WorldWideScience

Sample records for hemi-wicking states depended

  1. Deposition of sol-gel sensor spots by nanoimprint lithography and hemi-wicking

    Mikkelsen, Morten Bo Lindholm; Marie, Rodolphe; Hansen, Jan H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a method for homogeneous deposition of sol-gel sensor materials, which enable fabrication of sensor spots for optical pH and oxygen measurements inside plastic containers. A periodic pattern of posts is imprinted into a polycarbonate substrate and, using the principle of hemi-wicking, ......We present a method for homogeneous deposition of sol-gel sensor materials, which enable fabrication of sensor spots for optical pH and oxygen measurements inside plastic containers. A periodic pattern of posts is imprinted into a polycarbonate substrate and, using the principle of hemi...

  2. State Dependence in Unemployment

    Ahmad, Nisar

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the extent state dependence among unemployed immigrants in a dynamic discrete choice framework. Three alternative methodologies are employed to control for the problem of the initial condition. The empirical findings show that there is a considerable correlation between the un...

  3. State-dependent classical potentials

    D'Amico, M.

    2001-01-01

    As alternative treatment to the potential operators of standard quantum mechanics is presented. The method is derived from Bohm's mechanics. The operator scalar (V) and vector (A) potential functions are replaced by a quantum potential. It is argued that the classical potential is a special limiting case of a more general quantum potential. The theory is illustrated by deriving an equivalent single-particle equation for the i-th particle of an n-body Bohmian system. The resulting effective state-dependent potential holds the interaction between the single-particle self-wave ψ s and the environment wave ψ e of the n - 1 remaining particles. The effective state-dependent potential is offered as a resolution to the Aharonov-Bohm effect where the phase difference is shown to result from the presence of ψ e . Finally, the interaction between ψ s and ψ e is illustrated graphically

  4. Strategies for state-dependent quantum deleting

    Song Wei; Yang Ming; Cao Zhuoliang

    2004-01-01

    A quantum state-dependent quantum deleting machine is constructed. We obtain a upper bound of the global fidelity on N-to-M quantum deleting from a set of K non-orthogonal states. Quantum networks are constructed for the above state-dependent quantum deleting machine when K=2. Our deleting protocol only involves a unitary interaction among the initial copies, with no ancilla. We also present some analogies between quantum cloning and deleting

  5. State Dependence in Unemployment among Danish Immigrants

    Ahmad, Nisar

    This study examines the extent state dependence among unemployed Danish immigrants in a dynamic discrete choice framework. Three alternative methodologies are employed to control for the problem of the initial condition. The empirical findings show that there is a considerable correlation between...

  6. Dependency in State Transitions of Wind Turbines

    Herp, Jürgen; Ramezani, Mohammad Hossein; S. Nadimi, Esmaeil

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 IEEE. Turbine states and predicting the transition into failure states ahead of time is important in operation and maintenance of wind turbines. This study presents a method to monitor state transitions of a wind turbine based on the online inference on residuals. In a Bayesian framework...... be abstracted from generated data. Two models are presented: 1) assuming independence and 2) assuming dependence between states. In order to select the right models, machine learning is utilized to update hyperparameters on the conditional probabilities. Comparing fixed to learned hyperparameters points out...... the impact machine learning concepts have on the predictive performance of the presented models. In conclusion, a study on model residuals is performed to highlight the contribution to wind turbine monitoring. The presented algorithm can consistently detect the state transition under various configurations...

  7. State-dependent choice and ecological rationality.

    Nevai, Andrew L; Waite, Thomas A; Passino, Kevin M

    2007-08-07

    Decision makers who minimize costly errors should flexibly adjust the way they trade off competing demands, depending on their current state. We explore how state (amount of hoarded food) affects willingness to take extra predation risk to obtain larger food rewards, particularly in animals that may overemphasize safety. Assuming a sigmoid fitness function, we explore how a supplement in state influences this willingness trade danger for food energy. Above a threshold, the model predicts the supplement will weaken this willingness. Incremental increases in state in the deceleratory phase yield smaller fitness gains, so it pays to increase emphasis on safety after receiving a supplement. Below this threshold, the model makes the opposite prediction because incremental increases in state yield bigger fitness gains and so it pays to decrease emphasis on safety. We use the model to explain why hoarding gray jays (Perisoreus canadensis) were induced by an experimental subsidy to accept greater danger. This formerly puzzling finding makes sense if the jays' effective hoard was relatively small, due to theft and decomposition. We discuss adaptive state-dependent choice as a general explanation for apparently irrational behavior.

  8. State Dependence in Unemployment among Danish Immigrants

    Ahmad, Nisar

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the extent state dependence among unemployed Danish immigrants in a dynamic discrete choice framework. Three alternative methodologies are employed to control for the problem of the initial condition. The empirical findings show that there is a considerable correlation between...... compared to an individual who was employed at period “t-1”. This average partial effect is the same for western compared to non-western immigrants and women compared to men....

  9. The United States facing their petroleum dependence

    Noel, P.

    2002-06-01

    In the framework of ''the energy crisis of 2000-2001'', the Cheney report and the petroleum dependence, this study presents a critical examination of the United States petroleum situation, its perception in the american political milieu and the public policies implementing during the last ten years. The first section is devoted to the petroleum supply. In the second section, the american petroleum policy and the energy safety are studied. (A.L.B.)

  10. Coherent states for certain time-dependent systems

    Pedrosa, I.A.

    1989-01-01

    Hartley and Ray have constructed and studied coherent states for the time-dependent oscillator. Here we show how to construct states for more general time-dependent systems. We also show that these states are equivalent to the well-known squeezed states. (author) [pt

  11. State dependent optimization of measurement policy

    Konkarikoski, K.

    2010-07-01

    Measurements are the key to rational decision making. Measurement information generates value, when it is applied in the decision making. An investment cost and maintenance costs are associated with each component of the measurement system. Clearly, there is - under a given set of scenarios - a measurement setup that is optimal in expected (discounted) utility. This paper deals how the measurement policy optimization is affected by different system states and how this problem can be tackled.

  12. State dependent optimization of measurement policy

    Konkarikoski, K

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are the key to rational decision making. Measurement information generates value, when it is applied in the decision making. An investment cost and maintenance costs are associated with each component of the measurement system. Clearly, there is - under a given set of scenarios - a measurement setup that is optimal in expected (discounted) utility. This paper deals how the measurement policy optimization is affected by different system states and how this problem can be tackled.

  13. State-dependent impulses boundary value problems on compact interval

    Rachůnková, Irena

    2015-01-01

    This book offers the reader a new approach to the solvability of boundary value problems with state-dependent impulses and provides recently obtained existence results for state dependent impulsive problems with general linear boundary conditions. It covers fixed-time impulsive boundary value problems both regular and singular and deals with higher order differential equations or with systems that are subject to general linear boundary conditions. We treat state-dependent impulsive boundary value problems, including a new approach giving effective conditions for the solvability of the Dirichlet problem with one state-dependent impulse condition and we show that the depicted approach can be extended to problems with a finite number of state-dependent impulses. We investigate the Sturm–Liouville boundary value problem for a more general right-hand side of a differential equation. Finally, we offer generalizations to higher order differential equations or differential systems subject to general linear boundary...

  14. Time-dependent problems in quantum-mechanical state reconstruction

    Leonhardt, U.; Bardroff, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    We study the state reconstruction of wave packets that travel in time-dependent potentials. We solve the problem for explicitly time-dependent potentials. We solve the problem for explicitly time-dependent harmonic oscillators and sketch a general adaptive technique for finding the wave function that matches and observed evolution. (authors)

  15. The Dependence of Chimera States on Initial Conditions

    Feng Yue-E; Li Hai-Hong

    2015-01-01

    A chimera state consisting of both coherent and incoherent groups is a fascinating spatial pattern in non-locally coupled identical oscillators. It is thought that random initial conditions hardly evolve to chimera states. In this work, we study the dependence of chimera states on initial conditions. We show that random initial conditions may lead to chimera states and the chance of realizing chimera states becomes increasing when the model parameters are moving away from the boundary of their stable regime. (paper)

  16. Intertime jump statistics of state-dependent Poisson processes.

    Daly, Edoardo; Porporato, Amilcare

    2007-01-01

    A method to obtain the probability distribution of the interarrival times of jump occurrences in systems driven by state-dependent Poisson noise is proposed. Such a method uses the survivor function obtained by a modified version of the master equation associated to the stochastic process under analysis. A model for the timing of human activities shows the capability of state-dependent Poisson noise to generate power-law distributions. The application of the method to a model for neuron dynamics and to a hydrological model accounting for land-atmosphere interaction elucidates the origin of characteristic recurrence intervals and possible persistence in state-dependent Poisson models.

  17. Subjective Probabilities for State-Dependent Continuous Utility

    P.P. Wakker (Peter)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractFor the expected utility model with state dependent utilities, Karni, Schmeidler and Vind (1983) have shown how to recover uniquely the involved subjective probabilities if the preferences, contingent on a hypothetical probability distribution over the state space, are known. This they

  18. Coherent states of general time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    Abstract. By introducing an invariant operator, we obtain exact wave functions for a general time-dependent quadratic harmonic oscillator. The coherent states, both in x- and p-spaces, are calculated. We confirm that the uncertainty product in coherent state is always larger than Η/2 and is equal to the minimum of the ...

  19. Probabilistic quantum cloning of a subset of linearly dependent states

    Rui, Pinshu; Zhang, Wen; Liao, Yanlin; Zhang, Ziyun

    2018-02-01

    It is well known that a quantum state, secretly chosen from a certain set, can be probabilistically cloned with positive cloning efficiencies if and only if all the states in the set are linearly independent. In this paper, we focus on probabilistic quantum cloning of a subset of linearly dependent states. We show that a linearly-independent subset of linearly-dependent quantum states {| Ψ 1⟩,| Ψ 2⟩,…,| Ψ n ⟩} can be probabilistically cloned if and only if any state in the subset cannot be expressed as a linear superposition of the other states in the set {| Ψ 1⟩,| Ψ 2⟩,…,| Ψ n ⟩}. The optimal cloning efficiencies are also investigated.

  20. State dependent pseudo-resonances and excess noise

    Papoff, F.; D'Alessandro, G.; Oppo, G.Luca

    2008-01-01

    We show that strong response to nonresonant modulations and excess noise are state dependent in generic nonlinear systems; i.e., they affect some output states but are absent from others. This is demonstrated in complex Swift-Hohenberg models relevant to optics, where it is caused by the non-normality of the linearized stability operators around selected output states, even though the cavity modes are orthogonal. In particular, we find the effective parameters that control excess noise and th...

  1. Energy dependence of critical state of single-component systems

    Volchenkova, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Equations of critical states of the single-component systems: Psub(cr)(/Psub(o)=(Tsub(cr)/Tsub(o))x0.73, Tsub(cr)=K(Tsub(boil))sup(1.116) and Hsub(cr)(/Hsub(B)=Tsub(sr)/Tsub(B))sup(1.48) where Tsub(B)=1K, Hsub(B)-2 kcal/g-at, K-dimension factor are presented. It is shown that the revealed dependence Hsub(cr)=H(Tsub(cr)) is an energy boundary of a liquid-vapour phase state of the single-component systems beyond limits of which difference between liquid and vapour phases vanishes in increasing the system energy content. The given equations of state are true for all the single-component systems and permit to consider physicomechanical properties of substances in dynamic state depending on external conditions. Critical temperatures and dependences for elements from the most fusible He to infusible W and Re have been calculated

  2. State-dependent fluorescence of neutral atoms in optical potentials

    Martinez-Dorantes, M.; Alt, W.; Gallego, J.; Ghosh, S.; Ratschbacher, L.; Meschede, D.

    2018-02-01

    Recently we have demonstrated scalable, nondestructive, and high-fidelity detection of the internal state of 87Rb neutral atoms in optical dipole traps using state-dependent fluorescence imaging [M. Martinez-Dorantes, W. Alt, J. Gallego, S. Ghosh, L. Ratschbacher, Y. Völzke, and D. Meschede, Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 180503 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.180503]. In this paper we provide experimental procedures and interpretations to overcome the detrimental effects of heating-induced trap losses and state leakage. We present models for the dynamics of optically trapped atoms during state-dependent fluorescence imaging and verify our results by comparing Monte Carlo simulations with experimental data. Our systematic study of dipole force fluctuations heating in optical traps during near-resonant illumination shows that off-resonant light is preferable for state detection in tightly confining optical potentials.

  3. Exotic Paired States with Anisotropic Spin-Dependent Fermi Surfaces

    Feiguin, Adrian E.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a model for realizing exotic paired states in cold Fermi gases by using a spin-dependent optical lattice to engineer mismatched Fermi surfaces for each hyperfine species. The BCS phase diagram shows a stable paired superfluid state with coexisting pockets of momentum space with gapless unpaired carriers, similar to the Sarma state in polarized mixtures, but in our case the system is unpolarized. We propose the possible existence of an exotic 'Cooper-pair Bose-metal' phase, which has a gap for single fermion excitations but gapless and uncondensed 'Cooper-pair' excitations residing on a 'Bose surface' in momentum space.

  4. Asymptotic inference for jump diffusions with state-dependent intensity

    Becheri, Gaia; Drost, Feico; Werker, Bas

    2016-01-01

    We establish the local asymptotic normality property for a class of ergodic parametric jump-diffusion processes with state-dependent intensity and known volatility function sampled at high frequency. We prove that the inference problem about the drift and jump parameters is adaptive with respect to

  5. State-dependent factors and attention in Whiplash Associated Disorder

    Blokhorst, Mariëtte G.B.G.

    2005-01-01

    The main aim of this thesis is to investigate the relationship between state- dependent factors (headache, neck pain, fatigue, distress) and attention in WAD patients. Furthermore, the focus is on ‘noise-distractibility’ and ‘noise- intolerance’, which are symptoms related to attention and often

  6. Thermal state of the general time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    Taking advantage of dynamical invariant operator, we derived quantum mechanical solution of general time-dependent harmonic oscillator. The uncertainty relation of the system is always larger than ħ=2 not only in number but also in the thermal state as expected. We used the diagonal elements of density operator ...

  7. Integrated vehicle dynamics control using State Dependent Riccati Equations

    Bonsen, B.; Mansvelders, R.; Vermeer, E.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a State Dependent Riccati Equations (SDRE) solution for Integrated Vehicle Dynamics Control (IVDC). The SDRE approach is a nonlinear variant of the well known Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and implements a quadratic cost function optimization. A modified version of this

  8. State-dependent neutral delay equations from population dynamics.

    Barbarossa, M V; Hadeler, K P; Kuttler, C

    2014-10-01

    A novel class of state-dependent delay equations is derived from the balance laws of age-structured population dynamics, assuming that birth rates and death rates, as functions of age, are piece-wise constant and that the length of the juvenile phase depends on the total adult population size. The resulting class of equations includes also neutral delay equations. All these equations are very different from the standard delay equations with state-dependent delay since the balance laws require non-linear correction factors. These equations can be written as systems for two variables consisting of an ordinary differential equation (ODE) and a generalized shift, a form suitable for numerical calculations. It is shown that the neutral equation (and the corresponding ODE--shift system) is a limiting case of a system of two standard delay equations.

  9. Selective maintenance of multi-state systems with structural dependence

    Dao, Cuong D.; Zuo, Ming J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the selective maintenance problem for multi-state systems with structural dependence. Each component can be in one of multiple working levels and several maintenance actions are possible to a component in a maintenance break. The components structurally form multiple hierarchical levels and dependence groups. A directed graph is used to represent the precedence relations of components in the system. A selective maintenance optimization model is developed to maximize the system reliability in the next mission under time and cost constraints. A backward search algorithm is used to determine the assembly sequence for a selective maintenance scenario. The maintenance model helps maintenance managers in determining the best combination of maintenance activities to maximize the probability of successfully completing the next mission. Examples showing the use of the proposed method are presented. - Highlights: • A selective maintenance model for multi-state systems is proposed considering both economic and structural dependence. • Structural dependence is modeled as precedence relationship when disassembling components for maintenance. • Resources for disassembly and maintenance are evaluated using a backward search algorithm. • Maintenance strategies with and without structural dependence are analyzed. • Ignoring structural dependence may lead to over-estimation of system reliability.

  10. State-Dependent Implication and Equivalence in Quantum Logic

    Fedor Herbut

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ideal occurrence of an event (projector leads to the known change of a state (density operator into (the Lüders state. It is shown that two events and give the same Lüders state if and only if the equivalence relation is valid. This relation determines equivalence classes. The set of them and each class, are studied in detail. It is proved that the range projector of the Lüders state can be evaluated as , where denotes the greatest lower bound, and is the null projector of . State-dependent implication extends absolute implication (which, in turn, determines the entire structure of quantum logic. and are investigated in a closely related way to mutual benefit. Inherent in the preorder is the state-dependent equivalence , defining equivalence classes in a given Boolean subalgebra. The quotient set, in which the classes are the elements, has itself a partially ordered structure, and so has each class. In a complete Boolean subalgebra, both structures are complete lattices. Physical meanings are discussed.

  11. State-dependent intrinsic predictability of cortical network dynamics.

    Leila Fakhraei

    Full Text Available The information encoded in cortical circuit dynamics is fleeting, changing from moment to moment as new input arrives and ongoing intracortical interactions progress. A combination of deterministic and stochastic biophysical mechanisms governs how cortical dynamics at one moment evolve from cortical dynamics in recently preceding moments. Such temporal continuity of cortical dynamics is fundamental to many aspects of cortex function but is not well understood. Here we study temporal continuity by attempting to predict cortical population dynamics (multisite local field potential based on its own recent history in somatosensory cortex of anesthetized rats and in a computational network-level model. We found that the intrinsic predictability of cortical dynamics was dependent on multiple factors including cortical state, synaptic inhibition, and how far into the future the prediction extends. By pharmacologically tuning synaptic inhibition, we obtained a continuum of cortical states with asynchronous population activity at one extreme and stronger, spatially extended synchrony at the other extreme. Intermediate between these extremes we observed evidence for a special regime of population dynamics called criticality. Predictability of the near future (10-100 ms increased as the cortical state was tuned from asynchronous to synchronous. Predictability of the more distant future (>1 s was generally poor, but, surprisingly, was higher for asynchronous states compared to synchronous states. These experimental results were confirmed in a computational network model of spiking excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Our findings demonstrate that determinism and predictability of network dynamics depend on cortical state and the time-scale of the dynamics.

  12. Time-Dependent-Asymmetric-Linear-Parsimonious Ancestral State Reconstruction.

    Didier, Gilles

    2017-10-01

    The time-dependent-asymmetric-linear parsimony is an ancestral state reconstruction method which extends the standard linear parsimony (a.k.a. Wagner parsimony) approach by taking into account both branch lengths and asymmetric evolutionary costs for reconstructing quantitative characters (asymmetric costs amount to assuming an evolutionary trend toward the direction with the lowest cost). A formal study of the influence of the asymmetry parameter shows that the time-dependent-asymmetric-linear parsimony infers states which are all taken among the known states, except for some degenerate cases corresponding to special values of the asymmetry parameter. This remarkable property holds in particular for the Wagner parsimony. This study leads to a polynomial algorithm which determines, and provides a compact representation of, the parametric reconstruction of a phylogenetic tree, that is for all the unknown nodes, the set of all the possible reconstructed states associated with the asymmetry parameters leading to them. The time-dependent-asymmetric-linear parsimony is finally illustrated with the parametric reconstruction of the body size of cetaceans.

  13. True versus spurious state dependence in firm performance

    Kaiser, Ulrich; Kongsted, Hans Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the persistence of firms' exporting behavior in a panel of German manufacturing firms using dynamic binary choice models. We distinguish between true and spurious state dependence in exports and apply fixed effects methods that allow us to verify the robustness of our results ...... determinants. Our results, which are consistent with the findings of previous studies on firms in developing countries and in the United States, show the presence of important sunk costs in export market entry and a depreciation of knowledge and experience in export markets....

  14. True Versus Spurious State Dependence in Firm Performance

    Kaiser, Ulrich; Kongsted, Hans Christian

    This paper analyzes the persistence of firms' exporting behavior in a panel of German manufacturing firms using dynamic binary choice models. We distinguish between true and spurious state dependence in exports and apply fixed effects methods that allow us to verify the robustness of our results ...... determinants. Our results, which are consistent with the findings of previous studies on firms in developing countries and in the United States, show the presence of important sunk costs in export market entry and a depreciation of knowledge and experience in export markets...

  15. Control of Thermodynamical System with Input-Dependent State Delays

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Krstic, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    We consider control of a cooling system with several consumers that require cooling from a common source. The flow feeding coolant to the consumers can be controlled, but due to significant physical distances between the common source and the consumers, the coolant flow takes a non......-negligible amount of time to travel to the consumers, giving rise to input-dependent state delays. We first present a simple bilinear model of the system, followed by a state feedback control design that is able to stabilize the system at a chosen equilibrium in spite of the delays. We also present a heuristic...

  16. Cognitive Distortions in Depressed Women: Trait, or State Dependent?

    Sedat BATMAZ

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: The results have revealed that self-criticism, helplessness, hopelessness and preoccupation with danger related distortions had trait-like features, whereas self-blame related distortions were state dependent. This has clinical implications for the psychotherapeutic treatment of cognitive distortions in depression. Specifically, self-criticism related distortions should be managed during cognitive therapy for depression since the other subscales seem rather problematic. [JCBPR 2015; 4(3.000: 147-152

  17. Parameter dependence and outcome dependence in dynamical models for state vector reduction

    Ghirardi, G.C.; Grassi, R.; Butterfield, J.; Fleming, G.N.

    1993-01-01

    The authors apply the distinction between parameter independence and outcome independence to the linear and nonlinear models of a recent nonrelativistic theory of continuous state vector reduction. It is shown that in the nonlinear model there is a set of realizations of the stochastic process that drives the state vector reduction for which parameter independence is violated for parallel spin components in the EPR-Bohm setup. Such a set has an appreciable probability of occurrence (∼ 1/2). On the other hand, the linear model exhibits only extremely small parameter dependence effects. Some specific features of the models are investigated and it is recalled that, as has been pointed out recently, to be able to speak of definite outcomes (or equivalently of possessed objective elements of reality) at finite times, the criteria for their attribution to physical systems must be slightly changed. The concluding section is devoted to a detailed discussion of the difficulties met when attempting to take, as a starting point for the formulation of a relativistic theory, a nonrelativistic scheme which exhibits parameter dependence. Here the authors derive a theorem which identifies the precise sense in which the occurrence of parameter dependence forbids a genuinely relativistic generalization. Finally, the authors show how the appreciable parameter dependence of the nonlinear model gives rise to problems with relativity, while the extremely weak parameter dependence of the linear model does not give rise to any difficulty, provided the appropriate criteria for the attribution of definite outcomes are taken into account. 19 refs

  18. l-dependent potential barriers and superdeformed states

    Gherghescu, R.A.; Royer, G.

    1999-01-01

    The macroscopic-microscopic energy of rotating nuclei moving in the fusion-like deformation valley has been determined within a generalized liquid drop model including the nuclear proximity energy, the two-center shell model and the Strutinsky method. The l-dependent potential barriers of the 84 Zr, 132 Ce, 152 Dy and 192 Hg nuclei have been determined. A first minimum having a pure microscopic origin and lodging the normally deformed states, progressively disappears with increasing angular momenta. The microscopic and macroscopic energies contribute to generate a second minimum where superdeformed states may survive. It becomes progressively the lowest one at intermediate spins. At still higher angular momenta, the minimum moves towards the foot of the external fission barrier leading to macroscopic hyper-deformed quasi-molecular states. (authors)

  19. The United States facing their petroleum dependence; Les Etats-Unis face a leur dependance petroliere

    Noel, P. [Institut francais des Relations Internationals, 75 - Paris (France); Universite Pierre Mendes-France-IEPE-CNRS, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2002-06-01

    In the framework of ''the energy crisis of 2000-2001'', the Cheney report and the petroleum dependence, this study presents a critical examination of the United States petroleum situation, its perception in the american political milieu and the public policies implementing during the last ten years. The first section is devoted to the petroleum supply. In the second section, the american petroleum policy and the energy safety are studied. (A.L.B.)

  20. The ecological rationality of state-dependent valuation.

    McNamara, J M; Trimmer, P C; Houston, A I

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory studies on a range of animals have identified a bias that seems to violate basic principles of rational behavior: a preference is shown for feeding options that previously provided food when reserves were low, even though another option had been found to give the same reward with less delay. The bias presents a challenge to normative models of decision making (which only take account of expected rewards and the state of the animal at the decision time). To understand the behavior, we take a broad ecological perspective and consider how valuation mechanisms evolve when the best action depends upon the environment being faced. We show that in a changing and uncertain environment, state-dependent valuation can be favored by natural selection: Individuals should allow their hunger to affect learning for future decisions. The valuation mechanism that typically evolves produces the kind of behavior seen in standard laboratory tests. By providing an insight into why learning should be affected by the state of an individual, we provide a basis for understanding psychological principles in terms of an animal's ecology.

  1. Volume dependence of N-body bound states

    König, Sebastian; Lee, Dean

    2018-04-01

    We derive the finite-volume correction to the binding energy of an N-particle quantum bound state in a cubic periodic volume. Our results are applicable to bound states with arbitrary composition and total angular momentum, and in any number of spatial dimensions. The only assumptions are that the interactions have finite range. The finite-volume correction is a sum of contributions from all possible breakup channels. In the case where the separation is into two bound clusters, our result gives the leading volume dependence up to exponentially small corrections. If the separation is into three or more clusters, there is a power-law factor that is beyond the scope of this work, however our result again determines the leading exponential dependence. We also present two independent methods that use finite-volume data to determine asymptotic normalization coefficients. The coefficients are useful to determine low-energy capture reactions into weakly bound states relevant for nuclear astrophysics. Using the techniques introduced here, one can even extract the infinite-volume energy limit using data from a single-volume calculation. The derived relations are tested using several exactly solvable systems and numerical examples. We anticipate immediate applications to lattice calculations of hadronic, nuclear, and cold atomic systems.

  2. Disability and multi-state labour force choices with state dependence

    Oguzoglu, Umut

    2010-01-01

    I use a dynamic mixed multinomial logit model with unobserved heterogeneity to study the impact of work limiting disabilities on disaggregated labour choices. The first seven waves of the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey are used to investigate this relationship. Findings point out to strong state dependence in employment choices. Further, the impact of disability on employment outcomes is highly significant. Model simulations suggest that high cross and own state depe...

  3. Angular dependence of the exchange bias for the bistable state

    Bai, Yuhao [College of Physics and Electronic Information, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China); Research College of materials science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China); Xu, Xiaohong, E-mail: xuxh@dns.sxnu.edu.cn [Research College of materials science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China); Key Laboratory of Magnetic Molecules and Magnetic Information Materials, Ministry of Education, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China)

    2017-06-15

    The angular dependence of the exchange bias (ADEB) has been investigated in detail when the exchange-coupled ferromagnetic (FM)/antiferromagnetic (AFM) bilayer is in the bistable state. Complete and incomplete jump phenomena were found at the intrinsic easy and hard axes, when they pass through two special positions making the angular deviation of 58.2826° and 121.7174° from the easy axis of the uniaxial anisotropy, respectively. The combination of these different types of the jump phenomena at the intrinsic easy and hard axes yields five distinct types of the ADEB. The physical condition for each type of ADEB is established. Additionally, the extreme value problem of the exchange bias field and coercivity are also discussed, which is an important technological issue in the design of the magnetoresistive and spintronic devices. These results enable us to make a comprehensive understanding of the experimental ADEB curves.

  4. Local bifurcations in differential equations with state-dependent delay.

    Sieber, Jan

    2017-11-01

    A common task when analysing dynamical systems is the determination of normal forms near local bifurcations of equilibria. As most of these normal forms have been classified and analysed, finding which particular class of normal form one encounters in a numerical bifurcation study guides follow-up computations. This paper builds on normal form algorithms for equilibria of delay differential equations with constant delay that were developed and implemented in DDE-Biftool recently. We show how one can extend these methods to delay-differential equations with state-dependent delay (sd-DDEs). Since higher degrees of regularity of local center manifolds are still open for sd-DDEs, we give an independent (still only partial) argument which phenomena from the truncated normal must persist in the full sd-DDE. In particular, we show that all invariant manifolds with a sufficient degree of normal hyperbolicity predicted by the normal form exist also in the full sd-DDE.

  5. Elections, Private Information, and State-Dependent Candidate Quality

    Jensen, Thomas

    In this paper we contribute to the study of how democracy works when politicians are better informed than the electorate about conditions relevant for policy choice. We do so by setting up and analyzing a game theoretic model of electoral competition. An important feature of the model is that can......In this paper we contribute to the study of how democracy works when politicians are better informed than the electorate about conditions relevant for policy choice. We do so by setting up and analyzing a game theoretic model of electoral competition. An important feature of the model...... is that candidate quality is state-dependent. Our main insight is that if the electorate is sufficiently well informed then there exists an equilibrium where the candidates' policy positions reveal their information and the policy outcome is the same as it would be if voters were fully informed (the median policy...

  6. Local bifurcations in differential equations with state-dependent delay

    Sieber, Jan

    2017-11-01

    A common task when analysing dynamical systems is the determination of normal forms near local bifurcations of equilibria. As most of these normal forms have been classified and analysed, finding which particular class of normal form one encounters in a numerical bifurcation study guides follow-up computations. This paper builds on normal form algorithms for equilibria of delay differential equations with constant delay that were developed and implemented in DDE-Biftool recently. We show how one can extend these methods to delay-differential equations with state-dependent delay (sd-DDEs). Since higher degrees of regularity of local center manifolds are still open for sd-DDEs, we give an independent (still only partial) argument which phenomena from the truncated normal must persist in the full sd-DDE. In particular, we show that all invariant manifolds with a sufficient degree of normal hyperbolicity predicted by the normal form exist also in the full sd-DDE.

  7. Radio pulsar glitches as a state-dependent Poisson process

    Fulgenzi, W.; Melatos, A.; Hughes, B. D.

    2017-10-01

    Gross-Pitaevskii simulations of vortex avalanches in a neutron star superfluid are limited computationally to ≲102 vortices and ≲102 avalanches, making it hard to study the long-term statistics of radio pulsar glitches in realistically sized systems. Here, an idealized, mean-field model of the observed Gross-Pitaevskii dynamics is presented, in which vortex unpinning is approximated as a state-dependent, compound Poisson process in a single random variable, the spatially averaged crust-superfluid lag. Both the lag-dependent Poisson rate and the conditional distribution of avalanche-driven lag decrements are inputs into the model, which is solved numerically (via Monte Carlo simulations) and analytically (via a master equation). The output statistics are controlled by two dimensionless free parameters: α, the glitch rate at a reference lag, multiplied by the critical lag for unpinning, divided by the spin-down rate; and β, the minimum fraction of the lag that can be restored by a glitch. The system evolves naturally to a self-regulated stationary state, whose properties are determined by α/αc(β), where αc(β) ≈ β-1/2 is a transition value. In the regime α ≳ αc(β), one recovers qualitatively the power-law size and exponential waiting-time distributions observed in many radio pulsars and Gross-Pitaevskii simulations. For α ≪ αc(β), the size and waiting-time distributions are both power-law-like, and a correlation emerges between size and waiting time until the next glitch, contrary to what is observed in most pulsars. Comparisons with astrophysical data are restricted by the small sample sizes available at present, with ≤35 events observed per pulsar.

  8. Amplitude-dependent topological edge states in nonlinear phononic lattices

    Pal, Raj Kumar; Vila, Javier; Leamy, Michael; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2018-03-01

    This work investigates the effect of nonlinearities on topologically protected edge states in one- and two-dimensional phononic lattices. We first show that localized modes arise at the interface between two spring-mass chains that are inverted copies of each other. Explicit expressions derived for the frequencies of the localized modes guide the study of the effect of cubic nonlinearities on the resonant characteristics of the interface, which are shown to be described by a Duffing-like equation. Nonlinearities produce amplitude-dependent frequency shifts, which in the case of a softening nonlinearity cause the localized mode to migrate to the bulk spectrum. The case of a hexagonal lattice implementing a phononic analog of a crystal exhibiting the quantum spin Hall effect is also investigated in the presence of weakly nonlinear cubic springs. An asymptotic analysis provides estimates of the amplitude dependence of the localized modes, while numerical simulations illustrate how the lattice response transitions from bulk-to-edge mode-dominated by varying the excitation amplitude. In contrast with the interface mode of the first example studies, this occurs both for hardening and softening springs. The results of this study provide a theoretical framework for the investigation of nonlinear effects that induce and control topologically protected wave modes through nonlinear interactions and amplitude tuning.

  9. Capacity region of the 3 receiver state dependent multilevel BC with noncausal state information

    Viswanathan Ramachandran

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider a three receiver state dependent multilevel broadcast channel (BC, where the state information is known non-causally at the encoder as well as all the decoders. This is an extension of Nair and El Gamal’s three receiver multilevel BC (Nair and El Gamal, 2009, wherein two of the receivers decode only a common message while a third receiver decodes a private message as well. The objective is to characterize the rate tuples that are simultaneously achievable while ensuring negligible probability of error at each of the receivers. We characterize the capacity region of this setup in the paper.

  10. Observer dependence of quantum states in relativistic quantum field theories

    Malin, S.

    1982-01-01

    Quantum states can be understood as either (i) describing quantum systems or (ii) representing observers' knowledge about quantum systems. These different meanings are shown to imply different transformation properties in relativistic field theories. The rules for the reduction of quantum states and the transformation properties of quantum states under Lorentz transformations are derived for case (ii). The results obtained are applied to a quantum system recently presented and analyzed by Aharonov and Albert. It is shown that the present results, combined with Aharonov and Albert's, amount to a proof of Bohr's view that quantum states represent observers' knowledge about quantum systems

  11. Incorporating time dependent link costs in multi-state supernetworks

    Liao, F.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-state supernetwork represents a promising approach to model multi-modal and multi-activity travel behaviour. A derived feature of this approach is that a point-to-point path through the supernetwork represents a specific activity-travel pattern. A limitation of current multi-state

  12. Elections, Information, and State-Dependent Candidate Quality

    Jensen, Thomas

    voters are uncertain about the state. Candidates are fully informed and completely office-motivated. With a reasonable restriction on voters' beliefs, an equilibrium where candidates' positions reveal the true state does not exist. Non-revealing equilibria always exist. Some main findings...

  13. State-dependent cognition and its relevance to cultural evolution.

    Nettle, Daniel

    2018-02-05

    Individuals cope with their worlds by using information. In humans in particular, an important potential source of information is cultural tradition. Evolutionary models have examined when it is advantageous to use cultural information, and psychological studies have examined the cognitive biases and priorities that may transform cultural traditions over time. However, these studies have not generally incorporated the idea that individuals vary in state. I argue that variation in state is likely to influence the relative payoffs of using cultural information versus gathering personal information; and also that people in different states will have different cognitive biases and priorities, leading them to transform cultural information in different ways. I explore hunger as one example of state variable likely to have consequences for cultural evolution. Variation in state has the potential to explain why cultural traditions and dynamics are so variable between individuals and populations. It offers evolutionarily-grounded links between the ecology in which individuals live, individual-level cognitive processes, and patterns of culture. However, incorporating heterogeneity of state also makes the modelling of cultural evolution more complex, particularly if the distribution of states is itself influenced by the distribution of cultural beliefs and practices. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Non-Markovian State-Dependent Networks in Critical Loading

    2015-02-04

    Under suitable moment and mixing conditions which imply the invariance principle (cf. Herrndorf[8], Peligrad[17], Jacod and Shiryaev[9]), Corollary 4.1...volume 288 of Grundlehren der Mathema- tischen Wissenschaften [Fundamental Principles of Mathematical Sciences]. Springer-Verlag: Berlin, second...arrival rate control policy on throughput and work-in-process in production systems with workload dependent processing rates. Int. J. Prod. Econ . 2003, 85

  15. A new temperature-dependent equation of state of solids

    The equation of state (EOS) of condensed matter is important in many fields of basic and applied sciences ... the present paper, we have modified the basic assumption of Kumari et al [1] to obtain a new EOS. Pramana – J. ...... of Engineering Roorkee, Roorkee for providing financial and computational facilities. References.

  16. Size dependent deactivation of the excited state of DHICA

    Gauden, Magdalena; Pezzella, Alessandro; Panzella, Lucia

    2008-01-01

    Melanin is a natural pigment mainly responsible for the protection of skin and eyes from UV damage. 5,6- dihydroxyindole- 2 carboxylic acid (DHICA) is a key melanin building block. We have investigated the excited state dynamics of DHICA as well as its derivatives and oligomeric units using...

  17. State dependent valuation: the effect of deprivation on risk preferences.

    Dino J Levy

    Full Text Available The internal state of an organism affects its choices. Previous studies in various non-human animals have demonstrated a complex, and in some cases non-monotonic, interaction between internal state and risk preferences. Our aim was to examine the systematic effects of deprivation on human decision-making across various reward types. Using both a non-parametric approach and a classical economic analysis, we asked whether the risk attitudes of human subjects towards money, food and water rewards would change as a function of their internal metabolic state. Our findings replicate some previous work suggesting that, on average, humans become more risk tolerant in their monetary decisions, as they get hungry. However, our specific approach allowed us to make two novel observations about the complex interaction between internal state and risk preferences. First, we found that the change in risk attitude induced by food deprivation is a general phenomenon, affecting attitudes towards both monetary and consumable rewards. But much more importantly, our data indicate that rather than each subject becoming more risk tolerant as previously hypothesized based on averaging across subjects, we found that as a population of human subjects becomes food deprived the heterogeneity of their risk attitudes collapses towards a fixed point. Thus subjects who show high-risk aversion while satiated shift towards moderate risk aversion when deprived but subjects who are risk tolerant become more risk averse. These findings demonstrate a more complicated interaction between internal state and risk preferences and raise some interesting implications for both day-to-day decisions and financial market structures.

  18. State dependent valuation: the effect of deprivation on risk preferences.

    Levy, Dino J; Thavikulwat, Amalie C; Glimcher, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    The internal state of an organism affects its choices. Previous studies in various non-human animals have demonstrated a complex, and in some cases non-monotonic, interaction between internal state and risk preferences. Our aim was to examine the systematic effects of deprivation on human decision-making across various reward types. Using both a non-parametric approach and a classical economic analysis, we asked whether the risk attitudes of human subjects towards money, food and water rewards would change as a function of their internal metabolic state. Our findings replicate some previous work suggesting that, on average, humans become more risk tolerant in their monetary decisions, as they get hungry. However, our specific approach allowed us to make two novel observations about the complex interaction between internal state and risk preferences. First, we found that the change in risk attitude induced by food deprivation is a general phenomenon, affecting attitudes towards both monetary and consumable rewards. But much more importantly, our data indicate that rather than each subject becoming more risk tolerant as previously hypothesized based on averaging across subjects, we found that as a population of human subjects becomes food deprived the heterogeneity of their risk attitudes collapses towards a fixed point. Thus subjects who show high-risk aversion while satiated shift towards moderate risk aversion when deprived but subjects who are risk tolerant become more risk averse. These findings demonstrate a more complicated interaction between internal state and risk preferences and raise some interesting implications for both day-to-day decisions and financial market structures.

  19. Existence results for impulsive evolution differential equations with state-dependent delay

    Eduardo Hernandez M.; Rathinasamy Sakthivel; Sueli Tanaka Aki

    2008-01-01

    We study the existence of mild solution for impulsive evolution abstract differential equations with state-dependent delay. A concrete application to partial delayed differential equations is considered.

  20. Density-dependent phonoriton states in highly excited semiconductors

    Nguyen Hong Quang; Nguyen Minh Khue; Nguyen Que Huong

    1995-09-01

    The dynamical aspects of the phonoriton state in highly-photoexcited semiconductors is studied theoretically. The effect of the exciton-exciton interaction and nonbosonic character of high-density excitons are taken into account. Using Green's function method and within the Random Phase Approximation it is shown that the phonoriton dispersion and damping are very sensitive to the exciton density, characterizing the excitation degree of semiconductors. (author). 18 refs, 3 figs

  1. Maitra-Burke example of initial-state dependence in time-dependent density-functional theory

    Holas, A.; Balawender, R.

    2002-01-01

    In a recent paper, Maitra and Burke [Phys. Rev. A 63, 042501 (2001); 64, 039901(E) (2001)] have given an interesting and instructive example that illustrates a specific feature of the time-dependent density-functional theory--the dependence of the reconstructed time-dependent potential not only on the electron density, but also on the initial state of the system. However, a concise form of its presentation by these authors is insufficient to reveal all its peculiarities. Our paper represents a very detailed study of this valuable example, intended to facilitate a better understanding and appreciation

  2. Party Finances: Between Dependence on the State and Its Embezzlement

    Cristina Matiuța

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to analyze the financial behavior of political parties in Romania and the revenues collected in recent years, on the basis of available official data, as well as the practices of embezzling public money and using state resources for electoral purposes, by referring to several corruption scandals related to their funding. It suggests that, as laws became clearer and more restrictive, the methods of those engaged in corrupt practices seem to be refined as well and that a coherent legal framework along with the firm punishment of those guilty of violating laws could lessen the scourge of corruption.

  3. Delay-distribution-dependent H∞ state estimation for delayed neural networks with (x,v)-dependent noises and fading channels.

    Sheng, Li; Wang, Zidong; Tian, Engang; Alsaadi, Fuad E

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with the H ∞ state estimation problem for a class of discrete-time neural networks with stochastic delays subject to state- and disturbance-dependent noises (also called (x,v)-dependent noises) and fading channels. The time-varying stochastic delay takes values on certain intervals with known probability distributions. The system measurement is transmitted through fading channels described by the Rice fading model. The aim of the addressed problem is to design a state estimator such that the estimation performance is guaranteed in the mean-square sense against admissible stochastic time-delays, stochastic noises as well as stochastic fading signals. By employing the stochastic analysis approach combined with the Kronecker product, several delay-distribution-dependent conditions are derived to ensure that the error dynamics of the neuron states is stochastically stable with prescribed H ∞ performance. Finally, a numerical example is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The impact of new evidence on state-of-knowledge dependence

    Haim, M.; Apostolakis, G.

    1987-01-01

    When modeling a SOK (state-of-knowledge) dependence it is sometimes essential to apply a multivariate SOK distribution, e.g. when a new evidence is used to update a current assessment. As shown a SOK dependence may arise due to updating a prior distribution by dependent test-results. In two specific extreme cases SOK dependence (independence) cannot be influenced by updating the prior by new evidence: the case of identical units (a complete dependence), the case of independence (i.e., no SOK dependence) and evidence consists of conditionally independent test-results. (orig./HP)

  5. State-age-dependent maintenance policies for deteriorating systems with Erlang sojourn time distributions

    Yeh, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper investigates state-age-dependent maintenance policies for multistate deteriorating systems with Erlang sojourn time distributions. Since Erlang distributions are serial combinations of exponential phases, the deteriorating process can be modeled by a multi-phase Markovian model and hence easily analyzed. Based on the Markovian model, the optimal phase-dependent inspection and replacement policy can be obtained by using a policy improvement algorithm. However, since phases are fictitious and can not be identified by inspections, two procedures are developed to construct state-age-dependent policies based on the optimal phase-dependent policy. The properties of the constructed state-age-dependent policies are further investigated and the performance of the policy is evaluated through a numerical example

  6. State-Dependent Resource Harvesting with Lagged Information about System States.

    Fred A Johnson

    Full Text Available Markov decision processes (MDPs, which involve a temporal sequence of actions conditioned on the state of the managed system, are increasingly being applied in natural resource management. This study focuses on the modification of a traditional MDP to account for those cases in which an action must be chosen after a significant time lag in observing system state, but just prior to a new observation. In order to calculate an optimal decision policy under these conditions, possible actions must be conditioned on the previous observed system state and action taken. We show how to solve these problems when the state transition structure is known and when it is uncertain. Our focus is on the latter case, and we show how actions must be conditioned not only on the previous system state and action, but on the probabilities associated with alternative models of system dynamics. To demonstrate this framework, we calculated and simulated optimal, adaptive policies for MDPs with lagged states for the problem of deciding annual harvest regulations for mallards (Anas platyrhynchos in the United States. In this particular example, changes in harvest policy induced by the use of lagged information about system state were sufficient to maintain expected management performance (e.g. population size, harvest even in the face of an uncertain system state at the time of a decision.

  7. State-dependent resource harvesting with lagged information about system states

    Johnson, Fred A.; Fackler, Paul L.; Boomer, G Scott; Zimmerman, Guthrie S.; Williams, Byron K.; Nichols, James D.; Dorazio, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Markov decision processes (MDPs), which involve a temporal sequence of actions conditioned on the state of the managed system, are increasingly being applied in natural resource management. This study focuses on the modification of a traditional MDP to account for those cases in which an action must be chosen after a significant time lag in observing system state, but just prior to a new observation. In order to calculate an optimal decision policy under these conditions, possible actions must be conditioned on the previous observed system state and action taken. We show how to solve these problems when the state transition structure is known and when it is uncertain. Our focus is on the latter case, and we show how actions must be conditioned not only on the previous system state and action, but on the probabilities associated with alternative models of system dynamics. To demonstrate this framework, we calculated and simulated optimal, adaptive policies for MDPs with lagged states for the problem of deciding annual harvest regulations for mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in the United States. In this particular example, changes in harvest policy induced by the use of lagged information about system state were sufficient to maintain expected management performance (e.g. population size, harvest) even in the face of an uncertain system state at the time of a decision.

  8. Local Properties of Solutions to Non-Autonomous Parabolic PDEs with State-Dependent Delays

    Rezunenko, Oleksandr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2012), s. 56-71 ISSN 2158-611X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP103/12/2431 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : partial differential equations * state-dependent delay * invariance principle Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/AS/rezunenko- local properties of solutions to non-autonomous parabolic PDEs with state-dependent delay s.pdf

  9. State-Dependence of the Climate Sensitivity in Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity

    Pfister, Patrik L.; Stocker, Thomas F.

    2017-10-01

    Growing evidence from general circulation models (GCMs) indicates that the equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) depends on the magnitude of forcing, which is commonly referred to as state-dependence. We present a comprehensive assessment of ECS state-dependence in Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) by analyzing millennial simulations with sustained 2×CO2 and 4×CO2 forcings. We compare different extrapolation methods and show that ECS is smaller in the higher-forcing scenario in 12 out of 15 EMICs, in contrast to the opposite behavior reported from GCMs. In one such EMIC, the Bern3D-LPX model, this state-dependence is mainly due to the weakening sea ice-albedo feedback in the Southern Ocean, which depends on model configuration. Due to ocean-mixing adjustments, state-dependence is only detected hundreds of years after the abrupt forcing, highlighting the need for long model integrations. Adjustments to feedback parametrizations of EMICs may be necessary if GCM intercomparisons confirm an opposite state-dependence.

  10. Decay of hollow states in time-dependent density functional theory

    Kapoor, Varun; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Wismarsche Str. 43-45, Universitaet Rostock, Rostock-18051 (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Hollow or multiply excited states are inaccessible in time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using adiabatic Kohn-Sham potentials. We determine the exact Kohn Sham (KS) potential for doubly excited states in an exactly solvable model Helium atom. The exact single-particle density corresponds to the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose origin is traced back to phase of the exact KS orbital. The potential controls the barrier height and width in order for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as the doubly excited state in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. Instead, adiabatic KS potentials only show direct photoionization but no autoionization. A frequency-dependent linear response kernel would be necessary in order to capture the decay of autoionizing states.

  11. Violations of the Born rule in cool state-dependent horizons

    Marolf, Donald; Polchinski, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The black hole information problem has motivated many proposals for new physics. One idea, known as state-dependence, is that quantum mechanics must be generalized to describe the physics of black holes, and that fixed linear operators do not provide the fundamental description of experiences for infalling observers. Instead, such experiences are to be described by operators with an extra dependence on the global quantum state. By generalizing a previous argument for firewalls in generic black holes, we show that any implementation of this idea strong enough to remove firewalls from generic states requires massive violations of the Born rule. We also demonstrate a sense in which such violations are visible to infalling observers involved in preparing the initial state of the black hole. We emphasize the generality of our results; no details of any specific proposal for state-dependence are required.

  12. Violations of the Born rule in cool state-dependent horizons

    Marolf, Donald [Department of Physics, University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Polchinski, Joseph [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States)

    2016-01-04

    The black hole information problem has motivated many proposals for new physics. One idea, known as state-dependence, is that quantum mechanics must be generalized to describe the physics of black holes, and that fixed linear operators do not provide the fundamental description of experiences for infalling observers. Instead, such experiences are to be described by operators with an extra dependence on the global quantum state. By generalizing a previous argument for firewalls in generic black holes, we show that any implementation of this idea strong enough to remove firewalls from generic states requires massive violations of the Born rule. We also demonstrate a sense in which such violations are visible to infalling observers involved in preparing the initial state of the black hole. We emphasize the generality of our results; no details of any specific proposal for state-dependence are required.

  13. State-dependent sensorimotor processing: gaze and posture stability during simulated flight in birds.

    McArthur, Kimberly L; Dickman, J David

    2011-04-01

    Vestibular responses play an important role in maintaining gaze and posture stability during rotational motion. Previous studies suggest that these responses are state dependent, their expression varying with the environmental and locomotor conditions of the animal. In this study, we simulated an ethologically relevant state in the laboratory to study state-dependent vestibular responses in birds. We used frontal airflow to simulate gliding flight and measured pigeons' eye, head, and tail responses to rotational motion in darkness, under both head-fixed and head-free conditions. We show that both eye and head response gains are significantly higher during flight, thus enhancing gaze and head-in-space stability. We also characterize state-specific tail responses to pitch and roll rotation that would help to maintain body-in-space orientation during flight. These results demonstrate that vestibular sensorimotor processing is not fixed but depends instead on the animal's behavioral state.

  14. Cocaine induces state-dependent learning of sexual conditioning in male Japanese quail.

    Gill, Karin E; Rice, Beth Ann; Akins, Chana K

    2015-01-01

    State dependent learning effects have been widely studied in a variety of drugs of abuse. However, they have yet to be studied in relation to sexual motivation. The current study investigated state-dependent learning effects of cocaine in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) using a sexual conditioning paradigm. Cocaine-induced state-dependent learning effects were investigated using a 2×2 factorial design with training state as one factor and test state as the other factor. During a 14-day training phase, male quail were injected once daily with 10mg/kg cocaine or saline and then placed in a test chamber after 15min. In the test chamber, sexual conditioning trials consisted of presentation of a light conditioned stimulus (CS) followed by sexual reinforcement. During the state dependent test, half of the birds received a shift in drug state from training to testing (Coc→Sal or Sal→Coc) while the other half remained in the same drug state (Coc→Coc or Sal→Sal). Results showed that male quail that were trained and tested in the same state (Coc→Coc or Sal→Sal) showed greater sexual conditioning than male quail that were trained and tested in different states (Sal→Coc) except when cocaine was administered chronically prior to the test (Coc→Sal). For the latter condition, sexual conditioning persisted from cocaine training to the saline test. The findings suggest that state dependent effects may alter sexual motivation and that repeated exposure to cocaine during sexual activity may increase sexual motivation which, in turn, may lead to high risk sexual activities. An alternative explanation for the findings is also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Self-Employment Dynamics, State Dependence and Cross-Mobility Patterns

    Caliendo, Marco; Uhlendorff, Arne

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the mobility between self-employment, wage employment and non-employment. Using data for men in West Germany, we find strong true state dependence in all three states. Moreover, compared to wage employment, non-employment increases the probability of self-employment significantly, and self-employment goes along with a higher risk of future non-employment.

  16. A study of the bound states for square potential wells with position-dependent mass

    Ganguly, A.; Kuru, S.; Negro, J.; Nieto, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    A potential well with position-dependent mass is studied for bound states. Applying appropriate matching conditions, a transcendental equation is derived for the energy eigenvalues. Numerical results are presented graphically and the variation of the energy of the bound states are calculated as a function of the well-width and mass

  17. A Class of Stochastic Hybrid Systems with State-Dependent Switching Noise

    Leth, John-Josef; Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl; Schiøler, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop theoretical results based on a proposed method for modeling switching noise for a class of hybrid systems with piecewise linear partitioned state space, and state-depending switching. We devise a stochastic model of such systems, whose global dynamics is governed...

  18. Verification of Large State/Event Systems using Compositionality and Dependency Analysis

    Lind-Nielsen, Jørn; Andersen, Henrik Reif; Hulgaard, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    A state/event model is a concurrent version of Mealy machines used for describing embedded reactive systems. This paper introduces a technique that uses compositionality and dependency analysis to significantly improve the efficiency of symbolic model checking of state/event models. It makes...

  19. Verification of Large State/Event Systems using Compositionality and Dependency Analysis

    Lind-Nielsen, Jørn; Andersen, Henrik Reif; Behrmann, Gerd

    1999-01-01

    A state/event model is a concurrent version of Mealy machines used for describing embedded reactive systems. This paper introduces a technique that uses \\emph{compositionality} and \\emph{dependency analysis} to significantly improve the efficiency of symbolic model checking of state/event models...

  20. Stress state dependence of transient irradiation creep in 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel

    Foster, J.P.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1998-01-01

    Irradiation creep tests were performed in fast reactors using the stress states of uniaxial tension, biaxial tension, bending and torsion. In order to compare the saturated transient strain irradiation creep component, the test data were converted to equivalent strain and equivalent stress. The saturated transient irradiation creep component was observed to depend on the stress state. The highest value was exhibited by the uniaxial tension stress state, and the lowest by the torsion stress state. The biaxial tension and bending stress state transient component values were intermediate. This behavior appears to be related to the dislocation or microscopic substructure resulting from fabrication processing and the applied stress direction. (orig.)

  1. Charge states of fast heavy ions in solids; target atomic number dependence

    Shima, Kunihiro

    1985-01-01

    Discussions were carried out on the origin of Z 2 (atomic number) dependent charge states with respect to projectile electron loss and capture process, and on relationship between the Z 2 dependence and that of mean charge states for heavy ions of 1 MeV/u energy region. Present and previously reported results were examined on the equilibrium charge distributions, 9-bar, of 120 MeV 63 Cu, 25 and 40 MeV 35 Cl, 109 MeV Si and 59 MeV F ions. It was clarified that 9-bar became generally higher for lower Z 2 depending on increasing energy, and osillatory behavior with energy-depending amplitude was seen in 9-bar vs Z 2 . Discussions were carrid out on these phenomena and related matters. Z 2 oscillations of 9-bar of fast heavy ions might be due to those of electron capture cross section into projectile K and L vacancies for high and intermediate charge states, respectively. A quantitative interpretation of the Z 2 -dependent 9-bar values is in progress based on collision process and observation of projectile x-ray. The 9-bar value dependency on Z 2 in ion passing foils and decrease of Z 2 oscillation amplitude with increasing collision energy were quite similar to the Z 2 dependence in stopping powers or in effective charge states estimated from stopping powers. But there was some discrepancies in the Z 2 oscillation of 9-bar and that of stopping powers. (Takagi, S.)

  2. On the construction of coherent states of position dependent mass Schroedinger equation endowed with effective potential

    Chithiika Ruby, V.; Senthilvelan, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm to construct coherent states for an exactly solvable position dependent mass Schroedinger equation. We use point canonical transformation method and obtain ground state eigenfunction of the position dependent mass Schroedinger equation. We fix the ladder operators in the deformed form and obtain explicit expression of the deformed superpotential in terms of mass distribution and its derivative. We also prove that these deformed operators lead to minimum uncertainty relations. Further, we illustrate our algorithm with two examples, in which the coherent states given for the second example are new.

  3. Effect of state-dependent delay on a weakly damped nonlinear oscillator.

    Mitchell, Jonathan L; Carr, Thomas W

    2011-04-01

    We consider a weakly damped nonlinear oscillator with state-dependent delay, which has applications in models for lasers, epidemics, and microparasites. More generally, the delay-differential equations considered are a predator-prey system where the delayed term is linear and represents the proliferation of the predator. We determine the critical value of the delay that causes the steady state to become unstable to periodic oscillations via a Hopf bifurcation. Using asymptotic averaging, we determine how the system's behavior is influenced by the functional form of the state-dependent delay. Specifically, we determine whether the branch of periodic solutions will be either sub- or supercritical as well as an accurate estimation of the amplitude. Finally, we choose a few examples of state-dependent delay to test our analytical results by comparing them to numerical continuation.

  4. Brain state-dependence of electrically evoked potentials monitored with head-mounted electronics.

    Richardson, Andrew G; Fetz, Eberhard E

    2012-11-01

    Inferring changes in brain connectivity is critical to studies of learning-related plasticity and stimulus-induced conditioning of neural circuits. In addition, monitoring spontaneous fluctuations in connectivity can provide insight into information processing during different brain states. Here, we quantified state-dependent connectivity changes throughout the 24-h sleep-wake cycle in freely behaving monkeys. A novel, head-mounted electronic device was used to electrically stimulate at one site and record evoked potentials at other sites. Electrically evoked potentials (EEPs) revealed the connectivity pattern between several cortical sites and the basal forebrain. We quantified state-dependent changes in the EEPs. Cortico-cortical EEP amplitude increased during slow-wave sleep, compared to wakefulness, while basal-cortical EEP amplitude decreased. The results demonstrate the utility of using portable electronics to document state-dependent connectivity changes in freely behaving primates.

  5. Direct Yaw Control of Vehicle using State Dependent Riccati Equation with Integral Terms

    SANDHU, F.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct yaw control of four-wheel vehicles using optimal controllers such as the linear quadratic regulator (LQR and the sliding mode controller (SMC either considers only certain parameters constant in the nonlinear equations of vehicle model or totally neglect their effects to obtain simplified models, resulting in loss of states for the system. In this paper, a modified state-dependent Ricatti equation method obtained by the simplification of the vehicle model is proposed. This method overcomes the problem of the lost states by including state integrals. The results of the proposed system are compared with the sliding mode slip controller and state-dependent Ricatti equation method using high fidelity vehicle model in the vehicle simulation software package, Carsim. Results show 38% reduction in the lateral velocity, 34% reduction in roll and 16% reduction in excessive yaw by only increasing the fuel consumption by 6.07%.

  6. State-Dependent Decoding Algorithms Improve the Performance of a Bidirectional BMI in Anesthetized Rats

    Vito De Feo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs promise to improve the quality of life of patients suffering from sensory and motor disabilities by creating a direct communication channel between the brain and the external world. Yet, their performance is currently limited by the relatively small amount of information that can be decoded from neural activity recorded form the brain. We have recently proposed that such decoding performance may be improved when using state-dependent decoding algorithms that predict and discount the large component of the trial-to-trial variability of neural activity which is due to the dependence of neural responses on the network's current internal state. Here we tested this idea by using a bidirectional BMI to investigate the gain in performance arising from using a state-dependent decoding algorithm. This BMI, implemented in anesthetized rats, controlled the movement of a dynamical system using neural activity decoded from motor cortex and fed back to the brain the dynamical system's position by electrically microstimulating somatosensory cortex. We found that using state-dependent algorithms that tracked the dynamics of ongoing activity led to an increase in the amount of information extracted form neural activity by 22%, with a consequently increase in all of the indices measuring the BMI's performance in controlling the dynamical system. This suggests that state-dependent decoding algorithms may be used to enhance BMIs at moderate computational cost.

  7. State-Dependent Decoding Algorithms Improve the Performance of a Bidirectional BMI in Anesthetized Rats.

    De Feo, Vito; Boi, Fabio; Safaai, Houman; Onken, Arno; Panzeri, Stefano; Vato, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) promise to improve the quality of life of patients suffering from sensory and motor disabilities by creating a direct communication channel between the brain and the external world. Yet, their performance is currently limited by the relatively small amount of information that can be decoded from neural activity recorded form the brain. We have recently proposed that such decoding performance may be improved when using state-dependent decoding algorithms that predict and discount the large component of the trial-to-trial variability of neural activity which is due to the dependence of neural responses on the network's current internal state. Here we tested this idea by using a bidirectional BMI to investigate the gain in performance arising from using a state-dependent decoding algorithm. This BMI, implemented in anesthetized rats, controlled the movement of a dynamical system using neural activity decoded from motor cortex and fed back to the brain the dynamical system's position by electrically microstimulating somatosensory cortex. We found that using state-dependent algorithms that tracked the dynamics of ongoing activity led to an increase in the amount of information extracted form neural activity by 22%, with a consequently increase in all of the indices measuring the BMI's performance in controlling the dynamical system. This suggests that state-dependent decoding algorithms may be used to enhance BMIs at moderate computational cost.

  8. The role of age, gender, mood states and exercise frequency on exercise dependence.

    Costa, Sebastiano; Hausenblas, Heather A; Oliva, Patrizia; Cuzzocrea, Francesca; Larcan, Rosalba

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to explore the prevalence, and the role of mood, exercise frequency, age, and gender differences of exercise dependence. Regular exercisers (N = 409) completed a socio-demographic questionnaire, the Exercise Dependence Scale, and the Profile of Mood States. For data analyses, the participants were stratified for sex and age (age ranges = young adults: 18-24 years, adults: 25-44 years, and middle-aged adults: 45-64 years). We found that: (a) 4.4% of the participants were classified as at-risk for exercise dependence; (b) the men and the two younger groups (i.e., young adults and adults) had higher exercise dependence scores; and (c) age, gender, exercise frequency, and mood state were related to exercise dependence. Our results support previous research on the prevalence of exercise dependence and reveal that adulthood may be the critical age for developing exercise dependence. These findings have practical implication for identifying individuals at-risk for exercise dependence symptoms, and may aid in targeting and guiding the implementation of prevention program for adults.

  9. State-Dependent Impulsive Control Strategies for a Tumor-Immune Model

    Kwang Su Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling the number of tumor cells leads us to expect more efficient strategies for treatment of tumor. Towards this goal, a tumor-immune model with state-dependent impulsive treatments is established. This model may give an efficient treatment schedule to control tumor’s abnormal growth. By using the Poincaré map and analogue of Poincaré criterion, some conditions for the existence and stability of a positive order-1 periodic solution of this model are obtained. Moreover, we carry out numerical simulations to illustrate the feasibility of our main results and compare fixed-time impulsive treatment effects with state-dependent impulsive treatment effects. The results of our simulations say that, in determining optimal treatment timing, the model with state-dependent impulsive control is more efficient than that with fixed-time impulsive control.

  10. Decay of autoionizing states in time-dependent density functional and reduced density matrix functional theory

    Kapoor, Varun; Brics, Martins; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Autoionizing states are inaccessible to time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using known, adiabatic Kohn-Sham (KS) potentials. We determine the exact KS potential for a numerically exactly solvable model Helium atom interacting with a laser field that is populating an autoionizing state. The exact single-particle density of the population in the autoionizing state corresponds to that of the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose height and width allows for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. However, devising a useful exchange-correlation potential that is capable of governing such a scenario in general and in more complex systems is hopeless. As an improvement over TDDFT, time-dependent reduced density matrix functional theory has been proposed. We are able to obtain for the above described autoionization process the exact time-dependent natural orbitals (i.e., the eigenfunctions of the exact, time-dependent one-body reduced density matrix) and study the potentials that appear in the equations of motion for the natural orbitals and the structure of the two-body density matrix expanded in them.

  11. The effect of time-dependent coupling on non-equilibrium steady states

    Cornean, Horia; Neidhardt, Hagen; Zagrebnov, Valentin

    Consider (for simplicity) two one-dimensional semi-infinite leads coupled to a quantum well via time dependent point interactions. In the remote past the system is decoupled, and each of its components is at thermal equilibrium. In the remote future the system is fully coupled. We define...... and compute the non equilibrium steady state (NESS) generated by this evolution. We show that when restricted to the subspace of absolute continuity of the fully coupled system, the state does not depend at all on the switching. Moreover, we show that the stationary charge current has the same invariant...

  12. The effect of time-dependent coupling on non-equilibrium steady states

    Cornean, Horia; Neidhardt, Hagen; Zagrebnov, Valentin A.

    2009-01-01

    Consider (for simplicity) two one-dimensional semi-infinite leads coupled to a quantum well via time dependent point interactions. In the remote past the system is decoupled, and each of its components is at thermal equilibrium. In the remote future the system is fully coupled. We define...... and compute the non equilibrium steady state (NESS) generated by this evolution. We show that when restricted to the subspace of absolute continuity of the fully coupled system, the state does not depend at all on the switching. Moreover, we show that the stationary charge current has the same invariant...

  13. Role of state-dependent learning in the cognitive effects of caffeine in mice.

    Sanday, Leandro; Zanin, Karina A; Patti, Camilla L; Fernandes-Santos, Luciano; Oliveira, Larissa C; Longo, Beatriz M; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and it is generally believed that it promotes beneficial effects on cognitive performance. However, there is also evidence suggesting that caffeine has inhibitory effects on learning and memory. Considering that caffeine may have anxiogenic effects, thus changing the emotional state of the subjects, state-dependent learning may play a role in caffeine-induced cognitive alterations. Mice were administered 20 mg/kg caffeine before training and/or before testing both in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (an animal model that concomitantly evaluates learning, memory, anxiety-like behaviour and general activity) and in the inhibitory avoidance task, a classic paradigm for evaluating memory in rodents. Pre-training caffeine administration did not modify learning, but produced an anxiogenic effect and impaired memory retention. While pre-test administration of caffeine did not modify retrieval on its own, the pre-test administration counteracted the memory deficit induced by the pre-training caffeine injection in both the plus-maze discriminative and inhibitory avoidance tasks. Our data demonstrate that caffeine-induced memory deficits are critically related to state-dependent learning, reinforcing the importance of considering the participation of state-dependency on the interpretation of the cognitive effects of caffeine. The possible participation of caffeine-induced anxiety alterations in state-dependent memory deficits is discussed.

  14. Dependence of extinction cross-section on incident polarization state and particle orientation

    Yang Ping; Wendisch, Manfred; Bi Lei; Kattawar, George; Mishchenko, Michael; Hu, Yongxiang

    2011-01-01

    This note reports on the effects of the polarization state of an incident quasi-monochromatic parallel beam of radiation and the orientation of a hexagonal ice particle with respect to the incident direction on the extinction process. When the incident beam is aligned with the six-fold rotational symmetry axis, the extinction is independent of the polarization state of the incident light. For other orientations, the extinction cross-section for linearly polarized light can be either larger or smaller than its counterpart for an unpolarized incident beam. Therefore, the attenuation of a quasi-monochromatic radiation beam by an ice cloud depends on the polarization state of the beam if ice crystals within the cloud are not randomly oriented. Furthermore, a case study of the extinction of light by a quartz particle is also presented to illustrate the dependence of the extinction cross-section on the polarization state of the incident light.

  15. Energy dependency and sustainable regional development in the Baltic states: A review

    Štreimikienė Dalia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy security is one of the most important indicators of sustainable regional development and 'green' growth in implementation of EU strategy Europe 2020. It can provide the harmonized development and cohesion of 'old' and 'new' EU member states. Our paper conducts a comparative study of energy dependency and energy security indicators in the Baltic States. The Baltic countries achieved enormous progress in the use of renewable energy sources and energy efficiency since their EU accession in 2004. The increase of renewable energy capacities in Baltic States also contributed to the reduction of energy intensity and carbon intensity of economy and energy import dependency. Our results show that amongst all three states, it was Estonia that had achieved the best results in increased use of renewables and energy efficiency improvements and had distinguished itself with the best indicators and economic and regional policy outcomes.

  16. Evidence for forcing-dependent steady states in a turbulent swirling flow.

    Saint-Michel, B; Dubrulle, B; Marié, L; Ravelet, F; Daviaud, F

    2013-12-06

    We study the influence on steady turbulent states of the forcing in a von Karman flow, at constant impeller speed, or at constant torque. We find that the different forcing conditions change the nature of the stability of the steady states and reveal dynamical regimes that bear similarities to low-dimensional systems. We suggest that this forcing dependence may be applicable to other turbulent systems.

  17. Role of state-dependent learning in the cognitive effects of caffeine in mice

    Sanday, Leandro [UNIFESP; Zanin, Karina Agustini [UNIFESP; Patti, Camilla de Lima [UNIFESP; Fernandes-Santos, Luciano [UNIFESP; Oliveira, Larissa C. [UNIFESP; Longo, Beatriz Monteiro [UNIFESP; Andersen, Monica Levy [UNIFESP; Tufik, Sergio [UNIFESP; Frussa-Filho, Roberto [UNIFESP

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and it is generally believed that it promotes beneficial effects on cognitive performance. However, there is also evidence suggesting that caffeine has inhibitory effects on learning and memory. Considering that caffeine may have anxiogenic effects, thus changing the emotional state of the subjects, state-dependent learning may play a role in caffeine-induced cognitive alterations. Mice were administered 20 mg/kg caffeine be...

  18. Triplet state photochemistry and the three-state crossing of acetophenone within time-dependent density-functional theory

    Huix-Rotllant, Miquel, E-mail: miquel.huix@gmail.com; Ferré, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.ferre@univ-amu.fr [Institut de Chimie Radicalaire (UMR-7273), Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2014-04-07

    Even though time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) works generally well for describing excited states energies and properties in the Franck-Condon region, it can dramatically fail in predicting photochemistry, notably when electronic state crossings occur. Here, we assess the ability of TDDFT to describe the photochemistry of an important class of triplet sensitizers, namely, aromatic ketones. We take acetophenone as a test molecule, for which accurate ab initio results exist in the literature. Triplet acetophenone is generated thanks to an exotic three-state crossing involving one singlet and two triplets states (i.e., a simultaneous intersystem crossing and triplet conical intersection), thus being a stringent test for approximate TDDFT. We show that most exchange-correlation functionals can only give a semi-qualitative picture of the overall photochemistry, in which the three-state crossing is rather represented as a triplet conical intersection separated from the intersystem crossing. The best result overall is given by the double hybrid functional mPW2PLYP, which is even able to reproduce quantitatively the three-state crossing region. We rationalize this results by noting that double hybrid functionals include a larger portion of double excitation character to the excited states.

  19. A two-queue model with alternating limited service and state-dependent setups

    Winands, E.M.M.; Adan, I.J.B.F.; Houtum, van G.J.J.A.N.; Papadopoulos, C.T.

    2005-01-01

    We consider a two-queue model with state-dependent setups, in which a single server alternately serves the two queues. The high-priority queue is served exhaustively, whereas the low-priority queue is served according to the k-limited strategy. We obtain the transforms of the queue length and

  20. A Busy period analysis for the state dependent M/M/1/K queue

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad; Boxma, Onno

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the transient behavior of a state dependent M/M/1/K queue during the busy period. We derive in closed-form the joint transform of the length of the busy period, the number of customers served during the busy period, and the number of losses during the busy period. For two

  1. Existence of periodic solutions for Rayleigh equations with state-dependent delay

    Jehad O. Alzabut

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We establish sufficient conditions for the existence of periodic solutions for a Rayleigh-type equation with state-dependent delay. Our approach is based on the continuation theorem in degree theory, and some analysis techniques. An example illustrates that our approach to this problem is new.

  2. Brain State-dependent Functional Hemispheric Specialization in Men but not in Women

    Mohr, Christine; Michel, Christoph M.; Lantz, Goran; Ortigue, Stephanie; Viaud-Delmon, Isabelle; Landis, Theodor

    2017-01-01

    Hemispheric specialization is reliably demonstrated in patients with unilateral lesions or disconnected hemispheres, but is inconsistent in healthy populations. The reason for this paradox is unclear. We propose that functional hemispheric specialization in healthy participants depends upon functional brain states at stimulus arrival (FBS). Brain activity was recorded from 123 surface electrodes while 22 participants (11 women) performed lateralized lexical decisions (left hemisphere processi...

  3. Experimental evaluation of optimal Vehicle Dynamic Control based on the State Dependent Riccati Equation technique

    Alirezaei, M.; Kanarachos, S.A.; Scheepers, B.T.M.; Maurice, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Development and experimentally evaluation of an optimal Vehicle Dynamic Control (VDC) strategy based on the State Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) control technique is presented. The proposed nonlinear controller is based on a nonlinear vehicle model with nonlinear tire characteristics. A novel

  4. Stability properties of a heat equation with state-dependent parameters and asymmetric boundary conditions

    Backi, Christoph Josef; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Leth, John

    2015-01-01

    In this work the stability properties of a partial differential equation (PDE) with state-dependent parameters and asymmetric boundary conditions are investigated. The PDE describes the temperature distribution inside foodstuff, but can also hold for other applications and phenomena. We show...

  5. ON THE ANISOTROPIC NORM OF DISCRETE TIME STOCHASTIC SYSTEMS WITH STATE DEPENDENT NOISE

    Isaac Yaesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to determine conditions for the bound-edness of the anisotropic norm of discrete-time linear stochastic sys-tems with state dependent noise. It is proved that these conditions canbe expressed in terms of the feasibility of a specific system of matrixinequalities.

  6. Remarks on the necessity and implications of state-dependence in the black hole interior

    Papadodimas, Kyriakos; Raju, Suvrat

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the "state-dependence" of the map that we proposed recently between bulk operators in the interior of a large anti-de Sitter black hole and operators in the boundary CFT. By refining recent versions of the information paradox, we show that this feature is necessary for the CFT to

  7. Comments on the Necessity and Implications of State-Dependence in the Black Hole Interior

    Papadodimas, Kyriakos; Raju, Suvrat

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the "state-dependence" of the map that we proposed recently between bulk operators in the interior of a large AdS black hole and operators in the boundary CFT. By refining recent versions of the information paradox, we show that this feature is necessary for the CFT to successfully

  8. Existence of Mild Solutions for Impulsive Fractional Integro-Differential Inclusions with State-Dependent Delay

    Selvaraj Suganya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, we implement Bohnenblust–Karlin’s fixed point theorem to demonstrate the existence of mild solutions for a class of impulsive fractional integro-differential inclusions (IFIDI with state-dependent delay (SDD in Banach spaces. An example is provided to illustrate the obtained abstract results.

  9. Controllability Results For First Order Impulsive Stochastic Functional Differential Systems with State-Dependent Delay

    C. Parthasarathy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the controllability results of first order impulsive stochastic differential and neutral differential systems with state-dependent delay by using semigroup theory. The controllability results are derived by the means of Leray-SchauderAlternative fixed point theorem. An example is provided to illustrate the theory.

  10. Existence results for impulsive neutral functional differential equations with state-dependent delay

    Mani Mallika Arjunan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we study the existence of mild solutions for a class of impulsive abstract partial neutral functional differential equations with state-dependent delay. The results are obtained by using Leray-Schauder Alternative fixed point theorem. Example is provided to illustrate the main result.

  11. Moment ratios for heavy QQ- - states and their dependence on the quarkmass definition

    Bertlmann, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    When analyzing heavy qq - states with help of exponential moments we argue that a ratio of moments should be expanded rather than the moments themselves. Within a nonrelativistic approximation we show that the expanded ratio is totally independent on the quark mass definition, whereas the nonexpanded ratio of moments strongly depends on it. (Author)

  12. Noise-intolerance and state-dependent factors in patients with whiplash associated disorder

    Blokhorst, M.G.B.G.; Meeldijk, S.J.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Toor, T. van; Lousberg, R.; Ganzevles, P.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment was carried out in which the level of noise-intolerance in patients with a Whiplash Associated Disorder (WAD) was compared to healthy matched control subjects. In addition, the relationship between state-dependent factors (as headache, neck pain, fatigue and tension) and

  13. State-dependent bulk-boundary maps and black hole complementarity

    Papadodimas, Kyriakos; Raju, Suvrat

    2014-01-01

    We provide a simple and explicit construction of local bulk operators that describe the interior of a black hole in the AdS/CFT correspondence. The existence of these operators is predicated on the assumption that the mapping of CFT operators to local bulk operators depends on the state of the CFT.

  14. Role of the pH in state-dependent blockade of hERG currents

    Wang, Yibo; Guo, Jiqing; Perissinotti, Laura L.; Lees-Miller, James; Teng, Guoqi; Durdagi, Serdar; Duff, Henry J.; Noskov, Sergei Yu.

    2016-10-01

    Mutations that reduce inactivation of the voltage-gated Kv11.1 potassium channel (hERG) reduce binding for a number of blockers. State specific block of the inactivated state of hERG block may increase risks of drug-induced Torsade de pointes. In this study, molecular simulations of dofetilide binding to the previously developed and experimentally validated models of the hERG channel in open and open-inactivated states were combined with voltage-clamp experiments to unravel the mechanism(s) of state-dependent blockade. The computations of the free energy profiles associated with the drug block to its binding pocket in the intra-cavitary site display startling differences in the open and open-inactivated states of the channel. It was also found that drug ionization may play a crucial role in preferential targeting to the open-inactivated state of the pore domain. pH-dependent hERG blockade by dofetilie was studied with patch-clamp recordings. The results show that low pH increases the extent and speed of drug-induced block. Both experimental and computational findings indicate that binding to the open-inactivated state is of key importance to our understanding of the dofetilide’s mode of action.

  15. On common noise-induced synchronization in complex networks with state-dependent noise diffusion processes

    Russo, Giovanni; Shorten, Robert

    2018-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the study of common noise-induced synchronization phenomena in complex networks of diffusively coupled nonlinear systems. We consider the case where common noise propagation depends on the network state and, as a result, the noise diffusion process at the nodes depends on the state of the network. For such networks, we present an algebraic sufficient condition for the onset of synchronization, which depends on the network topology, the dynamics at the nodes, the coupling strength and the noise diffusion. Our result explicitly shows that certain noise diffusion processes can drive an unsynchronized network towards synchronization. In order to illustrate the effectiveness of our result, we consider two applications: collective decision processes and synchronization of chaotic systems. We explicitly show that, in the former application, a sufficiently large noise can drive a population towards a common decision, while, in the latter, we show how common noise can synchronize a network of Lorentz chaotic systems.

  16. Estimation of time- and state-dependent delays and other parameters in functional differential equations

    Murphy, K. A.

    1990-01-01

    A parameter estimation algorithm is developed which can be used to estimate unknown time- or state-dependent delays and other parameters (e.g., initial condition) appearing within a nonlinear nonautonomous functional differential equation. The original infinite dimensional differential equation is approximated using linear splines, which are allowed to move with the variable delay. The variable delays are approximated using linear splines as well. The approximation scheme produces a system of ordinary differential equations with nice computational properties. The unknown parameters are estimated within the approximating systems by minimizing a least-squares fit-to-data criterion. Convergence theorems are proved for time-dependent delays and state-dependent delays within two classes, which say essentially that fitting the data by using approximations will, in the limit, provide a fit to the data using the original system. Numerical test examples are presented which illustrate the method for all types of delay.

  17. Selective maintenance for multi-state series–parallel systems under economic dependence

    Dao, Cuong D.; Zuo, Ming J.; Pandey, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study on selective maintenance for multi-state series–parallel systems with economically dependent components. In the selective maintenance problem, the maintenance manager has to decide which components should receive maintenance activities within a finite break between missions. All the system reliabilities in the next operating mission, the available budget and the maintenance time for each component from its current state to a higher state are taken into account in the optimization models. In addition, the components in series–parallel systems are considered to be economically dependent. Time and cost savings will be achieved when several components are simultaneously repaired in a selective maintenance strategy. As the number of repaired components increases, the saved time and cost will also increase due to the share of setting up between components and another additional reduction amount resulting from the repair of multiple identical components. Different optimization models are derived to find the best maintenance strategy for multi-state series–parallel systems. A genetic algorithm is used to solve the optimization models. The decision makers may select different components to be repaired to different working states based on the maintenance objective, resource availabilities and how dependent the repair time and cost of each component are

  18. Dependency of a therapy-resistant state of cancer cells on a lipid peroxidase pathway.

    Viswanathan, Vasanthi S; Ryan, Matthew J; Dhruv, Harshil D; Gill, Shubhroz; Eichhoff, Ossia M; Seashore-Ludlow, Brinton; Kaffenberger, Samuel D; Eaton, John K; Shimada, Kenichi; Aguirre, Andrew J; Viswanathan, Srinivas R; Chattopadhyay, Shrikanta; Tamayo, Pablo; Yang, Wan Seok; Rees, Matthew G; Chen, Sixun; Boskovic, Zarko V; Javaid, Sarah; Huang, Cherrie; Wu, Xiaoyun; Tseng, Yuen-Yi; Roider, Elisabeth M; Gao, Dong; Cleary, James M; Wolpin, Brian M; Mesirov, Jill P; Haber, Daniel A; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Boehm, Jesse S; Kotz, Joanne D; Hon, Cindy S; Chen, Yu; Hahn, William C; Levesque, Mitchell P; Doench, John G; Berens, Michael E; Shamji, Alykhan F; Clemons, Paul A; Stockwell, Brent R; Schreiber, Stuart L

    2017-07-27

    Plasticity of the cell state has been proposed to drive resistance to multiple classes of cancer therapies, thereby limiting their effectiveness. A high-mesenchymal cell state observed in human tumours and cancer cell lines has been associated with resistance to multiple treatment modalities across diverse cancer lineages, but the mechanistic underpinning for this state has remained incompletely understood. Here we molecularly characterize this therapy-resistant high-mesenchymal cell state in human cancer cell lines and organoids and show that it depends on a druggable lipid-peroxidase pathway that protects against ferroptosis, a non-apoptotic form of cell death induced by the build-up of toxic lipid peroxides. We show that this cell state is characterized by activity of enzymes that promote the synthesis of polyunsaturated lipids. These lipids are the substrates for lipid peroxidation by lipoxygenase enzymes. This lipid metabolism creates a dependency on pathways converging on the phospholipid glutathione peroxidase (GPX4), a selenocysteine-containing enzyme that dissipates lipid peroxides and thereby prevents the iron-mediated reactions of peroxides that induce ferroptotic cell death. Dependency on GPX4 was found to exist across diverse therapy-resistant states characterized by high expression of ZEB1, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition in epithelial-derived carcinomas, TGFβ-mediated therapy-resistance in melanoma, treatment-induced neuroendocrine transdifferentiation in prostate cancer, and sarcomas, which are fixed in a mesenchymal state owing to their cells of origin. We identify vulnerability to ferroptic cell death induced by inhibition of a lipid peroxidase pathway as a feature of therapy-resistant cancer cells across diverse mesenchymal cell-state contexts.

  19. Uncovering state-dependent relationships in shallow lakes using Bayesian latent variable regression.

    Vitense, Kelsey; Hanson, Mark A; Herwig, Brian R; Zimmer, Kyle D; Fieberg, John

    2018-03-01

    Ecosystems sometimes undergo dramatic shifts between contrasting regimes. Shallow lakes, for instance, can transition between two alternative stable states: a clear state dominated by submerged aquatic vegetation and a turbid state dominated by phytoplankton. Theoretical models suggest that critical nutrient thresholds differentiate three lake types: highly resilient clear lakes, lakes that may switch between clear and turbid states following perturbations, and highly resilient turbid lakes. For effective and efficient management of shallow lakes and other systems, managers need tools to identify critical thresholds and state-dependent relationships between driving variables and key system features. Using shallow lakes as a model system for which alternative stable states have been demonstrated, we developed an integrated framework using Bayesian latent variable regression (BLR) to classify lake states, identify critical total phosphorus (TP) thresholds, and estimate steady state relationships between TP and chlorophyll a (chl a) using cross-sectional data. We evaluated the method using data simulated from a stochastic differential equation model and compared its performance to k-means clustering with regression (KMR). We also applied the framework to data comprising 130 shallow lakes. For simulated data sets, BLR had high state classification rates (median/mean accuracy >97%) and accurately estimated TP thresholds and state-dependent TP-chl a relationships. Classification and estimation improved with increasing sample size and decreasing noise levels. Compared to KMR, BLR had higher classification rates and better approximated the TP-chl a steady state relationships and TP thresholds. We fit the BLR model to three different years of empirical shallow lake data, and managers can use the estimated bifurcation diagrams to prioritize lakes for management according to their proximity to thresholds and chance of successful rehabilitation. Our model improves upon

  20. State-dependent differential Riccati equation to track control of time-varying systems with state and control nonlinearities.

    Korayem, M H; Nekoo, S R

    2015-07-01

    This work studies an optimal control problem using the state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE) in differential form to track for time-varying systems with state and control nonlinearities. The trajectory tracking structure provides two nonlinear differential equations: the state-dependent differential Riccati equation (SDDRE) and the feed-forward differential equation. The independence of the governing equations and stability of the controller are proven along the trajectory using the Lyapunov approach. Backward integration (BI) is capable of solving the equations as a numerical solution; however, the forward solution methods require the closed-form solution to fulfill the task. A closed-form solution is introduced for SDDRE, but the feed-forward differential equation has not yet been obtained. Different ways of solving the problem are expressed and analyzed. These include BI, closed-form solution with corrective assumption, approximate solution, and forward integration. Application of the tracking problem is investigated to control robotic manipulators possessing rigid or flexible joints. The intention is to release a general program for automatic implementation of an SDDRE controller for any manipulator that obeys the Denavit-Hartenberg (D-H) principle when only D-H parameters are received as input data. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of state dependent mandate laws on the labor supply decisions of young adults.

    Depew, Briggs

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the Affordable Care Act, the majority of states in the U.S. had already implemented state laws that extended the age that young adults could enroll as dependents on their parent's employer-based health insurance plans. Because of the fundamental link between health insurance and employment in the U.S., such policies may effect the labor supply decisions of young adults. Although the interaction between labor supply and health insurance has been extensively studied for other subpopulations, little is known about the role of health insurance in the labor supply decisions of young adults. I use the variation from the implementation and changes in state policies that expanded dependent health insurance coverage to examine how young adults adjusted their labor supply when they were able to be covered as a dependent on their parent's plan. I find that these state mandates led to a decrease in labor supply on the intensive margin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Remarks on the necessity and implications of state-dependence in the black hole interior

    Papadodimas, Kyriakos; Raju, Suvrat

    2016-04-01

    We revisit the "state-dependence" of the map that we proposed recently between bulk operators in the interior of a large anti-de Sitter black hole and operators in the boundary CFT. By refining recent versions of the information paradox, we show that this feature is necessary for the CFT to successfully describe local physics behind the horizon—not only for single-sided black holes but even in the eternal black hole. We show that state-dependence is invisible to an infalling observer who cannot differentiate these operators from those of ordinary quantum effective field theory. Therefore the infalling observer does not observe any violations of quantum mechanics. We successfully resolve a large class of potential ambiguities in our construction. We analyze states where the CFT is entangled with another system and show that the ER =EPR conjecture emerges from our construction in a natural and precise form. We comment on the possible semiclassical origins of state-dependence.

  3. Remarks on the necessity and implications of state-dependence in the black hole interior

    Papadodimas, Kyriakos

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the "state-dependence" of the map that we proposed recently between bulk operators in the interior of a large AdS black hole and operators in the boundary CFT. By refining recent versions of the information paradox, we show that this feature is necessary for the CFT to successfully describe local physics behind the horizon --- not only for single-sided black holes but even in the eternal black hole. We show that state-dependence is invisible to an infalling observer who cannot differentiate these operators from those of ordinary quantum effective field theory. Therefore the infalling observer does not observe any violations of quantum mechanics. We successfully resolve a large class of potential ambiguities in our construction. We analyze states where the CFT is entangled with another system and show that the ER=EPR conjecture emerges from our construction in a natural and precise form. We comment on the possible semi-classical origins of state-dependence.

  4. Impurity-induced tuning of quantum-well States in spin-dependent resonant tunneling.

    Kalitsov, Alan; Coho, A; Kioussis, Nicholas; Vedyayev, Anatoly; Chshiev, M; Granovsky, A

    2004-07-23

    We report exact model calculations of the spin-dependent tunneling in double magnetic tunnel junctions in the presence of impurities in the well. We show that the impurity can tune selectively the spin channels giving rise to a wide variety of interesting and novel transport phenomena. The tunneling magnetoresistance, the spin polarization, and the local current can be dramatically enhanced or suppressed by impurities. The underlying mechanism is the impurity-induced shift of the quantum well states (QWSs), which depends on the impurity potential, impurity position, and the symmetry of the QWS. Copyright 2004 The American Physical Society

  5. Gender anomalies in stated preference surveys – are biases really gender dependent?

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    2010-01-01

    The potential for a number of common but severe biases in stated preference method surveys being gender dependent has been largely overlooked in the literature. In this paper we summarize results from three Choice Experiment studies that find evidence in favor of gender differences in vulnerability...... set up a novel theoretical model, which provides an explanation for gender specific susceptibility to biases. We conclude that biases can indeed be gender dependent. Hence, researchers should not simply disregard potential gender differences, but rather take them into account and examine the extent...... of them when performing surveys. Finally, we give suggestions for future research in this area....

  6. Multiobjective Output Feedback Control of a Class of Stochastic Hybrid Systems with State-Dependent Noise

    S. Aberkane

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with dynamic output feedback control of continuous-time active fault tolerant control systems with Markovian parameters (AFTCSMP and state-dependent noise. The main contribution is to formulate conditions for multiperformance design, related to this class of stochastic hybrid systems, that take into account the problematic resulting from the fact that the controller only depends on the fault detection and isolation (FDI process. The specifications and objectives under consideration include stochastic stability, ℋ2 and ℋ∞ (or more generally, stochastic integral quadratic constraints performances. Results are formulated as matrix inequalities. The theoretical results are illustrated using a classical example from literature.

  7. Exactly solvable quantum state reduction models with time-dependent coupling

    Brody, Dorje C; Constantinou, Irene C; Dear, James D C; Hughston, Lane P

    2006-01-01

    A closed-form solution to the energy-based stochastic Schroedinger equation with a time-dependent coupling is obtained. The solution is algebraic in character, and is expressed directly in terms of independent random data. The data consist of (i) a random variable H which has the distribution P(H=E i ) = π i , where π i is the transition probability vertical bar (ψ 0 vertical bar Φ i ) vertical bar 2 from the initial state vertical bar ψ 0 ) to the Lueders state vertical bar Φ i ) with energy E i , and (ii) an independent P-Brownian motion, where P is the physical probability measure associated with the dynamics of the reduction process. When the coupling is time independent, it is known that state reduction occurs asymptotically-that is to say, over an infinite time horizon. In the case of a time-dependent coupling, we show that if the magnitude of the coupling decreases sufficiently rapidly, then the energy variance will be reduced under the dynamics, but the state need not reach an energy eigenstate. This situation corresponds to the case of a 'partial' or 'incomplete' measurement of the energy. We also construct an example of a model where the opposite situation prevails, in which complete state reduction is achieved after the passage of a finite period of time

  8. Isotope effect with energy-dependent density of states and impurities

    Williams, P.J.; Carbotte, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    We have calculated the total isotope coefficient β in a model where there is energy-dependent structure in the electronic density of states. We model the structure with a simple Lorentzian. In our calculation, doping has the effect of shifting the Fermi level and broadening the structure in the density of states. We have treated the dopants both as normal and as magnetic impurities. The asymmetry observed in the experimental data is found in our results. However, the complete range of values observed is difficult to reproduce. We question also whether the shifts in Fermi level required in such models are reasonable

  9. Rotational state dependence of ion-polar molecule reactions at very low temperature

    Dubernet, M.L.; McCarroll, R.

    1989-01-01

    The adiabatic rotational state method is used to investigate the rotational state dependence of the rate coefficients for ion-polar molecule reactions in the very low temperature regime characteristic of interstellar molecular clouds. Results obtained for the systems H 3 + +HCl and H 3 + +HCN indicate that all the methods based on the adiabatic separation of the rotational and radial motion of the collision complex - adiabatic capture centrifugal sudden approximation (ACCSA), statistical adiabatic channel model, classical adiabatic invariance method - agree very satisfactorily in the low temperature limit. Discrepancies observed between some of the published data would appear to arise from numerical inaccuracies rather than from any defect of the theory. (orig.)

  10. Effects of self-esteem on state and trait components of interpersonal dependency and depression in the workplace.

    Takagishi, Yukihiro; Sakata, Masatsugu; Kitamura, Toshinori

    2011-09-01

    This longitudinal study was undertaken to clarify the relationships among self-esteem, interpersonal dependency, and depression, focusing on a trait and state component of interpersonal dependency and depression. In a sample of 466 working people, self-esteem, interpersonal dependency, job stressor, and depression were assessed at 2 points of time. A structural equation model (SEM) was created to differentiate the trait component of interpersonal dependency, depression and the state component of interpersonal dependency, depression. The model revealed that self-esteem influenced trait interpersonal dependency and trait depression but not state interpersonal dependency or depression. Setting a latent variable as a trait component to differentiate trait and state in interpersonal dependency and depression in SEM was found to be effective both statistically and clinically. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Periodic solution for state-dependent impulsive shunting inhibitory CNNs with time-varying delays.

    Şaylı, Mustafa; Yılmaz, Enes

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we consider existence and global exponential stability of periodic solution for state-dependent impulsive shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks with time-varying delays. By means of B-equivalence method, we reduce these state-dependent impulsive neural networks system to an equivalent fix time impulsive neural networks system. Further, by using Mawhin's continuation theorem of coincide degree theory and employing a suitable Lyapunov function some new sufficient conditions for existence and global exponential stability of periodic solution are obtained. Previous results are improved and extended. Finally, we give an illustrative example with numerical simulations to demonstrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Constitutive relations describing creep deformation for multi-axial time-dependent stress states

    McCartney, L. N.

    1981-02-01

    A THEORY of primary and secondary creep deformation in metals is presented, which is based upon the concept of tensor internal state variables and the principles of continuum mechanics and thermodynamics. The theory is able to account for both multi-axial and time-dependent stress and strain states. The wellknown concepts of elastic, anelastic and plastic strains follow naturally from the theory. Homogeneous stress states are considered in detail and a simplified theory is derived by linearizing with respect to the internal state variables. It is demonstrated that the model can be developed in such a way that multi-axial constant-stress creep data can be presented as a single relationship between an equivalent stress and an equivalent strain. It is shown how the theory may be used to describe the multi-axial deformation of metals which are subjected to constant stress states. The multi-axial strain response to a general cyclic stress state is calculated. For uni-axial stress states, square-wave loading and a thermal fatigue stress cycle are analysed.

  13. Subgeometric Ergodicity Analysis of Continuous-Time Markov Chains under Random-Time State-Dependent Lyapunov Drift Conditions

    Mokaedi V. Lekgari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate random-time state-dependent Foster-Lyapunov analysis on subgeometric rate ergodicity of continuous-time Markov chains (CTMCs. We are mainly concerned with making use of the available results on deterministic state-dependent drift conditions for CTMCs and on random-time state-dependent drift conditions for discrete-time Markov chains and transferring them to CTMCs.

  14. Parabolic partial differential equations with discrete state-dependent delay: Classical solutions and solution manifold

    Krisztin, T.; Rezunenko, Oleksandr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 260, č. 5 (2016), s. 4454-4472 ISSN 0022-0396 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/12/2431 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Parabolic partial differential equations * State dependent delay * Solution manifold Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 1.988, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/AS/rezunenko-0457879.pdf

  15. On time transformations for differential equations with state-dependent delay

    Rezunenko, Oleksandr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2014), s. 298-307 ISSN 1895-1074 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/12/2431 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : differential equations * state-dependent delay * time transformations Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 0.578, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/AS/rezunenko-0429130.pdf

  16. Dynamics of second order in time evolution equations with state-dependent delay

    Chueshov, I.; Rezunenko, Oleksandr

    123-124, č. 1 (2015), s. 126-149 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/12/2431 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Second order evolution equations * State dependent delay * Nonlinear plate * Finite-dimensional attractor Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 1.125, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/AS/rezunenko-0444708.pdf

  17. Finite-dimensional global attractors for parabolic nonlinear equations with state-dependent delay

    Chueshov, I.; Rezunenko, Oleksandr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 5 (2015), s. 1685-1704 ISSN 1534-0392 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/12/2431 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Parabolic evolution equations * state-dependent delay * global attractor * finite-dimension * exponential attractor Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 0.926, year: 2015 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/AS/rezunenko-0444705.pdf

  18. Existence results for fractional integro-differential inclusions with state-dependent delay

    Siracusa Giovana

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we are concerned with a class of abstract fractional integro-differential inclusions with infinite state-dependent delay. Our approach is based on the existence of a resolvent operator for the homogeneous equation.We establish the existence of mild solutions using both contractive maps and condensing maps. Finally, an application to the theory of heat conduction in materials with memory is given.

  19. The angular dependence of spin-state energy splittings in the ? core

    Groß, Lynn; Steenbock, Torben; Herrmann, Carmen

    2013-07-01

    Spin-state energy splittings are highly relevant for catalysis, molecular magnetism, and materials science, yet continue to pose a challenge for electronic structure methods. For a Fe2O2+ 2 core, we evaluate the bridging angle dependence of energy splittings between ferromagnetically and antiferromagnetically coupled states for different exchange-correlation functionals, and compare with complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) values, also including second-order perturbative corrections (CASPT2). CASSCF and CASPT2 yield strong antiferromagnetic coupling, with the smallest coupling at 100°, and a smooth dependence on the angle for Fe-O-Fe angles of 70° to 120°. Interestingly, this is qualitatively the same behaviour as often found for stable dinuclear transition metal complexes. While all functionals show the same angular dependence as CASPT2, they favour the antiferromagnetic state less strongly. Pure functionals such as BP86, BLYP, SSB-D, and TPSS come closer to the CASPT2 results (with energy splittings by about 60 kJ/mol smaller than the CASPT2 ones) than hybrid functionals. The hybrid functionals B3LYP, B3LYP⋆, and PBE0 favour the antiferromagnetic state even less strongly, resulting in ferromagnetic coupling for angles around 100°. The good qualitative agreement between CASPT2 and CASSCF on the one hand and CASPT2 and density functional theory on the other hand for angles between 70° and 110° suggests that the chosen active space of 18 electrons in 14 orbitals may be adequate for spin-state energy splitting of Fe2O2+ 2 in that region (possibly due to error cancellation), while angles of 60° or 120° may require larger active spaces. This study is complemented by an analysis of local spins, local charges, and CASSCF natural orbitals.

  20. Allopregnanolone induces state-dependent fear via the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    Acca, Gillian M; Mathew, Abel S; Jin, Jingji; Maren, Stephen; Nagaya, Naomi

    2017-03-01

    Gonadal steroids and their metabolites have been shown to be important modulators of emotional behavior. Allopregnanolone (ALLO), for example, is a metabolite of progesterone that has been linked to anxiety-related disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder. In rodents, it has been shown to reduce anxiety in a number of behavioral paradigms including Pavlovian fear conditioning. We have recently found that expression of conditioned contextual (but not auditory) freezing in rats can be suppressed by infusion of ALLO into the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). To further explore the nature of this effect, we infused ALLO into the BNST of male rats prior to both conditioning and testing. We found that suppression of contextual fear occurred when the hormone was present during either conditioning or testing but not during both procedures, suggesting that ALLO acts in a state-dependent manner within the BNST. A shift in interoceptive context during testing for animals conditioned under ALLO provided further support for this mechanism of hormonal action on contextual fear. Interestingly, infusions of ALLO into the basolateral amygdala produced a state-independent suppression of both conditioned contextual and auditory freezing. Altogether, these results suggest that ALLO can influence the acquisition and expression of fear memories by both state-dependent and state-independent mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection-dependent six-photon Holland-Burnett state interference

    Jin, Rui-Bo; Fujiwara, Mikio; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Collins, Robert J.; Buller, Gerald S.; Yamashita, Taro; Miki, Shigehito; Terai, Hirotaka; Takeoka, Masahiro; Sasaki, Masahide

    2016-11-01

    The NOON state, and its experimental approximation the Holland-Burnett state, have important applications in phase sensing measurement with enhanced sensitivity. However, most of the previous Holland-Burnett state interference (HBSI) experiments only investigated the area of the interference pattern in the region immediately around zero optical path length difference, while the full HBSI pattern over a wide range of optical path length differences has not yet been well explored. In this work, we experimentally and theoretically demonstrate up to six-photon HBSI and study the properties of the interference patterns over a wide range of optical path length differences. It was found that the shape, the coherence time and the visibility of the interference patterns were strongly dependent on the detection schemes. This work paves the way for applications which are based on the envelope of the HBSI pattern, such as quantum spectroscopy and quantum metrology.

  2. Analysis of equations of state and temperature dependence of thermal expansivity and bulk modulus for silicon

    Pandya, Tushar C; Bhatt, Apoorva D; Thakar, Nilesh A

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper an attempt has been made for the comparative study of different equations of state for silicon (Phase-1, cubic diamond structure) in the pressure range of 0-11 GPa. We compare the results of different equations of state (EOS) with available experimental data. The Kwon and Kim EOS is found to give far better agreement with the available experimental data. Results obtained by Poirier-Tarantola, Vinet, Tait and Suzuki's equations of state are not giving satisfactory agreement with the available experimental data. In the present study simple methods based on thermodynamic functions are presented to investigate the temperature dependence of thermal expansivity and bulk modulus for silicon. The results are reported for silicon. The calculated values of thermal expansivity are in good agreement with experimental data.

  3. State-dependent alterations of lipid profiles in patients with bipolar disorder.

    Huang, Yu-Jui; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Chung, Kuo-Hsuan; Chen, Pao-Huan; Huang, Shou-Hung; Kuo, Chian-Jue

    2018-07-01

    Objective Serum lipid levels may be associated with the affective severity of bipolar disorder, but data on lipid profiles in Asian patients with bipolar disorder and the lipid alterations in different states of opposite polarities are scant. We investigated the lipid profiles of patients in the acute affective, partial, and full remission state in bipolar mania and depression. Methods The physically healthy patients aged between 18 and 45 years with bipolar I disorder, as well as age-matched healthy normal controls were enrolled. We compared the fasting blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein of manic or depressed patients in the acute phase and subsequent partial and full remission with those of their normal controls. Results A total of 32 bipolar manic patients (12 women and 20 men), 32 bipolar depressed participants (18 women and 14 men), and 64 healthy control participants took part in this study. The mean cholesterol level in acute mania was significantly lower than that in acute depression (p bipolar mania. Conclusion Circulating lipid profiles may be easily affected by affective states. The acute manic state may be accompanied by state-dependent lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels relative to that in other mood states.

  4. REDOX IMAGING OF THE p53-DEPENDENT MITOCHONDRIAL REDOX STATE IN COLON CANCER EX VIVO

    XU, HE N.; FENG, MIN; MOON, LILY; DOLLOFF, NATHAN; EL-DEIRY, WAFIK; LI, LIN Z.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial redox state and its heterogeneity of colon cancer at tissue level have not been previously reported. Nor has how p53 regulates mitochondrial respiration been measured at (deep) tissue level, presumably due to the unavailability of the technology that has sufficient spatial resolution and tissue penetration depth. Our prior work demonstrated that the mitochondrial redox state and its intratumor heterogeneity is associated with cancer aggressiveness in human melanoma and breast cancer in mouse models, with the more metastatic tumors exhibiting localized regions of more oxidized redox state. Using the Chance redox scanner with an in-plane spatial resolution of 200 μm, we imaged the mitochondrial redox state of the wild-type p53 colon tumors (HCT116 p53 wt) and the p53-deleted colon tumors (HCT116 p53−/−) by collecting the fluorescence signals of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins [Fp, including flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)] from the mouse xenografts snap-frozen at low temperature. Our results show that: (1) both tumor lines have significant degree of intratumor heterogeneity of the redox state, typically exhibiting a distinct bi-modal distribution that either correlates with the spatial core–rim pattern or the “hot/cold” oxidation-reduction patches; (2) the p53−/− group is significantly more heterogeneous in the mitochondrial redox state and has a more oxidized tumor core compared to the p53 wt group when the tumor sizes of the two groups are matched; (3) the tumor size dependence of the redox indices (such as Fp and Fp redox ratio) is significant in the p53−/− group with the larger ones being more oxidized and more heterogeneous in their redox state, particularly more oxidized in the tumor central regions; (4) the H&E staining images of tumor sections grossly correlate with the redox images. The present work is the first to reveal at the submillimeter scale the intratumor heterogeneity pattern

  5. State estimation for discrete-time Markovian jumping neural networks with mixed mode-dependent delays

    Liu Yurong; Wang Zidong; Liu Xiaohui

    2008-01-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the state estimation problem for a new class of discrete-time neural networks with Markovian jumping parameters as well as mode-dependent mixed time-delays. The parameters of the discrete-time neural networks are subject to the switching from one mode to another at different times according to a Markov chain, and the mixed time-delays consist of both discrete and distributed delays that are dependent on the Markovian jumping mode. New techniques are developed to deal with the mixed time-delays in the discrete-time setting, and a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional is put forward to reflect the mode-dependent time-delays. Sufficient conditions are established in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) that guarantee the existence of the state estimators. We show that both the existence conditions and the explicit expression of the desired estimator can be characterized in terms of the solution to an LMI. A numerical example is exploited to show the usefulness of the derived LMI-based conditions

  6. Personality traits and mental health states of methamphetamine-dependent and methamphetamine non-using MSM.

    Solomon, Todd M; Kiang, Mathew V; Halkitis, Perry N; Moeller, Robert W; Pappas, Molly K

    2010-02-01

    This analysis considers the relation between personality traits, mental health states and methamphetamine (MA) use in 60 men who have sex with men (MSM). Thirty MA-dependent and 30 MA non-using MSM were assessed on the Neo Five Factor Inventory, the Brief Symptom Inventory, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian Version tests. Our results indicate differences between groups on a variety of measures of personality traits and mental states. Specifically, MA-dependent participants were found to be more Neurotic, less Open, less Agreeable, and less Conscientious. Further, MA-dependent participants were found to have higher levels of Paranoid Ideation and higher levels of Interpersonal Sensitivity. Given the high prevalence of MA use in the MSM community and the association between MA use and sexual risk taking, our findings provided a clearer understanding of how individual personality traits may be a factor in the continued use of this drug among MSM. Further research should seek to incorporate individual personality traits into the development of efficacious MA-specific treatment interventions.

  7. Force-free state in a superconducting single crystal and angle-dependent vortex helical instability

    del Valle, J.; Gomez, A.; Gonzalez, E. M.; Manas-Valero, S.; Coronado, E.; Vicent, J. L.

    2017-06-01

    Superconducting 2 H -NbS e2 single crystals show intrinsic low pinning values. Therefore, they are ideal materials with which to explore fundamental properties of vortices. (V , I ) characteristics are the experimental data we have used to investigate the dissipation mechanisms in a rectangular-shaped 2 H -NbS e2 single crystal. Particularly, we have studied dissipation behavior with magnetic fields applied in the plane of the crystal and parallel to the injected currents, i.e., in the force-free state where the vortex helical instability governs the vortex dynamics. In this regime, the data follow the elliptic critical state model and the voltage dissipation shows an exponential dependence, V ∝eα (I -IC ∥ ) , IC ∥ being the critical current in the force-free configuration and α a linear temperature-dependent parameter. Moreover, this exponential dependence can be observed for in-plane applied magnetic fields up to 40° off the current direction, which implies that the vortex helical instability plays a role in dissipation even out of the force-free configuration.

  8. Pseudo-Hermitian coherent states under the generalized quantum condition with position-dependent mass

    Yahiaoui, S A; Bentaiba, M

    2012-01-01

    In the context of the factorization method, we investigate the pseudo-Hermitian coherent states and their Hermitian counterpart coherent states under the generalized quantum condition in the framework of a position-dependent mass. By considering a specific modification in the superpotential, suitable annihilation and creation operators are constructed in order to reproduce the Hermitian counterpart Hamiltonian in the factorized form. We show that by means of these ladder operators, we can construct a wide range of exactly solvable potentials as well as their accompanying coherent states. Alternatively, we explore the relationship between the pseudo-Hermitian Hamiltonian and its Hermitian counterparts, obtained from a similarity transformation, to construct the associated pseudo-Hermitian coherent states. These latter preserve the structure of Perelomov’s states and minimize the generalized position–momentum uncertainty principle. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators’. (paper)

  9. Using brain-computer interfaces and brain-state dependent stimulation as tools in cognitive neuroscience

    Ole eJensen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Large efforts are currently being made to develop and improve online analysis of brain activity which can be used e.g. for brain-computer interfacing (BCI. A BCI allows a subject to control a device by willfully changing his/her own brain activity. BCI therefore holds the promise as a tool for aiding the disabled and for augmenting human performance. While technical developments obviously are important, we will here argue that new insight gained from cognitive neuroscience can be used to identify signatures of neural activation which reliably can be modulated by the subject at will. This review will focus mainly on oscillatory activity in the alpha band which is strongly modulated by changes in covert attention. Besides developing BCIs for their traditional purpose, they might also be used as a research tool for cognitive neuroscience. There is currently a strong interest in how brain state fluctuations impact cognition. These state fluctuations are partly reflected by ongoing oscillatory activity. The functional role of the brain state can be investigated by introducing stimuli in real time to subjects depending on the actual state of the brain. This principle of brain-state dependent stimulation may also be used as a practical tool for augmenting human behavior. In conclusion, new approaches based on online analysis of ongoing brain activity are currently in rapid development. These approaches are amongst others informed by new insight gained from EEG/MEG studies in cognitive neuroscience and hold the promise of providing new ways for investigating the brain at work.

  10. State-Dependent Decisions Cause Apparent Violations of Rationality in Animal Choice

    Schuck-Paim, Cynthia; Pompilio, Lorena

    2004-01-01

    Normative models of choice in economics and biology usually expect preferences to be consistent across contexts, or “rational” in economic language. Following a large body of literature reporting economically irrational behaviour in humans, breaches of rationality by animals have also been recently described. If proven systematic, these findings would challenge long-standing biological approaches to behavioural theorising, and suggest that cognitive processes similar to those claimed to cause irrationality in humans can also hinder optimality approaches to modelling animal preferences. Critical differences between human and animal experiments have not, however, been sufficiently acknowledged. While humans can be instructed conceptually about the choice problem, animals need to be trained by repeated exposure to all contingencies. This exposure often leads to differences in state between treatments, hence changing choices while preserving rationality. We report experiments with European starlings demonstrating that apparent breaches of rationality can result from state-dependence. We show that adding an inferior alternative to a choice set (a “decoy”) affects choices, an effect previously interpreted as indicating irrationality. However, these effects appear and disappear depending on whether state differences between choice contexts are present or not. These results open the possibility that some expressions of maladaptive behaviour are due to oversights in the migration of ideas between economics and biology, and suggest that key differences between human and nonhuman research must be recognised if ideas are to safely travel between these fields. PMID:15550984

  11. State-dependent decisions cause apparent violations of rationality in animal choice.

    Cynthia Schuck-Paim

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Normative models of choice in economics and biology usually expect preferences to be consistent across contexts, or "rational" in economic language. Following a large body of literature reporting economically irrational behaviour in humans, breaches of rationality by animals have also been recently described. If proven systematic, these findings would challenge long-standing biological approaches to behavioural theorising, and suggest that cognitive processes similar to those claimed to cause irrationality in humans can also hinder optimality approaches to modelling animal preferences. Critical differences between human and animal experiments have not, however, been sufficiently acknowledged. While humans can be instructed conceptually about the choice problem, animals need to be trained by repeated exposure to all contingencies. This exposure often leads to differences in state between treatments, hence changing choices while preserving rationality. We report experiments with European starlings demonstrating that apparent breaches of rationality can result from state-dependence. We show that adding an inferior alternative to a choice set (a "decoy" affects choices, an effect previously interpreted as indicating irrationality. However, these effects appear and disappear depending on whether state differences between choice contexts are present or not. These results open the possibility that some expressions of maladaptive behaviour are due to oversights in the migration of ideas between economics and biology, and suggest that key differences between human and nonhuman research must be recognised if ideas are to safely travel between these fields.

  12. State-dependent decisions cause apparent violations of rationality in animal choice.

    Schuck-Paim, Cynthia; Pompilio, Lorena; Kacelnik, Alex

    2004-12-01

    Normative models of choice in economics and biology usually expect preferences to be consistent across contexts, or "rational" in economic language. Following a large body of literature reporting economically irrational behaviour in humans, breaches of rationality by animals have also been recently described. If proven systematic, these findings would challenge long-standing biological approaches to behavioural theorising, and suggest that cognitive processes similar to those claimed to cause irrationality in humans can also hinder optimality approaches to modelling animal preferences. Critical differences between human and animal experiments have not, however, been sufficiently acknowledged. While humans can be instructed conceptually about the choice problem, animals need to be trained by repeated exposure to all contingencies. This exposure often leads to differences in state between treatments, hence changing choices while preserving rationality. We report experiments with European starlings demonstrating that apparent breaches of rationality can result from state-dependence. We show that adding an inferior alternative to a choice set (a "decoy") affects choices, an effect previously interpreted as indicating irrationality. However, these effects appear and disappear depending on whether state differences between choice contexts are present or not. These results open the possibility that some expressions of maladaptive behaviour are due to oversights in the migration of ideas between economics and biology, and suggest that key differences between human and nonhuman research must be recognised if ideas are to safely travel between these fields.

  13. Temperature-dependent transformation thermotics for unsteady states: Switchable concentrator for transient heat flow

    Li, Ying, E-mail: 13110290008@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Shen, Xiangying, E-mail: 13110190068@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Huang, Jiping, E-mail: jphuang@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Ni, Yushan, E-mail: niyushan@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2016-04-22

    For manipulating heat flow efficiently, recently we established a theory of temperature-dependent transformation thermotics which holds for steady-state cases. Here, we develop the theory to unsteady-state cases by considering the generalized Fourier's law for transient thermal conduction. As a result, we are allowed to propose a new class of intelligent thermal metamaterial — switchable concentrator, which is made of inhomogeneous anisotropic materials. When environmental temperature is below or above a critical value, the concentrator is automatically switched on, namely, it helps to focus heat flux in a specific region. However, the focusing does not affect the distribution pattern of temperature outside the concentrator. We also perform finite-element simulations to confirm the switching effect according to the effective medium theory by assembling homogeneous isotropic materials, which bring more convenience for experimental fabrication than inhomogeneous anisotropic materials. This work may help to figure out new intelligent thermal devices, which provide more flexibility in controlling heat flow, and it may also be useful in other fields that are sensitive to temperature gradient, such as the Seebeck effect. - Highlights: • Established the unsteady-state temperature dependent transformation thermotics. • A thermal concentrator with switchable functionality. • An effective-medium design for experimental realization.

  14. Witness memory and alcohol: The effects of state-dependent recall.

    Schreiber Compo, Nadja; Carol, Rolando N; Evans, Jacqueline R; Pimentel, Pamela; Holness, Howard; Nichols-Lopez, Kristin; Rose, Stefan; Furton, Kenneth G

    2017-04-01

    Many real-world eyewitnesses are under the influence of alcohol either at the time of the crime, the interview, or both. Only recently has empirical research begun to examine the effects of alcohol on witness memory, yielding mixed results. The present study tested the importance of state-dependent memory in the context of alcohol's effects on encoding versus retrieval of a witnessed event, while simultaneously informing real-world investigative practices: Should witnesses sober up before an interview? Participants (N = 249) were randomized to a control, placebo, or alcohol condition at encoding and to either an immediate retrieval condition (in the same state) or a 1-week delay control, placebo, or alcohol retrieval condition. They recalled a witnessed mock crime using open ended and cued recall formats. After a delay, witnesses intoxicated at both encoding and retrieval provided less accurate information than witnesses in sober or placebo groups at both times. There was no advantage of state-dependent memory but intoxicated witnesses were best when recalling immediately compared to 1 week later (sober, placebo, or reintoxicated). Findings have direct implications for the timing of intoxicated witnesses' interviews such that moderately intoxicated witnesses may not benefit from a sobering delay but rather, should be interviewed immediately. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Timing analysis of safety properties using fault trees with time dependencies and timed state-charts

    Magott, Jan; Skrobanek, Pawel

    2012-01-01

    Behavior in time domain is often crucial for safety critical systems. Standard fault trees cannot express time-dependent behavior. In the paper, timing analysis of safety properties using fault trees with time dependencies (FTTDs) and timed state-charts is presented. A new version of timed state-charts (TSCs) is also proposed. These state-charts can model the dynamics of technical systems, e.g. controllers, controlled objects, and people. In TSCs, activity and communication times are represented by time intervals. In the proposed approach the structure of FTTD is fixed by a human. Time properties of events and gates of FTTD are expressed by time intervals, and are calculated using TSCs. The minimal and maximal values of these time intervals of FTTD can be calculated by finding paths with minimal and maximal time lengths in TSCs, which is an NP-hard problem. In order to reduce the practical complexity of computing the FTTD time parameters, some reductions of TSCs are defined in the paper, such as sequential, alternative, loop (iteration), and parallel. Some of the reductions are intuitive, in case of others—theorems are required. Computational complexity of each reduction is not greater than linear in the size of reduced TSC. Therefore, the obtained results enable decreasing of the costs of FTTD time parameters calculation when system dynamics is expressed by TSCs. Case study of a railroad crossing with a controller that controls semaphores, gate, light-audio signal close to the gate will be analyzed.

  16. Resting-state Functional Connectivity is an Age-dependent Predictor of Motor Learning Abilities.

    Mary, Alison; Wens, Vincent; Op de Beeck, Marc; Leproult, Rachel; De Tiège, Xavier; Peigneux, Philippe

    2017-10-01

    This magnetoencephalography study investigates how ageing modulates the relationship between pre-learning resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) and subsequent learning. Neuromagnetic resting-state activity was recorded 5 min before motor sequence learning in 14 young (19-30 years) and 14 old (66-70 years) participants. We used a seed-based beta-band power envelope correlation approach to estimate rsFC maps, with the seed located in the right primary sensorimotor cortex. In each age group, the relation between individual rsFC and learning performance was investigated using Pearson's correlation analyses. Our results show that rsFC is predictive of subsequent motor sequence learning but involves different cross-network interactions in the two age groups. In young adults, decreased coupling between the sensorimotor network and the cortico-striato-cerebellar network is associated with better motor learning, whereas a similar relation is found in old adults between the sensorimotor, the dorsal-attentional and the DMNs. Additionally, age-related correlational differences were found in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, known to subtend attentional and controlled processes. These findings suggest that motor skill learning depends-in an age-dependent manner-on subtle interactions between resting-state networks subtending motor activity on the one hand, and controlled and attentional processes on the other hand. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The tongue and its control by sleep state-dependent modulators.

    Horner, R L

    2011-12-01

    The neural networks controlling vital functions such as breathing are embedded in the brain, the neural and chemical environment of which changes with state, i.e., wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and REM sleep, and with commonly administered drugs such as anaesthetics, sedatives and ethanol. One particular output from the state-dependent chemical brain is the focus of attention in this paper; the motor output to the muscles of the tongue, specifically the actions of state-dependent modulators acting at the hypoglossal motor pool. Determining the mechanisms underlying the modulation of the hypoglossal motor output during sleep is relevant to understanding the spectrum of increased upper airway resistance, airflow limitation, hypoventilation and airway obstructions that occur during natural and drug-influenced sleep in humans. Understanding the mechanisms underlying upper airway dysfunction in sleep-disordered breathing is also important given the large and growing prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome which constitutes a major public health problem with serious clinical, social and economic consequences.

  18. State-dependent errors in a land surface model across biomes inferred from eddy covariance observations on multiple timescales

    Wang, T.; Brender, P.; Ciais, P.; Piao, S.; Mahecha, M.D.; Chevallier, F.; Reichstein, M.; Ottle, C.; Maignan, F.; Arain, A.; Bohrer, G.; Cescatti, A.; Kiely, G.; Law, B.E.; Lutz, M.; Montagnani, L.; Moors, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of state-dependent model biases in land surface models can highlight model deficiencies, and provide new insights into model development. In this study, artificial neural networks (ANNs) are used to estimate the state-dependent biases of a land surface model (ORCHIDEE: ORganising

  19. Building the nodal nuclear data dependences in a many-dimensional state-variable space

    Dufek, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The Abstract and Introduction are revised to reflect reviewers' comments. → Section is revised and simplified. → The third paragraph in Section is revised. → All typos are fixed. - Abstract: We present new methods for building the polynomial-regression based nodal nuclear data models. The data models can reflect dependences on a large number of state variables, and they can consider various history effects. Suitable multivariate polynomials that approximate the nodal data dependences are identified efficiently in an iterative manner. The history effects are analysed using a new sampling scheme for lattice calculations where the traditional base burnup and branch calculations are replaced by a large number of diverse burnup histories. The total number of lattice calculations is controlled so that the data models are built to a required accuracy.

  20. Modeling the state dependent impulse control for computer virus propagation under media coverage

    Liang, Xiyin; Pei, Yongzhen; Lv, Yunfei

    2018-02-01

    A state dependent impulsive control model is proposed to model the spread of computer virus incorporating media coverage. By the successor function, the sufficient conditions for the existence and uniqueness of order-1 periodic solution are presented first. Secondly, for two classes of periodic solutions, the geometric property of successor function and the analogue of the Poincaré criterion are employed to obtain the stability results. These results show that the number of the infective computers is under the threshold all the time. Finally, the theoretic and numerical analysis show that media coverage can delay the spread of computer virus.

  1. A New Attribute Control Chart using Multiple Dependent State Repetitive Sampling

    Aldosari, Mansour Sattam; Aslam, Muhammad; Jun, Chi-Hyuck

    2017-01-01

    In this manuscript, a new attribute control chart using multiple dependent state repetitive sampling is designed. The operational procedure and structure of the proposed control chart is given. The required measures to determine the average run length (ARL) for in-control and out-of-control processes are given. Tables of ARLs are reported for various control chart parameters. The proposed control chart is more sensitive in detecting a small shift in the process as compared to the existing attribute control charts. The simulation study shows the efficiency of the proposed chart over the existing charts. An example is given for the illustration purpose.

  2. Investigation of solutions of state-dependent multi-impulsive boundary value problems

    Rontó, András; Rachůnková, I.; Rontó, M.; Rachůnek, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2017), s. 287-312 ISSN 1072-947X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06958S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : state-dependent multi-impulsive systems * non-linear boundary value problem * parametrization technique Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 0.290, year: 2016 https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/gmj.2017.24.issue-2/gmj-2016-0084/gmj-2016-0084.xml

  3. A New Attribute Control Chart using Multiple Dependent State Repetitive Sampling

    Aldosari, Mansour Sattam

    2017-03-25

    In this manuscript, a new attribute control chart using multiple dependent state repetitive sampling is designed. The operational procedure and structure of the proposed control chart is given. The required measures to determine the average run length (ARL) for in-control and out-of-control processes are given. Tables of ARLs are reported for various control chart parameters. The proposed control chart is more sensitive in detecting a small shift in the process as compared to the existing attribute control charts. The simulation study shows the efficiency of the proposed chart over the existing charts. An example is given for the illustration purpose.

  4. Boundary layer phenomena for differential-delay equations with state-dependent time lags: III

    Mallet-Paret, John; Nussbaum, Roger D.

    We consider a class of singularly perturbed delay-differential equations of the form ɛ ẋ(t)=f(x(t),x(t-r)), where r= r( x( t)) is a state-dependent delay. We study the asymptotic shape, as ɛ→0, of slowly oscillating periodic solutions. In particular, we show that the limiting shape of such solutions can be explicitly described by the solution of a pair of so-called max-plus equations. We are able thereby to characterize both the regular parts of the solution graph and the internal transition layers arising from the singular perturbation structure.

  5. Investigation of solutions of state-dependent multi-impulsive boundary value problems

    Rontó, András; Rachůnková, I.; Rontó, M.; Rachůnek, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2017), s. 287-312 ISSN 1072-947X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06958S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : state-dependent multi-impulsive systems * non-linear boundary value problem * parametrization technique Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 0.290, year: 2016 https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/gmj.2017.24.issue-2/gmj-2016-0084/gmj-2016-0084. xml

  6. The fermionic projector in a time-dependent external potential: Mass oscillation property and Hadamard states

    Finster, Felix; Murro, Simone; Röken, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We give a non-perturbative construction of the fermionic projector in Minkowski space coupled to a time-dependent external potential which is smooth and decays faster than quadratically for large times. The weak and strong mass oscillation properties are proven. We show that the integral kernel of the fermionic projector is of the Hadamard form, provided that the time integral of the spatial sup-norm of the potential satisfies a suitable bound. This gives rise to an algebraic quantum field theory of Dirac fields in an external potential with a distinguished pure quasi-free Hadamard state.

  7. The fermionic projector in a time-dependent external potential: Mass oscillation property and Hadamard states

    Finster, Felix; Murro, Simone; Röken, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We give a non-perturbative construction of the fermionic projector in Minkowski space coupled to a time-dependent external potential which is smooth and decays faster than quadratically for large times. The weak and strong mass oscillation properties are proven. We show that the integral kernel of the fermionic projector is of the Hadamard form, provided that the time integral of the spatial sup-norm of the potential satisfies a suitable bound. This gives rise to an algebraic quantum field theory of Dirac fields in an external potential with a distinguished pure quasi-free Hadamard state.

  8. The fermionic projector in a time-dependent external potential: Mass oscillation property and Hadamard states

    Finster, Felix, E-mail: finster@ur.de, E-mail: simone.murro@ur.de, E-mail: Christian.Roeken@mathematik.ur.de; Murro, Simone, E-mail: finster@ur.de, E-mail: simone.murro@ur.de, E-mail: Christian.Roeken@mathematik.ur.de; Röken, Christian, E-mail: finster@ur.de, E-mail: simone.murro@ur.de, E-mail: Christian.Roeken@mathematik.ur.de [Fakultät für Mathematik, Universität Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    We give a non-perturbative construction of the fermionic projector in Minkowski space coupled to a time-dependent external potential which is smooth and decays faster than quadratically for large times. The weak and strong mass oscillation properties are proven. We show that the integral kernel of the fermionic projector is of the Hadamard form, provided that the time integral of the spatial sup-norm of the potential satisfies a suitable bound. This gives rise to an algebraic quantum field theory of Dirac fields in an external potential with a distinguished pure quasi-free Hadamard state.

  9. Dynamic Portfolio Optimization with Transaction Costs and State-Dependent Drift

    Palczewski, Jan; Poulsen, Rolf; Schenk-Hoppe, Klaus Reiner

    2015-01-01

    The problem of dynamic portfolio choice with transaction costs is often addressed by constructing a Markov Chain approximation of the continuous time price processes. Using this approximation, we present an efficient numerical method to determine optimal portfolio strategies under time- and state......-dependent drift and proportional transaction costs. This scenario arises when investors have behavioral biases or the actual drift is unknown and needs to be estimated. Our numerical method solves dynamic optimal portfolio problems with an exponential utility function for time-horizons of up to 40 years....... It is applied to measure the value of information and the loss from transaction costs using the indifference principle....

  10. Stability of a viral infection model with state-dependent delay, CTL and antibody immune responses

    Rezunenko, Oleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 4 (2017), s. 1547-1563 ISSN 1531-3492 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-06678S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Evolution equations * Lyapunov stability * state-dependent delay * virus infection model Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 0.994, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/AS/rezunenko-0476128.pdf

  11. Deterministic integer multiple firing depending on initial state in Wang model

    Xie Yong [Institute of Nonlinear Dynamics, MSSV, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)]. E-mail: yxie@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Xu Jianxue [Institute of Nonlinear Dynamics, MSSV, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Jiang Jun [Institute of Nonlinear Dynamics, MSSV, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2006-12-15

    We investigate numerically dynamical behaviour of the Wang model, which describes the rhythmic activities of thalamic relay neurons. The model neuron exhibits Type I excitability from a global view, but Type II excitability from a local view. There exists a narrow range of bistability, in which a subthreshold oscillation and a suprathreshold firing behaviour coexist. A special firing pattern, integer multiple firing can be found in the certain part of the bistable range. The characteristic feature of such firing pattern is that the histogram of interspike intervals has a multipeaked structure, and the peaks are located at about integer multiples of a basic interspike interval. Since the Wang model is noise-free, the integer multiple firing is a deterministic firing pattern. The existence of bistability leads to the deterministic integer multiple firing depending on the initial state of the model neuron, i.e., the initial values of the state variables.

  12. Deterministic integer multiple firing depending on initial state in Wang model

    Xie Yong; Xu Jianxue; Jiang Jun

    2006-01-01

    We investigate numerically dynamical behaviour of the Wang model, which describes the rhythmic activities of thalamic relay neurons. The model neuron exhibits Type I excitability from a global view, but Type II excitability from a local view. There exists a narrow range of bistability, in which a subthreshold oscillation and a suprathreshold firing behaviour coexist. A special firing pattern, integer multiple firing can be found in the certain part of the bistable range. The characteristic feature of such firing pattern is that the histogram of interspike intervals has a multipeaked structure, and the peaks are located at about integer multiples of a basic interspike interval. Since the Wang model is noise-free, the integer multiple firing is a deterministic firing pattern. The existence of bistability leads to the deterministic integer multiple firing depending on the initial state of the model neuron, i.e., the initial values of the state variables

  13. Tailoring of motional states in double-well potentials by time-dependent processes

    Haerkoenen, Kari; Kaerki, Ollijuhani; Suominen, Kalle-Antti

    2006-01-01

    We show that the vibrational state tailoring method developed for molecular systems can be applied for cold atoms in optical lattices. The original method is based on a three-level model interacting with two strong laser pulses in a counterintuitive sequence [M. Rodriguez et al., Phys. Rev. A 62, 053413 (2000)]. Here we outline the conditions for achieving similar dynamics with single time-dependent potential surfaces. It is shown that guided switching between diabatic and adiabatic evolution has an essential role in this system. We also show that efficient and precise tailoring of motional states in optical lattices can be achieved, for instance, simply by superimposing two lattices and moving them with respect to each other

  14. Multi-temperature state-dependent equivalent circuit discharge model for lithium-sulfur batteries

    Propp, Karsten; Marinescu, Monica; Auger, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are described extensively in the literature, but existing computational models aimed at scientific understanding are too complex for use in applications such as battery management. Computationally simple models are vital for exploitation. This paper proposes a non......-linear state-of-charge dependent Li-S equivalent circuit network (ECN) model for a Li-S cell under discharge. Li-S batteries are fundamentally different to Li-ion batteries, and require chemistry-specific models. A new Li-S model is obtained using a ‘behavioural’ interpretation of the ECN model; as Li...... pulse profile at four temperatures from 10 °C to 50 °C, giving linearized ECN parameters for a range of states-of-charge, currents and temperatures. These are used to create a nonlinear polynomial-based battery model suitable for use in a battery management system. When the model is used to predict...

  15. Grey Box Modelling of Flow in Sewer Systems with State Dependent Diffusion

    Breinholt, Anders; Thordarson, Fannar Örn; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg

    2011-01-01

    . It is shown that an additive diffusion noise term description leads to a violation of the physical constraints of the system, whereas a state dependent diffusion noise avoids this problem and should be favoured. It is also shown that a logarithmic transformation of the flow measurements secures positive lower...... flow prediction limits, because the observation noise is proportionally scaled with the modelled output. Finally it is concluded that a state proportional diffusion term best and adequately describes the one-step flow prediction uncertainty, and a proper description of the system noise is important......Generating flow forecasts with uncertainty limits from rain gauge inputs in sewer systems require simple models with identifiable parameters that can adequately describe the stochastic phenomena of the system. In this paper, a simple grey-box model is proposed that is attractive for both...

  16. Scale dependence of disease impacts on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality in the southwestern United States

    Bell, David M.; Bradford, John B.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2015-01-01

    Depending on how disease impacts tree exposure to risk, both the prevalence of disease and disease effects on survival may contribute to patterns of mortality risk across a species' range. Disease may accelerate tree species' declines in response to global change factors, such as drought, biotic interactions, such as competition, or functional traits, such as allometry. To assess the role of disease in mediating mortality risk in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), we developed hierarchical Bayesian models for both disease prevalence in live aspen stems and the resulting survival rates of healthy and diseased aspen near the species' southern range limit using 5088 individual trees on 281 United States Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis plots in the southwestern United States.

  17. The constrained discrete-time state-dependent Riccati equation technique for uncertain nonlinear systems

    Chang, Insu

    The objective of the thesis is to introduce a relatively general nonlinear controller/estimator synthesis framework using a special type of the state-dependent Riccati equation technique. The continuous time state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE) technique is extended to discrete-time under input and state constraints, yielding constrained (C) discrete-time (D) SDRE, referred to as CD-SDRE. For the latter, stability analysis and calculation of a region of attraction are carried out. The derivation of the D-SDRE under state-dependent weights is provided. Stability of the D-SDRE feedback system is established using Lyapunov stability approach. Receding horizon strategy is used to take into account the constraints on D-SDRE controller. Stability condition of the CD-SDRE controller is analyzed by using a switched system. The use of CD-SDRE scheme in the presence of constraints is then systematically demonstrated by applying this scheme to problems of spacecraft formation orbit reconfiguration under limited performance on thrusters. Simulation results demonstrate the efficacy and reliability of the proposed CD-SDRE. The CD-SDRE technique is further investigated in a case where there are uncertainties in nonlinear systems to be controlled. First, the system stability under each of the controllers in the robust CD-SDRE technique is separately established. The stability of the closed-loop system under the robust CD-SDRE controller is then proven based on the stability of each control system comprising switching configuration. A high fidelity dynamical model of spacecraft attitude motion in 3-dimensional space is derived with a partially filled fuel tank, assumed to have the first fuel slosh mode. The proposed robust CD-SDRE controller is then applied to the spacecraft attitude control system to stabilize its motion in the presence of uncertainties characterized by the first fuel slosh mode. The performance of the robust CD-SDRE technique is discussed. Subsequently

  18. Unified thalamic model generates multiple distinct oscillations with state-dependent entrainment by stimulation.

    Guoshi Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The thalamus plays a critical role in the genesis of thalamocortical oscillations, yet the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. To understand whether the isolated thalamus can generate multiple distinct oscillations, we developed a biophysical thalamic model to test the hypothesis that generation of and transition between distinct thalamic oscillations can be explained as a function of neuromodulation by acetylcholine (ACh and norepinephrine (NE and afferent synaptic excitation. Indeed, the model exhibited four distinct thalamic rhythms (delta, sleep spindle, alpha and gamma oscillations that span the physiological states corresponding to different arousal levels from deep sleep to focused attention. Our simulation results indicate that generation of these distinct thalamic oscillations is a result of both intrinsic oscillatory cellular properties and specific network connectivity patterns. We then systematically varied the ACh/NE and input levels to generate a complete map of the different oscillatory states and their transitions. Lastly, we applied periodic stimulation to the thalamic network and found that entrainment of thalamic oscillations is highly state-dependent. Our results support the hypothesis that ACh/NE modulation and afferent excitation define thalamic oscillatory states and their response to brain stimulation. Our model proposes a broader and more central role of the thalamus in the genesis of multiple distinct thalamo-cortical rhythms than previously assumed.

  19. Sexual orientation, substance use behaviors and substance dependence in the United States

    McCabe, Sean Esteban; Hughes, Tonda L.; Bostwick, Wendy B.; West, Brady T.; Boyd, Carol J.

    2009-01-01

    Aims To assess past-year prevalence rates of substance use behaviors and substance dependence across three major dimensions of sexual orientation (identity, attraction, and behavior) in a large national sample of adult women and men in the United States. Design Data were collected from structured diagnostic face-to-face interviews using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule DSM-IV Version (AUDADIS-IV). Setting Prevalence estimates were based on data collected from the 2004–2005 (Wave 2) National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Participants A large national sample of 34,653 adults aged 20 years and older: 52% female, 71% White, 12% Hispanic, 11% African American, 4% Asian, and 2% Native American or other racial/ethnic categories. Findings Approximately 2% of the sample self-identified as lesbian, gay or bisexual; 4% reported at least one lifetime same-sex sexual partner, and 6% reported same-sex sexual attraction. Although non-heterosexual orientation was generally associated with a higher risk of substance use and substance dependence, the majority of sexual minority respondents did not report substance use or meet criteria for DSM-IV substance dependence. There was considerable variation in substance use outcomes across sexual orientation dimensions; these variations were more pronounced among women than among men. Conclusions Results support previous research findings of heightened risk of substance use and substance dependence among some sexual minority groups and point to the need for research that examines reasons for such differences. Results also highlight important gender differences and question previous findings indicating uniformly higher risk for substance dependence among sexual minorities. Risks appear to vary based on gender and how sexual orientation is defined. Findings have implications for prevention and intervention efforts that more effectively target subgroups at greatest

  20. Jump locations of jump-diffusion processes with state-dependent rates

    Miles, Christopher E; Keener, James P

    2017-01-01

    We propose a general framework for studying statistics of jump-diffusion systems driven by both Brownian noise (diffusion) and a jump process with state-dependent intensity. Of particular natural interest in many physical systems are the jump locations: the system evaluated at the jump times. As an example, this could be the voltage at which a neuron fires, or the so-called ‘threshold voltage’. However, the state-dependence of the jump rate provides direct coupling between the diffusion and jump components, making it difficult to disentangle the two to study individually. In this work, we provide an iterative map formulation of the sequence of distributions of jump locations. The distributions computed by this map can be used to elucidate other interesting quantities about the process, including statistics of the interjump times. Ultimately, the limit of the map reveals that knowledge of the stationary distribution of the full process is sufficient to recover (but not necessarily equal to) the distribution of jump locations. We propose two biophysical examples to illustrate the use of this framework to provide insight about a system. We find that a sharp threshold voltage emerges robustly in a simple stochastic integrate-and-fire neuronal model. The interplay between the two sources of noise is also investigated in a stepping model of molecular motor in intracellular transport pulling a diffusive cargo. (paper)

  1. Predicting behavioural responses to novel organisms: state-dependent detection theory.

    Trimmer, Pete C; Ehlman, Sean M; Sih, Andrew

    2017-01-25

    Human activity alters natural habitats for many species. Understanding variation in animals' behavioural responses to these changing environments is critical. We show how signal detection theory can be used within a wider framework of state-dependent modelling to predict behavioural responses to a major environmental change: novel, exotic species. We allow thresholds for action to be a function of reserves, and demonstrate how optimal thresholds can be calculated. We term this framework 'state-dependent detection theory' (SDDT). We focus on behavioural and fitness outcomes when animals continue to use formerly adaptive thresholds following environmental change. In a simple example, we show that exposure to novel animals which appear dangerous-but are actually safe-(e.g. ecotourists) can have catastrophic consequences for 'prey' (organisms that respond as if the new organisms are predators), significantly increasing mortality even when the novel species is not predatory. SDDT also reveals that the effect on reproduction can be greater than the effect on lifespan. We investigate factors that influence the effect of novel organisms, and address the potential for behavioural adjustments (via evolution or learning) to recover otherwise reduced fitness. Although effects of environmental change are often difficult to predict, we suggest that SDDT provides a useful route ahead. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Glymphatic clearance controls state-dependent changes in brain lactate concentration

    Lundgaard, Iben; Lu, Minh Lon; Yang, Ezra

    2017-01-01

    Brain lactate concentration is higher during wakefulness than in sleep. However, it is unknown why arousal is linked to an increase in brain lactate and why lactate declines within minutes of sleep. Here, we show that the glymphatic system is responsible for state-dependent changes in brain lacta......-lymphatic clearance. This analysis provides fundamental new insight into brain energy metabolism by demonstrating that glucose that is not fully oxidized can be exported as lactate via glymphatic-lymphatic fluid transport.......Brain lactate concentration is higher during wakefulness than in sleep. However, it is unknown why arousal is linked to an increase in brain lactate and why lactate declines within minutes of sleep. Here, we show that the glymphatic system is responsible for state-dependent changes in brain lactate...... concentration. Suppression of glymphatic function via acetazolamide treatment, cisterna magna puncture, aquaporin 4 deletion, or changes in body position reduced the decline in brain lactate normally observed when awake mice transition into sleep or anesthesia. Concurrently, the same manipulations diminished...

  3. Predicting behavioural responses to novel organisms: state-dependent detection theory

    Sih, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Human activity alters natural habitats for many species. Understanding variation in animals' behavioural responses to these changing environments is critical. We show how signal detection theory can be used within a wider framework of state-dependent modelling to predict behavioural responses to a major environmental change: novel, exotic species. We allow thresholds for action to be a function of reserves, and demonstrate how optimal thresholds can be calculated. We term this framework ‘state-dependent detection theory’ (SDDT). We focus on behavioural and fitness outcomes when animals continue to use formerly adaptive thresholds following environmental change. In a simple example, we show that exposure to novel animals which appear dangerous—but are actually safe—(e.g. ecotourists) can have catastrophic consequences for ‘prey’ (organisms that respond as if the new organisms are predators), significantly increasing mortality even when the novel species is not predatory. SDDT also reveals that the effect on reproduction can be greater than the effect on lifespan. We investigate factors that influence the effect of novel organisms, and address the potential for behavioural adjustments (via evolution or learning) to recover otherwise reduced fitness. Although effects of environmental change are often difficult to predict, we suggest that SDDT provides a useful route ahead. PMID:28100814

  4. Consolidation in older adults depends upon competition between resting-state networks

    Heidi IL Jacobs

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory encoding and retrieval problems are inherent to aging. To date, however, the effect of aging upon the neural correlates of forming memory traces remains poorly understood. Resting-state fMRI connectivity can be used to investigate initial consolidation. We compared within and between network connectivity differences between healthy young and older participants before encoding, after encoding and before retrieval by means of resting-state fMRI. Alterations over time in the between-network connectivity analyses correlated with retrieval performance, whereas within-network connectivity did not: a higher level of negative coupling or competition between the default mode and the executive networks during the after encoding condition was associated with increased retrieval performance in the older adults, but not in the young group. Data suggest that the effective formation of memory traces depends on an age-dependent, dynamic reorganization of the interaction between multiple, large-scale functional networks. Our findings demonstrate that a cross-network based approach can further the understanding of the neural underpinnings of aging- associated memory decline.

  5. Magnetic history dependence of metastable states in thin films with dipolar interactions

    Iglesias, Oscar; Labarta, Amilcar

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of a Monte Carlo simulation of the ground state and magnetic relaxation of a model of a thin film consisting of a two-dimensional square lattice of Heisenberg spins with perpendicular anisotropy K, exchange J and long-range dipolar interactions g. We have studied the ground state configurations of this system for a wide range of the interaction parameters J/g, K/g by means of the simulated annealing procedure, showing that the model is able to reproduce the different magnetic configurations found in real samples. We have found the existence of a certain range of K/g, J/g values for which in-plane and out-of-plane configurations are quasi-degenerated in energy. We show that when a system in this region of parameters is perturbed by an external force that is subsequently removed, different kinds of ordering may be induced depending on the followed procedure. In particular, simulations of relaxations from saturation under an AC demagnetizing field or in zero field are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments on epitaxial and granular alloy thin films, which show a wide variety of magnetic patterns depending on their magnetic history

  6. The optimal solution of a non-convex state-dependent LQR problem and its applications.

    Xudan Xu

    Full Text Available This paper studies a Non-convex State-dependent Linear Quadratic Regulator (NSLQR problem, in which the control penalty weighting matrix [Formula: see text] in the performance index is state-dependent. A necessary and sufficient condition for the optimal solution is established with a rigorous proof by Euler-Lagrange Equation. It is found that the optimal solution of the NSLQR problem can be obtained by solving a Pseudo-Differential-Riccati-Equation (PDRE simultaneously with the closed-loop system equation. A Comparison Theorem for the PDRE is given to facilitate solution methods for the PDRE. A linear time-variant system is employed as an example in simulation to verify the proposed optimal solution. As a non-trivial application, a goal pursuit process in psychology is modeled as a NSLQR problem and two typical goal pursuit behaviors found in human and animals are reproduced using different control weighting [Formula: see text]. It is found that these two behaviors save control energy and cause less stress over Conventional Control Behavior typified by the LQR control with a constant control weighting [Formula: see text], in situations where only the goal discrepancy at the terminal time is of concern, such as in Marathon races and target hitting missions.

  7. State-dependent memory effects using caffeine and placebo do not extend to metamemory.

    Kelemen, William L; Creeley, Catherine E

    2003-01-01

    The authors examined the impact of caffeine on human memory and predictions of memory (i.e., metamemory). On Day 1, 83 college students drank a sweetened beverage containing either caffeine (4 mg/kg body weight) or a placebo before they studied 40 pairs of words. While the participants studied, they predicted their future memory performance for each word pair. On Day 2, the participants again received caffeine or a placebo before the memory test. The participants who drank the same beverage on both days (either caffeine or a placebo) recalled more word pairs than did those who drank different beverages (caffeine on 1 day and a placebo on the other day). In contrast, memory predictions were more accurate when the beverages did not match on both days. These data provide evidence for state-dependent memory when caffeine is used, but not for state-dependent metamemory. People's memory and their predictions of memory can be influenced in different ways if they drink caffeine before they study or take a test.

  8. Singular Hopf bifurcation in a differential equation with large state-dependent delay.

    Kozyreff, G; Erneux, T

    2014-02-08

    We study the onset of sustained oscillations in a classical state-dependent delay (SDD) differential equation inspired by control theory. Owing to the large delays considered, the Hopf bifurcation is singular and the oscillations rapidly acquire a sawtooth profile past the instability threshold. Using asymptotic techniques, we explicitly capture the gradual change from nearly sinusoidal to sawtooth oscillations. The dependence of the delay on the solution can be either linear or nonlinear, with at least quadratic dependence. In the former case, an asymptotic connection is made with the Rayleigh oscillator. In the latter, van der Pol's equation is derived for the small-amplitude oscillations. SDD differential equations are currently the subject of intense research in order to establish or amend general theorems valid for constant-delay differential equation, but explicit analytical construction of solutions are rare. This paper illustrates the use of singular perturbation techniques and the unusual way in which solvability conditions can arise for SDD problems with large delays.

  9. Charge-state dependence of binary-encounter-electron cross sections and peak energies

    Hidmi, H.I.; Richard, P.; Sanders, J.M.; Schoene, H.; Giese, J.P.; Lee, D.H.; Zouros, T.J.M.; Varghese, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    The charge-state dependence of the binary-encounter-electron (BEE) double-differential cross section (DDCS) at 0 degree with respect to the beam direction resulting from collisions of 1 MeV/amu H + , C q+ , N q+ , O q+ , F q+ , Si q+ , and Cl q+ , and 0.5 MeV/amu Cu q+ with H 2 is reported. The data show an enhancement in the BEE DDCS as the charge state of the projectile is decreased, in agreement with the data reported by Richard et al. [J. Phys. B 23, L213 (1990)]. The DDCS enhancement ratios observed for the three-electron isoelectronic sequence C 3+ :C 6+ , N 4+ :N 7+ , O 5+ :O 8+ , and F 6+ :F 9+ are about 1.35, whereas a DDCS enhancement of 3.5 was observed for Cu 4+ . The BEE enhancement with increasing electrons on the projectile has been shown by several authors to be due to the non-Coulomb static potential of the projectile and additionally to the e-e exchange interaction. An impulse-approximation (IA) model fits the shape of the BEE DDCS and predicts a Z p 2 dependence for the bare-ion cross sections. The IA also predicts a binary peak energy that is independent of q and Z p and below the classical value of 4t, where t is the energy of electrons traveling with the projectile velocity. We observed a BEE energy shift ΔE (ΔE=4t-E peak , where E peak is the measured energy at the peak of the binary encounter electrons) that is approximately independent of q for the low-Z p ions, whereas the measured ΔE values for Si, Cl, and Cu were found to be q dependent

  10. [The elemental composition of teeth hard tissues depending on the state of the environment].

    Suladze, N; Shishniashvili, T; Margvelashvili, V; Kobakhidze, K

    2014-01-01

    At present, great attention is paid to the origin of man-made micro elemental anomalies. To monitor the state of the environment and its effects on the human body, of great importance is the determination of the amount and distribution of various chemical elements in the dentin and enamel of the teeth. To determine the essential (Ca, Zn, Mn, Ni), conditionally essential (Rb, Ni, Sr) and toxic (Pb, Hg) trace elements in the mineralized tissues of the teeth and to identify the relationship between the elemental composition of the tooth structure and the state of the general and dental health depending on the state of the environment, we have examined 29 children aged 3-4 years who have carried out analysis of hard tissue of teeth (teeth used for remote medical reasons) for the maintenance of nine chemical elements. Children living in a relatively environmentally favorable conditions essential value and conditionally essential elements in the mineralized tissues of the teeth were within normal limits, and toxic elements slightly increased limits that differ from those of children living in environmentally disadvantaged areas. In particular, these essential elements were significantly reduced (except for zinc), as indicators of toxic elements - mercury and lead, increased by 12.5% and 44.5%, respectively, which is clearly reflected on the state of dental health because noted decompensated form of tooth decay. Thus, deviations in a state of general and dental health of children associated with an imbalance of macro-and microelements in the mineralized tissues of the teeth.

  11. Influence of oxidation state on the pH dependence of hydrous iridium oxide films

    Steegstra, Patrick; Ahlberg, Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    Many electrochemical reactions taking place in aqueous solution consume or produce protons. The pH in the diffusion layer can therefore be significantly altered during the reaction and there is a need for in situ pH measurements tracing this near surface pH. In the present paper the rotating ring disc technique was used to measure near surface pH changes during oxygen reduction, utilising hydrous iridium oxide as the pH sensing probe. Before such experiments a good understanding of the pH sensing properties of these films is required and the impact of the oxidation state of the film on the pH sensing properties was investigated as well as the influence of solution redox species. The pH sensitivity (depicted by dE/dpH) was found to depend on the average oxidation state of the film in a manner resembling the cyclic voltammetry response. In all cases the pH response is “supernernstian” with more than one proton per electron. The origin of this behaviour is discussed in the context of acid-base properties of the film and the existence of both hydrous and anhydrous oxide phases. The pH response depends also on the redox properties of the solution but can be optimised for various purposes by conditioning the film at different potentials. This was clearly illustrated by adding hydrogen peroxide, an intermediate in the oxygen reduction reaction, to the solution. It was shown that hydrous iridium oxide can be used as a reliable in situ pH sensor provided that care is taken to optimise the oxidation state of the film.

  12. Implications of rate and state dependent friclion for creep on shallow faults

    M. E. Belardinelli

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The aseismic sliding on shallow strike-slip faults, under the assumption of a non linear constitutive equation (velocity strengthening, is here treated as a two-dimensional quasi-static crack problem whose equations are solved numerically (boundary elements method. Results are compared with the corresponding one-dimensional («depth averaged» model by a suitable choice of the effective stiffness of the fault. In the one-dimensional case also the inertial term was taken into account in the evolutive equation. The current results are in agreement with an earlier one-dimensional model for afterslip as long as the state variable evolution is neglected a priori and friction depends only on velocity. In general, if the state variable is allowed to evolve, the previous approximation is valid for velocity strengthening slipping section of faults extending down to several kilometers in depth. For smaller sections of fault the evolution of the state variable affects the coseismic and early postseismic phase and accordingly it cannot be neglected. Moreover, in the presence of rheological heterogeneities, for fault sections shallower than 1 km depth, the comparison between the two-dimensional and one-dimensional models suggests the need to employ the two-dimensional model, possibly taking into account inertial effects.

  13. Bistable Epigenetic States Explain Age-Dependent Decline in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Heterogeneity.

    Hamidouche, Zahia; Rother, Karen; Przybilla, Jens; Krinner, Axel; Clay, Denis; Hopp, Lydia; Fabian, Claire; Stolzing, Alexandra; Binder, Hans; Charbord, Pierre; Galle, Joerg

    2017-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which heterogeneity, a major characteristic of stem cells, is achieved are yet unclear. We here study the expression of the membrane stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) in mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) clones. We show that subpopulations with varying Sca-1 expression profiles regenerate the Sca-1 profile of the mother population within a few days. However, after extensive replication in vitro, the expression profiles shift to lower values and the regeneration time increases. Study of the promoter of Ly6a unravels that the expression level of Sca-1 is related to the promoter occupancy by the activating histone mark H3K4me3. We demonstrate that these findings can be consistently explained by a computational model that considers positive feedback between promoter H3K4me3 modification and gene transcription. This feedback implicates bistable epigenetic states which the cells occupy with an age-dependent frequency due to persistent histone (de-)modification. Our results provide evidence that MSC heterogeneity, and presumably that of other stem cells, is associated with bistable epigenetic states and suggest that MSCs are subject to permanent state fluctuations. Stem Cells 2017;35:694-704. © The Authors Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  14. Pressure dependence of excited-state charge-carrier dynamics in organolead tribromide perovskites

    Liu, X. C.; Han, J. H.; Zhao, H. F.; Yan, H. C.; Shi, Y.; Jin, M. X.; Liu, C. L.; Ding, D. J.

    2018-05-01

    Excited-state charge-carrier dynamics governs the performance of organometal trihalide perovskites (OTPs) and is strongly influenced by the crystal structure. Characterizing the excited-state charge-carrier dynamics in OTPs under high pressure is imperative for providing crucial insights into structure-property relations. Here, we conduct in situ high-pressure femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy experiments to study the excited-state carrier dynamics of CH3NH3PbBr3 (MAPbBr3) under hydrostatic pressure. The results indicate that compression is an effective approach to modulate the carrier dynamics of MAPbBr3. Across each pressure-induced phase, carrier relaxation, phonon scattering, and Auger recombination present different pressure-dependent properties under compression. Responsiveness is attributed to the pressure-induced variation in the lattice structure, which also changes the electronic band structure. Specifically, simultaneous prolongation of carrier relaxation and Auger recombination is achieved in the ambient phase, which is very valuable for excess energy harvesting. Our discussion provides clues for optimizing the photovoltaic performance of OTPs.

  15. Transient state-dependent fluctuations in anxiety measured using STAI, POMS, PANAS or VAS: a comparative review

    Rossi, Valentina; Pourtois, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Several psychometric instruments can be used to measure state-dependent variations in anxiety, including the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Profile of Mood States (POMS), the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) and the Visual Analog Scales (VAS). Each of these instruments rests on specific theoretical assumptions about the construct of state anxiety, and has been widely used for this purpose in different research domains. However, it remains difficult to determine what ma...

  16. Estrogen- and Satiety State-Dependent Metabolic Lateralization in the Hypothalamus of Female Rats.

    Istvan Toth

    Full Text Available Hypothalamus is the highest center and the main crossroad of numerous homeostatic regulatory pathways including reproduction and energy metabolism. Previous reports indicate that some of these functions may be driven by the synchronized but distinct functioning of the left and right hypothalamic sides. However, the nature of interplay between the hemispheres with regard to distinct hypothalamic functions is still unclear. Here we investigated the metabolic asymmetry between the left and right hypothalamic sides of ovariectomized female rats by measuring mitochondrial respiration rates, a parameter that reflects the intensity of cell and tissue metabolism. Ovariectomized (saline injected and ovariectomized+estrogen injected animals were fed ad libitum or fasted to determine 1 the contribution of estrogen to metabolic asymmetry of hypothalamus; and 2 whether the hypothalamic asymmetry is modulated by the satiety state. Results show that estrogen-priming significantly increased both the proportion of animals with detected hypothalamic lateralization and the degree of metabolic difference between the hypothalamic sides causing a right-sided dominance during state 3 mitochondrial respiration (St3 in ad libitum fed animals. After 24 hours of fasting, lateralization in St3 values was clearly maintained; however, instead of the observed right-sided dominance that was detected in ad libitum fed animals here appeared in form of either right- or left-sidedness. In conclusion, our results revealed estrogen- and satiety state-dependent metabolic differences between the two hypothalamic hemispheres in female rats showing that the hypothalamic hemispheres drive the reproductive and satiety state related functions in an asymmetric manner.

  17. State-Dependent Differences in Emotion Regulation Between Unmedicated Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder.

    Rive, Maria M; Mocking, Roel J T; Koeter, Maarten W J; van Wingen, Guido; de Wit, Stella J; van den Heuvel, Odile A; Veltman, Dick J; Ruhé, Henricus G; Schene, Aart H

    2015-07-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) are difficult to distinguish clinically during the depressed or remitted states. Both mood disorders are characterized by emotion regulation disturbances; however, little is known about emotion regulation differences between MDD and BD. Better insight into these differences would be helpful for differentiation based on disorder-specific underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Previous studies comparing these disorders often allowed medication use, limiting generalizability and validity. Moreover, patients with MDD and BD were mostly compared during the depressed, but not the remitted, state, while state might potentially modulate differences between MDD and BD. To investigate positive and negative emotion regulation in medication-free patients with MDD and BD in 2 mood states: depressed or remitted. A cross-sectional study conducted from May 2009 to August 2013 comparing behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging emotion regulation data of 42 patients with MDD, 35 with BD, and 36 healthy control (HC) participants free of psychotropic medication recruited from several psychiatric institutions across the Netherlands. A voluntary emotion regulation functional magnetic resonance imaging task using positive and negative pictures. Behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging blood oxygen level-dependent responses during emotion regulation. In the remitted state, only patients with BD showed impaired emotion regulation (t = 3.39; P emotion type and associated with increased dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity compared with those with MDD and healthy control participants (P = .008). In the depressed state, patients with MDD and BD differed with regard to happy vs sad emotion regulation (t = 4.19; P differences in rostral anterior cingulate activity (P emotions poorly compared with those with BD and healthy control participants, while they demonstrated no rostral anterior

  18. Comparison of holographic and field theoretic complexities for time dependent thermofield double states

    Yang, Run-Qiu; Niu, Chao; Zhang, Cheng-Yong; Kim, Keun-Young

    2018-02-01

    We compute the time-dependent complexity of the thermofield double states by four different proposals: two holographic proposals based on the "complexity-action" (CA) conjecture and "complexity-volume" (CV) conjecture, and two quantum field theoretic proposals based on the Fubini-Study metric (FS) and Finsler geometry (FG). We find that four different proposals yield both similarities and differences, which will be useful to deepen our understanding on the complexity and sharpen its definition. In particular, at early time the complexity linearly increase in the CV and FG proposals, linearly decreases in the FS proposal, and does not change in the CA proposal. In the late time limit, the CA, CV and FG proposals all show that the growth rate is 2 E/(πℏ) saturating the Lloyd's bound, while the FS proposal shows the growth rate is zero. It seems that the holographic CV conjecture and the field theoretic FG method are more correlated.

  19. Burn-up dependent steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan research reactor-1

    Muhammad Atta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The burn-up dependent steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan research reactor-1, reference operating core, has been carried out utilizing standard computer codes WIMS/D4, CITATION, and RELAP5/MOD3.4. Reactor codes WIMS/D4 and CITATION have been used for the calculations of neutronic parameters including peaking factors and power profiles at different burn-up considering a xenon free core and also the equilibrium xenon values. RELAP5/MOD3.4 code was utilized for the determination of peak fuel centerline, clad and coolant temperatures to ensure the safety of the reactor throughout the cycle. The calculations reveal that the reactor is safe and no nucleate boiling will commence at any part of the core throughout the cycle and that the safety margin increases with burnup as peaking factors decrease.

  20. Demonstration of intuitive thinking in conditions of competitive activity depending on athletes' psychophysiological state.

    Korobeynikov G.V.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available One investigated application of intuitive thinking, depending on the physiological status of skilled fighters in their competitive activity. In research members of the team of Ukraine in Greco-Roman wrestling participated. 29 effective throws were analysed reverse a capture from position orchestra. One analyzed the effectiveness of intuitive thinking in athletes of different weight categories and the distribution coefficients of correlation of psychophysiological functions of athletes directly in competition during championships of Ukraine, World and Europe. One found that expression of intuitive thinking is associated with weight category of skilled fighters. It is shown that the effectiveness of intuitive thinking in terms of competitive activity is related to physiological state, and, above all qualified wrestlers' neurodynamic functions.

  1. Relativistic description of quark-antiquark bound states. II. Spin-dependent treatment

    Gara, A.; Durand, B.; Durand, L.

    1990-01-01

    We present the results of a study of light- and heavy-quark--antiquark bound states in the context of the reduced Bethe-Salpeter equation, including the full spin dependence. We obtain good fits to the observed spin splittings in the b bar b and c bar c systems using a short-distance single-gluon-exchange interaction, and a long-distance scalar confining interaction. However, we cannot obtain satisfactory fits to the centers of gravity of the b bar b and c bar c spin multiplets at the same time, and the splittings calculated for q bar Q mesons containing the lighter quarks are very poor. The difficulty appears to be intrinsic to the reduced Salpeter equation for reasons which we discuss

  2. Do more health insurance options lead to higher wages? Evidence from states extending dependent coverage.

    Dillender, Marcus

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about how health insurance affects labor market decisions for young adults. This is despite the fact that expanding coverage for people in their early 20s is an important component of the Affordable Care Act. This paper studies how having an outside source of health insurance affects wages by using variation in health insurance access that comes from states extending dependent coverage to young adults. Using American Community Survey and Census data, I find evidence that extending health insurance to young adults raises their wages. The increases in wages can be explained by increases in human capital and the increased flexibility in the labor market that comes from people no longer having to rely on their own employers for health insurance. The estimates from this paper suggest the Affordable Care Act will lead to wage increases for young adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Andreev Bound States Formation and Quasiparticle Trapping in Quench Dynamics Revealed by Time-Dependent Counting Statistics.

    Souto, R Seoane; Martín-Rodero, A; Yeyati, A Levy

    2016-12-23

    We analyze the quantum quench dynamics in the formation of a phase-biased superconducting nanojunction. We find that in the absence of an external relaxation mechanism and for very general conditions the system gets trapped in a metastable state, corresponding to a nonequilibrium population of the Andreev bound states. The use of the time-dependent full counting statistics analysis allows us to extract information on the asymptotic population of even and odd many-body states, demonstrating that a universal behavior, dependent only on the Andreev state energy, is reached in the quantum point contact limit. These results shed light on recent experimental observations on quasiparticle trapping in superconducting atomic contacts.

  4. On the relationship between emotional state and abnormal unfairness sensitivity in alcohol dependence

    Damien eBrevers

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent empirical findings suggest that alcohol dependence is characterized by heightened sensitivity to unfairness during social transactions. The present study went a step further and aimed to ascertain whether this abnormal level of sensitivity to unfairness is underlined by an increased emotional reactivity. Twenty-six recently abstinent alcohol-dependent individuals (AD and 32 controls performed an Ultimatum Game (UG, in which participants had to respond to take-it-or-leave-it offers, ranging from fair to unfair and made by a fictive proposer. Emotional state was recorded during UG offers presentation and was indexed by the amplitude of skin conductance response (SCR. Results showed that AD decided to reject unfair offers more frequently than their controls, confirming previous data. The proportion of rejected unfair UG offers was correlated with SCR, in the AD but not in the control group. This finding suggests that deciding to accept or reject unfair UG offers is influenced by arousal-affective activity in AD, but not in controls. Heightened emotional reactivity may have driven AD to punish the proposer rather than acting as a rational economic agent. An implication of present findings is that AD might have difficult to cope with unfair situations triggered by social interactions. Future studies are needed are needed in order to examine whether - emotional and behavioral - reactivity to unfairness during the UG could impact alcohol consumption and relapse in AD.

  5. On the relationship between emotional state and abnormal unfairness sensitivity in alcohol dependence.

    Brevers, Damien; Noël, Xavier; Hanak, Catherine; Verbanck, Paul; Kornreich, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Recent empirical findings suggest that alcohol dependence is characterized by heightened sensitivity to unfairness during social transactions. The present study went a step further and aimed to ascertain whether this abnormal level of sensitivity to unfairness is underlined by an increased emotional reactivity. Twenty-six recently abstinent alcohol-dependent (AD) individuals and 32 controls performed an ultimatum game (UG), in which participants had to respond to take-it-or-leave-it offers, ranging from fair to unfair and made by a fictive proposer. Emotional state was recorded during UG offers presentation and was indexed by the amplitude of skin conductance response (SCR). Results showed that AD decided to reject unfair offers more frequently than their controls, confirming previous data. The proportion of rejected unfair UG offers was correlated with SCR, in the AD but not in the control group. This finding suggests that deciding to accept or reject unfair UG offers is influenced by arousal-affective activity in AD, but not in controls. Heightened emotional reactivity may have driven AD to punish the proposer rather than acting as a rational economic agent. An implication of present findings is that AD might have difficult to cope with unfair situations triggered by social interactions. Future studies are needed in order to examine whether-emotional and behavioral-reactivity to unfairness during the UG could impact alcohol consumption and relapse in AD.

  6. Accurate Ground-State Energies of Solids and Molecules from Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory

    Olsen, Thomas; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that ground-state energies approaching chemical accuracy can be obtained by combining the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem with time-dependent densityfunctional theory. The key ingredient is a renormalization scheme, which eliminates the divergence...

  7. State of the Science White Paper: Effects of Plastics Pollution on Aquatic Life and Aquatic-Dependent Wildlife

    This document is a state-of-the-science review – one that summarizes available scientific information on the effects of chemicals associated with plastic pollution and their potential impacts on aquatic life and aquatic-dependent wildlife.

  8. Comparative reference of accommodation tension in schoolchildren of junior classes depending on emotional state

    L. E. Fedorischeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study the change of adaptation mechanisms in children of junior classes during working on close distance depending on their psychoemotional state.Methods: 52 children of the second classes of grammar school were included into the study. There were allocated 30 emotional labile schoolchildren with choleric temperament. The children were examined by pediatrician, neurologist and in laboratory. Standard ophthalmic examination was performed. Accommodation was examined by subjective (reserve of relative accommodation and objective (familiar tone of accommodation methods.Results: All children had low reserve of relative accommodation (RRA and high familiar tone of accommodation (FTA in the end of educational week especially in emotional labile children. After course of treatment (hygiene of visual activity; restoration of accommodation and therapy of visual tiredness; gymnastics for cervical spine; preparations with microelements, vitamins C,E, B-carotene; fenibute RRA was increased and FTA was decreased even in emotional labile children.Conclusion: There is correlation between refractive-accommodative apparatus and psychoemotional state in schoolchildren ofjunior classes.

  9. Comparative reference of accommodation tension in schoolchildren of junior classes depending on emotional state

    L. E. Fedorischeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study the change of adaptation mechanisms in children of junior classes during working on close distance depending on their psychoemotional state.Methods: 52 children of the second classes of grammar school were included into the study. There were allocated 30 emotional labile schoolchildren with choleric temperament. The children were examined by pediatrician, neurologist and in laboratory. Standard ophthalmic examination was performed. Accommodation was examined by subjective (reserve of relative accommodation and objective (familiar tone of accommodation methods.Results: All children had low reserve of relative accommodation (RRA and high familiar tone of accommodation (FTA in the end of educational week especially in emotional labile children. After course of treatment (hygiene of visual activity; restoration of accommodation and therapy of visual tiredness; gymnastics for cervical spine; preparations with microelements, vitamins C,E, B-carotene; fenibute RRA was increased and FTA was decreased even in emotional labile children.Conclusion: There is correlation between refractive-accommodative apparatus and psychoemotional state in schoolchildren ofjunior classes.

  10. A Recurrent Neural Network Approach to Rear Vehicle Detection Which Considered State Dependency

    Kayichirou Inagaki

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental vision-based detection often fails in cases when the acquired image quality is reduced by changing optical environments. In addition, the shape of vehicles in images that are taken from vision sensors change due to approaches by vehicle. Vehicle detection methods are required to perform successfully under these conditions. However, the conventional methods do not consider especially in rapidly varying by brightness conditions. We suggest a new detection method that compensates for those conditions in monocular vision-based vehicle detection. The suggested method employs a Recurrent Neural Network (RNN, which has been applied for spatiotemporal processing. The RNN is able to respond to consecutive scenes involving the target vehicle and can track the movements of the target by the effect of the past network states. The suggested method has a particularly beneficial effect in environments with sudden, extreme variations such as bright sunlight and shield. Finally, we demonstrate effectiveness by state-dependent of the RNN-based method by comparing its detection results with those of a Multi Layered Perceptron (MLP.

  11. Hippocampal Theta-Gamma Coupling Reflects State-Dependent Information Processing in Decision Making.

    Amemiya, Seiichiro; Redish, A David

    2018-03-20

    During decision making, hippocampal activity encodes information sometimes about present and sometimes about potential future plans. The mechanisms underlying this transition remain unknown. Building on the evidence that gamma oscillations at different frequencies (low gamma [LG], 30-55 Hz; high gamma [HG], 60-90 Hz; and epsilon, 100-140 Hz) reflect inputs from different circuits, we identified how changes in those frequencies reflect different information-processing states. Using a unique noradrenergic manipulation by clonidine, which shifted both neural representations and gamma states, we found that future representations depended on gamma components. These changes were identifiable on each cycle of theta as asymmetries in the theta cycle, which arose from changes within the ratio of LG and HG power and the underlying phases of those gamma rhythms within the theta cycle. These changes in asymmetry of the theta cycle reflected changes in representations of present and future on each theta cycle. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Behavioral State-Dependent Bidirectional Modulation of Motor Cortex Output

    Julia Schiemann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity in primary motor cortex (M1 correlates with behavioral state, but the cellular mechanisms underpinning behavioral state-dependent modulation of M1 output remain largely unresolved. Here, we performed in vivo patch-clamp recordings from layer 5B (L5B pyramidal neurons in awake mice during quiet wakefulness and self-paced, voluntary movement. We show that L5B output neurons display bidirectional (i.e., enhanced or suppressed firing rate changes during movement, mediated via two opposing subthreshold mechanisms: (1 a global decrease in membrane potential variability that reduced L5B firing rates (L5Bsuppressed neurons, and (2 a coincident noradrenaline-mediated increase in excitatory drive to a subpopulation of L5B neurons (L5Benhanced neurons that elevated firing rates. Blocking noradrenergic receptors in forelimb M1 abolished the bidirectional modulation of M1 output during movement and selectively impaired contralateral forelimb motor coordination. Together, our results provide a mechanism for how noradrenergic neuromodulation and network-driven input changes bidirectionally modulate M1 output during motor behavior.

  13. Microbial utilization of low molecular weight organic substrates in soil depends on their carbon oxidation state

    Gunina, Anna; Smith, Andrew; Jones, Davey; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    Removal of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS), originating from plants and microorganisms, from soil solution is regulated by microbial uptake. In addition to the concentration of LMWOS in soil solution, the chemical properties of each substance (e.g. C oxidation state, number of C atoms, number of -COOH groups) can affect their uptake and subsequent partitioning of C within the soil microbial community. The aim of this study was to trace the initial fate of three dominant classes of LMWOS in soil (sugars, carboxylic and amino acids), including their removal from solution and utilization by microorganisms, and to reveal the effect of substance chemical properties on these processes. Soil solution, spiked at natural abundance levels with 14C-labelled glucose, fructose, malate, succinate, formate, alanine or glycine, was added to the soil and 14C was traced in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CO2, cytosol and soil organic carbon (SOC) over 24 hours. The half-life time of all LMWOS in the DOC (T1 /2-solution) varied between 0.6-5.0 min showing extremely fast initial uptake of LMWOS. The T1 /2-solution of substances was dependent on C oxidation state, indicating that less oxidized organic substances (with C oxidation state "0") were retained longer in soil solution than oxidized substances. The LMWOS-C T1 /2-fast, characterizing the half-life time of 14C in the fast mineralization pool, ranged between 30 and 80 min, with the T1 /2-fast of carboxylic acids (malic acid) being the fastest and the T1 /2-fast of amino acids (glycine) being the slowest. An absence of correlation between T1 /2-fast and either C oxidation state, number of C atoms, or number of -COOH groups suggests that intercellular metabolic pathways are more important for LMWOS transformation in soil than their basic chemical properties. The CO2 release during LMWOS mineralization accounted for 20-90% of 14C applied. Mineralization of LMWOS was the least for sugars and the greatest for

  14. Medical marijuana laws in 50 states: investigating the relationship between state legalization of medical marijuana and marijuana use, abuse and dependence.

    Cerdá, Magdalena; Wall, Melanie; Keyes, Katherine M; Galea, Sandro; Hasin, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Marijuana is the most frequently used illicit substance in the United States. Little is known of the role that macro-level factors, including community norms and laws related to substance use, play in determining marijuana use, abuse and dependence. We tested the relationship between state-level legalization of medical marijuana and marijuana use, abuse, and dependence. We used the second wave of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a national survey of adults aged 18+ (n=34,653). Selected analyses were replicated using the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), a yearly survey of ∼68,000 individuals aged 12+. We measured past-year cannabis use and DSM-IV abuse/dependence. In NESARC, residents of states with medical marijuana laws had higher odds of marijuana use (OR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.49-2.47) and marijuana abuse/dependence (OR: 1.81; 95% CI: 1.22-2.67) than residents of states without such laws. Marijuana abuse/dependence was not more prevalent among marijuana users in these states (OR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.67-1.60), suggesting that the higher risk for marijuana abuse/dependence in these states was accounted for by higher rates of use. In NSDUH, states that legalized medical marijuana also had higher rates of marijuana use. States that legalized medical marijuana had higher rates of marijuana use. Future research needs to examine whether the association is causal, or is due to an underlying common cause, such as community norms supportive of the legalization of medical marijuana and of marijuana use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Caffeine inhibition of GLUT1 is dependent on the activation state of the transporter.

    Gunnink, Leesha K; Busscher, Brianna M; Wodarek, Jeremy A; Rosette, Kylee A; Strohbehn, Lauren E; Looyenga, Brendan D; Louters, Larry L

    2017-06-01

    Caffeine has been shown to be a robust uncompetitive inhibitor of glucose uptake in erythrocytes. It preferentially binds to the nucleotide-binding site on GLUT1 in its tetrameric form and mimics the inhibitory action of ATP. Here we demonstrate that caffeine is also a dose-dependent, uncompetitive inhibitor of 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) uptake in L929 fibroblasts. The inhibitory effect on 2DG uptake in these cells was reversible with a rapid onset and was additive to the competitive inhibitory effects of glucose itself, confirming that caffeine does not interfere with glucose binding. We also report for the first time that caffeine inhibition was additive to inhibition by curcumin, suggesting distinct binding sites for curcumin and caffeine. In contrast, caffeine inhibition was not additive to that of cytochalasin B, consistent with previous data that reported that these two inhibitors have overlapping binding sites. More importantly, we show that the magnitude of maximal caffeine inhibition in L929 cells is much lower than in erythrocytes (35% compared to 90%). Two epithelial cell lines, HCLE and HK2, have both higher concentrations of GLUT1 and increased basal 2DG uptake (3-4 fold) compared to L929 cells, and subsequently display greater maximal inhibition by caffeine (66-70%). Interestingly, activation of 2DG uptake (3-fold) in L929 cells by glucose deprivation shifted the responsiveness of these cells to caffeine inhibition (35%-70%) without a change in total GLUT1 concentration. These data indicate that the inhibition of caffeine is dependent on the activity state of GLUT1, not merely on the concentration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  16. Binary neutron star mergers: Dependence on the nuclear equation of state

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Okawa, Hirotada; Shibata, Masaru; Kiuchi, Kenta

    2011-01-01

    We perform a numerical-relativity simulation for the merger of binary neutron stars with 6 nuclear-theory-based equations of states (EOSs) described by piecewise polytropes. Our purpose is to explore the dependence of the dynamical behavior of the binary neutron star merger and resulting gravitational waveforms on the EOS of the supernuclear-density matter. The numerical results show that the merger process and the first outcome are classified into three types: (i) a black hole is promptly formed, (ii) a short-lived hypermassive neutron star (HMNS) is formed, (iii) a long-lived HMNS is formed. The type of the merger depends strongly on the EOS and on the total mass of the binaries. For the EOS with which the maximum mass is larger than 2M · , the lifetime of the HMNS is longer than 10 ms for a total mass m 0 =2.7M · . A recent radio observation suggests that the maximum mass of spherical neutron stars is M max ≥1.97±0.04M · in one σ level. This fact and our results support the possible existence of a HMNS soon after the onset of the merger for a typical binary neutron star with m 0 =2.7M · . We also show that the torus mass surrounding the remnant black hole is correlated with the type of the merger process; the torus mass could be large, ≥0.1M · , in the case that a long-lived HMNS is formed. We also show that gravitational waves carry information of the merger process, the remnant, and the torus mass surrounding a black hole.

  17. Maintenance of Xist Imprinting Depends on Chromatin Condensation State and Rnf12 Dosage in Mice.

    Atsushi Fukuda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In female mammals, activation of Xist (X-inactive specific transcript is essential for establishment of X chromosome inactivation. During early embryonic development in mice, paternal Xist is preferentially expressed whereas maternal Xist (Xm-Xist is silenced. Unlike autosomal imprinted genes, Xist imprinting for Xm-Xist silencing was erased in cloned or parthenogenetic but not fertilized embryos. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the variable nature of Xm-Xist imprinting is poorly understood. Here, we revealed that Xm-Xist silencing depends on chromatin condensation states at the Xist/Tsix genomic region and on Rnf12 expression levels. In early preimplantation, chromatin decondensation via H3K9me3 loss and histone acetylation gain caused Xm-Xist derepression irrespective of embryo type. Although the presence of the paternal genome during pronuclear formation impeded Xm-Xist derepression, Xm-Xist was robustly derepressed when the maternal genome was decondensed before fertilization. Once Xm-Xist was derepressed by chromatin alterations, the derepression was stably maintained and rescued XmXpΔ lethality, indicating that loss of Xm-Xist imprinting was irreversible. In late preimplantation, Oct4 served as a chromatin opener to create transcriptional permissive states at Xm-Xist/Tsix genomic loci. In parthenogenetic embryos, Rnf12 overdose caused Xm-Xist derepression via Xm-Tsix repression; physiological Rnf12 levels were essential for Xm-Xist silencing maintenance in fertilized embryos. Thus, chromatin condensation and fine-tuning of Rnf12 dosage were crucial for Xist imprint maintenance by silencing Xm-Xist.

  18. An isotope dependent study of acetone in its lowest excited triplet state

    Gehrtz, M.; Brauchle, C.; Voitlaender, J.

    1984-01-01

    The lowest excited triplet state T 1 of acetone-h 6 and acetone-d 6 was investigated with a pulsed dye laser equipped ODMR spectrometer. Acetone is found to be bent in T 1 and the out-of-plane distortion angle is estimated to be approx.= 38 0 . The observed zero-field splitting (ZFS) is surprisingly small. Both the spin-spin and the spin-orbit (SO) contribution to the ZFS are evaluated. The SO tensor contribution is calculated from a correlation between the deuterium effects on the ZFS parameters and the population rates. The sub-level selective kinetics of the acetone T 1 is largely determined by the mixing of the x- and z-level characteristics owing to magnetic axis rotation caused by the excited state out-of-plane distortion. Considerable deuterium effects are observed on the kinetic data and on the microwave transition frequencies. In all cases the spin-specific isotope effects (due to the promoting modes) and the global effects (due to the Franck-Condon factors) are specified. For the population rates and the SO contribution to ZFS, the inverse global isotope effects (deuterium factor > 1) was found for the first time. Based on the isotope dependence of the rates, the mechanisms of (vibrationally induced) SO coupling in acetone are discussed. It is concluded that non-adiabatic contributions have to be taken into account for the smallest population rate only, but that otherwise the adiabatic SO coupling mechanisms by far dominates in the acetone photophysics. (author)

  19. The inverse Gamma process: A family of continuous stochastic models for describing state-dependent deterioration phenomena

    Guida, M.; Pulcini, G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes the family of non-stationary inverse Gamma processes for modeling state-dependent deterioration processes with nonlinear trend. The proposed family of processes, which is based on the assumption that the “inverse” time process is Gamma, is mathematically more tractable than previously proposed state-dependent processes, because, unlike the previous models, the inverse Gamma process is a time-continuous and state-continuous model and does not require discretization of time and state. The conditional distribution of the deterioration growth over a generic time interval, the conditional distribution of the residual life and the residual reliability of the unit, given the current state, are provided. Point and interval estimation of the parameters which index the proposed process, as well as of several quantities of interest, are also discussed. Finally, the proposed model is applied to the wear process of the liners of some Diesel engines which was previously analyzed and proved to be a purely state-dependent process. The comparison of the inferential results obtained under the competitor models shows the ability of the Inverse Gamma process to adequately model the observed state-dependent wear process

  20. On the profile of frequency and voltage dependent interface states and series resistance in MIS structures

    Doekme, Ilbilge [Science Education Department, Faculty of Kirsehir Education, Gazi University, Kirsehir (Turkey)]. E-mail: ilbilgedokme@gazi.edu.tr; Altindal, Semsettin [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Gazi University, 06500, Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-30

    The variation in the capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G/{omega}-V) characteristics of Au/SiO{sub 2}/n-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure have been systematically investigated as a function of frequencies in the frequency range 0.5 kHz-10 MHz at room temperature. In addition, the forward and reverse bias current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of this structure were measured at room temperature. The high value of ideality factor was attributed to the high density of interface states localized at Si/SiO{sub 2} interface and interfacial oxide layer. The density of interface states (N{sub ss}) and the series resistance (R{sub ss}) were calculated from I-V and C-V measurements using different methods and the effect of them on C-V and G/{omega}-V characteristics were deeply researched. At the same energy position near the top of valance band, the calculated N{sub ss} values, obtained without taking into account the series resistance of the devices almost one order of magnitude larger than N{sub ss} values obtained by taking into account R{sub ss} values. It is found that the C-V and G/{omega}-V curves exhibit a peak at low frequencies and the peak values of C and G/{omega} decrease with increasing frequency. Also, the plots of R {sub s} as a function of bias give two peaks in the certain voltage range at low frequencies. These observations indicate that at low frequencies, the charges at interface states can easily follow an AC signal and the number of them increases with decreasing frequency. The I-V, C-V and G/{omega}-V characteristics of the MIS structure are affected not only with R {sub s} but also N {sub ss}. Experimental results show that both the R{sub s} and C{sub o} values should be taken into account in determining frequency-dependent electrical characteristics.

  1. State dependent arrival in bulk retrial queueing system with immediate Bernoulli feedback, multiple vacations and threshold

    Niranjan, S. P.; Chandrasekaran, V. M.; Indhira, K.

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyse state dependent arrival in bulk retrial queueing system with immediate Bernoulli feedback, multiple vacations, threshold and constant retrial policy. Primary customers are arriving into the system in bulk with different arrival rates λ a and λ b . If arriving customers find the server is busy then the entire batch will join to orbit. Customer from orbit request service one by one with constant retrial rate γ. On the other hand if an arrival of customers finds the server is idle then customers will be served in batches according to general bulk service rule. After service completion, customers may request service again with probability δ as feedback or leave from the system with probability 1 - δ. In the service completion epoch, if the orbit size is zero then the server leaves for multiple vacations. The server continues the vacation until the orbit size reaches the value ‘N’ (N > b). At the vacation completion, if the orbit size is ‘N’ then the server becomes ready to provide service for customers from the main pool or from the orbit. For the designed queueing model, probability generating function of the queue size at an arbitrary time will be obtained by using supplementary variable technique. Various performance measures will be derived with suitable numerical illustrations.

  2. Distinct forms of mitochondrial TOM-TIM supercomplexes define signal-dependent states of preprotein sorting.

    Chacinska, Agnieszka; van der Laan, Martin; Mehnert, Carola S; Guiard, Bernard; Mick, David U; Hutu, Dana P; Truscott, Kaye N; Wiedemann, Nils; Meisinger, Chris; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Rehling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial import of cleavable preproteins occurs at translocation contact sites, where the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) associates with the presequence translocase of the inner membrane (TIM23) in a supercomplex. Different views exist on the mechanism of how TIM23 mediates preprotein sorting to either the matrix or inner membrane. On the one hand, two TIM23 forms were proposed, a matrix transport form containing the presequence translocase-associated motor (PAM; TIM23-PAM) and a sorting form containing Tim21 (TIM23(SORT)). On the other hand, it was reported that TIM23 and PAM are permanently associated in a single-entity translocase. We have accumulated distinct transport intermediates of preproteins to analyze the translocases in their active, preprotein-carrying state. We identified two different forms of active TOM-TIM23 supercomplexes, TOM-TIM23(SORT) and TOM-TIM23-PAM. These two supercomplexes do not represent separate pathways but are in dynamic exchange during preprotein translocation and sorting. Depending on the signals of the preproteins, switches between the different forms of supercomplex and TIM23 are required for the completion of preprotein import.

  3. Direction of information flow in large-scale resting-state networks is frequency-dependent.

    Hillebrand, Arjan; Tewarie, Prejaas; van Dellen, Edwin; Yu, Meichen; Carbo, Ellen W S; Douw, Linda; Gouw, Alida A; van Straaten, Elisabeth C W; Stam, Cornelis J

    2016-04-05

    Normal brain function requires interactions between spatially separated, and functionally specialized, macroscopic regions, yet the directionality of these interactions in large-scale functional networks is unknown. Magnetoencephalography was used to determine the directionality of these interactions, where directionality was inferred from time series of beamformer-reconstructed estimates of neuronal activation, using a recently proposed measure of phase transfer entropy. We observed well-organized posterior-to-anterior patterns of information flow in the higher-frequency bands (alpha1, alpha2, and beta band), dominated by regions in the visual cortex and posterior default mode network. Opposite patterns of anterior-to-posterior flow were found in the theta band, involving mainly regions in the frontal lobe that were sending information to a more distributed network. Many strong information senders in the theta band were also frequent receivers in the alpha2 band, and vice versa. Our results provide evidence that large-scale resting-state patterns of information flow in the human brain form frequency-dependent reentry loops that are dominated by flow from parieto-occipital cortex to integrative frontal areas in the higher-frequency bands, which is mirrored by a theta band anterior-to-posterior flow.

  4. Glymphatic clearance controls state-dependent changes in brain lactate concentration.

    Lundgaard, Iben; Lu, Minh Lon; Yang, Ezra; Peng, Weiguo; Mestre, Humberto; Hitomi, Emi; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2017-06-01

    Brain lactate concentration is higher during wakefulness than in sleep. However, it is unknown why arousal is linked to an increase in brain lactate and why lactate declines within minutes of sleep. Here, we show that the glymphatic system is responsible for state-dependent changes in brain lactate concentration. Suppression of glymphatic function via acetazolamide treatment, cisterna magna puncture, aquaporin 4 deletion, or changes in body position reduced the decline in brain lactate normally observed when awake mice transition into sleep or anesthesia. Concurrently, the same manipulations diminished accumulation of lactate in cervical, but not in inguinal lymph nodes when mice were anesthetized. Thus, our study suggests that brain lactate is an excellent biomarker of the sleep-wake cycle and increases further during sleep deprivation, because brain lactate is inversely correlated with glymphatic-lymphatic clearance. This analysis provides fundamental new insight into brain energy metabolism by demonstrating that glucose that is not fully oxidized can be exported as lactate via glymphatic-lymphatic fluid transport.

  5. State-dependent, bidirectional modulation of neural network activity by endocannabinoids.

    Piet, Richard; Garenne, André; Farrugia, Fanny; Le Masson, Gwendal; Marsicano, Giovanni; Chavis, Pascale; Manzoni, Olivier J

    2011-11-16

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system and the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) play key roles in the modulation of brain functions. Although actions of eCBs and CB1Rs are well described at the synaptic level, little is known of their modulation of neural activity at the network level. Using microelectrode arrays, we have examined the role of CB1R activation in the modulation of the electrical activity of rat and mice cortical neural networks in vitro. We find that exogenous activation of CB1Rs expressed on glutamatergic neurons decreases the spontaneous activity of cortical neural networks. Moreover, we observe that the net effect of the CB1R antagonist AM251 inversely correlates with the initial level of activity in the network: blocking CB1Rs increases network activity when basal network activity is low, whereas it depresses spontaneous activity when its initial level is high. Our results reveal a complex role of CB1Rs in shaping spontaneous network activity, and suggest that the outcome of endogenous neuromodulation on network function might be state dependent.

  6. Matrix-Geometric Method for Queueing Model with State-Dependent Arrival of an Unreliable Server and PH Service

    M.ReniSagaya Raj

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider a state-dependent queueing system in which the system is subject to random breakdowns. Customer arrive at the system randomly following a Poisson process with state-dependent rates. Service times follows PH distribution and repair times are exponentially distributed. The server may fail to service with probability depending on the number of customer completed since the last repair. The main result of this paper is the matrix-geometric solution of the steady-state queue length from which many performance measurements of this queueing system like the stationary queue length distribution, waiting time distribution and the distribution of regular busy period, system utilization are obtained. Numerical examples are presented for both cases.

  7. Temperature dependence of hole mobility in Mott insulators: Normal-state resistivity of high-T/sub c/ superconductors

    Kumar, N.

    1989-01-01

    We consider the diffusion of a hole injected in a Mott insulator described by a one-band Hubbard Hamiltonian at half-filling and in the atomic limit. The diffusion coefficient turns out to be temperature independent exactly giving 1/T dependence for the drift mobility via the Einstein relation. This is in marked disagreement with the (1/T)/sup 1/2/ dependence obtaining in the self-retracing path approximation at low temperatures. We note the possible relevance of our result to the linear T dependence of the normal-state resistivity observed in the high-T/sub c/ oxide superconductors

  8. Derivation of the RPA (Random Phase Approximation) Equation of ATDDFT (Adiabatic Time Dependent Density Functional Ground State Response Theory) from an Excited State Variational Approach Based on the Ground State Functional.

    Ziegler, Tom; Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Autschbach, Jochen

    2014-09-09

    The random phase approximation (RPA) equation of adiabatic time dependent density functional ground state response theory (ATDDFT) has been used extensively in studies of excited states. It extracts information about excited states from frequency dependent ground state response properties and avoids, thus, in an elegant way, direct Kohn-Sham calculations on excited states in accordance with the status of DFT as a ground state theory. Thus, excitation energies can be found as resonance poles of frequency dependent ground state polarizability from the eigenvalues of the RPA equation. ATDDFT is approximate in that it makes use of a frequency independent energy kernel derived from the ground state functional. It is shown in this study that one can derive the RPA equation of ATDDFT from a purely variational approach in which stationary states above the ground state are located using our constricted variational DFT (CV-DFT) method and the ground state functional. Thus, locating stationary states above the ground state due to one-electron excitations with a ground state functional is completely equivalent to solving the RPA equation of TDDFT employing the same functional. The present study is an extension of a previous work in which we demonstrated the equivalence between ATDDFT and CV-DFT within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation.

  9. A multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock method for excited electronic states. I. General formalism and application to open-shell states.

    Miranda, R P; Fisher, A J; Stella, L; Horsfield, A P

    2011-06-28

    The solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for systems of interacting electrons is generally a prohibitive task, for which approximate methods are necessary. Popular approaches, such as the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) approximation and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), are essentially single-configurational schemes. TDHF is by construction incapable of fully accounting for the excited character of the electronic states involved in many physical processes of interest; TDDFT, although exact in principle, is limited by the currently available exchange-correlation functionals. On the other hand, multiconfigurational methods, such as the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) approach, provide an accurate description of the excited states and can be systematically improved. However, the computational cost becomes prohibitive as the number of degrees of freedom increases, and thus, at present, the MCTDHF method is only practical for few-electron systems. In this work, we propose an alternative approach which effectively establishes a compromise between efficiency and accuracy, by retaining the smallest possible number of configurations that catches the essential features of the electronic wavefunction. Based on a time-dependent variational principle, we derive the MCTDHF working equation for a multiconfigurational expansion with fixed coefficients and specialise to the case of general open-shell states, which are relevant for many physical processes of interest.

  10. Are Health State Valuations from the General Public Biased? A Test of Health State Reference Dependency Using Self-assessed Health and an Efficient Discrete Choice Experiment.

    Jonker, Marcel F; Attema, Arthur E; Donkers, Bas; Stolk, Elly A; Versteegh, Matthijs M

    2017-12-01

    Health state valuations of patients and non-patients are not the same, whereas health state values obtained from general population samples are a weighted average of both. The latter constitutes an often-overlooked source of bias. This study investigates the resulting bias and tests for the impact of reference dependency on health state valuations using an efficient discrete choice experiment administered to a Dutch nationally representative sample of 788 respondents. A Bayesian discrete choice experiment design consisting of eight sets of 24 (matched pairwise) choice tasks was developed, with each set providing full identification of the included parameters. Mixed logit models were used to estimate health state preferences with respondents' own health included as an additional predictor. Our results indicate that respondents with impaired health worse than or equal to the health state levels under evaluation have approximately 30% smaller health state decrements. This confirms that reference dependency can be observed in general population samples and affirms the relevance of prospect theory in health state valuations. At the same time, the limited number of respondents with severe health impairments does not appear to bias social tariffs as obtained from general population samples. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Temperature dependence of the partially localized state in a 2D molecular nanoporous network

    Piquero-Zulaica, Ignacio, E-mail: ipiquerozulaica@gmail.com [Centro de Física de Materiales (CSIC/UPV-EHU)—Materials Physics Center, Manuel Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Nowakowska, Sylwia [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Ortega, J. Enrique [Centro de Física de Materiales (CSIC/UPV-EHU)—Materials Physics Center, Manuel Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Manuel Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Departamento Física Aplicada I, Universidad del País Vasco, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Stöhr, Meike [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Gade, Lutz H. [Anorganisch-Chemisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 270, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Jung, Thomas A. [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Lobo-Checa, Jorge, E-mail: jorge.lobo@csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A state of a 2D porous network is demonstrated to originate from the Shockley state. • The temperature evolution of both states is followed by means of ARPES. • Identical energy shifts are observed for both states, proving their common origin. - Abstract: Two-dimensional organic and metal-organic nanoporous networks can scatter surface electrons, leading to their partial localization. Such quantum states are related to intrinsic surface states of the substrate material. We further corroborate this relation by studying the thermally induced energy shifts of the electronic band stemming from coupled quantum states hosted in a metal-organic array formed by a perylene derivative on Cu(111). We observe by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), that both, the Shockley and the partially localized states, shift by the same amount to higher binding energies upon decreasing the sample temperature, providing evidence of their common origin. Our experimental approach and results further support the use of surface states for modelling these systems, which are expected to provide new insight into the physics concerning partially confined electronic states: scattering processes, potential barrier strengths, excited state lifetimes or the influence of guest molecules.

  12. Effect of Pentylenetetrazol on Morphine State-Dependent Memory in Rat

    Marziyeh Tavassoli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Learning and memory are among the higher functions of the brain. State-dependent memory (STM is a type of memory in which the recall of a learned behavior is happend only in the same sensory and physiologic condition in which the behavior is encoded. The STM is seen with some drugs, e.g. the morphine. The pentylenetetrazol (PTZ is a durg which is used for the induction of seizure in experimental models. Some studies have been revealed different effects of the PTZ on brain higher function (learning, memory …. The aim of present study was to explore the effect of PTZ on morphine-induced STM. Materials and Methods: In this study, male adult Wistar rats (190-220 g were used. Animals in 3 groups (n=8 during 3 sessions (learning/memory, STM and interaction were studied. During 48 hour (training and test the learning and memory of animals were studied in inhibitory avoidance apparatus. The step-through latency in the test day was used as a criterion for memory. Post-training injection of saline or morphine (2.5, 5 and 7.5 mg/kg-ip in different groups was carried out. In addition, the pre-test injection of morphine at the same doses was made to study the STM. Moreover, the interaction of pre-test single-dose PTZ (60 mg/kg-ip on STM was studied. The locomotion of the animals was measured using the open field. Results: The post-training injection of morphine (2.5, 5 and 7.5 mg/kg-ip impaired the inhibitory memory of rats compared to control group (p<0.001. The post-training and pre-test injections of the same dose of morphine (7.5 mg/kg-ip reversed the impaired memory compared to morphine (2.5 and 5 mg/kg-ip, (p<0.001. The pre-test PTZ (60 mg/kg-ip maintained the morphine (7.5 mg/kg-ip STM (p<0.001. Conclusion: The present study revealed that the post-training ip injection of different doses of morphine results in the impairment of inhibitory avoidance memory in rat. In addition, the pre-test injection of the same doses of morphine

  13. Threshold energy dependence as a function of potential strength and the nonexistence of bound states

    Aronson, I.; Kleinman, C.J.; Spruch, L.

    1975-01-01

    The difficulty in attempting to prove that a given set of particles cannot form a bound state is the absence of a margin of error; the possibility of a bound state of arbitrarily small binding energy must be ruled out. At the sacrifice of rigor, one can hope to bypass the difficulty by studying the ground-state energy E(lambda) associated with H(lambda) identical with H/sub true/ + lambda/sub ν/, where H/sub true/ is the true Hamiltonian, ν is an artificial attractive potential, and lambda greater than 0. E(lambda) can be estimated via a Rayleigh-Ritz calculation. If H/sub true/ falls just short of being able to support a bound state, H(lambda) for lambda ''not too small'' will support a bound state of some significant binding. A margin of error is thereby created; the inability to find a bound state for lambda ''not too small'' suggests not only that H(lambda) can support at best a weakly bound state but that H/sub true/ cannot support a bound state at all. To give the argument real substance, one studies E(lambda) in the neighborhood of lambda = lambda 0 , the (unknown) smallest value for lambda for which H(lambda) can support a bound state. A comparison of E(lambda) determined numerically with the form of E(lambda) obtained with the use of a crude bound-state wave function in the Feynman theorem gives a rough self-consistency check. One thereby obtains a believable lower bound on the energy of a possible bound state of H/sub true/ or a believable argument that no such bound state exists. The method is applied to the triplet state of H -

  14. Benchmarks for electronically excited states: Time-dependent density functional theory and density functional theory based multireference configuration interaction

    Silva-Junior, Mario R.; Schreiber, Marko; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and DFT-based multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations are reported for a recently proposed benchmark set of 28 medium-sized organic molecules. Vertical excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state dipole...

  15. Research Paper: Cross State-dependent Learning Interaction Between Scopolamine and Morphine in Mice: The Role of Dorsal Hippocampus

    Morteza Maleki

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: The current study findings indicated a cross state-dependent learning between SCO and morphine at CA1 level. Therefore, it seems that muscarinic and opioid receptors may act reciprocally on modulation of passive avoidance memory retrieval, at the level of dorsal hippocampus, in mice.

  16. Child Mortality, Women's Status, Economic Dependency, and State Strength: A Cross-National Study of Less Developed Countries.

    Shen, Ce; Williamson, John B.

    1997-01-01

    Data from 86 developing countries suggest that foreign investment and debt dependency have adverse indirect effects on child mortality--effects mediated by variables linked to industrialism theory and gender stratification theory: women's education, health, and reproductive autonomy and rate of economic growth. State strength was related to lower…

  17. Formation of Bonded Exciplex in the Excited States of Dicyanoanthracene-Pyridine System : Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Study

    Setiawan, D.; Sethio, D.; Martoprawiro, M.A.; Filatov, M.; Gaol, FL; Nguyen, QV

    2012-01-01

    Strong quenching of fluorescence was recently observed in pyridine solutions of 9,10-dicyanoanthracene chromophore. It was hypothesized that quenching may be attributed to the formation of bound charge transfer complexes in the excited states of the molecules. In this work, using time-dependent

  18. About the Existence Results of Fractional Neutral Integrodifferential Inclusions with State-Dependent Delay in Fréchet Spaces

    Selvaraj Suganya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent nonlinear alternative for multivalued contractions in Fréchet spaces thanks to Frigon fixed point theorem consolidated with semigroup theory is utilized to examine the existence results for fractional neutral integrodifferential inclusions (FNIDI with state-dependent delay (SDD. An example is described to represent the hypothesis.

  19. Detection-dependent six-photon Holland-Burnett state interference

    Rui-Bo Jin; Mikio Fujiwara; Ryosuke Shimizu; Robert J. Collins; Gerald S. Buller; Taro Yamashita; Shigehito Miki; Hirotaka Terai; Masahiro Takeoka; Masahide Sasaki

    2016-01-01

    The NOON state, and its experimental approximation the Holland-Burnett state, have important applications in phase sensing measurement with enhanced sensitivity. However, most of the previous Holland-Burnett state interference (HBSI) experiments only investigated the area of the interference pattern in the region immediately around zero optical path length difference, while the full HBSI pattern over a wide range of optical path length differences has not yet been well explored. In this work,...

  20. The dependence of fidelity on the squeezing parameter in teleportation of the squeezed coherent states

    Zhang Jing-Tao; He Guang-Qiang; Ren Li-Jie; Zeng Gui-Hua

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates an analytical expression of teleportation fidelity in the teleportation scheme of a single mode of electromagnetic field. The fidelity between the original squeezed coherent state and the teleported one is expressed in terms of the squeezing parameter r and the quantum channel parameter (two-mode squeezed state) p. The results of analysis show that the fidelity increases with the increase of the quantum channel parameter p, while the fidelity decreases with the increase of the squeezing parameter r of the squeezed state. Thus the coherent state (r = 0)is the best quantum signal for continuous variable quantum teleportation once the quantum channel is built.

  1. In vivo NAD assay reveals the intracellular NAD contents and redox state in healthy human brain and their age dependences

    Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Lu, Ming; Lee, Byeong-Yeul; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    NAD is an essential metabolite that exists in NAD+ or NADH form in all living cells. Despite its critical roles in regulating mitochondrial energy production through the NAD+/NADH redox state and modulating cellular signaling processes through the activity of the NAD+-dependent enzymes, the method for quantifying intracellular NAD contents and redox state is limited to a few in vitro or ex vivo assays, which are not suitable for studying a living brain or organ. Here, we present a magnetic resonance (MR) -based in vivo NAD assay that uses the high-field MR scanner and is capable of noninvasively assessing NAD+ and NADH contents and the NAD+/NADH redox state in intact human brain. The results of this study provide the first insight, to our knowledge, into the cellular NAD concentrations and redox state in the brains of healthy volunteers. Furthermore, an age-dependent increase of intracellular NADH and age-dependent reductions in NAD+, total NAD contents, and NAD+/NADH redox potential of the healthy human brain were revealed in this study. The overall findings not only provide direct evidence of declined mitochondrial functions and altered NAD homeostasis that accompany the normal aging process but also, elucidate the merits and potentials of this new NAD assay for noninvasively studying the intracellular NAD metabolism and redox state in normal and diseased human brain or other organs in situ. PMID:25730862

  2. Event-Based $H_\\infty $ State Estimation for Time-Varying Stochastic Dynamical Networks With State- and Disturbance-Dependent Noises.

    Sheng, Li; Wang, Zidong; Zou, Lei; Alsaadi, Fuad E

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the event-based finite-horizon H ∞ state estimation problem is investigated for a class of discrete time-varying stochastic dynamical networks with state- and disturbance-dependent noises [also called (x,v) -dependent noises]. An event-triggered scheme is proposed to decrease the frequency of the data transmission between the sensors and the estimator, where the signal is transmitted only when certain conditions are satisfied. The purpose of the problem addressed is to design a time-varying state estimator in order to estimate the network states through available output measurements. By employing the completing-the-square technique and the stochastic analysis approach, sufficient conditions are established to ensure that the error dynamics of the state estimation satisfies a prescribed H ∞ performance constraint over a finite horizon. The desired estimator parameters can be designed via solving coupled backward recursive Riccati difference equations. Finally, a numerical example is exploited to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed state estimation scheme.

  3. Importance of GluA1 subunit-containing AMPA glutamate receptors for morphine state-dependency.

    Teemu Aitta-aho

    Full Text Available In state-dependency, information retrieval is most efficient when the animal is in the same state as it was during the information acquisition. State-dependency has been implicated in a variety of learning and memory processes, but its mechanisms remain to be resolved. Here, mice deficient in AMPA-type glutamate receptor GluA1 subunits were first conditioned to morphine (10 or 20 mg/kg s.c. during eight sessions over four days using an unbiased procedure, followed by testing for conditioned place preference at morphine states that were the same as or different from the one the mice were conditioned to. In GluA1 wildtype littermate mice the same-state morphine dose produced the greatest expression of place preference, while in the knockout mice no place preference was then detected. Both wildtype and knockout mice expressed moderate morphine-induced place preference when not at the morphine state (saline treatment at the test; in this case, place preference was weaker than that in the same-state test in wildtype mice. No correlation between place preference scores and locomotor activity during testing was found. Additionally, as compared to the controls, the knockout mice showed unchanged sensitization to morphine, morphine drug discrimination and brain regional μ-opioid receptor signal transduction at the G-protein level. However, the knockout mice failed to show increased AMPA/NMDA receptor current ratios in the ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons of midbrain slices after a single injection of morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c., sliced prepared 24 h afterwards, in contrast to the wildtype mice. The results indicate impaired drug-induced state-dependency in GluA1 knockout mice, correlating with impaired opioid-induced glutamate receptor neuroplasticity.

  4. Fractional amplitude analysis of low frequency fluctuation in alcohol dependent individuals: a resting state functional MRI study

    Yan Dingfang; Cheng Jun; Wu Hanbin; Xu Liangzhou; Liu Jinhuan; Zhao Yilin; Lin Xue; Liu Changsheng; Qiu Li

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore brain activity features during the resting state in alcohol dependent individuals, and study the relationship between the brain activity features and alcohol dependent individuals' clinical symptoms. Methods: Twenty-four alcohol dependent individuals and 22 healthy control subjects, well matched in gender, age, education and handedness, were enrolled as the alcohol dependent group and control group respectively. A GE 3.0 T MR scanner was used to acquire all the subjects' resting state data. DPARSF software was used to process resting functional MRI data, and then the whole brain fractional amplitudes of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF) data were acquired. Two-sample t test statistical analysis was made to access fALFF difference between the two groups. Results: In comparison with the control group, the alcohol dependent group showed reduced fALFF in bilateral medial prefrontal gyrus, right inferior occipital gyrus, left precuneus,left inferior temporal gyrus, and left posterior lobe of cerebellum (0.64-1.69 vs. 0.87-1.78, t=-4.23- -2.79, P<0.05). fALFF was increased in the alcohol dependent group at the anterior cingulate,bilateral inferior frontal gyrus,right middle frontal gyrus,bilateral insular lobe,bilateral dorsal thalamus (0.86-1.82 vs. 0.76-1.58, t=3.56-3.96, P<0.05). Conclusion: Alcohol dependent individuals had abnormal activity at the bilateral prefrontal lobe,anterior cingulate, bilateral dorsal thalamus, bilateral insular lobe, left posterior lobe of cerebellum et al, during the resting state, and these abnormal activities might be related with clinical manifestation and pathophysiology. (authors)

  5. Dependence of Stock Markets with Gold and Bonds under Bullish and Bearish Market States

    Shahzad, Syed Jawad Hussain; Raza, Naveed; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Ali, Azwadi

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the dependence of gold and benchmark bonds with ten stock markets including five larger developed markets (e.g. USA, UK, Japan, Canada and Germany) and five Eurozone peripheral GIPSI countries (Greece, Ireland, Portuguese, Spain and Ireland) stock markets. We use a novel quantile-on-quantile (QQ) approach to construct the dependence estimates of the quantiles of gold and bond with the quantiles of stock markets. The QQ approach, recently developed by Sim and Zhou (2015), c...

  6. On the relationship between emotional state and abnormal unfairness sensitivity in alcohol dependence

    Brevers, Damien; Noël, Xavier; Hanak, Catherine; Verbanck, Paul; Kornreich, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Recent empirical findings suggest that alcohol dependence is characterized by heightened sensitivity to unfairness during social transactions. The present study went a step further and aimed to ascertain whether this abnormal level of sensitivity to unfairness is underlined by an increased emotional reactivity. Twenty-six recently abstinent alcohol-dependent (AD) individuals and 32 controls performed an ultimatum game (UG), in which participants had to respond to take-it-or-leave-it offers, r...

  7. Nonmonotonic Temperature Dependence of the Pressure-Dependent Reaction Rate Constant and Kinetic Isotope Effect of Hydrogen Radical Reaction with Benzene Calculated by Variational Transition-State Theory.

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xin; Truhlar, Donald G; Xu, Xuefei

    2017-11-30

    The reaction between H and benzene is a prototype for reactions of radicals with aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we report calculations of the reaction rate constants and the branching ratios of the two channels of the reaction (H addition and H abstraction) over a wide temperature and pressure range. Our calculations, obtained with an accurate potential energy surface, are based on variational transition-state theory for the high-pressure limit of the addition reaction and for the abstraction reaction and on system-specific quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel theory calibrated by variational transition-state theory for pressure effects on the addition reaction. The latter is a very convenient way to include variational effects, corner-cutting tunneling, and anharmonicity in falloff calculations. Our results are in very good agreement with the limited experimental data and show the importance of including pressure effects in the temperature interval where the mechanism changes from addition to abstraction. We found a negative temperature effect of the total reaction rate constants at 1 atm pressure in the temperature region where experimental data are missing and accurate theoretical data were previously missing as well. We also calculated the H + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 and D + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 kinetic isotope effects, and we compared our H + C 6 H 6 results to previous theoretical data for H + toluene. We report a very novel nonmonotonic dependence of the kinetic isotope effect on temperature. A particularly striking effect is the prediction of a negative temperature dependence of the total rate constant over 300-500 K wide temperature ranges, depending on the pressure but generally in the range from 600 to 1700 K, which includes the temperature range of ignition in gasoline engines, which is important because aromatics are important components of common fuels.

  8. State-Dependent Changes of Connectivity Patterns and Functional Brain Network Topology in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Barttfeld, Pablo; Wicker, Bruno; Cukier, Sebastian; Navarta, Silvana; Lew, Sergio; Leiguarda, Ramon; Sigman, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    Anatomical and functional brain studies have converged to the hypothesis that autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are associated with atypical connectivity. Using a modified resting-state paradigm to drive subjects' attention, we provide evidence of a very marked interaction between ASD brain functional connectivity and cognitive state. We show that…

  9. Remarkable solvent-dependent excited-state chirality : A molecular modulator of circularly polarized luminescence

    van Delden, Richard A.; Huck, N.P.M.; Piet, J.J.; Warman, J.M.; Meskers, S.C.J.; Dekkers, H.P J M; Feringa, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    The photochemical control of ground- and excited-state chirality of (M)-cis-(1) and (P)-trans(2)-2-nitro-7-(dimethylamino)-9-(2',3'-dihydro-1'H-naphtho[2,1-b]-thiopyran-1'-ylidene)-9H-thioxanthene is described. It is shown that while ground state chirality can be controlled photochemically by

  10. Remarkable solvent-dependent excited-state chirality : a molecular modulator of circularly polarized luminescence

    Delden, van R.A.; Huck, H.P.M.; Piet, J.J.; Warman, J.M.; Meskers, S.C.J.; Dekkers, H.P.J.M.; Feringa, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    The photochemical control of ground- and excited-state chirality of (M)-cis-(1) and (P)-trans-(2)-2-nitro-7-(dimethylamino)-9-(2',3' -dihydro-1'H-naphtho[2,1-b]-thiopyran-1'-ylidene)-9H-thioxanthene is described. It is shown that while ground state chirality can be controlled photochemically by

  11. Effect of the time spent by the photon in the absorbed state on the time-dependent transfer of radiation

    Rao, D.M.; Rangarajan, K.E.; Peraiah, A.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent transfer equation is derived for a two-level atomic model which takes both bound-bound and bound-free transitions into account. A numerical scheme is proposed for solving the monochromatic time-dependent transfer equation when the time spent by the photon in the absorbed state is significant. The method can be easily extended to solve the problem of time-dependent line formation of the bound-free continuum. It is used here to study three types of boundary conditions of the incident radiation incident on a scattering atmosphere. The quantitative results show that the relaxation of the radiation field depends on the optical depth of the medium and on the ray's angle of emergence. 21 refs

  12. Solid-state dependent dissolution and oral bioavailability of piroxicam in rats.

    Lust, Andres; Laidmäe, Ivo; Palo, Mirja; Meos, Andres; Aaltonen, Jaakko; Veski, Peep; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Kogermann, Karin

    2013-01-23

    The aim of this study was to gain understanding about the effects of different solid-state forms of a poorly water-soluble piroxicam on drug dissolution and oral bioavailability in rats. Three different solid-state forms of piroxicam were studied: anhydrate I (AH), monohydrate (MH), and amorphous form in solid dispersion (SD). In addition, the effect of a new polymeric excipient Soluplus® (polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol graft copolymer) on oral bioavailability of piroxicam was investigated. Significant differences in the dissolution and oral bioavailability were found between the solid-state forms of piroxicam. Amorphous piroxicam in SD showed the fastest dissolution in vitro and a solid-state transformation to MH in the dissolution medium. Despite the presence of solid-state transformation, SD exhibited the highest rate and extent of oral absorption in rats. Oral bioavailability of other two solid-state forms decreased in the order AH and MH. The use of Soluplus® was found to enhance the dissolution and oral bioavailability of piroxicam in rats. The present study shows the importance of solid-state form selection for oral bioavailability of a poorly water-soluble drug. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Path dependent magnetic states and evidence of kinetically arrested states in Nd doped LaFe{sub 11.5}Al{sub 1.5}

    Bag, Pallab; Nath, R., E-mail: rnath@iisertvm.ac.in

    2017-03-15

    First order antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic transition and path dependent magnetic states in La{sub 1−x}Nd{sub x}Fe{sub 11.5}Al{sub 1.5} for x∼0.1 are studied at low temperatures via powder x-ray diffraction, magnetization, and specific heat measurements. X-ray diffraction measurements suggest that around 8% of high temperature antiferromagnetic phase is converted to ferromagnetic phase at low temperatures in zero field cooling. A systematic study of temperature and magnetic field dependent magnetization measurements show a non-monotonic variation of upper critical field and re-entrant antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic transition while warming at an applied magnetic field under zero-field-cooled condition. This has been interpreted in the framework of kinetic arrest model for first order magnetic transition. It is also found that the antiferromagnetic phase is in the non-equilibrium state and behaves as a glass-like magnetic state at low temperatures. The specific heat in field-temperature space is studied and found to have a lower electronic contribution for the non-equilibrium antiferromagnetic state, compared to the equilibrium ferromagnetic state in this compound. - Highlights: • Structural and magnetic properties of La{sub 0.9}Nd{sub 0.1}Fe{sub 11.5}Al{sub 1.5} are investigated. • It shows coexistence and path dependent AFM and FM phases at low temperatures. • The AFM and FM phase fractions were estimated from the x-ray diffraction pattern. • Re-entrant transition and a non-monotonic variation of upper critical field. • The glass like AFM state is explained by the kinetic arrest model.

  14. State-Dependent Differences in Emotion Regulation Between Unmedicated Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder

    Rive, M.M.; Mocking, R.J.T.; Koeter, M.W.; Wingen, G. van; Wit, S.J. de; Heuvel, O.A. van den; Veltman, D.J.; Ruhe, H.G.; Schene, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) are difficult to distinguish clinically during the depressed or remitted states. Both mood disorders are characterized by emotion regulation disturbances; however, little is known about emotion regulation differences between MDD

  15. State-Dependent Differences in Emotion Regulation Between Unmedicated Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder

    Rive, Maria M.; Mocking, Roel J. T.; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; van Wingen, Guido; de Wit, Stella J.; van den Heuvel, Odile A.; Veltman, Dick J.; Ruhe, Henricus G.; Schene, Aart H.

    IMPORTANCE Major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) are difficult to distinguish clinically during the depressed or remitted states. Both mood disorders are characterized by emotion regulation disturbances; however, little is known about emotion regulation differences between MDD

  16. State-Dependent Differences in Emotion Regulation Between Unmedicated Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder

    Rive, M.M.; Mocking, R.J.T.; Koeter, M.W.J.; van Wingen, G.; de Wit, S.J.; van den Heuvel, O.A.; Veltman, D.J.; Ruhe, H.G.; Schene, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) are difficult to distinguish clinically during the depressed or remitted states. Both mood disorders are characterized by emotion regulation disturbances; however, little is known about emotion regulation differences between MDD

  17. Prothrombotic state in patients with severe and prednisolone-dependent asthma

    Sneeboer, Marlous M. S.; Majoor, Christof J.; de Kievit, Anne; Meijers, Joost C. M.; van der Poll, Tom; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Bel, Elisabeth H.

    Background: Epidemiologic studies have shown that asthmatic patients, in particular those with severe disease, have increased risk of pulmonary embolism. It is unknown whether these patients have a prothrombotic state under stable conditions. Objective: We sought to compare coagulation and

  18. The temperature dependence of the chiral condensate in the Schwinger model with Matrix Product States

    Saito, H; Jansen, K.; Cichy, K.; Frankfurt Univ.; Poznan Univ.

    2014-12-01

    We present our recent results for the tensor network (TN) approach to lattice gauge theories. TN methods provide an efficient approximation for quantum many-body states. We employ TN for one dimensional systems, Matrix Product States, to investigate the 1-flavour Schwinger model. In this study, we compute the chiral condensate at finite temperature. From the continuum extrapolation, we obtain the chiral condensate in the high temperature region consistent with the analytical calculation by Sachs and Wipf.

  19. Localization of Cold Atoms in State-Dependent Optical Lattices via a Rabi Pulse

    Horstmann, Birger; Duerr, Stephan; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel realization of Anderson localization in nonequilibrium states of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A Rabi pulse transfers part of the population to a different internal state with infinite effective mass. These frozen atoms create a quantum superposition of different disorder potentials, localizing the mobile atoms. For weakly interacting mobile atoms, Anderson localization is obtained. The localization length increases with increasing disorder and decreasing interaction strength, contrary to the expectation for equilibrium localization.

  20. Signature of magnetic-dependent gapless odd frequency states at superconductor / ferromagnet interfaces

    Robinson, Jason [Department of Materials Science, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge, CB30FS (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The theory of superconductivity developed by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer (BCS) explains the stabilisation of electron pairs into a spin-singlet, even frequency, state by the formation of an energy gap below which the density of states (DoS) is zero. At a superconductor interface with an inhomogeneous ferromagnet, a gapless odd frequency superconducting state is predicted in which the Cooper pairs are in a spin-triplet state. Although indirect evidence for such a state has been obtained, the gap structure and pairing symmetry have not so far been determined. In this talk I will present scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of Nb superconducting films proximity coupled to epitaxial Ho. These measurements reveal pronounced changes to the Nb sub-gap superconducting DoS on driving the Ho through a metamagnetic transition from a helical antiferromagnetic to a homogeneous ferromagnetic state for which a BCS-like gap is recovered. The results verify odd frequency spin-triplet superconductivity at superconductor / inhomogeneous magnet interfaces.

  1. A model for studying time dependent quantum mechanical processes and its application for quasi-stationary states

    Revai, Janos.

    1988-10-01

    A model was attempted to construct which, on one hand, is flexible enough to imitate certain physical properties of real systems and, on the other hand, allows exact solution of its time dependent dynamics. This double goal is proposed to achieve by using separable interactions. A particle moving in an external field consisting of a stationary attractive and a time dependent repulsive part is proposed for the model in question. Due to the use of separable interactions, the time evolution dynamics can be solved exactly, and the model can be applied for studying time evolution of quasi-stationary states. (R.P.) 7 figs

  2. A Room to Grow: The Residential Density-dependence of Childbearing in Europe and the United States

    Nathanael Lauster

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available I argue that cultural processes linked to the demographic transition produce new density-dependent fertility dynamics. In particular, childbearing becomes dependent upon residential roominess. This relationship is culturally specific, and I argue that the cultural nature of this relationship means that professional and managerial classes are likely to be particularly influenced by residential roominess, while immigrants are less likely to be influenced. I test hypotheses linking residential roominess to the presence of an “own infant” in the household using census data from the Austria, Greece, Portugal, Spain, and the United States. Roominess predicts fertility in all countries, but to differing degrees.

  3. Asymptotic dependence of Gross–Tulub polaron ground-state energy in the strong coupling region

    N.I. Kashirina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The properties of translationally invariant polaron functional have been investigated in the region of strong and extremely strong coupling. It has been shown that the Gross–Tulub polaron functional obtained earlier using the methods of field theory was derived only for the region , where is the Fröhlich constant of the electron-phonon coupling. Various representations of exact and approximate polaron functionals have been considered. Asymptotic dependences of the polaron energy have been obtained using a functional extending the Gross–Tulub functional to the region of extremely strong coupling. The asymptotic dependence of polaron energies for an extremely strong coupling are (for the one-parameter variational function fk, and (for a two-parameter function . It has been shown that the virial theorem 1:3:4 holds for the two-parameter function . Minimization of the approximate functional obtained by expanding the exact Gross–Tulub functional in a series on leads to a quadratic dependence of the polaron energy. This approximation is justified for . For a two-parameter function , the corresponding dependence has the form . However, the use of approximate functionals, in contrast to the strict variational procedure, when the exact polaron functional varies, does not guarantee obtaining the upper limit for the polaron energy.

  4. Coherent states for the time dependent harmonic oscillator: the step function

    Moya-Cessa, Hector; Fernandez Guasti, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    We study the time evolution for the quantum harmonic oscillator subjected to a sudden change of frequency. It is based on an approximate analytic solution to the time dependent Ermakov equation for a step function. This approach allows for a continuous treatment that differs from former studies that involve the matching of two time independent solutions at the time when the step occurs

  5. The ideal free distribution as an evolutionarily stable state in density-dependent population games

    Cressman, R.; Křivan, Vlastimil

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 8 (2010), s. 1231-1242 ISSN 0030-1299 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100070601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : density-dependent population games Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.393, year: 2010

  6. State and location dependence of action potential metabolic cost in cortical pyramidal neurons

    Hallermann, Stefan; de Kock, Christiaan P. J.; Stuart, Greg J.; Kole, Maarten H. P.

    2012-01-01

    Action potential generation and conduction requires large quantities of energy to restore Na+ and K+ ion gradients. We investigated the subcellular location and voltage dependence of this metabolic cost in rat neocortical pyramidal neurons. Using Na+/K+ charge overlap as a measure of action

  7. State and location dependence of action potential metabolic cost in cortical pyramidal neurons

    Hallermann, S.; de Kock, C.P.J.; Stuart, G.J.; Kole, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Action potential generation and conduction requires large quantities of energy to restore Na + and K + ion gradients. We investigated the subcellular location and voltage dependence of this metabolic cost in rat neocortical pyramidal neurons. Using Na +K + charge overlap as a measure of action

  8. Investigating the structural origin of trpzip2 temperature dependent unfolding fluorescence line shape based on a Markov state model simulation.

    Song, Jian; Gao, Fang; Cui, Raymond Z; Shuang, Feng; Liang, Wanzhen; Huang, Xuhui; Zhuang, Wei

    2012-10-25

    Vibrationally resolved fluorescence spectra of the β-hairpin trpzip2 peptide at two temperatures as well as during a T-jump unfolding process are simulated on the basis of a combination of Markov state models and quantum chemistry schemes. The broad asymmetric spectral line shape feature is reproduced by considering the exciton-phonon couplings. The temperature dependent red shift observed in the experiment has been attributed to the state population changes of specific chromophores. Through further theoretical study, it is found that both the environment's electric field and the chromophores' geometry distortions are responsible for tryptophan fluorescence shift.

  9. States of curiosity modulate hippocampus-dependent learning via the dopaminergic circuit.

    Gruber, Matthias J; Gelman, Bernard D; Ranganath, Charan

    2014-10-22

    People find it easier to learn about topics that interest them, but little is known about the mechanisms by which intrinsic motivational states affect learning. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how curiosity (intrinsic motivation to learn) influences memory. In both immediate and one-day-delayed memory tests, participants showed improved memory for information that they were curious about and for incidental material learned during states of high curiosity. Functional magnetic resonance imaging results revealed that activity in the midbrain and the nucleus accumbens was enhanced during states of high curiosity. Importantly, individual variability in curiosity-driven memory benefits for incidental material was supported by anticipatory activity in the midbrain and hippocampus and by functional connectivity between these regions. These findings suggest a link between the mechanisms supporting extrinsic reward motivation and intrinsic curiosity and highlight the importance of stimulating curiosity to create more effective learning experiences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. States of curiosity modulate hippocampus-dependent learning via the dopaminergic circuit

    Gruber, Matthias J.; Gelman, Bernard D.; Ranganath, Charan

    2014-01-01

    Summary People find it easier to learn about topics that interest them, but little is known about the mechanisms by which intrinsic motivational states affect learning. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how curiosity (intrinsic motivation to learn) influences memory. In both immediate and one-day delayed memory tests, participants showed improved memory for information that they were curious about, and also for incidental material learned during states of high curiosity. FMRI results revealed that activity in the midbrain and the nucleus accumbens was enhanced during states of high curiosity. Importantly, individual variability in curiosity-driven memory benefits for incidental material was supported by anticipatory activity in the midbrain and hippocampus and by functional connectivity between these regions. These findings suggest a link between the mechanisms supporting extrinsic reward motivation and intrinsic curiosity and highlight the importance of stimulating curiosity in order to create more effective learning experiences. PMID:25284006

  11. State-dependent cellular activity patterns of the cat paraventricular hypothalamus measured by reflectance imaging

    Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Rector, D M; Poe, G R

    1996-01-01

    Activity within the cat paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) during sleep and waking states was measured by quantifying intrinsic tissue reflectivity. A fiber optic probe consisting of a 1.0 mm coherent image conduit, surrounded by plastic fibers which conducted 660 nm source light, was attached...... to a charge-coupled device camera, and positioned over the PVH in five cats. Electrodes for assessing state variables, including electroencephalographic activity, eye movement, and somatic muscle tone were also placed. After surgical recovery, reflected light intensity was measured continuously at 2.5 Hz...... changes with behavioral state in a regionally specific manner, and that overall activity increases during quiet sleep, and is even more enhanced in active sleep. PVH activation could be expected to stimulate pituitary release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and affect input to autonomic regulatory...

  12. Initial state dependence of nonlinear kinetic equations: The classical electron gas

    Marchetti, M.C.; Cohen, E.G.D.; Dorfman, J.R.; Kirkpatrick, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    The method of nonequilibrium cluster expansion is used to study the decay to equilibrium of a weakly coupled inhomogeneous electron gas prepared in a local equilibrium state at the initial time, t=0. A nonlinear kinetic equation describing the long time behavior of the one-particle distribution function is obtained. For consistency, initial correlations have to be taken into account. The resulting kinetic equation-differs from that obtained when the initial state of the system is assumed to be factorized in a product of one-particle functions. The question of to what extent correlations in the initial state play an essential role in determining the form of the kinetic equation at long times is discussed. To that end, the present calculations are compared wih results obtained before for hard sphere gases and in general with strong short-range forces. A partial answer is proposed and some open questions are indicated

  13. Dependence of isobar-analog state properties on variable part of Coulomb potential

    Dzhafarov, I.G.; Kuliev, A.A.; Salamov, D.I.

    1986-01-01

    Within the framework of the self-consistent approach and with the method of strength functions the fragmentation of isobar-analog state (IAS) properties for all isobarie 0 + -states is investigated. Microscopic values of IAS energy, matrix elements of allowed and forbidden Fermi transitions as well as isospin impurity values in ground states of parent nuclei are obtained. Numerical calculations carried out for 42 Ca 42 Sc, 48 Ca 48 Sc, 64 Zn 64 Ga, 66 Zn 66 Ga, 90 Zr 90 Nb, 208 Pb 208 Bi isobaric nuclei with Woods-Saxon potential, are compared with predictions of different approches and experiment. The developed model by the authors permits to describe sufficiently well the experimental data

  14. ENERGY-DEPENDENT POWER SPECTRAL STATES AND ORIGIN OF APERIODIC VARIABILITY IN BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    Yu Wenfei; Zhang Wenda

    2013-01-01

    We found that the black hole candidate MAXI J1659–152 showed distinct power spectra, i.e., power-law noise (PLN) versus band-limited noise (BLN) plus quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) below and above about 2 keV, respectively, in observations with Swift and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the 2010 outburst, indicating a high energy cutoff of the PLN and a low energy cutoff of the BLN and QPOs around 2 keV. The emergence of the PLN and the fading of the BLN and QPOs initially took place below 2 keV when the source entered the hard intermediate state and settled in the soft state three weeks later. The evolution was accompanied by the emergence of the disk spectral component and decreases in the amplitudes of variability in the soft and hard X-ray bands. Our results indicate that the PLN is associated with an optically thick disk in both hard and intermediate states, and the power spectral state is independent of the X-ray energy spectral state in a broadband view. We suggest that in the hard or intermediate state, the BLN and QPOs emerge from the innermost hot flow subjected to Comptonization, while the PLN originates from the optically thick disk farther out. The energy cutoffs of the PLN and the BLN or QPOs then follow the temperature of the seed photons from the inner edge of the optically thick disk, while the high frequency cutoff of the PLN follows the orbital frequency of the inner edge of the optically thick disk as well.

  15. Health Care Communication Laws in the United States, 2013: Implications for Access to Sensitive Services for Insured Dependents.

    Kristoff, Iris; Cramer, Ryan; Leichliter, Jami S

    Young adults may not seek sensitive health services when confidentiality cannot be ensured. To better understand the policy environment for insured dependent confidentiality, we systematically assessed legal requirements for health insurance plan communications using WestlawNext to create a jurisdiction-level data set of health insurance plan communication regulations as of March 2013. Two jurisdictions require plan communications be sent to a policyholder, 22 require plan communications to be sent to an insured, and 36 give insurers discretion to send plan communications to the policyholder or insured. Six jurisdictions prohibit disclosure, and 3 allow a patient to request nondisclosure of certain patient information. Our findings suggest that in many states, health insurers are given considerable discretion in determining to whom plan communications containing sensitive health information are sent. Future research could use this framework to analyze the association between state laws concerning insured dependent confidentiality and public health outcomes and related sensitive services.

  16. An M/M/c/K State-Dependent Model for Pedestrian Flow Control and Design of Facilities.

    Khalidur Rahman

    Full Text Available Pedestrian overflow causes queuing delay and in turn, is controlled by the capacity of a facility. Flow control or blocking control takes action to avoid queues from building up to extreme values. Thus, in this paper, the problem of pedestrian flow control in open outdoor walking facilities in equilibrium condition is investigated using M/M/c/K queuing models. State dependent service rate based on speed and density relationship is utilized. The effective rate of the Poisson arrival process to the facility is determined so as there is no overflow of pedestrians. In addition, the use of the state dependent queuing models to the design of the facilities and the effect of pedestrian personal capacity on the design and the traffic congestion are discussed. The study does not validate the sustainability of adaptation of Western design codes for the pedestrian facilities in the countries like Bangladesh.

  17. Stability and Linear Quadratic Differential Games of Discrete-Time Markovian Jump Linear Systems with State-Dependent Noise

    Huiying Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We mainly consider the stability of discrete-time Markovian jump linear systems with state-dependent noise as well as its linear quadratic (LQ differential games. A necessary and sufficient condition involved with the connection between stochastic Tn-stability of Markovian jump linear systems with state-dependent noise and Lyapunov equation is proposed. And using the theory of stochastic Tn-stability, we give the optimal strategies and the optimal cost values for infinite horizon LQ stochastic differential games. It is demonstrated that the solutions of infinite horizon LQ stochastic differential games are concerned with four coupled generalized algebraic Riccati equations (GAREs. Finally, an iterative algorithm is presented to solve the four coupled GAREs and a simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of it.

  18. State-dependent cellular activity patterns of the cat paraventricular hypothalamus measured by reflectance imaging

    Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Rector, D M; Poe, G R

    1996-01-01

    Activity within the cat paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) during sleep and waking states was measured by quantifying intrinsic tissue reflectivity. A fiber optic probe consisting of a 1.0 mm coherent image conduit, surrounded by plastic fibers which conducted 660 nm source light, was attached...... to a charge-coupled device camera, and positioned over the PVH in five cats. Electrodes for assessing state variables, including electroencephalographic activity, eye movement, and somatic muscle tone were also placed. After surgical recovery, reflected light intensity was measured continuously at 2.5 Hz...

  19. Multi-state reliability for coolant pump based on dependent competitive failure model

    Shang Yanlong; Cai Qi; Zhao Xinwen; Chen Ling

    2013-01-01

    By taking into account the effect of degradation due to internal vibration and external shocks. and based on service environment and degradation mechanism of nuclear power plant coolant pump, a multi-state reliability model of coolant pump was proposed for the system that involves competitive failure process between shocks and degradation. Using this model, degradation state probability and system reliability were obtained under the consideration of internal vibration and external shocks for the degraded coolant pump. It provided an effective method to reliability analysis for coolant pump in nuclear power plant based on operating environment. The results can provide a decision making basis for design changing and maintenance optimization. (authors)

  20. Intermittent Chaos in the Bray-Liebhafsky Oscillator. Dependence of Dynamic States on the Iodate Concentration

    Bubanja, I. N.; Ivanović-Šašić, A.; Čupić, Ž.; Anić, S.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.

    2017-12-01

    Chaotic dynamic states with intermittent oscillations were generated in a Bray-Liebhafsky (BL) oscillatory reaction in an isothermal open reactor i.e., in the continuously-fed well-stirred tank reactor (CSTR) when the inflow concentration of potassium iodate was the control parameter. They are found between periodic oscillations obtained when [KIO3]0 4.10 × 10-2 M. It was shown that the most chaotic states obtained experimentally somewhere in the middle of this region are in high correlation with results obtained by means of largest Lyapunov exponents and phenomenological analysis based on the quantitative characteristics of intermittent oscillations.

  1. Frequency dependent polarizabilities for the ground state of H2, HD, and D2

    Rychlewski, J.

    1983-01-01

    A variation-perturbation method has been employed to calculate the dynamic dipole polarizability for the ground state of the hydrogen molecule. The explicit correlated electronic wave functions were used. The averaged values of α(#betta#) and #betta#(#betta#) for several vibration-rotation states of HD and D 2 are presented. Similar values for H 2 have also been calculated and were used to test the efficiency of the method and the validity of the assumption applied in the present calculation. The agreement of the present theoretical results with the existing experimental data is found to be satisfactory

  2. Defect-dependent elasticity: Nanoindentation as a probe of stress state

    Jarausch, K. F.; Kiely, J. D.; Houston, J. E.; Russell, P. E.

    2000-01-01

    Using an interfacial force microscope, the measured elastic response of 100-nm-thick Au films was found to be strongly correlated with the films' stress state and thermal history. Large, reversible variations (2x) of indentation modulus were recorded as a function of applied stress. Low-temperature annealing caused permanent changes in the films' measured elastic properties. The measured elastic response was also found to vary in close proximity to grain boundaries in thin films and near surface steps on single-crystal surfaces. These results demonstrate a complex interdependence of stress state, defect structure, and elastic properties in thin metallic films. (c) 2000 Materials Research Society

  3. Initial state dependence of low-energy electron emission in fast ion atom collisions

    Moshammer, R.; Schmitt, W.; Kollmus, H.; Ullrich, J.; Fainstein, P.D.; Hagmann, S.

    1999-06-01

    Single and multiple ionization of Neon and Argon atoms by 3.6 MeV/u Au 53+ impact has been explored in kinematically complete experiments. Doubly differential cross sections for low-energy electron emission have been obtained for defined charge state of the recoiling target ion and the receding projectile. Observed target specific structures in the electron continuum are attributable to the nodal structure of the initial bound state momentum distribution. The experimental data are in excellent accord with CDW-EIS single ionization calculations if multiple ionization is considered appropriately. (orig.)

  4. Shaping charge excitations in chiral edge states with a time-dependent gate voltage

    Misiorny, Maciej; Fève, Gwendal; Splettstoesser, Janine

    2018-02-01

    We study a coherent conductor supporting a single edge channel in which alternating current pulses are created by local time-dependent gating and sent on a beam-splitter realized by a quantum point contact. The current response to the gate voltage in this setup is intrinsically linear. Based on a fully self-consistent treatment employing a Floquet scattering theory, we analyze the effect of different voltage shapes and frequencies, as well as the role of the gate geometry on the injected signal. In particular, we highlight the impact of frequency-dependent screening on the process of shaping the current signal. The feasibility of creating true single-particle excitations with this method is confirmed by investigating the suppression of excess noise, which is otherwise created by additional electron-hole pair excitations in the current signal.

  5. State and location dependence of action potential metabolic cost in cortical pyramidal neurons.

    Hallermann, Stefan; de Kock, Christiaan P J; Stuart, Greg J; Kole, Maarten H P

    2012-06-03

    Action potential generation and conduction requires large quantities of energy to restore Na(+) and K(+) ion gradients. We investigated the subcellular location and voltage dependence of this metabolic cost in rat neocortical pyramidal neurons. Using Na(+)/K(+) charge overlap as a measure of action potential energy efficiency, we found that action potential initiation in the axon initial segment (AIS) and forward propagation into the axon were energetically inefficient, depending on the resting membrane potential. In contrast, action potential backpropagation into dendrites was efficient. Computer simulations predicted that, although the AIS and nodes of Ranvier had the highest metabolic cost per membrane area, action potential backpropagation into the dendrites and forward propagation into axon collaterals dominated energy consumption in cortical pyramidal neurons. Finally, we found that the high metabolic cost of action potential initiation and propagation down the axon is a trade-off between energy minimization and maximization of the conduction reliability of high-frequency action potentials.

  6. Existence and controllability results for damped second order impulsive functional differential systems with state-dependent delay

    M. Mallika Arjunan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the existence and controllability of mild solutions for a damped second order impulsive functional differential equation with state-dependent delay in Banach spaces. The results are obtained by using Sadovskii's fixed point theorem combined with the theories of a strongly continuous cosine family of bounded linear operators. Finally, an example is provided to illustrate the main results.

  7. Fiber vs Rolling Texture: Stress State Dependence for Cold-Drawn Wire

    Zorina, M. A.; Karabanalov, M. S.; Stepanov, S. I.; Demakov, S. L.; Loginov, Yu. N.; Lobanov, M. L.

    2018-02-01

    The texture of the cold-drawn copper wire was investigated along the radius using electron backscatter diffraction. The complex fiber texture of the central region of the wire was considered as the rolling texture consisting of a set of preferred orientations. The texture of the periphery region was revealed to be similar to the shear texture. The orientation-dependent properties of the wire were proven to be determined by the texture of the near-surface layers.

  8. Composition dependence of density of states in a-Se100−xSnx thin ...

    genide glassy semiconductors [5–15] and the results have been interpreted in terms of space charge limited conduction or Poole–Frenkel conduction. One of the most direct methods for the determination of the density of the localised states g0 in the mobility gap involves the measurements of SCLC, which can be easily ...

  9. Dependence within Families and the Division of Labor: Comparing Sweden and the United States

    Evertsson, Marie; Nermo, Magnus

    2004-01-01

    This article assesses the relative explanatory value of the resource-bargaining perspective and the doing-gender approach for the division of housework in the United States and Sweden from the mid-1970s to 2000. The data used are the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) and the Swedish Level of Living Survey. Overall results show that housework…

  10. Dynamic learning and context-dependence in sequential, attribute-based, stated-preference valuation questions

    Thomas P. Holmes; Kevin J. Boyle

    2005-01-01

    A hybrid stated-preference model is presented that combines the referendum contingent valuation response format with an experimentally designed set of attributes. A sequence of valuation questions is asked to a random sample in a mailout mail-back format. Econometric analysis shows greater discrimination between alternatives in the final choice in the sequence, and the...

  11. State-Dependent Differences in Functional Connectivity in Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Ashura W. Buckley

    2015-12-01

    Interpretation: Functional connectivity is distinctly different in children with autism compared to samples with typical development and developmental delay without autism. Differences in connectivity in autism are state and region related. In this study, children with autism were characterized by a dynamically evolving pattern of altered connectivity.

  12. State-Dependent Alterations in Inhibitory Control and Emotional Face Identification in Seasonal Affective Disorder

    Hjordt, Liv V.; Stenbæk, Dea S.; Madsen, Kathrine Skak

    2017-01-01

    Background: Depressed individuals often exhibit impaired inhibition to negative input and identification of positive stimuli, but it is unclear whether this is a state or trait feature. We here exploited a naturalistic model, namely individuals with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), to study thi...... of life for these patients. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved)...

  13. Voltage-dependent conductance states of a single-molecule junction

    Wang, Y F; Néel, N; Kröger, J

    2012-01-01

    Ag–Sn-phthalocyanine–Ag junctions are shown to exhibit three conductance states. While the junctions are conductive at low bias, their impedance drastically increases above a critical bias. Two-level fluctuations occur at intermediate bias. These characteristics may be used to protect a nanoscale...

  14. CVA identification of nonlinear systems with LPV state-space models of affine dependence

    Larimore, W.E.; Cox, P.B.; Toth, R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses an improvement on the extension of linear subspace methods (originally developed in the Linear Time-Invariant (LTI) context) to the identification of Linear Parameter-Varying (LPV) and state-affine nonlinear system models. This includes the fitting of a special polynomial

  15. Simulation of a Jackson tandem network using state-dependent importance sampling

    Miretskiy, D.I.; Scheinhardt, W.R.W.; Mandjes, M.R.H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers importance sampling as a tool for rare-event simulation. The focus is on estimating the probability of overflow in the downstream queue of a Jackson two-node tandem queue. It is known that in this setting 'traditional' state-independent importance-sampling distributions perform

  16. COGNITIVE FUNCTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION DEPENDING ON THE STATE OF HEMOSTASIS AND RENAL FUNCTION

    Oleh Shmanko

    2015-09-01

      Summary. In 58 patients with arterial hypertension cognitive functions were examined depending on the state of hemostasis and renal function. The evaluation was conducted using short scale assessment of mental status (MMSE, Montreal scale (MOCA for studying attention and concentration, executive functions, memory, language performance, constructive visual performance, abstract thinking, mental calculation, spatial and temporal orientation. The sustainability of attentional focus and speed of sensorimotor reactions were investigated using the tables of Schulte. The quality of life of patients was assessed for physical and mental components employing a questionnaire SF-12. It was found that such indicators of hemostasis system as international normalized ratio, prothrombin index, level of fibrinogen are diagnostic predictors of the risk of cognitive impairment development in patients with arterial hypertension, considering the results of neuropsychological assessment and evaluation of quality of life. No significant dependence was found between the glomerular filtration rate and the development of cognitive impairment in patients with arterial hypertension.   Keywords: arterial hypertension, cognitive impairment, international normalized ratio, prothrombin index, fibrinogen, glomerular filtration rate.       Резюме У 58 пацієнтів з артеріальною гіпертензією досліджено когнітивні функції в залежності від стану згортальної системи крові та функції нирок.  Оцінку когнітивного статусу проводили за допомогою короткої шкали оцінки психічного статусу (MMSE, Монреальської шкали (MOCA для вивчення уваги та концентрації, виконавчих функцій, пам’яті, мови, конструкти

  17. Reconfiguration of Brain Network Architectures between Resting-State and Complexity-Dependent Cognitive Reasoning.

    Hearne, Luke J; Cocchi, Luca; Zalesky, Andrew; Mattingley, Jason B

    2017-08-30

    Our capacity for higher cognitive reasoning has a measurable limit. This limit is thought to arise from the brain's capacity to flexibly reconfigure interactions between spatially distributed networks. Recent work, however, has suggested that reconfigurations of task-related networks are modest when compared with intrinsic "resting-state" network architecture. Here we combined resting-state and task-driven functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine how flexible, task-specific reconfigurations associated with increasing reasoning demands are integrated within a stable intrinsic brain topology. Human participants (21 males and 28 females) underwent an initial resting-state scan, followed by a cognitive reasoning task involving different levels of complexity, followed by a second resting-state scan. The reasoning task required participants to deduce the identity of a missing element in a 4 × 4 matrix, and item difficulty was scaled parametrically as determined by relational complexity theory. Analyses revealed that external task engagement was characterized by a significant change in functional brain modules. Specifically, resting-state and null-task demand conditions were associated with more segregated brain-network topology, whereas increases in reasoning complexity resulted in merging of resting-state modules. Further increments in task complexity did not change the established modular architecture, but affected selective patterns of connectivity between frontoparietal, subcortical, cingulo-opercular, and default-mode networks. Larger increases in network efficiency within the newly established task modules were associated with higher reasoning accuracy. Our results shed light on the network architectures that underlie external task engagement, and highlight selective changes in brain connectivity supporting increases in task complexity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Humans have clear limits in their ability to solve complex reasoning problems. It is thought that

  18. Apparent Dependence of Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Parameters on Loading Velocity and Cumulative Displacement Inferred from Large-Scale Biaxial Friction Experiments

    Urata, Yumi; Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Noda, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Kazuo

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the constitutive parameters in the rate- and state-dependent friction (RSF) law by conducting numerical simulations, using the friction data from large-scale biaxial rock friction experiments for Indian metagabbro. The sliding surface area was 1.5 m long and 0.5 m wide, slid for 400 s under a normal stress of 1.33 MPa at a loading velocity of either 0.1 or 1.0 mm/s. During the experiments, many stick-slips were observed and those features were as follows. (1) The friction drop and recurrence time of the stick-slip events increased with cumulative slip displacement in an experiment before which the gouges on the surface were removed, but they became almost constant throughout an experiment conducted after several experiments without gouge removal. (2) The friction drop was larger and the recurrence time was shorter in the experiments with faster loading velocity. We applied a one-degree-of-freedom spring-slider model with mass to estimate the RSF parameters by fitting the stick-slip intervals and slip-weakening curves measured based on spring force and acceleration of the specimens. We developed an efficient algorithm for the numerical time integration, and we conducted forward modeling for evolution parameters ( b) and the state-evolution distances (L_{{c}}), keeping the direct effect parameter ( a) constant. We then identified the confident range of b and L_{{c}} values. Comparison between the results of the experiments and our simulations suggests that both b and L_{{c}} increase as the cumulative slip displacement increases, and b increases and L_{{c}} decreases as the loading velocity increases. Conventional RSF laws could not explain the large-scale friction data, and more complex state evolution laws are needed.

  19. Concentration state dependence of the rheological and structural properties of reconstituted silk.

    Mo, Chunli; Holland, Chris; Porter, David; Shao, Zhengzhong; Vollrath, Fritz

    2009-10-12

    The ability to control the processing of artificial silk is key to the successful application of this important and high performance biopolymer. Understanding where our current reconstitution process can be improved will not only aid us in the creation of better materials, but will also provide insight into the natural material along the way. This study aims to understand what proportion of reconstituted silk contributes to its rheological properties and what conformational state the silk proteins are in. It shows, for the first time, that a change in rheological properties can be related to a change in silk structures present in solution and reveals a low concentration gel state for silk that may have important implications for future successful artificial processing of silk.

  20. Automobile-dependency as a barrier to vision zero, evidence from the states in the USA.

    Ahangari, Hamed; Atkinson-Palombo, Carol; Garrick, Norman W

    2017-10-01

    With a traffic fatality rate of 10.6 per 100,000 as of 2013-more than triple that in the UK, the Netherlands, and Sweden-the United States has the worst traffic safety performance of all developed countries. Statewide variations are even more pronounced. North Dakota registers more than twice the national average and five times the rate of Massachusetts. We used panel models and annual data from 1997 to 2013 to capture the effect of seven separate sets of factors that influence traffic safety: exposure, travel behavior, socioeconomics, macroeconomics, safety policies, and mitigating factors such as health care. The results of our panel models and supplementary analysis of state effects show that two variables - Vehicle Miles Traveled and Vehicles per Capita-have the strongest impact on traffic fatality rates. This is closely followed by Infant Mortality Rates, the proxy that we used to represent the quality of health care. Policy levers such as Graduated Driver's Licenses (GDL) have improved safety, but to a limited extent. We also found that states with higher urban density and more walking are associated with lower traffic fatality rates. Taken as a whole, our findings suggest that if additional progress is to be made in reducing traffic fatalities, emphasis needs to move beyond simply focusing on policies such as GDL and seat belt laws, which have already been adopted by almost all jurisdictions across the United States. We need to also consider factors that focus on the type of urban form that we are creating to ensure that we are fostering environments that encourage multi-modal transportation such as walking to reduce the VMT and Vehicles per Capita, the two strongest predictors of traffic fatalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of excited state solvent fluctuations on time-dependent fluorescence Stokes shift

    Li, Tanping, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu; Kumar, Revati, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2015-11-07

    We explore the connection between the solvation dynamics of a chromophore upon photon excitation and equilibrium fluctuations of the solvent. Using molecular dynamics simulations, fluorescence Stokes shift for the tryptophan in Staphylococcus nuclease was examined using both nonequilibrium calculations and linear response theory. When the perturbed and unperturbed surfaces exhibit different solvent equilibrium fluctuations, the linear response approach on the former surface shows agreement with the nonequilibrium process. This agreement is excellent when the perturbed surface exhibits Gaussian statistics and qualitative in the case of an isomerization induced non-Gaussian statistics. However, the linear response theory on the unperturbed surface breaks down even in the presence of Gaussian fluctuations. Experiments also provide evidence of the connection between the excited state solvent fluctuations and the total fluorescence shift. These observations indicate that the equilibrium statistics on the excited state surface characterize the relaxation dynamics of the fluorescence Stokes shift. Our studies specifically analyze the Gaussian fluctuations of the solvent in the complex protein environment and further confirm the role of solvent fluctuations on the excited state surface. The results are consistent with previous investigations, found in the literature, of solutes dissolved in liquids.

  2. A multi-state magnetic memory dependent on the permeability of Metglas

    Petrie, J. R.; Wieland, K. A.; Timmerwilke, J. M.; Barron, S. C.; Burke, R. A.; Newburgh, G. A.; Burnette, J. E.; Fischer, G. A.; Edelstein, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    A three-state magnetic memory was developed based on differences in the magnetic permeability of a soft ferromagnetic media, Metglas 2826MB (Fe40Ni38Mo4B18). By heating bits of a 250 nm thick Metglas film with 70-100 mW of laser power, we were able to tune the local microstructure, and hence, the permeability. Ternary memory states were created by using lower laser power to enhance the initial permeability through localized atomic rearrangement and higher power to reduce the permeability through crystallization. The permeability of the bits was read by detecting variations in an external 32 Oe probe field within 10 μm of the media via a magnetic tunnel junction read head. Compared to data based on remanent magnetization, these multi-permeability bits have enhanced insensitivity to unexpected field and temperature changes. We found that data was not corrupted after exposure to fields of 1 T or temperatures of 423 K, indicating the effectiveness of this multi-state approach for safely storing large amounts of data.

  3. A multi-state magnetic memory dependent on the permeability of Metglas

    Petrie, J. R.; Wieland, K. A.; Timmerwilke, J. M.; Burke, R. A.; Newburgh, G. A.; Fischer, G. A.; Edelstein, A. S.; Barron, S. C.; Burnette, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    A three-state magnetic memory was developed based on differences in the magnetic permeability of a soft ferromagnetic media, Metglas 2826MB (Fe 40 Ni 38 Mo 4 B 18 ). By heating bits of a 250 nm thick Metglas film with 70–100 mW of laser power, we were able to tune the local microstructure, and hence, the permeability. Ternary memory states were created by using lower laser power to enhance the initial permeability through localized atomic rearrangement and higher power to reduce the permeability through crystallization. The permeability of the bits was read by detecting variations in an external 32 Oe probe field within 10 μm of the media via a magnetic tunnel junction read head. Compared to data based on remanent magnetization, these multi-permeability bits have enhanced insensitivity to unexpected field and temperature changes. We found that data was not corrupted after exposure to fields of 1 T or temperatures of 423 K, indicating the effectiveness of this multi-state approach for safely storing large amounts of data

  4. Excited states of ReO4-: A comprehensive time-dependent relativistic density functional theory study

    Xu, Wenhua; Ma, Jianyi; Peng, Daoling; Zou, Wenli; Liu, Wenjian; Staemmler, Volker

    2009-02-01

    The perrhenate anion, ReO4-, is taken as a showcase of heavy transition metal complexes, to examine the performance of time-dependent relativistic density functional linear response theory for electronic excitations, which is based on a newly proposed exact two-component Hamiltonian resulting from the symmetrized elimination of the small component. In total 30 scalar and 63 spinor excited states are investigated and the results are grossly in good agreement with those by the singles and doubles coupled-cluster linear response theory. It is found that only a few scalar states of 3T1 and 3T2 symmetries are split significantly by the spin-orbit coupling, whereas only those excited states involving the Rydberg-type virtual orbital are affected by the solvent effects. The nature of the optical absorption spectra is also highlighted.

  5. Excited states of ReO4-: A comprehensive time-dependent relativistic density functional theory study

    Xu Wenhua; Ma Jianyi; Peng Daoling; Zou Wenli; Liu Wenjian; Staemmler, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The perrhenate anion, ReO 4 - , is taken as a showcase of heavy transition metal complexes, to examine the performance of time-dependent relativistic density functional linear response theory for electronic excitations, which is based on a newly proposed exact two-component Hamiltonian resulting from the symmetrized elimination of the small component. In total 30 scalar and 63 spinor excited states are investigated and the results are grossly in good agreement with those by the singles and doubles coupled-cluster linear response theory. It is found that only a few scalar states of 3 T 1 and 3 T 2 symmetries are split significantly by the spin-orbit coupling, whereas only those excited states involving the Rydberg-type virtual orbital are affected by the solvent effects. The nature of the optical absorption spectra is also highlighted

  6. Edge-state-dependent tunneling of dipole-exchange spin waves in submicrometer magnetic strips with an air gap.

    Xing, X J; Zhang, D; Li, S W

    2012-12-14

    We have investigated the tunneling of dipole-exchange spin waves across an air gap in submicrometer-sized permalloy magnetic strips by means of micromagnetic simulations. The magnetizations beside the gap could form three distinct end-domain states with various strengths of dipolar coupling. Spin-wave tunneling through the gap at individual end-domain states is studied. It is found that the tunneling behavior is strongly dependent on these domain states. Nonmonotonic decay of transmission of spin waves with the increase of the gap width is observed. The underlying mechanism for these behaviors is proposed. The tunneling characteristics of the dipole-exchange spin waves differ essentially from those of the magnetostatic ones reported previously.

  7. Communication: Orbital instabilities and triplet states from time-dependent density functional theory and long-range corrected functionals

    Sears, John S.; Koerzdoerfer, Thomas; Zhang, Cai-Rong; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2011-10-01

    Long-range corrected hybrids represent an increasingly popular class of functionals for density functional theory (DFT) that have proven to be very successful for a wide range of chemical applications. In this Communication, we examine the performance of these functionals for time-dependent (TD)DFT descriptions of triplet excited states. Our results reveal that the triplet energies are particularly sensitive to the range-separation parameter; this sensitivity can be traced back to triplet instabilities in the ground state coming from the large effective amounts of Hartree-Fock exchange included in these functionals. As such, the use of standard long-range corrected functionals for the description of triplet states at the TDDFT level is not recommended.

  8. Widespread Dependence of Backup NHEJ on Growth State: Ramifications for the Use of DNA-PK Inhibitors

    Singh, Satyendra K.; Wu Wenqi; Zhang Lihua; Klammer, Holger; Wang Minli; Iliakis, George

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The backup pathway of nonhomologous end joining (B-NHEJ) enables cells to process DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) when the DNA-PK-dependent pathway of NHEJ (D-NHEJ) is compromised. Our previous results show marked reduction in the activity of B-NHEJ when LIG4 -/- mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) cease to grow and enter a plateau phase. The dependence of B-NHEJ on growth state is substantially stronger than that of D-NHEJ and points to regulatory mechanisms or processing determinants that require elucidation. Because the different D-NHEJ mutants show phenotypes distinct in their details, it is necessary to characterize the dependence of their DSB repair capacity on growth state and to explore species-specific responses. Methods and Materials: DSB repair was measured in cells of different genetic background from various species using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, or the formation of γ-H2AX foci, at different stages of growth. Results: Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we report a marked reduction of B-NHEJ during the plateau phase of growth in KU and XRCC4, mouse or Chinese hamster, mutants. Notably, this reduction is only marginal in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells. However, reduced B-NHEJ is also observed in repair proficient, plateau-phase cells after treatment with DNA-PK inhibitors. The reduction of B-NHEJ activity in the plateau phase of growth does not derive from the reduced expression of participating proteins, is detectable by γ-H2AX foci analysis, and leads to enhanced cell killing. Conclusions: These results further document the marked dependence on growth state of an essential DSB repair pathway and show the general nature of the effect. Molecular characterization of the mechanism underlying this response will help to optimize the administration of DNA repair inhibitors as adjuvants in radiation therapy.

  9. Frequency-dependent brain regional homogeneity alterations in patients with mild cognitive impairment during working memory state relative to resting state

    Pengyun eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported working memory deficits in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. However, previous studies investigating the neural mechanisms of MCI have primarily focused on brain activity alterations during working memory tasks. No study to date has compared brain network alterations in the working memory state between MCI patients and normal control subjects. Therefore, using the index of regional homogeneity (ReHo, we explored brain network impairments in MCI patients during a working memory task relative to the resting state, and identified frequency-dependent effects in separate frequency bands.Our results indicate that, in MCI patients, ReHo is altered in the posterior cingulate cortex in the slow-3 band (0.073–0.198 Hz, and in the bottom of the right occipital lobe and part of the right cerebellum, the right thalamus, a diffusing region in the bilateral prefrontal cortex, the left and right parietal-occipital regions, and the right angular gyrus in the slow-5 band (0.01–0.027 Hz. Furthermore, in normal controls, the value of ReHo in clusters belonging to the default mode network decreased, while the value of ReHo in clusters belonging to the attentional network increased during the task state. However, this pattern was reversed in MCI patients, and was associated with decreased working memory performance. In addition, we identified altered functional connectivity of the abovementioned regions with other parts of the brain in MCI patients.This is the first study to compare frequency-dependent alterations of ReHo in MCI patients between resting and working memory states. The results provide a new perspective regarding the neural mechanisms of working memory deficits in MCI patients, and extend our knowledge of altered brain patterns in resting and task-evoked states.

  10. Incident ion charge state dependence of electron emission during slow multicharged ion-surface interactions

    Hughes, I.G.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Havener, C.C.; Overbury, S.H.; Robinson, M.T.; Zehner, D.M.; Meyer, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    Characteristic variations in the total electron yield γ as a function of crystal azimuthal orientation are reported for slow N 2+ , N 5+ and N 6+ ions incident on a Au(011) single crystal, together with measurements of γ as a function of incident ion velocity. Kinetic electron emission is shown to arise predominantly in close collisions between incident ions and target atoms, and potential electron emission is found to be essentially constant within our present velocity range. The incident ion charge state is shown to play no role in kinetic electron emission. Extremely fast neutralization times of the order of 10 - 15 secs are needed to explain the observations

  11. Time-dependent inelastic analysis of metallic media using constitutive relations with state variables

    Kumar, V; Mukherjee, S [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, N.Y. (USA)

    1977-03-01

    A computational technique in terms of stress, strain and displacement rates is presented for the solution of boundary value problems for metallic structural elements at uniform elevated temperatures subjected to time varying loads. This method can accommodate any number of constitutive relations with state variables recently proposed by other researchers to model the inelastic deformation of metallic media at elevated temperatures. Numerical solutions are obtained for several structural elements subjected to steady loads. The constitutive relations used for these numerical solutions are due to Hart. The solutions are discussed in the context of the computational scheme and Hart's theory.

  12. Angular dependences of the luminescence and density of photon states in a chiral liquid crystal

    Umanskii, B A; Blinov, L M; Palto, S P [A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federaion (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-30

    Luminescence spectra of a laser dye-doped chiral liquid crystal have been studied in a wide range of angles (up to 60°) to the axis of its helical structure using a semicylindrical quartz prism, which made it possible to observe the shift and evolution of the photonic band gap in response to changes in angle. Using measured spectra and numerical simulation, we calculated the spectral distributions of the density of photon states in such a cholesteric crystal for polarised and unpolarised light, which characterise its structure as that of a chiral one-dimensional photonic crystal. (optics of liquid crystals)

  13. Triplet excited electronic state switching induced by hydrogen bonding: A transient absorption spectroscopy and time-dependent DFT study

    Ravi Kumar, Venkatraman; Ariese, Freek; Umapathy, Siva, E-mail: umapathy@ipc.iisc.ernet.in [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Department, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2016-03-21

    The solvent plays a decisive role in the photochemistry and photophysics of aromatic ketones. Xanthone (XT) is one such aromatic ketone and its triplet-triplet (T-T) absorption spectra show intriguing solvatochromic behavior. Also, the reactivity of XT towards H-atom abstraction shows an unprecedented decrease in protic solvents relative to aprotic solvents. Therefore, a comprehensive solvatochromic analysis of the triplet-triplet absorption spectra of XT was carried out in conjunction with time dependent density functional theory using the ad hoc explicit solvent model approach. A detailed solvatochromic analysis of the T-T absorption bands of XT suggests that the hydrogen bonding interactions are different in the corresponding triplet excited states. Furthermore, the contributions of non-specific and hydrogen bonding interactions towards differential solvation of the triplet states in protic solvents were found to be of equal magnitude. The frontier molecular orbital and electron density difference analysis of the T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} states of XT indicates that the charge redistribution in these states leads to intermolecular hydrogen bond strengthening and weakening, respectively, relative to the S{sub 0} state. This is further supported by the vertical excitation energy calculations of the XT-methanol supra-molecular complex. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding potential energy curves obtained for this complex in the S{sub 0}, T{sub 1}, and T{sub 2} states support the model. In summary, we propose that the different hydrogen bonding mechanisms exhibited by the two lowest triplet excited states of XT result in a decreasing role of the nπ{sup ∗} triplet state, and are thus responsible for its reduced reactivity towards H-atom abstraction in protic solvents.

  14. Frequency dependence of magnetic shielding performance of HTS plates in mixed states

    Kamitani, Atsushi; Yokono, Takafumi [Yamagata Univ., Yonezawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yokono, Takafumi [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Information Sciences and Electronics

    2000-06-01

    The magnetic shielding performance of the high-Tc superconducting (HTS) plate is investigated numerically. The behavior of the shielding current density in the HTS plate is expressed as the integral-differential equation with a normal component of the current vector potential as a dependent variable. The numerical code for solving the equation has been developed by using the combination of the Newton-Raphson method and the successive substitution method and, by use of the code, damping coefficients and shielding factors are evaluated for the various values of the frequency {omega}. The results of computations show that the HTS plate has a possibility of shielding the high-frequency magnetic field with {omega} > or approx. 1 kHz. (author)

  15. Temperature dependence of velocity of sound in high-Tc superconductors in normal state

    Bishoyi, K.C.; Rout, G.C.; Behera, S.N.

    2002-01-01

    A microscopic theoretical calculation of temperature dependence of velocity of sound in high temperature superconductors is addressed in this paper. The influence of model parameters of the system in its normal phase is investigated through numerical calculations. The results at the room temperature as well as low temperatures (∼ 25 K), are discussed. The dimensionless parameters involved in the calculations are the electron-phonon coupling (g), staggered magnetic field (h), hybridization (V), position of the f-level (d), temperature (t) and the conduction band width (ω). The model Hamiltonian contains the antiferromagnetism in conduction electrons of cooper and the electron-phonon interaction through the hybridization between conduction electrons and f-electrons of impurity atoms. The phonon Green's functions are calculated by Zubarev's technique. The velocity of sound is calculated in the long wavelength and finite temperature limit. (author)

  16. Frequency dependence of magnetic shielding performance of HTS plates in mixed states

    Kamitani, Atsushi; Yokono, Takafumi; Yokono, Takafumi

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic shielding performance of the high-Tc superconducting (HTS) plate is investigated numerically. The behavior of the shielding current density in the HTS plate is expressed as the integral-differential equation with a normal component of the current vector potential as a dependent variable. The numerical code for solving the equation has been developed by using the combination of the Newton-Raphson method and the successive substitution method and, by use of the code, damping coefficients and shielding factors are evaluated for the various values of the frequency ω. The results of computations show that the HTS plate has a possibility of shielding the high-frequency magnetic field with ω > or approx. 1 kHz. (author)

  17. Anomalous temperature dependent magneto-conductance in organic light-emitting diodes with multiple emissive states

    Zhao, Chen-xiao; Jia, Wei-yao; Huang, Ke-Xun; Zhang, Qiao-ming; Yang, Xiao-hui; Xiong, Zu-hong

    2015-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the magneto-conductance (MC) in organic electron donor-acceptor hybrid and layer heterojunction diodes was studied. The MC value increased with temperature in layer heterojunction and in 10 wt. % hybrid devices. An anomalous decrease of the MC with temperature was observed in 25 wt. %-50 wt. % hybrid devices. Further increasing donor concentration to 75 wt. %, the MC again increased with temperature. The endothermic exciplex-exciton energy transfer and the change in electroplex/exciton ratio caused by change in charge transport with temperature may account for these phenomena. Comparative studies of the temperature evolutions of the IV curves and the electroluminescence and photoluminescence spectra back our hypothesis.

  18. Anomalous temperature dependent magneto-conductance in organic light-emitting diodes with multiple emissive states

    Zhao, Chen-xiao; Jia, Wei-yao; Huang, Ke-Xun; Zhang, Qiao-ming; Yang, Xiao-hui; Xiong, Zu-hong

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the magneto-conductance (MC) in organic electron donor-acceptor hybrid and layer heterojunction diodes was studied. The MC value increased with temperature in layer heterojunction and in 10 wt. % hybrid devices. An anomalous decrease of the MC with temperature was observed in 25 wt. %–50 wt. % hybrid devices. Further increasing donor concentration to 75 wt. %, the MC again increased with temperature. The endothermic exciplex-exciton energy transfer and the change in electroplex/exciton ratio caused by change in charge transport with temperature may account for these phenomena. Comparative studies of the temperature evolutions of the IV curves and the electroluminescence and photoluminescence spectra back our hypothesis

  19. Anomalous temperature dependent magneto-conductance in organic light-emitting diodes with multiple emissive states

    Zhao, Chen-xiao; Jia, Wei-yao; Huang, Ke-Xun; Zhang, Qiao-ming; Yang, Xiao-hui; Xiong, Zu-hong, E-mail: zhxiong@swu.edu.cn [School of Physical Science and Technology, MOE Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2015-07-13

    The temperature dependence of the magneto-conductance (MC) in organic electron donor-acceptor hybrid and layer heterojunction diodes was studied. The MC value increased with temperature in layer heterojunction and in 10 wt. % hybrid devices. An anomalous decrease of the MC with temperature was observed in 25 wt. %–50 wt. % hybrid devices. Further increasing donor concentration to 75 wt. %, the MC again increased with temperature. The endothermic exciplex-exciton energy transfer and the change in electroplex/exciton ratio caused by change in charge transport with temperature may account for these phenomena. Comparative studies of the temperature evolutions of the IV curves and the electroluminescence and photoluminescence spectra back our hypothesis.

  20. Dependence on incident angle of solid state detector response to gamma-rays

    Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Yamaguchi, Satarou; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Ueki, Kohtaro

    2002-01-01

    The shape and size of a NaI(Tl) scintillator that should maximize response variation with γ-ray incident angle was estimated by analytical model calculation. It proved that, even for gamma rays of energy exceeding 1 MeV, a slab detector measuring 50 cm x 50 cm x 5 cm thick should present a ratio of at least 4 between maximum and minimum responses against incidence at different angles. For a sample case of 60 keV gamma rays, estimation of the incident angle dependence by means of Monte Carlo simulation agreed well with experiment using a CZT detector. The counts from photo-electric peak varied with incident angle roughly along a sine curve. The foregoing finding served as basis for proposing a practical direction finder for γ-ray source operating on the principle of determining the source direction from variations in count with incident angle. (author)

  1. Magnetic state dependent transient lateral photovoltaic effect in patterned ferromagnetic metal-oxide-semiconductor films

    Isidoro Martinez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the influence of an external magnetic field on the magnitude and dephasing of the transient lateral photovoltaic effect (T-LPE in lithographically patterned Co lines of widths of a few microns grown over naturally passivated p-type Si(100. The T-LPE peak-to-peak magnitude and dephasing, measured by lock-in or through the characteristic time of laser OFF exponential relaxation, exhibit a notable influence of the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic overlayer. We show experimentally and by numerical simulations that the T-LPE magnitude is determined by the Co anisotropic magnetoresistance. On the other hand, the magnetic field dependence of the dephasing could be described by the influence of the Lorentz force acting perpendiculary to both the Co magnetization and the photocarrier drift directions. Our findings could stimulate the development of fast position sensitive detectors with magnetically tuned magnitude and phase responses.

  2. Bias to negative emotions: a depression state-dependent marker in adolescent major depressive disorder.

    Maalouf, Fadi T; Clark, Luke; Tavitian, Lucy; Sahakian, Barbara J; Brent, David; Phillips, Mary L

    2012-06-30

    The aim of the current research was to examine for the first time the extent to which bias to negative emotions in an inhibitory control paradigm is a state or trait marker in major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescents. We administered the affective go/no go task which measures the ability to switch attention to or away from positive or negative emotional stimuli to 40 adolescents with MDD (20 in acute episode (MDDa) and 20 in remission (MDDr)) and 17 healthy controls (HC). MDDa were significantly faster on the shift to negative target blocks as compared to shift to positive target blocks while HC and MDDr displayed the opposite pattern as measured by an "emotional bias index" (EBI=latency (shift to negative targets)-latency (shift to positive targets)). There was also a trend for an effect of group on commission errors, suggesting more impulsive responding by MDDa than both MDDr and HC independently of stimulus valence throughout the task. Negative bias was not associated with depression severity or medication status. In conclusion, bias to negative emotional stimuli appears to be present in the acute stage of MDD and absent in remission suggesting that it is a depression state-specific marker of MDD in adolescents. Latency emerges as a better proxy of negative bias than commission errors and accuracy on this inhibitory control task in adolescents with MDD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Multimodal emotional state recognition using sequence-dependent deep hierarchical features.

    Barros, Pablo; Jirak, Doreen; Weber, Cornelius; Wermter, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Emotional state recognition has become an important topic for human-robot interaction in the past years. By determining emotion expressions, robots can identify important variables of human behavior and use these to communicate in a more human-like fashion and thereby extend the interaction possibilities. Human emotions are multimodal and spontaneous, which makes them hard to be recognized by robots. Each modality has its own restrictions and constraints which, together with the non-structured behavior of spontaneous expressions, create several difficulties for the approaches present in the literature, which are based on several explicit feature extraction techniques and manual modality fusion. Our model uses a hierarchical feature representation to deal with spontaneous emotions, and learns how to integrate multiple modalities for non-verbal emotion recognition, making it suitable to be used in an HRI scenario. Our experiments show that a significant improvement of recognition accuracy is achieved when we use hierarchical features and multimodal information, and our model improves the accuracy of state-of-the-art approaches from 82.5% reported in the literature to 91.3% for a benchmark dataset on spontaneous emotion expressions. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. The Self-perception of Text-message Dependency Scale (STDS): Psychometric update based on a United States sample.

    Liese, Bruce S; Benau, Erik M; Atchley, Paul; Reed, Derek; Becirevic, Amel; Kaplan, Brent

    2018-05-14

    Some have suggested that text messaging is an addictive behavior. However, this characterization is uncertain, partly due to lack of well-validated measures of text messaging attitudes and behaviors. One standard instrument for measuring text messaging attitudes and behaviors is the Self-perception of Text-message Dependency Scale (STDS), though the psychometric properties of this scale have only been examined with a sample of Japanese youth. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the STDS in the United States to determine its utility as a measure of text messaging dependence. We were interested in examining the factor structure and determining the extent to which this scale would correlate with two important outcome measures: motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) and moving violations. We analyzed data from 468 adults (age 18-74; 274 women) recruited via Amazon's Mechanical Turk (mTurk) service. Participants completed the STDS and provided information about their driving-related incidents in the past year. First we performed a confirmatory factor analysis, which supported the instrument's original factor structure. Then we tested the relationship between scores on the STDS and two important variables, MVAs and moving violations. We found that the STDS significantly correlated with both MVAs and moving violations. The present study confirms that the STDS is a potentially useful instrument for studying texting dependence in the United States and with adults of all ages. The instrument may be particularly useful in predicting motor vehicle outcomes.

  5. SYNTH-C, Steady-State and Time-Dependent 3-D Neutron Diffusion with Thermohydraulic Feedback

    Brega, E [ENEL-CRTN, Bastioni di Porta Volta 10, Milan (Italy); Salina, E [A.R.S. Spa, Viale Maino 35, Milan (Italy)

    1980-04-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: SYNTH-C-STEADY and SYNTH-C- TRANS solve respectively the steady-state and time-dependent few- group neutron diffusion equations in three dimensions x,y,z in the presence of fuel temperature and thermal-hydraulic feedback. The neutron diffusion and delayed precursor equations are approximated by a space-time (z,t) synthesis method with axially discontinuous trial functions. Three thermal-hydraulic and fuel heat transfer models are available viz. COBRA-3C/MIT model, lumped parameter (WIGL) model and adiabatic fuel heat-up model. 2 - Method of solution: The steady-state and time-dependent synthesis equations are solved respectively by the Wielandt's power method and by the theta-difference method (in time), both coupled with a block factorization technique and double precision arithmetic. The thermal-hydraulic model equations are solved by fully implicit finite differences (WIGL) or explicit-implicit difference techniques with iterations (COBRA-EC/MIT). 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Except for the few- group limitation, the programs have no other fixed limitation so the ability to run a problem depends only on the available computer storage.

  6. Humidity-dependent phase state of SOA particles from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors

    E. Saukko

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The physical phase state (solid, semi-solid, or liquid of secondary organic aerosol (SOA particles has important implications for a number of atmospheric processes. We report the phase state of SOA particles spanning a wide range of oxygen to carbon ratios (O / C, used here as a surrogate for SOA oxidation level, produced in a flow tube reactor by photo-oxidation of various atmospherically relevant surrogate anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs. The phase state of laboratory-generated SOA was determined by the particle bounce behavior after inertial impaction on a polished steel substrate. The measured bounce fraction was evaluated as a function of relative humidity and SOA oxidation level (O / C measured by an Aerodyne high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF AMS.

    The main findings of the study are: (1 biogenic and anthropogenic SOA particles are found to be amorphous solid or semi-solid based on the measured bounced fraction (BF, which was typically higher than 0.6 on a 0 to 1 scale. A decrease in the BF is observed for most systems after the SOA is exposed to relative humidity of at least 80% RH, corresponding to a RH at impaction of 55%. (2 Long-chain alkanes have a low BF (indicating a "liquid-like", less viscous phase particles at low oxidation levels (BF < 0.2 ± 0.05 for O / C = 0.1. However, BF increases substantially upon increasing oxidation. (3 Increasing the concentration of sulphuric acid (H2SO4 in solid SOA particles (here tested for longifolene SOA causes a decrease in BF levels. (4 In the majority of cases the bounce behavior of the various SOA systems did not show correlation with the particle O / C. Rather, the molar mass of the gas-phase VOC precursor showed a positive correlation with the resistance to the RH-induced phase change of the formed SOA particles.

  7. Delayed self-regulation and time-dependent chemical drive leads to novel states in epigenetic landscapes

    Mitra, Mithun K.; Taylor, Paul R.; Hutchison, Chris J.; McLeish, T. C. B.; Chakrabarti, Buddhapriya

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic pathway of a cell as it differentiates from a stem cell state to a mature lineage-committed one has been historically understood in terms of Waddington's landscape, consisting of hills and valleys. The smooth top and valley-strewn bottom of the hill represent their undifferentiated and differentiated states, respectively. Although mathematical ideas rooted in nonlinear dynamics and bifurcation theory have been used to quantify this picture, the importance of time delays arising from multistep chemical reactions or cellular shape transformations have been ignored so far. We argue that this feature is crucial in understanding cell differentiation and explore the role of time delay in a model of a single-gene regulatory circuit. We show that the interplay of time-dependent drive and delay introduces a new regime where the system shows sustained oscillations between the two admissible steady states. We interpret these results in the light of recent perplexing experiments on inducing the pluripotent state in mouse somatic cells. We also comment on how such an oscillatory state can provide a framework for understanding more general feedback circuits in cell development. PMID:25165605

  8. Internal State Dependent Odor Processing and Perception—The Role of Neuromodulation in the Fly Olfactory System

    Sercan Sayin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Animals rely heavily on their sense of olfaction to perform various vital interactions with an ever-in-flux environment. The turbulent and combinatorial nature of air-borne odorant cues demands the employment of various coding strategies, which allow the animal to attune to its internal needs and past or present experiences. Furthermore, these internal needs can be dependent on internal states such as hunger, reproductive state and sickness. Neuromodulation is a key component providing flexibility under such conditions. Understanding the contributions of neuromodulation, such as sensory neuron sensitization and choice bias requires manipulation of neuronal activity on a local and global scale. With Drosophila's genetic toolset, these manipulations are feasible and even allow a detailed look on the functional role of classical neuromodulators such as dopamine, octopamine and neuropeptides. The past years unraveled various mechanisms adapting chemosensory processing and perception to internal states such as hunger and reproductive state. However, future research should also investigate the mechanisms underlying other internal states including the modulatory influence of endogenous microbiota on Drosophila behavior. Furthermore, sickness induced by pathogenic infection could lead to novel insights as to the neuromodulators of circuits that integrate such a negative postingestive signal within the circuits governing olfactory behavior and learning. The enriched emporium of tools Drosophila provides will help to build a concrete picture of the influence of neuromodulation on olfaction and metabolism, adaptive behavior and our overall understanding of how a brain works.

  9. Revealing kinetics and state-dependent binding properties of IKur-targeting drugs that maximize atrial fibrillation selectivity

    Ellinwood, Nicholas; Dobrev, Dobromir; Morotti, Stefano; Grandi, Eleonora

    2017-09-01

    The KV1.5 potassium channel, which underlies the ultra-rapid delayed-rectifier current (IKur) and is predominantly expressed in atria vs. ventricles, has emerged as a promising target to treat atrial fibrillation (AF). However, while numerous KV1.5-selective compounds have been screened, characterized, and tested in various animal models of AF, evidence of antiarrhythmic efficacy in humans is still lacking. Moreover, current guidelines for pre-clinical assessment of candidate drugs heavily rely on steady-state concentration-response curves or IC50 values, which can overlook adverse cardiotoxic effects. We sought to investigate the effects of kinetics and state-dependent binding of IKur-targeting drugs on atrial electrophysiology in silico and reveal the ideal properties of IKur blockers that maximize anti-AF efficacy and minimize pro-arrhythmic risk. To this aim, we developed a new Markov model of IKur that describes KV1.5 gating based on experimental voltage-clamp data in atrial myocytes from patient right-atrial samples in normal sinus rhythm. We extended the IKur formulation to account for state-specificity and kinetics of KV1.5-drug interactions and incorporated it into our human atrial cell model. We simulated 1- and 3-Hz pacing protocols in drug-free conditions and with a [drug] equal to the IC50 value. The effects of binding and unbinding kinetics were determined by examining permutations of the forward (kon) and reverse (koff) binding rates to the closed, open, and inactivated states of the KV1.5 channel. We identified a subset of ideal drugs exhibiting anti-AF electrophysiological parameter changes at fast pacing rates (effective refractory period prolongation), while having little effect on normal sinus rhythm (limited action potential prolongation). Our results highlight that accurately accounting for channel interactions with drugs, including kinetics and state-dependent binding, is critical for developing safer and more effective pharmacological anti

  10. Are the Intraday Effects of Central Bank Intervention on Exchange Rate Spreads Asymmetric and State Dependent?

    Fatum, Rasmus; Pedersen, Jesper; Sørensen, Peter Norman

    This paper investigates the intraday effects of unannounced foreign exchange intervention on bid-ask exchange rate spreads using official intraday intervention data provided by the Danish central bank. Our starting point is a simple theoretical model of the bid-ask spread which we use to formulate...... exert a significant influence on the exchange rate spread, but in opposite directions: intervention purchases of the smaller currency, on average, reduce the spread while intervention sales, on average, increase the spread. We also show that intervention only affects the exchange rate spread when...... the state of the market is not abnormally volatile. Our results are consistent with the notion that illiquidity arises when traders fear speculative pressure against the smaller currency and confirms the asymmetry hypothesis of our theoretical model....

  11. State-dependent changes in auditory sensory gating in different cortical areas in rats.

    Renli Qi

    Full Text Available Sensory gating is a process in which the brain's response to a repetitive stimulus is attenuated; it is thought to contribute to information processing by enabling organisms to filter extraneous sensory inputs from the environment. To date, sensory gating has typically been used to determine whether brain function is impaired, such as in individuals with schizophrenia or addiction. In healthy subjects, sensory gating is sensitive to a subject's behavioral state, such as acute stress and attention. The cortical response to sensory stimulation significantly decreases during sleep; however, information processing continues throughout sleep, and an auditory evoked potential (AEP can be elicited by sound. It is not known whether sensory gating changes during sleep. Sleep is a non-uniform process in the whole brain with regional differences in neural activities. Thus, another question arises concerning whether sensory gating changes are uniform in different brain areas from waking to sleep. To address these questions, we used the sound stimuli of a Conditioning-testing paradigm to examine sensory gating during waking, rapid eye movement (REM sleep and Non-REM (NREM sleep in different cortical areas in rats. We demonstrated the following: 1. Auditory sensory gating was affected by vigilant states in the frontal and parietal areas but not in the occipital areas. 2. Auditory sensory gating decreased in NREM sleep but not REM sleep from waking in the frontal and parietal areas. 3. The decreased sensory gating in the frontal and parietal areas during NREM sleep was the result of a significant increase in the test sound amplitude.

  12. Implications of the dependence of neuronal activity on neural network states for the design of brain-machine interfaces

    Stefano ePanzeri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs can improve the quality of life of patients with sensory and motor disabilities by both decoding motor intentions expressed by neural activity, and by encoding artificially sensed information into patterns of neural activity elicited by causal interventions on the neural tissue. Yet, current BMIs can exchange relatively small amounts of information with the brain. This problem has proved difficult to overcome by simply increasing the number of recording or stimulating electrodes, because trial-to-trial variability of neural activity partly arises from intrinsic factors (collectively known as the network state that include ongoing spontaneous activity and neuromodulation, and so is shared among neurons. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the state dependence of neural responses, and in particular of how neural responses depend on endogenous slow fluctuations of network excitability. We then elaborate on how this knowledge may be used to increase the amount of information that BMIs exchange with brains. Knowledge of network state can be used to fine-tune the stimulation pattern that should reliably elicit a target neural response used to encode information in the brain, and to discount part of the trial-by-trial variability of neural responses, so that they can be decoded more accurately.

  13. Context-dependent fluctuation of serotonin in the auditory midbrain: the influence of sex, reproductive state and experience

    Hanson, Jessica L.; Hurley, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    In the face of changing behavioral situations, plasticity of sensory systems can be a valuable mechanism to facilitate appropriate behavioral responses. In the auditory system, the neurotransmitter serotonin is an important messenger for context-dependent regulation because it is sensitive to both external events and internal state, and it modulates neural activity. In male mice, serotonin increases in the auditory midbrain region, the inferior colliculus (IC), in response to changes in behavioral context such as restriction stress and social contact. Female mice have not been measured in similar contexts, although the serotonergic system is sexually dimorphic in many ways. In the present study, we investigated the effects of sex, experience and estrous state on the fluctuation of serotonin in the IC across contexts, as well as potential relationships between behavior and serotonin. Contrary to our expectation, there were no sex differences in increases of serotonin in response to a restriction stimulus. Both sexes had larger increases in second exposures, suggesting experience plays a role in serotonergic release in the IC. In females, serotonin increased during both restriction and interactions with males; however, the increase was more rapid during restriction. There was no effect of female estrous phase on the serotonergic change for either context, but serotonin was related to behavioral activity in females interacting with males. These results show that changes in behavioral context induce increases in serotonin in the IC by a mechanism that appears to be uninfluenced by sex or estrous state, but may depend on experience and behavioral activity. PMID:24198252

  14. Sensitive plant (Mimosa pudica hiding time depends on individual and state

    Sarah Reed-Guy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The decisions animals make to adjust their antipredator behavior to rapidly changing conditions have been well studied. Inducible defenses in plants are an antipredator behavior that acts on a longer time scale, but sensitive plants, Mimosa pudica, have a much more rapid antipredator response; they temporarily close their leaves when touched. The time they remain closed is defined as hiding time. We studied hiding time in sensitive plants and found that individual plants differed significantly in their hiding times. We then showed that the effect of individual explained substantial variation in hiding time on a short time scale. Finally, on a longer time scale, individuality persisted but the amount of variation attributed to individual decreased. We hypothesized that variation in plant condition might explain this change. We therefore manipulated sunlight availability and quantified hiding time. When deprived of light for 6 h, sensitive plants significantly shortened their hiding times. But when only half a plant was deprived of light, hiding times on the deprived half and light exposed half were not significantly different. This suggests that overall condition best explains variation in sensitive plant antipredator behavior. Just like in animals, sensitive plant antipredator behavior is condition dependent, and, just like in animals, a substantial amount of the remaining variation is explained by individual differences between plants. Thus, models designed to predict plasticity in animal behavior may be successfully applied to understand behavior in other organisms, including plants.

  15. Voxel Scale Complex Networks of Functional Connectivity in the Rat Brain: Neurochemical State Dependence of Global and Local Topological Properties

    Adam J. Schwarz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Network analysis of functional imaging data reveals emergent features of the brain as a function of its topological properties. However, the brain is not a homogeneous network, and the dependence of functional connectivity parameters on neuroanatomical substrate and parcellation scale is a key issue. Moreover, the extent to which these topological properties depend on underlying neurochemical changes remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated both global statistical properties and the local, voxel-scale distribution of connectivity parameters of the rat brain. Different neurotransmitter systems were stimulated by pharmacological challenge (d-amphetamine, fluoxetine, and nicotine to discriminate between stimulus-specific functional connectivity and more general features of the rat brain architecture. Although global connectivity parameters were similar, mapping of local connectivity parameters at high spatial resolution revealed strong neuroanatomical dependence of functional connectivity in the rat brain, with clear differentiation between the neocortex and older brain regions. Localized foci of high functional connectivity independent of drug challenge were found in the sensorimotor cortices, consistent with the high neuronal connectivity in these regions. Conversely, the topological properties and node roles in subcortical regions varied with neurochemical state and were dependent on the specific dynamics of the different functional processes elicited.

  16. Influence of linear-energy-dependent density of states on two-band superconductors: Three-square-well model approach

    Ogbuu, O.A.; Abah, O.C.; Asomba, G.C.; Okoye, C.M.I.

    2011-01-01

    We derived the transition temperature and the isotope exponent of two-band superconductor. We employed Bogoliubov-Valatin formalism assuming a three-square-well potential. The effect of linear-energy-dependent electronic DOS in superconductors is considered. The relevance of the studies to MgB 2 is analyzed. We have derived the expressions for the transition temperature and the isotope effect exponent within the framework of Bogoliubov-Valatin two-band formalism using a linear-energy-dependent electronic density of states assuming a three-square-well potentials model. Our results show that the approach could be used to account for a wide range of values of the transition temperature and isotope effect exponent. The relevance of the present calculations to MgB 2 is analyzed.

  17. Use of a theoretical equation of state to interpret time-dependent free volume in polymer glasses

    Curro, J.G.; Lagasse, R.R.; Simha, R.

    1981-01-01

    Many physical properties of polymer glasses change spontaneously during isothermal aging by a process commonly modeled as collapse of free volume. The model has not been verified rigorously because free volume cannot be unambiguously measured. In the present investigation we tentatively identify the free-volume fraction with the fraction of empty sites in the equation of state of Simha and Somcynsky. With this theory, volume recovery measurements can be analyzed to yield directly the time-dependent, free-volume fraction. Using this approach, recent volume measurements on poly(methyl methacrylate) are analyzed. The resulting free-volume fractions are then used in the Doolittle equation to predict the shift in stress relaxation curves at 23 0 C. These predicted shift factors agree with the experimental measurements of Cizmecioglu et al. In addition, it is shown that previous assumptions concerning temperature dependence of free volume are inconsistent with the theory

  18. Induction of latent memory for conditioned food aversion and its transformation into "active" state depend on translation and transcription processes.

    Solntseva, S V; Nikitin, V P

    2014-05-01

    Mechanisms of induction and retrieval of latent (hidden) memory for conditioned food aversion were investigated in snails. After initial training (single combination of a food stimulus with electric shock), aversive reactions to presentation of the conditioned food stimulus were not revealed. Repeated presentation of the stimuli in 12 days after the first combination was followed by the appearance of aversive food reactions that persisted for at least 14 days. Injections of inhibitors of protein (cycloheximide) or RNA (α-amanitin) synthesis immediately after the first or second combined presentation of the stimuli disturbed skill performance. We hypothesized that single combination of food and reinforcing stimuli led to translation- and transcription-dependent induction of latent conditioned food aversion memory. Transformation of this memory into an active state after repeated presentation of the stimulus combination also depends on the synthesis of new proteins and RNA.

  19. State-Dependent Cross-Brain Information Flow in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Bilek, Edda; Stößel, Gabriela; Schäfer, Axel; Clement, Laura; Ruf, Matthias; Robnik, Lydia; Neukel, Corinne; Tost, Heike; Kirsch, Peter; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Although borderline personality disorder (BPD)-one of the most common, burdensome, and costly psychiatric conditions-is characterized by repeated interpersonal conflict and instable relationships, the neurobiological mechanism of social interactive deficits remains poorly understood. To apply recent advancements in the investigation of 2-person human social interaction to investigate interaction difficulties among people with BPD. Cross-brain information flow in BPD was examined from May 25, 2012, to December 4, 2015, in pairs of participants studied in 2 linked functional magnetic resonance imaging scanners in a university setting. Participants performed a joint attention task. Each pair included a healthy control individual (HC) and either a patient currently fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for BPD (cBPD) (n = 23), a patient in remission for 2 years or more (rBPD) (n = 17), or a second HC (n = 20). Groups were matched for age and educational level. A measure of cross-brain neural coupling was computed following previously published work to indicate synchronized flow between right temporoparietal junction networks (previously shown to host neural coupling abilities in health). This measure is derived from an independent component analysis contrasting the time courses of components between pairs of truly interacting participants compared with bootstrapped control pairs. In the sample including 23 women with cBPD (mean [SD] age, 26.8 [5.7] years), 17 women with rBPD (mean [SD] age, 28.5 [4.3] years), and 80 HCs (mean [SD] age, 24.0 [3.4] years]) investigated as dyads, neural coupling was found to be associated with disorder state (η2 = 0.17; P = .007): while HC-HC pairs showed synchronized neural responses, cBPD-HC pairs exhibited significantly lower neural coupling just above permutation-based data levels (η2 = 0.16; P = .009). No difference was found between neural coupling in rBPD-HC and HC-HC pairs. The neural coupling in patients was

  20. Electrophysiological characterization of activation state-dependent Ca(v)2 channel antagonist TROX-1 in spinal nerve injured rats.

    Patel, R; Rutten, K; Valdor, M; Schiene, K; Wigge, S; Schunk, S; Damann, N; Christoph, T; Dickenson, A H

    2015-06-25

    Prialt, a synthetic version of Ca(v)2.2 antagonist ω-conotoxin MVIIA derived from Conus magus, is the first clinically approved voltage-gated calcium channel blocker for refractory chronic pain. However, due to the narrow therapeutic window and considerable side effects associated with systemic dosing, Prialt is only administered intrathecally. N-triazole oxindole (TROX-1) is a novel use-dependent and activation state-selective small-molecule inhibitor of Ca(v)2.1, 2.2 and 2.3 calcium channels designed to overcome the limitations of Prialt. We have examined the neurophysiological and behavioral effects of blocking calcium channels with TROX-1. In vitro, TROX-1, in contrast to state-independent antagonist Prialt, preferentially inhibits Ca(v)2.2 currents in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons under depolarized conditions. In vivo electrophysiology was performed to record from deep dorsal horn lamina V/VI wide dynamic range neurons in non-sentient spinal nerve-ligated (SNL) and sham-operated rats. In SNL rats, spinal neurons exhibited reduced responses to innocuous and noxious punctate mechanical stimulation of the receptive field following subcutaneous administration of TROX-1, an effect that was absent in sham-operated animals. No effect was observed on neuronal responses evoked by dynamic brushing, heat or cold stimulation in SNL or sham rats. The wind-up response of spinal neurons following repeated electrical stimulation of the receptive field was also unaffected. Spinally applied TROX-1 dose dependently inhibited mechanically evoked neuronal responses in SNL but not sham-operated rats, consistent with behavioral observations. This study confirms the pathological state-dependent actions of TROX-1 through a likely spinal mechanism and reveals a modality selective change in calcium channel function following nerve injury. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Fear extinction can be made state-dependent on peripheral epinephrine: role of norepinephrine in the nucleus tractus solitarius.

    Rosa, Jessica; Myskiw, Jociane C; Furini, Cristiane R G; Sapiras, Gerson G; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    We investigate whether the extinction of inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning can be subjected to endogenous state-dependence with systemic injections of epinephrine (E), and whether endogenous norepinephrine (NE) and the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS)→locus coeruleus→hippocampus/amygdala (HIPP/BLA) pathway participate in this. Rats trained in IA were submitted to two sessions of extinction 24 h apart: In the first, the animals were submitted to a training session of extinction, and in the second they were tested for the retention of extinction. Saline or E were given i.p. immediately after the extinction training (post-extinction training injections) and/or 6 min before the extinction test (pre-extinction test). Post-extinction training E (50 or 100 μg/kg) induced a poor retrieval of extinction in the test session of this task unless an additional E injection (50 μg/kg) was given prior to the extinction test. This suggested state-dependence. Muscimol (0.01 μg/side) microinfused into the NTS prior to the extinction test session blocked E-induced state-dependence. Norepinephrine (NE, 1 μg/side) infused bilaterally into NTS restores the extinction impairment caused by post-extinction training i.p. E. In animals with bilateral NTS blockade induced by muscimol, NE (1 μg/side) given prior to the extinction test into the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus or into the basolateral amygdala restored the normal extinction levels that had been impaired by muscimol. These results suggest a role for the NTS→locus coeruleus→HIPP/BLA pathway in the retrieval of extinction, as it has been shown to have in the consolidation of inhibitory avoidance and of object recognition learning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimating the sensitivity of a regional atmospheric model to a sea state dependent roughness using ensemble calculations

    Weisse, R.; Heyen, H.; Storch, H. von [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrophysik

    1999-07-01

    The sensitivity of an atmospheric high resolution limited area model to a sea state dependent roughness is examined. Two sets of Monte Carlo experiments are compared with each other, one set with a sea state dependent roughness, the other with a roughness parameterized by the standard Charnock relation. From the climatic point of view, i.e., on time scales of months and longer, the differences of mean and standard deviation between the two sets are small and exceed, for instance in winter, where the differences are largest, rarely 0.4 hPa. From the forecasters' point of view, i.e., locally and on a daily time scale, differences of several hPa may occur, but generally differences are smaller than 1 hPa, too. It is concluded that on longer time scales the Charnock relation is a reasonable parameterization in global and regional atmospheric climate models. It is illustrated, too, that the comparison of single realizations, a common practice in regional sensitivity studies, can be misleading. Large differences were found between individual realizations, suggesting a considerable impact of the sea state dependent roughness on the atmosphere. However, it is shown that these differences are to a large fraction caused by internal variability of the atmospheric model itself. (orig.) [German] Die Sensitivitaet eines atmosphaerischen Regionalmodells bezueglich einer seegangsabhaengigen Rauhigkeit wird mittels Ensemblerechnungen untersucht. Dazu werden eine Reihe von Monte-Carlo-Experimenten mit und ohne seegangsabhaengige Rauhigkeit verglichen. Im letzten Fall wird die Charnock-Relation zur Bestimmung der Rauhigkeit verwendet. Auf Zeitskalen von Monaten und laenger sind die Unterschiede zwischen den Experimenten mit und denen ohne seegangsabhaengige Rauhigkeit gering. Auf der lokalen und der taeglichen Skala koennen jedoch Unterschiede von einigen hPa im Bodenluftdruckfeld auftreten. Es wird gezeigt, dass diese Unterschiede jedoch weniger eine Reaktion des

  3. Basal metabolic state governs AIF-dependent growth support in pancreatic cancer cells

    Scott, Andrew J.; Wilkinson, Amanda S.; Wilkinson, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), named for its involvement in cell death pathways, is a mitochondrial protein that regulates metabolic homeostasis. In addition to supporting the survival of healthy cells, AIF also plays a contributory role to the development of cancer through its enzymatic activity, and we have previously shown that AIF preferentially supports advanced-stage prostate cancer cells. Here we further evaluated the role of AIF in tumorigenesis by exploring its function in pancreatic cancer, a disease setting that most often presents at an advanced stage by the time of diagnosis. A bioinformatics approach was first employed to investigate AIF mRNA transcript levels in pancreatic tumor specimens vs. normal tissues. AIF-deficient pancreatic cancer cell lines were then established via lentiviral infection. Immunoblot analysis was used to determine relative protein quantities within cells. Cell viability was measured by flow cytometry; in vitro and Matrigel™ growth/survival using Coulter™ counting and phase contrast microscopy; and glucose consumption in the absence and presence of Matrigel™ using spectrophotometric methods. Archival gene expression data revealed a modest elevation of AIF transcript levels in subsets of pancreatic tumor specimens, suggesting a possible role in disease progression. AIF expression was then suppressed in a panel of five pancreatic cancer cell lines that display diverse metabolic phenotypes. AIF ablation selectively crippled the growth of cells in vitro in a manner that directly correlated with the loss of mitochondrial respiratory chain subunits and altered glucose metabolism, and these effects were exacerbated in the presence of Matrigel™ substrate. This suggests a critical metabolic role for AIF to pancreatic tumorigenesis, while the spectrum of sensitivities to AIF ablation depends on basal cellular metabolic phenotypes. Altogether these data indicate that AIF supports the growth and survival of metabolically defined

  4. Solid state magnetic field sensors for micro unattended ground networks using spin dependent tunneling

    Tondra, Mark; Nordman, Catherine A.; Lange, Erik H.; Reed, Daniel; Jander, Albrect; Akou, Seraphin; Daughton, James

    2001-09-01

    Micro Unattended Ground Sensor Networks will likely employ magnetic sensors, primarily for discrimination of objects as opposed to initial detection. These magnetic sensors, then, must fit within very small cost, size, and power budgets to be compatible with the envisioned sensor suites. Also, a high degree of sensitivity is required to minimize the number of sensor cells required to survey a given area in the field. Solid state magnetoresistive sensors, with their low cost, small size, and ease of integration, are excellent candidates for these applications assuming that their power and sensitivity performance are acceptable. SDT devices have been fabricated into prototype magnetic field sensors suitable for use in micro unattended ground sensor networks. They are housed in tiny SOIC 8-pin packages and mounted on a circuit board with required voltage regulation, signal amplification and conditioning, and sensor control and communications functions. The best sensitivity results to date are 289 pT/rt. Hz at 1 Hz, and and 7 pT/rt. Hz at f > 10 kHz. Expected near term improvements in performance would bring these levels to approximately 10 pT/rt Hz at 1 Hz and approximately 1 pT/rt. Hz at > 1 kHz.

  5. From localized to extended states in a time-dependent quantum model

    Jose, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of a particle inside a rigid box with one of the walls oscillating periodically in time is studied quantum mechanically. In the classical limit, this model was introduced by Fermi in the context of cosmic ray physics. The classical solutions can go from being quasiperiodic to chaotic, as a function of the amplitude of the wall oscillation. In the quantum case, the authors calculate the spectral properties of the corresponding evolution operator, i.e.: the quasi-energy eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The specific form of the wall oscillation, e.g. iota(t) = √ 1 + 2δabsolute value of t, with absolute value of t ≤ 1/2, and iota(t + 1) = iota(t), is essential to the solutions presented here. It is found that as h increases with δ fixed, the nearest neighbor separation between quasi-energy eigenvalues changes from showing no energy level repulsion to energy level repulsion. This transition, from Poisson-like statistics to Gaussian-Orthogonal-Ensemble-like statistics is tested by looking at the distribution of quasi-energy level nearest neighbor separations and the Δ/sub e/(L) statistics. these results are also correlated to a transition between localized to extended states in energy space. The possible relevance of the results presented here to experiments in quasi-one-dimensional atoms is also discussed

  6. Coherence-enhanced phase-dependent dissipation in long SNS Josephson junctions: Revealing Andreev bound state dynamics

    Dassonneville, B.; Murani, A.; Ferrier, M.; Guéron, S.; Bouchiat, H.

    2018-05-01

    One of the best known causes of dissipation in ac-driven quantum systems stems from photon absorption causing transitions between levels. Dissipation can also be caused by the retarded response to the time-dependent excitation, and in general gives insight into the system's relaxation times and mechanisms. Here we address the dissipation in a mesoscopic normal wire with superconducting contacts, that sustains a dissipationless supercurrent at zero frequency and that may therefore naively be expected to remain dissipationless at a frequency lower than the superconducting gap. We probe the high-frequency linear response of such a normal metal/superconductor (NS) ring to a time-dependent flux by coupling it to a highly sensitive multimode microwave resonator. Far from being the simple, dissipationless derivative of the supercurrent-versus-phase relation, the ring's ac susceptibility also displays a dissipative component whose phase dependence is a signature of the dynamical processes occurring within the Andreev spectrum. We show how dissipation is driven by the competition between two mechanisms. The first is the relaxation of the Andreev level distribution function, while the second corresponds to microwave-induced transitions within the spectrum. Depending on the relative strength of those contributions, dissipation can be maximal at π , a phase at which the proximity-induced minigap closes, or can be maximal near π /2 , a phase at which the dc supercurrent is maximal. We also find that the dissipative response paradoxically increases at low temperature and can even exceed the normal-state conductance. The results are successfully confronted with theoretical predictions of the Kubo linear response and time-dependent Usadel equations, derived from the Bogoliubov-de Gennes Hamiltonian describing the SNS junction. These experiments thus demonstrate the power of the ac susceptibility measurement of individual hybrid mesoscopic systems in probing in a controlled way

  7. New SU(1,1) position-dependent effective mass coherent states for a generalized shifted harmonic oscillator

    Yahiaoui, Sid-Ahmed; Bentaiba, Mustapha

    2014-01-01

    A new SU(1,1) position-dependent effective mass coherent states (PDEM CS) related to the shifted harmonic oscillator (SHO) are deduced. This is accomplished by applying a similarity transformation to the generally deformed oscillator algebra (GDOA) generators for PDEM systems and a new set of operators that close the su(1,1) Lie algebra are constructed, being the PDEM CS of the basis for its unitary irreducible representation. From the Lie algebra generators, we evaluate the uncertainty relationship for a position and momentum-like operators in the PDEM CS and show that it is minimized in the sense of Barut–Girardello CS. We prove that the deduced PDEM CS preserve the same analytical form than those of Glauber states. As an illustration of our procedure, we depicted the 2D-probability density in the PDEM CS for SHO with the explicit form of the mass distribution with no singularities. (paper)

  8. Steady-state and time-dependent modelling of parallel transport in the scrape-off layer

    Havlickova, E.; Fundamenski, W.; Naulin, Volker

    2011-01-01

    The one-dimensional fluid code SOLF1D has been used for modelling of plasma transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) along magnetic field lines, both in steady state and under transient conditions that arise due to plasma turbulence. The presented work summarizes results of SOLF1D with attention...... given to transient parallel transport which reveals two distinct time scales due to the transport mechanisms of convection and diffusion. Time-dependent modelling combined with the effect of ballooning shows propagation of particles along the magnetic field line with Mach number up to M ≈ 1...... temperature calculated in SOLF1D is compared with the approximative model used in the turbulence code ESEL both for steady-state and turbulent SOL. Dynamics of the parallel transport are investigated for a simple transient event simulating the propagation of particles and energy to the targets from a blob...

  9. Electronic Excitations in Solution: The Interplay between State Specific Approaches and a Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Description.

    Guido, Ciro A; Jacquemin, Denis; Adamo, Carlo; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2015-12-08

    We critically analyze the performances of continuum solvation models when coupled to time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to predict solvent effects on both absorption and emission energies of chromophores in solution. Different polarization schemes of the polarizable continuum model (PCM), such as linear response (LR) and three different state specific (SS) approaches, are considered and compared. We show the necessity of introducing a SS model in cases where large electron density rearrangements are involved in the excitations, such as charge-transfer transitions in both twisted and quadrupolar compounds, and underline the very delicate interplay between the selected polarization method and the chosen exchange-correlation functional. This interplay originates in the different descriptions of the transition and ground/excited state multipolar moments by the different functionals. As a result, the choice of both the DFT functional and the solvent polarization scheme has to be consistent with the nature of the studied electronic excitation.

  10. Time-dependent theory of Raman scattering for systems with several excited electronic states: Application to a H+3 model system

    Heather, R.; Metiu, H.

    1989-01-01

    The time-dependent formulation of Raman scattering theory is used to study how nonadiabatic interactions affect the Raman spectrum of a model H + 3 system, which has two excited electronic states. We start with a formula derived by Heller which gives the Raman scattering cross section as the Fourier transform (over time) of a time-dependent overlap integral. The latter is calculated with a method proposed by Fleck, Morris, and Feit, and extended to curve crossing by Alvarellos and Metiu. In performing these calculations we are especially interested in displaying effects typical of systems having more than one upper state. If the incident laser populates two electronic states there are several ways (i.e., excite to state one and emit from state two, excite to state one, and emit from state one, etc.) by which the Raman process can reach a given final state, and this leads to quantum interference. This interference is manifested in the Raman cross section as approximate selection rules controlling which final states can be reached through the Raman process. These selection rules depend on the relative orientation of the transition dipoles that radiatively couple the ground electronic state with the excited electronic states. The magnitude of the nonadiabatic contribution to the Raman emission, e.g., the contribution from absorbing to state one and emitting from state two, can be determined from the polarization dependence of the Raman emission if the transition dipoles have neither parallel nor antiparallel relative orientation

  11. Solvent-dependent excited-state hydrogen transfer and intersystem crossing in 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)-benzothiazole

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2015-02-12

    The excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl) benzothiazole (HBT) has been investigated in a series of nonpolar, polar aprotic, and polar protic solvents. A variety of state-of-the-art experimental methods were employed, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. We show that the dynamics and mechanism of ESIHT of the singlet excited HBT are strongly solvent-dependent. In nonpolar solvents, the data demonstrate that HBT molecules adopt a closed form stabilized by O-H⋯N chelated hydrogen bonds with no twisting angle, and the photoinduced H transfer occurs within 120 fs, leading to the formation of a keto tautomer. In polar solvents, owing to dipole-dipole cross talk and hydrogen bonding interactions, the H transfer process is followed by ultrafast nonradiative deactivation channels, including ultrafast internal conversion (IC) and intersystem crossing (ISC). This is likely to be driven by the twisting motion around the C-C bond between the hydroxyphenyl and thiazole moieties, facilitating the IC back to the enol ground state or to the keto triplet state. In addition, our femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence experiments indicate, for the first time, that the lifetime of the enol form in ACN is approximately 280 fs. This observation indicates that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the H bond and deactivating the excited state of the HBT. Interestingly, the broadband transient absorption and fluorescence up-conversion data clearly demonstrate that the intermolecular proton transfer from the excited HBT to the DMSO solvent is about 190 fs, forming the HBT anion excited state.

  12. Solvent-dependent excited-state hydrogen transfer and intersystem crossing in 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)-benzothiazole

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede; Usman, Anwar; Alzayer, Maytham; Hamdi, Ghada A.; Alarousu, Erkki; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2015-01-01

    The excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl) benzothiazole (HBT) has been investigated in a series of nonpolar, polar aprotic, and polar protic solvents. A variety of state-of-the-art experimental methods were employed, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. We show that the dynamics and mechanism of ESIHT of the singlet excited HBT are strongly solvent-dependent. In nonpolar solvents, the data demonstrate that HBT molecules adopt a closed form stabilized by O-H⋯N chelated hydrogen bonds with no twisting angle, and the photoinduced H transfer occurs within 120 fs, leading to the formation of a keto tautomer. In polar solvents, owing to dipole-dipole cross talk and hydrogen bonding interactions, the H transfer process is followed by ultrafast nonradiative deactivation channels, including ultrafast internal conversion (IC) and intersystem crossing (ISC). This is likely to be driven by the twisting motion around the C-C bond between the hydroxyphenyl and thiazole moieties, facilitating the IC back to the enol ground state or to the keto triplet state. In addition, our femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence experiments indicate, for the first time, that the lifetime of the enol form in ACN is approximately 280 fs. This observation indicates that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the H bond and deactivating the excited state of the HBT. Interestingly, the broadband transient absorption and fluorescence up-conversion data clearly demonstrate that the intermolecular proton transfer from the excited HBT to the DMSO solvent is about 190 fs, forming the HBT anion excited state.

  13. A Discrete Event Simulation Model for Evaluating the Performances of an M/G/C/C State Dependent Queuing System

    Khalid, Ruzelan; M. Nawawi, Mohd Kamal; Kawsar, Luthful A.; Ghani, Noraida A.; Kamil, Anton A.; Mustafa, Adli

    2013-01-01

    M/G/C/C state dependent queuing networks consider service rates as a function of the number of residing entities (e.g., pedestrians, vehicles, and products). However, modeling such dynamic rates is not supported in modern Discrete Simulation System (DES) software. We designed an approach to cater this limitation and used it to construct the M/G/C/C state-dependent queuing model in Arena software. Using the model, we have evaluated and analyzed the impacts of various arrival rates to the throughput, the blocking probability, the expected service time and the expected number of entities in a complex network topology. Results indicated that there is a range of arrival rates for each network where the simulation results fluctuate drastically across replications and this causes the simulation results and analytical results exhibit discrepancies. Detail results that show how tally the simulation results and the analytical results in both abstract and graphical forms and some scientific justifications for these have been documented and discussed. PMID:23560037

  14. Method and basis set dependence of anharmonic ground state nuclear wave functions and zero-point energies: Application to SSSH

    Kolmann, Stephen J.; Jordan, Meredith J. T.

    2010-02-01

    One of the largest remaining errors in thermochemical calculations is the determination of the zero-point energy (ZPE). The fully coupled, anharmonic ZPE and ground state nuclear wave function of the SSSH radical are calculated using quantum diffusion Monte Carlo on interpolated potential energy surfaces (PESs) constructed using a variety of method and basis set combinations. The ZPE of SSSH, which is approximately 29 kJ mol-1 at the CCSD(T)/6-31G∗ level of theory, has a 4 kJ mol-1 dependence on the treatment of electron correlation. The anharmonic ZPEs are consistently 0.3 kJ mol-1 lower in energy than the harmonic ZPEs calculated at the Hartree-Fock and MP2 levels of theory, and 0.7 kJ mol-1 lower in energy at the CCSD(T)/6-31G∗ level of theory. Ideally, for sub-kJ mol-1 thermochemical accuracy, ZPEs should be calculated using correlated methods with as big a basis set as practicable. The ground state nuclear wave function of SSSH also has significant method and basis set dependence. The analysis of the nuclear wave function indicates that SSSH is localized to a single symmetry equivalent global minimum, despite having sufficient ZPE to be delocalized over both minima. As part of this work, modifications to the interpolated PES construction scheme of Collins and co-workers are presented.

  15. Method and basis set dependence of anharmonic ground state nuclear wave functions and zero-point energies: application to SSSH.

    Kolmann, Stephen J; Jordan, Meredith J T

    2010-02-07

    One of the largest remaining errors in thermochemical calculations is the determination of the zero-point energy (ZPE). The fully coupled, anharmonic ZPE and ground state nuclear wave function of the SSSH radical are calculated using quantum diffusion Monte Carlo on interpolated potential energy surfaces (PESs) constructed using a variety of method and basis set combinations. The ZPE of SSSH, which is approximately 29 kJ mol(-1) at the CCSD(T)/6-31G* level of theory, has a 4 kJ mol(-1) dependence on the treatment of electron correlation. The anharmonic ZPEs are consistently 0.3 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy than the harmonic ZPEs calculated at the Hartree-Fock and MP2 levels of theory, and 0.7 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy at the CCSD(T)/6-31G* level of theory. Ideally, for sub-kJ mol(-1) thermochemical accuracy, ZPEs should be calculated using correlated methods with as big a basis set as practicable. The ground state nuclear wave function of SSSH also has significant method and basis set dependence. The analysis of the nuclear wave function indicates that SSSH is localized to a single symmetry equivalent global minimum, despite having sufficient ZPE to be delocalized over both minima. As part of this work, modifications to the interpolated PES construction scheme of Collins and co-workers are presented.

  16. Electron nature of chemically active state of spiropyran with nitro group. Dependence of efficiency of radiation colouring of spiropyrans on their structure

    Kholmanskij, A.S.; Zubkov, A.V.; Dyumaev, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    Using the theory of solvatochromy it is shown that chemically active state of spiropyran with nitro group is its highly polar electron-excitated state. On the basis of the image on the electron nature of chemically active state of spiropyran the dependence of the values of radiation yield of the coloured forms of spiropyrans upon their structure is explained

  17. Power density and temperature dependent multi-excited states in InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    Bouzaïene, L.; Sfaxi, L.; Baira, M.; Maaref, H.; Bru-Chevallier, C.

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled InAs/GaAs (001) quantum dots (QDs) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy using ultra low-growth rate. A typical dot diameter of around 28 ± 2 nm and a typical height of 5 ± 1 nm are observed based on atomic force microscopy image. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra, their power and temperature dependences have been studied for ground (GS) and three excited states (1–3ES) in InAs QDs. By changing the excitation power density, we can significantly influence the distribution of excitons within the QD ensemble. The PL peak energy positions of GS and ES emissions bands depend on an excitation light power. With increasing excitation power, the GS emission energy was red-shifted, while the 1–3ES emission energies were blue-shifted. It is found that the full width at half maximum of the PL spectra has unusual relationship with increasing temperature from 9 to 300 K. The temperature dependence of QD PL spectra shown the existence of two stages of PL thermal quenching and two distinct activation energies corresponding to the temperature ranges I (9–100 K) and II (100–300 K).

  18. Coupling brain-machine interfaces with cortical stimulation for brain-state dependent stimulation: enhancing motor cortex excitability for neurorehabilitation

    Alireza eGharabaghi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Motor recovery after stroke is an unsolved challenge despite intensive rehabilitation training programs. Brain stimulation techniques have been explored in addition to traditional rehabilitation training to increase the excitability of the stimulated motor cortex. This modulation of cortical excitability augments the response to afferent input during motor exercises, thereby enhancing skilled motor learning by long-term potentiation-like plasticity. Recent approaches examined brain stimulation applied concurrently with voluntary movements to induce more specific use-dependent neural plasticity during motor training for neurorehabilitation. Unfortunately, such approaches are not applicable for the many severely affected stroke patients lacking residual hand function. These patients require novel activity-dependent stimulation paradigms based on intrinsic brain activity. Here, we report on such brain state-dependent stimulation (BSDS combined with haptic feedback provided by a robotic hand orthosis. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex and haptic feedback to the hand were controlled by sensorimotor desynchronization during motor-imagery and applied within a brain-machine interface environment in one healthy subject and one patient with severe hand paresis in the chronic phase after stroke. BSDS significantly increased the excitability of the stimulated motor cortex in both healthy and post-stroke conditions, an effect not observed in non-BSDS protocols. This feasibility study suggests that closing the loop between intrinsic brain state, cortical stimulation and haptic feedback provides a novel neurorehabilitation strategy for stroke patients lacking residual hand function, a proposal that warrants further investigation in a larger cohort of stroke patients.

  19. Frequency-Dependent Modulation of Regional Synchrony in the Human Brain by Eyes Open and Eyes Closed Resting-States.

    Song, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Shuqin; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Yijun; Zhu, Huaiqiu; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The eyes-open (EO) and eyes-closed (EC) states have differential effects on BOLD-fMRI signal dynamics, affecting both the BOLD oscillation frequency of a single voxel and the regional homogeneity (ReHo) of several neighboring voxels. To explore how the two resting-states modulate the local synchrony through different frequency bands, we decomposed the time series of each voxel into several components that fell into distinct frequency bands. The ReHo in each of the bands was calculated and compared between the EO and EC conditions. The cross-voxel correlations between the mean frequency and the overall ReHo of each voxel's original BOLD series in different brain areas were also calculated and compared between the two states. Compared with the EC state, ReHo decreased with EO in a wide frequency band of 0.01-0.25 Hz in the bilateral thalamus, sensorimotor network, and superior temporal gyrus, while ReHo increased significantly in the band of 0-0.01 Hz in the primary visual cortex, and in a higher frequency band of 0.02-0.1 Hz in the higher order visual areas. The cross-voxel correlations between the frequency and overall ReHo were negative in all the brain areas but varied from region to region. These correlations were stronger with EO in the visual network and the default mode network. Our results suggested that different frequency bands of ReHo showed different sensitivity to the modulation of EO-EC states. The better spatial consistency between the frequency and overall ReHo maps indicated that the brain might adopt a stricter frequency-dependent configuration with EO than with EC.

  20. Susceptibility of β1 Na+-K+ pump subunit to glutathionylation and oxidative inhibition depends on conformational state of pump.

    Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Mahmmoud, Yasser A; Hamilton, Elisha J; Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Fry, Natasha A S; Figtree, Gemma A; Cornelius, Flemming; Clarke, Ronald J; Rasmussen, Helge H

    2012-04-06

    Glutathionylation of cysteine 46 of the β1 subunit of the Na(+)-K(+) pump causes pump inhibition. However, the crystal structure, known in a state analogous to an E2·2K(+)·P(i) configuration, indicates that the side chain of cysteine 46 is exposed to the lipid bulk phase of the membrane and not expected to be accessible to the cytosolic glutathione. We have examined whether glutathionylation depends on the conformational changes in the Na(+)-K(+) pump cycle as described by the Albers-Post scheme. We measured β1 subunit glutathionylation and function of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in membrane fragments and in ventricular myocytes. Signals for glutathionylation in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-enriched membrane fragments suspended in solutions that preferentially induce E1ATP and E1Na(3) conformations were much larger than signals in solutions that induce the E2 conformation. Ouabain further reduced glutathionylation in E2 and eliminated an increase seen with exposure to the oxidant peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). Inhibition of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity after exposure to ONOO(-) was greater when the enzyme had been in the E1Na(3) than the E2 conformation. We exposed myocytes to different extracellular K(+) concentrations to vary the membrane potential and hence voltage-dependent conformational poise. K(+) concentrations expected to shift the poise toward E2 species reduced glutathionylation, and ouabain eliminated a ONOO(-)-induced increase. Angiotensin II-induced NADPH oxidase-dependent Na(+)-K(+) pump inhibition was eliminated by conditions expected to shift the poise toward the E2 species. We conclude that susceptibility of the β1 subunit to glutathionylation depends on the conformational poise of the Na(+)-K(+) pump.

  1. Susceptibility of β1 Na+-K+ Pump Subunit to Glutathionylation and Oxidative Inhibition Depends on Conformational State of Pump*

    Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Mahmmoud, Yasser A.; Hamilton, Elisha J.; Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Fry, Natasha A. S.; Figtree, Gemma A.; Cornelius, Flemming; Clarke, Ronald J.; Rasmussen, Helge H.

    2012-01-01

    Glutathionylation of cysteine 46 of the β1 subunit of the Na+-K+ pump causes pump inhibition. However, the crystal structure, known in a state analogous to an E2·2K+·Pi configuration, indicates that the side chain of cysteine 46 is exposed to the lipid bulk phase of the membrane and not expected to be accessible to the cytosolic glutathione. We have examined whether glutathionylation depends on the conformational changes in the Na+-K+ pump cycle as described by the Albers-Post scheme. We measured β1 subunit glutathionylation and function of Na+-K+-ATPase in membrane fragments and in ventricular myocytes. Signals for glutathionylation in Na+-K+-ATPase-enriched membrane fragments suspended in solutions that preferentially induce E1ATP and E1Na3 conformations were much larger than signals in solutions that induce the E2 conformation. Ouabain further reduced glutathionylation in E2 and eliminated an increase seen with exposure to the oxidant peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Inhibition of Na+-K+-ATPase activity after exposure to ONOO− was greater when the enzyme had been in the E1Na3 than the E2 conformation. We exposed myocytes to different extracellular K+ concentrations to vary the membrane potential and hence voltage-dependent conformational poise. K+ concentrations expected to shift the poise toward E2 species reduced glutathionylation, and ouabain eliminated a ONOO−-induced increase. Angiotensin II-induced NADPH oxidase-dependent Na+-K+ pump inhibition was eliminated by conditions expected to shift the poise toward the E2 species. We conclude that susceptibility of the β1 subunit to glutathionylation depends on the conformational poise of the Na+-K+ pump. PMID:22354969

  2. Induction of a Torpor-Like State by 5’-AMP Does Not Depend on H2S Production

    Dugbartey, George J.; Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Boerema, Ate S.; Henning, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia is used to reduce ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) during organ transplantation and major surgery, but does not fully prevent organ injury. Interestingly, hibernating animals undergo repetitive periods of low body temperature called ‘torpor’ without signs of organ injury. Recently, we identified an essential role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in entrance into torpor and preservation of kidney integrity during hibernation. A torpor-like state can be induced pharmacologically by injecting 5’-Adenosine monophosphate (5’-AMP). The mechanism by which 5’-AMP leads to the induction of a torpor-like state, and the role of H2S herein, remains to be unraveled. Therefore, we investigated whether induction of a torpor-like state by 5-AMP depends on H2S production. Methods To study the role of H2S on the induction of torpor, amino-oxyacetic acid (AOAA), a non-specific inhibitor of H2S, was administered before injection with 5'-AMP to block endogenous H2S production in Syrian hamster. To assess the role of H2S on maintenance of torpor induced by 5’-AMP, additional animals were injected with AOAA during torpor. Key Results During the torpor-like state induced by 5’-AMP, the expression of H2S- synthesizing enzymes in the kidneys and plasma levels of H2S were increased. Blockade of these enzymes inhibited the rise in the plasma level of H2S, but neither precluded torpor nor induced arousal. Remarkably, blockade of endogenous H2S production was associated with increased renal injury. Conclusions Induction of a torpor-like state by 5’-AMP does not depend on H2S, although production of H2S seems to attenuate renal injury. Unraveling the mechanisms by which 5’-AMP reduces the metabolism without organ injury may allow optimization of current strategies to limit (hypothermic) IRI and improve outcome following organ transplantation, major cardiac and brain surgery. PMID:26295351

  3. State-dependent interaction in the antihistamine-induced disruption of a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Lee, J.

    1982-01-01

    Two experiments were run to evaluate the possibility that injection of antihistamine can produce a state-dependent acquisition of a radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion. In the first experiment, pretreating rats with the antihistamine chlorpheniramine maleate prior to their initial exposure to sucrose and to low-level irradiation on the conditioning day did not prevent the acquisition of a taste aversion to sucrose when the antihistamine was also administered prior to a subsequent preference test. In the second experiment, rats were both conditioned and tested for a radiation-induced aversion in a drug-free state. Under these condtions, the rats continued to show an aversion to sucrose despite pretreating them with chlorpheniramine prior to irradiation. Since rats conditioned under the antihistamine do not show the radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion when tested for sucrose preference in a nondrug state, it would seem that pretreating rats with an antihistamine prior to conditioning affects only the retrieval of the previously learned response and not its acquisition

  4. An investigation of the flow dependence of temperature gradients near large vessels during steady state and transient tissue heating

    Kolios, M.C.; Worthington, A.E.; Hunt, J.W.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Sherar, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    Temperature distributions measured during thermal therapy are a major prognostic factor of the efficacy and success of the procedure. Thermal models are used to predict the temperature elevation of tissues during heating. Theoretical work has shown that blood flow through large blood vessels plays an important role in determining temperature profiles of heated tissues. In this paper, an experimental investigation of the effects of large vessels on the temperature distribution of heated tissue is performed. The blood flow dependence of steady state and transient temperature profiles created by a cylindrical conductive heat source and an ultrasound transducer were examined using a fixed porcine kidney as a flow model. In the transient experiments, a 20 s pulse of hot water, 30 deg. C above ambient, heated the tissues. Temperatures were measured at selected locations in steps of 0.1 mm. It was observed that vessels could either heat or cool tissues depending on the orientation of the vascular geometry with respect to the heat source and that these effects are a function of flow rate through the vessels. Temperature gradients of 6 deg. C mm -1 close to large vessels were routinely measured. Furthermore, it was observed that the temperature gradients caused by large vessels depended on whether the heating source was highly localized (i.e. a hot needle) or more distributed (i.e. external ultrasound). The gradients measured near large vessels during localized heating were between two and three times greater than the gradients measured during ultrasound heating at the same location, for comparable flows. Moreover, these gradients were more sensitive to flow variations for the localized needle heating. X-ray computed tomography data of the kidney vasculature were in good spatial agreement with the locations of all of the temperature variations measured. The three-dimensional vessel path observed could account for the complex features of the temperature profiles. The flow

  5. Multi-state model for studying an intermediate event using time-dependent covariates: application to breast cancer.

    Meier-Hirmer, Carolina; Schumacher, Martin

    2013-06-20

    The aim of this article is to propose several methods that allow to investigate how and whether the shape of the hazard ratio after an intermediate event depends on the waiting time to occurrence of this event and/or the sojourn time in this state. A simple multi-state model, the illness-death model, is used as a framework to investigate the occurrence of this intermediate event. Several approaches are shown and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. All these approaches are based on Cox regression. As different time-scales are used, these models go beyond Markov models. Different estimation methods for the transition hazards are presented. Additionally, time-varying covariates are included into the model using an approach based on fractional polynomials. The different methods of this article are then applied to a dataset consisting of four studies conducted by the German Breast Cancer Study Group (GBSG). The occurrence of the first isolated locoregional recurrence (ILRR) is studied. The results contribute to the debate on the role of the ILRR with respect to the course of the breast cancer disease and the resulting prognosis. We have investigated different modelling strategies for the transition hazard after ILRR or in general after an intermediate event. Including time-dependent structures altered the resulting hazard functions considerably and it was shown that this time-dependent structure has to be taken into account in the case of our breast cancer dataset. The results indicate that an early recurrence increases the risk of death. A late ILRR increases the hazard function much less and after the successful removal of the second tumour the risk of death is almost the same as before the recurrence. With respect to distant disease, the appearance of the ILRR only slightly increases the risk of death if the recurrence was treated successfully. It is important to realize that there are several modelling strategies for the intermediate event and that

  6. Presynaptic Regulation of Leptin in a Defined Lateral Hypothalamus-Ventral Tegmental Area Neurocircuitry Depends on Energy State.

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Bello, Nicholas T; Pang, Zhiping P

    2017-12-06

    Synaptic transmission controls brain activity and behaviors, including food intake. Leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone, acts on neurons located in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) to maintain energy homeostasis and regulate food intake behavior. The specific synaptic mechanisms, cell types, and neural projections mediating this effect remain unclear. In male mice, using pathway-specific retrograde tracing, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and post hoc cell type identification, we found that leptin reduces excitatory synaptic strength onto both melanin-concentrating hormone- and orexin-expressing neurons projecting from the LHA to the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which may affect dopamine signaling and motivation for feeding. A presynaptic mechanism mediated by distinct intracellular signaling mechanisms may account for this regulation by leptin. The regulatory effects of leptin depend on intact leptin receptor signaling. Interestingly, the synaptic regulatory function of leptin in the LHA-to-VTA neuronal pathway is highly sensitive to energy states: both energy deficiency (acute fasting) and excessive energy storage (high-fat diet-induced obesity) blunt the effect of leptin. These data revealed that leptin may regulate synaptic transmission in the LHA-to-VTA neurocircuitry in an inverted "U-shape" fashion dependent on plasma glucose levels and related to metabolic states. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) to ventral tegmental area (VTA) projection is an important neural pathway involved in balancing whole-body energy states and reward. We found that the excitatory synaptic inputs to both orexin- and melanin-concentrating hormone expressing LHA neurons projecting to the VTA were suppressed by leptin, a peptide hormone derived from adipocytes that signals peripheral energy status to the brain. Interestingly, energy states seem to affect how leptin regulates synaptic transmission since both the depletion of energy induced by acute food

  7. Use of state-dependent pair potentials in describing the structural and thermodynamic properties of noble gases

    Jakse, Noel; Bretonnet, Jean-Louis [Laboratoire de Theorie de la Matiere Condensee, Universite de Metz, 1 Boulevard FD Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France)

    2003-12-08

    Understanding the interatomic interactions in noble gases remains one of the fundamental problems not completely solved to date. From small-angle neutron scattering experiments it is well-known that three-body forces exist and cannot be neglected. On the theoretical side, semi-analytic and simulation methods have been used to reveal the nature of these many-body interactions. The purpose of the present work is to provide an overview of the different three-body contributions to the interactions and their relative importance in describing the structural and thermodynamic properties for noble gases by means of the integral equation theory and molecular dynamics simulations. We examine the relevance of the effective state-dependent pair potential in this framework, as well as the self-consistency problem that we are faced with in the integral equation theory.

  8. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in binary mixtures of water and tertiary butanol (TBA): alcohol mole fraction dependence.

    Pradhan, Tuhin; Ghoshal, Piue; Biswas, Ranjit

    2008-02-07

    The excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile (P4C) has been studied in water-tertiary butanol (TBA) mixtures at different alcohol mole fractions by using steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The ratio between the areas under the locally excited (LE) and charge transferred (CT) emission bands is found to exhibit a sharp rise at alcohol mole fraction approximately 0.04, a value at which several thermodynamic properties of this mixture is known to show anomalous change due to the enhancement of H-bonding network. The radiative rate associated with the LE emission also shows a maximum at this TBA mole fraction. Although the structural transition from the water-like tetrahedral network to the alcohol-like chain is reflected in the red shift of the absorption spectrum up to TBA mole fraction approximately 0.10, the emission bands (both LE and CT) show the typical nonideal alcohol mole fraction dependence at all TBA mole fractions. Quantum yield, CT radiative rate as well as transition moments also exhibit a nonideal alcohol mole fraction dependence. The time-resolved emission decay of P4C has been found to be biexponential at all TBA mole fractions, regardless of emission collection around either the LE or the CT bands. The time constant associated with the slow component (tau(slow)) shows a minimum at TBA mole fraction approximately 0.04, whereas such a minimum for the fast time constant, tau(fast) (representing the rate of LE --> CT conversion reaction) is not observed. The nonobservation of the minimum in tau(fast) might be due to the limited time resolution employed in our experiments.

  9. pH-Dependent spin state population and 19F NMR chemical shift via remote ligand protonation in an iron(ii) complex.

    Gaudette, Alexandra I; Thorarinsdottir, Agnes E; Harris, T David

    2017-11-30

    An Fe II complex that features a pH-dependent spin state population, by virtue of a variable ligand protonation state, is described. This behavior leads to a highly pH-dependent 19 F NMR chemical shift with a sensitivity of 13.9(5) ppm per pH unit at 37 °C, thereby demonstrating the potential utility of the complex as a 19 F chemical shift-based pH sensor.

  10. Integrated load distribution and production planning in series-parallel multi-state systems with failure rate depending on load

    Nourelfath, Mustapha; Yalaoui, Farouk

    2012-01-01

    A production system containing a set of machines (also called components) arranged according to a series-parallel configuration is addressed. A set of products must be produced in lots on this production system during a specified finite planning horizon. This paper presents a method for integrating load distribution decisions, and tactical production planning considering the costs of capacity change and the costs of unused capacity. The objective is to minimize the sum of capacity change costs, unused capacity costs, setup costs, holding costs, backorder costs, and production costs. The main constraints consist in satisfying the demand for all products over the entire horizon, and in not exceeding available repair resource. The production series-parallel system is modeled as a multi-state system with binary-state components. The proposed model takes into account the dependence of machines' failure rates on their load. Universal generating function technique can be used in the optimization algorithm for evaluating the expected system production rate in each period. We show how the formulated problem can be solved by comparing the results of several multi-product lot-sizing problems with capacity associated costs. The importance of integrating load distribution decisions and production planning is illustrated through numerical examples.

  11. Proteomic analysis of temperature dependent extracellular proteins from Aspergillus fumigatus grown under solid-state culture condition.

    Adav, Sunil S; Ravindran, Anita; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2013-06-07

    Fungal species of the genus Aspergillus are filamentous ubiquitous saprophytes that play a major role in lignocellulosic biomass recycling and also are considered as cell factories for the production of organic acids, pharmaceuticals, and industrially important enzymes. Analysis of extracellular secreted biomass degrading enzymes using complex lignocellulosic biomass as a substrate by solid-state fermentation could be a more practical approach to evaluate application of the enzymes for lignocellulosic biorefinery. This study isolated a fungal strain from compost, identified as Aspergillus fumigatus, and further analyzed it for lignocellulolytic enzymes at different temperatures using label free quantitative proteomics. The profile of secretome composition discovered cellulases, hemicellulases, lignin degrading proteins, peptidases and proteases, and transport and hypothetical proteins; while protein abundances and further their hierarchical clustering analysis revealed temperature dependent expression of these enzymes during solid-state fermentation of sawdust. The enzyme activities and protein abundances as determined by exponentially modified protein abundance index (emPAI) indicated the maximum activities at the range of 40-50 °C, demonstrating the thermophilic nature of the isolate A. fumigatus LF9. Characterization of the thermostability of secretome suggested the potential of the isolated fungal strain in the production of thermophilic biomass degrading enzymes for industrial application.

  12. Stimulus-dependent state transition between synchronized oscillation and randomly repetitive burst in a model cerebellar granular layer.

    Takeru Honda

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Information processing of the cerebellar granular layer composed of granule and Golgi cells is regarded as an important first step toward the cerebellar computation. Our previous theoretical studies have shown that granule cells can exhibit random alternation between burst and silent modes, which provides a basis of population representation of the passage-of-time (POT from the onset of external input stimuli. On the other hand, another computational study has reported that granule cells can exhibit synchronized oscillation of activity, as consistent with observed oscillation in local field potential recorded from the granular layer while animals keep still. Here we have a question of whether an identical network model can explain these distinct dynamics. In the present study, we carried out computer simulations based on a spiking network model of the granular layer varying two parameters: the strength of a current injected to granule cells and the concentration of Mg²⁺ which controls the conductance of NMDA channels assumed on the Golgi cell dendrites. The simulations showed that cells in the granular layer can switch activity states between synchronized oscillation and random burst-silent alternation depending on the two parameters. For higher Mg²⁺ concentration and a weaker injected current, granule and Golgi cells elicited spikes synchronously (synchronized oscillation state. In contrast, for lower Mg²⁺ concentration and a stronger injected current, those cells showed the random burst-silent alternation (POT-representing state. It is suggested that NMDA channels on the Golgi cell dendrites play an important role for determining how the granular layer works in response to external input.

  13. What shall I do now? State-dependent variations of life-history traits with aging in Wandering Albatrosses.

    Pardo, Deborah; Barbraud, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2014-02-01

    Allocation decisions depend on an organism's condition which can change with age. Two opposite changes in life-history traits are predicted in the presence of senescence: either an increase in breeding performance in late age associated with terminal investment or a decrease due to either life-history trade-offs between current breeding and future survival or decreased efficiency at old age. Age variation in several life-history traits has been detected in a number of species, and demographic performances of individuals in a given year are influenced by their reproductive state the previous year. Few studies have, however, examined state-dependent variation in life-history traits with aging, and they focused mainly on a dichotomy of successful versus failed breeding and non-breeding birds. Using a 50-year dataset on the long-lived quasi-biennial breeding wandering albatross, we investigated variations in life-history traits with aging according to a gradient of states corresponding to potential costs of reproduction the previous year (in ascending order): non-breeding birds staying at sea or present at breeding grounds, breeding birds that failed early, late or were successful. We used multistate models to study survival and decompose reproduction into four components (probabilities of return, breeding, hatching, and fledging), while accounting for imperfect detection. Our results suggest the possible existence of two strategies in the population: strict biennial breeders that exhibited almost no reproductive senescence and quasi-biennial breeders that showed an increased breeding frequency with a strong and moderate senescence on hatching and fledging probabilities, respectively. The patterns observed on survival were contrary to our predictions, suggesting an influence of individual quality rather than trade-offs between reproduction and survival at late ages. This work represents a step further into understanding the evolutionary ecology of senescence and its

  14. Strong Dependence of Hydration State of F-Actin on the Bound Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) Ions.

    Suzuki, Makoto; Imao, Asato; Mogami, George; Chishima, Ryotaro; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Takaya; Morimoto, Nobuyuki; Wazawa, Tetsuichi

    2016-07-21

    Understanding of the hydration state is an important issue in the chemomechanical energetics of versatile biological functions of polymerized actin (F-actin). In this study, hydration-state differences of F-actin by the bound divalent cations are revealed through precision microwave dielectric relaxation (DR) spectroscopy. G- and F-actin in Ca- and Mg-containing buffer solutions exhibit dual hydration components comprising restrained water with DR frequency f2 (fw). The hydration state of F-actin is strongly dependent on the ionic composition. In every buffer tested, the HMW signal Dhyme (≡ (f1 - fw)δ1/(fwδw)) of F-actin is stronger than that of G-actin, where δw is DR-amplitude of bulk solvent and δ1 is that of HMW in a fixed-volume ellipsoid containing an F-actin and surrounding water in solution. Dhyme value of F-actin in Ca2.0-buffer (containing 2 mM Ca(2+)) is markedly higher than in Mg2.0-buffer (containing 2 mM Mg(2+)). Moreover, in the presence of 2 mM Mg(2+), the hydration state of F-actin is changed by adding a small fraction of Ca(2+) (∼0.1 mM) and becomes closer to that of the Ca-bound form in Ca2.0-buffer. This is consistent with the results of the partial specific volume and the Cotton effect around 290 nm in the CD spectra, indicating a change in the tertiary structure and less apparent change in the secondary structure of actin. The number of restrained water molecules per actin (N2) is estimated to be 1600-2100 for Ca2.0- and F-buffer and ∼2500 for Mg2.0-buffer at 10-15 °C. These numbers are comparable to those estimated from the available F-actin atomic structures as in the first water layer. The number of HMW molecules is roughly explained by the volume between the equipotential surface of -kT/2e and the first water layer of the actin surface by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation using UCSF Chimera.

  15. Social, state-dependent and environmental modulation of faecal corticosteroid levels in free-ranging female spotted hyenas.

    Goymann, W; East, M L; Wachter, B; Höner, O P; Möstl, E; Van't Hof, T J; Hofer, H

    2001-12-07

    Little is known about to what extent the sensitivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may be state dependent and vary in the same species between environments. Here we tested whether the faecal corticosteroid concentrations of matrilineal adult female spotted hyenas are influenced by social and reproductive status in adjacent ecosystems and whether they vary between periods with and without social stress. Females in the Serengeti National Park frequently become socially subordinate intruders in other hyena territories by undertaking long-distance foraging trips to migratory herds, whereas in the Ngorongoro Crater they usually forage inside their own small territories on resident prey. The faecal corticosteroid concentrations in Serengeti females were significantly higher than in Ngorongoro females. Energy expenditure by lactation is exceptionally high in spotted hyenas and this may be reflected in their corticosteroid levels. The faecal corticosteroid levels in both populations were higher in lactating than in non-lactating females. During periods of social stability, faecal corticosteroid concentrations increased in non-lactating females but not in lactating females as social status declined. Lactating Serengeti females had significantly higher faecal corticosteroid concentrations during periods with acute severe social stress than during periods without, indicating that the HPA axis is sensitive to social stimuli even in lactating females. So far few studies have used non-invasive monitoring methods for assessing social stress in freeranging animals. This study demonstrates for the first time, to the authors' knowledge, that corticosteroid concentrations may differ between periods with and without social stress for a free-ranging female mammal and that the modulating effect of social status may depend on reproductive status.

  16. Source-dependent and source-independent controls on plutonium oxidation state and colloid associations in groundwater.

    Buesseler, Ken O; Kaplan, Daniel I; Dai, Minhan; Pike, Steven

    2009-03-01

    Plutonium (Pu) was characterized for its isotopic composition, oxidation states, and association with colloids in groundwater samples near disposal basins in F-Area of the Savannah River Site and compared to similar samples collected six years earlier. Two sources of Pu were identified, the disposal basins, which contained a 24Pu/l39Pu isotopic signature consistent with weapons grade Pu, and 244Cm, a cocontaminant that is a progenitor radionuclide of 24Pu. 24Pu that originated primarily from 244Cm tended to be appreciably more oxidized (Pu(V/VI)), less associated with colloids (approximately 1 kDa - 0.2 microm), and more mobile than 239Pu, as suggested by our prior studies at this site. This is not evidence of isotope fractionation but rather "source-dependent" controls on 240Pu speciation which are processes that are not at equilibrium, i.e., processes that appear kinetically hindered. There were also "source-independent" controls on 239Pu speciation, which are those processes that follow thermodynamic equilibrium with their surroundings. For example, a groundwater pH increase in one well from 4.1 in 1998 to 6.1 in 2004 resulted in an order of magnitude decrease in groundwater 239Pu concentrations. Similarly, the fraction of 239Pu in the reduced Pu(III/IV) and colloidal forms increased systematically with decreases in redox condition in 2004 vs 1998. This research demonstrates the importance of source-dependent and source-independent controls on Pu speciation which would impact Pu mobility during changes in hydrological, chemical, or biological conditions on both seasonal and decadal time scales, and over short spatial scales. This implies more dynamic shifts in Pu speciation, colloids association, and transport in groundwater than commonly believed.

  17. Time-dependent structural transformation analysis to high-level Petri net model with active state transition diagram

    Saito Ayumu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With an accumulation of in silico data obtained by simulating large-scale biological networks, a new interest of research is emerging for elucidating how living organism functions over time in cells. Investigating the dynamic features of current computational models promises a deeper understanding of complex cellular processes. This leads us to develop a method that utilizes structural properties of the model over all simulation time steps. Further, user-friendly overviews of dynamic behaviors can be considered to provide a great help in understanding the variations of system mechanisms. Results We propose a novel method for constructing and analyzing a so-called active state transition diagram (ASTD by using time-course simulation data of a high-level Petri net. Our method includes two new algorithms. The first algorithm extracts a series of subnets (called temporal subnets reflecting biological components contributing to the dynamics, while retaining positive mathematical qualities. The second one creates an ASTD composed of unique temporal subnets. ASTD provides users with concise information allowing them to grasp and trace how a key regulatory subnet and/or a network changes with time. The applicability of our method is demonstrated by the analysis of the underlying model for circadian rhythms in Drosophila. Conclusions Building ASTD is a useful means to convert a hybrid model dealing with discrete, continuous and more complicated events to finite time-dependent states. Based on ASTD, various analytical approaches can be applied to obtain new insights into not only systematic mechanisms but also dynamics.

  18. Dissociative part-dependent resting-state activity in dissociative identity disorder: a controlled FMRI perfusion study.

    Schlumpf, Yolanda R; Reinders, Antje A T S; Nijenhuis, Ellert R S; Luechinger, Roger; van Osch, Matthias J P; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    In accordance with the Theory of Structural Dissociation of the Personality (TSDP), studies of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have documented that two prototypical dissociative subsystems of the personality, the "Emotional Part" (EP) and the "Apparently Normal Part" (ANP), have different biopsychosocial reactions to supraliminal and subliminal trauma-related cues and that these reactions cannot be mimicked by fantasy prone healthy controls nor by actors. Arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI was used to test the hypotheses that ANP and EP in DID have different perfusion patterns in response to rest instructions, and that perfusion is different in actors who were instructed to simulate ANP and EP. In a follow-up study, regional cerebral blood flow of DID patients was compared with the activation pattern of healthy non-simulating controls. Compared to EP, ANP showed elevated perfusion in bilateral thalamus. Compared to ANP, EP had increased perfusion in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and motor-related areas. Perfusion patterns for simulated ANP and EP were different. Fitting their reported role-play strategies, the actors activated brain structures involved in visual mental imagery and empathizing feelings. The follow-up study demonstrated elevated perfusion in the left temporal lobe in DID patients, whereas non-simulating healthy controls had increased activity in areas which mediate the mental construction of past and future episodic events. DID involves dissociative part-dependent resting-state differences. Compared to ANP, EP activated brain structures involved in self-referencing and sensorimotor actions more. Actors had different perfusion patterns compared to genuine ANP and EP. Comparisons of neural activity for individuals with DID and non-DID simulating controls suggest that the resting-state features of ANP and EP in DID are not due to imagination. The findings are consistent with TSDP and inconsistent with the idea

  19. Dissociative part-dependent resting-state activity in dissociative identity disorder: a controlled FMRI perfusion study.

    Yolanda R Schlumpf

    Full Text Available In accordance with the Theory of Structural Dissociation of the Personality (TSDP, studies of dissociative identity disorder (DID have documented that two prototypical dissociative subsystems of the personality, the "Emotional Part" (EP and the "Apparently Normal Part" (ANP, have different biopsychosocial reactions to supraliminal and subliminal trauma-related cues and that these reactions cannot be mimicked by fantasy prone healthy controls nor by actors.Arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI was used to test the hypotheses that ANP and EP in DID have different perfusion patterns in response to rest instructions, and that perfusion is different in actors who were instructed to simulate ANP and EP. In a follow-up study, regional cerebral blood flow of DID patients was compared with the activation pattern of healthy non-simulating controls.Compared to EP, ANP showed elevated perfusion in bilateral thalamus. Compared to ANP, EP had increased perfusion in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and motor-related areas. Perfusion patterns for simulated ANP and EP were different. Fitting their reported role-play strategies, the actors activated brain structures involved in visual mental imagery and empathizing feelings. The follow-up study demonstrated elevated perfusion in the left temporal lobe in DID patients, whereas non-simulating healthy controls had increased activity in areas which mediate the mental construction of past and future episodic events.DID involves dissociative part-dependent resting-state differences. Compared to ANP, EP activated brain structures involved in self-referencing and sensorimotor actions more. Actors had different perfusion patterns compared to genuine ANP and EP. Comparisons of neural activity for individuals with DID and non-DID simulating controls suggest that the resting-state features of ANP and EP in DID are not due to imagination. The findings are consistent with TSDP and inconsistent

  20. Fock-space diagonalization of the state-dependent pairing Hamiltonian with the Woods-Saxon mean field

    Molique, H.; Dudek, J.

    1997-01-01

    A particle-number conserving approach is presented to solve the nuclear mean-field plus pairing Hamiltonian problem with a realistic deformed Woods-Saxon single-particle potential. The method is designed for the state-dependent monopole pairing Hamiltonian H pair =summation αβ G αβ c α † c bar α † c bar β c β with an arbitrary set of matrix elements G αβ . Symmetries of the Hamiltonians on the many-body level are discussed using the language of P symmetry introduced earlier in the literature and are employed to diagonalize the problem; the only essential approximation used is a many-body (Fock-space) basis cutoff. An optimal basis construction is discussed and the stability of the final result with respect to the basis cutoff is illustrated in details. Extensions of the concept of P symmetry are introduced and their consequences for an optimal many-body basis cutoff construction are exploited. An algorithm is constructed allowing to solve the pairing problems in the many-body spaces corresponding to p∼40 particles on n∼80 levels and for several dozens of lowest lying states with precision ∼(1 endash 2) % within seconds of the CPU time on a CRAY computer. Among applications, the presence of the low-lying seniority s=0 solutions, that are usually poorly described in terms of the standard approximations (BCS, HFB), is discussed and demonstrated to play a role in the interpretation of the spectra of rotating nuclei. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  1. Island-specific preferences of tourists for environmental features: implications of climate change for tourism dependent states

    Uyarra, M.C.; Cote, I.M. [East Anglia Univ., Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Conservation; Gill, J.A. [East Anglia Univ., Norwich (United Kingdom). School of Environmental Sciences; Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, Norwich (United Kingdom); Tinch, R.T. [East Anglia Univ., Norwich (United Kingdom). School of Environmental Sciences; Macaulay Land Use Research Inst., Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Viner, D. [East Anglia Univ., Norwich (United Kingdom). Climate Research Unit; Watkinson, A.R. [East Anglia Univ., Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Conservation; East Anglia Univ., Norwich (United Kingdom). School of Environmental Sciences

    2005-03-15

    Climate change may affect important environmental components of holiday destinations, which might have repercussions for tourism-dependent economies. This study documents the importance of environmental attributes in determining the choice and holiday enjoyment of tourists visiting Bonaire and Barbados, two Caribbean islands with markedly different tourism markets and infrastructure. Three hundred and sixteen and 338 participants from Bonaire and Barbados, respectively, completed standardized questionnaires. Warm temperatures, clear waters and low health risks were the most important environmental features determining holiday destination choice. However, tourists in Bonaire thereafter prioritized marine wildlife attributes (i.e. coral and fish diversity and abundance) over other environmental features, whereas tourists in Barbados exhibited stronger preferences for terrestrial features, particularly beach characteristics. The willingness of tourists to revisit these islands was strongly linked to the state of the preferred environmental attributes. More than 80% of tourists in Bonaire and Barbados would be unwilling to return for the same holiday price in the event, respectively, of coral bleaching as a result of elevated sea surface temperatures and reduced beach area as a result of sea level rise. Climate change might have a significant impact on Caribbean tourism economy through alteration of environmental features important to destination selection. Island-specific management strategies, such as focusing resources on the protection of key marine or terrestrial features, may provide a means of reducing the environmental and economic impacts of climate change. (author)

  2. Nutritional State-Dependent Ghrelin Activation of Vasopressin Neurons via Retrograde Trans-Neuronal–Glial Stimulation of Excitatory GABA Circuits

    Haam, Juhee; Halmos, Katalin C.; Di, Shi

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and physiological coupling between energy balance and fluid homeostasis is critical for survival. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin has been shown to stimulate the secretion of the osmoregulatory hormone vasopressin (VP), linking nutritional status to the control of blood osmolality, although the mechanism of this systemic crosstalk is unknown. Here, we show using electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging in rat brain slices that ghrelin stimulates VP neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in a nutritional state-dependent manner by activating an excitatory GABAergic synaptic input via a retrograde neuronal–glial circuit. In slices from fasted rats, ghrelin activation of a postsynaptic ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a), in VP neurons caused the dendritic release of VP, which stimulated astrocytes to release the gliotransmitter adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP activation of P2X receptors excited presynaptic GABA neurons to increase GABA release, which was excitatory to the VP neurons. This trans-neuronal–glial retrograde circuit activated by ghrelin provides an alternative means of stimulation of VP release and represents a novel mechanism of neuronal control by local neuronal–glial circuits. It also provides a potential cellular mechanism for the physiological integration of energy and fluid homeostasis. PMID:24790191

  3. Disrupted topological organization in whole-brain functional networks of heroin-dependent individuals: a resting-state FMRI study.

    Guihua Jiang

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies have shown that heroin addiction is related to abnormalities in widespread local regions and in the functional connectivity of the brain. However, little is known about whether heroin addiction changes the topological organization of whole-brain functional networks. Seventeen heroin-dependent individuals (HDIs and 15 age-, gender-matched normal controls (NCs were enrolled, and the resting-state functional magnetic resonance images (RS-fMRI were acquired from these subjects. We constructed the brain functional networks of HDIs and NCs, and compared the between-group differences in network topological properties using graph theory method. We found that the HDIs showed decreases in the normalized clustering coefficient and in small-worldness compared to the NCs. Furthermore, the HDIs exhibited significantly decreased nodal centralities primarily in regions of cognitive control network, including the bilateral middle cingulate gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, and right precuneus, but significantly increased nodal centralities primarily in the left hippocampus. The between-group differences in nodal centralities were not corrected by multiple comparisons suggesting these should be considered as an exploratory analysis. Moreover, nodal centralities in the left hippocampus were positively correlated with the duration of heroin addiction. Overall, our results indicated that disruptions occur in the whole-brain functional networks of HDIs, findings which may be helpful in further understanding the mechanisms underlying heroin addiction.

  4. Disrupted topological organization in whole-brain functional networks of heroin-dependent individuals: a resting-state FMRI study.

    Jiang, Guihua; Wen, Xue; Qiu, Yingwei; Zhang, Ruibin; Wang, Junjing; Li, Meng; Ma, Xiaofen; Tian, Junzhang; Huang, Ruiwang

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have shown that heroin addiction is related to abnormalities in widespread local regions and in the functional connectivity of the brain. However, little is known about whether heroin addiction changes the topological organization of whole-brain functional networks. Seventeen heroin-dependent individuals (HDIs) and 15 age-, gender-matched normal controls (NCs) were enrolled, and the resting-state functional magnetic resonance images (RS-fMRI) were acquired from these subjects. We constructed the brain functional networks of HDIs and NCs, and compared the between-group differences in network topological properties using graph theory method. We found that the HDIs showed decreases in the normalized clustering coefficient and in small-worldness compared to the NCs. Furthermore, the HDIs exhibited significantly decreased nodal centralities primarily in regions of cognitive control network, including the bilateral middle cingulate gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, and right precuneus, but significantly increased nodal centralities primarily in the left hippocampus. The between-group differences in nodal centralities were not corrected by multiple comparisons suggesting these should be considered as an exploratory analysis. Moreover, nodal centralities in the left hippocampus were positively correlated with the duration of heroin addiction. Overall, our results indicated that disruptions occur in the whole-brain functional networks of HDIs, findings which may be helpful in further understanding the mechanisms underlying heroin addiction.

  5. Temperature dependence of the heat capacities in the solid state of 18 mono-, di-, and poly-saccharides

    Hernandez-Segura, Gerardo O.; Campos, Myriam; Costas, Miguel; Torres, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the heat capacities in solid state C p (T) of 18 mono-, di-, and poly-saccharides has been determined using a power-compensation differential scanning calorimeter. The saccharides were α-D-xylose, D-ribose, 2-deoxy-D-ribose, methyl-β-D-ribose, α-D-glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, α-D-mannose, β-D-fructose, α-D-galactose, methyl-α-D-glucose, sucrose, maltose monohydrate, α-lactose monohydrate, cellobiose, maltotriose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, α-cyclodextrin, and β-cyclodextrin. The measurements were carried out at atmospheric pressure and from T = (288.15 to 358.15) K for 15 saccharides and from T = (288.15 to 328.15) K for D-ribose, 2-deoxy-D-ribose, and methyl-β-D-ribose. The present results are compared against literature values both at single temperatures, where most of the data are available, and throughout a range of temperatures, i.e., for C p (T). The predictions of a recently published correlation for organic solids are briefly discussed. By grouping saccharides in subsets, our present results can be used to compare amongst saccharide isomers and to assess the effect of different chemical groups and molecular size

  6. Growth-direction dependence of steady-state Saffman-Taylor flow in an anisotropic Hele-Shaw cell

    McCloud, K.V.; Maher, J.V.

    1996-01-01

    Selection of steady-state fingers has been measured in a Hele-Shaw cell perturbed by having a square lattice etched onto one of the plates. Flows at different orientations θ between the direction of flow and the lattice axes have been studied, in a wide range of observable tip velocities where the perturbation was made microscopic in the sense that the capillary length of the flow was much greater than the etched lattice cell size. The full range of dynamically interesting angles for the square lattice was examined, and above a threshold, the microscopic perturbation always results in wider fingers than are selected in the unperturbed case. There is some dependence of the width of the fingers on the orientation of the flow, with fingers at θ=0 degree being the widest with respect to the unperturbed fingers, and fingers at 45 degree being the least wide, although still wider than the unperturbed fingers. All observed solutions are symmetric, centered in the channel, and have the relation between tip-curvature and finger width expected of members of the Saffman-Taylor family of solutions. Selected solutions narrow again at tip velocities where the perturbation can no longer be considered microscopic. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  7. Chaotic diffusion in steady wavy vortex flow-Dependence on wave state and correlation with Eulerian symmetry measures

    King, G P [Instituto de Oceanografia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Rudman, Murray [CSIRO Manufacturing and Infrastructure Technology, P.O. Box 56, Highett, Vic. 3190 (Australia); Rowlands, G [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gkinglisboa@gmail.com, E-mail: Murray.Rudman@csiro.au, E-mail: G.Rowlands@warwick.ac.uk

    2008-01-31

    The dimensionless effective axial diffusion coefficient, D{sub z}, calculated from particle trajectories in steady wavy vortex flow in a narrow gap Taylor-Couette system, has been determined as a function of Reynolds number (R = Re/Re{sub c}), axial wavelength ({lambda}{sub z}), and the number of azimuthal waves (m). Two regimes of Reynolds number were found: (i) when R < 3.5, D{sub z} has a complex and sometimes multi-modal dependence on Reynolds number; (ii) when R > 3.5, D{sub z} decreases monotonically. Eulerian quantities measuring the departure from rotational symmetry, {psi}{sub {theta}}, and flexion-free flow, {psi}{sub {nu}}, were calculated. The space-averaged quantities {phi}-bar{sub {theta}} and {phi}-bar{sub {nu}} were found to have, unlike D{sub z}, a simple unimodal dependence on R. In the low R regime the correlation between D{sub z} and {psi}{sub {theta}}{psi}{sub {nu}} was complicated and was attributed to variations in the spatial distribution of the wavy disturbance occurring in this range of R. In the large R regime, however, the correlation simplified to D{sub z}{approx}{phi}-bar{sub {theta}}{phi}-bar{sub {nu}} for all wave states, and this was attributed to the growth of an integrable vortex core and the concentration of the wavy disturbance into narrow regions near the outflow and inflow jets. A reservoir model of a wavy vortex was used to determine the rate of escape across the outflow and inflow boundaries, the size of the 'escape basins' (associated with escape across the outflow and inflow boundaries), and the size of the trapping region in the vortex core. In the low R regime after the breakup of all KAM tori, the outflow basin ({gamma}{sub O}) is larger than the inflow basin ({gamma}{sub I}), and both {gamma}{sub O} and {gamma}{sub I} are (approximately) independent of R. In the large R regime, with increasing Reynolds number the trapping region grows, the outflow basin decreases, and the inflow basin shows a slight increase

  8. Equation-of-state dependent features in shock-oscillation modulated neutrino and gravitational-wave signals from supernovae

    Marek, A.; Janka, H.-T.; Müller, E.

    2009-03-01

    We present two-dimensional (axisymmetric) neutrino-hydrodynamic simulations of the long-time accretion phase of a 15 M_⊙ progenitor star after core bounce and before the launch of a supernova explosion, when non-radial hydrodynamic instabilities like convection occur in different regions of the collapsing stellar core and the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) leads to large-amplitude oscillations of the stalled shock with a period of tens of milliseconds. Our simulations were performed with the Prometheus-Vertex code, which includes a multi-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport scheme and employs an effective relativistic gravitational potential. Testing the influence of a stiff and a soft equation of state for hot neutron star matter, we find that the non-radial mass motions in the supernova core impose a time variability on the neutrino and gravitational-wave signals with larger amplitudes, as well as higher frequencies in the case of a more compact nascent neutron star. After the prompt shock-breakout burst of electron neutrinos, a more compact accreting remnant produces higher neutrino luminosities and higher mean neutrino energies. The observable neutrino emission in the SASI sloshing direction exhibits a modulation of several ten percent in the luminosities and around 1 MeV in the mean energies with most power at typical SASI frequencies between roughly 20 and 100 Hz. The modulation is caused by quasi-periodic variations in the mass accretion rate of the neutron star in each hemisphere. At times later than ~50-100 ms after bounce, the gravitational-wave amplitude is dominated by the growing low-frequency (⪉200 Hz) signal associated with anisotropic neutrino emission. A high-frequency wave signal results from nonradial gas flows in the outer layers of the anisotropically accreting neutron star. Right after bounce such nonradial mass motions occur due to prompt post-shock convection in both considered cases and contribute mostly to the early

  9. Possible pore size effects on the state of tris(8-quinolinato)aluminum(III) (Alq3) adsorbed in mesoporous silicas and their temperature dependence.

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ogawa, Makoto

    2008-12-07

    The states of tris(8-quinolinato)aluminum(III) (Alq3) adsorbed in mesoporous silicas with different pore sizes (2.5, 3.1 and 5.0 nm) were investigated. Alq3 was successfully occluded into the mesoporous silicas from solution and the adsorbed amount of Alq3 per BET surface area was effectively controlled by changing the added amount Alq3 to the solution. The state of Alq3 in the mesopore varied depending on the pore size as well as the adsorbed amount of Alq3 as revealed by variation of the photoluminescence spectra. The luminescence of the adsorbed Alq3 was found to be temperature-dependent, indicating the mobility of the adsorbed Alq3 to temperature variations. The temperature-dependence also depended on the pore size. The guest-guest interactions between Alq3 molecules as well as the host-guest interactions between Alq3 and the mesopore were controlled by the pore size.

  10. An insect-inspired bionic sensor for tactile localisation and material classification with state-dependent modulation

    Luca ePatanè

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Insects carry a pair of antennae on their head: multimodal sensory organs that serve a wide range of sensory-guided behaviours. During locomotion, antennae are involved in near-range orientation, for example in detecting, localising, probing and negotiating obstacles.Here we present a bionic, active tactile sensing system inspired by insect antennae. It comprises an actuated elastic rod equipped with a terminal acceleration sensor. The measurement principle is based on the analysis of damped harmonic oscillations registered upon contact with an object. The dominant frequency of the oscillation is extracted to determine the distance of the contact point along the probe, and basal angular encoders allow tactile localisation in a polar coordinate system. Finally, the damping behaviour of the registered signal is exploited to determine the most likely material.The tactile sensor is tested in four approaches with increasing neural plausibility: First, we show that peak extraction from the Fourier spectrum is sufficient for tactile localisation with position errors below 1%. Also, the damping property of the extracted frequency is used for material classification. Second, we show that the Fourier spectrum can be analysed by an Artificial Neural Network which can be trained to decode contact distance and to classify contact materials. Thirdly, we show how efficiency can be improved by band-pass filtering the Fourier spectrum by application of non-negative matrix factorisation. This reduces the input dimension by 95% while reducing classification performance by 8% only. Finally, we replace the FFT by an array of spiking neurons with gradually differing resonance properties, such that their spike rate is a function of the input frequency. We show that this network can be applied to detect tactile contact events of a wheeled robot, and how detrimental effects of robot velocity on antennal dynamics can be suppressed by state-dependent modulation of the

  11. Electromagnetic-field dependence of the internal excited state of the polaron and the qubit in quantum dot with thickness

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Xin, Wei; Yin, Hong-Wu; Eerdunchaolu

    2017-06-01

    The electromagnetic-field dependence of the ground and the first excited-state (GFES) energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the strong-coupling polaron in a quantum dot (QD) was studied for various QD thicknesses by using the variational method of the Pekar type (VMPT). On this basis, we construct a qubit in the quantum dot (QQD) by taking a two-level structure of the polaron as the carrier. The results of numerical calculations indicate that the oscillation period of the qubit, {itT}{in0}, increases with increasing the thickness of the quantum dot (TQD) {itL}, but decreases with increasing the cyclotron frequency of the magnetic field (CFMF) ω{in{itc}}, electric-field strength {itF}, and electron-phonon coupling strength (EPCS) α. The probability density of the qubit |Ψ({itρ}, {itz}, {itt})|{su2} presents a normal distribution of the electronic transverse coordinate ρ, significantly influenced by the TQD and effective radius of the quantum dot (ERQD) {itR}{in0}, and shows a periodic oscillation with variations in the electronic longitudinal coordinate {itz}, polar angle φ and time {itt}. The decoherence time τ and the quality factor {itQ} of the free rotation increase with increasing the CFMF ω{in{itc}}, dispersion coefficient η, and EPCS α, but decrease with increasing the electric-field strength {itF}, TQD {itL}, and ERQD {itR}{in0}. The TQD is an important parameter of the qubit. Theoretically, the target, which is to regulate the oscillation period, decoherence time and quality factor of the free rotation of the qubit, can be achieved by designing different TQDs and regulating the strength of the electromagnetic field.

  12. Statistical Characterization of the Charge State and Residue Dependence of Low-Energy CID Peptide Dissociation Patterns

    Huang, Yingying; Triscari, Joseph M.; Tseng, George C.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2005-01-01

    Data mining was performed on 28 330 unique peptide tandem mass spectra for which sequences were assigned with high confidence. By dividing the spectra into different sets based on structural features and charge states of the corresponding peptides, chemical interactions involved in promoting specific cleavage patterns in gas-phase peptides were characterized. Pairwise fragmentation maps describing cleavages at all Xxx-Zzz residue combinations for b and y ions reveal that the difference in basicity between Arg and Lys results in different dissociation patterns for singly charged Arg- and Lys-ending tryptic peptides. While one dominant protonation form (proton localized) exists for Arg-ending peptides, a heterogeneous population of different protonated forms or more facile interconversion of protonated forms (proton partially mobile) exists for Lys-ending peptides. Cleavage C-terminal to acidic residues dominates spectra from peptides that have a localized proton and cleavage N-terminal to Pro dominates those that have a mobile or partially mobile proton. When Pro is absent from peptides that have a mobile or partially mobile proton, cleavage at each peptide bond becomes much more prominent. Whether the above patterns can be found in b ions, y ions, or both depends on the location of the proton holder(s). Enhanced cleavages C-terminal to branched aliphatic residues (Ile, Val, Leu) are observed in both b and y ions from peptides that have a mobile proton, as well as in y ions from peptides that have a partially mobile proton; enhanced cleavages N-terminal to these residues are observed in b ions from peptides that have a partially mobile proton. Statistical tools have been designed to visualize the fragmentation maps and measure the similarity between them. The pairwise cleavage patterns observed expand our knowledge of peptide gas-phase fragmentation behaviors and should be useful in algorithm development that employs improved models to predict fragment ion

  13. Equation of State Dependent Dynamics and Multi-messenger Signals from Stellar-mass Black Hole Formation

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Liebendörfer, Matthias; Couch, Sean M.; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2018-04-01

    We investigate axisymmetric black hole (BH) formation and its gravitational wave (GW) and neutrino signals with self-consistent core-collapse supernova simulations of a non-rotating 40 M ⊙ progenitor star using the isotropic diffusion source approximation for the neutrino transport and a modified gravitational potential for general relativistic effects. We consider four different neutron star (NS) equations of state (EoS): LS220, SFHo, BHBΛϕ, and DD2, and study the impact of the EoS on BH formation dynamics and GW emission. We find that the BH formation time is sensitive to the EoS from 460 to >1300 ms and is delayed in multiple dimensions for ∼100–250 ms due to the finite entropy effects. Depending on the EoS, our simulations show the possibility that shock revival can occur along with the collapse of the proto-neutron star (PNS) to a BH. The gravitational waveforms contain four major features that are similar to previous studies but show extreme values: (1) a low-frequency signal (∼300–500 Hz) from core-bounce and prompt convection, (2) a strong signal from the PNS g-mode oscillation among other features, (3) a high-frequency signal from the PNS inner-core convection, and (4) signals from the standing accretion shock instability and convection. The peak frequency at the onset of BH formation reaches to ∼2.3 kHz. The characteristic amplitude of a 10 kpc object at peak frequency is detectable but close to the noise threshold of the Advanced LIGO and KAGRA, suggesting that the next-generation GW detector will need to improve the sensitivity at the kHz domain to better observe stellar-mass BH formation from core-collapse supernovae or failed supernovae.

  14. NEW HYPERON EQUATIONS OF STATE FOR SUPERNOVAE AND NEUTRON STARS IN DENSITY-DEPENDENT HADRON FIELD THEORY

    Banik, Sarmistha [BITS Pilani, Hyderabad Campus, Hyderabad-500078 (India); Hempel, Matthias [Departement Physik, Universität Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Bandyopadhyay, Debades [Astroparticle Physics and Cosmology Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700064 (India)

    2014-10-01

    We develop new hyperon equation of state (EoS) tables for core-collapse supernova simulations and neutron stars. These EoS tables are based on a density-dependent relativistic hadron field theory where baryon-baryon interaction is mediated by mesons, using the parameter set DD2 for nucleons. Furthermore, light and heavy nuclei along with interacting nucleons are treated in the nuclear statistical equilibrium model of Hempel and Schaffner-Bielich which includes excluded volume effects. Of all possible hyperons, we consider only the contribution of Λs. We have developed two variants of hyperonic EoS tables: in the npΛφ case the repulsive hyperon-hyperon interaction mediated by the strange φ meson is taken into account, and in the npΛ case it is not. The EoS tables for the two cases encompass a wide range of densities (10{sup –12} to ∼1 fm{sup –3}), temperatures (0.1 to 158.48 MeV), and proton fractions (0.01 to 0.60). The effects of Λ hyperons on thermodynamic quantities such as free energy per baryon, pressure, or entropy per baryon are investigated and found to be significant at higher densities. The cold, β-equilibrated EoS (with the crust included self-consistently) results in a 2.1 M {sub ☉} maximum mass neutron star for the npΛφ case, whereas that for the npΛ case is 1.95 M {sub ☉}. The npΛφ EoS represents the first supernova EoS table involving hyperons that is directly compatible with the recently measured 2 M {sub ☉} neutron stars.

  15. Potassium conductances mediate bidirectional state-dependent modulation of action potential evoked dendritic calcium signals in dentate gyrus granule cells

    János Brunner

    2014-03-01

    resulted in faster repolarization and increased AP related calcium signals relative to the control (i. e. in the absence of the extra conductance at the same membrane potential. In conclusion, our results revealed that activation of potassium currents can profoundly enhance dendritic bAP-evoked calcium signals in GC dendrites, thus providing a previously unknown state-dependent modulatory mechanism in dendritic signalization.

  16. Time-dependent Wigner distribution function employed in coherent Schroedinger cat states: |Ψ(t))=N-1/2(|α)+eiφ|-α))

    Choi, Jeong Ryeol; Yeon, Kyu Hwang

    2008-01-01

    The Wigner distribution function for the time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian system in the coherent Schroedinger cat state is investigated. The type of state we consider is a superposition of two coherent states, which are by an angle of π out of phase with each other. The exact Wigner distribution function of the system is evaluated under a particular choice of phase, δ c,q . Our development is employed for two special cases, namely, the Caldirola-Kanai oscillator and the frequency stable damped harmonic oscillator. On the basis of the diverse values of the Wigner distribution function that were plotted, we analyze the nonclassical behavior of the systems.

  17. Context-dependent Dynamic Processes in Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder : Differentiating Common and Unique Effects of State Regulation Deficits and Delay Aversion

    Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.; Wiersema, Jan R.; van der Meere, Jacob J.; Roeyers, Herbert

    The ability to specify differential predictions is a mark of a scientific models' value. State regulation deficits (SRD) and delay aversion (DAv) have both been hypothesized as context-dependent dynamic dysfunctions in ADHD. However, to date there has been no systematic comparison of their common

  18. Field Dependence-Field Independence Cognitive Style, Gender, Career Choice and Academic Achievement of Secondary School Students in Emohua Local Government Area of Rivers State

    Onyekuru, Bruno Uchenna

    2015-01-01

    This is a descriptive study that investigated the relationships among field dependence-field independence cognitive style and gender, career choice and academic achievement of secondary school students in Emohua Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria. From the initial sample of 320 senior secondary school one (SS1) students drawn from the…

  19. Cognitive Styles Field Dependence/Independence and Scientific Achievement of Male and Female Students of Zamfara State College of Education Maru, Nigeria

    Muhammad, Tukur; Daniel, Esther Gananamalar Sarojini; Abdurauf, Rose Amnah

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the association between cognitive styles (Field dependence/Independence) and scientific achievement in Male and Female student of Biology and Integrated science Department of Zamfara State College of Education Maru, the is correlational. A population of 700 students were used, in which 150 were randomly selected…

  20. Quinoidal Oligo(9,10-anthryl)s with Chain-Length-Dependent Ground States: A Balance between Aromatic Stabilization and Steric Strain Release

    Lim, Zhenglong

    2015-11-12

    Quinoidal π-conjugated polycyclic hydrocarbons have attracted intensive research interest due to their unique optical/electronic properties and possible magnetic activity, which arises from a thermally excited triplet state. However, there is still lack of fundamental understanding on the factors that determine the electronic ground states. Herein, by using quinoidal oligo(9,10-anthryl)s, it is demonstrated that both aromatic stabilisation and steric strain release play balanced roles in determining the ground states. Oligomers with up to four anthryl units were synthesised and their ground states were investigated by electronic absorption and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, assisted by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The quinoidal 9,10-anthryl dimer 1 has a closed-shell ground state, whereas the tri- (2) and tetramers (3) both have an open-shell diradical ground state with a small singlet-triplet gap. Such a difference results from competition between two driving forces: the large steric repulsion between the anthryl/phenyl units in the closed-shell quinoidal form that drives the molecule to a flexible open-shell diradical structure, and aromatic stabilisation due to the gain of more aromatic sextet rings in the closed-shell form, which drives the molecule towards a contorted quinoidal structure. The ground states of these oligomers thus depend on the overall balance between these two driving forces and show chain-length dependence. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Carrier-density dependence of photoluminescence from localized states in InGaN/GaN quantum wells in nanocolumns and a thin film

    Shimosako, N., E-mail: n-shimosako@sophia.jp; Inose, Y.; Satoh, H.; Kinjo, K.; Nakaoka, T.; Oto, T. [Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Kishino, K.; Ema, K. [Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Sophia Nanotechnology Research Center, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2015-11-07

    We have measured and analyzed the carrier-density dependence of photoluminescence (PL) spectra and the PL efficiency of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells in nanocolumns and in a thin film over a wide excitation range. The localized states parameters, such as the tailing parameter, density and size of the localized states, and the mobility edge density are estimated. The spectral change and reduction of PL efficiency are explained by filling of the localized states and population into the extended states around the mobility edge density. We have also found that the nanocolumns have a narrower distribution of the localized states and a higher PL efficiency than those of the film sample although the In composition of the nanocolumns is higher than that of the film.

  2. Market Mobilities/Immobilities: Mutation, Path-Dependency, and the Spread of Charter School Policies in the United States

    Cohen, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 25 years charter school policies have spread through the United States at a rapid pace. However, despite this rapid growth these policies have spread unevenly across the country with important variations in how charter school systems function in each state. Drawing on case studies in Michigan and Oregon, this article argues that…

  3. A DegU-P and DegQ-Dependent Regulatory Pathway for the K-state in Bacillus subtilis

    Mathieu Miras

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The K-state in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis is associated with transformability (competence as well as with growth arrest and tolerance for antibiotics. Entry into the K-state is determined by the stochastic activation of the transcription factor ComK and occurs in about ~15% of the population in domesticated strains. Although the upstream mechanisms that regulate the K-state have been intensively studied and are well understood, it has remained unexplained why undomesticated isolates of B. subtilis are poorly transformable compared to their domesticated counterparts. We show here that this is because fewer cells enter the K-state, suggesting that a regulatory pathway limiting entry to the K-state is missing in domesticated strains. We find that loss of this limitation is largely due to an inactivating point mutation in the promoter of degQ. The resulting low level of DegQ decreases the concentration of phosphorylated DegU, which leads to the de-repression of the srfA operon and ultimately to the stabilization of ComK. As a result, more cells reach the threshold concentration of ComK needed to activate the auto-regulatory loop at the comK promoter. In addition, we demonstrate that the activation of srfA transcription in undomesticated strains is transient, turning off abruptly as cells enter the stationary phase. Thus, the K-state and transformability are more transient and less frequently expressed in the undomesticated strains. This limitation is more extreme than appreciated from studies of domesticated strains. Selection has apparently limited both the frequency and the duration of the bistably expressed K-state in wild strains, likely because of the high cost of growth arrest associated with the K-state. Future modeling of K-state regulation and of the fitness advantages and costs of the K-state must take these features into account.

  4. The redox state and the phosphorylation state of the mannitol-specific carrier of the E. coli phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system

    Robillard, G.T.; Pas, H.H.; Gage, D.; Elferink, M.G.L.

    1988-01-01

    This review summarizes the recent developments in identifying the activity-linked cysteine as one of the phosphorylation sites on the mannitol-specific EII of the E. coli phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannitol transport system. Two phosphorylation sites have been identified, one being the HPr/P-HPr

  5. Concurrence of Quantum States: Algebraic Dynamical Method Study XXX Models in a Time-Depending Random External Field

    Fu Chuanji; Zhu Qinsheng; Wu Shaoyi

    2010-01-01

    Based on algebraic dynamics and the concept of the concurrence of the entanglement, we investigate the evolutive properties of the two-qubit entanglement that formed by Heisenberg XXX models under a time-depending external held. For this system, the property of the concurrence that is only dependent on the coupling constant J and total values of the external field is proved. Furthermore, we found that the thermal concurrence of the system under a static random external field is a function of the coupling constant J, temperature T, and the magnitude of external held. (general)

  6. Energy dependence phase shift analysis of PI4He elastic scattering and the possibility of the (PI4He) excited states existence

    Nichitiu, F.; Falomkin, I.V.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Shcherbakov, Yu.A.; Piragino, G.

    1981-06-01

    In the 24 MeV-260 MeV kinetic energy interval, the energy dependent phase shift analysis of π 4 He elastic scattering is done. The eneray dependence is given by the rational fraction approximants of the partial S matrix. The search for the stable S matrix zero-pole pairs in the k and √s complex plane give some proofs for the existence of the (π 4 He) excited states in the S, P and probably D partial waves. (authors)

  7. Geometrical conditions for completely positive trace-preserving maps and their application to a quantum repeater and a state-dependent quantum cloning machine

    Carlini, A.; Sasaki, M.

    2003-01-01

    We address the problem of finding optimal CPTP (completely positive trace-preserving) maps between a set of binary pure states and another set of binary generic mixed state in a two-dimensional space. The necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of such CPTP maps can be discussed within a simple geometrical picture. We exploit this analysis to show the existence of an optimal quantum repeater which is superior to the known repeating strategies for a set of coherent states sent through a lossy quantum channel. We also show that the geometrical formulation of the CPTP mapping conditions can be a simpler method to derive a state-dependent quantum (anti) cloning machine than the study so far based on the explicit solution of several constraints imposed by unitarity in an extended Hilbert space

  8. Modeling and dynamics of the inward-facing state of a Na+/Cl- dependent neurotransmitter transporter homologue.

    Saher Afshan Shaikh

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The leucine transporter (LeuT has recently commanded exceptional attention due mainly to two distinctions; it provides the only crystal structures available for a protein homologous to the pharmacologically relevant neurotransmitter: sodium symporters (NSS, and, it exhibits a hallmark 5-TM inverted repeat ("LeuT-fold", a fold recently discovered to also exist in several secondary transporter families, underscoring its general role in transporter function. Constructing the transport cycle of "LeuT-fold" transporters requires detailed structural and dynamic descriptions of the outward-facing (OF and inward-facing (IF states, as well as the intermediate states. To this end, we have modeled the structurally unknown IF state of LeuT, based on the known crystal structures of the OF state of LeuT and the IF state of vSGLT, a "LeuT-fold" transporter. The detailed methodology developed for the study combines structure-based alignment, threading, targeted MD and equilibrium MD, and can be applied to other proteins. The resulting IF-state models maintain the secondary structural features of LeuT. Water penetration and solvent accessibility calculations show that TM1, TM3, TM6 and TM8 line the substrate binding/unbinding pathway with TM10 and its pseudosymmetric partner, TM5, participating in the extracellular and intracellular halves of the lumen, respectively. We report conformational hotspots where notable changes in interactions occur between the IF and OF states. We observe Na2 exiting the LeuT-substrate- complex in the IF state, mainly due to TM1 bending. Inducing a transition in only one of the two pseudosymmetric domains, while allowing the second to respond dynamically, is found to be sufficient to induce the formation of the IF state. We also propose that TM2 and TM7 may be facilitators of TM1 and TM6 motion. Thus, this study not only presents a novel modeling methodology applied to obtain the IF state of LeuT, but also describes structural

  9. Loss of nonclassical properties of quantum states in linear phase-insensitive processes with arbitrary time-dependent parameters

    Dodonov, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    Conditions of disappearance of different 'nonclassical' properties (usual and high-order squeezing, sub-Poissonian statistics, negativity of s-parametrized quasidistributions) are derived for a quantum oscillator, whose evolution is governed by the standard master equation of quantum optics with arbitrary time-dependent coefficients.

  10. Skuas at penguin carcass: patch use and state-dependent leaving decisions in a top-predator

    Hahn, S.M.; Peter, H.-U.; Bauer, S.

    2005-01-01

    Foraging decisions depend not only on simple maximization of energy intake but also on parallel fitness-relevant activities that change the forager's ‘state’. We characterized patch use and patch leaving rules of a top-predatory seabird, the Brown Skua (Catharacta antarctica lonnbergi), which during

  11. Thermodynamic-state and kinetic-process dependent dual ferromagnetic states in high-Si content FeMn(PSi) alloys

    Li, Guijiang; Eriksson, Olle; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2015-01-01

    We have found that thermodynamic state and kinetic process co-determine the dual ferromagnetic (FM) orders in high-Si content FeMnP 1−x Si x (0.25 < x < 0.5). Alloys undergoing high temperature annealing and quenching process prefer a high magnetic moment FM state in a chemically partial disordered structure with low c/a ratio. This mechanism is suggested to be responsible for the often discussed virgin effect as well. A chemically ordered structure obtained by a slow cooling process from a relatively low annealing temperature and the increase in Si content stabilize a metastable lattice with high c/a ratio and FM order with low magnetic moment. The non-simultaneity of the magnetic and structural transitions can be responsible for the occurrence of FM state in the high c/a range. Thus, a c/a ratio that changes from high to low is physically plausible to stabilize the metastable FM order at low temperature. Our theoretical observations indicate that suitable thermodynamic state and kinetic diffusion process is crucial for optimizing magnetocaloric properties and exploring feasible magnetocaloric materials

  12. Time-dependent quantum many-body theory of identical bosons in a double well: Early-time ballistic interferences of fragmented and number entangled states

    Masiello, David J.; Reinhardt, William P.

    2007-01-01

    A time-dependent multiconfigurational self-consistent field theory is presented to describe the many-body dynamics of a gas of identical bosonic atoms confined to an external trapping potential at zero temperature from first principles. A set of generalized evolution equations are developed, through the time-dependent variational principle, which account for the complete and self-consistent coupling between the expansion coefficients of each configuration and the underlying one-body wave functions within a restricted two state Fock space basis that includes the full effects of the condensate's mean field as well as atomic correlation. The resulting dynamical equations are a classical Hamiltonian system and, by construction, form a well-defined initial value problem. They are implemented in an efficient numerical algorithm. An example is presented, highlighting the generality of the theory, in which the ballistic expansion of a fragmented condensate ground state is compared to that of a macroscopic quantum superposition state, taken here to be a highly entangled number state, upon releasing the external trapping potential. Strikingly different many-body matter-wave dynamics emerge in each case, accentuating the role of both atomic correlation and mean-field effects in the two condensate states

  13. Measuring vascular reactivity with resting-state blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations: A potential alternative to the breath-holding challenge?

    Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Christen, Thomas; Moseley, Michael E; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Wright, Clinton B; Tamura, Manjula K; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2017-07-01

    Measurement of the ability of blood vessels to dilate and constrict, known as vascular reactivity, is often performed with breath-holding tasks that transiently raise arterial blood carbon dioxide (P a CO 2 ) levels. However, following the proper commands for a breath-holding experiment may be difficult or impossible for many patients. In this study, we evaluated two approaches for obtaining vascular reactivity information using blood oxygenation level-dependent signal fluctuations obtained from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data: physiological fluctuation regression and coefficient of variation of the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal. We studied a cohort of 28 older adults (69 ± 7 years) and found that six of them (21%) could not perform the breath-holding protocol, based on an objective comparison with an idealized respiratory waveform. In the subjects that could comply, we found a strong linear correlation between data extracted from spontaneous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging signal fluctuations and the blood oxygenation level-dependent percentage signal change during breath-holding challenge ( R 2  = 0.57 and 0.61 for resting-state physiological fluctuation regression and resting-state coefficient of variation methods, respectively). This technique may eliminate the need for subject cooperation, thus allowing the evaluation of vascular reactivity in a wider range of clinical and research conditions in which it may otherwise be impractical.

  14. On the stability and multi-stability of a TCP/RED congestion control model with state-dependent delay and discontinuous marking function

    Zhang, Shu; Xu, Jian; Chung, Kwok-wai

    2015-05-01

    Random early detection (RED) is an effective algorithm to control the Internet congestion. However, researches on RED parameters are difficult since there are state-dependent delay and discontinuous terms on the right-hand side of the model. We smooth the model by hyperbolic tangent function and reformulate it by a switch function to keep state variables positive. Numerical simulations on the original system validates the reformulated model. The multi-stability phenomenon is observed and some suggestions on the selection of RED parameters are given to enhance the global stability of the model by numerical bifurcation continuation on the reformulated model.

  15. Tight-binding approximations to time-dependent density functional theory — A fast approach for the calculation of electronically excited states

    Rüger, Robert, E-mail: rueger@scm.com [Scientific Computing & Modelling NV, De Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Linnéstr. 2, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Lenthe, Erik van [Scientific Computing & Modelling NV, De Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heine, Thomas [Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Linnéstr. 2, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Visscher, Lucas [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-05-14

    We propose a new method of calculating electronically excited states that combines a density functional theory based ground state calculation with a linear response treatment that employs approximations used in the time-dependent density functional based tight binding (TD-DFTB) approach. The new method termed time-dependent density functional theory TD-DFT+TB does not rely on the DFTB parametrization and is therefore applicable to systems involving all combinations of elements. We show that the new method yields UV/Vis absorption spectra that are in excellent agreement with computationally much more expensive TD-DFT calculations. Errors in vertical excitation energies are reduced by a factor of two compared to TD-DFTB.

  16. Excited state nuclear forces from the Tamm-Dancoff approximation to time-dependent density functional theory within the plane wave basis set framework

    Hutter, Jürg

    2003-03-01

    An efficient formulation of time-dependent linear response density functional theory for the use within the plane wave basis set framework is presented. The method avoids the transformation of the Kohn-Sham matrix into the canonical basis and references virtual orbitals only through a projection operator. Using a Lagrangian formulation nuclear derivatives of excited state energies within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation are derived. The algorithms were implemented into a pseudo potential/plane wave code and applied to the calculation of adiabatic excitation energies, optimized geometries and vibrational frequencies of three low lying states of formaldehyde. An overall good agreement with other time-dependent density functional calculations, multireference configuration interaction calculations and experimental data was found.

  17. The amplitude and phase precision of 40 Hz auditory steady-state response depend on the level of arousal

    Griskova, Inga; Mørup, Morten; Parnas, Josef

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, in healthy subjects, the modulation of amplitude and phase precision of the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) to 40 Hz stimulation in two resting conditions varying in the level of arousal. Previously, ASSR measures have shown to be affected......-negative multi-way factorization (NMWF) (Morup et al. in J Neurosci Methods 161:361-368, 2007). The estimates of these measures were subjected to statistical analysis. The amplitude and phase precision of the ASSR were significantly larger during the low arousal state compared to the high arousal condition...

  18. Projectile- and charge-state-dependent electron yields from ion penetration of solids as a probe of preequilibrium stopping power

    Rothard, H.; Schou, Jørgen; Groeneveld, K.-O.

    1992-01-01

    Kinetic electron-emission yields gamma from swift ion penetration of solids are proportional to the (electronic) stopping power gamma approximately Beta-S*, if the preequilibrium evolution of the charge and excitation states of the positively charged ions is taken into account. We show...... by investigating the "transport factor" beta, the energy spectrum of directly ejected recoil electrons and the evolution of ionic charge state inside solids. Estimates of the energy-loss fraction leading to electron emission and the effective charges of the ions near the surface allow a quantitative description...

  19. A Consistent Derivation of the Impedance of a Lithium-Ion Battery Electrode and its Dependency on the State-of-Charge

    Schönleber, M.; Uhlmann, C.; Braun, P.; Weber, A.; Ivers-Tiffée, E.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •A derivation of the impedance model of a Lithium-Ion battery electrode is given. •The dependency of all partial impedances on the State-of-Charge is revealed. •The lasting disagreement in how to model solid-state diffusion is settled. •A solid starting point to derive models of any complexity is provided. •The connection between differential capacity and solid-state diffusion is revealed. -- Abstract: A derivation of the fundamental impedance of a Lithium-Ion battery electrode is given, exemplarily conducted for a solid thin-film electrode. The focus of this derivation is not on developing a model which is able to reproduce the exact behaviour of a given electrode, but rather on deriving its fundamental characteristics from few and intuitive assumptions in a simple and transparent way. It is thus shown, that the fundamental impedance of a solid thin-film electrode consists of an RC-element for charge-transfer, a Finite-Length Warburg element for diffusion in the electrolyte and a Finite-Space Warburg element for diffusion in the solid-state. The use of a Finite-Length Warburg element with a serially connected capacitor for modelling diffusion in the solid-state is thus indicated to be physically questionable. In addition, the theoretically expected behaviour of charge-transfer and solid-state diffusion on the degree of lithiation (State-of-Charge) is derived and discussed.

  20. The Effect of Dorsal Hippocampal α2-Adrenegic Receptors on WIN55,212-2 State-Dependent Memory of Passive Avoidance

    Zarrindast M.R.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Cannabinoids are a class of psychoactive compounds that produce a wide array of effects in a large number of species. In the present study, the effects of bilateral intra-CA1 injections of an α2-adrenergic receptor agents, on WIN55,212-2 state-dependent learning were examined in adult male Wistar rats. Methods: The animals were bilaterally implanted with chronic cannulae in the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus, trained in a step-down type inhibitory avoidance task, and tested 24h after training to measure step-down latency.Results: Post-training intra-CA1 injection of WIN55,212-2 (0.25 and 0.5µg/rat induced impairment of memory retention. Amnesia produced by post-training WIN55,212-2 (0.5µg/rat was reversed by pre-test administration of the same dose of WIN55,212-2 that is due to a state-dependent effect. Pre-test intra-CA1 injection of clonidine (0.5 and 0.75µg/rat, intra-CA1 improved post-training WIN55,212-2 (0.5µg/rat, intra-CA1-induced retrieval impairment, while pre-test intra-CA1 injection of yohimbine (1µg/rat, intra-CA1 2min before the administration of WIN55,212-2 (0.5µg/rat, intra-CA1 inhibited WIN55,212-2 state-dependent memory. Conclusion: These results suggest that α2-adrenergic receptors of the dorsal hippocampal CA1 regions may play an important role in Win55,212-2-induced amnesia and WIN55,212-2 state-dependent memory.

  1. Disrupted Topological Organization in Whole-Brain Functional Networks of Heroin-Dependent Individuals: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    Jiang, Guihua; Wen, Xue; Qiu, Yingwei; Zhang, Ruibin; Wang, Junjing; Li, Meng; Ma, Xiaofen; Tian, Junzhang; Huang, Ruiwang

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have shown that heroin addiction is related to abnormalities in widespread local regions and in the functional connectivity of the brain. However, little is known about whether heroin addiction changes the topological organization of whole-brain functional networks. Seventeen heroin-dependent individuals (HDIs) and 15 age-, gender-matched normal controls (NCs) were enrolled, and the resting-state functional magnetic resonance images (RS-fMRI) were acquired from these subj...

  2. Continuous solutions to a viral infection model with general incidence rate, discrete state-dependent delay, CTL and antibody immune responses

    Rezunenko, Oleksandr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2016, č. 79 (2016), s. 1-15 ISSN 1417-3875 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-06678S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : evolution equations * Lyapunov stability * state-dependent delay * virus infection model Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 0.926, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/AS/rezunenko-0464066.pdf

  3. Increased petroleum and natural gas dependence between Europe and the Arab Countries. What is the role for the states?

    Sarkis, N.

    1995-01-01

    This work deals with the increased petroleum and natural gas dependence between Europe and the Arab Countries. The euro-arabian relations and the worldwide energetic market perspectives are indicated as well as the petroleum, natural gas and coal prices between the years 1990 and 2010, the worldwide petroleum supply and demand estimations between 1994 and 2010 and the petroleum estimations between 1994 and 2010. (O.L.). 7 tabs

  4. Photoprotection in a purple phototrophic bacterium mediated by oxygen-dependent alteration of carotenoid excited-state properties

    Šlouf, V.; Chábera, P.; Olsen, J.D.; Martin, E.C.; Qian, P.; Hunter, C.N.; Polívka, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 22 (2012), s. 8570-8575 ISSN 0027-8424 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : charge-transfer state * photoprotection * purple bacteria * photosynthesis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 9.737, year: 2012

  5. Moonlight avoidance in gerbils reveals a sophisticated interplay among time allocation, vigilance and state-dependent foraging.

    Kotler, Burt P; Brown, Joel; Mukherjee, Shomen; Berger-Tal, Oded; Bouskila, Amos

    2010-05-22

    Foraging animals have several tools for managing the risk of predation, and the foraging games between them and their predators. Among these, time allocation is foremost, followed by vigilance and apprehension. Together, their use influences a forager's time allocation and giving-up density (GUD) in depletable resource patches. We examined Allenby's gerbils (Gerbilus andersoni allenbyi) exploiting seed resource patches in a large vivarium under varying moon phases in the presence of a red fox (Vulpes vulpes). We measured time allocated to foraging patches electronically and GUDs from seeds left behind in resource patches. From these, we estimated handling times, attack rates and quitting harvest rates (QHRs). Gerbils displayed greater vigilance (lower attack rates) at brighter moon phases (full full > new > wane). Finally, gerbils displayed higher QHRs at new and waxing moon phases. Differences across moon phases not only reflect changing time allocation and vigilance, but changes in the state of the foragers and their marginal value of energy. Early in the lunar cycle, gerbils rely on vigilance and sacrifice state to avoid risk; later they defend state at the cost of increased time allocation; finally their state can recover as safe opportunities expand. In the predator-prey foraging game, foxes may contribute to these patterns of behaviours by modulating their own activity in response to the opportunities presented in each moon phase.

  6. Spatial and thickness dependence of coupling interaction of surface states and influence on transport and optical properties of few-layer Bi2Se3

    Li, Zhongjun; Chen, Shi; Sun, Jiuyu; Li, Xingxing; Qiu, Huaili; Yang, Jinlong

    2018-02-01

    Coupling interaction between the bottom and top surface electronic states and the influence on transport and optical properties of Bi2Se3 thin films with 1-8 quintuple layers (QLs) have been investigated by first principles calculations. Obvious spatial and thickness dependences of coupling interaction are found by analyzing hybridization of two surface states. In the thin film with a certain thickness, from the outer to inner atomic layers, the coupling interaction exhibits an increasing trend. On the other hand, as thickness increases, the coupling interaction shows a disproportionate decrease trend. Moreover, the system with 3 QLs exhibits stronger interaction than that with 2 QLs. The presence of coupling interaction would suppress destructive interference of surface states and enhance resistance in various degrees. In view of the inversely proportional relation to transport channel width, the resistance of thin films should show disproportionate thickness dependence. This prediction is qualitatively consistent with the transport measurements at low temperature. Furthermore, the optical properties also exhibit obvious thickness dependence. Especially as the thickness increases, the coupling interaction results in red and blue shifts of the multiple-peak structures in low and high energy regions of imaginary dielectric function, respectively. The red shift trend is in agreement with the recent experimental observation and the blue shift is firstly predicted by the present calculation. The present results give a concrete understanding of transport and optical properties in devices based on Bi2Se3 thin films with few QLs.

  7. Quasi-stationary states of an electron with linearly dependent effective mass in an open nanostructure within transmission coefficient and S-matrix methods

    Seti, Julia; Tkach, Mykola; Voitsekhivska, Oxana

    2018-03-01

    The exact solutions of the Schrödinger equation for a double-barrier open semiconductor plane nanostructure are obtained by using two different approaches, within the model of the rectangular potential profile and the continuous position-dependent effective mass of the electron. The transmission coefficient and scattering matrix are calculated for the double-barrier nanostructure. The resonance energies and resonance widths of the electron quasi-stationary states are analyzed as a function of the size of the near-interface region between wells and barriers, where the effective mass linearly depends on the coordinate. It is established that, in both methods, the increasing size affects in a qualitatively similar way the spectral characteristics of the states, shifting the resonance energies into the low- or high-energy region and increasing the resonance widths. It is shown that the relative difference of resonance energies and widths of a certain state, obtained in the model of position-dependent effective mass and in the widespread abrupt model in physically correct range of near-interface sizes, does not exceed 0.5% and 5%, respectively, independently of the other geometrical characteristics of the structure.

  8. Millisecond dynamics in glutaredoxin during catalytic turnover is dependent on substrate binding and absent in the resting states

    Jensen, Kristine Steen; Winther, Jakob R; Teilum, Kaare

    2011-01-01

    to the glutathione exchange rate was observed for 23 residues. Binding of reduced glutathione resulted in competitive inhibition of the reduced enzyme having kinetics similar to that of the reaction. This observation couples the motions observed during catalysis directly to substrate binding. Backbone motions......Conformational dynamics is important for enzyme function. Which motions of enzymes determine catalytic efficiency and whether the same motions are important for all enzymes, however, are not well understood. Here we address conformational dynamics in glutaredoxin during catalytic turnover...... with a combination of NMR magnetization transfer, R(2) relaxation dispersion, and ligand titration experiments. Glutaredoxins catalyze a glutathione exchange reaction, forming a stable glutathinoylated enzyme intermediate. The equilibrium between the reduced state and the glutathionylated state was biochemically...

  9. Single crystal structures and theoretical calculations of uranium endohedral metallofullerenes (U@C2n , 2n = 74, 82) show cage isomer dependent oxidation states for U.

    Cai, Wenting; Morales-Martínez, Roser; Zhang, Xingxing; Najera, Daniel; Romero, Elkin L; Metta-Magaña, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Fortea, Antonio; Fortier, Skye; Chen, Ning; Poblet, Josep M; Echegoyen, Luis

    2017-08-01

    Charge transfer is a general phenomenon observed for all endohedral mono-metallofullerenes. Since the detection of the first endohedral metallofullerene (EMF), La@C 82 , in 1991, it has always been observed that the oxidation state of a given encapsulated metal is always the same, regardless of the cage size. No crystallographic data exist for any early actinide endohedrals and little is known about the oxidation states for the few compounds that have been reported. Here we report the X-ray structures of three uranium metallofullerenes, U@ D 3h -C 74 , U@ C 2 (5)-C 82 and U@ C 2v (9)-C 82 , and provide theoretical evidence for cage isomer dependent charge transfer states for U. Results from DFT calculations show that U@ D 3h -C 74 and U@ C 2 (5)-C 82 have tetravalent electronic configurations corresponding to U 4+ @ D 3h -C 74 4- and U 4+ @ C 2 (5)-C 82 4- . Surprisingly, the isomeric U@ C 2v (9)-C 82 has a trivalent electronic configuration corresponding to U 3+ @ C 2v (9)-C 82 3- . These are the first X-ray crystallographic structures of uranium EMFs and this is first observation of metal oxidation state dependence on carbon cage isomerism for mono-EMFs.

  10. Research of dependence of ultimate strength of the bond border in solid state of dissimilar metals from their plasticity

    Borts, B.V.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical model, describing the joining of dissimilar materials in solid state is presented. The model takes into account plastic deformation of materials at the joining temperature, and also shearing forces, appearing while rolling the material and playing determinant role in the process of materials solid phase joining. Experimental results of X-ray microanalysis, metallography, tension tests, micro-hardness and nano-hardness of samples bonding border are presented, which confirms the relevancy of the proposed model.

  11. Tumour exosomes display different differential mechanical and complement activation properties dependent on malignant state: implications in endothelial leakiness

    Whitehead, Bradley Joseph; Wu, Linping; Hvam, Michael Lykke

    2015-01-01

    (QNM AFM) to determine size and nanomechanical properties. Effect of HCV-29, T24 and FL3 exosomes on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer integrity was determined by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurements and transport was determined by flow cytometry. Complement......). Malignant cell-derived exosomes activated complement through calcium-sensitive pathways in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusions : Malignant (metastatic and non-metastatic) cell line exosomes display a markedly reduced stiffness and adhesion but an increased complement activation compared to non...

  12. Stark effect-dependent of ground-state donor binding energy in InGaN/GaN parabolic QWW

    El Ghazi, Haddou; Zorkani, Izeddine; Jorio, Anouar

    2013-01-01

    Using the finite-difference method within the quasi-one-dimensional effective potential model and effective mass approximation, the ground-state binding energy of hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity in wurtzite (WZ) (In,Ga)N/GaN parabolic transversal-section quantum-well wires (PQWWs) subjected to external electric field is investigated. An effective radius of a cylindrical QWW describing the strength of the lateral confinement is introduced. The results show that (i) the position of the largest electron probability density in x–y plane is located at a point and it is pushed along the negative sense by the electric field directed along the positive sense, (ii) the ground-state binding energy is largest for the impurity located at this point and starts to decrease when the impurity is away from this point, (iii) the ground-state binding energy decreases with increase in the external electric field and effective radius, and (iv) the Stark-shift increases with the increase of the external electric field and the effective radius

  13. Deriving frequency-dependent spatial patterns in MEG-derived resting state sensorimotor network: A novel multiband ICA technique.

    Nugent, Allison C; Luber, Bruce; Carver, Frederick W; Robinson, Stephen E; Coppola, Richard; Zarate, Carlos A

    2017-02-01

    Recently, independent components analysis (ICA) of resting state magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings has revealed resting state networks (RSNs) that exhibit fluctuations of band-limited power envelopes. Most of the work in this area has concentrated on networks derived from the power envelope of beta bandpass-filtered data. Although research has demonstrated that most networks show maximal correlation in the beta band, little is known about how spatial patterns of correlations may differ across frequencies. This study analyzed MEG data from 18 healthy subjects to determine if the spatial patterns of RSNs differed between delta, theta, alpha, beta, gamma, and high gamma frequency bands. To validate our method, we focused on the sensorimotor network, which is well-characterized and robust in both MEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) resting state data. Synthetic aperture magnetometry (SAM) was used to project signals into anatomical source space separately in each band before a group temporal ICA was performed over all subjects and bands. This method preserved the inherent correlation structure of the data and reflected connectivity derived from single-band ICA, but also allowed identification of spatial spectral modes that are consistent across subjects. The implications of these results on our understanding of sensorimotor function are discussed, as are the potential applications of this technique. Hum Brain Mapp 38:779-791, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Effect of the oxidation rate and Fe(II) state on microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(III) mineral formation

    Senko, John M.; Dewers , Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems.

  15. Dose-dependent effects of theta burst rTMS on cortical excitability and resting-state connectivity of the human motor system.

    Nettekoven, Charlotte; Volz, Lukas J; Kutscha, Martha; Pool, Eva-Maria; Rehme, Anne K; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fink, Gereon R; Grefkes, Christian

    2014-05-14

    Theta burst stimulation (TBS), a specific protocol of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), induces changes in cortical excitability that last beyond stimulation. TBS-induced aftereffects, however, vary between subjects, and the mechanisms underlying these aftereffects to date remain poorly understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether increasing the number of pulses of intermittent TBS (iTBS) (1) increases cortical excitability as measured by motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) and (2) alters functional connectivity measured using resting-state fMRI, in a dose-dependent manner. Sixteen healthy, human subjects received three serially applied iTBS blocks of 600 pulses over the primary motor cortex (M1 stimulation) and the parieto-occipital vertex (sham stimulation) to test for dose-dependent iTBS effects on cortical excitability and functional connectivity (four sessions in total). iTBS over M1 increased MEP amplitudes compared with sham stimulation after each stimulation block. Although the increase in MEP amplitudes did not differ between the first and second block of M1 stimulation, we observed a significant increase after three blocks (1800 pulses). Furthermore, iTBS enhanced resting-state functional connectivity between the stimulated M1 and premotor regions in both hemispheres. Functional connectivity between M1 and ipsilateral dorsal premotor cortex further increased dose-dependently after 1800 pulses of iTBS over M1. However, no correlation between changes in MEP amplitudes and functional connectivity was detected. In summary, our data show that increasing the number of iTBS stimulation blocks results in dose-dependent effects at the local level (cortical excitability) as well as at a systems level (functional connectivity) with a dose-dependent enhancement of dorsal premotor cortex-M1 connectivity. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/346849-11$15.00/0.

  16. The dependence of the tunneling characteristic on the electronic energy bands and the carrier’s states of Graphene superlattice

    Yang, C. H.; Shen, G. Z.; Ao, Z. M.; Xu, Y. W.

    2016-09-01

    Using the transfer matrix method, the carrier tunneling properties in graphene superlattice generated by the Thue-Morse sequence and Kolakoski sequence are investigated. The positions and strength of the transmission can be modulated by the barrier structures, the incident energy and angle, the height and width of the potential. These carriers tunneling characteristic can be understood from the energy band structures in the corresponding superlattice systems and the carrier’s states in well/barriers. The transmission peaks above the critical incident angle rely on the carrier’s resonance in the well regions. The structural diversity can modulate the electronic and transport properties, thus expanding its applications.

  17. Delay-Dependent Stability Analysis of Uncertain Fuzzy Systems with State and Input Delays under Imperfect Premise Matching

    Zejian Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the stability and stabilization problem for uncertain T-S fuzzy systems with time-varying state and input delays. A new augmented Lyapunov function with an additional triple-integral term and different membership functions of the fuzzy models and fuzzy controllers are introduced to derive the stability criterion, which is less conservative than the existing results. Moreover, a new flexibility design method is also provided. Some numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness and less conservativeness of the proposed method.

  18. Pressure-dependent ground states and fermiology in β- ( BDA-TTP ) 2 M Cl4 ( M=Fe,Ga )

    Choi, E. S.; Graf, D.; Brooks, J. S.; Yamada, J.; Akutsu, H.; Kikuchi, K.; Tokumoto, M.

    2004-07-01

    We have investigated pressure- and magnetic-field-dependent electrical transport properties in the charge transfer salts β-(BDA-TTP)2MCl4(M=Fe,Ga) , both of which show a metal-insulator (MI) transition around 120K at ambient pressure. The zero field temperature-pressure phase diagrams of the two compounds are quite similar; the MI transition temperature decreases with pressure, and superconductivity is observed in both the magnetic and non-magnetic compounds above ˜4.5kbar . Likewise, Shubnikov-de Haas effect measurements show nearly identical Fermi surfaces. These similarities suggest that the magnetic interaction J between the conduction electrons and the magnetic moments in β-(BDA-TTP)2FeCl4 is small. Nevertheless, magnetoresistance measurements show remarkable differences and reveal that magnetic interactions with the conduction electrons are still effective in M=Fe compounds.

  19. 1H line width dependence on MAS speed in solid state NMR - Comparison of experiment and simulation

    Sternberg, Ulrich; Witter, Raiker; Kuprov, Ilya; Lamley, Jonathan M.; Oss, Andres; Lewandowski, Józef R.; Samoson, Ago

    2018-06-01

    Recent developments in magic angle spinning (MAS) technology permit spinning frequencies of ≥100 kHz. We examine the effect of such fast MAS rates upon nuclear magnetic resonance proton line widths in the multi-spin system of β-Asp-Ala crystal. We perform powder pattern simulations employing Fokker-Plank approach with periodic boundary conditions and 1H-chemical shift tensors calculated using the bond polarization theory. The theoretical predictions mirror well the experimental results. Both approaches demonstrate that homogeneous broadening has a linear-quadratic dependency on the inverse of the MAS spinning frequency and that, at the faster end of the spinning frequencies, the residual spectral line broadening becomes dominated by chemical shift distributions and susceptibility effects even for crystalline systems.

  20. Effects of different doses of glucose and insulin on morphine state-dependent memory of passive avoidance in mice.

    Jafari, M R; Zarrindast, M R; Djahanguiri, B

    2004-10-01

    Behavioral effects of morphine, including its effect on memory, have been demonstrated to be influenced by glucose pretreatment. The measurement of step-down latency in passive avoidance has been used to study memory in laboratory animals. The pre-training injection of 5 mg/kg morphine impaired memory, which was restored when 24 h later the same dose of the drug was administered. To investigate the effects of glucose and insulin alone or in combination with morphine, on pre-test day, on memory recall in mice. The effects of different doses of glucose (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, IP) and insulin (5, 10, and 20 IU/kg, IP) alone or in combination with morphine, have been studied in mice. The blood glucose level and locomotor activity of the animals were also measured. Although the administration of glucose alone showed no effect on morphine-induced memory impairment, its co-administration with morphine resulted in a significant and dose-dependent memory enhancement compared with the effects of morphine administration alone. Like glucose, the administration of different doses of insulin alone produced no change in the memory, but when the drug was co-administered with morphine, it significantly reduced morphine-induced memory retrieval. The effect of insulin was the opposite of glucose. None of the animals subjected to insulin treatment showed convulsions. Glucose is suggested to increase, on the test day, the morphine-induced memory enhancement by three different mechanisms: cholinergic or opioidergic modulations, or regulation of the ATP-dependent potassium channels.

  1. Size dependence of the thermo-electrodynamics states of composite high-T c superconductors and its effect on the current instability conditions

    Romanovskii, V.R.; Watanabe, K.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of transverse geometries of the slab of composite high-T c superconductors on their stable and unstable thermal and electrodynamics transient states in the incomplete and complete penetration modes during the current charging are discussed. The transient period when the electric field that is induced by the charged current becomes more homogeneous during the initial stage of the complete penetration mode in the sub-critical voltage range is studied. In the over-critical voltage range, the cross-section shape of the slab affects its stable and unstable temperature variation. As a result, the current instability condition is not identical for high-T c superconducting composite tapes that have the same cross-sectional area with various shapes of the cross-section. The condition depends on their thickness: the less thickness, the more stable the current distribution in the composite superconductors with the same cross-sectional area. This feature is a result of the unavoidable reduction of the current-carrying capacity of a high-T c superconducting composite by the temperature increase. This reduction is caused by the relevant temperature dependence of electrodynamics states of the composite. This temperature dependence happens even during a stable stage of the current charging. These mechanisms must be considered during experiments at which the critical or quenching currents are defined

  2. Weather Regime-Dependent Predictability: Sequentially Linked High-Impact Weather Events over the United States during March 2016

    Bosart, L. F.; Winters, A. C.; Keyser, D.

    2016-12-01

    High-impact weather events (HWEs), defined by episodes of excessive precipitation or periods of well above or well below normal temperatures, can pose important predictability challenges on medium-range (8-16 day) time scales. Furthermore, HWEs can contribute disproportionately to temperature and precipitation anomaly statistics for a particular season. This disproportionate contribution suggests that HWEs need to be considered in describing and understanding the dynamical and thermodynamic processes that operate at the weather-climate intersection. HWEs typically develop in conjunction with highly amplified flow patterns that permit an extensive latitudinal exchange of polar and tropical air masses. Highly amplified flow patterns over North America often occur in response to a reconfiguration of the large-scale upstream flow pattern over the North Pacific Ocean. The large-scale flow pattern over the North Pacific, North America, and western North Atlantic during the latter half of March 2016 was characterized by frequent cyclonic wave breaking (CWB). This large-scale flow pattern enabled three sequentially linked HWEs to develop over the continental United States. The first HWE was a challenging-to-predict cyclogenesis event on 23-24 March in the central Plains that resulted in both a major snowstorm along the Colorado Front Range and a severe weather outbreak over the central and southern Plains. The second HWE was a severe weather outbreak that occurred over the Tennessee and Ohio River Valleys on 27-28 March. The third HWE was the development of well below normal temperatures over the eastern United States that followed the formation of a high-latitude omega block over northwestern North America during 28 March-1 April. This study will examine (1) the role that CWB over the North Pacific and North America played in the evolution of the flow pattern during late-March 2016 and the development of the three HWEs and (2) the skill of GFS operational and ensemble

  3. How Parallel Are Excited State Potential Energy Surfaces from Time-Independent and Time-Dependent DFT? A BODIPY Dye Case Study.

    Komoto, Keenan T; Kowalczyk, Tim

    2016-10-06

    To support the development and characterization of chromophores with targeted photophysical properties, excited-state electronic structure calculations should rapidly and accurately predict how derivatization of a chromophore will affect its excitation and emission energies. This paper examines whether a time-independent excited-state density functional theory (DFT) approach meets this need through a case study of BODIPY chromophore photophysics. A restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham (ROKS) treatment of the S 1 excited state of BODIPY dyes is contrasted with linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Vertical excitation energies predicted by the two approaches are remarkably different due to overestimation by TDDFT and underestimation by ROKS relative to experiment. Overall, ROKS with a standard hybrid functional provides the more accurate description of the S 1 excited state of BODIPY dyes, but excitation energies computed by the two methods are strongly correlated. The two approaches also make similar predictions of shifts in the excitation energy upon functionalization of the chromophore. TDDFT and ROKS models of the S 1 potential energy surface are then examined in detail for a representative BODIPY dye through molecular dynamics sampling on both model surfaces. We identify the most significant differences in the sampled surfaces and analyze these differences along selected normal modes. Differences between ROKS and TDDFT descriptions of the S 1 potential energy surface for this BODIPY derivative highlight the continuing need for validation of widely used approximations in excited state DFT through experimental benchmarking and comparison to ab initio reference data.

  4. Morphofunctional State of Esophageal Mucosa in Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Depending on the Nutritional Status of Patients

    H.D. Fadieienko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We have studied morphofunctional state of esophageal mucosa in 57 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD with normal (body mass index (BMI — 18.5–24.9 kg/m2 and excessive (BMI over 25 kg/m2 body weight. A histologic and morphometric study of esophageal mucosa, immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of apoptosis marker CD95 and inflammatory marker cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 were carried out. In reflux esophagitis, most characteristic are changes in multilayered epithelium — hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, proliferation of basal cells and acanthosis. At that, significant differences in morphometric characteristics of patients with normal BMI and overweight were not found. The development of reflux esophagitis was associated with violations of pro-apoptotic ability of esophageal mucosa cells and increased expression of COX-2, most significant in patients with high BMI. Detected disorders may determine the mechanisms of complicated course of GERD in these patients.

  5. Phonon density of states of YBa2Cu3Ox in dependence on oxygen content and temperature

    Natkaniec, I.; Belushkin, A.V.; Mayer, J.

    1988-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and neutron diffraction spectra of YBa 2 Cu 3 O x compounds for x=6.95, 6.45 and 6.15 at temperatures 290, 80 and 10 K were measured. Generalized functions of phonon density of states (GDOS) obtained from INS spectra change significantly in the wide energy range from 10 to 90 MeV with increasing oxygen deficiency. An anomalous increase of the GDOS at energies from 15 to 40 MeV with decreasing temperature was observed for superconducting samples (x=6.15 and 6.45), while in the non-superconducting sample (x=6.15) such effect was less pronounced

  6. Dependence of Excited State Potential Energy Surfaces on the Spatial Overlap of the Kohn-Sham Orbitals and the Amount of Nonlocal Hartree-Fock Exchange in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    Plötner, Jürgen; Tozer, David J; Dreuw, Andreas

    2010-08-10

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with standard GGA or hybrid exchange-correlation functionals is not capable of describing the potential energy surface of the S1 state of Pigment Yellow 101 correctly; an additional local minimum is observed at a twisted geometry with substantial charge transfer (CT) character. To investigate the influence of nonlocal exact orbital (Hartree-Fock) exchange on the shape of the potential energy surface of the S1 state in detail, it has been computed along the twisting coordinate employing the standard BP86, B3LYP, and BHLYP xc-functionals as well as the long-range separated (LRS) exchange-correlation (xc)-functionals LC-BOP, ωB97X, ωPBE, and CAM-B3LYP and compared to RI-CC2 benchmark results. Additionally, a recently suggested Λ-parameter has been employed that measures the amount of CT in an excited state by calculating the spatial overlap of the occupied and virtual molecular orbitals involved in the transition. Here, the error in the calculated S1 potential energy curves at BP86, B3LYP, and BHLYP can be clearly related to the Λ-parameter, i.e., to the extent of charge transfer. Additionally, it is demonstrated that the CT problem is largely alleviated when the BHLYP xc-functional is employed, although it still exhibits a weak tendency to underestimate the energy of CT states. The situation improves drastically when LRS-functionals are employed within TDDFT excited state calculations. All tested LRS-functionals give qualitatively the correct potential energy curves of the energetically lowest excited states of P. Y. 101 along the twisting coordinate. While LC-BOP and ωB97X overcorrect the CT problem and now tend to give too large excitation energies compared to other non-CT states, ωPBE and CAM-B3LYP are in excellent agreement with the RI-CC2 results, with respect to both the correct shape of the potential energy curve as well as the absolute values of the calculated excitation energies.

  7. Dynamics of α-Hb chain binding to its chaperone AHSP depends on heme coordination and redox state.

    Kiger, Laurent; Vasseur, Corinne; Domingues-Hamdi, Elisa; Truan, Gilles; Marden, Michael C; Baudin-Creuza, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    AHSP is an erythroid molecular chaperone of the α-hemoglobin chains (α-Hb). Upon AHSP binding, native ferric α-Hb undergoes an unprecedented structural rearrangement at the heme site giving rise to a 6th coordination bond with His(E7). Recombinant AHSP, WT α-Hb:AHSP and α-Hb(HE7Q):AHSP complexes were expressed in Escherichia coli. Thermal denaturation curves were measured by circular dichroism for the isolated α-Hb and bound to AHSP. Kinetics of ligand binding and redox reactions of α-Hb bound to AHSP as well as α-Hb release from the α-Hb:AHSP complex were measured by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. AHSP binding to α-Hb is kinetically controlled to prevail over direct binding with β-chains and is also thermodynamically controlled by the α-Hb redox state and not the liganded state of the ferrous α-Hb. The dramatic instability of isolated ferric α-Hb is greatly decreased upon AHSP binding. Removing the bis-histidyl hexacoordination in α-HbH58(E7)Q:AHSP complex reduces the stabilizing effect of AHSP binding. Once the ferric α-Hb is bound to AHSP, the globin can be more easily reduced by several chemical and enzymatic systems compared to α-Hb within the Hb-tetramer. α-Hb reduction could trigger its release from AHSP toward its final Hb β-chain partner producing functional ferrous Hb-tetramers. This work indicates a preferred kinetic pathway for Hb-synthesis. The cellular redox balance in Hb-synthesis should be considered as important as the relative proportional synthesis of both Hb-subunits and their heme cofactor. The in vivo role of AHSP is discussed in the context of the molecular disorders observed in thalassemia. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Social stress engages opioid regulation of locus coeruleus norepinephrine neurons and induces a state of cellular and physical opiate dependence.

    Chaijale, Nayla N; Curtis, Andre L; Wood, Susan K; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Bhatnagar, Seema; Reyes, Beverly As; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J; Valentino, Rita J

    2013-09-01

    Stress is implicated in diverse psychiatric disorders including substance abuse. The locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE) system is a major stress response system that is also a point of intersection between stress neuromediators and endogenous opioids and so may be a site at which stress can influence drug-taking behaviors. As social stress is a common stressor for humans, this study characterized the enduring impact of repeated social stress on LC neuronal activity. Rats were exposed to five daily consecutive sessions of social stress using the resident-intruder model or control manipulation. LC discharge rate recorded 2 days after the last manipulation was decreased in stressed rats compared with controls. By 10 days after the last manipulation, LC rates were comparable between groups. Systemic administration of the opiate antagonist, naloxone, robustly increased LC discharge rate in a manner suggestive of opiate withdrawal, selectively in stressed rats when administered 2 or 10 days after the last manipulation. This was accompanied by behavioral signs of mild opiate withdrawal. Western blot and electron microscopic studies indicated that repeated social stress decreased corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor and increased μ-opioid receptor levels in the LC. Together, the results suggest that repeated social stress engages endogenous opioid modulation of LC activity and induces signs of cellular and physical opiate dependence that endure after the stress. These cellular effects may predispose individuals with a history of repeated social stress to substance abuse behaviors.

  9. Interplay of spin-dependent delocalization and magnetic anisotropy in the ground and excited states of [Gd2@C78]- and [Gd2@C80]-

    Mansikkamäki, Akseli; Popov, Alexey A.; Deng, Qingming; Iwahara, Naoya; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2017-09-01

    The magnetic properties and electronic structure of the ground and excited states of two recently characterized endohedral metallo-fullerenes, [Gd2@C78]- (1) and [Gd2@C80]- (2), have been studied by theoretical methods. The systems can be considered as [Gd2]5+ dimers encapsulated in a fullerene cage with the fifteen unpaired electrons ferromagnetically coupled into an S = 15/2 high-spin configuration in the ground state. The microscopic mechanisms governing the Gd-Gd interactions leading to the ferromagnetic ground state are examined by a combination of density functional and ab initio calculations and the full energy spectrum of the ground and lowest excited states is constructed by means of ab initio model Hamiltonians. The ground state is characterized by strong electron delocalization bordering on a σ type one-electron covalent bond and minor zero-field splitting (ZFS) that is successfully described as a second order spin-orbit coupling effect. We have shown that the observed ferromagnetic interaction originates from Hund's rule coupling and not from the conventional double exchange mechanism. The calculated ZFS parameters of 1 and 2 in their optimized geometries are in qualitative agreement with experimental EPR results. The higher excited states display less electron delocalization, but at the same time they possess unquenched first-order angular momentum. This leads to strong spin-orbit coupling and highly anisotropic energy spectrum. The analysis of the excited states presented here constitutes the first detailed study of the effects of spin-dependent delocalization in the presence of first order orbital angular momentum and the obtained results can be applied to other mixed valence lanthanide systems.

  10. Hazardous, harmful and dependent drinking in hostel-dwelling students at the University of the Free State, Bloemfontein: a cross-sectional study.

    van Zyl, Paulina; Botha, Julie; van Wyk, Michelle; Breytenbach, Jaco; Nel, Christiaan; van Niekerk, Michael; Breytenbach, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of hazardous, harmful and dependent drinking among hostel-dwelling students on the main campus of the University of the Free State (UFS), and the influence of sex and academic year on the habit. A quarter of all hostel-dwelling students of UFS were selected by systematic random sampling. Willing participants completed a questionnaire comprising a demographic section and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Of the 339 participants with total AUDIT scores, 15.6% exhibited hazardous drinking, 4.1% harmful drinking and 5.6% alcohol dependence. Male students had a statistically significant higher prevalence (32.8%) of hazardous, harmful or dependent drinking than female students (18.9%). Women, however, are biologically more vulnerable to the ill effects of alcohol due to altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of alcohol. In addition, intoxicated women suffer more biological and social risks. When the cut-off point for hazardous drinking was adapted to account for the increased biological vulnerability of women, the difference between female and male participants was no longer significant. First year male students were less likely to engage in unsafe drinking than senior students. Female students in the alcohol dependent category showed an increasing trend over advancing academic year. Follow-up studies are needed to confirm whether a significant difference in hazardous drinking of first year male students compared to seniors reflects the influence of university policy or merely precedes drinking acculturation.

  11. Progressive failure site generation in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors under OFF-state stress: Weibull statistics and temperature dependence

    Sun, Huarui; Bajo, Miguel Montes; Uren, Michael J.; Kuball, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Gate leakage degradation of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors under OFF-state stress is investigated using a combination of electrical, optical, and surface morphology characterizations. The generation of leakage “hot spots” at the edge of the gate is found to be strongly temperature accelerated. The time for the formation of each failure site follows a Weibull distribution with a shape parameter in the range of 0.7–0.9 from room temperature up to 120 °C. The average leakage per failure site is only weakly temperature dependent. The stress-induced structural degradation at the leakage sites exhibits a temperature dependence in the surface morphology, which is consistent with a surface defect generation process involving temperature-associated changes in the breakdown sites

  12. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and photoemission measurement of O2: Direct evidence for dependence of Rydberg-valence mixing on vibrational states in O 1s → Rydberg states

    Gejo, T.; Oura, M.; Tokushima, T.; Horikawa, Y.; Arai, H.; Shin, S.; Kimberg, V.; Kosugi, N.

    2017-07-01

    High-resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) and low-energy photoemission spectra of oxygen molecules have been measured for investigating the electronic structure of Rydberg states in the O 1s → σ* energy region. The electronic characteristics of each Rydberg state have been successfully observed, and new assignments are made for several states. The RIXS spectra clearly show that vibrational excitation is very sensitive to the electronic characteristics because of Rydberg-valence mixing and vibronic coupling in O2. This observation constitutes direct experimental evidence that the Rydberg-valence mixing characteristic depends on the vibrational excitation near the avoided crossing of potential surfaces. We also measured the photoemission spectra of metastable oxygen atoms (O*) from O2 excited to 1s → Rydberg states. The broadening of the 4p Rydberg states of O* has been found with isotropic behavior, implying that excited oxygen molecules undergo dissociation with a lifetime of the order of 10 fs in 1s → Rydberg states.

  13. Modeling steady state SO2-dependent changes in capillary ATP concentration using novel O2 micro-delivery methods

    Ghonaim, Nour W.; Fraser, Graham M.; Ellis, Christopher G.; Yang, Jun; Goldman, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is known to be released from the erythrocyte in an oxygen (O2) dependent manner. Since ATP is a potent vasodilator, it is proposed to be a key regulator in the pathway that mediates micro-vascular response to varying tissue O2 demand. We propose that ATP signaling mainly originates in the capillaries due to the relatively long erythrocyte transit times in the capillary and the short ATP diffusion distance to the electrically coupled endothelium. We have developed a computational model to investigate the effect of delivering or removing O2 to limited areas at the surface of a tissue with an idealized parallel capillary array on total ATP concentration. Simulations were conducted when exposing full surface to perturbations in tissue O2 tension (PO2) or locally using a circular micro-outlet (~100 μm in diameter), a square micro-slit (200 × 200 μm), or a rectangular micro-slit (1000 μm wide × 200 μm long). Results indicated the rectangular micro-slit has the optimal dimensions for altering hemoglobin saturations (SO2) in sufficient number capillaries to generate effective changes in total [ATP]. This suggests a threshold for the minimum number of capillaries that need to be stimulated in vivo by imposed tissue hypoxia to induce a conducted micro-vascular response. SO2 and corresponding [ATP] changes were also modeled in a terminal arteriole (9 μm in diameter) that replaces 4 surface capillaries in the idealized network geometry. Based on the results, the contribution of terminal arterioles to the net change in [ATP] in the micro-vascular network is minimal although they would participate as O2 sources thus influencing the O2 distribution. The modeling data presented here provide important insights into designing a novel micro-delivery device for studying micro-vascular O2 regulation in the capillaries in vivo. PMID:24069001

  14. Frequency-dependent changes in the regional amplitude and synchronization of resting-state functional MRI in stroke.

    Jianfang Zhu

    Full Text Available Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI has been intensively used to assess alterations of inter-regional functional connectivity in patients with stroke, but the regional properties of brain activity in stroke have not yet been fully investigated. Additionally, no study has examined a frequency effect on such regional properties in stroke patients, although this effect has been shown to play important roles in both normal brain functioning and functional abnormalities. Here we utilized R-fMRI to measure the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF and regional homogeneity (ReHo, two major methods for characterizing the regional properties of R-fMRI, in three different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027-0.73 Hz; and typical band: 0.01-0.1 Hz in 19 stroke patients and 15 healthy controls. Both the ALFF and ReHo analyses revealed changes in brain activity in a number of brain regions, particularly the parietal cortex, in stroke patients compared with healthy controls. Remarkably, the regions with changed activity as detected by the slow-5 band data were more extensive, and this finding was true for both the ALFF and ReHo analyses. These results not only confirm previous studies showing abnormality in the parietal cortex in patients with stroke, but also suggest that R-fMRI studies of stroke should take frequency effects into account when measuring intrinsic brain activity.

  15. Study of psycho-emotional state of patients with acne depending on the severity and hereditary factors

    Anastasiia Petrenko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Acne is one of the most common skin disease in young adults and occurs in 85% of boys and girls. The disease is characterized by progressive course of the formation of psycho-emotional disorders, mainly depression row in about half of patients. Installed heredity is almost 80% of first-degree relatives of patients with acne. In patients with positive family history of acne the disease occurs earlier and course harder. The aim of the study – is to determine the impact of acne on psycho-emotional status in patients. Materials and methods. We examined 78 patients with severe and moderate acne. All patients were questioned by questionnaire CADI (Cardiff Acne Disability Index. Results. Among the surveyed men with moderate acne average value was 6, median – 6, mode – 6; in men with severe acne course average value was 8.6, median – 9.5, mode – 10. Among women surveyed the results of the form were somewhat different from data that were shown by male patients. Women with moderate acne had average value 7 points, the median – 7.5 mode – 8; among women who had severe acne course the average value was – 8, median – 9. Conclusions. As can be seen from the results of the questionnaire, respondents in all groups were shown a significant effect of disease on the psycho-emotional state of patients.

  16. Context-Dependence, Visibility, and Prediction Using State and Trait Individual Differences as Moderators of ESP in a Ganzfeld Environment

    José Miguel Pérez-Navarro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a method for participant classification, based on trait and state, in the experimental evaluation of ESP (extrasensory perception. We conducted three Ganzfeld experiments with a sample of 237 participants. In experiment I (N = 60 twenty participants ranked the target stimulus in the first position, achieving a non-significant rate of correct guesses of 33.3% (z = 1.48, p = .07, one tailed. In experiment II (N = 90 only 26.6% of the participants’ guesses were correct (z = .35, p = .36, one tailed. Weighting trials in the second experiment on the basis of the most successful predictors of the participants’ performance in the first experiment increased the rate of correct guesses from 26.6% to 36.4%. Results in a confirmatory experiment (N = 87 were not significant (32.7%, z = 1.32, p = .09, one tailed. However, overall results in this study were consistent with the effects sizes data reported in previous meta-analyses.

  17. Temporal redistribution of inhibition over neuronal subcellular domains underlies state-dependent rhythmic change of excitability in the hippocampus

    Somogyi, Peter; Katona, Linda; Klausberger, Thomas; Lasztóczi, Bálint; Viney, Tim J.

    2014-01-01

    The behaviour-contingent rhythmic synchronization of neuronal activity is reported by local field potential oscillations in the theta, gamma and sharp wave-related ripple (SWR) frequency ranges. In the hippocampus, pyramidal cell assemblies representing temporal sequences are coordinated by GABAergic interneurons selectively innervating specific postsynaptic domains, and discharging phase locked to network oscillations. We compare the cellular network dynamics in the CA1 and CA3 areas recorded with or without anaesthesia. All parts of pyramidal cells, except the axon initial segment, receive GABA from multiple interneuron types, each with distinct firing dynamics. The axon initial segment is exclusively innervated by axo-axonic cells, preferentially firing after the peak of the pyramidal layer theta cycle, when pyramidal cells are least active. Axo-axonic cells are inhibited during SWRs, when many pyramidal cells fire synchronously. This dual inverse correlation demonstrates the key inhibitory role of axo-axonic cells. Parvalbumin-expressing basket cells fire phase locked to field gamma activity in both CA1 and CA3, and also strongly increase firing during SWRs, together with dendrite-innervating bistratified cells, phasing pyramidal cell discharge. Subcellular domain-specific GABAergic innervation probably developed for the coordination of multiple glutamatergic inputs on different parts of pyramidal cells through the temporally distinct activity of GABAergic interneurons, which differentially change their firing during different network states. PMID:24366131

  18. R and D Requirements, RF Gun Mode Studies, FEL-2 Steady-State Studies, Preliminary FEL-1 Time-Dependent Studies, and Preliminary Layout Option Investigation

    Byrd, John; Corlett, John; Doolittle, Larry; Fawley, William; Lidia, Steven; Penn, Gregory; Ratti, Alex; Staples, John; Wilcox Russell; Wurtele, Jonathan; Zholents, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    This report constitutes the third deliverable of LBNLs contracted role in the FERMI (at) Elettra Technical Optimization study. It describes proposed RandD activities for the baseline design of the Technical Optimization Study, initial studies of the RF gun mode-coupling and potential effects on beam dynamics, steady-state studies of FEL-2 performance to 10 nm, preliminary studies of time-dependent FEL-1 performance using electron bunch distribution from the start-to-end studies, and a preliminary investigation of a configuration with FEL sinclined at a small angle from the line of the linac

  19. State-dependent electron delocalization dynamics at the solute-solvent interface: soft-x-ray absorption spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    Bokarev, Sergey I; Dantz, Marcus; Suljoti, Edlira; Kühn, Oliver; Aziz, Emad F

    2013-08-23

    Nonradiative decay channels in the L-edge fluorescence yield spectra from transition-metal-aqueous solutions give rise to spectral distortions with respect to x-ray transmission spectra. Their origin is unraveled here using partial and inverse partial fluorescence yields on the microjet combined with multireference ab initio electronic structure calculations. Comparing Fe2+, Fe3+, and Co2+ systems we demonstrate and quantify unequivocally the state-dependent electron delocalization within the manifold of d orbitals as one origin of this observation.

  20. Spin dependence of intra-ground-state-band E2 transitions in the SU(3) limit of the sdg interacting boson model

    Long, G. L.; Ji, H. Y.

    1998-04-01

    B(E2, L+2-->L) transitions in the sdg interacting boson model SU(3) limit are studied with a general E2 transition operator. Analytical expressions are obtained using a group theoretic method. It is found that when using transition operators of the form (d†g~+g†d~)2 or (g†g~)2, the B(E2, L+2-->L) values in the ground-state band have an L(L+3) dependent term. As L increases, the B(E2) values can be larger than the rigid rotor model value. Application to 236,238U is discussed.

  1. Proglucagon products in plasma of noninsulin-dependent diabetics and nondiabetic controls in the fasting state and after oral glucose and intravenous arginine

    Orskov, C; Jeppesen, J; Madsbad, S

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the major products of proglucagon (PG) processing in plasma in the fasting state, after intravenous arginine and after an oral glucose load in noninsulin-dependent diabetics (NIDDM) and in weight matched controls using specific radioimmunoassays and analytical gel filtration...... integrated incremental responses after intravenous arginine were identical in the two groups. After oral glucose the insulin concentrations in plasma were lower and the concentrations of all proglucagon products were higher in the NIDDM group compared to the control group. The gel filtration analysis showed....... In the fasting state the glucagonlike peptide-1 (GLP-1) immunoreactivity was significantly elevated in the NIDDM group compared with the control group. Both after intravenous arginine and after an oral glucose load a rise in the plasma concentrations of all immunoreactive moieties measured was seen. All...

  2. First-order chiral to non-chiral transition in the angular dependence of the upper critical induction of the Scharnberg–Klemm p-wave pair state

    Zhang, J; Gu, Q; Lörscher, C; Klemm, R A

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the temperature T and angular (θ, ϕ) dependencies of the upper critical induction B c2 (θ, ϕ, T) for parallel-spin superconductors with an axially symmetric p-wave pairing interaction pinned to the lattice and a dominant ellipsoidal Fermi surface (FS). For all FS anisotropies, the chiral Scharnberg–Klemm (SK) state B c2 (θ, ϕ, T) exceeds that of the chiral Anderson–Brinkman–Morel (ABM) state and exhibits a kink at θ = θ * (T, ϕ), indicative of a first-order transition from its chiral, nodal-direction behavior to its non-chiral, antinodal-direction behavior. Applicabilities to Sr 2 RuO 4 , UCoGe and the candidate topological superconductor Cu x Bi 2 Se 3 are discussed. (fast track communication)

  3. Finite element modeling of penetration of rigid cylindrical bar impacting on a clamped circular plate, employing a strain rate dependent flow rate and a Gruneisen equation of state

    Tariq, M.; Khan, I.A.

    2003-01-01

    A time dependent Finite Element simulation of penetration of a rigid cylindrical bar impacting on a copper plate is conducted, to demonstrate how material behavior appears to change when Johnson-Cook plasticity rule is employed along with a Gruneisen, equation of state with cubic shock velocity-particle relationship, and defining pressure both for compressed and expanded materials, as compared to the behavior when only isotropic strain-hardening model is employed. The bar impacts the plate with a velocity of 1000 m/s, and penetrates the plate, a portion of it coming out of the other side. Results are obtained and compared taking both an isotropic strain-hardening model, and a model incorporating Johnson-Cook flow rule along with Gruneisen equation of state. (author)

  4. A series of inorganic solid nitrogen sources for the synthesis of metal nitride clusterfullerenes: the dependence of production yield on the oxidation state of nitrogen and counter ion.

    Liu, Fupin; Guan, Jian; Wei, Tao; Wang, Song; Jiao, Mingzhi; Yang, Shangfeng

    2013-04-01

    A series of nitrogen-containing inorganic solid compounds with variable oxidation states of nitrogen and counter ions have been successfully applied as new inorganic solid nitrogen sources toward the synthesis of Sc-based metal nitride clusterfullerenes (Sc-NCFs), including ammonium salts [(NH4)xH(3-x)PO4 (x = 0-2), (NH4)2SO4, (NH4)2CO3, NH4X (X = F, Cl), NH4SCN], thiocyanate (KSCN), nitrates (Cu(NO3)2, NaNO3), and nitrite (NaNO2). Among them, ammonium phosphates ((NH4)xH(3-x)PO4, x = 1-3) and ammonium thiocyanate (NH4SCN) are revealed to behave as better nitrogen sources than others, and the highest yield of Sc-NCFs is achieved when NH4SCN was used as a nitrogen source. The optimum molar ratio of Sc2O3:(NH4)3PO4·3H2O:C and Sc2O3:NH4SCN:C has been determined to be 1:2:15 and 1:3:15, respectively. The thermal decomposition products of these 12 inorganic compounds have been discussed in order to understand their different performances toward the synthesis of Sc-NCFs, and accordingly the dependence of the production yield of Sc-NCFs on the oxidation state of nitrogen and counter ion is interpreted. The yield of Sc3N@C80 (I(h) + D(5h)) per gram Sc2O3 by using the N2-based group of nitrogen sources (thiocyanate, nitrates, and nitrite) is overall much lower than those by using gaseous N2 and NH4SCN, indicating the strong dependence of the yield of Sc-NCFs on the oxidation state of nitrogen, which is attributed to the "in-situ" redox reaction taking place for the N2-based group of nitrogen sources during discharging. For NH3-based group of nitrogen sources (ammonium salts) which exhibits a (-3) oxidation states of nitrogen, their performance as nitrogen sources is found to be sensitively dependent on the anion, and this is understood by considering their difference on the thermal stability and/or decomposition rate. Contrarily, for the N2-based group of nitrogen sources, the formation of Sc-NCFs is independent to both the oxidation state of nitrogen (+3 or +5) and the

  5. Implementation of effective cigarette health warning labels among low and middle income countries: state capacity, path-dependency and tobacco industry activity.

    Hiilamo, Heikki; Glantz, Stanton A

    2015-01-01

    We investigates the effects of ratifying the WHO Framework Convention of Tobacco Control (FTCT), state capacity, path-dependency and tobacco industry activity on the implementation of effective health warning labels (HWL) on cigarette packs among low and middle income countries (LMIC). Using logistic regression in separate analyses for FCTC Article 11 compliant HWLs and graphic HWLs (GHWL), we found that the odds of FCTC compliance increased by a factor of 1.31 for each year after FCTC entered into force in the country (p health regulations require investments in broader state capacity. As the theory of path-dependency predicts voluntary agreements have long lasting influence on the direction of tobacco control in a country. Adopting voluntary HWL policies reduced likelihood of having FCTC compliant HWLs decades later. The fact that voluntary agreements delayed effective tobacco regulations suggests that policymakers must be careful of accepting industry efforts for voluntary agreements in other areas of public health as well, such as alcohol and junk food. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Do freshwater fishes diversify faster than marine fishes? A test using state-dependent diversification analyses and molecular phylogenetics of new world silversides (atherinopsidae).

    Bloom, Devin D; Weir, Jason T; Piller, Kyle R; Lovejoy, Nathan R

    2013-07-01

    Freshwater habitats make up only ∼0.01% of available aquatic habitat and yet harbor 40% of all fish species, whereas marine habitats comprise >99% of available aquatic habitat and have only 60% of fish species. One possible explanation for this pattern is that diversification rates are higher in freshwater habitats than in marine habitats. We investigated diversification in marine and freshwater lineages in the New World silverside fish clade Menidiinae (Teleostei, Atherinopsidae). Using a time-calibrated phylogeny and a state-dependent speciation-extinction framework, we determined the frequency and timing of habitat transitions in Menidiinae and tested for differences in diversification parameters between marine and freshwater lineages. We found that Menidiinae is an ancestrally marine lineage that independently colonized freshwater habitats four times followed by three reversals to the marine environment. Our state-dependent diversification analyses showed that freshwater lineages have higher speciation and extinction rates than marine lineages. Net diversification rates were higher (but not significant) in freshwater than marine environments. The marine lineage-through time (LTT) plot shows constant accumulation, suggesting that ecological limits to clade growth have not slowed diversification in marine lineages. Freshwater lineages exhibited an upturn near the recent in their LTT plot, which is consistent with our estimates of high background extinction rates. All sequence data are currently being archived on Genbank and phylogenetic trees archived on Treebase. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  7. Is blunted cardiovascular reactivity in depression mood-state dependent? A comparison of major depressive disorder remitted depression and healthy controls.

    Salomon, Kristen; Bylsma, Lauren M; White, Kristi E; Panaite, Vanessa; Rottenberg, Jonathan

    2013-10-01

    Prior work has repeatedly demonstrated that people who have current major depression exhibit blunted cardiovascular reactivity to acute stressors (e.g., Salomon et al., 2009). A key question regards the psychobiological basis for these deficits, including whether such deficits are depressed mood-state dependent or whether these effects are trait-like and are observed outside of depression episodes in vulnerable individuals. To examine this issue, we assessed cardiovascular reactivity to a speech stressor task and a forehead cold pressor in 50 individuals with current major depressive disorder (MDD), 25 with remitted major depression (RMD), and 45 healthy controls. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure and impedance cardiography were assessed and analyses controlled for BMI and sex. Significant group effects were found for SBP, HR, and PEP for the speech preparation period and HR, CO, and PEP during the speech. For each of these parameters, only the MDD group exhibited attenuated reactivity as well as impaired SBP recovery. Reactivity and recovery in the RMD group more closely resembled the healthy controls. Speeches given by the MDD group were rated as less persuasive than the RMD or healthy controls' speeches. No significant differences were found for the cold pressor. Blunted cardiovascular reactivity and impaired recovery in current major depression may be mood-state dependent phenomena and may be more reflective of motivational deficits than deficits in the physiological integrity of the cardiovascular system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Steric effects on the primary isotope dependence of secondary kinetic isotope effects in hydride transfer reactions in solution: caused by the isotopically different tunneling ready state conformations?

    Maharjan, Binita; Raghibi Boroujeni, Mahdi; Lefton, Jonathan; White, Ormacinda R; Razzaghi, Mortezaali; Hammann, Blake A; Derakhshani-Molayousefi, Mortaza; Eilers, James E; Lu, Yun

    2015-05-27

    The observed 1° isotope effect on 2° KIEs in H-transfer reactions has recently been explained on the basis of a H-tunneling mechanism that uses the concept that the tunneling of a heavier isotope requires a shorter donor-acceptor distance (DAD) than that of a lighter isotope. The shorter DAD in D-tunneling, as compared to H-tunneling, could bring about significant spatial crowding effect that stiffens the 2° H/D vibrations, thus decreasing the 2° KIE. This leads to a new physical organic research direction that examines how structure affects the 1° isotope dependence of 2° KIEs and how this dependence provides information about the structure of the tunneling ready states (TRSs). The hypothesis is that H- and D-tunneling have TRS structures which have different DADs, and pronounced 1° isotope effect on 2° KIEs should be observed in tunneling systems that are sterically hindered. This paper investigates the hypothesis by determining the 1° isotope effect on α- and β-2° KIEs for hydride transfer reactions from various hydride donors to different carbocationic hydride acceptors in solution. The systems were designed to include the interactions of the steric groups and the targeted 2° H/D's in the TRSs. The results substantiate our hypothesis, and they are not consistent with the traditional model of H-tunneling and 1°/2° H coupled motions that has been widely used to explain the 1° isotope dependence of 2° KIEs in the enzyme-catalyzed H-transfer reactions. The behaviors of the 1° isotope dependence of 2° KIEs in solution are compared to those with alcohol dehydrogenases, and sources of the observed "puzzling" 2° KIE behaviors in these enzymes are discussed using the concept of the isotopically different TRS conformations.

  9. On the near UV photophysics of a phenylalanine residue: conformation-dependent ππ* state deactivation revealed by laser spectroscopy of isolated neutral dipeptides.

    Loquais, Yohan; Gloaguen, Eric; Alauddin, Mohammad; Brenner, Valérie; Tardivel, Benjamin; Mons, Michel

    2014-10-28

    The primary step of the near UV photophysics of a phenylalanine residue is investigated in one- and two-color pump-probe R2PI nanosecond experiments carried out on specific conformers of the Ac-Gly-Phe-NH2 molecule and related neutral compounds isolated in a supersonic expansion. Compared to toluene, whose ππ* state photophysics is dominated by intersystem crossing with a lifetime of ∼80 ns at the origin, the first ππ* state of Phe in the peptide environment is systematically found to be shorter-lived. The lifetime at the origin of transition is found to be significantly shortened in the presence of a primary amide (-CONH2) group (20-60 ns, depending on the conformer considered), demonstrating the existence of an additional non-radiative relaxation channel related to this chemical group. The quenching effect induced by the peptide environment is still more remarkable beyond the origin of the ππ* state, since vibronic bands of one of the 4 conformers observed (the 27-ribbon conformation) become barely detectable in the ns R2PI experiment, suggesting a significant conformer-selective lifetime shortening (below 100 ps). These results on dipeptides, which extend previous investigations on shorter Phe-containing molecules (N-Ac-Phe-NH2 and N-Ac-Phe-NH-Me), confirm the existence of conformer-dependent non-radiative deactivation processes, whose characteristic timescales range from tens of ns down to hundreds of ps or below. This dynamics is assigned to two distinct mechanisms: a first one, consistent with an excitation energy transfer from the optically active ππ* state to low-lying amide nπ* excited states accessed through conical intersections, especially in the presence of a C-terminal primary amide group (-CONH2); a second one, responsible for the short lifetimes in 2(7) ribbon structures, would be more specifically triggered by phenyl ring vibrational excitations. Implications in terms of spectroscopic probing of Phe in a peptide environment, especially

  10. Supported rhodium catalysts for ammonia-borane hydrolysis. Dependence of the catalytic activity on the highest occupied state of the single rhodium atoms

    Wang, Liangbing; Li, Hongliang; Zhang, Wenbo; Zhao, Xiao; Qiu, Jianxiang; Li, Aowen; Zheng, Xusheng; Zeng, Jie [Hefei National Lab. for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, Key Lab. of Strongly-Coupled Quantum Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui(China); Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Hu, Zhenpeng [School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin (China); Si, Rui [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2017-04-18

    Supported metal nanocrystals have exhibited remarkable catalytic performance in hydrogen generation reactions, which is influenced and even determined by their supports. Accordingly, it is of fundamental importance to determine the direct relationship between catalytic performance and metal-support interactions. Herein, we provide a quantitative profile for exploring metal-support interactions by considering the highest occupied state in single-atom catalysts. The catalyst studied consisted of isolated Rh atoms dispersed on the surface of VO{sub 2} nanorods. It was observed that the activation energy of ammonia-borane hydrolysis changed when the substrate underwent a phase transition. Mechanistic studies indicate that the catalytic performance depended directly on the highest occupied state of the single Rh atoms, which was determined by the band structure of the substrates. Other metal catalysts, even with non-noble metals, that exhibited significant catalytic activity towards NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} hydrolysis were rationally designed by adjusting their highest occupied states. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Application of the Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory to Excited-State Dynamics of Molecules and 2D Materials

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Rubio, Angel

    2018-04-01

    We review our recent developments in the ab initio simulation of excited-state dynamics within the framework of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Our targets range from molecules to 2D materials, although the methods are general and can be applied to any other finite and periodic systems. We discuss examples of excited-state dynamics obtained by real-time TDDFT coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) and the Ehrenfest approximation, including photoisomerization in molecules, photoenhancement of the weak interatomic attraction of noble gas atoms, photoenhancement of the weak interlayer interaction of 2D materials, pulse-laser-induced local bond breaking of adsorbed atoms on 2D sheets, modulation of UV light intensity by graphene nanoribbons at terahertz frequencies, and collision of high-speed ions with the 2D material to simulate the images taken by He ion microscopy. We illustrate how the real-time TDDFT approach is useful for predicting and understanding non-equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. We also discuss recent developments that address the excited-state dynamics of systems out of equilibrium and future challenges in this fascinating field of research.

  12. Spectrum of Slip Processes on the Subduction Interface in a Continuum Framework Resolved by Rate-and State Dependent Friction and Adaptive Time Stepping

    Herrendoerfer, R.; van Dinther, Y.; Gerya, T.

    2015-12-01

    To explore the relationships between subduction dynamics and the megathrust earthquake potential, we have recently developed a numerical model that bridges the gap between processes on geodynamic and earthquake cycle time scales. In a self-consistent, continuum-based framework including a visco-elasto-plastic constitutive relationship, cycles of megathrust earthquake-like ruptures were simulated through a purely slip rate-dependent friction, albeit with very low slip rates (van Dinther et al., JGR, 2013). In addition to much faster earthquakes, a range of aseismic slip processes operate at different time scales in nature. These aseismic processes likely accommodate a considerable amount of the plate convergence and are thus relevant in order to estimate the long-term seismic coupling and related hazard in subduction zones. To simulate and resolve this wide spectrum of slip processes, we innovatively implemented rate-and state dependent friction (RSF) and an adaptive time-stepping into our continuum framework. The RSF formulation, in contrast to our previous friction formulation, takes the dependency of frictional strength on a state variable into account. It thereby allows for continuous plastic yielding inside rate-weakening regions, which leads to aseismic slip. In contrast to the conventional RSF formulation, we relate slip velocities to strain rates and use an invariant formulation. Thus we do not require the a priori definition of infinitely thin, planar faults in a homogeneous elastic medium. With this new implementation of RSF, we succeed to produce consistent cycles of frictional instabilities. By changing the frictional parameter a, b, and the characteristic slip distance, we observe a transition from stable sliding to stick-slip behaviour. This transition is in general agreement with predictions from theoretical estimates of the nucleation size, thereby to first order validating our implementation. By incorporating adaptive time-stepping based on a

  13. State-dependent increase in the levels of neurotrophin-3 and neurotrophin-4/5 in patients with bipolar disorder: A meta-analysis.

    Tseng, Ping-Tao; Chen, Yen-Wen; Tu, Kun-Yu; Wang, Hung-Yu; Chung, Weilun; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Hsu, Shih-Pin; Kuo, Hung-Chang; Lin, Pao-Yen

    2016-08-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is one of the most serious psychiatric disorders in the world, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Regulation of neurotrophic factors have been thought to play a role in this process. There have been inconsistent findings regarding the differences in blood neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4/5) between patients with BD and healthy controls (HCs). The aim of the current meta-analysis is to examine the changes in the levels of NT-3 and NT-4/5 in BD patients at different affective states. Eight articles (including 465 BD patients and 353 HCs) were included in the analysis, and their results were pooled by using a random effects model. We found the levels of both NT-3 (p = 0.0046) and NT-4/5 (p = 0.0003) were significantly increased in BD patients, compared to HCs. Through subgroup analysis, this increase persisted only in patients in depressed state (p = 0.0038 for NT-3 and p = 0.0001 for NT-4/5), but not in manic or euthymic state. In addition, we found the differences in NT-3 and NT-4/5 were significantly associated with the duration of illness, but not by the mean age or female proportion. Our results suggest a state-dependent increase in NT-3 and NT-4/5 levels in patients with BD. Further studies are needed to examine dynamic changes of these neurotrophins in BD patients along the disease course. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of frequency-dependent series resistance and interface states of In/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si (MIS) structures

    Birkan Selcuk, A. [Department of Nuclear Electronics and Instrumentation, Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center, 06983 Saray, Ankara (Turkey); Tugluoglu, N. [Department of Nuclear Electronics and Instrumentation, Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center, 06983 Saray, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ntuglu@taek.gov.tr; Karadeniz, S.; Bilge Ocak, S. [Department of Nuclear Electronics and Instrumentation, Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center, 06983 Saray, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-11-15

    In this work, the investigation of the interface state density and series resistance from capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G/{omega}-V) characteristics in In/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures with thin interfacial insulator layer have been reported. The thickness of SiO{sub 2} film obtained from the measurement of the oxide capacitance corrected for series resistance in the strong accumulation region is 220 A. The forward and reverse bias C-V and G/{omega}-V characteristics of MIS structures have been studied at the frequency range 30 kHz-1 MHz at room temperature. The frequency dispersion in capacitance and conductance can be interpreted in terms of the series resistance (R{sub s}) and interface state density (D{sub it}) values. Both the series resistance R{sub s} and density of interface states D{sub it} are strongly frequency-dependent and decrease with increasing frequency. The distribution profile of R{sub s}-V gives a peak at low frequencies in the depletion region and disappears with increasing frequency. Experimental results show that the interfacial polarization contributes to the improvement of the dielectric properties of In/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si MIS structures. The interface state density value of In/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si MIS diode calculated at strong accumulation region is 1.11x10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} at 1 MHz. It is found that the calculated value of D{sub it} ({approx}10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2}) is not high enough to pin the Fermi level of the Si substrate disrupting the device operation.

  15. Critical Assessment of Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Excited States of Open-Shell Systems: II. Doublet-Quartet Transitions.

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian

    2016-06-14

    Compared with closed-shell systems, open-shell systems place three additional challenges to time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) for electronically excited states: (a) the spin-contamination problem is a serious issue; (b) the exchange-correlation (XC) kernel may be numerically instable; and (c) the single-determinant description of open-shell ground states readily becomes energetically instable. Confined to flip-up single excitations, the spin-contamination problem can largely be avoided by using the spin-flip TD-DFT (SF-TD-DFT) formalism, provided that a noncollinear XC kernel is employed. As for the numerical instabilities associated with such a kernel, only an ad hoc scheme has been proposed so far, viz., the ALDA0 kernel, which amounts to setting the divergent components (arising from density gradients and kinetic energy density) simply to zero. The ground-state instability problem can effectively be avoided by introducing the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) to TD-DFT. Therefore, on a general basis, the SF-TDA/ALDA0 Ansatz is so far the only promising means within the TD-DFT framework for flip-up single excitations of open-shell systems. To assess systematically the performance of SF-TDA/ALDA0, in total 61 low-lying quartet excited states of the benchmark set of 11 small radicals [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2016, 12, 238] are investigated with various XC functionals. Taking the MRCISD+Q (multireference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus the Davidson correction) results as benchmark, it is found that the mean absolute errors of SF-TDA/ALDA0 with the SAOP (statistical averaging of model orbital potentials), global hybrid, and range-separated hybrid functionals are in the range of 0.2-0.4 eV. This is in line not only with the typical accuracy of TD-DFT for singlet and triplet excited states of closed-shell systems but also with the gross accuracy of spin-adapted TD-DFT for spin-conserving excited states of open-shell systems.

  16. Wind Speed and Sea State Dependencies of Air-Sea Gas Transfer: Results From the High Wind Speed Gas Exchange Study (HiWinGS)

    Blomquist, B. W.; Brumer, S. E.; Fairall, C. W.; Huebert, B. J.; Zappa, C. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Yang, M.; Bariteau, L.; Prytherch, J.; Hare, J. E.; Czerski, H.; Matei, A.; Pascal, R. W.

    2017-10-01

    A variety of physical mechanisms are jointly responsible for facilitating air-sea gas transfer through turbulent processes at the atmosphere-ocean interface. The nature and relative importance of these mechanisms evolves with increasing wind speed. Theoretical and modeling approaches are advancing, but the limited quantity of observational data at high wind speeds hinders the assessment of these efforts. The HiWinGS project successfully measured gas transfer coefficients (k660) with coincident wave statistics under conditions with hourly mean wind speeds up to 24 m s-1 and significant wave heights to 8 m. Measurements of k660 for carbon dioxide (CO2) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) show an increasing trend with respect to 10 m neutral wind speed (U10N), following a power law relationship of the form: k660 CO2˜U10N1.68 and k660 dms˜U10N1.33. Among seven high wind speed events, CO2 transfer responded to the intensity of wave breaking, which depended on both wind speed and sea state in a complex manner, with k660 CO2 increasing as the wind sea approaches full development. A similar response is not observed for DMS. These results confirm the importance of breaking waves and bubble injection mechanisms in facilitating CO2 transfer. A modified version of the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment Gas transfer algorithm (COAREG ver. 3.5), incorporating a sea state-dependent calculation of bubble-mediated transfer, successfully reproduces the mean trend in observed k660 with wind speed for both gases. Significant suppression of gas transfer by large waves was not observed during HiWinGS, in contrast to results from two prior field programs.

  17. Interleukin-1β modulates smooth muscle cell phenotype to a distinct inflammatory state relative to PDGF-DD via NF-κB-dependent mechanisms.

    Alexander, Matthew R; Murgai, Meera; Moehle, Christopher W; Owens, Gary K

    2012-04-02

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic modulation in atherosclerosis and in response to PDGF in vitro involves repression of differentiation marker genes and increases in SMC proliferation, migration, and matrix synthesis. However, SMCs within atherosclerotic plaques can also express a number of proinflammatory genes, and in cultured SMCs the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β represses SMC marker gene expression and induces inflammatory gene expression. Studies herein tested the hypothesis that IL-1β modulates SMC phenotype to a distinct inflammatory state relative to PDGF-DD. Genome-wide gene expression analysis of IL-1β- or PDGF-DD-treated SMCs revealed that although both stimuli repressed SMC differentiation marker gene expression, IL-1β distinctly induced expression of proinflammatory genes, while PDGF-DD primarily induced genes involved in cell proliferation. Promoters of inflammatory genes distinctly induced by IL-1β exhibited over-representation of NF-κB binding sites, and NF-κB inhibition in SMCs reduced IL-1β-induced upregulation of proinflammatory genes as well as repression of SMC differentiation marker genes. Interestingly, PDGF-DD-induced SMC marker gene repression was not NF-κB dependent. Finally, immunofluorescent staining of mouse atherosclerotic lesions revealed the presence of cells positive for the marker of an IL-1β-stimulated inflammatory SMC, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20), but not the PDGF-DD-induced gene, regulator of G protein signaling 17 (RGS17). Results demonstrate that IL-1β- but not PDGF-DD-induced phenotypic modulation of SMC is characterized by NF-κB-dependent activation of proinflammatory genes, suggesting the existence of a distinct inflammatory SMC phenotype. In addition, studies provide evidence for the possible utility of CCL20 and RGS17 as markers of inflammatory and proliferative state SMCs within atherosclerotic plaques in vivo.

  18. Walk, Bicycle, and Transit Trips of Transit-Dependent and Choice Riders in the 2009 United States National Household Travel Survey.

    Lachapelle, Ugo

    2015-08-01

    Previous research has shown that public transit use may be associated with active transportation. Access to a car may influence active transportation of transit riders. Using the 2009 United States National Household Travel Survey (NHTS), transit users ≥ 16 years old (n = 25,550) were categorized according to driver status and number of cars and drivers in the household. This typology ranged from choice transit riders (ie, "fully motorized drivers") to transit-dependent riders (ie, "unmotorized nondriver"). Transit trips, walking trips, and bicycling trips of transit users are estimated in negative binomial models against the car availability typology. Sixteen percent of participants took transit in the past month; most (86%) lived in car-owning households. As income increased, car availability also increased. Transit user groups with lower car availability were generally more likely than fully motorized drivers to take more public transit, walking, and bicycle trips. Transit riders have varying levels of vehicle access; their use of combinations of alternative modes of transportation fluctuates accordingly. Transit-dependent individuals without cars or sharing cars used active transportation more frequently than car owners. Policies to reduce vehicle ownership in households may enable increases in the use of alternative modes of transportation for transit users, even when cars are still owned.

  19. Frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in patients with Wilson's disease: a resting-state fMRI study.

    Hu, Xiaopeng; Chen, Siyi; Huang, Chang-Bing; Qian, Yinfeng; Yu, Yongqiang

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in patients with Wilson's disease (WD). Resting-state function magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) were employed to measure the amplitude of ALFF in 28 patients with WD and 27 matched normal controls. Slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz) and slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) frequency bands were analyzed. Apart from the observation of atrophy in the cerebellum, basal ganglia, occipital gyrus, frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, and paracentral lobule, we also found widespread differences in ALFF of the two bands in the medial frontal gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, insula, basal ganglia, hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus, and thalamus bilaterally. Compared to normal controls, WD patients had increased ALFF in the posterior lobe of the cerebellum, inferior temporal gyrus, brain stem, basal ganglia, and decreased ALFF in the anterior lobe of the cerebellum and medial frontal gyrus. Specifically, we observed that the ALFF abnormalities in the cerebellum and middle frontal gyrus were greater in the slow-5 than in the slow-4 band. Correlation analysis showed consistently positive correlations between urinary copper excretion (Cu), serum ceruloplasmin (CP) and ALFFs in the cerebellum. Our study suggests the accumulation of copper profoundly impaired intrinsic brain activity and the impairments seem to be frequency-dependent. These results provide further insights into the understanding of the pathophysiology of WD.

  20. Growing parental economic power in parent-adult child households: coresidence and financial dependency in the United States, 1960-2010.

    Kahn, Joan R; Goldscheider, Frances; García-Manglano, Javier

    2013-08-01

    Research on coresidence between parents and their adult children in the United States has challenged the myth that elders are the primary beneficiaries, instead showing that intergenerationally extended households generally benefit the younger generation more than their parents. Nevertheless, the economic fortunes of those at the older and younger ends of the adult life course have shifted in the second half of the twentieth century, with increasing financial well-being among older adults and greater financial strain among younger adults. This article uses U.S. census and American Community Survey (ACS) data to examine the extent to which changes in generational financial well-being over the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries have been reflected in the likelihood of coresidence and financial dependency in parent-adult child U.S. households between 1960 and 2010. We find that younger adults have become more financially dependent on their parents and that while older adults have become more financially independent of their adult children, they nevertheless coreside with their needy adult children. We also find that the effect of economic considerations in decisions about coresidence became increasingly salient for younger adults, but decreasingly so for older adults.

  1. Statistical analysis of the description accuracy of dependence of flow stresses upon the deformation rate in the state of superplasticity by phenomenological equations

    Bojtsov, V.V.; Tsepin, M.A.; Karpilyanskij, N.N.; Ershov, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    Results of statistical analysis of the description accuracy of superplasticity S-form curve by different analytic expressions, suggested on the basis of phenomenological and metallophysical concepts about the nature of superplastic deformation, are given. Experimental investigations into the dependence of flow stresses on the deformation rate were conducted on VT3-1 two-phase titanium alloy. Test samples were cut out of a rod, 30 mm in diameter, produced by lengthwise rolling in α+#betta#-region. Optimal temperature of superplasticity manifestation was determined by the method of stress relaxation from a relaxation time value to a given stress. It was established that the Smirnov phemonemological equation describes in the best way the rate dependence of flow stress of superplastic material. This equation can be used for solution of problems of studying mechanism, physical nature of superplastic deformation, analysing strain-stress state and the structure of deformation zone during the processes of pressure shaping of superplastic materials, when considerably wide range (in the limits of 7-8 orders) of deformation rate variation takes place

  2. Systems dependability assessment

    Aubry, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Presents recent developments of probabilistic assessment of systems dependability based on stochastic models, including graph theory, finite state automaton and language theory, for both dynamic and hybrid contexts.

  3. Size-dependent oscillator strength and quantum efficiency of CdSe quantum dots controlled via the local density of states

    Leistikow, M.D.; Johansen, Jeppe; Kettelarij, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    We study experimentally time-resolved emission of colloidal CdSe quantum dots in an environment with a controlled local density of states LDOS. The decay rate is measured versus frequency and as a function of distance to a mirror. We observe a linear relation between the decay rate and the LDOS, ...... with the measured radiative rates. Our results are relevant for applications of CdSe quantum dots in spontaneous emission control and cavity quantum electrodynamics.......We study experimentally time-resolved emission of colloidal CdSe quantum dots in an environment with a controlled local density of states LDOS. The decay rate is measured versus frequency and as a function of distance to a mirror. We observe a linear relation between the decay rate and the LDOS......, allowing us to determine the size-dependent quantum efficiency and oscillator strength. We find that the quantum efficiency decreases with increasing emission energy mostly due to an increase in nonradiative decay. We manage to obtain the oscillator strength of the important class of CdSe quantum dots...

  4. Dynamic Simulation of the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku Earthquake with Geometric Complexity on a Rate- and State-dependent Subduction Plane

    Luo, B.; Duan, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Mw 9.0 Tohoku megathrust earthquake on 11 March 2011 is a great surprise to the scientific community due to its unexpected occurrence on the subduction zone of Japan Trench where earthquakes of magnitude ~7 to 8 are expected based on historical records. Slip distribution and kinematic slip history inverted from seismic data, GPS and tsunami recordings reveal two major aspects of this big event: a strong asperity near the hypocenter and large slip near the trench. To investigate physical conditions of these two aspects, we perform dynamic rupture simulations on a shallow-dipping rate- and state-dependent subduction plane with topographic relief. Although existence of a subducted seamount just up-dip of the hypocenter is still an open question, high Vp anomalies [Zhao et al., 2011] and low Vp/Vs anomalies [Yamamoto et al., 2014] there strongly suggest some kind of topographic relief exists there. We explicitly incorporate a subducted seamount on the subduction surface into our models. Our preliminary results show that the subducted seamount play a significant role in dynamic rupture propagation due to the alteration of the stress state around it. We find that a subducted seamount can act as a strong barrier to many earthquakes, but its ultimate failure after some earthquake cycles results in giant earthquakes. Its failure gives rise to large stress drop, resulting in a strong asperity in slip distribution as revealed in kinematic inversions. Our preliminary results also suggest that the rate- and state- friction law plays an important role in rupture propagation of geometrically complex faults. Although rate-strengthening behavior near the trench impedes rupture propagation, an energetic rupture can break such a barrier and manage to reach the trench, resulting in significant uplift at seafloor and hence devastating tsunami to human society.

  5. Trait- and pre-sleep-state-dependent arousal in insomnia disorders: what role may sleep reactivity and sleep-related metacognitions play? A pilot study.

    Palagini, Laura; Mauri, Mauro; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Riemann, Dieter; Drake, Christopher L

    2016-09-01

    Research into the cause of chronic insomnia has identified hyperarousal as a key factor, which is likely to have both trait and state components. Sleep-related cognition, metacognition, and sleep reactivity also play an important role in insomnia. Our aim was to investigate how these insomnia-related constructs are associated with trait predisposition and pre-sleep arousal in subjects with an insomnia disorder. Fifty-three individuals with insomnia disorder (according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) (F = 33; 52 + 10)) and 30 healthy controls (F = 18; 51.8 + 12 years) were evaluated with a set of questionnaires, including the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST), Metacognition Questionnaire - Insomnia (MCQI), Arousal Predisposition Scale (APS), and Pre-sleep Arousal Scale (PSAS). Statistical analyses included multiple regression to elucidate the independent determinants of APS and PSAS. Participants with insomnia presented higher FIRST, MCQI, APS, PSAS scores (p-values insomnia, APS and cognitive PSAS were best determined by MCQI (respectively, B = 0.09, p = 0.001, B = 0.08, p = 0.02), somatic PSAS by cognitive arousal (PSAS B = 0.35, p = 0.004) CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that in insomnia disorders, trait predisposition toward hyperarousal and pre-sleep-cognitive-state-dependent arousal may be closely related to sleep-related metacognitive processes. Sleep-related metacognitive processes may be associated with trait hyperarousal within the framework of a mutual relationship, and could, in turn, modulate cognitive pre-sleep-state arousal. A broad range of cognitive and metacognitive processes should be considered when dealing with subjects with insomnia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. On the violation of the exponential decay law in atomic physics: ab initio calculation of the time-dependence of the He-1s2p24P non-stationary state

    Nicolaides, C.A.; Mercouris, T.

    1996-01-01

    The detailed time dependence of the decay of a three-electron autoionizing state close to threshold has been obtained ab initio by solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE). The theory allows the definition and computation of energy-dependent matrix elements in terms of the appropriate N-electron wavefunctions, representing the localized initial state, Ψ O , the stationary scattering states of the continuous spectrum, U( e psilon ) , and the localized excited states, Ψ n , of the effective Hamiltonian QHQ, where Q ''ident to'' |Ψ O > O |. The time-dependent wavefunction is expanded over these states and the resulting coupled equations with time-dependent coefficients (in the thousands) are solved to all orders by a Taylor series expansion technique. The robustness of the method was verified by using a model interaction in analytic form and comparing the results from two different methods for integrating the TDSE (appendix B). For the physically relevant application, the chosen state was the He - 1s2p 24 P shape resonance, about which very accurate theoretical and experimental relevant information exists. Calculations using accurate wavefunctions and an energy grid of 20.000 points in the range 0.0-21.77 eV show that the effective interaction depends on energy in a state-specific manner, thereby leading to state-specific characteristics of non-exponential decay over about 6 x 10 4 au of time, from which a width of Γ = 5.2 meV and a lifetime of 1.26 x 10 -13 s is deduced. The results suggest that either in this state or in other autoionizing states close to threshold, NED may have sufficient presence to make the violation of the law of exponential decay observable. (Author)

  7. Affective state dependence and relative trait stability of perfectionism in sleep disturbances Dependência do estado afetivo e estabilidade relativa do traço do perfeccionismo nas perturbações de sono

    Berta R. Maia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the degree of absolute change, relative stability and state dependence of trait perfectionism in sleep disturbances in a sample of university students. METHOD: Participants completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale and two items concerning sleep difficulties. The mean age at T0 (baseline was 19.59 years (SD = 1.61, range = 17-25 and 62.5% of the sample were female. RESULTS: Absolute changes in self-oriented and socially-prescribed perfectionism were found. Relative stability was found for all perfectionism dimensions. Prior and concurrent sleep disturbances explained a significant amount of variance in perfectionism. Controlling for the effects of sleep measures, prior self-oriented perfectionism and other-oriented perfectionism were the only significant predictors of subsequent self-oriented perfectionism and other-oriented perfectionism, at T1 and T2. Difficulties falling asleep at T1 and socially-prescribed perfectionism at T0 were significant predictors of socially-prescribed perfectionism at T1. CONCLUSION: Despite significant changes in perfectionism mean scores over the follow-up, the correlation analyses demonstrated that participants remained quite stable in regard to their relative levels of perfectionism. As concurrent difficulties initiating sleep also predicted concurrent socially-prescribed perfectionism, this seems to be one dimension of perfectionism with trait-state characteristics.OBJETIVOS: Avaliar o grau de mudança absoluta, de estabilidade relativa e dependência do estado do perfeccionismo nas perturbações de sono numa amostra de estudantes universitários. MÉTODO: Os sujeitos completaram a Escala Multidimensional do Perfeccionismo e dois itens sobre dificuldades em dormir. Os dados foram recolhidos em três momentos de avaliação, separados por um intervalo de um ano acadêmico. A idade média dos sujeitos no T0 era de 19,59 anos (DP = 1,61, variação = 17-25; 62,5% eram mulheres

  8. Affective state dependence and relative trait stability of perfectionism in sleep disturbances Dependência do estado afetivo e estabilidade relativa do traço do perfeccionismo nas perturbações de sono

    Berta R. Maia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the degree of absolute change, relative stability and state dependence of trait perfectionism in sleep disturbances in a sample of university students. METHOD: Participants completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale and two items concerning sleep difficulties. The mean age at T0 (baseline was 19.59 years (SD = 1.61, range = 17-25 and 62.5% of the sample were female. RESULTS: Absolute changes in self-oriented and socially-prescribed perfectionism were found. Relative stability was found for all perfectionism dimensions. Prior and concurrent sleep disturbances explained a significant amount of variance in perfectionism. Controlling for the effects of sleep measures, prior selforiented perfectionism and other-oriented perfectionism were the only significant predictors of subsequent self-oriented perfectionism and otheroriented perfectionism, at T1 and T2. Difficulties falling asleep at T1 and socially-prescribed perfectionism at T0 were significant predictors of socially-prescribed perfectionism at T1. CONCLUSION: Despite significant changes in perfectionism mean scores over the follow-up, the correlation analyses demonstrated that participants remained quite stable in regard to their relative levels of perfectionism. As concurrent difficulties initiating sleep also predicted concurrent socially-prescribed perfectionism, this seems to be one dimension of perfectionism with trait-state characteristics.OBJETIVOS: Avaliar o grau de mudança absoluta, de estabilidade relativa e dependência do estado do perfeccionismo nas perturbações de sono numa amostra de estudantes universitários. MÉTODO: Os sujeitos completaram a Escala Multidimensional do Perfeccionismo e dois itens sobre dificuldades em dormir. Os dados foram recolhidos em três momentos de avaliação, separados por um intervalo de um ano acadêmico. A idade média dos sujeitos noT0 era de 19,59 anos (DP = 1,61, variação = 17-25; 62,5% eram mulheres

  9. Structure-dependent photophysical properties of singlet and triplet metal-to-ligand charge transfer states in copper(I) bis(diimine) compounds.

    Siddique, Zainul Abedin; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Ohno, Takeshi; Nozaki, Koichi

    2003-10-06

    The photophysical properties of singlet and triplet metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states of [Cu(I)(diimine)(2)](+), where diimine is 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dmphen), 2,9-dibutyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dbphen), or 6,6'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (dmbpy), were studied. On 400 nm laser excitation of [Cu(dmphen)(2)](+) in CH(2)Cl(2) solution, prompt (1)MLCT fluorescence with a quantum yield of (2.8 +/- 0.8) x 10(-5) was observed using a picosecond time-correlated single photon counting technique. The quantum yield was dependent on the excitation wavelength, suggesting that relaxation of the Franck-Condon state to the lowest (1)MLCT competes with rapid intersystem crossing (ISC). The fluorescence lifetime of the copper(I) compound was 13-16 ps, unexpectedly long despite a large spin-orbit coupling constant of 3d electrons in copper (829 cm(-1) ). Quantum chemical calculations using a density functional theory revealed that the structure of the lowest (1)MLCT in [Cu(dmphen)(2)](+) (1(1)B(1)) was flattened due to the Jahn-Teller effect in 3d(9) electronic configuration, and the dihedral angle between the two phenanthroline planes (dha) was about 75 degrees with the dha around 90 degrees in the ground state. Intramolecular reorganization energy for the radiative transition of 1(1)B(1) was calculated as 2.1 x 10(3) cm(-1), which is responsible for the large Stokes shift of the fluorescence observed (5.4 x 10(3) cm(-1)). To understand the sluggishness of the intersystem crossing (ISC) of (1)MLCT of the copper(I) compounds, the strength of the spin-orbit interaction between the lowest (1)MLCT (1(1)B(1)) and all (3)MLCT states was calculated. The ISC channels induced by strong spin-orbit interactions (ca. 300 cm(-1)) between the metal-centered HOMO and HOMO - 1 were shown to be energetically unfavorable in the copper(I) compounds because the flattening distortion caused large splitting (6.9 x 10(3) cm(-1)) between these orbitals. The possible ISC is therefore

  10. Frequency-dependent changes in local intrinsic oscillations in chronic primary insomnia: A study of the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in the resting state.

    Zhou, Fuqing; Huang, Suhua; Zhuang, Ying; Gao, Lei; Gong, Honghan

    2017-01-01

    New neuroimaging techniques have led to significant advancements in our understanding of cerebral mechanisms of primary insomnia. However, the neuronal low-frequency oscillation remains largely uncharacterized in chronic primary insomnia (CPI). In this study, the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF), a data-driven method based on resting-state functional MRI, was used to examine local intrinsic activity in 27 patients with CPI and 27 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls. We examined neural activity in two frequency bands, slow-4 (between 0.027 and 0.073 Hz) and slow-5 (0.010-0.027 Hz), because blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fluctuations in different low-frequency bands may present different neurophysiological manifestations that pertain to a spatiotemporal organization. The ALFF associated with the primary disease effect was widely distributed in the cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL), dorsal and ventral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, somatosensory cortex, and several default-mode sub-regions. Several brain regions (i.e., the right cerebellum, anterior lobe, and left putamen) exhibited an interaction between the frequency band and patient group. In the slow-5 band, increased ALFF of the right postcentral gyrus/inferior parietal lobule (PoCG/IPL) was enhanced in association with the sleep quality (ρ = 0.414, P  = 0.044) and anxiety index (ρ = 0.406, P  = 0.049) of the CPI patients. These findings suggest that during chronic insomnia, the intrinsic functional plasticity primarily responds to the hyperarousal state, which is the loss of inhibition in sensory-informational processing. Our findings regarding an abnormal sensory input and intrinsic processing mechanism might provide novel insight into the pathophysiology of CPI. Furthermore, the frequency factor should be taken into consideration when exploring ALFF-related clinical manifestations.

  11. Frequency-dependent changes in amplitude of low-frequency oscillations in depression: A resting-state fMRI study.

    Wang, Li; Kong, Qingmei; Li, Ke; Su, Yunai; Zeng, Yawei; Zhang, Qinge; Dai, Wenji; Xia, Mingrui; Wang, Gang; Jin, Zhen; Yu, Xin; Si, Tianmei

    2016-02-12

    We conducted this fMRI study to examine whether the alterations in amplitudes of low-frequency oscillation (LFO) of major depressive disorder (MDD) patients were frequency dependent. The LFO amplitudes (as indexed by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation [ALFF] and fractional ALFF [fALFF]) within 4 narrowly-defined frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027Hz, slow-4: 0.027-0.073Hz, slow-3: 0.073-0.198Hz, and slow-2: 0.198-0.25Hz) were computed using resting-state fMRI data of 35 MDD patients and 32 healthy subjects. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on ALFF and fALFF both within the low frequency bands of slow-4 and slow-5 and within all of the four bands. We observed significant main effects of group and frequency on ALFF and fALFF in widely distributed brain regions. Importantly, significant group and frequency interaction effects were observed in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, in a left-sided fashion, the bilateral posterior cingulate and precuneus, during ANOVA both within slow-4 and slow-5 bands and within all the frequency bands. The results suggest that the alterations of LFO amplitudes in specific brain regions in MDD patients could be more sensitively detected in the slow-5 rather than the slow-4 bands. The findings may provide guidance for the frequency choice of future resting-state fMRI studies of MDD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Steady-state dynamics and experience-dependent plasticity of dendritic spines of layer 4/5a pyramidal neurons in somatosensory cortex

    Amaya Miquelajauregui

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The steady state dynamics and experience-dependent plasticity of dendritic spines of layer (L 2/3 and L5B cortical pyramidal neurons have recently been assessed using in vivo two-photon microscopy (Trachtenberg et al., 2002; Zuo et al., 2005; Holtmaat et al., 2006. In contrast, not much is known about spine dynamics in L4/5a neurons, regarded as direct recipients of thalamocortical input (Constantinople and Bruno, 2013. In the adult mouse somatosensory cortex (SCx, the transcription factor Ebf2 is enriched in excitatory neurons of L4/5a, including pyramidal neurons. We assessed the molecular and electrophysiological properties of these neurons as well as the morphology of their apical tufts (Scholl analysis and cortical outputs (optogenetics within the SCx. To test the hypothesis that L4/5a pyramidal neurons play an important role in sensory processing (given their key laminar position; soma depth ~450-480 µm, we successfully labeled them in Ebf2-Cre mice with EGFP by expressing recombinant rAAV vectors in utero. Using longitudinal in vivo two-photon microscopy through a craniotomy (Mostany and Portera-Cailliau, 2008, we repeatedly imaged spines in apical dendritic tufts of L4/5a neurons under basal conditions and after sensory deprivation. Under steady-state conditions in adults, the morphology of the apical tufts and the mean spine density were stable at 0.39 ± 0.05 spines/μm (comparable to L5B, Mostany et al., 2011. Interestingly, spine elimination increases 4-8 days after sensory deprivation, probably due to input loss. This suggests that Ebf2+ L4/5a neurons could be involved in early steps of processing of thalamocortical information.

  13. Type I and Type III Interferons Display Different Dependency on Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases to Mount an Antiviral State in the Human Gut.

    Pervolaraki, Kalliopi; Stanifer, Megan L; Münchau, Stephanie; Renn, Lynnsey A; Albrecht, Dorothee; Kurzhals, Stefan; Senís, Elena; Grimm, Dirk; Schröder-Braunstein, Jutta; Rabin, Ronald L; Boulant, Steeve

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are constantly exposed to commensal flora and pathogen challenges. How IECs regulate their innate immune response to maintain gut homeostasis remains unclear. Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines produced during infections. While type I IFN receptors are ubiquitously expressed, type III IFN receptors are expressed only on epithelial cells. This epithelium specificity strongly suggests exclusive functions at epithelial surfaces, but the relative roles of type I and III IFNs in the establishment of an antiviral innate immune response in human IECs are not clearly defined. Here, we used mini-gut organoids to define the functions of types I and III IFNs to protect the human gut against viral infection. We show that primary non-transformed human IECs, upon viral challenge, upregulate the expression of both type I and type III IFNs at the transcriptional level but only secrete type III IFN in the supernatant. However, human IECs respond to both type I and type III IFNs by producing IFN-stimulated genes that in turn induce an antiviral state. Using genetic ablation of either type I or type III IFN receptors, we show that either IFN can independently restrict virus infection in human IECs. Importantly, we report, for the first time, differences in the mechanisms by which each IFN establishes the antiviral state. Contrary to type I IFN, the antiviral activity induced by type III IFN is strongly dependent on the mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling pathway, suggesting a pathway used by type III IFNs that non-redundantly contributes to the antiviral state. In conclusion, we demonstrate that human intestinal epithelial cells specifically regulate their innate immune response favoring type III IFN-mediated signaling, which allows for efficient protection against pathogens without producing excessive inflammation. Our results strongly suggest that type III IFN constitutes the frontline of antiviral response in the human gut. We propose that

  14. Sex-dependent alterations in resting-state cerebral blood flow, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and their coupling relationship in schizophrenia.

    Ma, Xiaomei; Wang, Di; Zhou, Yujing; Zhuo, Chuanjun; Qin, Wen; Zhu, Jiajia; Yu, Chunshui

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to investigate sex-dependent alterations in resting-state relative cerebral blood flow, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and relative cerebral blood flow-amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations coupling in patients with schizophrenia. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and three-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling imaging were performed to obtain resting-state amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and relative cerebral blood flow in 95 schizophrenia patients and 99 healthy controls. Sex differences in relative cerebral blood flow and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations were compared in both groups. Diagnostic group differences in relative cerebral blood flow, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and relative cerebral blood flow-amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations coupling were compared in male and female subjects, respectively. In both healthy controls and schizophrenia patients, the males had higher relative cerebral blood flow in anterior brain regions and lower relative cerebral blood flow in posterior brain regions than did the females. Compared with multiple regions exhibiting sex differences in relative cerebral blood flow, only the left middle frontal gyrus had a significant sex difference in amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations. In the females, schizophrenia patients exhibited increased relative cerebral blood flow and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in the basal ganglia, thalamus and hippocampus and reduced relative cerebral blood flow and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in the frontal, parietal and occipital regions compared with those of healthy controls. However, there were fewer brain regions with diagnostic group differences in the males than in the females. Brain regions with diagnostic group differences in relative cerebral blood flow and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations only partially overlapped. Only the female patients exhibited increased relative cerebral

  15. Perspectives of optical lattices with state-dependent tunneling in approaching quantum magnetism in the presence of the external harmonic trapping potential

    Sotnikov, Andrii

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically potential advantages of two-component mixtures in optical lattices with state-dependent tunneling for approaching long-range-order phases and detecting easy-axis antiferromagnetic correlations. While we do not find additional advantages of mixtures with large hopping imbalance for approaching quantum magnetism in a harmonic trap, it is shown that a nonzero difference in hopping amplitudes remains highly important for a proper symmetry breaking in the pseudospin space for the single-site-resolution imaging and can be advantageously used for a significant increase of the signal-to-noise ratio and thus detecting long-range easy-axis antiferromagnetic correlations in the corresponding experiments. - Highlights: • The most optimal ways to observe magnetic correlations in a quantum-gas microscope are presented. • Importance of a controlled symmetry breaking for antiferromagnetism is studied. • A quantitative theoretical analysis for the entropy in ultracold fermionic mixtures is performed. • No advantages from realizations with the strong hopping asymmetry are found.

  16. Isthmin exerts pro-survival and death-promoting effect on endothelial cells through alphavbeta5 integrin depending on its physical state.

    Zhang, Y; Chen, M; Venugopal, S; Zhou, Y; Xiang, W; Li, Y-H; Lin, Q; Kini, R M; Chong, Y-S; Ge, R

    2011-05-05

    Isthmin (ISM) is a 60 kDa secreted-angiogenesis inhibitor that suppresses tumor growth in mouse and disrupts vessel patterning in zebrafish embryos. It selectively binds to alphavbeta5 (αvβ5) integrin on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs), but the mechanism of its antiangiogenic action remains unknown. In this work, we establish that soluble ISM suppresses in vitro angiogenesis and induces EC apoptosis by interacting with its cell surface receptor αvβ5 integrin through a novel 'RKD' motif localized within its adhesion-associated domain in MUC4 and other proteins domain. ISM induces EC apoptosis through integrin-mediated death (IMD) by direct recruitment and activation of caspase-8 without causing anoikis. On the other hand, immobilized ISM loses its antiangiogenic function and instead promotes EC adhesion, survival and migration through αvβ5 integrin by activating focal adhesion kinase (FAK). ISM unexpectedly has both a pro-survival and death-promoting effect on ECs depending on its physical state. This dual function of a single antiangiogenic protein may impact its antiangiogenic efficacy in vivo.

  17. State-dependent variation in the inhibitory effect of (D-Ala sup 2 , D-Leu sup 5 )-enkephalin on hippocampal serotonin release in ground squirrels

    Kramarova, L.I.; Lee, T.F.; Cui, Y.; Wang, L.C.H. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    Accumulated evidence has suggested that increased endogenous opioid activities may facilitate the onset of hibernation either directly or possibly through modulation of other neurotransmitter systems. The seasonal change of (D-Ala{sup 2}, D-Leu{sup 5})-enkephalin (DADLE), a {delta} receptor agonist, in modulating K{sup +}-induced ({sup 3}H)-5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release from the hippocampal and hypothalamic slices of euthermic and hibernating Richardsons' ground squirrels was therefore investigated. DADLE had no effect on 5-HT release in the hypothalamic slices but elicited a dose-related inhibition on ({sup 3}H)-5-HT release from the hippocampal slices of the euthermic ground squirrel. The inhibitory effect of DADLE was completely reversed by naloxone, but not by tetrodotoxin. In contrast, DADLE failed to alter the K{sup +}-induced 5-HT release from the hippocampal slices of the hibernating ground squirrel. This state-dependent reduction in responsiveness to an opioid is consistent with the hypothesis that enhanced endogenous opioid activity in the hibernating phase could lead to down regulation of the opioid receptors and minimize its inhibition on hippocampal serotonergic activity. A high 5-HT activity would inhibit midbrain reticular activating system indirectly through non-serotonergic fibers, which in turn facilitate the onset or maintenance of hibernation.

  18. Optimal control of M/M/1 two-phase queueing system with state-dependent arrival rate, server breakdowns, delayed repair, and N-policy

    Rao, Hanumantha; Kumar, Vasanta; Srinivasa Rao, T.; Srinivasa Kumar, B.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we examine a two-stage queueing system where the arrivals are Poisson with rate depends on the condition of the server to be specific: vacation, pre-service, operational or breakdown state. The service station is liable to breakdowns and deferral in repair because of non-accessibility of the repair facility. The service is in two basic stages, the first being bulk service to every one of the customers holding up on the line and the second stage is individual to each of them. The server works under N-policy. The server needs preliminary time (startup time) to begin batch service after a vacation period. Startup times, uninterrupted service times, the length of each vacation period, delay times and service times follows an exponential distribution. The closed form of expressions for the mean system size at different conditions of the server is determined. Numerical investigations are directed to concentrate the impact of the system parameters on the ideal limit N and the minimum base expected unit cost.

  19. Bidirectional interactions between neuronal and hemodynamic responses to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS: challenges for brain-state dependent tDCS

    Anirban eDutta

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS has been shown to modulate cortical neural activity. During neural activity, the electric currents from excitable membranes of brain tissue superimpose in the extracellular medium and generate a potential at scalp, which is referred as the electroencephalogram (EEG. Respective neural activity (energy demand has been shown to be closely related, spatially and temporally, to cerebral blood flow (CBF that supplies glucose (energy supply via neurovascular coupling. The hemodynamic response can be captured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS, which enables continuous monitoring of cerebral oxygenation and blood volume. This neurovascular coupling phenomenon led to the concept of neurovascular unit (NVU that consists of the endothelium, glia, neurons, pericytes, and the basal lamina. Here, recent works suggest NVU as an integrated system working in concert using feedback mechanisms to enable proper brain homeostasis and function where the challenge remains in capturing these mostly nonlinear spatiotemporal interactions within NVU during tDCS. Therefore, we propose EEG-NIRS-based whole-head monitoring of tDCS-induced neuronal and hemodynamic alterations for brain-state dependent tDCS.

  20. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS - electroencephalography (EEG based brain-state dependent electrotherapy (BSDE: A computational approach based on excitation-inhibition balance hypothesis

    Snigdha Dagar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of severe chronic disability and the second cause of death worldwide with 15 million new cases and 50 million stroke survivors. The post stroke chronic disability may be ameliorated with early neuro rehabilitation where non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS techniques can be used as an adjuvant treatment to hasten the effects. However, the heterogeneity in the lesioned brain will require individualized NIBS intervention where innovative neuroimaging technologies of portable electroencephalography (EEG and functional-near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS can be leveraged for Brain State Dependent Electrotherapy (BSDE. In this hypothesis and theory article, we propose a computational approach based on excitation-inhibition (E-I balance hypothesis to objectively quantify the post stroke individual brain state using online fNIRS-EEG joint imaging. One of the key events that occurs following Stroke is the imbalance in local excitation-inhibition (that is the ratio of Glutamate/GABA which may be targeted with NIBS using a computational pipeline that includes individual forward models to predict current flow patterns through the lesioned brain or brain target region. The current flow will polarize the neurons which can be captured with excitation-inhibition based brain models. Furthermore, E-I balance hypothesis can be used to find the consequences of cellular polarization on neuronal information processing which can then be implicated in changes in function. We first review evidence that shows how this local imbalance between excitation-inhibition leading to functional dysfunction can be restored in targeted sites with NIBS (Motor Cortex, Somatosensory Cortex resulting in large scale plastic reorganization over the cortex, and probably facilitating recovery of functions. Secondly, we show evidence how BSDE based on inhibition–excitation balance hypothesis may target a specific brain site or network as an adjuvant treatment