was connected with personal computer. Using this method, we studied the age-related infra-tentrial brain atrophy in 67 normal subjects (14-90 years), and compared that with age-related supra-tentrial brain atrophy. There was a significant correlation between age and all indices [cranio-ventricular index (CVI), ventricular area index (VAI) and brain atrophy index (BAI)] in supratentrial brain. These indices did not correlated to the age in infra-tentrial brain (brainstem and cerebellum). Significant change of the brain atrophy occured above 60 years old was observed by BAI and VAI in supra-tentrial brain. There was a significant correlation between supra-tentrial brain atrophy index (BAI) and that of infratentrial brain. These results indicate that age-related brain atrophy might progress more slowly in brainstem and cerebellum than in cerebrum. (author)

  4. The relationship between tear severity, fatty infiltration, and muscle atrophy in the supraspinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Jeffrey J; Lansdown, Drew A; Cheung, Sunny; Feeley, Brian T; Ma, C Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy have been described as interrelated characteristic changes that occur within the muscles of the rotator cuff after cuff tears, and both are independently associated with poor outcomes after surgical repair. We hypothesize that fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy are two distinct processes independently associated with supraspinatus tears. A retrospective review of 377 patients who underwent shoulder magnetic resonance imaging at one institution was performed. Multivariate analysis was performed based on parameters including age, sex, rotator cuff tear severity, fatty infiltration grade, and muscle atrophy. A total of 116 patients (30.8%) had full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, 153 (40.6%) had partial thickness tears, and 108 (28.7%) had no evidence of tear. With increasing tear severity, the prevalence of substantial fatty infiltration (grade ≥2) increased: 6.5% of patients with no tears vs 41.4% for complete tears (P tear severity: 36.1% of no tears vs 77.6% of complete tears (P muscle atrophy when taking into account sex, age, and tear severity. Fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy are independently associated processes. Fatty infiltration is also related to increasing age, muscle tear severity, and sex, whereas muscle atrophy is related to increasing age but not tear severity. In patients without rotator cuff tears, fatty infiltration and atrophy prevalence increased independently with increasing age. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Facial nerve hemangioma: a rare case involving the vertical segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Neda; Newkirk, Kenneth; Kim, H Jeffrey

    2013-02-01

    This case report and literature review reports on a rare case of facial nerve hemangioma (FNH) involving the vertical facial nerve (FN) segment, and discusses the clinical presentation, imaging, pathogenesis, and management of these rare lesions. A 53-year-old male presented with a 10-year history of right hemifacial twitching and progressive facial paresis (House-Brackmann grading score V/VI). The computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies confirmed an expansile lesion along the vertical FN segment. Excision and histopathologic examination demonstrated FNH. FNHs involving the vertical FN segment are extremely rare. Despite being rare lesions, we believe that familiarity with the presentation and management of FNHs are imperative. Laryngoscope, 2012. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. MRI findings of serous atrophy of bone marrow and associated complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutin, Robert D. [Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); White, Lawrence M. [University of Toronto, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Laor, Tal [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Spitz, Damon J. [New England Baptist Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Lopez-Ben, Robert R. [Carolinas HealthCare System, Charlotte Radiology, Diagnostic Radiology, Charlotte, NC (United States); Stevens, Kathryn J. [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    To report the MRI appearance of serous atrophy of bone marrow (SABM) and analyse clinical findings and complications of SABM. A retrospective search of MRI examinations of SABM was performed. Symptoms, underlying conditions, MRI findings, delay in diagnosis and associated complications were recorded. We identified 30 patients (15 male, 15 female; mean age: 46 ± 21 years) with MRI findings of SABM. Underlying conditions included anorexia nervosa (n = 10), cachexia from malignant (n = 5) and non-malignant (n = 7) causes, massive weight loss after bariatric surgery (n = 1), biliary atresia (n = 1), AIDS (n = 3), endocrine disorders (n = 2) and scurvy (n = 1). MRI showed mildly hypointense signal on T1- weighted and hyperintense signal on fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive images of affected bone marrow in all cases and similar signal abnormalities of the adjacent subcutaneous fat in 29/30 cases. Seven patients underwent repeat MRI due to initial misinterpretation of bone marrow signal as technical error. Superimposed fractures of the hips and lower extremities were common (n = 14). SABM occurs most commonly in anorexia nervosa and cachexia. MRI findings of SABM are often misinterpreted as technical error requiring unnecessary repeat imaging. SABM is frequently associated with fractures of the lower extremities. (orig.)

  7. MRI findings of serous atrophy of bone marrow and associated complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutin, Robert D.; White, Lawrence M.; Laor, Tal; Spitz, Damon J.; Lopez-Ben, Robert R.; Stevens, Kathryn J.; Bredella, Miriam A.

    2015-01-01

    To report the MRI appearance of serous atrophy of bone marrow (SABM) and analyse clinical findings and complications of SABM. A retrospective search of MRI examinations of SABM was performed. Symptoms, underlying conditions, MRI findings, delay in diagnosis and associated complications were recorded. We identified 30 patients (15 male, 15 female; mean age: 46 ± 21 years) with MRI findings of SABM. Underlying conditions included anorexia nervosa (n = 10), cachexia from malignant (n = 5) and non-malignant (n = 7) causes, massive weight loss after bariatric surgery (n = 1), biliary atresia (n = 1), AIDS (n = 3), endocrine disorders (n = 2) and scurvy (n = 1). MRI showed mildly hypointense signal on T1- weighted and hyperintense signal on fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive images of affected bone marrow in all cases and similar signal abnormalities of the adjacent subcutaneous fat in 29/30 cases. Seven patients underwent repeat MRI due to initial misinterpretation of bone marrow signal as technical error. Superimposed fractures of the hips and lower extremities were common (n = 14). SABM occurs most commonly in anorexia nervosa and cachexia. MRI findings of SABM are often misinterpreted as technical error requiring unnecessary repeat imaging. SABM is frequently associated with fractures of the lower extremities. (orig.)

  8. Combining the boundary shift integral and tensor-based morphometry for brain atrophy estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalkiewicz, Mateusz; Pai, Akshay; Leung, Kelvin K.; Sommer, Stefan; Darkner, Sune; Sørensen, Lauge; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads

    2016-03-01

    Brain atrophy from structural magnetic resonance images (MRIs) is widely used as an imaging surrogate marker for Alzheimers disease. Their utility has been limited due to the large degree of variance and subsequently high sample size estimates. The only consistent and reasonably powerful atrophy estimation methods has been the boundary shift integral (BSI). In this paper, we first propose a tensor-based morphometry (TBM) method to measure voxel-wise atrophy that we combine with BSI. The combined model decreases the sample size estimates significantly when compared to BSI and TBM alone.

  9. Aspiration pneumonia induces muscle atrophy in the respiratory, skeletal, and swallowing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Riyo; Okazaki, Tatsuma; Ebihara, Satoru; Kobayashi, Makoto; Tsukita, Yoko; Nihei, Mayumi; Sugiura, Hisatoshi; Niu, Kaijun; Ebihara, Takae; Ichinose, Masakazu

    2018-05-22

    Repetition of the onset of aspiration pneumonia in aged patients is common and causes chronic inflammation. The inflammation induces proinflammatory cytokine production and atrophy in the muscles. The proinflammatory cytokines induce muscle proteolysis by activating calpains and caspase-3, followed by further degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Autophagy is another pathway of muscle atrophy. However, little is known about the relationship between aspiration pneumonia and muscle. For swallowing muscles, it is not clear whether they produce cytokines. The main objective of this study was to determine whether aspiration pneumonia induces muscle atrophy in the respiratory (the diaphragm), skeletal (the tibialis anterior, TA), and swallowing (the tongue) systems, and their possible mechanisms. We employed a mouse aspiration pneumonia model and computed tomography (CT) scans of aged pneumonia patients. To induce aspiration pneumonia, mice were inoculated with low dose pepsin and lipopolysaccharide solution intra-nasally 5 days a week. The diaphragm, TA, and tongue were isolated, and total RNA, proteins, and frozen sections were stored. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction determined the expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines, muscle E3 ubiquitin ligases, and autophagy related genes. Western blot analysis determined the activation of the muscle proteolysis pathway. Frozen sections determined the presence of muscle atrophy. CT scans were used to evaluate the muscle atrophy in aged aspiration pneumonia patients. The aspiration challenge enhanced the expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the diaphragm, TA, and tongue. Among muscle proteolysis pathways, the aspiration challenge activated caspase-3 in all the three muscles examined, whereas calpains were activated in the diaphragm and the TA but not in the tongue. Activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system was detected in all the three muscles examined. The aspiration challenge

  10. [Ethical attitudes of intensive care paediatricians as regards patients with spinal muscular atrophy type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agra Tuñas, María Carmen; Hernández Rastrollo, Ramón; Hernández González, Arturo; Ramil Fraga, Carmen; Cambra Lasaosa, Francisco José; Quintero Otero, Sebastián; Ruiz Extremera, Angela; Rodríguez Núñez, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA-1) is a progressive and fatal disease that leads to ethical problems for Paediatric professionals. Our objective was to determine the ethical options of Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) paediatricians as regards a child with SMA-1 and respiratory failure. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using an anonymous questionnaire sent to PICUs in Spain (which can be accessed through the Spanish Society of Paediatric Critical Care web page). Of the 124 responses analysed, 70% were from women, 51% younger than 40 years, 54% from a PICU with more than 10 beds, 69% with prior experience in such cases, and 53% with religious beliefs. In the last patient cared for, most paediatricians opted for non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) and limitation of therapeutic effort (LET) in case of NIV failure. Confronted with a future hypothetical case, half of paediatricians would opt for the same plan (NIV+LET), and 74% would support the family's decision, even in case of disagreement. Age, prior experience and sex were not related to the preferred options. Paediatricians with religious beliefs were less in favour of initial LET. Less than two-thirds (63%) scored the quality of life of a child with SMA-1 and invasive mechanical ventilation as very poor. Faced with child with SMA-1 and respiratory failure, most paediatricians are in favour of initiating NIV and LET when such support is insufficient, but they would accept the family's decision, even in case of disagreement. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. [Evaluation of diffuse cerebral atrophy in patients with a history of traumatic brain injury and its relation to cognitive deterioration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narberhaus, A; Segarra-Castells, M D; Verger-Maestre, K; Serra-Grabulosa, J M; Salgado-Pineda, P; Bartomeus-Jené, F; Mercader-Sobrequés, J M

    Diffuse damage secondary to traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be studied through volumetric analysis of several structures that are sensible to this kind of injury, such as corpus callosum, ventricular system, hippocampus, basal ganglia and the volume of cerebrospinal fluid spaces. Our aim is to describe how closed head injury (CHI) occurred in early years produce diffuse damage, and how this damage affects general cognitive functioning at long term. Initially the group of subjects was composed of 27 head injured children and adolescents following paediatric moderate to severe TBI. From this initial group we selected 15 patients without focal lesion, or in case of having suffered focal lesion, this was smaller than 2,600 mm3. These subjects were assessed by means of volumetric analysis of cerebrospinal fluid spaces, corpus callosum, hippocampus and caudate nucleus, comparing the results with a matched control group. We calculated the degree of general cognitive ability of these subjects through tests of intellectual, memory, frontal lobe and motor speed functioning. This study demonstrates that early CHI produce a volume decrease in all measured structures. Corpus callosum atrophy is the factor that better explains general cognitive impairment. Diffuse damage secondary to moderate to severe peadiatric TBI has long term effects on several cerebral structures and on cognitive performance. Corpus callosum atrophy is the best predictor for general cognitive impairment, compared with other affected structures.

  12. The yearly rate of Relative Thalamic Atrophy (yrRTA): a simple 2D/3D method for estimating deep gray matter atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez-González, Manuel; Salas-Pacheco, José M; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Despite a strong correlation to outcome, the measurement of gray matter (GM) atrophy is not being used in daily clinical practice as a prognostic factor and monitor the effect of treatments in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). This is mainly because the volumetric methods available to date are sophisticated and difficult to implement for routine use in most hospitals. In addition, the meanings of raw results from volumetric studies on regions of interest are not always easy to understand. Thus, there is a huge need of a methodology suitable to be applied in daily clinical practice in order to estimate GM atrophy in a convenient and comprehensive way. Given the thalamus is the brain structure found to be more consistently implied in MS both in terms of extent of atrophy and in terms of prognostic value, we propose a solution based in this structure. In particular, we propose to compare the extent of thalamus atrophy with the extent of unspecific, global brain atrophy, represented by ventricular enlargement. We name this ratio the "yearly rate of Relative Thalamic Atrophy" (yrRTA). In this report we aim to describe the concept of yrRTA and the guidelines for computing it under 2D and 3D approaches and explain the rationale behind this method. We have also conducted a very short crossectional retrospective study to proof the concept of yrRTA. However, we do not seek to describe here the validity of this parameter since these researches are being conducted currently and results will be addressed in future publications.

  13. The yearly rate of Relative Thalamic Atrophy (yrRTA: a simple 2D/3D method for estimating deep gray matter atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eMenéndez-González

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite a strong correlation to outcome, the measurement of gray matter (GM atrophy is not being used in daily clinical practice as a prognostic factor and monitor the effect of treatments in Multiple Sclerosis (MS. This is mainly because the volumetric methods available to date are sophisticated and difficult to implement for routine use in most hospitals. In addition, the meaning of raw results from volumetric studies on regions of interest are not always easy to understand. Thus, there is a huge need of a methodology suitable to be applied in daily clinical practice in order to estimate GM atrophy in a convenient and comprehensive way. Given the thalamus is the brain structure found to be more consistently implied in MS both in terms of extent of atrophy and in terms of prognostic value, we propose a solution based in this structure. In particular, we propose to compare the extent of thalamus atrophy (TA with the extent of unspecific, global brain atrophy, represented by ventricular enlargement. We name this ratio the yearly rate of Relative Thalamic Atrophy (yrRTA. In this report we aim to describe the concept of yrRTA and the guidelines for computing it under 2D and 3D approaches and explain the rationale behind this method. We have also conducted a very short crossectional retrospective study to proof the concept of yrRTA. However, we do not seek to describe here the validity of this parameter since these researches are being conducted currently and results will be addressed in future publications.

  14. Cognitive Impairments in Multiple System Atrophy of the Cerebellar Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun J. Hong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose We investigated the cognitive profiles in a large sample of patients with multiple system atrophy-cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C and compared directly them in patients with clinical diagnosis of probable MSA-C without dementia and control subjects with intact cognition. Methods We prospectively enrolled 26 patients with clinical diagnosis of probable MSA-C. All patients underwent a standardized neuropsychological test of the Seoul Neuropsychological Screening Battery. Results The score of Korean version of the Mini- Mental State Examination was significantly lower in patients with MSA-C (27.2 ± 2.5 than in control subjects (28.9 ± 1.0, p = 0.003. Patients with MSA-C showed a significantly worse performance in visuospatial function, 3 words recall, verbal immediate, delayed and recognition memory, visual delayed memory, phonemic and sementic Controlled Oral Word Association Test, and ideomotor praxis (p < 0.05. Conclusions Patients with MSA-C show more severe and more widespread cognitive dysfunctions than controls. Our results also indicate that cognitive dysfunction in patients with MCA-C is suggestive of disruption of the cerebellocortical circuits.

  15. Polyhexamethyleneguanidine phosphate induces severe lung inflammation, fibrosis, and thymic atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jeong Ah; Park, Hyun-Ju; Yang, Mi-Jin; Jung, Kyung Jin; Yang, Hyo-Seon; Song, Chang-Woo; Lee, Kyuhong

    2014-07-01

    Polyhexamethyleneguanidine phosphate (PHMG-P) has been widely used as a disinfectant because of its strong bactericidal activity and low toxicity. However, in 2011, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Ministry of Health and Welfare reported that a suspicious outbreak of pulmonary disease might have originated from humidifier disinfectants. The purpose of this study was to assess the toxicity of PHMG-P following direct exposure to the lung. PHMG-P (0.3, 0.9, or 1.5 mg/kg) was instilled into the lungs of mice. The levels of proinflammatory markers and fibrotic markers were quantified in lung tissues and flow cytometry was used to evaluate T cell distribution in the thymus. Administration of PHMG-P induced proinflammatory cytokines elevation and infiltration of immune cells into the lungs. Histopathological analysis revealed a dose-dependent exacerbation of both inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis on day 14. PHMG-P also decreased the total cell number and the CD4(+)/CD8(+) cell ratio in the thymus, with the histopathological examination indicating severe reduction of cortex and medulla. The mRNA levels of biomarkers associated with T cell development also decreased markedly. These findings suggest that exposure of lung tissue to PHMG-P leads to pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis as well as thymic atrophy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Frontal lobe atrophy of the brain in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Tomio

    1981-01-01

    Reported here are the CT findings on cerebral atrophic lesion chiefly developed in the frontal lobe in schizophrenics with unusual organic encephalopathy. Encephalopathy was recognized in 84 (73%) of 115 schizophrenics and 13 (33%) of 40 neurotics. In an attempt to exclude the effects of aging on encephalopathy, the ages at CT and at the development of disease, the number of morbid years, subtypical schizophrenia and relation between the clinical severity and the atrophic condition were comparatively studied. As a result, cerebral atrophy tended to increase along with aging, but the findings differed in that atrophia classified by age covered the entire brain in general, whereas atrophia in schizophrenics was found in the frontal lobe. In particular, because of the fact that clinical severity and atrophia in the frontal lobe are high correlated and that severe atrophia is recognized even in young people, schizophrenia and atrophia in the frontal lobe are considered to be closely related to each other. It is therefore suggested that the CT findings are useful to clinicians for finding appropriate methods to deal with the prognosis of schizophrenics in their daily diagnosis and for the therapeutic prevention of encephalatrophy by stimulating the frontal lobe, thereby delaying mental deterioration. (author)

  17. Use of fundus autofluorescence images to predict geographic atrophy progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearelly, Srilaxmi; Khanifar, Aziz A; Lederer, David E; Lee, Jane J; Ghodasra, Jason H; Stinnett, Sandra S; Cousins, Scott W

    2011-01-01

    Fundus autofluorescence imaging has been shown to be helpful in predicting progression of geographic atrophy (GA) secondary to age-related macular degeneration. We assess the ability of fundus autofluorescence imaging to predict rate of GA progression using a simple categorical scheme. Subjects with GA secondary to age-related macular degeneration with fundus autofluorescence imaging acquired at least 12 months apart were included. Rim area focal hyperautofluorescence was defined as percentage of the 500-μm-wide margin bordering the GA that contained increased autofluorescence. Rim area focal hyperautofluorescence on baseline fundus autofluorescence images was assessed and categorized depending on the extent of rim area focal hyperautofluorescence (Category 1: ≤33%; Category 2: between 33 and 67%; Category 3: ≥67%). Total GA areas at baseline and follow-up were measured to calculate change in GA progression. Forty-five eyes of 45 subjects were included; average duration of follow-up was 18.5 months. Median growth rates differed among categories of baseline rim area focal hyperautofluorescence (P = 0.01 among Categories 1, 2, and 3; P = 0.008 for Category 1 compared with Category 3, Jonckheere-Terpstra test). A simple categorical scheme that stratifies the amount of increased autofluorescence in the 500-μm margin bordering GA may be used to differentiate faster and slower progressors.

  18. Post-operative swallowing in multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueha, R; Nito, T; Sakamoto, T; Yamauchi, A; Tsunoda, K; Yamasoba, T

    2016-02-01

    Some patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) require surgical interventions such as tracheostomy and aspiration prevention. Few studies have investigated the postoperative clinical course of MSA patients. The aim of this study was to determine a management strategy for dysphagia and respiratory disorder in MSA. From 2001 to 2014, 18 MSA patients (13 males and 5 females, 52-76 years) underwent tracheostomy (TR, n = 11) or laryngeal closure (LC, n = 12). Five patients underwent LC following TR. Vocal fold impairment, the degree of dysphagia and pre/post-operative oral ingestion, and postoperative survival time were evaluated retrospectively. Swallowing function was assessed using the penetration aspiration scale (PAS). TR was performed due to respiratory disorder in seven patients and due to dysphagia in four patients. PAS scores ranged 1-8 in TR patients and 7-8 in LC patients. Seven of 11 patients who underwent TR displayed worsened PAS scores, and no patients displayed improved PAS scores following TR. All patients who underwent LC regained complete or partial oral intake after surgery. There were no significant differences in postoperative survival time between the two groups. Considering the impacts of TR and LC on survival time, postoperative feeding and swallowing, LC is a good option for treating MSA patients with dysphagia. © 2015 EAN.

  19. Spinal muscular atrophy associated with progressive myoclonus epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaloglu, Haluk; Melki, Judith

    2016-09-01

    A rare syndrome characterized by lower motor neuron disease associated with progressive myoclonic epilepsy, referred to as "spinal muscular atrophy associated with progressive myoclonic epilepsy" (SMA-PME), has been described in childhood and is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. SMA-PME is caused by mutation in the ASAH1 gene encoding acid ceramidase. Ceramide and the metabolites participate in various cellular events as lipid mediators. The catabolism of ceramide in mammals occurs in lysosomes through the activity of ceramidase. Three different ceramidases (acid, neutral and alkaline) have been identified and appear to play distinct roles in sphingolipid metabolism. The enzymatic activity of acid ceramidase is deficient in two rare inherited disorders; Farber disease and SMA-PME. Farber disease is a very rare and severe autosomal recessive condition with a distinct clinical phenotype. The marked difference in disease manifestations may explain why Farber and SMA-PME diseases were not previously suspected to be allelic conditions. The precise molecular mechanism underlying the phenotypic differences remains to be clarified. Recently, a condition with mutation in CERS1, the gene encoding ceramide synthase 1, has been identified as a novel form of PME. This finding underlies the essential role of enzymes regulating either the synthesis (CERS1) or degradation (ASAH1) of ceramide, and the link between defects in ceramide metabolism and PME.

  20. Astrocyte atrophy and immune dysfunction in self-harming macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim M Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Self-injurious behavior (SIB is a complex condition that exhibits a spectrum of abnormal neuropsychological and locomotor behaviors. Mechanisms for neuropathogenesis could include irregular immune activation, host soluble factors, and astrocyte dysfunction. METHODS: We examined the role of astrocytes as modulators of immune function in macaques with SIB. We measured changes in astrocyte morphology and function. Paraffin sections of frontal cortices from rhesus macaques identified with SIB were stained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2. Morphologic features of astrocytes were determined using computer-assisted camera lucida. RESULTS: There was atrophy of white matter astrocyte cell bodies, decreased arbor length in both white and gray matter astrocytes, and decreased bifurcations and tips on astrocytes in animals with SIB. This was combined with a five-fold increase in the proportion of astrocytes immunopositive for TLR2. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide direct evidence that SIB induces immune activation of astrocytes concomitant with quantifiably different morphology.

  1. Progressive Retinal Atrophy in the Border Collie: A new XLPRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Anne

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several forms of progressive retinal atrophy (PRA segregate in more than 100 breeds of dog with each PRA segregating in one or a few breeds. This breed specificity may be accounted for by founder effects and genetic drift, which have reduced the genetic heterogeneity of each breed, thereby facilitating the identification of causal mutations. We report here a new form of PRA segregating in the Border Collie breed. The clinical signs, including the loss of night vision and a progressive loss of day vision, resulting in complete blindness, occur at the age of three to four years and may be detected earlier through systematic ocular fundus examination and electroretinography (ERG. Results Ophthalmic examinations performed on 487 dogs showed that affected dogs present a classical form of PRA. Of those, 274 have been sampled for DNA extraction and 87 could be connected through a large pedigree. Segregation analysis suggested an X-linked mode of transmission; therefore both XLPRA1 and XLPRA2 mutations were excluded through the genetic tests. Conclusion Having excluded these mutations, we suggest that this PRA segregating in Border Collie is a new XLPRA (XLPRA3 and propose it as a potential model for the homologous human disease, X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa.

  2. Progressive retinal atrophy in the Border Collie: a new XLPRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilboux, Thierry; Chaudieu, Gilles; Jeannin, Patricia; Delattre, Delphine; Hedan, Benoit; Bourgain, Catherine; Queney, Guillaume; Galibert, Francis; Thomas, Anne; André, Catherine

    2008-03-03

    Several forms of progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) segregate in more than 100 breeds of dog with each PRA segregating in one or a few breeds. This breed specificity may be accounted for by founder effects and genetic drift, which have reduced the genetic heterogeneity of each breed, thereby facilitating the identification of causal mutations. We report here a new form of PRA segregating in the Border Collie breed. The clinical signs, including the loss of night vision and a progressive loss of day vision, resulting in complete blindness, occur at the age of three to four years and may be detected earlier through systematic ocular fundus examination and electroretinography (ERG). Ophthalmic examinations performed on 487 dogs showed that affected dogs present a classical form of PRA. Of those, 274 have been sampled for DNA extraction and 87 could be connected through a large pedigree. Segregation analysis suggested an X-linked mode of transmission; therefore both XLPRA1 and XLPRA2 mutations were excluded through the genetic tests. Having excluded these mutations, we suggest that this PRA segregating in Border Collie is a new XLPRA (XLPRA3) and propose it as a potential model for the homologous human disease, X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa.

  3. Aging affects the transcriptional regulation of human skeletal muscle disuse atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, Charlotte Arneboe; Frandsen, Ulrik; Jensen, Line

    2012-01-01

    Important insights concerning the molecular basis of skeletal muscle disuse-atrophy and aging related muscle loss have been obtained in cell culture and animal models, but these regulatory signaling pathways have not previously been studied in aging human muscle. In the present study, muscle...... atrophy was induced by immobilization in healthy old and young individuals to study the time-course and transcriptional factors underlying human skeletal muscle atrophy. The results reveal that irrespectively of age, mRNA expression levels of MuRF-1 and Atrogin-1 increased in the very initial phase (2......-4 days) of human disuse-muscle atrophy along with a marked reduction in PGC-1α and PGC-1β (1-4 days) and a ∼10% decrease in myofiber size (4 days). Further, an age-specific decrease in Akt and S6 phosphorylation was observed in young muscle within the first days (1-4 days) of immobilization. In contrast...

  4. The diagnosis of thymoma and thymic atrophy in patients with myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sund, K.K.; Skeie, G.O.; Gilhus, N.E.; Aarli, J.A.; Varhaug, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have compared clinical, immunological and radiological data in 20 patients with myasthenia gravis and thymoma and in 21 patients with myasthenia gravis and thymic atrophy. The median age at onset was 54 years in the thymoma group and 63 years in the thymic atrophy group. The severity of the disease was similar in the two groups, and there was no significant difference in the concentration of acetylcholine receptor antibodies. CA antibodies were demonstrated in 17/20 thymoma patients and in 6/21 with thymic atrophy, while 19/20 thymoma patients had antibodies to titin, compared with 9/21 among those with thymic atrophy. The diagnosis and treatment of patients with myasthenia gravis is based upon an evaluation of clinical, immunological and radiological data. 28 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Long-term effects of amyloid, hypometabolism, and atrophy on neuropsychological functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossenkoppele, R.; van der Flier, W.M.; Verfaillie, S.C.J.; Vrenken, H.; Versteeg, A.; van Schijndel, R.A.; Sikkes, S.A.; Twisk, J.; Adriaanse, S.M.; Zwan, M.D.; Boellaard, R.; Windhorst, A.D.; Barkhof, F.; Scheltens, P.; Lammertsma, A.A.; van Berckel, B.N.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess how amyloid deposition, glucose hypometabolism, and cerebral atrophy affect neuropsychological performance in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and controls over time. Methods: A total of 41 patients with AD dementia,

  6. Prevention of pectus excavatum for children with spinal muscular atrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, John R; Bianchi, Carlo

    2003-10-01

    To demonstrate the elimination of pectus excavatum and promotion of more normal lung growth and chest wall development by the use of high-span positive inspiratory pressure plus positive end-expiratory pressure (PIP+PEEP), patients with spinal muscular atrophy type 1 with paradoxical breathing were placed on high-span PIP+PEEP when sleeping from the point of diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy. Although the appearance of pectus excavatum is ubiquitous in untreated infants with spinal muscular atrophy type 1, after institution of high-span PIP+PEEP, pectus resolves and lungs and chest walls grow more normally. High-span PIP+PEEP is indicated for all infants diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy who demonstrate paradoxical breathing for the purpose of promoting more normal lung and chest development.

  7. Atrophy of sacrospinal muscle groups in patients with chronic, diffusely radiating lumbar back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    After surgery necessitated by lumbar back pain syndromes, radiolucency verified by CT may appear in the sacrospinal muscle group on the operate side. This radiolucency represents muscular atrophy and is in its most severe form a result of the replacement of muscle tissue with adipose tissue. Such muscular atrophy appeared in the present series in 31 out of all 156 patients (19.9%) and in 29 out of 94 patients operated on because of radiating lumbar back pain (30.9%). The radiological appearance, extent, and HU values of this muscular atrophy are presented in detail. Only weak correlations with the multitude of clinical symptoms and signs were found in this retrospective study. The effects of irreversible muscular atrophy on the indications for surgery and physiotherapy are discussed.

  8. Atrophy of sacrospinal muscle groups in patients with chronic, diffusely radiating lumbar back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laasonen, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    After surgery necessitated by lumbar back pain syndromes, radiolucency verified by CT may appear in the sacrospinal muscle group on the operate side. This radiolucency represents muscular atrophy and is in its most severe form a result of the replacement of muscle tissue with adipose tissue. Such muscular atrophy appeared in the present series in 31 out of all 156 patients (19.9%) and in 29 out of 94 patients operated on because of radiating lumbar back pain (30.9%). The radiological appearance, extent, and HU values of this muscular atrophy are presented in detail. Only weak correlations with the multitude of clinical symptoms and signs were found in this retrospective study. The effects of irreversible muscular atrophy on the indications for surgery and physiotherapy are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Progressive cerebellar atrophy and polyneuropathy: expanding the spectrum of PNKP mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poulton, C.; Oegema, R.; Heijsman, D.; Hoogeboom, J.; Schot, R.; Stroink, H.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Verheijen, F.W.; Spek, P. van der; Kremer, A.; Mancini, G.M.S.

    2013-01-01

    We present a neurodegenerative disorder starting in early childhood of two brothers consisting of severe progressive polyneuropathy, severe progressive cerebellar atrophy, microcephaly, mild epilepsy, and intellectual disability. The cause of this rare syndrome was found to be a homozygous mutation

  10. Imaging of the Macula Indicates Early Completion of Structural Deficit in Autosomal-Dominant Optic Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Milea, Dan; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables 3-dimensional imaging of the retina, including the layer of ganglion cells that supplies the optic nerve with its axons. We tested OCT as means of diagnosing and phenotyping autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (ADOA)....

  11. Subacute brain atrophy induced by radiation therapy to the malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, Akio; Matsutani, Masao; Takakura, Kintomo.

    1987-01-01

    In order to analyze brain atrophy after radiation therapy to the brain tumors, we calculated a CSF-cranial volume ratio on CT scan as an index of brain atrophy, and estimated dementia-score by Hasegawa's method in 91 post-irradiated patients with malignant brain tumors. Radiation-induced brain atrophy was observed in 51 out of 91 patients (56 %) and dementia in 23 out of 47 patients (49 %). These two conditions were closely related, and observed significantly more often in aged and whole-brain-irradiated patients. As radiation-induced brain atrophy accompanied by dementia appeared 2 - 3 months after the completion of radiation therapy, it should be regarded as a subacute brain injury caused by radiation therapy. (author)

  12. Brain atrophy in the visual cortex and thalamus induced by severe stress in animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Takanobu; Oishi, Naoya; Ikoma, Kazuya; Nishimura, Isao; Sakai, Yuki; Matsuda, Kenichi; Yamada, Shunji; Tanaka, Masaki; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Narumoto, Jin; Fukui, Kenji

    2017-10-06

    Psychological stress induces many diseases including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); however, the causal relationship between stress and brain atrophy has not been clarified. Applying single-prolonged stress (SPS) to explore the global effect of severe stress, we performed brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition and Voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Significant atrophy was detected in the bilateral thalamus and right visual cortex. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry for Iba-1 as the marker of activated microglia indicates regional microglial activation as stress-reaction in these atrophic areas. These data certify the impact of severe psychological stress on the atrophy of the visual cortex and the thalamus. Unexpectedly, these results are similar to chronic neuropathic pain rather than PTSD clinical research. We believe that some sensitisation mechanism from severe stress-induced atrophy in the visual cortex and thalamus, and the functional defect of the visual system may be a potential therapeutic target for stress-related diseases.

  13. Bilateral spontaneous dislocation of posterior chamber intraocular lens in a patient with gyrate atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kinori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with gyrate atrophy, a rare metabolic disease, who had bilateral late spontaneous posterior dislocation of in-the-bag posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL. He underwent pars plana vitrectomy, PCIOL retrieval and anterior chamber intraocular lens implantation in both eyes. This report may imply that patients with gyrate atrophy are at risk for spontaneous dislocation of intraocular lenses.

  14. Cerebral atrophy as outcome measure in short-term phase 2 clinical trials in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elskamp, I.J. van den; Boden, B.; Barkhof, F. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dattola, V. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Messina, Department of Neurosciences, Psychiatric and Anaesthesiological Sciences, Messina (Italy); Knol, D.L. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Filippi, M. [Scientific Institute and University Ospedale San Raffaele, Neuroimaging Research Unit, Milan (Italy); Kappos, L. [University Hospital, University of Basel, Department of Neurology, Basel (Switzerland); Fazekas, F. [Medical University of Graz, Department of Neurology, Graz (Austria); Wagner, K. [Bayer-Schering Pharma, Berlin (Germany); Pohl, C. [Bayer-Schering Pharma, Berlin (Germany); University Hospital Bonn, Department of Neurology, Bonn (Germany); Sandbrink, R. [Bayer-Schering Pharma, Berlin (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University Dusseldorf, Department of Neurology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Polman, C.H. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Uitdehaag, B.M.J. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    Cerebral atrophy is a compound measure of the neurodegenerative component of multiple sclerosis (MS) and a conceivable outcome measure for clinical trials monitoring the effect of neuroprotective agents. In this study, we evaluate the rate of cerebral atrophy in a 6-month period, investigate the predictive and explanatory value of other magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures in relation to cerebral atrophy, and determine sample sizes for future short-term clinical trials using cerebral atrophy as primary outcome measure. One hundred thirty-five relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients underwent six monthly MRI scans from which the percentage brain volume change (PBVC) and the number and volume of gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing lesions, T2 lesions, and persistent black holes (PBH) were determined. By means of multiple linear regression analysis, the relationship between focal MRI variables and PBVC was assessed. Sample size calculations were performed for all patients and subgroups selected for enhancement or a high T2 lesion load at baseline. A significant atrophy occurred over 6 months (PBVC = -0.33%, SE = 0.061, p < 0.0001). The number of baseline T2 lesions (p = 0.024), the on-study Gd-enhancing lesion volume (p = 0.044), and the number of on-study PBHs (p = 0.003) were associated with an increased rate of atrophy. For a 50% decrease in rate of atrophy, the sample size calculations showed that approximately 283 patients per arm are required in an unselected sampled population and 185 patients per arm are required in a selected population. Within a 6-month period, significant atrophy can be detected and on-study associations of PBVC and PBHs emphasizes axonal loss to be a driving mechanism. Application as primary outcome measure in short-term clinical trials with feasible sample size requires a potent drug to obtain sufficient power. (orig.)

  15. A Possible Link between Gastric Mucosal Atrophy and Gastric Cancer after Helicobacter pylori Eradication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomitsu Tahara

    Full Text Available The effect of H. pylori eradication in gastric cancer prevention can be attributed to the improvement of atrophic gastritis, which is a known risk of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer has also been diagnosed after long-term H. pylori eradication. This study aimed to clarify the association between gastric atrophy and gastric cancer after H. pylori eradication, including its clinicopathological features.A total of 55 consecutive patients with 64 early gastric cancers (EGCs diagnosed after H. pylori eradication were enrolled. The degree of endoscopic atrophy and the histological degrees of mononuclear cell infiltration, atrophy, and metaplasia in the corpus and adjacent mucosa of the EGCs were determined and scored.The majority of EGCs (63/64 were located within the endoscopically assessed atrophic mucosa or along the atrophic border. The adjacent mucosa of the EGCs presented significantly higher degrees of all histological parameters than in the corpus (mononuclear cell infiltration, 0.86+/-0.09 vs. 0.51+/-0.11, P = 0.016; atrophy, 1.77+/-0.13 vs. 0.65+/-0.14, P<0.0001; metaplasia, 1.68+/-0.13 vs. 0.48+/-0.1, P<0.0001. The degree of endoscopic atrophy improved in the patients with longer post-H. pylori eradication periods; however, this trend was not observed for the histological parameters, and high degrees of atrophy and metaplasia were observed in the adjacent mucosa of the EGCs compared with the corpus during all periods (all P<0.05. The histological degrees of atrophy and metaplasia in the adjacent mucosa were particularly higher in the patients who underwent eradication due to gastric ulcers.Severe gastric atrophy remained in the adjacent mucosa of the EGCs after H. pylori eradication, which may be linked to gastric carcinogenesis.

  16. Klinefelter′s syndrome associated with progressive muscular atrophy simulating Kennedy′s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Enrique Jiménez Caballero

    2012-01-01

    Kennedy's disease, an X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, is characterized by loss of lower motor neurons. Mild sensory deficits, gynecomastia and infertility may be observed. Klinefelter's syndrome is a variation of sex chromosome disorder characterized by hypogonadism, gynecomastia and azoospermia, and the most frequent karyotype is XXY. A 55-year-old man who presented with slowly progressive and diffuse neurogenic muscle atrophy without bulbar or sensory symptoms. He also had Klin...

  17. Correlation between hippocampal volumes and medial temporal lobe atrophy in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dhikav, Vikas; Duraiswamy, Sharmila; Anand, Kuljeet Singh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Hippocampus undergoes atrophy in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Calculation of hippocampal volumes can be done by a variety of methods using T1-weighted images of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Medial temporal lobes atrophy (MTL) can be rated visually using T1-weighted MRI brain images. The present study was done to see if any correlation existed between hippocampal volumes and visual rating scores of the MTL using Scheltens Visual Rating Method. Materia...

  18. Molecular events underlying skeletal muscle atrophy and the development of effective countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, F. W.; Criswell, D. S.

    1997-01-01

    Skeletal muscle adapts to loading; atrophying when exposed to unloading on Earth or in spaceflight. Significant atrophy (decreases in muscle fiber cross-section of 11-24%) in humans has been noted after only 5 days in space. Since muscle strength is determined both by muscle cross-section and synchronization of motor unit recruitment, a loss in muscle size weakens astronauts, which would increase risks to their safety if an emergency required maximal muscle force. Numerous countermeasures have been tested to prevent atrophy. Resistant exercise together with growth hormone and IGF-I are effective countermeasures to unloading as most atrophy is prevented in animal models. The loss of muscle protein is due to an early decrease in protein synthesis rate and a later increase in protein degradation. The initial decrease in protein synthesis is a result of decreased protein translation, caused by a prolongation in the elongation rate. A decrease in HSP70 by a sight increase in ATP may be the factors prolonging elongation rate. Increases in the activities of proteolytic enzymes and in ubiquitin contribute to the increased protein degradation rate in unloaded muscle. Numerous mRNA concentrations have been shown to be altered in unloaded muscles. Decreases in mRNAs for contractile proteins usually occur after the initial fall in protein synthesis rates. Much additional research is needed to determine the mechanism by which muscle senses the absence of gravity with an adaptive atrophy. The development of effective countermeasures to unloading atrophy will require more research.

  19. Three-Dimensional Culture Model of Skeletal Muscle Tissue with Atrophy Induced by Dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazunori; Genma, Riho; Gotou, Yuuki; Nagasaka, Sumire; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-15

    Drug screening systems for muscle atrophy based on the contractile force of cultured skeletal muscle tissues are required for the development of preventive or therapeutic drugs for atrophy. This study aims to develop a muscle atrophy model by inducing atrophy in normal muscle tissues constructed on microdevices capable of measuring the contractile force and to verify if this model is suitable for drug screening using the contractile force as an index. Tissue engineered skeletal muscles containing striated myotubes were prepared on the microdevices for the study. The addition of 100 µM dexamethasone (Dex), which is used as a muscle atrophy inducer, for 24 h reduced the contractile force significantly. An increase in the expression of Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 in the tissues treated with Dex was established. A decrease in the number of striated myotubes was also observed in the tissues treated with Dex. Treatment with 8 ng/mL Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF-I) for 24 h significantly increased the contractile force of the Dex-induced atrophic tissues. The same treatment, though, had no impact on the force of the normal tissues. Thus, it is envisaged that the atrophic skeletal muscle tissues induced by Dex can be used for drug screening against atrophy.

  20. Bilateral hippocampal atrophy in temporal lobe epilepsy: Effect of depressive symptoms and febrile seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finegersh, Andrey; Avedissian, Christina; Shamim, Sadat; Dustin, Irene; Thompson, Paul M.; Theodore, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Purpose Neuroimaging studies suggest a history of febrile seizures, and depression, are associated with hippocampal volume reductions in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Methods We used radial atrophy mapping (RAM), a three-dimensional (3D) surface modeling tool, to measure hippocampal atrophy in 40 patients with unilateral TLE, with or without a history of febrile seizures and symptoms of depression. Multiple linear regression was used to single out the effects of covariates on local atrophy. Key Findings Subjects with a history of febrile seizures (n = 15) had atrophy in regions corresponding to the CA1 and CA3 subfields of the hippocampus contralateral to seizure focus (CHC) compared to those without a history of febrile seizures (n = 25). Subjects with Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) score ≥14 (n = 11) had atrophy in the superoanterior portion of the CHC compared to subjects with BDI-II <14 (n = 29). Significance Contralateral hippocampal atrophy in TLE may be related to febrile seizures or depression. PMID:21269286

  1. Stem cell-derived neurotrophic support for the neuromuscular junction in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tanya J; Keirstead, Hans S

    2010-11-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by specific degeneration of α-motor neurons in the spinal cord. The use of cell transplantation to restore lost function through cell replacement or prevent further degeneration of motor neurons and synapses through neurotrophic support heralds tremendous hope in the SMA field. Much research has been carried out in the last decade on the use of embryonic stem cells in cell replacement strategies for various neurodegenerative diseases. Cell replacement is contingent on the ability of transplanted cells to integrate and form new functional connections with host cells. In the case of SMA, cell replacement is a tall order in that axons of transplanted cells would be required to grow over long distances from the spinal cord through growth-averse terrain to synapse with muscles in the periphery. The efficacy of neurotrophic support is contingent on the ability of transplanted cells to secrete neurotrophins appropriate for degenerating motor neurons in the spinal cord or development/stability of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in the periphery. The reader will gain an understanding of the potential of neurotrophins to promote development of the NMJ in a diseased or injured environment. Neurotrophins play a major role in NMJ development and thus may be a key factor in the pathogenesis of NMJs in SMA. Further research into the signaling mechanisms involved in NMJ maturation may identify additional mechanisms by which transplanted cells may be of therapeutic benefit.

  2. Optic Nerve Atrophy Due to Long-Standing Compression by Planum Sphenoidale Meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Somma, Alberto; Kaen, Ariel Matias; Cárdenas Ruiz-Valdepeñas, Eugenio; Cavallo, Luigi Maria

    2018-05-01

    In this study we report an uncommon endoscopic endonasal image of an atrophic optic nerve as seen after surgical removal of a suprasellar meningioma. The peculiarity of this case is the long-lasting underestimated ocular symptomatology of the patient who reported a 15-year history of impairment of vision on her left eye. A 51-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of a 15-year history of impairment of vision on her left eye. After making serendipitously the diagnosis of a suprasellar mass, we performed endoscopic endonasal surgery. The tumor was reached from below and removed safely, without manipulation of the optic pathways. At the end of tumor removal, the impressive left optic nerve atrophy due to enduring local tumor compression was visualized. To the best of our knowledge, no endoscopic endonasal image with such features has been provided in the pertinent literature. Possibly, this contribution will help identify damaged optic nerves during endoscopic endonasal surgery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [A sixty-year-old man suffering from multiple system atrophy with pneumatosis intestinalis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Fumitaka; Kawai, Motoharu; Ogasawara, Jun-Ichi; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Kanda, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    We herein report a 60-year-old man demonstrating multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar type (MSA-C) with a five-year of clinical history, who developed severe constipation followed by watery diarrhea. An abdominal CT scan showed free air in the abdominal cavity and extensive pericolic gas accumulation in the ascending and transverse colon. He was diagnosed to have pneumatosis intestinalis (PI). The air in the abdominal cavity as well as in the wall of the colon thereafter disappeared after nine days' of conservative therapy. The presense of chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction due to severe dysautonomia and a longstanding bed-ridden state may have been the cause of PI in this patient. This is the first case report of PI associated with MSA; however, the association of PI may have been overlooked in this disorder because of severe constipation and diarrhea, the two cardinal symptoms of PI, which happen to also be two of the typical symptoms of MSA itself.

  4. The segmentation of zones with increased autofluorescence in the junctional zone of parapapillary atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolář, R; Jan, J; Laemmer, R; Mardin, Ch Y

    2009-01-01

    The autofluorescence (AF) derived from the retinal pigment epithelium has the potential to be used as a feature for early glaucoma diagnosis. The aim of this paper is to design and evaluate the method used for semi-automatic segmentation of the zones with increased autofluorescence. A randomized sample of 20 patients (age: 56 ± 10 years) with open angle glaucoma was used. A new method for semi-automatic detection and segmentation of the zones with a higher level of autofluorescence in the junctional zone of parapapillary atrophy has been evaluated. Good agreement has been observed between manually and semi-automatically segmented zones for most of the images, but higher differences may occur for larger hyperfluorescent regions. The data were evaluated using the limits of agreement, with a 2σ border. The described method allows fast and objective evaluation of AF images, preventing undesirable inter-expert variance. A large proportion of AF images could be evaluated successfully by the developed procedure, and the obtained results are comparable to the manual procedure in most cases

  5. Dysfunction of the neuromuscular junction in spinal muscular atrophy types 2 and 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadman, Renske I; Vrancken, Alexander F J E; van den Berg, Leonard H; van der Pol, W Ludo

    2012-11-13

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is pathologically characterized by degeneration of anterior horn cells. Recent observations in animal models of SMA and muscle tissue from patients with SMA suggest additional abnormalities in the development and maturation of the neuromuscular junction. We therefore evaluated neuromuscular junction function in SMA with repetitive nerve stimulation. In this case-control study, repetitive nerve stimulation was performed in 35 patients with SMA types 2, 3, and 4, 20 healthy controls, and 5 controls with motor neuron disease. Pathologic decremental responses (>10%) during 3-Hz repetitive nerve stimulation were observed in 17 of 35 patients (49%) with SMA types 2 and 3, but not in healthy controls or controls with motor neuron disease. None of the patients or controls had an abnormal incremental response of >60%. The presence of an abnormal decremental response was not specific for the type of SMA, nor was it associated with compound muscle action potential amplitude, clinical scores, or disease duration. Two of 4 patients with SMA type 3 who tried pyridostigmine reported increased stamina. These data suggest dysfunction of the neuromuscular junction in patients with SMA types 2 and 3. Therefore, drugs that facilitate neuromuscular transmission are candidate drugs for evaluation in carefully designed, placebo-controlled, clinical trials.

  6. Goldenhar syndrome: Report of two cases with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Madiyal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome consists of a varied group of malformations that can involve multiple systems of the body. It is believed to be a variant of hemifacial microsomia with ocular and vertebral involvement. Characteristic findings, such as hypoplasia of one half of the face, epibulbar dermoids, ear tags, and spinal cord defects, warrant the name occulo-auriculo-vertebral dysplasia. The syndrome occurs due to imbalance in cells during the blastogenesis period of embryo formation. It is found to involve the derivatives of first and second branchial arches. The condition is apparent at birth, but the phenotype can vary greatly in its severity depending on the activation and expression of the defective gene. Reported here are detailed clinical and radiographic features of two sporadic cases of Goldenhar syndrome in young males. This work mainly highlights the various theories of etiopathogenesis as well as step-wise management protocol for patients diagnosed with the syndrome.

  7. Sex-related and tissue-specific effects of tobacco smoking on brain atrophy: assessment in a large longitudinal cohort of healthy elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin eDuriez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the cross-sectional and longitudinal effects of tobacco smoking on brain atrophy in a large cohort of healthy elderly participants (65 to 80 years. MRI was used for measuring whole brain (WB, gray matter (GM, white matter (WM, and hippocampus (HIP volumes at study entry time (baseline, N=1,451, and the annualized rates of variation of these volumes using a 4-year follow-up MRI in a subpart of the cohort (N=1,111. Effects of smoking status (never, former, or current smoker at study entry and of lifetime tobacco consumption on these brain phenotypes were studied using sex-stratified AN(COVAs, including other health parameters as covariates. At baseline, male current smokers had lower GM, while female current smokers had lower WM. In addition, female former smokers exhibited reduced baseline HIP, the reduction being correlated with lifetime tobacco consumption. Longitudinal analyses demonstrated that current smokers, whether men or women, had larger annualized rates of HIP atrophy, as compared to either current or former smokers, independent of their lifetime consumption of tobacco. There was no effect of smoking on the annualized rate of WM loss. In all cases, measured sizes of these tobacco-smoking effects were of the same order of magnitude than those of age, and larger than effect sizes of any other covariate. These results demonstrate gender- and tissue specific effects of tobacco smoking on brain atrophy. They indicate that tobacco smoking is a major factor of brain aging, with notable effects on the hippocampus annualized-rate of atrophy after the age of 65.

  8. Automated segmentation of geographic atrophy using deep convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Ziyuan; Sadda, SriniVas R.

    2018-02-01

    Geographic atrophy (GA) is an end-stage manifestation of the advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness and visual impairment in developed nations. Techniques to rapidly and precisely detect and quantify GA would appear to be of critical importance in advancing the understanding of its pathogenesis. In this study, we develop an automated supervised classification system using deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for segmenting GA in fundus autofluorescene (FAF) images. More specifically, to enhance the contrast of GA relative to the background, we apply the contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization. Blood vessels may cause GA segmentation errors due to similar intensity level to GA. A tensor-voting technique is performed to identify the blood vessels and a vessel inpainting technique is applied to suppress the GA segmentation errors due to the blood vessels. To handle the large variation of GA lesion sizes, three deep CNNs with three varying sized input image patches are applied. Fifty randomly chosen FAF images are obtained from fifty subjects with GA. The algorithm-defined GA regions are compared with manual delineation by a certified grader. A two-fold cross-validation is applied to evaluate the algorithm performance. The mean segmentation accuracy, true positive rate (i.e. sensitivity), true negative rate (i.e. specificity), positive predictive value, false discovery rate, and overlap ratio, between the algorithm- and manually-defined GA regions are 0.97 +/- 0.02, 0.89 +/- 0.08, 0.98 +/- 0.02, 0.87 +/- 0.12, 0.13 +/- 0.12, and 0.79 +/- 0.12 respectively, demonstrating a high level of agreement.

  9. Machine learning algorithms to classify spinal muscular atrophy subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Tuhin; Darras, Basil T; Wu, Jim S; Rutkove, Seward B

    2012-07-24

    The development of better biomarkers for disease assessment remains an ongoing effort across the spectrum of neurologic illnesses. One approach for refining biomarkers is based on the concept of machine learning, in which individual, unrelated biomarkers are simultaneously evaluated. In this cross-sectional study, we assess the possibility of using machine learning, incorporating both quantitative muscle ultrasound (QMU) and electrical impedance myography (EIM) data, for classification of muscles affected by spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Twenty-one normal subjects, 15 subjects with SMA type 2, and 10 subjects with SMA type 3 underwent EIM and QMU measurements of unilateral biceps, wrist extensors, quadriceps, and tibialis anterior. EIM and QMU parameters were then applied in combination using a support vector machine (SVM), a type of machine learning, in an attempt to accurately categorize 165 individual muscles. For all 3 classification problems, normal vs SMA, normal vs SMA 3, and SMA 2 vs SMA 3, use of SVM provided the greatest accuracy in discrimination, surpassing both EIM and QMU individually. For example, the accuracy, as measured by the receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (ROC-AUC) for the SVM discriminating SMA 2 muscles from SMA 3 muscles was 0.928; in comparison, the ROC-AUCs for EIM and QMU parameters alone were only 0.877 (p < 0.05) and 0.627 (p < 0.05), respectively. Combining EIM and QMU data categorizes individual SMA-affected muscles with very high accuracy. Further investigation of this approach for classifying and for following the progression of neuromuscular illness is warranted.

  10. Alveolar ridge atrophy related to facial morphology in edentulous patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuć J

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Joanna Kuć,1 Teresa Sierpińska,2 Maria Gołębiewska1 1Department of Prosthodontics, 2Department of Dental Technology, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland Objectives: The morphology of the alveolar process determines the retention and stability of prosthetic restorations, thereby determining the result of the therapy. Considering that the edentulous jaws may be affected by the atrophy process, it was hypothesized that the morphology of the alveolar process of the maxilla may be dependent on the anterior facial height and anatomy of the mandible. Subjects and methods: Twenty-five healthy edentulous Caucasian individuals were randomly chosen. Each subject underwent a lateral cephalogram before and after prosthetic rehabilitation. During exposition, newly made prostheses were placed in the patient’s mouth. Teeth remained in maximal intercuspidation. Morphological parameters were evaluated according to the Ricketts, McNamara, and Tallgren’s method. Results: An inversely proportional association was observed between patient age and the distal part of the maxilla. A statistically significant connection was noted between the vertical dimension of alveolar ridge and anterior total and lower facial height conditioned by prosthetic rehabilitation. Conclusion: The height of the lateral part of the alveolar ridge of the maxilla remains in connection with the anterior total and lower facial height obtained in the course of prosthetic rehabilitation. The vertical dimension of the alveolar ridge of the maxilla seems to be in close relationship with the morphology of the lower jaw. Keywords: anterior facial height, cephalometric analysis, complete dentures, vertical occlusal dimension

  11. Functional neural substrates of posterior cortical atrophy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shames, H; Raz, N; Levin, Netta

    2015-07-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome in which the most pronounced pathologic involvement is in the occipito-parietal visual regions. Herein, we aimed to better define the cortical reflection of this unique syndrome using a thorough battery of behavioral and functional MRI (fMRI) tests. Eight PCA patients underwent extensive testing to map their visual deficits. Assessments included visual functions associated with lower and higher components of the cortical hierarchy, as well as dorsal- and ventral-related cortical functions. fMRI was performed on five patients to examine the neuronal substrate of their visual functions. The PCA patient cohort exhibited stereopsis, saccadic eye movements and higher dorsal stream-related functional impairments, including simultant perception, image orientation, figure-from-ground segregation, closure and spatial orientation. In accordance with the behavioral findings, fMRI revealed intact activation in the ventral visual regions of face and object perception while more dorsal aspects of perception, including motion and gestalt perception, revealed impaired patterns of activity. In most of the patients, there was a lack of activity in the word form area, which is known to be linked to reading disorders. Finally, there was evidence of reduced cortical representation of the peripheral visual field, corresponding to the behaviorally assessed peripheral visual deficit. The findings are discussed in the context of networks extending from parietal regions, which mediate navigationally related processing, visually guided actions, eye movement control and working memory, suggesting that damage to these networks might explain the wide range of deficits in PCA patients.

  12. αA crystallin may protect against geographic atrophy-meta-analysis of cataract vs. cataract surgery for geographic atrophy and experimental studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cataract and geographic atrophy (GA, also called advanced "dry" age-related macular degeneration are the two major causes of visual impairment in the developed world. The association between cataract surgery and the development of GA was controversial in previous studies. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a meta-analysis by pooling the current evidence in literature and found that cataract is associated with an increased risk of geographic atrophy with a summary odds ratio (OR of 3.75 (95% CI: 95% CI: 1.84-7.62. However, cataract surgery is not associated with the risk of geographic atrophy (polled OR=3.23, 95% CI: 0.63-16.47. Further experiments were performed to analyze how the αA-crystallin, the major component of the lens, influences the development of GA in a mouse model. We found that theαA-crystallin mRNA and protein expression increased after oxidative stress induced by NaIO(3 in immunohistochemistry of retinal section and western blot of posterior eyecups. Both functional and histopathological evidence confirmed that GA is more severe in αA-crystallin knockout mice compared to wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS: Therefore, αA-crystallin may protect against geographic atrophy. This study provides a better understanding of the relationship between cataract, cataract surgery, and GA.

  13. A Case of Wolfram Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamali Naderian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of Wolfram syndrome characterized by early onset diabetes mellitus and progressive optic atrophy. Case Report: A 20-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus type I presented with best corrected visual acuity of 1/10 in both eyes with correction of -0.25+1.50@55 and -0.25+1.50@131 in his right and left eyes, respectively. Bilateral optic atrophy was evident on fundus examination. The patient also had diabetes insipidus, neurosensory deafness, neurogenic bladder, polyuria and extra-residual voiding indicating atony of the urinary tract, combined with delayed sexual maturity. Conclusion: One should consider Wolfram syndrome in patients with juvenile onset diabetes mellitus and hearing loss. Ophthalmological examination may disclose optic atrophy; urologic examinations are vital in such patients.

  14. Scientific skepticism and new discoveries: an analysis of a report of zinc/phytase supplementation and the efficacy of botulinum toxins in treating cosmetic facial rhytides, hemifacial spasm and benign essential blepharospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joel L

    2014-10-01

    A recent paper in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology by Koshy and colleagues (2012, 11( 4 ):507-512) report on "Effect of Dietary Zinc and Phytase Supplementation on Botulinum Toxin Treatments" and conclude by claiming the discovery of "a potentially meaningful role for zinc and/or phytase supplementation in increasing the degree and duration of botulinum toxin effect in the treatment of cosmetic facial rhytids, benign essential blepharospasm, and hemifacial spasm". The purpose of this paper is to examine these published claims for possible methodological and design errors and potential sources of bias. The authors evaluated the published results in comparison to the published literature on zinc deficiency, the role of phytase, prior reports of an effect of zinc on activity of botulinum toxin, issues of study design and execution and if the reported results of the study supported the study's conclusions. Multiple issues are present in the reported study, which appear to invalidate its conclusions. These areas include lack of direct evidence for the presence of clinical or subclinical zinc deficiency in the study population or for the level of phytate in the study population sufficient to interfere with zinc absorption in these subjects. Additionally, there is ambiguity as to the actual dose of zinc used as well as in the study design itself. Also there is a failure of the study through the "unmasking" of the crossover design. There is potential financial conflict of interest in the study execution that may have biased the reported results. Finally there is inadequate data presented to evaluate the claims made of a "new discovery" as to the three disease entities reported on and the various botulinum toxins used in each of the three treatment arms of the study. Based on this evaluation, it appears that a high level of clinical and scientific skepticism is warranted concerning any claim of a beneficial effect of zinc and phytase supplementation on the efficacy or

  15. A case Report of Wolfram Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Razavi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Wolfram syndrome is the association of diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus and sensorineural deafness and is sometimes called DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, Diabets Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness. It is a rare autosomal recessive disease with prevalence of one per 770,000. Natural history of Wolfram syndrome suggests that most patients will eventually develop most complications of this progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Juvenile–onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy are the best available diagnostic criteria for Wolfram syndrome. In this report clinical features of a patient with DIDMOAD syndrome is presented. A 12 year old male presented with short standing diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus. Further investigations showed bilateral optic atrophy, mild hearing loss and short stature. His parents were relative and he is first case in his family.

  16. Deep gray matter atrophy in multiple sclerosis: a tensor based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Guozhi; Datta, Sushmita; He, Renjie; Nelson, Flavia; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2009-07-15

    Tensor based morphometry (TBM) was applied to determine the atrophy of deep gray matter (DGM) structures in 88 relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. For group analysis of atrophy, an unbiased atlas was constructed from 20 normal brains. The MS brain images were co-registered with the unbiased atlas using a symmetric inverse consistent nonlinear registration. These studies demonstrate significant atrophy of thalamus, caudate nucleus, and putamen even at a modest clinical disability, as assessed by the expanded disability status score (EDSS). A significant correlation between atrophy and EDSS was observed for different DGM structures: (thalamus: r=-0.51, p=3.85 x 10(-7); caudate nucleus: r=-0.43, p=2.35 x 10(-5); putamen: r=-0.36, p=6.12 x 10(-6)). Atrophy of these structures also correlated with 1) T2 hyperintense lesion volumes (thalamus: r=-0.56, p=9.96 x 10(-9); caudate nucleus: r=-0.31, p=3.10 x 10(-3); putamen: r=-0.50, p=6.06 x 10(-7)), 2) T1 hypointense lesion volumes (thalamus: r=-0.61, p=2.29 x 10(-10); caudate nucleus: r=-0.35, p=9.51 x 10(-4); putamen: r=-0.43, p=3.51 x 10(-5)), and 3) normalized CSF volume (thalamus: r=-0.66, p=3.55 x 10(-12); caudate nucleus: r=-0.52, p=2.31 x 10(-7), and putamen: r=-0.66, r=2.13 x 10(-12)). More severe atrophy was observed mainly in thalamus at higher EDSS. These studies appear to suggest a link between the white matter damage and DGM atrophy in MS.

  17. Studies of cerebral atrophy and regional cerebral blood flow in patients with Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Shin

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral atrophy and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of 25 patients with Parkinson's disease were studied. The rCBF was measured with the intra-arterial Xe-133 injection method. The results obtained were as follows: 1) Sixty four % of Parkinson's disease patients showed ventricular dilation, and 76% of Parkinson's disease patients showed cortical atrophy on the CT scan, but we had to allow for the effects of the natural aging process on these results. 2) No correlation was recognized either between cerebral atrophy and the severity of Parkinson's disease, or between cerebral atrophy and the duration of Parkinson's disease. 3) In Parkinson's disease patients, the mean rCBF was lower than that of normal control subjects. The difference was even more remarkable in older patients. Only 40% of Parkinson's disease patients showed hyperfrontal pattern. 4) There was no correlation either between the mean rCBF and the severity of Parkinson's disease, or between the mean rCBF and the duration of Parkinson's disease. There was no significant difference between the mean rCBF of Parkinson's disease patients receiving levodopa and that of untreated patients. 5) The mean rCBF decreased in patients with cerebral atrophy on the CT scan. 6) Parkinson's disease patients with intellectual impairment showed cerebral atrophy and a remarkable decrease of the mean rCBF. 7) The effect of aging on cerebral atrophy on the CT scan had to be allowed for, but judging from the decrease of the mean rCBF, the cerebral cortex is evidently involved in Parkinson's disease. 8) The rCBF decline in Parkinson's disease patients may be related with the diminished cortical metabolic rate due to a remote effect of striatal dysfunction and a disturbance of mesocortical dopaminergic pathways. (J.P.N.)

  18. Studies of cerebral atrophy and regional cerebral blood flow in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Shin [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo

    1983-04-01

    Cerebral atrophy and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of 25 patients with Parkinson's disease were studied. The rCBF was measured with the intra-arterial Xe-133 injection method. The results obtained were as follows: 1) Sixty four % of Parkinson's disease patients showed ventricular dilation, and 76% of Parkinson's disease patients showed cortical atrophy on the CT scan, but we had to allow for the effects of the natural aging process on these results. 2) No correlation was recognized either between cerebral atrophy and the severity of Parkinson's disease, or between cerebral atrophy and the duration of Parkinson's disease. 3) In Parkinson's disease patients, the mean rCBF was lower than that of normal control subjects. The difference was even more remarkable in older patients. Only 40% of Parkinson's disease patients showed hyperfrontal pattern. 4) There was no correlation either between the mean rCBF and the severity of Parkinson's disease, or between the mean rCBF and the duration of Parkinson's disease. There was no significant difference between the mean rCBF of Parkinson's disease patients receiving levodopa and that of untreated patients. 5) The mean rCBF decreased in patients with cerebral atrophy on the CT scan. 6) Parkinson's disease patients with intellectual impairment showed cerebral atrophy and a remarkable decrease of the mean rCBF. 7) The effect of aging on cerebral atrophy on the CT scan had to be allowed for, but judging from the decrease of the mean rCBF, the cerebral cortex is evidently involved in Parkinson's disease. 8) The rCBF decline in Parkinson's disease patients may be related with the diminished cortical metabolic rate due to a remote effect of striatal dysfunction and a disturbance of mesocortical dopaminergic pathways.

  19. Fronto-striatal atrophy in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia & Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime eBertoux

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD has only recently been associated with significant striatal atrophy, whereas the striatum appears to be relatively preserved in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Considering the critical role the striatum has in cognition and behaviour, striatal degeneration, together with frontal atrophy, could be responsible of some characteristic symptoms in bvFTD and emerges therefore as promising novel diagnostic biomarker to distinguish bvFTD and AD. Previous studies have, however, only taken either cortical or striatal atrophy into account when comparing the two diseases. In this study, we establish for the first time a profile of fronto-striatal atrophy in 23 bvFTD and 29 AD patients at presentation, based on the structural connectivity of striatal and cortical regions. Patients are compared to 50 healthy controls by using a novel probabilistic connectivity atlas, which defines striatal regions by their cortical white matter connectivity, allowing us to explore the degeneration of the frontal and striatal regions that are functionally linked. Comparisons with controls revealed that bvFTD showed substantial fronto-striatal atrophy affecting the ventral as well as anterior and posterior dorso-lateral prefrontal cortices and the related striatal subregions. By contrast, AD showed few fronto-striatal atrophy, despite having significant posterior dorso-lateral prefrontal degeneration. Direct comparison between bvFTD and AD revealed significantly more atrophy in the ventral striatal-ventromedial prefrontal cortex regions in bvFTD. Consequently, deficits in ventral fronto-striatal regions emerge as promising novel and efficient diagnosis biomarker for bvFTD. Future investigations into the contributions of these fronto-striatal loops on bvFTD symptomology are needed to develop simple diagnostic and disease tracking algorithms.

  20. Petri net-based prediction of therapeutic targets that recover abnormally phosphorylated proteins in muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinmyung; Kwon, Mijin; Bae, Sunghwa; Yim, Soorin; Lee, Doheon

    2018-03-05

    Muscle atrophy, an involuntary loss of muscle mass, is involved in various diseases and sometimes leads to mortality. However, therapeutics for muscle atrophy thus far have had limited effects. Here, we present a new approach for therapeutic target prediction using Petri net simulation of the status of phosphorylation, with a reasonable assumption that the recovery of abnormally phosphorylated proteins can be a treatment for muscle atrophy. The Petri net model was employed to simulate phosphorylation status in three states, i.e. reference, atrophic and each gene-inhibited state based on the myocyte-specific phosphorylation network. Here, we newly devised a phosphorylation specific Petri net that involves two types of transitions (phosphorylation or de-phosphorylation) and two types of places (activation with or without phosphorylation). Before predicting therapeutic targets, the simulation results in reference and atrophic states were validated by Western blotting experiments detecting five marker proteins, i.e. RELA, SMAD2, SMAD3, FOXO1 and FOXO3. Finally, we determined 37 potential therapeutic targets whose inhibition recovers the phosphorylation status from an atrophic state as indicated by the five validated marker proteins. In the evaluation, we confirmed that the 37 potential targets were enriched for muscle atrophy-related terms such as actin and muscle contraction processes, and they were also significantly overlapping with the genes associated with muscle atrophy reported in the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (p-value net. We generated a list of the potential therapeutic targets whose inhibition recovers abnormally phosphorylated proteins in an atrophic state. They were evaluated by various approaches, such as Western blotting, GO terms, literature, known muscle atrophy-related genes and shortest path analysis. We expect the new proposed strategy to provide an understanding of phosphorylation status in muscle atrophy and to provide assistance towards

  1. Parry-Romberg syndrome in a pediatric patient. A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Reyes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Parry-Romberg syndrome is a rare degenerative disease of unknown etiology that has dental implications. It is characterized by a progressive hemifacial atrophy that appears in the early stages of life. It causes aesthetic, functional and psychological alterations, and has social implications for the patient. There is no definitive treatment for the Parry-Romberg syndrome. Systemic and immune alterations produce oral and maxillofacial manifestations, which need to be managed by specialized dental professionals. The aim of this paper is to do a literature review of the Parry-Romberg syndrome and describe the oral and clinical characteristics of this condition in a 12-year-old male pediatric patient, who had a history of neurological disorders and facial asymmetry on the left side. Dentists require an adequate knowledge of the clinical and dental characteristics of this syndrome. With early diagnosis and appropriate surgical and orthodontic treatment at an early age, they can improve the quality of life of patients and minimize invasive long-term effects.

  2. Use of sugammadex in a patient with progressive muscular atrophy and in a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae Hwa; Kim, Soon Im; Park, Sun Young; Jun, Mi Roung; Kim, Yong Eun; Kim, Hyoung June

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: We herein present 2 cases involving the combination of rocuronium and sugammadex in patients with motor neuron disease. The patients were a 54-year-old man with progressive muscular atrophy who underwent removal of internal fixators in the arm and leg, and a 66-year-old woman with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who underwent skin grafting in the left lower leg. General anesthesia was induced with propofol, rocuronium, and remifentanil and maintained with desflurane and remifentanil. At the end of the surgical procedure, we administered sugammadex. Three or 4 minutes after administration of sugammadex, the patients began to breathe spontaneously and were extubated without complications. Conclusion: Sugammadex can be used successfully to reverse neuromuscular blockade in patients with motor neuron disease. PMID:28591053

  3. Genetic variants of the alpha-synuclein gene SNCA are associated with multiple system atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Al-Chalabi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple system atrophy (MSA is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia and autonomic dysfunction. Pathogenic mechanisms remain obscure but the neuropathological hallmark is the presence of alpha-synuclein-immunoreactive glial cytoplasmic inclusions. Genetic variants of the alpha-synuclein gene, SNCA, are thus strong candidates for genetic association with MSA. One follow-up to a genome-wide association of Parkinson's disease has identified association of a SNP in SNCA with MSA. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We evaluated 32 SNPs in the SNCA gene in a European population of 239 cases and 617 controls recruited as part of the Neuroprotection and Natural History in Parkinson Plus Syndromes (NNIPPS study. We used 161 independently collected samples for replication. Two SNCA SNPs showed association with MSA: rs3822086 (P = 0.0044, and rs3775444 (P = 0.012, although only the first survived correction for multiple testing. In the MSA-C subgroup the association strengthened despite more than halving the number of cases: rs3822086 P = 0.0024, OR 2.153, (95% CI 1.3-3.6; rs3775444 P = 0.0017, OR 4.386 (95% CI 1.6-11.7. A 7-SNP haplotype incorporating three SNPs either side of rs3822086 strengthened the association with MSA-C further (best haplotype, P = 8.7 x 10(-4. The association with rs3822086 was replicated in the independent samples (P = 0.035. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report a genetic association between MSA and alpha-synuclein which has replicated in independent samples. The strongest association is with the cerebellar subtype of MSA. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00211224.

  4. [Spinal muscular atrophy and respiratory failure. How do primary care pediatricians act in a simulated scenario?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agra Tuñas, M C; Sánchez Santos, L; Busto Cuiñas, M; Rodríguez Núñez, A

    2015-11-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA-1) tends to be fatal in the first year of life if there is no ventilatory support. The decision whether to start such support is an ethical conflict for healthcare professionals. A scenario of acute respiratory failure in an infant with SMA-1 has been included in a training program using advanced simulation for Primary Care pediatricians (PCP). The performances of 34 groups of 4 pediatricians, who participated in 17 courses, were systematically analyzed. Clinical, ethical and communication aspects with parents were evaluated. The initial technical assistance (Administration of oxygen and immediate ventilatory support) was correctly performed by 94% of the teams. However, the PCP had problems in dealing with the ethical aspects of the case. Of the 85% of the teams that raised the ethical conflict with parents, 29% did so on their own initiative, 23% actively excluded them, and only 6% involved them and took their opinion into account in making decisions. Only 11.7% asked about the quality of life of children and 12% for their knowledge of the prognosis of the disease. None explained treatment alternatives, nor tried to contact the pediatrician responsible for the child. When faced with a simulated SMA-1 infant with respiratory failure, PCP have difficulties in interacting with the family, and to involve it in the decision making process. Practical training of all pediatricians should include case scenarios with an ethical clinical problem. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Matrix expansion and syncytial aggregation of syndecan-1+ cells underpin villous atrophy in coeliac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Salvestrini

    Full Text Available We studied the expression of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs in coeliac disease (CD mucosa, as they are critical determinants of tissue volume, which increases in active disease. We also examined mucosal expression of IL-6, which stimulates excess GAG synthesis in disorders such as Grave's ophthalmopathy.We stained archival jejunal biopsies from 5 children with CD at diagnosis, on gluten-free diet and challenge for sulphated GAGs. We then examined duodenal biopsies from 9 children with CD compared to 9 histological normal controls, staining for sulphated GAGs, heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPG, short-chain HSPG (Δ-HSPG and the proteoglycan syndecan-1 (CD138, which is expressed on epithelium and plasma cells. We confirmed findings with a second monoclonal in another 12 coeliac children. We determined mucosal IL-6 expression by immunohistochemistry and PCR in 9 further cases and controls, and used quantitative real time PCR for other Th17 pathway cytokines in an additional 10 cases and controls.In CD, HSPG expression was lost in the epithelial compartment but contrastingly maintained within an expanded lamina propria. Within the upper lamina propria, clusters of syndecan-1(+ plasma cells formed extensive syncytial sheets, comprising adherent plasma cells, lysed cells with punctate cytoplasmic staining and shed syndecan ectodomains. A dense infiltrate of IL-6(+ mononuclear cells was detected in active coeliac disease, also localised to the upper lamina propria, with significantly increased mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-17A but not IL-23 p19.Matrix expansion, through syndecan-1(+ cell recruitment and lamina propria GAG increase, underpins villous atrophy in coeliac disease. The syndecan-1(+ cell syncytia and excess GAG production recapitulate elements of the invertebrate encapsulation reaction, itself dependent on insect transglutaminase and glutaminated early response proteins. As in other matrix expansion disorders, IL-6 is upregulated and

  6. Matrix Expansion and Syncytial Aggregation of Syndecan-1+ Cells Underpin Villous Atrophy in Coeliac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvestrini, Camilla; Lucas, Mark; Lionetti, Paolo; Torrente, Franco; James, Sean; Phillips, Alan D.; Murch, Simon H.

    2014-01-01

    Background We studied the expression of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in coeliac disease (CD) mucosa, as they are critical determinants of tissue volume, which increases in active disease. We also examined mucosal expression of IL-6, which stimulates excess GAG synthesis in disorders such as Grave's ophthalmopathy. Methods We stained archival jejunal biopsies from 5 children with CD at diagnosis, on gluten-free diet and challenge for sulphated GAGs. We then examined duodenal biopsies from 9 children with CD compared to 9 histological normal controls, staining for sulphated GAGs, heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPG), short-chain HSPG (Δ-HSPG) and the proteoglycan syndecan-1 (CD138), which is expressed on epithelium and plasma cells. We confirmed findings with a second monoclonal in another 12 coeliac children. We determined mucosal IL-6 expression by immunohistochemistry and PCR in 9 further cases and controls, and used quantitative real time PCR for other Th17 pathway cytokines in an additional 10 cases and controls. Results In CD, HSPG expression was lost in the epithelial compartment but contrastingly maintained within an expanded lamina propria. Within the upper lamina propria, clusters of syndecan-1+ plasma cells formed extensive syncytial sheets, comprising adherent plasma cells, lysed cells with punctate cytoplasmic staining and shed syndecan ectodomains. A dense infiltrate of IL-6+ mononuclear cells was detected in active coeliac disease, also localised to the upper lamina propria, with significantly increased mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-17A but not IL-23 p19. Conclusions Matrix expansion, through syndecan-1+ cell recruitment and lamina propria GAG increase, underpins villous atrophy in coeliac disease. The syndecan-1+ cell syncytia and excess GAG production recapitulate elements of the invertebrate encapsulation reaction, itself dependent on insect transglutaminase and glutaminated early response proteins. As in other matrix expansion disorders

  7. The Expansion of RPE Atrophy after the Inverted ILM Flap Technique for a Chronic Large Macular Hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisanori Imai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of the expansion of submacular retinal pigment epithelium (RPE atrophy after using the inverted internal limiting membrane (ILM flap technique for a persisting, large, stage IV macular hole (MH. Case Report: A 79-year-old woman presented with a chronic large MH that remained open despite pars plana vitrectomy (PPV. The surgery was performed twice for the MH closure 14 years earlier. ILM peeling was not performed during the previous surgeries. The best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA with the Landolt ring chart was 0.08 at her visit. The minimum MH diameter was 1,240 μm. Inverted ILM flap technique with 20% SF6 gas tamponade was performed for the MH closure. For the inverted ILM flap technique, 25-gauge PPV and ILM staining with indocyanine green were used. The ILM was peeled off for 2 disc diameters around the MH, but the ILM was not removed completely. The ILM was then inverted and covered the MH. Results: One month after surgery, the MH was closed, accompanied by glial cell proliferation spreading from the inverted ILM flap (as reported before. On the other hand, the area of the submacular RPE atrophy, which was already observed 1 week after surgery, gradually increased in size. BCVA improved to 0.3 six months after the surgery. Conclusions: The inverted ILM flap technique may be promising even for persisting large MH which were not closed in previous surgeries, but long-term observation is needed because the detailed behavior of the inverted ILM and the Müller cells after surgery is not yet known.

  8. Non-neural phenotype of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: results from a large cohort of Italian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querin, Giorgia; Bertolin, Cinzia; Da Re, Elisa; Volpe, Marco; Zara, Gabriella; Pegoraro, Elena; Caretta, Nicola; Foresta, Carlo; Silvano, Maria; Corrado, Domenico; Iafrate, Massimo; Angelini, Lorenzo; Sartori, Leonardo; Pennuto, Maria; Gaiani, Alessandra; Bello, Luca; Semplicini, Claudio; Pareyson, Davide; Silani, Vincenzo; Ermani, Mario; Ferlin, Alberto; Sorarù, Gianni

    2016-08-01

    To carry out a deep characterisation of the main androgen-responsive tissues involved in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). 73 consecutive Italian patients underwent a full clinical protocol including biochemical and hormonal analyses, genitourinary examination, bone metabolism and densitometry, cardiological evaluation and muscle pathology. Creatine kinase levels were slightly to markedly elevated in almost all cases (68 of the 73; 94%). 30 (41%) patients had fasting glucose above the reference limit, and many patients had total cholesterol (40; 54.7%), low-density lipoproteins cholesterol (29; 39.7%) and triglyceride (35; 48%) levels above the recommended values. Although testosterone, luteinising hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone values were generally normal, in one-third of cases we calculated an increased Androgen Sensitivity Index reflecting the presence of androgen resistance in these patients. According to the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), 7/70 (10%) patients reported severe lower urinal tract symptoms (IPSS score >19), and 21/73 (30%) patients were moderately symptomatic (IPSS score from 8 to 19). In addition, 3 patients were carriers of an indwelling bladder catheter. Videourodynamic evaluation indicated that 4 of the 7 patients reporting severe urinary symptoms had an overt prostate-unrelated bladder outlet obstruction. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan data were consistent with low bone mass in 25/61 (41%) patients. Low bone mass was more frequent at the femoral than at the lumbar level. Skeletal muscle biopsy was carried out in 20 patients and myogenic changes in addition to the neurogenic atrophy were mostly observed. Our study provides evidence of a wide non-neural clinical phenotype in SBMA, suggesting the need for comprehensive multidisciplinary protocols for these patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Functional overload attenuates plantaris atrophy in tumor-bearing rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otis, Jeffrey S; Lees, Simon J; Williams, Jay H

    2007-01-01

    Late stage cancer malignancies may result in severe skeletal muscle wasting, fatigue and reduced quality of life. Resistance training may attenuate these derangements in cancer patients, but how this hypertrophic response relates to normal muscle adaptations in healthy subjects is unknown. Here, we determined the effect of resistance training on muscle mass and myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition in plantaris muscles from tumor-bearing (TB) rats. Age- and gender-matched Buffalo rats were used for all studies (n = 6/group). Suspensions of Morris Hepatoma MH7777 cells or normal saline were injected subcutaneously into the dorsum. Six weeks after cell implantation, muscles from TB rats were harvested, weighed and processed for ATP-independent proteasome activity assays. Once tumor-induced atrophy had been established, subgroups of TB rats underwent unilateral, functional overload (FO). Healthy, sham-operated rats served as controls. After six weeks, the extent of plantaris hypertrophy was calculated and MHC isoform compositions were determined by gel electrophoresis. Six weeks of tumor growth reduced body mass and the relative masses of gastrocnemius, plantaris, tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm muscles (p ≤ 0.05). Percent reductions in body mass had a strong, negative correlation to final tumor size (r = -0.78). ATP-independent proteasome activity was increased in plantaris muscles from TB rats (p ≤ 0.05). In healthy rats, functional overload (FO) increased plantaris mass ~44% compared to the contralateral control muscle, and increased the relative percentage of MHC type I and decreased the relative percentage of MHC type IIb compared to the sham-operated controls (p ≤ 0.05). Importantly, plantaris mass was increased ~24% in TB-FO rats and adaptations to MHC isoform composition were consistent with normal, resistance-trained muscles. Despite significant skeletal muscle derangements due to cancer, muscle retains the capacity to

  10. How to diminish calcium loss and muscle atrophy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgolewski, S.

    Humans in micro-gravity suffer from Ca loss and muscle atrophy, efforts are made to prevent it by means of physical exercises and with medicaments. The tread-mill and exercise bike are just two most frequently used examples. This can and should be widely extended, and in such a way as to mimic as close as possible the normal loading of the muscles and skeleton which we experience here on the earth. Special very light weight active harness is proposed which monitors the body loading. This is accomplished by means of computer aided monitoring of muscle and bone loading systems. Using feedback it helps the crew to load their bodies and skeletons in the same way as it happens here on the earth. The active exercise mat with pressure sensors first creates a record here on the earth of all normal muscle tensions during exercise. In space the computer guides each exercising crew member to follow their earthbound training routine. High care is needed to select the best and most effective exercises which should demand least energy, yet providing the very best results. May I suggest the very best known to me kind of comprehensive exercises: Yoga. Doing it on the Earth you need next to none special training equipment. Our body is in principle all we need here to do Yoga exercises on the Earth. Integral part of Yoga exercises are abdominal breathing exercises, which can slow down the breathing rate even threefold. This improves the oxygen and CO_2 exchange and massages all internal organs around the clock, helping the adept to stay fit and also keeps their minds steady and calm. Yoga exercises should be mastered already here on the earth, providing the crew with much greater tolerance to micro-gravity. In Yoga we acquire the tolerance not only to zero gravity but also to "negative" gravity: as it happens in all inverted positions. This should help the astronauts to be more tolerant of the half way only step into "zero gravity". Weightlessness state provides us the ultimate in

  11. Progressive contralateral hippocampal atrophy following surgery for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Cameron A; Gross, Donald W; Wheatley, B Matt; Beaulieu, Christian; Sankar, Tejas

    2016-09-01

    Determine the extent and time course of volumetric changes in the contralateral hippocampus following surgery for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Serial T1-weighted MRI brain scans were obtained in 26 TLE patients pre- and post-temporal lobe epilepsy surgery as well as in 12 control subjects of similar age. Patients underwent either anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) or selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH). Blinded, manual hippocampal volumetry (head, body, and tail) was performed in two groups: 1) two scan group [ATL (n=6); SAH (n=10)], imaged pre-surgery and on average at 5.4 years post-surgery; and 2) longitudinal group [ATL (n=8); SAH (n=2)] imaged pre-surgery and on post-operative day 1, 2, 3, 6, 60, 120 and a delayed time point (average 2.4 years). In the two scan group, there was atrophy by 12% of the unresected contralateral hippocampus (p<0.001), with atrophy being most pronounced (27%) in the hippocampal body (p<0.001) with no significant differences seen for the hippocampal head or tail. In the longitudinal group, significant atrophy was also observed for the whole hippocampus and the body with atrophy seen as early as post-operative day #1 which progressed significantly over the first post-operative week (1.3%/day and 3.0%./day, respectively) before stabilizing over the long-term to a 13% reduction in total volume. There was no significant difference in atrophy compared by surgical approach (ATL vs. SAH; p=0.94) or side (p=0.31); however, atrophy was significantly more pronounced in patients with ongoing post-operative seizures (hippocampal body, p=0.019; whole hippocampus, p=0.048). There were no detectable post-operative neuropsychological deficits attributable to contralateral hippocampal atrophy. Significant contralateral hippocampal atrophy occurs following TLE surgery, which begins immediately and progresses over the first post-operative week. The observation that seizure free patients had significantly less atrophy of the

  12. Cortical volumes and atrophy rates in FTD-3 CHMP2B mutation carriers and related non-carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon F; Østergaard, Lasse R; Rodell, Anders B

    2008-01-01

    with a mean interval of 16 months and surface based cortical segmentation we measured cortical thickness and volume, and quantified atrophy rates. Cortical thickness and atrophy rates were averaged within major lobes and focal effects were determined by parametric statistical maps. The volumetric atrophy...... in the frontal and occipital lobes, and in the left temporal lobe. Results indicated that cortical thickness has a higher sensitivity for detecting small changes than whole-brain volumetric measures. Comparing mutation carriers with non-carriers revealed increased atrophy rates in mutation carriers bilaterally...

  13. Patterns of brain atrophy associated with episodic memory and semantic fluency decline in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Amandine; Bernard, Charlotte; Dilharreguy, Bixente; Helmer, Catherine; Le Goff, Melanie; Chanraud, Sandra; Dartigues, Jean-François; Allard, Michèle; Amieva, Hélène; Catheline, Gwénaëlle

    2017-03-09

    The cerebral substratum of age-related cognitive decline was evaluated in an elderly-cohort followed for 12 years (n=306). Participants, free of dementia, received neuropsychological assessments every two years and an MRI exam at baseline and four years later. Cognitive decline was evaluated on two broadly used tests to detect dementia: the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (FCSRT), a verbal episodic memory task, and the Isaacs Set Test (IST), a semantic fluency task. Using voxel-based approach, the relationship between cognitive decline with 1/ baseline grey matter volumes and 2/ grey matter volume loss between the two scans was explored. Baseline volumes analysis revealed that FCSRT and IST declines were both associated with lower volumes of the medial temporal region. Volumes loss analysis confirmed that both declines are related to medial temporal lobe atrophy and revealed that FCSRT decline was specifically associated with atrophy of the posterior cingulate cortex whereas IST decline was specifically related to temporal pole atrophy. These results suggest that cognitive decline across aging is firstly related to structural modifications of the medial temporal lobe, followed by an atrophy in the posterior midline structures for episodic memory and an atrophy of the temporal pole for semantic fluency.

  14. Skeletal muscle atrophy in bioengineered skeletal muscle: a new model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter H U; Vandenburgh, Herman H

    2013-10-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy has been well characterized in various animal models, and while certain pathways that lead to disuse atrophy and its associated functional deficits have been well studied, available drugs to counteract these deficiencies are limited. An ex vivo tissue-engineered skeletal muscle offers a unique opportunity to study skeletal muscle physiology in a controlled in vitro setting. Primary mouse myoblasts isolated from adult muscle were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles (BAMs) containing hundreds of aligned postmitotic muscle fibers expressing sarcomeric proteins. When electrically stimulated, BAMs generated measureable active forces within 2-3 days of formation. The maximum isometric tetanic force (Po) increased for ∼3 weeks to 2587±502 μN/BAM and was maintained at this level for greater than 80 days. When BAMs were reduced in length by 25% to 50%, muscle atrophy occurred in as little as 6 days. Length reduction resulted in significant decreases in Po (50.4%), mean myofiber cross-sectional area (21.7%), total protein synthesis rate (22.0%), and noncollagenous protein content (6.9%). No significant changes occurred in either the total metabolic activity or protein degradation rates. This study is the first in vitro demonstration that length reduction alone can induce skeletal muscle atrophy, and establishes a novel in vitro model for the study of skeletal muscle atrophy.

  15. Little effects of Insulin-like Growth Factor-I on testicular atrophy induced by hypoxia

    Science.gov (United Stat