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Sample records for hematopoietic factor granulocyte-colony

  1. Long-active granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization.

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    Martino, Massimo; Laszlo, Daniele; Lanza, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Peg-filgrastim (PEG-FIL), a polyethylene glycol-conjugated form of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), has been introduced in clinical practice and is effective in shortening the time of neutropenia after cytotoxic chemotherapy. G-CSF has emerged as the preferred cytokine for hematopoietic progenitor cells' (HPC) mobilization. Nevertheless, data on the ability of PEG-FIL in this field have been published. We review publications in the field with the goal of providing an overview of this approach. PEG-FIL may be able to mobilize CD34(+) cells in a more timely fashion than G-CSF, with the advantages of only a single-dose administration, an earlier start and a reduction in the number of apheresis procedures. The main controversies concern the dosage of the drug and the optimal dose. In the context of chemo-mobilization, a single dose of 6 mg PEG-FIL seems effective in terms of HPC's mobilization and there is no increase in this effect if the dose is doubled to 12 mg. Steady-state mobilization requires higher doses of PEG-FIL and this approach is not cost-effective when compared with G-CSF. The experiences with PEG-FIL in the healthy donor setting are very limited.

  2. Differential role of CD97 in interleukin-8-induced and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-induced hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pel, Melissa; Hagoort, Henny; Kwakkenbos, Mark J.; Hamann, Jörg; Fibbe, Willem E.

    2008-01-01

    CD97 is broadly expressed on hematopoietic cells and is involved in neutrophil migration. Since neutrophils are key regulators in HSC/HPC mobilization, we studied a possible role for CD97 in interleukin-8 and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-induced HSC/HPC mobilization. Mobilization was absent

  3. Treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor decreases the capacity of hematopoietic progenitor cells for generation of lymphocytes in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Dam; Clark, D R; Hutchings, M

    1999-01-01

    An obstacle to stem cell gene therapy for AIDS is the limited numbers of hematopoietic progenitors available. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used for mobilization of progenitors, but little is known about the functional characteristics of mobilized progenitors, and immature and ...

  4. Effects of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor on Monosomy 7 aneuploidy in healthy hematopoietic stem cell and granulocyte donors.

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    Olnes, Matthew J; Poon, Andrea; Miranda, Susan J; Pfannes, Loretta; Tucker, Zachary; Loeliger, Kelsey; Padilla-Nash, Hesed; Yau, Yu Ying; Ried, Thomas; Leitman, Susan F; Young, Neal S; Sloand, Elaine M

    2012-03-01

    Reports of Monosomy 7 in patients receiving granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) have raised concerns that this cytokine may promote genomic instability. However, there are no studies addressing whether repeated administration of G-CSF produces Monosomy 7 aneuploidy in healthy donors. We examined Chromosomes 7 and 8 by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) in CD34+ cells from 35 healthy hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) donors after G-CSF administration for 5 days and by spectral karyotyping analysis (SKY) in four individuals to assess chromosomal integrity. We also studied 38 granulocyte donors who received up to 42 doses of G-CSF and dexamethasone (Dex) using FISH for Chromosomes 7 and 8. We found no abnormalities in Chromosomes 7 and 8 in G-CSF-mobilized CD34+ cells when assessed by FISH or SKY, nor did we detect aneuploidy in G-CSF- and Dex-treated donors. G-CSF does not promote clinically detectable Monosomy 7 or Trisomy 8 aneuploidy in HSCT or granulocyte donors. These findings should be reassuring to healthy HSCT and granulocyte donors. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  5. Adrenaline administration promotes the efficiency of granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mediated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization in mice.

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    Chen, Chong; Cao, Jiang; Song, Xuguang; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Li, Yong; Xu, Kailin

    2013-01-01

    A high dose of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used to mobilize hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), but G-CSF is relatively inefficient and may cause adverse effects. Recently, adrenaline has been found to play important roles in HSPC mobilization. In this study, we explored whether adrenaline combined with G-CSF could induce HSPC mobilization in a mouse model. Mice were treated with adrenaline and either a high or low dose of G-CSF alone or in combination. Peripheral blood HSPC counts were evaluated by flow cytometry. Levels of bone marrow SDF-1 were measured by ELISA, the transcription of CXCR4 and SDF-1 was measured by real-time RT-PCR, and CXCR4 protein was detected by Western blot. Our results showed that adrenaline alone fails to mobilize HSPCs into the peripheral blood; however, when G-CSF and adrenaline are combined, the WBC counts and percentages of HSPCs are significantly higher compared to those in mice that received G-CSF alone. The combined use of adrenaline and G-CSF not only accelerated HSPC mobilization, but also enabled the efficient mobilization of HSPCs into the peripheral blood at lower doses of G-CSF. Adrenaline/G-CSF treatment also extensively downregulated levels of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in mouse bone marrow. These results demonstrated that adrenaline combined with G-CSF can induce HSPC mobilization by down-regulating the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis, indicating that the use of adrenaline may enable the use of reduced dosages or durations of G-CSF treatment, minimizing G-CSF-associated complications.

  6. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor inhibits spontaneous cytochrome c release and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis of myelodysplastic syndrome hematopoietic progenitors.

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    Tehranchi, Ramin; Fadeel, Bengt; Forsblom, Ann-Mari; Christensson, Birger; Samuelsson, Jan; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva

    2003-02-01

    Low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), including refractory anemia and sideroblastic anemia, are characterized by increased apoptotic death of erythroid progenitors. The signaling pathways that elicit this pathologic cell death in MDS have, however, remained unclear. Treatment with erythropoietin in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may synergistically improve the anemia in patients with MDS, with a concomitant decrease in the number of apoptotic bone marrow precursors. Moreover, we have previously reported that G-CSF inhibits Fas-induced caspase activation in sideroblastic anemia (RARS). The present data demonstrate that almost 50% of erythroid progenitor cells derived from patients with MDS exhibit spontaneous release of cytochrome c from mitochondria with ensuing activation of caspase-9, whereas normal erythroid progenitors display neither of these features. G-CSF significantly inhibited cytochrome c release and suppressed apoptosis, most noticeably in cells from patients with sideroblastic anemia. Furthermore, inhibition of caspase-9 suppressed both spontaneous and Fas-mediated apoptosis of erythroid progenitors in all low-risk MDS cases studied. We propose that the increased sensitivity of MDS progenitor cells to death receptor stimulation is due to a constitutive activation of the mitochondrial axis of the apoptotic signaling pathway in these cells. These studies yield a mechanistic explanation for the beneficial clinical effects of growth factor administration in patients with MDS, and provide a model for the study of growth factor-mediated suppression of apoptosis in other bone marrow disorders.

  7. Healthy donor hematopoietic stem cell mobilization with biosimilar granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor: safety, efficacy, and graft performance.

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    Becker, Petra; Schwebig, Arnd; Brauninger, Susanne; Bialleck, Heike; Luxembourg, Beate; Schulz, Miriam; Tsamadou, Chrysanthi; Wiesneth, Markus; Reinhardt, Peter; Mytilineos, Joannis; Seidl, Christian; Gattu, Sreekanth; Kaliakina, Natalia; Singh, Pritibha; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Seifried, Erhard; Bonig, Halvard

    2016-12-01

    Biosimilar granulocyte-colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) have been available in the European Union since 2008, and Sandoz' biosimilar filgrastim was approved in the United States in March 2015 for all of the reference product's indications except acute radiation syndrome. Biosimilar G-CSFs have been largely embraced by the medical community, except for some reservations about healthy-donor stem cell mobilization, for which use outside of clinical studies was cautioned against by some members of the scientific community. In a two-center safety surveillance study (National Clinical Trial NCT01766934), 245 healthy volunteer stem cell donors were enrolled. Of 244 donors who began mobilization with twice-daily Sandoz biosimilar filgrastim, 242 received a full (n = 241) or partial (n = 1) course of G-CSF and underwent apheresis. Efficacy and safety were assessed and are reported here. Biosimilar filgrastim was accompanied by the typical G-CSF class-related adverse effects of expected frequency and severity. Median mobilization for CD34-positive stem cells was 97/µL (range, 20-347/µL); after one apheresis (91%) or two aphereses (9%) from all but three donors (1.2%), cell doses in excess of the typical 4 × 106 CD34-positive cells/kg of the recipient had been collected (range, 3-52 × 106 /kg). Biochemical and hematologic alterations were consistent with previous reports; all had normalized by the first follow-up 1 month after mobilization. Stem cell products engrafted with typical probability and kinetics for G-CSF-mobilized stem cell products. These data support the use of biosimilar filgrastim for healthy-donor stem cell mobilization as safe and effective. © 2016 The Authors. Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  8. A soluble granulocyte colony stimulating factor decoy receptor as a novel tool to increase hematopoietic cell homing and reconstitution in mice.

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    Fortin, Audrey; Benabdallah, Basma; Palacio, Lina; Carbonneau, Cynthia L; Le, Oanh N; Haddad, Elie; Beauséjour, Christian M

    2013-03-15

    The relative ineffectiveness of hematopoietic stem cells in reaching the bone marrow upon transplantation combined with the limited number of these cells available is a major reason for graft failure and delayed hematopoietic recovery. Hence, the development of strategies that could enhance homing is of high interest. Here, we provide evidence that homing is severely impaired postexposure to ionizing radiation (IR) in mice, an effect we found was time dependent and could be partially rescued using mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) therapy. In an attempt to further increase homing, we took advantage of our observation that the granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), a cytokine known to induce cell mobilization, is increased in the marrow of mice shortly after their exposure to IR. As such, we developed a truncated, yet functional, soluble G-CSF receptor (solG-CSFR), which we hypothesized could act as a decoy and foster homing. Using MSCs or conditioned media as delivery vehicles, we show that an engineered solG-CSFR has the potential to increase homing and hematopoietic reconstitution in mice. Altogether, our results provide novel findings at the interplay of IR and stromal cell therapy and present the regulation of endogenous G-CSF as an innovative proof-of-concept strategy to manipulate hematopoietic cell homing.

  9. The high effect of chemomobilization with high-dose etopside + granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in autologous hematopoietic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: a single center experience

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    Șebnem Izmir Güner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT provides hematopoietic support after high-dose chemotherapy and is the standard of care for patients with multiple myeloma (MM, chemo sensitive relapsed high or intermediate grade non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL and Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL. However, yields of hematopoietic stem cells vary greatly between patients, and the optimal strategy to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells into peripheral blood for collection has not been defined yet. We investigated the efficacy and safety of chemo mobilization with an intermediate dose etoposide (VP-16; 200 mg/m2 on days 1-3 and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF(5 μg/kg twice daily from day 4 through the final day of collection. We reviewed our institutional experience with 91 patients (71 MM, 12 HL, 8 NHL mobilized with this regimen. VP-16 + G-CSF resulted in successful mobilization in 95.55% of the patients (on one patient stem cell collection with plerixafor was applied, including 76 patients (83.52% whose stem cells were collected successfully in a single day. Collection was managed between min. D8 and max. D17. Patient age, gender, exposure to previous irradiation and chemotherapy, previous mobilization attempts, and disease characteristics were not considered during selection. Adverse effects of the regimen included supportive transfusions and fevers requiring hospitalization or intravenous antibiotics. VP-16 and GCSF appears to be a safe and effective mobilization regimen for patients with multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and Hodgkin’s lymphoma undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation, producing excellent stem cell yield with the majority of patients requiring 1 day of apheresis.

  10. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Induces Osteoblast Inhibition by B Lymphocytes and Osteoclast Activation by T Lymphocytes during Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Mobilization.

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    Li, Sidan; Li, Tianshou; Chen, Yongbing; Nie, Yinchao; Li, Changhong; Liu, Lanting; Li, Qiaochuan; Qiu, Lugui

    2015-08-01

    In the bone marrow (BM), hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in specialized niches near osteoblast cells at the endosteum. HSPCs that egress to peripheral blood are widely used for transplant, and mobilization is most commonly performed with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, the cellular targets of G-CSF that initiate the mobilization cascade and bone remodeling are not completely understood. Here, we examined whether T and B lymphocytes modulate the bone niche and influence HSPC mobilization. We used T and B defective mice to show that G-CSF-induced mobilization of HSPCs correlated with B lymphocytes but poorly with T lymphocytes. In addition, we found that defective B lymphocytes prevent G-CSF-mediated osteoblast disruption, and further study showed BM osteoblasts were reduced coincident with mobilization, induced by elevated expression of dickkopf1 of BM B lymphocytes. BM T cells were also involved in G-CSF-induced osteoclast activation by regulating the Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κ B Ligand/Osteoprotegerin (RANKL/OPG) axis. These data provide evidence that BM B and T lymphocytes play a role in G-CSF-induced HSPC mobilization by regulating bone remodeling. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and leukemogenesis

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    Lorena Lobo de Figueiredo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF plays an important role in normal granulopoiesis. Its functions are mediated by specific receptors on the surface of responsive cells and, upon ligand binding, several cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases are activated. The cytoplasmic region proximal to the membrane of the G-CSF receptor (G-CSF-R transduces proliferative and survival signals, whereas the distal carboxy-terminal region transduces maturation signals and suppresses the receptor's proliferative signals. Mutations in the G-CSF-R gene resulting in truncation of the carboxy-terminal region have been detected in a subset of patients with severe congenital neutropenia who developed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. In addition, the AML1-ETO fusion protein, expressed in leukemic cells harboring the t(8;21, disrupt the physiological function of transcription factors such as C/EBPα and C/EBPε, which in turn deregulate G-CSF-R expression. The resulting high levels of G-CSF-R and G-CSF-dependent cell proliferation may be associated with pathogenesis of AML with t(8;21. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that G-CSF may act as a co-stimulus augmenting the response of PML-RARα acute promyelocytic leukemia cells to all-trans-retinoic acid treatment. Finally, in the PLZF-RARα acute promyelocytic leukemia transgenic model, G-CSF deficiency suppressed leukemia development. Altogether, these data suggest that the G-CSF signaling pathway may play a role in leukemogenesis.

  12. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for hematopoietic stem cell donation from healthy female donors during pregnancy and lactation: what do we know?

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    Pessach, Ilias; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) are mostly used as supportive measures to reduce infectious complications associated with neutropenia. Over the past decade, the use of HGFs became a common method for mobilizing human CD34+ stem cells, either for autologous or allogeneic transplantation. However, since their introduction the long-term safety of the procedure has become a major focus of discussion and research. Most information refers to healthy normal donors and data concerning pregnant and lactating women are scarce. The clinical question, which is the core of this review, is whether stem cell donation, preceded by administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization, is a safe procedure for pregnant donors. METHODS Literature searches were performed in Pubmed for English language articles published before the end of May 2012, focusing on G-CSF administration during pregnancy, lactation and hematopoietic stem cell donation. Searches included animal and human studies. RESULTS Data from animals (n = 15 studies) and women (n = 46 studies) indicate that G-CSF crosses the placenta, stimulates fetal granulopoiesis, improves neonatal survival mostly for very immature infants, promotes trophoblast growth and placental metabolism and has an anti-abortive role. Granulocyte macrophage-CSF is a key cytokine in the maternal immune tolerance towards the implanted embryo and exerts protective long-term programming effects to preimplantation embryos. The available data suggest that probably CSFs should not be administered during the time of most active organogenesis (first trimester), except perhaps for the first week during which implantation takes place. Provided CSF is administered during the second and third trimesters, it appears to be safe, and pregnant women receiving the CSF treatment can become hematopoietic stem cell donors. There are also risks related to the anesthesia, which is required for the bone marrow aspiration. During

  13. Mobilization of long-term hematopoietic reconstituting cells in mice by the combination of stem cell factor plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

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    Yan, X Q; Briddell, R; Hartley, C; Stoney, G; Samal, B; McNiece, I

    1994-08-01

    In this study, we have compared the ability of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) alone and the combination of low doses of recombinant rat pegylated stem cell factor (rrSCF-PEG) plus rhG-CSF to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) with long-term engrafting potential. Female recipient irradiated mice were transplanted with PBPCs from male mice that were mobilized with rhG-CSF alone (group A) or rrSCF-PEG plus rhG-CSF (group B). As previously shown, greater short-term survival resulted in group B compared with group A, with 80% and 40% survival at 30 days posttransplant, respectively. Both groups of animals showed long-term donor-derived engraftment in greater than 95% of animals, as determined by quantitative specific polymerase chain reaction amplification of a Y chromosome sequence from whole blood of the mice at 6 to 12 months posttransplantation. Analysis of individual granulocyte-macrophage colonies, picked up from semisolid methylcellulose culture of bone marrow cells from transplanted mice, resulted in detection of donor-derived DNA in 98% of colonies from group B mice compared with 81% from group A mice. These data show that cells with long-term potential are mobilized by rhG-CSF alone and the combination of rrSCF-PEG plus rhG-CSF. Furthermore, an increased number of cells with short-term and long-term engraftment potential was obtained with rrSCF-PEG plus rhG-CSF compared with rhG-CSF alone.

  14. Interactions of erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, stem cell factor, and interleukin-11 on murine hematopoiesis during simultaneous administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeder, [No Value; de Haan, G; Engel, C; Nijhof, W; Dontje, B; Loeffler, M

    1998-01-01

    We investigated how in vivo effects of single hematopoietic cytokines change if given in combination for a prolonged time. Mice were treated with every combination of recombinant human (rh) erythropoietin (EPO), rh granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), recombinant rat (rr) stem cell factor

  15. The Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor has a dual role in neuronal and vascular plasticity

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    Stephanie eWallner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is a growth factor that has originally been identified several decades ago as a hematopoietic factor required mainly for the generation of neutrophilic granulocytes, and is in clinical use for that. More recently, it has been discovered that G-CSF also plays a role in the brain as a growth factor for neurons and neural stem cells, and as a factor involved in the plasticity of the vasculature. We review and discuss these dual properties in view of the neuroregenerative potential of this growth factor.

  16. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and reproductive medicine: A review

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    Marcelo Borges Cavalcante

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF has been proposed to improve pregnancy outcomes in reproductive medicine. Objective: A systematic review of the current use of G-CSF in patients who have difficulty conceiving and maintaining pregnancy was performed. Materials and Methods: Two electronic databases (PubMed/ Medline and Scopus were searched. Study selection, data extraction and quality assessment were performed in duplicate. The subject codes used were granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, G-CSF, recurrent miscarriage, IVF failure, and endometrium. Results: The search of electronic databases resulted in 215 citations (PubMed/ Medline: 139 and Scopus: 76, of which 38 were present in both databases. Of the remaining 177 publications, seven studies were included in the present review. Conclusion: Treatment with G-CSF is a novel proposal for immune therapy in patients with recurrent miscarriage and implantation failure following cycles of IVF. However, a larger number of well-designed studies are required for this treatment to be established.

  17. [Comparative study on the efficacy and safety between pegfilgrastim (PEG-rhG-CSF) and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in promoting hematopoietic recovery after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after hematological malignancy].

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    Yang, F; Sun, X D; Yuan, L; Zhang, J C; Hu, J W; Liu, N; Lou, X; Su, Y F; Yu, Z Y; Chen, J L; Li, Y H; Hu, L D; Chen, H; Jiang, M

    2017-10-14

    Objective: To observe the efficacy and safety between Pegfilgrastim (PEG-rhG-CSF) and Recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) in hematological malignancy after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) . Methods: 157 patients after allo-HSCT were enrolled in this study from June 2015 to November 2016. Two agents of G-CSF were used to stimulate hematopoietic recovery after transplantation. There were 65 cases in PEG-rhG-CSF and 92 cases in rhG-CSF groups. Patients in PEG-rhG-CSF group were given a single subcutaneous dose of 6 mg on the first day and +8 d, while cases in rhG-CSF group were given in dose of 5 μg·kg(-1)·d(-1) by subcutaneous injection from +1 d continuing to neutrophils more than 1.5×10(9)/L, and then the indicators and survival rates in two groups after transplantation were compared. Results: ①There were no significant differences of the neutrophil implantation time[13.5 (8-12) d vs 13 (9-24) d, P =0.393] and platelet implantation time [14 (9-160) d vs 14 (9-92) d, P =0.094] between PEG-rhG-CSF and rhG-CSF groups respectively. There were no significant differences in terms of neutropenia period ( P =0.435) , number of cases who got fever during neutropenia ( P =0.622) , and the median time of fever in neutropenia period ( P =0.460) , respectively between the two groups. There were no significant differences of erythrocyte and platelet transfusions ( P =0.074, P =0.059) within 1 month after transplantation. ②There were no significant differences with regard to the incidences of acute GVHD[23.1% (15/65) vs 34.8% (32/92) , P =0.115], chronic GVHD[20.0% (13/65) vs 32.6% (32/92) , P =0.081], Ⅱ-Ⅳdegree of acute GVHD[30.0% (13/65) vs 30.4% (30/92) , P =0.287] and extensive chronic GVHD[9.2% (6/65) vs 20.7% (19/92) , P =0.135] between PEG-rhG-CSF and rhG-CSF groups. ③There were no significant differences in terms of disease free survival (DFS) (62.5% vs 61.4%, P =0.478) and overall survival (OS

  18. Characterization of granulocyte colony stimulating factor for in vitro induction of regulatory T cells for cellular immune intervention in transplant medicine.

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    Lammers, Stefanie Schulze; Ukena, Sya N; Velaga, Sarvari; Franzke, Anke

    2013-04-01

    The application of regulatory T cells in the field of solid-organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is under investigation to develop novel cellular strategies for tolerance induction. Establishing in vitro procedures to induce and expand regulatory T cells seeks to overcome the limiting small number of this rare T cell population. The present study is based on growing evidence that granulocyte colony stimulating factor exerts immune regulatory function in the adaptive immune system and may induce regulatory T cells in vivo. We analyzed the effect of recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating factor to directly convert CD4+CD25- T cells into regulatory T cells in vitro. Marker molecules were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent-activated cell sorter analyses. Functional assays were performed to investigate the suppressive capacity of granulocyte colony stimulating factor stimulated T cells. Kinetic analyses of Foxp3 gene expression uncovered increased levels early after in vitro stimulation with granulocyte colony stimulating factor. However, protein analyses for the master transcription factor Foxp3 and other regulatory T cells revealed that granulocyte colony stimulating factor did not directly induce a regulatory T cell phenotype. Moreover, functional analyses demonstrated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor stimulation in vitro does not result in a suppressive, immune regulatory T cell population. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor does not induce regulatory T cells with a specific phenotype and suppressive potency in vitro. Therefore, granulocyte colony stimulating factor does not qualify for developing protocols aimed at higher regulatory T cell numbers for adoptive transfer strategies in solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  19. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor producing rectal cancer

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    Satoh Mikinori

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF-producing cancer has been reported to occur in various organs, especially the lung. However, G-CSF-producing colorectal cancer (CRC has never been reported in the English literature. Case presentation A 57-year-old man was admitted for the surgical removal of a rectal cancer. Some hepatic tumors in the liver were revealed concurrently, and their appearance suggested multiple liver metastases. Low anterior resection was performed. with the help of histopathological examination and immunohistochemical studies, we diagnosed this case to be an undifferentiated carcinoma of the rectum. After the operation, the white blood cell (WBC count increased gradually to 81,000 cells/μL. Modified-FOLFOX6 therapy was initiated to treat the liver metastases, but there was no effect, and peritoneal dissemination had also occurred. The serum level of G-CSF was elevated to 840 pg/mL (normal range, Conclusion This is the first case of G-CSF-producing rectal cancer, and its prognosis was very poor.

  20. Homeostatic γδ T Cell Contents Are Preserved by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Priming and Correlate with the Early Recovery of γδ T Cell Subsets after Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

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    Bian, Zhilei; Xu, Lan-Ping; Fu, Qiang; Huo, Mingrui; Liu, Long; Zhao, Xiaosu; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Jiangying

    2018-02-01

    Emerging evidence from graft manipulations and immunotherapeutic treatments has highlighted a favorable effect of γδ T cells in the setting of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT). However, γδ T cell subsets and their distinct features in the allograft have not been characterized. Additionally, whether homeostatic γδ T cell fractions are influenced by treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) remains elusive. We initially compared the phenotypes of γδ T cell subsets, including CD27 + , CD27 - , Vδ1 + , Vδ2 + , Vδ1 + CD27 + , Vδ1 + CD27 - , Vδ2 + CD27 + , and Vδ2 + CD27 - cells, in the peripheral blood of 20 healthy donors before and after G-CSF mobilization. The effects of G-CSF on the cytokine production capacities of γδ T cell subsets were also detected. Moreover, the correlation between donor homeostatic γδ T cell content and the early recoveries of γδ T cell subgroups after haploidentical HSCT was investigated in 40 pairs of donors and recipients. We found that both the proportions and IFN-γ secretion capacities of peripheral γδ T cell subsets were preserved in G-CSF-primed grafts. Homeostatic Vδ1 and Vδ2 proportions of donors significantly correlated with the early recoveries of Vδ1 and Vδ2 cells after haploidentical HSCT. Interestingly, a higher day 30 Vδ1 concentration was associated with a lower incidence of cytomegalovirus reactivation in recipients. These results not only clarify the preservation of γδ T cell phenotypes and functional features by G-CSF mobilization but also suggest the importance of homeostatic γδ T cell content for immune recovery after alloHSCT. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor attenuates oligomeric amyloid β neurotoxicity by activation of neprilysin.

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    Yukiko Doi

    Full Text Available Soluble oligomeric amyloid β (oAβ causes synaptic dysfunction and neuronal cell death, which are involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The hematopoietic growth factor granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is expressed in the central nervous system (CNS and drives neurogenesis. Here we show that G-CSF attenuated oAβ neurotoxicity through the enhancement of the enzymatic activity of Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin (NEP in neurons, while the NEP inhibitor thiorphan abolished the neuroprotection. Inhibition of MEK5/ERK5, a major downstream effector of G-CSF signaling, also ablated neuroprotective effect of G-CSF. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular administration of G-CSF enhanced NEP enzymatic activity and clearance of Aβ in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Thus, we propose that G-CSF may be a possible therapeutic strategy against AD.

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor protects mice during respiratory virus infections.

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    Tamar Hermesh

    Full Text Available A burst in the production of pro-inflammatory molecules characterizes the beginning of the host response to infection. Cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors work in concert to control pathogen replication and activate innate and adaptive immune responses. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF mobilizes and activates hematopoietic cells from the bone marrow, and it has been shown to mediate the generation of effective immunity against bacterial and fungal infections. G-CSF is produced at high levels in the lungs during infection with influenza and parainfluenza viruses, but its role during these infections is unknown. Here we show that during infection of mice with a non-lethal dose of influenza or Sendai virus, G-CSF promotes the accumulation of activated Ly6G+ granulocytes that control the extent of the lung pro-inflammatory response. Remarkably, these G-CSF-mediated effects facilitate viral clearance and sustain mouse survival.

  3. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor and Its Potential Application for Skeletal Muscle Repair and Regeneration

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    Craig R. Wright

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF was originally discovered in the context of hematopoiesis. However, the identification of the G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR being expressed outside the hematopoietic system has revealed wider roles for G-CSF, particularly in tissue repair and regeneration. Skeletal muscle damage, including that following strenuous exercise, induces an elevation in plasma G-CSF, implicating it as a potential mediator of skeletal muscle repair. This has been supported by preclinical studies and clinical trials investigating G-CSF as a potential therapeutic agent in relevant disease states. This review focuses on the growing literature associated with G-CSF and G-CSFR in skeletal muscle under healthy and disease conditions and highlights the current controversies.

  4. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor delays neutrophil apoptosis by inhibition of calpains upstream of caspase-3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Raam, Bram J.; Drewniak, Agata; Groenewold, Vincent; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2008-01-01

    Neutrophils have a very short life span and undergo apoptosis within 24 hours after leaving the bone marrow. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is essential for the recruitment of fresh neutrophils from the bone marrow but also delays apoptosis of mature neutrophils. To determine the

  5. Safety and efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in kidney and liver transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turgeon, N.; Hovingh, G. K.; Fishman, J. A.; Basgoz, N.; Tolkoff-Rubin, N. E.; Doran, M.; Cosimi, A. B.; Rubin, R. H.

    2000-01-01

    Leukopenia is not infrequently encountered following solid organ transplantation, most often in the setting of cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease and/or its treatment with ganciclovir. The present study was undertaken to determine the safety and efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)

  6. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapy to induce neovascularization in ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten

    2012-01-01

    Cell based therapy for ischemic heart disease has the potential to reduce post infarct heart failure and chronic ischemia. Treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes cells from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood. Some of these cells are putative stem or progenitor...

  7. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF: cloning, overexpression, purification and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanz Ana LS

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biopharmaceutical drugs are mainly recombinant proteins produced by biotechnological tools. The patents of many biopharmaceuticals have expired, and biosimilars are thus currently being developed. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF is a hematopoietic cytokine that acts on cells of the neutrophil lineage causing proliferation and differentiation of committed precursor cells and activation of mature neutrophils. Recombinant hG-CSF has been produced in genetically engineered Escherichia coli (Filgrastim and successfully used to treat cancer patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Filgrastim is a 175 amino acid protein, containing an extra N-terminal methionine, which is needed for expression in E. coli. Here we describe a simple and low-cost process that is amenable to scaling-up for the production and purification of homogeneous and active recombinant hG-CSF expressed in E. coli cells. Results Here we describe cloning of the human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor coding DNA sequence, protein expression in E. coli BL21(DE3 host cells in the absence of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG induction, efficient isolation and solubilization of inclusion bodies by a multi-step washing procedure, and a purification protocol using a single cationic exchange column. Characterization of homogeneous rhG-CSF by size exclusion and reverse phase chromatography showed similar yields to the standard. The immunoassay and N-terminal sequencing confirmed the identity of rhG-CSF. The biological activity assay, in vivo, showed an equivalent biological effect (109.4% to the standard reference rhG-CSF. The homogeneous rhG-CSF protein yield was 3.2 mg of bioactive protein per liter of cell culture. Conclusion The recombinant protein expression in the absence of IPTG induction is advantageous since cost is reduced, and the protein purification protocol using a single chromatographic step should reduce cost

  8. Bone marrow changes associated with recombinant granulocyte-macrophage and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors. Discrimination of granulocytic regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A C; Todd, W M; Hackney, M H; Ben-Ezra, J

    1994-06-01

    The hematopoietic growth factors recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor are associated with changes of the bone marrow. To evaluate the morphologic features and to differentiate them from leukemia, bone marrow specimens from 12 patients who had been treated with one of these agents were evaluated. The bone marrow displayed marked promyelocytic hyperplasia and a less striking increased percentage of myeloblasts. In each of the 11 patients without leukemia at the time of bone marrow biopsy, the percentage of promyelocytes in the bone marrow was greater than that of myeloblasts. Cytologic features of stimulated regeneration included diffuse cytoplasmic hypergranulation of immature neutrophilic precursors that had prominent perinuclear spherical clear areas representing the Golgi zones. With consideration of bone marrow composition and careful attention to cytologic detail, the distinction of bone marrow regeneration from acute leukemia can be made in most patients who are being treated with recombinant hematopoietic growth factors.

  9. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor attenuates inflammation in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giniatullina Raisa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF is protective in animal models of various neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated whether pegfilgrastim, GCSF with sustained action, is protective in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with manifestations of upper and lower motoneuron death and muscle atrophy accompanied by inflammation in the CNS and periphery. Methods Human mutant G93A superoxide dismutase (SOD1 ALS mice were treated with pegfilgrastim starting at the presymptomatic stage and continued until the end stage. After long-term pegfilgrastim treatment, the inflammation status was defined in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues including hematopoietic organs and muscle. The effect of GCSF on spinal cord neuron survival and microglia, bone marrow and spleen monocyte activation was assessed in vitro. Results Long-term pegfilgrastim treatment prolonged mutant SOD1 mice survival and attenuated both astro- and microgliosis in the spinal cord. Pegfilgrastim in SOD1 mice modulated the inflammatory cell populations in the bone marrow and spleen and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine in monocytes and microglia. The mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the circulation was restored back to basal level after long-term pegfilgrastim treatment in SOD1 mice while the storage of Ly6C expressing monocytes in the bone marrow and spleen remained elevated. After pegfilgrastim treatment, an increased proportion of these cells in the degenerative muscle was detected at the end stage of ALS. Conclusions GCSF attenuated inflammation in the CNS and the periphery in a mouse model of ALS and thereby delayed the progression of the disease. This mechanism of action targeting inflammation provides a new perspective of the usage of GCSF in the treatment of ALS.

  10. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor promotes behavioral recovery in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shijie; Kong, Xiaoyuan; Acosta, Sandra; Sava, Vasyl; Borlongan, Cesar; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan

    2016-05-01

    Hematopoietic growth factors such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) represent a novel approach for treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). After mild controlled cortical impact (CCI), mice were treated with G-CSF (100 μg/kg) for 3 consecutive days. The primary behavioral endpoint was performance on the radial arm water maze (RAWM), assessed 7 and 14 days after CCI. Secondary endpoints included 1) motor performance on a rotating cylinder (rotarod), 2) measurement of microglial and astroglial response, 3) hippocampal neurogenesis, and 4) measures of neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF] and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor [GDNF]) and cytokines in brain homogenates. G-CSF-treated animals performed significantly better than vehicle-treated mice in the RAWM at 1 and 2 weeks but not on the rotarod. Cellular changes found in the G-CSF group included increased hippocampal neurogenesis as well as astrocytosis and microgliosis in both the striatum and the hippocampus. Neurotrophic factors GDNF and BDNF, elaborated by activated microglia and astrocytes, were increased in G-CSF-treated mice. These factors along with G-CSF itself are known to promote hippocampal neurogenesis and inhibit apoptosis and likely contributed to improvement in the hippocampal-dependent learning task. Six cytokines that were modulated by G-CSF treatment following CCI were elevated on day 3, but only one of them remained altered by day 7, and all of them were no different from vehicle controls by day 14. The pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines modulated by G-CSF administration interact in a complex and incompletely understood network involving both damage and recovery processes, underscoring the dual role of inflammation after TBI. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Ruolo del sistema Bv8/Prochineticine nel dolore da Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor

    OpenAIRE

    CANESTRELLI, MICHELA

    2012-01-01

    Il Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) è un fattore di crescita emopoietico linea-specifico, prodotto da linfociti T, monociti, fibroblasti e cellule endoteliali del midollo osseo, che agisce sia a livello midollare sui precursori staminali totipotenti inducendone la differenziazione nella linea neutrofili-granulociti sia a livello periferico sui neutrofili maturi, potenziandone le capacità citotossiche, di fagocitosi e aumentando l’espressione di molecole di adesione (Metcalf., 199...

  12. Changes in gene expression of granulocytes during in vivo granulocyte colony-stimulating factor/dexamethasone mobilization for transfusion purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drewniak, Agata; van Raam, Bram J.; Geissler, Judy; Tool, Anton T. J.; Mook, Olaf R. F.; van den Berg, Timo K.; Baas, Frank; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of healthy donors with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and dexamethasone results in sufficient numbers of circulating granulocytes to prepare granulocyte concentrates for clinical purposes. Granulocytes obtained in this way demonstrate relatively normal functional

  13. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) producing malignant pleural mesothelioma: Report of a case

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiwara, Ayako; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Kanou, Takashi; OKAMI, JIRO; Tokunaga, Toshiteru; TOMITA, YASUHIKO; Kodama, Ken

    2015-01-01

    This report presents a case of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) producing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) that was treated by tumor resection. A 76-year-old male presented with a huge right-side chest wall tumor, along with a slight fever and chest wall pain. Laboratory findings showed an increased white blood cell count (64600 cells/?L) and C-reactive protein level (20.57?mg/dL). The patient underwent surgical removal of the tumor along with tissue from the chest wall and h...

  14. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome: A Concise Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Hofer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article concisely summarizes data on the action of one of the principal and best known growth factors, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, in a mammalian organism exposed to radiation doses inducing acute radiation syndrome. Highlighted are the topics of its real or anticipated use in radiation accident victims, the timing of its administration, the possibilities of combining G-CSF with other drugs, the ability of other agents to stimulate endogenous G-CSF production, as well as of the capability of this growth factor to ameliorate not only the bone marrow radiation syndrome but also the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome. G-CSF is one of the pivotal drugs in the treatment of radiation accident victims and its employment in this indication can be expected to remain or even grow in the future.

  15. Hematologic improvement in dogs with parvovirus infection treated with recombinant canine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, A; Dow, S; Ogilvie, G; Rao, S; Hackett, T

    2010-08-01

    Previously, dogs with canine parvovirus-induced neutropenia have not responded to treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). However, recombinant canine G-CSF (rcG-CSF) has not been previously evaluated for treatment of parvovirus-induced neutropenia in dogs. We assessed the effectiveness of rcG-CSF in dogs with parvovirus-induced neutropenia with a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized clinical trial. Endpoints of our study were time to recovery of WBC and neutrophil counts, and duration of hospitalization. 28 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia were treated with rcG-CSF and outcomes were compared to those of 34 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia not treated with rcG-CSF. We found that mean WBC and neutrophil counts were significantly higher (P parvovirus infection, but indicate the need for additional studies to evaluate overall safety of the treatment.

  16. The effect of long-term treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on hematopoiesis in HIV-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Sørensen, T U; Aladdin, H

    2000-01-01

    This randomized, placebo-controlled trial examine the long-term effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on absolute numbers of CD34+ progenitor cells and progenitor cell function in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. G-CSF (300 microg filgrastim) or placebo was ...

  17. Aggressive cutaneous vasculitis in a patient with chronic lymphatic leukemia following granulocyte colony stimulating factor injection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Husseiny Noha M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Vasculitis has been reported in a few cases of chronic lymphatic leukemia and with granulocytic colony-stimulating factor therapy. Those with granulocytic colony-stimulating factor occurred after prolonged therapy and there was a rise in total leukocyte count unlike that in our patient who received just a single injection for the first time. Case presentation We report the case of a 64-year-old Egyptian man with chronic lymphatic leukemia who developed progressive cutaneous vasculitic lesions following injection of a single dose of a granulocytic colony stimulating factor before a third cycle of chemotherapy to improve neutropenia. This is an unusual case and the pathogenesis is not fully understood. Our patient was not on any medical treatment except for bisoprolol for ischemic heart disease. Although aggressive management with steroids, anticoagulation and plasmapheresis had been carried out, the condition was aggressive and the patient's consciousness deteriorated. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of his brain revealed multiple ischemic foci that could be attributed to vasculitis of the brain. Conclusion The aim of this case report is to highlight the importance of monitoring patients on granulocytic colony-stimulating factor therapy, especially in the context of other conditions (such as a hematological malignancy that may lead to an adverse outcome.

  18. Stem cell mobilization by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for myocardial recovery after acute myocardial infarction: a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zohlnhofer, D.; Dibra, A.; Koppara, T.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of stem cell mobilization by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on myocardial regeneration on the basis of a synthesis of the data generated by randomized, controlled clinical trials of G-CSF after acute...

  19. CHOP compared with CHOP plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorduijn, J. K.; van der Holt, B.; van Imhoff, G. W.; van der Hem, K. G.; Kramer, M. H. H.; van Oers, M. H. J.; Ossenkoppele, G. J.; Schaafsma, M. R.; Verdonck, L. F.; Verhoef, G. E. G.; Steijaert, M. M. C.; Buijt, I.; Uyl-de Groot, C. A.; van Agthoven, M.; Mulder, A. H.; Sonneveld, P.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether the relative dose-intensity of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy could be improved by prophylactic administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

  20. CHOP compared with CHOP plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorduijn, JK; van der Holt, B; van Imhoff, GW; van der Hem, KG; Kramer, MHH; van Oers, MHJ; Ossenkoppele, GJ; Verdonck, LF; Verhoef, GEG; Steijaert, MMC; Buijt, I.; Uyl-de Groot, CA; van Agthoven, M; Mulder, AH; Sonneveld, P; Schaafsma, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose : To investigate whether the relative close-intensity of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy could be improved by prophylactic administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

  1. Investigating the Possibility of Intervertebral Disc Regeneration Induced by Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor-Stimulated Stem Cells in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ching Tzaan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration is a multifactorial process that is influenced by contributions from genetic predisposition, the aging phenomenon, lifestyle conditions, biomechanical loading and activities, and other health factors (such as diabetes. Attempts to decelerate disc degeneration using various techniques have been reported. However, to date, there has been no proven technique effective for broad clinical application. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF is a growth factor cytokine that has been shown to enhance the availability of circulating hematopoietic stem cells to the brain and heart as well as their capacity for mobilization of mesenchymal bone marrow stem cells. GCSF also exerts significant increases in circulating neutrophils as well as potent anti-inflammatory effects. In our study, we hypothesize that GCSF can induce bone marrow stem cells differentiation and mobilization to regenerate the degenerated IVD. We found that GCSF had no contribution in disc regeneration or maintenance; however, there were cell proliferation within end plates. The effects of GCSF treatment on end plates might deserve further investigation.

  2. Phenotypic features of first-generation transgenic goats for human granulocyte-colony stimulation factor production in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Ribrio I T P; Melo, Carlos H S; Souza-Fabjan, Joanna M G; Teixeira, Dárcio I A; Melo, Luciana M; Freitas, Vicente J F

    2014-11-01

    Human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor used in neutropenic patients. It is produced in transgenic bacteria or cultured mammalian cells. As an alternative, we now show that hG-CSF can be expressed in the mammary gland of first-generation (F1) transgenic goats during induced lactation. Despite lower milk production, transgenic females presented a similar milk composition (fat, protein and lactose) when compared to non-transgenic (p > 0.05) ones. The mean concentration (±SD) of recombinant hG-CSF in milk during lactation was 360 ± 178 µg ml(-1). All clinical parameters, as well as kidney and liver function, indicated that F1 transgenic goats were healthy. Additionally, no ectopic hG-CSF expression was detected in studied tissues of F1 transgenic males. Thus, F1 hG-CSF-transgenic goats can express the recombinant protein in milk at quantities compatible with their use as bioreactors in a commercial-scale protein-production program.

  3. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor increases circulating CD34-postive cells in patients with AIDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Dam-Larsen, S; Nielsen, C

    1997-01-01

    .e., the circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells (CD34 cells) in patients with AIDS, using the recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Eight patients with AIDS were treated with G-CSF for neutropenia (... G-CSF for 3-5 consecutive days. Within 5 days of initiation of G-CSF therapy, an increase in the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was seen in all patients. There was a median increase in ANC from 0.4 to 3.4 x 10(9)/l. In addition, G-CSF treatment significantly increased the absolute number of CD34...... cells. The median increase in CD34 cells was from 0.8 to 2.2 x 10(6)/l. Finally, using a highly sensitive HIV-1 RNA PCR, we found that treatment of AIDS patients with G-CSF did not lead to enhanced HIV replication. These observations indicate that G-CSF may be used to mobilize CD34 cells in patients...

  4. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor enhances bone tumor growth in mice in an osteoclast-dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Hirbe, Angela C.; Uluçkan, Özge; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Eagleton, Mark C.; Prior, Julie L.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Apicelli, Anthony; Weilbaecher, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    Inhibition of osteoclast (OC) activity has been associated with decreased tumor growth in bone in animal models. Increased recognition of factors that promote osteoclastic bone resorption in cancer patients led us to investigate whether increased OC activation could enhance tumor growth in bone. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used to treat chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, but is also associated with increased markers of OC activity and decreased bone mineral density (BMD). ...

  5. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) producing malignant pleural mesothelioma: Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ayako; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Kanou, Takashi; Okami, Jiro; Tokunaga, Toshiteru; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Kodama, Ken

    2015-01-01

    This report presents a case of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) producing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) that was treated by tumor resection. A 76-year-old male presented with a huge right-side chest wall tumor, along with a slight fever and chest wall pain. Laboratory findings showed an increased white blood cell count (64600 cells/μL) and C-reactive protein level (20.57 mg/dL). The patient underwent surgical removal of the tumor along with tissue from the chest wall and histopathological analysis led to a diagnosis of sarcomatous type of MPM. Immunohistochemical findings for both anti-human G-CSF and interleukin-6 monoclonal antibodies were positive. Although the general condition of the patient quickly improved after surgery, local recurrence occurred two months later and he died of respiratory failure seven months after the operation, though surgery provided symptom relief. G-CSF-producing MPMs usually show a poor prognosis, though less-invasive surgery may be considered for relief of symptoms.

  6. Recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor administration for treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefussy, Beatrice; Artamonov, Irena; Deutsch, Varda; Naparstek, Ela; Nagler, Arnon; Drory, Vivian E

    2010-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used to mobilize CD34+ haematopoietic stem cells from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood. We proposed to use cell subsets induced by G-CSF to slow down disease progression in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Patients with definite or probable ALS were assigned in a double-blind manner to receive G-CSF or placebo every three months for a year. The primary outcome measure was the functional decline, measured by the revised ALS Functional Rating Scale, Revised (ALSFRS-R) score. Secondary outcome measures included vital capacity, manual muscle strength, compound muscle action potential amplitudes, neurophysiological index, and McGill single item quality of life score (QoL). Thirty-nine patients were enrolled. Seventeen patients who received G-CSF and 18 who received placebo were evaluated. G-CSF was effective in mobilizing CD34+ to blood. The outcome measures used showed no statistically significant benefit, although there was a trend of slowing disease progression following two G-CSF treatments, as shown by lower slopes of ALSFRS-R and QoL in the first six treatment months. The treatment had no major side-effects. G-CSF administration in ALS patients caused successful mobilization of autologous bone marrow cells, but was not effective in slowing down disease deterioration.

  7. Effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration time on pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaraman, A; Argon, G; Usta Yesilbalkan, O; Dugum, O; Yigitaslan, S; Musmul, A; Balci Alparslan, G

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of administration time of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the level of pain related to G-CSF. This study was carried out with 48 cancer patients divided into A and B groups. In the first stage of the study, the groups A and B were planned to be administered with G-CSF at 10: 00 and 14: 00, respectively. In the second stage, patients in groups A and B were asked to self-administer filgrastim at 14: 00 and 10: 00, respectively. Patients were also asked to assess their pain level after G-CSF administration for a total of 4 times. According to the findings, the incidence of pain related to G-CSF was 91.7 %. The pain score after G-CSF being administered at 10: 00 was significantly higher compared to administration at 14: 00 in both groups (group A after 4, 8, and 12 hours: p pain score related to G-CSF administration at 14:00 p.m. was significantly reduced. Thus, in order to minimize the pain, it will be more beneficial to administer G-CSF at 14: 00 (Tab. 4, Ref. 31). Text in PDF www.elis.sk.

  8. Effect of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor on Endothelial Cells and Osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Ling Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Some animal studies showed that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF provides beneficial environment for bone healing. It has been well documented that endothelial cells and osteoblasts play critical roles in multiple phases of bone healing. However, the biological effects of G-CSF on these cells remain controversial. This study aimed to investigate the influence of G-CSF at various concentrations on endothelial cells and osteoblasts. Materials and Methods. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and human osteoblasts (hOBs were treated with G-CSF at 1000, 100, 10, and 0 ng/mL, respectively. The capacity of cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation of HUVECs was evaluated at 72, 8, and 6 hours after treatment, respectively. The capacity of proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of hOBs was evaluated at 24 hours, 72 hours, and 21 days after treatment, respectively. Results. HUVECs treated with 100 and 1000 ng/mL G-CSF showed a significantly higher value comparing with controls in migration assay (p<0.001, p<0.01, resp.; the group treated with 1000 ng/mL G-CSF showed a significantly lower value on tube formation. No significant difference was detected in groups of hOBs. Conclusions. G-CSF showed favorable effects only on the migration of HUVECs, and no direct influence was found on hOBs.

  9. Mechanisms for T cell tolerance induced with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Zhu; Zhang, Jin-Qiao; Sun, Li-Xia

    2016-02-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been widely accepted as a mediator of T cell tolerance. The immune modulatory effect of G-CSF on T cells is believed to be mediated exclusively through other effector cells, such as monocytes, tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC), and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Recent advances confirmed the direct effects of G-CSF in inducing immune tolerance of T cells through the G-CSF-G-CSF receptor pathway and related molecular mechanisms. This review aims to summarize the findings associated with the direct and indirect mechanisms for T cell tolerance induced with G-CSF. The role of G-CSF in preventing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and in treating autoimmune diseases (ADs) is also discussed. It is conceivable that G-CSF and immune cell compositions, such as tolerogenic DC and CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells, modulated by G-CSF could become an integral part of the immunomodulatory therapies against GVHD and ADs in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor-Producing Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Site

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    Hirotoshi Yasui

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF-producing nonhematopoietic malignancies have been reported in various organs and are associated with a poor clinical outcome. Moreover, carcinoma of unknown primary site (CUP is an uncommon malignancy that occurs in about 2-6% of cancer patients. CUP also has a poor prognosis due to its missing profile. Since both G-CSF-producing carcinoma and CUP are rare, G-CSF-producing CUP (GCSF-CUP is considered to have an even poorer prognosis and is seldom encountered. Herein, we report the case of a GCSF-CUP patient. A 75-year-old man was admitted to our hospital complaining of cervical lymphadenopathy. Multiple bulky lymph nodes without a primary site were revealed by image analysis. His complete blood count showed leukocytosis, and his blood chemistry panel indicated highly elevated levels of G-CSF. Although the patient was treated with combination chemotherapy of carboplatin, paclitaxel, bevacizumab and erlotinib, he died of intestinal perforation due to tumor invasion 23 days after the start of the therapy. An autopsy confirmed that the tumor was positive for anti-G-CSF antibody, but the primary site was still not detected.

  11. A Novel Combinatorial Therapy With Pulp Stem Cells and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor for Total Pulp Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Iohara, Koichiro; Murakami, Masashi; Takeuchi, Norio; Osako, Yohei; Ito, Masataka; Ishizaka, Ryo; Utunomiya, Shinji; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Kenji; Nakashima, Misako

    2013-01-01

    Autologous transplantation of pulp stem cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a dog pulpectomized tooth yielded better effects than transplantation of G-CSF or pulp stem cells alone. The combinatorial trophic effects of pulp stem cells and G-CSF are of immediate utility for pulp/dentin regeneration, demonstrating the prerequisites of safety and efficacy critical for clinical applications.

  12. Timing of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor treatment after acute myocardial infarction and recovery of left ventricular function: results from the STEMMI trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Mikkel; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Wang, Yongzhong

    2010-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have not demonstrated impact on systolic recovery compared to placebo. However, recent studies suggest that timing of G-CSF therapy is crucial.......Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have not demonstrated impact on systolic recovery compared to placebo. However, recent studies suggest that timing of G-CSF therapy is crucial....

  13. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor use in a large British hospital: comparison with published experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez Velasco R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF are high-cost agents recommended as prophylaxis of febrile neutropenia or as adjunctive treatment of severe neutropenic sepsis. Their use in high-risk situations such as acute myeloid leukaemia, acute lymphocytic leukaemia, myelodysplastic syndrome and stem cell transplantation is also indicated. Objective: This audit assessed the use of G-CSF within the Oncology and Haematology Service Delivery Unit at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ hospital (London, United Kingdom.Methods: Patients who received G-CSF in April-May 2008 were identified retrospectively from the pharmacy labelling system, and chemotherapy front sheets, clinic letters and transplantation protocols were reviewed. Patients on lenograstim, in clinical trials or under non-approved chemotherapy protocols were excluded.Results: A total of 104 G-CSF treatments were assessed. The most commonly treated malignancy was breast cancer (41.3%, with docetaxel 100 mg/m2 (34.6% being the most frequent chemotherapy regimen. The chemotherapy intent was curative in 66.3 % of cases. Pegfilgrastim was used in 73.1 % of cases and primary prophylaxis was the most common indication (54.8%. Stem cell transplantation was the first indication to meet the audit criterion (93.3%, followed by primary prophylaxis (89.5%. There was a considerable non-adherence for secondary prophylaxis (6.7%.Conclusion: The overall level of compliance with the audit criteria was 72.1%. The results for primary and secondary prophylaxis would have been different if FEC100 (fluorouracil, epirubicin, cyclophosphamide and docetaxel 100 mg/m2 had been considered a single chemotherapy regimen. Also, the lack of access to medical notes may have affected the reliability of the results for ‘therapeutic’ use.

  14. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alters the systemic metabolomic profile in healthy donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Kimberley Joanne; Melve, Guro Kristin; Bruserud, Øystein

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral blood stem cells mobilized by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) from healthy donors are commonly used for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The effect of G-CSF administration on global serum metabolite profiles has not been investigated before. This study aims to examine the systemic metabolomic profiles prior to and following administration of G-CSF in healthy adults. Blood samples were collected from 15 healthy stem cell donors prior to and after administration of G-CSF 10 µg/kg/day for 4 days. Using a non-targeted metabolomics approach, metabolite levels in serum were determined using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Comparison of the metabolite profiles of donors before and after G-CSF treatment revealed 239 metabolites that were significantly altered. The major changes of the metabolite profiles following G-CSF administration included alteration of several fatty acids, including increased levels of several medium and long-chain fatty acids, as well as polyunsaturated fatty acids; while there were lower levels of other lipid metabolites such as phospholipids, lysolipids, sphingolipids. Furthermore, there were significantly lower levels of several amino acids and/or their metabolites, including several amino acids with known immunoregulatory functions (methionine, tryptophan, valine). Lastly, the levels of several nucleotides and nucleotide metabolites (guanosine, adenosine, inosine) were also decreased after G-CSF administration, while methylated products were increased. Some of these altered products/metabolites may potentially have angioregulatory effects whereas others may suggest altered intracellular epigenetic regulation. Our results show that G-CSF treatment alters biochemical serum profiles, in particular amino acid, lipid and nucleotide metabolism. Additional studies are needed to further evaluate the relevance of these changes in healthy donors.

  15. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment ameliorates lupus nephritis through the expansion of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ji-Jing; Jambaldorj, Enkthuya; Lee, Jae-Ghi; Jang, Joon Young; Shim, Jung Min; Han, Miyeun; Koo, Tai Yeon; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-11-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can induce regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Despite the immune modulatory effects of G-CSF, results of G-CSF treatment in systemic lupus erythematosus are still controversial. We therefore investigated whether G-CSF can ameliorate lupus nephritis and studied the underlying mechanisms. NZB/W F1 female mice were treated with G-CSF or phosphate-buffered saline for 5 consecutive days every week from 24 weeks of age, and were analyzed at 36 weeks of age. G-CSF treatment decreased proteinuria and serum anti-dsDNA, increased serum complement component 3 (C3), and attenuated renal tissue injury including deposition of IgG and C3. G-CSF treatment also decreased serum levels of BUN and creatinine, and ultimately decreased mortality of NZB/W F1 mice. G-CSF treatment induced expansion of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + Tregs, with decreased renal infiltration of T cells, B cells, inflammatory granulocytes and monocytes in both kidneys and spleen. G-CSF treatment also decreased expression levels of MCP-1, IL-6, IL-2, and IL-10 in renal tissues as well as serum levels of MCP-1, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-17. When Tregs were depleted by PC61 treatment, G-CSF-mediated protective effects on lupus nephritis were abrogated. G-CSF treatment ameliorated lupus nephritis through the preferential expansion of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + Tregs. Therefore, G-CSF has a therapeutic potential for lupus nephritis.

  16. Enhancement of Umbilical Cord Blood Cell Hematopoiesis by Maitake Beta-Glucan Is Mediated by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Production▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Cheung, Sandy W. Y.; Nesin, Mirjana; Cassileth, Barrie R.; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2007-01-01

    Maitake beta-glucan (MBG) is an extract from the fruit body of the Grifola frondosa mushroom that is being widely used to treat cancer in Asia. We have previously reported that MBG enhances mouse bone marrow cell (BMC) hematopoiesis in vitro and protects BMC from doxorubicin (DOX) toxicity. In the current study, we investigated the ability of MBG to enhance hematopoiesis and to reduce the toxic effects of DOX on fresh human umbilical cord blood (CB) cells. MBG treatment significantly enhanced the colony formation unit (CFU) response of granulocytes-macrophages (CFU-GM response) over the whole dose range of 12.5 to 100 μg/ml (P < 0.05). The addition of MBG to DOX-treated CB cells significantly protected granulocyte-macrophage colony formation from the toxicity of DOX, which otherwise produced strong hematopoietic repression. MBG also partially replaced recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF), as shown by a significant augmentation of the CFU-GM response in the absence of rhG-CSF. We found that MBG induces granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production in CB CD33+ monocytes, as detected by intracellular cytokine flow cytometric assessment. In contrast, we found that adult peripheral blood monocytes did not produce a significant G-CSF response to MBG, whereas both adult and CB monocytes produced G-CSF in response to lipopolysaccharide. These studies provide the first evidence that MBG induces hematopoietic stem cell proliferation and differentiation of CFU-GM in umbilical CB cells and acts directly to induce G-CSF. PMID:17093103

  17. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor related pathways tested on an endometrial ex-vivo model.

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    Mona Rahmati

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Recombinant human Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (rhG-CSF supplementation seems to be a promising innovative therapy in reproductive medicine, used in case of recurrent miscarriage, embryo implantation failure or thin endometrium, although its mechanisms of action remain unknown. Our aim was to identify possible endometrial pathways influenced by rhG-CSF. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Hypothetical molecular interactions regulated by G-CSF were designed through a previous large scale endometrial microarray study. The variation of endometrial expression of selected target genes was confirmed in control and infertile patients. G-CSF supplementation influence on these targets was tested on an endometrial ex-vivo culture. Middle luteal phase endometrial biopsies were cultured on collagen sponge with or without rhG-CSF supplementation during 3 consecutive days. Variations of endometrial mRNA expression for the selected targets were studied by RT-PCR. RESULTS: At the highest dose of rhG-CSF stimulation, the mRNA expression of these selected target genes was significantly increased if compared with their expression without addition of rhG-CSF. The selected targets were G-CSF Receptor (G-CSFR, Integrin alpha-V/beta-3 (ITGB3 implicated in cell migration and embryo implantation, Plasminogen Activator Urokinase Receptor (PLAUR described as interacting with integrins and implicated in cell migration, Thymidine Phosphorylase (TYMP implicated in local angiogenesis, CD40 and its ligand CD40L involved in cell proliferation control. CONCLUSION: RhG-CSF seems able to influence endometrial expressions crucial for implantation process involving endometrial vascular remodelling, local immune modulation and cellular adhesion pathways. These variations observed in an ex-vivo model should be tested in-vivo. The strict indications or counter indication of rhG-CSF supplementation in reproductive field are not yet established, while the safety of its

  18. Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis as a Complication of Recombinant Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Therapy in a Heart Transplant Patient

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    Giovanbattista Ippoliti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rG-CSF is a myeloid growth factor that is widely used in haematology to recover neutropenia secondary to myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis is an acknowledged side effect of the above therapy. Its pathogenesis involves many mechanisms that collectively induce an increase in neutrophil function and a subsequent release of cytokines. Here, we report a case of leukocytoclastic vasculitis proven by skin biopsy, following the use of rG-CSF in a heart transplant patient with leukopenia secondary to immunosuppressive therapy.

  19. Clinical outcome after stem cell mobilization with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus S; Jørgensen, Erik; Kastrup, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Background. Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been investigated in trials aiming to promote recovery of myocardial function after myocardial infarction. Long-term safety-data have never been reported. A few studies indicated an increased risk of in-stent re-stenosis. We aimed to i.......8; 0.3). Conclusions. We found no indication of increased risk of adverse events up to 5 years after G-CSF treatment. These results support the continued investigation of G-CSF for cardiac therapy....

  20. The effect of long-term treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on hematopoiesis in HIV-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Sørensen, T U; Aladdin, H

    2000-01-01

    This randomized, placebo-controlled trial examine the long-term effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on absolute numbers of CD34+ progenitor cells and progenitor cell function in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. G-CSF (300 microg filgrastim) or placebo....... Significant increase in absolute numbers of circulating CD34+ cells was detected in the treatment group (P = 0.006). The function of progenitor cells was examined in vitro using a colony-forming unit (CFU) assay, and increase in the number of CFU/ml was detected (P = 0.005). In order to estimate the effect...

  1. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves motor recovery in the rat impactor model for spinal cord injury.

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    Tanjew Dittgen

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves outcome after experimental SCI by counteracting apoptosis, and enhancing connectivity in the injured spinal cord. Previously we have employed the mouse hemisection SCI model and studied motor function after subcutaneous or transgenic delivery of the protein. To further broaden confidence in animal efficacy data we sought to determine efficacy in a different model and a different species. Here we investigated the effects of G-CSF in Wistar rats using the New York University Impactor. In this model, corroborating our previous data, rats treated subcutaneously with G-CSF over 2 weeks show significant improvement of motor function.

  2. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF; filgrastim) treatment of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H

    1993-01-01

    After 10 weeks of treatment with clozapine, severe agranulocytosis was diagnosed in a 33-year-old female. The patient was treated with filgrastim (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [G-CSF]) 5 micrograms kg-1 day-1. The neutrophil count was 0.234 x 10(9) l-1 on admission, with a further decrease...... of neutrophil granulocytes (including immature forms) of 33.108 x 10(9) l-1 on day 12 after admission. The patient only had minor infectious complications during the neutropenic period. In conclusion, early treatment with filgrastim seems warranted in severe cases of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis. A dosage...

  3. Stem cell factor enhances in vivo effects of granulocyte colony stimulating factor for stimulating mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiece, I K; Briddell, R A; Hartley, C A; Smith, K A; Andrews, R G

    1993-07-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to increase peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) which have an enhanced engraftment potential in autologous transplantation compared with bone marrow cells. The data presented in this study demonstrate the ability of low doses of stem cell factor (SCF) to synergize with G-CSF to enhance the mobilization of PBPC, compared with G-CSF alone, in both mouse and primate models. In the mouse model the combination of SCF plus G-CSF stimulated an absolute increase in cells with in vivo repopulating potential. These studies suggest a possible role for SCF plus G-CSF in the clinical setting for increased mobilization of PBPC, giving rise to increased phoresis yields and enhanced engraftment for support of high-dose chemotherapy.

  4. Bone pain from granulocyte colony stimulating factor: does clinical trial sponsorship by a pharmaceutical company influence its reporting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldairy, Y; Nguyen, P L; Jatoi, A

    2011-01-01

    It is alleged that pharmaceutical companies sometimes unfairly present clinical trial results. To our knowledge, studies have not explored whether such alleged unfair reporting also occurs in the testing of palliative care agents in cancer patients, a particularly vulnerable group. Therefore, a systematic search was conducted to retrieve all published, prospective clinical trials that used granulocyte colony stimulating factor starting in 2003. Because granulocyte colony stimulating factor can cause severe bone pain - a concerning but historically under-reported symptom in cancer patients - this symptom was assessed to determine whether differences in reporting occurred based on pharmaceutical company-sponsorship. A total of 239 published clinical trials met the present study's eligibility criteria and were retrievable. Within this entire group of studies, 65 (27%) were pharmaceutical company-sponsored, and only 31 (13%) reported on bone pain. However, pharmaceutical company-sponsored trials reported on bone pain at a higher rate compared with other studies: 23% versus 9% (P= 0.005), and this conclusion did not change after adjusting for dose, use of the slow release formulation and year of publication. The reporting of adverse events from cancer symptom control and palliative care interventions should be improved - especially in trials not sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. © 2009 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Effects of an Inhibitor of Monocyte Recruitment on Recovery from Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice Treated with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor

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    Shijie Song

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Administration of the hematopoietic growth factor granulocyte-colony stimulating Factor (G-CSF has been reported to enhance recovery from controlled cortical impact (CCI in rodent models. G-CSF exerts actions in both the periphery (stimulation of hematopoiesis and in the brain, where it serves as a neurotrophic factor, promoting neuronal survival and stimulating neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in the hippocampus. In order to distinguish the direct CNS actions of G-CSF from its peripheral actions, experiments were designed to block the recruitment of peripheral monocytes to the site of the lesion produced by CCI. The selective C-C motif receptor 2 (CCR2 antagonist (RS504303 was co-administered with G-CSF for three days after CCI in a chimeric mouse previously transplanted with GFP-expressing (GFP+ blood stem-progenitor cells. Results: The drug significantly impaired infiltration of GFP+ bone marrow-derived cells to the frontal cortex and striatum without impeding recovery performance and hippocampal neurogenesis in the behavioral test, the Radial Arm Water Maze (RAWM. Administration of the CCR2 antagonist alone, without G-CSF, was effective in promoting recovery in RAWM. These results support the hypothesis that the direct action of G-CSF on neural cells, independent of its hematopoietic effects, is primarily responsible for enhanced recovery from CCI. In addition, this study confirms the importance of CCR2 and its ligand, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, in mediating the inflammatory response following CCI.

  6. Effects of an Inhibitor of Monocyte Recruitment on Recovery from Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice Treated with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shijie; Kong, Xiaoyuan; Acosta, Sandra; Sava, Vasyl; Borlongan, Cesar V; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan

    2017-07-02

    Administration of the hematopoietic growth factor granulocyte-colony stimulating Factor (G-CSF) has been reported to enhance recovery from controlled cortical impact (CCI) in rodent models. G-CSF exerts actions in both the periphery (stimulation of hematopoiesis) and in the brain, where it serves as a neurotrophic factor, promoting neuronal survival and stimulating neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in the hippocampus. In order to distinguish the direct CNS actions of G-CSF from its peripheral actions, experiments were designed to block the recruitment of peripheral monocytes to the site of the lesion produced by CCI. The selective C-C motif receptor 2 (CCR2) antagonist (RS504303) was co-administered with G-CSF for three days after CCI in a chimeric mouse previously transplanted with GFP-expressing (GFP+) blood stem-progenitor cells. The drug significantly impaired infiltration of GFP+ bone marrow-derived cells to the frontal cortex and striatum without impeding recovery performance and hippocampal neurogenesis in the behavioral test, the Radial Arm Water Maze (RAWM). Administration of the CCR2 antagonist alone, without G-CSF, was effective in promoting recovery in RAWM. These results support the hypothesis that the direct action of G-CSF on neural cells, independent of its hematopoietic effects, is primarily responsible for enhanced recovery from CCI. In addition, this study confirms the importance of CCR2 and its ligand, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), in mediating the inflammatory response following CCI.

  7. Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor-primed Bone Marrow: An Excellent Stem-cell Source for Transplantation in Acute Myelocytic Leukemia and Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia

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    Yuhang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steady-state bone marrow (SS-BM and granulocyte colony-stimulating growth factor-primed BM/peripheral blood stem-cell (G-BM/G-PBSC are the main stem-cell sources used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Here, we evaluated the treatment effects of SS-BM and G-BM/G-PBSC in human leucocyte antigen (HLA-identical sibling transplantation. Methods: A total of 226 patients (acute myelogenous leukemia-complete remission 1, chronic myelogenous leukemia-chronic phase 1 received SS-BM, G-BM, or G-PBSC from an HLA-identical sibling. Clinical outcomes (graft-versus-host disease [GVHD], overall survival, transplant-related mortality [TRM], and leukemia-free survival [LFS] were analyzed. Results: When compared to SS-BM, G-BM gave faster recovery time to neutrophil or platelet (P 0.05. Conclusions: G-CSF-primed bone marrow shared the advantages of G-PBSC and SS-BM. We conclude that G-BM is an excellent stem-cell source that may be preferable to G-PBSC or SS-BM in patients receiving HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

  8. The effect of long-term treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on hematopoiesis in HIV-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Sørensen, T U; Aladdin, H

    2000-01-01

    This randomized, placebo-controlled trial examine the long-term effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on absolute numbers of CD34+ progenitor cells and progenitor cell function in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. G-CSF (300 microg filgrastim) or placebo....... Significant increase in absolute numbers of circulating CD34+ cells was detected in the treatment group (P = 0.006). The function of progenitor cells was examined in vitro using a colony-forming unit (CFU) assay, and increase in the number of CFU/ml was detected (P = 0.005). In order to estimate the effect...... of G-CSF on in vivo function of progenitors the white-blood count was determined. Significant increase in white-blood count was found (P

  9. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Producing Infiltrating Urothelial Carcinoma of the Left Renal Pelvis: A Case Report

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    Takamasa Horiuchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF producing infiltrating urothelial carcinoma of the left renal pelvis. The patient was referred to our hospital for fever and anorexia. Blood tests showed elevated level of leukocytosis without any infectious diseases. The serum concentration of G-CSF was remarkably elevated. Abdominal computed tomography (CT revealed a huge mass in the left renal pelvis and para-aortic lymph node enlargement. He was underwent left nephroureterectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. The histological examination revealed infiltrating urothelial carcinoma with positive staining for G-CSF antibody. The postoperative course was smooth and the leukocyte count became normalized within a week postoperatively. However, multiple lung metastasis and leukocytosis were revealed about 2 months after the operation. G-CSF producing infiltrating urothelial carcinoma of the renal pelvis is reported to have a significantly poor prognosis, so it is very important to monitor closely after the operation.

  10. Primary granulocyte colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis during the first two cycles only or throughout all chemotherapy cycles in patients with breast cancer at risk for febrile neutropenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, M.J.; Peters, F.P.; Mandigers, C.M.P.W.; Dercksen, M.W.; Stouthard, J.M.; Nortier, H.J.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Warmerdam, L.J. van; Wouw, A.J. van de; Jacobs, E.M.G.; Mattijssen, V.; Rijt, C.C. van der; Smilde, T.J.; Velden, A.W. van der; Temizkan, M.; Batman, E.; Muller, E.W.; Gastel, S.M. van; Borm, G.F.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Early breast cancer is commonly treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. However, combining these drugs increases the risk of myelotoxicity and may require granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. The highest incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and largest benefit of G-CSF

  11. Primary Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Prophylaxis During the First Two Cycles Only or Throughout All Chemotherapy Cycles in Patients With Breast Cancer at Risk for Febrile Neutropenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Maureen J.; Peters, Frank P.; Mandigers, Caroline M.; Dercksen, M. Wouter; Stouthard, Jacqueline M.; Nortier, Hans J.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W.; van Warmerdam, Laurence J.; van de Wouw, Agnes J.; Jacobs, Esther M.; Mattijssen, Vera; van der Rijt, Carin C.; Smilde, Tineke J.; van der Velden, Annette W.; Temizkan, Mehmet; Batman, Erdogan; Muller, Erik W.; van Gastel, Saskia M.; Borm, George F.; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C. G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Early breast cancer is commonly treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. However, combining these drugs increases the risk of myelotoxicity and may require granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. The highest incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and largest benefit of G-CSF

  12. Dose intensity of standard adjuvant CMF with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for premenopausal patients with node-positive breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deGraaf, H; Willemse, PHB; Bong, SB; Piersma, H; Tjabbes, T; vanVeelen, H; Coenen, JLLM; deVries, EGE

    1996-01-01

    The effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on total dose and dose intensity of standard oral adjuvant CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy were studied in premenopausal patients with node-positive breast cancer. Treatment consisted of standard CMF

  13. The costs of peripheral blood progenitor cell reinfusion mobilised by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor following high dose melphalan as compared with conventional therapy in multiple myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Uyl-de Groot (Carin); G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert); A.A.P.M. van Riet (A. A P M); F.F.H. Rutten (Frans)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn a retrospective study, we calculated the treatment costs of 26 patients, who received either high dose melphalan combined with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF; filgrastim)(n=7) or without G-CSF (n=11) or alternatively, peripheral blood progenitor cell reinfusion (PBPC)

  14. Unmasking Cryptococcal Meningitis Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome due to Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Use in a Patient with a Poorly Differentiated Germ Cell Neoplasm

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    Nathan C. Bahr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS is frequently seen in patients with HIV and less frequently in patients on immune suppressive medications for other conditions. Here, we describe the first reported case of unmasking cryptococcal IRIS due to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor used in an HIV-negative patient with chemotherapy-induced neutropenia.

  15. Characterization of buffy coat-derived granulocytes for clinical use: a comparison with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor/dexamethasone-pretreated donor-derived products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Geer, A.; Gazendam, R. P.; Tool, A. T. J.; van Hamme, J. L.; de Korte, D.; van den Berg, T. K.; Zeerleder, S. S.; Kuijpers, T. W.

    2017-01-01

    Buffy coat-derived granulocytes have been described as an alternative to the apheresis product from donors pretreated with dexamethasone and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The latter is - dependent on the local and national settings - obtained following a demanding and time-consuming

  16. Evaluation of a biosimilar granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (filgrastim XM02 for peripheral blood stem cell mobilization and transplantation: a single center experience in Japan

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    Yoshimura H

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hideaki Yoshimura, Masaaki Hotta, Takahisa Nakanishi, Shinya Fujita, Aya Nakaya, Atsushi Satake, Tomoki Ito, Kazuyoshi Ishii, Shosaku Nomura First Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka, Japan Background: Biosimilar granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF has recently been introduced into clinical practice. G-CSFs are used to mobilize CD34+ cells and accelerate engraftment after transplantation. However, in Asia, particularly in Japan, data for peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC mobilization by this biosimilar G-CSF are currently lacking. Therefore, the clinical efficacy and safety of biosimilar G-CSF for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation needs to be evaluated in a Japanese context.Materials and methods: The subjects included two groups of patients with malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma. All patients received chemotherapy priming for the mobilization of PBSCs. All patients were treated with chemotherapy followed by the administration of either the biosimilar G-CSF, filgrastim XM02 (FBNK, or the originators, filgrastim, or lenograstim.Results: There were no significant differences among FBNK, filgrastim, and lenograstim treatments in the numbers of CD34+ cells in harvested PBSCs, the scores for granulocyte/macrophage colony forming units, or for malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma patients evaluated as separate or combined cohorts. In addition, there were no significant differences in safety, side effects, complications, or the time to engraftment after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.Conclusion: Biosimilar FBNK shows the same efficacy and safety as originator G-CSFs for facilitating bone marrow recovery in Japanese malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. In addition, it is less expensive than the originators, reducing hospitalization costs. Keywords: G-CSF, biosimilar, peripheral blood stem cell, hematological

  17. Adjuvant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy results in improved spatial learning and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anna Kathrin; Reich, Arno; Falkenburger, Björn; Schulz, Jörg B; Brandenburg, Lars Ove; Ribes, Sandra; Tauber, Simone C

    2015-01-01

    Despite the development of new antibiotic agents, mortality of pneumococcal meningitis remains high. In addition, meningitis results in severe long-term morbidity, most prominently cognitive deficits. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) stimulates proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells and increases the number of circulating neutrophil granulocytes. This study investigated the effect of adjuvant G-CSF treatment on cognitive function after pneumococcal meningitis. C57BL/6 mice were infected by subarachnoid injection of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3 and treated with ceftriaxone and G-CSF subcutaneously or ceftriaxone alone for 5 days. Clinical scores, motor performance, and mortality during bacterial meningitis were unaffected by adjuvant G-CSF treatment. No effect of G-CSF treatment on production of proinflammatory cytokines or activation of microglia or astrocytes was observed. The G-CSF treatment did, however, result in hippocampal neurogenesis and improved spatial learning performance 6 weeks after meningitis. These results suggest that G-CSF might offer a new adjuvant therapeutic approach in bacterial meningitis to reduce long-term cognitive deficits.

  18. Donor body mass index is an important factor that affects peripheral blood progenitor cell yield in healthy donors after mobilization with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Burns, Kevin M; Babic, Aleksandar; Carrum, George; Kennedy, Martha; Segura, Francisco J; Garcia, Salvador; Potts, Sandra; Leveque, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The use of hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation has rapidly expanded in recent years. Currently, several sources of HPCs are available for transplantation including peripheral blood HPCs (PBPCs), cord blood cells, and marrow cells. Of these, PBPC collection has become the major source of HPCs. An important variable in PBPC collection is the response to PBPC mobilization, which varies significantly and sometime causes mobilization failure. A retrospective study of 69 healthy donors who underwent PBPC donation by leukapheresis was performed. All of these donors received 10 μg/kg/day or more granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for 5 days before PBPC harvest. Donor factors were evaluated and correlated with mobilization responses, as indicated by the precollection CD34 count (pre-CD34). Donors with a pre-CD34 of more than 100 × 10(6) /L had higher body mass index (BMI) compared with donors whose pre-CD34 was 38 × 10(6) to 99 × 10(6) /L or less than 38 × 10(6) /L (32.0 ± 1.04 kg/m(2) vs. 28.7 ± 0.93 kg/m(2) vs. 25.9 ± 1.27 kg/m(2) , respectively; p donors with high BMIs had higher pre-CD34 on a per-kilogram-of-body-weight basis compared with donors with low BMIs. BMI is an important factor that affects donor's response to mobilization and consequently the HPC yield. This effect may be due to a relatively high dose of G-CSF administered to donors with higher BMI or due to the presence of unknown intrinsic factors affecting mobilization that correlate with the amount of adipose tissue in each donor. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  19. Evaluation of granulocytes reposition and appearance of the adverse effects produced by the stimulating factors of granulocytic colonies.

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    Gracia Solera Camarasa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the most frequent adverse effects produced by colony stimulating factors available at the University Hospital San Juan de Alicante (filgrastim and pegfilgrastim. Materials and methods: Observational, retrospective study, developed at the Pharmaceutical Care Unit for External Patients (UFPE of the Hospital Universitario de San Juan de Alicante, between February 8 and 26, 2016 (inclusive. Variables collected: Sex, age, diagnosis, chemotherapy scheme, start date chemotherapy treatment, stimulating factor and prescribed dose, cycles received, start date treatment with stimulant factor and adverse effects. Results: Of the 15 patients treated with colony stimulating factor only the 13.3% were being treated with lower doses than the ones according to their weight. In 100% the medication was correctly prescribed. The main chemotherapy regimen where primary prophylaxis was used was AC for breast cancer. The main side effects were musculoskeletal pain, asthenia / fatigue, and gastrointestinal disorders such as constipation and diarrhea. Conclusions: Preventive use with granulocytic colony stimulating factor has been shown to reduce the risk and duration of neutropenia. The adverse effects obtained are within the normal range for the use of said medicament.

  20. Effect of administration timing of postchemotherapy granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on host-immune cell recovery and CD8+T-cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed Labib; Nassef, Mohamed; Abdel Salam, Soha G R; Zidan, Abdelaziz; Mahmoud, Mohamed H; Badr, Gamal; Rubinstein, Mark; Cole, David

    2016-11-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a hematopoietic growth factor, is a standard supportive therapy given during cancer treatment. It induces acceleration in neutrophil recovery through stimulation of mobilization of hematopoietic progenitors. Given that the latter is also induced by chemotherapy itself, the timing of administration of G-CSF postchemotherapy might impact the resultant overall effects. The present study aimed to determine the optimal timing of G-CSF postchemotherapy to exert its optimal effects on the immune cell recovery and its impact on antigen-specific CD8 + T-cell response. B6 mice were treated once with cyclophosphamide (4 mg/mouse; CTX) and then daily with G-CSF (5 g/mouse) from Days 1-5, 2-5 or 5-9 post-CTX treatment. The total numbers of various immune cell types were analyzed on Days 7, 9 and 12 post-CTX treatment. To evaluate effects on CD8 + T-cell response, a pmel-1 transgenic mouse model was used in combination with prime boost peptide vaccination therapy. The total number of white blood cells (WBC), neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, granulocytes and dendritic cells (DC) were significantly increased after G-CSF treatment in particular when G-CSF was administered from Days 2-5 post-CTX treatment. Application of this timing of G-CSF and CTX treatment after adoptive transfer of T-cells followed by prime-boost vaccination with antigenic peptide did not block the expansion of the donor pmel-1 CD8 + T-cells. In conclusion, adjusting the timing of treatment with G-CSF postchemotherapy can optimize its promoting effects on recovery of myeloid cells without altering the associated antigen-specific immunity.

  1. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor priming chemotherapy is more effective than standard chemotherapy as salvage therapy in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; He, Aili; Wang, Fangxia; Bai, Ju; Wang, Jianli; Zhao, Wanhong; Zhang, Wanggang; Cao, Xingmei; Chen, Yinxia; Liu, Jie; Ma, Xiaorong; Chen, Hongli; Feng, Yuandong; Yang, Yun

    2017-12-29

    To improve the complete remission (CR) rate of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and alleviate the severe side effects of double induction chemotherapy, we combined a standard regimen with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming chemotherapy to compose a new double induction regimen for AML patients who failed to achieve CR after the first course. Ninety-seven patients with AML who did not achieve CR after the first course of standard chemotherapy were enrolled. Among them, 45 patients received G-CSF priming combined with low-dose chemotherapy during days 20-22 of the first course of chemotherapy, serving as priming group, 52 patients were administered standard chemotherapy again, serving as control group. Between the two groups there were no differences in the French-American-British (FAB) classification, risk status, the first course of chemotherapy, blood cell count or blasts percentage of bone marrow before the second course. But the CR rate was significantly higher and the adverse effect was much lower in the priming group than the control group. Cox multivariate regression analysis showed that WBC level before the second course and the selection of the second chemotherapy regimen were two independent factors for long survival of patients. These results elucidate that standard chemotherapy followed by G-CSF priming new double induction chemotherapy is an effective method for AML patients to improve CR rate and reduce adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF on IVF outcomes in infertile women: An RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Eftekhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite major advances in assisted reproductive techniques, the implantation rates remain relatively low. Some studies have demonstrated that intrauterine infusion of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves implantation in infertile women. Objective: To assess the G-CSF effects on IVF outcomes in women with normal endometrial thickness. Materials and methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 100 infertile women with normal endometrial thickness who were candidate for IVF were evaluated in two groups. Exclusion criteria were positive history of repeated implantation failure (RIF, endocrine disorders, severe endometriosis, congenital or acquired uterine anomaly and contraindication for G-CSF (renal disease, sickle cell disease, or malignancy. In G-CSF group (n=50, 300 μg trans cervical intrauterine of G-CSF was administered at the oocyte retrieval day. Controls (n=50 were treated with standard protocol. Chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate were compared between groups. Results: Number of total and mature oocytes (MII, two pronuclei (2PN, total embryos, transferred embryos, quality of transferred embryos, and fertilization rate did not differ significantly between two groups. So there were no significant differences between groups in chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rate, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate Conclusion: our result showed in normal IVF patients with normal endometrial thickness, the intrauterine infusion of G-CSF did not improve pregnancy outcomes.

  3. Characterization of Stress-Exposed Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Using ELISA and Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Katsuyoshi; Akashi, Satoko

    2014-10-01

    Information on the higher-order structure is important in the development of biopharmaceutical drugs. Recently, hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has been widely used as a tool to evaluate protein conformation, and unique automated systems for HDX-MS are now commercially available. To investigate the potential of this technique for the prediction of the activity of biopharmaceuticals, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), which had been subjected to three different stress types, was analyzed using HDX-MS and through comparison with receptor-binding activity. It was found that HDX-MS, in combination with ion mobility separation, was able to identify conformational changes in G-CSF induced by stress, and a good correlation with the receptor-binding activity was demonstrated, which cannot be completely determined by conventional peptide mapping alone. The direct evaluation of biological activity using bioassay is absolutely imperative in biopharmaceutical development, but HDX-MS can provide the alternative information in a short time on the extent and location of the structural damage caused by stresses. Furthermore, the present study suggests the possibility of this system being a versatile evaluation method for the preservation stability of biopharmaceuticals.

  4. Effects of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on chromosome aneuploidy and replication asynchrony in healthy peripheral blood stem cell donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Betsy; Oseth, Leann; Cain, Meghan; Trader, Erin; Pulkrabek, Shelley; Lindgren, Bruce; Luo, Xianghua; Clay, Mary; Miller, John; Confer, Dennis; Weisdorf, Daniel; McCullough, Jeffrey

    2011-09-01

    As peripheral blood has surpassed bone marrow as a predominant source of stem cells for transplantation, use of the cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) is increasing. Issues regarding potential genotoxic effects of even short-term, low-dose G-CSF treatment for the healthy donors have been raised. To address the question of chromosomal instability, we used FISH to evaluate the peripheral blood lymphocytes of 22 PBSC donors and 22 matched controls at 5 time points over a 12-month period. The specimens obtained were a pre-G-CSF, followed by collections at the time of PBSC harvest (days 5-7) and at 2, 6, and 12 months after donation. Eight additional PBSC donors provided a single sample at 12 months. Nine loci (mapped to chromosomes 7, 8, 9, 17, 21, and 22) were evaluated for aneuploidy, including 3 mapped to chromosome 7 because of the specific relevance of monosomy 7. Replication timing was evaluated for chromosome 15 and 17 loci. No evidence was found of G-CSF-induced chromosomal instability. This work supports the epidemiologic data that have demonstrated no increased risk for hematologic malignancies in G-CSF-primed PBSC donors.

  5. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-04-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for loss of white blood cells (WBCs), which are the body's main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved WBC loss, specifically neutrophils, in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated, irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well as internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses.

  6. Successful treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for ritodrine-induced neutropenia in a twin pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen-Yu; Lai, Yu-Ju; Hwang, Kwei-Shuai; Chen, Chi-Huang; Yu, Mu-Hsien; Chen, Huei-Tsung; Su, Her-Young

    2016-10-01

    Neutropenia developed after continuous intravenous infusion of ritodrine hydrochloride (Yutopar) for preterm uterine contractions in a twin pregnancy. We successfully returned the low neutrophil count to the normal range after discontinuation of infusion of ritodrine and treatment with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). A 34-year-old woman with twin pregnancy was treated with ritodrine for preterm uterine contractions at 27 weeks and 6 days gestation. Neutropenia developed after continuous intravenous infusion of ritodrine for about 4 weeks. We ceased the ritodrine infusion immediately and treated the neutropenia with G-CSF. A cesarean delivery was performed the day after cessation of the ritodrine infusion because of uncontrolled preterm labor. There were no adverse side effects or infectious complications in the mother or the newborns. The maternal neutrophil count recovered to the normal range 4 days after administration of G-CSF. Based on prior case reports and the clinical presentation of our case, G-CSF may be a useful treatment for pregnant women with ritodrine-induced neutropenia. However, more clinical studies are required to confirm the safety and efficacy of this treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Enhancement in cognitive function recovery by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in a rodent model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikoglu, Elif M; Heffernan, Meghan E; Tam, Kelly; Sicard, Kenneth M; Bratane, Bernt T; Quan, Meina; Fisher, Marc; King, Jean A

    2014-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by neuronal damage and commonly, secondary cell death, leading to functional and neurological dysfunction. Despite the recent focus of TBI research on developing therapies, affective therapeutic strategies targeting neuronal death associated with TBI remain underexplored. This study explored the efficacy of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) as an intervention for improving cognitive deficits commonly associated with TBI. Although G-CSF has been studied with histological techniques, to date, its effects on functional outcome remain unknown. To this end, we used a closed head injury (CHI) model in Wistar rats that were randomly assigned to one of four groups (untreated TBI, G-CSF treated TBI, G-CSF treated Control, Control). The treatment groups were administered subcutaneous injections of G-CSF 30 min (120 μg/kg) and 12 h (60 μg/kg) post-trauma. The Morris Water Maze test was used to measure any treatment-associated changes in cognitive deficits observed in TBI animals at days 2-6 post-injury. Our findings demonstrate a significant improvement in cognitive performance in the G-CSF treated TBI animals within a week of injury, compared to untreated TBI, indicative of immediate and beneficial effect of G-CSF on cognitive performance post CHI. Our model suggests that early G-CSF exposure may be a promising therapeutic approach in recovery of cognitive deficits due to TBI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plays an important role in immune complex-mediated arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Anne D; Haase, Claus; Cook, Andrew D; Hamilton, John A

    2016-05-01

    Neutrophils are an abundant cell type in many chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, their contribution to the pathology of RA has not been widely studied. A key cytokine involved in neutrophil development and function is granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). In this study we used the K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis (STA) model, mimicking the effector phase of RA, to investigate the importance of G-CSF in arthritis development and its relation to neutrophils. Here, we show for the first time in this model that G-CSF levels are increased both in the serum and in inflamed paws of arthritic mice and importantly that G-CSF blockade leads to a profound reduction in arthritis severity, as well as reduced numbers of neutrophils in blood. Moreover, CXCL1 and CXCL2 levels in the arthritic joints were also lowered. Our data demonstrate that G-CSF is a pivotal driver of the disease progression in the K/BxN STA model and possibly acts in part by regulating neutrophil numbers in the circulation. Therefore, our findings suggest that G-CSF might be a suitable target in RA, and perhaps in other immune complex-driven pathologies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Analytical characterization of in vitro refolding in the quality by design paradigm: Refolding of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Mili; Dixit, Shruti; Muthukumar, S; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-07-15

    Protein based therapeutics dominate most pharmaceutical pipelines today. For a therapeutic product to be effective, it is important that it is in its native form as slight modifications have been known to result in significantly different performance in the clinic. When expressed in hosts such as Escherichia coli, formation of inactive insoluble aggregates of proteins popularly known as inclusion bodies occurs in most cases. This necessitates the need for in vitro refolding to generate the native (and active) form of the therapeutic protein. This paper aims to provide an approach to generate a deeper understanding of refolding of a therapeutic protein and then to use it for its optimal production commercially. Recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor has been chosen as the model protein. Seven orthogonal analytical tools have been used to elucidate the refolding process. By strategically using these tools protein refolding has been segregated into a series of well-defined sequence of events, starting from the unfolded random coil and ending with the uniquely folded metastable state. The study also suggests the choice of tools that can be used to monitor each event. We believe that this paper successfully demonstrates an approach to generate deeper understanding of the protein refolding process as per the expectations laid out in the Quality by Design paradigm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cloning and Expression of Recombinant Immunotoxin using Diphtheria Toxin and Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Donyapoor

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Immunotoxin (IT is a directed toxin containing two distinct sections (immune and toxin parts covalently bond using specific chemical or peptide linkers. The aim of this study is to produce a recombinant and hybrid protein containing diphtheria toxin (DT and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF. Materials and Methods: According to the structure of the first commercial recombinant immunotoxin (Ontak, hybrid protein containing DT fused interlukine2, gene encoding of DT and G-CSF was amplified using specific primers and plasmid template of pET-IDZ3 (pET21 harboring the gene encoding ontak immunotoxine and pET-GCSF (pET23 harboring G-CSF, respectively. The DT-GCSF fusion protein produced using soeing PCR and specific primers. Finally, pET-DT-GCSF construction prepared using subcloning of DT-GCSF into pET21a(+ and confirmed by sequencing, SDS-PAGE and western blot technique. Results: Gene encoding of DT-GCSF inserted into NdeI/EcoRI site of pET21 and the construction of strain producing DT-GCSF recombinant immunotoxin was confirmed using customary methods. Conclusion: The cytokine fusion protein, DT-GCSF, could be used for the inhibition of G-CSF receptor bearing cancer cells.

  11. Simplified in vitro refolding and purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor using protein folding cation exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Sandeep; Dedaniya, Akshay; Thunuguntla, Rahul; Mallu, Maheswara Reddy; Parupudi, Pavani; Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy

    2015-01-30

    Protein folding-strong cation exchange chromatography (PF-SCX) has been employed for efficient refolding with simultaneous purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). To acquire a soluble form of renatured and purified rhG-CSF, various chromatographic conditions, including the mobile phase composition and pH was evaluated. Additionally, the effects of additives such as urea, amino acids, polyols, sugars, oxidizing agents and their amalgamations were also investigated. Under the optimal conditions, rhG-CSF was efficaciously solubilized, refolded and simultaneously purified by SCX in a single step. The experimental results using ribose (2.0M) and arginine (0.6M) combination were found to be satisfactory with mass yield, purity and specific activity of 71%, ≥99% and 2.6×10(8)IU/mg respectively. Through this investigation, we concluded that the SCX refolding method was more efficient than conventional methods which has immense potential for the large-scale production of purified rhG-CSF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimized granulocyte colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis in adult cancer patients: from biological principles to clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestris, Nicola; Del Re, Marzia; Azzariti, Amalia; Maiello, Evaristo; Lombardi, Lucia; Cinieri, Saverio; Guarini, Attilio; Brunetti, Anna Elisabetta; Delcuratolo, Sabina; De Vita, Fernando; Pisconti, Salvatore; Danesi, Romano; Colucci, Giuseppe

    2012-04-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, the depth and length of which are correlated to the risk of febrile neutropenia (FN) and neutropenia sepsis, remains a serious problem in medical oncology. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) stimulate the proliferation and survival of neutrophils and their precursors, thereby reducing the incidence, duration and severity of neutropenic events across a broad range of malignancies and regimens, often enabling the delivery of full chemotherapy dose intensity. In this review, areas covered include the physiologic role of G-CSF in granulopoiesis, as well as a related biological model of bone marrow kinetics after chemotherapy. Information relating to the application of clinical guidelines for optimization of prophylaxis of FN in adult cancer patients was critically summarized. The literature and pharmacological data were obtained through an electronic search. There are relevant physiological and clinical evidences for the use of G-CSF to prevent FN and to ameliorate the myelotoxicities of cancer chemotherapy. In particular, biological models are in favor of the prophylactic rather than therapeutic use of G-CSF therapy. Use of a single dose of pegfilgrastim per cycle in appropriate patients provides a more convenient and potentially more effective strategy for assisting neutrophil recovery. While biosimilars may cost less, future developments in their regulation will need to address multiple issues. In the interim, physicians should remember that small differences in biochemical and biophysical characteristics might translate into differences in potency and immunogenic potential.

  13. Cytokine combination therapy with erythropoietin and granulocyte colony stimulating factor in a porcine model of acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Franca S; Amabile, Nicolas; Shapiro, Mia; Mirsky, Rachel; Bartlett, Lauren; Zhang, Yan; Virmani, Renu; Chatterjee, Kanu; Boyle, Andrew; Grossman, William; Yeghiazarians, Yerem

    2010-12-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) have generated interest as novel therapies after myocardial infarction (MI), but the effect of combination therapy has not been studied in the large animal model. We investigated the impact of prolonged combination therapy with EPO and GCSF on cardiac function, infarct size, and vascular density after MI in a porcine model. MI was induced in pigs by a 90 min balloon occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. 16 animals were treated with EPO+GCSF, or saline (control group). Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography and pressure-volume measurements at baseline, 1 and 6 weeks post-MI. Histopathology was performed 6 weeks post-MI. At week 6, EPO+GCSF therapy stabilized left ventricular ejection fraction, (41 ± 1% vs. 33 ± 1%, p < 0.01) and improved diastolic function compared to the control group. Histopathology revealed increased areas of viable myocardium and vascular density in the EPO+GCSF therapy, compared to the control. Despite these encouraging results, in a historical analysis comparing combination therapy with monotherapy with EPO or GCSF, there were no significant additive benefits in the LVEF and volumes overtime using the combination therapy. Our findings indicate that EPO+GCSF combination therapy promotes stabilization of cardiac function after acute MI. However, combination therapy does not seem to be superior to monotherapy with either EPO or GCSF.

  14. Alpha-1 antitrypsin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as serum biomarkers of disease severity in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, Christoffer; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict

    2015-01-01

    disease severity. RESULTS: Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) differentiated between mild and moderate UC (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.79) with a sensitivity of 0.90 and a specificity of 0.70, thereby exceeding the predictive ability of CRP (AUC = 0.52). Combining alpha-1 antitrypsin and granulocyte colony...

  15. Impact of constitutional polymorphisms in VCAM1 and CD44 on CD34+ cell collection yield after administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor to healthy donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Antonio, Beatriz; Carmona, Magdalena; Falantes, Jose; Gil, Encarnación; Baez, Alicia; Suarez, María; Marín, Pedro; Espigado, Ildefonso; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Background The number of CD34(+) cells mobilized from bone marrow to peripheral blood after administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor varies greatly among healthy donors. This fact might be explained, at least in part, by constitutional differences in genes involved in the interactions tethering CD34(+) cells to the bone marrow. We analyzed genetic characteristics associated with CD34(+) cell mobilization in 112 healthy individuals receiving granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (filgrastim; 10 μg/kg; 5 days). Genetic variants in VCAM1 and in CD44 were associated with the number of CD34(+) cells in peripheral blood after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration (P = 0.02 and P = 0.04, respectively), with the quantity of CD34(+) cells ×10⁶/kg of donor (4.6 versus 6.3; P donor and total CD34(+) cells ×10⁶ (5.3 versus 6.7; P = 0.02 and 399 versus 533; P = 0.01, respectively). Conclusions In conclusion, genetic variability in molecules involved in migration and homing of CD34(+) cells influences the degree of mobilization of these cells.

  16. Myeloid Engraftment in Humanized Mice: Impact of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Treatment and Transgenic Mouse Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Alice M; Harmon, Cathal; Whelan, Sarah; O'Brien, Eóin C; O'Reilly, Vincent P; Crotty, Paul; Kelly, Pamela; Ryan, Michelle; Hickey, Fionnuala B; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Little, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Poor myeloid engraftment remains a barrier to experimental use of humanized mice. Focusing primarily on peripheral blood cells, we compared the engraftment profile of NOD-scid-IL2Rγc(-/-) (NSG) mice with that of NSG mice transgenic for human membrane stem cell factor (hu-mSCF mice), NSG mice transgenic for human interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and stem cell factor (SGM3 mice). hu-mSCF and SGM3 mice showed enhanced engraftment of human leukocytes compared to NSG mice, and this was reflected in the number of human neutrophils and monocytes present in these strains. Importantly, discrete classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocyte populations were identifiable in the blood of NSG and hu-mSCF mice, while the nonclassical population was absent in the blood of SGM3 mice. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) treatment increased the number of blood monocytes in NSG and hu-mSCF mice, and neutrophils in NSG and SGM3 mice; however, this effect appeared to be at least partially dependent on the stem cell donor used to engraft the mice. Furthermore, GCSF treatment resulted in a preferential expansion of nonclassical monocytes in both NSG and hu-mSCF mice. Human tubulointerstitial CD11c(+) cells were present in the kidneys of hu-mSCF mice, while monocytes and neutrophils were identified in the liver of all strains. Bone marrow-derived macrophages prepared from NSG mice were most effective at phagocytosing polystyrene beads. In conclusion, hu-mSCF mice provide the best environment for the generation of human myeloid cells, with GCSF treatment further enhancing peripheral blood human monocyte cell numbers in this strain.

  17. Interferon-alpha suppressed granulocyte colony stimulating factor production is reversed by CL097, a TLR7/8 agonist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tajuddin, Tariq

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Neutropenia, a major side-effect of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) therapy can be effectively treated by the recombinant form of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), an important growth factor for neutrophils. We hypothesized that IFN-alpha might suppress G-CSF production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), contributing to the development of neutropenia, and that a toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist might overcome this suppression. METHODS: Fifty-five patients who were receiving IFN-alpha\\/ribavirin combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection were recruited. Absolute neutrophil counts (ANC), monocyte counts and treatment outcome data were recorded. G-CSF levels in the supernatants of PBMCs isolated from the patients and healthy controls were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay following 18 h of culture in the absence or presence of IFN- alpha or the TLR7\\/8 agonist, CL097. RESULTS: Therapeutic IFN-alpha caused a significant reduction in neutrophil counts in all patients, with 15 patients requiring therapeutic G-CSF. The reduction in ANC over the course of IFN-alpha treatment was paralleled by a decrease in the ability of PBMCs to produce G-CSF. In vitro G-CSF production by PBMCs was suppressed in the presence of IFN-alpha; however, co-incubation with a TLR7\\/8 agonist significantly enhanced G-CSF secretion by cells obtained both from HCV patients and healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: Suppressed G-CSF production in the presence of IFN-alpha may contribute to IFN-alpha-induced neutropenia. However, a TLR7\\/8 agonist elicits G-CSF secretion even in the presence of IFN-alpha, suggesting a possible therapeutic role for TLR agonists in treatment of IFN-alpha-induced neutropenia.

  18. A Novel Combinatorial Therapy With Pulp Stem Cells and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor for Total Pulp Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iohara, Koichiro; Murakami, Masashi; Takeuchi, Norio; Osako, Yohei; Ito, Masataka; Ishizaka, Ryo; Utunomiya, Shinji; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of deep caries with pulpitis is a major challenge in dentistry. Stem cell therapy represents a potential strategy to regenerate the dentin-pulp complex, enabling conservation and restoration of teeth. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pulp stem cell transplantation as a prelude for the impending clinical trials. Clinical-grade pulp stem cells were isolated and expanded according to good manufacturing practice conditions. The absence of contamination, abnormalities/aberrations in karyotype, and tumor formation after transplantation in an immunodeficient mouse ensured excellent quality control. After autologous transplantation of pulp stem cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a dog pulpectomized tooth, regenerated pulp tissue including vasculature and innervation completely filled in the root canal, and regenerated dentin was formed in the coronal part and prevented microleakage up to day 180. Transplantation of pulp stem cells with G-CSF yielded a significantly larger amount of regenerated dentin-pulp complex compared with transplantation of G-CSF or stem cells alone. Also noteworthy was the reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and apoptotic cells and the significant increase in neurite outgrowth compared with results without G-CSF. The transplanted stem cells expressed angiogenic/neurotrophic factors. It is significant that G-CSF together with conditioned medium of pulp stem cells stimulated cell migration and neurite outgrowth, prevented cell death, and promoted immunosuppression in vitro. Furthermore, there was no evidence of toxicity or adverse events. In conclusion, the combinatorial trophic effects of pulp stem cells and G-CSF are of immediate utility for pulp/dentin regeneration, demonstrating the prerequisites of safety and efficacy critical for clinical applications. PMID:23761108

  19. Cost-benefit analysis of prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during CHOP antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranitsaris, G; Altmayer, C; Quirt, I

    1997-06-01

    Several randomised comparative trials have shown that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) reduces the duration of neutropenia, hospitalisation and intravenous antibacterial use in patients with cancer who are receiving high-dosage antineoplastic therapy. However, one area that has received less attention is the role of G-CSF in standard-dosage antineoplastic regimens. One such treatment that is considered to have a low potential for inducing fever and neutropenia is the CHOP regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We conducted a cost-benefit analysis from a societal perspective in order to estimate the net cost or benefit of prophylactic G-CSF in this patient population. This included direct costs for hospitalisation with antibacterial support, as well as indirect societal costs, such as time off work and antineoplastic therapy delays secondary to neutropenia. The findings were then tested by a comprehensive sensitivity analysis. The administration of G-CSF at a dosage of 5 micrograms/kg/day for 11 doses following CHOP resulted in an overall net cost of $Can1257. In the sensitivity analysis, lowering the G-CSF dosage to 2 micrograms/kg/day generated a net benefit of $Can6564, indicating a situation that was cost saving to society. The results of the current study suggest that the use of G-CSF in patients receiving CHOP antineoplastic therapy produces a situation that is close to achieving cost neutrality. However, low-dosage (2 micrograms/kg/day) G-CSF is an economically attractive treatment strategy because it may result in overall savings to society.

  20. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and umbilical cord blood cell transplantation: Synergistic therapies for the treatment of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Liska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is now characterized as a progressive, degenerative disease and continues to stand as a prevalent cause of death and disability. The pathophysiology of TBI is complex, with a variety of secondary cell death pathways occurring which may persist chronically following the initial cerebral insult. Current therapeutic options for TBI are minimal, with surgical intervention or rehabilitation therapy existing as the only viable treatments. Considering the success of stem-cell therapies in various other neurological diseases, their use has been proposed as a potential potent therapy for patients suffering TBI. Moreover, stem cells are highly amenable to adjunctive use with other therapies, providing an opportunity to overcome the inherent limitations of using a single therapeutic agent. Our research has verified this additive potential by demonstrating the efficacy of co-delivering human umbilical cord blood (hUCB cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF in a murine model of TBI, providing encouraging results which support the potential of this approach to treat patients suffering from TBI. These findings justify ongoing research toward uncovering the mechanisms which underlie the functional improvements exhibited by hUCB + G-CSF combination therapy, thereby facilitating its safe and effect transition into the clinic. This paper is a review article. Referred literature in this paper has been listed in the reference section. The datasets supporting the conclusions of this article are available online by searching various databases, including PubMed. Some original points in this article come from the laboratory practice in our research center and the authors' experiences.

  1. [Intracoronary and hypodermic injection of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improved cardiac function in Swine with chronic myocardial ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong-chong; Yao, Kang; Lu, Hao; Yang, Jun; Shi, Hong-cheng; Zhang, Yi-qi; Huang, Zhe-yong; Zhang, Shu-ning; Yang, Shan; Sun, Ai-jun; Zou, Yun-zeng; Ge, Jun-bo

    2009-08-01

    To compare the efficacy and feasibility between intracoronary and hypodermic injection of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on improving cardiac function in a Swine model of chronic myocardial ischemia. Eighteen Swine underwent placement of ameroid constrictor on left circumflex coronary artery. The presence of myocardial ischemia was verified at four weeks after the operation, and the animals were then randomly assigned into three groups (n = 6 each): (1) administration of vehicle (control), (2) hypodermic injection of G-CSF (5 microgxkg(-1)x;d(-1)) for five days (IH), and (3) intracoronary injection of a bonus G-CSF (60 microg/kg) (IC). Coronary angiogram, cardiac MRI, and (18)F-FDG-SPECT/(99m)Tc-SPECT (DISA-SPECT) measurements were performed at pre-administration and at 4 weeks post administration. Global heart function such as left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVSDV) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), myocardial perfusion, myocardial viability and myocardial infarct area were evaluated. Myocardial vWF, Bcl-2 and Bax expressions were detected by Western blot and RT-PCR. MRI data showed that left ventricular dilation and dysfunction were similarly prevented in IH and IC G-CSF treated animals at eight weeks after the operation. SPECT revealed that both IH and IC G-CSF equally improved the regional contractility of chronic myocardial ischemia and increased myocardial viability. Myocardial infarct size was also reduced after both G-CSF treatments as detected by MRI. Intracoronary injection of G-CSF did not lead to angiogenesis in other organs. G-CSF treatments were also associated with a significant reduction in myocardial apoptosis and significant increase in angiogenesis. Both intracoronary and hypodermic injection of G-CSF were safe and feasible and could equally improve cardiac function and increase angiogenesis in this Swine model of chronic myocardial ischemia.

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and drugs elevating extracellular adenosine synergize to enhance haematopoietic reconstitution in irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospisil, M.; Hofer, M.; Netikova, J.; Hola, J.; Vacek, A. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Inst. of Biophysics, Brno (Czech Republic); Znojil, V.; Vacha, J. [Masaryk Univ., Medical Faculty, Brno (Czech Republic)

    1998-03-01

    The activation of adenosine receptors has recently been demonstrated to stimulate haematopoiesis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine to influence curative effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in mice exposed to a sublethal dose of 4 Gy of {sup 60}Co radiation. Elevation of extracellular adenosine in mice was induced by the combined administration of dipyridamole, a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), an adenosine prodrug. The effects of dipyridamole plus AMP, and G-CSF, administered either alone or in combination, were evaluated. The drugs were injected to mice in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on d 3 after irradiation and the haematopoietic response was evaluated on d 7, 10, 14, 18 and 24 after irradiation. While the effects of G-CSF on the late maturation stages of blood cells, appearing shortly after the completion of the treatment, were not influenced by dipyridamole plus AMP, positive effects of the combination therapy occurred in the post-irradiation recovery phase which is dependent on the repopulation of haematopoietic stem cells. This was indicated by the significant elevation of counts of granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and granulocytic cells in the bone marrow (d 14), of GM-CFC (d 14), granulocytic and erythroid cells (d 14 and 18) in the spleen, and of neutrophils (d 18), monocytes (d 14 and 18) and platelets (d 18) in the peripheral blood. These effects suggest that the repopulation potential of the combination therapy lies in a common multi-lineage cell population. The results of this study implicate the promising possibility to enhance the curative effects of G-CSF under conditions of myelosuppressive state induced by radiation exposure. (au) 43 refs.

  3. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor impairs CD8(+) T cell functionality by interfering with central activation elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunse, C E; Tischer, S; Lahrberg, J; Oelke, M; Figueiredo, C; Blasczyk, R; Eiz-Vesper, B

    2016-07-01

    Besides mobilizing stem cells into the periphery, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to influence various types of innate and adaptive immune cells. For example, it impairs the effector function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). It is assumed that this effect is mediated indirectly by monocytes, regulatory T cells and immunomodulatory cytokines influenced by G-CSF. In this study, isolated G-CSF-treated CD8(+) T cells were stimulated antigen-dependently with peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC)-coupled artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) or stimulated antigen-independently with anti-CD3/CD28 stimulator beads. By measuring the changes in interferon (IFN)-γ and granzyme B expression at the mRNA and protein level, we showed for the first time that G-CSF has a direct effect on CD8(+) CTLs, which was confirmed based on the reduced production of IFN-γ and granzyme B by the cytotoxic T cell line TALL-104 after G-CSF treatment. By investigating further elements affected by G-CSF in CTLs from stem cell donors and untreated controls, we found a decreased phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) and CD3ζ after G-CSF treatment. Additionally, miRNA-155 and activation marker expression levels were reduced. In summary, our results show that G-CSF directly influences the effector function of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and affects various elements of T cell activation. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  4. Granulocyte transfusion combined with granulocyte colony stimulating factor in severe infection patients with severe aplastic anemia: a single center experience from China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaquan Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy and safety of granulocyte transfusion combined with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF in severe infection patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA. METHODS: Fifty-six patients in severe infections with SAA who had received granulocyte transfusions combined with G-CSF from 2006 to 2012 in our department were analyzed. A retrospective analysis was undertaken to investigate the survival rates (at 30 days, 90 days and 180 days, the responses to treatment (at 7 days and 30 days, including microbiological, radiographic and clinical responses, the neutrophil count and adverse events after transfusion. RESULTS: All SAA patients with severe infections were treated with granulocyte transfusions combined with G-CSF. Forty-seven patients had received antithymocyte globulin/antilymphocyte globulin and cyclosporine A as immunosuppressive therapy. The median number of granulocyte components transfused was 18 (range, 3-75. The survival at 30 days, 90 days and 180 days were 50(89%, 39(70% and 37(66% respectively. Among 31 patients who had invasive fungal infections, the survival at 30 days, 90 days and 180 days were 27(87%, 18(58% and 16(52% respectively. Among the 25 patients who had refractory severe bacterial infections, the survival at 30 days, 90 days and 180 days were 23(92%, 21(84% and 21(84% respectively. Survival rate was correlated with hematopoietic recovery. Responses of patients at 7 and 30 days were correlated with survival rate. Common adverse effects of granulocyte transfusion included mild to moderate fever, chills, allergy and dyspnea. CONCLUSION: Granulocyte transfusions combined with G-CSF could be an adjunctive therapy for treating severe infections of patients with SAA.

  5. Fludarabine, cytarabine, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and idarubicin (FLAG-IDA) for the treatment of children with poor-prognosis acute leukemia: the Hacettepe experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavil, Betul; Aytac, Selin; Balci, Yasemin Isik; Unal, Sule; Kuskonmaz, Barıs; Yetgin, Sevgi; Gurgey, Aytemiz; Tuncer, Murat; Gumruk, Fatma; Uckan, Duygu; Cetin, Mualla

    2010-10-01

    Fludarabine, cytarabine, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and idarubicin (FLAG-IDA) regimen has been proven to be a potentially useful chemotherapy regimen for relapsed or poor-prognosis childhood leukemia. The aim of the study was to evaluate complete remission (CR) rate, toxicity, and overall survival of children with poor-prognosis acute leukemia who received the FLAG-IDA regimen. Furthermore, the authors investigated the children who achieved CR following FLAG-IDA treatment regarding their eligibility for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Between January 2002 and April 2007, 25 children with poor-prognosis acute leukemia were treated with FLAG-IDA regimen in our center. Of the 25 children (16 AML, 9 ALL) with poor-prognosis acute leukemia, 7 (28.0%) received 1 cycle, 17 (68.0%) received 2 cycles, and 1 (4%) received 3 cycles of FLAG or FLAG-IDA regimen. After 44 cycles of FLAG-IDA or FLAG regimen, 10/25 (40%) children were nonresponders, 15/25 (60.0%) showed CR. Five (20%) of these patients in CR who underwent allogeneic HSCT are still in remission. The remaining 20 (80.0%) children were lost due to infection or relapse of the primary diseases. The overall survival of patients who are still alive and underwent allogeneic HSCT (mean: 40.6 ± 4.7, median: 40, range: 34-46 months) was longer than that of patients (mean: 5.5 ± 4.3, median: 4, range: 1-15 months) who did not undergo allogeneic HSCT. The CR rate was quite high in the present study using the FLAG-IDA regimen, and the authors believe this regimen is a possible option prior to allogeneic HSCT in children with poor-prognosis acute leukemia.

  6. Anti-obesity effects of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima fatty rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggu Lee

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF has molecular structures and intracellular signaling pathways that are similar to those of leptin and ciliary neurotropic factor (CNTF. It also has immune-modulatory properties. Given that leptin and CNTF play important roles in energy homeostasis and that obesity is an inflammatory condition in adipose tissue, we hypothesized that G-CSF could also play a role in energy homeostasis. We treated 12 38-week-old male Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima fatty rats (OLETF, diabetic and 12 age-matched male Long-Evans-Tokushima rats (LETO, healthy with 200 µg/day G-CSF or saline for 5 consecutive days. Body weight reduction was greater in G-CSF-treated OLETF (G-CSF/OLETF than saline-treated OLETF (saline/OLETF following 8 weeks of treatment (-6.9±1.6% vs. -3.1±2.2%, p<0.05. G-CSF treatment had no effect on body weight in LETO or on food intake in either OLETF or LETO. Body fat in G-CSF/OLETF was more reduced than in saline/OLETF (-32.2±3.1% vs. -20.8±6.2%, p<0.05. Energy expenditure was higher in G-CSF/OLETF from 4 weeks after the treatments than in saline/OLETF. Serum levels of cholesterol, triglyceride, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α were lower in G-CSF/OLETF than in saline/OLETF. Uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1 expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT was higher in G-CSF/OLETF than in saline/OLETF, but was unaffected in LETO. Immunofluorescence staining and PCR results revealed that G-CSF receptors were expressed in BAT. In vitro experiments using brown adipocyte primary culture revealed that G-CSF enhanced UCP-1 expression from mature brown adipocytes via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In conclusion, G-CSF treatment reduced body weight and increased energy expenditure in a diabetic model, and enhanced UCP-1 expression and decreased inflammatory cytokine levels may be associated with the effects of G-CSF treatment.

  7. Effects of interferon-γ and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on antifungal activity of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils against Candida albicans grown as biofilms or planktonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katragkou, Alphaspasia; Simitsopoulou, Maria; Chatzimoschou, Athanasios; Georgiadou, Elpiniki; Walsh, Thomas J; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2011-09-01

    Candida albicans is a leading cause of biofilm-related infections. As Candida biofilms are recalcitrant to host defenses, we sought to determine the effects of interferon-γ and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, two pro-inflammatory cytokines, on the antifungal activities of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) against C. albicans biofilms, using an in vitro biofilm model. Priming of PMNs by these cytokines augmented fungal damage of planktonic cells; however, priming of PMNs did not have the same effect against Candida biofilms. Biofilm phenotype appears to play an important role in protecting C. albicans from the innate immune system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. In vivo synergy between recombinant human stem cell factor and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in baboons enhanced circulation of progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R G; Briddell, R A; Knitter, G H; Opie, T; Bronsden, M; Myerson, D; Appelbaum, F R; McNiece, I K

    1994-08-01

    Recombinant human stem cell factor (rhSCF) and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) are synergistic in vitro in stimulating the proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells and their precursors. We examined the in vivo synergy of rhSCF with rhG-CSF for stimulating hematopoiesis in vivo in baboons. Administration of low-dose (LD) rhSCF (25 micrograms/kg) alone did not stimulate changes in circulating WBCs. In comparison, administration of LD rhSCF in combination with rhG-CSF at 10 micrograms/kg or 100 micrograms/kg stimulated increases in circulating WBCs of multiple types up to twofold higher than was stimulated by administration of the same dose of rhG-CSF alone. When the dose of rhG-CSF is increased to 250 micrograms/kg, the administration of LD rhSCF does not further increase the circulating WBC counts. Administration of LD rhSCF in combination with rhG-CSF also stimulated increased circulation of hematopoietic progenitors. LD rhSCF alone stimulated less of an increase in circulating progenitors, per milliliter of blood, than did administration of rhG-CSF alone at 100 micrograms/kg. Baboons administered LD rhSCF together with rhG-CSF at 10, 100, or 250 micrograms/kg had 3.5- to 16-fold higher numbers per milliliter of blood of progenitors cells of multiple types, including colony-forming units granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM), burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E), and colony-forming and burst-forming units-megakaryocyte (CFU-MK and BFU-MK) compared with animals given the same dose of rhG-CSF without rhSCF, regardless of the rhG-CSF dose. The increased circulation of progenitor cells stimulated by the combination of rhSCF plus rhG-CSF was not necessarily directly related to the increase in WBCs, as this effect on peripheral blood progenitors was observed even at an rhG-CSF dose of 250 micrograms/kg, where coadministration of LD rhSCF did not further increase WBC counts. Administration of very-low-dose rhSCF (2.5 micrograms/kg) with

  9. A Comparison of Brand and Biosimilar Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factors for Prophylaxis of Chemotherapy-Induced Febrile Neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Andrea G; Schwab, Phil; Lane, Daniel; Kennedy, Kenneth; Slabaugh, S Lane; Bowe, Andy

    2017-12-01

    Filgrastim-sndz, a granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), was introduced as a biosimilar to filgrastim in 2015, but real-world comparative effectiveness for filgrastim versus filgrastim-sndz has not been reported to date. To (a) compare the incidence of febrile neutropenia for patients taking filgrastim versus those taking filgrastim-sndz and (b) compare the incidence of a potential serious adverse event for filgrastim versus filgrastim-sndz. This retrospective cohort study identified patients receiving a G-CSF following chemotherapy, using administrative claims from the Humana Research Database. Patients enrolled in a Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plan with a claim for a G-CSF from October 1, 2015, through September 30, 2016, were identified. G-CSF use had to occur within 6 days of exposure to chemotherapy and without any subsequent chemotherapy within 14 days after G-CSF use. Febrile neutropenia requiring hospitalization was defined as hospitalization within 14 days after G-CSF use with (a) diagnosis of infection and/or neutropenia (broad definition) or (b) infection and neutropenia diagnoses (narrow definition). Serious adverse drug events (spleen rupture, acute respiratory syndrome, serious allergic reactions, capillary leak syndrome, thrombocytopenia, leukocytosis, cutaneous vasculitis, or bones and muscle ache) were also identified within 14 days after G-CSF use. An incidence difference of definition of febrile neutropenia and a difference of -0.8% (90% CI = -3.8%-2.1%; P = 0.64) for the narrow definition. For the analysis of serious adverse events, an incidence difference of -2.5% (90% CI = -7.5%-2.5%; P = 0.42) for filgrastim compared with filgrastim-sndz was not sufficient to establish noninferiority. This study is one of the first analyses of real-world evidence regarding the noninferiority of filgrastim and filgrastim-sndz. The study results support noninferiority of filgrastim and filgrastim-sndz for prevention of febrile neutropenia

  10. Increased mobilization and yield of stem cells using plerixafor in combination with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for the treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelus, Louis M; Farag, Sherif S

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma remain the most common indications for high-dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell rescue. While a CD34+ cell dose of 1 × 106/kg is considered the minimum required for engraftment, higher CD34+ doses correlate with improved outcome. Numerous studies, however, support targeting a minimum CD34+ cell dose of 2.0 × 106/kg, and an “optimal” dose of 4 to 6 × 106/kg for a single transplant. Unfortunately, up to 40% of patients fail to mobilize an optimal CD34+ cell dose using myeloid growth factors alone. Plerixafor is a novel reversible inhibitor of CXCR4 that significantly increases the mobilization and collection of higher numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Two randomized multi-center clinical trials in patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and multiple myeloma have demonstrated that the addition of plerixafor to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor increases the mobilization and yield of CD34+ cells in fewer apheresis days, which results in durable engraftment. This review summarizes the pharmacology and evidence for the clinical efficacy of plerixafor in mobilizing hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and discusses potential ways to utilize plerixafor in a cost-effective manner in patients with these diseases. PMID:24198526

  11. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF RECOMBINANT HUMAN GRANULOCYTIC COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR IN TREATMENT OF GRANULOCYTOPENIA DEVELOPED DURING IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Alexeeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of patients with severe clinical course of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is difficult problem. During the last years genetically engineered biological drugs are used equally with traditional immunosuppressive agents in treatment of severe forms of juvenile arthritis. High effectiveness of these drugs can be accompanied with development of unfavorable effects, for example, febrile neutropenia. The article presents results of a study of effectiveness and safety of recombinant human granulocytic colony-stimulating factor — filgrastim (Leucostim — in treatment of granulocytopenia developed during immunosuppressive therapy in 16 patients with JRA. It was shown that administration of filgrastim arrests leucopenia in 100% of patients and granulocytopenia — in 93% of patients in 24 hours after first injection. High effectiveness of drug was combined with good tolerability and safety.Key words: children, treatment, granulocytopenia, filgrastim, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(4:94-100

  12. Febrile Neutropenia Risk Assessment and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Support in Patients with Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Receiving R-CHOP Regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salar, Antonio; Haioun, Corinne; Rossi, Francesca Gaia

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ASCO and EORTC guidelines recommend granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) primary prophylaxis for cancer patients with a ≥20% overall risk of febrile neutropenia (FN), and to support delivery of dose-dense regimens. CHOP-like regimens (with rituximab [R]) are the current...... standard of care for the management of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but they are often associated with significant myelosuppression. Neutropenic events, particularly febrile neutropenia (FN), can be life-threatening and may lead to dose delays or reductions that compromise the efficacy......-CSF primary prophylaxis. Across all cycles, 29% of R-CHOP-21 patients had an unplanned hospitalization, with neutropenia/FN being the main reason. Subsequently, 67% of patients achieved a relative dose intensity (RDI) of ≥90% of their planned treatment (with respect to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin...

  13. Instent neointimal hyperplasia after percutaneous intervention for ST-elevation myocardial infarction and treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. Results from the stem cells in myocardial infarction (STEMMI) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Erik; Baldazzi, Federica; Ripa, Rasmus S

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilized pluripotent cells from the bone marrow are proposed to have a regenerative potential. Though, a report of excessive instent restenosis, in patients treated with G-CSF before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) warrants caution....

  14. Sustained receptor activation and hyperproliferation in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in mice with a severe congenital neutropenia/acute myeloid leukemia-derived mutation in the G-CSF receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A. Hermans (Mirjam); C. Heijmans-Antonissen (Claudia); A.C. Ward (Alister); A.E. Mayen (Angelique); R.E. Ploemacher (Robert); I.P. Touw (Ivo)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractIn approximately 20% of cases of severe congenital neutropenia (SCN), mutations are found in the gene encoding the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSF-R). These mutations introduce premature stop codons, which result in truncation of 82-98

  15. Similar in vitro effects and pulp regeneration in ectopic tooth transplantation by basic fibroblast growth factor and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, N; Hayashi, Y; Murakami, M; Alvarez, F J; Horibe, H; Iohara, K; Nakata, K; Nakamura, H; Nakashima, M

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to have combinatorial trophic effects with dental pulp stem cells for pulp regeneration. The aim of this investigation is to examine the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in vitro and in vivo compared with those of G-CSF and to assess the potential utility of bFGF as an alternative to G-CSF for pulp regeneration. Five different types of cells were examined in the in vitro effects of bFGF on cell migration, proliferation, anti-apoptosis, neurite outgrowth, angiogenesis, and odontogenesis compared with those of G-CSF. The in vivo regenerative potential of pulp tissue including vasculogenesis and odontoblastic differentiation was also compared using an ectopic tooth transplantation model. Basic fibroblast growth factor was similar to G-CSF in high migration, proliferation and anti-apoptotic effects and angiogenic and neurite outgrowth stimulatory activities in vitro. There was no significant difference between bFGF and G-CSF in the regenerative potential in vivo. The potential utility of bFGF for pulp regeneration is demonstrated as a homing/migration factor similar to the influence of G-CSF. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Cytomegalovirus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes can be efficiently expanded from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized hemopoietic progenitor cell products ex vivo and safely transferred to stem cell transplantation recipients to facilitate immune reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Leighton E; Blyth, Emily; Simms, Renee M; Micklethwaite, Kenneth P; Ma, Chun-Kei K; Burgess, Jane S; Antonenas, Vicki; Shaw, Peter J; Gottlieb, David J

    2013-05-01

    Uncontrolled cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation causes significant morbidity and mortality. Adoptive transfer of CMV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is a promising therapy to treat reactivation and prevent viral disease. In this article, we describe the generation of clinical-grade CMV-specific CTLs directly from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized hemopoietic progenitor cell (G-HPC) products collected for transplantation. This method requires less than 2.5% of a typical G-HPC product to reproducibly expand CMV-specific CTLs ex vivo. Comparison of 11 CMV CTL lines generated from G-HPC products with 52 CMV CTL lines generated from nonmobilized peripheral blood revealed similar expansion kinetics and phenotype. G-HPC-derived CTLs produced IFN-γ after reexposure to CMVpp65 antigen and exhibited CMV-directed cytotoxicity but no alloreactivity against transplantation recipient-derived cells. Seven patients received CMV-specific CTL lines expanded from G-HPC products in a prophylactic adoptive immunotherapy phase I/II clinical trial. Use of G-HPC products will facilitate integration of CTL generation into established quality systems of transplantation centers and more rapid inclusion of T cell therapies into routine clinical care. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. NF-κB is involved in brain repair by stem cell factor and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lili; Duchamp, Nicolas S; Boston, Dakota J; Ren, Xuefang; Zhang, Xiangjian; Hu, Heng; Zhao, Li-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stroke is the phase of brain recovery and repair generally beginning 3 months after stroke onset. No pharmaceutical approach is currently available to enhance brain repair in chronic stroke. We have previously determined the therapeutic effects of stem cell factor (SCF) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) alone or in combination (SCF+G-CSF) in an animal model of chronic stroke and demonstrated that only SCF+G-CSF induces long-term functional recovery. However, the mechanism underlying the SCF+G-CSF-induced brain repair in chronic stroke remains largely elusive. In the present study, we determined the role of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in neurovascular network remodeling and motor function improvement by SCF+G-CSF treatment in chronic stroke. SCF+G-CSF was subcutaneously administered for 7 days beginning 17 weeks after induction of experimental stroke. To inhibit NF-κB activation, NF-κB inhibitor was infused into the brain before SCF+G-CSF treatment. We observed that NF-κB inhibitor abolished the SCF+G-CSF-induced axonal sprouting, synaptogenesis and angiogenesis in the ipsilesional somatosensorimotor cortex. In addition, blockage of NF-κB activation resulted in elimination of the SCF+G-CSF-induced motor functional restoration in chronic stroke. These data suggest that NF-κB is required for the SCF+G-CSF-induced neuron-vascular network remodeling in the ipsilesional somatosensorimotor cortex and motor functional recovery in chronic stroke. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effect of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor on Immune-Modulatory Cytokines in the Bone Marrow Microenvironment and Mesenchymal Stem Cells of Healthy Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok Bozkaya, Ikbal; Azik, Fatih; Tavil, Betul; Koksal, Yasin; Ozguner, Meltem; Tunc, Bahattin; Uckan Cetinkaya, Duygu

    2015-11-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is sometimes administered to donors before bone marrow (BM) harvest. G-CSF-primed (G-BM) and unprimed BM (U-BM)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were obtained from 16 healthy donors and were expanded in vitro. Their proliferative characteristics, morphology, and differentiation capacity were examined. Supernatants of the second passage of MSCs were evaluated for transforming growth factor β1, hepatocyte growth factor, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels and compared with controls. The analyses of cytokines in the G-BM- and U-BM-derived MSCs supernatants revealed that PGE2 levels were significantly lower in the G-CSF-primed samples. These cytokines were also measured in BM plasma. The level of hepatocyte growth factor in G-BM plasma was significantly increased. The current study is the first to show the effects of G-CSF on the BM microenvironment of healthy human donors. The preliminary data suggest that G-BM- and U-BM-derived MSCs have similar morphologic/phenotypic properties and differentiation capacity but differ in their secretory capacity. Significant changes in cytokine levels of BM plasma in G-CSF-primed donors were also demonstrated. These findings suggest that BM MSCs and changes in the BM microenvironment may contribute to the effects of G-CSF on inflammation and immunomodulation. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluating the effects of buffer conditions and extremolytes on thermostability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor using high-throughput screening combined with design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablinger, Elisabeth; Hellweger, Monika; Leitgeb, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    In this study, we combined a high-throughput screening method, differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), with design of experiments (DoE) methodology to evaluate the effects of several formulation components on the thermostability of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). First we performed a primary buffer screening where we tested thermal stability of G-CSF in different buffers, pH values and buffer concentrations. The significance of each factor and the two-way interactions between them were studied by multivariable regression analysis. pH was identified as most critical factor regarding thermal stability. The most stabilizing buffer, sodium glutamate, and sodium acetate were determined for further investigations. Second we tested the effect of 6 naturally occurring extremolytes (trehalose, sucrose, ectoine, hydroxyectoine, sorbitol, mannitol) on the thermal stability of G-CSF, using a central composite circumscribed design. At low pH (3.8) and low buffer concentration (5 mM) all extremolytes led to a significant increase in thermal stability except the addition of ectoine which resulted in a strong destabilization of G-CSF. Increasing pH and buffer concentration led to an increase in thermal stability with all investigated extremolytes. The described systematic approach allowed to create a ranking of stabilizing extremolytes at different buffer conditions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Graft monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cell content predicts the risk of acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic transplantation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendramin, Antonio; Gimondi, Silvia; Bermema, Anisa; Longoni, Paolo; Rizzitano, Sara; Corradini, Paolo; Carniti, Cristiana

    2014-12-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are powerful immunomodulatory cells that in mice play a role in infectious and inflammatory disorders, including acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Their relevance in clinical acute GVHD is poorly known. We analyzed whether granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration, used to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells, affected the frequency of MDSCs in the peripheral blood stem cell grafts of 60 unrelated donors. In addition, we evaluated whether the MDSC content in the peripheral blood stem cell grafts affected the occurrence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing unrelated donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Systemic treatment with G-CSF induces an expansion of myeloid cells displaying the phenotype of monocytic MDSCs (Lin(low/neg)HLA-DR(-)CD11b(+)CD33(+)CD14(+)) with the ability to suppress alloreactive T cells in vitro, therefore meeting the definition of MDSCs. Monocytic MDSC dose was the only graft parameter to predict acute GVHD. The cumulative incidence of acute GVHD at 180 days after transplantation for recipients receiving monocytic MDSC doses below and above the median was 63% and 22%, respectively (P = .02). The number of monocytic MDSCs infused did not impact the relapse rate or the transplant-related mortality rate (P > .05). Although further prospective studies involving larger sample size are needed to validate the exact monocytic MDSC graft dose that protects from acute GVHD, our results strongly suggest the modulation of G-CSF might be used to affect monocytic MDSCs graft cell doses for prevention of acute GVHD. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rG-CSF) in the management of neutropenia induced by anthracyclines and ifosfamide in patients with soft tissue sarcomas (NEUSAR).

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    Bongiovanni, Alberto; Monti, Manuela; Foca, Flavia; Recine, Federica; Riva, Nada; Di Iorio, Valentina; Liverani, Chiara; De Vita, Alessandro; Miserocchi, Giacomo; Mercatali, Laura; Amadori, Dino; Ibrahim, Toni

    2017-01-01

    Anthracycline and ifosfamide-based chemotherapy represents a widely used regimen both in early and advanced settings in soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Prophylaxis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) reduces the severity of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of biosimilar G-CSF in these patients. Between 2003 and 2013, 67 patients with soft tissue tumors under epirubicin and ifosfamide (EI) treatment receiving biosimilar filgrastim (Zarzio®), originator filgrastim (Granulokine®, Neupogen®), and lenograstim (only originator Myelostim®) as primary prophylaxis for a total of 260 cycles of therapy were retrospectively analyzed. Baseline patient characteristics were summarized in a propensity score (PS). The incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) was 44.0 % in biosimilar filgrastim, 40.0 % in originator filgrastim, and 45.5 % in the lenograstim groups (p = 0.935). All grade and G4 neutropenia were similar in the three groups with the same safety profile. The use of biosimilar filgrastim achieved cost savings of €225.25 over originator filgrastim and €262.00 over lenograstim. Biosimilar G-CSF was effective in preventing FN and in reducing the need for hospitalization in STS patients undergoing EI treatment. It also proved comparable to its reference products from both a clinical and cost-effective standpoint.

  2. Immunomodulation Induced by Stem Cell Mobilization and Harvesting in Healthy Donors: Increased Systemic Osteopontin Levels after Treatment with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor.

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    Melve, Guro Kristin; Ersvaer, Elisabeth; Akkök, Çiğdem Akalın; Ahmed, Aymen Bushra; Kristoffersen, Einar K; Hervig, Tor; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-07-19

    Peripheral blood stem cells from healthy donors mobilized by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and harvested by leukapheresis are commonly used for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The frequency of severe graft versus host disease is similar for patients receiving peripheral blood and bone marrow allografts, even though the blood grafts contain more T cells, indicating mobilization-related immunoregulatory effects. The regulatory phosphoprotein osteopontin was quantified in plasma samples from healthy donors before G-CSF treatment, after four days of treatment immediately before and after leukapheresis, and 18-24 h after apheresis. Myeloma patients received chemotherapy, combined with G-CSF, for stem cell mobilization and plasma samples were prepared immediately before, immediately after, and 18-24 h after leukapheresis. G-CSF treatment of healthy stem cell donors increased plasma osteopontin levels, and a further increase was seen immediately after leukapheresis. The pre-apheresis levels were also increased in myeloma patients compared to healthy individuals. Finally, in vivo G-CSF exposure did not alter T cell expression of osteopontin ligand CD44, and in vitro osteopontin exposure induced only small increases in anti-CD3- and anti-CD28-stimulated T cell proliferation. G-CSF treatment, followed by leukapheresis, can increase systemic osteopontin levels, and this effect may contribute to the immunomodulatory effects of G-CSF treatment.

  3. Administration of recombinant human granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor does not induce long-lasting detectable epigenetic alterations in healthy donors.

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    Leitner, Gerda C; Faschingbauer, Martin; Wenda, Sabine; Weigel, Günter; Fischer, Gottfried

    2014-12-01

    The short-term safety profile of recombinant human granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (rHuG-CSF) in the allogeneic stem cell setting seems acceptable; only few data on long-term safety are available. To further study possible epigenetic alterations, we investigated prospectively the influence of rHuG-CSF on DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and on changes in DNA methylation of candidate genes in peripheral blood cells of healthy unrelated stem cell donors within an observation period of 1 year. In this study, 20 stem cell donors (14 male/six female; median age, 40 years; range, 22-54 years) and 20 sex- and age-matched blood component donors (controls) were included. Sampling was performed before rHuG-CSF administration; at the time of donation; and on Days (+1), 7, 30, 100, 180, and 360 in both groups. Analysis of DNMT activity in nuclear extracts was performed using a modified radionuclide assay. We performed methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction to detect the methylation status of promoter CpG islands of the genes of the retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR-B) and the Ras association domain family 1A (RASSF1A). DNMT activity increased significantly on the day of donation and 1 day after (p healthy stem cell donors. © 2014 AABB.

  4. The use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor induced mobilization for isolation of dental pulp stem cells with high regenerative potential.

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    Murakami, Masashi; Horibe, Hiroshi; Iohara, Koichiro; Hayashi, Yuki; Osako, Yohei; Takei, Yoshifumi; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Motoyama, Noboru; Kurita, Kenichi; Nakashima, Misako

    2013-12-01

    Human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) contain subsets of progenitor/stem cells with high angiogenic, neurogenic and regenerative potential useful for cell therapy. It is essential to develop a safe and efficacious method to isolate the clinical-grade DPSCs subsets from a small amount of pulp tissue without using conventional flow cytometry. Thus, a method for isolation of DPSCs subsets based on their migratory response to optimized concentration of 100 ng/ml of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was determined in this study. The DPSCs mobilized by G-CSF (MDPSCs) were enriched for CD105, C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR-4) and G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) positive cells, demonstrating stem cell properties including high proliferation rate and stability. The absence of abnormalities/aberrations in karyotype and lack of tumor formation after transplantation in an immunodeficient mouse were demonstrated. The conditioned medium of MDPSCs exhibited anti-apoptotic activity, enhanced migration and immunomodulatory properties. Furthermore, transplantation of MDPSCs accelerated vasculogenesis in an ischemic hindlimb model and augmented regenerated pulp tissue in an ectopic tooth root model compared to that of colony-derived DPSCs, indicating higher regenerative potential of MDPSCs. In conclusion, this isolation method for DPSCs subsets is safe and efficacious, having utility for potential clinical applications to autologous cell transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effect of Recombinant Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor on Oral and Periodontal Manifestations in a Patient with Cyclic Neutropenia: A Case Report

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    Sergio Matarasso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic Neutropenia (CN is characterized by recurrent infections, fever, oral ulcerations, and severe periodontitis as result of the reduced host defences. The previous studies have established the effectiveness of recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF to increase the number and the function of neutrophils in the peripheral blood in this disease. In a 20-year-old Caucasian female with a diagnosis of cyclic neutropenia, oral clinical examination revealed multiple painful ulcerations of the oral mucosa, poor oral hygiene conditions, marginal gingivitis, and moderate periodontitis. The patient received a treatment with G-CSF (Pegfilgrastim, 6 mg/month in order to improve her immunological status. Once a month nonsurgical periodontal treatment was carefully performed when absolute neutrophil count (ANC was ≥500/L. The treatment with G-CSF resulted in a rapid increase of circulating neutrophils that, despite its short duration, leaded to a reduction in infection related events and the resolution of the multiple oral ulcerations. The disappearance of oral pain allowed an efficacy nonsurgical treatment and a normal tooth brushing that determined a reduction of probing depth (PD≤4 mm and an improvement of the oral hygiene conditions recorded at 6-month follow-up.

  6. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Increases Cerebral Blood Flow via a NO Surge Mediated by Akt/eNOS Pathway to Reduce Ischemic Injury

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    Hock-Kean Liew

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF protects brain from ischemic/reperfusion (I/R injury, and inhibition of nitric oxide (NO synthases partially reduces G-CSF protection. We thus further investigated the effects of G-CSF on ischemia-induced NO production and its consequence on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF and neurological deficit. Endothelin-1 (ET-1 microinfused above middle cerebral artery caused a rapid reduction of rCBF (ischemia which lasted for 30 minutes and was followed by a gradual recovery of blood flow (reperfusion within the striatal region. Regional NO concentration increased rapidly (NO surge during ischemia and recovered soon to the baseline. G-CSF increased rCBF resulting in shorter ischemic duration and an earlier onset of reperfusion. The enhancement of the ischemia-induced NO by G-CSF accompanied by elevation of phospho-Akt and phospho-eNOS was noted, suggesting an activation of Akt/eNOS. I/R-induced infarct volume and neurological deficits were also reduced by G-CSF treatment. Inhibition of NO synthesis by L-NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME significantly reduced the effects of G-CSF on rCBF, NO surge, infarct volume, and neurological deficits. We conclude that G-CSF increases rCBF through a NO surge mediated by Akt/eNOS, which partially contributes to the beneficial effect of G-CSF on brain I/R injury.

  7. High pH solubilization and chromatography-based renaturation and purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor from inclusion bodies.

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    Li, Ming; Fan, Hua; Liu, Jiahua; Wang, Minhong; Wang, Lili; Wang, Chaozhan

    2012-03-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) is a very efficient therapeutic protein drug which has been widely used in human clinics to treat cancer patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. In this study, rhG-CSF was solubilized from inclusion bodies by using a high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea. It was found that solubilization of the rhG-CSF inclusion bodies greatly depended on the buffer pH employed; alkalic pH significantly favored the solubilization. In addition, when small amount of urea was added to the solution at high pH, the solubilization was further enhanced. After solubilization, the rhG-CSF was renatured with simultaneous purification by using weak anion exchange, strong anion exchange, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, separately. The results indicated that the rhG-CSF solubilized by the high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea had much higher mass recovery than the one solubilized by 8 M urea when using anyone of the three refolding methods employed in this work. In the case of weak anion exchange chromatography, the high pH solubilized rhG-CSF could get a mass recovery of 73%. The strategy of combining solubilization of inclusion bodies at high pH with refolding of protein using liquid chromatography may become a routine method for protein production from inclusion bodies.

  8. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) Accelerates Wound Healing in Hemorrhagic Shock Rats by Enhancing Angiogenesis and Attenuating Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hong; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Jiejie; Hao, Haojie; Jiang, Chaoguang; Han, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    Background Following severe trauma, treatment of cutaneous injuries is often delayed by inadequate blood supply. The aim of the present study was to determine whether granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) protects endothelial cells (ECs) and enhances angiogenesis in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock (HS) combined with cutaneous injury after resuscitation. Material/Methods The HS rats with full-thickness defects were resuscitated and randomly divided into a G-CSF group (200 μg/kg body weight), a normal saline group, and a blank control group. Histological staining was to used estimate the recovery and apoptosis of skin. Apoptosis- and angiogenesis-related factors were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot (WB). Scratch assay, tube formation, and WB experiments were performed to verify the functional effects of G-CSF on HUVECs in vitro. Results H&E staining and Masson trichrome staining showed earlier inflammation resolution and collagen synthesis in the G-CSF-treated group. Angiogenesis-related factors were elevated at mRNA and protein levels. TUNEL staining suggested fewer apoptotic cells in the G-CSF group. The apoptotic-related factors were down-regulated and anti-apoptotic factors were up-regulated in the G-CSF-treated group. Scratch assay and tube formation experiments revealed that G-CSF facilitated migration ability and angiogenic potential of HUVECs. The angiogenic and anti-apoptotic effects were also enhanced in vitro. Conclusions Our results suggest that G-CSF after resuscitation attenuates local apoptosis and accelerates angiogenesis. These findings hold great promise for improving therapy for cutaneous injury in severe trauma and ischemia diseases. PMID:28559534

  9. Dexamethasone promotes granulocyte mobilization by prolonging the half-life of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor in healthy donors for granulocyte transfusions.

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    Hiemstra, Ida H; van Hamme, John L; Janssen, Machiel H; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2017-03-01

    Granulocyte transfusion (GTX) is a potential approach to correcting neutropenia and relieving the increased risk of infection in patients who are refractory to antibiotics. To mobilize enough granulocytes for transfusion, healthy donors are premedicated with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and dexamethasone. Granulocytes have a short circulatory half-life. Consequently, patients need to receive GTX every other day to keep circulating granulocyte counts at an acceptable level. We investigated whether plasma from premedicated donors was capable of prolonging neutrophil survival and, if so, which factor could be held responsible. The effects of plasma from G-CSF/dexamethasone-treated donors on neutrophil survival were assessed by annexin-V, CD16. and CXCR4 staining and nuclear morphology. We isolated an albumin-bound protein using α-chymotrypsin and albumin-depletion and further characterized it using protein analysis. The effects of dexamethasone and G-CSF were assessed using mifepristone and G-CSF-neutralizing antibody. G-CSF plasma concentrations were determined by Western blot and Luminex analyses. G-CSF/dexamethasone plasma contained a survival-promoting factor for at least 2 days. This factor was recognized as an albumin-associated protein and was identified as G-CSF itself, which was surprising considering its reported half-life of only 4.5 hours. Compared with coadministration of dexamethasone, administration of G-CSF alone to the same GTX donors led to a faster decline in circulating G-CSF levels, whereas dexamethasone itself did not induce any G-CSF, demonstrating a role for dexamethasone in increasing G-CSF half-life. Dexamethasone increases granulocyte yield upon coadministration with G-CSF by extending G-CSF half-life. This observation might also be exploited in the coadministration of dexamethasone with other recombinant proteins to modulate their half-life. © 2016 AABB.

  10. OK-432 reduces mortality and bacterial translocation in irradiated and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-treated mice

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    Nose, Masako; Uzawa, Akiko; Ogyu, Toshiaki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Gen

    2001-06-01

    Acute radiation induces bacterial translocation from the gut, followed by systemic infection and sepsis. In order to reduce the mortality after acute whole body irradiation, it is essential to control bacterial translocation. In this study, we established a bacterial translocation assay as a sensitive method to detect minor mucosal injury by radiation. By utilizing this assay, we evaluated the adverse effects, if any, of hematopoietic reagents on the mucosal integrity in the respiratory and gastro-intestinal tracts. Bacterial translocation to the liver and spleen occurred after whole-body irradiation if the dose exceeded 6 Gy. The administration of G-CSF unexpectedly increased the bacterial translocation in 8 Gy-irradiated mice. The pharmaceutical preparation of low-virulent Streptococcus pyogenes, OK-432, significantly reduced the endotoxin levels in peripheral blood without any reduction of bacterial translocation. A combined treatment with G-CSF and OK-432 decreased bacterial translocation and prevented death. This result indicates that the early administration of G-CSF has an adverse effect on bacterial translocation, and that a combined treatment of G-CSF and OK-432 attenuates the adverse effect of G-CSF and improves the survival rate after acute irradiation. (author)

  11. Adjuvant Docetaxel and Cyclophosphamide (DC with prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF on days 8 &12 in breast cancer patients: a retrospective analysis.

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    Rinat Yerushalmi

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Four cycles of docetaxel/cyclophosphamide (DC resulted in superior survival than doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide in the treatment of early breast cancer. The original study reported a 5% incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN recommending prophylactic antibiotics with no granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF support. The worldwide adoption of this protocol yielded several reports on substantially higher rates of FN events. We explored the use of growth factor (GF support on days 8 and 12 of the cycle with the original DC protocol. METHODS: Our study included all consecutive patients with stages I-II breast cancer who were treated with the DC protocol at the Institute of Oncology, Davidoff Center (Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel from April, 2007 to March, 2012. Patient, tumor characteristics, and toxicity were reported. RESULTS: In total, 123 patients received the DC regimen. Median age was 60 years, (range, 25-81 years. Thirty-three patients (26.8% were aged 65 years and older. Most of the women (87% adhered to the planned G-CSF protocol (days 8 &12. 96% of the patients completed the 4 planned cycles of chemotherapy. Six patients (5% had dose reductions, 6 (5% had treatment delays due to non-medical reasons. Thirteen patients (10.6% experienced at least one event of FN (3 patients had 2 events, all requiring hospitalization. Eight patients (6.5% required additional support with G-CSF after the first chemotherapy cycle, 7 because of FN and one due to neutropenia and diarrhea. IN CONCLUSION: Primary prophylactic G-CSF support on days 8 and 12 of the cycle provides a tolerable option to deliver the DC protocol. Our results are in line with other retrospective protocols using longer schedules of GF support.

  12. Platelet lysate and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor serve safe and accelerated expansion of human bone marrow stromal cells for stroke therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Saito, Hisayasu; Ito, Masaki; Shichinohe, Hideo; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Autologous human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) should be expanded in the animal serum-free condition within clinically relevant periods in order to secure safe and effective cell therapy for ischemic stroke. This study was aimed to assess whether the hBMSCs enhance their proliferation capacity and provide beneficial effect in the infarct brain when cultured with platelet lysate (PL) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). The hBMSCs were cultured in the fetal calf serum (FCS)-, PL-, or PL/G-CSF-containing medium. Cell growth kinetics was analyzed. The hBMSCs-PL, hBMSC-PL/G-CSF, or vehicle was stereotactically transplanted into the ipsilateral striatum of the rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion 7 days after the insult. Motor function was assessed for 8 weeks, and the fate of transplanted hBMSCs was examined using immunohistochemistry. As the results, the hBMSCs-PL/G-CSF showed more enhanced proliferation than the hBMSCs-FCS and hBMSCs-PL. Transplantation of hBMSCs expanded with the PL- or PL/G-CSF-containing medium equally promoted functional recovery compared with the vehicle group. Histological analysis revealed that there were no significant differences in their migration, survival, and neural differentiation in the infarct brain between the hBMSCs-PL and hBMSCs-PL/G-CSF. These findings strongly suggest that the combination of PL and G-CSF may accelerate hBMSC expansion and serve safe cell therapy for patients with ischemic stroke at clinically relevant timing.

  13. Effects of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor on Opsonin Receptor Expression and Neutrophil Antibacterial Activity in a Mouse Model of Severe Acute Pancreatitis

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    Tuo Hong-Fang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial function of neutrophils, which is dependent on opsonin receptors, deteriorates in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF putatively enhanced levels of the opsonin receptors CD11b and CD32/16 in healthy human subjects, and provided protection against infection in animal models of SAP. A statistically convincing study of the effect of G-CSF on CD32/16 expression in an SAP model is lacking. We used a mouse model of SAP to investigate the association between G-CSF administration and CD32/16 levels on neutrophils and bacterial translocation. G-CSF or saline was subcutaneously injected into SAP-induced mice. The pancreases were histologically examined, and leukocytes were stained to count neutrophils. The expression of CD11b and CD32/16 on neutrophils was measured by flow cytometry, and bacterial translocation was observed by bacterial culture.The numbers of CD11b and CD32/16-positive neutrophils were significantly elevated in the SAP mice treated with G-CSF, and the mean fluorescence intensities of these receptors on neutrophils were significantly elevated. Bacterial translocations to cavity organs were suppressed from 17% to 6% by G-CSF treatment. Our results indicated that the number of neutrophils significantly increased with increasing expression of CD11b and CD32/16 and their mean fluorescence intensities (MFIs. This inhibited bacterial translocation to other organs. These results are in accord with other studies in SAP dogs and SAP mice. Our findings suggest that G-CSF was effective in protecting against bacterial infection in SAP mice.

  14. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapy improves survival in patients with hepatitis B virus-associated acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xue-Zhang; Liu, Fang-Fang; Tong, Jing-Jing; Yang, Hao-Zhen; Chen, Jing; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Mao, Yuan-Li; Xin, Shao-Jie; Hu, Jin-Hua

    2013-02-21

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). Fifty-five patients with HBV-associated ACLF were randomized into two groups: the treatment group and the control group. Twenty-seven patients in the treatment group received G-CSF (5 μg/kg per day, six doses) treatment plus standard therapy, and 28 patients in the control group received standard therapy only. The peripheral CD34(+) cell count was measured consecutively by flow cytometry. Circulating white blood cell count, biochemical parameters, and other clinical data of these patients were recorded and analyzed. All patients were followed up for a period of 3 mo to evaluate the changes in liver function and survival rate. The peripheral neutrophil and CD34(+) cell counts in the G-CSF group increased on day 3 from the onset of therapy, continued to rise on day 7, and remained elevated on day 15 compared to those of the control group. Child-Turcotte-Pugh score of patients in the treatment group was improved on day 30 from the onset of G-CSF therapy, compared to that in the controls (P = 0.041). Model for End-Stage of Liver Disease score of patients in the treatment group was improved on day 7 (P = 0.004) and remained high on day 30 from the onset of G-CSF therapy (P liver function and the survival rate of these patients.

  15. Relationship between native-state solubility and non-native aggregation of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor: practical implications for protein therapeutic development.

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    Banks, Douglas D; Zhang, Jun; Siska, Christine C

    2014-10-06

    Prescreening methods are needed in the biotechnology industry for rapid selection of protein therapeutic candidates and formulations of low aggregation propensity. In recent reports solubility measurements have shown promise as one such method, although the connection between protein solubility and non-native aggregation is not well understood. In the present investigation, recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhGCSF) was used to explore this relationship since it was previously shown to rapidly undergo non-native aggregation/precipitation under physiological conditions in a reaction attenuated by the addition of sucrose [Krishnan, S.; et al. Biochemistry 2002, 41, 6422-6431]. Strong correlations were found between rhGCSF non-native aggregation and both solubility and thermal stability as a function of sucrose concentration. We believe these results make sense in the context of an rhGCSF aggregation mechanism where loss of monomer to insoluble aggregate is limited by association to an observable dimer from a less soluble (and aggregation competent) intermediate species that exists in a temperature sensitive pre-equilibrium with the native monomer. Both solubility and measures of conformational stability report on the position of this equilibrium and therefore the concentration of reactive intermediate. Interestingly, aggregation also correlated with rhGCSF solubility as a function of salting-in concentrations of phosphate since both are dependent on the colloidal stability of the reactive intermediate but not with conformational stability. In lieu of a complete understanding of the aggregation processes that limit protein therapeutic shelf life, these results highlight the potential of using simple solubility measurements as an additional tool in the biotechnology prescreening repertoire.

  16. Transplanted Peripheral Blood Stem Cells Mobilized by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Promoted Hindlimb Functional Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury in Mice.

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    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Koda, Masao; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Sakuma, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Kei; Okawa, Akihiko; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Mannoji, Chikato

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) derived from bone marrow. We hypothesized that intraspinal transplantation of PBSCs mobilized by G-CSF could promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury. Spinal cords of adult nonobese diabetes/severe immunodeficiency mice were injured using an Infinite Horizon impactor (60 kdyn). One week after the injury, 3.0 µl of G-CSF-mobilized human mononuclear cells (MNCs; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), G-CSF-mobilized human CD34-positive PBSCs (CD34; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), or normal saline was injected to the lesion epicenter. We performed immunohistochemistry. Locomotor recovery was assessed by Basso Mouse Scale. The number of transplanted human cells decreased according to the time course. The CD31-positive area was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups compared with the vehicle group. The number of serotonin-positive fibers was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups than in the vehicle group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of apoptotic oligodendrocytes was significantly smaller in cell-transplanted groups, and the areas of demyelination in the MNC- and CD34-transplanted mice were smaller than that in the vehicle group, indicating that cell transplantation suppressed oligodendrocyte apoptosis and demyelination. Both the MNC and CD34 groups showed significantly better hindlimb functional recovery compared with the vehicle group. There was no significant difference between the two types of transplanted cells. Intraspinal transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized MNCs or CD34-positive cells promoted angiogenesis, serotonergic fiber regeneration/sparing, and preservation of myelin, resulting in improved hindlimb function after spinal cord injury in comparison with vehicle-treated control mice. Transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized PBSCs has advantages for treatment of spinal cord injury in the ethical and immunological viewpoints, although further exploration

  17. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF protects oligodendrocyte and promotes hindlimb functional recovery after spinal cord injury in rats.

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    Ryo Kadota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF is a protein that stimulates differentiation, proliferation, and survival of cells in the granulocytic lineage. Recently, a neuroprotective effect of G-CSF was reported in a model of cerebral infarction and we previously reported the same effect in studies of murine spinal cord injury (SCI. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the potential therapeutic effect of G-CSF for SCI in rats. METHODS: Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the present study. Contusive SCI was introduced using the Infinite Horizon Impactor (magnitude: 200 kilodyne. Recombinant human G-CSF (15.0 µg/kg was administered by tail vein injection at 1 h after surgery and daily the next four days. The vehicle control rats received equal volumes of normal saline at the same time points. RESULTS: Using a contusive SCI model to examine the neuroprotective potential of G-CSF, we found that G-CSF suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-1 beta and TNF- alpha in mRNA and protein levels. Histological assessment with luxol fast blue staining revealed that the area of white matter spared in the injured spinal cord was significantly larger in G-CSF-treated rats. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that G-CSF promoted up-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-Xl on oligpodendrocytes and suppressed apoptosis of oligodendrocytes after SCI. Moreover, administration of G-CSF promoted better functional recovery of hind limbs. CONCLUSIONS: G-CSF protects oligodendrocyte from SCI-induced cell death via the suppression of inflammatory cytokines and up-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein. As a result, G-CSF attenuates white matter loss and promotes hindlimb functional recovery.

  18. Four-Week Repeated Intravenous Dose Toxicity and Toxicokinetic Study of TS-DP2, a Novel Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor in Rats.

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    Lee, JooBuom; Lee, Kyungsun; Choe, Keunbum; Jung, Hyunseob; Cho, Hyunseok; Choi, Kiseok; Kim, Taegon; Kim, Seojin; Lee, Hyeong-Seok; Cha, Mi-Jin; Song, Si-Whan; Lee, Chul Kyu; Chun, Gie-Taek

    2015-12-01

    TS-DP2 is a recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) manufactured by TS Corporation. We conducted a four-week study of TS-DP2 (test article) in repeated intravenous doses in male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Lenograstim was used as a reference article and was administered intravenously at a dose of 1000 μg/kg/day. Rats received TS-DP2 intravenously at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 μg/kg/day once daily for 4 weeks, and evaluated following a 2-week recovery period. Edema in the hind limbs and loss of mean body weight and body weight gain were observed in both the highest dose group of TS-DP2 and the lenograstim group in male rats. Fibro-osseous lesions were observed in the lenograstim group in both sexes, and at all groups of TS-DP2 in males, and at doses of TS-DP2 500 μg/kg/day and higher in females. The lesion was considered a toxicological change. Therefore, bone is the primary toxicological target of TS-DP2. The lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) in males was 250 μg/kg/day, and no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) in females was 250 μg/kg/day in this study. In the toxicokinetic study, the serum concentrations of G-CSF were maintained until 8 hr after administration. The systemic exposures (AUC0-24h and C0) were not markedly different between male and female rats, between the administration periods, or between TS-DP2 and lenograstim. In conclusion, TS-DP2 shows toxicological similarity to lenograstim over 4-weeks of repeated doses in rats.

  19. Effect of combination therapy using hypothermia and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in a rat transient middle cerebral artery occlusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahari, Laya; Safari, Manouchehr; Joghataei, Mohamad Taghi; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Soleimani, Mansoureh

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death. Hypothermia has been recognized as an effective method in reducing brain injury. In this study, we assessed the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) as a neuroprotective agent and mild hypothermia on mortality, behavioral function, infarct volume, and brain edema in Wistar rats. Forty male rats were used in five groups (eight rats in each group): control, hypothermy, G-CSF, combination hypothermy + CSF, and sham. Rats were anesthetized by injection of chloral hydrate (400 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. Transient cerebral ischemia was induced by 60-min intraluminal occlusion of left middle cerebral artery. Hypothermia, initiated at the time of reperfusion and G-CSF was started one hour after reperfusion at a dose of 15 mg/kg subcutaneously. The motor behavior was measured using Garcia's index and animals were assigned for the assessments of infarction, brain swelling, and mortality rate. The mortality was 38.46% (control group) and reduced in other groups. Neurological deficit score of control group (40.31 ± 1.56) was significantly lower than in treatment groups. The total cerebral infarct volume of treatment group was significantly lower than control group (43.96 ± 44.05 mm3). Treatment with hypothermy plus G-CSF (2.69 ± 0.24%) could significantly reduce brain swelling volume than other treatment groups. Our major finding is that mild hypothermic treatment plus G-CSF significantly reduced mortality rate and edema and improved neurological function. The results suggest that the combination of hypothermia and G-CSF is more effectively than other treatment groups being used alone.

  20. Direct anti-inflammatory effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on activation and functional properties of human T cell subpopulations in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malashchenko, Vladimir Vladimirovich; Meniailo, Maxsim Evgenievich; Shmarov, Viacheslav Anatolievich; Gazatova, Natalia Dinislamovna; Melashchenko, Olga Borisovna; Goncharov, Andrei Gennadievich; Seledtsova, Galina Victorovna; Seledtsov, Victor Ivanovich

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the direct effects of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on functionality of human T-cell subsets. CD3 + T-lymphocytes were isolated from blood of healthy donors by positive magnetic separation. T cell activation with particles conjugated with antibodies (Abs) to human CD3, CD28 and CD2 molecules increased the proportion of cells expressing G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR, CD114) in all T cell subpopulations studied (CD45RA + /CD197 + naive T cells, CD45RA - /CD197 + central memory T cells, CD45RA - /CD197 - effector memory T cells and CD45RA + /CD197 - terminally differentiated effector T cells). Upon T-cell activation in vitro, G-CSF (10.0 ng/ml) significantly and specifically enhanced the proportion of CD114 + T cells in central memory CD4 + T cell compartment. A dilution series of G-CSF (range, 0.1-10.0 ng/ml) was tested, with no effect on the expression of CD25 (interleukin-2 receptor α-chain) on activated T cells. Meanwhile, G-CSF treatment enhanced the proportion of CD38 + T cells in CD4 + naïve T cell, effector memory T cell and terminally differentiated effector T cell subsets, as well as in CD4 - central memory T cells and terminally differentiated effector T cells. G-CSF did not affect IL-2 production by T cells; relatively low concentrations of G-CSF down-regulated INF-γ production, while high concentrations of this cytokine up-regulated IL-4 production in activated T cells. The data obtained suggests that G-CSF could play a significant role both in preventing the development of excessive and potentially damaging inflammatory reactivity, and in constraining the expansion of potentially cytodestructive T cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Rejuvenation of aged pig facial skin by transplanting allogeneic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced peripheral blood stem cells from a young pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harn, Horng-Jyh; Huang, Mao-Hsuan; Huang, Chi-Ting; Lin, Po-Cheng; Yen, Ssu-Yin; Chou, Yi-Wen; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Chu, Hen-Yi; Chiou, Tzyy-Wen; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2013-01-01

    Following a stroke, the administration of stem cells that have been treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) can ameliorate functional deficits in both rats and humans. It is not known, however, whether the application of GCSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) to human skin can function as an antiaging treatment. We used a Lanyu pig (Sus scrofa) model, since compared with rodents, the structure of a pig's skin is very similar to human skin, to provide preliminary data on whether these cells can exert antiaging effects over a short time frame. GCSF-mobilized PBSCs from a young male Lanyu pig (5 months) were injected intradermally into the cheek skin of aged female Lanyu pigs, and tissues before and after the cell injections were compared to determine whether this treatment caused skin rejuvenation. Increased levels of collagen, elastin, hyaluronic acid, and the hyaluronic acid receptor CD44 were observed in both dermal and subcutaneous layers following the injection of PBSCs. In addition, the treated skin tissue was tighter and more elastic than adjacent control regions of aged skin tissue. In the epidermal layer, PBSC injection altered the levels of both involucrin and integrin, indicating an increased rate of epidermal cell renewal as evidenced by reductions in both cornified cells and cells of the spinous layers and increases in the number of dividing cells within the basal layer. We found that the exogenous PBSCs, visualized using fluorescence in situ hybridization, were located primarily in hair follicles and adjacent tissues. In summary, PBSC injection restored young skin properties in the skin of aged (90 months) pigs. On the basis of our preliminary data, we conclude that intradermal injection of GCSF-mobilized PBSCs from a young pig can rejuvenate the skin in aged pigs.

  2. Crystallization of a 2:2 complex of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) with the ligand-binding region of the GCSF receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honjo, Eijiro; Tamada, Taro; Maeda, Yoshitake [Pharmaceutical Research Laboratory, Kirin Brewery Co. Ltd, 3 Miyahara-cho, Takasaki 370-1295 (Japan); Koshiba, Takumi [Central Laboratories for Key Technology, Kirin Brewery Co. Ltd, 1-13-5 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Matsukura, Yasuko; Okamoto, Tomoyuki [Pharmaceutical Research Laboratory, Kirin Brewery Co. Ltd, 3 Miyahara-cho, Takasaki 370-1295 (Japan); Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Tokunaga, Masao [Laboratory of Applied Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Kuroki, Ryota, E-mail: r-kuroki@neutrons.tokai.jaeri.go.jp [Pharmaceutical Research Laboratory, Kirin Brewery Co. Ltd, 3 Miyahara-cho, Takasaki 370-1295 (Japan)

    2005-08-01

    A 2:2 complex of highly purified GCSF receptor (Ig-CRH) with GCSF was crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution with sufficient quality for further structure determination. The granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) receptor receives signals for regulating the maturation, proliferation and differentiation of the precursor cells of neutrophilic granulocytes. The signalling complex composed of two GCSFs (GCSF, 19 kDa) and two GCSF receptors (GCSFR, 34 kDa) consisting of an Ig-like domain and a cytokine-receptor homologous (CRH) domain was crystallized. A crystal of the complex was grown in 1.0 M sodium formate and 0.1 M sodium acetate pH 4.6 and belongs to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 (or its enantiomorph P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 110.1, c = 331.8 Å. Unfortunately, this crystal form did not diffract beyond 5 Å resolution. Since the heterogeneity of GCSF receptor appeared to prevent the growth of good-quality crystals, the GCSF receptor was fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography. Crystals of the GCSF–fractionated GCSF receptor complex were grown as a new crystal form in 0.2 M ammonium phosphate. This new crystal form diffracted to beyond 3.0 Å resolution and belonged to space group P3{sub 1}21 (or its enantiomorph P3{sub 2}21), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 134.8, c = 105.7 Å.

  3. Characterization of buffy coat-derived granulocytes for clinical use: a comparison with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor/dexamethasone-pretreated donor-derived products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Geer, A; Gazendam, R P; Tool, A T J; van Hamme, J L; de Korte, D; van den Berg, T K; Zeerleder, S S; Kuijpers, T W

    2017-02-01

    Buffy coat-derived granulocytes have been described as an alternative to the apheresis product from donors pretreated with dexamethasone and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The latter is - dependent on the local and national settings - obtained following a demanding and time-consuming procedure, which is undesirable in critically ill septic patients. In contrast, buffy coat-derived products have a large volume and are often heavily contaminated with red cells and platelets. We developed a new pooled buffy coat-derived product with high purity and small volume, and performed a comprehensive functional characterization of these granulocytes. We pooled ten buffy coats following the production of platelet concentrates. Saline 0·9% was added to decrease the viscosity and the product was split into plasma, red cells and a 'super' buffy coat. Functional data of the granulocytes were compared to those obtained with granulocytes from healthy controls and G-CSF/dexamethasone-pretreated donors. Buffy coat-derived granulocytes showed adhesion, chemotaxis, reactive oxygen species production, degranulation, NETosis and in vitro killing of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Aspergillus species comparable to control and G-CSF/dexamethasone-derived granulocytes. Candida killing was superior compared to G-CSF/dexamethasone-derived granulocytes. Immunophenotyping was normal; especially no signs of activation in the buffy coat-derived granulocytes were seen. Viability was reduced. Buffy coats are readily available in the regular blood production process and would take away the concerns around the apheresis product. The product described appears a promising alternative for transfusion purposes. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  4. The Multifaceted Effects of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in Immunomodulation and Potential Roles in Intestinal Immune Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Andrew; Han, Jiahuai; Kim, Sung O.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The three colony-stimulating factors, GM-CSF, M-CSF and G-CSF, have been regarded as immunostimulators due to their role in granulocyte and myeloid hematopoiesis and immune function. However, unlike GM-CSF and M-CSF, G-CSF possesses immunosuppressive effects on other immune cells including monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells and T lymphocytes when exogenously administered. Given the immunomodulatory effects of exogenous G-CSF, endogenous G-CSF may also play an important role in maintaining local immune homeostasis in tissue where it is highly and constitutively produced. This review highlights the potential role of G-CSF in immunomodulation and intestinal immune homeostasis. PMID:20681025

  5. Rapid engraftment by peripheral blood progenitor cells mobilized by recombinant human stem cell factor and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R G; Briddell, R A; Knitter, G H; Rowley, S D; Appelbaum, F R; McNiece, I K

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that administration of low-dose recombinant human stem cell factor (rhSCF) plus recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to baboons mobilizes greater numbers of progenitor cells in the blood than does administration of rhG-CSF alone. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether marrow repopulating cells are present in the blood of nonhuman primates administered low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF, and if present, whether these cells engraft lethally irradiated recipients as rapidly as blood cells mobilized by treatment with rhG-CSF alone. One group of baboons was administered low-dose rhSCF (25 micrograms/kg/d) plus rhG-CSF (100 micrograms/kg/d) while a second group received rhG-CSF alone (100 micrograms/kg/d). Each animal underwent a single 2-hour leukapheresis occurring the day when the number of progenitor cells per volume of blood was maximal. For baboons administered low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF, the leukapheresis products contained 1.8-fold more mononuclear cells and 14.0-fold more progenitor cells compared to the leukapheresis products from animals treated with rhG-CSF alone. All animals successfully engrafted after transplantation of cryopreserved autologous blood cells. In animals transplanted with low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF mobilized blood cells, we observed a time to a platelet count of > 20,000 was 8 days +/- 0, to a white blood cell count (WBC) of > 1,000 was 11 +/- 1 days, and to an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of > 500 was 12 +/- 1 days. These results compared with 42 +/- 12, 16 +/- 1, and 24 +/- 4 days to achieve platelets > 20,000, WBC > 1,000, and ANC > 500, respectively, for baboons transplanted with rhG-CSF mobilized blood cells. Animals transplanted with low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF mobilized blood cells had blood counts equivalent to pretransplant values within 3 weeks after transplant. The results suggest that the combination of low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF mobilizes greater numbers of

  6. Consensus on the use of neutrophil-stimulating hematopoietic growth factors in clinical practice : An international viewpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusthoven, JJ; deVries, EGE; Dale, DC; Piccart, M; Glaspy, J; Hamilton, A

    Hematopoietic growth factors (CSFs) are now available for use in patients with myelosuppression due to congenital, acquired and therapy-induced conditions. Variations in the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in

  7. Combination therapy of human umbilical cord blood cells and granulocyte colony stimulating factor reduces histopathological and motor impairments in an experimental model of chronic traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A Acosta

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is associated with neuro-inflammation, debilitating sensory-motor deficits, and learning and memory impairments. Cell-based therapies are currently being investigated in treating neurotrauma due to their ability to secrete neurotrophic factors and anti-inflammatory cytokines that can regulate the hostile milieu associated with chronic neuroinflammation found in TBI. In tandem, the stimulation and mobilization of endogenous stem/progenitor cells from the bone marrow through granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF poses as an attractive therapeutic intervention for chronic TBI. Here, we tested the potential of a combined therapy of human umbilical cord blood cells (hUCB and G-CSF at the acute stage of TBI to counteract the progressive secondary effects of chronic TBI using the controlled cortical impact model. Four different groups of adult Sprague Dawley rats were treated with saline alone, G-CSF+saline, hUCB+saline or hUCB+G-CSF, 7-days post CCI moderate TBI. Eight weeks after TBI, brains were harvested to analyze hippocampal cell loss, neuroinflammatory response, and neurogenesis by using immunohistochemical techniques. Results revealed that the rats exposed to TBI treated with saline exhibited widespread neuroinflammation, impaired endogenous neurogenesis in DG and SVZ, and severe hippocampal cell loss. hUCB monotherapy suppressed neuroinflammation, nearly normalized the neurogenesis, and reduced hippocampal cell loss compared to saline alone. G-CSF monotherapy produced partial and short-lived benefits characterized by low levels of neuroinflammation in striatum, DG, SVZ, and corpus callosum and fornix, a modest neurogenesis, and a moderate reduction of hippocampal cells loss. On the other hand, combined therapy of hUCB+G-CSF displayed synergistic effects that robustly dampened neuroinflammation, while enhancing endogenous neurogenesis and reducing hippocampal cell loss. Vigorous and long-lasting recovery of

  8. Five Days Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Treatment Increases Bone Formation and Reduces Gap Size of a Rat Segmental Bone Defect: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marietta Herrmann

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Bone is an organ with high natural regenerative capacity and most fractures heal spontaneously when appropriate fracture fixation is provided. However, additional treatment is required for patients with large segmental defects exceeding the endogenous healing potential and for patients suffering from fracture non-unions. These cases are often associated with insufficient vascularization. Transplantation of CD34+ endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs has been successfully applied to promote neovascularization of bone defects, however including extensive ex vivo manipulation of cells. Here, we hypothesized, that treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF may improve bone healing by mobilization of CD34+ progenitor cells into the circulation, which in turn may facilitate vascularization at the defect site. In this pilot study, we aimed to characterize the different cell populations mobilized by G-CSF and investigate the influence of cell mobilization on the healing of a critical size femoral defect in rats. Cell mobilization was investigated by flow cytometry at different time points after five consecutive daily G-CSF injections. In a pilot study, bone healing of a 4.5-mm critical femoral defect in F344 rats was compared between a saline-treated control group and a G-CSF treatment group. In vivo microcomputed tomography and histology were applied to compare bone formation in both treatment groups. Our data revealed that leukocyte counts show a peak increase at the first day after the last G-CSF injection. In addition, we found that CD34+ progenitor cells, including EPCs, were significantly enriched at day 1, and further increased at day 5 and day 11. Upregulation of monocytes, granulocytes and macrophages peaked at day 1. G-CSF treatment significantly increased bone volume and bone density in the defect, which was confirmed by histology. Our data show that different cell populations are mobilized by G-CSF treatment in cell specific

  9. Multimodal Approaches for Regenerative Stroke Therapies: Combination of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells is Not Superior to G-CSF Alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Tudor Balseanu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Attractive therapeutic strategies to enhance post-stroke recovery of aged brains include methods of cellular therapy that can enhance the endogenous restorative mechanisms of the injured brain. Since stroke afflicts mostly the elderly, it is highly desirable to test the efficacy of cell therapy in the microenvironment of aged brains that is generally refractory to regeneration. In particular, stem cells from the bone marrow allow an autologous transplantation approach that can be translated in the near future to the clinical practice. Such a bone marrow-derived therapy includes the grafting of stem cells as well as the delayed induction of endogenous stem cell mobilization and homing by the stem cell mobilizer granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF. We tested the hypothesis that grafting of bone marrow-derived pre-differentiated mesenchymal cells (BM-MSCs in G-CSF-treated animals improves the long-term functional outcome in aged rodents. To this end, G-CSF alone (50 μg/kg or in combination with a single dose (106 cells of rat BM MSCs was administered intravenously to Sprague-Dawley rats at 6 h after transient occlusion (90 min of the middle cerebral artery. Infarct volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging at 3 and 48 days post-stroke and additionally by immunhistochemistry at day 56. Functional recovery was tested during the entire post-stroke survival period of 56 days. Daily treatment for post-stroke aged rats with G-CSF led to a robust and consistent improvement of neurological function after 28 days. The combination therapy also led to robust angiogenesis in the formerly infarct core and beyond in the “islet of regeneration.” However, G-CSF + BM MSCs may not impact at all on the spatial reference-memory task or infarct volume and therefore did not further improve the post-stroke recovery. We suggest that in a real clinical practice involving older post-stroke patients, successful regenerative therapies

  10. Efficacy and the Safety of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Treatment in Patients with Muscular Dystrophy: A Non-Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Sienkiewicz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe current standard treatment for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD involves corticosteroids. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF induces the proliferation of satellite cells and myoblasts and, in turn, muscle regeneration. Beneficial effects of G-CSF were also described for skeletal muscle disorders.AimWe assessed the safety and effects of using G-CSF to promote muscle strength in patients with DMD.Materials and methodsInclusion criteria were as follows: patients aged 5–15 years with diagnosed with DMD confirmed by genetic test or biopsy. Fourteen patients were treated with steroids, and their use was not changed in this study. Diagnoses were confirmed by genetic tests: deletions were detected in 11 patients and duplications in 5 patients. Nineteen 5- to 15-year-old patients diagnosed with DMD—9 were in wheelchairs, whereas 10 were mobile and independent—completed an open study. Participants received a clinical examination and performed physiotherapeutic and laboratory tests to gage their manual muscle strength, their isometric force using a hand dynamometer, and aerobic capacity [i.e., 6-min walk test (6MWT] before and after therapy. Each participant received G-CSF (5 µg/kg/body/day subcutaneously for five consecutive days during the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 12th month. Laboratory investigations that included full blood count and biochemistry were performed. Side effects of G-CSF treatment were assessed during each visit. During each cycle of G-CSF administration in the hospital, rehabilitation was also applied. All patients received regular ambulatory rehabilitation.ResultsThe subcutaneous administration of G-CSF improved muscle strength in participants. We recorded a significant increase in the distance covered in the 6MWT, either on foot or in a wheelchair, increased muscle force in isometric force, and a statistically significant decrease in the activity of the muscle enzyme creatine kinase

  11. A comparative study of adverse reactions occurring after administration of glycosylated granulocyte colony stimulating factor and/or dexamethasone for mobilization of neutrophils in healthy donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuft, H G; Goudeva, L; Blasczyk, R

    2004-05-01

    Both granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and dexamethasone (DXM) are used for neutrophil (PMN) mobilization and collection. This prospective study was aimed to evaluate and compare the rate, severity and clinical significance of adverse reactions of these drugs alone and in combination in healthy donors. PMN mobilization was carried out using dexamethasone alone (8 mg orally; n=25) or glycosylated G-CSF alone (Lenograstim, 5 microg/kg subcutaneously, n=24) or in combination (n=23) prior to a standard granulocyte apheresis on the Spectra cell separator. The number of PMNs counted in the mobilized peripheral blood of the donors was 7.0 (3.6-20.4) x10(9)/L (DXM), 25.2 (15.5-49.7) x10(9)/L (G-CSF), and 31.6 (20.0-43.0) x10(9)/L (G-CSF+DXM), corresponding to PMN apheresis yields of 13 (8-43) x10(9)/U, 56 (34-118) x10(9)/U, and 83 (33-117) x10(9)/U, respectively. The three groups had comparable percentages of donors with at least one adverse effect (ranging from 75 to 80%), but the G-CSF-containing regimens were generally more toxic, as was reflected by higher percentages of donors with moderate to severe adverse reactions and higher overall severity scores of 2.28 (G-CSF) and 2.08 (G-CSF+DXM) compared with 1.33 in the DXM group ( pdonors; 19%) and unwillingness to give further neutrophil donations (2/47 donors; 4%). The addition of DXM to G-CSF diminished some symptoms, particularly bone pain, headache and the frequency of requests for analgesics. The predominant symptoms in the DXM alone group were mild gastrointestinal complaints. We conclude that G-CSF stimulation improved neutrophil mobilization and apheresis yields at the expense of donor tolerability. Compared with G-CSF alone, the combination G-CSF and DXM did not increase the quantity or the severity of donor symptoms.

  12. Effect of mobilization of bone marrow stem cells by granulocyte colony stimulating factor on clinical symptoms, left ventricular perfusion and function in patients with severe chronic ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yongzhong; Tägil, Kristina; Ripa, Rasmus S.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A phase I safety and efficacy study with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilization of bone marrow stem cells to induce vasculogenesis in patients with severe ischemic heart disease (IHD) was conducted. DESIGN, PATIENTS AND RESULTS: 29 patients with IHD participated...... in 'mobilizers'. At the follow-up, G-CSF treated had improved in CCS classification, NTG consumption and angina attacks, but the controls only in CCS classification. No difference was seen between the two groups. The decline in NTG consumption tended to be significant in 'mobilizers' compared to controls...

  13. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor recruitment of CD34+ progenitors to peripheral blood: impaired mobilization in chronic granulomatous disease and adenosine deaminase--deficient severe combined immunodeficiency disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhsaria, S; Fleisher, T A; Vowells, S; Brown, M; Miller, J; Gordon, I; Blaese, R M; Dunbar, C E; Leitman, S; Malech, H L

    1996-08-01

    Peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells mobilized by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration are potentially useful for transplantation and as a target of gene transfer for therapy of hematopoietic disorders. Efficient harvest and planning for clinical use of PB CD34+ cells ideally requires foreknowledge of the expected mobilization kinetics and yield. We developed a sensitive flow cytometric assay for accurately enumerating CD34+ cells throughout the range seen at baseline to peak mobilization. We used this assay to assess the kinetics of G-CSF-mediated mobilization of CD34+ cells to PB in normal volunteers and in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) or adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). Two dose levels of G-CSF were examined (5 and 10 micrograms/kg/d for 7 days). Both doses were well tolerated. For normal subjects and patients an increase in PB CD34+ cells was first detected only preceding the third dose of G-CSF (day 3), peaked transiently on day 5 or 6, and then decreased thereafter despite additional doses of G-CSF. With 32 normal volunteers mean peak CD34+ cell counts were 57 and 76 cells/mm2 of blood (5 and 10 micrograms doses, respectively), whereas for 18 CGD patients the mean peaks were 31 and 40 cells/mm2 of blood. For 2 ADA-deficient SCID patients studied at a G-CSF dose of 5 micrograms/kg/d, the average peak was 16 cells/mm2 of blood. For both of these patient groups mobilization of CD34+ cells to PB was impaired compared with similarly treated normal subjects (P 48%. Thus, ANC is not a reliable surrogate to predict peak PB CD34+ cell counts and direct enumeration of PB CD34+ counts should be undertaken in decisions regarding timing and duration of apheresis to harvest a specific number of these cells. Finally, unexpected, but significant differences in the PB CD34+ cell mobilization between normal subjects and patients with inherited disorders can occur and underscores the

  14. Hematopoietic growth factors for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Penkowa, M; Johnsen, H E

    1998-01-01

    of leukemic myelopoiesis and subsequent progression into overt acute myeloid leukemia. In conclusion, combinations of hematopoietic growth factors may be of clinical benefit in some patients with MDS. However, due to the cost and unpredictable clinical outcome there is a need for extended laboratory research......Administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF), rh granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) or rh interleukin-3 (rhIL-3) effectively stimulate and expand marrow myelopoiesis resulting in a dose-dependent increment of peripheral blood...

  15. Recombinant rat stem cell factor synergizes with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in vivo in mice to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells that have enhanced repopulating potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briddell, R A; Hartley, C A; Smith, K A; McNiece, I K

    1993-09-15

    Splenectomized mice treated for 7 days with pegylated recombinant rat stem cell factor (rrSCF-PEG) showed a dose-dependent increase in peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) that have enhanced in vivo repopulating potential. A dose of rrSCF-PEG at 25 micrograms/kg/d for 7 days produced no significant increase in PBPC. However, when this dose of rrSCF-PEG was combined with an optimal dose of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF; 200 micrograms/kg/d), a synergistic increase in PBPC was observed. Compared with treatment with rhG-CSF alone, the combination of rrSCF-PEG plus rhG-CSF resulted in a synergistic increase in peripheral white blood cells, in the incidence and absolute numbers of PBPC, and in the incidence and absolute numbers of circulating cells with in vivo repopulating potential. These data suggest that low doses of SCF, which would have minimal, if any, effects in vivo, can synergize with optimal doses of rhG-CSF to enhance the mobilization of PBPC stimulated by rhG-CSF alone.

  16. Pretransplant mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves b-cell reconstitution by lentiviral vector gene therapy in SCID-X1 mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Huston (Marshall W.); A.R.A. Riegman (Adriaan R.A.); R.M.A. Yadak (Rana); Y.M. van Helsdingen (Yvette); H. De Boer (Helen); N.P. van Til (Niek); G. Wagemaker (Gerard)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractHematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to

  17. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor delays PWI/DWI mismatch evolution and reduces final infarct volume in permanent-suture and embolic focal cerebral ischemia models in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bråtane, Bernt T; Bouley, James; Schneider, Armin; Bastan, Birgul; Henninger, Nils; Fisher, Marc

    2009-09-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used clinically to attenuate neutropenia after chemotherapy. G-CSF acts as a growth factor in the central nervous system, counteracts apoptosis, and is neuroprotective in rodent transient ischemia models. We assessed the effect of G-CSF on ischemic lesion evolution in a rat permanent-suture occlusion model with diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and the neuroprotective effect of G-CSF in a rat embolic stroke model. With a constant perfusion deficit, vehicle-treated animals showed an expanding apparent diffusion coefficient lesion volume that matched the perfusion deficit volume at approximately 3 hours, with the 24-hour infarct volume equivalent to the perfusion deficit. In G-CSF-treated rats, the apparent diffusion coefficient lesion volume did not increase after treatment initiation, and the infarct volume at 24 hours reflected the initial apparent diffusion coefficient lesion volume. In the embolic model, we observed a significant decrease in infarct volume in G-CSF-treated animals compared with the vehicle-treated group. These results confirm the potent neuroprotective activity of G-CSF in different focal ischemia models. The magnetic resonance imaging data demonstrate that G-CSF preserved the perfusion/diffusion mismatch.

  18. The preparation of 6x His-tagged granulocyte colony stimulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-12-13

    Dec 13, 2010 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. ... The use of these methods yielded purified 6xHis-tagged GCSF with a concentration of about 250 µg/ml RTS reaction. Key words: Granulocyte colony stimulating factor, in vitro expression system, .... plasmid was done using Hind III restriction enzyme according to the.

  19. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: increase in numbers of naive CD4 cells and CD34 cells makes G-CSF a candidate for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Afzelius, P; Dam-Larsen, S

    1998-01-01

    The potential of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize CD4 cells and/or CD34 cells for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy was examined. Ten human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients were treated with G-CSF (300 microg/day) for 5 days. Numbers of CD4....... Furthermore, the fraction of naive CD4 cells increased. These findings have implications for the design of immunotherapy or gene therapy protocols....

  20. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) reduces not only gram-negative but also gram-positive infection-associated proinflammatory cytokine release by interaction between Kupffer cells and leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, C J; Wanner, G A; Menger, M D; Vollmar, B

    2004-05-01

    An important principle for the beneficial effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a central mediator in the endogenous host response, is the reduction of systemic cytokine levels in various gram-negative models of sepsis and septic shock. There is debate, however, on whether G-CSF is protective also in gram-positive sepsis and acts directly or indirectly on macrophages and hepatic Kupffer cells (KC). KC were harvested from either G-CSF-(200 microg/kg bw i.v.) or saline-pretreated Sprague-Dawley rats and stimulated in vitro for subsequent assessment of cytokine release over 24 h. Pretreatment with G-CSF led to a significant (prelease of TNF-alpha (-81%), IL-6 (-82%) and IL-1 beta (-57%). Exposure of KC to heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus/SAC) caused a 2- to 3-fold higher TNF-alpha release, but similar IL-6 levels when compared with those after LPS stimulation. Still, G-CSF proved to significantly reduce the release of both TNF-alpha and IL-6 upon KC exposure with SAC for 24h. Interestingly, in neutropenic animals (100mg/kg cyclophosphamide), G-CSF was not capable to blunt the LPS-induced cytokine release, indicating that the action of G-CSF on KC is not direct in nature but targets cellular communication and function of neutrophils. The present results demonstrate that pretreatment with G-CSF in vivo effectively prevents the overactivation of KC by both gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial substances, probably via modulation of neutrophil function. Thus, inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine response through G-CSF may represent a promising hepatoprotective approach during systemic inflammation.

  1. Alteration in the concentrations of Interleukin-7 (IL-7), Interleukin-10 (IL-10) and Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) in alcohol-dependent individuals without liver disease, during detoxification therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikou, Thomas; Ioannidis, Anastasios; Zoga, Margarita; Tzavellas, Elias; Paparrigopoulos, Thomas; Magana, Maria; Pliatsika, Paraskevi; Nikolaou, Chryssoula; Chatzipanagiotou, Stylianos

    2016-06-01

    The course of Interleukin-7 (IL-7), Interleukin-10 (IL-10) and Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) was investigated in alcohol-dependent individuals without liver disease in order to ascertain the use of these cytokines as markers for the follow-up testing and the outcome of the detoxification treatment. Forty-eight alcohol-dependent individuals were admitted for alcohol detoxification. Blood was obtained upon admission, two weeks later and after the completion of the detoxification period (4-5 weeks). Serum IL-7, IL-10 and G-CSF were measured with a commercially available sandwich enzyme immunoassay. IL-7 concentration was steadily high from admission up to two weeks later and then showed a fall, yet still remaining significantly higher than in the control group at the end of the detoxification treatment. IL-10 concentration was significantly low on admission, presenting a linear increase during therapy and remained insignificantly low at the end. G-CSF was significantly elevated on admission and presented a linear fall ending up in almost normal values at the end of the detoxification therapy. The alterations in the concentration of IL-7, IL-10 and G-CSF and their trend to normalization during the detoxification therapy are indicative of the generalized immune system disorder, caused by alcohol abuse. Further studies will help in further elucidating the pathophysiology of the immune system function in alcohol abuse, while immunological parameters might serve as biological markers and diagnostic tools for the assessment of the course and the outcome of the detoxification therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Serpina1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-8-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pel, M; van Os, R; Velders, GA; Hagoort, H; Heegaard, PMH; Lindley, IJD; Willemze, R; Fibbe, WE

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report that cytokine-induced (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-8) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization is completely inhibited after low-dose (0.5 Gy) total-body irradiation (TBI). Because neutrophil granular proteases are regulatory

  3. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor increases CD4+ T cell counts of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving stable, highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aladdin, H; Ullum, H; Dam Nielsen, S.

    2000-01-01

    Thirty human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with CD4+ T cell counts factor (G-CSF; 0.3 mg/mL 3 times...... a week) for 12 weeks. Blood samples were collected at specified time points. G-CSF treatment enhanced the total lymphocyte count (P=.002) and increased CD3+ (P=.005), CD4+ (P=.03), and CD8+ (P=.004) T cell counts as well as numbers of CD3-CD16+CD56+ NK cells (P=.001). The increases in CD4+ and CD8+ cell...... counts resulted from increases in CD45RO+ memory T cells and cells expressing the CD38 activation marker. Lymphocyte proliferative responses to phytohemagglutinin and Candida antigen decreased, whereas NK cell activity and plasma HIV RNA did not change during G-CSF treatment. After 24 weeks, all immune...

  4. Attenuation of the bacterial load in blood by pretreatment with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor protects rats from fatal outcome and brain damage during Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Lund, Søren Peter

    2004-01-01

    A model of pneumococcal meningitis in young adult rats receiving antibiotics once the infection was established was developed. The intent was to mimic clinical and histopathological features of pneumococcal meningitis in humans. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate whether medical...... of meningitis result in reduced risks of death and brain damage. This beneficial effect is most likely achieved through improved control of the systemic disease....... to the infection compared to that for untreated rats (P = 0.039 by the log rank test). The improved outcome was associated with reduced signs of cerebral cortical damage (P = 0.008). Furthermore, the beneficial effects of G-CSF were associated with reduced bacterial loads in the cerebrospinal fluid (median, 1.1 x...... postinfection did not alter the clinical or histological outcome relative to that for non-G-CSF-treated rats. The magnitude of bacteremia and pretreatment with G-CSF were found to be prognostic factors for both outcome and brain damage. In summary, elevated neutrophil levels prior to the development...

  5. Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor and Physiotherapy after Stroke: Results of a Feasibility Randomised Controlled Trial: Stem Cell Trial of Recovery EnhanceMent after Stroke-3 (STEMS-3 ISRCTN16714730.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Sprigg

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF mobilises endogenous haematopoietic stem cells and enhances recovery in experimental stroke. Recovery may also be dependent on an enriched environment and physical activity. G-CSF may have the potential to enhance recovery when used in combination with physiotherapy, in patients with disability late after stroke.A pilot 2 x 2 factorial randomised (1:1 placebo-controlled trial of G-CSF (double-blind, and/or a 6 week course of physiotherapy, in 60 participants with disability (mRS >1, at least 3 months after stroke. Primary outcome was feasibility, acceptability and tolerability. Secondary outcomes included death, dependency, motor function and quality of life measured 90 and 365 days after enrolment.Recruitment to the trial was feasible and acceptable; of 118 screened patients, 92 were eligible and 32 declined to participate. 60 patients were recruited between November 2011 and July 2013. All participants received some allocated treatment. Although 29 out of 30 participants received all 5 G-CSF/placebo injections, only 7 of 30 participants received all 18 therapy sessions. G-CSF was well tolerated but associated with a tendency to more adverse events than placebo (16 vs 10 patients, p = 0.12 and serious adverse events (SAE (9 vs 3, p = 0.10. On average, patients received 14 (out of 18 planned therapy sessions, interquartile range [12, 17]. Only a minority (23% of participants completed all physiotherapy sessions, a large proportion of sessions (114 of 540, 21% were cancelled due to patient (94, 17% and therapist factors (20, 4%. No significant differences in functional outcomes were detected in either the G-CSF or physiotherapy group at day 90 or 365.Delivery of G-CSF is feasible in chronic stroke. However, the study failed to demonstrate feasibility for delivering additional physiotherapy sessions late after stroke therefore a definitive study using this trial design is not supported. Future work

  6. Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor and Physiotherapy after Stroke: Results of a Feasibility Randomised Controlled Trial: Stem Cell Trial of Recovery EnhanceMent after Stroke-3 (STEMS-3 ISRCTN16714730).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprigg, Nikola; O'Connor, Rebecca; Woodhouse, Lisa; Krishnan, Kailash; England, Timothy J; Connell, Louise A; Walker, Marion F; Bath, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilises endogenous haematopoietic stem cells and enhances recovery in experimental stroke. Recovery may also be dependent on an enriched environment and physical activity. G-CSF may have the potential to enhance recovery when used in combination with physiotherapy, in patients with disability late after stroke. A pilot 2 x 2 factorial randomised (1:1) placebo-controlled trial of G-CSF (double-blind), and/or a 6 week course of physiotherapy, in 60 participants with disability (mRS >1), at least 3 months after stroke. Primary outcome was feasibility, acceptability and tolerability. Secondary outcomes included death, dependency, motor function and quality of life measured 90 and 365 days after enrolment. Recruitment to the trial was feasible and acceptable; of 118 screened patients, 92 were eligible and 32 declined to participate. 60 patients were recruited between November 2011 and July 2013. All participants received some allocated treatment. Although 29 out of 30 participants received all 5 G-CSF/placebo injections, only 7 of 30 participants received all 18 therapy sessions. G-CSF was well tolerated but associated with a tendency to more adverse events than placebo (16 vs 10 patients, p = 0.12) and serious adverse events (SAE) (9 vs 3, p = 0.10). On average, patients received 14 (out of 18 planned) therapy sessions, interquartile range [12, 17]. Only a minority (23%) of participants completed all physiotherapy sessions, a large proportion of sessions (114 of 540, 21%) were cancelled due to patient (94, 17%) and therapist factors (20, 4%). No significant differences in functional outcomes were detected in either the G-CSF or physiotherapy group at day 90 or 365. Delivery of G-CSF is feasible in chronic stroke. However, the study failed to demonstrate feasibility for delivering additional physiotherapy sessions late after stroke therefore a definitive study using this trial design is not supported. Future work should

  7. Early applications of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF can stabilize the blood–optic-nerve barrier and ameliorate inflammation in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Tseng Wen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF was reported to have a neuroprotective effect in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION model. However, the therapeutic window and anti-inflammatory effects of G-CSF in a rAION model have yet to be elucidated. Thus, this study aimed to determine the therapeutic window of G-CSF and investigate the mechanisms of G-CSF via regulation of optic nerve (ON inflammation in a rAION model. Rats were treated with G-CSF on day 0, 1, 2 or 7 post-rAION induction for 5 consecutive days, and a control group were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS. Visual function was assessed by flash visual evoked potentials at 4 weeks post-rAION induction. The survival rate and apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells were determined by FluoroGold labeling and TUNEL assay, respectively. ON inflammation was evaluated by staining of ED1 and Iba1, and ON vascular permeability was determined by Evans Blue extravasation. The type of macrophage polarization was evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. The protein levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were analyzed by western blotting. A therapeutic window during which G-CSF could rescue visual function and retinal ganglion cell survival was demonstrated at day 0 and day 1 post-infarct. Macrophage infiltration was reduced by 3.1- and 1.6-fold by G-CSF treatment starting on day 0 and 1 post-rAION induction, respectively, compared with the PBS-treated group (P<0.05. This was compatible with 3.3- and 1.7-fold reductions in ON vascular permeability after G-CSF treatment compared with PBS treatment (P<0.05. Microglial activation was increased by 3.8- and 3.2-fold in the early (beginning treatment at day 0 or 1 G-CSF-treated group compared with the PBS-treated group (P<0.05. Immediate (within 30 mins of infarct treatment with G-CSF also induced M2 microglia/macrophage activation. The cytokine levels were lower in the group that received immediate G-CSF treatment

  8. Intermediate-dose versus low-dose cyclophosphamide and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for peripheral blood stem cell mobilization in patients with multiple myeloma treated with novel induction therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadani, Mehdi; Kochuparambil, S Thomas; Osman, Salman; Cumpston, Aaron; Leadmon, Sonia; Bunner, Pamela; Watkins, Kathy; Morrison, Devi; Speir, Ethan; Deremer, David; Kota, Vamsi; Jillella, Anand; Craig, Michael; Awan, Farrukh

    2012-07-01

    Peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization with intermediate-dose cyclophosphamide (ID-CY) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to be more efficacious, albeit more toxic, than low-dose cyclophosphamide (LD-CY) mobilization regimens in patients with multiple myeloma treated with conventional therapies. However, the relative importance of cyclophosphamide dose intensity in peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization after novel induction regimens is not known. Here we report mobilization outcomes of 123 patients who underwent transplantation within 1 year of starting induction chemotherapy with novel agents. We compared consecutive patients undergoing mobilization with ID-CY/G-CSF (3-4 g/m(2)) at one institution (n = 55) with patients receiving LD-CY/G-CSF (1.5 g/m(2)) at a different transplantation center (n = 68). At baseline, the 2 groups were well balanced, except for more frequent previous lenalidomide use in the ID-CY group (P = .04). Compared with LD-CY, ID-CY use was associated with higher median peak PB CD34(+) cell count (35/μL versus 160/μL; P < .001), CD34(+) cell yield on day 1 of collection (2.6 × 10(6)/kg versus 11.7 × 10(6)/kg, P ≤ .001), and total CD34(+) cell yield (7.5 × 10(6)/kg versus 16.6 × 10(6)/kg; P ≤ .001). Six patients in the LD-CY group had mobilization failure, compared with no patients in the ID-CY group. A significantly higher proportion of patients in the LD-CY group (P < .001) were unable to collect ≥5 × 10(6)/kg and ≥10 × 10(6)/kg CD34(+) cells. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment were significantly faster in the ID-CY group, likely because of higher infused CD34(+) cell doses. In conclusion, compared with LD-CY, ID-CY produced a more robust peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization and significantly reduced the rates of mobilization failure. These data caution against the use of LD-CY-containing mobilization strategies in patients with multiple myeloma undergoing stem cell

  9. The effects of hematopoietic growth factors on neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ye; Cui, Lili; Piao, Chunshu; Li, Bin; Zhao, Li-Ru

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) are initially discovered as the essential hematopoietic growth factors regulating bone marrow stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and SCF in combination with G-CSF (SCF+G-CSF) has synergistic effects on bone marrow stem cell mobilization. In this study we have determined the effect of SCF and G-CSF on neurite outgrowth in rat cortical neurons. Using molecular and cellular biology and live cell imaging approaches, we have revealed that receptors for SCF and G-CSF are expressed on the growth core of cortical neurons, and that SCF+G-CSF synergistically enhances neurite extension through PI3K/AKT and NFκB signaling pathways. Moreover, SCF+G-CSF induces much greater NFκB activation, NFκB transcriptional binding and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) production than SCF or G-CSF alone. In addition, we have also observed that BDNF, the target gene of NFκB, is required for SCF+G-CSF-induced neurite outgrowth. These data suggest that SCF+G-CSF has synergistic effects to promote neurite growth. This study provides new insights into the contribution of hematopoietic growth factors in neuronal plasticity.

  10. The effects of hematopoietic growth factors on neurite outgrowth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Su

    Full Text Available Stem cell factor (SCF and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF are initially discovered as the essential hematopoietic growth factors regulating bone marrow stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and SCF in combination with G-CSF (SCF+G-CSF has synergistic effects on bone marrow stem cell mobilization. In this study we have determined the effect of SCF and G-CSF on neurite outgrowth in rat cortical neurons. Using molecular and cellular biology and live cell imaging approaches, we have revealed that receptors for SCF and G-CSF are expressed on the growth core of cortical neurons, and that SCF+G-CSF synergistically enhances neurite extension through PI3K/AKT and NFκB signaling pathways. Moreover, SCF+G-CSF induces much greater NFκB activation, NFκB transcriptional binding and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF production than SCF or G-CSF alone. In addition, we have also observed that BDNF, the target gene of NFκB, is required for SCF+G-CSF-induced neurite outgrowth. These data suggest that SCF+G-CSF has synergistic effects to promote neurite growth. This study provides new insights into the contribution of hematopoietic growth factors in neuronal plasticity.

  11. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: increase in numbers of naive CD4 cells and CD34 cells makes G-CSF a candidate for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Afzelius, P; Dam-Larsen, S

    1998-01-01

    The potential of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize CD4 cells and/or CD34 cells for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy was examined. Ten human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients were treated with G-CSF (300 microg/day) for 5 days. Numbers of CD4...... and CD34 cells were measured. To examine the numbers of naive and memory type CD4 cells, CD4 cell coexpression of CD45RA and CD45RO was measured. Functionality of mobilized CD4 cells was examined by use of the proliferation assay and interleukin-2 ELISA. The number of CD34 cells increased from 1.50 to 20.......01/microL (P CD34 cells and CD4 cells in HIV-infected patients...

  12. Uso de fatores de crescimento epidérmico e estimulador de colônias de granulócitos na prevenção e tratamento da enterocolite necrosante no recém-nascido Use of epidermic and granulocyte-colony stimulating growth factors in the prevention and treatment of necrotizing enterocolitis of the newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dáfne Cardoso B. da Silva

    2008-06-01

    pathophysiology of this disease improves, new therapies, such as the administration of epidermal growth factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, are being discussed. CONCLUSIONS: The use of growth factors for treatment and prevention of NEC seems promising. However, further clinics assays are needed to evaluate the effectiveness and the safety of these growth factors. At this moment, the best clinical practice is the prevention of the disease.

  13. Treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor decreases the capacity of hematopoietic progenitor cells for generation of lymphocytes in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Clark, D R; Hutchings, M

    1999-01-01

    of CD34+ progenitor cells to generate lymphocytes was examined by use of thymic organ cultures. The mean number of lymphocytes generated per CD34+ cell on day 0 was 0.72 and on day 4 was 0.09 (PCD34+ cell was significantly reduced after G-CSF treatment...

  14. Serpina1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-8-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization

    OpenAIRE

    van Pel, Melissa; van Os, Ronald; Velders, Gerjo A.; Hagoort, Henny; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Lindley, Ivan J. D.; Willemze, Roel; Fibbe, Willem E.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report that cytokine-induced (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-8) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization is completely inhibited after low-dose (0.5 Gy) total-body irradiation (TBI). Because neutrophil granular proteases are regulatory mediators in cytokine-induced HSC/HPC mobilization, we considered a possible role for protease inhibitors in the induction of HSC/HPC mobilization. Bone marrow (BM) extracellular extracts that wer...

  15. Human progenitor cells rapidly mobilized by AMD3100 repopulate NOD/SCID mice with increased frequency in comparison to cells from the same donor mobilized by granulocyte colony stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, David A; Bonde, Jesper; Craft, Timothy P

    2007-01-01

    ) or purified CD34(+) cells was compared at limiting dilution into NOD/SCID mice. Human AMD3100-mobilized MNC possessed enhanced repopulating frequency in comparison to G-CSF-mobilized MNC from paired donors, and purified CD34(+) progenitors were at least as efficient as the G-CSF mobilized cells....... The frequencies of NOD/SCID repopulating cells (SRC) were 1 SRC in 8.7 x 10(6) AMD3100-mobilized MNC compared to 1 SRC in 29.0 x 10(6) G-CSF-mobilized MNC, and 1 SRC in 1.2 x 10(5) AMD3100-mobilized CD34(+) cells compared to 1 SRC in 1.8 x 10(5) G-CSF-mobilized CD34(+) cells. Hematopoietic differentiation...

  16. Short and long term effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during induction therapy in acute myeloid leukemia patients younger than 65: results of a randomized multicenter phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beksac, Meral; Ali, Ridvan; Ozcelik, Tulay; Ozcan, Muhit; Ozcebe, Osman; Bayik, Mahmut; Paydas, Semra; Buyukasik, Yahya; Ilhan, Osman; Ozkalemkas, Fahir; Gurman, Gunhan; Uysal, Akin; Akan, Hamdi; Soydan, Ender Akcaglayan; Tunali, Ahmet

    2011-03-01

    This prospective multicenter phase III clinical trial was designed to assess efficacy and safety of G-CSF as an adjunct to de novo AML remission induction therapy (www.clinicaltrials.gov. NCT00820976). Patients' characteristics were similar in both arms. G-CSF improved severity and duration of leukopenia. Three-year OS were similar (25.6 ± 5.1% vs. 31.8 ± 5.6%) in both arms except for patients with myeloblastic features. Significant factors for better survival were the use of G-CSF (p=0.049), female sex (p=0.05) and single induction cycle (p<0.001) in multivariate analysis. Female patients performed better than male patients. Better survival obtained among female AML patients needs to be validated within the context of cytogenetic analysis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Uso clínico de los factores de crecimiento hematopoyético Clinical use of hematopoietic growth factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Domingo Torres Hernández

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Los factores de crecimiento hematopoyético (FCH son producto de la excitante y prometedora industria de la biología molecular y la Ingeniería gen ética. Se hace una revisión de la farmacología del Factor Estimulador de Colonias de Granulocitos y del Factor Estimulador de Colonias de Granulocitos-Macrófagos, como también de su uso clínico en neutropenia aguda post-quimioterapia mielotóxica anticancerosa, trasplante de médula ósea, leucemia aguda, síndromes mielodisplásicos, anemia aplástica, síndrome de inmunodeficiencia adquirida y neutropenia crónica.

    Hematopoietic growth factors are one of the products of the exciting and promising molecular biology and genetic engineering industries. Two of these factors are the recombinant human - granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and the recombinant human-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor; a review Is presented on their pharmacology and clinical uses in acute neutropenia after myelotoxic anticancer therapy, bone marrow transplantion, acute leukemia, myelodyplastic syndromes, aplastic anemia, AIDS and chronic neutropenia.

  18. Effects of hematopoietic growth factors on in vitro colony formation by human megakaryocyte progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, L; Bruno, E; Briddell, R A; Graham, C D; Brandt, J E; Hoffman, R

    1988-08-01

    In order to study the effects of recombinant and purified hematopoietic growth factors on megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor cells (CFU-MK), enriched populations of human CFU-MK were isolated utilizing fluorescence activated cell sorting after labelling of cells with monoclonal antibodies exhibiting specificity to the My10 (HPCA-1) antigen and the major histocompatibility (MHC) class II (HLA-DR) locus. The CFU-MK cloning efficiency (CE) was 1.1 +/- 0.5% for cells expressing both high densities of My10 and low densities of HLA-DR (My10 DR+). This procedure resulted in an 18 fold increase in CE over NALT- cells. The effects of natural or recombinant human hematopoietic growth factors including erythropoietin (Epo), thrombocytopoiesis stimulating factor (TSF), interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), macrophage colony stimulating factor (CSF-1), and interleukin 3 (IL-3) on MK colony formation by My10 DR+ cells were determined utilizing a defined medium assay system. Neither Epo, TSF, CSF-1, IL-1 alpha nor G-CSF alone augmented MK colony formation above baseline (2.5 +/- 0.8 per 5 x 10(3) My10 DR+ cells plated). By contrast, the addition of GM-CSF and IL-3 each increased CFU-MK colony formation with maximal stimulation occurring following the addition of 200 units/ml of IL-3 and 100 units/ml of GM-CSF. At maximal concentration, IL-3 had a greater ability to promote megakaryocyte colony formation than GM-CSF.

  19. Effect of recombinant and purified hematopoietic growth factors on human megakaryocyte colony formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, E; Briddell, R; Hoffman, R

    1988-06-01

    The effect of a number of purified or recombinant hematopoietic growth factors, including recombinant erythropoietin (rEpo), thrombocytopoiesis stimulating factor (TSF), recombinant interleukin 1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha), recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rG-CSF), macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1), recombinant interleukin 3 (rIL-3), and recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF), on megakaryocyte (MK) colony formation by normal human marrow cells in a serum-depleted assay system was determined. Neither rEpo, TSF, CSF-1, rIL-1 alpha, nor rG-CSF alone augmented MK colony formation. Both rGM-CSF and rIL-3 at optimal doses increased MK colony formation eightfold and tenfold, respectively, above baseline values. Addition of increasing amounts of either rGM-CSF or rIL-3 led to progressively greater numbers of MK colonies formed until plateau levels were reached. Both rGM-CSF and rIL-3 also led to a dose-related increase in the number of cells per MK colony formed in culture. These molecules were equivalent stimulators of MK colony formation when their effects at optimal concentrations were compared. The effects of rGM-CSF and rIL-3 were additive at suboptimal concentrations of rIL-3 in that colony formation by a combination of the two growth factors approximated the sum of colony formation by each growth factor alone. These data suggest that rGM-CSF and rIL-3 alone and in combination are important regulators of in vitro megakaryocytopoiesis at the progenitor cell level.

  20. [Analysis of influence factors on G-CSF-mobilized hematopoietic stem cells of 191 healthy donors in a mono center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Yuan, Lei; Li, Hong-Hua; Zhao, Yu; Huang, Wen-Rong; Bo, Jian; Wang, Shu-Hong; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Dou, Li-Ping; Wang, Quan-Shun; Yu, Li; Jing, Yu

    2013-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the factors influencing mobilization efficiency of peripheral hematopoietic stem cells with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and their impact on healthy donors. 181 donors were mobilized subcutaneously with G-CSF at 5 - 10 µg/(kg·d), and 10 donors were mobilized with G-CSF at 3.3 - 4.9 µg/(kg·d), once 12 h, for 4 - 5 d. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (MNC) and CD34(+) cell counts were analyzed by flow cytometry. Mobilization-related side effects were also monitored. The results showed that white blood cell counts increased by 6 times averaged after mobilization (P donors were superior to female ones in cell harvest (P Donor body weight played positive role in cell yield, while impact of age on harvest was not remarkable. Neither MNC nor CD34(+) cell count showed a linear relationship with G-CSF dose. Only slight side effects were observed on the donors in this study. It is concluded that mobilization with G-CSF is sufficient in healthy donors without remarkable side effects.

  1. Paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor or recombinant human interleukin 3 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in ovarian cancer : A feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, GJ; Willemse, PHB; Beijnen, JH; Piersma, H; vanderGraaf, WTA; deVries, EGE; Boonstra, J.

    1997-01-01

    The tolerability and efficacy of four courses of paclitaxel and ifosfamide plus cisplatin every 3 weeks was evaluated in patients with residual or refractory ovarian cancer. Additionally, supportive haematological effects of recombinant human interleukin 3 (rhIL-3) and recombinant human granulocyte

  2. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroni, Maria, E-mail: maria.moroni@usuhs.edu [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ngudiankama, Barbara F. [Laboratory of Viral Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Christensen, Christine [Division of Comparative Pathology, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Olsen, Cara H. [Biostatistics Consulting Center, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Owens, Rossitsa [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Lombardini, Eric D. [Veterinary Medicine Department, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangkok (Thailand); Holt, Rebecca K. [Veterinary Science Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Whitnall, Mark H. [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  3. Pharmacological properties of granulocytic colony-stimulating factor pegylated using electron beam synthesis nanotechnologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dygai, A M; Zyuz'kov, G N; Zhdanov, V V; Madonov, P G; Udut, E V; Miroshnichenko, L A; Khrichkova, T Yu; Simanina, E V; Stavrova, L A; Artamonov, A V; Bekarev, A A; Kinsht, D N; Chaikovskiy, A V; Markova, T S; Gurto, R V

    2011-11-01

    Granulocytic CSF pegylated using electron-beam synthesis nanotechnology exhibits pronounced granulomonocytopoiesis-stimulating and SC-mobilizing activity. More potent stimulation of committed precursors against the background of less pronounced activation of polypotent hemopoietic cells is a peculiarity of hemostimulating action of pegylated using electron-beam synthesis nanotechnology granulocytic CSF in comparison with its non-modified analog. The mobilizing effect of pegylated using electron-beam synthesis nanotechnology granulocytic CSF on early progenitor elements surpasses that of non-conjugated cytokine.

  4. Regulatory Systems in Bone Marrow for Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Mobilization and Homing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, P.; Carrillo, E.; Vélez, C.; Hita-Contreras, F.; Martínez-Amat, A.; Rodríguez-Serrano, F.; Boulaiz, H.; Ortiz, R.; Melguizo, C.; Prados, J.; Aránega, A.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell release, migration, and homing from the bone marrow (BM) and of the mobilization pathway involves a complex interaction among adhesion molecules, cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, stromal cells, and hematopoietic cells. The identification of new mechanisms that regulate the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) cells has important implications, not only for hematopoietic transplantation but also for cell therapies in regenerative medicine for patients with acute myocardial infarction, spinal cord injury, and stroke, among others. This paper reviews the regulation mechanisms underlying the homing and mobilization of BM hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, investigating the following issues: (a) the role of different factors, such as stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), among other ligands; (b) the stem cell count in peripheral blood and BM and influential factors; (c) the therapeutic utilization of this phenomenon in lesions in different tissues, examining the agents involved in HSPCs mobilization, such as the different forms of G-CSF, plerixafor, and natalizumab; and (d) the effects of this mobilization on BM-derived stem/progenitor cells in clinical trials of patients with different diseases. PMID:23844360

  5. Regulatory Systems in Bone Marrow for Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Mobilization and Homing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Alvarez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell release, migration, and homing from the bone marrow (BM and of the mobilization pathway involves a complex interaction among adhesion molecules, cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, stromal cells, and hematopoietic cells. The identification of new mechanisms that regulate the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs cells has important implications, not only for hematopoietic transplantation but also for cell therapies in regenerative medicine for patients with acute myocardial infarction, spinal cord injury, and stroke, among others. This paper reviews the regulation mechanisms underlying the homing and mobilization of BM hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, investigating the following issues: (a the role of different factors, such as stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, among other ligands; (b the stem cell count in peripheral blood and BM and influential factors; (c the therapeutic utilization of this phenomenon in lesions in different tissues, examining the agents involved in HSPCs mobilization, such as the different forms of G-CSF, plerixafor, and natalizumab; and (d the effects of this mobilization on BM-derived stem/progenitor cells in clinical trials of patients with different diseases.

  6. [Fusarium solani infection in a patient after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiang-Wei; Shu, Xiang-Rong; Ren, Jing; Yin, Xiu-Yun; Jiang, Min; Hu, Liang-Ding; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Hu

    2010-10-01

    To study Fusarium solani infection as a complication in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and to discuss the diagnosis and appropriate therapy. Symptoms, physical examination, laboratory tests, computed tomographic (CT) scans, treatments and outcomes of Fusarium solani infection in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were retrospectively analyzed, and related literatures reviewed. The patient developed pulmonary infiltration and systemic multiple subcutaneous masses after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Tissue biopsy smear showed a large number of hyphae and spores, and fungal culture grew Fusarium solani. The subcutaneous masses were incised and drained, while amphotericin B and voriconazole were administered, with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for hematopoietic recovery. The patient was discharge after full recovery. Fusarium solani infection is a rare but fatal complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Once the skin lesions or subcutaneous masses developed, tissue smear and culture should be done as soon as possible. Early diagnosis and effective treatment to recovery of the patient after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Moreover, the recovery of adequate neutrophil levels is the most important factor in the resolution of fusarial infection.

  7. Hematopoietic stem cell mobilization: updated conceptual renditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonig, H; Papayannopoulou, T

    2013-01-01

    Despite its specific clinical relevance, the field of hematopoietic stem cell mobilization has received broad attention, owing mainly to the belief that pharmacologic stem cell mobilization might provide clues as to how stem cells are retained in their natural environment, the bone marrow ‘niche’. Inherent to this knowledge is also the desire to optimally engineer stem cells to interact with their target niche (such as after transplantation), or to lure malignant stem cells out of their protective niches (in order to kill them), and in general to decipher the niche’s structural components and its organization. Whereas, with the exception of the recent addition of CXCR4 antagonists to the armamentarium for mobilization of patients refractory to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alone, clinical stem cell mobilization has not changed significantly over the last decade or so, much effort has been made trying to explain the complex mechanism(s) by which hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells leave the marrow. This brief review will report some of the more recent advances about mobilization, with an attempt to reconcile some of the seemingly inconsistent data in mobilization and to interject some commonalities among different mobilization regimes. PMID:22951944

  8. Turning Death to Growth: Hematopoietic Growth Factors Promote Neurite Outgrowth through MEK/ERK/p53 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mei; Zhao, Li-Ru

    2017-11-08

    Stem cell factor (SCF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) are the essential hematopoietic growth factors to control hematopoiesis. However, the role of SCF and G-CSF in the central nervous system remains poorly understood. Here, we have demonstrated the involvement of MEK/ERK/p53 signaling in SCF + G-CSF-enhanced neurite extension. Cortical neurons dissected from embryonic rat brains were seeded onto the membranes of transwell inserts, and neurite outgrowth was determined by using both the neurite outgrowth quantification assay kit and immunostaining of β III tubulin. Quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting were used for determining gene and protein expression of ERK and p53, respectively. p53 small interfering RNA (siRNAs) were introduced into neurons for examining the involvement of p53 in SCF + G-CSF-mediated neurite outgrowth. We observed that both SCF and G-CSF alone increased activation of MEK/ERK and gene expression of p53, while SCF + G-CSF synergistically activated the MEK/ERK signaling and upregulated p53 expression. MEK specific inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) blocked the SCF + G-CSF-increased ERK phosphorylation and p53 gene and protein expression, and the MEK specific inhibitors also eliminated the SCF + G-CSF-promoted neurite outgrowth. p53 siRNAs knocked down the SCF + G-CSF-elevated p53 protein and prevented the SCF + G-CSF-enhanced neurite outgrowth. These findings suggest that activation of MEK/ERK/p53 signaling is required for SCF + G-CSF-promoted neurite outgrowth. Through the pro-apoptotic pathway of the MEK/ERK/p53, SCF + G-CSF turns neuronal fate from apoptotic commitment toward neural network generation. This observation provides novel insights into the putative role of SCF + G-CSF in supporting generation of neural connectivity during CNS development and in brain repair under pathological or neurodegenerative conditions.

  9. Biosimilar Filgrastim in Autologous Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization and Post-Transplant Hematologic Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Francesco; Mengarelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    To date, two kinds of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factors (G-CSF) have been approved for autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell (PBSCs) mobilization and posttransplant hematologic recovery after high-dose chemotherapy: filgrastim (originator and biosimilar) and lenograstim. Biosimilar filgrastim has been approved on the basis of comparable efficacy and safety in clinical studies where it has been used as chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia prophylaxis, but no specific pre-registration studies have been published in the transplant setting. Hence, there is still general skepticism about the role of biosimilar G-CSFs in this setting of patients. This review of biochemical, pre-clinical and clinical data suggests significant comparability of biosimilar filgrastim with both originator filgrastim and lenograstim in autologous PBSCs mobilization and post-autograft hematologic recovery.

  10. Serine protease inhibitors serpina1 and serpina3 are down-regulated in bone marrow during hematopoietic progenitor mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ingrid G; Hendy, Jean; Coughlin, Paul; Horvath, Anita; Lévesque, Jean-Pierre

    2005-04-04

    Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells into the blood involves a massive release of neutrophil serine proteases in the bone marrow. We hypothesize that the activity of these neutrophil serine proteases is regulated by the expression of naturally occurring inhibitors (serpina1 and serpina3) produced locally within the bone marrow. We found that serpina1 and serpina3 were transcribed in the bone marrow by many different hematopoietic cell populations and that a strong reduction in expression occurred both at the protein and mRNA levels during mobilization induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor or chemotherapy. This decreased expression was restricted to the bone marrow as serpina1 expression was maintained in the liver, leading to no change in plasma concentrations during mobilization. The down-regulation of serpina1 and serpina3 during mobilization may contribute to a shift in the balance between serine proteases and their inhibitors, and an accumulation of active neutrophil serine proteases in bone marrow extravascular fluids that cleave and inactivate molecules essential to the retention of hematopoietic progenitor cells within the bone marrow. These data suggest an unexpected role for serpina1 and serpina3 in regulating the bone marrow hematopoietic microenvironment as well as influencing the migratory behavior of hematopoietic precursors.

  11. Stem cell factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiece, I K; Briddell, R A

    1995-07-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) is the ligand for the tyrosine kinase receptor c-kit, which is expressed on both primitive and mature hematopoietic progenitor cells. In vitro, SCF synergizes with other growth factors, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, and interleukin-3 to stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of cells of the lymphoid, myeloid, erythroid, and megakaryocytic lineages. In vivo, SCF also synergizes with other growth factors and has been shown to enhance the mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells in combination with G-CSF. In phase I/II clinical studies administration of the combination of SCF and G-CSF resulted in a two- to threefold increase in cells that express the CD34 antigen compared with G-CSF alone. Other potential clinical uses include ex vivo expansion protocols and in vitro culture for gene therapy.

  12. Rapid Mobilization Reveals a Highly Engraftable Hematopoietic Stem Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggatt, Jonathan; Singh, Pratibha; Tate, Tiffany A; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Datari, Shruti R; Fukuda, Seiji; Liu, Liqiong; Kharchenko, Peter V; Schajnovitz, Amir; Baryawno, Ninib; Mercier, Francois E; Boyer, Joseph; Gardner, Jason; Morrow, Dwight M; Scadden, David T; Pelus, Louis M

    2018-01-11

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a potential curative therapy for malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Improving the efficiency of stem cell collection and the quality of the cells acquired can broaden the donor pool and improve patient outcomes. We developed a rapid stem cell mobilization regimen utilizing a unique CXCR2 agonist, GROβ, and the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. A single injection of both agents resulted in stem cell mobilization peaking within 15 min that was equivalent in magnitude to a standard multi-day regimen of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Mechanistic studies determined that rapid mobilization results from synergistic signaling on neutrophils, resulting in enhanced MMP-9 release, and unexpectedly revealed genetic polymorphisms in MMP-9 that alter activity. This mobilization regimen results in preferential trafficking of stem cells that demonstrate a higher engraftment efficiency than those mobilized by G-CSF. Our studies suggest a potential new strategy for the rapid collection of an improved hematopoietic graft. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparación de la eficacia y seguridad de la terapia combinada de cardiomioplastia celular con el factor estimulante de colonias de granulocitos en pacientes con cardiopatía isquémica en dos vías de implatación Comparison of efficacy and safety of combined therapy of cellular cardiomyoplasty and granulocyte colony stimulating factor in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy in two routes of implantation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Juan M Senior; Clara Saldarriaga; Francisco Cuéllar A; Juan D Gómez; Fabián Jaimes

    2011-01-01

    Este estudio tiene como objetivo evaluar la eficacia y seguridad de la terapia combinada de cardiomioplastia celular con el factor estimulante de colonias de granulocitos en pacientes con cardiopatía...

  14. Mobilization of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells Using Inhibitors of CXCR4 and VLA-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettig, Michael P.; Ansstas, George; DiPersio, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Successful hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) requires the infusion of a sufficient number of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) that are capable of homing to the bone marrow cavity and regenerating durable trilineage hematopoiesis in a timely fashion. Stem cells harvested from peripheral blood are the most commonly used graft source in HSCT. While granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the most frequently used agent for stem cell mobilization, the use of G-CSF alone results in suboptimal stem cell yields in a significant proportion of patients. Both the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and the integrin α4β1 (VLA-4) play important roles in the homing and retention of HSPCs within the bone marrow microenvironment. Preclinical and/or clinical studies have shown that targeted disruption of the interaction of CXCR4 or VLA-4 with their ligands results in the rapid and reversible mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the peripheral circulation and is synergistic when combined with G-CSF. In this review we discuss the development of small molecule CXCR4 and VLA-4 inhibitors and how they may improve the utility and convenience of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. PMID:21886173

  15. Erythropoietic Potential of CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells from Human Cord Blood and G-CSF-Mobilized Peripheral Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglian Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cell (RBC supply for transfusion has been severely constrained by the limited availability of donor blood and the emergence of infection and contamination issues. Alternatively, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from human organs have been increasingly considered as safe and effective blood source. Several methods have been studied to obtain mature RBCs from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells via in vitro culture. Among them, human cord blood (CB and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized adult peripheral blood (mPB are common adult stem cells used for allogeneic transplantation. Our present study focuses on comparing CB- and mPB-derived stem cells in differentiation from CD34+ cells into mature RBCs. By using CD34+ cells from cord blood and G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood, we showed in vitro RBC generation of artificial red blood cells. Our results demonstrate that CB- and mPB-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells have similar characteristics when cultured under the same conditions, but differ considerably with respect to expression levels of various genes and hemoglobin development. This study is the first to compare the characteristics of CB- and mPB-derived erythrocytes. The results support the idea that CB and mPB, despite some similarities, possess different erythropoietic potentials in in vitro culture systems.

  16. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF in stroke patients with concomitant vascular disease--a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Floel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: G-CSF has been shown in animal models of stroke to promote functional and structural regeneration of the central nervous system. It thus might present a therapy to promote recovery in the chronic stage after stroke. METHODS: Here, we assessed the safety and tolerability of G-CSF in chronic stroke patients with concomitant vascular disease, and explored efficacy data. 41 patients were studied in a double-blind, randomized approach to either receive 10 days of G-CSF (10 µg/kg body weight/day, or placebo. Main inclusion criteria were an ischemic infarct >4 months prior to inclusion, and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Primary endpoint was number of adverse events. We also explored changes in hand motor function for activities of daily living, motor and verbal learning, and finger tapping speed, over the course of the study. RESULTS: Adverse events (AEs were more frequent in the G-CSF group, but were generally graded mild or moderate and from the known side-effect spectrum of G-CSF. Leukocyte count rose after day 2 of G-CSF dosing, reached a maximum on day 8 (mean 42/nl, and returned to baseline 1 week after treatment cessation. No significant effect of treatment was detected for the primary efficacy endpoint, the test of hand motor function. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate the feasibility, safety and reasonable tolerability of subcutaneous G-CSF in chronic stroke patients. This study thus provides the basis to explore the efficacy of G-CSF in improving chronic stroke-related deficits. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00298597.

  17. The effect of long-term treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on hematopoiesis in HIV-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Sørensen, T U; Aladdin, H

    2000-01-01

    was given three times weekly for 12 weeks to 30 HIV-infected patients that had been treated with HAART for at least 24 weeks and not yet achieved CD4 counts above 350 CD4+ cells/microl. Blood samples were collected at weeks 0, 2, 4, 8, and 12, and again 12 weeks after termination of the G-CSF treatment...... of G-CSF on in vivo function of progenitors the white-blood count was determined. Significant increase in white-blood count was found (P count decreased (P = 0.001 and P = 0.013, respectively). Significant increase in the CD4 count occurred, but correlation...... between the numbers of progenitors and the CD4 count was not found. These data suggest that G-CSF mainly increases the number and differentiation of myeloid progenitors....

  18. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF; filgrastim) treatment of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H

    1993-01-01

    of neutrophil granulocytes (including immature forms) of 33.108 x 10(9) l-1 on day 12 after admission. The patient only had minor infectious complications during the neutropenic period. In conclusion, early treatment with filgrastim seems warranted in severe cases of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis. A dosage...... the next day to dosage of filgrastim was increased to 10 micrograms kg-1 day-1 with immediate improvement. A rapid and pronounced leucocytosis developed with maximal value...

  19. Methimazole Induced Total Myeloid Aplasia with Delayed Recovery Despite Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF): Marrow Progenitor Recovery Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Tania; Özgönenel, Bülent; Gadgeel, Manisha; Buck, Steven; Adhikari, Amita; Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi

    2016-06-01

    An eighteen-year-old female with Graves thyrotoxicosis presented with methimazole-induced agranulocytosis and total myeloid aplasia. The bone marrow at presentation showed complete absence of myeloid precursors and striking plasmacytosis. 16 days later, myeloid precursors were still absent morphologically; however bone marrow flow cytometry and cell culture detected an improvement in myelogenesis, which was soon followed by clinical recovery of agranulocytosis. Neutrophil recovery was delayed until day 22 after cessation of methimazole despite G-CSF use, consistent with a direct toxic effect on committed myeloid cells. Our findings suggest that cell culture and flow cytometric evaluation of bone marrow myeloid progenitors can be used as a guide to anticipate neutrophil recovery.

  20. Impact of posttransplantation G-CSF on outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Hanna J.; Loberiza, Fausto R.; Ringdén, Olle; Barrett, A. John; Bolwell, Brian J.; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Champlin, Richard E.; Gale, Robert Peter; Hale, Gregory A.; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Martino, Rodrigo; McCarthy, Philip L.; Tiberghien, Pierre; Verdonck, Leo F.; Horowitz, Mary M.

    2006-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is often administered after hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) to accelerate neutrophil recovery, but it is unclear what impact G-CSF has on long-term transplantation outcomes. We analyzed within the database of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research the impact of giving posttransplantation G-CSF on the outcomes of allogeneic HCT for acute myelogenous leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia in 2719 patients who underwent transplantation between 1995 and 2000. These included 1435 recipients of HLA-identical sibling bone marrow (BM), 609 recipients of HLA-identical peripheral-blood stem cells (PBSCs), and 675 recipients of unrelated donor BM transplants. Outcomes were compared between patients receiving or not receiving G-CSF within 7 days of HCT according to graft type. Median follow-up was more than 30 months (range, 2-87 months). G-CSF shortened the posttransplantation neutropenic period, but did not affect days +30 and +100 treatment-related mortality (TRM). Probabilities of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), leukemia-free survival (LFS), and overall survival were similar whether or not G-CSF was given. Multivariate analyses confirmed that giving G-CSF did not affect the risk of GVHD, TRM, LFS, or survival. In conclusion, results of this study found no long-term benefit or disadvantage of giving G-CSF after transplantation to promote hematopoietic recovery. PMID:16239431

  1. Autophagy and the hematopoietic niche: a regulatory role for the Forkhead-box transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez Puerto, MC

    2016-01-01

    Two main components of the hematopoietic niche are hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). FOXO transcription factors play a fundamental role in the maintenance of these cells through the regulation of cell cycle and oxidative stress. Other gene expression programs

  2. The role of the nervous system in hematopoietic stem cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Fakhredin; Soleimani, Masoud; Atashi, Amir; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Shahjahani, Mohammad; Roshandel, Elham; Jaseb, Kaveh; Saki, Najmaldin

    2013-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and blood cell progenitors, such as maturing leucocytes, steadily enter from bone marrow (BM) into the circulation under steady-state conditions, and their mobilization is dramatically amplified during stress conditions and by mediators such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). This mobilization is dependent upon bone remodeling, the proteolytic enzymes of bone marrow-derived stromal cells, and adhesion molecules such as integrin, but the main mechanisms controlling this traffic are still unclear. The nervous system, as the most important regulator of the body, can affect the mobilization network by secreting catecholamines, so that denervation of catecholaminergic fibers in the BM of mice could lead to declining mobilization in steady state and stress situations, even in the presence of other intact environmental factors in the BM. Thus, due to the importance of the nervous system, we have attempted to give a general overview of how the nervous system is involved in the mobilization of HSCs in this review. Then, we will try to describe the mobilization process induced by the nervous system, which consists of 3 mechanisms: stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1)/CXC chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), proteolytic enzymes, and bone remodeling.

  3. Stimulation of hematopoiesis in vivo by stem cell factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R G; Briddell, R A; Appelbaum, F R; McNiece, I K

    1994-05-01

    The ligand for c-kit, known as stem cell factor, mast cell growth factor, or kit ligand, plays a central role in normal hematopoietic stem cell, melanocyte, and gametocyte development and function during embryogenesis and in adult life. In vitro, stem cell factor promotes the survival of hematopoietic progenitors and enhances their proliferation in response to specific growth factors. Administration of recombinant soluble stem cell factor to rodents, dogs, and baboons produces a broad array of effects on hematopoiesis, though not all lineages are equally stimulated. At doses of more than 100 micrograms/kg/d stem cell factor stimulates neutrophilia, lymphocytosis, basophilia, and reticulocytosis and increases mast cells in multiple tissues. In vivo mast cell activation can occur. Marrow cellularity is increased and progenitor cells are increased in marrow, spleen, and blood, and marrow-repopulating cells are increased in the circulation of stem cell factor-treated animals. Stem cell factor synergizes with other hematopoietic growth factors in vivo. Low-dose stem cell factor, 25 micrograms/kg/d, that does not elicit a detectable biological response, enhances the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in vivo, increasing the neutrophilia and circulation of progenitor and marrow-repopulating cells above that which is achieved with either factor alone. In phase I human trials, dose-limiting toxicities, related to mast cell activation, were reached at 25 to 50 micrograms/kg/d of recombinant human stem cell factor. At these doses, progenitor and long-term culture-initiating cells are increased in marrow and increases in circulating levels of progenitor cells of multiple types are observed. Phase I-II trials of low-dose stem cell factor in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor show that the combination increases the circulation of CD34+ cells and colony-forming progenitor cells. Further studies are needed to determine the therapeutic role of stem

  4. Amelioration of radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome by an antioxidant chlorophyllin through increased stem cell activity and modulation of hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryavanshi, Shweta; Sharma, Deepak; Checker, Rahul; Thoh, Maikho; Gota, Vikram; Sandur, Santosh K; Sainis, Krishna B

    2015-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells (HSPC) are low in abundance and exhibit high radiosensitivity and their ability to divide dramatically decreases following exposure to ionizing radiation. Our earlier studies have shown antiapoptotic, immune-stimulatory, and antioxidant effects of chlorophyllin, a constituent of the over the counter drug derifil. Here we describe the beneficial effects of chlorophyllin against radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome. Chlorophyllin administration significantly enhanced the abundance of HSPC in vivo. It induced a transient cell cycle arrest in lineage-negative cells in the bone marrow. However, the chlorophyllin-treated mice exposed to whole body irradiation (WBI) had a significantly higher proportion of actively dividing HSPC in the bone marrow as compared to only WBI-exposed mice. It significantly increased the number of colony forming units (CFUs) by bone marrow cells in vitro and spleen CFUs in irradiated mice in vivo. Pharmacokinetic study showed that chlorophyllin had a serum half-life of 141.8 min in mice. Chlorophyllin upregulated antiapoptotic genes and antioxidant machinery via activation of prosurvival transcription factors Nrf-2 and NF-κB and increased the survival and recovery of bone marrow cells in mice exposed to WBI. Chlorophyllin stimulated granulocyte production in bone marrow and increased the abundance of peripheral blood neutrophils by enhancing serum levels of granulocyte-colony stimulation factor (GCSF). Most importantly, prophylactic treatment of mice with chlorophyllin significantly abrogated radiation-induced mortality. Chlorophyllin mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome by increasing the abundance of hematopoietic stem cells, enhancing granulopoiesis, and stimulating prosurvival pathways in bone marrow cells and lymphocytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Critical Modulation of Hematopoietic Lineage Fate by Hepatic Leukemia Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wahlestedt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A gradual restriction in lineage potential of multipotent stem/progenitor cells is a hallmark of adult hematopoiesis, but the underlying molecular events governing these processes remain incompletely understood. Here, we identified robust expression of the leukemia-associated transcription factor hepatic leukemia factor (Hlf in normal multipotent hematopoietic progenitors, which was rapidly downregulated upon differentiation. Interference with its normal downregulation revealed Hlf as a strong negative regulator of lymphoid development, while remaining compatible with myeloid fates. Reciprocally, we observed rapid lymphoid commitment upon reduced Hlf activity. The arising phenotypes resulted from Hlf binding to active enhancers of myeloid-competent cells, transcriptional induction of myeloid, and ablation of lymphoid gene programs, with Hlf induction of nuclear factor I C (Nfic as a functionally relevant target gene. Thereby, our studies establish Hlf as a key regulator of the earliest lineage-commitment events at the transition from multipotency to lineage-restricted progeny, with implications for both normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

  6. New Insights in the Mobilization of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Lymphoma and Multiple Myeloma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelopoulou, Maria K.; Tsirkinidis, Pantelis; Boutsikas, Georgios; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros P.; Tsirigotis, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    Following chemotherapy and/or the administration of growth factors, such as granulocyte-colony stimulated factor (G-CSF), hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) mobilize from bone marrow to peripheral blood. This review aims to systematically present the structure of the HSC “niche” and elucidate the mechanisms of their mobilization. However, this field is constantly evolving and new pathways and molecules have been shown to contribute to the mobilization process. Understanding the importance and the possible primary pathophysiologic role of each pathway is rather difficult, since they share various overlapping components. The primary initiating event for the mobilization of HSC is chemotherapy-induced endogenous G-CSF production or exogenous G-CSF administration. G-CSF induces proliferation and expansion of the myelomonocytic series, which leads to proteolytic enzyme activation. These enzymes result in disruption of various receptor-ligand bonds, which leads to the disanchorage of HSC from the bone marrow stroma. In everyday clinical practice, CXC chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) antagonists are now being used as mobilization agents in order to improve HSC collection. Furthermore, based on the proposed mechanisms of HSC mobilization, novel mobilizing agents have been developed and are currently evaluated in preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:25197663

  7. A neuroprotective function for the hematopoietic protein granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schäbitz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Krüger, Carola; Pitzer, Claudia; Weber, Daniela; Laage, Rico; Gassler, Nikolaus; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Mier, Walter; Kirsch, Friederike; Dittgen, Tanjew; Bach, Alfred; Sommer, Clemens; Schneider, Armin

    2008-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of cells of the myeloid lineage, which was cloned more than 20 years ago...

  8. Thrombomodulin contributes to gamma tocotrienol-mediated lethality protection and hematopoietic cell recovery in irradiated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Pathak

    Full Text Available Systemic administration of recombinant thrombomodulin (TM confers radiation protection partly by accelerating hematopoietic recovery. The uniquely potent radioprotector gamma tocotrienol (GT3, in addition to being a strong antioxidant, inhibits the enzyme hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR and thereby likely modulates the expression of TM. We hypothesized that the mechanism underlying the exceptional radioprotective properties of GT3 partly depends on the presence of endothelial TM. In vitro studies confirmed that ionizing radiation suppresses endothelial TM (about 40% at 4 hr after 5 Gy γ-irradiation and that GT3 induces TM expression (about 2 fold at the mRNA level after 5 μM GT3 treatment for 4 hr. In vivo survival studies showed that GT3 was significantly more effective as a radioprotector in TM wild type (TM+/+ mice than in mice with low TM function (TMPro/-. After exposure to 9 Gy TBI, GT3 pre-treatment conferred 85% survival in TM+/+ mice compared to only 50% in TMPro/-. Thus, GT3-mediated radiation lethality protection is partly dependent on endothelial TM. Significant post-TBI recovery of hematopoietic cells, particularly leukocytes, was observed in TM+/+ mice (p = 0.003, but not in TMPro/- mice, despite the fact that GT3 induced higher levels of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF in TMPro/- mice (p = 0.0001. These data demonstrate a critical, G-CSF-independent, role for endothelial TM in GT3-mediated lethality protection and hematopoietic recovery after exposure to TBI and may point to new strategies to enhance the efficacy of current medical countermeasures in radiological/nuclear emergencies.

  9. 5-Androstene-3{beta},17{beta}-diol Promotes Recovery of Immature Hematopoietic Cells Following Myelosuppressive Radiation and Synergizes With Thrombopoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aerts-Kaya, Fatima S.F.; Visser, Trudi P.; Arshad, Shazia [Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Frincke, James; Stickney, Dwight R.; Reading, Chris L. [Harbor Therapeutics, Inc, San Diego, California (United States); Wagemaker, Gerard, E-mail: g.wagemaker@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: 5-Androstene-3{beta},17{beta}-diol (5-AED) stimulates recovery of hematopoiesis after exposure to radiation. To elucidate its cellular targets, the effects of 5-AED alone and in combination with (pegylated) granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and thrombopoietin (TPO) on immature hematopoietic progenitor cells were evaluated following total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were exposed to radiation delivered as a single or as a fractionated dose, and recovery of bone marrow progenitors and peripheral blood parameters was assessed. Results: BALB/c mice treated with 5-AED displayed accelerated multilineage blood cell recovery and elevated bone marrow (BM) cellularity and numbers of progenitor cells. The spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-S) assay, representing the life-saving short-term repopulating cells in BM of irradiated donor mice revealed that combined treatment with 5-AED plus TPO resulted in a 20.1-fold increase in CFU-S relative to that of placebo controls, and a 3.7 and 3.1-fold increase in comparison to 5-AED and TPO, whereas no effect was seen of Peg-G-CSF with or without 5-AED. Contrary to TPO, 5-AED also stimulated reconstitution of the more immature marrow repopulating (MRA) cells. Conclusions: 5-AED potently counteracts the hematopoietic effects of radiation-induced myelosuppression and promotes multilineage reconstitution by stimulating immature bone marrow cells in a pattern distinct from, but synergistic with TPO.

  10. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, Zhiguo [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chao, Nelson J. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Benny J., E-mail: chen0032@mc.duke.edu [Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  11. Sulfatase modifying factor 1–mediated fibroblast growth factor signaling primes hematopoietic multilineage development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Mario; Visigalli, Ilaria; Bergamasco, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    Self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are balanced by the concerted activities of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Wnt, and Notch pathways, which are tuned by enzyme-mediated remodeling of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1) activates the Sulf1 and Sulf2 sulfatases that remodel the HSPGs, and is mutated in patients with multiple sulfatase deficiency. Here, we show that the FGF signaling pathway is constitutively activated in Sumf1−/− HSCs and hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs). These cells show increased p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase levels, which in turn promote β-catenin accumulation. Constitutive activation of FGF signaling results in a block in erythroid differentiation at the chromatophilic erythroblast stage, and of B lymphocyte differentiation at the pro–B cell stage. A reduction in mature myeloid cells and an aberrant development of T lymphocytes are also seen. These defects are rescued in vivo by blocking the FGF pathway in Sumf1−/− mice. Transplantation of Sumf1−/− HSPCs into wild-type mice reconstituted the phenotype of the donors, suggesting a cell autonomous defect. These data indicate that Sumf1 controls HSPC differentiation and hematopoietic lineage development through FGF and Wnt signaling. PMID:20643830

  12. Sulfatase modifying factor 1-mediated fibroblast growth factor signaling primes hematopoietic multilineage development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Mario; Visigalli, Ilaria; Bergamasco, Roberta; Biffi, Alessandra; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2010-08-02

    Self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are balanced by the concerted activities of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Wnt, and Notch pathways, which are tuned by enzyme-mediated remodeling of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1) activates the Sulf1 and Sulf2 sulfatases that remodel the HSPGs, and is mutated in patients with multiple sulfatase deficiency. Here, we show that the FGF signaling pathway is constitutively activated in Sumf1(-/-) HSCs and hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs). These cells show increased p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase levels, which in turn promote beta-catenin accumulation. Constitutive activation of FGF signaling results in a block in erythroid differentiation at the chromatophilic erythroblast stage, and of B lymphocyte differentiation at the pro-B cell stage. A reduction in mature myeloid cells and an aberrant development of T lymphocytes are also seen. These defects are rescued in vivo by blocking the FGF pathway in Sumf1(-/-) mice. Transplantation of Sumf1(-/-) HSPCs into wild-type mice reconstituted the phenotype of the donors, suggesting a cell autonomous defect. These data indicate that Sumf1 controls HSPC differentiation and hematopoietic lineage development through FGF and Wnt signaling.

  13. First Global Consensus for Evidence-Based Management of the Hematopoietic Syndrome Resulting From Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainiak, Nicholas; Gent, Robert Nicolas; Carr, Zhanat; Schneider, Rita; Bader, Judith; Buglova, Elena; Chao, Nelson; Norman Coleman, C.; Ganser, Arnold; Gorin, Claude; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Andrew Huff, L.; Lillis-Hearne, Patricia; Maekawa, Kazuhiko; Nemhauser, Jeffrey; Powles, Ray; Schünemann, Holger; Shapiro, Alla; Stenke, Leif; Valverde, Nelson; Weinstock, David; White, Douglas; Albanese, Joseph; Meineke, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hematopoietic syndrome (HS) is a clinical diagnosis assigned to people who present with ≥1 new-onset cytopenias in the setting of acute radiation exposure. The World Health Organization convened a panel of experts to evaluate the evidence and develop recommendations for medical countermeasures for the management of HS in a hypothetical scenario involving the hospitalization of 100 to 200 individuals exposed to radiation. The objective of this consultancy was to develop recommendations for treatment of the HS based upon the quality of evidence. Methods English-language articles were identified in MEDLINE and PubMed. Reference lists of retrieved articles were distributed to panel members before the meeting and updated during the meeting. Published case series and case reports of individuals with HS, published randomized controlled trials of relevant interventions used to treat nonirradiated individuals, reports of studies in irradiated animals, and prior recommendations of subject matter experts were selected. Studies were extracted using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. In cases in which data were limited or incomplete, a narrative review of the observations was made. No randomized controlled trials of medical countermeasures have been completed for individuals with radiation-associated HS. The use of GRADE analysis of countermeasures for injury to hematopoietic tissue was restricted by the lack of comparator groups in humans. Reliance on data generated in nonirradiated humans and experimental animals was necessary. Results Based upon GRADE analysis and narrative review, a strong recommendation was made for the administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor or granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and a weak recommendation was made for the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conclusions Assessment of therapeutic interventions for HS in

  14. Biosimilar G-CSF versus filgrastim and lenograstim in healthy unrelated volunteer hematopoietic stem cell donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Roiya; Urbanowska, Elżbieta; Zborowska, Hanna; Król, Małgorzata; Król, Maria; Torosian, Tigran; Piotrowska, Iwona; Bogusz, Krzysztof; Skwierawska, Kamila; Wiktor-Jędrzejczak, Wiesław; Snarski, Emilian

    2017-10-01

    The World Marrow Donor Organization recommends original granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for the mobilization of stem cells in healthy unrelated hematopoietic stem cell donors. We report the comparison of a biosimilar G-CSF (Zarzio) with two original G-CSFs (filgrastim and lenograstim) in mobilization in unrelated donors. We included data of 313 consecutive donors who were mobilized during the period from October 2014 to March 2016 at the Medical University of Warsaw. The primary endpoints of this study were the efficiency of CD34+ cell mobilization to the circulation and results of the first apheresis. The mean daily dose of G-CSF was 9.1 μg/kg for lenograstim, 9.8 μg/kg for biosimilar filgrastim, and 9.3 μg/kg for filgrastim (p donors mobilized with lenograstim and in 93% donors mobilized with original and biosimilar filgrastim (p = 0.005). The mobilized apheresis outcomes (mean number of CD34+ cells/kg of donor collected during the first apheresis) was similar with lenograstim, biosimilar filgrastim, and filgrastim: 6.2 × 106, 7.6 × 106, and 7.3 × 106, respectively, p = 0.06. There was no mobilization failure in any of the donors. Biosimilar G-CSF is as effective in the mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells in unrelated donors as original G-CSFs. Small and clinically irrelevant differences seen in the study can be attributed to differences in G-CSF dose and collection-related factors. Active safety surveillance concurrent to clinical use and reporting to donor outcome registry (e.g., EBMT donor outcome registry or WMDA SEAR/SPEAR) might help to evaluate the possible short- and long-term complications of biosimilar G-CSF.

  15. What is the role of biosimilar G-CSF agents in hematopoietic stem cell mobilization at present?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Serdal; Altuntas, Fevzi

    2017-12-01

    Mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells, which has largely replaced bone marrow harvesting as a source of hematopoietic stem cells, using recombinant agents such as filgrastim or lenograstim has become a standard procedure in both patients and healthy donors prior to peripheral blood stem cell collection for autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Published literature data suggest that mobilization with recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is safe and mobilization outcomes are satisfactory. In recent years, besides G-CSF originators, biosimilar G-CSF agents have been approved by the regulatory agencies for the same indications. Current data showed that by using the biosimilar G-CSF, similar results regarding safety and efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell mobilization may be achieved compared to the originator G-CSF. Although the issues such as the similarity to a licenced biological medicine, differences in manufacturing processes, the potential to cause immunogenicity, extrapolation and interchangeability of these biosimilar products are still being discussed by the scientific area, however, more experience with these agents now exists in approved endications and there seems to be no reason to expect significant differences between biosimilar G-CSF and originator G-CSF regarding their efficacy and safety in both patients and healthy donors. Also, the significant cost savings of biosimilars in real life setting may enhance the use of these agents in the future. Nonetheless, the collection of long-term follow-up data is mandatory for both patients and healthy donors, and multicentre randomized clinical trials that directly compare biosimilar G-CSF with the originator G-CSF are needed in order to allow the transplant community to make informed decisions regarding the choice of G-CSF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Low-Dose Irradiation Promotes Persistent Oxidative Stress and Decreases Self-Renewal in Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Rodrigues-Moreira

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous observations linking protracted exposure to low-dose (LD radiation and leukemia occurrence, the effects of LD irradiation on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs remain poorly documented. Here, we show that adult HSCs are hypersensitive to LD irradiation. This hyper-radiosensitivity is dependent on an immediate increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS that also promotes autophagy and activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 antioxidant pathway. Nrf2 activation initially protects HSCs from the detrimental effects of ROS, but protection is transient, and increased ROS levels return, promoting a long-term decrease in HSC self-renewal. In vivo, LD total body irradiation (TBI does not decrease HSC numbers unless the HSC microenvironment is altered by an inflammatory insult. Paradoxically, such an insult, in the form of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF preconditioning, followed by LD-TBI facilitates efficient bone marrow transplantation without myeloablation. Thus, LD irradiation has long-term detrimental effects on HSCs that may result in hematological malignancies, but LD-TBI may open avenues to facilitate autologous bone marrow transplantation.

  17. Serpina1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-8-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pel, Melissa; van Os, Ronald; Velders, Gerjo A; Hagoort, Henny; Heegaard, Peter M H; Lindley, Ivan J D; Willemze, Roel; Fibbe, Willem E

    2006-01-31

    Here, we report that cytokine-induced (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-8) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization is completely inhibited after low-dose (0.5 Gy) total-body irradiation (TBI). Because neutrophil granular proteases are regulatory mediators in cytokine-induced HSC/HPC mobilization, we considered a possible role for protease inhibitors in the induction of HSC/HPC mobilization. Bone marrow (BM) extracellular extracts that were obtained from murine femurs after 0.5 Gy of TBI contained an inhibitor of elastase. Also, after low-dose TBI, both Serpina1 mRNA and protein concentrations were increased in BM extracts, compared with extracts that were obtained from controls. The inhibitory activity in BM extracts of irradiated mice was reversed by addition of an Ab directed against Serpina1. To further study a possible in vivo role of Serpina1 in HSC/HPC mobilization, we administered Serpina1 before IL-8 injection. This administration resulted in an almost complete inhibition of HSC/HPC mobilization, whereas heat-inactivated Serpina1 had no effect. These results indicate that low-dose TBI inhibits cytokine-induced HSC/HPC mobilization and induces Serpina1 in the BM. Because exogenous administration of Serpina1 inhibits mobilization, we propose that radiation-induced Serpina1 is responsible for the inhibition of HSC/HPC mobilization. Also, we hypothesize that cytokine-induced HSC/HPC mobilization is determined by a critical balance between serine proteases and serine protease inhibitors.

  18. CD56 expression in normal immature granulocytes after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroi, Kazuo; Fujiwara, Shin-Ichiro; Tatara, Raine; Sugimoto, Miyuki; Yamamoto, Chihiro; Uehara, Eisuke; Meguro, Akiko; Hatano, Kaoru; Okazuka, Kiyoshi; Oh, Iekuni; Ohmine, Ken; Suzuki, Takahiro; Mori, Masaki; Nagai, Tadashi; Ozawa, Keiya

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells from 93 patients with hematological malignancies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) were analyzed using flow cytometry (FCM). The disease was acute myeloblastic leukemia (50 patients), acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and others. Conditioning was myeloablative (80 patients) or reduced intensity. The stem cell source was bone marrow (75 patients), peripheral blood stem cells, or cord blood. After AHSCT, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was given to all patients. All patients showed engraftment of the donor cells. FCM was conducted on a median of 22 days after AHSCT. The gate was set around a granulocytic region consisting of immature granulocytes. The positivity rates of CD13, CD14, CD15, CD33, CD34, CD56, and HLA-DR in the cells were 59.9 ± 27.4%, 5.8 ± 8.8%, 98.3 ± 1.9%, 92.3 ± 12.4%, 2.6 ± 5.8%, 24.3 ± 16.7%, and 9.1 ± 6.6%, respectively. The greatest value of CD56 positivity was 73.1%. On the basis of CD56 expression, cases of more than 24% CD56 positivity were assigned to the CD56-high group (39 patients), while the rest were assigned to the CD56-low/negative group. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of disease status, sex, donor, hematopoietic stem cells, days of FCM analysis, or peripheral blood cell counts around the days of performing FCM. These results indicate that CD56 can be expressed in normal immature granulocytes at a variety of expression levels in regenerative bone marrow. Attention should be paid when evaluating aberrant antigen expression of CD56 in granulocytes.

  19. Cartography of hematopoietic stem cell commitment dependent upon a reporter for transcription factor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Koichi

    2007-06-01

    A hierarchical hematopoietic developmental tree has been proposed based on the result of prospective purification of lineage-restricted progenitors. For more detailed mapping for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) commitment, we tracked the expression of PU.1, a major granulocyte/monocyte (GM)- and lymphoid-related transcription factor, from the HSC to the myelolymphoid progenitor stages by using a mouse line harboring a knockin reporter for PU.1. This approach enabled us to find a new progenitor population committed to GM and lymphoid lineages within the HSC fraction. This result suggests that there should be another developmental pathway independent of the conventional one with myeloid versus lymphoid bifurcation, represented by common myeloid progenitors and common lymphoid progenitors, respectively. The utilization of the transcription factor expression as a functional marker might be useful to obtain cartography of the hematopoietic development at a higher resolution.

  20. HIF-1α is required for hematopoietic stem cell mobilization and 4-prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors enhance mobilization by stabilizing HIF-1α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forristal, C E; Nowlan, B; Jacobsen, R N; Barbier, V; Walkinshaw, G; Walkley, C R; Winkler, I G; Levesque, J P

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with hematological neoplasms fail to mobilize sufficient numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) precluding subsequent autologous HSC transplantation. Plerixafor, a specific antagonist of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, can rescue some but not all patients who failed to mobilize with G-CSF alone. These refractory poor mobilizers cannot currently benefit from autologous transplantation. To discover alternative targetable pathways to enhance HSC mobilization, we studied the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the effect of HIF-1α pharmacological stabilization on HSC mobilization in mice. We demonstrate in mice with HSC-specific conditional deletion of the Hif1a gene that the oxygen-labile transcription factor HIF-1α is essential for HSC mobilization in response to G-CSF and Plerixafor. Conversely, pharmacological stabilization of HIF-1α with the 4-prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor FG-4497 synergizes with G-CSF and Plerixafor increasing mobilization of reconstituting HSCs 20-fold compared with G-CSF plus Plerixafor, currently the most potent mobilizing combination used in the clinic. PMID:25578474

  1. Brazilian experience using high dose sequential chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for malignant lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Kosa Lino Duarte

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of high-dose sequential chemotherapy in a Brazilian population. METHODS: High-dose cyclophosphamide followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an effective and feasible therapy for refractory/relapsed lymphomas; this regimen has never before been evaluated in a Brazilian population. All patients (106 with high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 77 with Hodgkin's lymphoma submitted to this treatment between 1998 and 2006 were analyzed. Chemotherapy consisted of the sequential administration of high-dose cyclophosphamide (4 or 7 g/m² and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (300 µg/day, followed by peripheral blood progenitor cell harvesting, administration of etoposide (2g/m² and methotrexate (8 g/m² only for Hodgkin's lymphoma and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. RESULTS: At diagnosis, non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients had a median age of 45 (range: 8-65 years old, 78% had diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and 83% had stage III/IV disease. The Hodgkin's lymphoma patients had a median age of 23 (range: 7-68 years old, 64.9% had the nodular sclerosis subtype and 65% had stage III/IV disease. Nine Hodgkin's lymphoma patients (13% and 10 (9% non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients had some kind of cardiac toxicity. The overall survival, disease-free survival and progression-free survival in Hodgkin's lymphoma were 29%, 59% and 26%, respectively. In non-Hodgkin lymphoma, these values were 40%, 49% and 31%, respectively. High-dose cyclophosphamide-related mortality was 10% for Hodgkin's lymphoma and 5% for non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients. High-dose cyclophosphamide dosing had no impact on toxicity or survival for both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a greater prevalence of poor prognostic factors, our results are comparable to the literature. The incidence of secondary neoplasias is noteworthy. Our study suggests that this approach is efficient and feasible, regardless of toxicity-related mortality.

  2. Complete remission of t(11;17) positive acute promyelocytic leukemia induced by all-trans retinoic acid and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Jansen (Joop); M.C. de Breems-de Ridder (Marleen); W.M. Geertsma; C.A.J. Erpelinck (Claudia); K. van Lom (Kirsten); R. Slater (Rosalyn); B.A. van der Reijden (Bert); G.E. de Greef (Georgine); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); B. Löwenberg (Bob); E.M.E. Smit (Elisabeth)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe combined use of retinoic acid and chemotherapy has led to an important improvement of cure rates in acute promyelocytic leukemia. Retinoic acid forces terminal maturation of the malignant cells and this application represents the first generally accepted

  3. Favorable effect of priming with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in remission induction of acute myeloid leukemia restricted to dose escalation of cytarabine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Pabst (Thomas); E. Vellenga (Edo); W.L.J. van Putten (Wim); H. Schouten (Harry); C. Graux (Carlos); M.-C. Vekemans (Marie-Christiane); B.J. Biemond (Bart); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); J. Passweg (Jakob Robert); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); M.C.J.C. Legdeur (M. C J C); M. Theobald (Matthias); E. Jacky (Emanuel); M. Bargetzi (Mario); J. Maertens (Johan); G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert); B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe clinical value of chemotherapy sensitization of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with G-CSF priming has remained controversial. Cytarabine is a key constituent of remission induction chemotherapy. The effect of G-CSF priming has not been investigated in relationship with variable dose

  4. Favorable effect of priming with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in remission induction of acute myeloid leukemia restricted to dose escalation of cytarabine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pabst, Thomas; Vellenga, Edo; van Putten, Wim; Schouten, Harry C.; Graux, Carlos; Vekemans, Marie-Christiane; Biemond, Bart; Sonneveld, Peter; Passweg, Jakob; Verdonck, Leo; Legdeur, Marie-Cecile; Theobald, Matthias; Jacky, Emanuel; Bargetzi, Mario; Maertens, Johan; Ossenkoppele, Gert Jan; Lowenberg, Bob

    2012-01-01

    The clinical value of chemotherapy sensitization of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with G-CSF priming has remained controversial. Cytarabine is a key constituent of remission induction chemotherapy. The effect of G-CSF priming has not been investigated in relationship with variable dose levels of

  5. Case Report. Prevention of Clozapine-Induced Granulocytopenia/Agranulocytosis with Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) in an Intellectually Disabled Patient with Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, G.; Graham, J. G.; Haut, F. F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: While clozapine is an effective treatment for refractory schizophrenia, its use is limited by haematological side effects. Treatment options that allow continued prescription of clozapine by tackling these side effects will greatly aid patients for whom this medication is all too often their only hope of recovery. Method: In this case…

  6. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not mitigate disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is responsible for one of the most economically important diseases in swine worldwide. It causes reproductive failure in sows and pneumonia in pigs that predisposes them to secondary bacterial infections. Methods to control PRRSV and/or lim...

  7. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not prevent disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinese highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) strain JXwn06 has been shown to produce high fevers, loss of body condition, respiratory distress and death in pigs. Necropsy reveals extensive interstitial pneumonia, multi-systemic pathology and a high occurrence of secondary bacterial infections. The ful...

  8. Safety and Efficacy of a Mouth-Rinse with Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor in Patients with Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Huang, Xin-En; Ji, Zhu-Qing; Liu, Meng-Yan; Qian, Ting; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    To assess the safety and effectiveness of a mouth-rinse with G-CSF (JiSaiXin, produced by NCPC Biotechnology Co., Ltd) in treating patients with chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis (CIM). A consecutive cohort of patients with advanced cancers and CIM were treated with mouth-rinse G-CSF. All chemotherapy for patients with advanced cancers was adopted from regimens suggested by NCCN guidelines. The mouth-rinse with G-CSF at a dose of 150-300ug plus 100ml-500ml normal saline was started from the time of oral mucositis was confirmed and continuously used for at least 7 days as one course. After at least two courses of treatment, safety and efficacy were evaluated. There were 7 female and 7 male patients with advanced cancer and CIM recruited into this study, including 5 with colorectal, 2 with lung, 1 patient with gastric, 1 with cervical and 1 with pancreatic cancer, as well as 2 patients with diffuse large B cell lymphomas, 1 with nasopharyngeal and 1 with gastric cancer. The median age was 57 (41-79) years. Grade 1 to 2 myelosuppression was observed in 3/14 patients, and Grade 4 myelosuppression in 1/14. Adverse effects on the gastrointestinal tract were documented in 5/14 patients, and were Grade 1 to Grade 3. No treatment related death was documented. Regarding CIM, the median response time to mouth rinse of G-CSF was 2 (1-5) days, and all patients with CIM demonstrated a positive response. Mouth-rinse with G-CSF proved to be safe and effective in treating patients with advanced cancers and CIM. However, further randomized controlled studies should be conducted to clarify the effectiveness of this treatment with other lesions.

  9. Attenuation of the bacterial load in blood by pretreatment with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor protects rats from fatal outcome and brain damage during Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Lund, Søren Peter

    2004-01-01

    10(5) versus 2.9 x 10(5) CFU/ml; P = 0.023) and in blood (median, 2.9 x 10(2) versus 6.3 x 10(2) CFU/ml; P = 0.024), as well as attenuated pleocytosis (median, 800 x 10(6) versus 1,231 x 10(6) cells/liter; P = 0.025), 24 h after the infection. Conversely, initiation of G-CSF therapy 28 h...

  10. Factors Influencing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Donation Intention in Hong Kong: A Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Janette; Leung, Eva; Wong, William; Leung, Kate; Lee, Cheuk Kwong; Lam, Wendy; Ip, Patrick

    2015-10-08

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become increasingly common for treatment of severe hematological disorders. However, the number of compatible hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) donors is usually limited. Expanding donor pool size would enhance matching success by increasing donor frequency and introducing allelic diversity within the registry. Identifying factors that affect public willingness towards HSC donation allows better strategic recruitment planning to facilitate donor pool expansion. Previous studies in white populations showed knowledge, family attitude, trust towards the healthcare system, fear, self-identity, and social identity are important factors related to HSC donation intention. However, given the differences in cultural and society values that exist across different regions, in particular between the East and West, whether these factors influence HSC donation willingness in Hong Kong remained to be determined. The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with HSC donation motivation in Hong Kong. A large-scale, cross-sectional, observational study involving 3479 local participants. There is a positive correlation of HSC donation intention with younger age (18-32, OR: 1.80, p≤0·001) and higher education (OR: 1·47, p≤0.001). Better HSCT knowledge is also related to greater HSC donation intention (OR: 2.55, p£0.001). Our data suggests HSCT education could help to improve donor recruitment and that more resources should be allocated for public education.

  11. Protection against radiation-induced hematopoietic damage in bone marrow by hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingfang; Sun, Huiyan; Xiao, Fengjun; Wang, Xiaojie; Yang, Yuefeng; Liu, Yingxia; Zhang, Qunwei; Wu, Chutse; Wang, Hua; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene could prevent radiation-induced hematopoietic damage. Thirty C57BL/6 mice were randomized into three groups, in which phosphate buffer saline (PBS), mock adenovirus vector (Ad-null) or adenovirus vector containing HGF (Ad-HGF) were injected into the tail vein of each group, respectively. After 48 hours, the mice received a single irradiation dose of 6.5 Gy (60)Co gamma rays. Blood samples were extracted via the tail vein at day 0, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, 24 and 30 after irradiation, for red blood cell (RBC) and white blood cell (WBC) and cluster of differentiation4 (CD4)/cluster of differentiation8 (CD8) ratio assessment. At weekly intervals following irradiation, serum erythropoietin (EPO), Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). On post-irradiation day 30, the mice were autopsied and erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) were evaluated. Adenovirus-mediated HGF gene transfer could increase human HGF level in serum and have a significant elevation in RBC and WBC count. Ad-HGF increased EPO and IL-6 levels and prompted BFU-E formation. Ad-HGF decreased radiation- induced micronucleus frequency in the mouse bone marrow (BM). Most evidence of radiation-induced hematopoietic damage was observed morphologically in bone marrow specimen four weeks after irradiation. Ad-HGF protected against radiation-induced BM failure and increased survival. Finally, Ad-HGF increased the thymic index and enhanced immune function in the irradiated C57BL/6 mice. This is the first report to date that demonstrates the potential of HGF gene transfer to prevent radiation-induced hematopoietic damage.

  12. Factors influencing platelet transfusion refractoriness in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solves, Pilar; Sanz, Jaime; Freiria, Carmen; Santiago, Marta; Villalba, Ana; Gómez, Inés; Montesinos, Pau; Montoro, Juan; Piñana, Jose Luis; Lorenzo, José Ignacio; Puig, Nieves; Sanz, Guillermo F; Sanz, Miguel Ángel; Carpio, Nelly

    2018-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been considered a risk factor for development of platelet transfusion refractoriness. The objective of this study was to assess the platelet transfusion refractoriness rate in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from different sources. We retrospectively reviewed the charts and transfusion records of patients who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation at our institution between 2013 and 2015. The evaluation of post-transfusion platelet count was assessed for each transfusion given, from day of progenitor infusion to day 30 after transplantation. Of 167 patients included in this study, 101 received peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) and 66 received umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT). Overall, the percentage of platelet transfusions with a 14-h CCI lower than 5000 was 59.3%, being these data significantly higher for UCBT (67.6%) than for PBSCT (31.0%). Seventy-eight percent of patients underwent UCBT become refractory, while 38.6% of patients who received PBSCT were refractory. Factors associated to platelet refractoriness were lower CD34+ cell dose infused, higher number of antibiotics used, presence of anti-HLA I antibodies, and reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. Platelet refractoriness is a frequent and complex adverse event and remains a therapeutic challenge in the management of patients undergoing HSCT. There is a higher rate of platelet refractoriness in patients who received UCBT as compared to patients who received PBSCT.

  13. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: comparison with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Bonaventura; Jarque, Isidro; Gascón, Francisco; Hernández-Boluda, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Miralles, Francisco; de la Rubia, Javier; Alcalá, Carmen; Sanz, Jaime; Mallada, Javier; Cervelló, Angeles; Navarré, Arantxa; Carcelén-Gadea, María; Boscá, Isabel; Gil-Perotin, Sara; Solano, Carlos; Sanz, Miguel Angel; Coret, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    The main objective of our work is to describe the long-term results of myeloablative autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (AHSCT) in multiple sclerosis patients. Patients that failed to conventional therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS) underwent an approved protocol for AHSCT, which consisted of peripheral blood stem cell mobilization with cyclophosphamide and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), followed by a conditioning regimen of BCNU, Etoposide, Ara-C, Melphalan IV, plus Rabbit Thymoglobulin. Thirty-eight MS patients have been transplanted since 1999. Thirty-one patients have been followed for more than 2 years (mean 8.4 years). There were 22 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients and 9 secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) patients. No death related to AHSCT. A total of 10 patients (32.3%) had at least one relapse during post-AHSCT evolution, 6 patients in the RRMS group (27.2%) and 4 in the SPMS group (44.4%). After AHSCT, 7 patients (22.6%) experienced progression of disability, all within SP form. By contrast, no patients with RRMS experienced worsening of disability after a median follow-up of 5.4 years, 60% of them showed a sustained reduction in disability (SRD), defined as the improvement of 1.0 point in the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) sustains for 6 months (0.5 in cases of EDSS ≥ 5.5). The only clinical variable that predicted a poor response to AHSCT was a high EDSS in the year before transplant. AHSCT using the BEAM-ATG scheme is safe and efficacious to control the aggressive forms of RRMS.

  14. Attenuated hematopoietic response to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with acquired pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seymour, JF; Begley, CG; Dirksen, U; Presneill, JJ; Nicola, NA; Moore, PE; Schoch, OD; van Asperen, P; Roth, B; Burdach, S; Dunn, AR

    1998-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acquired pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a rare lung disease characterized by excessive surfactant accumulation within the alveolar space, remains obscure. Gene-targeted mice lacking the hematopoietic growth factor granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)

  15. Tissue-specific mitotic bookmarking by hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadauke, Stephan; Udugama, Maheshi I; Pawlicki, Jan M; Achtman, Jordan C; Jain, Deepti P; Cheng, Yong; Hardison, Ross C; Blobel, Gerd A

    2012-08-17

    Tissue-specific transcription patterns are preserved throughout cell divisions to maintain lineage fidelity. We investigated whether transcription factor GATA1 plays a role in transmitting hematopoietic gene expression programs through mitosis when transcription is transiently silenced. Live-cell imaging revealed that a fraction of GATA1 is retained focally within mitotic chromatin. ChIP-seq of highly purified mitotic cells uncovered that key hematopoietic regulatory genes are occupied by GATA1 in mitosis. The GATA1 coregulators FOG1 and TAL1 dissociate from mitotic chromatin, suggesting that GATA1 functions as platform for their postmitotic recruitment. Mitotic GATA1 target genes tend to reactivate more rapidly upon entry into G1 than genes from which GATA1 dissociates. Mitosis-specific destruction of GATA1 delays reactivation selectively of genes that retain GATA1 during mitosis. These studies suggest a requirement of mitotic "bookmarking" by GATA1 for the faithful propagation of cell-type-specific transcription programs through cell division. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cell tissue factor activates the coagulation cascade in endotoxemic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlinski, Rafal; Wang, Jian-Guo; Owens, A. Phillip; Williams, Julie; Antoniak, Silvio; Tencati, Michael; Luther, Thomas; Rowley, Jesse W.; Low, Elizabeth N.; Weyrich, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the primary activator of the coagulation cascade. During endotoxemia, TF expression leads to disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, the relative contribution of TF expression by different cell types to the activation of coagulation has not been defined. In this study, we investigated the effect of either a selective inhibition of TF expression or cell type-specific deletion of the TF gene (F3) on activation of coagulation in a mouse model of endotoxemia. We found that inhibition of TF on either hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic cells reduced plasma thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) levels 8 hours after administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, plasma TAT levels were significantly reduced in endotoxemic mice lacking the TF gene in either myeloid cells (TFflox/flox,LysMCre mice) or in both endothelial cells (ECs) and hematopoietic cells (TFflox/flox,Tie-2Cre mice). However, deletion of the TF gene in ECs alone had no effect on LPS-induced plasma TAT levels. Similar results were observed in mice lacking TF in vascular smooth muscle cells. Finally, we found that mouse platelets do not express TF pre-mRNA or mRNA. Our data demonstrate that in a mouse model of endotoxemia activation of the coagulation cascade is initiated by TF expressed by myeloid cells and an unidentified nonhematopoietic cell type(s). PMID:20410508

  17. [Factors impacting yield of CD34(+) cells from healthy donors mobilized with rhG-CSF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Zhou, Li-Kun; Xue, Mei; Yan, Hong-Min; Liu, Jing; Wang, Zhi-Dong; Ding, Li; Wang, Heng-Xiang

    2009-12-01

    This study was aimed to explore the effect of donor characteristics (age, sex and so on.) on CD34(+) cell yields in apheresis from healthy donors mobilized by recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor(rhG-CSF). In 61 healthy donors, the characteristics associated with CD34(+) cell yield were analysed. The relationship between the CD34(+) cell yields and donor characteristics was statistically assessed with multivariate forward, backward and stepwise regression methods. A variety of parameters were analyzed which included donor age, sex, weight, height, body mass index (BMI) and time for collection of peripheral blood apheresis, while the mean number of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs), CD34(+) cell count, CD34(+) cell proportion based on MNC and CD34(+) cell count per kg of donor weight were used as the variables. The results showed that age of donors was the main factor impacting CD34(+) cell yields (-0.60 donors could reach the peak CD34(+) cell yields. It is concluded that the age of the donors is the first factor determining the choice of donors for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the sex, height, weight and BMI are secondary factors impacting yield of CD34(+) cells from donors mobilized with rhG-CSF.

  18. Risk Factors for Subsequent Central Nervous System Tumors in Pediatric Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, Melissa; Shaw, Bronwen E; Brazauskas, Ruta

    2017-01-01

    Survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) are at risk of subsequent solid tumors, including central nervous system (CNS) tumors. The risk of CNS tumors after HCT in pediatric HCT recipients is not known. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors for CNS tumors in pediatric recipients...... of allogeneic HCT reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1976 and 2008. A case control design was used. There were no CNS tumors in the nonmalignant cohort (n = 4543) or in those undergoing HCT for solid tumors (n = 26). There were 59 CNS tumors in 8720 patients...... transplanted for hematologic malignancies. In comparison with the general population, pediatric HCT recipients with hematologic malignancies had a 33 times higher than expected rate of CNS tumors (95% confidence interval, 22.98 to 45.77; P 

  19. The use of growth factors to manage the hematologic side effects of PEG-interferon alfa and ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collantes, Rochelle S; Younossi, Zobair M

    2005-01-01

    Hematologic side effects (anemia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia) of combination therapy with pegylated (PEG)-interferon alfa and ribavirin are commonly encountered during antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C (HCV). An important consequence of these side effects is dose modification of PEG-interferon alfa, ribavirin, or both. Dose modification (including discontinuation) diminishes the efficacy of optimal treatment regimen for HCV and may have a negative impact on sustained virologic response. Additionally, fatigue associated with anemia may impair patients' quality of life. The clinical implications of neutropenia or thrombocytopenia are less clear than for anemia; nevertheless, severe infection and bleeding are uncommon. Dose adjustments effectively treat these hematologic side effects, but the resulting suboptimal dosing and potential impact on virologic response are major concerns. Recent attempts to maximize adherence to the optimal treatment regimen have used hematopoietic growth factors rather than dose adjustment to treat side effects. Research on growth factor support has focused on anemia and neutropenia. Epoetin alfa and darbepoetin alfa are erythropoietic growth factors that effectively increase hemoglobin while maintaining the optimal ribavirin dose and improving patients' quality of life. Preliminary work suggests that filgrastim, granulocyte colony stimulating factors, may be an effective treatment of interferon-induced neutropenia. Although this early work shows tremendous promise for managing hematologic side effects of combination therapy for HCV, and potentially enhancing adherence, further research is needed to clarify the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of growth factors in the management of patients with chronic HCV.

  20. Effects of hematopoietic growth factors on purified bone marrow progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Bot (Freek)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWe have used highly enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells and in-vitro culture to examine the following questions: 1. The effects of recombinant lL-3 and GM-CSF on proliferation and differentiation of enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells have not been clearly defined: - how do IL~3

  1. Factors affecting the CD34+ cell yields from the second donations of healthy donors: The steady-state lymphocyte count is a good predictive factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Tao; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Yu; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Chang, Ying-Jun

    2016-12-01

    A second allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation and donor lymphocyte infusion using cells from the same donor is a therapeutic option in the case of stem-cell graft failure or disease relapse, but little is known about the factors associated with the CD34+ cell yields from second donations. One-hundred healthy donors who underwent a second mobilization treatment and peripheral blood stem-cell (PBSC) collection were studied. For both mobilization processes, 5 µg of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor per kg per day was administered. The blood counts of the donors were monitored during the processes. The second donations from the same donors provided lower apheresis yields than did the initial collections. The number of CD34+ cells collected from normal donors after a second cycle of PBSC mobilization was associated with their steady-state lymphocyte counts and the intertransplantation interval. Female sex negatively affected the CD34+ cell yields. The cutoff value for the steady-state absolute lymphocyte count was 2.055 × 109/L. To harvest greater numbers of CD34+ cells from second collections, male donors and those with intervals of longer than 9 months between donations should be selected. The lymphocyte counts prior to the first donations may predict the content of CD34+ cells in the allografts prepared using the second donations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Purification of human recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Escherichia coli, recombinant proteins were produced either as three dimensionally folded forms or as unfolded forms, inclusion body (IB). The formation of IB was a frequent consequence of high-level protein production and inadequacy of folding agents namely chaperones in the cytoplasm. The structure of the protein in ...

  3. Hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization with "just-in-time" plerixafor approach is a cost-effective alternative to routine plerixafor use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Lauren; Cumpston, Aaron; Shillingburg, Alexandra; Wen, Sijin; Luo, Jin; Leadmon, Sonia; Watkins, Kathy; Craig, Michael; Hamadani, Mehdi; Kanate, Abraham S

    2015-12-01

    Hematopoietic cell mobilization with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and plerixafor results in superior CD34+ cell yield compared with G-CSF alone in patients with myeloma and lymphoma. However, plerixafor-based approaches may be associated with high costs. Several institutions use a "just-in-time" plerixafor approach, in which plerixafor is only administered to patients likely to fail mobilization with G-CSF alone. Whether such an approach is cost-effective is unknown. We evaluated 136 patients with myeloma or lymphoma who underwent mobilization with 2 approaches of plerixafor utilization. Between January 2010 and October 2012, 76 patients uniformly received mobilization with G-CSF and plerixafor. Between November 2012 and June 2014, 60 patients were mobilized with plerixafor administered only to those patients likely to fail mobilization with G-CSF alone. The routine plerixafor group had a higher median peak peripheral blood CD34+ cell count (62 versus 29 cells/μL, P mobilization failure rates. The mean plerixafor doses used was lower with "just-in-time" approach (1.3 versus 2.1, P = 0.0002). The mean estimated cost in the routine plerixafor group was higher (USD 27,513 versus USD 23,597, P = 0.01). Our analysis demonstrates that mobilization with a just-in-time plerixafor approach is a safe, effective, and cost-efficient strategy for HPC collection. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Mobilization with “Just-in-Time” Plerixafor Approach is a Cost Effective Alternative to Routine Plerixafor Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Lauren; Cumpston, Aaron; Shillingburg, Alexandra; Wen, Sijin; Luo, Jin; Leadmon, Sonia; Watkins, Kathy; Craig, Michael; Hamadani, Mehdi; Kanate, Abraham S.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and plerixafor results in superior CD34+ cell yield, when compared to mobilization with G-CSF alone in patients with myeloma and lymphoma. However, plerixafor-based approaches are associated with high costs. To circumvent this, several institutions use a so-called “just-in-time” plerixafor (JIT-P) approach, where plerixafor is only administered to patients likely to fail mobilization with G-CSF alone. Whether such a JIT-P approach is cost effective has not been confirmed to date. We present here, results of 136 patients with myeloma or lymphoma who underwent mobilization with two different approaches of plerixafor utilization. Between Jan 2010-Oct 2012 (n=76) patients uniformly received mobilization with G-CSF and plerixafor (routine G+P cohort). To reduce mobilization costs, between Nov 2012-Jun 2014 (n=60) patients were mobilized with JIT-P where plerixafor was only administered to patients likely to fail mobilization with G-CSF alone. Patients in routine G+P group had a higher median peak peripheral blood CD34+ cell count (62 vs. 29 cells/μL, pmobilization failure rates. The mean number of plerixafor doses utilized in JIT-P was lower (1.3 vs. 2.1, p=0.0002). The mean estimated cost in the routine G+P group was higher than that in the JIT-P group (USD 27,513 vs. USD 23,597, p=0.01). Our analysis demonstrates that mobilization with a JIT-P approach is a safe, effective and cost efficient strategy for HPC collection. PMID:26475754

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients: factors determining progression to lower respiratory tract disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yae-Jean; Guthrie, Katherine A; Waghmare, Alpana; Walsh, Edward E; Falsey, Ann R; Kuypers, Jane; Cent, Anne; Englund, Janet A; Boeckh, Michael

    2014-04-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease (LRD) is a life-threatening complication in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Lymphopenia has been associated with an increased risk of progression from upper respiratory tract infection (URI) to LRD. This study retrospectively analyzed the significance of lymphocyte engraftment dynamics, lung function, smoking history, corticosteroids, antiviral treatment, viral subtypes, and RSV-specific neutralizing antibodies for the progression to LRD in 181 HCT recipients with RSV URI. In multivariable models, smoking history, conditioning with high-dose total body irradiation, and an absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) ≤100/mm(3) at the time of URI onset were significantly associated with disease progression. No progression occurred in patients with ALCs of >1000/mm(3) at URI onset. Lymphocyte engraftment dynamics were similar in progressors and nonprogressors. Pre- and posttransplant donor and posttransplant recipient RSV subtype-specific neutralizing antibody levels, RSV viral subtypes, and corticosteroids also were not significantly associated with LRD progression. Host and transplant related factors appear to determine the risk of progression to LRD more than viral factors. Dysfunctional cell-mediated immunity appears to be important in the pathogenesis of progressive RSV disease after HCT. A characterization of RSV-specific T-cell immunity is warranted.

  6. Vascular Platform to Define Hematopoietic Stem Cell Factors and Enhance Regenerative Hematopoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Poulos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs inhabit distinct microenvironments within the adult bone marrow (BM, which govern the delicate balance between HSC quiescence, self-renewal, and differentiation. Previous reports have proposed that HSCs localize to the vascular niche, comprised of endothelium and tightly associated perivascular cells. Herein, we examine the capacity of BM endothelial cells (BMECs to support ex vivo and in vivo hematopoiesis. We demonstrate that AKT1-activated BMECs (BMEC-Akt1 have a unique transcription factor/cytokine profile that supports functional HSCs in lieu of complex serum and cytokine supplementation. Additionally, transplantation of BMEC-Akt1 cells enhanced regenerative hematopoiesis following myeloablative irradiation. These data demonstrate that BMEC-Akt1 cultures can be used as a platform for the discovery of pro-HSC factors and justify the utility of BMECs as a cellular therapy. This technical advance may lead to the development of therapies designed to decrease pancytopenias associated with myeloablative regimens used to treat a wide array of disease states.

  7. Prolonged Shedding of Human Coronavirus in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients: Risk Factors and Viral Genome Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogimi, Chikara; Greninger, Alexander L; Waghmare, Alpana A; Kuypers, Jane M; Shean, Ryan C; Xie, Hu; Leisenring, Wendy M; Stevens-Ayers, Terry L; Jerome, Keith R; Englund, Janet A; Boeckh, Michael

    2017-07-15

    Recent data suggest that human coronavirus (HCoV) pneumonia is associated with significant mortality in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Investigation of risk factors for prolonged shedding and intrahost genome evolution may provide critical information for development of novel therapeutics. We retrospectively reviewed HCT recipients with HCoV detected in nasal samples by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). HCoV strains were identified using strain-specific PCR. Shedding duration was defined as time between first positive and first negative sample. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate factors for prolonged shedding (≥21 days). Metagenomic next-generation sequencing (mNGS) was conducted when ≥4 samples with cycle threshold values of <28 were available. Seventeen of 44 patients had prolonged shedding. Among 31 available samples, 35% were OC43, 32% were NL63, 19% were HKU1, and 13% were 229E; median shedding duration was similar between strains (P = .79). Bivariable logistic regression analyses suggested that high viral load, receipt of high-dose steroids, and myeloablative conditioning were associated with prolonged shedding. mNGS among 5 subjects showed single-nucleotide polymorphisms from OC43 and NL63 starting 1 month following onset of shedding. High viral load, high-dose steroids, and myeloablative conditioning were associated with prolonged shedding of HCoV in HCT recipients. Genome changes were consistent with the expected molecular clock of HCoV.

  8. Multilineage hematopoietic recovery with concomitant antitumor effects using low dose Interleukin-12 in myelosuppressed tumor-bearing mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Joseph D

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-12 (IL-12 is a cytokine well known for its role in immunity. A lesser known function of IL-12 is its role in hematopoiesis. The promising data obtained in the preclinical models of antitumor immunotherapy raised hope that IL-12 could be a powerful therapeutic agent against cancer. However, excessive clinical toxicity, largely due to repeat dose regimens, and modest clinical response observed in the clinical trials have pointed to the necessity to design protocols that minimize toxicity without affecting the anti-tumor effect of IL-12. We have focused on the lesser known role of IL-12 in hematopoiesis and hypothesized that an important clinical role for IL-12 in cancer may be as an adjuvant hematological cancer therapy. In this putative clinical function, IL-12 is utilized for the prevention of cancer therapy-related cytopenias, while providing concomitant anti-tumor responses over and above responses observed with the primary therapy alone. This putative clinical function of IL-12 focuses on the dual role of IL-12 in hematopoiesis and immunity. Methods We assessed the ability of IL-12 to facilitate hematopoietic recovery from radiation (625 rad and chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide in two tumor-bearing murine models, namely the EL4 lymphoma and the Lewis lung cancer models. Antitumor effects and changes in bone marrow cellularity were also assessed. Results We show herein that carefully designed protocols, in mice, utilizing IL-12 as an adjuvant to radiation or chemotherapy yield facile and consistent, multilineage hematopoietic recovery from cancer therapy-induced cytopenias, as compared to vehicle and the clinically-utilized cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF (positive control, while still providing concomitant antitumor responses over and above the effects of the primary therapy alone. Moreover, our protocol design utilizes single, low doses of IL-12 that did not yield any apparent toxicity

  9. An All-Recombinant Protein-Based Culture System Specifically Identifies Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Ieyasu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are considered one of the most promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of various blood disorders. However, due to difficulties in establishing stable maintenance and expansion of HSCs in vitro, their insufficient supply is a major constraint to transplantation studies. To solve these problems we have developed a fully defined, all-recombinant protein-based culture system. Through this system, we have identified hemopexin (HPX and interleukin-1α as responsible for HSC maintenance in vitro. Subsequent molecular analysis revealed that HPX reduces intracellular reactive oxygen species levels within cultured HSCs. Furthermore, bone marrow immunostaining and 3D immunohistochemistry revealed that HPX is expressed in non-myelinating Schwann cells, known HSC niche constituents. These results highlight the utility of this fully defined all-recombinant protein-based culture system for reproducible in vitro HSC culture and its potential to contribute to the identification of factors responsible for in vitro maintenance, expansion, and differentiation of stem cell populations.

  10. The myeloma-associated oncogene fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 is transforming in hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Zhu, Y X; Plowright, E E; Bergsagel, P L; Chesi, M; Patterson, B; Hawley, T S; Hawley, R G; Stewart, A K

    2001-04-15

    Translocations involving fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (fgfr3) have been identified in about 25% of patients with myeloma. To directly examine the oncogenic potential of fgfr3, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with retroviral vectors containing either wild-type fgfr3 or an activated mutant form of the receptor, fgfr3-TD. Mice transplanted with FGFR3-TD-expressing BM developed a marked leukocytosis and lethal hematopoietic cell infiltration of multiple tissues within 6 weeks of transplantation. Secondary and tertiary recipients of spleen or BM from primary fgfr3-TD mice also developed tumors within 6 to 8 weeks. Analysis of the circulating tumor cells revealed a pre-B-cell phenotype in most mice, although immature T-lymphoid or mature myeloid populations also predominated in some animals. Enhanced lymphoid but not myeloid colony formation was observed in the early posttransplantation period and only interleukin 7 and FGF-responsive pre-B-cell lines could be established from tumors. Cell expansions in primary recipients appeared polyclonal, whereas tumors in later passages exhibited either clonal B- or T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. Mice transplanted with wild-type FGFR3-expressing BM developed delayed pro-B-cell lymphoma/leukemias approximately 1 year after transplantation. These studies confirm that FGFR3 is transforming and can produce lymphoid malignancies in mice.

  11. Hemorrhagic cystitis after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: risk factors, graft source and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunde, L E; Dasaraju, S; Cao, Q; Cohn, C S; Reding, M; Bejanyan, N; Trottier, B; Rogosheske, J; Brunstein, C; Warlick, E; Young, J A H; Weisdorf, D J; Ustun, C

    2015-11-01

    Although hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is a common complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), its risk factors and effects on survival are not well known. We evaluated HC in a large cohort (n=1321, 2003-2012) receiving alloHCT from all graft sources, including umbilical cord blood (UCB). We compared HC patients with non-HC (control) patients and examined clinical variables at HC onset and resolution. Of these 1321 patients, 219 (16.6%) developed HC at a median of 22 days after alloHCT. BK viruria was detected in 90% of 109 tested HC patients. Median duration of HC was 27 days. At the time of HC diagnosis, acute GVHD, fever, severe thrombocytopenia and steroid use were more frequent than at the time of HC resolution. In univariate analysis, male sex, age <20 years, myeloablative conditioning with cyclophosphamide and acute GVHD were associated with HC. In multivariate analysis, HC was significantly more common in males and HLA-mismatched UCB graft recipients. Severe grade HC (grade III-IV) was associated with increased treatment-related mortality but not with overall survival at 1 year. HC remains hazardous and therefore better prophylaxis, and early interventions to limit its severity are still needed.

  12. Nutritional status of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients: influencing risk factors and impact on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghammaz, Amro Mohamed Sedky; Ben Matoug, Rima; Elzimaity, Maha; Mostafa, Nevine

    2017-04-24

    Patients subjected to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at increased nutritional risk which in turn may alter their outcome. For providing good nutritional care for patients, it is important to analyze risk factors influencing nutritional status during and after HSCT. Fifty patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT were subjected to nutritional status assessment by using the patient-generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) at initial admission, day 30 and day 180. Two patients (4%) had malnutrition at admission, 36 (72%) at day 30, and 24 (48%) at day 180. At day 30, comorbidity index higher than 0 and fever lasting for more than 1 week had a significant impact on nutritional status (P = .004 and P = .006, respectively). Regarding day 180, comorbidity index higher than 0 and presence of ≥grade II acute gastrointestinal graft versus host disease (GI GVHD) significantly influenced nutritional status (P = .017 and P = .026, respectively). Well-nourished patients at admission and day 180 had a significantly higher overall survival (OS) in comparison to malnourished patients (P Nutritional status at admission and day 180 had a significant influence on OS in multivariate analysis (P = .039 and P = .032, respectively). Allogeneic HSCT patients having high comorbidity index, developing prolonged fever, and experiencing ≥grade II acute GI GVHD suffer from worsening in their nutritional status during hospitalization and after discharge. Also, nutritional status at admission and day 180 significantly influences their survival.

  13. Age-related changes of healthy bone marrow cell signaling in response to growth factors provide insight into low risk MDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblau, Steven M; Cohen, Aileen C; Soper, David; Huang, Ying-Wen; Cesano, Alessandra

    2014-11-01

    Single Cell Network Profiling (SCNP) is a multiparametric flow cytometry-based assay that quantifiably and simultaneously measures changes in intracellular signaling proteins in response to in vitro extracellular modulators at the single cell level. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous clonal disorder of hematopoietic stem cells that occurs in elderly subjects and is characterized by dysplasia and ineffective hematopoiesis. The functional responsiveness of MDS bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic cells, including functionally distinct myeloid and erythroid precursor subsets, to hematopoietic growth factors (HGF) and the relationship of modulated signaling to disease characteristics is poorly understood. SCNP was used first to examine the effects of age on erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF)-induced signaling in myeloid, nucleated red blood cells (nRBC), and CD34 expressing cell subsets in healthy BM (n = 15). SCNP was then used to map functional signaling profiles in low risk (LR) MDS (n = 7) for comparison to signaling in samples from healthy donors and to probe signaling associations within clinically defined subgroups. In healthy BM samples, signaling responses to HGF were quite homogeneous (i.e., tightly regulated) with age-dependent effects observed in response to EPO but not to GCSF. Despite the relatively small number of samples assayed in the study, LR MDS could be classified into distinct subgroups based on both cell subset frequency and signaling profiles. As a correlate of underlying genetic abnormalities, signal transduction analyses may provide a functional and potentially clinically relevant classification of MDS. Further evaluation in a larger cohort is warranted. © 2013 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  14. [Analysis of the risk factors for hemorrhagic cystitis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for beta-thalassemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wen-fang; Pei, Fu-yu; Wu, Xue-dong; Liu, Si-xi; He, Yue-lin; Liao, Jian-yun; Li, Na; Chen, Ge-yu; Feng, Xiao-qing; Li, Chun-fu

    2010-04-01

    To analyze the risk factors of hemorrhagic cystitis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for beta-thalassemia in children. The clinical records of 30 children with beta-thalassemia undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation between December, 2008 and November, 2009 were analyzed. Hemorrhagic cystitis occurred in 8 of the 33 patients with an incidence of 24.24%, including 1 with grade I, 6 with grade II and 1 with grade III hemorrhagic cystitis. The median time of hemorrhagic cystitis onset was 22.9 days (range 6-35 days) and the median duration was 11.9 days(range 3-27 days). Univariate analysis indicated that the different types of transplantation and acute graft-versus-host disease affect the occurrence of hemorrhagic cystitis. The children with Allo-PBSCT had higher incidence than those receiving Allo-PBSCT+Allo-UBT and Allo-BMT (Por=6 years had obviously higher incidence of hemorrhagic cystitis than those at younger ages. Age is the major factor that affects the occurrence of hemorrhagic cystitis in children undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for beta-thalassemia.

  15. Factors affecting autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell collections by large-volume leukapheresis: a single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araci Massami Sakashita

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate factors affecting peripheral bloodhematopoietic stem cell yield in patients undergoing large-volumeleukapheresis for autologous peripheral blood stem cell collection.Methods: Data from 304 consecutive autologous peripheral bloodstem cell donors mobilized with hematopoietic growth factor (usually G-CSF, associated or not with chemotherapy, at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein between February 1999 and June 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The objective was to obtain at least 2 x 106CD34+ cells/kg of body weight. Pre-mobilization factors analyzedincluded patient’s age, gender and diagnosis. Post mobilizationparameters evaluated were pre-apheresis peripheral white bloodcell count, immature circulating cell count, mononuclear cell count,peripheral blood CD34+ cell count, platelet count, and hemoglobinlevel. The effect of pre and post-mobilization factors on hematopoietic stem cell collection yield was investigated using logistic regression analysis (univariate and multivariate approaches. Results: Premobilization factors correlating to poor CD34+ cell yield in univariate analysis were acute myeloid leukemia (p = 0.017 and other hematological diseases (p = 0.023. Significant post-mobilization factors included peripheral blood immature circulating cells (p = 0.001, granulocytes (p = 0.002, hemoglobin level (p = 0.016, and CD34+ cell concentration (p < 0.001 in the first harvesting day. However, according to multivariate analysis, peripheral blood CD34+ cell content (p < 0.001 was the only independent factor that significantly correlated to poor hematopoietic stem cell yield. Conclusion: In this study, peripheral blood CD34+ cell concentration was the only factor significantly correlated to yield in patients submitted to for autologous collection.

  16. Aberrant Levels of Hematopoietic/Neuronal Growth and Differentiation Factors in Euthyroid Women at Risk for Autoimmune Thyroid Disease.

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    Elske T Massolt

    Full Text Available Subjects at risk for major mood disorders have a higher risk to develop autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD and vice-versa, implying a shared pathogenesis. In mood disorder patients, an abnormal profile of hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is observed, suggesting that growth/differentiation abnormalities of these cell lineages may predispose to mood disorders. The first objective of our study was to investigate whether an aberrant profile of these hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is also detectable in subjects at risk for AITD. A second objective was to study the inter relationship of these factors with previously determined and published growth factors/cytokines in the same subjects.We studied 64 TPO-Ab-negative females with at least 1 first- or second-degree relative with AITD, 32 of whom did and 32 who did not seroconvert to TPO-Ab positivity in 5-year follow-up. Subjects were compared with 32 healthy controls (HCs. We measured serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, Stem Cell Factor (SCF, Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 2 (IGFBP-2, Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF and IL-7 at baseline.BDNF was significantly lower (8.2 vs 18.9 ng/ml, P<0.001, while EGF (506.9 vs 307.6 pg/ml, P = 0.003 and IGFBP-2 (388.3 vs 188.5 ng/ml, P = 0.028 were significantly higher in relatives than in HCs. Relatives who seroconverted in the next 5 years had significantly higher levels of SCF than non-seroconverters (26.5 vs 16.7 pg/ml, P = 0.017. In a cluster analysis with the previously published growth factors/cytokines SCF clustered together with IL-1β, IL-6 and CCL-3, of which high levels also preceded seroconversion.Relatives of AITD patients show aberrant serum levels of 4 hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors similar to the aberrancies found in mood disorder patients, suggesting that shared growth and differentiation defects in both the hematopoietic and neuronal system may underlie thyroid autoimmunity and mood disorders. A

  17. Factors Associated with Cytomegalovirus Reactivation Following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Human Leukocyte Antigens Might Be Among the Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Acar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cytomegalovirus (CMV is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT recipients. Current practice includes prophylactic and preemptive treatment modalities, which have risks, side effects, and costs of their own. There is no established risk scoring system that applies to all patients. We aimed to investigate the risk factors for CMV reactivation in AHSCT recipients. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the risk factors for CMV reactivation in 185 consequent AHSCT recipients transplanted between September 2003 and December 2009 at the Stem Cell Transplantation Unit of Gazi University. Besides the standard transplant-related parameters, HLA antigens were also included among the variables analyzed. RESULTS: Despite the very high rate of donor (94.6% and recipient (100% seropositivity, which are the so-called major risk factors in previous reports, our reactivation rate was much lower, with a frequency of 24.9%. The underlying disease, sex, conditioning regimen, and presence of antithymocyte globulin or fludarabine in the conditioning regimen had no impact on reactivation rate. CMV reactivation was significantly more frequent in recipients with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD compared to those without GVHD (p<0.0001. CMV reactivation was significantly more frequent (p<0.05 in patients with HLA-B14, HLADRB1* 01, and HLA-DRB1*13 antigens and less frequent in recipients with HLA-A11 and HLA-DRB1*04 antigens (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Universal risk factors/scores that apply to all transplant recipients are required for tailored prophylaxis and/ or treatment strategies for CMV reactivation. Uncovering the role of genetic factors, including HLA antigens, as possible risk factors might lead the way to risk-adaptive strategies for adoptive cellular therapy and/or vaccination.

  18. Risk factors for hemorrhagic cystitis in pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, R T; Gu, Z; Liu, W; Lovins, R; Kasow, K; Woodard, P; Srivastava, K; Leung, W

    2015-04-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) results in significant morbidity among hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Several potential causes for HC have been postulated, including viral infection, but definitive evidence is lacking, particularly in pediatric HSCT patients. Ninety pediatric HSCT recipients were prospectively tested on a weekly basis for adenovirus (ADV) and BK virus (BKV) by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in blood and urine samples. Results were correlated with the occurrence of grade II-IV HC. The odds ratio (OR) of HC (95% confidence interval) for BKV ≥1 × 10(9) copies/mL of urine was 7.39 (1.52, 35.99), with a P-value of 0.013. Those with acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) also had higher odds of developing HC, with an OR of 5.34. Given a 20% prevalence rate of HC, positive and negative predictive values of 29% and 95% were seen with a cutoff of 10(9) copies/mL. BK viremia did not reach significance as a risk factor for development of HC (P = 0.06). Only 8 patients showed ADV viruria and 7 showed ADV viremia; all had low viral loads and 4 had no evidence of HC. HC in pediatric HSCT is correlated most strongly to elevated urinary viral load of BKV and to aGVHD, but less strongly to BK viremia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Transplante de células tronco hematopoéticas para doenças auto-imunes no Brasil Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diseases in Brazil

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    Júlio C. Voltarelli

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available O transplante de células progenitoras hematopoéticas apresenta bases sólidas para ser indicado no tratamento das doenças autoimunes. No relato são apresentados estes dados e a seqüência de eventos que tem contribuído para a implantação de um protocolo brasileiro do procedimento na modalidade autogênica utilizando regimes de mobilização uniforme com Ciclofosfamida 2g/m2 mais fator estimulador de colônias granulocitárias e condicionamentos particulares para o lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, esclerose sistêmica e esclerose múltipla. As entidades descritas anteriormente foram escolhidas para o início do protocolo cooperativo após amplos debates em encontros ocorridos em Ribeirão Preto e São Francisco, EUA.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation presents a solid basis to be indicated for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In this work data related to the procedure and the sequence of events which have contributed to the implantation of a Brazilian protocol are discussed. Included is a discussion of the autogenic procedure using uniform mobilization regimens with Cyclophosphamide 2g/m2 plus granulocyte-colony stimulation factor and particular conditioning for systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. The formerly described entities were chosen for the beginning of a cooperative protocol after wide-ranging debates which took place both in Ribeirão Preto and San Francisco, USA.

  20. Factores de Crescimento Hematopoiético

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    Maria De Fátima Miguel Rodrigues

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available SUMÁRIO: Os factores de crescimento hematopoiético (FCH são glicoproteinas que regulam a proliferação e diferenciação das células sanguíneas. Com o objectivo de reduzir a morbilidade, melhorar a qualidade de vida e as taxas de sobrevivência dos doentes submetidos a terapêuticas mielossupressoras, tern sido desenvolvida uma intensa investigação clínica e experimental na tentativa de evitar a degradação dos parâmetros hematológicos.Apresenta-se oeste artigo uma breve revisão sobre os FCH: a sua origem endógena, classificação, mecanismos de acção, potencial uso na prática clínica, em particular no carcinoma brônquico, doenças linfoproliferativas e outras doenças hematológicas, SIDA e insuficiêncla renal crónica. É dado maior relevo a três FCH: Eritropoietina (EPO, Factor estimulante das colónias de granulocitos (G-CSF e Factor estimulante das colónias de granulocitos e macrófagos (GM-CSF. Referem-se finalmente a posologia, os efeitos adversos e as indicações internacionalmente aceites para o uso dos FCH na prática clínica. SUMMARY: Hematopoietic growth factors (HGF are glycoproteins that control the proliferation and differentiation of blood cells. In the aim to reduce morbiedity, improve survival and quality of life in patients submitted to mielossupressive therapies, intensive clinical and experimental research has been undertaken in an attempt to avoid the degradation of hematologic parameters.We present a brief review of HGF, describing their endogenous production, classification and mechanisms of action, as well as their potential clinical indications, namely in bronchial carcinoma, lymphoproliferative disorders and other hematological diseases, AIDS and cronic renal failure.Some of these factors are discussed in detail: Erythropoietin (EPO, Granulocyte colony – stimulating factor (G-CSF, and Granulocyte macrophage

  1. Cytosine Arabinoside reduces the numbers of granulocyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hematopoietic stem cell quiescence maintained by. p12CIP1/WAF 1. Science 2000.; 287:1804-1808. 19. Morrison SJ, Wright DE, Weissman IL. Cyclophosphamide/ granulocyte colony stimulating factor induces hematopoietic stem cells to proliferate prior to mobilization. Proceedings of the National. Academy of Sciences ...

  2. Acute renal failure following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: Incidence, outcome and risk factors

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    Imed Helal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal insufficiency is a common complication early after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT. We retrospectively examined the incidence, risk factors and associated mortality of acute renal failure (ARF in a cohort of 101 consecutive allogeneic HCT patients. These patients were reviewed to determine their baseline characteristics, the presence of co-morbid conditions and mortality rates at one year. ARF was defined by the doubling of the baseline serum creatinine (Scr levels. The mean age of the 101 study patients was 34 ± 11.8 years. Of them, 58 (57.4% had ARF, yielding an incidence of 2.6% per week during the first year following HCT. The peak frequency of ARF occurred during the second week (29.3%. The need for hemodialysis, a proof of the severity of ARF, was seen in 12 cases (20.7%. On univariate analysis, the Scr at one month greater than 90 μmol/L (P = 0.008, use of aminoglycosides (P < 10 -3 , the presence of veno-occlusive disease (VOD (P < 10 -3 and the need for admission to the intensive care unit (ICU (P = 0.003 were associated with a significantly increased risk of ARF. On multivariate analysis, the independent variables associated with an increased risk for ARF were the presence of VOD [P = 0.07, relative risk (RR = 2.06] and use of aminoglycosides (P < 10 -3 , RR = 11.2. The overall mortality rate among the study patients was 35.6% at the end of the first year. On multivariate analysis, only the use of aminoglycosides (P = 0.02, RR = 0.31, admission to the ICU (P < 10 -3, RR = 7.29 and the development of ARF (P = 0.001, RR = 8.97 were independent predictors of mortality. Our study shows that ARF is highly prevalent during the early period following HCT and increases mortality, particularly if dialysis dependent. It frequently occurs following VOD and aminoglycoside use. As the prognosis is rather grim, it is very important that the associated factors be identified early, for an effective prevention of this disease.

  3. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk Factors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Severe Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I (Hurler Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunlin, Elizabeth; Steinberger, Julia; DeFor, Todd; Orchard, Paul; Kelly, Aaron S

    2018-02-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is a life-saving procedure, but one associated with increasing long-term cardiovascular risk requiring frequent long-term follow-up. This therapy has significantly lengthened survival in mucopolysaccharidosis type IH (Hurler syndrome), a disease with known coronary artery involvement. Metabolic syndrome-a constellation of central obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose-is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, and occurs when any 3 or more of these 5 components is present within a single individual. The incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components is poorly defined after transplantation for Hurler syndrome. Chart review of all long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome ≥9 years of age for factors comprising the metabolic syndrome: obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose. Sixty-three patients were evaluated, 20 of whom had components of the metabolic syndrome available for review. There was no significant difference in age at transplantation, sex, number of transplants, pretransplant radiation, or percent engraftment between those with and without these data. Median follow-up after transplantation for the 20 patients with data was 14.3 years. Only 1 (5%) patient of this group fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Fifty-three percent of the patients had 1 or more components of metabolic syndrome: the most common was high blood pressure occurring in 40%. Metabolic syndrome is uncommon in this cohort of long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome but almost half of the patients had 1 or more components of the syndrome, with high blood pressure being the most common. Further studies are needed to develop guidelines in this diagnosis as well as other nonmalignant diseases of children

  4. The use of covalently immobilized stem cell factor to selectively affect hematopoietic stem cell activity within a gelatin hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadik, Bhushan P; Pedron Haba, Sara; Skertich, Luke J; Harley, Brendan A C

    2015-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a rare stem cell population found primarily in the bone marrow and responsible for the production of the body's full complement of blood and immune cells. Used clinically to treat a range of hematopoietic disorders, there is a significant need to identify approaches to selectively expand their numbers ex vivo. Here we describe a methacrylamide-functionalized gelatin (GelMA) hydrogel for in vitro culture of primary murine HSCs. Stem cell factor (SCF) is a critical biomolecular component of native HSC niches in vivo and is used in large dosages in cell culture media for HSC expansion in vitro. We report a photochemistry based approach to covalently immobilize SCF within GelMA hydrogels via acrylate-functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG) tethers. PEG-functionalized SCF retains the native bioactivity of SCF but can be stably incorporated and retained within the GelMA hydrogel over 7 days. Freshly-isolated murine HSCs cultured in GelMA hydrogels containing covalently-immobilized SCF showed reduced proliferation and improved selectivity for maintaining primitive HSCs. Comparatively, soluble SCF within the GelMA hydrogel network induced increased proliferation of differentiating hematopoietic cells. We used a microfluidic templating approach to create GelMA hydrogels containing gradients of immobilized SCF that locally direct HSC response. Together, we report a biomaterial platform to examine the effect of the local presentation of soluble vs. matrix-immobilized biomolecular signals on HSC expansion and lineage specification. This approach may be a critical component of a biomaterial-based artificial bone marrow to provide the correct sequence of niche signals to grow HSCs in the laboratory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pegfilgrastim prophylaxis is associated with a lower risk of hospitalization of cancer patients than filgrastim prophylaxis: a retrospective United States claims analysis of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF

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    Naeim Arash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myelosuppressive chemotherapy can lead to dose-limiting febrile neutropenia. Prophylactic use of recombinant human G-CSF such as daily filgrastim and once-per-cycle pegfilgrastim may reduce the incidence of febrile neutropenia. This comparative study examined the effect of pegfilgrastim versus daily filgrastim on the risk of hospitalization. Methods This retrospective United States claims analysis utilized 2004–2009 data for filgrastim- and pegfilgrastim-treated patients receiving chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL or breast, lung, ovarian, or colorectal cancers. Cycles in which pegfilgrastim or filgrastim was administered within 5 days from initiation of chemotherapy (considered to represent prophylaxis were pooled for analysis. Neutropenia-related hospitalization and other healthcare encounters were defined with a “narrow” criterion for claims with an ICD-9 code for neutropenia and with a “broad” criterion for claims with an ICD-9 code for neutropenia, fever, or infection. Odds ratios (OR for hospitalization and 95% confidence intervals (CI were estimated by generalized estimating equation (GEE models and adjusted for patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Per-cycle healthcare utilization and costs were examined for cycles with pegfilgrastim or filgrastim prophylaxis. Results We identified 3,535 patients receiving G-CSF prophylaxis, representing 12,056 chemotherapy cycles (11,683 pegfilgrastim, 373 filgrastim. The mean duration of filgrastim prophylaxis in the sample was 4.8 days. The mean duration of pegfilgrastim prophylaxis in the sample was 1.0 day, consistent with the recommended dosage of pegfilgrastim - a single injection once per chemotherapy cycle. Cycles with prophylactic pegfilgrastim were associated with a decreased risk of neutropenia-related hospitalization (narrow definition: OR = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.16–1.13; broad definition: OR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.24–0.59 and all-cause hospitalization (OR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.35–0.72 versus cycles with prophylactic filgrastim. For neutropenia-related utilization by setting of care, there were more ambulatory visits and hospitalizations per cycle associated with filgrastim prophylaxis than with pegfilgrastim prophylaxis. Mean per-cycle neutropenia-related costs were also higher with prophylactic filgrastim than with prophylactic pegfilgrastim. Conclusions In this comparative effectiveness study, pegfilgrastim prophylaxis was associated with a reduced risk of neutropenia-related or all-cause hospitalization relative to filgrastim prophylaxis.

  6. Stem cell mobilization induced by subcutaneous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to improve cardiac regeneration after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction: result of the double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled stem cells in myocardial infarction (STEMMI) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Jørgensen, Erik; Wang, Yongzhong

    2006-01-01

    hours after symptom onset. Patients were randomized to double-blind treatment with G-CSF (10 microg/kg of body weight) or placebo for 6 days. The primary end point was change in systolic wall thickening from baseline to 6 months determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An independent core...... laboratory analyzed all MRI examinations. Systolic wall thickening improved 17% in the infarct area in the G-CSF group and 17% in the placebo group (P=1.0). Comparable results were found in infarct border and noninfarcted myocardium. Left ventricular ejection fraction improved similarly in the 2 groups...

  7. Problems in early diagnosis of bladder cancer in a spinal cord injury patient: Report of a case of simultaneous production of granulocyte colony stimulating factor and parathyroid hormone-related protein by squamous cell carcinoma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gurpreet

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Typical symptoms and signs of a clinical condition may be absent in spinal cord injury (SCI patients. Case presentation A male with paraplegia was passing urine through penile sheath for 35 years, when he developed urinary infections. There was no history of haematuria. Intravenous urography showed bilateral hydronephrosis. The significance of abnormal outline of bladder was not appreciated. As there was large residual urine, he was advised intermittent catheterisation. Serum urea: 3.5 mmol/L; creatinine: 77 umol/L. A year later, serum urea: 36.8 mmol/l; creatinine: 632 umol/l; white cell count: 22.2; neutrophils: 18.88. Ultrasound: bilateral hydronephrosis. Bilateral nephrostomy was performed. Subsequently, blood tests showed: Urea: 14.2 mmol/l; Creatinine: 251 umol/l; Adjusted Calcium: 3.28 mmol/l; Parathyroid hormone: A repeat ultrasound scan demonstrated a tumour arising from right lateral wall; biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma. In view of persistently high white cell count and high calcium level, immunohistochemistry for G-CSF and PTHrP was performed. Dense staining of tumour cells for G-CSF and faintly positive staining for C-terminal PTHrP were observed. This patient expired about five months later. Conclusion This case demonstrates how delay in diagnosis of bladder cancer could occur in a SCI patient due to absence of characteristic symptoms and signs.

  8. Factors affecting the development of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter (AF/AFL) following autologous hematopoietic SCT (auto-HSCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuter, J A; Villanueva, M L H; Loberiza, F R; Armitage, J O; Bociek, R G; Ganti, A K; Tarantolo, S R; Vose, J M; Easley, A; Bierman, P J

    2013-07-01

    The use of autologous hematopoietic SCT (auto-HSCT) has expanded to include older patients. Increasing age is a well-appreciated risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation and/or atrial flutter (AF/AFL) in the general population. As more elderly patients undergo auto-HSCT, the risk of developing AF/AFL post transplant may also increase. However, few data evaluating other risk factors for the development of AF/AFL following auto-HSCT exist. Therefore, we performed a retrospective study to determine the incidence of AF/AFL following auto-HSCT and to determine the risk factors associated with the development of AF/AFL. Patients who developed AF/AFL were compared with a group of patients who received auto-HSCT within the same time period (April 1999 to May 2005) and were within 5 years of age. Of the 516 patients who underwent auto-HSCT at the University of Nebraska Medical Center 44 (8.5%) developed AF/AFL at a median time of 4 days (range, days 1-9) following auto-HSCT. In multivariate analysis, risk factors for developing AF/AFL were older age, odds ratio and 95% CI of 1.14 (1.07-1.21), elevated serum creatinine level, 2.69 (1.00-7.22), history of previous arrhythmia, 9.33 (3.01-28.99), and history of previous mediastinal irradiation, 11.12 (1.33-92.96).

  9. Risk Factors and Outcomes of Invasive Fungal Infections in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, Marisa H; Churay, Tracey; Braun, Thomas; Kauffman, Carol A; Couriel, Daniel R

    2017-06-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients are at increased risk of invasive fungal infections (IFI), which are associated with a high mortality rate. We evaluated the impact of IFI in allogeneic HCT patients. In total, 541 consecutive allogeneic HCT recipients were included. The cumulative incidence of any IFI and mold infections at 1-year post-HCT was 10 and 7%, respectively. Median times to IFI and mold infection were 200 and 210 days, respectively. There was a trend toward fewer IFI and mold infections in the last several years. Both acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (OR 1.83, p = 0.05) and corticosteroid duration (OR 1.0, p = 0.026) were significantly associated with increased risk of IFI, acute GVHD (OR 2.3, p = 0.027) emerged as the most important association with mold infections. Any IFI [HR 4.1 (2.79-6.07), p 90 days was also significantly associated with higher NRM [HR 1.9 (1.3-2.6), p < 0.0001]. This study highlights the impact of IFI on NRM among HCT patients. The decrease in number of IFI and mold infections over the last several years may reflect the benefit of prophylaxis with mold-active antifungal agents.

  10. Towards an understanding of lineage specification in hematopoietic stem cells: a mathematical model for the interaction of transcription factors GATA-1 and PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, Ingo; Glauche, Ingmar

    2006-08-21

    In addition to their self-renewal capabilities, hematopoietic stem cells guarantee the continuous supply of fully differentiated, functional cells of various types in the peripheral blood. The process which controls differentiation into the different lineages of the hematopoietic system (erythroid, myeloid, lymphoid) is referred to as lineage specification. It requires a potentially multi-step decision sequence which determines the fate of the cells and their successors. It is generally accepted that lineage specification is regulated by a complex system of interacting transcription factors. However, the underlying principles controlling this regulation are currently unknown. Here, we propose a simple quantitative model describing the interaction of two transcription factors. This model is motivated by experimental observations on the transcription factors GATA-1 and PU.1, both known to act as key regulators and potential antagonists in the erythroid vs. myeloid differentiation processes of hematopoietic progenitor cells. We demonstrate the ability of the model to account for the observed switching behavior of a transition from a state of low expression of both factors (undifferentiated state) to the dominance of one factor (differentiated state). Depending on the parameter choice, the model predicts two different possibilities to explain the experimentally suggested, stem cell characterizing priming state of low level co-expression. Whereas increasing transcription rates are sufficient to induce differentiation in one scenario, an additional system perturbation (by stochastic fluctuations or directed impulses) of transcription factor levels is required in the other case.

  11. Sex and body mass index but not CXCL12 801 G/A polymorphism determine the efficacy of hematopoietic cell mobilization: a study in healthy volunteer donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Juliane; Bornhauser, Martin; Kramer, Michael; Hölig, Kristina; Poppe-Thiede, Kirsten; Schmidt, Helmuth; Wiesneth, Markus; Schaefer-Eckart, Kerstin; Schlenke, Peter; Punzel, Michael; Martin, Sonja; Kroschinsky, Frank; Schmidt, Alexander H; Ehninger, Gerhard; Thiede, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Analyses of healthy donors of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilized hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and of patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation have suggested that individuals harboring the CXCL12-A allele mobilize a higher number of CD34 + HSPCs after G-CSF administration. We typed 463 healthy unrelated donors (376 men and 87 women) who had received daily subcutaneous injections at a mean dose of 7.36 ± 1.71 μg/kg G-CSF for 5 days for CXCL12 801 G/A using a real-time PCR assay. Interestingly, the median concentration of mobilized CD34 + cells on day 5 was almost identical in donors with the A-allele (79/μL; range, 11 to 249/μL) and the G/G-group (82/μL; range, 15 to 268/μL). In addition, the allelic distribution was not different in donors (n = 11) who mobilized less than 20/μL CD34 + cells. No difference in the overall yield of CD34 + cells in the apheresis product and in the number of CD34 + cells/kg recipient could be detected between both groups. In a multivariate regression model for the endpoint CD34 + cells/μL at day 5, only male sex (regression coefficient, 11.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.7 to 21.2, P = .021) and body mass index as continuous variables (regression coefficient, 3.5; 95% confidence interval, 2.5 to 4.5, P = .0001) but not age, smoking status, or CXCL12 allelic status represented independent variables. Our data derived from a large well-controlled cohort contradict previous analyses suggesting an association between CXCL12 allelic status and the yield of CD34 + HSPC after G-CSF mobilization. Concentration of CD34 + cells in the peripheral blood, the most objective parameter, could not be predicted by CXCL12 genotype. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization is more robust in healthy African American compared to Caucasian donors and is not affected by the presence of sickle cell trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panch, Sandhya R; Yau, Yu Ying; Fitzhugh, Courtney D; Hsieh, Matthew M; Tisdale, John F; Leitman, Susan F

    2016-05-01

    Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-stimulated hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) collected by apheresis have become the predominant graft source for HPC transplantation in adults. Among healthy allogeneic donors, demographic characteristics (age, sex, body mass index [BMI]) and baseline hematologic counts affect HPC mobilization, leading to variability in CD34+ apheresis yields. Racial differences in HPC mobilization are less well characterized. We retrospectively analyzed data from 1096 consecutive G-CSF-stimulated leukapheresis procedures in healthy allogeneic African American (AA) or Caucasian donors. In a multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age, sex, BMI, baseline platelet and mononuclear cell counts, and daily G-CSF dose, peak CD34+ cell mobilization was significantly higher among AAs (n = 215) than Caucasians (n = 881; 123 ± 87 × 10(6) cells/L vs. 75 ± 47 × 10(6) cells/L; p cells/L vs. 123 ± 87 × 10(6) cells/L) but not in Caucasians (74 ± 46 × 10(6) cells/L vs. 93 ± 53 × 10(6) cells/L; p sickle cell trait (SCT; n = 41) did not affect CD34+ mobilization (peak CD34+ 123 ± 91 × 10(6) cells/L vs. 107 ± 72 × 10(6) cells/L, HbAS vs. HbAA; p = 0.34). Adverse events were minimal and similar across race. AAs demonstrated significantly better CD34 mobilization responses to G-CSF than Caucasians. This was independent of other demographic and hematologic variables. Studying race-associated pharmacogenomics in relation to G-CSF may improve dosing strategies. Adverse event profile and CD34 mobilization were similar in AA donors with and without SCT. Our findings suggest that it would be safe to include healthy AA donors with SCT in unrelated donor registries. © 2016 AABB.

  13. Inactivation of the forkhead transcription factor FoxO3 is essential for PKB-mediated survival of hematopoietic progenitor cells by kit ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engström, Maria; Karlsson, Richard; Jönsson, Jan-Ingvar

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Kit ligand (KL) is a major survival factor for hematopoietic stem cells. Although anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family members are expressed in these cells, the survival effects by KL appear to involve other mechanisms. Survival signals can also be elicited by the activation of phosphatidylinos......OBJECTIVE: Kit ligand (KL) is a major survival factor for hematopoietic stem cells. Although anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family members are expressed in these cells, the survival effects by KL appear to involve other mechanisms. Survival signals can also be elicited by the activation......, immunofluorescence, and subcellular fractionation, we analyzed the effects of KL on PKB and different forkhead family members in two factor-dependent cell lines, FDCP-mix and FDC-P1, as well as primary mouse bone marrow-derived Lin(-) progenitors. Forced overexpression of triple mutated form of FoxO3 by retroviral...

  14. Addition of plerixafor for CD34+ cell mobilization in six healthy stem cell donors ensured satisfactory grafts for transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauge, Anne Werner; Haastrup, Eva Kannik; Sengeløv, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    In allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, collection of a sufficient number of HSCs at a fixed time point is crucial. For HSC mobilization into the peripheral blood, the standard regimen, that is, granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), may be inadequate. Use of plerixaf...

  15. Serpina1 (alpha1-AT) is synthesized in the osteoblastic stem cell niche.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiperij, H.B.; Pel, M. van; Rooij, K.E. de; Hoeben, R.C.; Fibbe, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Previously, we identified Serpina1 as a potent inhibitor of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSC/HPC) mobilization. Serpina1 protein is found in the bone marrow (BM) extracellular fluid and concentrations are decreased during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced HSC/HPC

  16. PROLIFERATION OF RAT-LIVER MACROPHAGES IN-VITRO - INFLUENCE OF HEMATOPOIETIC GROWTH-FACTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEDEMAKERS, RMJ; SCHERPHOF, GL; DAEMEN, T

    We examined the effects of several hemopoietic growth factors on proliferation of rat liver macrophages in vitro. The proliferative response of liver macrophages to hemopoietic growth factors was assayed on the basis of [methyl-H-3]thymidine uptake. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor and

  17. Milestones of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation – From First Human Studies to Current Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juric, Mateja Kralj; Ghimire, Sakhila; Ogonek, Justyna; Weissinger, Eva M.; Holler, Ernst; van Rood, Jon J.; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Dickinson, Anne; Greinix, Hildegard T.

    2016-01-01

    Since the early beginnings, in the 1950s, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become an established curative treatment for an increasing number of patients with life-threatening hematological, oncological, hereditary, and immunological diseases. This has become possible due to worldwide efforts of preclinical and clinical research focusing on issues of transplant immunology, reduction of transplant-associated morbidity, and mortality and efficient malignant disease eradication. The latter has been accomplished by potent graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effector cells contained in the stem cell graft. Exciting insights into the genetics of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system allowed improved donor selection, including HLA-identical related and unrelated donors. Besides bone marrow, other stem cell sources like granulocyte-colony stimulating-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells and cord blood stem cells have been established in clinical routine. Use of reduced-intensity or non-myeloablative conditioning regimens has been associated with a marked reduction of non-hematological toxicities and eventually, non-relapse mortality allowing older patients and individuals with comorbidities to undergo allogeneic HSCT and to benefit from GvL or antitumor effects. Whereas in the early years, malignant disease eradication by high-dose chemotherapy or radiotherapy was the ultimate goal; nowadays, allogeneic HSCT has been recognized as cellular immunotherapy relying prominently on immune mechanisms and to a lesser extent on non-specific direct cellular toxicity. This chapter will summarize the key milestones of HSCT and introduce current developments. PMID:27881982

  18. Deletion of Krüppel-like factor 4 in endothelial and hematopoietic cells enhances neointimal formation following vascular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Yamashita, Maho; Horimai, Chihiro; Hayashi, Matsuhiko

    2014-01-27

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) is involved in a variety of cellular functions by activating or repressing the transcription of multiple genes. Results of previous studies showed that tamoxifen-inducible global deletion of the Klf4 gene in mice accelerated neointimal formation following vascular injury, in part via enhanced proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Because Klf4 is also expressed in non-SMCs including endothelial cells (ECs), we determined if Tie2 promoter-dependent deletion of Klf4 in ECs and hematopoietic cells affected injury-induced neointimal formation. Klf4 conditional knockout (cKO) mice were generated by breeding Tie2-Cre mice and Klf4 floxed mice, and their phenotype was analyzed after carotid ligation injury. Results showed that injury-induced repression of SMC differentiation markers was unaffected by Tie2 promoter-dependent Klf4 deletion. However, of interest, neointimal formation was significantly enhanced in Klf4-cKO mice 21 days following carotid injury. Moreover, Klf4-cKO mice exhibited an augmented proliferation rate, enhanced accumulation of macrophages and T lymphocytes, and elevated expression of cell adhesion molecules including vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (Vcam1) and E-selectin in injured arteries. Mechanistic analyses in cultured ECs revealed that Klf4 inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α-induced expression of Vcam1 through blocking the binding of nuclear factor-κB to the Vcam1 promoter. These results provide evidence that Klf4 in non-SMCs such as ECs regulates neointimal formation by repressing arterial inflammation following vascular injury.

  19. [Collection of hematopoietic progenitor cells from healthy donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojanić, Ines; Cepulić, Branka Golubić; Mazić, Sanja

    2009-06-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation is an established therapy for many hematologic disorders. HPCs may be collected from bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood. In order to minimize the risk for healthy HPC donors, thorough investigation is required before donation. The donor work-up should include medical history, physical examination, ECG, chest x-ray, blood count, coagulation screening, and testing for infectious disease markers. Donors should be fully informed on the donation procedure and sign an informed consent for donation. HPCs are traditionally collected from bone marrow with the donor in general anesthesia. The procedure includes multiple bone marrow aspirates from pelvic bones and at least overnight hospital stay. Although marrow donation is generally safe and well tolerated, minor complications like pain at the collection site, fatigue and pain on walking or sitting may occur in a relatively small proportion of donors (6%-20%). Major and life-threatening complications such as anesthesia-related events, mechanical injury to the bone, sacroiliac joint and sciatic nerve following marrow donation are relatively rare, being estimated to 0.1%-0.3% of cases. In the last decade, peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) have become an increasingly used altemative to bone marrow. PBPC transplantation offers faster hematopoietic recovery and lower early transplant-related morbidity and mortality. The incidence of acute graft vs. host disease (GvHD) is no greater than in bone marrow transplants. However, there is evidence for increased chronic GvHD, which is in part related to the higher number of T and NK cells that are collected with PBPC and re-infused to the patient. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used to mobilize PBPCs for collection by leukapheresis. Leukapheresis is usually perfomed after 4 to 5 days of G-CSF subcutaneous administration at a dose of 10 mg/kg b.w. Vascular access

  20. Cytomegalovirus is a potential risk factor for late-onset hemorrhagic cystitis following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ting-Ting; Xu, Lan-Ping; Liu, Dai-Hong; Liu, Kai-Yan; Fu, Hai-Xia; Zhao, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Late-onset hemorrhagic cystitis (LOHC) is a common complication following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) and is primarily associated with viral infection. We prospectively quantified cytomegalovirus (CMV), BK virus (BKV), and adenovirus in urine and plasma using Q-RT-PCR in 50 consecutive patients to define the relationship between virus and LOHC. Of the 50 patients, 21 developed LOHC at a median of 29 days (range 4-64 days), with a cumulative incidence of 42% (±7.1%). The cumulative incidence of LOHC on day 100 in patients with and without CMV viremia (prior to or at the onset of LOHC) were 56.3% (±8.9%) and 16.7% (±9.1%) (P = 0.018), respectively, and it was 59.3% (±9.8%) and 21.7% (±8.8%) in patients with and without CMV viruria (prior to or at the onset of LOHC) (P = 0.021), respectively. The cumulative incidence of LOHC was also higher in patients with a plasma BKV load increased ≥3 log10 or with a urine BKV load increased ≥4 log10 than those without the increase (P < 0.001). Only one patient with LOHC was tested positive for ADV. Both the univariate and multivariate analyses showed that CMV viremia (HR = 3.461, 95% CI: 1.005-11.922, P = 0.049) and a plasma BKV load that was increased ≥3 log10 (HR = 10.705, 95%CI: 2.469-46.420, P = 0.002) were independent risk factors for the development of LOHC. We conclude that both CMV viremia and an increase of plasma BKV are independent risk factors for LOHC. And the role of CMV viremia was firstly demonstrated. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Cytokines regulating hematopoietic stem cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng C; Lodish, Harvey F

    2008-07-01

    Regulation of the multiple fates of hematopoietic stem cells - including quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation, apoptosis, and mobilization from the niche - requires the cooperative actions of several cytokines and other hormones that bind to receptors on these cells. In this review we discuss recent advances in the identification of novel hematopoietic stem cell supportive cytokines and the mechanisms by which they control hematopoietic stem cell fate decisions. Several extrinsic factors that stimulate ex-vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells were recently identified by a number of experimental approaches, including forward genetic screening and transcriptional profiling of supportive stromal cells. Recent experiments in which multiple cytokine signaling pathways are activated or suppressed in hematopoietic stem cells reveal the complexity of signal transduction and cell-fate choice in hematopoietic stem cells in vivo and in vitro. The study of genetically modified mice and improvements in the in-vitro hematopoietic stem cell culture system will be powerful tools to elucidate the functions of cytokines that regulate hematopoietic stem cell function. These will further reveal the complex nature of the mechanisms by which extrinsic factors regulate signal transduction and cell-fate decisions of hematopoietic stem cells.

  2. Deletion of Krüppel‐Like Factor 4 in Endothelial and Hematopoietic Cells Enhances Neointimal Formation Following Vascular Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Yamashita, Maho; Horimai, Chihiro; Hayashi, Matsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Background Krüppel‐like factor 4 (Klf4) is involved in a variety of cellular functions by activating or repressing the transcription of multiple genes. Results of previous studies showed that tamoxifen‐inducible global deletion of the Klf4 gene in mice accelerated neointimal formation following vascular injury, in part via enhanced proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Because Klf4 is also expressed in non‐SMCs including endothelial cells (ECs), we determined if Tie2 promoter‐dependent deletion of Klf4 in ECs and hematopoietic cells affected injury‐induced neointimal formation. Methods and Results Klf4 conditional knockout (cKO) mice were generated by breeding Tie2‐Cre mice and Klf4 floxed mice, and their phenotype was analyzed after carotid ligation injury. Results showed that injury‐induced repression of SMC differentiation markers was unaffected by Tie2 promoter‐dependent Klf4 deletion. However, of interest, neointimal formation was significantly enhanced in Klf4‐cKO mice 21 days following carotid injury. Moreover, Klf4‐cKO mice exhibited an augmented proliferation rate, enhanced accumulation of macrophages and T lymphocytes, and elevated expression of cell adhesion molecules including vascular cell adhesion molecule–1 (Vcam1) and E‐selectin in injured arteries. Mechanistic analyses in cultured ECs revealed that Klf4 inhibited tumor necrosis factor‐α–induced expression of Vcam1 through blocking the binding of nuclear factor‐κB to the Vcam1 promoter. Conclusions These results provide evidence that Klf4 in non‐SMCs such as ECs regulates neointimal formation by repressing arterial inflammation following vascular injury. PMID:24470523

  3. The impact of frequent injections for hematopoietic growth factor support on patients receiving chemotherapy: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu John

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of life may be affected by daily injections of supportive hematopoietic growth factor medication, which is frequently required by patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The objective of the study was to identify areas where long-acting derivatives of current proteins, which require less frequent administration, may provide advantages over existing therapies that require more frequent administration. Methods An observational study was conducted to assess the impact of daily injections of Filgrastim (Neupogen®; Amgen Inc. on patients' quality of life. A Subject Outcome Questionnaire was administered to patients after chemotherapy on 2 consecutive cycles. Time spent for treatment and patient attitude towards injection frequency were measured. The effect on patients' daily activities, including their ability to work, was analyzed. Results Thirty patients completed the first, and 24 the second, administration of the Questionnaire across 3 participating sites in the United States. The average patient time commitment for each daily injection was 78 minutes. Forty-five percent of patients were moderately to extremely bothered by travel during the first chemotherapy cycle, which increased to 59% during the second cycle. Forty-four percent and 18% of patients reported having to rearrange their daily schedules and take time off from work to accommodate each injection at least some of the time, respectively. Eighty-nine percent of the patients reported a preference for a longer-acting drug that required fewer injections. Conclusion Results indicate that frequent injections represent a significant burden on patients' lives and that the majority would prefer longer-acting medications that require less frequent administration and potentially fewer clinic visits.

  4. Hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cell tissue factor activates the coagulation cascade in endotoxemic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Pawlinski, Rafal; Wang, Jian-Guo; Owens, A. Phillip; Williams, Julie; Antoniak, Silvio; Tencati, Michael; Luther, Thomas; Rowley, Jesse W.; Low, Elizabeth N.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Mackman, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the primary activator of the coagulation cascade. During endotoxemia, TF expression leads to disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, the relative contribution of TF expression by different cell types to the activation of coagulation has not been defined. In this study, we investigated the effect of either a selective inhibition of TF expression or cell type-specific deletion of the TF gene (F3) on activation of coagulation in a mouse model of endotoxemia. We fou...

  5. CD24: from a Hematopoietic Differentiation Antigen to a Genetic Risk Factor for Multiple Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yixin; Zhao, Ming; Xiang, Bo; Chang, Christopher; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-02-01

    The autoantibody is an essential characteristic of inflammatory disorders, including autoimmune diseases. Although the exact pathogenic mechanisms of these diseases remain elusive, accumulated evidence has implicated that genetic factors play important roles in autoimmune inflammation. Among these factors, CD24 was first identified as a heat-stable antigen in 1978 and first successfully cloned in 1990. Thereafter, its functional roles have been intensively investigated in various human diseases, especially autoimmune diseases and cancers. It is currently known that CD24 serves as a costimulatory factor of T cells that regulate their homeostasis and proliferation, while in B cells, CD24 is functionally involved in cell activation and differentiation. CD24 can enhance autoimmune diseases in terms of its protective role in the clonal deletion of autoreactive thymocytes. Furthermore, CD24 deficiency has been linked to mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Finally, CD24 genetic variants, including single-nucleotide polymorphisms and deletions, are etiologically relevant to autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Therefore, CD24 is a promising biomarker and novel therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases.

  6. Physiopathology, Etiologic Factors, Diagnosis, and Course of Polycythemia Vera as Related to Therapy According to William Dameshek, 1940-1950

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jacques Michiels

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available According to Dameshek, true polycythemia (polycythemia vera: PV is a chronic myeloproliferative disorder of the total bone marrow without any evidence of invasiveness, in which erythrocytosis, leukocytosis, and thrombocytosis are all simultaneously present. A possible hereditary or transmitted tendency may be present, but actual familial polycythemia is rare. As to the etiology, Dameshek proposed 2 highly speculative possibilities in 1950: the presence of excessive bone marrow stimulation by an unknown factor or factors, and a lack or a diminution in the normal inhibitory factor or factors. Dameshek’s hypothesis was confirmed in 2005 by Vainchenker in France by the discovery of the acquired JAK2V617F mutation as the cause of 3 phenotypes of classical myeloproliferative neoplasms: essential thrombocythemia, PV, and myelofibrosis. The JAK2V617F mutation induces a loss of inhibitory activity of the JH2 pseudokinase part on the JH1 kinase part of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2. This leads to enhanced activity of the normal JH1 kinase activity of JAK2, which makes the mutated hematopoietic stem cells hypersensitive to the hematopoietic growth factors thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, insulin-like growth factor-1, stem cell factor, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, resulting in trilinear myeloproliferation. In retrospect, the situation observed by Dameshek where all “stops” to blood production in the bone marrow are pulled in PV is caused by the JAK2V617F mutation. Dameshek considered PV patients as fundamentally normal and therefore the treatment should be as physiologic as possible. For this reason, a systematic phlebotomy/iron deficiency method of treatment was recommended; the use of radioactive phosphorus is reserved for refractory cases and cases of major thrombosis. If the patient lives long enough and does not succumb to the effects of thrombosis or other complications, the marrow will gradually show signs of diminished activity. The blood

  7. The Expanding Family of Bone Marrow Homing Factors for Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Stromal Derived Factor 1 Is Not the Only Player in the Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Z. Ratajczak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The α-chemokine stromal derived factor 1 (SDF-1, which binds to the CXCR4 and CXCR7 receptors, directs migration and homing of CXCR4+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs to bone marrow (BM and plays a crucial role in retention of these cells in stem cell niches. However, this unique role of SDF-1 has been recently challenged by several observations supporting SDF-1-CXCR4-independent BM homing. Specifically, it has been demonstrated that HSPCs respond robustly to some bioactive lipids, such as sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P and ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P, and migrate in response to gradients of certain extracellular nucleotides, including uridine triphosphate (UTP and adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Moreover, the responsiveness of HSPCs to an SDF-1 gradient is enhanced by some elements of innate immunity (e.g., C3 complement cascade cleavage fragments and antimicrobial cationic peptides, such as cathelicidin/LL-37 or β2-defensin as well as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Since all these factors are upregulated in BM after myeloblative conditioning for transplantation, a more complex picture of homing emerges that involves several factors supporting, and in some situations even replacing, the SDF-1-CXCR4 axis.

  8. Impact of genomic risk factors on outcome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickinson, A.M.; Pearce, K.F.; Norden, J.; O'Brien, S.G.; Holler, E.; Bickeboller, H.; Balavarca, Y.; Rocha, V.; Kolb, H.J.; Hromadnikova, I.; Sedlacek, P.; Niederwieser, D.; Brand, R.; Ruutu, T.; Apperley, J.; Szydlo, R.; Goulmy, E.; Siegert, W.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Gratwohl, A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-HLA gene polymorphisms have been shown to influence outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Results were derived from heterogeneous, small populations and their value remains a matter of debate. DESIGN AND METHODS: In this study, we assessed the effect of

  9. Wnt3a protein reduces growth factor-driven expansion of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in serum-free cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia E Duinhouwer

    Full Text Available Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC is a promising approach to improve insufficient engraftment after umbilical cord blood stem cell transplantation (UCB-SCT. Although culturing HSPC with hematopoietic cytokines results in robust proliferation, it is accompanied with extensive differentiation and loss of self-renewal capacity. Wnt signaling has been implicated in regulating HSPC fate decisions in vivo and in promoting HSPC self-renewal by inhibition of differentiation, but the effects of Wnt on the ex vivo expansion of HSPC are controversial. Here, we demonstrate that exogenous Wnt3a protein suppresses rather than promotes the expansion of UCB-derived CD34+ cells in serum free expansion cultures. The reduced expansion was also observed in cultures initiated with Lin-CD34+CD38lowCD45RA-CD90+ cells which are highly enriched in HSC and was also observed in response to activation of beta-catenin signaling by GSK3 inhibition. The presence of Wnt3a protein during the culture reduced the frequency of multilineage CFU-GEMM and the long-term repopulation ability of the expanded HSPC. These data suggest that Wnt signaling reduces expansion of human HSPC in growth factor-driven expansion cultures by promoting differentiation of HSPC.

  10. Exogenous endothelial cells as accelerators of hematopoietic reconstitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizer J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the successes of recombinant hematopoietic-stimulatory factors at accelerating bone marrow reconstitution and shortening the neutropenic period post-transplantation, significant challenges remain such as cost, inability to reconstitute thrombocytic lineages, and lack of efficacy in conditions such as aplastic anemia. A possible means of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution would be administration of cells capable of secreting hematopoietic growth factors. Advantages of this approach would include: a ability to regulate secretion of cytokines based on biological need; b long term, localized production of growth factors, alleviating need for systemic administration of factors that possess unintended adverse effects; and c potential to actively repair the hematopoietic stem cell niche. Here we overview the field of hematopoietic growth factors, discuss previous experiences with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in accelerating hematopoiesis, and conclude by putting forth the rationale of utilizing exogenous endothelial cells as a novel cellular therapy for acceleration of hematopoietic recovery.

  11. Factors associated with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) among patients in a population-based study of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Angela R; Warlick, Erica D; Roesler, Michelle A; Poynter, Jenny N; Richardson, Michaela; Nguyen, Phuong; Cioc, Adina; Hirsch, Betsy; Ross, Julie A

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by dysplastic changes in the bone marrow, ineffective erythropoiesis, and an increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Treatment planning for patients with MDS is a complex process, and we sought to better characterize hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes and the factors that play into decision-making regarding referral of adults with MDS for definitive therapy with HCT. Patients enrolled in a population-based study of MDS between April 2010 and January 2013 who underwent HCT within the first year after enrollment were included in this analysis. Age- and risk-matched MDS patient controls also enrolled during that time period were used as a comparison. Survival was significantly better in the HCT group (48 vs. 21 %, log-rank p value 0.009). Non-HCT patients were more likely to have comorbidities, and HCT patients were more likely to have a college degree and an income >$80,000. All three of these variables were independently associated with HCT, but none impacted survival. Patients with MDS in our study who underwent HCT had better survival than a comparable group of patients who did not undergo HCT. With refined treatment techniques, more patients may be able to be considered for this therapy. More work needs to be done to determine why education and income appear to impact the decision to pursue HCT, but these factors may impact referral to an academic center where aggressive therapy like HCT is more likely to be considered.

  12. β-Catenin-independent activation of TCF1/LEF1 in human hematopoietic tumor cells through interaction with ATF2 transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Grumolato

    Full Text Available The role of Wnt signaling in embryonic development and stem cell maintenance is well established and aberrations leading to the constitutive up-regulation of this pathway are frequent in several types of human cancers. Upon ligand-mediated activation, Wnt receptors promote the stabilization of β-catenin, which translocates to the nucleus and binds to the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF family of transcription factors to regulate the expression of Wnt target genes. When not bound to β-catenin, the TCF/LEF proteins are believed to act as transcriptional repressors. Using a specific lentiviral reporter, we identified hematopoietic tumor cells displaying constitutive TCF/LEF transcriptional activation in the absence of β-catenin stabilization. Suppression of TCF/LEF activity in these cells mediated by an inducible dominant-negative TCF4 (DN-TCF4 inhibited both cell growth and the expression of Wnt target genes. Further, expression of TCF1 and LEF1, but not TCF4, stimulated TCF/LEF reporter activity in certain human cell lines independently of β-catenin. By a complementary approach in vivo, TCF1 mutants, which lacked the ability to bind to β-catenin, induced Xenopus embryo axis duplication, a hallmark of Wnt activation, and the expression of the Wnt target gene Xnr3. Through generation of different TCF1-TCF4 fusion proteins, we identified three distinct TCF1 domains that participate in the β-catenin-independent activity of this transcription factor. TCF1 and LEF1 physically interacted and functionally synergized with members of the activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2 family of transcription factors. Moreover, knockdown of ATF2 expression in lymphoma cells phenocopied the inhibitory effects of DN-TCF4 on the expression of target genes associated with the Wnt pathway and on cell growth. Together, our findings indicate that, through interaction with ATF2 factors, TCF1/LEF1 promote the growth of hematopoietic malignancies in the

  13. Enhanced genetic modification of adult growth factor mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijing; Torres-Coronado, Mónica; Gu, Angel; Rao, Anitha; Gardner, Agnes M; Epps, Elizabeth W; Gonzalez, Nancy; Tran, Chy-Anh; Wu, Xiwei; Wang, Jin-Hui; DiGiusto, David L

    2014-10-01

    Genetic modification of adult human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with lentiviral vectors leads to long-term gene expression in the progeny of the HSPCs and has been used to successfully treat several monogenic diseases. In some cases, the gene-modified cells have a selective growth advantage over nonmodified cells and eventually are the dominant engrafted population. However, in disease indications for which the gene-modified cells do not have a selective advantage, optimizing transduction of HSPC is paramount to successful stem cell-based gene therapy. We demonstrate here that transduction of adult CD34+ HSPCs with lentiviral vectors in the presence of rapamycin, a widely used mTORC1 inhibitor, results in an approximately threefold increase in stable gene marking with minimal effects on HSPC growth and differentiation. Using this approach, we have demonstrated that we can enhance the frequency of gene-modified HSPCs that give rise to clonogenic progeny in vitro without excessive increases in the number of vector copies per cell or changes in integration pattern. The genetic marking of HSPCs and expression of transgenes is durable, and transplantation of gene-modified HSPCs into immunodeficient mice results in high levels of gene marking of the lymphoid and myeloid progeny in vivo. The prior safe clinical history of rapamycin in other applications supports the use of this compound to generate gene-modified autologous HSPCs for our HIV gene therapy clinical trials. ©AlphaMed Press.

  14. Repairing the Brain by SCF+G-CSF Treatment at 6 Months Postexperimental Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Lili Cui; Dandan Wang; Sandra McGillis; Michele Kyle; Li-Ru Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Stroke, a leading cause of adult disability in the world, is a severe medical condition with limited treatment. Physical therapy, the only treatment available for stroke rehabilitation, appears to be effective within 6 months post-stroke. Here, we have mechanistically determined the efficacy of combined two hematopoietic growth factors, stem cell factor (SCF) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF; SCF + G-CSF), in brain repair 6 months after cortical infarct induction in the transg...

  15. SIMPL enhancement of tumor necrosis factor-α dependent p65-MED1 complex formation is required for mammalian hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weina Zhao

    Full Text Available Significant insight into the signaling pathways leading to activation of the Rel transcription factor family, collectively termed NF-κB, has been gained. Less well understood is how subsets of NF-κB-dependent genes are regulated in a signal specific manner. The SIMPL protein (signaling molecule that interacts with mouse pelle-like kinase is required for full Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNFα induced NF-κB activity. We show that SIMPL is required for steady-state hematopoiesis and the expression of a subset of TNFα induced genes whose products regulate hematopoietic cell activity. To gain insight into the mechanism through which SIMPL modulates gene expression we focused on the Tnf gene, an immune response regulator required for steady-state hematopoiesis. In response to TNFα SIMPL localizes to the Tnf gene promoter where it modulates the initiation of Tnf gene transcription. SIMPL binding partners identified by mass spectrometry include proteins involved in transcription and the interaction between SIMPL and MED1 was characterized in more detail. In response to TNFα, SIMPL is found in p65-MED1 complexes where SIMPL enhances p65/MED1/SIMPL complex formation. Together our results indicate that SIMPL functions as a TNFα-dependent p65 co-activator by facilitating the recruitment of MED1 to p65 containing transcriptional complexes to control the expression of a subset of TNFα-induced genes.

  16. Analysis of the variable factors influencing tacrolimus blood concentration during the switch from continuous intravenous infusion to oral administration after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Kimitaka; Ikesue, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Yamamoto-Taguchi, Nanae; Tsuchiya, Yuichi; Matsukawa, Kumi; Uchida, Mayako; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Akashi, Koichi; Masuda, Satohiro

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to identify variable factors affecting tacrolimus blood concentration during the switch from continuous intravenous infusion to twice-daily oral administration in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients (n = 73). The blood concentration/dose ratio of tacrolimus immediately before the change from continuous infusion (C/Div) was compared with that between 3 and 5 days after the change to oral administration (C/Dpo). Median (C/Dpo)/(C/Div) was 0.21 (range 0.04-0.58). Multiple regression analysis showed that concomitant use of oral itraconazole or voriconazole significantly increased the (C/Dpo)/(C/Div) of tacrolimus (p = 0.002), probably owing to the inhibition of enterohepatic cytochrome P450 3A4. In addition, 5 of 18 (28%) patients who had the lowest quartile (C/Dpo)/(C/Div) values developed acute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), which was significantly higher than in others [5 of 55 (9%) patients, p = 0.045]. Although the switch from intravenous to oral administration at a ratio of 1:5 appeared to be appropriate, a lower conversion ratio was suitable in patients taking oral itraconazole or voriconazole. In patients whose blood concentration decreases after the switch, the development of GVHD should be monitored and tacrolimus dosage should be readjusted to maintain an appropriate blood concentration.

  17. CXC chemokine receptor 3 expression on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    expressed on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood stimulated with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) but not on freshly isolated CD34(+) progenitors. Freshly isolated CD34(+) progenitors expressed low levels of CXCR3 messenger RNA, but this expression was highly up......-regulated by GM-CSF, as indicated by a real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction technique. gamma IP-10 and Mig induced chemotaxis of GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitors by means of CXCR3, since an anti-CXCR3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) was found to block gamma IP-10-induced and Mig......-induced CD34(+) progenitor chemotaxis. These chemotactic attracted CD34(+) progenitors are colony-forming units-granulocyte-macrophage. gamma IP-10 and Mig also induced GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitor adhesion and aggregation by means of CXCR3, a finding confirmed by the observation that anti-CXCR3 m...

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell cytokines and fibroblast growth factor-2 stimulate human endothelial cell-pericyte tube co-assembly in 3D fibrin matrices under serum-free defined conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie O Smith

    Full Text Available We describe a novel 3D fibrin matrix model using recombinant hematopoietic stem cell cytokines under serum-free defined conditions which promotes the assembly of human endothelial cell (EC tubes with co-associated pericytes. Individual ECs and pericytes are randomly mixed together and EC tubes form that is accompanied by pericyte recruitment to the EC tube abluminal surface over a 3-5 day period. These morphogenic processes are stimulated by a combination of the hematopoietic stem cell cytokines, stem cell factor, interleukin-3, stromal derived factor-1α, and Flt-3 ligand which are added in conjunction with fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 into the fibrin matrix. In contrast, this tube morphogenic response does not occur under serum-free defined conditions when VEGF and FGF-2 are added together in the fibrin matrices. We recently demonstrated that VEGF and FGF-2 are able to prime EC tube morphogenic responses (i.e. added overnight prior to the morphogenic assay to hematopoietic stem cell cytokines in collagen matrices and, interestingly, they also prime EC tube morphogenesis in 3D fibrin matrices. EC-pericyte interactions in 3D fibrin matrices leads to marked vascular basement membrane assembly as demonstrated using immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, we show that hematopoietic stem cell cytokines and pericytes stimulate EC sprouting in fibrin matrices in a manner dependent on the α5β1 integrin. This novel co-culture system, under serum-free defined conditions, allows for a molecular analysis of EC tube assembly, pericyte recruitment and maturation events in a critical ECM environment (i.e. fibrin matrices that regulates angiogenic events in postnatal life.

  19. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Cytokines and Fibroblast Growth factor-2 Stimulate Human Endothelial Cell-Pericyte Tube Co-Assembly in 3D Fibrin Matrices under Serum-Free Defined Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Annie O.; Bowers, Stephanie L. K.; Stratman, Amber N.; Davis, George E.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel 3D fibrin matrix model using recombinant hematopoietic stem cell cytokines under serum-free defined conditions which promotes the assembly of human endothelial cell (EC) tubes with co-associated pericytes. Individual ECs and pericytes are randomly mixed together and EC tubes form that is accompanied by pericyte recruitment to the EC tube abluminal surface over a 3-5 day period. These morphogenic processes are stimulated by a combination of the hematopoietic stem cell cytokines, stem cell factor, interleukin-3, stromal derived factor-1α, and Flt-3 ligand which are added in conjunction with fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 into the fibrin matrix. In contrast, this tube morphogenic response does not occur under serum-free defined conditions when VEGF and FGF-2 are added together in the fibrin matrices. We recently demonstrated that VEGF and FGF-2 are able to prime EC tube morphogenic responses (i.e. added overnight prior to the morphogenic assay) to hematopoietic stem cell cytokines in collagen matrices and, interestingly, they also prime EC tube morphogenesis in 3D fibrin matrices. EC-pericyte interactions in 3D fibrin matrices leads to marked vascular basement membrane assembly as demonstrated using immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, we show that hematopoietic stem cell cytokines and pericytes stimulate EC sprouting in fibrin matrices in a manner dependent on the α5β1 integrin. This novel co-culture system, under serum-free defined conditions, allows for a molecular analysis of EC tube assembly, pericyte recruitment and maturation events in a critical ECM environment (i.e. fibrin matrices) that regulates angiogenic events in postnatal life. PMID:24391990

  20. Hypothetical atopic dermatitis-myeloproliferative neoplasm (AD-MPN syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki eKawakami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs are hematopoietic malignancies caused by uncontrolled proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Recent studies have described several mutant mice exhibiting both AD-like skin inflammation and MPN. Common pathways for skin inflammation encompass overexpression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and reduced signaling of epidermal growth factor receptor in the epidermis, while overproduction of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor by keratinocytes and constitutive activation of Stat5 in hematopoietic stem cells are important for the development of MPN. The murine studies suggest the existence of a similar human disease tentatively termed the AD-MPN syndrome.

  1. 5-AED Enhances Survival of Irradiated Mice in a G-CSF-Dependent Manner, Stimulates Innate Immune Cell Function, Reduces Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Induces Genes that Modulate Cell Cycle Progression and Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-22

    promotes survival of irradiated human hematopoietic progeni- tors in vitro through induction of Nuclear Factor-κB (NFκB)-dependent Granulocyte Colony...modulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis. INTRODUCTION Because of the increasing threat posed by nuclear weapons [1], there is a pressing need for both...being developed as a radioprotectant and therapeutic for ARS. The steroid induces resistance to a variety of infec- tions in animals [5–10], enhances

  2. Mathematical Models of Human Hematopoiesis Following Acute Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    mediator to the action of known hematopoietic stimulators such as thrombopoietin ( TPO ) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Thus, in our...significant stimulatory role of TPO in thrombopoiesis (Kaushansky 2005), it is assumed to represent a large portion of the generic mediator. Thus, known...biological mechanisms involving TPO are used to justify the effects of the generic mediator in our model. TPO concentration is regulated by platelets

  3. Risk Factors and Outcomes Related to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Admission after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, Marta; Amigoni, Angela; Contin, Annaelena; Cattelan, Manuela; Carraro, Elisa; Campagnano, Emiliana; Tumino, Manuela; Calore, Elisabetta; Marzollo, Antonio; Mainardi, Chiara; Boaro, Maria Paola; Nizzero, Marta; Pettenazzo, Andrea; Basso, Giuseppe; Messina, Chiara

    2017-08-01

    To describe incidence, causes, and outcomes related to pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), we investigated the risk factors predisposing to PICU admission and prognostic factors in terms of patient survival. From October 1998 to April 2015, 496 children and young adults (0 to 23 years) underwent transplantation in the HSCT unit. Among them, 70 (14.1%) were admitted to PICU. The 3-year cumulative incidence of PICU admission was 14.3%. The main causes of PICU admission were respiratory failure (36%), multiple organ failure (16%), and septic shock (13%). The overall 90-day cumulative probability of survival after PICU admission was 34.3% (95% confidence interval, 24.8% to 47.4%). In multivariate analysis, risk factors predisposing to PICU admission were allogeneic HSCT (versus autologous HSCT, P = .030) and second or third HSCT (P = .018). Characteristics significantly associated with mortality were mismatched HSCT (P = .011), relapse of underlying disease before PICU admission (P < .001), acute respiratory distress syndrome at admission (P = .012), hepatic failure at admission (P = .021), and need for invasive ventilation during PICU course (P < .001). Our data indicate which patients have a high risk for PICU admission after HSCT and for dismal outcomes after PICU stay. These findings may provide support for the clinical decision-making process on the opportunity of PICU admission for severely compromised patients after HSCT. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Limited clinical efficacy of azacitidine in transfusion-dependent, growth factor-resistant, low- and Int-1-risk MDS: Results from the nordic NMDSG08A phase II trial

    OpenAIRE

    Tobiasson, Magnus; Dybedal, Ingunn; Holm, Mette Skov; Karimi, Mohsen; Brandefors, Lena; Garelius, Hege; Grövdal, Michael; Høgh-Dufva, Inge; Grønbæk, Kirsten; Jansson, Monika; Marcher, Vlaus Werenberg; Nilsson, Lars Håkan; Kittang, Astrid Marta Olsnes; Porwit, Anna; Saft, Leonie

    2014-01-01

    This prospective phase II study evaluated the efficacy of azacitidine (Aza)+erythropoietin (Epo) in transfusion-dependent patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients ineligible for or refractory to full-dose Epo+granulocyte colony stimulation factors for >8 weeks and a transfusion need of greater than or equal to4 units over 8 weeks were included. Aza 75 mg m−2 d−1, 5/28 days, was given for six cycles; non-responding patients received another three cycles combined with E...

  5. Incidence, risk factors and outcome of pre engraftment Gram-negative bacteremia after allogeneic and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: an Italian prospective multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girmenia, Corrado; Bertaina, Alice; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Carotti, Alessandra; Algarotti, Alessandra; Busca, Alessandro; Cattaneo, Chiara; Raiola, Anna Maria; Guidi, Stefano; Iori, Anna Paola; Candoni, Anna; Irrera, Giuseppe; Milone, Giuseppe; Marcacci, Giampaolo; Scimè, Rosanna; Musso, Maurizio; Cudillo, Laura; Sica, Simona; Castagna, Luca; Corradini, Paolo; Marchesi, Francesco; Pastore, Domenico; Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Annaloro, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Santarone, Stella; Nassi, Luca; Farina, Claudio; Viscoli, Claudio; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Bonifazi, Francesca; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Italiano, Gruppo

    2017-08-03

    Gram-negative bacteremia (GNB) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) and updated epidemiological investigation is advisable. We prospectively evaluated the epidemiology of pre-engraftment GNB in 1,118 allogeneic HSCT (allo-HSCT) and 1,625 autologous HSCT (auto-HSCT) among 54 transplant centers during 2014 (SIGNB-GITMO-AMCLI study). Using logistic regression methods we identified risk factors for GNB and evaluated the impact of GNB on the 4-month overall-survival after transplant. SIGNB-GITMO-AMCLI is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02088840. The cumulative incidence of pre-engraftment GNB was 17.3% in allo-HSCT and 9% in auto-HSCT. Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the most common isolates. By multivariate analysis variables associated with GNB were a diagnosis of acute leukemia, a transplant from HLA-mismatched donor and from cord-blood, older age and duration of severe neutropenia in allo-HSCT, and a diagnosis of lymphoma, older age and no antibacterial prophylaxis in auto-HSCT. A pre-transplant infection by a resistant pathogen was significantly associated with an increased risk of post-transplant infection by the same microorganism in allo-HSCT. Colonization by resistant Gram-negative bacteria was significantly associated with an increased rate of infection by the same pathogen in both transplant procedures. GNB was independently associated with increased mortality at 4-months both in allo-HSCT (HR 2.13, 95% CI 1.45-3.13;p=.0001) and auto-HSCT (HR 2.43, 95% CI 1.22-4.84;p=.012). Pre-engraftment GNB is an independent factor associated with increased mortality at four months from auto-HSCT and allo-HSCT. Previous infectious history and colonization monitoring represent major indicators of GNB.

  6. Risk Factors and Utility of a Risk-Based Algorithm for Monitoring Cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr Virus, and Adenovirus Infections in Pediatric Recipients after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustia, Evelyn; Violago, Leah; Jin, Zhezhen; Foca, Marc D.; Kahn, Justine M.; Arnold, Staci; Sosna, Jean; Bhatia, Monica; Kung, Andrew L.; George, Diane; Garvin, James H.; Satwani, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Infectious complications, particularly viral infections, remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). Only a handful of studies in children have analyzed the risks for and impact of viremia on alloHCT-related outcomes. We conducted a retrospective study of 140 pediatric patients undergoing alloHCT to investigate the incidence of and risk factors for cytomegalovirus (CMV), adenovirus (ADV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viremia and viral disease after alloHCT. Furthermore, we assessed the impact of viremia on days of hospitalization and develop an algorithm for routine monitoring of viremia. Patients were monitored before alloHCT and then weekly for 180 days after alloHCT. Patients were considered to have viremia if CMV were > 600 copies/mL, EBV were > 1000 copies/mL, or ADV were > 1000 copies/mL on 2 consecutive PCRs. The overall incidences of viremia and viral disease in all patients from day 0 to +180 after alloHCT were 41.4% (n = 58) and 17% (n = 24), respectively. The overall survival for patients with viremia and viral disease was significantly lower compared with those without viremia (58% versus 74.2%, P = .03) and viral disease (48.2% versus 71.2%, P = .024). We identified that pretransplantation CMV risk status, pre-alloHCT viremia, and use of alemtuzumab were associated with the risk of post-alloHCT viremia. The average hospitalization days in patients with CMV risk (P = .011), viremia (P = .024), and viral disease (P = .002) were significantly higher. The algorithm developed from our data can potentially reduce viral PCR testing by 50% and is being studied prospectively at our center. Improved preventative treatment strategies for children at risk of viremia after alloHCT are needed. PMID:27252110

  7. Human CD34+ CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells cultured with growth factors including Angptl5 efficiently engraft adult NOD-SCID Il2rγ-/- (NSG mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C Drake

    Full Text Available Increasing demand for human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in clinical and research applications necessitates expansion of HSCs in vitro. Before these cells can be used they must be carefully evaluated to assess their stem cell activity. Here, we expanded cord blood CD34(+ CD133(+ cells in a defined medium containing angiopoietin like 5 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 and evaluated the cells for stem cell activity in NOD-SCID Il2rg(-/- (NSG mice by multi-lineage engraftment, long term reconstitution, limiting dilution and serial reconstitution. The phenotype of expanded cells was characterized by flow cytometry during the course of expansion and following engraftment in mice. We show that the SCID repopulating activity resides in the CD34(+ CD133(+ fraction of expanded cells and that CD34(+ CD133(+ cell number correlates with SCID repopulating activity before and after culture. The expanded cells mediate long-term hematopoiesis and serial reconstitution in NSG mice. Furthermore, they efficiently reconstitute not only neonate but also adult NSG recipients, generating human blood cell populations similar to those reported in mice reconstituted with uncultured human HSCs. These findings suggest an expansion of long term HSCs in our culture and show that expression of CD34 and CD133 serves as a marker for HSC activity in human cord blood cell cultures. The ability to expand human HSCs in vitro should facilitate clinical use of HSCs and large-scale construction of humanized mice from the same donor for research applications.

  8. Deletion of Krüppel‐Like Factor 4 in Endothelial and Hematopoietic Cells Enhances Neointimal Formation Following Vascular Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Yamashita, Maho; Horimai, Chihiro; Hayashi, Matsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Background Krüppel‐like factor 4 (Klf4) is involved in a variety of cellular functions by activating or repressing the transcription of multiple genes. Results of previous studies showed that tamoxifen‐inducible global deletion of the Klf4 gene in mice accelerated neointimal formation following vascular injury, in part via enhanced proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Because Klf4 is also expressed in non‐SMCs including endothelial cells (ECs), we determined if Tie2 promoter‐dependent...

  9. Limited clinical efficacy of azacitidine in transfusion-dependent, growth factor-resistant, low- and Int-1-risk MDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Mette; Dybedahl, I; Holm, Mette

    2014-01-01

    This prospective phase II study evaluated the efficacy of azacitidine (Aza)+erythropoietin (Epo) in transfusion-dependent patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients ineligible for or refractory to full-dose Epo+granulocyte colony stimulation factors for >8 weeks and a trans......This prospective phase II study evaluated the efficacy of azacitidine (Aza)+erythropoietin (Epo) in transfusion-dependent patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients ineligible for or refractory to full-dose Epo+granulocyte colony stimulation factors for >8 weeks...... after Aza+Epo, giving a total response rate of 20%. Mutational screening revealed a high frequency of recurrent mutations. Although no single mutation predicted for response, SF3A1 (n=3) and DNMT3A (n=4) were only observed in non-responders. We conclude that Aza can induce TI in severely anemic MDS...... patients, but efficacy is limited, toxicity substantial and most responses of short duration. This treatment cannot be generally recommended in lower-risk MDS. Mutational screening revealed a high frequency of mutations....

  10. The Hematopoietic Transcription Factors RUNX1 and ERG Prevent AML1-ETO Oncogene Overexpression and Onset of the Apoptosis Program in t(8;21) AMLs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandoli, Amit; Singh, Abhishek A.; Prange, Koen H. M.; Tijchon, Esther; Oerlemans, Marjolein; Dirks, Rene; Ter Huurne, Menno; Wierenga, Albertus T. J.; Janssen-Megens, Eva M.; Berentsen, Kim; Sharifi, Nilofar; Kim, Bowon; Matarese, Filomena; Nguyen, Luan N.; Hubner, Nina C.; Rao, Nagesha A.; van den Akker, Emile; Altucci, Lucia; Vellenga, Edo; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Martens, Joost H. A.

    2016-01-01

    The t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-associated oncoprotein AML1-ETO disrupts normal hematopoietic differentiation. Here, we have investigated its effects on the transcriptome and epigenome in t(8,21) patient cells. AML1-ETO binding was found at promoter regions of active genes with high levels

  11. USE OF HEMATOPOIETIC GROWTH FACTOR IN THE MANAGEMENT OF HEMATOLOGICAL SIDE EFFECTS ASSOCIATED TO ANTIVIRAL TREATMENT FOR HCV HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Mancino

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Haematological abnormalities are common during combination antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C. Although dose reduction or discontinuation can easily treat these side effects, they can adversely affect the efficacy of combination antiviral therapy reducing the likelihood of a sustained viral response (SVR. To avoid potentially diminishing a patient’s chance of response, many physicians have begun using growth factors off-label to manage anaemia and neutropenia in hepatitis C. Haematopoietic growth factors are generally well tolerated and they may be useful for managing haematological side effects of anti-HCV therapy improving patients’ quality of life. To date, the role and benefit of these agents during anti-HCV therapy and their positive impact on SVR have not conclusively determined in the published studies. However, the possibility of a benefit to individual outpatients remains, and an individualized approach is recommended. This review explores the incidence, clinical significance, and management of anaemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia associated with combination therapy for HCV infection.

  12. Angiogenic factors in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL): Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre Palma, Luis Mario; Gehrke, Iris; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton

    2015-03-01

    The role of angiogenesis in haematological malignancies such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is difficult to envision, because leukaemia cells are not dependent on a network of blood vessels to support basic physiological requirements. Regardless, CLL cells secrete high levels of major angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF). Nonetheless, it remains unclear how most angiogenic factors regulate accumulation and delayed apoptosis of CLL cells. Angiogenic factors such as leptin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), follistatin, angiopoietin-1 (Ang1), angiogenin (ANG), midkine (MK), pleiotrophin (PTN), progranulin (PGRN), proliferin (PLF), placental growth factor (PIGF), and endothelial locus-1 (Del-1), represent novel therapeutic targets of future CLL research but have remained widely overlooked. This review aims to outline our current understanding of angiogenic growth factors and their relationship with CLL, a still uncured haematopoietic malignancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Risk Factors for Subtherapeutic Tacrolimus Levels after Conversion from Continuous Intravenous Infusion to Oral in Children after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Michelle; Offer, Katharine; Jin, Zhezhen; Kahn, Justine; Bhatia, Monica; Kung, Andrew L; Garvin, James H; George, Diane; Satwani, Prakash

    2016-05-01

    Tacrolimus (FK506) is a calcineurin inhibitor and is an essential component of many immunosuppressive regimens. The oral bioavailability of tacrolimus may be affected by many factors, including patient age and gender, as well as by drug-drug interactions or genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism. The dosing recommendations for pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) recipients have been derived from tacrolimus use in adult solid-organ transplantation patients. Data describing the impact of conversion of i.v. tacrolimus to oral on the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) are limited in children after alloHCT. In this study, we describe the incidence of grades II to IV aGVHD after conversion from i.v. tacrolimus to oral tacrolimus and study the clinical factors associated with delayed achievement of therapeutic blood levels. In this retrospective analysis, 68 pediatric patients (median age, 6.7 years; range, .25 to 22 years), underwent alloHCT for malignant and nonmalignant diseases and received tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil for aGVHD prophylaxis. Among all patients, the median number of days to achieve therapeutic tacrolimus trough concentration (10 ng/mL to 20 ng/mL) was 7 days (range, 0 to 37 days). Twenty-two patients developed grades II to IV aGVHD and the cumulative incidence of grades II to IV aGVHD in all patients was 32.4% (standard error, .06). On multivariate analysis ethnicity (white versus others: odds ratio [OR], -4.5; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.091 to 18.91; P = .038) and ≥ 10 days of subtherapeutic tacrolimus levels in first 30 days on i.v. (OR, -3.8; 95% CI, 1.276 to 11.43; P = .017) were significantly associated with delay in achieving therapeutic tacrolimus trough concentration. The impact of race/ethnicity on therapeutic tacrolimus trough concentration in pediatric alloHCT recipients should be further studied prospectively so that individualized dosing plans can be developed

  14. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivu-Economescu, Mihaela; Rubach, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are recognized as a new way to treat various diseases and injuries, with a wide range of health benefits. The goal is to heal or replace diseased or destroyed organs or body parts with healthy new cells provided by stem cell transplantation. The current practical form of stem cell therapy is the hematopoietic stem cells transplant applied for the treatment of hematological disorders. There are over 2100 clinical studies in progress concerning hematopoietic stem cell therapies. All of them are using hematopoietic stem cells to treat various diseases like: cancers, leukemia, lymphoma, cardiac failure, neural disorders, auto-immune diseases, immunodeficiency, metabolic or genetic disorders. Several challenges are to be addressed prior to developing and applying large scale cell therapies: 1) to explain and control the mechanisms of differentiation and development toward a specific cell type needed to treat the disease, 2) to obtain a sufficient number of desired cell type for transplantation, 3) to overcome the immune rejection and 4) to show that transplanted cells fulfill their normal functions in vivo after transplants. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. A novel complex, RUNX1-MYEF2, represses hematopoietic genes in erythroid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van Riel (Boet); T. Pakozdi (Tibor); R.W.W. Brouwer (Rutger); R. Monteiro (Rui); E. Tuladhar (Era); V. Franke (Vedran); J.C. Bryne; R.J.J. Jorna (Ruud); E.J. Rijkers; W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); C. Andrieu-Soler (Charlotte); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); R. Patient (Roger); E. Soler (Eric); B. Lenhard (Boris); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractRUNX1 is known to be an essential transcription factor for generating hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), but much less is known about its role in the downstream process of hematopoietic differentiation. RUNX1 has been shown to be part of a large transcription factor complex, together with

  16. Thrombopoietin and hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    de Graaf, Carolyn A; Metcalf, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the cytokine that is chiefly responsible for megakaryocyte production but increasingly attention has turned to its role in maintaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are required to initiate the production of all mature hematopoietic cells, but this differentiation needs to be balanced against self-renewal and quiescence to maintain the stem cell pool throughout life. TPO has been shown to support HSC quiescence during adult hematopoiesis, with the loss of TPO s...

  17. Evaluation of the risk factors associated with high-dose chemotherapy-induced dysgeusia in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: possible usefulness of cryotherapy in dysgeusia prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Naoto; Hanafusa, Takeshi; Abe, Shinji; Sato, Chiemi; Nakamura, Toshimi; Teraoka, Kazuhiko; Abe, Masahiro; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Ishizawa, Keisuke

    2016-09-01

    Dysgeusia is one of the sporadic adverse effects induced by chemotherapy, but it remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to retrospectively identify the risk factors related with dysgeusia in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). Forty-eight patients with myeloma or lymphoma undergoing AHSCT were enrolled in this study. Data regarding dysgeusia and symptoms were collected by interviews conducted by medical workers. Patient characteristics and unfavorable effects induced by dysgeusia were obtained from medical records and analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the risk factors related with dysgeusia. Of the 48 patients, 20 (42 %) had dysgeusia after AHSCT. The total period of parenteral nutrition (TPN) administration and period of decreased oral intake in the dysgeusia group were statistically longer than those in the non-dysgeusia group. Multivariate analyses revealed that oral mucositis (odds ratio: 30.3; p cryotherapy was the independent suppressive factor of dysgeusia (odds ratio: 0.14; p cryotherapy was an independent suppressive factor for dysgeusia. Therefore, oral cryotherapy should be implemented into the regimen of supportive care management in patients undergoing AHSCT.

  18. The role of stem cell factor in mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells: synergy with G-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiece, I K; Briddell, R A; Hartley, C A; Andrews, R G

    1993-10-01

    The use of cytokine mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) in transplantation following chemotherapy has led to enhanced engraftment. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown in a number of clinical studies to be an effective mobilizer of PBPC. Preclinical data in mice and primates have demonstrated a potential role for the use of stem cell factor (SCF) in mobilization of PBPC. In the studies presented here, low doses of SCF are shown to synergize with optimal doses of G-CSF to enhance the number and quality of PBPC compared to G-CSF alone. Phase I studies using r-metHuSCF demonstrated mast cell-related dose limiting effects. The data presented here have led to Phase I/II studies to evaluate the potential use of low doses of SCF in combination with G-CSF for mobilization of PBPC.

  19. Retinoic acid regulates hematopoietic development from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönn, Roger E; Guibentif, Carolina; Moraghebi, Roksana; Chaves, Patricia; Saxena, Shobhit; Garcia, Bradley; Woods, Niels-Bjarne

    2015-02-10

    The functions of retinoic acid (RA), a potent morphogen with crucial roles in embryogenesis including developmental hematopoiesis, have not been thoroughly investigated in the human setting. Using an in vitro model of human hematopoietic development, we evaluated the effects of RA signaling on the development of blood and on generated hematopoietic progenitors. Decreased RA signaling increases the generation of cells with a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-like phenotype, capable of differentiation into myeloid and lymphoid lineages, through two separate mechanisms: by increasing the commitment of pluripotent stem cells toward the hematopoietic lineage during the developmental process and by decreasing the differentiation of generated blood progenitors. Our results demonstrate that controlled low-level RA signaling is a requirement in human blood development, and we propose a new interpretation of RA as a regulatory factor, where appropriate control of RA signaling enables increased generation of hematopoietic progenitor cells from pluripotent stem cells in vitro. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A reappraisal of ICU and long-term outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients and reassessment of prognosis factors: results of a 5-year cohort study (2009-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platon, L; Amigues, L; Ceballos, P; Fegueux, N; Daubin, D; Besnard, N; Larcher, R; Landreau, L; Agostini, C; Machado, S; Jonquet, O; Klouche, K

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiology and prognosis of complications related to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients requiring admission to intensive care unit (ICU) have not been reassessed precisely in the past few years. We performed a retrospective single-center study on 318 consecutive HSCT patients (2009-2013), analyzing outcome and factors prognostic of ICU admission. Among these patients, 73 were admitted to the ICU. In all, 32 patients (40.3%) died in ICU, 46 at hospital discharge (63%) and 61 (83.6%) 1 year later. Survivors had a significantly lower sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score, serum lactate and bilirubin upon ICU admission. Catecholamine support, mechanical ventilation (MV) and/or renal replacement therapy during ICU stay, a delayed organ support and an active graft versus host disease (GvHD) significantly worsen the outcome. By multivariate analysis, the worsening of SOFA score from days 1 to 3, the need for MV and the occurrence of an active GvHD were predictive of mortality. In conclusion, the incidence of HSCT-related complications requiring an admission to an ICU was at 22%, with an ICU mortality rate of 44%, and 84% 1 year later. A degradation of SOFA score at day 3 of ICU, need of MV and occurrence of an active GvHD are main predictive factors of mortality.

  1. Limited clinical efficacy of azacitidine in transfusion-dependent, growth factor-resistant, low- and Int-1-risk MDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Mette; Dybedahl, I; Holm, Mette

    2014-01-01

    This prospective phase II study evaluated the efficacy of azacitidine (Aza)+erythropoietin (Epo) in transfusion-dependent patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients ineligible for or refractory to full-dose Epo+granulocyte colony stimulation factors for >8 weeks...... and a transfusion need of 4 units over 8 weeks were included. Aza 75 mg m(-2) d(-1), 5/28 days, was given for six cycles; non-responding patients received another three cycles combined with Epo 60 000 units per week. Primary end point was transfusion independence (TI). All patients underwent targeted mutational...... screen for 42 candidate genes. Thirty enrolled patients received one cycle of Aza. Ten patients discontinued the study early, 7 due to adverse events including 2 deaths. Thirty-eight serious adverse events were reported, the most common being infection. Five patients achieved TI after six cycles and one...

  2. Characterizing the human hematopoietic CDome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Mike Stein; Simon, Christian; Olsen, Lars Rønn

    2014-01-01

    , we seek to give a preliminary characterization of the "human hematopoietic CDome." We encountered severe gaps in the knowledge of CD protein expression, mostly resulting from incomplete and unstructured data generation, which we argue inhibit both basic research as well as therapies seeking to target......In this study, we performed extensive semi-automated data collection from the primary and secondary literature in an effort to characterize the expression of all membrane proteins within the CD scheme on hematopoietic cells. Utilizing over 6000 data points across 305 CD molecules on 206 cell types...... membrane proteins. We detail these shortcomings and propose strategies to overcome these issues. Analyzing the available data, we explore the functional characteristics of the CD molecules both individually and across the groups of hematopoietic cells on which they are expressed. We compare protein and m...

  3. Motor skill delays in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy as an important risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverna, Livia; Tremolada, Marta; Bonichini, Sabrina; Tosetto, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Messina, Chiara; Pillon, Marta

    2017-01-01

    CNS-directed therapies for the treatment of leukemia can adversely affect the acquisition of new skills, such as reading/writing and math. Two years after the end of treatments, children show gross and fine motor skill delays that may persist even when patients are considered healed. The goal of the present study was to assess motor skills difficulties in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment. Particular attention has been paid to those patients who had undergone Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) and to the relationship between motor delays and age bands. Participants were 60 children (median age of 5; inter quartile range: 3.07-5.76), including 31 females and 29 males, 91.7% of them were affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 8.3% by acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Five children had undergone HCST. Parents were interviewed by Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) on children's motor skills and filled in the Italian Temperament Questionnaire (QUIT). VABS's total scores were converted into equivalent mental age scores (EMA). A score difference of at least three months between current age and equivalent mental age was considered a developmental delay. Non-parametric analyses were run to understand if HSCT treatment and a specific age band influence children's motor skills. Significant delays were found in global motor skills (56.7%) as well as in fine and gross motor domains. Mann Whitney U tests showed that children with HSCT were reported to have lower gross motor mean ranks (U = 62; p = 0.004; Mean rank = 15.40) than peers without HSCT (Mean rank = 31.87) and lower mean rank values on motor temperament scale (U = 9; p = 0.003; HSCT Mean rank = 4.75 versus no HSCT Mean rank = 27.81). Kruskal Wallis' tests identified the high risk treatment showing that HSCT experience negatively impacted the motor skills and temperamental motor activity of pre-school children one year after the diagnosis of leukemia.

  4. Motor skill delays in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy as an important risk factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Taverna

    Full Text Available CNS-directed therapies for the treatment of leukemia can adversely affect the acquisition of new skills, such as reading/writing and math. Two years after the end of treatments, children show gross and fine motor skill delays that may persist even when patients are considered healed. The goal of the present study was to assess motor skills difficulties in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment. Particular attention has been paid to those patients who had undergone Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT and to the relationship between motor delays and age bands. Participants were 60 children (median age of 5; inter quartile range: 3.07-5.76, including 31 females and 29 males, 91.7% of them were affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, and 8.3% by acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Five children had undergone HCST. Parents were interviewed by Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS on children's motor skills and filled in the Italian Temperament Questionnaire (QUIT. VABS's total scores were converted into equivalent mental age scores (EMA. A score difference of at least three months between current age and equivalent mental age was considered a developmental delay. Non-parametric analyses were run to understand if HSCT treatment and a specific age band influence children's motor skills. Significant delays were found in global motor skills (56.7% as well as in fine and gross motor domains. Mann Whitney U tests showed that children with HSCT were reported to have lower gross motor mean ranks (U = 62; p = 0.004; Mean rank = 15.40 than peers without HSCT (Mean rank = 31.87 and lower mean rank values on motor temperament scale (U = 9; p = 0.003; HSCT Mean rank = 4.75 versus no HSCT Mean rank = 27.81. Kruskal Wallis' tests identified the high risk treatment showing that HSCT experience negatively impacted the motor skills and temperamental motor activity of pre-school children one year after the diagnosis of leukemia.

  5. The preparation of 6x His-tagged granulocyte colony stimulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... synthesis through gene amplification of open reading frame (ORF) of hGCSFb, cloning in pIVEX 2.4d vector and transformation of the produced construct in chemically competent Escherichia coli DH 5 α cells. A cell free protein synthesis system, RTS 100 E. coli HY kit, was tested for 6x His tagged G-CSF protein synthesis.

  6. OP9-Lhx2 stromal cells facilitate derivation of hematopoietic progenitors both in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Generating engraftable hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs is an ideal approach for obtaining induced HSCs for cell therapy. However, the path from PSCs to robustly induced HSCs (iHSCs in vitro remains elusive. We hypothesize that the modification of hematopoietic niche cells by transcription factors facilitates the derivation of induced HSCs from PSCs. The Lhx2 transcription factor is expressed in fetal liver stromal cells but not in fetal blood cells. Knocking out Lhx2 leads to a fetal hematopoietic defect in a cell non-autonomous role. In this study, we demonstrate that the ectopic expression of Lhx2 in OP9 cells (OP9-Lhx2 accelerates the hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs. OP9-Lhx2 significantly increased the yields of hematopoietic progenitor cells via co-culture with PSCs in vitro. Interestingly, the co-injection of OP9-Lhx2 and PSCs into immune deficient mice also increased the proportion of hematopoietic progenitors via the formation of teratomas. The transplantation of phenotypic HSCs from OP9-Lhx2 teratomas but not from the OP9 control supported a transient repopulating capability. The upregulation of Apln gene by Lhx2 is correlated to the hematopoietic commitment property of OP9-Lhx2. Furthermore, the enforced expression of Apln in OP9 cells significantly increased the hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs. These results indicate that OP9-Lhx2 is a good cell line for regeneration of hematopoietic progenitors both in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Cooperative activities of hematopoietic regulators recruit RNA polymerase II to a tissue-specific chromatin domain

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Kirby D.; Grass, Jeffrey A.; Boyer, Meghan E; Kiekhaefer, Carol M.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2002-01-01

    The hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-1 regulates erythropoiesis and β-globin expression. Although consensus GATA-1 binding sites exist throughout the murine β-globin locus, we found that GATA-1 discriminates among these sites in vivo. Conditional expression of GATA-1 in GATA-1-null cells recapitulated the occupancy pattern. GATA-1 induced RNA polymerase II (pol II) recruitment to subregions of the locus control region and to the β-globin promoters. The hematopoietic factor NF-E2 cooper...

  8. Prognostic Factors and a New Prognostic Index Model for Children and Adolescents with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Who Underwent Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Multicenter Study of the Turkish Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplantation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vural Kesik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The prognostic factors and a new childhood prognostic index after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT in patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL were evaluated. Materials and Methods: The prognostic factors of 61 patients who underwent AHSCT between January 1990 and December 2014 were evaluated. In addition, the Age-Adjusted International Prognostic Index and the Childhood International Prognostic Index (CIPI were evaluated for their impact on prognosis. Results: The median age of the 61 patients was 14.8 years (minimummaximum: 5-20 years at the time of AHSCT. There were single relapses in 28 patients, ≥2 relapses in eight patients, and refractory disease in 25 patients. The chemosensitivity/chemorefractory ratio was 36/25. No pretransplant radiotherapy, no remission at the time of transplantation, posttransplant white blood cell count over 10x103/ μL, posttransplant positron emission tomography positivity at day 100, and serum albumin of <2.5 g/dL at diagnosis were correlated with progression-free survival. No remission at the time of transplantation, bone marrow positivity at diagnosis, and relapse after AHSCT were significant parameters for overall survival. Conclusion: The major factors affecting the progression-free and overall survival were clearly demonstrated. A CIPI that uses a lactate dehydrogenase level of 500 IU/L worked well for estimating the prognosis. We recommend AHSCT at first complete remission for relapsed cases, and it should also be taken into consideration for patients with high prognostic scores at diagnosis.

  9. Evidence for a role of NF-κB in the survival of hematopoietic cells mediated by interleukin 3 and the oncogenic TEL/platelet-derived growth factor receptor β fusion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besançon, Françoise; Atfi, Azeddine; Gespach, Christian; Cayre, Yvon E.; Bourgeade, Marie-Françoise

    1998-01-01

    Interleukin 3 (IL-3) and other hematopoietic cytokines transduce signals that stimulate DNA synthesis and cell survival. In certain chronic myelomonocytic leukemias, a TEL/platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) fusion protein is produced as a consequence of the t(5;12) translocation. It contains the amino terminus of the transcription factor TEL fused to the transmembranous and cytoplasmic domains of the PDGFRβ. It is oncogenic as it substitutes for IL-3, thus promoting cell growth and preventing apoptotic cell death. The mechanism by which TEL/PDGFRβ generates survival signals remains undefined. Here, we report that both IL-3 and TEL/PDGFRβ initiate a signaling cascade that leads to the activation of the transcriptional factor NF-κB. In fact, either cytokine deprivation of IL-3-dependent Ba/F3 cells or exposure of TEL/PDGFRβ-expressing cells to the specific inhibitor of the PDGFR tyrosine kinase, CGP53716, caused a strong decrease in NF-κB activity followed by extensive cell death. Further, treatment with the proteasome inhibitor Z-IE(O-t-Bu)A-leucinal suppressed IL-3 and TEL/PDGFRβ-dependent survival. The same result was seen upon overexpression of an unphosphorylable form of IκBα. Because both conditions inactivate NF-κB by preventing its translocation into the nucleus, that process seems to be essential for cell survival in response to IL-3 and TEL/PDGFRβ. Moreover, overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of the protooncogene c-Myc, a downstream target of NF-κB, had a similar effect. We conclude that NF-κB plays an important role in maintaining cell survival in response to IL-3 and TEL/PDGFRβ and that c-Myc may be a downstream effector mediating this effect. PMID:9653143

  10. Instruction of hematopoietic lineage choice by cytokine signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endele, Max; Etzrodt, Martin; Schroeder, Timm, E-mail: timm.schroeder@bsse.ethz.ch

    2014-12-10

    Hematopoiesis is the cumulative consequence of finely tuned signaling pathways activated through extrinsic factors, such as local niche signals and systemic hematopoietic cytokines. Whether extrinsic factors actively instruct the lineage choice of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells or are only selectively allowing survival and proliferation of already intrinsically lineage-committed cells has been debated over decades. Recent results demonstrated that cytokines can instruct lineage choice. However, the precise function of individual cytokine-triggered signaling molecules in inducing cellular events like proliferation, lineage choice, and differentiation remains largely elusive. Signal transduction pathways activated by different cytokine receptors are highly overlapping, but support the production of distinct hematopoietic lineages. Cellular context, signaling dynamics, and the crosstalk of different signaling pathways determine the cellular response of a given extrinsic signal. New tools to manipulate and continuously quantify signaling events at the single cell level are therefore required to thoroughly interrogate how dynamic signaling networks yield a specific cellular response. - Highlights: • Recent studies provided definite proof for lineage-instructive action of cytokines. • Signaling pathways involved in hematopoietic lineage instruction remain elusive. • New tools are emerging to quantitatively study dynamic signaling networks over time.

  11. Peripheral blood stem cell mobilization from healthy donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Melda Comert; Sahin, Fahri; Saydam, Guray

    2015-08-01

    Most frequently used graft of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for allogeneic transplantation is peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) that are collected after mobilization with frequently granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Administration of the optimal dose of G-CSF while preserving the donor health is one of the most important points for sufficient PBSC mobilization and harvest. We hereby tried to summarize characteristic features, potential side effects and main topics in peripheral blood stem cell mobilization from healthy donors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Transplantation of Non-Hematopoietic Adult Bone Marrow Stem/Progenitor Cells Isolated by the p75 Nerve Growth Factor Receptor into the Penis Rescues Erectile Function in a Rat Model of Cavernous Nerve Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendirci, Muammer; Trost, Landon; Bakondi, Benjamin; Whitney, Mandolin J.; Hellstrom, Wayne J.G.; Spees, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Radical prostatectomy to treat prostate cancer frequently results in erectile dysfunction and reduced quality-of-life. We investigated the effects of transplanting non-hematopoietic adult bone marrow stem/progenitor cells (multipotent stromal cells; MSCs) into the corpus cavernosum in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury (BCNCI). Materials and Methods MSCs were isolated from the bone marrow of transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP) rats by plastic adherence (rMSCs) or magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) using antibodies against the p75 low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (p75LNGFR; p75-derived MSCs). BCNCI was induced in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Immediately after injury, rats were injected intracavernosally either with PBS (vehicle control, n=8), fibroblasts (cell control, n=8), rMSCs (cell treatment, n=8), or p75dMSCs (cell treatment, n=8). Other rats underwent a sham operation (PBS injection, n=8). Four weeks after the procedures, erectile function was assessed by measurement of intracavernosal-to-mean arterial pressure ratios (ICP/MAP) and total ICP values during stimulation of the cavernosal nerve. Results Intracavernous injection of p75dMSCs after BCNCI resulted in significantly higher mean ICP/MAP and total ICP values compared with all other groups except for sham (p injected with rMSCs had partial rescue of erectile function compared with animals that received p75dMSCs. Fibroblast (cell control) and PBS (vehicle control) injections did not improve erectile function. ELISA results suggested that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) secreted by p75dMSCs protected the cavernosal nerve after BCNCI. Conclusions Transplantation of adult stem/progenitor cells may provide an effective treatment for ED following radical prostatectomy. PMID:20728109

  13. Thrombopoietin and hematopoietic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Carolyn A

    2011-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the cytokine that is chiefly responsible for megakaryocyte production but increasingly attention has turned to its role in maintaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are required to initiate the production of all mature hematopoietic cells, but this differentiation needs to be balanced against self-renewal and quiescence to maintain the stem cell pool throughout life. TPO has been shown to support HSC quiescence during adult hematopoiesis, with the loss of TPO signaling associated with bone marrow failure and thrombocytopenia. Recent studies have shown that constitutive activation mutations in Mpl contribute to myeloproliferative disease. In this review, we will discuss TPO signaling pathways, regulation of TPO levels and the role of TPO in normal hematopoiesis and during myeloproliferative disease. PMID:21478671

  14. Association of Macroeconomic Factors With Nonrelapse Mortality After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Adults With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: An Analysis From the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Sebastian; Labopin, Myriam; Ibatici, Adalberto; Browne, Paul; Czerw, Tomasz; Socie, Gerard; Unal, Ali; Kyrcz-Krzemien, Slawomira; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Goker, Hakan; Potter, Mike; Furness, Caroline L; McQuaker, Grant; Beelen, Dietrich; Milpied, Noel; Campos, Antonio; Craddock, Charles; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-03-01

    From a global perspective, the rates of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) are closely related to the economic status of a country. However, a potential association with outcome has not yet been documented. The goal of this study was to evaluate effects of health care expenditure (HCE), Human Development Index (HDI), team density, and center experience on nonrelapse mortality (NRM) after HLA-matched sibling alloHCT for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A total of 983 patients treated with myeloablative alloHCT between 2004 and 2008 in 24 European countries were included. In a univariate analysis, the probability of day 100 NRM was increased for countries with lower current HCE (8% vs. 3%; p = .06), countries with lower HDI (8% vs. 3%; p = .02), and centers with less experience (8% vs. 5%; p = .04). In addition, the overall NRM was increased for countries with lower current HCE (21% vs. 17%; p = .09) and HDI (21% vs. 16%; p = .03) and for centers with lower activity (21% vs. 16%; p = .07). In a multivariate analysis, the strongest predictive model for day 100 NRM included current HCE greater than the median (hazard ratio [HR], 0.39; p = .002). The overall NRM was mostly predicted by HDI greater than the median (HR, 0.65; p = .01). Both lower current HCE and HDI were associated with decreased probability of overall survival. Both macroeconomic factors and the socioeconomic status of a country strongly influence NRM after alloHCT for adults with ALL. Our findings should be considered when clinical studies in the field of alloHCT are interpreted. ©AlphaMed Press.

  15. Maintenance of human embryonic stem cells in mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned media augments hematopoietic specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Mejía, Verónica; Fernández, Agustín F; Ayllón, Verónica; Real, Pedro J; Bueno, Clara; Anderson, Per; Martín, Francisco; Fraga, Mario F; Menendez, Pablo

    2012-06-10

    The realization of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) as a model for human developmental hematopoiesis and in potential cell replacement strategies relies on an improved understanding of the extrinsic and intrinsic factors regulating hematopoietic-specific hESC differentiation. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent cells of mesodermal origin that form a part of hematopoietic stem cell niches and have an important role in the regulation of hematopoiesis through production of secreted factors and/or cell-to-cell interactions. We have previously shown that hESCs may be successfully maintained feeder free using hMSC-conditioned media (MSC-CM). Here, we hypothesized that hESCs maintained in MSC-CM may be more prone to differentiation toward hematopoietic lineage than hESCs grown in standard human foreskin fibroblast-conditioned media. We report that specification into hemogenic progenitors and subsequent hematopoietic differentiation and clonogenic progenitor capacity is robustly enhanced in hESC lines maintained in MSC-CM. Interestingly, co-culture of hESCs on hMSCs fully abrogates hematopoietic specification of hESCs, thus suggesting that the improved hematopoietic differentiation is mediated by MSC-secreted factors rather than by MSC-hESC physical interactions. To investigate the molecular mechanism involved in this process, we analyzed global (LINE-1) methylation and genome-wide promoter DNA methylation. hESCs grown in MSC-CM showed a decrease of 17% in global DNA methylation and a promoter DNA methylation signature consisting of 45 genes commonly hypomethylated and 102 genes frequently hypermethylated. Our data indicate that maintenance of hESCs in MSC-CM robustly augments hematopoietic specification and that the process seems mediated by MSC-secreted factors conferring a DNA methylation signature to undifferentiated hESCs which may influence further predisposition toward hematopoietic specification.

  16. Body mass index and bioelectrical impedance phase angle as potentially modifiable nutritional markers are independent risk factors for outcome in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbain, Paul; Birlinger, Jakob; Ihorst, Gabriele; Biesalski, Hans-Konrad; Finke, Juergen; Bertz, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Beside many risk factors in patients considered for alloHCT, only body mass index (BMI) as a broad marker of nutritional status has prognostic value in these patients. This is the first prospective study to investigate the validity of further nutritional markers: adjusted BMI, normalized for gender and age; Subjective Global Assessment questionnaire and standardized phase angle, normalized for gender, age and BMI in 105 patients as independent risk factors for outcomes [overall survival (OS), non-relapse mortality (NRM), relapse mortality (RM), progression-free survival (PFS)] until 2 years after alloHCT. In Cox proportional-hazards regression models, we included a variety of accepted risk factors. The two most influential pre-transplant risk factors identified and associated with similarly increased hazard ratios (HR) for OS, RM, and PFS were a low-standardized phase angle (HR = 1.97, P = 0.043; HR = 3.18, P = 0.017, and HR = 1.91, P = 0.039) and advanced disease. Under- and overweight according BMI percentiles (≤10th; ≥90th) revealed associations with increased risk of NRM (HR = 2.90, P = 0.018; HR = 3.02, P = 0.062), although only low BMI was weakly associated with OS (HR = 1.82, P = 0.09). In conclusion, our results demonstrate that pre-transplant phase angle is an independent predictor for 2-year outcomes in these patients. Further investigation is necessary to demonstrate whether the theoretically modifiable phase angle can be increased by physical training combined with nutritional support, and if this improves outcome after alloHCT.

  17. A synthetic three-dimensional niche system facilitates generation of functional hematopoietic cells from human-induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficient generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs holds great promise in personalized transplantation therapies. However, the derivation of functional and transplantable HSCs from iPSCs has had very limited success thus far. Methods We developed a synthetic 3D hematopoietic niche system comprising nanofibers seeded with bone marrow (BM-derived stromal cells and growth factors to induce functional hematopoietic cells from human iPSCs in vitro. Results Approximately 70 % of human CD34+ hematopoietic cells accompanied with CD43+ progenitor cells could be derived from this 3D induction system. Colony-forming-unit (CFU assay showed that iPSC-derived CD34+ cells formed all types of hematopoietic colonies including CFU-GEMM. TAL-1 and MIXL1, critical transcription factors associated with hematopoietic development, were expressed during the differentiation process. Furthermore, iPSC-derived hematopoietic cells gave rise to both lymphoid and myeloid lineages in the recipient NOD/SCID mice after transplantation. Conclusions Our study underscores the importance of a synthetic 3D niche system for the derivation of transplantable hematopoietic cells from human iPSCs in vitro thereby establishing a foundation towards utilization of human iPSC-derived HSCs for transplantation therapies in the clinic.

  18. Factors Influencing Pulmonary Toxicity in Children Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in the Setting of Total Body Irradiation-Based Myeloablative Conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abugideiri, Mustafa, E-mail: Mabugid@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Nanda, Ronica H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Butker, Charlotte [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Zhang, Chao [Department of Biostatistics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Kim, Sungjin [Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Research Center, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Chiang, Kuang-Yueh [Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Center, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, and Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, Bone Marrow Transplant, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Butker, Elizabeth; Khan, Mohammad K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Haight, Ann E. [Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Center, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, and Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, Bone Marrow Transplant, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Chen, Zhengjia [Department of Biostatistics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated factors associated with increased risk of pulmonary toxicity (PT) from any cause in pediatric patients after myeloablative conditioning, using total body irradiation (TBI), followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods and Materials: The records of 129 consecutive pediatric patients (range: 1-21 years of age) who underwent TBI-based myeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies at our institution between January 2003 and May 2014 were reviewed. Although total TBI doses ranged from 10.5 to 14 Gy, lung doses were limited to 10 Gy with partial transmission blocks. TBI dose rates ranged from 5.6 cGy/min to 20.9 cGy/min. PT was classified using clinical symptoms, radiographic evidence, and ventilatory defects on pulmonary function tests. Noninfectious (idiopathic) pneumonia syndrome (IPS) was characterized by patients exhibiting PT while demonstrating no signs of infection throughout the follow-up period. Results: PT from any cause developed in 70.5% of patients and was significantly associated with increased transplantation-related mortality (TRM) (P=.03) and decreased overall survival (OS) (P=.02). IPS developed in 23.3% of patients but was not associated with increased TRM (P=.6) or decreased OS (P=.5). Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) significantly affected PT (P=.001) but did not significantly influence the development of IPS (P=.4). Infection was a leading cause of PT (75.8%). TBI dose rate significantly affected development of overall PT (P=.02) and was the sole factor to significantly influence the incidence of IPS (P=.002). TBI total dose, dose per fraction, disease type, transplantation chemotherapy, age of patient, sex, and donor type did not significantly impact overall PT or IPS. Conclusions: A high incidence of PT was noted in this large series of homogeneously treated pediatric patients undergoing TBI for allogeneic HSCT. TBI dose rates affected overall PT and strongly

  19. Deconstructing the Complexity of TGFβ Signaling in Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Quiescence and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinge, Ashwini; Filippi, Marie-Dominique

    2016-12-01

    The hematopoietic system is highly dynamic and must constantly produce new blood cells every day. Mature blood cells all derive from a pool of rare long-lived hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that are mostly quiescent but occasionally divide and self-renew in order to maintain the stem cell pool and continuous replenishment of mature blood cells throughout life. A tight control of HSC self-renewal, commitment to differentiation and maintenance of quiescence states is necessary for lifelong blood supply. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a critical regulator hematopoietic cell functions. It is a potent inhibitor of hematopoietic cell growth. However, TGFβ functions are more complex and largely context-dependent. Emerging evidence suggests a role in aging, cell identity and cell fate decisions. Here, we will review the role of TGF-β and downstream signaling in normal HSC functions, in HSC quiescence and beyond.

  20. Human hematopoietic stem cell adherence to cytokines and matrix molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Long, M. W.; Briddell, R.; Walter, A W; Bruno, E; Hoffman, R.

    1992-01-01

    The hematopoietic microenvironment is a complex structure in which stem cells, progenitor cells, stromal cells, growth factors, and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules each interact to direct the coordinate regulation of blood cell development. While much is known concerning the individual components of this microenvironment, little is understood of the interactions among these various components or, in particular, the nature of those interactions responsible for the regional localization of...

  1. Aging, Clonality and Rejuvenation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Akunuru, Shailaja; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with reduced organ function and increased disease incidence. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) aging driven by both cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is linked to impaired HSC self-renewal and regeneration, aging-associated immune remodeling, and increased leukemia incidence. Compromised DNA damage responses and increased production of reactive oxygen species have been previously causatively attributed to HSC aging. However, recent paradigm-shifting concepts such as global ...

  2. Increased mitochondrial apoptotic priming of human regulatory T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kazuyuki; Kim, Haesook T; Bascug, O R Gregory; Kawano, Yutaka; Ryan, Jeremy; Matsuoka, Ken-ichi; Davids, Matthew S; Koreth, John; Ho, Vincent T; Cutler, Corey; Armand, Philippe; Alyea, Edwin P; Blazar, Bruce R; Antin, Joseph H; Soiffer, Robert J; Letai, Anthony; Ritz, Jerome

    2014-09-01

    CD4 regulatory T cells play a critical role in establishment of immune tolerance and prevention of graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The recovery and maintenance of regulatory T cells is dependent on homeostatic factors including the generation of naïve regulatory T cells from hematopoietic precursor cells, the proliferation and expansion of mature regulatory T cells, and the survival of regulatory T cells in vivo. In this study, quantitation of mitochondrial apoptotic priming was used to compare susceptibility of regulatory T cells, conventional CD4 T cells and CD8 T cells to intrinsic pathway apoptosis in 57 patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and 25 healthy donors. In healthy donors, regulatory T cells are more susceptible to mitochondrial priming than conventional T cells. Mitochondrial priming is increased after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in all T-cell subsets and particularly in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease. Regulatory T cells express high levels of CD95 and are also more susceptible than conventional T cells to apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway. However, CD95 expression and extrinsic pathway apoptosis is not increased after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Decreased expression of BCL2 and increased expression of BIM, a mitochondrial cell death activator protein, in regulatory T cells contributes to increased mitochondrial priming in this T-cell subset but additional factors likely contribute to increased mitochondrial priming following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  3. Hematological parameters, and hematopoietic growth factors: EPO and IL-3 in response to whole-body cryostimulation (WBC in military academy students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Szygula

    Full Text Available The effects of extreme cold on the human body are not fully understood, there are also no reports on the effect of cryogenic temperatures on the levels of erythropoietin (EPO and interleukin 3 (IL-3, two important factors that regulate hematopoiesis.determination of changes in peripheral blood cell counts and EPO and IL-3 levels induced by a series of 10, 20 and 30 standard whole-body cryostimulation (WBC treatments. The study involved 45 men, experimental group (EXP, n = 30 subjected to 30 WBC treatments (-130°C, treatment duration: 3 minutes and a control group (CON, n = 15. Blood samples were collected before the series of treatments and after 10, 20 and 30 treatments. After 10 and 20 treatments we observed lower red blood cell counts and hematocrit and hemoglobin levels compared to baseline (p<0.05 and the control group (p<0.05. Additionally we observed an increase in hemoglobin concentration in plasma (p<0.05, and bilirubin after 10 and 20 treatments, and a decrease in plasma concentration of haptoglobin after 10, 20 and 30 treatments (p<0.05. The number of leukocytes was higher after 10 and 20 WBC treatments compared to baseline and the CON group. EPO concentration in plasma was elevated and the concentration of IL-3 was lower after 10, 20 and 30 WBC treatments. The decrease in indices of the erythrocytic system, plasma hemoglobin and bilirubin, with a simultaneous decrease in haptoglobin concentrations after 10 and 20 WBC treatments, may be due to increased intravascular hemolysis. At the same time there was a small, but statistically significant increase in the concentration of EPO stimulated erythropoiesis which could facilitate a return of erythrocytic system indices to initial levels after 30 WBC treatments. Changes in the white blood cell system showed transient mobilization of this system under the influence of WBC.

  4. Gata2 in Hematopoietic Cell Generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.-L. Kauts (Mari-Liis)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe mammalian hematopoietic system is maintained by hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Whereas in the adult, they reside in the bone marrow, the first HSCs are generated in the main vasculature of the midgestation embryo as a result of tightly regulated extrinsic and intrinsic molecular

  5. Aging, Clonality, and Rejuvenation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akunuru, Shailaja; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Aging is associated with reduced organ function and increased disease incidence. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) aging driven by both cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is linked to impaired HSC self-renewal and regeneration, aging-associated immune remodeling, and increased leukemia incidence. Compromised DNA damage responses and the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been previously causatively attributed to HSC aging. However, recent paradigm-shifting concepts, such as global epigenetic and cytoskeletal polarity shifts, cellular senescence, as well as the clonal selection of HSCs upon aging, provide new insights into HSC aging mechanisms. Rejuvenating agents that can reprogram the epigenetic status of aged HSCs or senolytic drugs that selectively deplete senescent cells provide promising translational avenues for attenuating hematopoietic aging and, potentially, alleviating aging-associated immune remodeling and myeloid malignancies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. On signaling pathways: hematopoietic stem cell specification from hemogenic endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yan; Huang, He

    2015-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are specified and generated during the embryonic development and have remarkable potential to replenish the full set of blood cell lineages. Researchers have long been interested in clarifying the molecular events involved in HSC specification. Many studies have reported the development of methods for generating functional hematopoietic cells from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs-embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)) for decades. However, the generation of HSCs with robust long-term repopulation potential remains a swingeing challenge, of which a major factor contributing to this failure is the difficulty to define the intraembryonic signals related to the specification of HSCs. Since HSCs directly derive from hemogenic endothelium, in this review, we summarize both in vivo and in vitro studies on conserved signaling pathways that control the specification of HSCs from hemogenic endothelial cells.

  7. Donor Dependent Variations in Hematopoietic Differentiation among Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Féraud

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis generated from human embryonic stem cells (ES and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS are unprecedented resources for cell therapy. We compared hematopoietic differentiation potentials from ES and iPS cell lines originated from various donors and derived them using integrative and non-integrative vectors. Significant differences in differentiation toward hematopoietic lineage were observed among ES and iPS. The ability of engraftment of iPS or ES-derived cells in NOG mice varied among the lines with low levels of chimerism. iPS generated from ES cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC reproduce a similar hematopoietic outcome compared to their parental ES cell line. We were not able to identify any specific hematopoietic transcription factors that allow to distinguish between good versus poor hematopoiesis in undifferentiated ES or iPS cell lines. There is a relatively unpredictable variation in hematopoietic differentiation between ES and iPS cell lines that could not be predicted based on phenotype or gene expression of the undifferentiated cells. These results demonstrate the influence of genetic background in variation of hematopoietic potential rather than the reprogramming process.

  8. Hematopoietic Stem Cell and Its Growth Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-16

    senile dementia of the Alzheimer type share an antigenic deermi oclonsi antibody specific for Lactasyiceramide. J. fBo. Chem. nant with intermediate...erythroblast. Blood 63:1376, 1984. 10. Yen SH, Gaskin F, Fu SM: Neurofibrillary tangles in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type share an antigenic...and induced globin expression. Science 216:1233. 59 21. Yen SH, F Gaskin and SM Fu. 1983. Neurofibrillary tangles in senile dementia of the Alzheimer

  9. Epigenetic alterations in hematopoietic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Young Rock; Schatoff, Emma; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2012-10-01

    Gene discovery efforts in patients with hematopoietic malignancies have brought to the forefront a series of mutations in genes thought to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. These mutations occur in genes known, or suspected, to play a role in modifying cytosine nucleotides on DNA and/or altering the state of histone modifications. Genes such as ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2, IDH1/2, MLL1, and TET2 all have been shown to be mutated and/or translocated in patients with myeloid malignancies. Intriguingly, many of the alterations affecting DNA cytosine modifications in myeloid malignancies (mutations in DNMT3A, IDH1/2, and TET2) have also been found in patients with T-cell lymphomas, and EZH2 mutations appear to be critical in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development as well. In addition, the discovery of frequent mutations in CREBBP, EP300, EZH2, and MLL2 in B-cell lymphomas suggests that epigenetic alterations play a critical role in lymphomagenesis. The purpose of this review is to present functional evidence of how alterations in these epigenetic modifiers promote hematopoietic transformation. The conclusions drawn from these data are valuable in understanding biological mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets.

  10. Analysis of the recovery of cryopreserved and thawed CD34+ and CD3+ cells collected for hematopoietic transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Virginia; Khuu, Hanh; David-Ocampo, Virginia; Byrne, Karen; Pavletic, Steven; Bishop, Michael; Fowler, Daniel H; Barrett, A John; Stroncek, David F

    2014-04-01

    Cryopreservation is often used to store cellular therapies, but little is known about how well CD3+ or CD34+ cells tolerate this process. Viable CD34+ cell recoveries were analyzed from related and unrelated donor granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) products and viable CD3+ cell recoveries from G-CSF-mobilized and nonmobilized apheresis products from related and unrelated donors. All products were cryopreserved with 5% dimethyl sulfoxide and 6% pentastarch using a controlled-rate freezer and were stored in liquid nitrogen. Related donor products were cryopreserved immediately after collection and unrelated donor products greater than 12 hours postcollection. The postthaw recovery of CD34+ cells from related donor PBSCs was high (n = 86; 97.5 ± 23.1%) and there was no difference in postthaw CD34+ cell recovery from unrelated donor PBSCs (n = 14; 98.8 ± 37.2%; p = 0.863). In related donor lymphocyte products the postthaw CD3+ cell recovery (n = 48; 90.7 ± 21.4%) was greater than that of unrelated donor products (n = 14; 66.6 ± 35.8%; p = 0.00251). All unrelated donor lymphocyte products were from G-CSF-mobilized products, while most related donor lymphocyte products were from nonmobilized products. A comparison of the CD3+ cell recovery from related donor G-CSF-mobilized products (n = 19; 85.0 ± 29.2%) with that of unrelated donor products found no significant difference (p = 0.137). The postthaw recovery of CD34+ cells was high in both related and unrelated donor products, but the recovery of CD3+ cells in unrelated donor G-CSF-mobilized products was lower. G-CSF-mobilized unrelated donor products may contain fewer CD3+ cells than non-G-CSF-exposed products upon thaw and, when indicated, cell doses should be monitored. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Human hematopoietic stem cell adherence to cytokines and matrix molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, M W; Briddell, R; Walter, A W; Bruno, E; Hoffman, R

    1992-07-01

    The hematopoietic microenvironment is a complex structure in which stem cells, progenitor cells, stromal cells, growth factors, and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules each interact to direct the coordinate regulation of blood cell development. While much is known concerning the individual components of this microenvironment, little is understood of the interactions among these various components or, in particular, the nature of those interactions responsible for the regional localization of specific developmental signals. We hypothesized that cytokines act together with ECM molecules to anchor stem cells within the microenvironment, thus modulating their function. In order to analyze matrix-cytokine-stem cell interactions, we developed an ECM model system in which purified stem cell populations and plastic-immobilized individual proteins are used to assess the role of various matrix molecules and/or cytokines in human hematopoietic cell development. Analysis of these interactions revealed that a single ECM protein, thrombospondin, in conjunction with a single cytokine (e.g., c-kit ligand), constitutes a developmental signal that synergistically modulates hematopoietic stem cell function.

  12. Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiece, I; Briddell, R

    2001-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells have the potential for providing benefit in a variety of clinical settings. These include cells for support of patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy, as a target for replacement gene therapy, and as a source of cells for immunotherapy. The limitation to many of these applications has been the total absolute number of defined target cells. Therefore many investigators have explored methods to culture hematopoietic cells in vitro to increase the numbers of these cells. Studies attempting to expand hematopoietic stem cells, progenitor cells, and mature cells in vitro have become possible over the past decade due to the availability of recombinant growth factors and cell selection technologies. To date, no studies have demonstrated convincing data on the expansion of true stem cells, and so the focus of this review is the expansion of committed progenitor cells and mature cells. A number of clinical studies have been preformed using a variety of culture conditions, and several studies are currently in progress that explore the use of ex vivo expanded cells. These studies will be discussed in this review. There are evolving data that suggest that there are real clinical benefits associated with the use of the expanded cells; however, we are still at the early stages of understanding how to optimally culture different cell populations. The next decade should determine what culture conditions and what cell populations are needed for a range of clinical applications.

  13. SBR-Blood: systems biology repository for hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Jens; Heuston, Elisabeth F; Mishra, Tejaswini; Keller, Cheryl A; Hardison, Ross C; Bodine, David M

    2016-01-04

    Extensive research into hematopoiesis (the development of blood cells) over several decades has generated large sets of expression and epigenetic profiles in multiple human and mouse blood cell types. However, there is no single location to analyze how gene regulatory processes lead to different mature blood cells. We have developed a new database framework called hematopoietic Systems Biology Repository (SBR-Blood), available online at http://sbrblood.nhgri.nih.gov, which allows user-initiated analyses for cell type correlations or gene-specific behavior during differentiation using publicly available datasets for array- and sequencing-based platforms from mouse hematopoietic cells. SBR-Blood organizes information by both cell identity and by hematopoietic lineage. The validity and usability of SBR-Blood has been established through the reproduction of workflows relevant to expression data, DNA methylation, histone modifications and transcription factor occupancy profiles. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Thrombopoietin expands hematopoietic stem cells after transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Norma; Priestley, Greg; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Kaushansky, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that thrombopoietin (TPO) contributes to the development of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), supporting their survival and proliferation in vitro. To determine whether TPO supports the impressive expansion of HSC observed following transplantation, we transplanted normal marrow cells into lethally irradiated Tpo–/– and Tpo+/+ mice and quantified HSC self-renewal and expansion and hematopoietic progenitor cell homing. Although essentially identical numbers of...

  15. SNP Array in Hematopoietic Neoplasms: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinming Song

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic analysis is essential for the diagnosis and prognosis of hematopoietic neoplasms in current clinical practice. Many hematopoietic malignancies are characterized by structural chromosomal abnormalities such as specific translocations, inversions, deletions and/or numerical abnormalities that can be identified by karyotype analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP arrays offer high-resolution identification of copy number variants (CNVs and acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH/uniparental disomy (UPD that are usually not identifiable by conventional cytogenetic analysis and FISH studies. As a result, SNP arrays have been increasingly applied to hematopoietic neoplasms to search for clinically-significant genetic abnormalities. A large numbers of CNVs and UPDs have been identified in a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms. CNVs detected by SNP array in some hematopoietic neoplasms are of prognostic significance. A few specific genes in the affected regions have been implicated in the pathogenesis and may be the targets for specific therapeutic agents in the future. In this review, we summarize the current findings of application of SNP arrays in a variety of hematopoietic malignancies with an emphasis on the clinically significant genetic variants.

  16. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile eCoste

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs. Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-to-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system.

  17. AF10 plays a key role in the survival of uncommitted hematopoietic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Chamorro-Garcia

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis is a complex process regulated by both cell intrinsic and cell extrinsic factors. Alterations in the expression of critical genes during hematopoiesis can modify the balance between stem cell differentiation and proliferation, and may ultimately give rise to leukemia and other diseases. AF10 is a transcription factor that has been implicated in the development of leukemia following chromosomal rearrangements between the AF10 gene and one of at least two other genes, MLL and CALM. The link between AF10 and leukemia, together with the known interactions between AF10 and hematopoietic regulators, suggests that AF10 may be important in hematopoiesis and in leukemic transformation. Here we show that AF10 is important for proper hematopoietic differentiation. The induction of hematopoietic differentiation in both human hematopoietic cell lines and murine total bone marrow cells triggers a decrease of AF10 mRNA and protein levels, particularly in stem cells and multipotent progenitors. Gain- and loss-of-function studies demonstrate that over- or under-expression of AF10 leads to apoptotic cell death in stem cells and multipotent progenitors. We conclude that AF10 plays a key role in the maintenance of multipotent hematopoietic cells.

  18. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes early hematopoietic progenitor formation and erythroid specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafdar, Anuradha; Dobbin, Edwina; Corrigan, Pamela; Freeburn, Robin; Wheadon, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during development is a complex process linked to morphogenic signals. Understanding this process is important for regenerative medicine applications that require in vitro production of HSC. In this study we investigated the effects of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during early embryonic differentiation and hematopoietic specification using an embryonic stem cell system. Our data clearly demonstrates that following early differentiation induction, canonical Wnt signaling induces a strong mesodermal program whilst maintaining a degree of stemness potential. This involved a complex interplay between β-catenin/TCF/LEF/Brachyury/Nanog. β-catenin mediated up-regulation of TCF/LEF resulted in enhanced brachyury levels, which in-turn lead to Nanog up-regulation. During differentiation, active canonical Wnt signaling also up-regulated key transcription factors and cell specific markers essential for hematopoietic specification, in particular genes involved in establishing primitive erythropoiesis. This led to a significant increase in primitive erythroid colony formation. β-catenin signaling also augmented early hematopoietic and multipotent progenitor (MPP) formation. Following culture in a MPP specific cytokine cocktail, activation of β-catenin suppressed differentiation of the early hematopoietic progenitor population, with cells displaying a higher replating capacity and a propensity to form megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors. This bias towards erythroid lineage commitment was also observed when hematopoietic progenitors were directed to undergo myeloid colony formation. Overall this study underscores the importance of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mesodermal specification, primitive erythropoiesis and early hematopietic progenitor formation during hematopoietic induction.

  19. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes early hematopoietic progenitor formation and erythroid specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Tarafdar

    Full Text Available The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs during development is a complex process linked to morphogenic signals. Understanding this process is important for regenerative medicine applications that require in vitro production of HSC. In this study we investigated the effects of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during early embryonic differentiation and hematopoietic specification using an embryonic stem cell system. Our data clearly demonstrates that following early differentiation induction, canonical Wnt signaling induces a strong mesodermal program whilst maintaining a degree of stemness potential. This involved a complex interplay between β-catenin/TCF/LEF/Brachyury/Nanog. β-catenin mediated up-regulation of TCF/LEF resulted in enhanced brachyury levels, which in-turn lead to Nanog up-regulation. During differentiation, active canonical Wnt signaling also up-regulated key transcription factors and cell specific markers essential for hematopoietic specification, in particular genes involved in establishing primitive erythropoiesis. This led to a significant increase in primitive erythroid colony formation. β-catenin signaling also augmented early hematopoietic and multipotent progenitor (MPP formation. Following culture in a MPP specific cytokine cocktail, activation of β-catenin suppressed differentiation of the early hematopoietic progenitor population, with cells displaying a higher replating capacity and a propensity to form megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors. This bias towards erythroid lineage commitment was also observed when hematopoietic progenitors were directed to undergo myeloid colony formation. Overall this study underscores the importance of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mesodermal specification, primitive erythropoiesis and early hematopietic progenitor formation during hematopoietic induction.

  20. Human placenta is a potent hematopoietic niche containing hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells throughout development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Catherine; Bollerot, Karine; Mendes, Sandra; Haak, Esther; Crisan, Mihaela; Cerisoli, Francesco; Lauw, Ivoune; Kaimakis, Polynikis; Jorna, Ruud; Vermeulen, Mark; Kayser, Manfred; van der Linden, Reinier; Imanirad, Parisa; Verstegen, Monique; Nawaz-Yousaf, Humaira; Papazian, Natalie; Steegers, Eric; Cupedo, Tom; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are responsible for the life-long production of the blood system and are pivotal cells in hematologic transplantation therapies. During mouse and human development, the first HSCs are produced in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region. Subsequent to this emergence, HSCs are found in other anatomical sites of the mouse conceptus. While the mouse placenta contains abundant HSCs at midgestation, little is known concerning whether HSCs or hematopoietic progenitors are present and supported in the human placenta during development. In this study we show, over a range of developmental times including term, that the human placenta contains hematopoietic progenitors and HSCs. Moreover, stromal cell lines generated from human placenta at several developmental time points are pericyte-like cells and support human hematopoiesis. Immunostaining of placenta sections during development localizes hematopoietic cells in close contact with pericytes/perivascular cells. Thus, the human placenta is a potent hematopoietic niche throughout development. PMID:19796619

  1. Evaluation of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization Rates with Early Plerixafor Administration for Adult Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Jessica T; Shaw, J Ryan; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Horwitz, Mitchell E; Engemann, Ashley M

    2017-08-01

    The addition of plerixafor to high-dose colony-stimulating growth factor has been shown to improve stem cell mobilization rates in autologous transplant patients with multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. This study evaluates the change in administration time of plerixafor to determine if cell mobilization rates are similar between the US Food and Drug Administration-approved administration time of 11 hours before apheresis and an earlier administration time of 16 hours before apheresis. Medical records of patients age ≥ 18 years undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation requiring the use of plerixafor after at least 4 days of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy to complete stem cell mobilization from January 1, 2010 through September 30, 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The primary outcome was CD34 + cell mobilization success rates when plerixafor was administered 11 ± 2 hours (standard administration group) compared with 16 ± 2 hours before cell apheresis (early administration group), as defined as collection of  ≥2 × 10 6 CD34 + cells/kg. Secondary outcomes included the number of plerixafor therapy days required to collect a total of ≥2 × 10 6 CD34 + cells/kg, the number of apheresis cycles required to achieve ≥2 × 10 6 CD34 + cells/kg, the median CD34 + cells/kg collected in each apheresis session, and the rates of reported adverse events that occurred in the standard administration time group compared with the early administration time group. Of the 197 patients included, 114 patients received plerixafor 11 ± 2 hours before apheresis and 83 patients received plerixafor 16 hours ± 2 hours before apheresis. Ninety-four percent of patients in the early administration group achieved successful stem cell mobilization compared with 81.6% in the standard administration group (P = .0111). The median number of plerixafor days to reach the collection goal of  ≥2 × 10 6 CD34 + cells/kg was 1 day for

  2. An amino acid substitution in the Drosophila hopTum-l Jak kinase causes leukemia-like hematopoietic defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, H; Hanratty, W P; Dearolf, C R

    1995-01-01

    Proteins of the Jak family of non-receptor kinases play important roles in mammalian hematopoietic signal transduction. They mediate the cellular response to a wide range of cytokines and growth factors. A dominant mutation in a Drosophila Jak kinase, hopscotchTumorous-lethal (hopTum-l), causes hematopoietic defects. Here we conduct a molecular analysis of hopTum-l. We demonstrate that the hopTum-l hematopoietic phenotype is caused by a single amino acid substitution of glycine to glutamic acid at residue 341. We generate a true revertant of the hopTum-l mutation, in which both the molecular lesion and the mutant hematopoietic phenotype revert back to wild type. We also examine the effects of the G341E substitution in transgenic flies. The results indicate that a mutant Jak kinase can cause leukemia-like abnormalities. Images PMID:7729418

  3. Transcriptional Regulation of Hhex in Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ontogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portero Migueles, Rosa; Shaw, Louise; Rodrigues, Neil P

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge during development via an endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition from hemogenic endothelium of the dorsal aorta (DA). Using in situ hybridization and analysis of a knock-in RedStar reporter, we show that the transcriptional regulator Hhex is expressed...... in endothelium of the dorsal aorta (DA) and in clusters of putative HSCs as they are specified during murine development. We exploited this observation, using the Hhex locus to define cis regulatory elements, enhancers and interacting transcription factors that are both necessary and sufficient to support gene...... expression in the emerging HSC. We identify an evolutionarily conserved non-coding region (ECR) in the Hhex locus with the capacity to bind the hematopoietic-affiliated transcriptional regulators Gata2, SCL, Fli1, Pu.1 and Ets1/2. This region is sufficient to drive the expression of a transgenic GFP reporter...

  4. Antimicrobial Resistance in Gram-Negative Rods Causing Bacteremia in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Averbuch, Diana; Tridello, Gloria; Hoek, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Background: This intercontinental study aimed to study gram-negative rod (GNR) resistance in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods: GNR bacteremias occurring during 6 months post-HSCT (February 2014-May 2015) were prospectively collected, and analyzed for rates and risk factors ...

  5. Gastrointestinal toxicity, systemic inflammation, and liver biochemistry in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver toxicity is frequently seen in relation to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but pathogenesis and the risk factors are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between liver toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, and levels of immune-r...

  6. Gastrointestinal toxicity, systemic inflammation, and liver biochemistry in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Karina; Pontoppidan, Peter; Uhlving, Hilde Hylland

    2017-01-01

    Liver toxicity is frequently seen in relation to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but pathogenesis and the risk factors are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between liver toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, and levels of immun...

  7. Autophagy is required for stem cell mobilization by G-CSF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Vu, Therese; Lineburg, Katie E.

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used clinically to prevent neutropenia after cytotoxic chemotherapy and to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for transplantation. Autophagy, a process of cytoplasmic component recycling, maintains cellular homeostasis and protects...... the cell during periods of metabolic stress or nutrient deprivation. We have observed that G-CSF activates autophagy in neutrophils and HSCs from both mouse and human donors. Furthermore, G-CSF-induced neutrophil and HSC mobilization is impaired in the absence of autophagy. In contrast, autophagy...... is dispensable for direct HSC mobilization in response to the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. Altogether, these data demonstrate an important role for G-CSF in invoking autophagy within hematopoietic and myeloid cells and suggest that this pathway is critical for ensuring cell survival in response to clinically...

  8. The Role of Cytokines, Chemokines, and Growth Factors in the Pathogenesis of Pityriasis Rosea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Drago

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pityriasis rosea (PR is an exanthematous disease related to human herpesvirus- (HHV- 6/7 reactivation. The network of mediators involved in recruiting the infiltrating inflammatory cells has never been studied. Object. To investigate the levels of serum cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines in PR and healthy controls in order to elucidate the PR pathogenesis. Materials and Methods. Interleukin- (IL- 1, IL-6, IL-17, interferon- (IFN- γ, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, and chemokines, CXCL8 (IL-8 and CXCL10 (IP-10, were measured simultaneously by a multiplex assay in early acute PR patients’ sera and healthy controls. Subsequently, sera from PR patients were analysed at 3 different times (0, 15, and 30 days. Results and discussion. Serum levels of IL-17, IFN-γ, VEGF, and IP-10 resulted to be upregulated in PR patients compared to controls. IL-17 has a key role in host defense against pathogens stimulating the release of proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines. IFN-γ has a direct antiviral activity promoting NK cells and virus specific T cells cytotoxicity. VEGF stimulates vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. IP-10 can induce chemotaxis, apoptosis, cell growth, and angiogenesis. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that these inflammatory mediators may modulate PR pathogenesis in synergistic manner.

  9. Trasplante de células progenitoras derivadas de la médula ósea y factor de crecimiento granulocítico en cardiopatía isquémica aguda y crónica Transplant of stem cells derived from bone marrow and granulocytic growth factor in acute and chronic ischemic myocardiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M Senior

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: estudios recientes demuestran la seguridad y eficacia de la implantación de células progenitoras derivadas de la médula ósea y de la administración del factor estimulante de colonias de granulocito en pacientes con infarto agudo del miocardio con elevación del segmento ST y en cardiopatía isquémica crónica. Se diseñó un estudio prospectivo, abierto de «antes y después» para evaluar la seguridad y eficacia de la terapia celular asociada a la administración del factor de crecimiento. Se reporta la primera experiencia con este tipo de terapia. Metodología: este es el reporte del seguimiento a seis meses, de los pacientes con cardiopatía isquémica aguda y crónica a quienes se les realizó trasplante de células progenitoras derivadas de la médula ósea, movilizadas con factor de crecimiento estimulante de colonias de granulocitos, por vía intracoronaria o epicárdica. Se incluyeron dos grupos de pacientes: 1. Diez pacientes con infarto de pared anterior y 2. Cinco pacientes con cardiopatía isquémica crónica, todos con necrosis extensa demostrada por ausencia de viabilidad miocárdica por medicina nuclear y fracción de eyección menor del 40%. Resultados: se demostró mejoría significativa de la fracción de eyección de 29,44 ± 3,36 a 37,6 ± 5,3 con pIntroduction: recent studies have shown the safety and efficacy of the stem cells derived from bone marrow (BMC implant with concomitant administration of stimulating factor of granulocyte colonies in patients with acute myocardial infarction with ST segment elevation and in chronic ischemic cardiopathy. An open prospective «before and after» design was made to evaluate the safety and efficacy of cell therapy associated to growth factor administration. The first experience with this kind of therapy is reported. Methodology; this is a 6 months follow-up report of patients with acute and chronic ischemic cardiopathy to whom transplant of stem cells derived from

  10. In Utero Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hemoglobinopathies

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    Tippi C. Mackenzie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCTx is a promising strategy to circumvent the challenges of postnatal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation. The goal of IUHCTx is to introduce donor cells into a naïve host prior to immune maturation, thereby inducing donor–specific tolerance. Thus, this technique has the potential of avoiding host myeloablative conditioning with cytotoxic agents. Over the past two decades, several attempts at IUHCTx have been made to cure numerous underlying congenital anomalies with limited success. In this review, we will briefly review the history of IUHCTx and give a perspective on alpha thalassemia major, one target disease for its clinical application.

  11. Recent advances in hematopoietic stem cell biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A; Nolta, Jan A

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Exciting advances have been made in the field of hematopoietic stem cell biology during the past year. This review summarizes recent progress in the identification, culture, and in vivo tracking of hematopoietic stem cells. RECENT FINDINGS: The roles of Wnt and Notch proteins...... made recently in the field of stem cell biology, researchers now have improved tools to define novel populations of stem cells, examine them ex vivo using conditions that promote self-renewal, track them into recipients, and determine whether they can contribute to the repair of damaged tissues...

  12. Reconstruction of hematopoietic inductive microenvironment after transplantation of VCAM-1-modified human umbilical cord blood stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Liu

    Full Text Available The hematopoietic inductive microenvironment (HIM is where hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells grow and develop. Hematopoietic stromal cells were the key components of the HIM. In our previous study, we had successfully cultured and isolated human cord blood-derived stromal cells (HUCBSCs and demonstrated that they could secret hemopoietic growth factors such as GM-CSF, TPO, and SCF. However, it is still controversial whether HUCBSCs can be used for reconstruction of HIM. In this study, we first established a co-culture system of HUCBSCs and cord blood CD34(+ cells and then determined that using HUCBSCs as the adherent layer had significantly more newly formed colonies of each hematopoietic lineage than the control group, indicating that HUCBSCs had the ability to promote the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells/progenitor cells. Furthermore, the number of colonies was significantly higher in vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1-modified HUCBSCs, suggesting that the ability of HUCBSCs in promoting the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells/progenitor cells was further enhanced after having been modified with VCAM-1. Next, HUCBSCs were infused into a radiation-damaged animal model, in which the recovery of hematopoiesis was observed. The results demonstrate that the transplanted HUCBSCs were "homed in" to bone marrow and played roles in promoting the recovery of irradiation-induced hematopoietic damage and repairing HIM. Compared with the control group, the HUCBSC group had significantly superior effectiveness in terms of the recovery time for hemogram and myelogram, CFU-F, CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-Meg. Such differences were even more significant in VCAM-1-modified HUCBSCs group. We suggest that HUCBSCs are able to restore the functions of HIM and promote the recovery of radiation-induced hematopoietic damage. VCAM-1 plays an important role in supporting the repair of HIM damage.

  13. HIF1α is a regulator of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cell development in hypoxic sites of the mouse embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanirad, Parisa; Kartalaei, Parham Solaimani; Crisan, Mihaela; Vink, Chris; Yamada-Inagawa, Tomoko; de Pater, Emma; Kurek, Dorota; Kaimakis, Polynikis; van der Linden, Reiner; Speck, Nancy; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia affects many physiologic processes during early stages of mammalian ontogeny, particularly placental and vascular development. In the adult, the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment plays a role in regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function. HSCs are generated from the major vasculature of the embryo, but whether the hypoxic response affects the generation of these HSCs is as yet unknown. Here we examined whether Hypoxia Inducible Factor1-alpha (HIF1α), a key modulator of the response to hypoxia, is essential for HSC development. We found hypoxic cells in embryonic tissues that generate and expand hematopoietic cells (aorta, placenta and fetal liver), and specifically aortic endothelial and hematopoietic cluster cells. A Cre/loxP conditional knockout (cKO) approach was taken to delete HIF1α in Vascular Endothelial-Cadherin expressing endothelial cells, the precursors to definitive hematopoietic cells. Functional assays show that HSC and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) are significantly reduced in cKO aorta and placenta. Moreover, decreases in phenotypic aortic hematopoietic cluster cells in cKO embryos indicate that HIF1α is necessary for generation and/or expansion of HPC and HSCs. cKO adult BM HSCs are also affected under transplantation conditions. Thus, HIF1α is a regulator of HSC generation and function beginning at the earliest embryonic stages. PMID:24141110

  14. HIF1α is a regulator of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cell development in hypoxic sites of the mouse embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Imanirad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia affects many physiologic processes during early stages of mammalian ontogeny, particularly placental and vascular development. In the adult, the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment plays a role in regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function. HSCs are generated from the major vasculature of the embryo, but whether the hypoxic response affects the generation of these HSCs is as yet unknown. Here we examined whether Hypoxia Inducible Factor1-alpha (HIF1α, a key modulator of the response to hypoxia, is essential for HSC development. We found hypoxic cells in embryonic tissues that generate and expand hematopoietic cells (aorta, placenta and fetal liver, and specifically aortic endothelial and hematopoietic cluster cells. A Cre/loxP conditional knockout (cKO approach was taken to delete HIF1α in Vascular Endothelial-Cadherin expressing endothelial cells, the precursors to definitive hematopoietic cells. Functional assays show that HSC and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs are significantly reduced in cKO aorta and placenta. Moreover, decreases in phenotypic aortic hematopoietic cluster cells in cKO embryos indicate that HIF1α is necessary for generation and/or expansion of HPCs and HSCs. cKO adult BM HSCs are also affected under transplantation conditions. Thus, HIF1α is a regulator of HSC generation and function beginning at the earliest embryonic stages.

  15. Hematopoietic cell differentiation from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are undifferentiated cells that can self-renew and potentially differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages, such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature hematopoietic cells in the presence of a suitable culture system. Establishment of pluripotent stem cells provides a comprehensive model to study early hematopoietic development and has emerged as a powerful research tool to explore regenerative medicine. Nowadays, HSC transplantation and hematopoietic cell transfusion have successfully cured some patients, especially in malignant hematological diseases. Owing to a shortage of donors and a limited number of the cells, hematopoietic cell induction from pluripotent stem cells has been regarded as an alternative source of HSCs and mature hematopoietic cells for intended therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells are therefore extensively utilized to facilitate better understanding in hematopoietic development by recapitulating embryonic development in vivo, in which efficient strategies can be easily designed and deployed for the generation of hematopoietic lineages in vitro. We hereby review the current progress of hematopoietic cell induction from embryonic stem/induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23796405

  16. [Hematopoietic reconstitution and prognosis of different types of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe aplastic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Wu, Depei; Hu, Shaoyan; Jin, Song; Wang, Xiuli; Miao, Miao; Chen, Jia; Han, Yue; Tang, Xiaowen; Qiu, Huiying; Sun, Aining; Jin, Zhengming; Fu, Chengcheng; Ma, Xiao; Chen, Feng

    2015-08-01

    To compare the differences between hematopoietic reconstitution and longterm prognosis of patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) after HLA- matched sibling donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(MSD-HSCT), Haploidentical HSCT(Haplo-HSCT), unrelated donor allogeneic HSCT(UD-HSCT)and umbilical cord blood HSCT(UCB-HSCT). In this retrospective study, 63 patients with SAA who received HSCT in the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University between May 2008 and December 2013 were enrolled. The subjects were divided into 4 groups according to the transplantation types. The hematopoietic reconstitution, the incidence of acute graft-versushost disease(aGVHD)and 5- year survival rate after transplantation were compared. All 53 subjects who received MSD-HSCT, Haplo-HSCT and UD-HSCT achieved hematopoietic reconstitution. Of them, the recovery of neutrophil and platelet were not significantly different(P0.05). MSD-HSCT, Haplo-HSCT and UD-HSCT had no statistically significance in terms of hematopoietic reconstitution or prognosis. Although hematopoietic reconstitution of UCB-HSCT was lower than other transplantation types, but no significant difference in overall prognosis. So if HLA-matched sibling donor is not available, SAA patients can choose Haplo- HSCT, UD - HSCT or UCB- HSCT with comparable efficacy to MSD- HSCT, as an alternative therapy.

  17. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long-te...

  18. Ex vivo Expansion of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Farahbakhshian (Elnaz)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHematopoiesis is a complex cellular differentiation process resulting in the formation of all blood cell types. In this process, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside at the top of the hematopoiesis hierarchy and have the capacity to differentiate into all blood cell lineages

  19. Molecular regulation of human hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Galen, P.L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Peter van Galen focuses on understanding the determinants that maintain the stem cell state. Using human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as a model, processes that govern self-renewal and tissue regeneration were investigated. Specifically, a role for microRNAs in balancing the human HSC

  20. Cellular memory and, hematopoietic stem cell aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, Leonie M.; de Haan, Gerald

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) balance self-renewal and differentiation in order to sustain lifelong blood production and simultaneously maintain the HSC pool. However, there is clear evidence that HSCs are subject to quantitative and qualitative exhaustion. In this review, we briefly discuss

  1. Autonomous behavior of hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, LM; Akkerman, [No Value; Weersing, E; Ausema, A; Dontje, B; Van Zant, G; de Haan, G

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Mechanisms that affect the function of primitive hematopoietic stem cells with long-term proliferative potential remain largely unknown. Here we assessed whether properties of stem cells are cell-extrinsically or cell-autonomously regulated. Materials and Methods. We developed a model in

  2. [Murine and human hematopoietic progenitor cultures grown on stromal layers expressing Notch ligands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raevskaya, A A; Savvateeva, M V; Bukhinnik, S S; Kandarakov, O F; Butylin, P A; Zhuk, S V; Demin, A M; Zaritsky, V P Krasnov A Y; Belyavsky, A V

    2017-01-01

    The ex vivo maintenance and expansion of hematopoietic stem cells and early progenitors is necessary for the successful treatment of hematopoietic and immune diseases. Multiple attempts to improve the expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) by their cultivation in the presence of growth factor cocktails have so far failed. Novel approaches aimed at conserving the earliest precursors in their undifferentiated state are needed. These approaches should take into account local regulatory factors that are present in the HSC microenvironment and the three-dimensional architecture of their niche. In the present study, we compared the effects of two Notch ligands, i.e., Jagged1 and DLL1, on murine and human hematopoiesis in vitro. Our observations indicate that the stromal expression of Notch ligands increases the production of both the total and phenotypically early murine and human hematopoietic cells in the co-culture. On one hand, this study demonstrates the similarity of effects of stromal expression of Notch ligands on murine and human hematopoiesis in vitro. On the other hand, our study revealed a number of cell type and ligand-specific variations that are systematically described below. It seems that the effects of SCF cytokine addition on murine hematopoiesis in vitro depend on the stromal context and are oppositely directed for Jagged1 and DLL1.

  3. Pharmacologic increase in HIF1α enhances hematopoietic stem and progenitor homing and engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Jennifer M; Hoggatt, Jonathan; Singh, Pratibha; Pelus, Louis M

    2014-01-09

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is a lifesaving therapy for a number of immunologic disorders. For effective transplant, HSCs must traffic from the peripheral blood to supportive bone marrow niches. We previously showed that HSC trafficking can be enhanced by ex vivo treatment of hematopoietic grafts with 16-16 dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (dmPGE2). While exploring regulatory molecules involved in dmPGE2 enhancement, we found that transiently increasing the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1α) is required for dmPGE2-enhanced CXCR4 upregulation and enhanced migration and homing of stem and progenitor cells and that pharmacologic manipulation of HIF1α is also capable of enhancing homing and engraftment. We also now identify the specific hypoxia response element required for CXCR4 upregulation. These data define a precise mechanism through which ex vivo pulse treatment with dmPGE2 enhances the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells; these data also define a role for hypoxia and HIF1α in enhancement of hematopoietic transplantation.

  4. Structure and expression of human B cell stimulatory factor-2 (BSF-2/IL-6) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, K; Hirano, T; Watanabe, Y; Muratani, K; Matsuda, T; Nakai, S; Kishimoto, T

    1987-01-01

    The chromosomal DNA segment of human B cell stimulatory factor-2 (BSF-2/IL-6) was isolated and characterized by nucleotide sequence analysis. The human BSF-2/IL-6 gene consists of five exons and four introns and its organization shows a distinctive similarity to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor gene. The two genes have the same number of exons and introns and the size of each exon is strikingly similar. The BSF-2/IL-6 mRNA was found to be constitutively expressed in a human T cell leukemia virus-1 transformed T cell line, TCL-Na1, a bladder cell carcinoma line, T24, and an amnion derived cell line, FL. The BSF-2/IL-6 mRNA was also found to be inducible with interleukin-1 beta in an astrocytoma line, U373 and a glioblastoma line, SK-MG-4. S1 mapping and primer extension analyses showed the presence of multiple initiation sites and the preferential utilization of a different initiation site for each individual tissue tested. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3500852

  5. Exercise as an Adjuvant Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Russell; Niemiro, Grace M.; De Lisio, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) using mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSPCs) is the only curative strategy for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies. HSPC collection protocols rely on pharmacological agents to mobilize HSPCs to peripheral blood. Limitations including variable donor responses and long dosing protocols merit further investigations into adjuvant therapies to enhance the efficiency of HSPCs collection. Exercise, a safe and feasible intervention in patients undergoing HSCT, has been previously shown to robustly stimulate HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. Exercise-induced HSPC mobilization is transient limiting its current clinical potential. Thus, a deeper investigation of the mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization and the factors responsible for removal of HSPCs from circulation following exercise is warranted. The present review will describe current research on exercise and HSPC mobilization, outline the potential mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization, and highlight potential sites for HSPC homing following exercise. We also outline current barriers to the implementation of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for HSPC mobilization and suggest potential strategies to overcome these barriers. PMID:27123008

  6. Ion Channels in Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Pillozzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs reside in bone marrow niches and give rise to hematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs. These have more restricted lineage potential and eventually differentiate into specific blood cell types. Bone marrow also contains mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, which present multilineage differentiation potential toward mesodermal cell types. In bone marrow niches, stem cell interaction with the extracellular matrix is mediated by integrin receptors. Ion channels regulate cell proliferation and differentiation by controlling intracellular Ca2+, cell volume, release of growth factors, and so forth. Although little evidence is available about the ion channel roles in true HSCs, increasing information is available about HPCs and MSCs, which present a complex pattern of K+ channel expression. K+ channels cooperate with Ca2+ and Cl− channels in regulating calcium entry and cell volume during mitosis. Other K+ channels modulate the integrin-dependent interaction between leukemic progenitor cells and the niche stroma. These channels can also regulate leukemia cell interaction with MSCs, which also involves integrin receptors and affects the MSC-mediated protection from chemotherapy. Ligand-gated channels are also implicated in these processes. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors regulate cell proliferation and migration in HSCs and MSCs and may be implicated in the harmful effects of smoking.

  7. Oral changes in individuals undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Haddad Barrach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation receive high doses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which cause severe immunosuppression.OBJECTIVE: To report an oral disease management protocol before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.METHODS: A prospective study was carried out with 65 patients aged > 18 years, with hematological diseases, who were allocated into two groups: A (allogeneic transplant, 34 patients; B (autologous transplant, 31 patients. A total of three dental status assessments were performed: in the pre-transplantation period (moment 1, one week after stem cell infusion (moment 2, and 100 days after transplantation (moment 3. In each moment, oral changes were assigned scores and classified as mild, moderate, and severe risks.RESULTS: The most frequent pathological conditions were gingivitis, pericoronitis in the third molar region, and ulcers at the third moment assessments. However, at moments 2 and 3, the most common disease was mucositis associated with toxicity from the drugs used in the immunosuppression.CONCLUSION: Mucositis accounted for the increased score and potential risk of clinical complications. Gingivitis, ulcers, and pericoronitis were other changes identified as potential risk factors for clinical complications.

  8. Mesenchymal stromal cells and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Maria Ester; Fibbe, Willem E

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) comprise a heterogeneous population of multipotent cells that can be isolated from various human tissues and culture-expanded ex vivo for clinical use. Due to their immunoregulatory properties and their ability to secrete growth factors, MSCs play a key role in the regulation of hematopoiesis and in the modulation of immune responses against allo- and autoantigens. In light of these properties, MSCs have been employed in clinical trials in the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to facilitate engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and to prevent graft failure, as well as to treat steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). The available clinical evidence derived from these studies indicates that MSC administration is safe. Moreover, promising preliminary results in terms of efficacy have been reported in some clinical trials, especially in the treatment of acute GvHD. In this review we critically discuss recent advances in MSC therapy by reporting on the most relevant studies in the field of HSCT. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Exercise as an Adjuvant Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Russell; Niemiro, Grace M; De Lisio, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) using mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSPCs) is the only curative strategy for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies. HSPC collection protocols rely on pharmacological agents to mobilize HSPCs to peripheral blood. Limitations including variable donor responses and long dosing protocols merit further investigations into adjuvant therapies to enhance the efficiency of HSPCs collection. Exercise, a safe and feasible intervention in patients undergoing HSCT, has been previously shown to robustly stimulate HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. Exercise-induced HSPC mobilization is transient limiting its current clinical potential. Thus, a deeper investigation of the mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization and the factors responsible for removal of HSPCs from circulation following exercise is warranted. The present review will describe current research on exercise and HSPC mobilization, outline the potential mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization, and highlight potential sites for HSPC homing following exercise. We also outline current barriers to the implementation of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for HSPC mobilization and suggest potential strategies to overcome these barriers.

  10. Exercise as an Adjuvant Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Emmons

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT using mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSPCs is the only curative strategy for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies. HSPC collection protocols rely on pharmacological agents to mobilize HSPCs to peripheral blood. Limitations including variable donor responses and long dosing protocols merit further investigations into adjuvant therapies to enhance the efficiency of HSPCs collection. Exercise, a safe and feasible intervention in patients undergoing HSCT, has been previously shown to robustly stimulate HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. Exercise-induced HSPC mobilization is transient limiting its current clinical potential. Thus, a deeper investigation of the mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization and the factors responsible for removal of HSPCs from circulation following exercise is warranted. The present review will describe current research on exercise and HSPC mobilization, outline the potential mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization, and highlight potential sites for HSPC homing following exercise. We also outline current barriers to the implementation of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for HSPC mobilization and suggest potential strategies to overcome these barriers.

  11. Desensitization for solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary, Andrea A; Leffell, Mary S

    2014-01-01

    Desensitization protocols are being used worldwide to enable kidney transplantation across immunologic barriers, i.e. antibody to donor HLA or ABO antigens, which were once thought to be absolute contraindications to transplantation. Desensitization protocols are also being applied to permit transplantation of HLA mismatched hematopoietic stem cells to patients with antibody to donor HLA, to enhance the opportunity for transplantation of non-renal organs, and to treat antibody-mediated rejection. Although desensitization for organ transplantation carries an increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection, ultimately these transplants extend and enhance the quality of life for solid organ recipients, and desensitization that permits transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells is life saving for patients with limited donor options. Complex patient factors and variability in treatment protocols have made it difficult to identify, precisely, the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of donor-specific antibodies. The mechanisms underlying desensitization may differ among the various protocols in use, although there are likely to be some common features. However, it is likely that desensitization achieves a sort of immune detente by first reducing the immunologic barrier and then by creating an environment in which an autoregulatory process restricts the immune response to the allograft. PMID:24517434

  12. Oral changes in individuals undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrach, Regina Haddad; Souza, Mair Pedro de; Silva, Daniela Polo Camargo da; Lopez, Priscila Suman; Montovani, Jair Cortez

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation receive high doses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which cause severe immunosuppression. To report an oral disease management protocol before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A prospective study was carried out with 65 patients aged>18 years, with hematological diseases, who were allocated into two groups: A (allogeneic transplant, 34 patients); B (autologous transplant, 31 patients). A total of three dental status assessments were performed: in the pre-transplantation period (moment 1), one week after stem cell infusion (moment 2), and 100 days after transplantation (moment 3). In each moment, oral changes were assigned scores and classified as mild, moderate, and severe risks. The most frequent pathological conditions were gingivitis, pericoronitis in the third molar region, and ulcers at the third moment assessments. However, at moments 2 and 3, the most common disease was mucositis associated with toxicity from the drugs used in the immunosuppression. Mucositis accounted for the increased score and potential risk of clinical complications. Gingivitis, ulcers, and pericoronitis were other changes identified as potential risk factors for clinical complications. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masmas, T.N.; Petersen, S.L.; Madsen, H.O.

    2008-01-01

    Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with nonmyeloablative conditioning is a rare but serious clinical problem. Graft rejection and salvage therapy in eight patients in a retrospective analysis of 124 consecutive patients is reported. The patients were conditioned with low......-dose fludarabine and total body irradiation (TBI). The association of pretransplantation risk factors with rejection and the effect of chimerism and graft-versus-host disease on rejection were analyzed. Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were compared between patients with and without...... rejection. Retransplantation was performed with increased TBI conditioning for all patients, and with increased mycophenolate mofetil doses for recipients with HLA-identical sibling donors. No known pretransplantation risk factors were confirmed in this study. Rejection episodes were unevenly distributed...

  14. The Involvment of Hematopoietic-Specific PLC -β2 in Homing and Engraftment of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamiak, Mateusz; Suszynska, Malwina; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Ratajczak, Janina; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2016-12-01

    Migration and bone marrow (BM) homing of hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) is regulated by several signaling pathways, and here we provide evidence for the involvement in this process of hematopoietic-specific phospholipase C-β2 (PLC-β2). This enzyme is involved in release of intracellular calcium and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Recently we reported that PLC-β2 promotes mobilization of HSPCs from BM into peripheral blood (PB), and this effect is mediated by the involvement of PLC-β2 in the release of proteolytic enzymes from granulocytes and its role in disintegration of membrane lipid rafts. Here we report that, besides the role of PLC-β2 in the release of HSPCs from BM niches, PLC-β2 regulates the migration of HSPCs in response to chemotactic gradients of BM homing factors, including SDF-1, S1P, C1P, and ATP. Specifically, HSPCs from PLC-β2-KO mice show impaired homing and engraftment in vivo after transplantation into lethally irradiated mice. This decrease in migration of HSPCs can be explained by impaired calcium release in PLC-β2-KO mice and a high baseline level of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), an enzyme that negatively regulates cell migration.

  15. Spliceosomal component Sf3b1 is essential for hematopoietic differentiation in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Garza, Adriana; Cameron, Rosannah C; Nik, Sara; Payne, Sara G; Bowman, Teresa V

    2016-09-01

    SF3B1 (Splicing factor 3b, subunit 1) is one of the most commonly mutated factors in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Although the genetic correlation between SF3B1 mutations and MDS etiology are quite strong, no in vivo model currently exists to explore how SF3B1 loss alters blood cell development. Using zebrafish mutants, we show here that proper function of Sf3b1 is required for all hematopoietic lineages. As in MDS patients, zebrafish sf3b1 mutants develop a macrocytic-anemia-like phenotype due to a block in maturation at a late progenitor stage. The mutant embryos also develop neutropenia, because their primitive myeloid cells fail to mature and turn on differentiation markers such as l-plastin and myeloperoxidase. In contrast, production of definitive hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from hemogenic endothelial cells within the dorsal aorta is greatly diminished, whereas arterial endothelial cells are correctly fated. Notch signaling, imperative for the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition, is also normal, indicating that HSPC induction is blocked in sf3b1 mutants downstream or independent of Notch signaling. The data demonstrate that Sf3b1 function is necessary during key differentiation fate decisions in multiple blood cell types. Zebrafish sf3b1 mutants offer a novel animal model with which to explore the role of splicing in hematopoietic development and provide an excellent in vivo system with which to delve into the question of why and how Sf3b1 dysfunction is detrimental to hematopoietic differentiation, which could improve MDS diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bcl11a Deficiency Leads to Hematopoietic Stem Cell Defects with an Aging-like Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidinh Luc

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available B cell CLL/lymphoma 11A (BCL11A is a transcription factor and regulator of hemoglobin switching that has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for sickle cell disease and thalassemia. In the hematopoietic system, BCL11A is required for B lymphopoiesis, yet its role in other hematopoietic cells, especially hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs remains elusive. The extensive expression of BCL11A in hematopoiesis implicates context-dependent roles, highlighting the importance of fully characterizing its function as part of ongoing efforts for stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Here, we demonstrate that BCL11A is indispensable for normal HSC function. Bcl11a deficiency results in HSC defects, typically observed in the aging hematopoietic system. We find that downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (Cdk6, and the ensuing cell-cycle delay, correlate with HSC dysfunction. Our studies define a mechanism for BCL11A in regulation of HSC function and have important implications for the design of therapeutic approaches to targeting BCL11A.

  17. Identification of the Niche and Phenotype of the First Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrejs Ivanovs

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In various vertebrate species, the dorsal aorta (Ao is the site of specification of adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. It has been observed that the upregulation of essential hematopoietic transcription factors and the formation of specific intra-aortic hematopoietic cell clusters occur predominantly in the ventral domain of the Ao (AoV. In the mouse, the first HSCs emerge in the AoV. Here, we demonstrate that in the human embryo the first definitive HSCs also emerge asymmetrically and are localized to the AoV, which thus identifies a functional niche for developing human HSCs. Using magnetic cell separation and xenotransplantations, we show that the first human HSCs are CD34+VE-cadherin+CD45+C-KIT+THY-1+Endoglin+RUNX1+CD38−/loCD45RA−. This population harbors practically all committed hematopoietic progenitors and is underrepresented in the dorsal domain of the Ao (AoD and urogenital ridges (UGRs. The present study provides a foundation for analysis of molecular mechanisms underpinning embryonic specification of human HSCs.

  18. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with primary immunodeficiencies: Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Juliana Folloni; Kerbauy, Fabio Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Andreza Alice Feitosa; Kutner, Jose Mauro; Camargo, Luis Fernando Aranha; Stape, Adalberto; Troster, Eduardo Juan; Zamperlini-Netto, Gabriele; Azambuja, Alessandra Milani Prandini de; Carvalho, Bruna; Dorna, Mayra de Barros; Vilela, Marluce Dos Santos; Jacob, Cristina Miuki Abe; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Cunha, Jose Marcos; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda Maria; Hamerschlak, Nelson

    2011-06-01

    To report the experience of a tertiary care hospital with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with primary immunodeficiencies. Seven pediatric patients with primary immunodeficiencies (severe combined immunodeficiency: n = 2; combined immunodeficiency: n = 1; chronic granulomatous disease: n = 1; hyper-IgM syndrome: n = 2; and IPEX syndrome: n = 1) who underwent eight hematopoietic stem cell transplants in a single center, from 2007 to 2010, were studied. Two patients received transplants from HLA-identical siblings; the other six transplants were done with unrelated donors (bone marrow: n = 1; cord blood: n = 5). All patients had pre-existing infections before hematopoietic stem cell transplants. One patient received only anti-thymocyte globulin prior to transplant, three transplants were done with reduced intensity conditioning regimens and four transplants were done after myeloablative therapy. Two patients were not evaluated for engraftment due to early death. Three patients engrafted, two had primary graft failure and one received a second transplant with posterior engraftment. Two patients died of regimen related toxicity (hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome); one patient died of progressive respiratory failure due to Parainfluenza infection present prior to transplant. Four patients are alive and well from 60 days to 14 months after transplant. Patients' status prior to transplant is the most important risk factor on the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplants in the treatment of these diseases. Early diagnosis and the possibility of a faster referral of these patients for treatment in reference centers may substantially improve their survival and quality of life.

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. Hematopoietic cell phosphatase is recruited to CD22 following B cell antigen receptor ligation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankester, A. C.; van Schijndel, G. M.; van Lier, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell phosphatase is a nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase that is preferentially expressed in hematopoietic cell lineages. Motheaten mice, which are devoid of (functional) hematopoietic cell phosphatase, have severe disturbances in the regulation of B cell activation and

  4. Epigenomics in hematopoietic transplantation: novel treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Nicole; Rank, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a high risk but curative treatment option for leukemia, myelodysplasia and other hematological malignancies. After high dose radio- or chemo-therapy, recipient's hematopoiesis is replaced by a new immunosystem and residual malignant cells are eliminated by the graft-versus-leukemia reaction. The benefit of this immunological effect is limited by the most frequent complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: graft-versus-host disease. In addition to their well-known anti-tumor activity, epigenetic drugs mediate immunotolerance without reducing alloreactivity or even enhance graft-versus-leukemia effect without inducing graft-versus-host disease by regulating cytokine release, increasing the circulating number of regulatory T cells and interacting with natural killer cells. We focus on the use of epigenetic drugs in the allogeneic transplantation setting in relation to their anti-tumor and immunomodulatory potential.

  5. Proteomic cornerstones of hematopoietic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimmeck, Daniel; Hansson, Jenny; Raffel, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative tissues such as the skin epidermis, the intestinal mucosa or the hematopoietic system are organized in a hierarchical manner with stem cells building the top of this hierarchy. Somatic stem cells harbor the highest self-renewal activity and generate a series of multipotent progenitors...... which differentiate into lineage committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. In this report, we applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare the full proteomes of ex vivo isolated and FACS-sorted populations highly enriched for either multipotent hematopoietic stem...... evaluation, 893 proteins were found differentially expressed between multipotent and myeloid committed cells. The differential protein content in these cell populations points to a distinct structural organization of the cytoskeleton including remodeling activity. In addition, we found a marked difference...

  6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Development and Transcriptional Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gekas, Christos

    2008-01-01

    The continuous production of blood cells, a process termed hematopoiesis, is sustained throughout the lifetime of an individual by a relatively small population of cells known as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are unique cells characterized by their ability to self-renew and give rise to all types of mature blood cells. Given their high proliferative potential, HSCs need to be tightly regulated on the cellular and molecular levels or could otherwise turn malignant. On the other hand, t...

  7. bantam miRNA is important for Drosophila blood cell homeostasis and a regulator of proliferation in the hematopoietic progenitor niche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Victoria; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Tokusumi, Yumiko; Schulz, Robert A., E-mail: rschulz@nd.edu

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • bantam miRNA is endogenously expressed in the hematopoietic progenitor niche. • bantam is necessary and sufficient to induce cellular proliferation in the PSC. • bantam is upstream of the Insulin Receptor signaling pathway. • A model for positive regulation of hematopoietic niche growth is proposed. - Abstract: The Drosophila hematopoietic system is utilized in this study to gain novel insights into the process of growth control of the hematopoietic progenitor niche in blood development. The niche microenvironment is an essential component controlling the balance between progenitor populations and differentiated, mature blood cells and has been shown to lead to hematopoietic malignancies in humans when misregulated. MicroRNAs are one class of regulators associated with blood malignancies; however, there remains a relative paucity of information about the role of miRNAs in the niche. Here we demonstrate that bantam miRNA is endogenously active in the Drosophila hematopoietic progenitor niche, the posterior signaling center (PSC), and functions in the primary hematopoietic organ, the lymph gland, as a positive regulator of growth. Loss of bantam leads to a significant reduction in the PSC and overall lymph gland size, as well as a loss of the progenitor population and correlative premature differentiation of mature hemocytes. Interestingly, in addition to being essential for proper lymph gland development, we have determined bantam to be a novel upstream component of the insulin signaling cascade in the PSC and have unveiled dMyc as one factor central to bantam activity. These important findings identify bantam as a new hematopoietic regulator, place it in an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway, present one way in which it is regulated, and provide a mechanism through which it facilitates cellular proliferation in the hematopoietic niche.

  8. Self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are characterized by their ability to self-renew and differentiate into all blood lineage cells. The fate decisions of HSCs (self-renewal versus differentiation) are made through the process of cell division and are often compared to "birth" and "death". Stem cells give rise to undifferentiated stem cells (birth) or differentiate into progenitor cells (death). This process is regulated by asymmetric/symmetric divisions of HSCs. It has been proposed that fate determination occurs as a stochastic process and that individual stem cell dynamics are randomly regulated. The behavior of HSCs is known to be regulated by the cell intrinsic factor and extrinsic (microenvironmental) stimuli. Therefore, it is possible that the signals from a specific microenvironment (niche) have the potential to control or modulate stem cell dynamics. This review focuses on the functions of the HSC niche and the application of single cell analysis for understanding the mechanisms underlying the HSC decision-making process.

  9. The Microtubule Plus-End Tracking Protein CLASP2 Is Required for Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Drabek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian CLASPs are microtubule plus-end tracking proteins whose essential function as regulators of microtubule behavior has been studied mainly in cultured cells. We show here that absence of murine CLASP2 in vivo results in thrombocytopenia, progressive anemia, and pancytopenia, due to defects in megakaryopoiesis, in erythropoiesis, and in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell activity. Furthermore, microtubule stability and organization are affected upon attachment of Clasp2 knockout hematopoietic stem-cell-enriched populations, and these cells do not home efficiently toward their bone marrow niche. Strikingly, CLASP2-deficient hematopoietic stem cells contain severely reduced mRNA levels of c-Mpl, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, an essential factor for megakaryopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. Our data suggest that thrombopoietin signaling is impaired in Clasp2 knockout mice. We propose that the CLASP2-mediated stabilization of microtubules is required for proper attachment, homing, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells and that this is necessary to sustain c-Mpl transcription.

  10. Reprogramming of embryonic human fibroblasts into fetal hematopoietic progenitors by fusion with human fetal liver CD34+ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav M Sandler

    Full Text Available Experiments with somatic cell nuclear transfer, inter-cellular hybrid formation_ENREF_3, and ectopic expression of transcription factors have clearly demonstrated that cell fate can be dramatically altered by changing the epigenetic state of cell nuclei. Here we demonstrate, using chemical fusion, direct reprogramming of the genome of human embryonic fibroblasts (HEF into the state of human fetal liver hFL CD34+ (hFL hematopoietic progenitors capable of proliferating and differentiating into multiple hematopoietic lineages. We show that hybrid cells retain their ploidy and can differentiate into several hematopoietic lineages. Hybrid cells follow transcription program of differentiating hFL cells as shown by genome-wide transcription profiling. Using whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP profiling of both donor genomes we demonstrate reprogramming of HEF genome into the state of hFL hematopoietic progenitors. Our results prove that it is possible to convert the fetal somatic cell genome into the state of fetal hematopoietic progenitors by fusion. This suggests a possibility of direct reprogramming of human somatic cells into tissue specific progenitors/stem cells without going all the way back to the embryonic state. Direct reprogramming of terminally differentiated cells into the tissue specific progenitors will likely prove useful for the development of novel cell therapies.

  11. Cooperative activities of hematopoietic regulators recruit RNA polymerase II to a tissue-specific chromatin domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kirby D.; Grass, Jeffrey A.; Boyer, Meghan E.; Kiekhaefer, Carol M.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2002-01-01

    The hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-1 regulates erythropoiesis and β-globin expression. Although consensus GATA-1 binding sites exist throughout the murine β-globin locus, we found that GATA-1 discriminates among these sites in vivo. Conditional expression of GATA-1 in GATA-1-null cells recapitulated the occupancy pattern. GATA-1 induced RNA polymerase II (pol II) recruitment to subregions of the locus control region and to the β-globin promoters. The hematopoietic factor NF-E2 cooperated with GATA-1 to recruit pol II to the promoters. We propose that only when GATA-1 attracts pol II to the locus control region can pol II access the promoter in a NF-E2-dependent manner. PMID:12193659

  12. Moderate expression of TRF2 in the hematopoietic system increases development of large cell blastic T-cell lymphomas

    OpenAIRE

    Begemann, Sebastian; Galimi, Francesco; Karlseder, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) plays a central role in the protection of chromosome ends by inhibiting telomeres from initiating a DNA damage cascade. TRF2 overexpression has been suggested to induce tumor development in the mouse, and TRF2 levels have been found increased in human tumors. Here we tested whether moderate expression of TRF2 in the hematopoietic system leads to cancer development in the mouse. TRF2 and a GFP-TRF2 fusion protein were introduced into hematopoietic p...

  13. The rate of protein synthesis in hematopoietic stem cells is limited partly by 4E-BPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signer, Robert A J; Qi, Le; Zhao, Zhiyu; Thompson, David; Sigova, Alla A; Fan, Zi Peng; DeMartino, George N; Young, Richard A; Sonenberg, Nahum; Morrison, Sean J

    2016-08-01

    Adult stem cells must limit their rate of protein synthesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unexplored. Differences in protein synthesis among hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells did not correlate with differences in proteasome activity, total RNA content, mRNA content, or cell division rate. However, adult HSCs had more hypophosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and 4E-BP2 as compared with most other hematopoietic progenitors. Deficiency for 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2 significantly increased global protein synthesis in HSCs, but not in other hematopoietic progenitors, and impaired their reconstituting activity, identifying a mechanism that promotes HSC maintenance by attenuating protein synthesis. © 2016 Signer et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  14. Pleiotrophin Regulates the Retention and Self-Renewal of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in the Bone Marrow Vascular Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A. Himburg

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms through which the bone marrow (BM microenvironment regulates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC fate remain incompletely understood. We examined the role of the heparin-binding growth factor pleiotrophin (PTN in regulating HSC function in the niche. PTN−/− mice displayed significantly decreased BM HSC content and impaired hematopoietic regeneration following myelosuppression. Conversely, mice lacking protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor zeta, which is inactivated by PTN, displayed significantly increased BM HSC content. Transplant studies revealed that PTN action was not HSC autonomous, but rather was mediated by the BM microenvironment. Interestingly, PTN was differentially expressed and secreted by BM sinusoidal endothelial cells within the vascular niche. Furthermore, systemic administration of anti-PTN antibody in mice substantially impaired both the homing of hematopoietic progenitor cells to the niche and the retention of BM HSCs in the niche. PTN is a secreted component of the BM vascular niche that regulates HSC self-renewal and retention in vivo.

  15. Bacterial bloodstream infections in the allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant patient: new considerations for a persistent nemesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandoy, C E; Ardura, M I; Papanicolaou, G A; Auletta, J J

    2017-08-01

    Bacterial bloodstream infections (BSI) cause significant transplant-related morbidity and mortality following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). This manuscript reviews the risk factors for and the bacterial pathogens causing BSIs in allo-HCT recipients in the contemporary transplant period. In addition, it offers insight into emerging resistant pathogens and reviews clinical management considerations to treat and strategies to prevent BSIs in allo-HCT patients.

  16. Comparison of HCMV DNA load and antigenemia results in hematopoietic transplant recipients based on GVHD grade

    OpenAIRE

    Pajand O.; Ziyaeyan M; Mousavi A; Hojabri Z; Kazemi B; Bahador A; Hamidian.M; Hashemi F.B.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections are a significant challenge in patients with Hematopoietic Cell Transplant (HCT). Acute Graft vs. Host (GVHD) is recognized as a predisposing factor for increased incidence of HCMV reactivation. Availability of rapid and accurate tests for HCMV detection in HCT recipients is of foremost importance in developing countries, such as Iran. Methods: A total of 201 peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) and plasma specimens from 26 allogeneic HCT recipi...

  17. Thrombopoietin contributes to the formation and the maintenance of hematopoietic progenitor-containing cell clusters in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kaho; Nobuhisa, Ikuo; Anani, Maha; Saito, Kiyoka; Taga, Tetsuya

    2017-07-01

    In the midgestation mouse embryo, hematopoietic cell clusters containing hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells arise in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. We have previously reported that forced expression of the Sox17 transcription factor in CD45lowc-Kithigh AGM cells, which are the hematopoietic cellular component of the cell clusters, and subsequent coculture with OP9 stromal cells in the presence of three cytokines, stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin-3 (IL-3), and thrombopoietin (TPO), led to the formation and the maintenance of cell clusters with cells at an undifferentiated state in vitro. In this study, we investigated the role of each cytokine in the formation of hematopoietic cell clusters. We cultured Sox17-transduced AGM cells with each of the 7 possible combinations of the three cytokines. The size and the number of Sox17-transduced cell clusters in the presence of TPO, either alone or in combination, were comparable to that observed with the complete set of the three cytokines. Expression of TPO receptor, c-Mpl was almost ubiquitously expressed and maintained in Sox17-transduced hematopoietic cell clusters. In addition, the expression level of c-Mpl was highest in the CD45lowc-Kithigh cells among the Sox17-transduced cell clusters. Moreover, c-Mpl protein was highly expressed in the intra-aortic hematopoietic cell clusters in comparison with endothelial cells of dorsal aorta. Finally, stimulation of the endothelial cells prepared from the AGM region by TPO induced the production of hematopoietic cells. These results suggest that TPO contributes to the formation and the maintenance of hematopoietic cell clusters in the AGM region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Human Placenta Is a Potent Hematopoietic Niche Containing Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells throughout Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Robin (Catherine); K. Bollerot (Karine); S.C. Mendes (Sandra); E. Haak (Esther); M. Crisan (Mihaela); F. Cerisoli (Francesco); I. Lauw (Ivoune); P. Kaimakis (Polynikis); R.J.J. Jorna (Ruud); M. Vermeulen (Mark); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); R. van der Linden (Reinier); P. Imanirad (Parisa); M.M.A. Verstegen (Monique); H. Nawaz-Yousaf (Humaira); N. Papazian (Natalie); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); T. Cupedo (Tom); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are responsible for the life-long production of the blood system and are pivotal cells in hematologic transplantation therapies. During mouse and human development, the first HSCs are produced in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region. Subsequent to this

  19. CCR1 plays a critical role in modulating pain through hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuruddeen D Lewis

    Full Text Available Inflammation is associated with immune cells infiltrating into the inflammatory site and pain. CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1 mediates trafficking of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. However, the contribution of CCR1 to pain is incompletely understood. Here we report an unexpected discovery that CCR1-mediated trafficking of neutrophils and CCR1 activity on non-hematopoietic cells both modulate pain. Using a genetic approach (CCR1-/- animals and pharmacological inhibition of CCR1 with selective inhibitors, we show significant reductions in pain responses using the acetic acid-induced writhing and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced mechanical hyperalgesia models. Reductions in writhing correlated with reduced trafficking of myeloid cells into the peritoneal cavity. We show that CCR1 is highly expressed on circulating neutrophils and their depletion decreases acetic acid-induced writhing. However, administration of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavity did not enhance acetic acid-induced writhing in wild-type (WT or CCR1-/- mice. Additionally, selective knockout of CCR1 in either the hematopoietic or non-hematopoietic compartments also reduced writhing. Together these data suggest that CCR1 functions to significantly modulate pain by controlling neutrophil trafficking to the inflammatory site and having an unexpected role on non-hematopoietic cells. As inflammatory diseases are often accompanied with infiltrating immune cells at the inflammatory site and pain, CCR1 antagonism may provide a dual benefit by restricting leukocyte trafficking and reducing pain.

  20. Mobilization of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, Simon N; van Os, Ronald P; Bunting, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Animal models have added significantly to our understanding of the mechanism(s) of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) mobilization. Such models suggest that changes in the interaction between the HSPC and the hematopoietic microenvironmental 'niche' (cellular and extracellular components)

  1. The role of the donor in the repair of the marrow vascular niche following hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayton, William B; Li, Xiao-Miao; Butler, Jason; Guthrie, Steven M; Jorgensen, Marda L; Wingard, John R; Scott, Edward W

    2007-11-01

    Bone marrow sinusoids maintain homeostasis between developing hematopoietic cells and the circulation, and they provide niches for hematopoietic progenitors. Sinusoids are damaged by chemotherapy and radiation. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been shown to produce endothelial progenitor cells that contribute to the repair of damaged blood vessels. Because HSCs home to the marrow during bone marrow transplant, these cells may play a role in repair of marrow sinusoids. Here, we explore the role of donor HSCs in the repair of damaged sinusoids following hematopoietic stem cell transplant. We used three methods to test this role: (a) expression of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule to identify endothelial progenitors and the presence of the Y chromosome to identify male donor cells in female recipients; (b) presence of the Y chromosome to identify male donor cells in female recipients, and expression of the panendothelial marker mouse endothelial cell antigen-32 to identify sinusoidal endothelium; and (c) use of Tie-2/green fluorescent protein mice as donors or recipients and presence of Dil-Ac-LDL to identify sinusoids. We found that sinusoids were predominantly host-derived posttransplant. Donor cells spread along the marrow vasculature early post-transplant in a pattern that matched stromal-derived factor-1 expression. Furthermore, these engrafting progenitors were positioned to provide physical support, as well as growth and survival signals in the form of vascular-endothelial growth factor-A. Occasionally, donor cells provide cellular "patches" in the damaged sinusoids, although this occurred at a low level compared with hematopoietic engraftment. Donor support for the repair of the marrow vascular niche may be a critical first step of hematopoietic engraftment.

  2. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogojan, C; Frederiksen, J L

    2009-01-01

    Intensive immunosuppresion followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been suggested as potential treatment in severe forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Since 1995 ca. 400 patients have been treated with HSCT. Stabilization or improvement occurred in almost 70% of cases at least...... in restoration of self-tolerance. Relatively young patients with active inflammatory lesions of relatively short duration and rapidly progressive disease, but still low disability scores, unresponsive to conventional therapy seem the best candidates for transplantation. Transplant-related mortality was 6...

  3. Mesenchymal stem cell derived hematopoietic cells are permissive to HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent, self-renewing cells known for their differentiation potential into cells of mesenchymal lineage. The ability of single cell clones isolated from adipose tissue resident MSCs (ASCs to differentiate into cells of hematopoietic lineage has been previously demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated if the hematopoietic differentiated (HD cells derived from ASCs could productively be infected with HIV-1. Results HD cells were generated by differentiating clonally expanded cultures of adherent subsets of ASCs (CD90+, CD105+, CD45-, and CD34-. Transcriptome analysis revealed that HD cells acquire a number of elements that increase their susceptibility for HIV-1 infection, including HIV-1 receptor/co-receptor and other key cellular cofactors. HIV-1 infected HD cells (HD-HIV showed elevated p24 protein and gag and tat gene expression, implying a high and productive infection. HD-HIV cells showed decreased CD4, but significant increase in the expression of CCR5, CXCR4, Nef-associated factor HCK, and Vpu-associated factor BTRC. HIV-1 restricting factors like APOBEC3F and TRIM5 also showed up regulation. HIV-1 infection increased apoptosis and cell cycle regulatory genes in HD cells. Although undifferentiated ASCs failed to show productive infection, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of several hematopoietic lineage associated genes such as c-Kit, MMD2, and IL-10. Conclusions Considering the presence of profuse amounts of ASCs in different tissues, these findings suggest the possible role that could be played by HD cells derived from ASCs in HIV-1 infection. The undifferentiated ASCs were non-permissive to HIV-1 infection; however, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of some hematopoietic lineage related genes. The findings relate the importance of ASCs in HIV-1 research and facilitate the understanding of the disease process and management strategies.

  4. Mobilization of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells: General Principles and Molecular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonig, Halvard; Papayannopoulou, Thalla

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell mobilization can be achieved by a variety of bone marrow niche modifications, although efficient mobilization requires simultaneous expansion of the stem/progenitor cell pool and niche modification. Many of the mechanisms involved in G-CSF-induced mobilization have been described. With regard to mobilization of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, challenges for the future include the analysis of genetic factors responsible for the great variability in mobilization responses, and the identification of predictors of mobilization efficiency, as well as the development of mobilizing schemes for poor mobilizers. Moreover, improved regimens for enhanced or even preferential mobilization of nonhematopoietic stem/progenitor cell types, and their therapeutic potential for endogenous tissue repair will be questions to be vigorously pursued in the near future. PMID:22890918

  5. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerman, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.beerman@childrens.harvard.edu [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States); Rossi, Derrick J. [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging.

  6. The bone marrow stem cell niche grows up: mesenchymal stem cells and macrophages move in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehninger, Armin; Trumpp, Andreas

    2011-03-14

    Stem cell niches are defined as the cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate stem cell function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. This includes control of the balance between quiescence, self-renewal, and differentiation, as well as the engagement of specific programs in response to stress. In mammals, the best understood niche is that harboring bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Recent studies have expanded the number of cell types contributing to the HSC niche. Perivascular mesenchymal stem cells and macrophages now join the previously identified sinusoidal endothelial cells, sympathetic nerve fibers, and cells of the osteoblastic lineage to form similar, but distinct, niches that harbor dormant and self-renewing HSCs during homeostasis and mediate stem cell mobilization in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

  7. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed, T. M.

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). In our laboratory we have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3-26.3 cGy d^-1). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific (three major responding subgroups identified) and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup 1), the failure to augment basic repair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments (particularly marked within erythroid compartments) that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccommodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3) appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high-tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity. The kinetics of these repair-mediated, regenerative hematopoietic

  8. Symptomatic BK Virus Infection Is Associated with Kidney Function Decline and Poor Overall Survival in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudayyeh, Ala; Hamdi, Amir; Lin, Heather; Abdelrahim, Maen; Rondon, Gabriela; Andersson, Borje S; Afrough, Aimaz; Martinez, Charles S; Tarrand, Jeffrey J; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Marin, David; Gaber, A. Osama; Salahudeen, Abdulla; Oran, Betul; Chemaly, Roy F.; Olson, Amanda; Jones, Roy; Popat, Uday; Champlin, Richard E; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2017-01-01

    Nephropathy due to BK virus infection is an evolving challenge in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that BKV infection was a marker of Kidney Function Decline and a poor prognostic factor in HSCT recipients who experience this complication. In this retrospective study, we analyzed all patients who underwent their first allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at our institution between 2004 and 2012. We evaluated the incidence of persistent kidney function decline, which was defined as a confirmed reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate of at least 25% from baseline using the CKD-EPI equation. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to model the cause-specific hazard of kidney function decline and Fine and Gray’s method was used to account for the competing risks of death. Among 2477 recipients of a first allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, BK viruria was detected in 25% (n=629) and kidney function decline in 944 (38.1%). On multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age, sex, acute graft-versus-host disease, chronic graft versus host disease, preparative conditioning regimen, and graft source, BK viruria remained a significant risk factor for kidney function decline (P <0.001). In addition, patients with BKV infection and kidney function decline experienced worse overall survival. Post-allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, BKV infection was strongly and independently associated with subsequent kidney function decline and worse patient survival after HSCT. PMID:26608093

  9. Umbilical cord blood banking in the worldwide hematopoietic stem cell transplantation system: perspectives for Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalynychenko, T O

    2017-09-01

    Significant progress in the promotion of procedural technologies associated with the transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells caused a rapid increase in activity. The exchange of hematopoietic stem cells for unrelated donor transplantations is now much easier due to the relevant international professional structures and organizations established to support cooperation and standard setting, as well as rules for the functioning of both national donor registries and cord blood banks. These processes are increasing every year and are contributing to the outpacing rates of development in this area. Products within their country should be regulated by the competent government authorities. This study analyzes the work of international and national levels of support for transplantation activity in the field of unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the standardization order of technologies, as well as data that justify the need to create a network of donated umbilical cord blood banks in Ukraine as a factor in the development of allogeneic transplantation. This will promote the accessibility of international standards for the treatment of serious diseases for Ukrainian citizens.

  10. Deletion of the Imprinted Gene Grb10 Promotes Hematopoietic Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiao; Himburg, Heather A; Pohl, Katherine; Quarmyne, Mamle; Tran, Evelyn; Zhang, Yurun; Fang, Tiancheng; Kan, Jenny; Chao, Nelson J; Zhao, Liman; Doan, Phuong L; Chute, John P

    2016-11-01

    Imprinted genes are differentially expressed by adult stem cells, but their functions in regulating adult stem cell fate are incompletely understood. Here we show that growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (Grb10), an imprinted gene, regulates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and regeneration. Deletion of the maternal allele of Grb10 in mice (Grb10m/+ mice) substantially increased HSC long-term repopulating capacity, as compared to that of Grb10+/+ mice. After total body irradiation (TBI), Grb10m/+ mice demonstrated accelerated HSC regeneration and hematopoietic reconstitution, as compared to Grb10+/+ mice. Grb10-deficient HSCs displayed increased proliferation after competitive transplantation or TBI, commensurate with upregulation of CDK4 and Cyclin E. Furthermore, the enhanced HSC regeneration observed in Grb10-deficient mice was dependent on activation of the Akt/mTORC1 pathway. This study reveals a function for the imprinted gene Grb10 in regulating HSC self-renewal and regeneration and suggests that the inhibition of Grb10 can promote hematopoietic regeneration in vivo. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. MiR-24 is required for hematopoietic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Roy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of miRNA, miR-24, in mouse hematopoietic progenitors increases monocytic/ granulocytic differentiation and inhibits B cell development. To determine if endogenous miR-24 is required for hematopoiesis, we antagonized miR-24 in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs and performed in vitro differentiations. Suppression of miR-24 resulted in an inability to produce blood and hematopoietic progenitors (HPCs from ESCs. The phenotype is not a general defect in mesoderm production since we observe production of nascent mesoderm as well as mesoderm derived cardiac muscle and endothelial cells. Results from blast colony forming cell (BL-CFC assays demonstrate that miR-24 is not required for generation of the hemangioblast, the mesoderm progenitor that gives rise to blood and endothelial cells. However, expression of the transcription factors Runx1 and Scl is greatly reduced, suggesting an impaired ability of the hemangioblast to differentiate. Lastly, we observed that known miR-24 target, Trib3, is upregulated in the miR-24 antagonized embryoid bodies (EBs. Overexpression of Trib3 alone in ESCs was able to decrease HPC production, though not as great as seen with miR-24 knockdown. These results demonstrate an essential role for miR-24 in the hematopoietic differentiation of ESCs. Although many miRNAs have been implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis, this is the first miRNA observed to be required for the specification of mammalian blood progenitors from early mesoderm.

  12. Apoptosis-Related Gene Expression Profiling in Hematopoietic Cell Fractions of MDS Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langemeijer, Saskia MC; Knops, Ruth; Gilissen, Christian; Woestenenk, Rob; de Witte, Theo; Huls, Gerwin; van der Reijden, Bert A; Jansen, Joop H

    2016-01-01

    Although the vast majority of patients with a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) suffer from cytopenias, the bone marrow is usually normocellular or hypercellular. Apoptosis of hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow has been implicated in this phenomenon. However, in MDS it remains only partially elucidated which genes are involved in this process and which hematopoietic cells are mainly affected. We employed sensitive real-time PCR technology to study 93 apoptosis-related genes and gene families in sorted immature CD34+ and the differentiating erythroid (CD71+) and monomyeloid (CD13/33+) bone marrow cells. Unsupervised cluster analysis of the expression signature readily distinguished the different cellular bone marrow fractions (CD34+, CD71+ and CD13/33+) from each other, but did not discriminate patients from healthy controls. When individual genes were regarded, several were found to be differentially expressed between patients and controls. Particularly, strong over-expression of BIK (BCL2-interacting killer) was observed in erythroid progenitor cells of low- and high-risk MDS patients (both p = 0.001) and TNFRSF4 (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 4) was down-regulated in immature hematopoietic cells (p = 0.0023) of low-risk MDS patients compared to healthy bone marrow. PMID:27902785

  13. Transcriptional profiling of Foxo3a and Fancd2 regulated genes in mouse hematopoietic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Functional maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs is constantly challenged by stresses like DNA damage and oxidative stress. Foxo factors particularly Foxo3a function to regulate the self-renewal of HSCs and contribute to the maintenance of the HSC pool during aging by providing resistance to oxidative stress. Fancd2-deficient mice had multiple hematopoietic defects including HSC loss in early development and in response to cellular stresses including oxidative stress. The cellular mechanisms underlying HSC loss in Fancd2-deficient mice include abnormal cell cycle status loss of quiescence and compromised hematopoietic repopulating capacity of HSCs. To address on a genome wide level the genes and pathways that are impacted by deletion of the Fancd2 and Foxo3a we performed microarray analysis on phenotypic HSCs (Lin−ckit+Sca-1+CD150+CD48− from Fancd2 single knockout Foxo3a single knockout and Fancd2−/−Foxo3a−/− double-knockout (dKO mice. Here we provide detailed methods and analysis on these microarray data which has been deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO: GSE64215.

  14. Distinct Functions of Different scl Isoforms in Zebrafish Definitive Hematopoietic Stem Cell Initiation and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yahui

    2011-07-01

    The establishment of entire blood system relies on the multi-potent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), thus identifying the molecular mechanism in HSC generation is of importance for not only complementing the fundamental knowledge in stem cell biology, but also providing insights to the regenerative therapies. Recent researches have documented the formation of nascent HSCs through a direct transition from ventral aortic endothelium, named as endothelial hematopoietic transition (EHT) process. However, the precise genetic program engaged in this process remains largely elusive. The transcription factor scl plays pivotal and conserved roles in embryonic and adult hematopoiesis from teleosts to mammals. Our lab have previously identified a new truncated scl isoform, scl-beta, which is indispensible for the specification of HSCs in the ventral wall of dorsal aorta (VDA), the zebrafish equivalent of mammalian fetal hematopoietic organ. Here we observe that, by combining time-lapse confocal imaging of transgenic zebrafish and genetic epistasis analysis, scl-beta is expressed in a subset of ventral aortic endothelial cells and critical for their forthcoming transformation to hemogenic endothelium; in contrast, runx1 is required downstream to govern the successful egress of the hemogenic endothelial cells to become naive HSCs. In addition, the traditional known full-length scl-alpha isoform is firstly evidenced to be required for the maintenance or survival of newly formed HSCs in VDA. Collectively our data has established the genetic hierarchy controlling discrete steps in the consecutive process of HSC formation from endothelial cells and further development in VDA.

  15. PBSC mobilization in lymphoma patients: analysis of risk factors for collection failure and development of a predictive score based on the kinetics of circulating CD34+ cells and WBC after chemotherapy and G-CSF mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giuseppe; Skert, Cristina; Morello, Enrico; Almici, Camillo; Arcaini, Luca; Basilico, Claudia; Cavalli, Lara; Botto, Barbara; Castelli, Andrea; Pica, Gianmatteo; Ripamonti, Francesco; Salvi, Flavia; Carella, Angelo M; Gaidano, Gianluca; Levis, Alessandro; Nosari, Annamaria; Russo, Domenico; Vitolo, Umberto

    2015-09-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is a potentially curative treatment of lymphoma, but peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization fails in some patients. PBSC mobilizing agents have recently been proved to improve the PBSC yield after a prior mobilization failure. Predictive parameters of mobilization failure allowing for a preemptive, more cost-effective use of such agents during the first mobilization attempt are still poorly defined, particularly during mobilization with chemotherapy + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We performed a retrospective analysis of a series of lymphoma patients who were candidates for ASCT, to identify factors influencing PBSC mobilization outcome. Premobilization parameters-age, histology, disease status, mobilizing protocol, and previous treatments-as well as white blood cell (WBC) and PBSC kinetics, markers potentially able to predict failure during the ongoing mobilization attempt, were analyzed in 415 consecutive mobilization procedures in 388 patients. We used chemotherapy + G-CSF in 411 (99%) of mobilization attempts and PBSC collection failed (mobilization failure. Using these three parameters, we established a scoring system to predict risk of failure during mobilization ranging from 2 to 90%, thus allowing a selective use of a preemptive mobilization policy. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Avoidance of Total Knee Arthroplasty in Early Osteoarthritis of the Knee with Intra-Articular Implantation of Autologous Activated Peripheral Blood Stem Cells versus Hyaluronic Acid: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Differential Effects of Growth Factor Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thana Turajane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this randomized controlled trial, in early osteoarthritis (OA that failed conservative intervention, the need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA and WOMAC scores were evaluated, following a combination of arthroscopic microdrilling mesenchymal cell stimulation (MCS and repeated intra-articular (IA autologous activated peripheral blood stem cells (AAPBSCs with growth factor addition (GFA and hyaluronic acid (HA versus IA-HA alone. Leukapheresis-harvested AAPBSCs were administered as three weekly IA injections combined with HA and GFA (platelet-rich plasma [PRP] and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [hG-CSF] and MCS in group 1 and in group 2 but without hG-CSF while group 3 received IA-HA alone. Each group of 20 patients was evaluated at baseline and at 1, 6, and, 12 months. At 12 months, all patients in the AAPBSC groups were surgical intervention free compared to three patients needing TKA in group 3 (p<0.033. Total WOMAC scores showed statistically significant improvements at 6 and 12 months for the AAPBSC groups versus controls. There were no notable adverse events. We have shown avoidance of TKA in the AAPBSC groups at 12 months and potent, early, and sustained symptom alleviation through GFA versus HA alone. Differential effects of hG-CSF were noted with an earlier onset of symptom alleviation throughout.

  17. Synergistic actions of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells in vascularizing bioengineered tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo K Moioli

    Full Text Available Poor angiogenesis is a major road block for tissue repair. The regeneration of virtually all tissues is limited by angiogenesis, given the diffusion of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products is limited to a few hundred micrometers. We postulated that co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells improves angiogenesis of tissue repair and hence the outcome of regeneration. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by using bone as a model whose regeneration is impaired unless it is vascularized. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs were isolated from each of three healthy human bone marrow samples and reconstituted in a porous scaffold. MSCs were seeded in micropores of 3D calcium phosphate (CP scaffolds, followed by infusion of gel-suspended CD34(+ hematopoietic cells. Co-transplantation of CD34(+ HSCs and CD34(- MSCs in microporous CP scaffolds subcutaneously in the dorsum of immunocompromised mice yielded vascularized tissue. The average vascular number of co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSC scaffolds was substantially greater than MSC transplantation alone. Human osteocalcin was expressed in the micropores of CP scaffolds and was significantly increased upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Human nuclear staining revealed the engraftment of transplanted human cells in vascular endothelium upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Based on additional in vitro results of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, we adsorbed VEGF with co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSCs in the microporous CP scaffolds in vivo, and discovered that vascular number and diameter further increased, likely owing to the promotion of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by VEGF. Together, co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells may improve the regeneration of vascular dependent tissues such as bone

  18. Endocrinopathies after Allogeneic and Autologous Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Orio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo- and autologous- (auto- stem cell transplant (HSCT. This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90–99% of women and 60–90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40–50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma, gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT.

  19. Characterization of Selectin Ligands on Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Hanan

    2013-05-18

    Successful bone marrow (BM) transplantation requires the homing of the transplanted hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to their bone marrow niche, where they undergo differentiation to form mature cells that are eventually released into the peripheral blood. However, the survival rate of patients receiving BM transplants is poor since many of the transplanted HSPCs do not make it to their BM niches in the recipient’s body. Since the availability of HSPCs from traditional sources is limited, transplanting more number of HSPCs is not a solution to this problem. This study aims to characterize the adhesion molecules mediating cell migration in order to better understand the adhesion mechanisms of HSCs with the bone marrow endothelium. This will aid in developing future tools to improve the clinical transplantation of HSPCs. This study also aims to understand the factors that influence HSPC proliferation in the bone marrow niche. E-selectin plays an important role in the process of homing; however, its ligands on HSPCs are not well characterized. We used western blotting and immunoprecipitation to show that endomucin is expressed on HSPCs and plays a role in the binding of HSPCs to E-selectin. We also studied the effect of recombinant E-selectin on the expression of a newly characterized E-selectin ligand in our lab, CD34, in HSPCs. This will provide us insight into novel roles for endomucin and E-selectin and help us to understand the factors influencing HSPC migration to BM endothelium.

  20. Interleukin-7 and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: beyond the thymus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Broers (Anna Elisabeth Clasine)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAllogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has been established as important treatment modality for patients with hematological malignancies, aplastic anemia, and inborn errors of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Nevertheless, major lethal and non-lethal complications

  1. Latexin is a newly discovered regulator of hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Gerald

    Deeply hidden in the bone marrow are rare hematopoietic stem cells that produce all types of blood cells in the circulatory system. A new study shows that the latexin gene affects the size of this population of cells.

  2. Hematopoietic stem cells: concepts, definitions, and the new reality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eaves, Connie J

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) research took hold in the 1950s with the demonstration that intravenously injected bone marrow cells can rescue irradiated mice from lethality by reestablishing blood cell production...

  3. Establishing an autologous versus allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant program in nations with emerging economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhri, Naeem A; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Almohareb, Fahad I; Alzahrani, Hazzaa A; Bashir, Qaiser; Savani, Bipin; Gupta, Vikas; Hashmi, Shahrukh K

    2017-12-01

    More than 70,000 hematopoietic cell transplants are currently performed each year, and these continue to increase every year. However, there is a significant variation in the number of absolute transplants and transplant rates between centers, countries, and global regions. The prospect for emerging countries to develop a hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) program, as well as to decide on whether autologous HCT (auto-HCT) or allogeneic HCT (allo-HCT) should be established to start with, relies heavily on factors that can explain differences between these two procedures. Major factors that will influence a decision about establishing the type of HCT program are macroeconomic factors such as organization of the healthcare network, available resources and infrastructure. Prevalence of specific diseases in the region as well genetic background of donors and recipients will also influence the mandate or priority of the HCT in the national healthcare plan to explain some of the country-specific differences. Furthermore, microeconomic factors play a role, such as center-specific experience in treating various disorders requiring hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, along with accreditation status and patient volume. The objective of the transplant procedure was to improve the survival and quality of life of patients. The regional difference that one notices in emerging countries about the higher number of allo-HCT compared with auto-HCT procedures performed is primarily based on suboptimal healthcare network in treating various malignant disorders that are the primary indication for auto-stem cell transplantation. In this context, nonmalignant disorders such as bone marrow failure syndromes, inherited genetic disorders and hemoglobinopathies have become the major indication for stem cell transplantation. Better understanding of these factors will assist in establishing new transplant centers in the emerging countries to achieve their specific objectives and

  4. FAM20: an evolutionarily conserved family of secreted proteins expressed in hematopoietic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobos Everardo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hematopoiesis is a complex developmental process controlled by a large number of factors that regulate stem cell renewal, lineage commitment and differentiation. Secreted proteins, including the hematopoietic growth factors, play critical roles in these processes and have important biological and clinical significance. We have employed representational difference analysis to identify genes that are differentially expressed during experimentally induced myeloid differentiation in the murine EML hematopoietic stem cell line. Results One identified clone encoded a previously unidentified protein of 541 amino acids that contains an amino terminal signal sequence but no other characterized domains. This protein is a member of family of related proteins that has been named family with sequence similarity 20 (FAM20 with three members (FAM20A, FAM20B and FAM20C in mammals. Evolutionary comparisons revealed the existence of a single FAM20 gene in the simple vertebrate Ciona intestinalis and the invertebrate worm Caenorhabditis elegans and two genes in two insect species, Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae. Six FAM20 family members were identified in the genome of the pufferfish, Fugu rubripes and five members in the zebrafish, Danio rerio. The mouse Fam20a protein was ectopically expressed in a mammalian cell line and found to be a bona fide secreted protein and efficient secretion was dependent on the integrity of the signal sequence. Expression analysis revealed that the Fam20a gene was indeed differentially expressed during hematopoietic differentiation and that the other two family members (Fam20b and Fam20c were also expressed during hematcpoiesis but that their mRNA levels did not vary significantly. Likewise FAM20A was expressed in more limited set of human tissues than the other two family members. Conclusions The FAM20 family represents a new family of secreted proteins with potential functions in regulating

  5. The Role of Toll Like Receptors in Hematopoietic Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlene Monlish

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs that shape the innate immune system by identifying pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS and host-derived damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPS. TLRs are widely expressed on both immune cells and non-immune cells, including hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, effector immune cell populations, and endothelial cells. In addition to their well-known role in the innate immune response to acute infection or injury, accumulating evidence supports a role for TLRs in the development of hematopoietic and other malignancies. Several hematopoietic disorders, including lymphoproliferative disorders and myelodysplastic syndromes, which possess a high risk of transformation to leukemia, have been linked to aberrant TLR signaling. Furthermore, activation of TLRs leads to the induction of a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which can promote tumorigenesis by driving cell proliferation and migration and providing a favorable microenvironment for tumor cells. Beyond hematopoietic malignancies, the upregulation of a number of TLRs has been linked to promoting tumor cell survival, proliferation, and metastasis in a variety of cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and lung. This review focuses on the contribution of TLRs to hematopoietic malignancies, highlighting the known direct and indirect effects of TLR signaling on tumor cells and their microenvironment. In addition, the utility of TLR agonists and antagonists as potential therapeutics in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies is discussed.

  6. Short Stat5-interacting peptide derived from phospholipase C-β3 inhibits hematopoietic cell proliferation and myeloid differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Yasudo

    Full Text Available Constitutive activation of the transcription factor Stat5 in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells leads to various hematopoietic malignancies including myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN. Our recent study found that phospholipase C (PLC-β3 is a novel tumor suppressor involved in MPN, lymphoma and other tumors. Stat5 activity is negatively regulated by the SH2 domain-containing protein phosphatase SHP-1 in a PLC-β3-dependent manner. PLC-β3 can form the multimolecular SPS complex together with SHP-1 and Stat5. The close physical proximity of SHP-1 and Stat5 brought about by interacting with the C-terminal segment of PLC-β3 (PLC-β3-CT accelerates SHP-1-mediated dephosphorylation of Stat5. Here we identify the minimal sequences within PLC-β3-CT required for its tumor suppressor function. Two of the three Stat5-binding noncontiguous regions, one of which also binds SHP-1, substantially inhibited in vitro proliferation of Ba/F3 cells. Surprisingly, an 11-residue Stat5-binding peptide (residues 988-998 suppressed Stat5 activity in Ba/F3 cells and in vivo proliferation and myeloid differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, this study further defines PLC-β3-CT as the Stat5- and SHP-1-binding domain by identifying minimal functional sequences of PLC-β3 for its tumor suppressor function and implies their potential utility in the control of hematopoietic malignancies.

  7. Irradiation selects for p53-deficient hematopoietic progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriy Marusyk

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification and characterization of mutations that drive cancer evolution constitute a major focus of cancer research. Consequently, dominant paradigms attribute the tumorigenic effects of carcinogens in general and ionizing radiation in particular to their direct mutagenic action on genetic loci encoding oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. However, the effects of irradiation are not limited to genetic loci that encode oncogenes and tumor suppressors, as irradiation induces a multitude of other changes both in the cells and their microenvironment which could potentially affect the selective effects of some oncogenic mutations. P53 is a key tumor suppressor, the loss of which can provide resistance to multiple genotoxic stimuli, including irradiation. Given that p53 null animals develop T-cell lymphomas with high penetrance and that irradiation dramatically accelerates lymphoma development in p53 heterozygous mice, we hypothesized that increased selection for p53-deficient cells contributes to the causal link between irradiation and induction of lymphoid malignancies. We sought to determine whether ionizing irradiation selects for p53-deficient hematopoietic progenitors in vivo using mouse models. We found that p53 disruption does not provide a clear selective advantage within an unstressed hematopoietic system or in previously irradiated BM allowed to recover from irradiation. In contrast, upon irradiation p53 disruption confers a dramatic selective advantage, leading to long-term expansion of p53-deficient clones and to increased lymphoma development. Selection for cells with disrupted p53 appears to be attributable to several factors: protection from acute irradiation-induced ablation of progenitor cells, prevention of irradiation-induced loss of clonogenic capacity for stem and progenitor cells, improved long-term maintenance of progenitor cell fitness, and the disabling/elimination of competing p53 wild-type progenitors. These studies

  8. Limited clinical efficacy of azacitidine in transfusion-dependent, growth factor-resistant, low- and Int-1-risk MDS: Results from the nordic NMDSG08A phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiasson, M; Dybedahl, I; Holm, M S; Karimi, M; Brandefors, L; Garelius, H; Grövdal, M; Högh-Dufva, I; Grønbæk, K; Jansson, M; Marcher, C; Nilsson, L; Kittang, A O; Porwit, A; Saft, L; Möllgård, L; Hellström-Lindberg, E

    2014-03-07

    This prospective phase II study evaluated the efficacy of azacitidine (Aza)+erythropoietin (Epo) in transfusion-dependent patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients ineligible for or refractory to full-dose Epo+granulocyte colony stimulation factors for >8 weeks and a transfusion need of 4 units over 8 weeks were included. Aza 75 mg m(-2) d(-1), 5/28 days, was given for six cycles; non-responding patients received another three cycles combined with Epo 60 000 units per week. Primary end point was transfusion independence (TI). All patients underwent targeted mutational screen for 42 candidate genes. Thirty enrolled patients received one cycle of Aza. Ten patients discontinued the study early, 7 due to adverse events including 2 deaths. Thirty-eight serious adverse events were reported, the most common being infection. Five patients achieved TI after six cycles and one after Aza+Epo, giving a total response rate of 20%. Mutational screening revealed a high frequency of recurrent mutations. Although no single mutation predicted for response, SF3A1 (n=3) and DNMT3A (n=4) were only observed in non-responders. We conclude that Aza can induce TI in severely anemic MDS patients, but efficacy is limited, toxicity substantial and most responses of short duration. This treatment cannot be generally recommended in lower-risk MDS. Mutational screening revealed a high frequency of mutations.

  9. Clonal dominance and transplantation dynamics in hematopoietic stem cell compartments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ashcroft

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells in mammals are known to reside mostly in the bone marrow, but also transitively passage in small numbers in the blood. Experimental findings have suggested that they exist in a dynamic equilibrium, continuously migrating between these two compartments. Here we construct an individual-based mathematical model of this process, which is parametrised using existing empirical findings from mice. This approach allows us to quantify the amount of migration between the bone marrow niches and the peripheral blood. We use this model to investigate clonal hematopoiesis, which is a significant risk factor for hematologic cancers. We also analyse the engraftment of donor stem cells into non-conditioned and conditioned hosts, quantifying the impact of different treatment scenarios. The simplicity of the model permits a thorough mathematical analysis, providing deeper insights into the dynamics of both the model and of the real-world system. We predict the time taken for mutant clones to expand within a host, as well as chimerism levels that can be expected following transplantation therapy, and the probability that a preconditioned host is reconstituted by donor cells.

  10. Features of transfusion therapy in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kucher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to identify factors influencing the safety and efficacy of the transfusion therapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. From January 1 to December 31, 2015, 329 patients with hematologic diseases and malignancies who had undergone 367 HSCT were included into the study. Transfusion therapy was conducted in 345 HSCT – 94 % of cases. Totally, 9074 cases of transfusion of blood components were recorded: red blood cellcontaining – 2378 (26.2 %, plateletcontaining – 6255 (68.9 %, fresh frozen plasma – 441 (4.9 %. АВ0incompatibility between the donor and recipient was determined in 60.4 % of cases (n=154 in HSCT from allogeneic donor. Acute «graft versus host disease» was observed in 34.9 % of cases (n=89. Hemorrhagic complications were in 46 cases (12.5 %, mainly nasal, gastrointestinal bleeding and hemorrhagic cystitis. Pprevention and treatment of anemic and hemorrhagic complications in HSCT requires longterm and massive transfusion therapy with the availability of АВ0-incompatibility. The use of leukofiltrated, γ - or x-ray irradiated, individually and immunologically compatible blood components can reduce the risk of development of acute and delayed transfusion reactions in HSCT. 

  11. HSC-explorer: a curated database for hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Montrone

    Full Text Available HSC-Explorer (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/HSC/ is a publicly available, integrative database containing detailed information about the early steps of hematopoiesis. The resource aims at providing fast and easy access to relevant information, in particular to the complex network of interacting cell types and molecules, from the wealth of publications in the field through visualization interfaces. It provides structured information on more than 7000 experimentally validated interactions between molecules, bioprocesses and environmental factors. Information is manually derived by critical reading of the scientific literature from expert annotators. Hematopoiesis-relevant interactions are accompanied with context information such as model organisms and experimental methods for enabling assessment of reliability and relevance of experimental results. Usage of established vocabularies facilitates downstream bioinformatics applications and to convert the results into complex networks. Several predefined datasets (Selected topics offer insights into stem cell behavior, the stem cell niche and signaling processes supporting hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. HSC-Explorer provides a versatile web-based resource for scientists entering the field of hematopoiesis enabling users to inspect the associated biological processes through interactive graphical presentation.

  12. The LMO2 oncogene regulates DNA replication in hematopoietic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Humbert, Magali; Grondin, Benoît; Lisi, Véronique; Veiga, Diogo F. T.; Haman, André; Cazaux, Christophe; Mashtalir, Nazar; Affar, EL Bachir; Verreault, Alain; Hoang, Trang

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic transcription factors are commonly activated in acute leukemias and subvert normal gene expression networks to reprogram hematopoietic progenitors into preleukemic stem cells, as exemplified by LIM-only 2 (LMO2) in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Whether or not these oncoproteins interfere with other DNA-dependent processes is largely unexplored. Here, we show that LMO2 is recruited to DNA replication origins by interaction with three essential replication enzymes: DNA polymerase delta (POLD1), DNA primase (PRIM1), and minichromosome 6 (MCM6). Furthermore, tethering LMO2 to synthetic DNA sequences is sufficient to transform these sequences into origins of replication. We next addressed the importance of LMO2 in erythroid and thymocyte development, two lineages in which cell cycle and differentiation are tightly coordinated. Lowering LMO2 levels in erythroid progenitors delays G1-S progression and arrests erythropoietin-dependent cell growth while favoring terminal differentiation. Conversely, ectopic expression in thymocytes induces DNA replication and drives these cells into cell cycle, causing differentiation blockade. Our results define a novel role for LMO2 in directly promoting DNA synthesis and G1-S progression. PMID:26764384

  13. Structure of Nascent Chromatin Is Essential for Hematopoietic Lineage Specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruk, Svetlana; Mariani, Samanta A; De Dominici, Marco; Porazzi, Patrizia; Minieri, Valentina; Cai, Jingli; Iacovitti, Lorraine; Flomenberg, Neal; Calabretta, Bruno; Mazo, Alexander

    2017-04-11

    The role of chromatin structure in lineage commitment of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors (HPCs) is presently unclear. We show here that CD34 + HPCs possess a post-replicative chromatin globally devoid of the repressive histone mark H3K27me3. This H3K27-unmodified chromatin is required for recruitment of lineage-determining transcription factors (TFs) C/EBPα, PU.1, and GATA-1 to DNA just after DNA replication upon cytokine-induced myeloid or erythroid commitment. Blocking DNA replication or increasing H3K27me3 levels prevents recruitment of these TFs to DNA and suppresses cytokine-induced erythroid or myeloid differentiation. However, H3K27me3 is rapidly associated with nascent DNA in more primitive human and murine HPCs. Treatment of these cells with instructive cytokines leads to a significant delay in accumulation of H3K27me3 in nascent chromatin due to activity of the H3K27me3 demethylase UTX. Thus, HPCs utilize special mechanisms of chromatin modification for recruitment of specific TFs to DNA during early stages of lineage specification. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Structure of Nascent Chromatin Is Essential for Hematopoietic Lineage Specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Petruk

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of chromatin structure in lineage commitment of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors (HPCs is presently unclear. We show here that CD34+ HPCs possess a post-replicative chromatin globally devoid of the repressive histone mark H3K27me3. This H3K27-unmodified chromatin is required for recruitment of lineage-determining transcription factors (TFs C/EBPα, PU.1, and GATA-1 to DNA just after DNA replication upon cytokine-induced myeloid or erythroid commitment. Blocking DNA replication or increasing H3K27me3 levels prevents recruitment of these TFs to DNA and suppresses cytokine-induced erythroid or myeloid differentiation. However, H3K27me3 is rapidly associated with nascent DNA in more primitive human and murine HPCs. Treatment of these cells with instructive cytokines leads to a significant delay in accumulation of H3K27me3 in nascent chromatin due to activity of the H3K27me3 demethylase UTX. Thus, HPCs utilize special mechanisms of chromatin modification for recruitment of specific TFs to DNA during early stages of lineage specification.

  15. Serpina1 (alpha1-AT) is synthesized in the osteoblastic stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiperij, H Bea; van Pel, Melissa; de Rooij, Karien E; Hoeben, Rob C; Fibbe, Willem E

    2009-05-01

    Previously, we identified Serpina1 as a potent inhibitor of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSC/HPC) mobilization. Serpina1 protein is found in the bone marrow (BM) extracellular fluid and concentrations are decreased during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced HSC/HPC mobilization in mice. In addition, administration of exogenous Serpina1 protein inhibits HSC/HPC mobilization. BM cells responsible for production and secretion of Serpina1 remain unknown. Here, we examined the expression of Serpina1 in order to identify cell populations of the BM that synthesize Serpina1. Osteoblast (OB) and hematopoietic BM cell fractions were isolated from femurs, tibias, and humeri obtained from untreated mice. Subsequently, each BM fraction was examined for the production of Serpina1 messenger RNA and protein by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that Serpina1 messenger RNA is produced at high levels by OB compared to hematopoietic BM cells. Furthermore, Western blot analysis indicated that Serpina1 protein was secreted by OB. In contrast, no Serpina1 protein could be detected in the supernatant obtained from overnight cultured hematopoietic BM cells. Finally, in BM sections obtained from the femurs of untreated mice, Serpina1 protein was detected in OB cells lining the bone. Serpina1 protein in the BM extracellular fluid is predominantly produced by OB. This indicates that Serpina1 may play a regulatory role in the maintenance of HSC in the OB stem cell niche.

  16. Prevalence of viral infections and hemorrhagic cystitis in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakiba, Elaheh; Yaghobi, Ramin; Ramzi, Mani

    2011-12-01

    About 7% to 70% of hemorrhagic cystitis is classified as early and late-onset incidence in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. The association between the prevalence of viral infections and hemorrhagic cystitis was evaluated in pretransplant and posttransplant recipients and donors. Ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid-treated blood and urine samples of 30 recipients and 24 donors were collected before hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients, and monitored for 100 days after transplant. Prevalence of BK virus DNA was investigated by polymerase chain reaction. Prevalence of adenovirus and cytomegalovirus DNA was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction. Type of transplant, conditioning regimens, graft-versus-host disease clinical grading, demographic data, hematologic, and biochemical indexes also were analyzed. Different grades of hematuria were found in 16 of 30 of the recipients with hemorrhagic cystitis. Severe hematuria and diffuse thickening of the bladder were found in 5 of 30 transplant patients. Multiple infections of BK virus, adenovirus, and cytomegalovirus were seen in 5 patients with severe hemorrhagic cystitis. The viruria of these viruses was decreased in patients with hemorrhagic cystitis as follows: BK virus (5 of 5), adenovirus (2 of 5), and cytomegalovirus (not detected). Also, a significant relation was found between hemorrhagic cystitis and risk factors including donor-recipient sex mismatches, familial relationships, leukemia as an underlying disease, older age, allogenic type of transplant, prophylactic and therapeutic dose of anti-graft-versus-host-disease regimens. Detection of single and multiple infections of BK virus, adenovirus, and cytomegalovirus in blood and/or urine samples of hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, in combination with 1 or more inducing factors of hemorrhagic cystitis were enforced on the important role these risk factors play in the cause of hemorrhagic cystitis.

  17. Major complications following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afessa, Bekele; Peters, Steve G

    2006-06-01

    Tens of thousands of patients undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) annually, 15 to 40% of whom are admitted to the intensive care unit. Pulmonary complications are the most life threatening conditions that develop in HSCT recipients. Both infectious and noninfectious complications occur more frequently in allogeneic HSCT. The management of HSCT recipients requires knowledge of their immune status, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, and early treatment. During the pre-engraftment phase (0 to 30 days after transplant), the most prevalent pathogens causing infection are bacteria and Candida species and, if the neutropenia persists, Aspergillus species. The early post-engraftment phase (30 to 100 days) is characterized by cytomegalovirus (CMV), Pneumocystis jiroveci, and Aspergillus infections. During the late posttransplant phase (> 100 days), allogeneic HSCT recipients are at risk for CMV, community-acquired respiratory virus, and encapsulated bacterial infections. Antigen and polymerase chain reaction assays are important for the diagnosis of CMV and Aspergillus infections. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) and peri-engraftment respiratory distress syndrome occur in both allogeneic and autologous HSCT recipients, usually during the first 30 days. Bronchiolitis obliterans occurs exclusively in allogeneic HSCT recipients with graft versus host disease. Idiopathic pneumonia syndrome occurs at any time following transplant. Bronchoscopy is usually helpful for the diagnosis of the infectious pulmonary complications and DAH.

  18. The Hematopoietic Niche in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette H. Schmitt-Graeff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Specialized microanatomical areas of the bone marrow provide the signals that are mandatory for the maintenance and regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and progenitor cells. A complex microenvironment adjacent to the marrow vasculature (vascular niche and close to the endosteum (endosteal niche harbors multiple cell types including mesenchymal stromal cells and their derivatives such as CAR cells expressing high levels of chemokines C-X-C motif ligand 12 and early osteoblastic lineage cells, endothelial cells, and megakaryocytes. The characterization of the cellular and molecular networks operating in the HSC niche has opened new perspectives for the understanding of the bidirectional cross-talk between HSCs and stromal cell populations in normal and malignant conditions. A structural and functional remodeling of the niche may contribute to the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN. Malignant HSCs may alter the function and survival of MSCs that do not belong to the neoplastic clone. For example, a regression of nestin+ MSCs by apoptosis has been attributed to neuroglial damage in MPN. Nonneoplastic MSCs in turn can promote aggressiveness and drug resistance of malignant cells. In the future, strategies to counteract the pathological interaction between the niche and neoplastic HSCs may offer additional treatment strategies for MPN patients.

  19. Prostaglandin E2 increases hematopoietic stem cell survival and accelerates hematopoietic recovery after radiation injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Rebecca L.; Georger, Mary; Bromberg, Olga; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Frisch, Benjamin J.; Becker, Michael W.; Calvi, Laura M.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), which continuously maintain all mature blood cells, are regulated within the marrow microenvironment. We previously reported that pharmacologic treatment of naïve mice with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) expands HSPCs. However, the cellular mechanisms mediating this expansion remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that PGE2 treatment in naïve mice inhibits apoptosis of HSPCs without changing their proliferation rate. In a murine model of sub-lethal total body irradiation (TBI), in which HSPCs are rapidly lost, treatment with a long-acting PGE2 analogue (dmPGE2) reversed the apoptotic program initiated by TBI. dmPGE2 treatment in vivo decreased the loss of functional HSPCs following radiation injury, as demonstrated both phenotypically and by their increased reconstitution capacity. The antiapoptotic effect of dmPGE2 on HSPCs did not impair their ability to differentiate in vivo, resulting instead in improved hematopoietic recovery after TBI. dmPGE2 also increased microenvironmental cyclooxygenase-2 expression and expanded the α-SMA+ subset of marrow macrophages, thus enhancing the bone marrow microenvironmental response to TBI. Therefore, in vivo treatment with PGE2 analogues may be particularly beneficial to HSPCs in the setting of injury by targeting them both directly and also through their niche. The current data provide rationale for in vivo manipulation of the HSPC pool as a strategy to improve recovery after myelosuppression. PMID:23169593

  20. Characterization of Hematopoietic Transcription Factor Complexes in Erythroid Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.F. Rodriguez

    2006-01-01

    textabstractEfficient tagging methodologies are an integral aspect of protein complex characterization by proteomic approaches. Due to biotin’s very high affinity for avidin and streptavidin, biotinylation tagging offers an attractive approach for the efficient purification of protein

  1. A defined, feeder-free, serum-free system to generate in vitro hematopoietic progenitors and differentiated blood cells from hESCs and hiPSCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Salvagiotto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Human ESC and iPSC are an attractive source of cells of high quantity and purity to be used to elucidate early human development processes, for drug discovery, and in clinical cell therapy applications. To efficiently differentiate pluripotent cells into a pure population of hematopoietic progenitors we have developed a new 2-dimensional, defined and highly efficient protocol that avoids the use of feeder cells, serum or embryoid body formation. Here we showed that a single matrix protein in combination with growth factors and a hypoxic environment is sufficient to generate from pluripotent cells hematopoietic progenitors capable of differentiating further in mature cell types of different lineages of the blood system. We tested the differentiation method using hESCs and 9 iPSC lines generated from different tissues. These data indicate the robustness of the protocol providing a valuable tool for the generation of clinical-grade hematopoietic cells from pluripotent cells.

  2. Hematopoietic (stem) cell development — how divergent are the roads taken?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.-L. Kauts (Mari-Liis); C.S. Vink (Chris); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe development of the hematopoietic system during early embryonic stages occurs in spatially and temporally distinct waves. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the most potent and self-renewing cells of this system, are produced in the final ‘definitive’ wave of hematopoietic cell

  3. Interleukin-1 regulates Hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia); M. Peeters (Marian); E. Haak (Esther); K. van der Horn (Karin); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are

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  5. File list: DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.B