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Sample records for heme-iron catalytic site

  1. A functional mimic of natural peroxidases : synthesis and catalytic activity of a non-heme iron peptide hydroperoxide complex

    Choma, CT; Schudde, EP; Kellogg, RM; Robillard, GT; Feringa, BL

    1998-01-01

    Site-selective attachment of unprotected peptides to a non-heme iron complex is achieved by displacing two halides on the catalyst by peptide caesium thiolates, This coupling approach should be compatible with any peptide sequence provided there is only a single reduced cysteine. The oxidation

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of soybean lipoxygenase-1 : Influence of lipid hydroperoxide activation and lyophilization on the structure of the non-heme iron active site

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Heijdt, L.M. van der; Feiters, M.C.; Navaratnam, S.; Nolting, H.-F.; Hermes, C.; Veldink, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectra at the Fe K-edge of the non-heme iron site in Fe(II) as well as Fe(III) soybean lipoxygenase-1, in frozen solution or lyophilized, are presented; the latter spectra were obtained by incubation of the Fe(II) enzyme with its product hydroperoxide. An edge shift of about 23 eV

  3. Design and synthesis of a tetradentate '3-amine-1-carboxylate' ligand to mimic the metal binding environment at the non-heme iron(II) oxidase active site.

    Dungan, Victoria J; Ortin, Yannick; Mueller-Bunz, Helge; Rutledge, Peter J

    2010-04-07

    Non-heme iron(II) oxidases (NHIOs) catalyse a diverse array of oxidative chemistry in Nature. As part of ongoing efforts to realize biomimetic, iron-mediated C-H activation, we report the synthesis of a new 'three-amine-one-carboxylate' ligand designed to complex with iron(II) and mimic the NHIO active site. The tetradentate ligand has been prepared as a single enantiomer in nine synthetic steps from N-Cbz-L-alanine, pyridine-2,6-dimethanol and diphenylamine, using Seebach oxazolidinone chemistry to control the stereochemistry. X-Ray crystal structures are reported for two important intermediates, along with variable temperature NMR experiments to probe the hindered interconversion of conformational isomers of several key intermediates, 2,6-disubstituted pyridine derivatives. The target ligand and an N-Cbz-protected precursor were each then complexed with iron(II) and tested for their ability to promote alkene dihydroxylation, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant.

  4. The mechanism of stereospecific C-H oxidation by Fe(Pytacn) complexes: bioinspired non-heme iron catalysts containing cis-labile exchangeable sites.

    Prat, Irene; Company, Anna; Postils, Verònica; Ribas, Xavi; Que, Lawrence; Luis, Josep M; Costas, Miquel

    2013-05-17

    A detailed mechanistic study of the hydroxylation of alkane C-H bonds using H2O2 by a family of mononuclear non heme iron catalysts with the formula [Fe(II)(CF3SO3)2(L)] is described, in which L is a tetradentate ligand containing a triazacyclononane tripod and a pyridine ring bearing different substituents at the α and γ positions, which tune the electronic or steric properties of the corresponding iron complexes. Two inequivalent cis-labile exchangeable sites, occupied by triflate ions, complete the octahedral iron coordination sphere. The C-H hydroxylation mediated by this family of complexes takes place with retention of configuration. Oxygen atoms from water are incorporated into hydroxylated products and the extent of this incorporation depends in a systematic manner on the nature of the catalyst, and the substrate. Mechanistic probes and isotopic analyses, in combination with detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations, provide strong evidence that C-H hydroxylation is performed by highly electrophilic [Fe(V)(O)(OH)L] species through a concerted asynchronous mechanism, involving homolytic breakage of the C-H bond, followed by rebound of the hydroxyl ligand. The [Fe(V)(O)(OH)L] species can exist in two tautomeric forms, differing in the position of oxo and hydroxide ligands. Isotopic-labeling analysis shows that the relative reactivities of the two tautomeric forms are sensitively affected by the α substituent of the pyridine, and this reactivity behavior is rationalized by computational methods. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Structures of the multicomponent Rieske non-heme iron toluene 2, 3-dioxygenase enzyme system

    Friemann, Rosmarie [Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 590, 751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Lee, Kyoung [Department of Microbiology, Changwon National University, Changwon, Kyoungnam 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Microbiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Brown, Eric N. [Department of Biochemistry, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Gibson, David T. [Department of Microbiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Eklund, Hans [Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 590, 751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: s-ramaswamy@uiowa.edu [Department of Biochemistry, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 590, 751 24 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structures of the three-component toluene 2, 3-dioxygenase system provide a model for electron transfer among bacterial Rieske non-heme iron dioxygenases. Bacterial Rieske non-heme iron oxygenases catalyze the initial hydroxylation of aromatic hydrocarbon substrates. The structures of all three components of one such system, the toluene 2, 3-dioxygenase system, have now been determined. This system consists of a reductase, a ferredoxin and a terminal dioxygenase. The dioxygenase, which was cocrystallized with toluene, is a heterohexamer containing a catalytic and a structural subunit. The catalytic subunit contains a Rieske [2Fe–2S] cluster and mononuclear iron at the active site. This iron is not strongly bound and is easily removed during enzyme purification. The structures of the enzyme with and without mononuclear iron demonstrate that part of the structure is flexible in the absence of iron. The orientation of the toluene substrate in the active site is consistent with the regiospecificity of oxygen incorporation seen in the product formed. The ferredoxin is Rieske type and contains a [2Fe–2S] cluster close to the protein surface. The reductase belongs to the glutathione reductase family of flavoenzymes and consists of three domains: an FAD-binding domain, an NADH-binding domain and a C-terminal domain. A model for electron transfer from NADH via FAD in the reductase and the ferredoxin to the terminal active-site mononuclear iron of the dioxygenase is proposed.

  6. Mononuclear non-heme iron(III)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 2. Mononuclear non-heme iron(III) complexes of linear and tripodal tridentate ligands as functional models for catechol dioxygenases: Effect of -alkyl substitution on regioselectivity and reaction rate. Mallayan Palaniandavar Kusalendiran Visvaganesan.

  7. Oxidative stability of a heme iron-fortified bakery product: Effectiveness of ascorbyl palmitate and co-spray-drying of heme iron with calcium caseinate.

    Alemán, Mercedes; Bou, Ricard; Tres, Alba; Polo, Javier; Codony, Rafael; Guardiola, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Fortification of food products with iron is a common strategy to prevent or overcome iron deficiency. However, any form of iron is a pro-oxidant and its addition will cause off-flavours and reduce a product's shelf life. A highly bioavailable heme iron ingredient was selected to fortify a chocolate cream used to fill sandwich-type cookies. Two different strategies were assessed for avoiding the heme iron catalytic effect on lipid oxidation: ascorbyl palmitate addition and co-spray-drying of heme iron with calcium caseinate. Oxidation development and sensory acceptability were monitored in the cookies over one-year of storage at room temperature in the dark. The addition of ascorbyl palmitate provided protection against oxidation and loss of tocopherols and tocotrienols during the preparation of cookies. In general, ascorbyl palmitate, either alone or in combination with the co-spray-dried heme iron, prevented primary oxidation and hexanal formation during storage. The combination of both strategies resulted in cookies that were acceptable from a sensory point of view after 1year of storage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes

    Westre, Tami E. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Fe-K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the electronic and geometric structure of the iron active site in non-heme iron enzymes. A new theoretical extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis approach, called GNXAS, has been tested on data for iron model complexes to evaluate the utility and reliability of this new technique, especially with respect to the effects of multiple-scattering. In addition, a detailed analysis of the 1s→3d pre-edge feature has been developed as a tool for investigating the oxidation state, spin state, and geometry of iron sites. Edge and EXAFS analyses have then been applied to the study of non-heme iron enzyme active sites.

  9. Dietary hemoglobin rescues young piglets from severe iron deficiency anemia: Duodenal expression profile of genes involved in heme iron absorption.

    Robert Staroń

    Full Text Available Heme is an efficient source of iron in the diet, and heme preparations are used to prevent and cure iron deficiency anemia in humans and animals. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for heme absorption remain only partially characterized. Here, we employed young iron-deficient piglets as a convenient animal model to determine the efficacy of oral heme iron supplementation and investigate the pathways of heme iron absorption. The use of bovine hemoglobin as a dietary source of heme iron was found to efficiently counteract the development of iron deficiency anemia in piglets, although it did not fully rebalance their iron status. Our results revealed a concerted increase in the expression of genes responsible for apical and basolateral heme transport in the duodenum of piglets fed a heme-enriched diet. In these animals the catalytic activity of heme oxygenase 1 contributed to the release of elemental iron from the protoporphyrin ring of heme within enterocytes, which may then be transported by the strongly expressed ferroportin across the basolateral membrane to the circulation. We hypothesize that the well-recognized high bioavailability of heme iron may depend on a split pathway mediating the transport of heme-derived elemental iron and intact heme from the interior of duodenal enterocytes to the bloodstream.

  10. Prebiotics increase heme iron bioavailability and do not affect non-heme iron bioavailability in humans.

    Weinborn, Valerie; Valenzuela, Carolina; Olivares, Manuel; Arredondo, Miguel; Weill, Ricardo; Pizarro, Fernando

    2017-05-24

    The aim of this study was to establish the effect of a prebiotic mix on heme and non-heme iron (Fe) bioavailability in humans. To this purpose, twenty-four healthy women were randomized into one of two study groups. One group ate one yogurt per day for 12 days with a prebiotic mix (prebiotic group) and the other group received the same yogurt but without the prebiotic mix (control group). Before and after the intake period, the subjects participated in Fe absorption studies. These studies used 55 Fe and 59 Fe radioactive isotopes as markers of heme Fe and non-heme Fe, respectively, and Fe absorption was measured by the incorporation of radioactive Fe into erythrocytes. The results showed that there were no significant differences in heme and non-heme Fe bioavailability in the control group. Heme Fe bioavailability of the prebiotic group increased significantly by 56% post-prebiotic intake. There were no significant differences in non-heme Fe bioavailability in this group. We concluded that daily consumption of a prebiotic mix increases heme Fe bioavailability and does not affect non-heme iron bioavailability.

  11. Irradiation of bovine meat: effect of heme-iron concentration

    Mistura, Liliana Perazzini Furtado

    2002-01-01

    The irradiation is often used, nowadays, for meat conservation and it is important to know how much this process interferes with the nutritional quality of the meat. In this study round cut meat, ground and steaks (from a local supermarket) was irradiated with doses of O; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 7,5 and 10 kGy (JS-7500 Nordium Inc -Canada) and the interference of irradiation and the process of food preparation on heme-iron (H Fe) content was determined. Half of the sample was kept raw and the other half was grilled in a pre-warmed oven at 250 deg C for 9 min and a controlled humidity of 70%. The chemical composition, the total iron (T Fe) (EM) and the heme iron concentration were determined (Hornsey,1956) and the sensorial quality evaluated. The average T Fe concentration of raw and ground , ground and grilled, raw steaks and grilled steak meat, on dry and degreased basis was 113 mug/g, 121 mug/g , 91 mug/g and 77 mug/g; and the H Fe concentration 105 mug/g (93% of T Fe) , 88 mug/g (73% of T Fe), 90 mug/g (99% of T Fe) and 52 mug/g (68% of T Fe) respectively. Data were evaluated by ANOVA with fixed effects and multiple comparisons. The irradiation neither altered the chemical composition nor the proportion of heme iron of meat. The preparation conditions (temperature, cooking time, environment humidity, meat presentation) of the sample interfered more with the heme iron content than the irradiation. With the sensorial analysis we verified that meats irradiated with doses of 3 kGy were better evaluated in softness and succulency attributes than the others. Meat submitted to irradiation doses up to 3 kGy were accepted by the specialists' panel. (author)

  12. Mononuclear non-heme iron(III) complexes of linear and tripodal ...

    The rate of oxygenation depends on the solvent and the. Lewis acidity of iron(III) ... has been achieved by non-heme iron enzymes and their ..... oxygen atoms of nitrate ion (figure 3). ... enhanced covalency of iron-catecholate interaction and.

  13. The effect of irradiation and thermal process on beef heme iron concentration and color properties

    Mistura, Liliana Perazzini Furtado; Colli, Celia

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of irradiation and thermal process on the heme iron (heme-Fe) concentration and color properties of Brazilian cattle beef. Beef samples (patties and steaks) were irradiated at 0-10 kGy and cooked in a combination oven at 250 deg C for 9 minutes with 70% humidity. Total iron and heme iron (heme-Fe) concentrations were determined. The data were compared by multiple comparisons and fixed- effects ANOVA. Irradiation at doses higher than 5 kGy significantly altered the heme-Fe concentration. However, the sample preparation conditions interfered more in the heme-Fe content than did the irradiation. Depending on the animal species, meat heme iron levels between 35 and 52% of the total iron are used for dietetic calculations. In this study the percentage of heme-iron was, on average, 70% of the total iron showing that humidity is an important factor for its preservation. The samples were analyzed instrumentally for CIE L * , a * , and b * values. (author)

  14. A central role for heme iron in colon carcinogenesis associated with red meat intake.

    Bastide, Nadia M; Chenni, Fatima; Audebert, Marc; Santarelli, Raphaelle L; Taché, Sylviane; Naud, Nathalie; Baradat, Maryse; Jouanin, Isabelle; Surya, Reggie; Hobbs, Ditte A; Kuhnle, Gunter G; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Gueraud, Françoise; Corpet, Denis E; Pierre, Fabrice H F

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiology shows that red and processed meat intake is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Heme iron, heterocyclic amines, and endogenous N-nitroso compounds (NOC) are proposed to explain this effect, but their relative contribution is unknown. Our study aimed at determining, at nutritional doses, which is the main factor involved and proposing a mechanism of cancer promotion by red meat. The relative part of heme iron (1% in diet), heterocyclic amines (PhIP + MeIQx, 50 + 25 μg/kg in diet), and NOC (induced by NaNO₂+ NaNO₂; 0.17 + 0.23 g/L of drinking water) was determined by a factorial design and preneoplastic endpoints in chemically induced rats and validated on tumors in Min mice. The molecular mechanisms (genotoxicity, cytotoxicity) were analyzed in vitro in normal and Apc-deficient cell lines and confirmed on colon mucosa. Heme iron increased the number of preneoplastic lesions, but dietary heterocyclic amines and NOC had no effect on carcinogenesis in rats. Dietary hemoglobin increased tumor load in Min mice (control diet: 67 ± 39 mm²; 2.5% hemoglobin diet: 114 ± 47 mm², P = 0.004). In vitro, fecal water from rats given hemoglobin was rich in aldehydes and was cytotoxic to normal cells, but not to premalignant cells. The aldehydes 4-hydroxynonenal and 4-hydroxyhexenal were more toxic to normal versus mutated cells and were only genotoxic to normal cells. Genotoxicity was also observed in colon mucosa of mice given hemoglobin. These results highlight the role of heme iron in the promotion of colon cancer by red meat and suggest that heme iron could initiate carcinogenesis through lipid peroxidation. . ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Probes of the catalytic site of cysteine dioxygenase.

    Chai, Sergio C; Bruyere, John R; Maroney, Michael J

    2006-06-09

    The first major step of cysteine catabolism, the oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, is catalyzed by cysteine dioxygenase (CDO). In the present work, we utilize recombinant rat liver CDO and cysteine derivatives to elucidate structural parameters involved in substrate recognition and x-ray absorption spectroscopy to probe the interaction of the active site iron center with cysteine. Kinetic studies using cysteine structural analogs show that most are inhibitors and that a terminal functional group bearing a negative charge (e.g. a carboxylate) is required for binding. The substrate-binding site has no stringent restrictions with respect to the size of the amino acid. Lack of the amino or carboxyl groups at the alpha-carbon does not prevent the molecules from interacting with the active site. In fact, cysteamine is shown to be a potent activator of the enzyme without being a substrate. CDO was also rendered inactive upon complexation with the metal-binding inhibitors azide and cyanide. Unlike many non-heme iron dioxygenases that employ alpha-keto acids as cofactors, CDO was shown to be the only dioxygenase known to be inhibited by alpha-ketoglutarate.

  16. Effects of illumination and packaging on non-heme iron and color attributes of sliced ham.

    Li, H; Li, C B; Xu, X L; Zhou, G H

    2012-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate effects of illumination and packaging on color of cooked cured sliced ham during refrigeration, and the possibility of decomposition of nitrosylheme under light and oxygen exposure. Three illumination levels and three packaging films with different oxygen transmission rates (OTRs) were used in two separate experiments during 35 days storage, and pH value, a* value, nitrosylheme, residual nitrite and non-heme iron were evaluated. Packaging OTRs had significant effects (P0.05) nitrosylheme concentration during storage. For both groups, storage time had a significant effect (P<0.01) on a* value and nitrosylheme. Negative relationships between nitrosylheme and nitrite in the illumination group, and between nitrosylheme and non-heme iron in the packaging group were observed. Therefore, illumination level and packaging OTR had limited effects on overall pigment stability, but more discoloration and loss of redness occurred on the surface of products. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Rieske non-heme iron-dependent oxygenases catalyse diverse reactions in natural product biosynthesis.

    Perry, Christopher; de Los Santos, Emmanuel L C; Alkhalaf, Lona M; Challis, Gregory L

    2018-04-13

    Covering: up to the end of 2017The roles played by Rieske non-heme iron-dependent oxygenases in natural product biosynthesis are reviewed, with particular focus on experimentally characterised examples. Enzymes belonging to this class are known to catalyse a range of transformations, including oxidative carbocyclisation, N-oxygenation, C-hydroxylation and C-C desaturation. Examples of such enzymes that have yet to be experimentally investigated are also briefly described and their likely functions are discussed.

  18. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    -ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation......Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X...

  19. Heme Iron Content in Lamb Meat Is Differentially Altered upon Boiling, Grilling, or Frying as Assessed by Four Distinct Analytical Methods

    Pourkhalili, Azin; Mirlohi, Maryam; Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2013-01-01

    Lamb meat is regarded as an important source of highly bioavailable iron (heme iron) in the Iranians diet. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of traditional cooking methods on the iron changes in lamb meat. Four published experimental methods for the determination of heme iron were assessed analytically and statistically. Samples were selected from lambs' loin. Standard methods (AOAC) were used for proximate analysis. For measuring heme iron, the results of four experi...

  20. Toward a catalytic site in DNA

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Rohr, Katja; Vogel, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A number of functionalized polyaza crown ether building blocks have been incorporated into DNA-conjugates as catalytic Cu(2+) binding sites. The effect of the DNA-conjugate catalyst on the stereochemical outcome of a Cu(2+)-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction will be presented....

  1. Catalytic site identification—a web server to identify catalytic site structural matches throughout PDB

    Kirshner, Daniel A.; Nilmeier, Jerome P.; Lightstone, Felice C.

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic site identification web server provides the innovative capability to find structural matches to a user-specified catalytic site among all Protein Data Bank proteins rapidly (in less than a minute). The server also can examine a user-specified protein structure or model to identify structural matches to a library of catalytic sites. Finally, the server provides a database of pre-calculated matches between all Protein Data Bank proteins and the library of catalytic sites. The database has been used to derive a set of hypothesized novel enzymatic function annotations. In all cases, matches and putative binding sites (protein structure and surfaces) can be visualized interactively online. The website can be accessed at http://catsid.llnl.gov. PMID:23680785

  2. Meat, Dietary Heme Iron, and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    Talaei, Mohammad; Wang, Ye-Li; Yuan, Jian-Min; Pan, An; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated the relationships of red meat, poultry, fish, and shellfish intakes, as well as heme iron intake, with the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D).The Singapore Chinese Health Study is a population-based cohort study that recruited 63,257 Chinese adults aged 45-74 years from 1993 to 1998. Usual diet was evaluated using a validated 165-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire at recruitment. Physician-diagnosed T2D was self-reported during 2 follow-up interviews in 1999-2004 and 2006-2010. During a mean follow-up of 10.9 years, 5,207 incident cases of T2D were reported. When comparing persons in the highest intake quartiles with those in the lowest, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio for T2D was 1.23 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14, 1.33) for red meat intake (P for trend meat intake remained significantly associated with T2D risk (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.25; P for trend = 0.02). Heme iron was associated with a higher risk of T2D even after additional adjustment for red meat intake (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.28; P for trend = 0.03). In conclusion, red meat and poultry intakes were associated with a higher risk of T2D. These associations were mediated completely for poultry and partially for red meat by heme iron intake. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Factors for the bioavailability of heme iron preparation in female rats

    村上, 亜由美; 岸本, 三香子; 川口, 真規子; 松浦, 寿喜; 市川, 富夫; Ayumi, Murakami; Mikako, Kishimoto; Makiko, Kawaguchi; Toshiki, Matsuura; Tomio, Ichikawa

    1998-01-01

    Factors for iron absorption in small intestine using heme iron preparation (HIP) and ferric citrate (FC) were investigated. We measured the solubility of iron of experimental diets (FC-normal, FC-overload, HIP-normal, HIP-overload) in water (adjusted pH6.8) and the diffusibility of dietary iron after digestion in vitro. The results did not show significantly differences between FC and HIP. Also, we measured microsomal heme oxygenase (HO) activity in intestinal mucosa of female rats fed experi...

  4. Mono- and binuclear non-heme iron chemistry from a theoretical perspective

    Rokob, T. A.; Chalupský, Jakub; Bím, Daniel; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C.; Srnec, Martin; Rulíšek, Lubomír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 21, 5/6 (2016), s. 619-644 ISSN 0949-8257 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-10279Y; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31419S; GA ČR GA15-19143S Grant - others:COST(XE) CM1305 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : non-heme iron * density functional theory * multireference methods * dioxygen activation * reactivity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.894, year: 2016

  5. Structural and Functional Models of Non-Heme Iron Enzymes : A Study of the 2-His-1-Carboxylate Facial Triad Structural Motif

    Bruijnincx, P.C.A.

    2007-01-01

    The structural and functional modeling of a specific group of non-heme iron enzymes by the synthesis of small synthetic analogues is the topic of this thesis. The group of non-heme iron enzymes with the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad has recently been established as a common platform for the

  6. Peroxide Activation for Electrophilic Reactivity by the Binuclear Non-heme Iron Enzyme AurF

    Park, Kiyoung; Li, Ning; Kwak, Yeonju; Srnec, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Binuclear non-heme iron enzymes activate O 2 for diverse chemistries that include oxygenation of organic substrates and hydrogen atom abstraction. This process often involves the formation of peroxo-bridged biferric intermediates, only some of which can perform electrophilic reactions. To elucidate the geometric and electronic structural requirements to activate peroxo reactivity, the active peroxo intermediate in 4-aminobenzoate N-oxygenase (AurF) has been characterized spectroscopically and computationally. A magnetic circular dichroism study of reduced AurF shows that its electronic and geometric structures are poised to react rapidly with O 2 . Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic definition of the peroxo intermediate formed in this reaction shows that the active intermediate has a protonated peroxo bridge. Density functional theory computations on the structure established here show that the protonation activates peroxide for electrophilic/single-electron-transfer reactivity. As a result, this activation of peroxide by protonation is likely also relevant to the reactive peroxo intermediates in other binuclear non-heme iron enzymes.

  7. Heme iron content in lamb meat is differentially altered upon boiling, grilling, or frying as assessed by four distinct analytical methods.

    Pourkhalili, Azin; Mirlohi, Maryam; Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2013-01-01

    Lamb meat is regarded as an important source of highly bioavailable iron (heme iron) in the Iranians diet. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of traditional cooking methods on the iron changes in lamb meat. Four published experimental methods for the determination of heme iron were assessed analytically and statistically. Samples were selected from lambs' loin. Standard methods (AOAC) were used for proximate analysis. For measuring heme iron, the results of four experimental methods were compared regarding their compliance to Ferrozine method which was used for the determination of nonheme iron. Among three cooking methods, the lowest total iron and heme iron were found in boiling method. The heme iron proportions to the total iron in raw, boiled lamb meat and grilled, were counted as 65.70%, 67.75%, and 76.01%, receptively. Measuring the heme iron, the comparison of the methods in use showed that the method in which heme extraction solution was composed of 90% acetone, 18% water, and 2% hydrochloric acid was more appropriate and more correlated with the heme iron content calculated by the difference between total iron and nonheme iron.

  8. Heme Iron Content in Lamb Meat Is Differentially Altered upon Boiling, Grilling, or Frying as Assessed by Four Distinct Analytical Methods

    Azin Pourkhalili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lamb meat is regarded as an important source of highly bioavailable iron (heme iron in the Iranians diet. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of traditional cooking methods on the iron changes in lamb meat. Four published experimental methods for the determination of heme iron were assessed analytically and statistically. Samples were selected from lambs' loin. Standard methods (AOAC were used for proximate analysis. For measuring heme iron, the results of four experimental methods were compared regarding their compliance to Ferrozine method which was used for the determination of nonheme iron. Among three cooking methods, the lowest total iron and heme iron were found in boiling method. The heme iron proportions to the total iron in raw, boiled lamb meat and grilled, were counted as 65.70%, 67.75%, and 76.01%, receptively. Measuring the heme iron, the comparison of the methods in use showed that the method in which heme extraction solution was composed of 90% acetone, 18% water, and 2% hydrochloric acid was more appropriate and more correlated with the heme iron content calculated by the difference between total iron and nonheme iron.

  9. Irradiation of bovine meat: effect of heme-iron concentration.; Irradiacao de carne bovina: efeito na concentracao de ferro heme

    Mistura, Liliana Perazzini Furtado

    2002-07-01

    The irradiation is often used, nowadays, for meat conservation and it is important to know how much this process interferes with the nutritional quality of the meat. In this study round cut meat, ground and steaks (from a local supermarket) was irradiated with doses of O; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 7,5 and 10 kGy (JS-7500 Nordium Inc -Canada) and the interference of irradiation and the process of food preparation on heme-iron (H Fe) content was determined. Half of the sample was kept raw and the other half was grilled in a pre-warmed oven at 250 deg C for 9 min and a controlled humidity of 70%. The chemical composition, the total iron (T Fe) (EM) and the heme iron concentration were determined (Hornsey,1956) and the sensorial quality evaluated. The average T Fe concentration of raw and ground , ground and grilled, raw steaks and grilled steak meat, on dry and degreased basis was 113 mug/g, 121 mug/g , 91 mug/g and 77 mug/g; and the H Fe concentration 105 mug/g (93% of T Fe) , 88 mug/g (73% of T Fe), 90 mug/g (99% of T Fe) and 52 mug/g (68% of T Fe) respectively. Data were evaluated by ANOVA with fixed effects and multiple comparisons. The irradiation neither altered the chemical composition nor the proportion of heme iron of meat. The preparation conditions (temperature, cooking time, environment humidity, meat presentation) of the sample interfered more with the heme iron content than the irradiation. With the sensorial analysis we verified that meats irradiated with doses of 3 kGy were better evaluated in softness and succulency attributes than the others. Meat submitted to irradiation doses up to 3 kGy were accepted by the specialists' panel. (author)

  10. Heme and non-heme iron transporters in non-polarized and polarized cells

    Yasui Yumiko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heme and non-heme iron from diet, and recycled iron from hemoglobin are important products of the synthesis of iron-containing molecules. In excess, iron is potentially toxic because it can produce reactive oxygen species through the Fenton reaction. Humans can absorb, transport, store, and recycle iron without an excretory system to remove excess iron. Two candidate heme transporters and two iron transporters have been reported thus far. Heme incorporated into cells is degraded by heme oxygenases (HOs, and the iron product is reutilized by the body. To specify the processes of heme uptake and degradation, and the reutilization of iron, we determined the subcellular localizations of these transporters and HOs. Results In this study, we analyzed the subcellular localizations of 2 isoenzymes of HOs, 4 isoforms of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1, and 2 candidate heme transporters--heme carrier protein 1 (HCP1 and heme responsive gene-1 (HRG-1--in non-polarized and polarized cells. In non-polarized cells, HCP1, HRG-1, and DMT1A-I are located in the plasma membrane. In polarized cells, they show distinct localizations: HCP1 and DMT1A-I are located in the apical membrane, whereas HRG-1 is located in the basolateral membrane and lysosome. 16Leu at DMT1A-I N-terminal cytosolic domain was found to be crucial for plasma membrane localization. HOs are located in smooth endoplasmic reticulum and colocalize with NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. Conclusions HCP1 and DMT1A-I are localized to the apical membrane, and HRG-1 to the basolateral membrane and lysosome. These findings suggest that HCP1 and DMT1A-I have functions in the uptake of dietary heme and non-heme iron. HRG-1 can transport endocytosed heme from the lysosome into the cytosol. These localization studies support a model in which cytosolic heme can be degraded by HOs, and the resulting iron is exported into tissue fluids via the iron transporter ferroportin 1, which is

  11. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Tatiana Christides

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55 increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  12. Dinitrosyl non-heme iron complexes at the gamma radiation treatment of animals

    Aliev, D.I.; Alieva, I.N.; Abilov, Z.G.; Gurbanov, I.S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: At the present time there are a great number investigations dedicated to revealing of mechanism formation of 2,03 complexes at the some pathologies in an organism. These complexes are represented weakly bounded form of non-heme iron, including into beside iron two nitrogen oxide molecules (NO) and two paired RS- groups of proteins or low-molecular compounds. 2,03 complexes are characterized by an axial symmetrical tensory of the g-factor with g=2,037, g=2,012 and g=2,03. In this study the data testifying 2,03 complexes formation into liver of animal treated by the fatal dose of gamma-radiation are reported. The changing of the ESR signal form was observed. It was shown that the form and intensity of the 2,03 signal in healthy and irradiated animals are differ from each other. The analysis of the 2,03 signal parameters is confirm this fact, too. The conclusion was made that 2,03 complexes ESR signal may be considered as an indicator of integrity of intracellular membranes of the gamma-irradiated animals

  13. Synthesis of 5-hydroxyectoine from ectoine: crystal structure of the non-heme iron(II and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase EctD.

    Klaus Reuter

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available As a response to high osmolality, many microorganisms synthesize various types of compatible solutes. These organic osmolytes aid in offsetting the detrimental effects of low water activity on cell physiology. One of these compatible solutes is ectoine. A sub-group of the ectoine producer's enzymatically convert this tetrahydropyrimidine into a hydroxylated derivative, 5-hydroxyectoine. This compound also functions as an effective osmostress protectant and compatible solute but it possesses properties that differ in several aspects from those of ectoine. The enzyme responsible for ectoine hydroxylation (EctD is a member of the non-heme iron(II-containing and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (EC 1.14.11. These enzymes couple the decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate with the formation of a high-energy ferryl-oxo intermediate to catalyze the oxidation of the bound organic substrate. We report here the crystal structure of the ectoine hydroxylase EctD from the moderate halophile Virgibacillus salexigens in complex with Fe(3+ at a resolution of 1.85 A. Like other non-heme iron(II and 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases, the core of the EctD structure consists of a double-stranded beta-helix forming the main portion of the active-site of the enzyme. The positioning of the iron ligand in the active-site of EctD is mediated by an evolutionarily conserved 2-His-1-carboxylate iron-binding motif. The side chains of the three residues forming this iron-binding site protrude into a deep cavity in the EctD structure that also harbours the 2-oxoglutarate co-substrate-binding site. Database searches revealed a widespread occurrence of EctD-type proteins in members of the Bacteria but only in a single representative of the Archaea, the marine crenarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The EctD crystal structure reported here can serve as a template to guide further biochemical and structural studies of this biotechnologically interesting enzyme family.

  14. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2014-01-01

    45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal...

  15. Experimental and Computational Evidence for the Mechanism of Intradiol Catechol Dioxygenation by Non-Heme Iron(III) Complexes

    Jastrzebski, Robin; Quesne, Matthew G; Weckhuysen, Bert M; de Visser, Sam P; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A

    2014-01-01

    Catechol intradiol dioxygenation is a unique reaction catalyzed by iron-dependent enzymes and non-heme iron(III) complexes. The mechanism by which these systems activate dioxygen in this important metabolic process remains controversial. Using a combination of kinetic measurements and computational modelling of multiple iron(III) catecholato complexes, we have elucidated the catechol cleavage mechanism and show that oxygen binds the iron center by partial dissociation of the substrate from the iron complex. The iron(III) superoxide complex that is formed subsequently attacks the carbon atom of the substrate by a rate-determining C=O bond formation step. PMID:25322920

  16. Are meat and heme iron intake associated with pancreatic cancer? Results from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Cohort

    Taunk, Pulkit; Hecht, Eric; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Several studies on pancreatic cancer have reported significant positive associations for intake of red meat but null associations for heme iron. We assessed total, red, white, and processed meat intake, meat cooking methods and doneness, and heme iron and mutagen intake in relation to pancreatic cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study cohort. 322,846 participants (187,265 men; 135,581 women) successfully completed and returned the food frequency questionnaire between 1995–1996. After a mean follow-up of 9.2 years (up to 10.17 years), 1,417 individuals (895 men, 522 women) developed exocrine pancreatic cancer. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), and trends were calculated using the median value of each quantile. Models incorporated age as the time metric and were adjusted for smoking history, BMI, self-reported diabetes, and energy-adjusted saturated fat. Pancreatic cancer risk significantly increased with intake of total meat (Q5 vs. Q1 HR=1.20, 95% CI 1.02–1.42, p-trend=0.03), red meat (HR=1.22, 95% CI 1.01–1.48, p-trend=0.02), high-temperature cooked meat (HR=1.21, 95% CI 1.00–1.45, p-trend=0.02), grilled/barbequed meat (HR=1.24, 95% CI 1.03–1.50, p-trend=0.007), well/very well done meat (HR=1.32, 95% CI 1.10–1.58, p-trend = 0.005), and heme iron from red meat (Q4 vs. Q1 HR=1.21, 95% CI 1.01–1.45, p-trend=0.04). When stratified by sex, these associations remained significant in men but not women except for white meat intake in women (HR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.02–1.74, p-trend = 0.04). Additional studies should confirm our findings that consuming heme iron from red meat increases pancreatic cancer risk. PMID:26666579

  17. Heme Iron Concentrate and Iron Sulfate Added to Chocolate Biscuits: Effects on Hematological Indices of Mexican Schoolchildren.

    Quintero-Gutiérrez, Adrián Guillermo; González-Rosendo, Guillermina; Pozo, Javier Polo; Villanueva-Sánchez, Javier

    2016-08-01

    Food fortification is one of the most effective strategies for increasing iron intake in the population. A simple blind trial was conducted to compare the effect of 2 forms of iron fortification and assess the changes in hemoglobin and iron status indices among preschool children from rural communities. Hemoglobin was evaluated in 47 children aged 3-6 years old. For 72 days (10-week period), children ate Nito biscuits. Thirteen pupils with elevated hemoglobin levels were assigned to the biscuit control group, and pupils with hemoglobin equal to 13.5 mg/dL or less were randomly allocated to consume fortified biscuits with a heme iron concentrate (n = 15) or iron sulfate (n = 19). Changes in hemoglobin, plasma ferritin, and other hematological indices were evaluated with analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measurements. Except mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentrations (+1.27 ± 2.25 g/dL), hematological indices increased significantly across the study: Mean corpuscular volume (+2.2 ± 1.0 f/dL), red blood cells (+0.30 ± 0.37 M/μL), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (+1.8 ± 1.74 pg), hemoglobin (+1.68 ± 0.91 g/dL), hematocrit (+3.43% ± 3.03%), and plasma ferritin (+18.38 ± 22.1 μg/L) were all p effect of the iron-fortified chocolate biscuits in the hemoglobin levels was higher than the control group (+1.1 ± 0.2 g/dL) but no difference was found between consumers of fortified biscuits with heme iron concentrate or iron sulfate (+1.9 ± 0.2 g/dL and +2.0 ± 0.2 g/dL, respectively). Heme iron concentrate and iron sulfate were equally effective in increasing Hb levels and hematological indices. Processed foods were shown to be an effective, valuable, and admissible intervention to prevent anemia in preschool children.

  18. Thioredoxin binding site of phosphoribulokinase overlaps the catalytic site

    Porter, M.A.; Hartman, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    The ATP-regulatory binding site of phosphoribulokinase was studied using bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate (BrAcNHEtOP). BrAcNHEtOP binds to the active-regulatory binding site of the protein. Following trypsin degradation of the labeled protein, fragments were separated by HPLC and sequenced. (DT)

  19. In vivo genotoxic effects of dietary heme iron on rat colon mucosa and ex vivo effects on colon cells monitored by an optimized alkaline comet assay.

    Océane, C Martin

    2015-04-01

    In conclusion, our results offer a suitable protocol to evaluate genotoxicity on in vivo cryopreserved colon mucosa and on in vitro murine colonic cells, with a middle throughput capacity. This protocol confirms the increase of genotoxicity in rat colon mucosa after an heme-iron diet. Moreover, this protocol enables the demonstration that aldehydes from heme-induced lipoperoxidation are responsible for this increase of genotoxicity.

  20. Direct instrumental identification of catalytically active surface sites

    Pfisterer, Jonas H. K.; Liang, Yunchang; Schneider, Oliver; Bandarenka, Aliaksandr S.

    2017-09-01

    The activity of heterogeneous catalysts—which are involved in some 80 per cent of processes in the chemical and energy industries—is determined by the electronic structure of specific surface sites that offer optimal binding of reaction intermediates. Directly identifying and monitoring these sites during a reaction should therefore provide insight that might aid the targeted development of heterogeneous catalysts and electrocatalysts (those that participate in electrochemical reactions) for practical applications. The invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) and the electrochemical STM promised to deliver such imaging capabilities, and both have indeed contributed greatly to our atomistic understanding of heterogeneous catalysis. But although the STM has been used to probe and initiate surface reactions, and has even enabled local measurements of reactivity in some systems, it is not generally thought to be suited to the direct identification of catalytically active surface sites under reaction conditions. Here we demonstrate, however, that common STMs can readily map the catalytic activity of surfaces with high spatial resolution: we show that by monitoring relative changes in the tunnelling current noise, active sites can be distinguished in an almost quantitative fashion according to their ability to catalyse the hydrogen-evolution reaction or the oxygen-reduction reaction. These data allow us to evaluate directly the importance and relative contribution to overall catalyst activity of different defects and sites at the boundaries between two materials. With its ability to deliver such information and its ready applicability to different systems, we anticipate that our method will aid the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts.

  1. Red and processed meat, nitrite, and heme iron intakes and postmenopausal breast cancer risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

    Inoue-Choi, Maki; Sinha, Rashmi; Gierach, Gretchen L.; Ward, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown inconsistent associations between red and processed meat intake and breast cancer risk. N-nitroso compounds and heme iron have been hypothesized as contributing factors. We followed 193,742 postmenopausal women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study and identified 9,305 incident breast cancers (1995–2006). Dietary intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. We adjusted daily intakes of meat, nitrite, and heme iron for energy intake using the nutrient density method. We estimated multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) by quintiles of dietary exposures for all breast cancer, by stage (in-situ, localized, regional/distant), and by estrogen/progesterone receptor (ER/PR) status using Cox proportional hazards regression. Total red meat intake was positively associated with risk of regional/distant cancer (p-trend=0.02). The risk was 25% higher in the highest vs. lowest intake quintile (95%CI=1.03–1.52). Higher processed red meat intake (Q5 vs. Q1) was associated with 27% higher risk of localized breast cancer (95%CI=1.01–1.27, p-trend=0.03) and a 19% higher risk of regional/distant cancer (95%CI=0.98–1.44, p-trend=0.10). In addition, higher nitrite intake from processed red meat was positively associated with localized cancer (HR for Q5 vs. Q1=1.23, 95%CI=1.09–1.39, p-trendmeat and processed meat may increase risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Added nitrite and heme iron may partly contribute to these observed associations. PMID:26505173

  2. A non-heme iron-mediated chemical demethylation in DNA and RNA.

    Yi, Chengqi; Yang, Cai-Guang; He, Chuan

    2009-04-21

    DNA methylation is arguably one of the most important chemical signals in biology. However, aberrant DNA methylation can lead to cytotoxic or mutagenic consequences. A DNA repair protein in Escherichia coli, AlkB, corrects some of the unwanted methylations of DNA bases by a unique oxidative demethylation in which the methyl carbon is liberated as formaldehyde. The enzyme also repairs exocyclic DNA lesions--that is, derivatives in which the base is augmented with an additional heterocyclic subunit--by a similar mechanism. Two proteins in humans that are homologous to AlkB, ABH2 and ABH3, repair the same spectrum of lesions; another human homologue of AlkB, FTO, is linked to obesity. In this Account, we describe our studies of AlkB, ABH2, and ABH3, including our development of a general strategy to trap homogeneous protein-DNA complexes through active-site disulfide cross-linking. AlkB uses a non-heme mononuclear iron(II) and the cofactors 2-ketoglutarate (2KG) and dioxygen to effect oxidative demethylation of the DNA base lesions 1-methyladenine (1-meA), 3-methylcytosine (3-meC), 1-methylguanine (1-meG), and 3-methylthymine (3-meT). ABH3, like AlkB, works better on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and is capable of repairing damaged bases in RNA. Conversely, ABH2 primarily repairs lesions in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA); it is the main housekeeping enzyme that protects the mammalian genome from 1-meA base damage. The AlkB-family proteins have moderate affinities for their substrates and bind DNA in a non-sequence-specific manner. Knowing that these proteins flip the damaged base out from the duplex DNA and insert it into the active site for further processing, we first engineered a disulfide cross-link in the active site to stabilize the Michaelis complex. Based on the detailed structural information afforded by the active-site cross-linked structures, we can readily install a cross-link away from the active site to obtain the native-like structures of these complexes

  3. Mortality from different causes associated with meat, heme iron, nitrates, and nitrites in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study: population based cohort study

    Sinha, Rashmi; Ward, Mary H; Graubard, Barry I; Inoue-Choi, Maki; Dawsey, Sanford M; Abnet, Christian C

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of different types of meat intake and meat associated compounds with overall and cause specific mortality. Design Population based cohort study. Setting Baseline dietary data of the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study (prospective cohort of the general population from six states and two metropolitan areas in the US) and 16 year follow-up data until 31 December 2011. Participants 536 969 AARP members aged 50-71 at baseline. Exposures Intake of total meat, processed and unprocessed red meat (beef, lamb, and pork) and white meat (poultry and fish), heme iron, and nitrate/nitrite from processed meat based on dietary questionnaire. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models were used with the lowest fifth of calorie adjusted intakes as reference categories. Main outcome measure Mortality from any cause during follow-up. Results An increased risk of all cause mortality (hazard ratio for highest versus lowest fifth 1.26, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.29) and death due to nine different causes associated with red meat intake was observed. Both processed and unprocessed red meat intakes were associated with all cause and cause specific mortality. Heme iron and processed meat nitrate/nitrite were independently associated with increased risk of all cause and cause specific mortality. Mediation models estimated that the increased mortality associated with processed red meat was influenced by nitrate intake (37.0-72.0%) and to a lesser degree by heme iron (20.9-24.1%). When the total meat intake was constant, the highest fifth of white meat intake was associated with a 25% reduction in risk of all cause mortality compared with the lowest intake level. Almost all causes of death showed an inverse association with white meat intake. Conclusions The results show increased risks of all cause mortality and death due to nine different causes associated with both processed and unprocessed red meat, accounted for, in part, by

  4. Mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes with the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad: recent developments in enzymology and modeling studies.

    Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; van Koten, Gerard; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M

    2008-12-01

    Iron-containing enzymes are one of Nature's main means of effecting key biological transformations. The mononuclear non-heme iron oxygenases and oxidases have received the most attention recently, primarily because of the recent availability of crystal structures of many different enzymes and the stunningly diverse oxidative transformations that these enzymes catalyze. The wealth of available structural data has furthermore established the so-called 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad as a new common structural motif for the activation of dioxygen. This superfamily of mononuclear iron(ii) enzymes catalyzes a wide range of oxidative transformations, ranging from the cis-dihydroxylation of arenes to the biosynthesis of antibiotics such as isopenicillin and fosfomycin. The remarkable scope of oxidative transformations seems to be even broader than that associated with oxidative heme enzymes. Not only are many of these oxidative transformations of key biological importance, many of these selective oxidations are also unprecedented in synthetic organic chemistry. In this critical review, we wish to provide a concise background on the chemistry of the mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes characterized by the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad and to discuss the many recent developments in the field. New examples of enzymes with unique reactivities belonging to the superfamily have been reported. Furthermore, key insights into the intricate mechanistic details and reactive intermediates have been obtained from both enzyme and modeling studies. Sections of this review are devoted to each of these subjects, i.e. the enzymes, biomimetic models, and reactive intermediates (225 references).

  5. Networks of high mutual information define the structural proximity of catalytic sites: implications for catalytic residue identification.

    Cristina Marino Buslje

    Full Text Available Identification of catalytic residues (CR is essential for the characterization of enzyme function. CR are, in general, conserved and located in the functional site of a protein in order to attain their function. However, many non-catalytic residues are highly conserved and not all CR are conserved throughout a given protein family making identification of CR a challenging task. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that CR carry a particular signature defined by networks of close proximity residues with high mutual information (MI, and that this signature can be applied to distinguish functional from other non-functional conserved residues. Using a data set of 434 Pfam families included in the catalytic site atlas (CSA database, we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that MI can complement amino acid conservation scores to detect CR. The Kullback-Leibler (KL conservation measurement was shown to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed hypothesis. A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls, combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity of 0.90, the Cls method was found to have a sensitivity of 0.816. In summary, we demonstrate that networks of residues with high MI provide a distinct signature on CR and propose that such a signature should be present in other classes of functional residues where the requirement to maintain a particular function places limitations on the diversification of the structural environment along the course of evolution.

  6. Networks of high mutual information define the structural proximity of catalytic sites: implications for catalytic residue identification.

    Marino Buslje, Cristina; Teppa, Elin; Di Doménico, Tomas; Delfino, José María; Nielsen, Morten

    2010-11-04

    Identification of catalytic residues (CR) is essential for the characterization of enzyme function. CR are, in general, conserved and located in the functional site of a protein in order to attain their function. However, many non-catalytic residues are highly conserved and not all CR are conserved throughout a given protein family making identification of CR a challenging task. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that CR carry a particular signature defined by networks of close proximity residues with high mutual information (MI), and that this signature can be applied to distinguish functional from other non-functional conserved residues. Using a data set of 434 Pfam families included in the catalytic site atlas (CSA) database, we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that MI can complement amino acid conservation scores to detect CR. The Kullback-Leibler (KL) conservation measurement was shown to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI) was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed hypothesis. A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC) was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls), combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity of 0.90, the Cls method was found to have a sensitivity of 0.816. In summary, we demonstrate that networks of residues with high MI provide a distinct signature on CR and propose that such a signature should be present in other classes of functional residues where the requirement to maintain a particular function places limitations on the diversification of the structural environment along the course of evolution.

  7. Predicting the catalytic sites of isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS ...

    Isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS) related Non-haem iron-dependent oxygenases and oxidases (NHIDOX) demonstrated a striking structural conservativeness, even with low protein sequence homology. It is evident that these enzymes have an architecturally similar catalytic centre with active ligands lining the reactive pocket.

  8. Unprecedented access of phenolic substrates to the heme active site of a catalase: substrate binding and peroxidase-like reactivity of Bacillus pumilus catalase monitored by X-ray crystallography and EPR spectroscopy.

    Loewen, Peter C; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Switala, Jacek; Donald, Lynda J; Ivancich, Anabella

    2015-05-01

    Heme-containing catalases and catalase-peroxidases catalyze the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide as their predominant catalytic activity, but in addition, individual enzymes support low levels of peroxidase and oxidase activities, produce superoxide, and activate isoniazid as an antitubercular drug. The recent report of a heme enzyme with catalase, peroxidase and penicillin oxidase activities in Bacillus pumilus and its categorization as an unusual catalase-peroxidase led us to investigate the enzyme for comparison with other catalase-peroxidases, catalases, and peroxidases. Characterization revealed a typical homotetrameric catalase with one pentacoordinated heme b per subunit (Tyr340 being the axial ligand), albeit in two orientations, and a very fast catalatic turnover rate (kcat  = 339,000 s(-1) ). In addition, the enzyme supported a much slower (kcat  = 20 s(-1) ) peroxidatic activity utilizing substrates as diverse as ABTS and polyphenols, but no oxidase activity. Two binding sites, one in the main access channel and the other on the protein surface, accommodating pyrogallol, catechol, resorcinol, guaiacol, hydroquinone, and 2-chlorophenol were identified in crystal structures at 1.65-1.95 Å. A third site, in the heme distal side, accommodating only pyrogallol and catechol, interacting with the heme iron and the catalytic His and Arg residues, was also identified. This site was confirmed in solution by EPR spectroscopy characterization, which also showed that the phenolic oxygen was not directly coordinated to the heme iron (no low-spin conversion of the Fe(III) high-spin EPR signal upon substrate binding). This is the first demonstration of phenolic substrates directly accessing the heme distal side of a catalase. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Networks of High Mutual Information Define the Structural Proximity of Catalytic Sites: Implications for Catalytic Residue Identification

    Buslje, Cristina Marino; Teppa, Elin; Di Doménico, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    other non-functional conserved residues. Using a data set of 434 Pfam families included in the catalytic site atlas (CSA) database, we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that MI can complement amino acid conservation scores to detect CR. The Kullback-Leibler (KL) conservation measurement was shown.......90, the Cls method was found to have a sensitivity of 0.816. In summary, we demonstrate that networks of residues with high MI provide a distinct signature on CR and propose that such a signature should be present in other classes of functional residues where the requirement to maintain a particular function...

  10. Correction: Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges.

    Martínez-Araya, Jorge Ignacio; Grand, André; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2016-01-28

    Correction for 'Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges' by Jorge Ignacio Martínez-Araya et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5cp03822g.

  11. Determination of lanthanum and rare earth elements in bovine whole blood reference material by ICP-MS after coprecipitation preconcentration with heme-iron as coprecipitant

    Fujimori, Eiji; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Inagaki, Kazumi; Haraguchi, H.

    1999-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of lanthanide elements in the bovine whole blood reference material (IAEA A-13) has been investigated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The bovine whole blood reference material was digested with HNO 3 and HClO 4 , and then the pH of the digested solution was adjusted to 12 with 3 M sodium hydroxide aqueous solution. In this experimental procedure, lanthanide elements in the blood sample were coprecipitated with iron mainly derived from heme-iron in blood itself. In order to minimize matrix effects due to iron, excess iron in the analysis solution was removed by solvent extraction using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) prior to the determination of lanthanide elements by ICP-MS. The recoveries of all lanthanide elements were almost quantitative in the recovery test. In consequence, it has been found that all lanthanide elements in bovine whole blood reference material are at the wide concentration range of 0.90 pg/g for Tm ∝1880 pg/g for Ce. (orig.)

  12. Effects of dietary heme iron and exercise training on abdominal fat accumulation and lipid metabolism in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    Katsumura, Masanori; Takagi, Shoko; Oya, Hana; Tamura, Shohei; Saneyasu, Takaoki; Honda, Kazuhisa; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi

    2017-08-01

    Animal by-products can be recycled and used as sources of essential nutrients. Water-soluble heme iron (WSHI), a functional food additive for supplementing iron, is produced by processing animal blood. In this study, we investigated the effects of dietary supplementation of 3% WSHI and exercise training for 4 weeks on the accumulation of abdominal fat and lipid metabolism in mice fed high-fat diet. Exercise-trained mice had significantly less perirenal adipose tissue, whereas WSHI-fed mice tended to have less epididymal adipose tissue. In addition, total weight of abdominal adipose tissues was significantly decreased in the Exercise + WSHI group. Dietary WSHI significantly increased the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of lipoprotein lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase. WSHI-fed mice also tended to show increased mRNA levels of adipose triglyceride lipase in their epididymal adipose tissue. Dietary WSHI also significantly decreased the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related enzymes in the liver, but did not influence levels in the Gastrocnemius muscle. Exercise training did not influence the mRNA levels of lipid metabolism-related enzymes in the epididymal adipose tissue, liver or the Gastrocnemius muscle. These findings suggest that the accumulation of abdominal fat can be efficiently decreased by the combination of dietary WSHI and exercise training in mice fed high-fat diet. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  13. Ebselen Reversibly Inhibits Human Glutamate Dehydrogenase at the Catalytic Site.

    Jin, Yanhong; Li, Di; Lu, Shiying; Zhao, Han; Chen, Zhao; Hou, Wei; Ruan, Benfang Helen

    Human glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) plays an important role in neurological diseases, tumor metabolism, and hyperinsulinism-hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS). However, there are very few inhibitors known for human GDH. Recently, Ebselen was reported to crosslink with Escherichia coli GDH at the active site cysteine residue (Cys321), but the sequence alignment showed that the corresponding residue is Ala329 in human GDH. To investigate whether Ebselen could be an inhibitor for human GDH, we cloned and expressed an N-terminal His-tagged human GDH in E. coli. The recombinant human GDH enzyme showed expected properties such as adenosine diphosphate activation and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide/nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate dual recognition. Further, we developed a 2-(3-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)-2-(4-nitrophenyl)-2H-tetrazol-3-ium-5-yl) benzenesulfonate sodium salt (EZMTT)-based assay for human GDH, which was highly sensitive and is suitable for high-throughput screening for potent GDH inhibitors. In addition, ForteBio binding assays demonstrated that Ebselen is a reversible active site inhibitor for human GDH. Since Ebselen is a multifunctional organoselenium compound in Phase III clinical trials for inflammation, an Ebselen-based GDH inhibitor might be valuable for future drug discovery for HHS patients.

  14. Twinning in fcc lattice creates low-coordinated catalytically active sites in porous gold

    Krajčí, Marian [Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, SK-84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kameoka, Satoshi; Tsai, An-Pang [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2016-08-28

    We describe a new mechanism for creation of catalytically active sites in porous gold. Samples of porous gold prepared by de-alloying Al{sub 2}Au exhibit a clear correlation between the catalytic reactivity towards CO oxidation and structural defects in the fcc lattice of Au. We have found that on the stepped (211) surfaces quite common twin boundary defects in the bulk structure of porous gold can form long close-packed rows of atoms with the coordination number CN = 6. DFT calculations confirm that on these low-coordinated Au sites dioxygen chemisorbs and CO oxidation can proceed via the Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanism with the activation energy of 37 kJ/mol or via the CO–OO intermediate with the energy barrier of 19 kJ/mol. The existence of the twins in porous gold is stabilized by the surface energy.

  15. 4-Hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal metabolism differs in Apc(+/+) cells and in Apc(Min/+) cells: it may explain colon cancer promotion by heme iron.

    Baradat, Maryse; Jouanin, Isabelle; Dalleau, Sabine; Taché, Sylviane; Gieules, Mathilde; Debrauwer, Laurent; Canlet, Cécile; Huc, Laurence; Dupuy, Jacques; Pierre, Fabrice H F; Guéraud, Françoise

    2011-11-21

    Animal and epidemiological studies suggest that dietary heme iron would promote colorectal cancer. Oxidative properties of heme could lead to the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic secondary lipid oxidation products, such as 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal (HNE). This compound is more cytotoxic to mouse wild-type colon cells than to isogenic cells with a mutation on the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. The latter thus have a selective advantage, possibly leading to cancer promotion. This mutation is an early and frequent event in human colorectal cancer. To explain this difference, the HNE biotransformation capacities of the two cell types have been studied using radiolabeled and stable isotope-labeled HNE. Apc-mutated cells showed better biotransformation capacities than nonmutated cells did. Thiol compound conjugation capacities were higher for mutated cells, with an important advantage for the extracellular conjugation to cysteine. Both cells types were able to reduce HNE to 4-hydroxynonanal, a biotransformation pathway that has not been reported for other intestinal cells. Mutated cells showed higher capacities to oxidize 4-hydroxynonanal into 4-hydroxynonanoic acid. The mRNA expression of different enzymes involved in HNE metabolism such as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1, 2 and 3A1, glutathione transferase A4-4, or cystine transporter xCT was upregulated in mutated cells compared with wild-type cells. In conclusion, this study suggests that Apc-mutated cells are more efficient than wild-type cells in metabolizing HNE into thiol conjugates and 4-hydroxynonanoic acid due to the higher expression of key biotransformation enzymes. These differential biotransformation capacities would explain the differences of susceptibility between normal and Apc-mutated cells regarding secondary lipid oxidation products.

  16. Probing the electrostatics of active site microenvironments along the catalytic cycle for Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase.

    Liu, C Tony; Layfield, Joshua P; Stewart, Robert J; French, Jarrod B; Hanoian, Philip; Asbury, John B; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Benkovic, Stephen J

    2014-07-23

    Electrostatic interactions play an important role in enzyme catalysis by guiding ligand binding and facilitating chemical reactions. These electrostatic interactions are modulated by conformational changes occurring over the catalytic cycle. Herein, the changes in active site electrostatic microenvironments are examined for all enzyme complexes along the catalytic cycle of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) by incorporation of thiocyanate probes at two site-specific locations in the active site. The electrostatics and degree of hydration of the microenvironments surrounding the probes are investigated with spectroscopic techniques and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. Changes in the electrostatic microenvironments along the catalytic environment lead to different nitrile (CN) vibrational stretching frequencies and (13)C NMR chemical shifts. These environmental changes arise from protein conformational rearrangements during catalysis. The QM/MM calculations reproduce the experimentally measured vibrational frequency shifts of the thiocyanate probes across the catalyzed hydride transfer step, which spans the closed and occluded conformations of the enzyme. Analysis of the molecular dynamics trajectories provides insight into the conformational changes occurring between these two states and the resulting changes in classical electrostatics and specific hydrogen-bonding interactions. The electric fields along the CN axes of the probes are decomposed into contributions from specific residues, ligands, and solvent molecules that make up the microenvironments around the probes. Moreover, calculation of the electric field along the hydride donor-acceptor axis, along with decomposition of this field into specific contributions, indicates that the cofactor and substrate, as well as the enzyme, impose a substantial electric field that facilitates hydride transfer. Overall, experimental and theoretical data provide evidence for

  17. Statistical Profiling of One Promiscuous Protein Binding Site: Illustrated by Urokinase Catalytic Domain.

    Cerisier, Natacha; Regad, Leslie; Triki, Dhoha; Petitjean, Michel; Flatters, Delphine; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2017-10-01

    While recent literature focuses on drug promiscuity, the characterization of promiscuous binding sites (ability to bind several ligands) remains to be explored. Here, we present a proteochemometric modeling approach to analyze diverse ligands and corresponding multiple binding sub-pockets associated with one promiscuous binding site to characterize protein-ligand recognition. We analyze both geometrical and physicochemical profile correspondences. This approach was applied to examine the well-studied druggable urokinase catalytic domain inhibitor binding site, which results in a large number of complex structures bound to various ligands. This approach emphasizes the importance of jointly characterizing pocket and ligand spaces to explore the impact of ligand diversity on sub-pocket properties and to establish their main profile correspondences. This work supports an interest in mining available 3D holo structures associated with a promiscuous binding site to explore its main protein-ligand recognition tendency. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Long-Range Electrostatics-Induced Two-Proton Transfer Captured by Neutron Crystallography in an Enzyme Catalytic Site.

    Gerlits, Oksana; Wymore, Troy; Das, Amit; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Parks, Jerry M; Smith, Jeremy C; Weiss, Kevin L; Keen, David A; Blakeley, Matthew P; Louis, John M; Langan, Paul; Weber, Irene T; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2016-04-11

    Neutron crystallography was used to directly locate two protons before and after a pH-induced two-proton transfer between catalytic aspartic acid residues and the hydroxy group of the bound clinical drug darunavir, located in the catalytic site of enzyme HIV-1 protease. The two-proton transfer is triggered by electrostatic effects arising from protonation state changes of surface residues far from the active site. The mechanism and pH effect are supported by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. The low-pH proton configuration in the catalytic site is deemed critical for the catalytic action of this enzyme and may apply more generally to other aspartic proteases. Neutrons therefore represent a superb probe to obtain structural details for proton transfer reactions in biological systems at a truly atomic level. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Single-Site Palladium(II) Catalyst for Oxidative Heck Reaction: Catalytic Performance and Kinetic Investigations

    Duan, Hui; Li, Mengyang; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Huang, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Luo, Zhong; Chen, Hongzhong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Zou, Ruqiang; Lei, Aiwen; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The development of organometallic single-site catalysts (SSCs) has inspired the designs of new heterogeneous catalysts with high efficiency. Nevertheless, the application of SSCs in certain modern organic reactions, such as C-C bond formation reactions, has still been less investigated. In this study, a single-site Pd(II) catalyst was developed, where 2,2'-bipyridine-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) was employed as the support of a Pd(II) complex. The overall performance of the single-site Pd(II) catalyst in the oxidative Heck reaction was then investigated. The investigation results show that the catalyst displays over 99% selectivity for the product formation with high reaction yield. Kinetic profiles further confirm its high catalytic efficiency, showing that the rate constant is nearly 40 times higher than that for the free Pd(II) salt. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that the catalyst has remarkable lifetime and recyclability.

  20. Catalytic asymmetric diels-alder reaction of quinone imine ketals: a site-divergent approach.

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Nakatsu, Hiroki; Maruoka, Keiji

    2015-04-07

    The catalytic asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction of quinone imine ketals with diene carbamates catalyzed by axially chiral dicarboxylic acids is reported herein. A variety of primary and secondary alkyl-substituted quinone derivatives which have not been applied in previous asymmetric quinone Diels-Alder reactions could be employed using this method. More importantly, we succeeded in developing a strategy to divert the reaction site in unsymmetrical 3-alkyl quinone imine ketals from the inherently favored unsubstituted C=C bond to the disfavored alkyl-substituted C=C bond. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Comparative analysis of the heme iron electronic structure and stereochemistry in tetrameric rabbit hemoglobin and monomeric soybean leghemoglobin a using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution

    Alenkina, I. V.; Kumar, A.; Berkovsky, A. L.; Oshtrakh, M. I.

    2018-02-01

    A comparative study of tetrameric rabbit hemoglobin and monomeric soybean leghemoglobin a in the oxy- and deoxy-forms was carried out using 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution in order to analyze the heme iron electronic structure and stereochemistry in relation to the Mössbauer hyperfine parameters. The Mössbauer spectra of tetrameric rabbit hemoglobin in both forms were fitted using two quadrupole doublets related to the 57Fe in ɑ- and β-subunits. In contrast, the Mössbauer spectra of monomeric soybean leghemoglobin a were fitted using: (i) two quadrupole doublets for the oxy-form related to two conformational states of the distal His E7 imidazole ring and different hydrogen bonding of oxygen molecule in the oxy-form and (ii) using three quadrupole doublets for deoxy-form related to three conformational states of the proximal His F8 imidazole ring. Small variations of Mössbauer hyperfine parameters related to small differences in the heme iron electronic structure and stereochemistry in tetrameric rabbit hemoglobin and monomeric soybean leghemoglobin a are discussed.

  2. Improved catalytic properties of halohydrin dehalogenase by modification of the halide-binding site.

    Tang, Lixia; Torres Pazmiño, Daniel E; Fraaije, Marco W; de Jong, René M; Dijkstra, Bauke W; Janssen, Dick B

    2005-05-03

    Halohydrin dehalogenase (HheC) from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 catalyzes the dehalogenation of vicinal haloalcohols by an intramolecular substitution reaction, resulting in the formation of the corresponding epoxide, a halide ion, and a proton. Halide release is rate-limiting during the catalytic cycle of the conversion of (R)-p-nitro-2-bromo-1-phenylethanol by the enzyme. The recent elucidation of the X-ray structure of HheC showed that hydrogen bonds between the OH group of Tyr187 and between the Odelta1 atom of Asn176 and Nepsilon1 atom of Trp249 could play a role in stabilizing the conformation of the halide-binding site. The possibility that these hydrogen bonds are important for halide binding and release was studied using site-directed mutagenesis. Steady-state kinetic studies revealed that mutant Y187F, which has lost both hydrogen bonds, has a higher catalytic activity (k(cat)) with two of the three tested substrates compared to the wild-type enzyme. Mutant W249F also shows an enhanced k(cat) value with these two substrates, as well as a remarkable increase in enantiopreference for (R)-p-nitro-2-bromo-1-phenylethanol. In case of a mutation at position 176 (N176A and N176D), a 1000-fold lower catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) was obtained, which is mainly due to an increase of the K(m) value of the enzyme. Pre-steady-state kinetic studies showed that a burst of product formation precedes the steady state, indicating that halide release is still rate-limiting for mutants Y187F and W249F. Stopped-flow fluorescence experiments revealed that the rate of halide release is 5.6-fold higher for the Y187F mutant than for the wild-type enzyme and even higher for the W249F enzyme. Taken together, these results show that the disruption of two hydrogen bonds around the halide-binding site increases the rate of halide release and can enhance the overall catalytic activity of HheC.

  3. Catalytic zinc site and mechanism of the metalloenzyme PR-AMP cyclohydrolase.

    D'Ordine, Robert L; Linger, Rebecca S; Thai, Carolyn J; Davisson, V Jo

    2012-07-24

    The enzyme N(1)-(5'-phosphoribosyl) adenosine-5'-monophosphate cyclohydrolase (PR-AMP cyclohydrolase) is a Zn(2+) metalloprotein encoded by the hisI gene. It catalyzes the third step of histidine biosynthesis, an uncommon ring-opening of a purine heterocycle for use in primary metabolism. A three-dimensional structure of the enzyme from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum has revealed that three conserved cysteine residues occur at the dimer interface and likely form the catalytic site. To investigate the functions of these cysteines in the enzyme from Methanococcus vannielii, a series of biochemical studies were pursued to test the basic hypothesis regarding their roles in catalysis. Inactivation of the enzyme activity by methyl methane thiosulfonate (MMTS) or 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) also compromised the Zn(2+) binding properties of the protein inducing loss of up to 90% of the metal. Overall reaction stoichiometry and the potassium cyanide (KCN) induced cleavage of the protein suggested that all three cysteines were modified in the process. The enzyme was protected from DTNB-induced inactivation by inclusion of the substrate N(1)-(5'-phosphoribosyl)adenosine 5'-monophosphate; (PR-AMP), while Mg(2+), a metal required for catalytic activity, enhanced the rate of inactivation. Site-directed mutations of the conserved C93, C109, C116 and the double mutant C109/C116 were prepared and analyzed for catalytic activity, Zn(2+) content, and reactivity with DTNB. Substitution of alanine for each of the conserved cysteines showed no measurable catalytic activity, and only the C116A was still capable of binding Zn(2+). Reactions of DTNB with the C109A/C116A double mutant showed that C93 is completely modified within 0.5 s. A model consistent with these data involves a DTNB-induced mixed disulfide linkage between C93 and C109 or C116, followed by ejection of the active site Zn(2+) and provides further evidence that the Zn(2+) coordination site involves the

  4. Reactivity of the binuclear non-heme iron active site of delta(9) desaturase studied by large-scale multireference ab initio calculations

    Chalupský, Jakub; Rokob, Tibor András; Kurashige, Y.; Yanai, T.; Solomon, E. I.; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Srnec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 136, č. 45 (2014), s. 15977-15991 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31419S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : DMRG-CASPT2 * ab initio calculations * reaction mechanisms Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 12.113, year: 2014

  5. Key Feature of the Catalytic Cycle of TNF-α Converting Enzyme Involves Communication Between Distal Protein Sites and the Enzyme Catalytic Core

    Solomon, A.; Akabayov, B.; Frenkel, A.; Millas, M.; Sagi, I.

    2007-01-01

    Despite their key roles in many normal and pathological processes, the molecular details by which zinc-dependent proteases hydrolyze their physiological substrates remain elusive. Advanced theoretical analyses have suggested reaction models for which there is limited and controversial experimental evidence. Here we report the structure, chemistry and lifetime of transient metal-protein reaction intermediates evolving during the substrate turnover reaction of a metalloproteinase, the tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE). TACE controls multiple signal transduction pathways through the proteolytic release of the extracellular domain of a host of membrane-bound factors and receptors. Using stopped-flow x-ray spectroscopy methods together with transient kinetic analyses, we demonstrate that TACE's catalytic zinc ion undergoes dynamic charge transitions before substrate binding to the metal ion. This indicates previously undescribed communication pathways taking place between distal protein sites and the enzyme catalytic core. The observed charge transitions are synchronized with distinct phases in the reaction kinetics and changes in metal coordination chemistry mediated by the binding of the peptide substrate to the catalytic metal ion and product release. Here we report key local charge transitions critical for proteolysis as well as long sought evidence for the proposed reaction model of peptide hydrolysis. This study provides a general approach for gaining critical insights into the molecular basis of substrate recognition and turnover by zinc metalloproteinases that may be used for drug design

  6. Size and Site Dependence of the Catalytic Activity of Iridium Clusters toward Ethane Dehydrogenation.

    Ge, Yingbin; Jiang, Hao; Kato, Russell; Gummagatta, Prasuna

    2016-12-01

    This research focuses on optimizing transition metal nanocatalyst immobilization and activity to enhance ethane dehydrogenation. Ethane dehydrogenation, catalyzed by thermally stable Ir n (n = 8, 12, 18) atomic clusters that exhibit a cuboid structure, was studied using the B3LYP method with triple-ζ basis sets. Relativistic effects and dispersion corrections were included in the calculations. In the dehydrogenation reaction Ir n + C 2 H 6 → H-Ir n -C 2 H 5 → (H) 2 -Ir n -C 2 H 4 , the first H-elimination is the rate-limiting step, primarily because the reaction releases sufficient heat to facilitate the second H-elimination. The catalytic activity of the Ir clusters strongly depends on the Ir cluster size and the specific catalytic site. Cubic Ir 8 is the least reactive toward H-elimination in ethane: Ir 8 + C 2 H 6 → H-Ir 8 -C 2 H 5 has a large (65 kJ/mol) energy barrier, whereas Ir 12 (3 × 2 × 2 cuboid) and Ir 18 (3 × 3 × 2 cuboid) lower this energy barrier to 22 and 3 kJ/mol, respectively. The site dependence is as prominent as the size effect. For example, the energy barrier for the Ir 18 + C 2 H 6 → H-Ir 18 -C 2 H 5 reaction is 3, 48, and 71 kJ/mol at the corner, edge, or face-center sites of the Ir 18 cuboid, respectively. Energy release due to Ir cluster insertion into an ethane C-H bond facilitates hydrogen migration on the Ir cluster surface, and the second H-elimination of ethane. In an oxygen-rich environment, oxygen molecules may be absorbed on the Ir cluster surface. The oxygen atoms bonded to the Ir cluster surface may slightly increase the energy barrier for H-elimination in ethane. However, the adsorption of oxygen and its reaction with H atoms on the Ir cluster releases sufficient heat to yield an overall thermodynamically favored reaction: Ir n + C 2 H 6 + 1 / 2 O 2 → Ir n + C 2 H 4 + H 2 O. These results will be useful toward reducing the energy cost of ethane dehydrogenation in industry.

  7. Amine binding and oxidation at the catalytic site for photosynthetic water oxidation

    Ouellette, Anthony J. A.; Anderson, Lorraine B.; Barry, Bridgette A.

    1998-01-01

    Photosynthetic water oxidation occurs at the Mn-containing catalytic site of photosystem II (PSII). By the use of 14C-labeled amines and SDS-denaturing PAGE, covalent adducts derived from primary amines and the PSII subunits, CP47, D2/D1, and the Mn-stabilizing protein, can be observed. When PSII contains the 18- and 24-kDa extrinsic proteins, which restrict access to the active site, no 14C labeling is obtained. NaCl, but not Na2SO4, competes with 14C labeling in Mn-containing PSII preparations, and the concentration dependence of this competition parallels the activation of oxygen evolution. Formation of 14C-labeled adducts is observed in the presence or in the absence of a functional manganese cluster. However, no significant Cl− effect on 14C labeling is observed in the absence of the Mn cluster. Isolation and quantitation of the 14C-labeled aldehyde product, produced from [14C]benzylamine, gives yields of 1.8 ± 0.3 mol/mol PSII and 2.9 ± 0.2 mol/mol in Mn-containing and Mn-depleted PSII, respectively. The corresponding specific activities are 0.40 ± 0.07 μmol(μmol PSII-hr)−1 and 0.64 ± 0.04 μmol(μmol PSII-hr)−1. Cl− suppresses the production of [14C]benzaldehyde in Mn-containing PSII, but does not suppress the production in Mn-depleted preparations. Control experiments show that these oxidation reactions do not involve the redox-active tyrosines, D and Z. Our results suggest the presence of one or more activated carbonyl groups in protein subunits that form the active site of PSII. PMID:9482863

  8. Enhanced selectivity in non-heme iron catalysed oxidation of alkanes with peracids : evidence for involvement of Fe(IV)=O species

    Berg, Tieme A. van den; Boer, Johannes W. de; Browne, Wesley R.; Roelfes, Gerard; Feringa, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    Catalytic alkane oxidation with high selectivity using peracids and an (N4Py)Fe complex is presented and the role of [(N4Py)Fe(IV)=O]2+ species, molecular oxygen and hydroxyl radicals in the catalysis is discussed.

  9. Human acid β-glucosidase: isolation and amino acid sequence of a peptide containing the catalytic site

    Dinur, T.; Osiecki, K.M.; Legler, G.; Gatt, S.; Desnick, R.J.; Grabowski, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    Human acid β-glucosidase (D-glucosyl-N-acylsphingosine glucohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.45) cleaves the glucosidic bonds of glucosylceramide and synthetic β-glucosides. The deficient activity of this hydrolase is the enzymatic defect in the subtypes and variants of Gaucher disease, the most prevalent lysosomal storage disease. To isolate and characterize the catalytic site of the normal enzyme, brominated 3 H-labeled conduritol B epoxide ( 3 H-Br-CBE), which inhibits the enzyme by binding covalently to this site, was used as an affinity label. Under optimal conditions 1 mol of 3 H-Br-CBE bound to 1 mol of pure enzyme protein, indicating the presence of a single catalytic site per enzyme subunit. After V 8 protease digestion of the 3 H-Br-CBE-labeled homogeneous enzyme, three radiolabeled peptides, designated peptide A, B, or C, were resolved by reverse-phase HPLC. The partial amino acid sequence (37 residues) of peptide A (M/sub r/, 5000) was determined. The sequence of this peptide, which contained the catalytic site, had exact homology to the sequence near the carboxyl terminus of the protein, as predicted from the nucleotide sequence of the full-length cDNA encoding acid β-glucosidase

  10. Principles of water oxidation and O2-based hydrocarbon transformation by multinuclear catalytic sites

    Musaev, Djamaladdin G [Chemistry, Emory University; Hill, Craig L [Chemistry, Emory University; Morokuma, Keiji [Chemistry, Emory University

    2014-10-28

    Abstract The central thrust of this integrated experimental and computational research program was to obtain an atomistic-level understanding of the structural and dynamic factors underlying the design of catalysts for water oxidation and selective reductant-free O2-based transformations. The focus was on oxidatively robust polyoxometalate (POM) complexes in which a catalytic active site interacts with proximal metal centers in a synergistic manner. Thirty five publications in high-impact journals arose from this grant. I. Developing an oxidatively and hydrolytically stable and fast water oxidation catalyst (WOC), a central need in the production of green fuels using water as a reductant, has proven particularly challenging. During this grant period we have designed and investigated several carbon-free, molecular (homogenous), oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOCs, including the Rb8K2[{Ru4O4(OH)2(H2O)4}(γ-SiW10O36)2]·25H2O (1) and [Co4(H2O)2(α-PW9O34)2]10- (2). Although complex 1 is fast, oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOC, Ru is neither abundant nor inexpensive. Therefore, development of a stable and fast carbon-free homogenous WOC, based on earth-abundant elements became our highest priority. In 2010, we reported the first such catalyst, complex 2. This complex is substantially faster than 1 and stable under homogeneous conditions. Recently, we have extended our efforts and reported a V2-analog of the complex 2, i.e. [Co4(H2O)2(α-VW9O34)2]10- (3), which shows an even greater stability and reactivity. We succeeded in: (a) immobilizing catalysts 1 and 2 on the surface of various electrodes, and (b) elucidating the mechanism of O2 formation and release from complex 1, as well as the Mn4O4L6 “cubane” cluster. We have shown that the direct O-O bond formation is the most likely pathway for O2 formation during water oxidation catalyzed by 1. II. Oxo transfer catalysts that contain two proximal and synergistically interacting redox active metal

  11. Catalytic Ozonation of Toluene Using Chilean Natural Zeolite: The Key Role of Brønsted and Lewis Acid Sites

    Serguei Alejandro-Martín

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of surface physical-chemical characteristics of Chilean natural zeolite on the catalytic ozonation of toluene is presented in this article. Surface characteristics of natural zeolite were modified by acid treatment with hydrochloric acid and ion-exchange with ammonium sulphate. Prior to catalytic ozonation assays, natural and chemically modified zeolite samples were thermally treated at 623 and 823 K in order to enhance Brønsted and Lewis acid sites formation, respectively. Natural and modified zeolite samples were characterised by N2 adsorption at 77 K, elemental analysis, X-ray fluorescence, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, using pyridine as a probe molecule. The highest values of the reaction rate of toluene oxidation were observed when NH4Z1 and 2NH4Z1 zeolite samples were used. Those samples registered the highest density values of Lewis acid sites compared to other samples used here. Results indicate that the presence of strong Lewis acid sites at the 2NH4Z1 zeolite surface causes an increase in the reaction rate of toluene oxidation, confirming the role of Lewis acid sites during the catalytic ozonation of toluene at room temperature. Lewis acid sites decompose gaseous ozone into atomic oxygen, which reacts with the adsorbed toluene at Brønsted acid sites. On the other hand, no significant contribution of Brønsted acid sites on the reaction rate was registered when NH4Z1 and 2NH4Z1 zeolite samples were used.

  12. Energy-dependent dissociation of ATP from high affinity catalytic sites of beef heart mitochondrial adenosine triphosphatase

    Penefsky, H.S.

    1985-01-01

    Incubation of [gamma- 32 P]ATP with a molar excess of the membrane-bound form of mitochondrial ATPase (F1) results in binding of the bulk of the radioactive nucleotide in high affinity catalytic sites (Ka = 10(12) M-1). Subsequent initiation of respiration by addition of succinate or NADH is accompanied by a profound decrease in the affinity for ATP. About one-third of the bound radioactive ATP appears to dissociate, that is, the [gamma- 32 P]ATP becomes accessible to hexokinase. The NADH-stimulated dissociation of [gamma- 32 P]ATP is energy-dependent since the stimulation is inhibited by uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and is prevented by respiratory chain inhibitors. The rate of the energy-dependent dissociation of ATP that occurs in the presence of NADH, ADP, and Pi is commensurate with the measured initial rate of ATP synthesis in NADH-supported oxidative phosphorylation catalyzed by the same submitochondrial particles. Thus, the rate of dissociation of ATP from the high affinity catalytic site of submitochondrial particles meets the criterion of kinetic competency under the conditions of oxidative phosphorylation. These experiments provide evidence in support of the argument that energy conserved during the oxidation of substrates by the respiratory chain can be utilized to reduce the very tight binding of product ATP in high affinity catalytic sites and to promote dissociation of the nucleotide

  13. Processivity and Subcellular Localization of Glycogen Synthase Depend on a Non-catalytic High Affinity Glycogen-binding Site*

    Díaz, Adelaida; Martínez-Pons, Carlos; Fita, Ignacio; Ferrer, Juan C.; Guinovart, Joan J.

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen synthase, a central enzyme in glucose metabolism, catalyzes the successive addition of α-1,4-linked glucose residues to the non-reducing end of a growing glycogen molecule. A non-catalytic glycogen-binding site, identified by x-ray crystallography on the surface of the glycogen synthase from the archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi, has been found to be functionally conserved in the eukaryotic enzymes. The disruption of this binding site in both the archaeal and the human muscle glycogen synth...

  14. Modeling the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase: Electro-catalytic ...

    The mechanistic aspects of relevant electro–catalytic proton reductions have been discussed in detail. ... in the presence of a weak acid.4 This prompted us to investigate whether .... shifted to lower magnetic field strengths than those in parent ...

  15. Simultaneous pore enlargement and introduction of highly dispersed Fe active sites in MSNs for enhanced catalytic activity

    Gu Jinlou; Dong Xu; Elangovan, S.P.; Li Yongsheng; Zhao Wenru; Iijima, Toshio; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Shi Jianlin

    2012-01-01

    An effective post-hydrothermal treatment strategy has been developed to dope highly dispersed iron catalytical centers into the framework of mesoporous silica, to keep the particle size in nanometric scale, and in the meanwhile, to expand the pore size of the synthesized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). Characterization techniques such as XRD, BET, SEM and TEM support that the synthesized samples are long period ordered with particles size about 100 nm and a relatively large pore size of ca. 3.5 nm. UV–vis, XPS and EPR measurements demonstrate that the introduced iron active centers are highly dispersed in a coordinatively unsaturated status. NH 3 -TPD verifies that the acid amount of iron-doped MSNs is quite high. The synthesized nanocatalysts show an excellent catalytic performance for benzylation of benzene by benzyl chloride, and they present relatively higher yield and selectivity to diphenylmethane with a lower iron content and much shorter reaction time. - Graphical abstract: Uniform MSNs with iron active centers and large pore size have been prepared by a newly developed strategy, which demonstrates enhanced catalytic performance for benzylation of benzene by benzyl chloride. Highlights: ► Iron species were introduced into the framework of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with uniform dispersion. ► The pore sizes of the synthesized nanocatalysts were expanded. ► The acidic site quantities were quite high and the acidic centers were accessible. ► The nanocatalysts presented higher yield and selectivity to diphenylmethane with significantly lower Fe content.

  16. CMASA: an accurate algorithm for detecting local protein structural similarity and its application to enzyme catalytic site annotation

    Li Gong-Hua

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid development of structural genomics has resulted in many "unknown function" proteins being deposited in Protein Data Bank (PDB, thus, the functional prediction of these proteins has become a challenge for structural bioinformatics. Several sequence-based and structure-based methods have been developed to predict protein function, but these methods need to be improved further, such as, enhancing the accuracy, sensitivity, and the computational speed. Here, an accurate algorithm, the CMASA (Contact MAtrix based local Structural Alignment algorithm, has been developed to predict unknown functions of proteins based on the local protein structural similarity. This algorithm has been evaluated by building a test set including 164 enzyme families, and also been compared to other methods. Results The evaluation of CMASA shows that the CMASA is highly accurate (0.96, sensitive (0.86, and fast enough to be used in the large-scale functional annotation. Comparing to both sequence-based and global structure-based methods, not only the CMASA can find remote homologous proteins, but also can find the active site convergence. Comparing to other local structure comparison-based methods, the CMASA can obtain the better performance than both FFF (a method using geometry to predict protein function and SPASM (a local structure alignment method; and the CMASA is more sensitive than PINTS and is more accurate than JESS (both are local structure alignment methods. The CMASA was applied to annotate the enzyme catalytic sites of the non-redundant PDB, and at least 166 putative catalytic sites have been suggested, these sites can not be observed by the Catalytic Site Atlas (CSA. Conclusions The CMASA is an accurate algorithm for detecting local protein structural similarity, and it holds several advantages in predicting enzyme active sites. The CMASA can be used in large-scale enzyme active site annotation. The CMASA can be available by the

  17. Rationale and design of the oral HEMe iron polypeptide Against Treatment with Oral Controlled Release Iron Tablets trial for the correction of anaemia in peritoneal dialysis patients (HEMATOCRIT trial

    Isbel Nicole M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main hypothesis of this study is that oral heme iron polypeptide (HIP; Proferrin® ES administration will more effectively augment iron stores in erythropoietic stimulatory agent (ESA-treated peritoneal dialysis (PD patients than conventional oral iron supplementation (Ferrogradumet®. Methods Inclusion criteria are peritoneal dialysis patients treated with darbepoietin alpha (DPO; Aranesp®, Amgen for ≥ 1 month. Patients will be randomized 1:1 to receive either slow-release ferrous sulphate (1 tablet twice daily; control or HIP (1 tablet twice daily for a period of 6 months. The study will follow an open-label design but outcome assessors will be blinded to study treatment. During the 6-month study period, haemoglobin levels will be measured monthly and iron studies (including transferring saturation [TSAT] measurements will be performed bi-monthly. The primary outcome measure will be the difference in TSAT levels between the 2 groups at the end of the 6 month study period, adjusted for baseline values using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA. Secondary outcome measures will include serum ferritin concentration, haemoglobin level, DPO dosage, Key's index (DPO dosage divided by haemoglobin concentration, and occurrence of adverse events (especially gastrointestinal adverse events. Discussion This investigator-initiated multicentre study has been designed to provide evidence to help nephrologists and their peritoneal dialysis patients determine whether HIP administration more effectively augments iron stores in ESP-treated PD patients than conventional oral iron supplementation. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number ACTRN12609000432213.

  18. Engineered disulfide bonds increase active-site local stability and reduce catalytic activity of a cold-adapted alkaline phosphatase.

    Asgeirsson, Bjarni; Adalbjörnsson, Björn Vidar; Gylfason, Gudjón Andri

    2007-06-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an extracellular enzyme that is membrane-bound in eukaryotes but resides in the periplasmic space of bacteria. It normally carries four cysteine residues that form two disulfide bonds, for instance in the APs of Escherichia coli and vertebrates. An AP variant from a Vibrio sp. has only one cysteine residue. This cysteine is second next to the nucleophilic serine in the active site. We have individually modified seven residues to cysteine that are on two loops predicted to be within a 5 A radius. Four of them formed a disulfide bond to the endogenous cysteine. Thermal stability was monitored by circular dichroism and activity measurements. Global stability was similar to the wild-type enzyme. However, a significant increase in heat-stability was observed for the disulfide-containing variants using activity as a measure, together with a large reduction in catalytic rates (k(cat)) and a general decrease in Km values. The results suggest that a high degree of mobility near the active site and in the helix carrying the endogenous cysteine is essential for full catalytic efficiency in the cold-adapted AP.

  19. Enhancement in catalytic activity of Aspergillus niger XynB by selective site-directed mutagenesis of active site amino acids.

    Wu, Xiuyun; Tian, Zhennan; Jiang, Xukai; Zhang, Qun; Wang, Lushan

    2018-01-01

    XynB from Aspergillus niger ATCC1015 (AnXynB) is a mesophilic glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 11 xylanase which holds great potentials in a wide variety of industrial applications. In the present study, the catalytic activity and stability of AnXynB were improved by a combination of computational and experimental approaches. Virtual mutation and molecular dynamics simulations indicated that the introduction of Glu and Asn altered the interaction network at the - 3 subsite. Interestingly, the double mutant S41N/T43E displayed 72% increase in catalytic activity when compared to the wild type (WT). In addition, it also showed a better thermostability than the WT enzyme. Kinetic determination of the T43E and S41N/T43E mutants suggested that the higher xylanase activity is probably due to the increasing binding affinity of enzyme and substrate. Consequently, the enzyme activity and thermostability of AnXynB was both increased by selective site-directed mutagenesis at the - 3 subsite of its active site architecture which provides a good example for a successfully engineered enzyme for potential industrial application. Moreover, the molecular evolution approach adopted in this study led to the design of a library of sequences that captures a meaningful functional diversity in a limited number of protein variants.

  20. Catalytic transitions in the human MDR1 P-glycoprotein drug binding sites.

    Wise, John G

    2012-06-26

    Multidrug resistance proteins that belong to the ATP-binding cassette family like the human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1 or Pgp) are responsible for many failed cancer and antiviral chemotherapies because these membrane transporters remove the chemotherapeutics from the targeted cells. Understanding the details of the catalytic mechanism of Pgp is therefore critical to the development of inhibitors that might overcome these resistances. In this work, targeted molecular dynamics techniques were used to elucidate catalytically relevant structures of Pgp. Crystal structures of homologues in four different conformations were used as intermediate targets in the dynamics simulations. Transitions from conformations that were wide open to the cytoplasm to transition state conformations that were wide open to the extracellular space were studied. Twenty-six nonredundant transitional protein structures were identified from these targeted molecular dynamics simulations using evolutionary structure analyses. Coupled movement of nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) and transmembrane domains (TMDs) that form the drug binding cavities were observed. Pronounced twisting of the NBDs as they approached each other as well as the quantification of a dramatic opening of the TMDs to the extracellular space as the ATP hydrolysis transition state was reached were observed. Docking interactions of 21 known transport ligands or inhibitors were analyzed with each of the 26 transitional structures. Many of the docking results obtained here were validated by previously published biochemical determinations. As the ATP hydrolysis transition state was approached, drug docking in the extracellular half of the transmembrane domains seemed to be destabilized as transport ligand exit gates opened to the extracellular space.

  1. Involvement of the Cys-Tyr cofactor on iron binding in the active site of human cysteine dioxygenase.

    Arjune, Sita; Schwarz, Guenter; Belaidi, Abdel A

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur metabolism has gained increasing medical interest over the last years. In particular, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been recognized as a potential marker in oncology due to its altered gene expression in various cancer types. Human CDO is a non-heme iron-dependent enzyme, which catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, which is further metabolized to taurine or pyruvate and sulfate. Several studies have reported a unique post-translational modification of human CDO consisting of a cross-link between cysteine 93 and tyrosine 157 (Cys-Tyr), which increases catalytic efficiency in a substrate-dependent manner. However, the reaction mechanism by which the Cys-Tyr cofactor increases catalytic efficiency remains unclear. In this study, steady-state kinetics were determined for wild type CDO and two different variants being either impaired or saturated with the Cys-Tyr cofactor. Cofactor formation in CDO resulted in an approximately fivefold increase in k cat and tenfold increase in k cat/K m over the cofactor-free CDO variant. Furthermore, iron titration experiments revealed an 18-fold decrease in K d of iron upon cross-link formation. This finding suggests a structural role of the Cys-Tyr cofactor in coordinating the ferrous iron in the active site of CDO in accordance with the previously postulated reaction mechanism of human CDO. Finally, we identified product-based inhibition and α-ketoglutarate and glutarate as CDO inhibitors using a simplified well plate-based activity assay. This assay can be used for high-throughput identification of additional inhibitors, which may contribute to understand the functional importance of CDO in sulfur amino acid metabolism and related diseases.

  2. Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges.

    Ignacio Martínez-Araya, Jorge; Grand, André; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2015-11-28

    By means of the Spin-Polarized Conceptual Density Functional Theory (SP-CDFT), three 2,6-bis(imino)pyridine catalysts based on iron(II), used for polymerization of ethylene, were studied. The catalysts differed by the substituent group, bearing either -H, -NO2 or -OCH3. To date, catalytic activity, a purely experimental parameter measuring the mass of polyethylene produced per millimole of iron per time and pressure unit at a fixed temperature, has not been explained in terms of local hyper-softness. The latter is a purely theoretical parameter designed for quantifying electronic effects; it is measured using the metal atom responsible for the coordination process with the monomer (ethylene). Because steric effects are not relevant in these kinds of catalysts and only electronic effects drive the catalytic process, an interesting link is found between catalytic activity and the local hyper-softness condensed on the iron atom by means of four functionals (B3LYP, BP86, B97D, and VSXC). This work demonstrates that the use of local hyper-softness, predicted by the SP-CDFT, is a suitable parameter for explaining order relationships among catalytic activity values, thus quantifying the electronic influence of the substituent group inducing this difference; the use of only net electric charges does not lead to clear conclusions. This finding can aid in estimating catalytic activities leading to a more rational design of new catalysts via computational chemistry.

  3. Identification of the segment of the catalytic subunit of (Na+,K+)ATPase containing the digitalis binding site.

    Rossi, B; Ponzio, G; Lazdunski, M

    1982-01-01

    Digitalis compounds that are extensively used in the treatment of cardiovascular disorders are known to bind specifically at the extracellular side of (Na+,K+)ATPase. We have recently reported the synthesis of [3H]p- nitrophenyltriazene -ouabain, a derivative of ouabain, which specifically alkylates the catalytic chain of the (Na+,K+)ATPase at a defined region of the sequence. The peptidic segment involved in the binding of digitalis to (Na+,K+)ATPase has been located after mild trypsin treatment of the labeled enzyme. In the presence of 100 mM KCl, tryptic fragmentation results in two peptide fragments of mol. wt. 58 000 and 41 000, respectively. The radioactive probe labeled only the 41 000 fragment indicating that the digitalis binding site is located on the 41 000 domain situated at the N-terminal part of the sequence of the alpha-subunit. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:6329711

  4. Identification of catalytic sites in cobalt-nitrogen-carbon materials for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    Zitolo, Andrea; Ranjbar-Sahraie, Nastaran; Mineva, Tzonka; Li, Jingkun; Jia, Qingying; Stamatin, Serban; Harrington, George F; Lyth, Stephen Mathew; Krtil, Petr; Mukerjee, Sanjeev; Fonda, Emiliano; Jaouen, Frédéric

    2017-10-16

    Single-atom catalysts with full utilization of metal centers can bridge the gap between molecular and solid-state catalysis. Metal-nitrogen-carbon materials prepared via pyrolysis are promising single-atom catalysts but often also comprise metallic particles. Here, we pyrolytically synthesize a Co-N-C material only comprising atomically dispersed cobalt ions and identify with X-ray absorption spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility measurements and density functional theory the structure and electronic state of three porphyrinic moieties, CoN 4 C 12 , CoN 3 C 10,porp and CoN 2 C 5 . The O 2 electro-reduction and operando X-ray absorption response are measured in acidic medium on Co-N-C and compared to those of a Fe-N-C catalyst prepared similarly. We show that cobalt moieties are unmodified from 0.0 to 1.0 V versus a reversible hydrogen electrode, while Fe-based moieties experience structural and electronic-state changes. On the basis of density functional theory analysis and established relationships between redox potential and O 2 -adsorption strength, we conclude that cobalt-based moieties bind O 2 too weakly for efficient O 2 reduction.Nitrogen-doped carbon materials with atomically dispersed iron or cobalt are promising for catalytic use. Here, the authors show that cobalt moieties have a higher redox potential, bind oxygen more weakly and are less active toward oxygen reduction than their iron counterpart, despite similar coordination.

  5. Co-Aromatization of Methane with Olefins: The Role of Inner Pore and External Surface Catalytic Sites

    Yung, Matthew M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); He, Peng [University of Calgary; Jarvis, Jack [University of Calgary; Meng, Shijun [University of Calgary; Wang, Aiguo [University of Calgary; Kou, Shiyu [University of Calgary; Gatip, Richard [University of Calgary; Liu, Lijia [Soochow University; Song, Hua [University of Calgary

    2018-04-22

    The co-aromatization of methane with olefins is investigated using Ag-Ga/HZSM-5 as the catalyst at 400 degrees C. The presence of methane has a pronounced effect on the product distribution in terms of increased average carbon number and substitution index and decreased aromatic carbon fraction compared with its N2 environment counterpart. The participation of methane during the co-aromatization over the Ag-Ga/HZSM-5 catalyst diminishes as the co-fed olefin feedstock molecule becomes larger, from 1-hexene to 1-octene and 1-decene, in diameter. The effect of suppressed methane participation with larger olefinic molecules is not as significant when Ag-Ga/HY is employed as the catalyst, which might be attributed to the larger pore size of HY that gives more room to hold olefin and methane molecules within the inner pores and reduces the diffusion limitation of olefin molecules. The effect of olefin feedstock on the methane participation during the co-aromatization over Ag-Ga/HZSM-5 is experimentally evidenced by 13C and 2D NMR. The incorporation of the methane carbon atoms into the phenyl ring of product molecules is reduced significantly with larger co-fed olefins, whereas its incorporation into the substitution groups of the formed aromatic molecules is not notably affected, suggesting that the methane participation in the phenyl ring formation might preferably occur within inner pores, while its incorporation into substitution groups may mainly take place on external catalytic sites. This hypothesis is well supported by the product selectivity obtained over Ag-Ga/HZSM-5 catalysts prepared using conventional ZSM-5, ZSM-5 with the external catalytic sites deactivated, nanosize ZSM-5, ZSM-5 with a micro/meso pore structure and ZSM-5 with the inner pores blocked, and further confirmed by the isotopic labeling studies.

  6. Active catalytic sites in the ammoxidation of propane and propene over V-Sb-O catalysts

    Buchholz, S.A.; Zanthoff, H.W. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie

    1998-12-31

    The ammoxidation of propane over VSb{sub y}O{sub x} catalysts (y=1, 2, 5) was investigated with respect to the role of different oxygen species in the selective and non selective reaction steps using transient experiments in the Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) reactor. Only lattice oxygen is involved in the oxidation reactions. Using isotopic labelled oxygen it is shown that two different active sites exist on the surface. On site A, which can be reoxidized faster by gas phase oxygen compared to site B, mainly CO is formed. On site B CO{sub 2} and acrolein as well as NO and N{sub 2}O in the presence of ammonia in the feed gas are formed and reoxidation mainly occurs with bulk lattice oxygen. (orig.)

  7. Catalytic Pyrolysis of Chilean Oak: Influence of Brønsted Acid Sites of Chilean Natural Zeolite

    Serguei Alejandro Martín

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the Chilean natural zeolite as catalyst on bio-oil upgrade processes. The aim of this study was to analyze chemical composition of bio-oil samples obtained from catalytic pyrolysis of Chilean native oak in order to increase bio-oil stability during storage. In order to identify chemical compounds before and after storage, biomass pyrolysis was carried out in a fixed bed reactor at 623 K and bio-oil samples were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrophotometry (GC/MS. A bio-oil fractionation method was successfully applied here. Results indicate that bio-oil viscosity decreases due to active sites on the zeolite framework. Active acids sites were associated with an increment of alcohols, aldehydes, and hydrocarbon content during storage. Higher composition on aldehydes and alcohols after storage could be attributed to the occurrence of carbonyl reduction reactions that promotes them. These reactions are influenced by zeolite surface characteristics and could be achieved via the direct contribution of Brønsted acid sites to Chilean natural zeolite.

  8. Piv site-specific invertase requires a DEDD motif analogous to the catalytic center of the RuvC Holliday junction resolvases.

    Buchner, John M; Robertson, Anne E; Poynter, David J; Denniston, Shelby S; Karls, Anna C

    2005-05-01

    Piv, a unique prokaryotic site-specific DNA invertase, is related to transposases of the insertion elements from the IS110/IS492 family and shows no similarity to the site-specific recombinases of the tyrosine- or serine-recombinase families. Piv tertiary structure is predicted to include the RNase H-like fold that typically encompasses the catalytic site of the recombinases or nucleases of the retroviral integrase superfamily, including transposases and RuvC-like Holliday junction resolvases. Analogous to the DDE and DEDD catalytic motifs of transposases and RuvC, respectively, four Piv acidic residues D9, E59, D101, and D104 appear to be positioned appropriately within the RNase H fold to coordinate two divalent metal cations. This suggests mechanistic similarity between site-specific inversion mediated by Piv and transposition or endonucleolytic reactions catalyzed by enzymes of the retroviral integrase superfamily. The role of the DEDD motif in Piv catalytic activity was addressed using Piv variants that are substituted individually or multiply at these acidic residues and assaying for in vivo inversion, intermolecular recombination, and DNA binding activities. The results indicate that all four residues of the DEDD motif are required for Piv catalytic activity. The DEDD residues are not essential for inv recombination site recognition and binding, but this acidic tetrad does appear to contribute to the stability of Piv-inv interactions. On the basis of these results, a working model for Piv-mediated inversion that includes resolution of a Holliday junction is presented.

  9. Combining Ru, Ni and Ni(OH){sub 2} active sites for improving catalytic performance in benzene hydrogenation

    Zhu, Lihua, E-mail: lihuazhu@stu.xmu.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Sun, Hanlei; Zheng, Jinbao [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Yu, Changlin, E-mail: yuchanglinjx@163.com [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Zhang, Nuowei [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Shu, Qing [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Chen, Bing H., E-mail: chenbh@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(T) catalysts were successfully prepared by the simple methods of hydrazine-reduction and galvanic replacement, where 0.04/0.96 and T represented the Ru/Ni atomic ratio and reducing temperature of the catalyst in N{sub 2}+10%H{sub 2}, respectively. The nanostructures of the Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96} nanoparticles in the Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(T) catalysts were controlled by modulating their annealing temperature in N{sub 2}+10%H{sub 2} and characterized by an array of techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) mapping and high-sensitivity low-energy ion scattering (HS-LEIS). The Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(30) catalyst, which was composed of Ru clusters or single atoms supported on Ni/Ni(OH){sub 2} nanoparticles, exhibited much better catalytic performance for benzene hydrogenation than the Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(T) catalysts reduced at above 30 °C, such as Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(160) with the nanostructure of partial Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.9} alloy and Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(280) with the nanostructure of complete Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.9} alloy. The reason was that the synergistic effect of multiple active sites – Ru, Ni and Ni(OH){sub 2} sites was present in the Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(30) catalyst, where hydrogen was preferentially activated at Ru sites, benzene was probably activated at Ni(OH){sub 2} surface and Ni acted as a “bridge” for transferring activated H{sup ∗} species to activated benzene by hydrogen spillover effect, hydrogenating and forming product – cyclohexane. This study also provided a typical example to illustrate that the synergy effect of multiple active sites can largely improve the catalytic hydrogenation performance. - Highlights: • The Ru

  10. Catalytic surface radical in dye-decolorizing peroxidase: a computational, spectroscopic and site-directed mutagenesis study

    Linde, Dolores; Pogni, Rebecca; Cañellas, Marina; Lucas, Fátima; Guallar, Victor; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Sinicropi, Adalgisa; Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Coscolín, Cristina; Romero, Antonio; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Martínez, Angel T.

    2014-01-01

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) of Auricularia auricula-judae has been expressed in Escherichia coli as a representative of a new DyP family, and subjected to mutagenic, spectroscopic, crystallographic and computational studies. The crystal structure of DyP shows a buried haem cofactor, and surface tryptophan and tyrosine residues potentially involved in long-range electron transfer from bulky dyes. Simulations using PELE (Protein Energy Landscape Exploration) software provided several binding-energy optima for the anthraquinone-type RB19 (Reactive Blue 19) near the above aromatic residues and the haem access-channel. Subsequent QM/MM (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) calculations showed a higher tendency of Trp-377 than other exposed haem-neighbouring residues to harbour a catalytic protein radical, and identified the electron-transfer pathway. The existence of such a radical in H2O2-activated DyP was shown by low-temperature EPR, being identified as a mixed tryptophanyl/tyrosyl radical in multifrequency experiments. The signal was dominated by the Trp-377 neutral radical contribution, which disappeared in the W377S variant, and included a tyrosyl contribution assigned to Tyr-337 after analysing the W377S spectra. Kinetics of substrate oxidation by DyP suggests the existence of high- and low-turnover sites. The high-turnover site for oxidation of RB19 (kcat> 200 s−1) and other DyP substrates was assigned to Trp-377 since it was absent from the W377S variant. The low-turnover site/s (RB19 kcat ~20 s−1) could correspond to the haem access-channel, since activity was decreased when the haem channel was occluded by the G169L mutation. If a tyrosine residue is also involved, it will be different from Tyr-337 since all activities are largely unaffected in the Y337S variant. PMID:25495127

  11. Single cobalt sites in mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix for selective catalytic hydrogenation of nitroarenes

    Sun, Xiaohui

    2017-11-20

    A supported cobalt catalyst with atomically dispersed Co-Nx sites (3.5 wt% Co) in a mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix (named Co@mesoNC) is synthesized by hydrolysis of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) in a Zn/Co bimetallic zeolitic imidazolate framework (BIMZIF(Co,Zn)), followed by high-temperature pyrolysis and SiO2 leaching. A combination of TEM, XRD XPS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies confirm the absence of cobalt nanoparticles and indicate that these highly dispersed cobalt species are present in the form of Co-Nx. The exclusive formation of Co-Nx sites in the carbon matrix is attributed to the presence of a large amount of Zn and N in the BIMZIF precursor together with the presence of SiO2 in the pore space of this framework, extending the initial spatial distance between cobalt atoms and thereby impeding their agglomeration. The presence of SiO2 during high-temperature pyrolysis is proven crucial to create mesoporosity and a high BET area and pore volume in the N-doped carbon support (1780 m2 g−1, 1.54 cm3 g−1). This heterogeneous Co@mesoNC catalyst displays high activity and selectivity (>99%) for the selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline at mild conditions (0.5–3 MPa, 343–383 K). When more challenging substrates (functionalized nitroarenes) are hydrogenated, the catalyst Co@mesoNC displays an excellent chemoselectivity to the corresponding substituted anilines.The presence of mesoporosity improves mass transport of reactants and/or products and the accessibility of the active Co-Nx sites, and greatly reduces deactivation due to fouling.

  12. Single cobalt sites in mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix for selective catalytic hydrogenation of nitroarenes

    Sun, Xiaohui; Olivos-Suarez, Alma I.; Osadchii, Dmitrii; Romero, Maria Jose Valero; Kapteijn, Freek; Gascon, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    A supported cobalt catalyst with atomically dispersed Co-Nx sites (3.5 wt% Co) in a mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix (named Co@mesoNC) is synthesized by hydrolysis of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) in a Zn/Co bimetallic zeolitic imidazolate framework (BIMZIF(Co,Zn)), followed by high-temperature pyrolysis and SiO2 leaching. A combination of TEM, XRD XPS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies confirm the absence of cobalt nanoparticles and indicate that these highly dispersed cobalt species are present in the form of Co-Nx. The exclusive formation of Co-Nx sites in the carbon matrix is attributed to the presence of a large amount of Zn and N in the BIMZIF precursor together with the presence of SiO2 in the pore space of this framework, extending the initial spatial distance between cobalt atoms and thereby impeding their agglomeration. The presence of SiO2 during high-temperature pyrolysis is proven crucial to create mesoporosity and a high BET area and pore volume in the N-doped carbon support (1780 m2 g−1, 1.54 cm3 g−1). This heterogeneous Co@mesoNC catalyst displays high activity and selectivity (>99%) for the selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline at mild conditions (0.5–3 MPa, 343–383 K). When more challenging substrates (functionalized nitroarenes) are hydrogenated, the catalyst Co@mesoNC displays an excellent chemoselectivity to the corresponding substituted anilines.The presence of mesoporosity improves mass transport of reactants and/or products and the accessibility of the active Co-Nx sites, and greatly reduces deactivation due to fouling.

  13. Catalytic water co-existing with a product peptide in the active site of HIV-1 protease revealed by X-ray structure analysis.

    Vishal Prashar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is known that HIV-1 protease is an important target for design of antiviral compounds in the treatment of Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS. In this context, understanding the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme is of crucial importance as transition state structure directs inhibitor design. Most mechanistic proposals invoke nucleophilic attack on the scissile peptide bond by a water molecule. But such a water molecule coexisting with any ligand in the active site has not been found so far in the crystal structures. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here the first observation of the coexistence in the active site, of a water molecule WAT1, along with the carboxyl terminal product (Q product peptide. The product peptide has been generated in situ through cleavage of the full-length substrate. The N-terminal product (P product has diffused out and is replaced by a set of water molecules while the Q product is still held in the active site through hydrogen bonds. The position of WAT1, which hydrogen bonds to both the catalytic aspartates, is different from when there is no substrate bound in the active site. We propose WAT1 to be the position from where catalytic water attacks the scissile peptide bond. Comparison of structures of HIV-1 protease complexed with the same oligopeptide substrate, but at pH 2.0 and at pH 7.0 shows interesting changes in the conformation and hydrogen bonding interactions from the catalytic aspartates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The structure is suggestive of the repositioning, during substrate binding, of the catalytic water for activation and subsequent nucleophilic attack. The structure could be a snap shot of the enzyme active site primed for the next round of catalysis. This structure further suggests that to achieve the goal of designing inhibitors mimicking the transition-state, the hydrogen-bonding pattern between WAT1 and the enzyme should be replicated.

  14. Catalytic water co-existing with a product peptide in the active site of HIV-1 protease revealed by X-ray structure analysis.

    Prashar, Vishal; Bihani, Subhash; Das, Amit; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Hosur, Madhusoodan

    2009-11-17

    It is known that HIV-1 protease is an important target for design of antiviral compounds in the treatment of Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). In this context, understanding the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme is of crucial importance as transition state structure directs inhibitor design. Most mechanistic proposals invoke nucleophilic attack on the scissile peptide bond by a water molecule. But such a water molecule coexisting with any ligand in the active site has not been found so far in the crystal structures. We report here the first observation of the coexistence in the active site, of a water molecule WAT1, along with the carboxyl terminal product (Q product) peptide. The product peptide has been generated in situ through cleavage of the full-length substrate. The N-terminal product (P product) has diffused out and is replaced by a set of water molecules while the Q product is still held in the active site through hydrogen bonds. The position of WAT1, which hydrogen bonds to both the catalytic aspartates, is different from when there is no substrate bound in the active site. We propose WAT1 to be the position from where catalytic water attacks the scissile peptide bond. Comparison of structures of HIV-1 protease complexed with the same oligopeptide substrate, but at pH 2.0 and at pH 7.0 shows interesting changes in the conformation and hydrogen bonding interactions from the catalytic aspartates. The structure is suggestive of the repositioning, during substrate binding, of the catalytic water for activation and subsequent nucleophilic attack. The structure could be a snap shot of the enzyme active site primed for the next round of catalysis. This structure further suggests that to achieve the goal of designing inhibitors mimicking the transition-state, the hydrogen-bonding pattern between WAT1 and the enzyme should be replicated.

  15. On the mechanism of sulfite activation of chloroplast thylakoid ATPase and the relation of ADP tightly bound at a catalytic site to the binding change mechanism

    Du, Z.; Boyer, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    Washed chloroplast thylakoid membranes upon exposure to [ 3 H]ADP retain in tightly bound [ 3 H]ADP on a catalytic site of the ATP synthase. The presence of sufficient endogenous or added Mg 2+ results in an enzyme with essentially no ATPase activity. Sulfite activates the ATPase, and many molecules of ATP per synthase can be hydrolyzed before most of the bound [ 3 H]ADP is released, a result interpreted as indicating that the ADP is not bound at a site participating in catalysis by the sulfite-activated enzyme. The authors present evidence that this is not the case. The Mg 2+ - and ADP-inhibited enzyme when exposed to MgATP and 20-100 mM sulfite shows a lag of about 1 min at 22 degree C and of about 15 s at 37 degree C before reaching the same steady-state rate as attained with light-activated ATPase that has not been inhibited by Mg 2+ and ADP. The lag is not eliminated if the enzyme is exposed to sulfite prior to MgATP addition, indicating that ATPase turnover is necessary for the activation. The release of most of the bound [ 3 H]ADP parallels the onset of ATPase activity, although some [ 3 H]ADP is not released even with prolonged catalytic turnover and may be on poorly active or inactive enzyme or at noncatalytic sites. The results are consistent with most of the tightly bound [ 3 H]ADP being at a catalytic site and being replaced as this Mg 2+ - and ADP-inhibited site regains equivalent participation with other catalytic sites on the activated enzyme. The sulfite activation can be explained by sulfite combination at a P i binding site of the enzyme-ADP-Mg 2+ complex to give a form more readily activated by ATP binding at an alternative site

  16. Specificity and versatility of substrate binding sites in four catalytic domains of human N-terminal acetyltransferases.

    Cédric Grauffel

    Full Text Available Nt-acetylation is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes. Although thought for a long time to protect proteins from degradation, the role of Nt-acetylation is still debated. It is catalyzed by enzymes called N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs. In eukaryotes, several NATs, composed of at least one catalytic domain, target different substrates based on their N-terminal sequences. In order to better understand the substrate specificity of human NATs, we investigated in silico the enzyme-substrate interactions in four catalytic subunits of human NATs (Naa10p, Naa20p, Naa30p and Naa50p. To date hNaa50p is the only human subunit for which X-ray structures are available. We used the structure of the ternary hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex and a structural model of hNaa10p as a starting point for multiple molecular dynamics simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE, MKG, hNaa10p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE. Nine alanine point-mutants of the hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex were also simulated. Homology models of hNaa20p and hNaa30p were built and compared to hNaa50p and hNaa10p. The simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG reproduce the interactions revealed by the X-ray data. We observed strong hydrogen bonds between MLG and tyrosines 31, 138 and 139. Yet the tyrosines interacting with the substrate's backbone suggest that their role in specificity is limited. This is confirmed by the simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/EEE and hNaa10p/AcCoA/MLG, where these hydrogen bonds are still observed. Moreover these tyrosines are all conserved in hNaa20p and hNaa30p. Other amino acids tune the specificity of the S1' sites that is different for hNaa10p (acidic, hNaa20p (hydrophobic/basic, hNaa30p (basic and hNaa50p (hydrophobic. We also observe dynamic correlation between the ligand binding site and helix [Formula: see text] that tightens under substrate binding. Finally, by comparing the four structures we propose maps of the peptide

  17. A conserved mechanism of autoinhibition for the AMPK kinase domain: ATP-binding site and catalytic loop refolding as a means of regulation

    Littler, Dene R.; Walker, John R.; Davis, Tara; Wybenga-Groot, Leanne E.; Finerty, Patrick J. Jr; Newman, Elena; Mackenzie, Farell; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2010-01-01

    A 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the isolated kinase domain from the α2 subunit of human AMPK, the first from a multicellular organism, is presented. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a highly conserved trimeric protein complex that is responsible for energy homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Here, a 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the isolated kinase domain from the α2 subunit of human AMPK, the first from a multicellular organism, is presented. This human form adopts a catalytically inactive state with distorted ATP-binding and substrate-binding sites. The ATP site is affected by changes in the base of the activation loop, which has moved into an inhibited DFG-out conformation. The substrate-binding site is disturbed by changes within the AMPKα2 catalytic loop that further distort the enzyme from a catalytically active form. Similar structural rearrangements have been observed in a yeast AMPK homologue in response to the binding of its auto-inhibitory domain; restructuring of the kinase catalytic loop is therefore a conserved feature of the AMPK protein family and is likely to represent an inhibitory mechanism that is utilized during function

  18. Establishing efficient cobalt based catalytic sites for oxygen evolution on a Ta3N5 photocatalyst

    Nurlaela, Ela; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Llorens, Isabelle; Hazemann, Jean-louis; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    In a photocatalytic suspension system with a powder semiconductor, the interface between the photocatalyst semiconductor and catalyst should be constructed to minimize resistance for charge transfer of excited carriers. This study demonstrates an in-depth understanding of pretreatment effects on the photocatalytic O2 evolution reaction (OER) activity of visible-light-responsive Ta3N5 decorated with CoOx nanoparticles. The CoOx/Ta3N5 sample was synthesized by impregnation followed by sequential heat treat-ments under NH3 flow and air flow at various temperatures. Various characterization techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and X-ray photoelectron spec-troscopy (XPS), were used to clarify the state and role of cobalt. No improvement in photocatalytic activity for OER over the bare Ta3N5 was observed for the as-impregnated CoOx/Ta3N5, likely because of insufficient contact between CoOx and Ta3N5. When the sample was treated in NH3 at high temperature, a substantial improvement in the photocatalytic activity was observed. After NH3 treatment at 700 °C, the Co0-CoOx core-shell agglomerated cobalt structure was identified by XAS and STEM. No metallic cobalt species was evident after the photocatalytic OER, indicating that the metallic cobalt itself is not essential for the reaction. Accordingly, mild oxidation (200 °C) of the NH3-treated CoOx/Ta3N5 sample enhanced photocatalytic OER activity. Oxidation at higher temperatures drastically eliminated the photocatalytic activity, most likely because of unfavorable Ta3N5 oxidation. These results suggest that the intimate contact between cobalt species and Ta3N5 facilitated at high temperature is beneficial to enhancing hole transport and that the cobalt oxide provides electrocatalytic sites for OER.

  19. Establishing efficient cobalt based catalytic sites for oxygen evolution on a Ta3N5 photocatalyst

    Nurlaela, Ela

    2015-08-05

    In a photocatalytic suspension system with a powder semiconductor, the interface between the photocatalyst semiconductor and catalyst should be constructed to minimize resistance for charge transfer of excited carriers. This study demonstrates an in-depth understanding of pretreatment effects on the photocatalytic O2 evolution reaction (OER) activity of visible-light-responsive Ta3N5 decorated with CoOx nanoparticles. The CoOx/Ta3N5 sample was synthesized by impregnation followed by sequential heat treat-ments under NH3 flow and air flow at various temperatures. Various characterization techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and X-ray photoelectron spec-troscopy (XPS), were used to clarify the state and role of cobalt. No improvement in photocatalytic activity for OER over the bare Ta3N5 was observed for the as-impregnated CoOx/Ta3N5, likely because of insufficient contact between CoOx and Ta3N5. When the sample was treated in NH3 at high temperature, a substantial improvement in the photocatalytic activity was observed. After NH3 treatment at 700 °C, the Co0-CoOx core-shell agglomerated cobalt structure was identified by XAS and STEM. No metallic cobalt species was evident after the photocatalytic OER, indicating that the metallic cobalt itself is not essential for the reaction. Accordingly, mild oxidation (200 °C) of the NH3-treated CoOx/Ta3N5 sample enhanced photocatalytic OER activity. Oxidation at higher temperatures drastically eliminated the photocatalytic activity, most likely because of unfavorable Ta3N5 oxidation. These results suggest that the intimate contact between cobalt species and Ta3N5 facilitated at high temperature is beneficial to enhancing hole transport and that the cobalt oxide provides electrocatalytic sites for OER.

  20. Site-specific growth of Au-Pd alloy horns on Au nanorods: A platform for highly sensitive monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhancement raman spectroscopy

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2013-06-12

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a highly sensitive probe for molecular detection. The aim of this study was to develop an efficient platform for investigating the kinetics of catalytic reactions with SERS. To achieve this, we synthesized a novel Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructure (HIF-AuNR@AuPd) through site-specific epitaxial growth of Au-Pd alloy horns as catalytic sites at the ends of Au nanorods. Using high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography, we successfully reconstructed the complex three-dimensional morphology of HIF-AuNR@AuPd and identified that the horns are bound with high-index {11l} (0.25 < l < 0.43) facets. With an electron beam probe, we visualized the distribution of surface plasmon over the HIF-AuNR@AuPd nanorods, finding that strong longitudinal surface plasmon resonance concentrated at the rod ends. This unique crystal morphology led to the coupling of high catalytic activity with a strong SERS effect at the rod ends, making HIF-AuNR@AuPd an excellent bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of surface catalytic reactions. Using the hydrogenation of 4-nitrothiophenol as a model reaction, we demonstrated that its first-order reaction kinetics could be accurately determined from this platform. Moreover, we clearly identified the superior catalytic activity of the rod ends relative to that of the rod bodies, owing to the different SERS activities at the two positions. In comparison with other reported Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructures, HIF-AuNR@AuPd offered both higher catalytic activity and greater detection sensitivity. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  1. Determination of the positions of aluminum atoms introduced into SSZ-35 and the catalytic properties of the generated Brønsted acid sites.

    Miyaji, Akimitsu; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Shiga, Akinobu; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Nishitoba, Toshiki; Motokura, Ken; Baba, Toshihide

    2017-03-01

    The positions of aluminum (Al) atoms in SSZ-35 together with the characteristics of the generated protons were investigated by 27 Al multiple quantum magic-angle spinning (MQ-MAS), 29 Si MAS, and 1 H MAS NMR data analyses accompanied by a variable temperature 1 H MAS NMR analysis. The origin of the acidic -OH groups (Brønsted acid sites) generated by introducing Al atoms into the T sites was investigated and the T sites introduced into the Al atoms were revealed. To further determine the catalytic properties of the acidic protons generated in SSZ-35, the influence of the concentration of the Al atoms on the catalytic activity and selectivity during the transformation of toluene was examined.

  2. Direct photoaffinity labeling by nucleotides of the apparent catalytic site on the heavy chains of smooth muscle and Acanthamoeba myosins

    Maruta, H.; Korn, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    The heavy chains of Acanthamoeba myosins, IA, IB and II, turkey gizzard myosin, and rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1 were specifically labeled by radioactive ATP, ADP, and UTP, each of which is a substrate or product of myosin ATPase activity, when irradiated with uv light at 0 0 C. With UTP, as much as 0.45 mol/mol of Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and 1 mol/mol of turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain was incorporated. Evidence that the ligands were associated with the catalytic site included the observations that reaction occurred only with nucleotides that are substrates or products of the ATPase activity; that the reaction was blocked by pyrophosphate which is an inhibitor of the ATPase activity; that ATP was bound as ADP; and that label was probably restricted to a single peptide following limited subtilisin proteolysis of labeled Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and extensive cleavage with CNBr and trypsin of labeled turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain

  3. Cys-X scanning for expansion of active-site residues and modulation of catalytic functions in a glutathione transferase.

    Norrgård, Malena A; Hellman, Ulf; Mannervik, Bengt

    2011-05-13

    We propose Cys-X scanning as a semisynthetic approach to engineer the functional properties of recombinant proteins. As in the case of Ala scanning, key residues in the primary structure are identified, and one of them is replaced by Cys via site-directed mutagenesis. The thiol of the residue introduced is subsequently modified by alternative chemical reagents to yield diverse Cys-X mutants of the protein. This chemical approach is orthogonal to Ala or Cys scanning and allows the expansion of the repertoire of amino acid side chains far beyond those present in natural proteins. In its present application, we have introduced Cys-X residues in human glutathione transferase (GST) M2-2, replacing Met-212 in the substrate-binding site. To achieve selectivity of the modifications, the Cys residues in the wild-type enzyme were replaced by Ala. A suite of simple substitutions resulted in a set of homologous Met derivatives ranging from normethionine to S-heptyl-cysteine. The chemical modifications were validated by HPLC and mass spectrometry. The derivatized mutant enzymes were assayed with alternative GST substrates representing diverse chemical reactions: aromatic substitution, epoxide opening, transnitrosylation, and addition to an ortho-quinone. The Cys substitutions had different effects on the alternative substrates and differentially enhanced or suppressed catalytic activities depending on both the Cys-X substitution and the substrate assayed. As a consequence, the enzyme specificity profile could be changed among the alternative substrates. The procedure lends itself to large-scale production of Cys-X modified protein variants.

  4. Effect of A-site deficiency in LaMn_0_._9Co_0_._1O_3 perovskites on their catalytic performance for soot combustion

    Dinamarca, Robinson; Garcia, Ximena; Jimenez, Romel; Fierro, J.L.G.; Pecchi, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A-site defective perovskites increases the oxidation state of the B-cation. • Not always non-stoichiometric perovskites exhibit higher catalytic activity in soot combustion. • The highly symmetric cubic crystalline structure diminishes the redox properties of perovskites. - Abstract: The influence of lanthanum stoichiometry in Ag-doped (La_1_-_xAg_xMn_0_._9Co_0_._1O_3) and A-site deficient (La_1_-_xMn_0_._9Co_0_._1O_3_-_δ) perovskites with x equal to 10, 20 and 30 at.% has been investigated in catalysts for soot combustion. The catalysts were prepared by the amorphous citrate method and characterized by XRD, nitrogen adsorption, XPS, O_2-TPD and TPR. The formation of a rhombohedral excess-oxygen perovskite for Ag-doped and a cubic perovskite structure for an A-site deficient series is confirmed. The efficient catalytic performance of the larger Ag-doped perovskite structure is attributed to the rhombohedral crystalline structure, Ag_2O segregated phases and the redox pair Mn"4"+/Mn"3"+. A poor catalytic activity for soot combustion was observed with A-site deficient perovskites, despite the increase in the redox pair Mn"4"+/Mn"3"+, which is attributed to the cubic crystalline structure.

  5. Dissecting the Catalytic Mechanism of Betaine-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase Using Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    Castro, C.; Gratson, A.A.; Evans, J.C.; Jiracek, J.; Collinsova, M.; Ludwig, M.L.; Garrow, T.A. (ASCR); (UIUC); (Michigan)

    2010-03-05

    Betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) is a zinc-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from glycine betaine (Bet) to homocysteine (Hcy) to form dimethylglycine (DMG) and methionine (Met). Previous studies in other laboratories have indicated that catalysis proceeds through the formation of a ternary complex, with a transition state mimicked by the inhibitor S-({delta}-carboxybutyl)-l-homocysteine (CBHcy). Using changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence to determine the affinity of human BHMT for substrates, products, or CBHcy, we now demonstrate that the enzyme-substrate complex reaches its transition state through an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which Hcy is the first substrate to bind and Met is the last product released. Hcy, Met, and CBHcy bind to the enzyme to form binary complexes with K{sub d} values of 7.9, 6.9, and 0.28 {micro}M, respectively. Binary complexes with Bet and DMG cannot be detected with fluorescence as a probe, but Bet and DMG bind tightly to BHMT-Hcy to form ternary complexes with K{sub d} values of 1.1 and 0.73 {micro}M, respectively. Mutation of each of the seven tryptophan residues in human BHMT provides evidence that the enzyme undergoes two distinct conformational changes that are reflected in the fluorescence of the enzyme. The first is induced when Hcy binds, and the second, when Bet binds. As predicted by the crystal structure of BHMT, the amino acids Trp44 and Tyr160 are involved in binding Bet, and Glu159 in binding Hcy. Replacing these residues by site-directed mutagenesis significantly reduces the catalytic efficiency (V{sub max}/K{sub m}) of the enzyme. Replacing Tyr77 with Phe abolishes enzyme activity.

  6. On the mechanism of sulfite activation of chloroplast thylakoid ATPase and the relation of ADP tightly bound at a catalytic site to the binding change mechanism

    Du, Z.; Boyer, P.D. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1990-01-16

    Washed chloroplast thylakoid membranes upon exposure to ({sup 3}H)ADP retain in tightly bound ({sup 3}H)ADP on a catalytic site of the ATP synthase. The presence of sufficient endogenous or added Mg{sup 2+} results in an enzyme with essentially no ATPase activity. Sulfite activates the ATPase, and many molecules of ATP per synthase can be hydrolyzed before most of the bound ({sup 3}H)ADP is released, a result interpreted as indicating that the ADP is not bound at a site participating in catalysis by the sulfite-activated enzyme. The authors present evidence that this is not the case. The Mg{sup 2+}- and ADP-inhibited enzyme when exposed to MgATP and 20-100 mM sulfite shows a lag of about 1 min at 22{degree}C and of about 15 s at 37{degree}C before reaching the same steady-state rate as attained with light-activated ATPase that has not been inhibited by Mg{sup 2+} and ADP. The lag is not eliminated if the enzyme is exposed to sulfite prior to MgATP addition, indicating that ATPase turnover is necessary for the activation. The release of most of the bound ({sup 3}H)ADP parallels the onset of ATPase activity, although some ({sup 3}H)ADP is not released even with prolonged catalytic turnover and may be on poorly active or inactive enzyme or at noncatalytic sites. The results are consistent with most of the tightly bound ({sup 3}H)ADP being at a catalytic site and being replaced as this Mg{sup 2+}- and ADP-inhibited site regains equivalent participation with other catalytic sites on the activated enzyme. The sulfite activation can be explained by sulfite combination at a P{sub i} binding site of the enzyme-ADP-Mg{sup 2+} complex to give a form more readily activated by ATP binding at an alternative site.

  7. Local Environment and Nature of Cu Active Sites in Zeolite-Based Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    Deka, U.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325811202; Lezcano-Gonzalez, I.; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397; Beale, A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325802068

    2013-01-01

    Cu-exchanged zeolites have demonstrated widespread use as catalyst materials in the abatement of NOx, especially from mobile sources. Recent studies focusing on Cu-exchanged zeolites with the CHA structure have demonstrated them to be excellent catalysts in the ammonia-assisted selective catalytic

  8. Retro-binding thrombin active site inhibitors: identification of an orally active inhibitor of thrombin catalytic activity.

    Iwanowicz, Edwin J; Kimball, S David; Lin, James; Lau, Wan; Han, W-C; Wang, Tammy C; Roberts, Daniel G M; Schumacher, W A; Ogletree, Martin L; Seiler, Steven M

    2002-11-04

    A series of retro-binding inhibitors of human alpha-thrombin was prepared to elucidate structure-activity relationships (SAR) and optimize in vivo performance. Compounds 9 and 11, orally active inhibitors of thrombin catalytic activity, were identified to be efficacious in a thrombin-induced lethality model in mice.

  9. Selenization of Cu2ZnSnS4 Enhanced the Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Improved Zinc-Site Catalytic Activity for I3.

    Wang, Xiuwen; Xie, Ying; Bateer, Buhe; Pan, Kai; Jiao, Yanqing; Xiong, Ni; Wang, Song; Fu, Honggang

    2017-11-01

    Cu 2 ZnSnS 4 (CZTS) and Cu 2 ZnSn(S,Se) 4 (CZTSSe) as promising photovoltaic materials have drawn much attention because they are environmentally benign and earth-abundant elements. In this work, the monodispersed, low-cost Cu 2 ZnSnS 4 nanocrystals with small size have been controllably synthesized via a wet chemical routine. And CZTSSe could be easily prepared after selenization of CZTS. When they are employed as counter electrodes (CEs) for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), the power conversion efficiency (PCE) has been improved from 3.54% to 7.13% as CZTS is converted to CZTSSe, which is also compared to that of Pt (7.62%). The exact reason for the enhanced catalytic activity of I 3 - is discussed with the work function and density functional theory (DFT) when CZTSSe converted from CZTS. The results of a Kelvin probe suggest that the work function of CZTSSe (5.61 eV) is closer to that of Pt (5.65 eV) and higher than that of CZTS, which matched the redox shuttle potential better. According to the theory calculation, all the atomic and bond populations changed significantly when Se replaced partly the S on the CZTS system, especially in the Zn site. During the catalytic process as CEs, the adsorption energy obviously increased compared to those at other sites when I 3 - adsorbed on the Zn site in CZTSSe. So, Zn plays an important role for the reduction of I 3 - after CZTS is converted to CZTSSe. Based on above analysis, the reason for enhanced performance of DSSCs when CZTS converted to CZTSSe is mainly due to the enhancement of Zn-site activity. This work is beneficial for understanding the catalytic reaction mechanism of CZTS(Se) as CEs of DSSCs.

  10. Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Supported on Macro-Mesoporous Aluminosilicates for Catalytic Steam Gasification of Heavy Oil Fractions for On-Site Upgrading

    Daniel López

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic steam gasification of extra-heavy oil (EHO fractions was studied using functionalized aluminosilicates, with NiO, MoO3, and/or CoO nanoparticles with the aim of evaluating the synergistic effect between active phase and the support in heavy oil on-site upgrading. Catalysts were characterized by chemical composition through X-ray Fluorescence, surface area, and pore size distribution through N2 adsorption/desorption, catalyst acidity by temperature programmed desorption (TPD, and metal dispersion by pulse H2 chemisorption. Batch adsorption experiments and catalytic steam gasification of adsorbed heavy fractions was carried out by thermogravimetric analysis and were performed with heavy oil model solutions of asphaltenes and resins (R–A in toluene. Effective activation energy estimation was used to determine the catalytic effect of the catalyst in steam gasification of Colombian EHO. Additionally, R–A decomposition under inert atmosphere was conducted for the evaluation of oil components reactions with active phases and steam atmosphere. The presence of a bimetallic active phase Inc.reases the decomposition of the heavy compounds at low temperature by an increase in the aliphatic chains decomposition and the dissociation of heteroatoms bonds. Also, coke formation after steam gasification process is reduced by the application of the bimetallic catalyst yielding a conversion greater than 93%.

  11. Enhancement of the catalytic activity of ferulic acid decarboxylase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 through random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jiyoung; Jung, Chaewon; Han, Dongfei; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Chong, Youhoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 catalyzes the decarboxylation reaction of lignin monomers and phenolic compounds such as p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid into their corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives, that is, 4-vinylphenol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively. Among various ferulic acid decarboxylase enzymes, we chose the FADase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4, whose crystal structure is known, and produced mutants to enhance its catalytic activity by random and site-directed mutagenesis. After three rounds of sequential mutations, FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) showed approximately 34-fold higher catalytic activity than wild-type for the production of 4-vinylguaiacol from ferulic acid. Docking analyses suggested that the increased activity of FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) could be due to formation of compact active site compared with that of the wild-type FADase. Considering the amount of phenolic compounds such as lignin monomers in the biomass components, successfully bioengineered FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 could provide an ecofriendly biocatalytic tool for producing diverse styrene derivatives from biomass.

  12. Identification of residues in the heme domain of soluble guanylyl cyclase that are important for basal and stimulated catalytic activity.

    Padmamalini Baskaran

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide signals through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC, a heme-containing heterodimer. NO binds to the heme domain located in the N-terminal part of the β subunit of sGC resulting in increased production of cGMP in the catalytic domain located at the C-terminal part of sGC. Little is known about the mechanism by which the NO signaling is propagated from the receptor domain (heme domain to the effector domain (catalytic domain, in particular events subsequent to the breakage of the bond between the heme iron and Histidine 105 (H105 of the β subunit. Our modeling of the heme-binding domain as well as previous homologous heme domain structures in different states point to two regions that could be critical for propagation of the NO activation signal. Structure-based mutational analysis of these regions revealed that residues T110 and R116 in the αF helix-β1 strand, and residues I41 and R40 in the αB-αC loop mediate propagation of activation between the heme domain and the catalytic domain. Biochemical analysis of these heme mutants allows refinement of the map of the residues that are critical for heme stability and propagation of the NO/YC-1 activation signal in sGC.

  13. Catalytic distillation structure

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  14. Switch in Site of Inhibition: A Strategy for Structure-Based Discovery of Human Topoisomerase IIα Catalytic Inhibitors

    2015-01-01

    A study of structure-based modulation of known ligands of hTopoIIα, an important enzyme involved in DNA processes, coupled with synthesis and in vitro assays led to the establishment of a strategy of rational switch in mode of inhibition of the enzyme’s catalytic cycle. 6-Arylated derivatives of known imidazopyridine ligands were found to be selective inhibitors of hTopoIIα, while not showing TopoI inhibition and DNA binding. Interestingly, while the parent imidazopyridines acted as ATP-competitive inhibitors, arylated derivatives inhibited DNA cleavage similar to merbarone, indicating a switch in mode of inhibition from ATP-hydrolysis to the DNA-cleavage stage of catalytic cycle of the enzyme. The 6-aryl-imidazopyridines were relatively more cytotoxic than etoposide in cancer cells and less toxic to normal cells. Such unprecedented strategy will encourage research on “choice-based change” in target-specific mode of action for rapid drug discovery. PMID:25941559

  15. Changed membrane integration and catalytic site conformation are two mechanisms behind the increased Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio by presenilin 1 familial Alzheimer-linked mutations

    Johanna Wanngren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme complex γ-secretase generates amyloid β-peptide (Aβ, a 37–43-residue peptide associated with Alzheimer disease (AD. Mutations in presenilin 1 (PS1, the catalytical subunit of γ-secretase, result in familial AD (FAD. A unifying theme among FAD mutations is an alteration in the ratio Aβ species produced (the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio, but the molecular mechanisms responsible remain elusive. In this report we have studied the impact of several different PS1 FAD mutations on the integration of selected PS1 transmembrane domains and on PS1 active site conformation, and whether any effects translate to a particular amyloid precursor protein (APP processing phenotype. Most mutations studied caused an increase in the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio, but via different mechanisms. The mutations that caused a particular large increase in the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio did also display an impaired APP intracellular domain (AICD formation and a lower total Aβ production. Interestingly, seven mutations close to the catalytic site caused a severely impaired integration of proximal transmembrane/hydrophobic sequences into the membrane. This structural defect did not correlate to a particular APP processing phenotype. Six selected FAD mutations, all of which exhibited different APP processing profiles and impact on PS1 transmembrane domain integration, were found to display an altered active site conformation. Combined, our data suggest that FAD mutations affect the PS1 structure and active site differently, resulting in several complex APP processing phenotypes, where the most aggressive mutations in terms of increased Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio are associated with a decrease in total γ-secretase activity.

  16. GTP Binding and Oncogenic Mutations May Attenuate Hypervariable Region (HVR)-Catalytic Domain Interactions in Small GTPase K-Ras4B, Exposing the Effector Binding Site*

    Lu, Shaoyong; Banerjee, Avik; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras4B, a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer, plays an essential role in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Its C-terminal membrane-associated hypervariable region (HVR) is required for full biological activity. In the active GTP-bound state, the HVR interacts with acidic plasma membrane (PM) headgroups, whereas the farnesyl anchors in the membrane; in the inactive GDP-bound state, the HVR may interact with both the PM and the catalytic domain at the effector binding region, obstructing signaling and nucleotide exchange. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR, we aim to figure out the effects of nucleotides (GTP and GDP) and frequent (G12C, G12D, G12V, G13D, and Q61H) and infrequent (E37K and R164Q) oncogenic mutations on full-length K-Ras4B. The mutations are away from or directly at the HVR switch I/effector binding site. Our results suggest that full-length wild-type GDP-bound K-Ras4B (K-Ras4BWT-GDP) is in an intrinsically autoinhibited state via tight HVR-catalytic domain interactions. The looser association in K-Ras4BWT-GTP may release the HVR. Some of the oncogenic mutations weaken the HVR-catalytic domain association in the K-Ras4B-GDP/-GTP bound states, which may facilitate the HVR disassociation in a nucleotide-independent manner, thereby up-regulating oncogenic Ras signaling. Thus, our results suggest that mutations can exert their effects in more than one way, abolishing GTP hydrolysis and facilitating effector binding. PMID:26453300

  17. GTP Binding and Oncogenic Mutations May Attenuate Hypervariable Region (HVR)-Catalytic Domain Interactions in Small GTPase K-Ras4B, Exposing the Effector Binding Site.

    Lu, Shaoyong; Banerjee, Avik; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-11-27

    K-Ras4B, a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer, plays an essential role in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Its C-terminal membrane-associated hypervariable region (HVR) is required for full biological activity. In the active GTP-bound state, the HVR interacts with acidic plasma membrane (PM) headgroups, whereas the farnesyl anchors in the membrane; in the inactive GDP-bound state, the HVR may interact with both the PM and the catalytic domain at the effector binding region, obstructing signaling and nucleotide exchange. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR, we aim to figure out the effects of nucleotides (GTP and GDP) and frequent (G12C, G12D, G12V, G13D, and Q61H) and infrequent (E37K and R164Q) oncogenic mutations on full-length K-Ras4B. The mutations are away from or directly at the HVR switch I/effector binding site. Our results suggest that full-length wild-type GDP-bound K-Ras4B (K-Ras4B(WT)-GDP) is in an intrinsically autoinhibited state via tight HVR-catalytic domain interactions. The looser association in K-Ras4B(WT)-GTP may release the HVR. Some of the oncogenic mutations weaken the HVR-catalytic domain association in the K-Ras4B-GDP/-GTP bound states, which may facilitate the HVR disassociation in a nucleotide-independent manner, thereby up-regulating oncogenic Ras signaling. Thus, our results suggest that mutations can exert their effects in more than one way, abolishing GTP hydrolysis and facilitating effector binding. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Catalytic soman scavenging by Y337A/F338A acetylcholinesterase mutant assisted with novel site-directed aldoximes

    Kovarik, Zrinka; Hrvat, Nikolina Maček; Katalinić, Maja; Sit, Rakesh K.; Paradyse, Alexander; Žunec, Suzana; Musilek, Kamil; Fokin, Valery V.; Taylor, Palmer; Radić, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to the nerve agent soman is difficult to treat due to the rapid dealkylation of soman-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) conjugate known as aging. Oxime antidotes commonly used to reactivate organophosphate inhibited AChE are ineffective against soman, while the efficacy of the recommended nerve agent bioscavenger butyrylcholinesterase is limited by strictly stoichiometric scavenging. To overcome this limitation, we tested ex vivo, in human blood, and in vivo, in soman exposed mice, the capacity of aging-resistant human AChE mutant Y337A/F338A in combination with oxime HI-6 to act as a catalytic bioscavenger of soman. HI-6 was previously shown in vitro to efficiently reactivate this mutant upon soman, as well as VX, cyclosarin, sarin and paraoxon inhibition. We here demonstrate that ex vivo, in whole human blood, 1 μM soman was detoxified within 30 minutes when supplemented with 0.5 μM Y337A/F338A AChE and 100 μM HI-6. This combination was further tested in vivo. Catalytic scavenging of soman in mice improved the therapeutic outcome and resulted in the delayed onset of toxicity symptoms. Furthermore, in a preliminary in vitro screen we identified an even more efficacious oxime than HI-6, in a series of forty-two pyridinium aldoximes, and five imidazole 2-aldoxime N-propyl pyridinium derivatives. One of the later imidazole aldoximes, RS-170B, was a 2–3 –fold more effective reactivator of Y337A/F338A AChE than HI-6 due to the smaller imidazole ring, as indicated by computational molecular models, that affords a more productive angle of nucleophilic attack. PMID:25835984

  19. Control of ATP hydrolysis by ADP bound at the catalytic site of chloroplast ATP synthase as related to protonmotive force and Mg sup 2+

    Du, Z.; Boyer, P.D. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1989-01-24

    The activation of the ATP synthesis and hydrolysis capacity of isolated chloroplast membranes by protonmotive force is known to be associated with the release of tightly bound ADP from the ATP synthase. The data support the view that the activation requires only those structural changes occurring in the steady-state reaction mechanism. The trapping of ADP released during light activation or the chelation of Mg{sup 2+} with EDTA effectively reduces the rate of decay of the ATPase activity. When the release of tightly bound ADP and Mg{sup 2+} is promoted by light activation, followed by immediate dilution and washing to retard the rebinding of the ADP and Mg{sup 2+} released, the ATPase activity remains high in the dark long after the protonmotive force has disappeared. After the addition of ADP and Mg{sup 2+} the decay of the ATPase activity has the same characteristics as those of the unwashed chloroplast membrane. The results are interpreted as indicating that both Mg{sup 2+} and ADP must be present prior to exposure to MgATP for the ATPase to be inhibited. However, in contrast to the isolated chloroplast ATPase, the steady-state activity of the membrane-bound ATPase is not inhibited by excess Mg{sup 2+}. The replacement of ({sup 3}H)ADP from catalytic sites during hydrolysis of unlabeled ATP or during photophosphorylation with unlabeled ADP occurs as anticipated if Mg{sup 2+} and ADP bound at one catalytic site without P{sub i} block catalysis by all three enzyme sites. The inhibited form induced by Mg{sup 2+} and ADP may occur only under laboratory conditions and not have an in vivo role.

  20. Control of ATP hydrolysis by ADP bound at the catalytic site of chloroplast ATP synthase as related to protonmotive force and Mg2+

    Du, Z.; Boyer, P.D.

    1989-01-01

    The activation of the ATP synthesis and hydrolysis capacity of isolated chloroplast membranes by protonmotive force is known to be associated with the release of tightly bound ADP from the ATP synthase. The data support the view that the activation requires only those structural changes occurring in the steady-state reaction mechanism. The trapping of ADP released during light activation or the chelation of Mg 2+ with EDTA effectively reduces the rate of decay of the ATPase activity. When the release of tightly bound ADP and Mg 2+ is promoted by light activation, followed by immediate dilution and washing to retard the rebinding of the ADP and Mg 2+ released, the ATPase activity remains high in the dark long after the protonmotive force has disappeared. After the addition of ADP and Mg 2+ the decay of the ATPase activity has the same characteristics as those of the unwashed chloroplast membrane. The results are interpreted as indicating that both Mg 2+ and ADP must be present prior to exposure to MgATP for the ATPase to be inhibited. However, in contrast to the isolated chloroplast ATPase, the steady-state activity of the membrane-bound ATPase is not inhibited by excess Mg 2+ . The replacement of [ 3 H]ADP from catalytic sites during hydrolysis of unlabeled ATP or during photophosphorylation with unlabeled ADP occurs as anticipated if Mg 2+ and ADP bound at one catalytic site without P i block catalysis by all three enzyme sites. The inhibited form induced by Mg 2+ and ADP may occur only under laboratory conditions and not have an in vivo role

  1. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    Daly, Michael J.

    2005-06-01

    Natural selection in highly radioactive waste sites may yield bacteria with favorable bioremediating characteristics. However, until recently the microbial ecology of such environments has remained unexplored because of the high costs and technical complexities associated with extracting and characterizing samples from such sites. We have examined the bacterial ecology within radioactive sediments from a high-level nuclear waste plume in the vadose zone on the DOE?s Hanford Site in south-central Washington state (Fredrickson et al, 2004). Manganese-dependent, radiation resistant bacteria have been isolated from this contaminated site including the highly Mn-dependent Deinococcus and Arthrobacter spp.

  2. Dynamic Contacts of U2, RES, Cwc25, Prp8 and Prp45 Proteins with the Pre-mRNA Branch-Site and 3' Splice Site during Catalytic Activation and Step 1 Catalysis in Yeast Spliceosomes.

    Cornelius Schneider

    Full Text Available Little is known about contacts in the spliceosome between proteins and intron nucleotides surrounding the pre-mRNA branch-site and their dynamics during splicing. We investigated protein-pre-mRNA interactions by UV-induced crosslinking of purified yeast B(act spliceosomes formed on site-specifically labeled pre-mRNA, and analyzed their changes after conversion to catalytically-activated B* and step 1 C complexes, using a purified splicing system. Contacts between nucleotides upstream and downstream of the branch-site and the U2 SF3a/b proteins Prp9, Prp11, Hsh49, Cus1 and Hsh155 were detected, demonstrating that these interactions are evolutionarily conserved. The RES proteins Pml1 and Bud13 were shown to contact the intron downstream of the branch-site. A comparison of the B(act crosslinking pattern versus that of B* and C complexes revealed that U2 and RES protein interactions with the intron are dynamic. Upon step 1 catalysis, Cwc25 contacts with the branch-site region, and enhanced crosslinks of Prp8 and Prp45 with nucleotides surrounding the branch-site were observed. Cwc25's step 1 promoting activity was not dependent on its interaction with pre-mRNA, indicating it acts via protein-protein interactions. These studies provide important insights into the spliceosome's protein-pre-mRNA network and reveal novel RNP remodeling events during the catalytic activation of the spliceosome and step 1 of splicing.

  3. Characterization of the catalytic and noncatalytic ADP binding sites of the F1-ATPase from the thermophilic bacterium, PS3

    Yoshida, M.; Allison, W.S.

    1986-01-01

    Two classes of ADP binding sites at 20 degrees C have been characterized in the F1-ATPase from the thermophilic bacterium, PS3 (TF1). One class is comprised of three sites which saturate with [ 3 H]ADP in less than 10 s with a Kd of 10 microM which, once filled, exchange rapidly with medium ADP. The binding of ADP to these sites is dependent on Mg2+. [ 3 H]ADP bound to these sites is removed by repeated gel filtrations on centrifuge columns equilibrated with ADP free medium. The other class is comprised of a single site which saturates with [ 3 H]ADP in 30 min with a Kd of 30 microM. [ 3 H]ADP bound to this site does not exchange with medium ADP nor does it dissociate on gel filtration through centrifuge columns equilibrated with ADP free medium. Binding of [ 3 H]ADP to this site is weaker in the presence of Mg2+ where the Kd for ADP is about 100 microM. [ 3 H]ADP dissociated from this site when ATP plus Mg2+ was added to the complex while it remained bound in the presence of ATP alone or in the presence of ADP, Pi, or ADP plus Pi with or without added Mg2+. Significant amounts of ADP in the 1:1 TF1.ADP complex were converted to ATP in the presence of Pi, Mg2+, and 50% dimethyl sulfoxide. Enzyme-bound ATP synthesis was abolished by chemical modification of a specific glutamic acid residue by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, but not by modification of a specific tyrosine residue with 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzofurazan. Difference circular dichroism spectra revealed that the three Mg2+ -dependent, high affinity ADP binding sites that were not stable to gel filtration were on the alpha subunits and that the single ADP binding site that was stable to gel filtration was on one of the three beta subunits

  4. Evaluating the uncertainties of thermal catalytic conversion in measuring atmospheric nitrogen dioxide at four differently polluted sites in China

    Xu, Zheng; Wang, Tao; Xue, L. K.; Louie, Peter K. K.; Luk, Connie W. Y.; Gao, J.; Wang, S. L.; Chai, F. H.; Wang, W. X.

    2013-09-01

    A widely used method for measuring nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the atmosphere is the conversion of NO2 to nitric oxide (NO) on the hot surface of a molybdenum oxide (MoO) catalyst followed by the chemiluminescence detection of NO. Although it has long been recognized that this type of conversion may suffer from the positive interference of other oxidized nitrogen compounds, evaluations of such interference in the atmosphere are scarce, thus rendering it difficult to make use of a large portion of the NO2 or NOx data obtained via this method (often denoted as NO2* or NOx*). In the present study, we compared the MoO converter with a selective, more accurate photolytic approach at four differently polluted sites in China. The converter worked well at the urban site, which was greatly affected by fresh emissions, but, on average, overestimated NO2 by 30%-50% at the two suburban sites and by more than 130% at the mountain-top site during afternoon hours, with a much larger positive bias seen during the top 10% of ozone events. The degree of overestimation depended on both air-parcel age and the composition of the oxidation products/intermediates of NOx (NOz). We attempted to derive an empirical formula to correct for this overestimation using concurrently measured O3, NO, and NO2* at the two suburban sites. Although the formula worked well at each individual site, the different NOz partitions at the sites made it difficult to obtain a universal formula. In view of the difficulty of assessing the uncertainties of the conventional conversion method, thus limiting the usability of data obtained via this method in atmospheric research, we suggest that, in areas away from fresh NOx emission sources, either a more selective NO2 measurement method or a NOy (NOx and its reaction products and intermediates) instrument should be adopted.

  5. CD/MCD/VTVH-MCD Studies of Escherichia coli Bacterioferritin Support a Binuclear Iron Cofactor Site.

    Kwak, Yeonju; Schwartz, Jennifer K; Huang, Victor W; Boice, Emily; Kurtz, Donald M; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-12-01

    Ferritins and bacterioferritins (Bfrs) utilize a binuclear non-heme iron binding site to catalyze oxidation of Fe(II), leading to formation of an iron mineral core within a protein shell. Unlike ferritins, in which the diiron site binds Fe(II) as a substrate, which then autoxidizes and migrates to the mineral core, the diiron site in Bfr has a 2-His/4-carboxylate ligand set that is commonly found in diiron cofactor enzymes. Bfrs could, therefore, utilize the diiron site as a cofactor rather than for substrate iron binding. In this study, we applied circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH-MCD) spectroscopies to define the geometric and electronic structures of the biferrous active site in Escherichia coli Bfr. For these studies, we used an engineered M52L variant, which is known to eliminate binding of a heme cofactor but to have very minor effects on either iron oxidation or mineral core formation. We also examined an H46A/D50A/M52L Bfr variant, which additionally disrupts a previously observed mononuclear non-heme iron binding site inside the protein shell. The spectral analyses define a binuclear and an additional mononuclear ferrous site. The biferrous site shows two different five-coordinate centers. After O2 oxidation and re-reduction, only the mononuclear ferrous signal is eliminated. The retention of the biferrous but not the mononuclear ferrous site upon O2 cycling supports a mechanism in which the binuclear site acts as a cofactor for the O2 reaction, while the mononuclear site binds the substrate Fe(II) that, after its oxidation to Fe(III), migrates to the mineral core.

  6. Kinetic Mechanism of Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase from Escherichia coli and Catalytic Importance of the Conserved Proline in the PRPP Binding Site

    Lundegaard, Claus; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoribosyltransferases catalyze the formation of nucleotides from a nitrogenous base and 5-phosphoribosyl-a-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). These enzymes and the PRPP synthases resemble each other in a short homologous sequence of 13 amino acid residues which has been termed the PRPP binding site and...

  7. In-Situ Generated Graphene as the Catalytic Site for Visible-Light Mediated Ethylene Epoxidation on AG Nanocatalysts

    Zhang, Xueqiang Alex; Jain, Prashant

    2017-06-01

    Despite the harsh conditions for chemical conversion, ethylene oxide produced from ethylene epoxidation on Ag-based heterogeneous catalyst constitutes one of the largest volume chemicals in chemical industry. Recently, photocatalytic epoxidation of ethylene over plasmonic Ag nanoparticles enables the chemical conversion under significantly decreased temperature and ambient pressure conditions. Yet a detailed understanding of the photocatalytic process at the reactant/catalyst interface is under debate. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful vibrational spectroscopy technique that enables the localized detection of rare and/or transient chemical species with high sensitivity under in situ and ambient conditions. Using SERS, we are able to monitor at individual sites of an Ag nanocatalyst the visible-light-mediated adsorption and epoxidation of ethylene. From detected intermediates, we find that the primary step in the photoepoxidation is the transient formation of graphene catalyzed by the Ag surface. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations that model the observed SERS spectra suggest that the defective edge sites of the graphene formed on Ag constitute the active site for C2H4 adsorption and epoxidation. Further studies with pre-formed graphene/Ag catalyst composites confirm the indispensable role of graphene in visible-light-mediated ethylene epoxidation. Carbon is often thought to be either an innocent support or a poison for metallic catalysts; however our studies reveal a surprising role for crystalline carbon layers as potential co-catalysts.

  8. A catalytic metal ion interacts with the cleavage site G•U wobble in the HDV ribozyme†

    Chen, Jui-Hui; Gong, Bo; Bevilacqua, Philip C.; Carey, Paul R.; Golden, Barbara L.

    2009-01-01

    The HDV ribozyme self-cleaves by a chemical mechanism involving general acid-base catalysis to generate a 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate and a 5′-hydroxyl termini. Biochemical studies from several laboratories have implicated C75 as the general acid and hydrated magnesium as the general base. We have previously shown that C75 has a pKa shifted > 2 pH units toward neutrality [Gong, B., Chen, J. H., Chase, E., Chadalavada, D. M., Yajima, R., Golden, B. L., Bevilacqua, P. C., and Carey, P. R. (2007) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 13335–13342.], while in crystal structures, it is well-positioned for proton transfer. However no crystallographic evidence for a hydrated magnesium poised to serve as a general base in the reaction has been observed in high-resolution crystal structures of various reaction states and mutants. Herein, we use solution kinetic experiments and parallel Raman crystallographic studies to examine the effects of pH on rate and Mg2+-binding properties of wild-type and 7-deazaguanosine mutants of the HDV ribozyme. These data suggest that a previously-unobserved hydrated magnesium ion interacts with the N7 of the cleavage site G•U wobble base pair. Integrating this metal ion binding site with the available crystal structures provides a new three-dimensional model for the active site of the ribozyme that accommodates all available biochemical data and appears competent for catalysis. The position of this metal is consistent with a role of a magnesium-bound hydroxide as a general base as dictated by biochemical data. PMID:19178151

  9. Effect of Number of Various-Type Acid Sites Located on 20 % Co/ZrO2 • SiO2 Sample Surface on Parameters of Catalytic Process in Synthesis of High-Octane Motor Fuel Components

    A. P. Nesenchouk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers an effect of ZrO2 content in 20%Co/xZrO2∙(100 – xSiO2 (x = 0, 10, 15, 25, 30, 40 and 100 mass percent catalyst carriers on their catalytic properties. Temperature programmed desorption of NH3 has made it possible to determine relations between their acid and catalytic properties. The paper reveals the TPD spectrum is the result of 4 overlapping peaks originating during NH3 desorption from the respective groups of acid sites. Total acidity of samples and contribution of separate acid site groups into the given acidity have been have been determined in the paper. The paper contains graphical dependences of a various-type acid site number on  content of zirconium oxide in the carrier. Correlations between change in various-type acid site number and catalytic process parameters (CO conversion, C5+ hydrocarbon output and  C5+ isoparaffin output have been found in the paper. The paper shows that the highest values of CO conversion and C5+ hydrocarbon output correspond to maximum number of acid sites, and that number accounts for a peak of desorbed ammonia at Tmax = 122 °C, while the lowest isoparaffin output corresponds to minimum number of acid sites, which characterizes a peak of desorbed ammonia at Tmax = 224–257 °C. 

  10. Structural investigations of the active-site mutant Asn156Ala of outer membrane phospholipase A: Function of the Asn-His interaction in the catalytic triad

    Snijder, H.J.; van Eerde, J.H.; Kalk, K.H.; Dekker, N.; Egmond, M.R.; Dijkstra, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    Outer membrane phospholipase A (OMPLA) from Escherichia coli is an integral-membrane enzyme with a unique His-Ser-Asn catalytic triad. In serine proteases and serine esterases usually an Asp occurs in the catalytic triad; its role has been the subject of much debate. Here the role of the uncharged

  11. Single-Atom Mn Active Site in a Triol-Stabilized β-Anderson Manganohexamolybdate for Enhanced Catalytic Activity towards Adipic Acid Production

    Jianhui Luo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adipic acid is an important raw chemical for the commercial production of polyamides and polyesters. The traditional industrial adipic acid production utilizes nitric acid to oxidize KA oil (mixtures of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol, leading to the emission of N2O and thus causing ozone depletion, global warming, and acid rain. Herein, we reported an organically functionalized β-isomer of Anderson polyoxometalates (POMs nanocluster with single-atom Mn, β-{[H3NC(CH2O3]2MnMo6O18}− (1, as a highly active catalyst to selectively catalyze the oxidation of cyclohexanone, cyclohexanol, or KA oil with atom economy use of 30% H2O2 for the eco-friendly synthesis of adipic acid. The catalyst has been characterized by single crystal and powder XRD, XPS, ESI-MS, FT-IR, and NMR. A cyclohexanone (cyclohexanol conversion of >99.9% with an adipic acid selectivity of ~97.1% (~85.3% could be achieved over catalyst 1 with high turnover frequency of 2427.5 h−1 (2132.5 h−1. It has been demonstrated that the existence of Mn3+ atom active site in catalyst 1 and the special butterfly-shaped topology of POMs both play vital roles in the enhancement of catalytic activity.

  12. Catalytic treatment

    Bindley, W T.R.

    1931-04-18

    An apparatus is described for the catalytic treatment of liquids, semi-liquids, and gases comprising a vessel into which the liquid, semi-liquid, or gas to be treated is introduced through a common inlet to a chamber within the vessel whence it passes to contact with a catalyst through radially arranged channels or passages to a common outlet chamber.

  13. Effect of A-site deficiency in LaMn{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}O{sub 3} perovskites on their catalytic performance for soot combustion

    Dinamarca, Robinson [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Sciences, University of Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Garcia, Ximena; Jimenez, Romel [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Fierro, J.L.G. [Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Pecchi, Gina, E-mail: gpecchi@udec.cl [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Sciences, University of Concepción, Concepción (Chile)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • A-site defective perovskites increases the oxidation state of the B-cation. • Not always non-stoichiometric perovskites exhibit higher catalytic activity in soot combustion. • The highly symmetric cubic crystalline structure diminishes the redox properties of perovskites. - Abstract: The influence of lanthanum stoichiometry in Ag-doped (La{sub 1-x}Ag{sub x}Mn{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}) and A-site deficient (La{sub 1-x}Mn{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-δ}) perovskites with x equal to 10, 20 and 30 at.% has been investigated in catalysts for soot combustion. The catalysts were prepared by the amorphous citrate method and characterized by XRD, nitrogen adsorption, XPS, O{sub 2}-TPD and TPR. The formation of a rhombohedral excess-oxygen perovskite for Ag-doped and a cubic perovskite structure for an A-site deficient series is confirmed. The efficient catalytic performance of the larger Ag-doped perovskite structure is attributed to the rhombohedral crystalline structure, Ag{sub 2}O segregated phases and the redox pair Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+}. A poor catalytic activity for soot combustion was observed with A-site deficient perovskites, despite the increase in the redox pair Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+}, which is attributed to the cubic crystalline structure.

  14. Nitric Oxide Reduction by Carbon Monoxide over Supported Hexaruthenium Cluster Catalysts. 1. The Active Site Structure That Depends on Supporting Metal Oxide and Catalytic Reaction Conditions.

    Minato, Taketoshi; Izumi, Yasuo; Aika, Ken-Ichi; Ishiguro, Atsushi; Nakajima, Takayuki; Wakatsuki, Yasuo

    2003-08-28

    Ruthenium site structures supported on metal oxide surfaces were designed by reacting organometallic Ru cluster [Ru6C(CO)16](2-) or [Ru6(CO)18](2-) with various metal oxides, TiO2, Al2O3, MgO, and SiO2. The surface Ru site structure, formed under various catalyst preparation and reaction conditions, was investigated by the Ru K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Samples of [Ru6C(CO)16](2-)/TiO2(anatase) and [Ru6C(CO)16](2-)/TiO2(rutile) were found to retain the original Ru6C framework when heated in the presence of NO (2.0 kPa) or NO (2.0 kPa) + CO (2.0 kPa) at 423 K, i.e., catalytic reaction conditions for NO decomposition. At 523 K, the Ru-Ru bonds of the Ru6C framework were cleaved by the attack of NO. In contrast, the Ru site became spontaneously dispersed over TiO2 (anatase). When being supported over TiO2 (mesoporous), MgO, or Al2O3, the Ru6C framework split into fragments in gaseous NO or NO + CO even at 423 K. The Ru6 framework of [Ru6(CO)18](2-) was found to break easily into smaller ensembles in the presence of NO and/or CO at 423 K on support. Taking into consideration the realistic environments in which these catalysts will be used, we also examined the effect of water and oxygen. When water was introduced to the sample [Ru6C(CO)16](2-)/TiO2(anatase) at 423 K, it did not have any effects on the stabilized Ru6C framework structure. In the presence of oxygen gas, however, the Ru hexanuclear structure decomposed into isolated Ru cations bound to surface oxygen atoms of TiO2 (anatase).

  15. Site-specific growth of Au-Pd alloy horns on Au nanorods: A platform for highly sensitive monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhancement raman spectroscopy

    Huang, Jianfeng; Zhu, Yihan; Lin, Ming; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhao, Lan; Yang, Yang; Yao, Kexin; Han, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a highly sensitive probe for molecular detection. The aim of this study was to develop an efficient platform for investigating the kinetics of catalytic reactions with SERS. To achieve this, we synthesized

  16. Catalytic-site mapping of pyruvate formate lyase. Hypophosphite reaction on the acetyl-enzyme intermediate affords carbon-phosphorus bond synthesis (1-hydroxyethylphosphonate).

    Plaga, W; Frank, R; Knappe, J

    1988-12-15

    Pyruvate formate-lyase of Escherichia coli cells, a homodimeric protein of 2 x 85 kDa, is distinguished by the property of containing a stable organic free radical (g = 2.0037) in its resting state. The enzyme (E-SH) achieves pyruvate conversion to acetyl-CoA via two distinct half-reactions (E-SH + pyruvate in equilibrium E-S-acetyl + formate; E-S-acetyl + CoA in equilibrium E-SH + acetyl-CoA), the first of which has been proposed to involve reversible homolytic carbon-carbon bond cleavage [J. Knappe et al. (1984) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 81, 1332-1335]. Present studies identified Cys-419 as the covalent-catalytic cysteinyl residue via CNBr fragmentation of E-S-[14C]acetyl and radio-sequencing of the isolated peptide CB-Ac (amino acid residues 406-423). Reaction of the formate analogue hypophosphite with E-S-acetyl was investigated and found to produce 1-hydroxyethylphosphonate with a thioester linkage to the adjacent Cys-418. The structure was determined from the chymotryptic peptide CH-P (amino acid residues 415-425), using 31P-NMR spectroscopy (delta = 44 ppm) and by chemical characterisation through degradation into 1-hydroxyethylphosphonate with phosphodiesterase or bromine. This novel P-C-bond synthesis involves the enzyme-based free radical and is proposed to resemble the physiological C-C-bond synthesis (pyruvate production) from formate and E-S-acetyl. These findings are interpreted as proof of a radical mechanism for the action of pyruvate formate-lyase. The central Cys-418/Cys-419 pair of the active site shows a distinctive thiolate property even in the inactive (nonradical) form of the enzyme, as determined using an iodoacetate probe.

  17. Construction of a catalytically inactive cholesterol oxidase mutant: investigation of the interplay between active site-residues glutamate 361 and histidine 447.

    Yin, Ye; Liu, Pingsheng; Anderson, Richard G W; Sampson, Nicole S

    2002-06-15

    Cholesterol oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of cholesterol to cholest-5-en-3-one and its subsequent isomerization into cholest-4-en-3-one. Two active-site residues, His447 and Glu361, are important for catalyzing the oxidation and isomerization reactions, respectively. Double-mutants were constructed to test the interplay between these residues in catalysis. We observed that the k(cat) of oxidation for the H447Q/E361Q mutant was 3-fold less than that for H447Q and that the k(cat) of oxidation for the H447E/E361Q mutant was 10-fold slower than that for H447E. Because both doubles-mutants do not have a carboxylate at position 361, they do not catalyze isomerization of the reaction intermediate cholest-5-en-3-one to cholest-4-en-3-one. These results suggest that Glu361 can compensate for the loss of histidine at position 447 by acting as a general base catalyst for oxidation of cholesterol. Importantly, the construction of the double-mutant H447E/E361Q yields an enzyme that is 31,000-fold slower than wild type in k(cat) for oxidation. The H447E/E361Q mutant is folded like native enzyme and still associates with model membranes. Thus, this mutant may be used to study the effects of membrane binding in the absence of catalytic activity. It is demonstrated that in assays with caveolae membrane fractions, the wild-type enzyme uncouples platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRbeta) autophosphorylation from tyrosine phosphorylation of neighboring proteins, and the H447E/E361Q mutant does not. Thus maintenance of membrane structure by cholesterol is important for PDGFRbeta-mediated signaling. The cholesterol oxidase mutant probe described will be generally useful for investigating the role of membrane structure in signal transduction pathways in addition to the PDGFRbeta-dependent pathway tested.

  18. Neuraminidase-mediated haemagglutination of recent human influenza A(H3N2) viruses is determined by arginine 150 flanking the neuraminidase catalytic site.

    Mögling, Ramona; Richard, Mathilde J; Vliet, Stefan van der; Beek, Ruud van; Schrauwen, Eefje J A; Spronken, Monique I; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2017-06-01

    Over the last decade, an increasing proportion of circulating human influenza A(H3N2) viruses exhibited haemagglutination activity that was sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors. This change in haemagglutination as compared to older circulating A(H3N2) viruses prompted an investigation of the underlying molecular basis. Recent human influenza A(H3N2) viruses were found to agglutinate turkey erythrocytes in a manner that could be blocked with either oseltamivir or neuraminidase-specific antisera, indicating that agglutination was driven by neuraminidase, with a low or negligible contribution of haemagglutinin. Using representative virus recombinants it was shown that the haemagglutinin of a recent A(H3N2) virus indeed had decreased activity to agglutinate turkey erythrocytes, while its neuraminidase displayed increased haemagglutinating activity. Viruses with chimeric and mutant neuraminidases were used to identify the amino acid substitution histidine to arginine at position 150 flanking the neuraminidase catalytic site as the determinant of this neuraminidase-mediated haemagglutination. An analysis of publicly available neuraminidase gene sequences showed that viruses with histidine at position 150 were rapidly replaced by viruses with arginine at this position between 2005 and 2008, in agreement with the phenotypic data. As a consequence of neuraminidase-mediated haemagglutination of recent A(H3N2) viruses and poor haemagglutination via haemagglutinin, haemagglutination inhibition assays with A(H3N2) antisera are no longer useful to characterize the antigenic properties of the haemagglutinin of these viruses for vaccine strain selection purposes. Continuous monitoring of the evolution of these viruses and potential consequences for vaccine strain selection remains important.

  19. Models for non-heme iron containing oxidation enzymes

    Roelfes, Johannes Gerhardus

    2000-01-01

    IJzer is een van de essentiël elementen voor alle levende wezens. Heel veel belangrijke functies in organismen worden vervuld door ijzer bevattende eiwitten. De bekendste voorbeelden hiervan zijn ongetwijfeld hemoglobine en myoglobine, die het transport van zuurstof van de longen naar de rest van

  20. An unsaturated metal site-promoted approach to construct strongly coupled noble metal/HNb3O8 nanosheets for efficient thermo/photo-catalytic reduction.

    Shen, Lijuan; Xia, Yuzhou; Lin, Sen; Liang, Shijing; Wu, Ling

    2017-10-05

    Creating two-dimensional (2D) crystal-metal heterostructures with an ultrathin thickness has spurred increasing research endeavors in catalysis because of its fascinating opportunities in tuning the electronic state at the surface and enhancing the chemical reactivity. Here we report a novel and facile Nb 4+ -assisted strategy for the in situ growth of highly dispersed Pd nanoparticles (NPs) on monolayer HNb 3 O 8 nanosheets (HNb 3 O 8 NS) constituting a 2D Pd/HNb 3 O 8 NS heterostructure composite without using extra reducing agents and stabilizing agents. The Pd NP formation is directed via a redox reaction between an oxidative Pd salt precursor (H 2 PdCl 4 ) and reductive unsaturated surface metal (Nb 4+ ) sites induced by light irradiation on monolayer HNb 3 O 8 NS. The periodic arrangement of metal Nb nodes on HNb 3 O 8 NS leads to a homogeneous distribution of Pd NPs. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that the direct redox reaction between the Nb 4+ and Pd 2+ ions leads to a strong chemical interaction between the formed Pd metal NPs and the monolayer HNb 3 O 8 support. Consequently, the as-obtained Pd/HNb 3 O 8 composite serves as a highly efficient bifunctional catalyst in both heterogeneous thermocatalytic and photocatalytic selective reduction of aromatic nitro compounds in water under ambient conditions. The achieved high activity originates from the unique 2D nanosheet configuration and in situ Pd incorporation, which leads to a large active surface area, strong metal-support interaction and enhanced charge transport capability. Moreover, this facile Nb 4+ -assisted synthetic route has demonstrated to be general, which can be applied to load other metals such as Au and Pt on monolayer HNb 3 O 8 NS. It is anticipated that this work can extend the facile preparation of noble metal/nanosheet 2D heterostructures, as well as promote the simultaneous capture of duple renewable thermal and photon energy sources to drive an energy efficient

  1. The role of the active site Zn in the catalytic mechanism of the GH38 Golgi alpha-mannosidase II: Implications from noeuromycin inhibition

    Bols, Mikael; Kuntz, Douglas A.; Rose, David R.

    2006-01-01

    Golgi alpha-mannosidase II (GMII) is a Family 38 glycosyl hydrolase involved in the eukaryotic N-glycosylation pathway in protein synthesis. Understanding of its catalytic mechanism has been of interest for the development of specific inhibitors that could lead to novel anti-metastatic or anti-in...

  2. "Hydro-metathesis" of olefins: A catalytic reaction using a bifunctional single-site tantalum hydride catalyst supported on fibrous silica (KCC-1) nanospheres

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2011-02-18

    Tantalizing hydrocarbons: Tantalum hydride supported on fibrous silica nanospheres (KCC-1) catalyzes, in the presence of hydrogen, the direct conversion of olefins into alkanes that have higher and lower numbers of carbon atoms (see scheme). This catalyst shows remarkable catalytic activity and stability, with excellent potential of regeneration. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. "Hydro-metathesis" of olefins: A catalytic reaction using a bifunctional single-site tantalum hydride catalyst supported on fibrous silica (KCC-1) nanospheres

    Polshettiwar, Vivek; Thivolle-Cazat, Jean; Taoufik, Mostafa; Stoffelbach, Franç ois; Norsic, Sé bastien; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Tantalizing hydrocarbons: Tantalum hydride supported on fibrous silica nanospheres (KCC-1) catalyzes, in the presence of hydrogen, the direct conversion of olefins into alkanes that have higher and lower numbers of carbon atoms (see scheme). This catalyst shows remarkable catalytic activity and stability, with excellent potential of regeneration. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. MgATP-concentration dependence of protection of yeast vacuolar V-ATPase from inactivation by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole supports a bi-site catalytic mechanism of ATP hydrolysis

    Milgrom, Elena M.; Milgrom, Yakov M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► MgATP protects V-ATPase from inactivation by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole. ► V-ATPase activity saturation with MgATP is not sufficient for complete protection. ► The results support a bi-site catalytic mechanism for V-ATPase. -- Abstract: Catalytic site occupancy of the yeast vacuolar V-ATPase during ATP hydrolysis in the presence of an ATP-regenerating system was probed using sensitivity of the enzyme to inhibition by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-Cl). The results show that, regardless of the presence or absence of the proton-motive force across the vacuolar membrane, saturation of V-ATPase activity at increasing MgATP concentrations is accompanied by only partial protection of the enzyme from inhibition by NBD-Cl. Both in the presence and absence of an uncoupler, complete protection of V-ATPase from inhibition by NBD-Cl requires MgATP concentrations that are significantly higher than those expected from the K m values for MgATP. The results are inconsistent with a tri-site model and support a bi-site model for a mechanism of ATP hydrolysis by V-ATPase.

  5. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  6. Single molecule TPM analysis of the catalytic pentad mutants of Cre and Flp site-specific recombinases: contributions of the pentad residues to the pre-chemical steps of recombination

    Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Cheng, Yong-Song; Ma, Chien-Hui; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-01-01

    Cre and Flp site-specific recombinase variants harboring point mutations at their conserved catalytic pentad positions were characterized using single molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) analysis. The findings reveal contributions of these amino acids to the pre-chemical steps of recombination. They suggest functional differences between positionally conserved residues in how they influence recombinase-target site association and formation of ‘non-productive’, ‘pre-synaptic’ and ‘synaptic’ complexes. The most striking difference between the two systems is noted for the single conserved lysine. The pentad residues in Cre enhance commitment to recombination by kinetically favoring the formation of pre-synaptic complexes. These residues in Flp serve a similar function by promoting Flp binding to target sites, reducing non-productive binding and/or enhancing the rate of assembly of synaptic complexes. Kinetic comparisons between Cre and Flp, and between their derivatives lacking the tyrosine nucleophile, are consistent with a stronger commitment to recombination in the Flp system. The effect of target site orientation (head-to-head or head-to-tail) on the TPM behavior of synapsed DNA molecules supports the selection of anti-parallel target site alignment prior to the chemical steps. The integrity of the synapse, whose establishment/stability is fostered by strand cleavage in the case of Flp but not Cre, appears to be compromised by the pentad mutations. PMID:25765648

  7. Identification of the srtC1 Transcription Start Site and Catalytically Essential Residues Required for Actinomyces oris T14V SrtC1 Activity

    2011-07-27

    report the identification of the tran scription starting site of the srtC1 determined by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method and several...When needed, kanamycin and trimethoprim were included in growth media at concentra tions of 50 and 100mg mL1, respectively. RNA isolation and...tation, resuspended in a small volume of RNase free water and stored at 80 1C. To determine the transcription start site(s) of A. oris srtC1, 50RACE PCR

  8. Single-Site VO x Moieties Generated on Silica by Surface Organometallic Chemistry: A Way To Enhance the Catalytic Activity in the Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane

    Barman, Samir

    2016-07-26

    We report here an accurate surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) approach to propane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) using a μ2-oxo-bridged, bimetallic [V2O4(acac)2] (1) (acac = acetylacetonate anion) complex as a precursor. The identity and the nuclearity of the product of grafting and of the subsequent oxidative treatment have been systematically studied by means of FT-IR, Raman, solid-state (SS) NMR, UV-vis DRS, EPR and EXAFS spectroscopies. We show that the grafting of 1 on the silica surface under a rigorous SOMC protocol and the subsequent oxidative thermal treatment lead exclusively to well-defined and isolated monovanadate species. The resulting material has been tested for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane in a moderate temperature range (400-525 °C) and compared with that of silica-supported vanadium catalysts prepared by the standard impregnation technique. The experimental results show that the catalytic activity in propane ODH is strongly upgraded by the degree of isolation of the VOx species that can be achieved by employing the SOMC protocol. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  9. Single-Site VO x Moieties Generated on Silica by Surface Organometallic Chemistry: A Way To Enhance the Catalytic Activity in the Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane

    Barman, Samir; Maity, Niladri; Bhatte, Kushal; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Dachwald, Oliver; Haeß ner, Carmen; Saih, Youssef; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Llorens, Isabelle; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Kö hler, Klaus; D’ Elia, Valerio; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    We report here an accurate surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) approach to propane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) using a μ2-oxo-bridged, bimetallic [V2O4(acac)2] (1) (acac = acetylacetonate anion) complex as a precursor. The identity and the nuclearity of the product of grafting and of the subsequent oxidative treatment have been systematically studied by means of FT-IR, Raman, solid-state (SS) NMR, UV-vis DRS, EPR and EXAFS spectroscopies. We show that the grafting of 1 on the silica surface under a rigorous SOMC protocol and the subsequent oxidative thermal treatment lead exclusively to well-defined and isolated monovanadate species. The resulting material has been tested for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane in a moderate temperature range (400-525 °C) and compared with that of silica-supported vanadium catalysts prepared by the standard impregnation technique. The experimental results show that the catalytic activity in propane ODH is strongly upgraded by the degree of isolation of the VOx species that can be achieved by employing the SOMC protocol. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  10. Hydrogen bonds between the alpha and beta subunits of the F1-ATPase allow communication between the catalytic site and the interface of the beta catch loop and the gamma subunit.

    Boltz, Kathryn W; Frasch, Wayne D

    2006-09-19

    F(1)-ATPase mutations in Escherichia coli that changed the strength of hydrogen bonds between the alpha and beta subunits in a location that links the catalytic site to the interface between the beta catch loop and the gamma subunit were examined. Loss of the ability to form the hydrogen bonds involving alphaS337, betaD301, and alphaD335 lowered the k(cat) of ATPase and decreased its susceptibility to Mg(2+)-ADP-AlF(n) inhibition, while mutations that maintain or strengthen these bonds increased the susceptibility to Mg(2+)-ADP-AlF(n) inhibition and lowered the k(cat) of ATPase. These data suggest that hydrogen bonds connecting alphaS337 to betaD301 and betaR323 and connecting alphaD335 to alphaS337 are important to transition state stabilization and catalytic function that may result from the proper alignment of catalytic site residues betaR182 and alphaR376 through the VISIT sequence (alpha344-348). Mutations betaD301E, betaR323K, and alphaR282Q changed the rate-limiting step of the reaction as determined by an isokinetic plot. Hydrophobic mutations of betaR323 decreased the susceptibility to Mg(2+)-ADP-AlF(n)() inhibition and lowered the number of interactions required in the rate-limiting step yet did not affect the k(cat) of ATPase, suggesting that betaR323 is important to transition state formation. The decreased rate of ATP synthase-dependent growth and decreased level of lactate-dependent quenching observed with alphaD335, betaD301, and alphaE283 mutations suggest that these residues may be important to the formation of an alternative set of hydrogen bonds at the interface of the alpha and beta subunits that permits the release of intersubunit bonds upon the binding of ATP, allowing gamma rotation in the escapement mechanism.

  11. Engineered catalytic biofilms for continuous large scale production of n-octanol and (S)-styrene oxide.

    Gross, Rainer; Buehler, Katja; Schmid, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluates the technical feasibility of biofilm-based biotransformations at an industrial scale by theoretically designing a process employing membrane fiber modules as being used in the chemical industry and compares the respective process parameters to classical stirred-tank studies. To our knowledge, catalytic biofilm processes for fine chemicals production have so far not been reported on a technical scale. As model reactions, we applied the previously studied asymmetric styrene epoxidation employing Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120ΔC biofilms and the here-described selective alkane hydroxylation. Using the non-heme iron containing alkane hydroxylase system (AlkBGT) from P. putida Gpo1 in the recombinant P. putida PpS81 pBT10 biofilm, we were able to continuously produce 1-octanol from octane with a maximal productivity of 1.3 g L ⁻¹(aq) day⁻¹ in a single tube micro reactor. For a possible industrial application, a cylindrical membrane fiber module packed with 84,000 polypropylene fibers is proposed. Based on the here presented calculations, 59 membrane fiber modules (of 0.9 m diameter and 2 m length) would be feasible to realize a production process of 1,000 tons/year for styrene oxide. Moreover, the product yield on carbon can at least be doubled and over 400-fold less biomass waste would be generated compared to classical stirred-tank reactor processes. For the octanol process, instead, further intensification in biological activity and/or surface membrane enlargement is required to reach production scale. By taking into consideration challenges such as biomass growth control and maintaining a constant biological activity, this study shows that a biofilm process at an industrial scale for the production of fine chemicals is a sustainable alternative in terms of product yield and biomass waste production. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Kinetic catalytic studies of scorpion's hemocyanin

    Queinnec, E.; Vuillaume, M.; Gardes-Albert, M.; Ferradini, C.; Ducancel, F.

    1991-01-01

    Hemocyanins are copper proteins which function as oxygen carriers in the haemolymph of Molluscs and Arthropods. They possess enzymatic properties: peroxidatic and catalatic activities, although they have neither iron nor porphyrin ring at the active site. The kinetics of the catalytic reaction is described. The reaction of superoxide anion with hemocyanin has been studied using pulse radiolysis at pH 9. The catalytic rate constant is 3.5 X 10 7 mol -1 .l.s -1 [fr

  13. Generation of Cu–In alloy surfaces from CuInO2 as selective catalytic sites for CO2 electroreduction

    Jedidi, Abdesslem

    2015-08-11

    The lack of availability of efficient, selective and stable electrocatalysts is a major hindrance for scalable CO2 reduction processes. Herein, we report the generation of Cu–In alloy surfaces for electrochemical reduction of CO2 from mixed metal oxides of CuInO2 as the starting material. The material successfully generates selective active sites to form CO from CO2 electroreduction at mild overpotentials. Density functional theory (DFT) indicates that the site occupation of the inert In occurs more on the specific sites of Cu. In addition, while In atoms do not preferentially adsorb H or CO, Cu atoms, which neighbor the In atoms, alters the preference of their adsorption. This preference for site occupation and altered adsorption may account for the improved selectivity over that observed for Cu metal. This study demonstrates an example of a scalable synthesis method of bimetallic surfaces utilized with the mixed oxide precursor having the diversity of metal choice, which may drastically alter the electrocatalytic performance, as presented herein.

  14. Extra-Large-Pore Zeolites with UTL Topology: Control of the Catalytic Activity by Variation in the Nature of the Active Sites

    Shamzhy, Mariya; Shvets, O. V.; Opanasenko, Maksym; Kurfiřtová, Lenka; Kubička, D.; Čejka, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 7 (2013), s. 1891-1898 ISSN 1867-3880 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP106/12/G015 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : acidity * active sites * Beckmann rearrangement Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.044, year: 2013

  15. Generation of Cu–In alloy surfaces from CuInO2 as selective catalytic sites for CO2 electroreduction

    Jedidi, Abdesslem; Rasul, Shahid; Masih, Dilshad; Cavallo, Luigi; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The lack of availability of efficient, selective and stable electrocatalysts is a major hindrance for scalable CO2 reduction processes. Herein, we report the generation of Cu–In alloy surfaces for electrochemical reduction of CO2 from mixed metal oxides of CuInO2 as the starting material. The material successfully generates selective active sites to form CO from CO2 electroreduction at mild overpotentials. Density functional theory (DFT) indicates that the site occupation of the inert In occurs more on the specific sites of Cu. In addition, while In atoms do not preferentially adsorb H or CO, Cu atoms, which neighbor the In atoms, alters the preference of their adsorption. This preference for site occupation and altered adsorption may account for the improved selectivity over that observed for Cu metal. This study demonstrates an example of a scalable synthesis method of bimetallic surfaces utilized with the mixed oxide precursor having the diversity of metal choice, which may drastically alter the electrocatalytic performance, as presented herein.

  16. Active site intermediates in the reduction of O(2) by cytochrome oxidase, and their derivatives.

    Wikström, Mårten

    2012-04-01

    The mechanism of dioxygen activation and reduction in cell respiration, as catalysed by cytochrome c oxidase, has a long history. The work by Otto Warburg, David Keilin and Britton Chance defined the dioxygen-binding heme iron centre, viz. das Atmungsferment, or cytochrome a(3). Chance brought the field further in the mid-1970's by ingenious low-temperature studies that for the first time identified the primary enzyme-substrate (ES) Michaelis complex of cell respiration, the dioxygen adduct of heme a(3), which he termed Compound A. Further work using optical, resonance Raman, EPR, and other sophisticated spectroscopic techniques, some of which with microsecond time resolution, has brought us to the situation today, where major principles of how O(2) reduction occurs in respiration are well understood. Nonetheless, some questions have remained open, for example concerning the precise structures, catalytic roles, and spectroscopic properties of the breakdown products of Compound A that have been called P, F (for peroxy and ferryl), and O (oxidised). This nomenclature has been known to be inadequate for some time already, and an alternative will be suggested here. In addition, the multiple forms of P, F and O states have been confusing, a situation that we endeavour to help clarifying. The P and F states formed artificially by reacting cytochrome oxidase with hydrogen peroxide are especially scrutinised, and some novel interpretations will be given that may account for previously unexplained observations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Active sites of the cytochrome p450cam (CYP101) F87W and F87A mutants. Evidence for significant structural reorganization without alteration of catalytic regiospecificity.

    Tuck, S F; Graham-Lorence, S; Peterson, J A; Ortiz de Montellano, P R

    1993-01-05

    Ferricyanide oxidation of the aryl-iron complexes formed by the reaction of cytochrome P450 enzymes with arylhydrazines causes in situ migration of the aryl group from the iron to the porphyrin nitrogen atoms. The regiochemistry of this migration, defined by the ratio of the four possible N-arylprotoporphyrin IX isomers, provides a method for mapping the topologies of cytochrome P450 active sites. The method has been validated by using it to examine the active site of cytochrome P450cam (CYP101), for which a crystal structure is available. In agreement with the crystal structure, reaction with phenylhydrazine gives a 5:25:70 ratio of the NA:NC:ND (subscript indicates pyrrole ring) N-phenylprotoporphyrin IX isomers. Naphthylhydrazine, however, yields exclusively the NC regioisomer and 4-(phenyl)phenylhydrazine the NA:NC:ND isomers in a 14:40:46 ratio. These isomer ratio differences are readily explained by topological differences between the upper and lower reaches of the active site. Having validated the aryl-iron shift as a topological probe, we used it to investigate the structural changes caused by mutation of Phe-87, a residue that provides the ceiling over pyrrole ring D in the crystal structure of cytochrome P450cam. Mutation of Phe-87 to a tryptophan causes no detectable change in the regiochemistry of camphor hydroxylation and only minor changes in the N-aryl isomer ratios. However, mutation of Phe-87 to an alanine, which was expected to open up the region above pyrrole ring D, severely decreased the proportion of the ND in favor of the NA isomer. Less rather than more space is therefore available over pyrrole ring D in the F87A mutant despite the fact that the regiochemistry of camphor hydroxylation remains unchanged. These results provide evidence for significant structural reorganization in the upper regions of the substrate binding site without alteration of the camphor hydroxylation regiospecificity in the F87A mutant.

  18. Human holocarboxylase synthetase with a start site at methionine-58 is the predominant nuclear variant of this protein and has catalytic activity

    Bao, Baolong; Wijeratne, Subhashinee S.K.; Rodriguez-Melendez, Rocio; Zempleni, Janos

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Unambiguous evidence is provided that methionine-58 serves as an in-frame alternative translation site for holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS58). → Full-length HLCS and HLCS58 enter the nucleus, but HLCS58 is the predominant variant. → HLCS58 has biological activity as biotin protein ligase. -- Abstract: Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) catalyzes the covalent binding of biotin to both carboxylases in extranuclear structures and histones in cell nuclei, thereby mediating important roles in intermediary metabolism, gene regulation, and genome stability. HLCS has three putative translational start sites (methionine-1, -7, and -58), but lacks a strong nuclear localization sequence that would explain its participation in epigenetic events in the cell nucleus. Recent evidence suggests that small quantities of HLCS with a start site in methionine-58 (HLCS58) might be able to enter the nuclear compartment. We generated the following novel insights into HLCS biology. First, we generated a novel HLCS fusion protein vector to demonstrate that methionine-58 is a functional translation start site in human cells. Second, we used confocal microscopy and western blots to demonstrate that HLCS58 enters the cell nucleus in meaningful quantities, and that full-length HLCS localizes predominantly in the cytoplasm but may also enter the nucleus. Third, we produced recombinant HLCS58 to demonstrate its biological activity toward catalyzing the biotinylation of both carboxylases and histones. Collectively, these observations are consistent with roles of HLCS58 and full-length HLCS in nuclear events. We conclude this report by proposing a novel role for HLCS in epigenetic events, mediated by physical interactions between HLCS and other chromatin proteins as part of a larger multiprotein complex that mediates gene repression.

  19. Including lateral interactions into microkinetic models of catalytic reactions

    Hellman, Anders; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina

    2007-01-01

    In many catalytic reactions lateral interactions between adsorbates are believed to have a strong influence on the reaction rates. We apply a microkinetic model to explore the effect of lateral interactions and how to efficiently take them into account in a simple catalytic reaction. Three differ...... different approximations are investigated: site, mean-field, and quasichemical approximations. The obtained results are compared to accurate Monte Carlo numbers. In the end, we apply the approximations to a real catalytic reaction, namely, ammonia synthesis....

  20. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  1. SHORT COMMUNICATION CATALYTIC KINETIC ...

    IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of ...

  2. Catalytic distillation process

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  3. Haemophilus responses to nutritional immunity: epigenetic and morphological contribution to biofilm architecture, invasion, persistence and disease severity.

    Blake R Szelestey

    Full Text Available In an effort to suppress microbial outgrowth, the host sequesters essential nutrients in a process termed nutritional immunity. However, inflammatory responses to bacterial insult can restore nutritional resources. Given that nutrient availability modulates virulence factor production and biofilm formation by other bacterial species, we hypothesized that fluctuations in heme-iron availability, particularly at privileged sites, would similarly influence Haemophilus biofilm formation and pathogenesis. Thus, we cultured Haemophilus through sequential heme-iron deplete and heme-iron replete media to determine the effect of transient depletion of internal stores of heme-iron on multiple pathogenic phenotypes. We observed that prior heme-iron restriction potentiates biofilm changes for at least 72 hours that include increased peak height and architectural complexity as compared to biofilms initiated from heme-iron replete bacteria, suggesting a mechanism for epigenetic responses that participate in the changes observed. Additionally, in a co-infection model for human otitis media, heme-iron restricted Haemophilus, although accounting for only 10% of the inoculum (90% heme-iron replete, represented up to 99% of the organisms recovered at 4 days. These data indicate that fluctuations in heme-iron availability promote a survival advantage during disease. Filamentation mediated by a SulA-related ortholog was required for optimal biofilm peak height and persistence during experimental otitis media. Moreover, severity of disease in response to heme-iron restricted Haemophilus was reduced as evidenced by lack of mucosal destruction, decreased erythema, hemorrhagic foci and vasodilatation. Transient restriction of heme-iron also promoted productive invasion events leading to the development of intracellular bacterial communities. Taken together, these data suggest that nutritional immunity, may, in fact, foster long-term phenotypic changes that better equip

  4. Molecular mechanism of strict substrate specificity of an extradiol dioxygenase, DesB, derived from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6.

    Keisuke Sugimoto

    Full Text Available DesB, which is derived from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6, is a type II extradiol dioxygenase that catalyzes a ring opening reaction of gallate. While typical extradiol dioxygenases show broad substrate specificity, DesB has strict substrate specificity for gallate. The substrate specificity of DesB seems to be required for the efficient growth of S. sp. SYK-6 using lignin-derived aromatic compounds. Since direct coordination of hydroxyl groups of the substrate to the non-heme iron in the active site is a critical step for the catalytic reaction of the extradiol dioxygenases, the mechanism of the substrate recognition and coordination of DesB was analyzed by biochemical and crystallographic methods. Our study demonstrated that the direct coordination between the non-heme iron and hydroxyl groups of the substrate requires a large shift of the Fe (II ion in the active site. Mutational analysis revealed that His124 and His192 in the active site are essential to the catalytic reaction of DesB. His124, which interacts with OH (4 of the bound gallate, seems to contribute to proper positioning of the substrate in the active site. His192, which is located close to OH (3 of the gallate, is likely to serve as the catalytic base. Glu377' interacts with OH (5 of the gallate and seems to play a critical role in the substrate specificity. Our biochemical and structural study showed the substrate recognition and catalytic mechanisms of DesB.

  5. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  6. Component Development to Accelerate Commercial Implementation of Ultra-Low Emissions Catalytic Combustion

    McCarty, Jon; Berry, Brian; Lundberg, Kare; Anson, Orris

    2003-03-31

    This final report describes a 2000-2003 program for the development of components and processes to enhance the commercialization of ultra-low emissions catalytic combustion in industrial gas turbines. The range of project tasks includes: development of more durable, lower-cost catalysts and catalytic combustor components; development and design of a catalytic pre-burner and a catalytic pilot burner for gas turbines, and on-site fuel conversion processing for utilization of liquid fuel.

  7. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  8. Catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbons

    Vail' eva, N A; Buyanov, R A

    1979-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of petroleum fractions (undecane) was performed with the object of clarifying such questions as the mechanism of action of the catalyst, the concepts of activity and selectivity of the catalyst, the role of transport processes, the temperature ranges and limitations of the catalytic process, the effect of the catalyst on secondary processes, and others. Catalysts such as quartz, MgO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, were used. Analysis of the experimental findings and the fact that the distribution of products is independent of the nature of the surface, demonstrate that the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons in the presence of catalysts is based on the heterogeneous-homogeneous radical-chain mechanism of action, and that the role of the catalysts reduces to increasing the concentration of free radicals. The concept of selectivity cannot be applied to catalysts here, since they do not affect the mechanism of the unfolding of the process of pyrolysis and their role consists solely in initiating the process. In catalytic pyrolysis the concepts of kinetic and diffusive domains of unfolding of the catalytic reaction do not apply, and only the outer surface of the catalyst is engaged, whereas the inner surface merely promotes deletorious secondary processes reducing the selectivity of the process and the activity of the catalyst. 6 references, 2 figures.

  9. Catalytic Conversion of Biofuels

    Jørgensen, Betina

    This thesis describes the catalytic conversion of bioethanol into higher value chemicals. The motivation has been the unavoidable coming depletion of the fossil resources. The thesis is focused on two ways of utilising ethanol; the steam reforming of ethanol to form hydrogen and the partial oxida...

  10. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  11. Catalytic methanol dissociation

    Alcinikov, Y.; Fainberg, V.; Garbar, A.; Gutman, M.; Hetsroni, G.; Shindler, Y.; Tatrtakovsky, L.; Zvirin, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Results of the methanol dissociation study on copper/potassium catalyst with alumina support at various temperatures are presented. The following gaseous and liquid products at. The catalytic methanol dissociation is obtained: hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and dimethyl ether. Formation rates of these products are discussed. Activation energies of corresponding reactions are calculated

  12. Concentric catalytic combustor

    Bruck, Gerald J [Oviedo, FL; Laster, Walter R [Oviedo, FL

    2009-03-24

    A catalytic combustor (28) includes a tubular pressure boundary element (90) having a longitudinal flow axis (e.g., 56) separating a first portion (94) of a first fluid flow (e.g., 24) from a second portion (95) of the first fluid flow. The pressure boundary element includes a wall (96) having a plurality of separate longitudinally oriented flow paths (98) annularly disposed within the wall and conducting respective portions (100, 101) of a second fluid flow (e.g., 26) therethrough. A catalytic material (32) is disposed on a surface (e.g., 102, 103) of the pressure boundary element exposed to at least one of the first and second portions of the first fluid flow.

  13. Catalytic exhaust control

    Heinemann, H

    1973-09-01

    Recent achievements and problems in the development of exhaust control devices in the USA are reviewed. To meet the 1976 emission standards, catalytic systems for the oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons and for the reduction of nitrogen oxides to nitrogen and water are needed. While oxidizing catalysts using platinum, palladium, copper, vanadium, and chromium appplied on alumina or ceramic materials are more or less effective in emission control, there are no catalytic devices for the reduction of nitrogen oxides with the required useful life of 25,000 to 50,000 miles as yet available. In the case of platinum catalysts on monolithic supports, the operating temperature of 650 to 750/sup 0/C as required for the oxidation process may cause inactivation of the catalysts and fusion of the support material. The oxidation of CO and hydrocarbons is inhibited by high concentrations of CO, nitric oxide, and hydrocarbons. The use of catalytic converters requires the use of lead-free or low-lead gasoline. The nitrogen oxides conversion efficiency is considerably influenced by the oxygen-to-CO ratio of the exhaust gas, which makes limitation of this ratio necessary.

  14. Application of Zeolitic Additives in the Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC

    A. Nemati Kharat

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Current article describes application of zeolites in fluid catalytic cracking (FCC. The use of several zeolitic additives for the production light olefins and reduction of pollutants is described. Application of zeolites as fluid catalytic cracking (FCC catalysts and additives due to the presence of active acid sites in the zeolite framework  increase the formation of desired cracking products (i.e., olefin and branched products  in the FCC unit.

  15. Catalytic biomass pyrolysis process

    Dayton, David C.; Gupta, Raghubir P.; Turk, Brian S.; Kataria, Atish; Shen, Jian-Ping

    2018-04-17

    Described herein are processes for converting a biomass starting material (such as lignocellulosic materials) into a low oxygen containing, stable liquid intermediate that can be refined to make liquid hydrocarbon fuels. More specifically, the process can be a catalytic biomass pyrolysis process wherein an oxygen removing catalyst is employed in the reactor while the biomass is subjected to pyrolysis conditions. The stream exiting the pyrolysis reactor comprises bio-oil having a low oxygen content, and such stream may be subjected to further steps, such as separation and/or condensation to isolate the bio-oil.

  16. Catalytic reforming methods

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  17. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  18. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is ...

  19. Catalytic hydrotreatment of refinery waste

    1989-01-01

    The object of the project is to produce liquid hydrocarbons by the catalytic hydroprocessing of solid refinery wastes (hard pitches) in order to improve the profitability of deep conversion processes and reduce the excess production of heavy fuels. The project was mostly carried out on the ASVAHL demonstration platform site, at Solaize, and hard pitches were produced primarily by deasphalting of atmospheric or vacuum distillation residues. The project includes two experimental phases and an economic evaluation study phase. In phase 1, two granular catalysts were used to transform pitch into standard low sulphur fuel oil: a continuously moving bed, with demetallation and conversion catalyst; a fixed bed, with hydrorefining catalyst. In phase 2 of the project, it was proven that a hydrotreatment process using a finely dispersed catalyst in the feedstock, can, under realistic operating conditions, transform with goods yields hard pitch into distillates that can be refined through standard methods. In phase 3 of the project, it was shown that the economics of such processes are tightly linked to the price differential between white and black oil products, which is expected to increase in the future. Furthermore, the evolution of environmental constraints will impel the use of such methods, thus avoiding the coproduction of polluting solid residues.

  20. Catalytic detritiation of water

    Rogers, M.L.; Lamberger, P.H.; Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot-scale system has been used at Mound Laboratory to investigate the catalytic detritiation of water. A hydrophobic, precious metal catalyst is used to promote the exchange of tritium between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen at 60 0 C. Two columns are used, each 7.5 m long by 2.5 cm ID and packed with catalyst. Water flow is 5-10 cm 3 /min and countercurrent hydrogen flow is 9,000-12,000 cm 3 /min. The equipment, except for the columns, is housed in an inert atmosphere glovebox and is computer controlled. The hydrogen is obtained by electrolysis of a portion of the water stream. Enriched gaseous tritium is withdrawn for further enrichment. A description of the system is included along with an outline of its operation. Recent experimental data are discussed

  1. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  2. Calculating the Na⁺ translocating V-ATPase catalytic site affinity for substrate binding by homology modeled NtpA monomer using molecular dynamics/free energy calculation.

    Muhammed, Zahed; Arai, Satoshi; Saijo, Shinya; Yamato, Ichiro; Murata, Takeshi; Suenaga, Atsushi

    2012-07-01

    Vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) of Enterococcus hirae is composed of a soluble catalytic domain (V₁; NtpA₃-B₃-D-G) and an integral membrane domain (V₀; NtpI-K₁₀) connected by a central and two peripheral stalks (NtpC, NtpD-G and NtpE-F). Recently nucleotide binding of catalytic NtpA monomer has been reported (Arai et al.). In the present study, we calculated the nucleotide binding affinity of NtpA by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation/free energy calculation using MM-GBSA approach based on homology modeled structure of NtpA monomer docked with ATP analogue, adenosine 5'-[β, γ-imido] triphosphate (AMP-PNP). The calculated binding free energies showed qualitatively good agreement with experimental data. The calculation was cross-validated further by the rigorous method, thermodynamic integration (TI) simulation. Finally, the interaction between NtpA and nucleotides at the atomic level was investigated by the analyses of components of free energy and the optimized model structures obtained from MD simulations, suggesting that electrostatic contribution is responsible for the difference in nucleotide binding to NtpA monomer. This is the first observation and suggestion to explain the difference of nucleotide binding properties in V-ATPase NtpA subunit, and our method can be a valuable primary step to predict nucleotide binding affinity to other subunits (NtpAB, NtpA₃B₃) and to explore subunit interactions and eventually may help to understand energy transduction mechanism of E. hirae V-ATPase. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of proteins from animal source foods on heme iron bioavailability in humans.

    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Valenzuela, Carolina; Brito, Alex; Weinborn, Valerie; Flores, Sebastián; Arredondo, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Forty-five women (35-45 year) were randomly assigned to three iron (Fe) absorption sub-studies, which measured the effects of dietary animal proteins on the absorption of heme Fe. Study 1 was focused on heme, red blood cell concentrate (RBCC), hemoglobin (Hb), RBCC+beef meat; study 2 on heme, heme+fish, chicken, and beef; and study 3 on heme and heme+purified animal protein (casein, collagen, albumin). Study 1: the bioavailability of heme Fe from Hb was similar to heme only (∼13.0%). RBCC (25.0%) and RBCC+beef (21.3%) were found to be increased 2- and 1.6-fold, respectively, when compared with heme alone (pProteins from animal source foods and their digestion products did not enhance heme Fe absorption. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Photoenhanced Oxidative DNA Cleavage with Non-Heme Iron(II) Complexes

    Li, Qian; Browne, Wesley R.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    The DNA cleavage activity of iron(II) complexes of a series of monotopic pentadentate N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine (N4Py)-derived ligands (1-5) was investigated under laser irradiation at 473, 400.8, and 355 nm in the absence of a reducing agent and compared to that under

  5. Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat

    Souza, A.R.M. de; Arthur, V.; Canniatti-Brazaca, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 °C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses, except for the storage, and the total number of pigments was affected by the irradiation and the time, reducing the values with the increase of storage. Irradiation was shown to be a good method to conserve iron. (author) [pt

  6. Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat

    Souza, Adriana Regia Marques de; Arthur, Valter Arthur; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2007-01-01

    Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 deg C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses, except for the storage, and the total number of pigments was affected by the irradiation and the time, reducing the values with the increase of storage. Irradiation was shown to be a good method to conserve iron. (author)

  7. Natural selection on HFE in Asian populations contributes to enhanced non-heme iron absorption.

    Ye, Kaixiong; Cao, Chang; Lin, Xu; O'Brien, Kimberly O; Gu, Zhenglong

    2015-06-10

    HFE, a major regulator of iron (Fe) homeostasis, has been suggested to be under positive selection in both European and Asian populations. While the genetic variant under selection in Europeans (a non-synonymous mutation, C282Y) has been relatively well-studied, the adaptive variant in Asians and its functional consequences are still unknown. Identifying the adaptive HFE variants in Asians will not only elucidate the evolutionary history and the genetic basis of population difference in Fe status, but also assist the future practice of genome-informed dietary recommendation. Using data from the International HapMap Project, we confirmed the signatures of positive selection on HFE in Asian populations and identified a candidate adaptive haplotype that is common in Asians (52.35-54.71%) but rare in Europeans (5.98%) and Africans (4.35%). The T allele at tag SNP rs9366637 (C/T) captured 95.8% of this Asian-common haplotype. A significantly reduced HFE expression was observed in individuals carrying T/T at rs9366637 compared to C/C and C/T, indicating a possible role of gene regulation in adaptation. We recruited 57 women of Asian descent and measured Fe absorption using stable isotopes in those homozygous at rs9366637. We observed a 22% higher absorption in women homozygous for the Asian-common haplotype (T/T) compared to the control genotype (C/C). Additionally, compared with a group of age-matched Caucasian women, Asian women exhibited significantly elevated Fe absorption. Our results indicate parallel adaptation of HFE gene in Europeans and Asians with different genetic variants. Moreover, natural selection on HFE may have contributed to elevated Fe absorption in Asians. This study regarding population differences in Fe homeostasis has significant medical impact as high Fe level has been linked to an increased disease risk of metabolic syndromes.

  8. Directing a Non-Heme Iron(III)-Hydroperoxide Species on a Trifurcated Reactivity Pathway

    Wegeberg, Christina; Lauritsen, Frants R.; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2018-01-01

    The reactivity of [FeIII(tpena)]2+ (tpena=N,N,N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine-N'-acetate) as a catalyst for oxidation reactions depends on its ratio to the terminal oxidant H2O2 and presence or absence of sacrificial substrates. The outcome can be switched between: 1)catalysed H2O2...

  9. A Non-Heme Iron Photocatalyst for Light-Driven Aerobic Oxidation of Methanol

    Chen, Juan; Stepanovic, Stepan; Draksharapu, Apparao; Gruden, Maja; Browne, Wesley R

    2018-01-01

    Non-heme (L)FeIIIand (L)FeIII-O-FeIII(L) complexes (L=1,1-di(pyridin-2-yl)-N,N-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethan-1-amine) underwent reduction under irradiation to the FeIIstate with concomitant oxidation of methanol to methanal, without the need for a secondary photosensitizer. Spectroscopic and DFT

  10. Short hydrogen bonds in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases

    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The survey of crystallographic data from the Protein Data Bank for 37 structures of trypsin and other serine proteases at a resolution of 0.78–1.28 Å revealed the presence of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the enzymes, which are formed between the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues and are on average 2.7 Å long. This is the typical bond length for normal hydrogen bonds. The geometric properties of the hydrogen bonds in the active site indicate that the H atom is not centered between the heteroatoms of the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues in the active site. Taken together, these findings exclude the possibility that short “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds are formed in the ground state structure of the active sites examined in this work. Some time ago, it was suggested by Cleland that the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis is operative in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases, and requires the presence of short hydrogen bonds around 2.4 Å long in the active site, with the H atom centered between the catalytic heteroatoms. The conclusions drawn from this work do not exclude the validity of the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis at all, but they merely do not support it in this particular case, with this particular class of enzymes.

  11. Catalytic properties of extraframework iron-containing species in ZSM-5 for N2O decomposition

    Li, G.; Pidko, E.A.; Filot, I.A.W.; Santen, van R.A.; Li, Can; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The reactivity of mononuclear and binuclear iron-containing complexes in ZSM-5 zeolite for catalytic N2O decomposition has been investigated by periodic DFT calculations and microkinetic modeling. On mononuclear sites, the activation of a first N2O molecule is favorable. The rate of catalytic N2O

  12. Dependence of crystal size on the catalytic performance of a porous coordination polymer.

    Kiyonaga, Tomokazu; Higuchi, Masakazu; Kajiwara, Takashi; Takashima, Yohei; Duan, Jingui; Nagashima, Kazuro; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2015-02-14

    Submicrosized MOF-76(Yb) exhibits a higher catalytic performance for esterification than microsized MOF-76(Yb). Control of the crystal size of porous heterogeneous catalysts, such as PCP/MOFs, offers a promising approach to fabricating high-performance catalysts based on accessibility to the internal catalytic sites.

  13. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  14. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    126, No. 2, March 2014, pp. 341–351. c Indian Academy of Sciences. ... enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and .... Gas–liquid and liquid–solid transport processes in catalytic reactors.5.

  15. Catalysis on singly dispersed bimetallic sites

    Zhang, Shiran; Nguyen, Luan; Liang, Jin-Xia; Shan, Junjun; Liu, Jingyue; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Patlolla, Anitha; Huang, Weixin; Li, Jun; Tao, Franklin

    2015-08-01

    A catalytic site typically consists of one or more atoms of a catalyst surface that arrange into a configuration offering a specific electronic structure for adsorbing or dissociating reactant molecules. The catalytic activity of adjacent bimetallic sites of metallic nanoparticles has been studied previously. An isolated bimetallic site supported on a non-metallic surface could exhibit a distinctly different catalytic performance owing to the cationic state of the singly dispersed bimetallic site and the minimized choices of binding configurations of a reactant molecule compared with continuously packed bimetallic sites. Here we report that isolated Rh1Co3 bimetallic sites exhibit a distinctly different catalytic performance in reduction of nitric oxide with carbon monoxide at low temperature, resulting from strong adsorption of two nitric oxide molecules and a nitrous oxide intermediate on Rh1Co3 sites and following a low-barrier pathway dissociation to dinitrogen and an oxygen atom. This observation suggests a method to develop catalysts with high selectivity.

  16. Chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor.

    Koga, Hirotaka; Kitaoka, Takuya; Isogai, Akira

    2015-01-15

    We discuss the successful use of chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor for the production of useful chemicals. The chemical modification of cellulose paper was achieved using a silane-coupling technique. Amine-modified paper was directly used as a base catalyst for the Knoevenagel condensation reaction. Methacrylate-modified paper was used for the immobilization of lipase and then in nonaqueous transesterification processes. These catalytic paper materials offer high reaction efficiencies and have excellent practical properties. We suggest that the paper-specific interconnected microstructure with pulp fiber networks provides fast mixing of the reactants and efficient transport of the reactants to the catalytically-active sites. This concept is expected to be a promising route to green and sustainable chemistry.

  17. Chemically-Modified Cellulose Paper as a Microstructured Catalytic Reactor

    Hirotaka Koga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the successful use of chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor for the production of useful chemicals. The chemical modification of cellulose paper was achieved using a silane-coupling technique. Amine-modified paper was directly used as a base catalyst for the Knoevenagel condensation reaction. Methacrylate-modified paper was used for the immobilization of lipase and then in nonaqueous transesterification processes. These catalytic paper materials offer high reaction efficiencies and have excellent practical properties. We suggest that the paper-specific interconnected microstructure with pulp fiber networks provides fast mixing of the reactants and efficient transport of the reactants to the catalytically-active sites. This concept is expected to be a promising route to green and sustainable chemistry.

  18. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  19. Kinetic and catalytic performance of a BI-porous composite material in catalytic cracking and isomerisation reactions

    Al-Khattaf, S.

    2012-01-10

    Catalytic behaviour of pure zeolite ZSM-5 and a bi-porous composite material (BCM) were investigated in transformation of m-xylene, while zeolite HY and the bi-porous composite were used in the cracking of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (TIPB). The micro/mesoporous material was used to understand the effect of the presence of mesopores on these reactions. Various characterisation techniques, that is, XRD, SEM, TGA, FT-IR and nitrogen sorption measurements were applied for complete characterisation of the catalysts. Catalytic tests using CREC riser simulator showed that the micro/mesoporous composite catalyst exhibited higher catalytic activity as compared with the conventional microporous ZSM-5 and HY zeolite for transformation of m-xylene and for the catalytic cracking of TIPB, respectively. The outstanding catalytic reactivity of m-xylene and TIPB molecules were mainly attributed to the easier access of active sites provided by the mesopores. Apparent activation energies for the disappearance of m-xylene and TIPB over all catalysts were found to decrease in the order: EBCM>EZSM-5 and EBCM>EHY, respectively. © 2012 Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering.

  20. Catalytic oxidation of soot over alkaline niobates

    Pecchi, G.; Cabrera, B.; Buljan, A.; Delgado, E.J.; Gordon, A.L.; Jimenez, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► No previous reported studies about alkaline niobates as catalysts for soot oxidation. ► NaNbO 3 and KNbO 3 perovskite-type oxides show lower activation energy than other lanthanoid perovskite-type oxides. ► The alkaline niobate does not show deactivation by metal loss. - Abstract: The lack of studies in the current literature about the assessment of alkaline niobates as catalysts for soot oxidation has motivated this research. In this study, the synthesis, characterization and assessment of alkaline metal niobates as catalysts for soot combustion are reported. The solids MNbO 3 (M = Li, Na, K, Rb) are synthesized by a citrate method, calcined at 450 °C, 550 °C, 650 °C, 750 °C, and characterized by AAS, N 2 adsorption, XRD, O 2 -TPD, FTIR and SEM. All the alkaline niobates show catalytic activity for soot combustion, and the activity depends basically on the nature of the alkaline metal and the calcination temperature. The highest catalytic activity, expressed as the temperature at which combustion of carbon black occurs at the maximum rate, is shown by KNbO 3 calcined at 650 °C. At this calcination temperature, the catalytic activity follows an order dependent on the atomic number, namely: KNbO 3 > NaNbO 3 > LiNbO 3 . The RbNbO 3 solid do not follow this trend presumably due to the perovskite structure was not reached. The highest catalytic activity shown by of KNbO 3 , despite the lower apparent activation energy of NaNbO 3 , stress the importance of the metal nature and suggests the hypothesis that K + ions are the active sites for soot combustion. It must be pointed out that alkaline niobate subjected to consecutive soot combustion cycles does not show deactivation by metal loss, due to the stabilization of the alkaline metal inside the perovskite structure.

  1. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    Tanabe, K.; Iizuka, T.

    1983-04-01

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author) [pt

  2. Catalytic Decoupling of Quantum Information

    Majenz, Christian; Berta, Mario; Dupuis, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The decoupling technique is a fundamental tool in quantum information theory with applications ranging from quantum thermodynamics to quantum many body physics to the study of black hole radiation. In this work we introduce the notion of catalytic decoupling, that is, decoupling in the presence...... and quantum state merging, and leads to a resource theory of decoupling....

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation ...

    were characterized by infrared, electronic, electron paramagnetic resonance ... The catalytic oxidation property of ruthenium(III) complexes were also ... cies at room temperature. ..... aldehyde part of Schiff base ligands, catalytic activ- ity of new ...

  4. Step sites in syngas catalysis

    Rostrup-Nielsen, J.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2006-01-01

    Step sites play an important role in many catalytic reactions. This paper reviews recent results on metal catalysts for syngas reactions with emphasis on steam reforming. Modern characterization techniques (STEM, HREM...) and theoretical calculations (DFT) has allowed a more quantitative explanat......Step sites play an important role in many catalytic reactions. This paper reviews recent results on metal catalysts for syngas reactions with emphasis on steam reforming. Modern characterization techniques (STEM, HREM...) and theoretical calculations (DFT) has allowed a more quantitative...... explanation of the impact of step sites on catalyst activity and side reactions such as carbon formation. This leads to a discussion of principles for catalyst promotion....

  5. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core-shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the ‘confined effect’ and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties.

  6. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems.

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core–shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the 'confined effect' and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties.

  7. A first principles study of the binding of formic acid in catalase complementing high resolution X-ray structures

    Rovira, Carme; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Biarnes, Xevi; Carpena, Xavi; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    Density functional molecular dynamics simulations using a QM/MM approach are used to get insight into the binding modes of formic acid in catalase. Two ligand binding sites are found, named A and B, in agreement with recent high resolution structures of catalase with bound formic acid. In addition, the calculations show that the His56 residue is protonated and the ligand is present as a formate anion. The lowest energy minimum structure (A) corresponds to the ligand interacting with both the heme iron and the catalytic residues (His56 and Asn129). The second minimum energy structure (B) corresponds to the situation in which the ligand interacts solely with the catalytic residues. A mechanism for the process of formic acid binding in catalase is suggested

  8. A first principles study of the binding of formic acid in catalase complementing high resolution X-ray structures

    Rovira, Carme [Centre especial de Recerca en Quimica Teorica, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: crovira@pcb.ub.es; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes [Centre especial de Recerca en Quimica Teorica, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Biarnes, Xevi [Centre especial de Recerca en Quimica Teorica, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Carpena, Xavi [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas y Parc Cientific de Barcelona (CSIC-PCB), Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fita, Ignacio [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas y Parc Cientific de Barcelona (CSIC-PCB), Josep Samitier 1-5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Loewen, Peter C. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada MB R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2006-03-31

    Density functional molecular dynamics simulations using a QM/MM approach are used to get insight into the binding modes of formic acid in catalase. Two ligand binding sites are found, named A and B, in agreement with recent high resolution structures of catalase with bound formic acid. In addition, the calculations show that the His56 residue is protonated and the ligand is present as a formate anion. The lowest energy minimum structure (A) corresponds to the ligand interacting with both the heme iron and the catalytic residues (His56 and Asn129). The second minimum energy structure (B) corresponds to the situation in which the ligand interacts solely with the catalytic residues. A mechanism for the process of formic acid binding in catalase is suggested.

  9. Catalytic process for tritium exchange reaction

    Hansoo Lee; Kang, H.S.; Paek, S.W.; Hongsuk Chung; Yang Geun Chung; Sook Kyung Lee

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic activities for a hydrogen isotope exchange were measured through the reaction of a vapor and gas mixture. The catalytic activity showed to be comparable with the published data. Since the gas velocity is relatively low, the deactivation was not found clearly during the 5-hour experiment. Hydrogen isotope transfer experiments were also conducted through the liquid phase catalytic exchange reaction column that consisted of a catalytic bed and a hydrophilic bed. The efficiencies of both the catalytic and hydrophilic beds were higher than 0.9, implying that the column performance was excellent. (author)

  10. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: A Review

    Theodore Dickerson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical conversion route for lignocellulosic biomass that produces chemicals and fuels compatible with current, petrochemical infrastructure. Catalytic modifications to pyrolysis bio-oils are geared towards the elimination and substitution of oxygen and oxygen-containing functionalities in addition to increasing the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the final products. Recent progress has focused on both hydrodeoxygenation and hydrogenation of bio-oil using a variety of metal catalysts and the production of aromatics from bio-oil using cracking zeolites. Research is currently focused on developing multi-functional catalysts used in situ that benefit from the advantages of both hydrodeoxygenation and zeolite cracking. Development of robust, highly selective catalysts will help achieve the goal of producing drop-in fuels and petrochemical commodities from wood and other lignocellulosic biomass streams. The current paper will examine these developments by means of a review of existing literature.

  11. Catalytic combustion in gas stoves - Phase II

    Hjelm, Anna-Karin [CATATOR AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    . To overcome the latter, improved aeration of the system is needed, e.g. modification of nozzle-size and/or flame port plate. The effects of installing a retro-fit catalytic design onto the burner in the gas oven were also examined. Similar to the burners of the cooking plates, the emitted NO{sub x} was greatly reduced, i.e. up to 90 %. Other on-going projects using similar catalyst concepts as in this study have shown that the life-time of the catalyst, i.e. the mechanical stability and the catalytic activity, is extremely good (> 1000 h). To examine if this durability of the catalyst is limited in this specific application by deactivation caused by possible food spillage, a number of commonly used food ingredients were painted onto the catalysts and the activity of the catalyst prior to and after the 'deactivation' was investigated. The results show that no ingredients of organic type (fat, milk, egg, sugar) have any significant impact on the catalytic activity. Salt however was seen to block active reaction sites of the catalyst, but the tests showed that the catalyst could in this case be easily re-activated by simply washing it in water. The design modifications are very modest and the amount of catalyst is small, costing about 6-10 SEK (0.80-1.2 USD) per cooking plate.

  12. Catalytic processes for cleaner fuels

    Catani, R.; Marchionna, M.; Rossini, S.

    1999-01-01

    More stringent limitations on vehicle emissions require different measurement: fuel reformulation is one of the most important and is calling for a noticeable impact on refinery assets. Composition rangers of the future fuels have been defined on a time scale. In this scenario the evolution of catalytic technologies becomes a fundamental tool for allowing refinery to reach the fixed-by-law targets. In this paper, the refinery process options to meet each specific requirements of reformulated fuels are surveyed [it

  13. Facile Syntheses and Molecular-Docking of Novel Substituted 3,4-Dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxamide/carbohydrazide Analogues with Antimicrobial and Antifungal Properties

    Jitendra D. Bhosale

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the use of facile one-pot, high-yielding reactions to synthesize substituted 3,4-dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxamides 3a–m and carbohydrazide analogues 5a–l as potential antifungal and antimicrobial agents. The structural identity and purity of the synthesized compounds were assigned based on appropriate spectroscopic techniques. Synthesized compounds were assessed in vitro for antifungal and antibacterial activity. The compounds 5h, 5i and 5j were found to be the most potent against Aspergillus fumigatus, with MIC values of 0.039 mg/mL. The compound 5f bearing a 2, 6-dichloro group on the phenyl ring was found to be the most active broad spectrum antibacterial agent with a MIC value of 0.039 mg/mL. The mode of action of the most promising antifungal compounds (one representative from each series; 3j and 5h was established by their molecular docking with the active site of sterol 14α-demethylase. Molecular docking studies revealed a highly spontaneous binding ability of the tested compounds in the access channel away from catalytic heme iron of the enzyme, which suggested that the tested compounds inhibit this enzyme and would avoid heme iron-related deleterious side effects observed with many existing antifungal compounds.

  14. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M. [Molten Metal Technology, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy issued a Planned Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) in 1993, with the objective of identifying unique technologies which could be applied to the most hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. The combination of radioactive contamination with additional contamination by hazardous constituents such as those identified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) pose an especially challenging problem. Traditional remediation technologies are increasingly becoming less acceptable to stakeholders and regulators because of the risks they pose to public health and safety. Desirable recycling technologies were described by the DOE as: (1) easily installed, operated, and maintained; (2) exhibiting superior environmental performance; (3) protective of worker and public health and safety; (4) readily acceptable to a wide spectrum of evaluators; and (5) economically feasible. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) was awarded a contract as a result of the PRDA initiative to demonstrate the applicability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP), MMT`s proprietary elemental recycling technology, to DOE`s inventory of low level mixed waste. This includes DOE`s inventory of radioactively- and RCRA-contaminated scrap metal and other waste forms expected to be generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of DOE sites.

  15. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy issued a Planned Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) in 1993, with the objective of identifying unique technologies which could be applied to the most hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. The combination of radioactive contamination with additional contamination by hazardous constituents such as those identified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) pose an especially challenging problem. Traditional remediation technologies are increasingly becoming less acceptable to stakeholders and regulators because of the risks they pose to public health and safety. Desirable recycling technologies were described by the DOE as: (1) easily installed, operated, and maintained; (2) exhibiting superior environmental performance; (3) protective of worker and public health and safety; (4) readily acceptable to a wide spectrum of evaluators; and (5) economically feasible. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) was awarded a contract as a result of the PRDA initiative to demonstrate the applicability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP), MMT's proprietary elemental recycling technology, to DOE's inventory of low level mixed waste. This includes DOE's inventory of radioactively- and RCRA-contaminated scrap metal and other waste forms expected to be generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of DOE sites

  16. Mechanisms of catalytic activity in heavily coated hydrocracking catalysts

    Millan, M.; Adell, C.; Hinojosa, C.; Herod, A.A.; Kandiyoti, R. [University of London Imperial College Science Technology & Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-01-15

    Catalyst deactivation by coke deposition has a direct impact on the economic viability of heavy hydrocarbon upgrading processes, such as coal liquefaction and oil residue hydroprocessing. Coke deposition is responsible for rapid loss of catalytic activity and it mostly takes place in the early stages of hydrocracking. The effect of carbonaceous deposition on the catalytic activity of a chromium pillared montmorillonite has been studied in the present work. Its catalytic activity in hydrocracking a coal extract was evaluated based on the boiling point distributions of feed and products obtained by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and their characterisation by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and UV-Fluorescence spectroscopy (UV-F). A large deposition on the catalyst was observed after two successive 2-hour long runs in which the catalyst recovered from the first run was reused in the second. The pillared clay retained its activity even though it showed high carbon loading, a large drop in surface area and complete apparent pore blockage. Some observations may contribute to explain this persistent catalytic activity. First, there is evidence suggesting the dynamic nature of the carbonaceous deposits, which continuously exchange material with the liquid, allowing catalytic activity to continue. Secondly, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) on the used Cr montmorillonite has shown preferential deposition on some regions of the catalyst, which leaves a fraction of the surface relatively exposed. Finally, evidence from SEM coupled to X-ray microanalysis also suggest that deposits are thinner in areas where the active phase of the catalyst is present in higher concentrations. Hydrogenation on the active sites would make the deposits more soluble in the liquid cleaning of surrounding area from deposits.

  17. Functional and catalytic active sites prediction and docking analysis ...

    The initial critical step of reduction of azo bond during the metabolism of azo dyes is catalysed by a group of NADH and FAD dependant enzyme called azoreductases. Although several azoreductases have been identified from microorganisms and partially characterized, very little is known about the structural basis of the ...

  18. Functional and catalytic active sites prediction and docking analysis ...

    Bioinformatics

    2015-07-01

    Jul 1, 2015 ... Full Length Research Paper ... been identified from microorganisms and partially characterized, ... understanding of the biodegradation of some of the commercially ... are highly toxic and contain carcinogenic compounds.

  19. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  20. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  1. Catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon oils

    1940-09-12

    A process is described for the vapor phase catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon oils boiling substantially in the gas oil range. The reaction takes place in the presence of a solid catalyst between 700 to 900/sup 0/F under pressure between atmospheric and 400 psi. A gas containing between 20 and 90 mol % of free hydrogen is used. The reaction is allowed to proceed until consumption of the free begins. The reaction is discontinued at that point and the catalyst is regenerated for further use.

  2. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  3. Catalytic enantioselective Reformatsky reaction with ketones

    Fernandez-Ibanez, M. Angeles; Macia, Beatriz; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    Chiral tertiary alcohols were obtained with good yields and enantioselectivities via a catalytic Reformatsky reaction with ketones, including the challenging diaryl ketones, using chiral BINOL derivatives.

  4. Catalytic hot gas cleaning of gasification gas

    Simell, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-31

    The aim of this work was to study the catalytic cleaning of gasification gas from tars and ammonia. In addition, factors influencing catalytic activity in industrial applications were studied, as well as the effects of different operation conditions and limits. Also the catalytic reactions of tar and ammonia with gasification gas components were studied. The activities of different catalyst materials were measured with laboratory-scale reactors fed by slip streams taken from updraft and fluid bed gasifiers. Carbonate rocks and nickel catalysts proved to be active tar decomposing catalysts. Ammonia decomposition was in turn facilitated by nickel catalysts and iron materials like iron sinter and iron dolomite. Temperatures over 850 deg C were required at 2000{sup -1} space velocity at ambient pressure to achieve almost complete conversions. During catalytic reactions H{sub 2} and CO were formed and H{sub 2}O was consumed in addition to decomposing hydrocarbons and ammonia. Equilibrium gas composition was almost achieved with nickel catalysts at 900 deg C. No deactivation by H{sub 2}S or carbon took place in these conditions. Catalyst blocking by particulates was avoided by using a monolith type of catalyst. The apparent first order kinetic parameters were determined for the most active materials. The activities of dolomite, nickel catalyst and reference materials were measured in different gas atmospheres using laboratory apparatus. This consisted of nitrogen carrier, toluene as tar model compound, ammonia and one of the components H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O or CO+CO{sub 2}. Also synthetic gasification gas was used. With the dolomite and nickel catalyst the highest toluene decomposition rates were measured with CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. In gasification gas, however, the rate was retarded due to inhibition by reaction products (CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}). Tar decomposition over dolomite was modelled by benzene reactions with CO{sub 2}, H

  5. Outstanding catalytic activity of ultra-pure platinum nanoparticles.

    Januszewska, Aneta; Dercz, Grzegorz; Piwowar, Justyna; Jurczakowski, Rafal; Lewera, Adam

    2013-12-09

    Small (4 nm) nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution, exceptional surface purity, and increased surface order, which exhibits itself as an increased presence of basal crystallographic planes, can be obtained without the use of any surfactant. These nanoparticles can be used in many applications in an as-received state and are threefold more active towards a model catalytic reaction (oxidation of ethylene glycol). Furthermore, the superior properties of this material are interesting not only due to the increase in their intrinsic catalytic activity, but also due to the exceptional surface purity itself. The nanoparticles can be used directly (i.e., as-received, without any cleaning steps) in biomedical applications (i.e., as more efficient drug carriers due to an increased number of adsorption sites) and in energy-harvesting/data-storage devices. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Catalytic properties of ADAM12 and its domain deletion mutants

    Jacobsen, Jonas; Visse, Robert; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2008-01-01

    of pro, catalytic, disintegrin, cysteine-rich, and EGF domains. Here we present a novel activity of recombinant ADAM12-S and its domain deletion mutants on S-carboxymethylated transferrin (Cm-Tf). Cleavage of Cm-Tf occurred at multiple sites, and N-terminal sequencing showed that the enzyme exhibits...... restricted specificity but a consensus sequence could not be defined as its subsite requirements are promiscuous. Kinetic analysis revealed that the noncatalytic C-terminal domains are important regulators of Cm-Tf activity and that ADAM12-PC consisting of the pro domain and catalytic domain is the most...... active on this substrate. It was also observed that NaCl inhibits ADAM12. Among the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP) examined, the N-terminal domain of TIMP-3 (N-TIMP-3) inhibits ADAM12-S and ADAM12-PC with low nanomolar Ki(app) values while TIMP-2 inhibits them with a slightly lower...

  7. Petrochemical promoters in catalytic cracking

    Gomez, Maria; Vargas, Clemencia; Lizcano, Javier

    2010-01-01

    This study is based on the current scheme followed by a refinery with available Catalytic Cracking capacity to process new feedstocks such as Straight Run Naphtha and Naphthas from FCC. These feedstocks are of petrochemical interest to produce Ethane, Ethylene, Propylene, i-Butane, Toluene and Xylene. To evaluate the potential of these new streams versus the Cracking-charged Residues, it was performed a detailed chemical analysis on the structural groups in carbons [C1-C12] at the reactor product obtained in pilot plant. A catalyst with and without Propylene Promoter Additive was used. This study analyzes the differences in the chemical composition of the feedstocks, relating them to the yield of each petrochemical product. Straight Run Naphthas with a high content of Naphthenes, and Paraffines n[C5-C12] and i[C7-C12] are selective to the production of i-Butane and Propane, while Naphthas from FCC with a high content of n[C5-C12]Olefins, i-Olefins, and Aromatics are more selective to Propylene, Toluene, and Xylene. Concerning Catalytic Cracking of Naphthas, the Additive has similar selectivity for all the petrochemical products, their yields increase by about one point with 4%wt of Additive, while in cracking of Residues, the Additive increases in three points Propylene yield, corresponding to a selectivity of 50% (?C3= / ?LPG).

  8. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  9. Catalytic converters in the fireplace

    Kouki, J.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to selecting the appropriate means of heating and using dry fuel, the amount of harmful emissions contained by flue gases produced by fireplaces can be reduced by technical means. One such option is to use an oxidising catalytic converter. Tests at TTS Institute's Heating Studies Experimental Station have focused on two such converters (dense and coarse) mounted in light-weight iron heating stoves. The ability of the dense catalytic converter to oxidise carbon monoxide gases proved to be good. The concentration of carbon monoxide in the flue gases was reduced by as much as 90 %. Measurements conducted by VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) showed that the conversion of other gases, e.g. of methane, was good. The exhaust resistance caused by the dense converter was so great as to necessitate the mounting of a fluegas evacuation fan in the chimney for the purpose of creating sufficient draught. When relying on natural draught, the dense converter requires a chimney of at least 7 metres and a by-pass connection while the fire is being lit. In addition, the converter will have to be constructed to be less dense and this will mean that it's capability to oxidise non-combusted gases will be reduced. The coarse converter did not impair the draught but it's oxidising property was insufficient. With the tests over, the converter was not observed to have become blocked up by impurities

  10. Heterogeneous catalytic degradation of polyacrylamide solution | Hu ...

    Modified with trace metal elements, the catalytic activity of Fe2O3/Al2O3 could be changed greatly. Among various trace metal elements, Fe2O3/Al2O3 catalysts modified with Co and Cu showed great increase on catalytic activity. International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology, Vol. 2, No. 7, 2010, pp. 110- ...

  11. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Holocytochrome c Synthase and the Key Roles Played by Cysteines and Histidine of the Heme Attachment Site, Cys-XX-Cys-His*

    Babbitt, Shalon E.; San Francisco, Brian; Mendez, Deanna L.; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S.; Rodgers, Kenton R.; Bretsnyder, Eric C.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c assembly requires the covalent attachment of heme by thioether bonds between heme vinyl groups and a conserved CXXCH motif of cytochrome c/c1. The enzyme holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS) binds heme and apocytochrome c substrate to catalyze this attachment, subsequently releasing holocytochrome c for proper folding to its native structure. We address mechanisms of assembly using a functional Escherichia coli recombinant system expressing human HCCS. Human cytochrome c variants with individual cysteine, histidine, double cysteine, and triple cysteine/histidine substitutions (of CXXCH) were co-purified with HCCS. Single and double mutants form a complex with HCCS but not the triple mutant. Resonance Raman and UV-visible spectroscopy support the proposal that heme puckering induced by both thioether bonds facilitate release of holocytochrome c from the complex. His-19 (of CXXCH) supplies the second axial ligand to heme in the complex, the first axial ligand was previously shown to be from HCCS residue His-154. Substitutions of His-19 in cytochrome c to seven other residues (Gly, Ala, Met, Arg, Lys, Cys, and Tyr) were used with various approaches to establish other roles played by His-19. Three roles for His-19 in HCCS-mediated assembly are suggested: (i) to provide the second axial ligand to the heme iron in preparation for covalent attachment; (ii) to spatially position the two cysteinyl sulfurs adjacent to the two heme vinyl groups for thioether formation; and (iii) to aid in release of the holocytochrome c from the HCCS active site. Only H19M is able to carry out these three roles, albeit at lower efficiencies than the natural His-19. PMID:25170082

  12. Mechanisms of mitochondrial holocytochrome c synthase and the key roles played by cysteines and histidine of the heme attachment site, Cys-XX-Cys-His.

    Babbitt, Shalon E; San Francisco, Brian; Mendez, Deanna L; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S; Rodgers, Kenton R; Bretsnyder, Eric C; Kranz, Robert G

    2014-10-17

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c assembly requires the covalent attachment of heme by thioether bonds between heme vinyl groups and a conserved CXXCH motif of cytochrome c/c1. The enzyme holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS) binds heme and apocytochrome c substrate to catalyze this attachment, subsequently releasing holocytochrome c for proper folding to its native structure. We address mechanisms of assembly using a functional Escherichia coli recombinant system expressing human HCCS. Human cytochrome c variants with individual cysteine, histidine, double cysteine, and triple cysteine/histidine substitutions (of CXXCH) were co-purified with HCCS. Single and double mutants form a complex with HCCS but not the triple mutant. Resonance Raman and UV-visible spectroscopy support the proposal that heme puckering induced by both thioether bonds facilitate release of holocytochrome c from the complex. His-19 (of CXXCH) supplies the second axial ligand to heme in the complex, the first axial ligand was previously shown to be from HCCS residue His-154. Substitutions of His-19 in cytochrome c to seven other residues (Gly, Ala, Met, Arg, Lys, Cys, and Tyr) were used with various approaches to establish other roles played by His-19. Three roles for His-19 in HCCS-mediated assembly are suggested: (i) to provide the second axial ligand to the heme iron in preparation for covalent attachment; (ii) to spatially position the two cysteinyl sulfurs adjacent to the two heme vinyl groups for thioether formation; and (iii) to aid in release of the holocytochrome c from the HCCS active site. Only H19M is able to carry out these three roles, albeit at lower efficiencies than the natural His-19. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Catalytic hydrotreatment of refinery waste: Demonstration project

    1989-01-01

    The object of this project and report is to produce liquid hydrocarbons by the catalytic hydroprocessing of solid refinery wastes (hard pitches) in order to improve the profitability of deep conversion processes and reduce the excess production of heavy fuels. The project was mostly carried out on the ASVAHL demonstration platform site, at Solaize, and hard pitches were produced primarily by deasphalting of atmospheric or vacuum distillation residues. The project includes two experimental phases and an economic evaluation study phase. In Phase 1, two granular catalysts were used to transform pitch into standard low sulfur fuel oil: a continuously moving bed, with demetallation and conversion catalyst; a fixed bed, with hydrorefining catalyst. In Phase 2 of the project, it was proven that a hydrotreatment process using a finely dispersed catalyst in the feedstock, can, under realistic operating conditions, transform with good yields hard pitch into distillates that can be refined through standard methods. In Phase 3 of the project, it was shown that the economics of such processes are tightly linked to the price differential between white'' and black'' oil products, which is expected to increase in the future. Furthermore, the evolution of environmental constraints will impel the use of such methods, thus avoiding the coproduction of polluting solid residues. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Substrate-Directed Catalytic Selective Chemical Reactions.

    Sawano, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2018-05-04

    The development of highly efficient reactions at only the desired position is one of the most important subjects in organic chemistry. Most of the reactions in current organic chemistry are reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions, and the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reactions are determined by the inherent nature of the reagent or catalyst. In sharp contrast, substrate-directed reaction determines the selectivity of the reactions by the functional group on the substrate and can strictly distinguish sterically and electronically similar multiple reaction sites in the substrate. In this Perspective, three topics of substrate-directed reaction are mainly reviewed: (1) directing group-assisted epoxidation of alkenes, (2) ring-opening reactions of epoxides by various nucleophiles, and (3) catalytic peptide synthesis. Our newly developed synthetic methods with new ligands including hydroxamic acid derived ligands realized not only highly efficient reactions but also pinpointed reactions at the expected position, demonstrating the substrate-directed reaction as a powerful method to achieve the desired regio- and stereoselective functionalization of molecules from different viewpoints of reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions.

  15. Method of fabricating a catalytic structure

    Rollins, Harry W [Idaho Falls, ID; Petkovic, Lucia M [Idaho Falls, ID; Ginosar, Daniel M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-22

    A precursor to a catalytic structure comprising zinc oxide and copper oxide. The zinc oxide has a sheet-like morphology or a spherical morphology and the copper oxide comprises particles of copper oxide. The copper oxide is reduced to copper, producing the catalytic structure. The catalytic structure is fabricated by a hydrothermal process. A reaction mixture comprising a zinc salt, a copper salt, a hydroxyl ion source, and a structure-directing agent is formed. The reaction mixture is heated under confined volume conditions to produce the precursor. The copper oxide in the precursor is reduced to copper. A method of hydrogenating a carbon oxide using the catalytic structure is also disclosed, as is a system that includes the catalytic structure.

  16. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Wayland, B.B.

    1993-12-01

    Focus of this project is on developing new approaches for hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. The strategies to accomplish CO reduction are based on favorable thermodynamics manifested by rhodium macrocycles for producing a series of intermediates implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Metalloformyl complexes from reactions of H 2 and CO, and CO reductive coupling to form metallo α-diketone species provide alternate routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics are promising candidates for future development

  17. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Leppaelahti, J; Koljonen, T [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  18. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  19. Studies of Catalytic Model Systems

    Holse, Christian

    The overall topic of this thesis is within the field of catalysis, were model systems of different complexity have been studied utilizing a multipurpose Ultra High Vacuum chamber (UHV). The thesis falls in two different parts. First a simple model system in the form of a ruthenium single crystal...... of the Cu/ZnO nanoparticles is highly relevant to industrial methanol synthesis for which the direct interaction of Cu and ZnO nanocrystals synergistically boost the catalytic activity. The dynamical behavior of the nanoparticles under reducing and oxidizing environments were studied by means of ex situ X......-ray Photoelectron Electron Spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The surface composition of the nanoparticles changes reversibly as the nanoparticles exposed to cycles of high-pressure oxidation and reduction (200 mbar). Furthermore, the presence of metallic Zn is observed by XPS...

  20. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  1. The evolution of catalytic function

    Maurel, Marie-Christine; Ricard, Jacques

    2006-03-01

    It is very likely that the main driving force of enzyme evolution is the requirement to improve catalytic and regulatory efficiency which results from the intrinsic performance as well as from the spatial and functional organization of enzymes in living cells. Kinetic co-operativity may occur in simple monomeric proteins if they display “slow” conformational transitions, at the cost of catalytic efficiency. Oligomeric enzymes on the other hand can be both efficient and co-operative. We speculate that the main reason for the emergence of co-operative oligomeric enzymes is the need for catalysts that are both cooperative and efficient. As it is not useful for an enzyme to respond to a change of substrate concentration in a complex kinetic way, the emergence of symmetry has its probable origin in a requirement for “functional simplicity”. In a living cell, enzyme are associated with other macromolecules and membranes. The fine tuning of their activity may also be reached through mutations of the microenvironment. Our hypothesis is that these mutations are related to the vectorial transport of molecules, to achieve the hysteresis loops of enzyme reactions generated by the coupling of reaction and diffusion, through the co-operativity brought about by electric interactions between a charged substrate and a membrane, and last but not least, through oscillations. As the physical origins of these effects are very simple and do not require complex molecular devices, it is very likely that the functional advantage generated by the spatial and functional organization of enzyme molecules within the cell have appeared in prebiotic catalysis or very early during the primeval stages of biological evolution. We shall began this paper by presenting the nature of the probable earliest catalysts in the RNA world.

  2. Catalytic Ethanol Dehydration over Different Acid-activated Montmorillonite Clays.

    Krutpijit, Chadaporn; Jongsomjit, Bunjerd

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the catalytic dehydration of ethanol to obtain ethylene over montmorillonite clays (MMT) with mineral acid activation including H2SO4 (SA-MMT), HCl (HA-MMT) and HNO3 (NA-MMT) was investigated at temperature range of 200 to 400°C. It revealed that HA-MMT exhibited the highest catalytic activity. Ethanol conversion and ethylene selectivity were found to increase with increased reaction temperature. At 400°C, the HA-MMT yielded 82% of ethanol conversion having 78% of ethylene yield. At lower temperature (i.e. 200 to 300°C), diethyl ether (DEE) was a major product. The highest activity obtained from HA-MMT can be attributed to an increase of weak acid sites and acid density by the activation of MMT with HCl. It can be also proven by various characterization techniques that in most case, the main structure of MMT did not alter by acid activation (excepted for NA-MMT). Upon the stability test for 72 h during the reaction, the MMT and HA-MMT showed only slight deactivation due to carbon deposition. Hence, the acid activation of MMT by HCl is promising to enhance the catalytic dehydration of ethanol.

  3. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    Lu, Yi

    2003-01-01

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize

  4. Oriented Decoration in Metal-Functionalized Ordered Mesoporous Silicas and Their Catalytic Applications in the Oxidation of Aromatic Compounds

    Shijian Zhou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ordered mesoporous silicas (OMSs attract considerable attention due to their advanced structural properties. However, for the pristine silica materials, the inert property greatly inhibits their catalytic applications. Thus, to contribute to the versatile surface of OMSs, different metal active sites, including acidic/basic sites and redox sites, have been introduced into specific locations (mesoporous channels and framework of OMSs and the metal-functionalized ordered mesoporous silicas (MOMSs show great potential in the catalytic applications. In this review, we first present the categories of metal active sites. Then, the synthesized processes of MOMSs are thoroughly discussed, in which the metal active sites would be introduced with the assistance of organic groups into the specific locations of OMSs. In addition, the structural morphologies of OMSs are elaborated and the catalytic applications of MOMSs in the oxidation of aromatic compounds are illustrated in detail. Finally, the prospects for the future development in this field are proposed.

  5. Lamellar zirconium phosphates to host metals for catalytic purposes.

    Ballesteros-Plata, Daniel; Infantes-Molina, Antonia; Rodríguez-Aguado, Elena; Braos-García, Pilar; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique

    2018-02-27

    In the present study a porous lamellar zirconium phosphate heterostructure (PPH) formed from zirconium(iv) phosphate expanded with silica galleries (P/Zr molar ratio equal to 2 and (Si + Zr)/P equal to 3) was prepared to host noble metals. Textural and structural characterization of PPH-noble metal materials was carried out in order to elucidate the location and dispersion of the metallic particles and the properties of the resulting material to be used in catalytic processes. In the present paper, their activity in the catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reaction of dibenzofuran (DBF) was evaluated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) evidenced that the structure of the pillared zirconium phosphate material was not modified by the incorporation of Pt and Pd. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed a different dispersion of the noble metal. The acidity of the resulting PPH-noble metal materials also changed, although in all cases the acidity was of weak nature, and the incorporation of noble metals affected Brønsted acid sites as observed from 31 P NMR spectra. In general, the textural, structural and acidic properties of the resulting materials suggest that PPH can be considered a good candidate to be used as a catalytic support. Thus, the catalytic results of the PPH-noble metal samples indicated that the Pd sample showed a stable behavior probably ascribed to a high dispersion of the active phase. However, the Pt sample suffered from fast deactivation. The selectivity to the reaction products was strongly dependent on the noble metal employed.

  6. Catalytic strategy used by the myosin motor to hydrolyze ATP.

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2014-07-22

    Myosin is a molecular motor responsible for biological motions such as muscle contraction and intracellular cargo transport, for which it hydrolyzes adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Early steps of the mechanism by which myosin catalyzes ATP hydrolysis have been investigated, but still missing are the structure of the final ADP·inorganic phosphate (Pi) product and the complete pathway leading to it. Here, a comprehensive description of the catalytic strategy of myosin is formulated, based on combined quantum-classical molecular mechanics calculations. A full exploration of catalytic pathways was performed and a final product structure was found that is consistent with all experiments. Molecular movies of the relevant pathways show the different reorganizations of the H-bond network that lead to the final product, whose γ-phosphate is not in the previously reported HPγO4(2-) state, but in the H2PγO4(-) state. The simulations reveal that the catalytic strategy of myosin employs a three-pronged tactic: (i) Stabilization of the γ-phosphate of ATP in a dissociated metaphosphate (PγO3(-)) state. (ii) Polarization of the attacking water molecule, to abstract a proton from that water. (iii) Formation of multiple proton wires in the active site, for efficient transfer of the abstracted proton to various product precursors. The specific role played in this strategy by each of the three loops enclosing ATP is identified unambiguously. It explains how the precise timing of the ATPase activation during the force generating cycle is achieved in myosin. The catalytic strategy described here for myosin is likely to be very similar in most nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes.

  7. The ab initio study of the catalytic hydrogenation of the oxirene

    J.B. Mensah

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The oxirene is an unsaturated heterocyclic molecule with one oxygen atom and two carbon atoms. Its hydrogenation has been performed on two catalytic site based on molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 and tungsten disulfide (WS2 of MoS3H3+ and WS3H3+ type, respectively. The calculations were carried out using the SCF and MP2 methods and B3LYP functional calculations. The results obtained showed that the hydrogenation of the oxirene is possible on these two kinds of catalytic sites on the one hand, and the reaction product is the acetaldehyde molecule, on the other hand. The reaction process study that led to the results showed that the catalytic hydrogenation of the oxirene is a dissociative process. On the basis of the variation of some parameters during the process, a mechanism of the reaction has been proposed.

  8. Catalytic modification of cellulose and hemicellulose - Sugarefine

    Repo, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland),Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry], email: timo.repo@helsinki.fi

    2012-07-01

    The main goal of the project is to develop catalytic methods for the modification of lignocellulose-based saccharides in the biorefineries. The products of these reactions could be used for example as biofuel components, raw materials for the chemical industry, solvents and precursors for biopolymers. The catalyst development aims at creating efficient, selective and green catalytic methods for profitable use in biorefineries. The project is divided in three work packages: In WP1 (Catalytic dehydration of cellulose) the aim is at developing non-toxic, efficient methods for the catalytic dehydration of cellulose the target molecule being here 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF). 5-HMF is an interesting platform chemical for the production of fuel additives, solvents and polymers. In WP2 (Catalytic reduction), the objective of the catalytic reduction studies is to produce commercially interesting monofunctional chemicals, such as 1-butanol or 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MeTHF). In WP3 (Catalytic oxidation), the research focuses on developing a green and efficient oxidation method for producing acids. Whereas acetic and formic acids are bulk chemicals, diacids such as glucaric and xylaric acids are valuable specialty chemicals for detergent, polymer and food production.

  9. Frontier Molecular Orbital Contributions to Chlorination versus Hydroxylation Selectivity in the Non-Heme Iron Halogenase SyrB2

    Srnec, Martin; Solomon, E. I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 6 (2017), s. 2396-2407 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-10279Y Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Chlorination * Chlorine compounds * Free radical reactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  10. Experimental and Computational Evidence for the Mechanism of Intradiol Catechol Dioxygenation by Non- Heme Iron(III) Complexes

    Jastrzebski, Robin; Quesne, Matthew G.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.; de Visser, Sam P.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Catechol intradiol dioxygenation is a unique reaction catalyzed by iron-dependent enzymes and nonheme iron(III) complexes. The mechanism by which these systems activate dioxygen in this important metabolic process remains controversial. Using a combination of kinetic measurements and computational

  11. Peroxo-Type Intermediates in Class I Ribonucleotide Reductase and Related Binuclear Non-Heme Iron Enzymes

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta; Bell, Caleb B.; Clay, MIchael D.

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a systematic study of chemically possible peroxo-type intermediates occurring in the non-heme di-iron enzyme class la ribonucleotide reductase, using spectroscopically calibrated computational chemistry. Density functional computations of equilibrium structures, Fe-O and O-O str...

  12. Frontier Molecular Orbital Contributions to Chlorination versus Hydroxylation Selectivity in the Non-Heme Iron Halogenase SyrB2

    Srnec, Martin; Solomon, E. I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 6 (2017), s. 2396-2407 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-10279Y Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Chlorination * Chlorine compounds * Free radical reaction s Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  13. Influence of Ligand Architecture in Tuning Reaction Bifurcation Pathways for Chlorite Oxidation by Non-Heme Iron Complexes

    Barman, Prasenjit; Faponle, Abayomi S; Vardhaman, Anil Kumar; Angelone, Davide; Löhr, Anna-Maria; Browne, Wesley R; Comba, Peter; Sastri, Chivukula V; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-01-01

    Reaction bifurcation processes are often encountered in the oxidation of substrates by enzymes and generally lead to a mixture of products. One particular bifurcation process that is common in biology relates to electron transfer versus oxygen atom transfer by high-valent iron(IV)-oxo complexes,

  14. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions

    Zhiqi Lao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines.

  15. Catalytic models developed through social work

    Jensen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    of adolescents placed in out-of-home care and is characterised using three situated cases as empirical data. Afterwards the concept of catalytic processes is briefly presented and then applied in an analysis of pedagogical treatment in the three cases. The result is a different conceptualisation of the social......The article develops the concept of catalytic processes in relation to social work with adolescents in an attempt to both reach a more nuanced understanding of social work and at the same time to develop the concept of catalytic processes in psychology. The social work is pedagogical treatment...

  16. Efficient catalytic combustion in integrated micropellistors

    Bársony, I; Ádám, M; Fürjes, P; Dücső, Cs; Lucklum, R; Hirschfelder, M; Kulinyi, S

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses two of the key issues of the development of catalytic combustion-type sensors: the selection and production of active catalytic particles on the micropellistor surface as well as the realization of a reliable thermal conduction between heater element and catalytic surface, for the sensing of temperature increase produced by the combustion. The report also demonstrates that chemical sensor product development by a MEMS process is a continuous struggle for elimination of all uncertainties influencing reliability and sensitivity of the final product

  17. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  18. Structural basis for the catalytic mechanism of a proficient enzyme: Orotidine 5'-Monophosphate Decarboxylase

    Harris, Pernille Hanne; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2000-01-01

    /ß-barrels with two shared active sites. The orientation of the orotate moiety of the substrate is unambiguously deduced from the structure, and previously proposed catalytic mechanisms involving protonation of O2 or O4 can be ruled out. The proximity of the OMP carboxylate group with Asp71 appears to be instrumental...

  19. Chemistry and engineering of catalytic hydrodesulfurization

    Schuit, G.C.A.; Gates, B.C.

    1973-01-01

    A review with 74 refs. on catalytic hydrodesulfurization of pure compds. and petroleum feedstocks, with emphasis on reaction intermediates and structures of Al2O3-supported Ni-W and Co-Mo catalysts. [on SciFinder (R)

  20. Catalytic Aminohalogenation of Alkenes and Alkynes.

    Chemler, Sherry R; Bovino, Michael T

    2013-06-07

    Catalytic aminohalogenation methods enable the regio- and stereoselective vicinal difunctionalization of alkynes, allenes and alkenes with amine and halogen moieties. A range of protocols and reaction mechanisms including organometallic, Lewis base, Lewis acid and Brønsted acid catalysis have been disclosed, enabling the regio- and stereoselective synthesis of halogen-functionalized acyclic amines and nitrogen heterocycles. Recent advances including aminofluorination and catalytic enantioselective aminohalogenation reactions are summarized in this review.

  1. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  2. Exploration of alternate catalytic mechanisms and optimization strategies for retroaldolase design.

    Bjelic, Sinisa; Kipnis, Yakov; Wang, Ling; Pianowski, Zbigniew; Vorobiev, Sergey; Su, Min; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Kornhaber, Gregory; Hunt, John F; Tong, Liang; Hilvert, Donald; Baker, David

    2014-01-09

    Designed retroaldolases have utilized a nucleophilic lysine to promote carbon-carbon bond cleavage of β-hydroxy-ketones via a covalent Schiff base intermediate. Previous computational designs have incorporated a water molecule to facilitate formation and breakdown of the carbinolamine intermediate to give the Schiff base and to function as a general acid/base. Here we investigate an alternative active-site design in which the catalytic water molecule was replaced by the side chain of a glutamic acid. Five out of seven designs expressed solubly and exhibited catalytic efficiencies similar to previously designed retroaldolases for the conversion of 4-hydroxy-4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-2-butanone to 6-methoxy-2-naphthaldehyde and acetone. After one round of site-directed saturation mutagenesis, improved variants of the two best designs, RA114 and RA117, exhibited among the highest kcat (>10(-3)s(-1)) and kcat/KM (11-25M(-1)s(-1)) values observed for retroaldolase designs prior to comprehensive directed evolution. In both cases, the >10(5)-fold rate accelerations that were achieved are within 1-3 orders of magnitude of the rate enhancements reported for the best catalysts for related reactions, including catalytic antibodies (kcat/kuncat=10(6) to 10(8)) and an extensively evolved computational design (kcat/kuncat>10(7)). The catalytic sites, revealed by X-ray structures of optimized versions of the two active designs, are in close agreement with the design models except for the catalytic lysine in RA114. We further improved the variants by computational remodeling of the loops and yeast display selection for reactivity of the catalytic lysine with a diketone probe, obtaining an additional order of magnitude enhancement in activity with both approaches. © 2013.

  3. Catalytic partial oxidation of pyrolysis oils

    Rennard, David Carl

    2009-12-01

    details the catalytic partial oxidation of glycerol without preheat: droplets of glycerol are sprayed directly onto the top of the catalyst bed, where they react autothermally with contact times on the order of tau ≈ 30 ms. The reactive flash volatilization of glycerol results in equilibrium syngas production over Rh-Ce catalysts. In addition, water can be added to the liquid glycerol, resulting in true autothermal reforming. This highly efficient process can increase H2 yields and alter the H2 to CO ratio, allowing for flexibility in syngas quality depending on the purpose. Chapter 5 details the results of a time on stream experiment, in which optimal syngas conditions are chosen. Although conversion is 100% for 450 hours, these experiments demonstrate the deactivation of the catalyst over time. Deactivation is exhibited by decreases in H2 and CO 2 production accompanied by a steady increase in CO and temperature. These results are explained as a loss of water-gas shift equilibration. SEM images suggest catalyst sintering may play a role; EDS indicates the presence of impurities on the catalyst. In addition, the instability of quartz in the reactor is demonstrated by etching, resulting in a hole in the reactor tube at the end of the experiment. These results suggest prevaporization may be desirable in this application, and that quartz is not a suitable material for the reactive flash volatilization of oxygenated fuels. In Chapter 6, pyrolysis oil samples from three sources - poplar, pine, and hardwoods - are explored in the context of catalytic partial oxidation. Lessons derived from the tests with model compounds are applied to reactor design, resulting in the reactive flash vaporization of bio oils. Syngas is successfully produced, though deactivation due to coke and ash deposition keeps H2 below equlibrium. Coke formation is observed on the reactor walls, but is avoided between the fuel injection site and catalyst by increasing the proximity of these in the reactor

  4. Investigation of the Origin of Catalytic Activity in Oxide-Supported Nanoparticle Gold

    Harrison, Ian [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2017-05-26

    Since Haruta’s discovery in 1987 of the surprising catalytic activity of supported Au nanoparticles, we have seen a very large number of experimental and theoretical efforts to explain this activity and to fully understand the nature of the behavior of the responsible active sites. In 2011, we discovered that a dual catalytic site at the perimeter of ~3nm diameter Au particles supported on TiO2 is responsible for oxidative catalytic activity. O2 molecules bind with Au atoms and Ti4+ ions in the TiO2 support and the weakened O-O bond dissociates at low temperatures, proceeding to produce O atoms which act as oxidizing agents for the test molecule, CO. The papers supported by DOE have built on this finding and have been concerned with two aspects of the behavior of Au/TiO2 catalysts: (1). Mechanistic behavior of dual catalytic sites in the oxidation of organic molecules such as ethylene and acetic acid; (2). Studies of the electronic properties of the TiO2 (110) single crystal in relation to its participation in charge transfer at the occupied dual catalytic site. A total of 20 papers have been produced through DOE support of this work. The papers combine IR spectroscopic investigations of Au/TiO2 catalysts with surface science on the TiO2(110) and TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces with modern density functional modeling. The primary goals of the work were to investigate the behavior of the dual Au/Ti4+ site for the partial oxidation of alcohols to acids, the hydrogenation of aldehydes and ketones to alcohols, and the condensation of oxygenate intermediates- all processes related to the utilization of biomass in the production of useful chemical energy sources.

  5. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  6. Contributions to the theory of catalytic titrations-III Neutralization catalytic titrations.

    Gaál, F F; Abramović, B F

    1985-07-01

    Neutralization catalytic titrations of weak monoprotic adds and bases with both volumetric and coulometric addition of the titrant (strong base/acid) have been simulated by taking into account the equilibrium concentration of the catalyst during the titration. The influence of several factors on the shape of the simulated catalytic titration curve has been investigated and is discussed.

  7. Atomically Precise Metal Nanoclusters for Catalytic Application

    Jin, Rongchao [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-11-18

    The central goal of this project is to explore the catalytic application of atomically precise gold nanoclusters. By solving the total structures of ligand-protected nanoclusters, we aim to correlate the catalytic properties of metal nanoclusters with their atomic/electronic structures. Such correlation unravel some fundamental aspects of nanocatalysis, such as the nature of particle size effect, origin of catalytic selectivity, particle-support interactions, the identification of catalytically active centers, etc. The well-defined nanocluster catalysts mediate the knowledge gap between single crystal model catalysts and real-world conventional nanocatalysts. These nanoclusters also hold great promise in catalyzing certain types of reactions with extraordinarily high selectivity. These aims are in line with the overall goals of the catalytic science and technology of DOE and advance the BES mission “to support fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the level of electrons, atoms, and molecules”. Our group has successfully prepared different sized, robust gold nanoclusters protected by thiolates, such as Au25(SR)18, Au28(SR)20, Au38(SR)24, Au99(SR)42, Au144(SR)60, etc. Some of these nanoclusters have been crystallographically characterized through X-ray crystallography. These ultrasmall nanoclusters (< 2 nm diameter) exhibit discrete electronic structures due to quantum size effect, as opposed to quasicontinuous band structure of conventional metal nanoparticles or bulk metals. The available atomic structures (metal core plus surface ligands) of nanoclusters serve as the basis for structure-property correlations. We have investigated the unique catalytic properties of nanoclusters (i.e. not observed in conventional nanogold catalysts) and revealed the structure-selectivity relationships. Highlights of our

  8. A catalytic approach to estimate the redox potential of heme-peroxidases

    Ayala, Marcela; Roman, Rosa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The redox potential of heme-peroxidases varies according to a combination of structural components within the active site and its vicinities. For each peroxidase, this redox potential imposes a thermodynamic threshold to the range of oxidizable substrates. However, the instability of enzymatic intermediates during the catalytic cycle precludes the use of direct voltammetry to measure the redox potential of most peroxidases. Here we describe a novel approach to estimate the redox potential of peroxidases, which directly depends on the catalytic performance of the activated enzyme. Selected p-substituted phenols are used as substrates for the estimations. The results obtained with this catalytic approach correlate well with the oxidative capacity predicted by the redox potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple

  9. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity of Pd(II Salen-Functionalized Mesoporous Silica

    Rotcharin Sawisai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Salen ligand synthesized from 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde was used as a palladium chelating ligand for the immobilization of the catalytic site. Mesoporous silica supported palladium catalysts were prepared by immobilizing Pd(OAc2 onto a mesoporous silica gel through the coordination of the imine-functionalized mesoporous silica gel. The prepared catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX, inductivity couple plasma (ICP, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy. The solid catalysts showed higher activity for the hydroamination of C-(tetra-O-acetyl-β-D-galactopyranosylallene with aromatic amines compared with the corresponding homogenous catalyst. The heterogeneous catalytic system can be easily recovered by simple filtration and reused for up to five cycles with no significant loss of catalytic activity.

  10. Reactivity of organic compounds in catalytic synthesis

    Minachev, Kh M; Bragin, O V

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive review of 1976 Soviet research on catalysis delivered to the 1977 annual session of the USSR Academy of Science Council on Catalysis (Baku 6/16-20/77) covers hydrocarbon reactions, including hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis, dehydrogenation, olefin dimerization and disproportionation, and cyclization and dehydrocyclization (e.g., piperylene cyclization and ethylene cyclotrimerization); catalytic and physicochemical properties of zeolites, including cracking, dehydrogenation, and hydroisomerization catalytic syntheses and conversion of heterocyclic and functional hydrocarbon derivatives, including partial and total oxidation (e.g., of o-xylene to phthalic anhydride); syntheses of thiophenes from alkanes and hydrogen sulfide over certain dehydrogenation catalysts; catalytic syntheses involving carbon oxides ( e.g., the development of a new heterogeneous catalyst for hydroformylation of olefins), and of Co-MgO zeolitic catalysts for synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and fabrication of high-viscosity lubricating oils over bifunctional aluminosilicate catalysts.

  11. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  12. Modeling and simulation of heterogeneous catalytic processes

    Dixon, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis and mathematical modeling are essential components of the continuing search for better utilization of raw materials and energy, with reduced impact on the environment. Numerical modeling of chemical systems has progressed rapidly due to increases in computer power, and is used extensively for analysis, design and development of catalytic reactors and processes. This book presents reviews of the state-of-the-art in modeling of heterogeneous catalytic reactors and processes. Reviews by leading authorities in the respective areas Up-to-date reviews of latest techniques in modeling of catalytic processes Mix of US and European authors, as well as academic/industrial/research institute perspectives Connections between computation and experimental methods in some of the chapters.

  13. Structural/surface characterization and catalytic evaluation of rare-earth (Y, Sm and La) doped ceria composite oxides for CH{sub 3}SH catalytic decomposition

    He, Dedong; Chen, Dingkai; Hao, Husheng; Yu, Jie; Liu, Jiangping; Lu, Jichang; Liu, Feng [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, 650500 (China); Wan, Gengping [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, 650500 (China); Research Center for Analysis and Measurement, Hainan University, Haikou, 570228 (China); He, Sufang [Research Center for Analysis and Measurement, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, 650093 (China); Luo, Yongming, E-mail: environcatalysis222@yahoo.com [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, 650500 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Ce{sub 0.75}RE{sub 0.25}O{sub 2-δ} (RE = Y, Sm and La) were synthesized by citrate complexation method. • Ce{sub 0.75}Y{sub 0.25}O{sub 2-δ} exhibited the best stability for the decomposition of CH{sub 3}SH. • Cation radius played a key role in determining structure and surface characteristics. • Catalytic behavior depended on synergistic role of oxygen vacancies and basic sites. • Ce{sub 2}S{sub 3} accumulation on the surface was responsible for the deactivation of catalyst. - Abstract: A series of rare earth (Y, Sm and La) doped ceria composite oxides and pure CeO{sub 2} were synthesized and evaluated by conducting CH{sub 3}SH catalytic decomposition test. Several characterization studies, including XRD, BET, Raman, H{sub 2}-TPR, XPS, FT-IR, CO{sub 2}-TPD and CH{sub 3}SH-TPD, were undertaken to correlate structural and surface properties of the obtained ceria-based catalysts with their catalytic performance for CH{sub 3}SH decomposition. More oxygen vacancies and increased basic sites exhibited in the rare earth doped ceria catalysts. Y doped ceria sample (Ce{sub 0.75}Y{sub 0.25}O{sub 2-δ}), with a moderate increase in basic sites, contained more oxygen vacancies. More structural defects and active sites could be provided, and a relatively small amount of sulfur would accumulate, which resulted in better catalytic performance. The developed catalyst presented good catalytic behavior with stability very similar to that of typical zeolite-based catalysts reported previously. However, La doped ceria catalyst (Ce{sub 0.75}La{sub 0.25}O{sub 2-δ}) with the highest alkalinity was not the most active one. More sulfur species would be adsorbed and a large amount of cerium sulfide species (Ce{sub 2}S{sub 3}) would accumulate, which caused deactivation of the catalysts. The combined effect of increased oxygen vacancies and alkalinity led to the catalytic stability of Ce{sub 0.75}Sm{sub 0.25}O{sub 2-δ} sample was comparable to that of pure Ce

  14. Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three applications: (i) wet air catalytic oxidation (WACO), (ii) wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) on Cu-PILC and Fe-PILC, and (iii) behavior of Ti-PILC and Fe-PILC in the photocatalytic or photo-Fenton conversion of pollutants. Literature data are critically analyzed to evidence the main direction to further investigate, in particularly with reference to the possible practical application of these technologies to treat industrial, municipal, or agro-food production wastewater.

  15. Catalytic Kinetic Resolution of Biaryl Compounds.

    Ma, Gaoyuan; Sibi, Mukund P

    2015-08-10

    Biaryl compounds with axial chirality are very common in synthetic chemistry, especially in catalysis. Axially chiral biaryls are important due to their biological activities and extensive applications in asymmetric catalysis. Thus the development of efficient enantioselective methods for their synthesis has attracted considerable attention. This Minireview discusses the progress made in catalytic kinetic resolution of biaryl compounds and chronicles significant advances made recently in catalytic kinetic resolution of biaryl scaffolds. © 2015 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    Débora Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolites can be used as catalysts in catalytic pyrolysis and influence the final products obtained.

  17. Janus droplet as a catalytic micromotor

    Shklyaev, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    Self-propulsion of a Janus droplet in a solution of surfactant, which reacts on a half of a drop surface, is studied theoretically. The droplet acts as a catalytic motor creating a concentration gradient, which generates its surface-tension-driven motion; the self-propulsion speed is rather high, 60 μ \\text{m/s} and more. This catalytic motor has several advantages over other micromotors: simple manufacturing, easily attained neutral buoyancy. In contrast to a single-fluid droplet, which demonstrates a self-propulsion as a result of symmetry breaking instability, for the Janus one no stability threshold exists; hence, the droplet radius can be scaled down to micrometers.

  18. Catalytic burners in larger boiler appliances

    Silversand, Fredrik; Persson, Mikael (Catator AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    This project focuses on the scale up of a Catator's catalytic burner technology to enable retrofit installation in existing boilers and the design of new innovative combinations of catalytic burners and boilers. Different design approaches are discussed and evaluated in the report and suggestions are made concerning scale-up. Preliminary test data, extracted from a large boiler installation are discussed together with an accurate analysis of technical possibilities following an optimization of the boiler design to benefit from the advantages of catalytic combustion. The experimental work was conducted in close collaboration with ICI Caldaie (ICI), located in Verona, Italy. ICI is a leading European boiler manufacturer in the effect segment ranging from about 20 kWt to several MWt. The study shows that it is possibly to scale up the burner technology and to maintain low emissions. The boilers used in the study were designed around conventional combustion and were consequently not optimized for implementation of catalytic burners. From previous experiences it stands clear that the furnace volume can be dramatically decreased when applying catalytic combustion. In flame combustion, this volume is normally dimensioned to avoid flame impingement on cold surfaces and to facilitate completion of the gas-phase reactions. The emissions of nitrogen oxides can be reduced by decreasing the residence time in the furnace. Even with the over-dimensioned furnace used in this study, we easily reached emission values close to 35 mg/kWh. The emissions of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons were negligible (less than 5 ppmv). It is possible to decrease the emissions of nitrogen oxides further by designing the furnace/boiler around the catalytic burner, as suggested in the report. Simultaneously, the size of the boiler installation can be reduced greatly, which also will result in material savings, i.e. the production cost can be reduced. It is suggested to optimize the

  19. Catalytic gasification of oil-shales

    Lapidus, A.; Avakyan, T. [I.M. Gubkin Russian State Univ. of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russian Federation); Strizhakova, Yu. [Samara State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, the problem of complex usage of solid fossil fuels as raw materials for obtaining of motor fuels and chemical products is becoming increasingly important. A one of possible solutions of the problem is their gasification with further processing of gaseous and liquid products. In this work we have investigated the process of thermal and catalytic gasification of Baltic and Kashpir oil-shales. We have shown that, as compared with non-catalytic process, using of nickel catalyst in the reaction increases the yield of gas, as well as hydrogen content in it, and decreases the amount of liquid products. (orig.)

  20. Using electron beams to investigate catalytic materials

    Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dang Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Transmission Electron microscopy (TEM) enables us, not only to reveal the morphology, but also to provide structural, chemical and electronic information about solid catalysts at the atomic level, providing a dramatic driving force for the development of heterogeneous catalysis. Almost all catalytic materials have been studied with TEM in order to obtain information about their structures, which can help us to establish the synthesis-structure-property relationships and to design catalysts with new structures and desired properties. Herein, several examples will be reviewed to illustrate the investigation of catalytic materials by using electron beams. (authors)

  1. Enhancing charge transfer kinetics by nanoscale catalytic cermet interlayer.

    An, Jihwan; Kim, Young-Beom; Gür, Turgut M; Prinz, Fritz B

    2012-12-01

    Enhancing the density of catalytic sites is crucial for improving the performance of energy conversion devices. This work demonstrates the kinetic role of 2 nm thin YSZ/Pt cermet layers on enhancing the oxygen reduction kinetics for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells. Cermet layers were deposited between the porous Pt cathode and the dense YSZ electrolyte wafer using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Not only the catalytic role of the cermet layer itself but the mixing effect in the cermet was explored. For cells with unmixed and fully mixed cermet interlayers, the maximum power density was enhanced by a factor of 1.5 and 1.8 at 400 °C, and by 2.3 and 2.7 at 450 °C, respectively, when compared to control cells with no cermet interlayer. The observed enhancement in cell performance is believed to be due to the increased triple phase boundary (TPB) density in the cermet interlayer. We also believe that the sustained kinetics for the fully mixed cermet layer sample stems from better thermal stability of Pt islands separated by the ALD YSZ matrix, which helped to maintain the high-density TPBs even at elevated temperature.

  2. Tackling Critical Catalytic Residues in Helicobacter pylori L-Asparaginase

    Maristella Maggi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial asparaginases (amidohydrolases, EC 3.5.1.1 are important enzymes in cancer therapy, especially for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. They are tetrameric enzymes able to catalyze the deamination of L-ASN and, to a variable extent, of L-GLN, on which leukemia cells are dependent for survival. In contrast to other known L-asparaginases, Helicobacter pylori CCUG 17874 type II enzyme (HpASNase is cooperative and has a low affinity towards L-GLN. In this study, some critical amino acids forming the active site of HpASNase (T16, T95 and E289 have been tackled by rational engineering in the attempt to better define their role in catalysis and to achieve a deeper understanding of the peculiar cooperative behavior of this enzyme. Mutations T16E, T95D and T95H led to a complete loss of enzymatic activity. Mutation E289A dramatically reduced the catalytic activity of the enzyme, but increased its thermostability. Interestingly, E289 belongs to a loop that is very variable in L-asparaginases from the structure, sequence and length point of view, and which could be a main determinant of their different catalytic features.

  3. Quantum mechanical design of enzyme active sites.

    Zhang, Xiyun; DeChancie, Jason; Gunaydin, Hakan; Chowdry, Arnab B; Clemente, Fernando R; Smith, Adam J T; Handel, T M; Houk, K N

    2008-02-01

    The design of active sites has been carried out using quantum mechanical calculations to predict the rate-determining transition state of a desired reaction in presence of the optimal arrangement of catalytic functional groups (theozyme). Eleven versatile reaction targets were chosen, including hydrolysis, dehydration, isomerization, aldol, and Diels-Alder reactions. For each of the targets, the predicted mechanism and the rate-determining transition state (TS) of the uncatalyzed reaction in water is presented. For the rate-determining TS, a catalytic site was designed using naturalistic catalytic units followed by an estimation of the rate acceleration provided by a reoptimization of the catalytic site. Finally, the geometries of the sites were compared to the X-ray structures of related natural enzymes. Recent advances in computational algorithms and power, coupled with successes in computational protein design, have provided a powerful context for undertaking such an endeavor. We propose that theozymes are excellent candidates to serve as the active site models for design processes.

  4. Catalytic molecularly imprinted polymer membranes: development of the biomimetic sensor for phenols detection.

    Sergeyeva, T A; Slinchenko, O A; Gorbach, L A; Matyushov, V F; Brovko, O O; Piletsky, S A; Sergeeva, L M; Elska, G V

    2010-02-05

    Portable biomimetic sensor devices for the express control of phenols content in water were developed. The synthetic binding sites mimicking active site of the enzyme tyrosinase were formed in the structure of free-standing molecularly imprinted polymer membranes. Molecularly imprinted polymer membranes with the catalytic activity were obtained by co-polymerization of the complex Cu(II)-catechol-urocanic acid ethyl ester with (tri)ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate, and oligourethaneacrylate. Addition of the elastic component oligourethaneacrylate provided formation of the highly cross-linked polymer with the catalytic activity in a form of thin, flexible, and mechanically stable membrane. High accessibility of the artificial catalytic sites for the interaction with the analyzed phenol molecules was achieved due to addition of linear polymer (polyethyleneglycol Mw 20,000) to the initial monomer mixture before the polymerization. As a result, typical semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPNs) were formed. The cross-linked component of the semi-IPN was represented by the highly cross-linked catalytic molecularly imprinted polymer, while the linear one was represented by polyethyleneglycol Mw 20,000. Extraction of the linear polymer from the fully formed semi-IPN resulted in formation of large pores in the membranes' structure. Concentration of phenols in the analyzed samples was detected using universal portable device oxymeter with the oxygen electrode in a close contact with the catalytic molecularly imprinted polymer membrane as a transducer. The detection limit of phenols detection using the developed sensor system based on polymers-biomimics with the optimized composition comprised 0.063 mM, while the linear range of the sensor comprised 0.063-1 mM. The working characteristics of the portable sensor devices were investigated. Storage stability of sensor systems at room temperature comprised 12 months (87%). As compared to traditional methods of phenols

  5. Fluid catalytic cracking : Feedstocks and reaction mechanism

    Dupain, X.

    2006-01-01

    The Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) process is one of the key units in a modern refinery. Traditionally, its design is primarily aimed for the production of gasoline from heavy oil fractions, but as co-products also diesel blends and valuable gasses (e.g. propene and butenes) are formed in

  6. Kinetic equation of heterogeneous catalytic isotope exchange

    Trokhimets, A I [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziko-Organicheskoj Khimii

    1979-12-01

    A kinetic equation is derived for the bimolecular isotope exchange reaction between AXsub(n)sup(*) and BXsub(m)sup(o), all atoms of element X in each molecule being equivalent. The equation can be generalized for homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic isotope exchange.

  7. Complementary structure sensitive and insensitive catalytic relationships

    Santen, van R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The burgeoning field of nanoscience has stimulated an intense interest in properties that depend on particle size. For transition metal particles, one important property that depends on size is catalytic reactivity, in which bonds are broken or formed on the surface of the particles. Decreased

  8. Toward Facilitative Mentoring and Catalytic Interventions

    Smith, Melissa K.; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    In TESOL teacher mentoring, giving advice can be conceptualized as a continuum, ranging from directive to facilitative feedback. The goal, over time, is to lead toward the facilitative end of the continuum and specifically to catalytic interventions that encourage self-reflection and autonomous learning. This study begins by examining research on…

  9. Electrochemical Promotion of Catalytic Reactions Using

    Petrushina, Irina; Bjerrum, Niels; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on electrochemical promotion (EP) of catalytic reactions using Pt/C/polybenzimidazole(H3PO4)/Pt/C fuel cell performed by the Energy and Materials Science Group (Technical University of Denmark) during the last 6 years[1-4]. The development of our...... understanding of the nature of the electrochemical promotion is also presented....

  10. Novel Metal Nanomaterials and Their Catalytic Applications

    Jiaqing Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the rapidly developing areas of nanotechnology, nano-scale materials as heterogeneous catalysts in the synthesis of organic molecules have gotten more and more attention. In this review, we will summarize the synthesis of several new types of noble metal nanostructures (FePt@Cu nanowires, Pt@Fe2O3 nanowires and bimetallic Pt@Ir nanocomplexes; Pt-Au heterostructures, Au-Pt bimetallic nanocomplexes and Pt/Pd bimetallic nanodendrites; Au nanowires, CuO@Ag nanowires and a series of Pd nanocatalysts and their new catalytic applications in our group, to establish heterogeneous catalytic system in “green” environments. Further study shows that these materials have a higher catalytic activity and selectivity than previously reported nanocrystal catalysts in organic reactions, or show a superior electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol. The whole process might have a great impact to resolve the energy crisis and the environmental crisis that were caused by traditional chemical engineering. Furthermore, we hope that this article will provide a reference point for the noble metal nanomaterials’ development that leads to new opportunities in nanocatalysis.

  11. CATALYTIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF Mn(II ...

    Preferred Customer

    method is based on the catalytic effect of Mn(II) with the oxidation of Celestine blue .... water samples were filtered through a 0.45 μm pore size membrane filter to remove suspended .... slope of the calibration graph as the optimization criterion. ..... In presence of Phen as stability enhancement agent in indicator system. ( ) +.

  12. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of the alkaloid (+)-myrtine

    Pizzuti, Maria Gabriefla; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    A new protocol for the asymmetric synthesis of trans-2,6-disubstituted-4-piperidones has been developed using a catalytic enantioselective conjugate addition reaction in combination with a diastereoselective lithiation-substitution sequence; an efficient synthesis of (+)-myrtine has been achieved

  13. Catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanone

    ... a precursor and characterized by chemical analysis using the ICP–AES method, XRD, TEM, FTIR and BET surface area determination. The oxidation reaction was carried out at 70°C under atmospheric pressure. The results showed the catalytic performance of Pt/Al2O3 as being very high in terms of turnover frequency.

  14. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue

    2004-01-01

    technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate...

  15. Sintering of Catalytic Nanoparticles: Particle Migration or Ostwald Ripening?

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Challa, Sivakumar R.

    2013-01-01

    deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. This is especially true for high temperature catalytic processes, such as steam reforming, automotive exhaust treatment, or catalytic combustion. With dwindling supplies of precious metals and increasing demand, fundamental...

  16. Catalytic characterization of bi-functional catalysts derived from Pd ...

    Unknown

    1995; Lyubovsky and Pfefferle 1999; Sales et al 1999;. Hill et al 2000). ... For a catalytic system, whose activity ... catalytic systems containing Pd, supported on various acid- ..... Further studies are needed to optimize a balance between.

  17. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size

  18. Mesoporous Zeolite Single Crystals for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Conversion

    Schmidt, I.; Christensen, Claus H.; Kustova, Marina

    2005-01-01

    Recently, mesoporous zeolite single crystals were discovered. They constitute a novel family of materials that features a combined micropore and mesopore architecture within each individual crystal. Here, we briefly summarize recent catalytic results from cracking and isomerization of alkalies......, alkylation of aromatics and present new results on isomerization of aromatics. Specifically, the shape-selective isomerization of meta-xylenc into para-xylene and ortho-xylene is studied. In all these reactions, rnesoporous zeolite single crystals prove to be unique catalysts since they provide easy...... transport to and from active sites and at the same time maintain the shape-selectivity required. Thus, all these results support the idea that the beneficial effect of the mesopores system in the mesoporous zeolite single crystals call be solely attributed to enhanced mass transport....

  19. Catalytic activity trends of CO oxidation – A DFT study

    Jiang, Tao

    theoretical study of CO oxidation with experimental studies. The latter shows promoted catalytic activity when gold particle size decreases to 5 nm. Oxidizing CO by N2O was found to involve a CO␣O transition state, with atomic O adsorbed on the gold B5 sites and CO on the corners. On the other hand, CO...... and experiment were found to be the same. The experiment findings are in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. The second part of the thesis focuses on improving the convergence property of Quasi-Newton algorithm. The eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix of 54 atoms bulk Cu model are calculated......, and the sizes of eigenvalues follow power-law distribution. It is found that the anharmonicity of the weak modes lead to poor Newton step and poor Hessian update in BFGS type Quasi-Newton algorithm, which slow down the geometry optimization. Line search that fulfills Wolff conditions is then applied to improve...

  20. The impact of catalytic materials on fuel reformulation

    Rossini, Stefano [Snamprogetti, S. Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy)

    2003-01-15

    Fuel reformulation has been seeded by the growing consciousness of the potential damages mankind was causing to the ecosystem and to itself. Fuel reformulation means that fuels are defined on a chemical composition base with additional engine-technology related standards rather than on pure performance bases. These standards, which are getting more and more stringent, can be met by different leverages, mainly catalysts and processes operating conditions.This survey reviews the contribution of catalytic materials to the production of cleaner fuel components through some significant examples selected from scientific and technical literature. Having described the trends in automotive fuels quality, production of gasoline and diesel pool components is discussed relating the required properties to the material active site configuration, i.e. acidity/basicity, structural parameters, physical constraints. While distinctions are made between pathways leading to gasoline and those leading to diesel, sulfur removal is faced on a more generalized approach.

  1. Highly Efficient Catalytic Cyclic Carbonate Formation by Pyridyl Salicylimines.

    Subramanian, Saravanan; Park, Joonho; Byun, Jeehye; Jung, Yousung; Yavuz, Cafer T

    2018-03-21

    Cyclic carbonates as industrial commodities offer a viable nonredox carbon dioxide fixation, and suitable heterogeneous catalysts are vital for their widespread implementation. Here, we report a highly efficient heterogeneous catalyst for CO 2 addition to epoxides based on a newly identified active catalytic pocket consisting of pyridine, imine, and phenol moieties. The polymeric, metal-free catalyst derived from this active site converts less-reactive styrene oxide under atmospheric pressure in quantitative yield and selectivity to the corresponding carbonate. The catalyst does not need additives, solvents, metals, or co-catalysts, can be reused at least 10 cycles without the loss of activity, and scaled up easily to a kilogram scale. Density functional theory calculations reveal that the nucleophilicity of pyridine base gets stronger due to the conjugated imines and H-bonding from phenol accelerates the reaction forward by stabilizing the intermediate.

  2. Molecular Components of Catalytic Selectivity

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

    2008-07-02

    Selectivity, that is, to produce one molecule out of many other thermodynamically feasible product molecules, is the key concept to develop 'clean manufacturing' processes that do not produce byproducts (green chemistry). Small differences in potential energy barriers for elementary reaction steps control which reaction channel is more likely to yield the desired product molecule (selectivity), instead of the overall activation energy for the reaction that controls turnover rates (activity). Recent studies have demonstrated the atomic- or molecular-level tailoring of parameters such as the surface structures of active sites that give rise to nanoparticle size and shape dependence of turnover rates and reaction selectivities. Here, we highlight seven molecular components that influence reaction selectivities. These include: surface structure, adsorbate-induced restructuring, adsorbate mobility, reaction intermediates, surface composition, charge transport, and oxidation states for model metal single crystal and colloid nanoparticle catalysts. We show examples of their functioning and describe in-situ instruments that permit us to investigate their roles in surface reactions.

  3. Exploring functionally related enzymes using radially distributed properties of active sites around the reacting points of bound ligands

    Ueno Keisuke

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural genomics approaches, particularly those solving the 3D structures of many proteins with unknown functions, have increased the desire for structure-based function predictions. However, prediction of enzyme function is difficult because one member of a superfamily may catalyze a different reaction than other members, whereas members of different superfamilies can catalyze the same reaction. In addition, conformational changes, mutations or the absence of a particular catalytic residue can prevent inference of the mechanism by which catalytic residues stabilize and promote the elementary reaction. A major hurdle for alignment-based methods for prediction of function is the absence (despite its importance of a measure of similarity of the physicochemical properties of catalytic sites. To solve this problem, the physicochemical features radially distributed around catalytic sites should be considered in addition to structural and sequence similarities. Results We showed that radial distribution functions (RDFs, which are associated with the local structural and physicochemical properties of catalytic active sites, are capable of clustering oxidoreductases and transferases by function. The catalytic sites of these enzymes were also characterized using the RDFs. The RDFs provided a measure of the similarity among the catalytic sites, detecting conformational changes caused by mutation of catalytic residues. Furthermore, the RDFs reinforced the classification of enzyme functions based on conventional sequence and structural alignments. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the application of RDFs provides advantages in the functional classification of enzymes by providing information about catalytic sites.

  4. Resonance Raman study on the structure of the active sites of microsomal cytochrome P-450 isozymes LM2 and LM4.

    Hildebrandt, P; Greinert, R; Stier, A; Taniguchi, H

    1989-12-08

    The isozymes 2 and 4 of rabbit microsomal cytochrome P-450 (LM2, LM4) have been studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy. Based on high quality spectra, a vibrational assignment of the porphyrin modes in the frequency range between 100-1700 cm-1 is presented for different ferric states of cytochrome P-450 LM2 and LM4. The resonance Raman spectra are interpreted in terms of the spin and ligation state of the heme iron and of heme-protein interactions. While in cytochrome P-450 LM2 the six-coordinated low-spin configuration is predominantly occupied, in the isozyme LM4 the five-coordinated high-spin form is the most stable state. The different stability of these two spin configurations in LM2 and LM4 can be attributed to the structures of the active sites. In the low-spin form of the isozymes LM4 the protein matrix forces the heme into a more rigid conformation than in LM2. These steric constraints are removed upon dissociation of the sixth ligand leading to a more flexible structure of the active site in the high-spin form of the isozyme LM4. The vibrational modes of the vinyl groups were found to be characteristic markers for the specific structures of the heme pockets in both isozymes. They also respond sensitively to type-I substrate binding. While in cytochrome P-450 LM4 the occupation of the substrate-binding pocket induces conformational changes of the vinyl groups, as reflected by frequency shifts of the vinyl modes, in the LM2 isozyme the ground-state conformation of these substituents remain unaffected, suggesting that the more flexible heme pocket can accommodate substrates without imposing steric constraints on the porphyrin. The resonance Raman technique makes structural changes visible which are induced by substrate binding in addition and independent of the changes associated with the shift of the spin state equilibrium: the high-spin states in the substrate-bound and substrate-free enzyme are structurally different. The formation of the inactive form

  5. Interactions of a Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer with the catalytic domain of RNase MRP.

    Perederina, Anna; Khanova, Elena; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Esakova, Olga; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-10-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a multicomponent ribonucleoprotein complex closely related to RNase P. RNase MRP and eukaryotic RNase P share most of their protein components, as well as multiple features of their catalytic RNA moieties, but have distinct substrate specificities. While RNase P is practically universally found in all three domains of life, RNase MRP is essential in eukaryotes. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP are poorly understood. Here, we show that Pop5 and Rpp1, protein components found in both RNase P and RNase MRP, form a heterodimer that binds directly to the conserved area of the putative catalytic domain of RNase MRP RNA. The Pop5/Rpp1 binding site corresponds to the protein binding site in bacterial RNase P RNA. Structural and evolutionary roles of the Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer in RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  6. On the effect of atomic structure on the deactivation of catalytic gold nanoparticles

    Walsh, M J; Gai, P L; Boyes, E D

    2012-01-01

    Here we present atomic scale studies into the nature of both the internal structure and external surfaces of catalytic Au nanoparticles using aberration corrected in-situ electron microscopy. The activity of catalytic nanoparticles is thought to be highly sensitive to the particles' structure, meaning typical local atomic rearrangements are likely to significantly affect the overall performance of the catalyst. As-deposited Au nanoparticles are found to exhibit a variety of morphologies, with many being internally strained or highly stepped at the surface. Upon heating, surface atoms are observed to minimise the particles' surface energy by restructuring towards planar (111) facets, resulting in the removal of low co-ordinated sites thought to be crucial in catalysis by Au nanoparticles. These results suggest the process of surface energy minimisation made possible by heating may lead to a loss of active sites and consequently contribute to the deactivation of the catalyst.

  7. Significance of the enzymatic properties of yeast S39A enolase to the catalytic mechanism.

    Brewer, J M; Glover, C V; Holland, M J; Lebioda, L

    1998-04-02

    The S39A mutant of yeast enolase (isozyme 1), prepared by site-directed mutagenesis, has a relative Vmax of 0.01% and an activation constant for Mg2+ ca. 10-fold higher, compared with native enzyme. It is correctly folded. There is little effect of solvent viscosity on activity. We think that the loop Ser36-His43 fails to move to the 'closed' position upon catalytic Mg2+ binding, weakening several electrostatic interactions involved in the mechanism.

  8. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    Yu-Tung Chien

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The results show that catalytic residues have distinct structural features and context. Their neighboring residues, whether sequence or structure neighbors within specific range, are usually structurally more rigid than those of noncatalytic residues. The structural context feature is combined with support vector machine to identify catalytic residues from enzyme structure. The prediction results are better or comparable to those of recent structure-based prediction methods.

  9. Effect of inlet cone pipe angle in catalytic converter

    Amira Zainal, Nurul; Farhain Azmi, Ezzatul; Arifin Samad, Mohd

    2018-03-01

    The catalytic converter shows significant consequence to improve the performance of the vehicle start from it launched into production. Nowadays, the geometric design of the catalytic converter has become critical to avoid the behavior of backpressure in the exhaust system. The backpressure essentially reduced the performance of vehicles and increased the fuel consumption gradually. Consequently, this study aims to design various models of catalytic converter and optimize the volume of fluid flow inside the catalytic converter by changing the inlet cone pipe angles. Three different geometry angles of the inlet cone pipe of the catalytic converter were assessed. The model is simulated in Solidworks software to determine the optimum geometric design of the catalytic converter. The result showed that by decreasing the divergence angle of inlet cone pipe will upsurge the performance of the catalytic converter.

  10. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2018-04-10

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  11. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2016-02-09

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  12. Enantioselective catalytic fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement.

    Romanov-Michailidis, Fedor; Pupier, Marion; Besnard, Céline; Bürgi, Thomas; Alexakis, Alexandre

    2014-10-03

    An efficient and highly stereoselective fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement is described. The catalytic reaction requires use of Selectfluor in combination with the chiral, enantiopure phosphate anion derived from acid L3. Under optimized conditions, cyclopropylamines A were transformed into β-fluoro cyclobutylimines B in good yields and high levels of diastereo- and enantiocontrol. Furthermore, the optically active cyclobutylimines were reduced diastereoselectively with L-Selectride in the corresponding fluorinated amines C, compounds of significant interest in the pharmacological industry.

  13. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  14. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-04-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendly technique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing a catalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allows combustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, the adiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the threshold temperature for thermal NO{sub X} formation while maintaining a stable combustion. However, several challenges are connected to the application of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of this thesis reviews the use of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The influence of the fuel has been studied and compared over different catalyst materials. The material section is divided into two parts. The first concerns bimetallic palladium catalysts. These catalysts showed a more stable activity compared to their pure palladium counterparts for methane combustion. This was verified both by using an annular reactor at ambient pressure and a pilot-scale reactor at elevated pressures and flows closely resembling the ones found in a gas turbine combustor. The second part concerns high-temperature materials, which may be used either as active or washcoat materials. A novel group of materials for catalysis, i.e. garnets, has been synthesised and tested in combustion of methane, a low-heating value gas and diesel fuel. The garnets showed some interesting abilities especially for combustion of low-heating value, LHV, gas. Two other materials were also studied, i.e. spinels and hexa aluminates, both showed very promising thermal stability and the substituted hexa aluminates also showed a good catalytic activity. Finally, deactivation of the catalyst materials was studied. In this part the sulphur poisoning of palladium, platinum and the above-mentioned complex metal oxides has been studied for combustion of a LHV gas. Platinum and surprisingly the garnet were least deactivated. Palladium was severely affected for methane combustion while the other washcoat materials were

  15. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.; Zeitoon, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Molten Metal Technology was awarded a contract to demonstrate the applicability of the Catalytic Extraction Process, a proprietary process that could be applied to US DOE's inventory of low level mixed waste. This paper is a description of that technology, and included within this document are discussions of: (1) Program objectives, (2) Overall technology review, (3) Organic feed conversion to synthetic gas, (4) Metal, halogen, and transuranic recovery, (5) Demonstrations, (6) Design of the prototype facility, and (7) Results

  16. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2017-12-19

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  17. Rice Cellulose SynthaseA8 Plant-Conserved Region Is a Coiled-Coil at the Catalytic Core Entrance

    Rushton, Phillip S.; Olek, Anna T.; Makowski, Lee; Badger, John; Steussy, C. Nicklaus; Carpita, Nicholas C.; Stauffacher, Cynthia V. (NEU); (Purdue)

    2016-11-22

    The crystallographic structure of a rice (Oryza sativa) cellulose synthase, OsCesA8, plant-conserved region (P-CR), one of two unique domains in the catalytic domain of plant CesAs, was solved to 2.4 Å resolution. Two antiparallel α-helices form a coiled-coil domain linked by a large extended connector loop containing a conserved trio of aromatic residues. The P-CR structure was fit into a molecular envelope for the P-CR domain derived from small-angle X-ray scattering data. The P-CR structure and molecular envelope, combined with a homology-based chain trace of the CesA8 catalytic core, were modeled into a previously determined CesA8 small-angle X-ray scattering molecular envelope to produce a detailed topological model of the CesA8 catalytic domain. The predicted position for the P-CR domain from the molecular docking models places the P-CR connector loop into a hydrophobic pocket of the catalytic core, with the coiled-coil aligned near the entrance of the substrate UDP-glucose into the active site. In this configuration, the P-CR coiled-coil alone is unlikely to regulate substrate access to the active site, but it could interact with other domains of CesA, accessory proteins, or other CesA catalytic domains to control substrate delivery.

  18. Effect of phase interaction on catalytic CO oxidation over the SnO_2/Al_2O_3 model catalyst

    Chai, Shujing; Bai, Xueqin; Li, Jing; Liu, Cheng; Ding, Tong; Tian, Ye; Liu, Chang; Xian, Hui; Mi, Wenbo; Li, Xingang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Activity for CO oxidation is greatly enhanced by interaction between SnO_2 and Al_2O_3. • Interaction between SnO_2 and Al_2O_3 phases can generate oxygen vacancies. • Oxygen vacancies play an import role for catalytic CO oxidation. • Sn"4"+ cations are the effective sites for catalytic CO oxidation. • Langmuir-Hinshelwood model is preferred for catalytic CO oxidation. - Abstract: We investigated the catalytic CO oxidation over the SnO_2/Al_2O_3 model catalysts. Our results show that interaction between the Al_2O_3 and SnO_2 phases results in the significantly improved catalytic activity because of the formation of the oxygen vacancies. The oxygen storage capacity of the SnO_2/Al_2O_3 catalyst prepared by the physically mixed method is nearly two times higher than that of the SnO_2, which probably results from the change of electron concentration on the interface of the SnO_2 and Al_2O_3 phases. Introducing water vapor to the feeding gas would a little decrease the activity of the catalysts, but the reaction rate could completely recover after removal of water vapor. The kinetics results suggest that the surface Sn"4"+ cations are effective CO adsorptive sites, and the surface adsorbed oxygen plays an important role upon CO oxidation. The reaction pathways upon the SnO_2-based catalysts for CO oxidation follow the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model.

  19. Catalytic mechanism of the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene over Fe–Co/Mg(Al)O derived from hydrotalcites

    Tope, Balkrishna B.; Balasamy, Rabindran J.; Khurshid, Alam; Atanda, Luqman A.; Yahiro, Hidenori; Shishido, Tetsuya; Takehira, Katsuomi; Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman S.

    2011-01-01

    -H+ abstraction from ethyl group on Mg2+-O2- basic sites, followed by C-O-Mg bond formation. The α-H+ abstraction by O2-(-Mg 2+) was likely followed by β-H abstraction, leading to the formations of styrene and H2. Such catalytic mechanism by the Fe 3+ acid-O2-(-Mg

  20. Activating basal-plane catalytic activity of two-dimensional MoS2 monolayer with remote hydrogen plasma

    Cheng, Chia-Chin; Lu, Ang-Yu; Tseng, Chien-Chih; Yang, Xiulin; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Chen, Min-Cheng; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Li, Lain-Jong

    2016-01-01

    that account for a small percentage of the surface area, rather than the basal planes, of MoS2 monolayer have been confirmed as their active catalytic sites. As a result, extensive efforts have been developing in activating the basal planes of MoS2

  1. Catalytic hydrogen recombination for nuclear containments

    Koroll, G.W.; Lau, D.W.P.; Dewit, W.A.; Graham, W.R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Catalytic recombiners appear to be a credible option for hydrogen mitigation in nuclear containments. The passive operation, versatility and ease of back fitting are appealing for existing stations and new designs. Recently, a generation of wet-proofed catalyst materials have been developed at AECL which are highly specific to H 2 -O 2 , are active at ambient temperatures and are being evaluated for containment applications. Two types of catalytic recombiners were evaluated for hydrogen removal in containments based on the AECL catalyst. The first is a catalytic combustor for application in existing air streams such as provided by fans or ventilation systems. The second is an autocatalytic recombiner which uses the enthalpy of reaction to produce natural convective flow over the catalyst elements. Intermediate-scale results obtained in 6 m 3 and 10 m 3 spherical and cylindrical vessels are given to demonstrate self-starting limits, operating limits, removal capacity, scaling parameters, flow resistance, mixing behaviour in the vicinity of an operating recombiner and sensitivity to poisoning, fouling and radiation. (author). 13 refs., 10 figs

  2. Electrochemical catalytic treatment of phenol wastewater

    Ma Hongzhu; Zhang Xinhai; Ma Qingliang; Wang Bo

    2009-01-01

    The slurry bed catalytic treatment of contaminated water appears to be a promising alternative for the oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. In this paper, the electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater catalyzed by ferric sulfate and potassium permanganate adsorbed onto active bentonite in slurry bed electrolytic reactor with graphite electrode has been investigated. In order to determine the optimum operating condition, the orthogonal experiments were devised and the results revealed that the system of ferric sulfate, potassium permanganate and active bentonite showed a high catalytic efficiency on the process of electrochemical oxidation phenol in initial pH 5. When the initial concentration of phenol was 0.52 g/L (the initial COD 1214 mg/L), up to 99% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was obtained in 40 min. According to the experimental results, a possible mechanism of catalytic degradation of phenol was proposed. Environmental estimation was also done and the results showed that the treated wastewater have little impact on plant growth and could totally be applied to irrigation.

  3. Catalytic applications of bio-inspired nanomaterials

    Pacardo, Dennis Kien Balaong

    The biomimetic synthesis of Pd nanoparticles was presented using the Pd4 peptide, TSNAVHPTLRHL, isolated from combinatorial phage display library. Using this approach, nearly monodisperse and spherical Pd nanoparticles were generated with an average diameter of 1.9 +/- 0.4 nm. The peptide-based nanocatalyst were employed in the Stille coupling reaction under energy-efficient and environmentally friendly reaction conditions of aqueous solvent, room temperature and very low catalyst loading. To this end, the Pd nanocatalyst generated high turnover frequency (TOF) value and quantitative yields using ≥ 0.005 mol% Pd as well as catalytic activities with different aryl halides containing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups. The Pd4-capped Pd nanoparticles followed the atom-leaching mechanism and were found to be selective with respect to substrate identity. On the other hand, the naturally-occurring R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL) was employed in the synthesis of biotemplated Pd nanomaterials which showed morphological changes as a function of Pd:peptide ratio. TOF analysis for hydrogenation of olefinic alcohols showed similar catalytic activity regardless of nanomorphology. Determination of catalytic properties of these bio-inspired nanomaterials are important as they serve as model system for alternative green catalyst with applications in industrially important transformations.

  4. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors.

  5. Catalytic pyrolysis of olive mill wastewater sludge

    Abdellaoui, Hamza

    From 2008 to 2013, an average of 2,821.4 kilotons/year of olive oil were produced around the world. The waste product of the olive mill industry consists of solid residue (pomace) and wastewater (OMW). Annually, around 30 million m3 of OMW are produced in the Mediterranean area, 700,000 m3 year?1 in Tunisia alone. OMW is an aqueous effluent characterized by an offensive smell and high organic matter content, including high molecular weight phenolic compounds and long-chain fatty acids. These compounds are highly toxic to micro-organisms and plants, which makes the OMW a serious threat to the environment if not managed properly. The OMW is disposed of in open air evaporation ponds. After evaporation of most of the water, OMWS is left in the bottom of the ponds. In this thesis, the effort has been made to evaluate the catalytic pyrolysis process as a technology to valorize the OMWS. The first section of this research showed that 41.12 wt. % of the OMWS is mostly lipids, which are a good source of energy. The second section proved that catalytic pyrolysis of the OMWS over red mud and HZSM-5 can produce green diesel, and 450 °C is the optimal reaction temperature to maximize the organic yields. The last section revealed that the HSF was behind the good fuel-like properties of the OMWS catalytic oils, whereas the SR hindered the bio-oil yields and quality.

  6. Antibody proteases: induction of catalytic response.

    Gabibov, A G; Friboulet, A; Thomas, D; Demin, A V; Ponomarenko, N A; Vorobiev, I I; Pillet, D; Paon, M; Alexandrova, E S; Telegin, G B; Reshetnyak, A V; Grigorieva, O V; Gnuchev, N V; Malishkin, K A; Genkin, D D

    2002-10-01

    Most of the data accumulated throughout the years on investigation of catalytic antibodies indicate that their production increases on the background of autoimmune abnormalities. The different approaches to induction of catalytic response toward recombinant gp120 HIV-1 surface protein in mice with various autoimmune pathologies are described. The peptidylphosphonate conjugate containing structural part of gp120 molecule is used for reactive immunization of NZB/NZW F1, MRL, and SJL mice. The specific modification of heavy and light chains of mouse autoantibodies with Val-Ala-Glu-Glu-Glu-Val-PO(OPh)2 reactive peptide was demonstrated. Increased proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies in SJL mice encouraged us to investigate the production of antigen-specific catalytic antibodies on the background of induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The immunization of autoimmune-prone mice with the engineered fusions containing the fragments of gp120 and encephalitogenic epitope of myelin basic protein (MBP(89-104)) was made. The proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies isolated from the sera of autoimmune mice immunized by the described antigen was shown. Specific immune response of SJL mice to these antigens was characterized. Polyclonal antibodies purified from sera of the immunized animals revealed proteolytic activity. The antiidiotypic approach to raise the specific proteolytic antibody as an "internal image" of protease is described. The "second order" monoclonal antibodies toward subtilisin Carlsberg revealed pronounced proteolytic activity.

  7. Electrochemical catalytic treatment of phenol wastewater

    Ma Hongzhu, E-mail: hzmachem@snnu.edu.cn [Institute of Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Zhang Xinhai [Institute of Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Ma Qingliang [Department of Applied Physics, College of Sciences, Taiyuan University of Technology, 030024 Taiyuan (China); Wang Bo [Institute of Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China)

    2009-06-15

    The slurry bed catalytic treatment of contaminated water appears to be a promising alternative for the oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. In this paper, the electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater catalyzed by ferric sulfate and potassium permanganate adsorbed onto active bentonite in slurry bed electrolytic reactor with graphite electrode has been investigated. In order to determine the optimum operating condition, the orthogonal experiments were devised and the results revealed that the system of ferric sulfate, potassium permanganate and active bentonite showed a high catalytic efficiency on the process of electrochemical oxidation phenol in initial pH 5. When the initial concentration of phenol was 0.52 g/L (the initial COD 1214 mg/L), up to 99% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was obtained in 40 min. According to the experimental results, a possible mechanism of catalytic degradation of phenol was proposed. Environmental estimation was also done and the results showed that the treated wastewater have little impact on plant growth and could totally be applied to irrigation.

  8. COAL CONVERSION WASTEWATER TREATMENT BY CATALYTIC OXIDATION IN SUPERCRITICAL WATER; FINAL

    Phillip E. Savage

    1999-01-01

    phenoxy radicals, which then react in the fluid phase by the same mechanism operative for non-catalytic SCWO of phenol. The rates of phenol disappearance and CO(sub 2) formation are sensitive to the phenol and O(sub 2) concentrations, but independent of the water density. Power-law rate expressions were developed to correlate the catalytic kinetics. The catalytic kinetics were also consistent with a Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate law derived from a dual-site mechanism comprising the following steps: reversible adsorption of phenol on one type of catalytic site, reversible dissociative adsorption of oxygen on a different type of site, and irreversible, rate-determining surface reaction between adsorbed phenol and adsorbed oxygen

  9. Catalytic Reforming of Oxygenates: State of the Art and Future Prospects.

    Li, Di; Li, Xinyu; Gong, Jinlong

    2016-10-12

    This Review describes recent advances in the design, synthesis, reactivity, selectivity, structural, and electronic properties of the catalysts for reforming of a variety of oxygenates (e.g., from simple monoalcohols to higher polyols, then to sugars, phenols, and finally complicated mixtures like bio-oil). A comprehensive exploration of the structure-activity relationship in catalytic reforming of oxygenates is carried out, assisted by state-of-the-art characterization techniques and computational tools. Critical emphasis has been given on the mechanisms of these heterogeneous-catalyzed reactions and especially on the nature of the active catalytic sites and reaction pathways. Similarities and differences (reaction mechanisms, design and synthesis of catalysts, as well as catalytic systems) in the reforming process of these oxygenates will also be discussed. A critical overview is then provided regarding the challenges and opportunities for research in this area with a focus on the roles that systems of heterogeneous catalysis, reaction engineering, and materials science can play in the near future. This Review aims to present insights into the intrinsic mechanism involved in catalytic reforming and provides guidance to the development of novel catalysts and processes for the efficient utilization of oxygenates for energy and environmental purposes.

  10. Particle size effects in the catalytic electroreduction of CO₂ on Cu nanoparticles.

    Reske, Rulle; Mistry, Hemma; Behafarid, Farzad; Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Strasser, Peter

    2014-05-14

    A study of particle size effects during the catalytic CO2 electroreduction on size-controlled Cu nanoparticles (NPs) is presented. Cu NP catalysts in the 2-15 nm mean size range were prepared, and their catalytic activity and selectivity during CO2 electroreduction were analyzed and compared to a bulk Cu electrode. A dramatic increase in the catalytic activity and selectivity for H2 and CO was observed with decreasing Cu particle size, in particular, for NPs below 5 nm. Hydrocarbon (methane and ethylene) selectivity was increasingly suppressed for nanoscale Cu surfaces. The size dependence of the surface atomic coordination of model spherical Cu particles was used to rationalize the experimental results. Changes in the population of low-coordinated surface sites and their stronger chemisorption were linked to surging H2 and CO selectivities, higher catalytic activity, and smaller hydrocarbon selectivity. The presented activity-selectivity-size relations provide novel insights in the CO2 electroreduction reaction on nanoscale surfaces. Our smallest nanoparticles (~2 nm) enter the ab initio computationally accessible size regime, and therefore, the results obtained lend themselves well to density functional theory (DFT) evaluation and reaction mechanism verification.

  11. Influence of ionizing radiation on the catalytic properties of oxide catalysts tested by hydrogen peroxide decomposition

    Mucka, V.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a study of some physical and catalytic properties of different oxide catalysts as affected by ionizing radiation (γ, n, e - ) and tested by the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution are presented in this paper. The oxidation state of the active component present on the catalyst surface was found to be one of the most sensitive properties to the ionizing radiation. Changes of this state induced by γ-irradiation were found to be positive in most cases; electron pre-irradiation of the oxides leads, as a rule, to negative effects and the effects of neutron irradiation may be positive or negative. On the other hand, changes in the catalytic activity of the oxides after γ-or electron-irradiation seem to be mostly negative and positive, respectively; the effects of fast neutrons seem to vary here. Neither quantitative or qualitative correlation was found between the radiation-induced changes in these two quantities. The results give evidence that ionizing radiation principally affects the surface concentration of the catalytic sites. Both the character and magnitude of the changes in surface oxidation abilities and in catalytic activities of the oxide catalysts seem to be dependent upon the actual state of the catalyst surface. (author)

  12. Catalytic oxidation of o-aminophenols and aromatic amines by mushroom tyrosinase.

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Jose Luis; Garcia-Molina, Francisco; Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro Antonio; Varon, Ramon; Tudela, Jose; Rodriguez-Lopez, Jose N; Garcia-Canovas, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    The kinetics of tyrosinase acting on o-aminophenols and aromatic amines as substrates was studied. The catalytic constants of aromatic monoamines and o-diamines were both low, these results are consistent with our previous mechanism in which the slow step is the transfer of a proton by a hydroxyl to the peroxide in oxy-tyrosinase (Fenoll et al., Biochem. J. 380 (2004) 643-650). In the case of o-aminophenols, the hydroxyl group indirectly cooperates in the transfer of the proton and consequently the catalytic constants in the action of tyrosinase on these compounds are higher. In the case of aromatic monoamines, the Michaelis constants are of the same order of magnitude than for monophenols, which suggests that the monophenols bind better (higher binding constant) to the enzyme to facilitate the π-π interactions between the aromatic ring and a possible histidine of the active site. In the case of aromatic o-diamines, both the catalytic and Michaelis constants are low, the values of the catalytic constants being lower than those of the corresponding o-diphenols. The values of the Michaelis constants of the aromatic o-diamines are slightly lower than those of their corresponding o-diphenols, confirming that the aromatic o-diamines bind less well (lower binding constant) to the enzyme. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Catalytic dehydrogenation of alcohol over solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters with an octahedral metal framework

    Kamiguchi, Satoshi, E-mail: kamigu@riken.jp [Advanced Catalysis Research Group, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako City, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Organometallic Chemistry Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako City, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Okumura, Kazu [School of Advanced Engineering, Kogakuin University, Nakano-machi, Hachioji City, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan); Nagashima, Sayoko; Chihara, Teiji [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters catalyzed the dehydrogenation of alcohol. • The dehydrogenation proceeded without the addition of any oxidants. • The catalytic activity developed when the cluster was activated at 300–500 °C in H{sub 2}. • The Lewis-acidic molybdenum atom and basic sulfur ligand were catalytically active. • The clusters function as bifunctional acid–base catalysts. - Abstract: Solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters with an octahedral metal framework, the superconducting Chevrel phases, are applied to catalysis. A copper salt of a nonstoichiometric sulfur-deficient cluster, Cu{sub x}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8–δ} (x = 2.94 and δ ≈ 0.3), is stored in air for more than 90 days. When the oxygenated cluster is thermally activated in a hydrogen stream above 300 °C, catalytic activity for the dehydrogenation of primary alcohols to aldehydes and secondary alcohols to ketones develops. The addition of pyridine or benzoic acid decreases the dehydrogenation activity, indicating that both a Lewis-acidic coordinatively unsaturated molybdenum atom and a basic sulfur ligand synergistically act as the catalytic active sites.

  14. Turning goals into results: the power of catalytic mechanisms.

    Collins, J

    1999-01-01

    Most executives have a big, hairy, audacious goal. They write vision statements, formalize procedures, and develop complicated incentive programs--all in pursuit of that goal. In other words, with the best of intentions, they install layers of stultifying bureaucracy. But it doesn't have to be that way. In this article, Jim Collins introduces the catalytic mechanism, a simple yet powerful managerial tool that helps translate lofty aspirations into concrete reality. Catalytic mechanisms are the crucial link between objectives and performance; they are a galvanizing, nonbureaucratic means to turn one into the other. What's the difference between catalytic mechanisms and most traditional managerial controls? Catalytic mechanisms share five characteristics. First, they produce desired results in unpredictable ways. Second, they distribute power for the benefit of the overall system, often to the discomfort of those who traditionally hold power. Third, catalytic mechanisms have teeth. Fourth, they eject "viruses"--those people who don't share the company's core values. Finally, they produce an ongoing effect. Catalytic mechanisms are just as effective for reaching individual goals as they are for corporate ones. To illustrate how catalytic mechanisms work, the author draws on examples of individuals and organizations that have relied on such mechanisms to achieve their goals. The same catalytic mechanism that works in one organization, however, will not necessarily work in another. Catalytic mechanisms must be tailored to specific goals and situations. To help readers get started, the author offers some general principles that support the process of building catalytic mechanisms effectively.

  15. Effect of support on the catalytic activity of manganese oxide catalyts for toluene combustion

    Pozan, Gulin Selda

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► α-Al 2 O 3 , obtained from Bohmite, as a support for enhancing of the activity. ► The support material for catalytic oxidation. ► The manganese state and oxygen species effect on the catalytic combustion reaction. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to study combustion of toluene (1000 ppm) over MnO 2 modified with different supports. α-Al 2 O 3 and γ-Al 2 O 3 obtained from Boehmite, γ-Al 2 O 3 (commercial), SiO 2 , TiO 2 and ZrO 2 were used as commercial support materials. In view of potential interest of this process, the influence of support material on the catalytic performance was discussed. The deposition of 9.5MnO 2 was performed by impregnation over support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed reduction and oxidation (TPR/TPO) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic tests were carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed-bed flow reactor. 9.5MnO 2 /α-Al 2 O 3 (B) (synthesized from Boehmite) catalyst exhibits the highest catalytic activity, over which the toluene conversion was up to 90% at a temperature of 289 °C. Considering all the characterization and reaction data reported in this study, it was concluded that the manganese state and oxygen species played an important role in the catalytic activity.

  16. Surface binding sites in carbohydrate active enzymes: An emerging picture of structural and functional diversity

    Svensson, Birte; Cockburn, Darrell

    2013-01-01

    is not universal and is in fact rare among some families of enzymes. In some cases an alternative to possessing a CBM is for the enzyme to bind to the substrate at a site on the catalytic domain, but away from the active site. Such a site is termed a surface (or secondary) binding site (SBS). SBSs have been...

  17. Does Density of Cationic Sites Affect Catalytic Activity of Co Zeolites in Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO with Methane?

    Dědeček, Jiří; Kaucký, Dalibor; Wichterlová, Blanka

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 18, 3/4 (2002), s. 283-290 ISSN 1022-5528 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS4040016 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : Co zeolites * ZSM-5 * NO reduction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.648, year: 2002

  18. Heterogeneous catalytic materials solid state chemistry, surface chemistry and catalytic behaviour

    Busca, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous Catalytic Materials discusses experimental methods and the latest developments in three areas of research: heterogeneous catalysis; surface chemistry; and the chemistry of catalysts. Catalytic materials are those solids that allow the chemical reaction to occur efficiently and cost-effectively. This book provides you with all necessary information to synthesize, characterize, and relate the properties of a catalyst to its behavior, enabling you to select the appropriate catalyst for the process and reactor system. Oxides (used both as catalysts and as supports for cata

  19. Relation Between Acid and Catalytic Properties of Chlorinated Gamma-Alumina. a 31p Mas Nmr and Ftir Investigation

    Guillaume D.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have studied the effect of chlorine on the surface properties of gamma-alumina, especially on their acid properties. The use of FTIR spectroscopy and 31P MAS NMR of adsorbed trimethylphosphine allows to propose a chlorination mechanism. To correlate the surface properties of these chlorinated gamma-alumina with their catalytic properties, we have used a model reaction, the cracking of n-heptane under reforming conditions. The analysis of the correlation between acid properties determined by 31P MAS NMR and the catalytic results (in terms of activities and selectivities allows to identify which sites are involved in the cracking reaction.

  20. Validation of the catalytic properties of Cu-Os/13X using single fixed bed reactor in selective catalytic reduction of NO

    Oh, Kwang Seok; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic decomposition of NO over Cu-Os/13X has been carried out in a tubular fixed bed reactor at atmospheric pressure and the results were compared with literature data performed by high-throughput screening (HTS). The activity and durability of Cu-Os/13X prepared by conventional ion-exchange method have been investigated in the presence of H 2 O and SO 2 . It was found that Cu-Os/13X prepared by ion-exchange shows a high activity in a wide temperature range in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with C 3 H 6 compared to Cu/13X, proving the existence of more NO adsorption site on Cu-Os/13X. However, Cu-Os/13X exhibited low activity in the presence of water, and was quite different from the result reported in literature. SO 2 resistance is also low and does not recover its original activity when the SO 2 was blocked in the feed gas stream. This result suggested that catalytic activity between combinatorial screening and conventional testing should be compared to confirm the validity of high-throughput screening

  1. Effect of Dopant Loading on the Structural and Catalytic Properties of Mn-Doped SrTiO3 Catalysts for Catalytic Soot Combustion

    Santiago Iván Suárez-Vázquez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles have been associated with respiratory diseases and cancer. To decrease these emissions, perovskite-mixed oxides have been proposed due to their thermal stability and redox surface properties. In this work, SrTiO3 doped with different amounts of Mn were synthesized by the hydrothermal method and tested for soot combustion. Results show that at low Mn content, structural distortion, and higher Oads/Olat ratio were observed which was attributed to the high content of Mn3+ in Ti sites. On the other hand, increasing the Mn content led to surface segregation of manganese oxide. All synthesized catalysts showed mesopores in the range of 32–47 nm. In the catalytic combustion of soot, the samples synthesized in this work lowered the combustion temperature by more than 100 °C compared with the uncatalyzed reaction. The sample doped with 1 wt % of Mn showed the best catalytic activity. The activation energy of these samples was also calculated, and the order of decreasing activation energy is as follows: uncatalyzed > Mn0 > Mn8 > Mn4 > Mn1. The best catalytic activity for Mn1 was attributed to its physicochemical properties and the mobility of the oxygen from the bulk to the surface at temperatures higher than 500 °C.

  2. Superior acidic catalytic activity and stability of Fe-doped HTaWO6 nanotubes

    Liu, He

    2017-07-26

    Fe-doped HTaWO6 (H1-3xFexTaWO6, x = 0.23) nanotubes as highly active solid acid catalysts were prepared via an exfoliation-scrolling-exchange process. The specific surface area and pore volume of undoped nanotubes (20.8 m2 g-1, 0.057 cm3 g-1) were remarkably enhanced through Fe3+ ion-exchange (>100 m2 g-1, 0.547 cm3 g-1). Doping Fe ions into the nanotubes endowed them with improved thermal stability due to the stronger interaction between the intercalated Fe3+ ions and the host layers. This interaction also facilitated the preservation of effective Brønsted acid sites and the generation of new acid sites. The integration of these functional roles resulted in Fe-doped nanotubes with high acidic catalytic activities in the Friedel-Crafts alkylation of anisole and the esterification of acetic acid. Facile accessibility to active sites, generation of effective Brønsted acid sites, high stability of the tubular structure and strong acid sites were found to synergistically contribute to the excellent acidic catalytic efficiency. Additionally, the activity of cycled nanocatalysts can be easily recovered through annealing treatment.

  3. Superior acidic catalytic activity and stability of Fe-doped HTaWO6 nanotubes

    Liu, He; Zhang, Haitao; Fei, Linfeng; Ma, Hongbin; Zhao, Guoying; Mak, CheeLeung; Zhang, Xixiang; Zhang, Suojiang

    2017-01-01

    Fe-doped HTaWO6 (H1-3xFexTaWO6, x = 0.23) nanotubes as highly active solid acid catalysts were prepared via an exfoliation-scrolling-exchange process. The specific surface area and pore volume of undoped nanotubes (20.8 m2 g-1, 0.057 cm3 g-1) were remarkably enhanced through Fe3+ ion-exchange (>100 m2 g-1, 0.547 cm3 g-1). Doping Fe ions into the nanotubes endowed them with improved thermal stability due to the stronger interaction between the intercalated Fe3+ ions and the host layers. This interaction also facilitated the preservation of effective Brønsted acid sites and the generation of new acid sites. The integration of these functional roles resulted in Fe-doped nanotubes with high acidic catalytic activities in the Friedel-Crafts alkylation of anisole and the esterification of acetic acid. Facile accessibility to active sites, generation of effective Brønsted acid sites, high stability of the tubular structure and strong acid sites were found to synergistically contribute to the excellent acidic catalytic efficiency. Additionally, the activity of cycled nanocatalysts can be easily recovered through annealing treatment.

  4. Catalytic ozonation not relying on hydroxyl radical oxidation: A selective and competitive reaction process related to metal-carboxylate complexes

    Zhang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic ozonation following non-hydroxyl radical pathway is an important technique not only to degrade refractory carboxylic-containing organic compounds/matter but also to avoid catalyst deactivation caused by metal-carboxylate complexation. It is unknown whether this process is effective for all carboxylates or selective to special molecule structures. In this work, the selectivity was confirmed using O3/(CuO/CeO2) and six distinct ozone-resistant probe carboxylates (i.e., acetate, citrate, malonate, oxalate, pyruvate and succinate). Among these probe compounds, pyruvate, oxalate, and citrate were readily degraded following the rate order of oxalate>citrate>pyruvate, while the degradation of acetate, malonate, and succinate was not promoted. The selectivity was independent on carboxylate group number of the probe compounds and solution pH. Competitive degradation was observed for carboxylate mixtures following the preference order of citrate, oxalate, and finally pyruvate. The competitive degradation was ascribed to competitive adsorption on the catalyst surface. It was revealed that the catalytically degradable compounds formed bidentate chelating or bridging complexes with surface copper sites of the catalyst, i.e., the active sites. The catalytically undegradable carboxylates formed monodentate complexes with surface copper sites or just electrostatically adsorbed on the catalyst surface. The selectivity, relying on the structure of surface metal-carboxylate complex, should be considered in the design of catalytic ozonation process. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Catalytic cracking models developed for predictive control purposes

    Dag Ljungqvist

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with state-space modeling issues in the context of model-predictive control, with application to catalytic cracking. Emphasis is placed on model establishment, verification and online adjustment. Both the Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC and the Residual Catalytic Cracking (RCC units are discussed. Catalytic cracking units involve complex interactive processes which are difficult to operate and control in an economically optimal way. The strong nonlinearities of the FCC process mean that the control calculation should be based on a nonlinear model with the relevant constraints included. However, the model can be simple compared to the complexity of the catalytic cracking plant. Model validity is ensured by a robust online model adjustment strategy. Model-predictive control schemes based on linear convolution models have been successfully applied to the supervisory dynamic control of catalytic cracking units, and the control can be further improved by the SSPC scheme.

  7. Protein structure based prediction of catalytic residues.

    Fajardo, J Eduardo; Fiser, Andras

    2013-02-22

    Worldwide structural genomics projects continue to release new protein structures at an unprecedented pace, so far nearly 6000, but only about 60% of these proteins have any sort of functional annotation. We explored a range of features that can be used for the prediction of functional residues given a known three-dimensional structure. These features include various centrality measures of nodes in graphs of interacting residues: closeness, betweenness and page-rank centrality. We also analyzed the distance of functional amino acids to the general center of mass (GCM) of the structure, relative solvent accessibility (RSA), and the use of relative entropy as a measure of sequence conservation. From the selected features, neural networks were trained to identify catalytic residues. We found that using distance to the GCM together with amino acid type provide a good discriminant function, when combined independently with sequence conservation. Using an independent test set of 29 annotated protein structures, the method returned 411 of the initial 9262 residues as the most likely to be involved in function. The output 411 residues contain 70 of the annotated 111 catalytic residues. This represents an approximately 14-fold enrichment of catalytic residues on the entire input set (corresponding to a sensitivity of 63% and a precision of 17%), a performance competitive with that of other state-of-the-art methods. We found that several of the graph based measures utilize the same underlying feature of protein structures, which can be simply and more effectively captured with the distance to GCM definition. This also has the added the advantage of simplicity and easy implementation. Meanwhile sequence conservation remains by far the most influential feature in identifying functional residues. We also found that due the rapid changes in size and composition of sequence databases, conservation calculations must be recalibrated for specific reference databases.

  8. Catalytically active and hierarchically porous SAPO-11 zeolite synthesized in the presence of polyhexamethylene biguanidine

    Liu, Yan

    2014-03-01

    Hierarchically porous SAPO-11 zeolite (H-SAPO-11) is rationally synthesized from a starting silicoaluminophosphate gel in the presence of polyhexamethylene biguanidine as a mesoscale template. The sample is well characterized by XRD, N2 sorption, SEM, TEM, NMR, XPS, NH3-TPD, and TG techniques. The results show that the sample obtained has good crystallinity, hierarchical porosity (mesopores at ca. 10nm and macropores at ca. 50-200nm), high BET surface area (226m2/g), large pore volume (0.25cm3/g), and abundant medium and strong acidic sites (0.36mmol/g). After loading Pt (0.5wt.%) on H-SAPO-11 by using wet impregnation method, catalytic hydroisomerization tests of n-dodecane show that the hierarchical Pt/SAPO-11 zeolite exhibits high conversion of n-dodecane and enhanced selectivity for branched products as well as reduced selectivity for cracking products, compared with conventional Pt/SAPO-11 zeolite. This phenomenon is reasonably attributed to the presence of hierarchical porosity, which is favorable for access of reactants on catalytically active sites. The improvement in catalytic performance in long-chain paraffin hydroisomerization over Pt/SAPO-11-based catalyst is of great importance for its industrial applications in the future. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Catalytic conversion reactions mediated by single-file diffusion in linear nanopores: hydrodynamic versus stochastic behavior.

    Ackerman, David M; Wang, Jing; Wendel, Joseph H; Liu, Da-Jiang; Pruski, Marek; Evans, James W

    2011-03-21

    We analyze the spatiotemporal behavior of species concentrations in a diffusion-mediated conversion reaction which occurs at catalytic sites within linear pores of nanometer diameter. Diffusion within the pores is subject to a strict single-file (no passing) constraint. Both transient and steady-state behavior is precisely characterized by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a spatially discrete lattice-gas model for this reaction-diffusion process considering various distributions of catalytic sites. Exact hierarchical master equations can also be developed for this model. Their analysis, after application of mean-field type truncation approximations, produces discrete reaction-diffusion type equations (mf-RDE). For slowly varying concentrations, we further develop coarse-grained continuum hydrodynamic reaction-diffusion equations (h-RDE) incorporating a precise treatment of single-file diffusion in this multispecies system. The h-RDE successfully describe nontrivial aspects of transient behavior, in contrast to the mf-RDE, and also correctly capture unreactive steady-state behavior in the pore interior. However, steady-state reactivity, which is localized near the pore ends when those regions are catalytic, is controlled by fluctuations not incorporated into the hydrodynamic treatment. The mf-RDE partly capture these fluctuation effects, but cannot describe scaling behavior of the reactivity.

  10. Tritium stripping by a catalytic exchange stripper

    Heung, L.K.; Gibson, G.W.; Ortman, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    A catalytic exchange process for stripping elemental tritium from gas streams has been demonstrated. The process uses a catalyzed isotopic exchange reaction between tritium in the gas phase and protium or deuterium in the solid phase on alumina. The reaction is catalyzed by platinum deposited on the alumina. The process has been tested with both tritium and deuterium. Decontamination factors (ration of inlet and outlet tritium concentrations) as high as 1000 have been achieved, depending on inlet concentration. The test results and some demonstrated applications are presented

  11. Plasma-catalytic reforming of liquid hydrocarbons

    Nedybaliuk, O.A.; Chernyak, V.Ya; Kolgan, V.V.; Iukhymenko, V.V.; Solomenko, O.V.; Fedirchyk, I.I.; Martysh, E.V.; Demchina, V.P.; Klochok, N.V.; Dragnev, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    The series of experiments studying the plasma-catalytic reforming of liquid hydrocarbons was carried out. The dynamic plasma-liquid system based on a low-power rotating gliding arc with solid electrodes was used for the investigation of liquid hydrocarbons reforming process. Conversion was done via partial oxidation. A part of oxidant flow was activated by the discharge. Synthesis-gas composition was analysed by means of mass-spectrometry and gas-chromatography. A standard boiler, which operates on natural gas and LPG, was used for the burning of synthesis-gas

  12. Methane combustion in catalytic premixed burners

    Cerri, I.; Saracco, G.; Specchia, V.

    1999-01-01

    Catalytic premixed burners for domestic boiler applications were developed with the aim of achieving a power modularity from 10 to 100% and pollutant emissions limited to NO x 2 , where the combustion took place entirely inside the burner heating it to incandescence and allowing a decrease in the flame temperature and NO x emissions. Such results were confirmed through further tests carried out in a commercial industrial-scale boiler equipped with the conical panels. All the results, by varying the excess air and the heat power employed, are presented and discussed [it

  13. Direct catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of spirulina to biofuels with hydrogen

    Zeng, Qin; Liao, Hansheng; Zhou, Shiqin; Li, Qiuping; Wang, Lu; Yu, Zhihao; Jing, Li

    2018-01-01

    We report herein on acquiring biofuels from direct catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of spirulina. The component of bio-oil from direct catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction was similar to that from two independent processes (including liquefaction and upgrading of biocrude). However, one step process has higher carbon recovery, due to the less loss of carbons. It was demonstrated that the yield and HHV of bio-oil from direct catalytic algae with hydrothermal condition is higher than that from two independent processes.

  14. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis.

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-06-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data.

  15. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-01-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation uni...

  16. Effect of support on the catalytic activity of manganese oxide catalyts for toluene combustion.

    Pozan, Gulin Selda

    2012-06-30

    The aim of this work was to study combustion of toluene (1000ppm) over MnO(2) modified with different supports. α-Al(2)O(3) and γ-Al(2)O(3) obtained from Boehmite, γ-Al(2)O(3) (commercial), SiO(2), TiO(2) and ZrO(2) were used as commercial support materials. In view of potential interest of this process, the influence of support material on the catalytic performance was discussed. The deposition of 9.5MnO(2) was performed by impregnation over support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed reduction and oxidation (TPR/TPO) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic tests were carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed-bed flow reactor. 9.5MnO(2)/α-Al(2)O(3)(B) (synthesized from Boehmite) catalyst exhibits the highest catalytic activity, over which the toluene conversion was up to 90% at a temperature of 289°C. Considering all the characterization and reaction data reported in this study, it was concluded that the manganese state and oxygen species played an important role in the catalytic activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Catalytic membrane in reduction of aqueous nitrates: operational principles and catalytic performance

    Ilinitch, O.M.; Cuperus, F.P.; Nosova, L.V.; Gribov, E.N.

    2000-01-01

    The catalytic membrane with palladium-copper active component supported over the macroporous ceramic membrane, and a series of γ-Al 2O 3 supported Pd-Cu catalysts were prepared and investigated. In reduction of nitrate ions by hydrogen in water at ambient temperature, pronounced internal diffusion

  18. Non-thermal plasmas for non-catalytic and catalytic VOC abatement

    Vandenbroucke, Arne M.; Morent, Rino; De Geyter, Nathalie; Leys, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We review the current status of catalytic and non-catalytic VOC abatement based on a vast number of research papers. → The underlying mechanisms of plasma-catalysis for VOC abatement are discussed. → Critical process parameters that determine the influent are discussed and compared. - Abstract: This paper reviews recent achievements and the current status of non-thermal plasma (NTP) technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Many reactor configurations have been developed to generate a NTP at atmospheric pressure. Therefore in this review article, the principles of generating NTPs are outlined. Further on, this paper is divided in two equally important parts: plasma-alone and plasma-catalytic systems. Combination of NTP with heterogeneous catalysis has attracted increased attention in order to overcome the weaknesses of plasma-alone systems. An overview is given of the present understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-catalytic processes. In both parts (plasma-alone systems and plasma-catalysis), literature on the abatement of VOCs is reviewed in close detail. Special attention is given to the influence of critical process parameters on the removal process.

  19. Influence of thermal treatments on the basic and catalytic properties of Mg,Al-mixed oxides derived from hydrotalcites

    Bastiani R.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the influence of calcination conditions on basic properties and catalytic performance of Mg,Al-mixed oxides derived from a hydrotalcite sample (Al/(Al+Mg=0.20. Various heating rates, calcination atmospheres and lengths of calcination at 723K were evaluated. TPD of CO2 and retroaldolization of diacetone alcohol (DAA were used to determine the basic properties of the mixed oxides. The basic site density determined by TPD of CO2 showed a better correlation with catalytic activity for acetone/citral aldol condensation than the relative basicity obtained from retroaldolization of DAA. Calcination atmosphere was the parameter that influenced most the basic and the catalytic properties of the Mg,Al-mixed oxides, with calcination under dry air being the best choice.

  20. Stability for Function Trade-Offs in the Enolase Superfamily 'Catalytic Module'

    Nagatani, R.A.; Gonzalez, A.; Shoichet, B.K.; Brinen, L.S.; Babbitt, P.C.; /UC, San Francisco /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-07-12

    Enzyme catalysis reflects a dynamic interplay between charged and polar active site residues that facilitate function, stabilize transition states, and maintain overall protein stability. Previous studies show that substituting neutral for charged residues in the active site often significantly stabilizes a protein, suggesting a stability trade-off for functionality. In the enolase superfamily, a set of conserved active site residues (the ''catalytic module'') has repeatedly been used in nature in the evolution of many different enzymes for the performance of unique overall reactions involving a chemically diverse set of substrates. This catalytic module provides a robust solution for catalysis that delivers the common underlying partial reaction that supports all of the different overall chemical reactions of the superfamily. As this module has been so broadly conserved in the evolution of new functions, we sought to investigate the extent to which it follows the stability-function trade-off. Alanine substitutions were made for individual residues, groups of residues, and the entire catalytic module of o-succinylbenzoate synthase (OSBS), a member of the enolase superfamily from Escherichia coli. Of six individual residue substitutions, four (K131A, D161A, E190A, and D213A) substantially increased protein stability (by 0.46-4.23 kcal/mol), broadly consistent with prediction of a stability-activity trade-off. The residue most conserved across the superfamily, E190, is by far the most destabilizing. When the individual substitutions were combined into groups (as they are structurally and functionally organized), nonadditive stability effects emerged, supporting previous observations that residues within the module interact as two functional groups within a larger catalytic system. Thus, whereas the multiple-mutant enzymes D161A/E190A/D213A and K131A/K133A/D161A/E190A/D213A/K235A (termed 3KDED) are stabilized relative to the wild-type enzyme (by 1

  1. Microwave Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in Aqueous Solutions

    Cha, Chang

    2003-01-01

    .... A sufficient amount of experimental work has been completed evaluating the performance of the microwave catalytic oxidation process and determining the effect of different operating parameters...

  2. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size and composition. We find that Pt electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level combined with a modified electron distribution in the nanoparticle due to Pt-to-Au charge transfer are the origin of the outstanding catalytic properties. From our model we deduce the catalytically favorable surface patterns that induce ensemble and ligand effects. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  3. Mean field approximation for the kinetics of the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ammonia

    Santos, M.; Bodanese, J.P. [Centro de Ensino Sao Jose, Universidade do Vale do Itajai (Brazil); S. Grandi, B.C. da [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil)

    2007-04-15

    In this work we study a catalytic reaction model among three monomers in order to understand the chemical kinetics of the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide by ammonia (4NO+4NH{sub 3}+O{sub 2}{yields}4N{sub 2}+6H{sub 2}O). Our model takes into account the formation of the intermediate species in the global scheme of the reaction. In order to determine the dynamical behaviour of the model we used single site approximation method. In this approach we have observed that, depending on the values of the control parameters, the model presents an active or an inactive phase. In fact, the dynamical phase diagram of the model exhibits a first order line separating these two phases. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. A consistent reaction scheme for the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides with ammonia

    Janssens, Ton V.W.; Falsig, Hanne; Lundegaard, Lars Fahl

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, the standard and fast selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 are described in a complete catalytic cycle, that is able to produce the correct stoichiometry, while only allowing adsorption and desorption of stable molecules. The standard SCR reaction is a coupling of the ac...... for standard SCR. Finally, the role of a nitrate/nitrite equilibrium and the possible in uence of Cu dimers and Brønsted sites are discussed, and an explanation is offered as to how a catalyst can be effective for SCR, while being a poor catalyst for NO oxidation to NO2....... spectroscopy (FTIR). A consequence of the reaction scheme is that all intermediates in fast SCR are also part of the standard SCR cycle. The calculated activation energy by density functional theory (DFT) indicates that the oxidation of an NO molecule by O2 to a bidentate nitrate ligand is rate determining...

  5. Synthesis and catalytic performance of ZSM-5/MCM-41 composite molecular sieve from palygorskite

    Jiang, Jinlong; Wu, Mei; Yang, Yong; Duanmu, Chuansong; Chen, Jing; Gu, Xu

    2017-10-01

    ZSM-5/MCM-41 composite molecular sieve has been hydrothermally synthesized through a two-step crystallization process using palygorskite (PAL) as silicon and aluminum source. The products were characterized by various means and their catalytic properties for acetalization of cyclohexanone and esterification of acetic acid and n-butanol were also investigated. In the first step ZSM-5 zeolite could be formed from the acid-treated PAL after hydrothermal treatment using tetrapropylammonium bromide as template. XRD patterns, N2 adsorption and desorption data, and TEM images show that the composite obtained in the secondary step had a well-ordered mesoporous MCM-41 phase and a microporous ZSM-5 zeolite phase. Compared with ZSM-5, ZSM-5/MCM-41 composite possessed more total acid amount, weak acid sites and large pore structure due to the formation of MCM-41 and exhibited higher catalytic activity for the acetalization and esterification reaction.

  6. Multifaceted catalytic hydrogenation of amides via diverse activation of a sterically confined bipyridine-ruthenium framework.

    Miura, Takashi; Naruto, Masayuki; Toda, Katsuaki; Shimomura, Taiki; Saito, Susumu

    2017-05-16

    Amides are ubiquitous and abundant in nature and our society, but are very stable and reluctant to salt-free, catalytic chemical transformations. Through the activation of a "sterically confined bipyridine-ruthenium (Ru) framework (molecularly well-designed site to confine adsorbed H 2 in)" of a precatalyst, catalytic hydrogenation of formamides through polyamide is achieved under a wide range of reaction conditions. Both C=O bond and C-N bond cleavage of a lactam became also possible using a single precatalyst. That is, catalyst diversity is induced by activation and stepwise multiple hydrogenation of a single precatalyst when the conditions are varied. The versatile catalysts have different structures and different resting states for multifaceted amide hydrogenation, but the common structure produced upon reaction with H 2 , which catalyzes hydrogenation, seems to be "H-Ru-N-H."

  7. Catalytic Gas-Phase Production of Lactide from Renewable Alkyl Lactates.

    De Clercq, Rik; Dusselier, Michiel; Makshina, Ekaterina; Sels, Bert F

    2018-03-12

    A new route to lactide, which is a key building block of the bioplastic polylactic acid, is proposed involving a continuous catalytic gas-phase transesterification of renewable alkyl lactates in a scalable fixed-bed setup. Supported TiO 2 /SiO 2 catalysts are highly selective to lactide, with only minimal lactide racemization. The solvent-free process allows for easy product separation and recycling of unconverted alkyl lactates and recyclable lactyl intermediates. The catalytic activity of TiO 2 /SiO 2 catalysts was strongly correlated to their optical properties by DR UV/Vis spectroscopy. Catalysts with high band-gap energy of the supported TiO 2 phase, indicative of a high surface spreading of isolated Ti centers, show the highest turnover frequency per Ti site. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Nature of active centers of catalytic system of VOCl/sub 3/ - Al(C/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/Cl

    Dubnikova, I L; Meshkova, I N [AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Khimicheskoj Fiziki

    1977-05-01

    To investigate the nature of the active sites of the catalyst VOCl/sub 3/-Al(C/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/Cl during olefine polymerization, the following factors have been studied: composition and catalytic activity of homogeneous and heterogeneous components of the system, valent state of vanadium entering into the composition of the catalytic sites, effect of an organoaluminium component on the catalytic activity of the system, and the properties of the polymeric products being formed. It has been shown that the catalytic sites of the system VOCl/sub 3/-Al(C/sub 4/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/Cl are located, predominantly, in the heterogeneus phase of the catalyst. A conclusion has been made that heterogeneous catalytic sites are bimetal complexes of alkyl derivatives of vanadium trichloride and aluminuim alkylchlorides and that polycentral mechanism of catalysis of olefine polymerization in the presence of VOCl/sub 3/-Al(C/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/Cl is caused by two types of active vanadium-aluminium complexes differing in the nature of an organoaluminium component.

  9. Visualization of the Differential Transition State Stabilization within the Active Site Environment

    Jerzy Leszczynski

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Increasing interest in the enzymatic reaction mechanisms and in the nature of catalytic effects in enzymes causes the need of appropriate visualization methods. A new interactive method to investigate catalytic effects using differential transition state stabilization approach (DTSS [1, 2] is presented. The catalytic properties of the active site of cytidine deaminase (E.C. 3.5.4.5 is visualized in the form of differential electrostatic properties. The visualization was implemented using scripting interface of VMD [3]. Cumulative Atomic Multipole Moments (CAMM [4,5,6] were utilized for efficient yet accurate evaluation of the electrostatic properties. The implementation is efficient enough for interactive presentation of catalytic effects in the active site of the enzyme due to transition state or substrate movement. This system of visualization of DTTS approach can be potentially used to validate hypotheses regarding the catalytic mechanism or to study binding properties of transition state analogues.

  10. Fluorine-doped carbon nanotubes as an efficient metal-free catalyst for destruction of organic pollutants in catalytic ozonation.

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie; Yu, Hongtao

    2018-01-01

    Metal-free carbon materials have been presented to be potential alternatives to metal-based catalysts for heterogeneous catalytic ozonation, yet the catalytic performance still needs to be enhanced. Doping carbon with non-metallic heteroatoms (e.g., N, B, and F) could alter the electronic structure and electrochemical properties of original carbon materials, has been considered to be an effective method for improving the catalytic activity of carbon materials. Herein, fluorine-doped carbon nanotubes (F-CNTs) were synthesized via a facile method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy. The as-synthesized F-CNTs exhibited notably enhanced catalytic activity towards catalytic ozonation for the degradation of organic pollutants. The oxalic acid removal efficiency of optimized F-CNTs was approximately two times as much as that of pristine CNTs, and even exceeded those of four conventional metal-based catalysts (ZnO, Al 2 O 3 , Fe 2 O 3 , and MnO 2 ). The XPS and Raman studies confirmed that the covalent CF bonds were formed at the sp 3 C sites instead of sp 2 C sites on CNTs, not only resulting in high positive charge density of C atoms adjacent to F atoms, but remaining the delocalized π-system with intact carbon structure of F-CNTs, which then favored the conversion of ozone molecules (O 3 ) into reactive oxygen species (ROS) and contributed to the high oxalic acid removal efficiency. Furthermore, electron spin resonance (ESR) studies revealed that superoxide radicals (O 2 - ) and singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) might be the dominant ROS that responsible for the degradation of oxalic acid in these catalytic systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Computational and Physical Analysis of Catalytic Compounds

    Wu, Richard; Sohn, Jung Jae; Kyung, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Nanoparticles exhibit unique physical and chemical properties depending on their geometrical properties. For this reason, synthesis of nanoparticles with controlled shape and size is important to use their unique properties. Catalyst supports are usually made of high-surface-area porous oxides or carbon nanomaterials. These support materials stabilize metal catalysts against sintering at high reaction temperatures. Many studies have demonstrated large enhancements of catalytic behavior due to the role of the oxide-metal interface. In this paper, the catalyzing ability of supported nano metal oxides, such as silicon oxide and titanium oxide compounds as catalysts have been analyzed using computational chemistry method. Computational programs such as Gamess and Chemcraft has been used in an effort to compute the efficiencies of catalytic compounds, and bonding energy changes during the optimization convergence. The result illustrates how the metal oxides stabilize and the steps that it takes. The graph of the energy computation step(N) versus energy(kcal/mol) curve shows that the energy of the titania converges faster at the 7th iteration calculation, whereas the silica converges at the 9th iteration calculation.

  12. New separation technique. Catalytically functionated separation membrane

    Urgami, Tadashi [Kansai Univ., Osaka (Japan)

    1989-02-01

    This report introduces research examples, showing the fundamental principle of the membrane by separating the catalytically functionated separation membrane into enzyme fixing separation membrane, polymerized metal complex separation membrane and polymer catalyst separation membrane. This membrane can achieve both functions of separation and catalytic reaction simultaneously and has sufficient possibility to combine powerful functions. Enzyme fixing separation membrane is prepared by carrier combination method, bridging method or covering method and the enzyme fixing method with polymerized complex in which enzyme is controlled to prevent the activity lowering as much as possible and enzyme is fixed from an aqueous solution into polymer membrane. This membrane is applied to the continuous manufacturing of invert sugar from cane sugar and adsorption and removing of harmful substances from blood by utilizing both micro-capsuled urease and active carbon. Alginic acid-copper (II) complex membrane is used for the polymerized metal complex membrane and polystyrene sulfonate membrane is used for the polymer catalyst separation membrane. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tabs.

  13. Study of catalytic phenomena in radiation chemistry

    Dran, J.C.

    1965-01-01

    Two phenomena have been studied: the action of γ rays from radio-cobalt on the adsorption and catalytic properties of ZnO and NiO in. relationship with the heterogeneous oxidation of CO, and the homogeneous catalysis by OsO 4 of the oxidation of various aqueous phase solutes by the same radiation. The prior irradiation of ZnO and of NiO does not modify their catalytic activity but generally increases the adsorption energy of -the gases CO and O 2 . The influence of the radiations appears to be connected with the presence of traces of water on ZnO and of an excess of oxygen on NiO. Osmium tetroxide which is not degraded by irradiation in acid solution, accelerates the radiolytic oxidation of certain compounds (Te IV , Pt 11 , As 111 ) in the presence of oxygen, as a result of its sensitizing effect on the oxidation by H 2 O 2 . In the case of phosphites on the other hand, OsO 4 has a protecting action under certain conditions of acidity and may suppress entirely the chain reaction which characterizes the oxidation of this solute byγ rays. A general mechanism is proposed for these phenomena. The rate constant for the OsO 4 + HO 2 reaction is calculated to be 5.7 x 10 5 l.mol -1 . sec -1 . (author) [fr

  14. Catalytic hydroprocessing of heavy oil feedstocks

    Okunev, A G; Parkhomchuk, E V; Lysikov, A I; Parunin, P D; Semeikina, V S; Parmon, V N

    2015-01-01

    A grave problem of modern oil refining industry is continuous deterioration of the produced oil quality, on the one hand, and increase in the demand for motor fuels, on the other hand. This necessitates processing of heavy oil feedstock with high contents of sulfur, nitrogen and metals and the atmospheric residue. This feedstock is converted to light oil products via hydrogenation processes catalyzed by transition metal compounds, first of all, cobalt- or nickel-promoted molybdenum and tungsten compounds. The processing involves desulfurization, denitrogenation and demetallization reactions as well as reactions converting heavy hydrocarbons to lighter fuel components. The review discusses the mechanisms of reactions involved in the heavy feedstock hydroprocessing, the presumed structure and state of the catalytically active components and methods for the formation of supports with the desired texture. Practically used and prospective approaches to catalytic upgrading of heavy oil feedstock as well as examples of industrial processing of bitumen and vacuum residues in the presence of catalysts are briefly discussed. The bibliography includes 140 references

  15. Catalytic hydroprocessing of heavy oil feedstocks

    Okunev, A. G.; Parkhomchuk, E. V.; Lysikov, A. I.; Parunin, P. D.; Semeikina, V. S.; Parmon, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    A grave problem of modern oil refining industry is continuous deterioration of the produced oil quality, on the one hand, and increase in the demand for motor fuels, on the other hand. This necessitates processing of heavy oil feedstock with high contents of sulfur, nitrogen and metals and the atmospheric residue. This feedstock is converted to light oil products via hydrogenation processes catalyzed by transition metal compounds, first of all, cobalt- or nickel-promoted molybdenum and tungsten compounds. The processing involves desulfurization, denitrogenation and demetallization reactions as well as reactions converting heavy hydrocarbons to lighter fuel components. The review discusses the mechanisms of reactions involved in the heavy feedstock hydroprocessing, the presumed structure and state of the catalytically active components and methods for the formation of supports with the desired texture. Practically used and prospective approaches to catalytic upgrading of heavy oil feedstock as well as examples of industrial processing of bitumen and vacuum residues in the presence of catalysts are briefly discussed. The bibliography includes 140 references.

  16. Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels

    Smith, Lance; Etemad, Shahrokh; Karim, Hasan; Pfefferle, William C.

    2009-04-21

    An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

  17. A QM/MM study of the catalytic mechanism of nicotinamidase.

    Sheng, Xiang; Liu, Yongjun

    2014-02-28

    Nicotinamidase (Pnc1) is a member of Zn-dependent amidohydrolases that hydrolyzes nicotinamide (NAM) to nicotinic acid (NA), which is a key step in the salvage pathway of NAD(+) biosynthesis. In this paper, the catalytic mechanism of Pnc1 has been investigated by using a combined quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical (QM/MM) approach based on the recently obtained crystal structure of Pnc1. The reaction pathway, the detail of each elementary step, the energetics of the whole catalytic cycle, and the roles of key residues and Zn-binding site are illuminated. Our calculation results indicate that the catalytic water molecule comes from the bulk solvent, which is then deprotonated by residue D8. D8 functions as a proton transfer station between C167 and NAM, while the activated C167 serves as the nucleophile. The residue K122 only plays a role in stabilizing intermediates and transition states. The oxyanion hole formed by the amide backbone nitrogen atoms of A163 and C167 has the function to stabilize the hydroxyl anion of nicotinamide. The Zn-binding site rather than a single Zn(2+) ion acts as a Lewis acid to influence the reaction. Two elementary steps, the activation of C167 in the deamination process and the decomposition of catalytic water in the hydrolysis process, correspond to the large energy barriers of 25.7 and 28.1 kcal mol(-1), respectively, meaning that both of them contribute a lot to the overall reaction barrier. Our results may provide useful information for the design of novel and efficient Pnc1 inhibitors and related biocatalytic applications.

  18. Redox competition mode of scanning electrochemical microscopy (RC-SECM) for visualisation of local catalytic activity.

    Eckhard, Kathrin; Chen, Xingxing; Turcu, Florin; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2006-12-07

    In order to locally analyse catalytic activity on modified surfaces a transient redox competition mode of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) has been developed. In a bi-potentiostatic experiment the SECM tip competes with the sample for the very same analyte. This leads to a current decrease at the SECM tip, if it is positioned in close proximity to an active catalyst site on the surface. Specifically, local catalytic activity of a Pt-catalyst modified sample with respect to the catalytic reduction of molecular oxygen was investigated. At higher local catalytic activity the local 02 partial pressure within the gap between accurately positioned SECM tip and sample is depleted, leading to a noticeable tip current decrease over active sites. A flexible software module has been implemented into the SECM to adapt the competition conditions by proper definition of tip and sample potentials. A potential pulse profile enables the localised electrochemically induced generation of molecular oxygen prior to the competition detection. The current decay curves are recorded over the entire duration of the applied reduction pulse. Hence, a time resolved processing of the acquired current values provides movies of the local oxygen concentration against x,y-position. The SECM redox competition mode was verified with a macroscopic Pt-disk electrode as a test sample to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. Moreover, highly dispersed electro-deposited spots of gold and platinum on glassy carbon were visualised using the redox competition mode of SECM. Catalyst spots of different nature as well as activity inhomogeneities within one spot caused by local variations in Pt-loading were visualised successfully.

  19. Structured materials for catalytic and sensing applications

    Hokenek, Selma

    The optical and chemical properties of the materials used in catalytic and sensing applications directly determine the characteristics of the resultant catalyst or sensor. It is well known that a catalyst needs to have high activity, selectivity, and stability to be viable in an industrial setting. The hydrogenation activity of palladium catalysts is known to be excellent, but the industrial applications are limited by the cost of obtaining catalyst in amounts large enough to make their use economical. As a result, alloying palladium with a cheaper, more widely available metal while maintaining the high catalytic activity seen in monometallic catalysts is, therefore, an attractive option. Similarly, the optical properties of nanoscale materials used for sensing must be attuned to their application. By adjusting the shape and composition of nanoparticles used in such applications, very fine changes can be made to the frequency of light that they absorb most efficiently. The design, synthesis, and characterization of (i) size controlled monometallic palladium nanoparticles for catalytic applications, (ii) nickel-palladium bimetallic nanoparticles and (iii) silver-palladium nanoparticles with applications in drug detection and biosensing through surface plasmon resonance, respectively, will be discussed. The composition, size, and shape of the nanoparticles formed were controlled through the use of wet chemistry techniques. After synthesis, the nanoparticles were analyzed using physical and chemical characterization techniques such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy- Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry (STEM-EDX). The Pd and Ni-Pd nanoparticles were then supported on silica for catalytic testing using mass spectrometry. The optical properties of the Ag-Pd nanoparticles in suspension were further investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV-Vis). Monometallic palladium particles have

  20. Iron and Zinc Complexes of Bulky Bis-Imidazole Ligands : Enzyme Mimicry and Ligand-Centered Redox Activity

    Folkertsma, E.

    2016-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is directed to the development of cheap and non-toxic iron-based homogeneous catalysts, using enzyme models and redox non-innocent ligands. Inspired by nature, the first approach focuses on the synthesis of structural models of the active site of non-heme iron

  1. Site Features

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of various site features from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times...

  2. Catalytic hydrodeoxygenation of 2-methoxy phenol and dibenzofuran over Pt/mesoporous zeolites

    Lee, Hyung Won; Jun, Bo Ram; Kim, Hannah; Kim, Do Heui; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Park, Sung Hoon; Ko, Chang Hyun; Kim, Tae-Wan; Park, Young-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    The hydrodeoxygenation of 2-methoxy phenol and dibenzofuran, which are representative model compounds of bio-oil, was performed using two different Pt/mesoporous zeolite catalysts, Pt/mesoporous Y and Pt/mesoporous MFI. The reforming of 2-methoxy phenol and dibenzofuran via catalytic hydrodeoxygenation was investigated using a batch reactor at 40 bar and 250 °C. The characteristics of the catalysts were analyzed by N 2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction, and NH 3 temperature programmed desorption. Pt/mesoporous zeolite catalysts containing both strong acid sites and mesopores showed the higher conversion of 2-methoxy phenol than Pt/SiO 2 and Pt/Si-MCM-48 with no acid sites, Pt/γ-Al 2 O 3 , and a mixture of mesoporous Y and Pt/SiO 2 , indicating the importance of both Pt and strong acid sites for high catalytic activity. Among the two Pt/mesoporous zeolite catalysts tested, the conversion of 2-methoxy phenol to cyclohexane over Pt/mesoporous Y was much higher than that over the Pt/mesoporous MFI. This was attributed to the better textural properties, such as surface area, pore volume and micropore size, compared to those of Pt/mesoporous MFI. The catalytic conversions of dibenzofuran obtained using two Pt/mesoporous zeolite catalysts were similar and the main products were 1,1′-bicyclohexyl, cyclopentylmethyl-cyclohexane and cyclohexane. In addition, the reaction mechanisms of 2-methoxy phenol and dibenzofuran over Pt/mesoporous zeolite were suggested. - Highlights: • HDO of 2-methoxy phenol and dibenzofuran was performed over Pt/mesoporous zeolites. • Pt/mesoporous zeolites have mesopores and strong acid sites. • Main product of HDO of 2-methoxy phenol was cyclohexane. • Main products of HDO of dibenzofuran were bicyclohexyl (BCH), i-BCH, and cyclohexane

  3. Influence of basic properties of Mg,Al-mixed oxides on their catalytic activity in knoevenagel condensation between benzaldehyde and phenylsulfonylacetonitrile

    Caridad Noda Pérez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic performance of Mg,Al-mixed oxides (MO20, MO25 and MO33 derived from hydrotalcites was evaluated in the Knoevenagel reaction between benzaldehyde and phenylsulfonylacetonitrile at 373 and 383 K. The best results were obtained for the sample MO20 that presented the highest basic sites density and external area and the smallest crystallite sizes. The relative amount of basic sites with weak to intermediate strength also played an important role on catalytic performance. By increasing the catalyst content from 1 to 5 wt.% at 383 K, a complete conversion of the reactants is attained, producing α-phenylsulfonylcinnamonitrile with a selectivity of 100%.

  4. Hydrogen Production From catalytic reforming of greenhouse gases ...

    ADOWIE PERE

    a fixed bed stainless steel reactor. The 20wt%. ... catalytic activity for hydrogen production with the highest yield and selectivity of 32.5% and 17.6% respectively. © JASEM ... CO2 reforming of methane is however not fully developed ..... Design and preparation of .... catalytic nickel membrane for gas to liquid (GTL) process.

  5. Catalytic synthesis of ammonia using vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Billing, Gert D.

    1992-01-01

    The dissociation of nitrogen is the rate-limiting step in the catalytic synthesis of ammonia. Theoretical calculations have shown that the dissociative sticking probability of molecular nitrogen on catalytic active metal surfaces is enhanced by orders of magnitude when the molecules...

  6. synthesis, characterization, electrical and catalytic studies of some

    B. S. Chandravanshi

    catalytic activity of the VO(IV) and Mn(III) complexes have been tested in the epoxidation reaction of styrene ... Vanadyl sulfate pentahydrate, chromium chloride hexahydrate, anhydrous ferric ..... The catalytic oxidation of styrene gives the products styrene oxide, benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, ... bond via a radical mechanism.

  7. Site decontamination

    Bicker, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Among the several DOE sites that have been radiologically decontaminated under the auspices of the Nevada Operations Office are three whose physical characteristics are unique. These are the Tatum Dome Test Site (TDTS) near Hattiesburg, Mississippi; a location of mountainous terrain (Pahute Mesa) on the Nevada Test Site; and the GNOME site near Carlsbad, New Mexico. In each case the contamination, the terrain, and the climate conditions were different. This presentation includes a brief description of each site, the methods used to perform radiological surveys, the logistics required to support the decontamination (including health physics and sample analysis), and the specific techniques used to reduce or remove the contamination

  8. Catalysis by Glomerella cingulata cutinase requires conformational cycling between the active and inactive states of its catalytic triad.

    Nyon, Mun Peak; Rice, David W; Berrisford, John M; Hounslow, Andrea M; Moir, Arthur J G; Huang, Huazhang; Nathan, Sheila; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Craven, C Jeremy

    2009-01-09

    Cutinase belongs to a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of esters and triglycerides. Structural studies on the enzyme from Fusarium solani have revealed the presence of a classic catalytic triad that has been implicated in the enzyme's mechanism. We have solved the crystal structure of Glomerella cingulata cutinase in the absence and in the presence of the inhibitors E600 (diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate) and PETFP (3-phenethylthio-1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-one) to resolutions between 2.6 and 1.9 A. Analysis of these structures reveals that the catalytic triad (Ser136, Asp191, and His204) adopts an unusual configuration with the putative essential histidine His204 swung out of the active site into a position where it is unable to participate in catalysis, with the imidazole ring 11 A away from its expected position. Solution-state NMR experiments are consistent with the disrupted configuration of the triad observed crystallographically. H204N, a site-directed mutant, was shown to be catalytically inactive, confirming the importance of this residue in the enzyme mechanism. These findings suggest that, during its catalytic cycle, cutinase undergoes a significant conformational rearrangement converting the loop bearing the histidine from an inactive conformation, in which the histidine of the triad is solvent exposed, to an active conformation, in which the triad assumes a classic configuration.

  9. Catalytic effect of light illumination on bioleaching of chalcopyrite.

    Zhou, Shuang; Gan, Min; Zhu, Jianyu; Li, Qian; Jie, Shiqi; Yang, Baojun; Liu, Xueduan

    2015-04-01

    The influence of visible light exposure on chalcopyrite bioleaching was investigated using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The results indicated, in both shake-flasks and aerated reactors with 8500-lux light, the dissolved Cu was 91.80% and 23.71% higher, respectively, than that in the controls without light. The catalytic effect was found to increase bioleaching to a certain limit, then plateaued as the initial chalcopyrite concentration increased from 2% to 4.5%. Thus a balanced mineral concentration is highly amenable to bioleaching via offering increased available active sites for light adsorption while eschewing mineral aggregation and screening effects. Using semiconducting chalcopyrite, the light facilitated the reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) as metabolic substrates for A.ferrooxidans, leading to better biomass, lower pH and redox potential, which are conducive to chalcopyrite leaching. The light exposure on iron redox cycling was further confirmed by chemical leaching tests using Fe(3+), which exhibited higher Fe(2+) levels in the light-induced system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Catalytic cracking of iso-hexene over sapo-34 catalyst

    Nawaz, Z.; Shu, Q.

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic cracking of model feed compound, iso-hexene (2-methyl-1-pentene) was experimentally studied over 100% pure SAPO-34 zeolite catalyst. The critical focus was given to obtain maximum propylene selectivity. The product distributions were analyzed at temperature between 450-600 degree C. time-on-stream (TOS) from 1 to 5 min. and at WHSV = 7.9 h/sub -1/ The reaction behavior was quantified on both direct and indirect carbenium ion mechanisms owing to catalyst's small pore diameter with respect to 2-methyl-l-pentene kinetic diameter. The propylene yield and selectivity obtained was 41.2% and 43.1% respectively. with higher overall olefins selectivity 90.3%. The small pore size and week surface acid sites of 1000 percent pure SAPO-34 catalyst were found to be suitable for light olefins production and eliminate chances of bimolecular reactions. It was observed that both conversion and selectivity were strongly effected by TOS, as coke precursors become dominant and deactivate catalyst at higher TOS. (author)

  11. Carbon nanofibers: a versatile catalytic support

    Nelize Maria de Almeida Coelho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is present an overview of the promising results obtained while using carbon nanofibers based composites as catalyst support for different practical applications: hydrazine decomposition, styrene synthesis, direct oxidation of H2S into elementary sulfur and as fuel-cell electrodes. We have also discussed some prospects of the use of these new materials in total combustion of methane and in ammonia decomposition. The macroscopic carbon nanofibers based composites were prepared by the CVD method (Carbon Vapor Deposition employing a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and ethane. The results showed a high catalytic activity and selectivity in comparison to the traditional catalysts employed in these reactions. The fact was attributed, mainly, to the morphology and the high external surface of the catalyst support.

  12. Radiant non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.

    2017-10-31

    A radiant, non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot exhaust gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is positioned adjacent to the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot exhaust gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is positioned outside of flue gas flow path for a relatively large residence time.

  13. Chemical and catalytic effects of ion implantation

    Wolf, G.K.

    1982-01-01

    Energetic particles are used for inducing chemical reactions as well as for modifying the properties of materials with regard to their bulk and surface chemical behavior. The effects are partly caused by radiation damage or phase intermixing, partly by the chemical properties of the individual bombarding particles. In this contribution a survey of relevant applications of these techniques is presented: (1) Chemical reactions of implanted and recoil atoms and their use for syntheses, doping and labeling of compounds. (2) The formation of thin films by decomposing chemical compounds with ion beams. 3) Catalytic effects on substrates treated by sputtering or ion implantation. Recent results with nonmetallic substrates are reviewed. Mainly hydrogenation reactions at a solid/gas interface or redox reactions at an electrified solid/liquid interface are mentioned. The present status and future prospects of these kinds of investigations will be discussed. (author)

  14. Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation

    Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1984-03-27

    A method is described for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor, contracting said reactant in liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure consisting of closed porous containers containing the catalyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column. 7 figs.

  15. Direct catalytic asymmetric aldol-Tishchenko reaction.

    Gnanadesikan, Vijay; Horiuchi, Yoshihiro; Ohshima, Takashi; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2004-06-30

    A direct catalytic asymmetric aldol reaction of propionate equivalent was achieved via the aldol-Tishchenko reaction. Coupling an irreversible Tishchenko reaction to a reversible aldol reaction overcame the retro-aldol reaction problem and thereby afforded the products in high enantio and diastereoselectivity using 10 mol % of the asymmetric catalyst. A variety of ketones and aldehydes, including propyl and butyl ketones, were coupled efficiently, yielding the corresponding aldol-Tishchenko products in up to 96% yield and 95% ee. Diastereoselectivity was generally below the detection limit of 1H NMR (>98:2). Preliminary studies performed to clarify the mechanism revealed that the aldol products were racemic with no diastereoselectivity. On the other hand, the Tishchenko products were obtained in a highly enantiocontrolled manner.

  16. Smoke emissions from a catalytic wood stove

    Cowburn, D.A.; Stephens, N.P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The work reported here was concerned with testing a catalytic wood burning stove (roomheater) following the most applicable UK procedures. The identical stove has also been tested in several other nations to their individual procedures. The results will be submitted to the International Energy Agency (IEA) such that appropriate comparisons can be made. The results comprised: burning rate; an indicative appliance efficiency; heat output; carbon dioxide emissions; carbon monoxide emissions; and smoke emissions. These results were determined with the appliance at three nominal burning rates (high, medium and low). Comparing the results with those obtained in other countries indicates good agreement except when the appliance was operated at low burning rates, under which conditions the UK results indicate significantly worse smoke emissions than those measured by other researchers. (author)

  17. Flowthrough Reductive Catalytic Fractionation of Biomass

    Anderson, Eric M.; Stone, Michael L.; Katahira, Rui; Reed, Michelle; Beckham, Gregg T.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2017-11-01

    Reductive catalytic fractionation (RCF) has emerged as a leading biomass fractionation and lignin valorization strategy. Here, flowthrough reactors were used to investigate RCF of poplar. Most RCF studies to date have been conducted in batch, but a flow-based process enables the acquisition of intrinsic kinetic and mechanistic data essential to accelerate the design, optimization, and scale-up of RCF processes. Time-resolved product distributions and yields obtained from experiments with different catalyst loadings were used to identify and deconvolute events during solvolysis and hydrogenolysis. Multi-bed RCF experiments provided unique insights into catalyst deactivation, showing that leaching, sintering, and surface poisoning are causes for decreased catalyst performance. The onset of catalyst deactivation resulted in higher concentrations of unsaturated lignin intermediates and increased occurrence of repolymerization reactions, producing high-molecular-weight species. Overall, this study demonstrates the concept of flowthrough RCF, which will be vital for realistic scale-up of this promising approach.

  18. Propulsion Mechanism of Catalytic Microjet Engines.

    Fomin, Vladimir M; Hippler, Markus; Magdanz, Veronika; Soler, Lluís; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2014-02-01

    We describe the propulsion mechanism of the catalytic microjet engines that are fabricated using rolled-up nanotech. Microjets have recently shown numerous potential applications in nanorobotics but currently there is a lack of an accurate theoretical model that describes the origin of the motion as well as the mechanism of self-propulsion. The geometric asymmetry of a tubular microjet leads to the development of a capillary force, which tends to propel a bubble toward the larger opening of the tube. Because of this motion in an asymmetric tube, there emerges a momentum transfer to the fluid. In order to compensate this momentum transfer, a jet force acting on the tube occurs. This force, which is counterbalanced by the linear drag force, enables tube velocities of the order of 100 μ m/s. This mechanism provides a fundamental explanation for the development of driving forces that are acting on bubbles in tubular microjets.

  19. Catalytic Synthesis of Nitriles in Continuous Flow

    Nordvang, Emily Catherine

    The objective of this thesis is to report the development of a new, alternative process for the flexible production of nitrile compounds in continuous flow. Nitriles are an important class of compounds that find applications as solvents, chemical intermediates and pharmaceutical compounds......, alternative path to acetonitrile from ethanol via the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylamine. The catalytic activity and product ratios of the batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effect of reaction conditions on the reaction is investigated. The effects of ammonia in the reaction...... dehydrogenation of ethylamine and post-reaction purging.Chapter 4 outlines the application of RuO2/Al2O3 catalysts to the oxidative dehydrogenation of benzylamine in air, utilizing a new reaction setup. Again, batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effects of reaction conditions, ammonia...

  20. Catalytic flash pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake using sodium based catalysts

    Imran, Ali; Bramer, Eddy A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of wood with impregnated vegetable oil was investigated and compared with catalytic pyrolysis of jatropha cake making use of sodium based catalysts to produce a high quality bio-oil. The catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in two

  1. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Oravainen, H. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  2. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Oravainen, H [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  3. Site organization and site arrangement

    Boissonnet, B.; Macqueron, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    The present paper deals with criteria for the choice of a production unit or power plant site, the organization and development of a site in terms of its particular characteristics and takes into account personnel considerations in site organizations as well as the problem of integrating the architecture into the environment. (RW) [de

  4. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical...

  5. Optimization of Cholinesterase-Based Catalytic Bioscavengers Against Organophosphorus Agents.

    Lushchekina, Sofya V; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Grigorenko, Bella L; Nemukhin, Alexander V; Varfolomeev, Sergei D; Lockridge, Oksana; Masson, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Organophosphorus agents (OPs) are irreversible inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). OP poisoning causes major cholinergic syndrome. Current medical counter-measures mitigate the acute effects but have limited action against OP-induced brain damage. Bioscavengers are appealing alternative therapeutic approach because they neutralize OPs in bloodstream before they reach physiological targets. First generation bioscavengers are stoichiometric bioscavengers. However, stoichiometric neutralization requires administration of huge doses of enzyme. Second generation bioscavengers are catalytic bioscavengers capable of detoxifying OPs with a turnover. High bimolecular rate constants ( k cat / K m > 10 6 M -1 min -1 ) are required, so that low enzyme doses can be administered. Cholinesterases (ChE) are attractive candidates because OPs are hemi-substrates. Moderate OP hydrolase (OPase) activity has been observed for certain natural ChEs and for G117H-based human BChE mutants made by site-directed mutagenesis. However, before mutated ChEs can become operational catalytic bioscavengers their dephosphylation rate constant must be increased by several orders of magnitude. New strategies for converting ChEs into fast OPase are based either on combinational approaches or on computer redesign of enzyme. The keystone for rational conversion of ChEs into OPases is to understand the reaction mechanisms with OPs. In the present work we propose that efficient OP hydrolysis can be achieved by re-designing the configuration of enzyme active center residues and by creating specific routes for attack of water molecules and proton transfer. Four directions for nucleophilic attack of water on phosphorus atom were defined. Changes must lead to a novel enzyme, wherein OP hydrolysis wins over competing aging reactions. Kinetic, crystallographic, and computational data have been accumulated that describe mechanisms of reactions involving ChEs. From these studies, it appears that introducing

  6. Optimization of Cholinesterase-Based Catalytic Bioscavengers Against Organophosphorus Agents

    Sofya V. Lushchekina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus agents (OPs are irreversible inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AChE. OP poisoning causes major cholinergic syndrome. Current medical counter-measures mitigate the acute effects but have limited action against OP-induced brain damage. Bioscavengers are appealing alternative therapeutic approach because they neutralize OPs in bloodstream before they reach physiological targets. First generation bioscavengers are stoichiometric bioscavengers. However, stoichiometric neutralization requires administration of huge doses of enzyme. Second generation bioscavengers are catalytic bioscavengers capable of detoxifying OPs with a turnover. High bimolecular rate constants (kcat/Km > 106 M−1min−1 are required, so that low enzyme doses can be administered. Cholinesterases (ChE are attractive candidates because OPs are hemi-substrates. Moderate OP hydrolase (OPase activity has been observed for certain natural ChEs and for G117H-based human BChE mutants made by site-directed mutagenesis. However, before mutated ChEs can become operational catalytic bioscavengers their dephosphylation rate constant must be increased by several orders of magnitude. New strategies for converting ChEs into fast OPase are based either on combinational approaches or on computer redesign of enzyme. The keystone for rational conversion of ChEs into OPases is to understand the reaction mechanisms with OPs. In the present work we propose that efficient OP hydrolysis can be achieved by re-designing the configuration of enzyme active center residues and by creating specific routes for attack of water molecules and proton transfer. Four directions for nucleophilic attack of water on phosphorus atom were defined. Changes must lead to a novel enzyme, wherein OP hydrolysis wins over competing aging reactions. Kinetic, crystallographic, and computational data have been accumulated that describe mechanisms of reactions involving ChEs. From these studies, it appears that

  7. Design of a facility for the in situ measurement of catalytic reaction by neutron scattering spectroscopy

    Tan, Shuai; Cheng, Yongqiang; Daemen, Luke L.; Lutterman, Daniel A.

    2018-01-01

    Catalysis is a critical enabling science for future energy needs. The next frontier of catalysis is to evolve from catalyst discovery to catalyst design, and for this next step to be realized, we must develop new techniques to better understand reaction mechanisms. To do this, we must connect catalytic reaction rates and selectivities to the kinetics, energetics, and dynamics of individual elementary steps and relate these to the structure and dynamics of the catalytic sites involved. Neutron scattering spectroscopies offer unique capabilities that are difficult or impossible to match by other techniques. The current study presents the development of a compact and portable instrumental design that enables the in situ investigation of catalytic samples by neutron scattering techniques. The developed apparatus was tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory and includes a gas handling panel that allows for computer hookups to control the panel externally and online measurement equipment such as coupled GC-FID/TCD (Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detector/Thermal Conductivity Detector) and MS (Mass Spectrometry) to characterize offgassing while the sample is in the neutron scattering spectrometer. This system is flexible, modular, compact, and portable enabling its use for many types of gas-solid and liquid-solid reactions at the various beamlines housed at the SNS.

  8. Mapping Catalytically Relevant Edge Electronic States of MoS2

    2018-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is a semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide that is known to be a catalyst for both the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) as well as for hydro-desulfurization (HDS) of sulfur-rich hydrocarbon fuels. Specifically, the edges of MoS2 nanostructures are known to be far more catalytically active as compared to unmodified basal planes. However, in the absence of the precise details of the geometric and electronic structure of the active catalytic sites, a rational means of modulating edge reactivity remain to be developed. Here we demonstrate using first-principles calculations, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, as well as scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) imaging that edge corrugations yield distinctive spectroscopic signatures corresponding to increased localization of hybrid Mo 4d states. Independent spectroscopic signatures of such edge states are identified at both the S L2,3 and S K-edges with distinctive spatial localization of such states observed in S L2,3-edge STXM imaging. The presence of such low-energy hybrid states at the edge of the conduction band is seen to correlate with substantially enhanced electrocatalytic activity in terms of a lower Tafel slope and higher exchange current density. These results elucidate the nature of the edge electronic structure and provide a clear framework for its rational manipulation to enhance catalytic activity. PMID:29721532

  9. Effect of hierarchical porosity and phosphorus modification on the catalytic properties of zeolite Y

    Li, Wenlin; Zheng, Jinyu; Luo, Yibin; Da, Zhijian, E-mail: dazhijian.ripp@sinopec.com

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Hierarchical zeolite Y was prepared by citric acid treatment and alkaline treatment with NaOH&TBPH. • The addition of TBPH during desilication process transferred the bridge bonded OH− to the terminal P−OH group. • Moderate Brønsted acid sites could be created with phosphorus modification. • Zeolite with hierarchical porosity and appropriated acidities favored high conversion of 1,3,5-TIPB. - Abstract: The zeolite Y is considered as a leading catalyst for FCC industry. The acidity and porosity modification play important roles in determining the final catalytic properties of zeolite Y. The alkaline treatment of zeolite Y by dealumination and alkaline treatment with NaOH and NaOH&TBPH was investigated. The zeolites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, low-temperature adsorption of nitrogen, transmission electron microscope, NMR, NH{sub 3}-TPD and IR study of acidity. Accordingly, the hierarchical porosity and acidity property were discussed systematically. Finally, the catalytic performance of the zeolites Y was evaluated in the cracking of 1,3,5-TIPB. It was found that desilication with NaOH&TBPH ensured the more uniform intracrystalline mesoporosity with higher microporosity, while preserving higher B/L ratio and moderate Brønsted acidities resulting in catalysts with the most appropriated acidity and then with better catalytic performance.

  10. Synthesis of MoO3 nanoparticles for azo dye degradation by catalytic ozonation

    Manivel, Arumugam; Lee, Gang-Juan; Chen, Chin-Yi; Chen, Jing-Heng; Ma, Shih-Hsin; Horng, Tzzy-Leng; Wu, Jerry J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Synthesis of one-dimensional MoO 3 nanostructures using hydrothermal, microwave, and sonochemical methods. • Sonochemical synthesized MoO 3 presents the best efficiency for the dye removal by catalytic ozonation. • Efficient environmental remediation process. - Abstract: One-dimensional molybdenum trioxide nanostructures were prepared in three different approaches, including thermal, microwave, and sonochemical methods. The physicochemical properties of the obtained MoO 3 nanoparticles were investigated by diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis. Among the methods as investigated, sonochemical synthesis gave well-dispersed fine MoO 3 nanoparticles compared with the other approaches. All the synthesized MoO 3 nanostructures were examined for the catalytic ozonation to degrade azo dye in aqueous environment. Different performances were obtained for the catalyst prepared in different methods and the catalytic efficiencies were found to be the order of sonochemical, microwave, and then thermal methods. The sonochemical MoO 3 catalyst allowed the total dye removal within 20 min and its good performance was justified according to their higher surface area with higher number of active sites that provide effective dye interaction for better degradation

  11. Site operations

    House, W.B.; Ebenhack, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    This chapter is a discussion of the management and operations practices used at the Barnwell Waste Management Facility in Barnwell, SC. The following topics are discussed: (1) Waste receiving and inspection, including manifest and certificates of compliance, radiological surveys, disposition of nonconforming items, and decontamination and disposition of secondary waste streams; (2) Waste disposal, including Title 10 CFR 61 requirements, disposal area evaluations, shipment offloading, container emplacement, and radiation protection; (3) Trench closure, including trench backfilling, trench capping, and permanent markers; (4) Site maintenance and stabilization, including trench maintenance, surface water management, and site closure activities; (5) Site monitoring programs, including operational monitoring, and environmental monitoring program; (6) Personnel training and qualifications, including basic training program, safety training program, special skills training, and physical qualifications; (7) Records management, including waste records, personnel training records, personnel dosimetry records, site monitoring records, trench qualification and construction records, and site drawings and stabilization records; (8) Site security; (9) Emergency response plans; and (10) Quality assurance

  12. Effect of the methionine ligand on the reorganization energy of the type-1 copper site of nitrite Reductase

    Farver, Ole; Wijma, Hein J.; MacPherson, Iain

    2007-01-01

    Copper-containing nitrite reductase harbors a type-1 and a type-2 Cu site. The former acts as the electron acceptor site of the enzyme, and the latter is the site of catalytic action. The effect of the methionine ligand on the reorganization energy of the type-1 site was explored by studying...

  13. CATALYTIC PERFORMANCES OF Fe2O3/TS-1 CATALYST IN PHENOL HYDROXYLATION REACTION

    Didik Prasetyoko

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxylation reaction of phenol into diphenol, such as hydroquinone and catechol, has a great role in many industrial applications. Phenol hydroxylation reaction can be carried out using Titanium Silicalite-1 (TS-1 as catalyst and H2O2 as an oxidant. TS-1 catalyst shows high activity and selectivity for phenol hydroxylation reaction. However, its hydrophobic sites lead to slow H2O2 adsorption toward the active site of TS-1. Consequently, the reaction rate of phenol hydroxylation reaction is tends to be low. Addition of metal oxide Fe2O3 enhanced hydrophilicity of TS-1 catalyst. Liquid phase catalytic phenol hydroxylation using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant was carried out over iron (III oxide-modified TS-1 catalyst (Fe2O3/TS-1, that were prepared by impregnation method using iron (III nitrate as precursor and characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, pyridine adsorption, and hydrophilicity techniques. Catalysts 1Fe2O3/TS-1 showed maximum catalytic activity of hydroquinone product. In this research, the increase of hydroquinone formation rate is due to the higher hydrophilicity of Fe2O3/TS-1 catalysts compare to the parent catalyst, TS-1.   Keywords: Fe2O3/TS-1, hydrophilic site, phenol hydroxylation

  14. Catalytic conversion of CO2 into valuable products

    Pham-Huu, C.; Ledoux, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Synthesis gas, a mixture of H 2 and CO, is an important feed-stock for several chemical processes operated in the production of methanol and synthetic fuels through a Fischer- Tropsch synthesis. Synthesis gas is produced via an endothermic steam reforming of methane (CH 4 + H 2 O → CO + 3H 2 , ΔH = +225.4 kJ.mol -1 ), catalytic or direct partial oxidation of methane (CH 4 + (1/2)O 2 → CO + 2H 2 , ΔH -38 kJ.mol -1 ) and CO 2 reforming of methane (CH 4 + CO 2 → 2CO + 2H 2 , ΔH= +247 kJ.mol -1 ). The main disadvantage of these processes is the high coke formation, essentially in the nano-filament form, which may cause severe deactivation of the catalyst by pore or active site blocking and sometimes, physical disintegration of the catalyst body causing a high pressure drop along the catalyst bed and even, in some cases, inducing damage to the reactor itself. Previous results obtained in the catalytic partial oxidation of methane have shown that due to the hot spot and carbon nano-filaments formation, especially in the case of the CO 2 reforming, the alumina-based catalyst in an extrudate form was broken into powder which induces a significant pressure drop across the catalytic bed. In the case of endothermic reactions, steam and CO 2 reforming, the temperature drop within the catalyst bed could also modified the activity of the catalyst. Silicon carbide (SiC) exhibits a high thermal conductivity, a high resistance towards oxidation, a high mechanical strength, and chemical inertness, all of which make it a good candidate for use as catalyst support in several endothermic and exothermic reactions such as dehydrogenation, selective partial oxidation, and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The gas-solid reaction allows the preparation of SiC with medium surface area, i.e. 10 to 40 m 2 .g -1 , and controlled macroscopic shape, i.e. grains, extrudates or foam, for it subsequence use as catalyst support. In addition, due to its chemical

  15. Catalytic oxidative desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels using air

    Sundararaman, Ramanathan

    Conventional approaches to oxidative desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbons involve use of high-purity, expensive water soluble peroxide for oxidation of sulfur compounds followed by post-treatment for removal of oxidized sulfones by extraction. Both are associated with higher cost due to handling, storage of oxidants and yield loss with extraction and water separation, making the whole process more expensive. This thesis explores an oxidative desulfurization process using air as an oxidant followed by catalytic decomposition of sulfones thereby eliminating the aforementioned issues. Oxidation of sulfur compounds was realized by a two step process in which peroxides were first generated in-situ by catalytic air oxidation, followed by catalytic oxidation of S compounds using the peroxides generated in-situ completing the two step approach. By this technique it was feasible to oxidize over 90% of sulfur compounds present in real jet (520 ppmw S) and diesel (41 ppmw S) fuels. Screening of bulk and supported CuO based catalysts for peroxide generation using model aromatic compound representing diesel fuel showed that bulk CuO catalyst was more effective in producing peroxides with high yield and selectivity. Testing of three real diesel fuels obtained from different sources for air oxidation over bulk CuO catalyst showed different level of effectiveness for generating peroxides in-situ which was consistent with air oxidation of representative model aromatic compounds. Peroxides generated in-situ was then used as an oxidant to oxidize sulfur compounds present in the fuel over MoO3/SiO2 catalyst. 81% selectivity of peroxides for oxidation of sulfur compounds was observed on MoO3/SiO2 catalyst at 40 °C and under similar conditions MoO3/Al2O3 gave only 41% selectivity. This difference in selectivity might be related to the difference in the nature of active sites of MoO3 on SiO2 and Al2O 3 supports as suggested by H2-TPR and XRD analyses. Testing of supported and bulk Mg

  16. Large-Scale Analysis Exploring Evolution of Catalytic Machineries and Mechanisms in Enzyme Superfamilies.

    Furnham, Nicholas; Dawson, Natalie L; Rahman, Syed A; Thornton, Janet M; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-01-29

    Enzymes, as biological catalysts, form the basis of all forms of life. How these proteins have evolved their functions remains a fundamental question in biology. Over 100 years of detailed biochemistry studies, combined with the large volumes of sequence and protein structural data now available, means that we are able to perform large-scale analyses to address this question. Using a range of computational tools and resources, we have compiled information on all experimentally annotated changes in enzyme function within 379 structurally defined protein domain superfamilies, linking the changes observed in functions during evolution to changes in reaction chemistry. Many superfamilies show changes in function at some level, although one function often dominates one superfamily. We use quantitative measures of changes in reaction chemistry to reveal the various types of chemical changes occurring during evolution and to exemplify these by detailed examples. Additionally, we use structural information of the enzymes active site to examine how different superfamilies have changed their catalytic machinery during evolution. Some superfamilies have changed the reactions they perform without changing catalytic machinery. In others, large changes of enzyme function, in terms of both overall chemistry and substrate specificity, have been brought about by significant changes in catalytic machinery. Interestingly, in some superfamilies, relatives perform similar functions but with different catalytic machineries. This analysis highlights characteristics of functional evolution across a wide range of superfamilies, providing insights that will be useful in predicting the function of uncharacterised sequences and the design of new synthetic enzymes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. The catalytic cycle of nitrous oxide reductase - The enzyme that catalyzes the last step of denitrification.

    Carreira, Cíntia; Pauleta, Sofia R; Moura, Isabel

    2017-12-01

    The reduction of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide requires a catalyst to overcome the large activation energy barrier of this reaction. Its biological decomposition to the inert dinitrogen can be accomplished by denitrifiers through nitrous oxide reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the last step of the denitrification, a pathway of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. Nitrous oxide reductase is a multicopper enzyme containing a mixed valence CuA center that can accept electrons from small electron shuttle proteins, triggering electron flow to the catalytic sulfide-bridged tetranuclear copper "CuZ center". This enzyme has been isolated with its catalytic center in two forms, CuZ*(4Cu1S) and CuZ(4Cu2S), proven to be spectroscopic and structurally different. In the last decades, it has been a challenge to characterize the properties of this complex enzyme, due to the different oxidation states observed for each of its centers and the heterogeneity of its preparations. The substrate binding site in those two "CuZ center" forms and which is the active form of the enzyme is still a matter of debate. However, in the last years the application of different spectroscopies, together with theoretical calculations have been useful in answering these questions and in identifying intermediate species of the catalytic cycle. An overview of the spectroscopic, kinetics and structural properties of the two forms of the catalytic "CuZ center" is given here, together with the current knowledge on nitrous oxide reduction mechanism by nitrous oxide reductase and its intermediate species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of the catalytic center of the Ebola virus L polymerase.

    Schmidt, Marie Luisa; Hoenen, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) causes a severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. While no licensed therapeutics are available, recently there has been tremendous progress in developing antivirals. Targeting the ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) proteins, which facilitate genome replication and transcription, and particularly the polymerase L, is a promising antiviral approach since these processes are essential for the virus life cycle. However, until now little is known about L in terms of its structure and function, and in particular the catalytic center of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of L, which is one of the most promising molecular targets, has never been experimentally characterized. Using multiple sequence alignments with other negative sense single-stranded RNA viruses we identified the putative catalytic center of the EBOV RdRp. An L protein with mutations in this center was then generated and characterized using various life cycle modelling systems. These systems are based on minigenomes, i.e. miniature versions of the viral genome, in which the viral genes are exchanged against a reporter gene. When such minigenomes are coexpressed with RNP proteins in mammalian cells, the RNP proteins recognize them as authentic templates for replication and transcription, resulting in reporter activity reflecting these processes. Replication-competent minigenome systems indicated that our L catalytic domain mutant was impaired in genome replication and/or transcription, and by using replication-deficient minigenome systems, as well as a novel RT-qPCR-based genome replication assay, we showed that it indeed no longer supported either of these processes. However, it still showed similar expression to wild-type L, and retained its ability to be incorporated into inclusion bodies, which are the sites of EBOV genome replication. We have experimentally defined the catalytic center of the EBOV RdRp, and thus a promising antiviral target regulating an essential

  19. Characterization of the catalytic center of the Ebola virus L polymerase.

    Marie Luisa Schmidt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV causes a severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. While no licensed therapeutics are available, recently there has been tremendous progress in developing antivirals. Targeting the ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP proteins, which facilitate genome replication and transcription, and particularly the polymerase L, is a promising antiviral approach since these processes are essential for the virus life cycle. However, until now little is known about L in terms of its structure and function, and in particular the catalytic center of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp of L, which is one of the most promising molecular targets, has never been experimentally characterized.Using multiple sequence alignments with other negative sense single-stranded RNA viruses we identified the putative catalytic center of the EBOV RdRp. An L protein with mutations in this center was then generated and characterized using various life cycle modelling systems. These systems are based on minigenomes, i.e. miniature versions of the viral genome, in which the viral genes are exchanged against a reporter gene. When such minigenomes are coexpressed with RNP proteins in mammalian cells, the RNP proteins recognize them as authentic templates for replication and transcription, resulting in reporter activity reflecting these processes. Replication-competent minigenome systems indicated that our L catalytic domain mutant was impaired in genome replication and/or transcription, and by using replication-deficient minigenome systems, as well as a novel RT-qPCR-based genome replication assay, we showed that it indeed no longer supported either of these processes. However, it still showed similar expression to wild-type L, and retained its ability to be incorporated into inclusion bodies, which are the sites of EBOV genome replication.We have experimentally defined the catalytic center of the EBOV RdRp, and thus a promising antiviral target

  20. Origin of the pKa shift of the catalytic lysine in acetoacetate decarboxylase.

    Ishikita, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    The pKa value of Lys115, the catalytic residue in acetoacetate decarboxylate, was calculated using atomic coordinates of the X-ray crystal structure with consideration of the protonation states of all titratable sites in the protein. The calculated pKa value of Lys115 (pKa(Lys115)) was unusually low (approximately 6) in agreement with the experimentally measured value. Although charged residues impact pKa(Lys115) considerably in the native protein, the significant pKa(Lys115) downshift in the...

  1. Tailoring the electronic structure of graphene for catalytic and nanoelectronic applications

    Vallejo, Federico Calle; García Lastra, Juan Maria

    2011-01-01

    We explore possible routes to tailor the catalytic and electronic properties of graphitic materials through doping. The investigation is carried out by theoretical Density Functional Theory (DFT) and tight-binding calculations. We show that Feporphyrin- like sites inserted in graphitic sheets......, created after doping are active towards the Oxygen Reduction reaction (ORR). On the other hand, we also show that it is possible to tune the opening of a gap in the band structure of graphene by changing the adsorption periodicity of molecules on its surface....

  2. Orion EFT-1 Catalytic Tile Experiment Overview and Flight Measurements

    Salazar, Giovanni; Amar, Adam; Hyatt, Andrew; Rezin, Marc D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and results of a surface catalysis flight experiment flown on the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle during Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1). Similar to previous Space Shuttle catalytic tile experiments, the present test consisted of a highly catalytic coating applied to an instrumented TPS tile. However, the present catalytic tile experiment contained significantly more instrumentation in order to better resolve the heating overshoot caused by the change in surface catalytic efficiency at the interface between two distinct materials. In addition to collecting data with unprecedented spatial resolution of the "overshoot" phenomenon, the experiment was also designed to prove if such a catalytic overshoot would be seen in turbulent flow in high enthalpy regimes. A detailed discussion of the results obtained during EFT1 is presented, as well as the challenges associated with data interpretation of this experiment. Results of material testing carried out in support of this flight experiment are also shown. Finally, an inverse heat conduction technique is employed to reconstruct the flight environments at locations upstream and along the catalytic coating. The data and analysis presented in this work will greatly contribute to our understanding of the catalytic "overshoot" phenomenon, and have a significant impact on the design of future spacecraft.

  3. A Review on Catalytic Membranes Production and Applications

    Heba Abdallah

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of the chemical industry regarding reducing the production cost and obtaining a high-quality product with low environmental impact became the essential requirements of the world in these days. The catalytic membrane is considered as one of the new alternative solutions of catalysts problems in the industries, where the reaction and separation can be amalgamated in one unit. The catalytic membrane has numerous advantages such as breaking the thermodynamic equilibrium limitation, increasing conversion rate, reducing the recycle and separation costs. But the limitation or most disadvantages of catalytic membranes related to the high capital costs for fabrication or the fact that manufacturing process is still under development. This review article summarizes the most recent advances and research activities related to preparation, characterization, and applications of catalytic membranes. In this article, various types of catalytic membranes are displayed with different applications and explained the positive impacts of using catalytic membranes in various reactions. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved. Received: 1st April 2016; Revised: 14th February 2017; Accepted: 22nd February 2017 How to Cite: Abdallah, H. (2017. A Review on Catalytic Membranes Production and Applications. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (2: 136-156 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.2.462.136-156 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.2.462.136-156

  4. The role of short-range Cys171-Cys178 disulfide bond in maintaining cutinase active site integrity: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Matak, Mehdi Youssefi; Moghaddam, Majid Erfani

    2009-01-01

    Understanding structural determinants in enzyme active site integrity can provide a good knowledge to design efficient novel catalytic machineries. Fusarium solani pisi cutinase with classic triad Ser-His-Asp is a promising enzyme to scrutinize these structural determinants. We performed two MD simulations: one, with the native structure, and the other with the broken Cys171-Cys178 disulfide bond. This disulfide bond stabilizes a turn in active site on which catalytic Asp175 is located. Functionally important H-bonds and atomic fluctuations in catalytic pocket have been changed. We proposed that this disulfide bond within active site can be considered as an important determinant of cutinase active site structural integrity.

  5. Hydrocarbon conversion with an attenuated superactive multimetallic catalytic composite

    Antos, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are converted by contacting them at hydrocarbon conversion conditions with a novel attenuated superactive multimetallic catalytic composite comprising a combination of a catalytically effective amount of a pyrolyzed rhenium carbonyl component with a porous carrier material containing a uniform dispersion of catalytically effective amounts of a platinum group component, which is maintained in the elemental metallic state during the incorporation and pyrolysis of the rhenium carbonyl component, and of an iron component. In a highly preferred embodiment, this novel catalytic composite also contains a catalytically effective amount of a halogen component. The platinum group component, pyrolyzed rhenium carbonyl component, iron component and optional halogen component are preferably present in the multimetallic catalytic composite in amounts, calculated on an elemental basis, corresponding to about 0.01 to about 2 wt. % platinum group metal, about 0.01 to about 5 wt. % rhenium, about 0.005 to about 4 wt. % iron and about 0.1 to about 5 wt. % halogen. A key feature associated with the preparation of the subject catalytic composite is reaction of a rhenium carbonyl complex with a porous carrier material containing a uniform dispersion of an iron component and of a platinum group component maintained in the elemental state, whereby the interaction of the rhenium moiety with the platinum group moiety is maximized due to the platinophilic (i.e., platinum-seeking) propensities of the carbon monoxide ligands associated with the rhenium reagent. A specific example of the type of hydrocarbon conversion process disclosed herein is a process for the catalytic reforming of a low octane gasoline fraction wherein the gasoline fraction and a hydrogen stream are contacted with the attenuated superactive multimetallic catalytic composite at reforming conditions

  6. Surface composition of carburized tungsten trioxide and its catalytic activity

    Nakazawa, M.; Okamoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    The surface composition and electronic structure of carburized tungsten trioxide are investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The relationship between the surface composition and the catalytic activity for methanol electro-oxidation is clarified. The tungsten carbide concentration in the surface layer increases with the carburization time. The formation of tungsten carbide enhances the catalytic activity. On the other hand, the presence of free carbon or tungsten trioxide in the surface layer reduces the activity remarkably. It is also shown that, the higher the electronic density of states near the Fermi level, the higher the catalytic activity

  7. Enhanced propylene production in FCC by novel catalytic materials

    Kelkar, C.P.; Harris, D.; Xu, M.; Fu, J. [BASF Catalyst LLC, Iselin, NJ (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking is expected to increasingly supply the additional incremental requirements for propylene. The most efficient route to increase propylene yield from an FCC unit is through the use of medium pore zeolites such as ZSM-5. ZSM-5 zeolite cracks near linear olefins in the gasoline range to LPG olefins such as propylene and butylenes. This paper will describe catalytic approaches to increase gasoline range olefins and the chemistry of ZSM-5 to crack those olefins. The paper will also describe novel catalytic materials designed to increase propylene. (orig.)

  8. Critical Role of Interdomain Interactions in the Conformational Change and Catalytic Mechanism of Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidase 1.

    Stamogiannos, Athanasios; Maben, Zachary; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Mpakali, Anastasia; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stern, Lawrence J; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2017-03-14

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) is an intracellular enzyme that is important for the generation of antigenic epitopes and major histocompatibility class I-restricted adaptive immune responses. ERAP1 processes a vast variety of different peptides but still shows length and sequence selectivity, although the mechanism behind these properties is poorly understood. X-ray crystallographic analysis has revealed that ERAP1 can assume at least two distinct conformations in which C-terminal domain IV is either proximal or distal to active site domain II. To improve our understanding of the role of this conformational change in the catalytic mechanism of ERAP1, we used site-directed mutagenesis to perturb key salt bridges between domains II and IV. Enzymatic analysis revealed that these mutations, although located away from the catalytic site, greatly reduce the catalytic efficiency and change the allosteric kinetic behavior. The variants were more efficiently activated by small peptides and bound a competitive inhibitor with weaker affinity and faster dissociation kinetics. Molecular dynamics analysis suggested that the mutations affect the conformational distribution of ERAP1, reducing the population of closed states. Small-angle X-ray scattering indicated that both the wild type and the ERAP1 variants are predominantly in an open conformational state in solution. Overall, our findings suggest that electrostatic interactions between domains II and IV in ERAP1 are crucial for driving a conformational change that regulates the structural integrity of the catalytic site. The extent of domain opening in ERAP1 probably underlies its specialization for antigenic peptide precursors and should be taken into account in inhibitor development efforts.

  9. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  10. Catalytic Reactor For Oxidizing Mercury Vapor

    Helfritch, Dennis J.

    1998-07-28

    A catalytic reactor (10) for oxidizing elemental mercury contained in flue gas is provided. The catalyst reactor (10) comprises within a flue gas conduit a perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) having a plurality of through openings (33) and a plurality of projecting corona discharge electrodes (31); a perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) having a plurality of through openings (43) axially aligned with the through openings (33) of the perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) displaced from and opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31); and a catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) overlaying that face of the perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31). A uniformly distributed corona discharge plasma (1000) is intermittently generated between the plurality of corona discharge electrode tips (31) and the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) when a stream of flue gas is passed through the conduit. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is not being generated, the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) adsorb mercury vapor contained in the passing flue gas. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is being generated, ions and active radicals contained in the generated corona discharge plasma (1000) desorb the mercury from the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d), oxidizing the mercury in virtually simultaneous manner. The desorption process regenerates and activates the catalyst member molecules.

  11. Electrochemical promotion of sulfur dioxide catalytic oxidation

    Petrushina, Irina; Bandur, Viktor; Cappeln, Frederik Vilhelm

    2000-01-01

    investigation was to study a possible non-Faradaic electrochemical promotion of the liquid-phase catalytic reaction. It has been shown that there are two negative potential promotion areas with maximum effects at approximately -0.1 and -0.2 V, and one positive potential promotion area with the maximum effect...... between 0.1 and 0.3 V. There were no Faradaic reactions in the negative polarization region, and there was an anodic current which was less than 16% of the theoretical value for an exclusively Faradaic SO2 oxidation. Therefore the promotion effects at negative polarization are completely non-Faradaic. All...... the promotion effects have been explained as mainly due to charging of the electric double layer at the gold electrode. The effect at -0.2 V also depends on the V2O5 concentration and is more pronounced at higher V2O5 concentrations. This has been ascribed to a destruction of the vanadium polymeric chains...

  12. Additive Manufacturing of Catalytically Active Living Materials.

    Saha, Abhijit; Johnston, Trevor G; Shafranek, Ryan T; Goodman, Cassandra J; Zalatan, Jesse G; Storti, Duane W; Ganter, Mark A; Nelson, Alshakim

    2018-04-25

    Living materials, which are composites of living cells residing in a polymeric matrix, are designed to utilize the innate functionalities of the cells to address a broad range of applications such as fermentation and biosensing. Herein, we demonstrate the additive manufacturing of catalytically active living materials (AMCALM) for continuous fermentation. A multi-stimuli-responsive yeast-laden hydrogel ink, based on F127-dimethacrylate, was developed and printed using a direct-write 3D printer. The reversible stimuli-responsive behaviors of the polymer hydrogel inks to temperature and pressure are critical, as they enabled the facile incorporation of yeast cells and subsequent fabrication of 3D lattice constructs. Subsequent photo-cross-linking of the printed polymer hydrogel afforded a robust elastic material. These yeast-laden living materials were metabolically active in the fermentation of glucose into ethanol for 2 weeks in a continuous batch process without significant reduction in efficiency (∼90% yield of ethanol). This cell immobilization platform may potentially be applicable toward other genetically modified yeast strains to produce other high-value chemicals in a continuous biofermentation process.

  13. Plasma-catalytic decomposition of TCE

    Vandenbroucke, A.; Morent, R.; De Geyter, N.; Leys, C. [Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium). Dept. of Applied Physics; Tuan, N.D.M.; Giraudon, J.M.; Lamonier, J.F. [Univ. des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Villeneuve (France). Dept. de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide

    2010-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are gaseous pollutants that pose an environmental hazard due to their high volatility and their possible toxicity. Conventional technologies to reduce the emission of VOCs have their advantages, but they become cost-inefficient when low concentrations have to be treated. In the past 2 decades, non-thermal plasma technology has received growing attention as an alternative and promising remediation method. Non-thermal plasmas are effective because they produce a series of strong oxidizers such as ozone, oxygen radicals and hydroxyl radicals that provide a reactive chemical environment in which VOCs are completely oxidized. This study investigated whether the combination of NTP and catalysis could improve the energy efficiency and the selectivity towards carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Trichloroethylene (TCE) was decomposed by non-thermal plasma generated in a DC-excited atmospheric pressure glow discharge. The production of by-products was qualitatively investigated through FT-IR spectrometry. The results were compared with those from a catalytic reactor. The removal rate of TCE reached a maximum of 78 percent at the highest input energy. The by-products of TCE decomposition were CO{sub 2}, carbon monoxide (CO) hydrochloric acid (HCl) and dichloroacetylchloride. Combining the plasma system with a catalyst located in an oven downstream resulted in a maximum removal of 80 percent, at an energy density of 300 J/L, a catalyst temperature of 373 K and a total air flow rate of 2 slm. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Microchannel Reactor System for Catalytic Hydrogenation

    Adeniyi Lawal; Woo Lee; Ron Besser; Donald Kientzler; Luke Achenie

    2010-12-22

    We successfully demonstrated a novel process intensification concept enabled by the development of microchannel reactors, for energy efficient catalytic hydrogenation reactions at moderate temperature, and pressure, and low solvent levels. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for hydrogenation of onitroanisole and a proprietary BMS molecule. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we designed and developed a fully-automated skid-mounted multichannel microreactor pilot plant system for multiphase reactions. The system is capable of processing 1 – 10 kg/h of liquid substrate, and an industrially relevant immiscible liquid-liquid was successfully demonstrated on the system. Our microreactor-based pilot plant is one-of-akind. We anticipate that this process intensification concept, if successfully demonstrated, will provide a paradigm-changing basis for replacing existing energy inefficient, cost ineffective, environmentally detrimental slurry semi-batch reactor-based manufacturing practiced in the pharmaceutical and fine chemicals industries.

  15. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    Dan, Monica; Mihet, Maria; Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H 2 . In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al 2 O 3 . The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N 2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H 2 , CH 4 , CO, CO 2 . The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H 2 O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%

  16. Process for catalytic flue gas denoxing

    Woldhuis, A.; Goudriaan, F.; Groeneveld, M.; Samson, R.

    1991-01-01

    With the increasing concern for the environment, stringency of legislation and industry's awareness of its own environmental responsibility, the demand for the reduction of emission levels of nitrogen oxides is becoming increasingly urgent. This paper reports that Shell has developed a low temperature catalytic deNOx system for deep removal of nitrogen oxides, which includes a low-pressure-drop reactor. This process is able to achieve over 90% removal of nitrogen oxides and therefore can be expected to meet legislation requirements for the coming years. The development of a low-temperature catalyst makes it possible to operate at temperatures as low as 120 degrees C, compared to 300-400 degrees C for the conventional honeycomb and plate-type catalysts. This allows an add-on construction, which is most often a more economical solution than the retrofits in the hot section required with conventional deNOx catalysts. The Lateral Flow Reactor (LFR), which is used for dust-free flue gas applications, and the Parallel Passage Reactor (PPR) for dust-containing flue gas applications, have been developed to work with pressure drops below 10 mbar

  17. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    Dan, Monica, E-mail: monica.dan@itim-cj.ro; Mihet, Maria, E-mail: maria.mihet@itim-cj.ro; Lazar, Mihaela D., E-mail: diana.lazar@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat Street, 400293 Cluj Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H{sub 2}. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H{sub 2}O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  18. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    The contract was conceived to establish the commercial capability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) to treat contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. In so doing, Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT), pursued the following objectives: demonstration of the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal can be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP will concentrate the radionuclides in a dense vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP will convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which can be used as feed gases for chemical synthesis or as an energy source; recovery volatile heavy metals--that CEP's off-gas treatment system will capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; and establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory--that CEP is a more cost-effective and, complete treatment and recycling technology than competing technologies for processing contaminated scrap. The process and its performance are described

  19. Radioisotope applications on fluidized catalytic cracking units

    Charlton, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Radioisotopes are used to trace the flow of all the phases of Fluidized Catalytic Cracking process in oil refineries. The gaseous phases, steam, hydrocarbon vapour and air, are generally traced using a noble-gas isotope, 41 Ar, 79 Kr or 85 Kr. An appropriate tracer for the catalyst is produced by irradiating a catalyst sample in a nuclear reactor. The activation products, 140 La and 24 Na provide appropriate radioactive 'labels' for the catalyst, which is reinjected into the FCC. An advantage of this approach is that it facilitates the study of the behaviour of different particle size fractions. Radioisotopes as sealed sources of gamma radiation are used to measure catalyst density variations and density distributions in critical parts of the unit. An important trend in radioisotope applications is the increasing use of the information they produce as inputs to or as validation of, mathematical process models. In line with the increasing sophistication of the models, the technology is undergoing continuous refinement. Developments include the investigation of more efficient, more convenient tracers, the introduction of systems to facilitate more rapid and comprehensive data acquisition and software refinements for enhanced data analysis

  20. Catalytic cleavage activities of 10–23 DNAzyme analogs functionalized with an amino group in its catalytic core

    Qi Wang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Functionalization of the catalytic loop of 10–23 DNAzyme with an amino group was performed by incorporation of 7-(3-aminopropyl-8-aza-7-deaza-2′-deoxyadenosine in different single positions. Among the nine modified positions in the catalytic loop, A9 is the unique position with positive contribution by such modification. These results indicated that more efficient deoxyribozymes remain to be explored by introduction of exogenous functional groups in an appropriate position in the catalytic loop of 10–23 DNAzyme, such as the combination of 7-functional group substituted 8-aza-7-deaza-2′-deoxyadenosine analogs and A9 position.

  1. Conformational flexibility in the catalytic triad revealed by the high-resolution crystal structure of Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin in an unliganded state

    Blankenship, Elise; Vukoti, Krishna [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Miyagi, Masaru, E-mail: mxm356@cwru.edu [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Lodowski, David T., E-mail: mxm356@cwru.edu [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This work reports the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of S. erythraeus trypsin. The detailed model of a prototypical serine protease at a catalytically relevant pH with an unoccupied active site is presented and is compared with other high-resolution serine protease structures. With more than 500 crystal structures determined, serine proteases make up greater than one-third of all proteases structurally examined to date, making them among the best biochemically and structurally characterized enzymes. Despite the numerous crystallographic and biochemical studies of trypsin and related serine proteases, there are still considerable shortcomings in the understanding of their catalytic mechanism. Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) does not exhibit autolysis and crystallizes readily at physiological pH; hence, it is well suited for structural studies aimed at extending the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases. While X-ray crystallographic structures of this enzyme have been reported, no coordinates have ever been made available in the Protein Data Bank. Based on this, and observations on the extreme stability and unique properties of this particular trypsin, it was decided to crystallize it and determine its structure. Here, the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of an unmodified, unliganded trypsin crystallized at physiological pH is reported. Detailed structural analysis reveals the geometry and structural rigidity of the catalytic triad in the unoccupied active site and comparison to related serine proteases provides a context for interpretation of biochemical studies of catalytic mechanism and activity.

  2. Conformational flexibility in the catalytic triad revealed by the high-resolution crystal structure of Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin in an unliganded state

    Blankenship, Elise; Vukoti, Krishna; Miyagi, Masaru; Lodowski, David T.

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of S. erythraeus trypsin. The detailed model of a prototypical serine protease at a catalytically relevant pH with an unoccupied active site is presented and is compared with other high-resolution serine protease structures. With more than 500 crystal structures determined, serine proteases make up greater than one-third of all proteases structurally examined to date, making them among the best biochemically and structurally characterized enzymes. Despite the numerous crystallographic and biochemical studies of trypsin and related serine proteases, there are still considerable shortcomings in the understanding of their catalytic mechanism. Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) does not exhibit autolysis and crystallizes readily at physiological pH; hence, it is well suited for structural studies aimed at extending the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases. While X-ray crystallographic structures of this enzyme have been reported, no coordinates have ever been made available in the Protein Data Bank. Based on this, and observations on the extreme stability and unique properties of this particular trypsin, it was decided to crystallize it and determine its structure. Here, the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of an unmodified, unliganded trypsin crystallized at physiological pH is reported. Detailed structural analysis reveals the geometry and structural rigidity of the catalytic triad in the unoccupied active site and comparison to related serine proteases provides a context for interpretation of biochemical studies of catalytic mechanism and activity

  3. Quantitative 3D Fluorescence Imaging of Single Catalytic Turnovers Reveals Spatiotemporal Gradients in Reactivity of Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals upon Steaming

    Ristanovic, Zoran|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328233005; Hofmann, Jan P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355351110; De Cremer, Gert; Kubarev, Alexey V.; Rohnke, Marcus; Meirer, Florian; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten B. J.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing the number, distribution, and accessibility of Bronsted acid sites in zeolite-based catalysts is of a paramount importance to further improve their catalytic performance. However, it remains challenging to measure real-time changes in reactivity of single zeolite catalyst particles by

  4. Impact of A cation size of double perovskite A2AlTaO6 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba) on dielectric and catalytic properties

    Gorodea, I.; Goanta, M.; Toma, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Synthesis by solid state reaction of the double perovskite A 2 AlTaO 6 , where A = Ca, Sr and Ba. • The role of different A-site cations on their synthesis and structures was investigated. • The influence of the divalent A-site cations on the dielectric properties was evaluated by resistivity measurements. • Catalytic properties were evaluated in water splitting process, under gamma-rays irradiation emitted by a 60 Co source, for the first time. - Abstract: Double perovskite-type oxide A 2 AlTaO 6 materials, where A = Ca, Sr and Ba, were prepared using conventional solid state reaction. The role of different A-site cations on their synthesis, structures, dielectric and catalytic properties was investigated. Double perovskite oxide structures were evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD). As the average cation size decreases, the crystallographic structure at room temperature evolves from cubic to monoclinic. The influence of the nature of the divalent A-site cations on the dielectric properties was evaluated by resistivity measurements in the frequency range of 10–10 6 Hz. It can be found that relative permittivity and dielectric loss regularly changed with A cation size. Catalytic properties of the obtained compounds were evaluated in water splitting process, under gamma-rays irradiation emitted by a 60 Co source for the first time. From experimental data it was noticed that the double perovskite Ca 2 AlTaO 6 had a higher catalytic effect

  5. Bimetallic Nanoparticles in Alternative Solvents for Catalytic Purposes

    Trung Dang-Bao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bimetallic nanoparticles represent attractive catalytic systems thanks to the synergy between both partners at the atomic level, mainly induced by electronic effects which in turn are associated with the corresponding structures (alloy, core-shell, hetero-dimer. This type of engineered material can trigger changes in the kinetics of catalyzed processes by variations on the electrophilicity/nucleophilicity of the metal centers involved and also promote cooperative effects to foster organic transformations, including multi-component and multi-step processes. Solvents become a crucial factor in the conception of catalytic processes, not only due to their environmental impact, but also because they can preserve the bimetallic structure during the catalytic reaction and therefore increase the catalyst life-time. In this frame, the present review focuses on the recent works described in the literature concerning the synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles in non-conventional solvents, i.e., other than common volatile compounds, for catalytic applications.

  6. Catalytic Transformation of Ethylbenzene over Y-Zeolite-based Catalysts

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    2008-01-01

    Catalytic transformation of ethylbenzene (EB) has been investigated over ultrastable Y (USY)-zeolite-based catalysts in a novel riser simulator at different operating conditions. The effect of reaction conditions on EB conversion is reported

  7. Catalytic Oxidation of Cyanogen Chloride over a Monolithic Oxidation Catalyst

    Campbell, Jeffrey

    1997-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of cyanogen chloride was evaluated over a monolithic oxidation catalyst at temperatures between 200 and 300 deg C in air employing feed concentrations between 100 and 10,000 ppm...

  8. Highly efficient catalytic systems based on Pd-coated microbeads

    Lim, Jin Hyun; Cho, Ahyoung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Bumkyo; Kang, Dong Woo; Koo, Chong Min; Yu, Taekyung; Park, Bum Jun

    2018-01-01

    The efficiency of two prototype catalysis systems using palladium (Pd)-coated microparticles was investigated with regard to the recovery and recyclability of the catalytic particles. One such system was the interface-adsorption method, in which polymer particles coated with Pd nanoparticles strongly and irreversibly attach to the oil-water interface. Due to the irreversible adsorption of the catalytic particles to the interface, particle loss was completely prevented while mixing the aqueous solution and while collecting the products. The other system was based on the magnetic field-associated particle recovery method. The use of polymeric microparticles containing Pd nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles accelerated the sedimentation of the particles in the aqueous phase by applying a strong magnetic field, consequently suppressing drainage of the particles from the reactor along the product stream. Upon multiple runs of the catalytic reactions, it was found that conversion does not change significantly, demonstrating the excellent recyclability and performance efficiency in the catalytic processes.

  9. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by catalytic vapor decomposition ...

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs); catalytic vapor decomposition; soap bubble mass flowmeter. ... [4,13,14], makes them an excellent candidate for use as a dielectric in supercapac- itors [15]. ... the change in liquid level in the scrubber. After the ...

  10. Catalytic conversion of methane: Carbon dioxide reforming and oxidative coupling

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    and the oxidative coupling of methane. These two reactions have tremendous technological significance for practical application in industry. An understanding of the fundamental aspects and reaction mechanisms of the catalytic reactions reviewed in this study would

  11. The Catalytic Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (+)‐Liphagal

    Day, Joshua J.; McFadden, Ryan M.; Virgil, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Ring a ding: The first catalytic enantioselective total synthesis of the meroterpenoid natural product (+)-liphagal is disclosed. The approach showcases a variety of technology including enantioselective enolate alkylation, a photochemical alkyne-alkene [2+2] reaction, microwaveassisted metal...

  12. Kinetic Studies of Catalytic Oxidation of Cyclohexene Using ...

    acer

    Kinetic Studies of Catalytic Oxidation of Cyclohexene Using Chromium VI Oxide in. Acetic Acid ... respect to the oxidant using pseudo-order approximation method. .... making the concentration of the cyclohexene in ..... on Titanium Silicate.

  13. Processing and structural characterization of porous reforming catalytic films

    Hou Xianghui; Williams, Jey; Choy, Kwang-Leong

    2006-01-01

    Nickel-based catalysts are often used to reform methanol into hydrogen. The preparation and installation of these catalysts are costly and laborious. As an alternative, directly applying catalytic films onto the separator components can improve the manufacturing efficiency. This paper reports the successful deposition of adherent porous NiO-Al 2 O 3 -based catalytic films with well-controlled stoichiometry, using a single-step Aerosol Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (AACVD) method. The microstructure, composition and crystalline phase of the as-deposited catalytic films are characterized using a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectrometer. The results have demonstrated the capability of AACVD to produce porous NiO-Al 2 O 3 -based catalytic films

  14. Magnetic, catalytic, EPR and electrochemical studies on binuclear ...

    Magnetic, catalytic, EPR and electrochemical studies on binuclear copper(II) complexes ... to the oxidation of 3,5-di--butylcatechol to the corresponding quinone. ... EPR spectral studies in methanol solvent show welldefined four hyperfine ...

  15. Quantum catalysis : the modelling of catalytic transition states

    Hall, M.B.; Margl, P.; Naray-Szabo, G.; Schramm, Vern; Truhlar, D.G.; Santen, van R.A.; Warshel, A.; Whitten, J.L.; Truhlar, D.G.; Morokuma, K.

    1999-01-01

    A review with 101 refs.; we present an introduction to the computational modeling of transition states for catalytic reactions. We consider both homogeneous catalysis and heterogeneous catalysis, including organometallic catalysts, enzymes, zeolites and metal oxides, and metal surfaces. We summarize

  16. Expediting the chemistry of hematite nanocatalyst for catalytic aquathermolysis of heavy crude oil

    Khalil, Munawar

    .e. thiophene at considerably mild condition. Based on the analyses, it is suggested that the catalytic mechanism involves a cyclic phase transformation of some hematite surfaces into magnetite as thiophene was oxidatively decomposed to produce maleic acid, SO2 and CO2. However, in the presence of water as the source of active oxygen, these magnetite surfaces could be reconstructed back into hematite surfaces. In addition, it is also found that the catalytic activity of hematite can be improved by changing its surface property from hydrophilic into slightly more hydrophobic. However, further improvement on hydrophobicity reduces the activity due to the blockage of the catalytic site. Finally, when both bare and surface-modified hematite nanocatalysts were used in aquathermolysis reaction of heavy crude oil sample, the viscosity of heavy oil sample was significantly decreased by 61.52% and 74.33%, respectively. In addition, the quality of heavy oil can also be upgraded as the amount of saturated and aromatic fractions were significantly increased while asphaltene and resin fractions were reduced.

  17. Remote Exosites of the Catalytic Domain of Matrix Metalloproteinase-12 Enhance Elastin Degradation┼

    Fulcher, Yan G.; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    How does matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12 or metalloelastase) degrade elastin with high specific activity? NMR suggested soluble elastin to cover surfaces of MMP-12 far from its active site. Two of these surfaces have been found, by mutagenesis guided by the BINDSIght approach, to affect degradation and affinity for elastin substrates but not a small peptide substrate. Main exosite 1 has been extended out to Asp124 that binds calcium. Novel exosite 2 comprises residues from the II–III loop and β-strand I near the back of the catalytic domain. The high exposure of these distal exosites may make them accessible to elastin made more flexible by partial hydrolysis. Importantly, combination of a lesion at each of exosites 1 and 2 and active site decreased catalytic competence towards soluble elastin by 13- to 18-fold to the level of MMP-3, homologue and poor elastase. Double mutant cycle analysis of conservative mutations of Met156 (exosite 2) and either Asp124 (exosite 1) or Ile180 (active site) had additive effects. Compared to polar substitutions observed in other MMPs, Met156 enhanced affinity and Ile180 kcat for soluble elastin. Both residues detracted from the higher folding stability with polar mutations. This resembles the trend in enzymes of an inverse relationship between folding stability and activity. Restoring Asp124 from combination mutants enhanced kcat for soluble elastin. In elastin degradation, exosites 1 and 2 contributed independently of each other and Ile180 at the active site, but with partial coupling to Ala182 near the active site. The concept of weak, separated interactions coalescing somewhat independently can be extended to this proteolytic digestion of a protein from fibrils. PMID:21967233

  18. Superfund Sites

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This layer represents active Superfund Sites published by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These data were extracted from the Superfund Enterprise...

  19. Site development

    Noack, J.

    1975-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a general view over all necessary considerations to develop the site after it has been chosen and before starting with the construction of a nuclear power plant. (orig./RW) [de

  20. Site selection

    Olsen, C.W.

    1983-07-01

    The conditions and criteria for selecting a site for a nuclear weapons test at the Nevada Test Site are summarized. Factors considered are: (1) scheduling of drill rigs, (2) scheduling of site preparation (dirt work, auger hole, surface casing, cementing), (3) schedule of event (when are drill hole data needed), (4) depth range of proposed W.P., (5) geologic structure (faults, Pz contact, etc.), (6) stratigraphy (alluvium, location of Grouse Canyon Tuff, etc.), (7) material properties (particularly montmorillonite and CO 2 content), (8) water table depth, (9) potential drilling problems (caving), (10) adjacent collapse craters and chimneys, (11) adjacent expended but uncollapsed sites, (12) adjacent post-shot or other small diameter holes, (13) adjacent stockpile emplacement holes, (14) adjacent planned events (including LANL), (15) projected needs of Test Program for various DOB's and operational separations, and (16) optimal use of NTS real estate

  1. Fabrication of catalytically active Au/Pt/Pd trimetallic nanoparticles by rapid injection of NaBH{sub 4}

    Zhang, Haijun, E-mail: zhanghaijun@wust.edu.cn [College of Materials and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430081 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Refractories and Ceramics, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Lu, Lilin [College of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Cao, Yingnan; Du, Shuang [College of Materials and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430081 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Refractories and Ceramics, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Cheng, Zhong [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhang, Shaowei [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Refractories and Ceramics, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The synthesis and characterization of 2.0 nm-diameter Au/Pt/Pd nanoparticles are reported. The catalytic activity for glucose oxidation of the nanoparticles is several times higher than that of Au nanoparticles with nearly same size. - Highlights: • PVP-protected Au/Pt/Pd trimetallic nanoparticles (TNPs) of 2.0 nm in diameter were prepared. • The catalytic activity of TNPs is several times higher than that of Au nanoparticles. • Negatively charged Au atoms in the TNPs were confirmed by DFT calculation. - Abstract: Au/Pt/Pd trimetallic nanoparticles (TNPs) with an alloyed structure and an average diameter of about 2.0 nm were prepared via reducing the corresponding ions with rapidly injected NaBH{sub 4}, and characterized by UV–vis, TEM and HR-TEM. The catalytic activity of as-prepared TNPs for the aerobic glucose oxidation is several times higher than that of Au monometallic nanoparticles with about the same average size, which could be attributed to the catalytically active sites provided by the negatively charged Au atoms as a result of the electron donation from the neighboring Pd atoms. This was well supported by the electron density calculations based on the density functional theory.

  2. Investigation on catalytic gasification of high-ash coal with mixing-gas in a small-scale fluidised bed

    Chen, X.; Zhang, J.; Lin, J. [Fuzhou University, Fuzhou (China)

    2005-10-15

    The experimental study on the Yangquan high-ash coal catalytic gasification with mixing gas by using solid alkali or waste liquid of viscose fiber as the catalyst in a small-scale fluidized bed with 28 mm i.d. was carried out. The loading saturation levels of two catalysts in Yangquan high-ash coal are about 6%. Under the gasification temperature ranging from 830 to 900{sup o}C and from 900 to 920{sup o}C, the apparent reaction order of Yangquan high-ash coal with respect to the unreacted carbon fraction approximates to 2.3 and 1/3 for the non-catalyst case, respectively. Also, the different values of apparent reaction order in the two temperature ranges are presented for the case with 3% solid alkali catalyst loaded. At the low temperature ranging from 830 to 860{sup o}C, the apparent reaction order of catalytic gasification is 1 since enough active carbon sites on the coal surface are formed during the catalytic gasification by solid alkali. But at the high temperature ranging from 860 to 920{sup o}C, the sodium carbonate produced by the reaction of solid alkali with carbon dioxide can be easily fused, transferred and re-distributed, which affects the gasification reaction rate, and the apparent reaction order of catalytic gasification is reduced to 1.3. 10 refs., 9 figs., 4 tab s.

  3. Effect of Mo-Doped Mesoporous Al-SSP Catalysts for the Catalytic Dehydration of Ethanol to Ethylene

    Titinan Chanchuey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic dehydration of ethanol to ethylene over the mesoporous Al-SSP and Mo-doped Al-SSP catalysts was investigated. The Al-SSP catalyst was first synthesized by the modified sol-gel method and then doped with Mo by impregnation to obtain 1% Mo/Al-SSP and 5% Mo/Al-SSP catalysts (1 and 5 wt% of Mo. The final catalysts were characterized using various techniques such as XRD, N2 physisorption, SEM/EDX, TEM, and NH3-TPD. The catalytic activity for all catalysts in gas-phase ethanol dehydration reaction was determined at temperature range of 200°C to 400°C. It was found that the most crucial factor influencing the catalytic activities appears to be the acidity. The acid property of catalysts depended on the amount of Mo loading. Increased Mo loading in Al-SSP resulted in increased weak acid sites, which enhanced the catalytic activity. Besides acidity, the high concentration of Al at surface of catalyst is also essential to obtain high activity. Based on the results, the most suitable catalyst in this study is 1% Mo/Al-SSP catalyst, which can produce ethylene yield of ca. 90% at 300°C with slight amounts of diethyl ether (DEE and acetaldehyde.

  4. Fabrication of catalytically active Au/Pt/Pd trimetallic nanoparticles by rapid injection of NaBH4

    Zhang, Haijun; Lu, Lilin; Cao, Yingnan; Du, Shuang; Cheng, Zhong; Zhang, Shaowei

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The synthesis and characterization of 2.0 nm-diameter Au/Pt/Pd nanoparticles are reported. The catalytic activity for glucose oxidation of the nanoparticles is several times higher than that of Au nanoparticles with nearly same size. - Highlights: • PVP-protected Au/Pt/Pd trimetallic nanoparticles (TNPs) of 2.0 nm in diameter were prepared. • The catalytic activity of TNPs is several times higher than that of Au nanoparticles. • Negatively charged Au atoms in the TNPs were confirmed by DFT calculation. - Abstract: Au/Pt/Pd trimetallic nanoparticles (TNPs) with an alloyed structure and an average diameter of about 2.0 nm were prepared via reducing the corresponding ions with rapidly injected NaBH 4 , and characterized by UV–vis, TEM and HR-TEM. The catalytic activity of as-prepared TNPs for the aerobic glucose oxidation is several times higher than that of Au monometallic nanoparticles with about the same average size, which could be attributed to the catalytically active sites provided by the negatively charged Au atoms as a result of the electron donation from the neighboring Pd atoms. This was well supported by the electron density calculations based on the density functional theory

  5. Functional Sites Induce Long-Range Evolutionary Constraints in Enzymes.

    Benjamin R Jack

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Functional residues in proteins tend to be highly conserved over evolutionary time. However, to what extent functional sites impose evolutionary constraints on nearby or even more distant residues is not known. Here, we report pervasive conservation gradients toward catalytic residues in a dataset of 524 distinct enzymes: evolutionary conservation decreases approximately linearly with increasing distance to the nearest catalytic residue in the protein structure. This trend encompasses, on average, 80% of the residues in any enzyme, and it is independent of known structural constraints on protein evolution such as residue packing or solvent accessibility. Further, the trend exists in both monomeric and multimeric enzymes and irrespective of enzyme size and/or location of the active site in the enzyme structure. By contrast, sites in protein-protein interfaces, unlike catalytic residues, are only weakly conserved and induce only minor rate gradients. In aggregate, these observations show that functional sites, and in particular catalytic residues, induce long-range evolutionary constraints in enzymes.

  6. Effect of radioactive radiation on catalytic properties of solid materials

    Sokol' skii, D V; Kuzembaev, K K; Kel' man, I V [AN Kazakhskoj SSR, Alma-Ata. Inst. Organicheskogo Kataliza i Ehlektrokhimii

    1977-05-01

    General survey is made of the problem of radiation modification of the action of solid catalysts with respect to the various types of heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Consideration is given to the key mechanisms responsible for radiation damage in the interaction of high-energy radiation with a solid body. The effect of ionizing radiation on the adsorption capacity and catalytic activity of solid bodies is discussed.

  7. Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

  8. Advanced Catalytic Converter in Gasoline Enginer Emission Control: A Review

    Leman A.M.; Jajuli Afiqah; Feriyanto Dafit; Rahman Fakhrurrazi; Zakaria Supaat

    2017-01-01

    Exhaust emission from automobile source has become a major contributor to the air pollution and environmental problem. Catalytic converter is found to be one of the most effective tools to reduce the overwhelming exhaust pollutants in our environment. The development of sustainable catalytic converter still remains a critical issue due to the stringent exhaust emission regulations. Another issue such as price and availability of the precious metal were also forced the automotive industry to i...

  9. Catalytical Properties of Free and Immobilized Aspergillus niger Tannase

    Abril Flores-Maltos; Luis V. Rodríguez-Durán; Jacqueline Renovato; Juan C. Contreras; Raúl Rodríguez; Cristóbal N. Aguilar

    2011-01-01

    A fungal tannase was produced, recovered, and immobilized by entrapment in calcium alginate beads. Catalytical properties of the immobilized enzyme were compared with those of the free one. Tannase was produced intracellularly by the xerophilic fungus Aspergillus niger GH1 in a submerged fermentation system. Enzyme was recovered by cell disruption and the crude extract was partially purified. The catalytical properties of free and immobilized tannase were evaluated using tannic acid and methy...

  10. Catalytic Reactor for Inerting of Aircraft Fuel Tanks

    1974-06-01

    Aluminum Panels After Triphase Corrosion Test 79 35 Inerting System Flows in Various Flight Modes 82 36 High Flow Reactor Parametric Data 84 37 System...AD/A-000 939 CATALYTIC REACTOR FOR INERTING OF AIRCRAFT FUEL TANKS George H. McDonald, et al AiResearch Manufacturing Company Prepared for: Air Force...190th Street 2b. GROUP Torrance, California .. REPORT TITLE CATALYTIC REACTOR FOR INERTING OF AIRCRAFT FUEL TANKS . OESCRIP TIVE NOTEs (Thpe of refpoft

  11. Aerobic, catalytic oxidation of alcohols in ionic liquids

    Souza Roberto F. de

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and simple catalytic system based on RuCl3 dissolved in ionic liquids has been developed for the oxidation of alcohols into aldehydes and ketones under mild conditions. A new fluorinated ionic liquid, 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium pentadecafluorooctanoate, was synthesized and demonstrated better performance that the other ionic liquids employed. Moreover this catalytic system utilizes molecular oxygen as an oxidizing agent, producing water as the only by-product.

  12. Catalytic flash pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake using sodium based catalysts

    Ali Imran, A.; Bramer, Eduard A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of wood with impregnated vegetable oil was investigated and compared with catalytic pyrolysis of jatropha cake making use of sodium based catalysts to produce a high quality bio-oil. The catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in two modes: in-situ catalytic pyrolysis and post

  13. Detection of Intracellular Reduced (Catalytically Active) SHP-1 and Analyses of Catalytically Inactive SHP-1 after Oxidation by Pervanadate or H2O2.

    Choi, Seeyoung; Love, Paul E

    2018-01-05

    Oxidative inactivation of cysteine-dependent Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs) by cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a critical role in regulating signal transduction in multiple cell types. The phosphatase activity of most PTPs depends upon a 'signature' cysteine residue within the catalytic domain that is maintained in the de-protonated state at physiological pH rendering it susceptible to ROS-mediated oxidation. Direct and indirect techniques for detection of PTP oxidation have been developed (Karisch and Neel, 2013). To detect catalytically active PTPs, cell lysates are treated with iodoacetyl-polyethylene glycol-biotin (IAP-biotin), which irreversibly binds to reduced (S - ) cysteine thiols. Irreversible oxidation of SHP-1 after treatment of cells with pervanadate or H 2 O 2 is detected with antibodies specific for the sulfonic acid (SO 3 H) form of the conserved active site cysteine of PTPs. In this protocol, we describe a method for the detection of the reduced (S - ; active) or irreversibly oxidized (SO 3 H; inactive) form of the hematopoietic PTP SHP-1 in thymocytes, although this method is applicable to any cysteine-dependent PTP in any cell type.

  14. LIBRA: LIgand Binding site Recognition Application.

    Hung, Le Viet; Caprari, Silvia; Bizai, Massimiliano; Toti, Daniele; Polticelli, Fabio

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, structural genomics and ab initio molecular modeling activities are leading to the availability of a large number of structural models of proteins whose biochemical function is not known. The aim of this study was the development of a novel software tool that, given a protein's structural model, predicts the presence and identity of active sites and/or ligand binding sites. The algorithm implemented by ligand binding site recognition application (LIBRA) is based on a graph theory approach to find the largest subset of similar residues between an input protein and a collection of known functional sites. The algorithm makes use of two predefined databases for active sites and ligand binding sites, respectively, derived from the Catalytic Site Atlas and the Protein Data Bank. Tests indicate that LIBRA is able to identify the correct binding/active site in 90% of the cases analyzed, 90% of which feature the identified site as ranking first. As far as ligand binding site recognition is concerned, LIBRA outperforms other structure-based ligand binding sites detection tools with which it has been compared. The application, developed in Java SE 7 with a Swing GUI embedding a JMol applet, can be run on any OS equipped with a suitable Java Virtual Machine (JVM), and is available at the following URL: http://www.computationalbiology.it/software/LIBRAv1.zip. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Electronic Structure of the Ferryl Intermediate in the α-Ketoglutarate Dependent Non-Heme Iron Halogenase SyrB2: Contributions to H Atom Abstraction Reactivity

    Srnec, Martin; Wong, S. D.; Matthews, M. L.; Krebs, C.; Bollinger, J. M.; Solomon, E. I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 138, č. 15 (2016), s. 5110-5122 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-10279Y Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Ferryl intermediate * syringomycin halogenase * electronic structure Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  16. The effect of soy products in the diet on retention of non-heme iron from radiolabeled test meals fed to marginally iron-deficient young rats

    Thompson, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Diets based either on casein or soy products and containing about 25 ppm iron were fed to weanling rats for 13 days. Rats were fasted overnight and fed a 59 Fe-radiolabeled casein test meal the morning of day 14. On day 21 less 59 Fe was retained by rats fed various diets based on selected soy products than by rats fed the casein-based diet. A similar adverse effect of diet components on 59 Fe retention from a casein test meal was observed for lactalbumin and for psyllium husk. No adverse effect of diet on 59 Fe retention was observed for the fiber of soy cotyledons or for rapeseed protein concentrate. For a commercial soy protein isolated (SPI) fed throughout the 21-day experiment, the adverse effect of diet on 59 Fe retention was observed to the sum of the effect of dietary SPI previous to the 59 Fe-radiolabeled casein test meal fed on day 14 and the effect of dietary SPI subsequent to the casein test meal. An effect of dietary soy products on 59 Fe retention from a casein test meal was not observed with diets containing higher iron levels (83 ppm) or when diets were fed for a longer period prior to the test meal (56 days). The present work shows that in some circumstances the concept of iron bioavailability must be expanded to include not only the influence of meal composition, but also the influence of diet previous to and subsequent to a meal

  17. Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat; Alteracoes provocadas pela irradiacao e armazenamento nos teores de ferro heme em carne de frango

    Souza, Adriana Regia Marques de; Arthur, Valter Arthur [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao]. E-mail: sgcbraza@esalq.usp.br

    2007-04-15

    Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 deg C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses, except for the storage, and the total number of pigments was affected by the irradiation and the time, reducing the values with the increase of storage. Irradiation was shown to be a good method to conserve iron. (author)

  18. Electron Transport in a Dioxygenase-Ferredoxin Complex: Long Range Charge Coupling between the Rieske and Non-Heme Iron Center.

    Wayne K Dawson

    Full Text Available Dioxygenase (dOx utilizes stereospecific oxidation on aromatic molecules; consequently, dOx has potential applications in bioremediation and stereospecific oxidation synthesis. The reactive components of dOx comprise a Rieske structure Cys2[2Fe-2S]His2 and a non-heme reactive oxygen center (ROC. Between the Rieske structure and the ROC, a universally conserved Asp residue appears to bridge the two structures forming a Rieske-Asp-ROC triad, where the Asp is known to be essential for electron transfer processes. The Rieske and ROC share hydrogen bonds with Asp through their His ligands; suggesting an ideal network for electron transfer via the carboxyl side chain of Asp. Associated with the dOx is an itinerant charge carrying protein Ferredoxin (Fdx. Depending on the specific cognate, Fdx may also possess either the Rieske structure or a related structure known as 4-Cys-[2Fe-2S] (4-Cys. In this study, we extensively explore, at different levels of theory, the behavior of the individual components (Rieske and ROC and their interaction together via the Asp using a variety of density function methods, basis sets, and a method known as Generalized Ionic Fragment Approach (GIFA that permits setting up spin configurations manually. We also report results on the 4-Cys structure for comparison. The individual optimized structures are compared with observed spectroscopic data from the Rieske, 4-Cys and ROC structures (where information is available. The separate pieces are then combined together into a large Rieske-Asp-ROC (donor/bridge/acceptor complex to estimate the overall coupling between individual components, based on changes to the partial charges. The results suggest that the partial charges are significantly altered when Asp bridges the Rieske and the ROC; hence, long range coupling through hydrogen bonding effects via the intercalated Asp bridge can drastically affect the partial charge distributions compared to the individual isolated structures. The results are consistent with a proton coupled electron transfer mechanism.

  19. Non-Heme Iron Catalysts with a Rigid Bis-Isoindoline Backbone and Their Use in Selective Aliphatic C−H Oxidation

    Chen, Jianming; Lutz, Martin; Milan, Michela; Costas, Miquel; Otte, Matthias; Klein Gebbink, Bert

    2017-01-01

    Iron complexes derived from a bis-isoindoline-bis-pyridine ligand platform based on the BPBP ligand (BPBP=N,N′-bis(2-picolyl)-2,2′-bis-pyrrolidine) have been synthesized and applied in selective aliphatic C−H oxidation with hydrogen peroxide under mild conditions. The introduction of benzene

  20. Post-translational transformation of methionine to aspartate is catalyzed by heme iron and driven by peroxide: a novel subunit-specific mechanism in hemoglobin.

    Strader, Michael Brad; Hicks, Wayne A; Kassa, Tigist; Singleton, Eileen; Soman, Jayashree; Olson, John S; Weiss, Mitchell J; Mollan, Todd L; Wilson, Michael T; Alayash, Abdu I

    2014-08-08

    A pathogenic V67M mutation occurs at the E11 helical position within the heme pockets of variant human fetal and adult hemoglobins (Hb). Subsequent post-translational modification of Met to Asp was reported in γ subunits of human fetal Hb Toms River (γ67(E11)Val → Met) and β subunits of adult Hb (HbA) Bristol-Alesha (β67(E11)Val → Met) that were associated with hemolytic anemia. Using kinetic, proteomic, and crystal structural analysis, we were able to show that the Met → Asp transformation involves heme cycling through its oxoferryl state in the recombinant versions of both proteins. The conversion to Met and Asp enhanced the spontaneous autoxidation of the mutants relative to wild-type HbA and human fetal Hb, and the levels of Asp were elevated with increasing levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Using H2(18)O2, we verified incorporation of (18)O into the Asp carboxyl side chain confirming the role of H2O2 in the oxidation of the Met side chain. Under similar experimental conditions, there was no conversion to Asp at the αMet(E11) position in the corresponding HbA Evans (α62(E11)Val → Met). The crystal structures of the three recombinant Met(E11) mutants revealed similar thioether side chain orientations. However, as in the solution experiments, autoxidation of the Hb mutant crystals leads to electron density maps indicative of Asp(E11) formation in β subunits but not in α subunits. This novel post-translational modification highlights the nonequivalence of human Hb α, β, and γ subunits with respect to redox reactivity and may have direct implications to α/β hemoglobinopathies and design of oxidatively stable Hb-based oxygen therapeutics. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Catalytic gasification in fluidized bed, of orange waste. Comparison with non catalytic gasification

    Aguiar Trujillo, Leonardo; Marquez Montesinos, Francisco; Ramos Robaina, Boris A.; Guerra Reyes, Yanet; Arauzo Perez, Jesus; Gonzalo Callejo, Alberto; Sanchez Cebrian, Jose L

    2011-01-01

    The industry processing of the orange, generates high volumes of solid waste. This waste has been used as complement in the animal feeding, in biochemical processes; but their energy use has not been valued by means of the gasification process. They were carried out gasification studies with air in catalytic fluidized bed (using dolomite and olivine as catalysts in a secondary reactor, also varying the temperature of the secondary reactor and the catalyst mass), of the solid waste of orange and the results are compared with those obtained in the gasification with non catalytic air. In the processes we use a design of complete factorial experiment of 2k, valuing the influence of the independent variables and their interactions in the answers, using the software Design-Expert version 7 and a grade of significance of 95 %. The results demonstrate the qualities of the solid waste of orange in the energy use by means of the gasification process for the treatment of these residuals, obtaining a gas of low caloric value. The use of catalysts also diminishes the yield of tars obtained in the gasification process, being more active the dolomite that the olivine in this process. (author)

  2. Petroleum Refineries (Catalytic Cracking, Catalytic Reforming and Sulfur Recovery Units): National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)

    learn more about the NESHAP for catalytic cracking and reforming units, as well as sulfur recovery units in petroleum refineries by reading the rule history, rule summary, background information documents, and compliance information

  3. Modelling of procecces in catalytic recombiners

    Boehm, J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to achieve a high degree of safety in nuclear power plants and prevent possible accident scenarios, their consequences are calculated and analysed with numeric codes. One of the most important part of nuclear safety research of hazardous incidents are development and validation of these numeric models, which are implemented into accident codes. The severe hydrogen release during a core meltdown is one of the considered scenario of performed accident analyses. One of the most important measure for the elimination of the hydrogen is catalytic recombiners. Converting the hydrogen with the atmospheric oxygen to water vapor in an exothermic reaction will prevent possible detonation of the hydrogen/air atmosphere. Within the dissertation the recombiner simulation REKO-DIREKT was developed and validated by an extensive experimental database. The performance of recombiners with regard to the conversion of the hydrogen and the temperature development is modelled. The REKO-DIREKT program is unique and has made significant revolution in research of hydrogen safety. For the first time it has been possible to show the performance of the recombiner so great in detail by using REKO-DIREKT. In the future engineers of nuclear power plants will have opportunity to have precise forecasts about the process of the possible accidents with hydrogen release. Also with presence of water vapor or with oxygen depletion which are included in the model. The major discussion of the hydrogen ignition at hot catalyst steel plates can be evaluated in the future with REKO-DIREKT more reliably than the existing used models. (orig.)

  4. Catalytic performance of Metal‐Organic‐Frameworks vs. extra‐large pore zeolite UTL incondensation reactions

    Mariya eShamzhy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic behavior of isomorphously substituted B‐, Al‐, Ga‐, and Fe‐containing extra‐large pore UTLzeolites was investigated in Knoevenagel condensation involving aldehydes, Pechmann condensationof 1‐naphthol with ethylacetoacetate, and Prins reaction of β‐pinene with formaldehyde andcompared with large‐pore aluminosilicate zeolite BEA and representative Metal‐Organic‐FrameworksCu3(BTC2 and Fe(BTC. The yield of the target product over the investigated catalysts in Knoevenagelcondensation increases in the following sequence: (AlBEA < (AlUTL < (GaUTL < (FeUTL < Fe(BTC <(BUTL < Cu3(BTC2 being mainly related to the improving selectivity with decreasing strength ofactive sites of the individual catalysts. The catalytic performance of Fe(BTC, containing the highestconcentration of Lewis acid sites of the appropriate strength is superior over large‐pore zeolite(AlBEA and B‐, Al‐, Ga‐, Fe‐substituted extra‐large pore zeolites UTL in Prins reaction of β‐pinene withformaldehyde and Pechmann condensation of 1‐naphthol with ethylacetoacetate.

  5. Structure of octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens in a complex with phosphate

    Trofimov, A. A.; Polyakov, K. M.; Boiko, K. M.; Filimonenkov, A. A.; Dorovatovskii, P. V.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Popov, V. O.; Koval'chuk, M. V.

    2010-01-01

    Octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens (TvNiR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrite and hydroxylamine to ammonia. The structures of the free enzyme and of the enzyme in complexes with the substrate (nitrite ion) and the inhibitor (azide ion) have been solved previously. In this study we report the structures of the oxidized complex of TvNiR with phosphate and of this complex reduced by europium(II) chloride (1.8- and 2.0-A resolution, the R factors are 15.9 and 16.7%, respectively) and the structure of the enzyme in the complex with cyanide (1.76-A resolution, the R factor is 16.5%), which was prepared by soaking a crystal of the oxidized phosphate complex of TvNiR. In the active site of the enzyme, the phosphate ion binds to the iron ion of the catalytic heme and to the side chains of the catalytic residues Arg131, Tyr303, and His361. The cyanide ion is coordinated to the heme-iron ion and is hydrogen bonded to the residue His361. In the structure of reduced TvNiR, the phosphate ion is bound in the same manner as in the structure of oxidized TvNiR, and the nine c oordinated europium ion is located on the surface of one of the crystallographically independent monomers of the enzyme.

  6. Structure of octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens in a complex with phosphate

    Trofimov, A. A.; Polyakov, K. M., E-mail: kostya@eimb.relarn.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology (Russian Federation); Boiko, K. M.; Filimonenkov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Bach Institute of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Dorovatovskii, P. V. [Kurchatov Center for Synchrotron Radiation and Nanotechnology (Russian Federation); Tikhonova, T. V.; Popov, V. O. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Bach Institute of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Koval' chuk, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2010-01-15

    Octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens (TvNiR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrite and hydroxylamine to ammonia. The structures of the free enzyme and of the enzyme in complexes with the substrate (nitrite ion) and the inhibitor (azide ion) have been solved previously. In this study we report the structures of the oxidized complex of TvNiR with phosphate and of this complex reduced by europium(II) chloride (1.8- and 2.0-A resolution, the R factors are 15.9 and 16.7%, respectively) and the structure of the enzyme in the complex with cyanide (1.76-A resolution, the R factor is 16.5%), which was prepared by soaking a crystal of the oxidized phosphate complex of TvNiR. In the active site of the enzyme, the phosphate ion binds to the iron ion of the catalytic heme and to the side chains of the catalytic residues Arg131, Tyr303, and His361. The cyanide ion is coordinated to the heme-iron ion and is hydrogen bonded to the residue His361. In the structure of reduced TvNiR, the phosphate ion is bound in the same manner as in the structure of oxidized TvNiR, and the nine{sub c}oordinated europium ion is located on the surface of one of the crystallographically independent monomers of the enzyme.

  7. Probing Structural and Catalytic Characteristics of Galactose Oxidase Confined in Nanoscale Chemical Environments

    Ikemoto, Hideki; Mossin, Susanne; Ulstrup, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Galactose oxidase (GAOX) is a special metalloenzyme in terms of its active site structure and catalytic mechanisms. This work reports a study where the enzyme confined in a nanoscale chemical environment provided by mesoporous silicas (MPS) is probed. Two types of MPS, i.e. SBA-15 and MCF, were...... synthesized and used to accommodate GAOX. SBA-15-ROD is rod-shaped particles with periodically ordered nanopores (9.5 nm), while MCF has a mesocellular foam-like structure with randomly distributed pores (23 nm) interconnected by smaller windows (8.8 nm). GAOX is non-covalently confined in SBA-15- ROD, while...... it is covalently immobilized in MCF. Relatively high loadings in the range of 50–60 mg g1 are achieved. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is used to probe the active site structures of the enzyme. The similar ESR spectra observed for GAOX in the free and immobilized states support that the electronic...

  8. Metallo-deuteroporphyrin as a biomimetic catalyst for the catalytic oxidation of lignin to aromatics.

    Zhu, Chenjie; Ding, Weiwei; Shen, Tao; Tang, Chenglun; Sun, Chenguo; Xu, Shichao; Chen, Yong; Wu, Jinglan; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-05-22

    A series of metallo-deuteroporphyrins derived from hemin were prepared as models of the cytochrome P450 enzyme. With the aid of the highly active Co(II) deuteroporphyrin complex, the catalytic oxidation system was applied for the oxidation of several lignin model compounds, and high yields of monomeric products were obtained under mild reaction conditions. It was found that the modified cobalt deuteroporphyrin that has no substituents at the meso sites but does have the disulfide linkage in the propionate side chains at the β sites exhibited much higher activity and stability than the synthetic tetraphenylporphyrin. The changes in the propionate side chains can divert the reactivity of cobalt deuteroporphyrins from the typical CC bond cleavage to CO bond cleavage. Furthermore, this novel oxidative system can convert enzymolysis lignin into depolymerized products including a significant portion of well-defined aromatic monomers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Catalytic routes to fuels from C1 and oxygenate molecules

    Wang, Shuai

    2017-02-23

    This account illustrates concepts in chemical kinetics underpinned by the formalism of transition state theory using catalytic processes that enable the synthesis of molecules suitable as fuels from C-1 and oxygenate reactants. Such feedstocks provide an essential bridge towards a carbon-free energy future, but their volatility and low energy density require the formation of new C-C bonds and the removal of oxygen. These transformations are described here through recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and site requirements in catalysis by surfaces, with emphasis on enabling concepts that tackle ubiquitous reactivity and selectivity challenges. The hurdles in forming the first C-C bond from C-1 molecules are illustrated by the oxidative coupling of methane, in which surface O-atoms form OH radicals from O-2 and H2O molecules. These gaseous OH species act as strong H-abstractors and activate C-H bonds with earlier transition states than oxide surfaces, thus rendering activation rates less sensitive to the weaker C-H bonds in larger alkane products than in CH4 reactants. Anhydrous carbonylation of dimethyl ether forms a single C-C bond on protons residing within inorganic voids that preferentially stabilize the kinetically-relevant transition state through van der Waals interactions that compensate for the weak CO nucleophile. Similar solvation effects, but by intrapore liquids instead of inorganic hosts, also become evident as alkenes condense within MCM-41 channels containing isolated Ni2+ active sites during dimerization reactions. Intrapore liquids preferentially stabilize transition states for C-C bond formation and product desorption, leading to unprecedented reactivity and site stability at sub-ambient temperatures and to 1-alkene dimer selectivities previously achieved only on organometallic systems with co-catalysts or activators. C-1 homologation selectively forms C-4 and C-7 chains with a specific backbone (isobutane, triptane) on solid

  10. Catalytic routes to fuels from C1 and oxygenate molecules

    Wang, Shuai; Agirrezabal-Telleria, Iker; Bhan, Aditya; Simonetti, Dante; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Iglesia, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    This account illustrates concepts in chemical kinetics underpinned by the formalism of transition state theory using catalytic processes that enable the synthesis of molecules suitable as fuels from C-1 and oxygenate reactants. Such feedstocks provide an essential bridge towards a carbon-free energy future, but their volatility and low energy density require the formation of new C-C bonds and the removal of oxygen. These transformations are described here through recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and site requirements in catalysis by surfaces, with emphasis on enabling concepts that tackle ubiquitous reactivity and selectivity challenges. The hurdles in forming the first C-C bond from C-1 molecules are illustrated by the oxidative coupling of methane, in which surface O-atoms form OH radicals from O-2 and H2O molecules. These gaseous OH species act as strong H-abstractors and activate C-H bonds with earlier transition states than oxide surfaces, thus rendering activation rates less sensitive to the weaker C-H bonds in larger alkane products than in CH4 reactants. Anhydrous carbonylation of dimethyl ether forms a single C-C bond on protons residing within inorganic voids that preferentially stabilize the kinetically-relevant transition state through van der Waals interactions that compensate for the weak CO nucleophile. Similar solvation effects, but by intrapore liquids instead of inorganic hosts, also become evident as alkenes condense within MCM-41 channels containing isolated Ni2+ active sites during dimerization reactions. Intrapore liquids preferentially stabilize transition states for C-C bond formation and product desorption, leading to unprecedented reactivity and site stability at sub-ambient temperatures and to 1-alkene dimer selectivities previously achieved only on organometallic systems with co-catalysts or activators. C-1 homologation selectively forms C-4 and C-7 chains with a specific backbone (isobutane, triptane) on solid

  11. High Zn/Al ratios enhance dehydrogenation vs hydrogen transfer reactions of Zn-ZSM-5 catalytic systems in methanol conversion to aromatics

    Pinilla-Herrero, Irene; Borfecchia, Elisa; Holzinger, Julian

    2018-01-01

    suggest that catalytic activity is associated with [Zn(H2O)n(OH)]+ species located in the exchange positions of the materials with little or no contribution of ZnO or metallic Zn. The effect of Zn/Al ratio on their catalytic performance in methanol conversion to aromatics has been investigated. In all...... cases, higher Zn content causes an increase in the yield of aromatics while keeping the production of alkanes low. For similar Zn contents, high densities of Al sites favour the hydrogen transfer reactions and alkane formation whereas in samples with low Al contents, and thus higher Zn/Al ratio...

  12. Crystal structures of wild-type Trichoderma reesei Cel7A catalytic domain in open and closed states

    Bodenheimer, Annette M. [Molecular and Structural Biochemistry Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC USA; Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN USA; Meilleur, Flora [Molecular and Structural Biochemistry Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC USA; Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN USA

    2016-11-07

    Trichoderma reesei Cel7A efficiently hydrolyses cellulose. We report here the crystallographic structures of the wild-type TrCel7A catalytic domain (CD) in an open state and, for the first time, in a closed state. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that the loops along the CD tunnel move in concerted motions. Together, the crystallographic and MD data suggest that the CD cycles between the tense and relaxed forms that are characteristic of work producing enzymes. Analysis of the interactions formed by R251 provides a structural rationale for the concurrent decrease in product inhibition and catalytic efficiency measured for product-binding site mutants.

  13. Site development

    Gaynor, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a low-level radioactive waste land disposal facility is little different than any industrial development of similar scope. Consideration must be made for normal business and operations management, security, facility maintenance, traffic control and necessary amenities for personnel. The item specific to the low-level waste site is the handling of radioactive waste materials and the regulatory and environmental protection procedures that must be planned for and accomodated in the site design and development. Each of these elements and the facility as a whole must be designed to be compatible with local land use plans, available transportation and support services, and the social and economic goals of the local community. Plans should also be made for quality control and orderly construction. This chapter deals with those aspects of the facility, its design and construction which are integral parts to the overall performance of the site

  14. Site Practice

    Wahedi, Haseebullah

    2016-01-01

    different practices in the construction phase. The research is based on an ethnographic study of a case in Denmark. The empirical data were collected through direct observations and semi-structured interviews with site managers, contract managers, foremen and craftsmen. Findings revealed...... that the construction phase comprises several communities and practices, leading to various uses of the drawings. The results indicated that the craftsmen used drawings to position themselves in the correct location, and that the site managers and contract managers used them as management tools and legal documents...

  15. Reductive Catalytic Fractionation of Corn Stover Lignin

    Anderson, Eric M.; Katahira, Rui; Reed, Michelle; Resch, Michael G.; Karp, Eric M.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-12-05

    Reductive catalytic fractionation (RCF) has emerged as an effective biomass pretreatment strategy to depolymerize lignin into tractable fragments in high yields. We investigate the RCF of corn stover, a highly abundant herbaceous feedstock, using carbon-supported Ru and Ni catalysts at 200 and 250 degrees C in methanol and, in the presence or absence of an acid cocatalyst (H3PO4 or an acidified carbon support). Three key performance variables were studied: (1) the effectiveness of lignin extraction as measured by the yield of lignin oil, (2) the yield of monomers in the lignin oil, and (3) the carbohydrate retention in the residual solids after RCF. The monomers included methyl coumarate/ferulate, propyl guaiacol/syringol, and ethyl guaiacol/syringol. The Ru and Ni catalysts performed similarly in terms of product distribution and monomer yields. The monomer yields increased monotonically as a function of time for both temperatures. At 6 h, monomer yields of 27.2 and 28.3% were obtained at 250 and 200 degrees C, respectively, with Ni/C. The addition of an acid cocatalysts to the Ni/C system increased monomer yields to 32% for acidified carbon and 38% for phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C. The monomer product distribution was dominated by methyl coumarate regardless of the use of the acid cocatalysts. The use of phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C or the high temperature condition without acid resulted in complete lignin extraction and partial sugar solubilization (up to 50%) thereby generating lignin oil yields that exceeded the theoretical limit. In contrast, using either Ni/C or Ni on acidified carbon at 200 degrees C resulted in moderate lignin oil yields of ca. 55%, with sugar retention values >90%. Notably, these sugars were amenable to enzymatic digestion, reaching conversions >90% at 96 h. Characterization studies on the lignin oils using two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance and gel permeation chromatrography revealed

  16. Site selection

    CERN PhotoLab

    1968-01-01

    To help resolve the problem of site selection for the proposed 300 GeV machine, the Council selected "three wise men" (left to right, J H Bannier of the Netherlands, A Chavanne of Switzerland and L K Boggild of Denmark).

  17. Site Restoration

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A

    2001-04-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of the Site Restoration Department of SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and activities related to the management of decommissioning projects. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations.

  18. Site Restoration

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of the Site Restoration Department of SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and activities related to the management of decommissioning projects. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations

  19. Catalytic mechanism of the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene over Fe–Co/Mg(Al)O derived from hydrotalcites

    Tope, Balkrishna B.

    2011-11-01

    Catalytic mechanism of ethylbenzene dehydrogenation over Fe-Co/Mg(Al)O derived from hydrotalcites has been studied based on the XAFS and XPS catalyst characterization and the FTIR measurements of adsorbed species. Fe-Co/Mg(Al)O showed synergy, whereas Fe-Ni/Mg(Al)O showed no synergy, in the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene. Ni species were stably incorporated as Ni2+ in the regular sites in periclase and spinel structure in the Fe-Ni/Mg(Al)O. Contrarily, Co species exists as a mixture of Co3+/Co2+ in the Fe-Co/Mg(Al)O and was partially isolated from the regular sites in the structures with increasing the Co content. Co addition enhanced Lewis acidity of Fe3+ active sites by forming Fe3+-O-Co 3+/2+(1/1) bond, resulting in an increase in the activity. FTIR of ethylbenzene adsorbed on the Fe-Co/Mg(Al)O clearly showed formations of C-O bond and π-adsorbed aromatic ring. This suggests that ethylbenzene was strongly adsorbed on the Fe3+ acid sites via π-bonding and the dehydrogenation was initiated by α-H+ abstraction from ethyl group on Mg2+-O2- basic sites, followed by C-O-Mg bond formation. The α-H+ abstraction by O2-(-Mg 2+) was likely followed by β-H abstraction, leading to the formations of styrene and H2. Such catalytic mechanism by the Fe 3+ acid-O2-(-Mg2+) base couple and the Fe 3+/Fe2+ reduction-oxidation cycle was further assisted by Co3+/Co2+, leading to a good catalytic activity for the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: kinetics and biodegradability enhancement.

    Suárez-Ojeda, María Eugenia; Kim, Jungkwon; Carrera, Julián; Metcalfe, Ian S; Font, Josep

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15 bar of oxygen partial pressure (P(O2)) and at 180, 200 and 220 degrees C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P(O2) were 140-160 degrees C and 2-9 bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160 degrees C and 2 bar of P(O2), which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD(RB)) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture.