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Sample records for hematopoietic factor granulocyte-colony

  1. Long-active granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization.

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    Martino, Massimo; Laszlo, Daniele; Lanza, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Peg-filgrastim (PEG-FIL), a polyethylene glycol-conjugated form of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), has been introduced in clinical practice and is effective in shortening the time of neutropenia after cytotoxic chemotherapy. G-CSF has emerged as the preferred cytokine for hematopoietic progenitor cells' (HPC) mobilization. Nevertheless, data on the ability of PEG-FIL in this field have been published. We review publications in the field with the goal of providing an overview of this approach. PEG-FIL may be able to mobilize CD34(+) cells in a more timely fashion than G-CSF, with the advantages of only a single-dose administration, an earlier start and a reduction in the number of apheresis procedures. The main controversies concern the dosage of the drug and the optimal dose. In the context of chemo-mobilization, a single dose of 6 mg PEG-FIL seems effective in terms of HPC's mobilization and there is no increase in this effect if the dose is doubled to 12 mg. Steady-state mobilization requires higher doses of PEG-FIL and this approach is not cost-effective when compared with G-CSF. The experiences with PEG-FIL in the healthy donor setting are very limited.

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilizes dormant hematopoietic stem cells without proliferation in mice.

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    Bernitz, Jeffrey M; Daniel, Michael G; Fstkchyan, Yesai S; Moore, Kateri

    2017-04-06

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used clinically to treat leukopenia and to enforce hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization to the peripheral blood (PB). However, G-CSF is also produced in response to infection, and excessive exposure reduces HSC repopulation capacity. Previous work has shown that dormant HSCs contain all the long-term repopulation potential in the bone marrow (BM), and that as HSCs accumulate a divisional history, they progressively lose regenerative potential. As G-CSF treatment also induces HSC proliferation, we sought to examine whether G-CSF-mediated repopulation defects are a result of increased proliferative history. To do so, we used an established H2BGFP label retaining system to track HSC divisions in response to G-CSF. Our results show that dormant HSCs are preferentially mobilized to the PB on G-CSF treatment. We find that this mobilization does not result in H2BGFP label dilution of dormant HSCs, suggesting that G-CSF does not stimulate dormant HSC proliferation. Instead, we find that proliferation within the HSC compartment is restricted to CD41-expressing cells that function with short-term, and primarily myeloid, regenerative potential. Finally, we show CD41 expression is up-regulated within the BM HSC compartment in response to G-CSF treatment. This emergent CD41 Hi HSC fraction demonstrates no observable engraftment potential, but directly matures into megakaryocytes when placed in culture. Together, our results demonstrate that dormant HSCs mobilize in response to G-CSF treatment without dividing, and that G-CSF-mediated proliferation is restricted to cells with limited regenerative potential found within the HSC compartment. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Adrenaline administration promotes the efficiency of granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mediated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization in mice.

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    Chen, Chong; Cao, Jiang; Song, Xuguang; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Li, Yong; Xu, Kailin

    2013-01-01

    A high dose of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used to mobilize hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), but G-CSF is relatively inefficient and may cause adverse effects. Recently, adrenaline has been found to play important roles in HSPC mobilization. In this study, we explored whether adrenaline combined with G-CSF could induce HSPC mobilization in a mouse model. Mice were treated with adrenaline and either a high or low dose of G-CSF alone or in combination. Peripheral blood HSPC counts were evaluated by flow cytometry. Levels of bone marrow SDF-1 were measured by ELISA, the transcription of CXCR4 and SDF-1 was measured by real-time RT-PCR, and CXCR4 protein was detected by Western blot. Our results showed that adrenaline alone fails to mobilize HSPCs into the peripheral blood; however, when G-CSF and adrenaline are combined, the WBC counts and percentages of HSPCs are significantly higher compared to those in mice that received G-CSF alone. The combined use of adrenaline and G-CSF not only accelerated HSPC mobilization, but also enabled the efficient mobilization of HSPCs into the peripheral blood at lower doses of G-CSF. Adrenaline/G-CSF treatment also extensively downregulated levels of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in mouse bone marrow. These results demonstrated that adrenaline combined with G-CSF can induce HSPC mobilization by down-regulating the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis, indicating that the use of adrenaline may enable the use of reduced dosages or durations of G-CSF treatment, minimizing G-CSF-associated complications.

  4. Mobilization and collection of CD34+ cells for autologous transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells in children: analysis of two different granulocyte-colony stimulating factor doses

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    Kátia Aparecida de Brito Eid

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs is the cell choice in autologous transplantation. The classic dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G- CSF for mobilization is a single daily dose of 10 µg/kg of patient body weight. There is a theory that higher doses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor applied twice daily could increase the number of CD34+ cells collected in fewer leukapheresis procedures. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare a fractionated dose of 15 µg G-CSF/kg of body weight and the conventional dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in respect to the number of leukapheresis procedures required to achieve a minimum collection of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight. Methods: Patients were divided into two groups: Group 10 - patients who received a single daily dose of 10 µg G-CSF/kg body weight and Group 15 - patients who received a fractioned dose of 15 µg G-CSF/kg body weight daily. The leukapheresis procedure was carried out in an automated cell separator. The autologous transplantation was carried out when a minimum number of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight was achieved. Results: Group 10 comprised 39 patients and Group 15 comprised 26 patients. A total of 146 apheresis procedures were performed: 110 (75.3% for Group 10 and 36 (24.7% for Group 15. For Group 10, a median of three (range: 1-7 leukapheresis procedures and a mean of 8.89 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight (±9.59 were collected whereas for Group 15 the corresponding values were one (range: 1-3 and 5.29 × 106 cells/kg body weight (±4.95. A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the number of apheresis procedures (p-value <0.0001. Conclusions: To collect a minimum target of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight, the administration of a fractionated dose of 15 µg G-CSF/kg body weight significantly decreased the number of leukapheresis procedures performed.

  5. Inductive potential of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor to mature neutrophils from X-irradiated human peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumori, Takeo; Yoshino, Hironori; Hayashi, Masako; Takahashi, Kenji; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) has been used for treatment of neutropenia. Filgrastim, Nartograstim, and Lenograstim are clinically available in Japan. However, the differences in potential benefit for radiation-induced disorder between these types of rhG-CSFs remain unknown. Therefore, the effects of three different types of rhG-CSFs on granulocyte progenitor cells and expansion of neutrophils from nonirradiated or 2 Gy X-irradiated human CD34 + hematopoietic progenitor cells were examined. For analysis of granulocyte colony-forming units (CFU-G) and a surviving fraction of CFU-G, nonirradiated or X-irradiated CD34 + cells were cultured in methylcellulose containing rhG-CSF. These cells were cultured in serum-free medium supplemented with rhG-CSF, and the expansion and characteristics of neutrophils were analyzed. All three types of rhG-CSFs increased the number of CFU-G in a dose-dependent manner; however, Lenograstim is superior to others because of CFU-G-derived colony formation at relatively low doses. The surviving fraction of CFU-G was independent of the types of rhG-CSFs. Expansion of neutrophils by rhG-CSF was largely attenuated by X-irradiation, though no significant difference in neutrophil number was observed between the three types of rhG-CSFs under both nonirradiation and X-irradiation conditions. In terms of functional characteristics of neutrophils, Lenograstim-induced neutrophils produced high levels of reactive oxygen species compared to Filgrastim, when rhG-CSF was applied to nonirradiated CD34 + cells. In conclusion, different types of rhG-CSFs lead to different effects when rhG-CSF is applied to nonirradiated CD34 + cells, though Filgrastim, Nartograstim, and Lenograstim show equal effects on X-irradiated CD34 + cells. (author)

  6. Hematopoietic properties of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor/immunoglobulin (G-CSF/IgG-Fc fusion proteins in normal and neutropenic rodents.

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    George N Cox

    Full Text Available Previously we showed that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF in vitro bioactivity is preserved when the protein is joined via a flexible 7 amino acid linker to an immunoglobulin-1 (IgG1-Fc domain and that the G-CSF/IgG1-Fc fusion protein possessed a longer circulating half-life and improved hematopoietic properties compared to G-CSF in normal rats. We have extended this analysis by comparing the relative hematopoietic potencies of G-CSF/IgG1-Fc to G-CSF in normal mice and to G-CSF and polyethylene glycol (PEG -modified G-CSF in neutropenic rats. Mice were treated for 5 days using different doses and dosing regimens of G-CSF/IgG1-Fc or G-CSF and circulating neutrophil levels in the animals measured on Day 6. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc stimulated greater increases in blood neutrophils than comparable doses of G-CSF when administered using daily, every other day or every third day dosing regimens. In rats made neutropenic with cyclophosphamide, G-CSF/IgG1-Fc accelerated recovery of blood neutrophils to normal levels (from Day 9 to Day 5 when administered as 5 daily injections or as a single injection on Day 1. By contrast, G-CSF accelerated neutrophil recovery when administered as 5 daily injections, but not when administered as a single injection. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc was as effective as PEG-G-CSF at accelerating neutrophil recovery following a single injection in neutropenic rats. G-CSF/IgG1-Fc and G-CSF/IgG4-Fc fusion proteins in which the 7 amino acid linker was deleted also were effective at accelerating neutrophil recovery following a single injection in neutropenic rats. These studies confirm the enhanced in vivo hematopoietic properties of G-CSF/IgG-Fc fusion proteins.

  7. Mobilization of primitive and committed hematopoietic progenitors in nonhuman primates treated with defibrotide and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

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    Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Di Nicola, Massimo; Longoni, Paolo; Milani, Raffaella; Milanesi, Marco; Guidetti, Anna; Haanstra, Krista; Jonker, Margaret; Cleris, Loredana; Magni, Michele; Formelli, Franca; Gianni, Alesssandro M

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of defibrotide in enhancing cytokine-induced hematopoietic mobilization in rhesus monkeys. Animals received recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF, 100 microg/kg/day SC for 5 days) and, after a 4- to 6-week washout period, were remobilized with defibrotide (15 mg/kg/hour continuous intravenous for 5 days) plus rhG-CSF. Hematopoietic mobilization was evaluated by complete blood counts, differential counts, as well as frequency and absolute numbers of colony-forming cells (CFCs), high-proliferative potential CFCs (HPP-CFCs), and long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs). Compared to baseline values, rhG-CSF increased circulating CFCs, HPP-CFCs, and LTC-ICs by 158-, 125-, and 67-fold, respectively; the same figures for defibrotide/rhG-CSF were 299-, 1452-, and 295-fold, respectively. Defibrotide/rhG-CSF treatment compared to rhG-CSF alone increased CFCs, HPP-CFCs, and LTC-ICs by 1.4- (35,089 vs 25,825, pdefibrotide treatment associated with a 5-day rhG-CSF treatment. Compared to rhG-CSF, defibrotide/rhG-CSF increased the mobilization of CFCs, HPP-CFCs, and LTC-ICs by 2- (31,128 vs 15,527, pdefibrotide enhances rhG-CSF-elicited mobilization of primitive and committed progenitors; and 2) a 2-day defibrotide injection is as effective as a 5-day injection.

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and leukemogenesis

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    Lorena Lobo de Figueiredo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF plays an important role in normal granulopoiesis. Its functions are mediated by specific receptors on the surface of responsive cells and, upon ligand binding, several cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases are activated. The cytoplasmic region proximal to the membrane of the G-CSF receptor (G-CSF-R transduces proliferative and survival signals, whereas the distal carboxy-terminal region transduces maturation signals and suppresses the receptor's proliferative signals. Mutations in the G-CSF-R gene resulting in truncation of the carboxy-terminal region have been detected in a subset of patients with severe congenital neutropenia who developed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. In addition, the AML1-ETO fusion protein, expressed in leukemic cells harboring the t(8;21, disrupt the physiological function of transcription factors such as C/EBPα and C/EBPε, which in turn deregulate G-CSF-R expression. The resulting high levels of G-CSF-R and G-CSF-dependent cell proliferation may be associated with pathogenesis of AML with t(8;21. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that G-CSF may act as a co-stimulus augmenting the response of PML-RARα acute promyelocytic leukemia cells to all-trans-retinoic acid treatment. Finally, in the PLZF-RARα acute promyelocytic leukemia transgenic model, G-CSF deficiency suppressed leukemia development. Altogether, these data suggest that the G-CSF signaling pathway may play a role in leukemogenesis.

  9. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for hematopoietic stem cell donation from healthy female donors during pregnancy and lactation: what do we know?

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    Pessach, Ilias; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) are mostly used as supportive measures to reduce infectious complications associated with neutropenia. Over the past decade, the use of HGFs became a common method for mobilizing human CD34+ stem cells, either for autologous or allogeneic transplantation. However, since their introduction the long-term safety of the procedure has become a major focus of discussion and research. Most information refers to healthy normal donors and data concerning pregnant and lactating women are scarce. The clinical question, which is the core of this review, is whether stem cell donation, preceded by administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization, is a safe procedure for pregnant donors. METHODS Literature searches were performed in Pubmed for English language articles published before the end of May 2012, focusing on G-CSF administration during pregnancy, lactation and hematopoietic stem cell donation. Searches included animal and human studies. RESULTS Data from animals (n = 15 studies) and women (n = 46 studies) indicate that G-CSF crosses the placenta, stimulates fetal granulopoiesis, improves neonatal survival mostly for very immature infants, promotes trophoblast growth and placental metabolism and has an anti-abortive role. Granulocyte macrophage-CSF is a key cytokine in the maternal immune tolerance towards the implanted embryo and exerts protective long-term programming effects to preimplantation embryos. The available data suggest that probably CSFs should not be administered during the time of most active organogenesis (first trimester), except perhaps for the first week during which implantation takes place. Provided CSF is administered during the second and third trimesters, it appears to be safe, and pregnant women receiving the CSF treatment can become hematopoietic stem cell donors. There are also risks related to the anesthesia, which is required for the bone marrow aspiration. During

  10. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells with granulocyte colony stimulating factors for autologous transplant in hematologic malignancies: a single center experience

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    Gabús, Raul; Borelli, Gabriel; Ferrando, Martín; Bódega, Enrique; Citrín, Estela; Jiménez, Constanza Olivera; Álvarez, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2006 the Hematology Service of Hospital Maciel published its experience with peripheral blood progenitor cell harvesting for autologous stem cell transplantation using Filgen JP (Clausen Filgrastim). After mobilization with a mean filgrastim dose of 78 mcg/Kg, 4.7 x 106 CD34+ cells/Kg were obtained by apheresis. Age above 50, multiple myeloma as underlying disease and a malignancy that was not in remission were identified as frequent characteristics among patients showing complex mobilization. Objective The aim of this study was to compare stem cell mobilization using different brands of filgrastim. Methods One hundred and fifty-seven mobilizations performed between 1997 and 2006 were analyzed. This retrospective analysis comparative two groups of patients: those mobilized with different brands of filgrastim (Group A) and those who received Filgen JP (Clausen Filgrastim) as mobilizing agent (Group B). A cluster analysis technique was used to identify four clusters of individuals with different behaviors differentiated by age, total dose of filgrastim required, number of apheresis and harvested CD34+ cells. Results The mean total dose of filgrastim administered was 105 mcg/Kg, the median number of apheresis was 2 procedures and the mean number of harvested stem cells was 4.98 x 106 CD34+ cells/Kg. No significant differences were observed between Groups A and B regarding the number of apheresis, harvested CD34+ cells and number of mobilization failures, however the total dose of filgrastim was significantly lower in Group B. Conclusions Among other factors, the origin of the cytokine used as mobilizing agent is an element to be considered when evaluating CD34+ cell mobilization results. PMID:23049356

  11. The Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor has a dual role in neuronal and vascular plasticity

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    Stephanie eWallner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is a growth factor that has originally been identified several decades ago as a hematopoietic factor required mainly for the generation of neutrophilic granulocytes, and is in clinical use for that. More recently, it has been discovered that G-CSF also plays a role in the brain as a growth factor for neurons and neural stem cells, and as a factor involved in the plasticity of the vasculature. We review and discuss these dual properties in view of the neuroregenerative potential of this growth factor.

  12. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-primed, delayed marrow harvests as a source of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells for allogeneic transplantation.

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    Phillips, G L; Davey, D D; Hale, G A; Marshall, K W; Munn, R K; Nath, R; Reece, D E; Van Zant, G

    1999-10-01

    We evaluated the ability of G-CSF to increase the number of hematopoietic stem cells obtained by "delayed" BM harvest for allogeneic transplantation. Five normal donors received G-CSF @ 10 mcg/kg/day x 5 followed by repeat PB and BM assays at day 6 and 16, and BM harvest at day 16. Stem cells were not increased in the BM at day 16. Five patients underwent BMT and engrafted at +10 to +19 days. While the tested strategy offers no intrinsic advantages, its potential cannot be evaluated fully without alternative timing and/or additional, "early acting" growth factors.

  13. Studies on mechanism of treatment of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, recombinant human interleukin-11 and recombinant human interleukin-2 on hematopoietic injuries induced by 4.5 Gy γ-rays irradiation in beagles

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    Li Ming; Ou Hongling; Xing Shuang; Huang Haixiao; Xiong Guolin; Xie Ling; Zhao Yanfang; Zhao Zhenhu; Wang Ning; Wang Jinxiang; Miao Jingcheng; Zhu Nankang; Luo Qingliang; Cong Yuwen; Zhang Xueguang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of treatment of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF), recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11) and recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) on hematopoietic injuries induced by 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray irradiation in beagles, and to provide experimental evidence for the clinical treatment of extremely severe myeloid acute radiation sickness (ARS). Methods: Sixteen beagle dogs were given 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray total body irradiation (TBI), then randomly assigned into irradiation control group, supportive care group or cytokines + supportive care (abbreviated as cytokines) group. In addition to supportive care, rhG-CSF, rhIL-11 and rhIL-2 were administered subcutaneously to treat dogs in cytokines group. The percentage of CD34 + cells, cell cycle and apoptosis of nucleated cells in peripheral blood were examined by Flow cytometry. Results: After 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray irradiation, the CD34 + cells in peripheral blood declined obviously (61.3% and 52.1% of baseline for irradiation control and supportive care group separately). The cell proportion of nucleated cells in G 0 /G 1 phase was increased notably notably (99.27% and 99.49% respectively). The rate of apoptosis (26.93% and 21.29% separately) and necrosis (3.27% and 4.14%, respectively) of nucleated cells were elevated significantly when compared with values before irradiation (P 0 /G 1 phase blockage of nucleated cells became more serious (99.71%). The rate of apoptosis (5.66%) and necrosis (1.60%) of nucleated cells were significantly lower than that of irradiation control and supportive care groups 1 d after exposure. Conclusions: Cytokines maybe mobilize CD34 + cells in bone marrow to peripheral blood, indce cell block at G 0 /G 1 phase and reduce apoptosis, and eventually cure hematopoietic injuries induced by irradiation. (authors)

  14. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor induces in vitro lymphangiogenesis

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    Lee, Ae Sin; Kim, Dal; Wagle, Susbin Raj; Lee, Jung Eun; Jung, Yu Jin; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Won

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •G-CSF induces tube formation, migration and proliferation of lymphatic cells. •G-CSF increases phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in lymphatic endothelial cells. •MAPK and Akt pathways are linked to G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis. •G-CSF increases sprouting of a lymphatic ring. •G-CSF produces peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. -- Abstract: Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is reported to induce differentiation in cells of the monocyte lineage and angiogenesis in vascular endothelial cells, but its effects on lymphangiogenesis is uncertain. Here we examined the effects and the mechanisms of G-CSF-induced lymphangiogenesis using human lymphatic endothelial cells (hLECs). Our results showed that G-CSF induced capillary-like tube formation, migration and proliferation of hLECs in a dose- and time-dependent manner and enhanced sprouting of thoracic duct. G-CSF increased phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in hLECs. Supporting the observations, specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase and MAPK suppressed the G-CSF-induced in vitro lymphangiogenesis and sprouting. Intraperitoneal administration of G-CSF to mice also stimulated peritoneal lymphangiogenesis. These findings suggest that G-CSF is a lymphangiogenic factor

  15. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor protects mice during respiratory virus infections.

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    Tamar Hermesh

    Full Text Available A burst in the production of pro-inflammatory molecules characterizes the beginning of the host response to infection. Cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors work in concert to control pathogen replication and activate innate and adaptive immune responses. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF mobilizes and activates hematopoietic cells from the bone marrow, and it has been shown to mediate the generation of effective immunity against bacterial and fungal infections. G-CSF is produced at high levels in the lungs during infection with influenza and parainfluenza viruses, but its role during these infections is unknown. Here we show that during infection of mice with a non-lethal dose of influenza or Sendai virus, G-CSF promotes the accumulation of activated Ly6G+ granulocytes that control the extent of the lung pro-inflammatory response. Remarkably, these G-CSF-mediated effects facilitate viral clearance and sustain mouse survival.

  16. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome: A Concise Review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Komůrková, Denisa; Hoferová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2014), s. 4770-4778 ISSN 1420-3049 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0128 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : granulocyte colony-stimulating factor * radiation accident s * acute radiation syndrome Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.416, year: 2014

  17. Expression of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor correlates with prognosis in oral and mesopharyngeal carcinoma.

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    Tsuzuki, H; Fujieda, S; Sunaga, H; Noda, I; Saito, H

    1998-02-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptors (G-CSFRs) have been observed on the surface of not only hematopoietic cells but also several cancer cells. The stimulation of G-CSF has been demonstrated to induce proliferation and activation of G-CSFR-positive cells. In this study, we investigated the expression of G-CSFR on the surface of tumor cells and G-CSF production in oral and mesopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) by an immunohistochemical approach. Of 58 oral and mesopharyngeal SCCs, 31 cases (53.4%) and 36 cases (62.1%) were positive for G-CSFR and G-CSF, respectively. There was no association between G-CSFR expression and G-CSF staining. In the group positive for G-CSFR expression, relapse was significantly more likely after primary treatment (P = 0.0069), whereas there was no association between G-CSFR expression and age, sex, tumor size, lymph node metastasis, and clinical stage. Also, the G-CSFR-positive groups had a significantly lower disease-free and overall survival rate than the G-CSFR-negative groups (P = 0.0172 and 0.0188, respectively). However, none of the clinical markers correlated significantly with G-CSF staining, nor did the status of G-CSF production influence the overall survival. The results imply that assessment of G-CSFR may prove valuable in selecting patients with oral and mesopharyngeal SCC for aggressive therapy.

  18. Regulation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor-mediated granulocytic differentiation by C-mannosylation.

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    Otani, Kei; Niwa, Yuki; Suzuki, Takehiro; Sato, Natsumi; Sasazawa, Yukiko; Dohmae, Naoshi; Simizu, Siro

    2018-04-06

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor (G-CSFR) is a type I cytokine receptor which is involved in hematopoietic cell maturation. G-CSFR has three putative C-mannosylation sites at W253, W318, and W446; however, it is not elucidated whether G-CSFR is C-mannosylated or not. In this study, we first demonstrated that G-CSFR was C-mannosylated at only W318. We also revealed that C-mannosylation of G-CSFR affects G-CSF-dependent downstream signaling through changing ligand binding capability but not cell surface localization. Moreover, C-mannosylation of G-CSFR was functional and regulated granulocytic differentiation in myeloid 32D cells. In conclusion, we found that G-CSFR is C-mannosylated at W318 and that this C-mannosylation has role(s) for myeloid cell differentiation through regulating downstream signaling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilizes functional endothelial progenitor cells in patients with coronary artery disease.

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    Powell, Tiffany M; Paul, Jonathan D; Hill, Jonathan M; Thompson, Michael; Benjamin, Moshe; Rodrigo, Maria; McCoy, J Philip; Read, Elizabeth J; Khuu, Hanh M; Leitman, Susan F; Finkel, Toren; Cannon, Richard O

    2005-02-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) that may repair vascular injury are reduced in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We reasoned that EPC number and function may be increased by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) used to mobilize hematopoietic progenitor cells in healthy donors. Sixteen CAD patients had reduced CD34(+)/CD133(+) (0.0224+/-0.0063% versus 0.121+/-0.038% mononuclear cells [MNCs], P<0.01) and CD133(+)/VEGFR-2(+) cells, consistent with EPC phenotype (0.00033+/-0.00015% versus 0.0017+/-0.0006% MNCs, P<0.01), compared with 7 healthy controls. Patients also had fewer clusters of cells in culture, with out-growth consistent with mature endothelial phenotype (2+/-1/well) compared with 16 healthy subjects at high risk (13+/-4/well, P<0.05) or 14 at low risk (22+/-3/well, P<0.001) for CAD. G-CSF 10 microg/kg per day for 5 days increased CD34(+)/CD133(+) cells from 0.5+/-0.2/microL to 59.5+/-10.6/microL and CD133(+)/ VEGFR-2(+) cells from 0.007+/-0.004/microL to 1.9+/-0.6/microL (both P<0.001). Also increased were CD133(+) cells that coexpressed the homing receptor CXCR4 (30.4+/-8.3/microL, P<0.05). Endothelial cell-forming clusters in 10 patients increased to 27+/-9/well after treatment (P<0.05), with a decline to 9+/-4/well at 2 weeks (P=0.06). Despite reduced EPCs compared with healthy controls, patients with CAD respond to G-CSF with increases in EPC number and homing receptor expression in the circulation and endothelial out-growth in culture. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are reduced in coronary artery disease. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF) administered to patients increased: (1) CD133+/VEGFR-2+ cells consistent with EPC phenotype; (2) CD133+ cells coexpressing the chemokine receptor CXCR4, important for homing of EPCs to ischemic tissue; and (3) endothelial cell-forming clusters in culture. Whether EPCs mobilized into the circulation will be useful for the purpose of initiating vascular growth and myocyte repair

  20. Selective binding and oligomerization of the murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor by a low molecular weight, nonpeptidyl ligand.

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    Doyle, Michael L; Tian, Shin-Shay; Miller, Stephen G; Kessler, Linda; Baker, Audrey E; Brigham-Burke, Michael R; Dillon, Susan B; Duffy, Kevin J; Keenan, Richard M; Lehr, Ruth; Rosen, Jon; Schneeweis, Lumelle A; Trill, John; Young, Peter R; Luengo, Juan I; Lamb, Peter

    2003-03-14

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor regulates neutrophil production by binding to a specific receptor, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor, expressed on cells of the granulocytic lineage. Recombinant forms of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor are used clinically to treat neutropenias. As part of an effort to develop granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mimics with the potential for oral bioavailability, we previously identified a nonpeptidyl small molecule (SB-247464) that selectively activates murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor signal transduction pathways and promotes neutrophil formation in vivo. To elucidate the mechanism of action of SB-247464, a series of cell-based and biochemical assays were performed. The activity of SB-247464 is strictly dependent on the presence of zinc ions. Titration microcalorimetry experiments using a soluble murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor construct show that SB-247464 binds to the extracellular domain of the receptor in a zinc ion-dependent manner. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies demonstrate that SB-247464 induces self-association of the N-terminal three-domain fragment in a manner that is consistent with dimerization. SB-247464 induces internalization of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor on intact cells, consistent with a mechanism involving receptor oligomerization. These data show that small nonpeptidyl compounds are capable of selectively binding and inducing productive oligomerization of cytokine receptors.

  1. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor attenuates inflammation in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

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    Giniatullina Raisa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF is protective in animal models of various neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated whether pegfilgrastim, GCSF with sustained action, is protective in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with manifestations of upper and lower motoneuron death and muscle atrophy accompanied by inflammation in the CNS and periphery. Methods Human mutant G93A superoxide dismutase (SOD1 ALS mice were treated with pegfilgrastim starting at the presymptomatic stage and continued until the end stage. After long-term pegfilgrastim treatment, the inflammation status was defined in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues including hematopoietic organs and muscle. The effect of GCSF on spinal cord neuron survival and microglia, bone marrow and spleen monocyte activation was assessed in vitro. Results Long-term pegfilgrastim treatment prolonged mutant SOD1 mice survival and attenuated both astro- and microgliosis in the spinal cord. Pegfilgrastim in SOD1 mice modulated the inflammatory cell populations in the bone marrow and spleen and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine in monocytes and microglia. The mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the circulation was restored back to basal level after long-term pegfilgrastim treatment in SOD1 mice while the storage of Ly6C expressing monocytes in the bone marrow and spleen remained elevated. After pegfilgrastim treatment, an increased proportion of these cells in the degenerative muscle was detected at the end stage of ALS. Conclusions GCSF attenuated inflammation in the CNS and the periphery in a mouse model of ALS and thereby delayed the progression of the disease. This mechanism of action targeting inflammation provides a new perspective of the usage of GCSF in the treatment of ALS.

  2. Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (hG-CSF) Expression in Plastids of Lactuca sativa

    OpenAIRE

    Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Habashi, Ali Akbar; Rajabi Memari, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) can serve as valuable biopharmaceutical for research and treatment of the human blood cancer. Transplastomic plants have been emerged as a new and high potential candidate for production of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins in comparison with transgenic plants due to extremely high level expression, biosafety and many other advantages. Methods: hG-CSF gene was cloned into pCL vector between prrn16S promoter and TpsbA ter...

  3. Recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administered enterally to neonates is not absorbed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Darlene A; Maheshwari, Akhil; Christensen, Robert D

    2003-08-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is present in liquids swallowed by the fetus and neonate; specifically, amniotic fluid, colostrum, and human milk. The swallowed G-CSF has local effects on enteric cells, which express the G-CSF receptor. However, some portion of the G-CSF ingested by the fetus and neonate might be absorbed into the circulation and have systemic actions, such as stimulating neutrophil production. To assess this possibility we sought to determine if circulating G-CSF concentrations of neonates increase after enteral administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). This was a single-center, prospective, blinded, randomized, 2 x 2 crossover study, with each infant receiving 1 dose of rhG-CSF (100 microg/kg) and 1 dose of placebo. Plasma G-CSF concentrations were measured at 2 and 4 hours after administration of the test solution. No significant change in plasma G-CSF concentration was observed after the enteral administration of rhG-CSF. On this basis, we conclude that orally administered rhG-CSF is not absorbed in significant quantities, and we speculate that the G-CSF swallowed by the fetus and neonate has local but not systemic effects.

  4. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome: A Concise Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Hofer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article concisely summarizes data on the action of one of the principal and best known growth factors, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, in a mammalian organism exposed to radiation doses inducing acute radiation syndrome. Highlighted are the topics of its real or anticipated use in radiation accident victims, the timing of its administration, the possibilities of combining G-CSF with other drugs, the ability of other agents to stimulate endogenous G-CSF production, as well as of the capability of this growth factor to ameliorate not only the bone marrow radiation syndrome but also the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome. G-CSF is one of the pivotal drugs in the treatment of radiation accident victims and its employment in this indication can be expected to remain or even grow in the future.

  5. Highly Expressed Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Receptor (G-CSFR) in Human Gastric Cancer Leads to Poor Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhisong; Li, Yong; Zhao, Qun; Fan, Liqiao; Tan, Bibo; Zuo, Jing; Hua, Kelei; Ji, Qiang

    2018-03-23

    BACKGROUND Chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer (GC) patients has been the mainstay of therapy for many years. Although adding anti-angiogenic drugs to chemotherapy improves patient survival slightly, identifying anti-angiogenic therapy-sensitive patients remains challenging for oncologists. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis, which can be minimized with the anti-G-CSF antibody. Thus, G-CSF might be a potential tumor marker. However, the effects of G-CSF and G-CSFR expression on GC patient survival remain unclear. MATERIAL AND METHODS Seventy GC tissue samples were collected for G-CSF and G-CSFR detection by immunohistochemistry. A total of 40 paired GC tissues and matched adjacent mucosa were used to measure the G-CSF and G-CSFR levels by ELISA. Correlations between G-CSF/G-CSFR and clinical characteristics, VEGF-A levels and overall survival were analyzed. Biological function and underlying mechanistic investigations were carried out using SGC7901 cell lines, and the effects of G-CSF on tumor proliferation, migration, and tube formation were examined. RESULTS The levels of G-CSFR were upregulated in GC tissues compared to normal mucosa tissues. Higher G-CSF expression was associated with later tumor stages and higher tumor VEGF-A and serum CA724 levels, whereas higher G-CSFR expression was associated with lymph node metastasis. Patients with higher G-CSF expression had shorter overall survival times. In vitro, G-CSF stimulated SGC7901 proliferation and migration through the JAK2/STAT3 pathway and accelerated HUVEC tube formation. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that increased G-CSF and G-CSFR in tumors leads to unfavorable outcomes for GC patients by stimulating tumor proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis, indicating that these factors are potential tumor targets for cancer treatment.

  6. Structural insights into the backbone-circularized granulocyte colony-stimulating factor containing a short connector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyafusa, Takamitsu; Shibuya, Risa; Honda, Shinya

    2018-06-02

    Backbone circularization is a powerful approach for enhancing the structural stability of polypeptides. Herein, we present the crystal structure of the circularized variant of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in which the terminal helical region was circularized using a short, two-amino acid connector. The structure revealed that the N- and C-termini were indeed connected by a peptide bond. The local structure of the C-terminal region transited from an α helix to 3 10 helix with a bend close to the N-terminal region, indicating that the structural change offset the insufficient length of the connector. This is the first-ever report of a crystal structure of the backbone of a circularized protein. It will facilitate the development of backbone circularization methodology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hematologic improvement in dogs with parvovirus infection treated with recombinant canine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, A; Dow, S; Ogilvie, G; Rao, S; Hackett, T

    2010-08-01

    Previously, dogs with canine parvovirus-induced neutropenia have not responded to treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). However, recombinant canine G-CSF (rcG-CSF) has not been previously evaluated for treatment of parvovirus-induced neutropenia in dogs. We assessed the effectiveness of rcG-CSF in dogs with parvovirus-induced neutropenia with a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized clinical trial. Endpoints of our study were time to recovery of WBC and neutrophil counts, and duration of hospitalization. 28 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia were treated with rcG-CSF and outcomes were compared to those of 34 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia not treated with rcG-CSF. We found that mean WBC and neutrophil counts were significantly higher (P parvovirus infection, but indicate the need for additional studies to evaluate overall safety of the treatment.

  8. The effect of long-term treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on hematopoiesis in HIV-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Sørensen, T U; Aladdin, H

    2000-01-01

    This randomized, placebo-controlled trial examine the long-term effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on absolute numbers of CD34+ progenitor cells and progenitor cell function in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. G-CSF (300 microg filgrastim) or placebo was ...

  9. Aggressive cutaneous vasculitis in a patient with chronic lymphatic leukemia following granulocyte colony stimulating factor injection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Husseiny Noha M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Vasculitis has been reported in a few cases of chronic lymphatic leukemia and with granulocytic colony-stimulating factor therapy. Those with granulocytic colony-stimulating factor occurred after prolonged therapy and there was a rise in total leukocyte count unlike that in our patient who received just a single injection for the first time. Case presentation We report the case of a 64-year-old Egyptian man with chronic lymphatic leukemia who developed progressive cutaneous vasculitic lesions following injection of a single dose of a granulocytic colony stimulating factor before a third cycle of chemotherapy to improve neutropenia. This is an unusual case and the pathogenesis is not fully understood. Our patient was not on any medical treatment except for bisoprolol for ischemic heart disease. Although aggressive management with steroids, anticoagulation and plasmapheresis had been carried out, the condition was aggressive and the patient's consciousness deteriorated. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of his brain revealed multiple ischemic foci that could be attributed to vasculitis of the brain. Conclusion The aim of this case report is to highlight the importance of monitoring patients on granulocytic colony-stimulating factor therapy, especially in the context of other conditions (such as a hematological malignancy that may lead to an adverse outcome.

  10. CHOP compared with CHOP plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorduijn, JK; van der Holt, B; van Imhoff, GW; van der Hem, KG; Kramer, MHH; van Oers, MHJ; Ossenkoppele, GJ; Verdonck, LF; Verhoef, GEG; Steijaert, MMC; Buijt, I.; Uyl-de Groot, CA; van Agthoven, M; Mulder, AH; Sonneveld, P; Schaafsma, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose : To investigate whether the relative close-intensity of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy could be improved by prophylactic administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

  11. CHOP compared with CHOP plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorduijn, J. K.; van der Holt, B.; van Imhoff, G. W.; van der Hem, K. G.; Kramer, M. H. H.; van Oers, M. H. J.; Ossenkoppele, G. J.; Schaafsma, M. R.; Verdonck, L. F.; Verhoef, G. E. G.; Steijaert, M. M. C.; Buijt, I.; Uyl-de Groot, C. A.; van Agthoven, M.; Mulder, A. H.; Sonneveld, P.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether the relative dose-intensity of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy could be improved by prophylactic administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

  12. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF; filgrastim) treatment of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H

    1993-01-01

    After 10 weeks of treatment with clozapine, severe agranulocytosis was diagnosed in a 33-year-old female. The patient was treated with filgrastim (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [G-CSF]) 5 micrograms kg-1 day-1. The neutrophil count was 0.234 x 10(9) l-1 on admission, with a further decrease...

  13. Stem cell mobilization by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for myocardial recovery after acute myocardial infarction: a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zohlnhofer, D.; Dibra, A.; Koppara, T.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of stem cell mobilization by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on myocardial regeneration on the basis of a synthesis of the data generated by randomized, controlled clinical trials of G-CSF after acute...

  14. Engineering a pharmacologically superior form of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor by fusion with gelatin-like-protein polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Shan; Wen, Xiao-Fang; Wu, Yi-Liang; Wang, Ye-Fei; Fan, Min; Yang, Zhi-Yu; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Lin-Fu

    2010-03-01

    The plasma half-life of therapeutic proteins is a critical factor in many clinical applications. Therefore, new strategies to prolong plasma half-life of long-acting peptides and protein drugs are in high demand. Here, we designed an artificial gelatin-like protein (GLK) and fused this hydrophilic GLK polymer to granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to generate a chimeric GLK/G-CSF fusion protein. The genetically engineered recombinant GLK/G-CSF (rGLK/G-CSF) fusion protein was purified from Pichia pastoris. In vitro studies demonstrated that rGLK/G-CSF possessed an enlarged hydrodynamic radius, improved thermal stability and retained full bioactivity compared to unfused G-CSF. Following a single subcutaneous administration to rats, the rGLK/G-CSF fusion protein displayed a slower plasma clearance rate and stimulated greater and longer lasting increases in circulating white blood cells than G-CSF. Our findings indicate that fusion with this artificial, hydrophilic, GLK polymer provides many advantages in the construction of a potent hematopoietic factor with extended plasma half-life. This approach could be easily applied to other therapeutic proteins and have important clinical applications. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Intranasal Delivery of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Its Neuroprotective Effects Against Ischemic Brain Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bao-Liang; He, Mei-Qing; Han, Xiang-Yu; Sun, Jing-Yi; Yang, Ming-Feng; Yuan, Hui; Fan, Cun-Dong; Zhang, Shuai; Mao, Lei-Lei; Li, Da-Wei; Zhang, Zong-Yong; Zheng, Cheng-Bi; Yang, Xiao-Yi; Li, Yang V; Stetler, R Anne; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor with strong neuroprotective properties. However, it has limited capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier and thus potentially limiting its protective capacity. Recent studies demonstrated that intranasal drug administration is a promising way in delivering neuroprotective agents to the central nervous system. The current study therefore aimed at determining whether intranasal administration of G-CSF increases its delivery to the brain and its neuroprotective effect against ischemic brain injury. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in rat was induced with middle cerebral artery occlusion. Our resulted showed that intranasal administration is 8-12 times more effective than subcutaneous injection in delivering G-CSF to cerebrospinal fluid and brain parenchyma. Intranasal delivery enhanced the protective effects of G-CSF against ischemic injury in rats, indicated by decreased infarct volume and increased recovery of neurological function. The neuroprotective mechanisms of G-CSF involved enhanced upregulation of HO-1 and reduced calcium overload following ischemia. Intranasal G-CSF application also promoted angiogenesis and neurogenesis following brain ischemia. Taken together, G-CSF is a legitimate neuroprotective agent and intranasal administration of G-CSF is more effective in delivery and neuroprotection and could be a practical approach in clinic.

  16. Prevention of myelosuppression by combined treatment with enterosorbent and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, O O; Posokhova, К А; Todor, I N; Lukianova, N Yu; Nikolaev, V G; Chekhun, V F

    2015-06-01

    Hematotoxicity and its complication are the prominent limiting factors for rational treatment of malignancies. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used to increase granulocyte production. It has been shown previously that enterosorption causes prominent myeloprotective activity also. Still, no trial was performed to combine both of them. To study the influence of combination of enterosorption and pharmaceutical analogue of naturally occurring G-CSF (filgrastim) on bone marrow protection and the growth of grafted tumor in a case of injection of melphalan (Mel). Mel injections were used for promotion of bone marrow suppression in rats. Carbon granulated enterosorbent C2 (IEPOR) was used for providing of enteral sorption detoxifying therapy. Filgrastim was used to increase white blood cells (WBC) count. The simultaneous usage of enterosorption and filgrastim had maximum effectiveness for restoring of all types of blood cells. WBC count was higher by 138.3% compared with the Mel group. The increase of platelets count by 98.5% was also observed. In the group (Mel + C2 + filgrastim) the absolute neutrophils count was twofold higher, in comparison with rats of Mel group. Simultaneous administration of G-CSF-analogue and carbonic enterosorbent C2 is a perspective approach for bone marrow protection, when the cytostatic drug melphalan is used. Such combination demonstrates prominent positive impact on restoring of all types of blood cells and had no influence on the antitumor efficacy.

  17. Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) expression in plastids of Lactuca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Habashi, Ali Akbar; Rajabi Memari, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) can serve as valuable biopharmaceutical for research and treatment of the human blood cancer. Transplastomic plants have been emerged as a new and high potential candidate for production of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins in comparison with transgenic plants due to extremely high level expression, biosafety and many other advantages. hG-CSF gene was cloned into pCL vector between prrn16S promoter and TpsbA terminator. The recombinant vector was coated on nanogold particles and transformed to lettuce chloroplasts through biolistic method. Callogenesis and regeneration of cotyledonary explants were obtained by Murashige and Skoog media containing 6-benzylaminopurine and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid hormones. The presence of hG-CSF gene in plastome was studied with four specific PCR primers and expression by Western immunoblotting. hG-CSF gene cloning was confirmed by digestion and sequencing. Transplastomic lettuce lines were regenerated and subjected to molecular analysis. The presence of hG-CSF in plastome was confirmed by PCR using specific primers designed from the plastid genome. Western immunoblotting of extracted protein from transplastomic plants showed a 20-kDa band, which verified the expression of recombinant protein in lettuce chloroplasts. This study is the first report that successfully express hG-CSF gene in lettuce chloroplast. The lettuce plastome can provide a cheap and safe expression platform for producing valuable biopharmaceuticals for research and treatment.

  18. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor controls neural and behavioral plasticity in response to cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calipari, Erin S; Godino, Arthur; Peck, Emily G; Salery, Marine; Mervosh, Nicholas L; Landry, Joseph A; Russo, Scott J; Hurd, Yasmin L; Nestler, Eric J; Kiraly, Drew D

    2018-01-16

    Cocaine addiction is characterized by dysfunction in reward-related brain circuits, leading to maladaptive motivation to seek and take the drug. There are currently no clinically available pharmacotherapies to treat cocaine addiction. Through a broad screen of innate immune mediators, we identify granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) as a potent mediator of cocaine-induced adaptations. Here we report that G-CSF potentiates cocaine-induced increases in neural activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex. In addition, G-CSF injections potentiate cocaine place preference and enhance motivation to self-administer cocaine, while not affecting responses to natural rewards. Infusion of G-CSF neutralizing antibody into NAc blocks the ability of G-CSF to modulate cocaine's behavioral effects, providing a direct link between central G-CSF action in NAc and cocaine reward. These results demonstrate that manipulating G-CSF is sufficient to alter the motivation for cocaine, but not natural rewards, providing a pharmacotherapeutic avenue to manipulate addictive behaviors without abuse potential.

  19. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exacerbate radiation-induced acute lung injury in rats?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Gouji; Awaya, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2000-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) frequently occurs as a complication of thoracic irradiation. However, the mechanism of RP is not well known. Activated neutrophils are a possible pathogenesis of RP. Neutrophil activation induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may exacerbate RP. We studied the effects of recombinant human G-CSF on acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation using rats. Animals were divided into three groups: sham irradiation with saline control, irradiation alone, and irradiation with G-CSF. Actual irradiation was given as a single fraction of 16 Gy delivered to the right hemithorax. G-CSF at a dose of 12 μg/body was administered subcutaneously once a day from 14 to 18 days after actual irradiation. Lung injury was evaluated 21 days after irradiation by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid findings and the lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in BAL fluid and the W/D ratio were significantly increased in the irradiation alone and the irradiation with G-CSF groups compared with those of the sham irradiation+saline control group. However, there was no significant difference observed between the irradiation alone and irradiation with G-CSF groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that postradiation administration of G-CSF does not exacerbate acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation in rats. (author)

  20. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose splenic uptake from extramedullary hematopoiesis after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Dayem, H M; Rosen, G; El-Zeftawy, H; Naddaf, S; Kumar, M; Atay, S; Cacavio, A

    1999-05-01

    Two patients with sarcoma, one with recurrent osteosarcoma of the spine and the other with metastatic synovial cell sarcoma, were treated with high-dose chemotherapy that produced severe leukopenia. The patients received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to stimulate the bone marrow (480 mg given subcutaneously twice daily for 5 to 7 days); their responses were seen as a marked increase in peripheral leukocyte count with no change in the erythrocyte or platelet counts. The patients had fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) imaging 24 hours after the end of G-CSF treatment. Diffusely increased uptake of F-18 FDG was seen in the bone marrow in both patients. In addition, markedly increased uptake in the spleen was noted in both, indicating that the spleen was the site of extramedullary hematopoiesis. The patients had no evidence of splenic metastases. The first patient had a history of irradiation to the dorsal spine, which was less responsive to G-CSF administration than was the nonirradiated lumbar spine.

  1. Structural analysis of the receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanazono, Y.; Hosoi, T.; Kuwaki, T.; Matsuki, S.; Miyazono, K.; Miyagawa, K.; Takaku, F.

    1990-01-01

    We investigated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptors on neutrophils from three patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase, in comparison with four normal volunteers. Because we experienced some difficulties in radioiodinating intact recombinant human G-CSF, we developed a new derivative of human G-CSF termed YPY-G-CSF. It was easy to iodinate this protein using the lactoperoxidase method because of two additional tyrosine residues, and its radioactivity was higher than that previously reported. The biological activity of YPY-G-CSF as G-CSF was fully retained. Scatchard analysis demonstrated that CML neutrophils had a single class of binding sites (1400 +/- 685/cell) with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 245 +/- 66 pM. The number of sites and Kd value of CML neutrophils were not significantly different from those of normal neutrophils (p greater than 0.9). Cross-linking studies revealed two specifically labeled bands of [125I]YPY-G-CSF-receptor complexes with apparent molecular masses of 160 and 110 kd on both normal and CML neutrophils. This is the first report describing two receptor proteins on neutrophils. According to the analyses of the proteolytic process of these cross-linked complexes and proteolytic mapping, we assume that alternative splicing or processing from a single gene may generate two distinct receptor proteins that bind specifically to G-CSF but have different fates in intracellular metabolism

  2. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exacerbate radiation-induced acute lung injury in rats?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Gouji; Awaya, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) frequently occurs as a complication of thoracic irradiation. However, the mechanism of RP is not well known. Activated neutrophils are a possible pathogenesis of RP. Neutrophil activation induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may exacerbate RP. We studied the effects of recombinant human G-CSF on acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation using rats. Animals were divided into three groups: sham irradiation with saline control, irradiation alone, and irradiation with G-CSF. Actual irradiation was given as a single fraction of 16 Gy delivered to the right hemithorax. G-CSF at a dose of 12 {mu}g/body was administered subcutaneously once a day from 14 to 18 days after actual irradiation. Lung injury was evaluated 21 days after irradiation by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid findings and the lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in BAL fluid and the W/D ratio were significantly increased in the irradiation alone and the irradiation with G-CSF groups compared with those of the sham irradiation+saline control group. However, there was no significant difference observed between the irradiation alone and irradiation with G-CSF groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that postradiation administration of G-CSF does not exacerbate acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation in rats. (author)

  3. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) for stroke: an individual patient data meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    England, Timothy J.; Sprigg, Nikola; Alasheev, Andrey M.; Belkin, Andrey A.; Kumar, Amit; Prasad, Kameshwar; Bath, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may enhance recovery from stroke through neuroprotective mechanisms if administered early, or neurorepair if given later. Several small trials suggest administration is safe but effects on efficacy are unclear. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCT) assessing G-CSF in patients with hyperacute, acute, subacute or chronic stroke, and asked Investigators to share individual patient data on baseline characteristics, stroke severity and typ...

  4. Timing of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor treatment after acute myocardial infarction and recovery of left ventricular function: results from the STEMMI trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Mikkel; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Wang, Yongzhong

    2010-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have not demonstrated impact on systolic recovery compared to placebo. However, recent studies suggest that timing of G-CSF therapy is crucial.......Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have not demonstrated impact on systolic recovery compared to placebo. However, recent studies suggest that timing of G-CSF therapy is crucial....

  5. Myeloprotective Action of Combined Application of Ukrainian Recombinant Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (r-GCSF and Enterosorbent С2 in Rats with Malignant Guerin Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor, I.M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to analyze myeloprotective effect of novel enterosorbents alone and in combination with two recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating factors: Neupogen (Switzerland and r- GCSF (Ukraine. It is proven that Ukrainian version of recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating factor r-GCSF does not concede officinal drug Neupogen (Switzerland by its experimental therapeutic action and combined use with enterosorbent C2 significantly increases myeloprotective effect of both GCSF versions.

  6. Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) signaling in spinal microglia drives visceral sensitization following colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Lilian; Lapointe, Tamia K; Iftinca, Mircea; Marsters, Candace; Hollenberg, Morley D; Kurrasch, Deborah M; Altier, Christophe

    2017-10-17

    Pain is a main symptom of inflammatory diseases and often persists beyond clinical remission. Although we have a good understanding of the mechanisms of sensitization at the periphery during inflammation, little is known about the mediators that drive central sensitization. Recent reports have identified hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors as important regulators of tumor- and nerve injury-associated pain. Using a mouse model of colitis, we identify the proinflammatory cytokine granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF or Csf-3) as a key mediator of visceral sensitization. We report that G-CSF is specifically up-regulated in the thoracolumbar spinal cord of colitis-affected mice. Our results show that resident spinal microglia express the G-CSF receptor and that G-CSF signaling mediates microglial activation following colitis. Furthermore, healthy mice subjected to intrathecal injection of G-CSF exhibit pronounced visceral hypersensitivity, an effect that is abolished by microglial depletion. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that G-CSF injection increases Cathepsin S activity in spinal cord tissues. When cocultured with microglia BV-2 cells exposed to G-CSF, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) nociceptors become hyperexcitable. Blocking CX3CR1 or nitric oxide production during G-CSF treatment reduces excitability and G-CSF-induced visceral pain in vivo. Finally, administration of G-CSF-neutralizing antibody can prevent the establishment of persistent visceral pain postcolitis. Overall, our work uncovers a DRG neuron-microglia interaction that responds to G-CSF by engaging Cathepsin S-CX3CR1-inducible NOS signaling. This interaction represents a central step in visceral sensitization following colonic inflammation, thereby identifying spinal G-CSF as a target for treating chronic abdominal pain.

  7. Effects of human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on fracture healing in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozlar, M.; Aslan, B.; Kalaci, A.; Yanat, Ahmet N.; Baktiroglu, L.; Tasci, A.

    2005-01-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulation factor (G-CSF) is generally used to prevent and cure the neutropenia associated with chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. In addition to its effects on neutrophil function, G-CSF was found to have the characteristic of modulating the cytokines in the inflammatory response. Then, the question to answer is whether it has any effect on fracture healing and to what extent? In this study, we test the effects of G-CSF on the healing of tibia fracture in a rat model. This study was performed at Harran University, Sanliurfa, Turkey between July 2003 and August 2004. Twenty female, healthy Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing between 250 and 300 gm were divided into 2 groups, and their tibiae broken. The rats in the G-CSF group were injected subcutaneous with 25ug/kg/day of recombinant human G-CSF for 7 days, and the ones in the control group with 0.9% sodium chloride. Rats were sacrificed 3 weeks after surgery and then radiological, histological and biomechanical evaluations were performed. Biomechanical tests were performed at the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey.The median radiographic scores for the control group were calculated as 4.1, and 6.1 for the G-CSF group (p = 0.016). Cortex remodeling, callus formation, bone union and marrow changes values did not differ significantly (p > 0.05). Mechanical parameter (mean max-Load) values for the control group were found to be 24.0 +/- 3.0 N, and 241.5 +/-75.7 N for the G-CSF group (p 0.001). We found that G-CSF has an important effect on fracture healing. However, this effect requires further study. (author)

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in repeated IVF failure, a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleyasin, Ashraf; Abediasl, Zhila; Nazari, Atefeh; Sheikh, Mahdi

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed key roles for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) in embryo implantation process and maintenance of pregnancy, and some studies showed promising results by using local intrauterine infusion of GCSF in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). This multicenter, randomized, controlled trial included 112 infertile women with repeated IVF failure to evaluate the efficacy of systemic single-dose subcutaneous GCSF administration on IVF success in these women. In this study, the Long Protocol of ovarian stimulation was used for all participants. Sealed, numbered envelopes assigned 56 patients to receive subcutaneous 300 µg GCSF before implantation and 56 in the control group. The implantation (number of gestational sacs on the total number of transferred embryos), chemical pregnancy (positive serum β-HCG), and clinical pregnancy (gestational sac and fetal heart) rates were compared between the two groups. This trial is registered at www.irct.ir (IRCT201503119568N11). The successful implantation (18% vs 7.2%, P=0.007), chemical pregnancy (44.6% vs 19.6%, P=0.005), and clinical pregnancy (37.5% vs 14.3%, P=0.005) rates were significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group. After adjustment for participants' age, endometrial thickness, good-quality oocyte counts, number of transferred embryos, and anti-Mullerian hormone levels, GCSF treatment remained significantly associated with successful implantation (OR=2.63, 95% CI=1.09-6.96), having chemical pregnancy (OR= 2.74, 95% CI=1.11-7.38) and clinical pregnancy (OR=2.94, 95% CI=1.23-8.33). In conclusion, administration of single-dose systemic subcutaneous GCSF before implantation significantly increases the IVF success, implantation, and pregnancy rates in infertile women with repeated IVF failure. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  9. Comparison of two strategies for the treatment of radiogenic leukopenia using granulocyte colony stimulating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamietz, I.A.; Rosskopf, B.; Dapper, F.D.; Lieven, H. von; Boettcher, H.D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced leukopenia can cause a delay or discontinuation of radiotherapy. This complication can be overcome with the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, an uncertainty exists regarding the mode of application of G-CSF in patients treated with radiotherapy. For this reason, the efficacy of two strategies for the administration of G-CSF in irradiated patients was compared in a prospective randomized clinical study. Methods and Materials: Forty-one patients who developed leukopenia ( 9 per liter) while undergoing radiotherapy were treated with G-CSF at a daily dose of 5 μg/kg. The first group received single injections of G-CSF as required (n = 21). The second group received G-CSF on at least 3 consecutive days (n = 20). An analysis was made of the changes in leucocyte counts, the number of days on which radiotherapy had to be interrupted, and the side effects of growth-factor treatment. Results: An increase in leucocyte values in the peripheral blood was observed in all patients treated with G-CSF. In the group which received G-CSF when required, two injections (range: 1-8) were administered in most cases. In the second group, most of the patients received three injections (range: 3-9). The average duration of therapy interruptions due to leukopenia was 4.8 days (0-28) in the first therapy arm and 2.5 (0-20) in the second arm. The variance in the duration of therapy interruptions between the two groups was not significant (p = 0.2). Radiotherapy had to be terminated in two patients due to thrombocytopenia but the application of G-CSF did not seem to be a reason of decreasing platelet counts. Conclusions: Our results reveal that G-CSF is safe and effective in the treatment of radiation-induced leukopenia regardless of the mode of application. Because the calculated difference related to radiation treatment interruptions has no clinical relevance, both approaches examined in our study appear reasonable.

  10. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves motor recovery in the rat impactor model for spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanjew Dittgen

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves outcome after experimental SCI by counteracting apoptosis, and enhancing connectivity in the injured spinal cord. Previously we have employed the mouse hemisection SCI model and studied motor function after subcutaneous or transgenic delivery of the protein. To further broaden confidence in animal efficacy data we sought to determine efficacy in a different model and a different species. Here we investigated the effects of G-CSF in Wistar rats using the New York University Impactor. In this model, corroborating our previous data, rats treated subcutaneously with G-CSF over 2 weeks show significant improvement of motor function.

  11. Clinical outcome after stem cell mobilization with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus S; Jørgensen, Erik; Kastrup, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Background. Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been investigated in trials aiming to promote recovery of myocardial function after myocardial infarction. Long-term safety-data have never been reported. A few studies indicated an increased risk of in-stent re-stenosis. We aimed to i.......8; 0.3). Conclusions. We found no indication of increased risk of adverse events up to 5 years after G-CSF treatment. These results support the continued investigation of G-CSF for cardiac therapy....

  12. Isolation, nucleotide sequence and expression of a cDNA encoding feline granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, S P; Onions, D E

    2001-06-21

    A cDNA encoding feline granulocyte colony stimulating factor (fG-CSF) was cloned from alveolar macrophages using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The cDNA is 949 bp in length and encodes a predicted mature protein of 174 amino acids. Recombinant fG-CSF was expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion and purified by affinity chromatography. Biological activity of the recombinant protein was demonstrated using the murine myeloblastic cell line GNFS-60, which showed an ED50 for fG-CSF of approximately 2 ng/ml. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  13. Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Receptor, Tissue Factor, and VEGF-R Bound VEGF in Human Breast Cancer In Loco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtukiewicz, Marek Z; Sierko, Ewa; Skalij, Piotr; Kamińska, Magda; Zimnoch, Lech; Brekken, Ralf A; Thorpe, Philip E

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin and docetaxel-based chemotherapy regimens used in breast cancer patients are associated with high risk of febrile neutropenia (FN). Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) are recommended for both treating and preventing chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Increased thrombosis incidence in G-CSF treated patients was reported; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The principal activator of blood coagulation in cancer is tissue factor (TF). It additionally contributes to cancer progression and stimulates angiogenesis. The main proangiogenic factor is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The aim of the study was to evaluate granulocyte-colony stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR), tissue factor (TF) expression and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF-R) bound VEGF in human breast cancer in loco. G-CSFR, TF and VEGFR bound VEGF (VEGF: VEGFR) were assessed in 28 breast cancer tissue samples. Immunohistochemical (IHC) methodologies according to ABC technique and double staining IHC procedure were employed utilizing antibodies against G-CSFR, TF and VEGF associated with VEGFR (VEGF: VEGFR). Expression of G-CSFR was demonstrated in 20 breast cancer tissue specimens (71%). In 6 cases (21%) the expression was strong (IRS 9-12). Strong expression of TF was observed in all investigated cases (100%). Moreover, expression of VEGF: VEGFR was visualized in cancer cells (IRS 5-8). No presence of G-CSFR, TF or VEGF: VEGFR was detected on healthy breast cells. Double staining IHC studies revealed co-localization of G-CSFR and TF, G-CSFR and VEGF: VEGFR, as well as TF and VEGF: VEGFR on breast cancer cells and ECs. The results of the study indicate that GCSFR, TF and VEGF: VEGFR expression as well as their co-expression might influence breast cancer biology, and may increase thromboembolic adverse events incidence.

  14. The effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on rotator cuff healing after injury and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David; Maerz, Tristan; Kurdziel, Michael; Hein, Joel; Doshi, Shashin; Bedi, Asheesh; Anderson, Kyle; Baker, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    The failure rate of tendon-bone healing after repair of rotator cuff tears remains high. A variety of biologic- and cell-based therapies aimed at improving rotator cuff healing have been investigated, and stem cell-based techniques have become increasingly more common. However, most studies have focused on the implantation of exogenous cells, which introduces higher risk and cost. We aimed to improve rotator cuff healing by inducing endogenous stem cell mobilization with systemic administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). We asked: (1) Does G-CSF administration increase local cellularity after acute rotator cuff repair? (2) Is there histologic evidence that G-CSF improved organization at the healing enthesis? (3) Does G-CSF administration improve biomechanical properties of the healing supraspinatus tendon-bone complex? (4) Are there micro-MRI-based observations indicating G-CSF-augmented tendon-bone healing? After creation of full-thickness supraspinatus tendon defects with immediate repair, 52 rats were randomized to control or G-CSF-treated groups. G-CSF was administered for 5 days after repair and rats were euthanized at 12 or 19 postoperative days. Shoulders were subjected to micro-MR imaging, stress relaxation, and load-to-failure as well as blinded histologic and histomorphometric analyses. G-CSF-treated animals had significantly higher cellularity composite scores at 12 and 19 days compared with both control (12 days: 7.40 ± 1.14 [confidence interval {CI}, 5.98-8.81] versus 4.50 ± 0.57 [CI, 3.58-5.41], p = 0.038; 19 days: 8.00 ± 1.00 [CI, 6.75-9.24] versus 5.40 ± 0.89 [CI, 4.28-6.51], p = 0.023) and normal animals (12 days: p = 0.029; 19 days: p = 0.019). There was no significant difference between G-CSF-treated animals or control animals in ultimate stress (MPa) and strain, modulus (MPa), or yield stress (MPa) and strain at either 12 days (p = 1.000, p = 0.104, p = 1.000, p = 0.909, and p = 0.483, respectively) or 19 days (p = 0

  15. Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor-primed Bone Marrow: An Excellent Stem-cell Source for Transplantation in Acute Myelocytic Leukemia and Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steady-state bone marrow (SS-BM and granulocyte colony-stimulating growth factor-primed BM/peripheral blood stem-cell (G-BM/G-PBSC are the main stem-cell sources used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Here, we evaluated the treatment effects of SS-BM and G-BM/G-PBSC in human leucocyte antigen (HLA-identical sibling transplantation. Methods: A total of 226 patients (acute myelogenous leukemia-complete remission 1, chronic myelogenous leukemia-chronic phase 1 received SS-BM, G-BM, or G-PBSC from an HLA-identical sibling. Clinical outcomes (graft-versus-host disease [GVHD], overall survival, transplant-related mortality [TRM], and leukemia-free survival [LFS] were analyzed. Results: When compared to SS-BM, G-BM gave faster recovery time to neutrophil or platelet (P 0.05. Conclusions: G-CSF-primed bone marrow shared the advantages of G-PBSC and SS-BM. We conclude that G-BM is an excellent stem-cell source that may be preferable to G-PBSC or SS-BM in patients receiving HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

  16. Application of microchip CGE for the analysis of PEG-modified recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Ji; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Kang Choon; Na, Dong Hee

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microchip CGE (MCGE) for the analysis of PEG-modified granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (PEG-G-CSF) prepared with PEG-aldehydes. The unmodified and PEG-modified G-CSFs were analyzed by Protein 80 and 230 Labchips on the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer. The MCGE allowed size-based separation and quantitation of PEG-G-CSF. The Protein 80 Labchip was useful for PEG-5K-G-CSF, while the Protein 230 Labchip was more suitable for PEG-20K-G-CSF. The MCGE was also used to monitor a search for optimal PEG-modification (PEGylation) conditions to produce mono-PEG-G-CSF. This study demonstrates the usefulness of MCGE for monitoring and optimizing the PEGylation of G-CSF with the advantages of speed, minimal sample consumption, and automatic quantitation.

  17. Primary granulocyte colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis during the first two cycles only or throughout all chemotherapy cycles in patients with breast cancer at risk for febrile neutropenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, M.J.; Peters, F.P.; Mandigers, C.M.P.W.; Dercksen, M.W.; Stouthard, J.M.; Nortier, H.J.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Warmerdam, L.J. van; Wouw, A.J. van de; Jacobs, E.M.G.; Mattijssen, V.; Rijt, C.C. van der; Smilde, T.J.; Velden, A.W. van der; Temizkan, M.; Batman, E.; Muller, E.W.; Gastel, S.M. van; Borm, G.F.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Early breast cancer is commonly treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. However, combining these drugs increases the risk of myelotoxicity and may require granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. The highest incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and largest benefit of G-CSF

  18. Primary Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Prophylaxis During the First Two Cycles Only or Throughout All Chemotherapy Cycles in Patients With Breast Cancer at Risk for Febrile Neutropenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Maureen J.; Peters, Frank P.; Mandigers, Caroline M.; Dercksen, M. Wouter; Stouthard, Jacqueline M.; Nortier, Hans J.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W.; van Warmerdam, Laurence J.; van de Wouw, Agnes J.; Jacobs, Esther M.; Mattijssen, Vera; van der Rijt, Carin C.; Smilde, Tineke J.; van der Velden, Annette W.; Temizkan, Mehmet; Batman, Erdogan; Muller, Erik W.; van Gastel, Saskia M.; Borm, George F.; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C. G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Early breast cancer is commonly treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. However, combining these drugs increases the risk of myelotoxicity and may require granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. The highest incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and largest benefit of G-CSF

  19. Dose intensity of standard adjuvant CMF with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for premenopausal patients with node-positive breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deGraaf, H; Willemse, PHB; Bong, SB; Piersma, H; Tjabbes, T; vanVeelen, H; Coenen, JLLM; deVries, EGE

    1996-01-01

    The effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on total dose and dose intensity of standard oral adjuvant CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy were studied in premenopausal patients with node-positive breast cancer. Treatment consisted of standard CMF

  20. Effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on leucopenia in zidovudine-treated patients with AIDS and AIDS related complex, a phase I/II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouw, P. A.; van Leeuwen, R.; van Oers, R. H.; Lange, J. M.; Danner, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    Twelve male patients, eight with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and four with AIDS related complex (ARC), who had zidovudine associated neutropenia (less than 1 x 10(9) neutrophils/l) were treated with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a phase I/II

  1. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in glycogen storage disease type 1b. Results of the European Study on Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G.; Rake, J.P.; Labrune, P.; Leonard, J.V.; Moses, S.; Ullrich, K.; Wendel, U.; Groenier, K.H.; Smit, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    Patients with glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD-1b) have neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction that predispose to frequent infections and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), for which granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) is given. To investigate the use and the value of GCSF treatment in

  2. Porcine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) delivered via replication-defective adenovirus induces a sustained increase in circulating peripheral blood neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of immunomodulators is a promising area for biotherapeutic, prophylactic, and metaphylactic use to prevent and combat infectious disease, particularly during periods of peak disease incidence. Cytokines, including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), are one class of compounds that...

  3. The receptor for Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is expressed in radial glia during development of the nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krüger Carola

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte colony-stimulating (G-CSF factor is a well-known hematopoietic growth factor stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of myeloid progenitors. Recently, we uncovered that G-CSF acts also as a neuronal growth factor in the brain, which promotes adult neural precursor differentiation and enhances regeneration of the brain after insults. In adults, the receptor for G-CSF is predominantly expressed in neurons in many brain areas. We also described expression in neurogenic regions of the adult brain, such as the subventricular zone and the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus. In addition, we found close co-localization of the G-CSF receptor and its ligand G-CSF. Here we have conducted a systematic expression analysis of G-CSF receptor and its ligand in the developing embryo. Results Outside the central nervous system (CNS we found G-CSF receptor expression in blood vessels, muscles and their respective precursors and neurons. The expression of the G-CSF receptor in the developing CNS was most prominent in radial glia cells. Conclusion Our data imply that in addition to the function of G-CSF and its receptor in adult neurogenesis, this system also has a role in embryonic neurogenesis and nervous system development.

  4. Enhanced heterologous expression of biologically active human granulocyte colony stimulating factor in transgenic tobacco BY-2 cells by localization to endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nisha R; Chidambareswaren, M; Manjula, S

    2014-09-01

    Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells, one of the best characterized cell lines is an attractive expression system for heterologous protein expression. However, the expression of foreign proteins is currently hampered by their low yield, which is partially the result of proteolytic degradation. Human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine. Recombinant hG-CSF is successfully being used for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in cancer patients. Here, we describe a simple strategy for producing biologically active hG-CSF in tobacco BY-2 cells, localized in the apoplast of BY-2 cells, as well as targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER targeting significantly enhanced recombinant production which scaled to 17.89 mg/l from 4.19 mg/l when expressed in the apoplasts. Southern blotting confirmed the stable integration of hG-CSF in the BY-2 nuclear genome, and the expression of hG-CSF was analysed by Western blotting. Total soluble protein containing hG-CSF isolated from positive calli showed proliferative potential when tested on HL-60 cell lines by MTT assay. We also report the potential of a Fluorescence-activated cell sorting approach for an efficient sorting of the hG-CSF-expressing cell lines, which will enable the generation of homogenous high-producing cell lines.

  5. Both systemic and local application of Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is neuroprotective after retinal ganglion cell axotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietz Gunnar PH

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hematopoietic Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF plays a crucial role in controlling the number of neutrophil progenitor cells. Its function is mediated via the G-CSF receptor, which was recently found to be expressed also in the central nervous system. In addition, G-CSF provided neuroprotection in models of neuronal cell death. Here we used the retinal ganglion cell (RGC axotomy model to compare effects of local and systemic application of neuroprotective molecules. Results We found that the G-CSF receptor is robustly expressed by RGCs in vivo and in vitro. We thus evaluated G-CSF as a neuroprotectant for RGCs and found a dose-dependent neuroprotective effect of G-CSF on axotomized RGCs when given subcutaneously. As stem stell mobilization had previously been discussed as a possible contributor to the neuroprotective effects of G-CSF, we compared the local treatment of RGCs by injection of G-CSF into the vitreous body with systemic delivery by subcutaneous application. Both routes of application reduced retinal ganglion cell death to a comparable extent. Moreover, G-CSF enhanced the survival of immunopurified RGCs in vitro. Conclusion We thus show that G-CSF neuroprotection is at least partially independent of potential systemic effects and provide further evidence that the clinically applicable G-CSF could become a treatment option for both neurodegenerative diseases and glaucoma.

  6. Pretransplant mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves B-cell reconstitution by lentiviral vector gene therapy in SCID-X1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Marshall W; Riegman, Adriaan R A; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg(-/-) mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin(-)) cells or Il2rg(-/-) Lin(-) cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning.

  7. Donor body mass index is an important factor that affects peripheral blood progenitor cell yield in healthy donors after mobilization with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Burns, Kevin M; Babic, Aleksandar; Carrum, George; Kennedy, Martha; Segura, Francisco J; Garcia, Salvador; Potts, Sandra; Leveque, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The use of hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation has rapidly expanded in recent years. Currently, several sources of HPCs are available for transplantation including peripheral blood HPCs (PBPCs), cord blood cells, and marrow cells. Of these, PBPC collection has become the major source of HPCs. An important variable in PBPC collection is the response to PBPC mobilization, which varies significantly and sometime causes mobilization failure. A retrospective study of 69 healthy donors who underwent PBPC donation by leukapheresis was performed. All of these donors received 10 μg/kg/day or more granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for 5 days before PBPC harvest. Donor factors were evaluated and correlated with mobilization responses, as indicated by the precollection CD34 count (pre-CD34). Donors with a pre-CD34 of more than 100 × 10(6) /L had higher body mass index (BMI) compared with donors whose pre-CD34 was 38 × 10(6) to 99 × 10(6) /L or less than 38 × 10(6) /L (32.0 ± 1.04 kg/m(2) vs. 28.7 ± 0.93 kg/m(2) vs. 25.9 ± 1.27 kg/m(2) , respectively; p donors with high BMIs had higher pre-CD34 on a per-kilogram-of-body-weight basis compared with donors with low BMIs. BMI is an important factor that affects donor's response to mobilization and consequently the HPC yield. This effect may be due to a relatively high dose of G-CSF administered to donors with higher BMI or due to the presence of unknown intrinsic factors affecting mobilization that correlate with the amount of adipose tissue in each donor. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  8. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor priming chemotherapy is more effective than standard chemotherapy as salvage therapy in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; He, Aili; Wang, Fangxia; Bai, Ju; Wang, Jianli; Zhao, Wanhong; Zhang, Wanggang; Cao, Xingmei; Chen, Yinxia; Liu, Jie; Ma, Xiaorong; Chen, Hongli; Feng, Yuandong; Yang, Yun

    2017-12-29

    To improve the complete remission (CR) rate of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and alleviate the severe side effects of double induction chemotherapy, we combined a standard regimen with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming chemotherapy to compose a new double induction regimen for AML patients who failed to achieve CR after the first course. Ninety-seven patients with AML who did not achieve CR after the first course of standard chemotherapy were enrolled. Among them, 45 patients received G-CSF priming combined with low-dose chemotherapy during days 20-22 of the first course of chemotherapy, serving as priming group, 52 patients were administered standard chemotherapy again, serving as control group. Between the two groups there were no differences in the French-American-British (FAB) classification, risk status, the first course of chemotherapy, blood cell count or blasts percentage of bone marrow before the second course. But the CR rate was significantly higher and the adverse effect was much lower in the priming group than the control group. Cox multivariate regression analysis showed that WBC level before the second course and the selection of the second chemotherapy regimen were two independent factors for long survival of patients. These results elucidate that standard chemotherapy followed by G-CSF priming new double induction chemotherapy is an effective method for AML patients to improve CR rate and reduce adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. A Randomized Case-Controlled Study of Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor for the Treatment of Sepsis in Preterm Neutropenic Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Aktaş, Doğukan; Demirel, Bilge; Gürsoy, Tuğba; Ovalı, Fahri

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to treat sepsis in neutropenic preterm infants. Methods: Fifty-six neutropenic preterm infants with suspected or culture-proven sepsis hospitalized in Zeynep Kamil Maternity and Children's Educational and Training Hospital, Kozyatağı/Istanbul, Turkey between January 2008 and January 2010 were enrolled. Patients were ...

  10. Effect of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF on IVF outcomes in infertile women: An RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Eftekhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite major advances in assisted reproductive techniques, the implantation rates remain relatively low. Some studies have demonstrated that intrauterine infusion of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves implantation in infertile women. Objective: To assess the G-CSF effects on IVF outcomes in women with normal endometrial thickness. Materials and methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 100 infertile women with normal endometrial thickness who were candidate for IVF were evaluated in two groups. Exclusion criteria were positive history of repeated implantation failure (RIF, endocrine disorders, severe endometriosis, congenital or acquired uterine anomaly and contraindication for G-CSF (renal disease, sickle cell disease, or malignancy. In G-CSF group (n=50, 300 μg trans cervical intrauterine of G-CSF was administered at the oocyte retrieval day. Controls (n=50 were treated with standard protocol. Chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate were compared between groups. Results: Number of total and mature oocytes (MII, two pronuclei (2PN, total embryos, transferred embryos, quality of transferred embryos, and fertilization rate did not differ significantly between two groups. So there were no significant differences between groups in chemical, clinical and ongoing pregnancy rate, implantation rate, and miscarriage rate Conclusion: our result showed in normal IVF patients with normal endometrial thickness, the intrauterine infusion of G-CSF did not improve pregnancy outcomes.

  11. The safety and clinical efficacy of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor injection for colon cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: The present study was designed to evaluate safety and efficacy of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF injection and whether this regimen could reduce the incidence of adverse events caused by chemotherapy. Method: A total of 100 patients with colon cancer who were treated with chemotherapy in our hospital from January 2011 to December 2014 were randomly divided into two groups, with 50 patients in each group. The patients in the treatment group received G-CSF 24 hours after chemotherapy for consecutive three days; the patients in the control group received the same dose of normal saline. Routine blood tests were performed 7 days and 14 days after chemotherapy. Results: Compared with the control group, the incidences of febrile neutropenia and leukocytopenia in the treatment group were significantly lower (p<0.05. In addition, the incidence of liver dysfunction in the treatment group was lower than that of the control group, without statistical significance. The incidence of myalgia in the treatment was higher than that of the control group without statistical significance. Conclusion: The present study indicated that G-CSF injection after chemotherapy is safe and effective for preventing adverse events in colon cancer patients with chemotherapy.

  12. Simplified in vitro refolding and purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor using protein folding cation exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Sandeep; Dedaniya, Akshay; Thunuguntla, Rahul; Mallu, Maheswara Reddy; Parupudi, Pavani; Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy

    2015-01-30

    Protein folding-strong cation exchange chromatography (PF-SCX) has been employed for efficient refolding with simultaneous purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). To acquire a soluble form of renatured and purified rhG-CSF, various chromatographic conditions, including the mobile phase composition and pH was evaluated. Additionally, the effects of additives such as urea, amino acids, polyols, sugars, oxidizing agents and their amalgamations were also investigated. Under the optimal conditions, rhG-CSF was efficaciously solubilized, refolded and simultaneously purified by SCX in a single step. The experimental results using ribose (2.0M) and arginine (0.6M) combination were found to be satisfactory with mass yield, purity and specific activity of 71%, ≥99% and 2.6×10(8)IU/mg respectively. Through this investigation, we concluded that the SCX refolding method was more efficient than conventional methods which has immense potential for the large-scale production of purified rhG-CSF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mobilization of stem cell with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor promotes recovery after traumatic brain injury in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Marzban

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was designed to investigate the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF administration in rats for 6 weeks after traumatic brain injury (TBI. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats (n = 30 were injured with controlled cortical impact device and divided into four groups. The treatment groups (n = 10 each were injected subcutaneously with recombinant human G-CSF. Vehicle group (n=10 received phosphate buffered saline (PBS and only Brdu intraperitoneally. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU was used for mitotic labeling. Experimental rats were injected intraperitoneally with BrdU. Rats were killed at 6th week after traumatic brain injury. Neurological functional evaluation of animals was performed before and after injury using neurological severity scores (NSS. Animals were sacrificed 42 days after TBI and brain sections were stained using Brdu immunohistochemistry. Results: Statistically significant improvement in functional outcome was observed in treatment groups when compared with control (p<0.01. This benefit was visible 7 days after TBI and persisted until 42 days (end of trial. Histological analysis showed that Brdu cell positive was more in the lesion boundary zone at treatment animal group than all injected animals. Discussion: We believe that G-CSF therapeutic protocol reported here represents an attractive strategy for the development of a clinically significant noninvasive traumatic brain injury therapy.

  14. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and Chelsea & Westminster TEN management protocol [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sica-Chapman, A; Williams, G; Soni, N; Bunker, C B

    2010-04-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare but life-threatening, allergic drug reaction. Skin blistering with epidermal and mucosal necrolysis with subsequent detachment from an inflamed underlying dermis is a hallmark of the condition. The pathogenesis of TEN is not well understood, accounting for controversies about its management and significant delay in initiating potentially beneficial therapy. There are no management protocols based on a robust evidence base. Prompt recognition of the diagnosis and consensus on early management initiatives are necessary in order to improve outcomes and survival in TEN. To date, TEN management has been directed at arresting the allergic reaction and treating the complications. We have identified a need for specific medical interventions to accelerate wound regeneration. This approach has not previously been adopted in the management of TEN. We observed that in two cases of severe TEN, dramatic re-epithelialization and recovery coincided with the introduction of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for neutropenia. We explain how addition of the G-CSF promotes recovery from TEN by enhanced bioregeneration of the damaged tissues through accelerated re-epithelialization. G-CSF has been used for severe neutropenia in TEN, but we recommend and explain why, as in our Chelsea and Westminster protocol, G-CSF should be considered in treating severe TEN irrespective of the severity of neutropenia.

  15. Two protocols to treat thin endometrium with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during frozen embryo transfer cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Zhang, Qiong; Hao, Jie; Xu, Dabao; Li, Yanping

    2015-04-01

    The efficacy of two granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) protocols for thin endometrium were investigated. Eighty-two patients were diagnosed with thin endometrium (endometrial scratch subgroups. Compared with previous cycles, endometrial thickness increased from 5.7 ± 0.7 mm to 8.1 ± 2.1 mm after G-CSF treatment (P Endometrial thickness increases were not significantly different between the two subgroups. The G-CSF with endometrial scratch subgroup established nominally higher though non-significant clinical pregnancy and live birth rates than the G-CSF only subgroup (53.8 % versus 42.9% and 38.5% versus 28.6%, respectively). Fifty-two patients underwent FET despite edometrial thickness less than 7 mm, and were included as controls. Significantly higher embryo implantation and clinical pregnancy rates were observed in the G-CSF group compared with the control group (31.5% versus 13.9%; P Endometrial scracth did not impair G-CSF treatment for thin endometrium and favoured pregnancy and live birth rates. For patients with thin endometrium, embryo transfer cancellation and G-CSF treatment in subsequent FET cycles is beneficial. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interferon-alpha suppressed granulocyte colony stimulating factor production is reversed by CL097, a TLR7/8 agonist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tajuddin, Tariq

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Neutropenia, a major side-effect of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) therapy can be effectively treated by the recombinant form of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), an important growth factor for neutrophils. We hypothesized that IFN-alpha might suppress G-CSF production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), contributing to the development of neutropenia, and that a toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist might overcome this suppression. METHODS: Fifty-five patients who were receiving IFN-alpha\\/ribavirin combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection were recruited. Absolute neutrophil counts (ANC), monocyte counts and treatment outcome data were recorded. G-CSF levels in the supernatants of PBMCs isolated from the patients and healthy controls were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay following 18 h of culture in the absence or presence of IFN- alpha or the TLR7\\/8 agonist, CL097. RESULTS: Therapeutic IFN-alpha caused a significant reduction in neutrophil counts in all patients, with 15 patients requiring therapeutic G-CSF. The reduction in ANC over the course of IFN-alpha treatment was paralleled by a decrease in the ability of PBMCs to produce G-CSF. In vitro G-CSF production by PBMCs was suppressed in the presence of IFN-alpha; however, co-incubation with a TLR7\\/8 agonist significantly enhanced G-CSF secretion by cells obtained both from HCV patients and healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: Suppressed G-CSF production in the presence of IFN-alpha may contribute to IFN-alpha-induced neutropenia. However, a TLR7\\/8 agonist elicits G-CSF secretion even in the presence of IFN-alpha, suggesting a possible therapeutic role for TLR agonists in treatment of IFN-alpha-induced neutropenia.

  17. Extension of Tissue Plasminogen Activator Treatment Window by Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in a Thromboembolic Rat Model of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ike C. dela Peña

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available When given beyond 4.5 h of stroke onset, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA induces deleterious side effects in the ischemic brain, notably, hemorrhagic transformation (HT. We examined the efficacy of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF in reducing delayed tPA-induced HT, cerebral infarction, and neurological deficits in a thromboembolic (TE stroke model, and whether the effects of G-CSF were sustained for longer periods of recovery. After stroke induction, rats were given intravenous saline (control, tPA (10 mg/kg, or G-CSF (300 μg/kg + tPA 6 h after stroke. We found that G-CSF reduced delayed tPA-associated HT by 47%, decreased infarct volumes by 33%, and improved motor and neurological deficits by 15% and 25%, respectively. It also prevented delayed tPA treatment-induced mortality by 46%. Immunohistochemistry showed 1.5- and 1.8-fold enrichment of the endothelial progenitor cell (EPC markers CD34+ and VEGFR2 in the ischemic cortex and striatum, respectively, and 1.7- and 2.8-fold increases in the expression of the vasculogenesis marker von Willebrand factor (vWF in the ischemic cortex and striatum, respectively, in G-CSF-treated rats compared with tPA-treated animals. Flow cytometry revealed increased mobilization of CD34+ cells in the peripheral blood of rats given G-CSF. These results corroborate the efficacy of G-CSF in enhancing the therapeutic time window of tPA for stroke treatment via EPC mobilization and enhancement of vasculogenesis.

  18. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors for febrile neutropenia prophylaxis following chemotherapy: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevenson Matt D

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Febrile neutropenia (FN occurs following myelosuppressive chemotherapy and is associated with morbidity, mortality, costs, and chemotherapy reductions and delays. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs stimulate neutrophil production and may reduce FN incidence when given prophylactically following chemotherapy. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the effectiveness of G-CSFs (pegfilgrastim, filgrastim or lenograstim in reducing FN incidence in adults undergoing chemotherapy for solid tumours or lymphoma. G-CSFs were compared with no primary G-CSF prophylaxis and with one another. Nine databases were searched in December 2009. Meta-analysis used a random effects model due to heterogeneity. Results Twenty studies compared primary G-CSF prophylaxis with no primary G-CSF prophylaxis: five studies of pegfilgrastim; ten of filgrastim; and five of lenograstim. All three G-CSFs significantly reduced FN incidence, with relative risks of 0.30 (95% CI: 0.14 to 0.65 for pegfilgrastim, 0.57 (95% CI: 0.48 to 0.69 for filgrastim, and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.88 for lenograstim. Overall, the relative risk of FN for any primary G-CSF prophylaxis versus no primary G-CSF prophylaxis was 0.51 (95% CI: 0.41 to 0.62. In terms of comparisons between different G-CSFs, five studies compared pegfilgrastim with filgrastim. FN incidence was significantly lower for pegfilgrastim than filgrastim, with a relative risk of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.98. Conclusions Primary prophylaxis with G-CSFs significantly reduces FN incidence in adults undergoing chemotherapy for solid tumours or lymphoma. Pegfilgrastim reduces FN incidence to a significantly greater extent than filgrastim.

  19. Annual patient and caregiver burden of oncology clinic visits for granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapy in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J Mark; Li, Xiaoyan; Reiner, Maureen; Tzivelekis, Spiros

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factors (G-CSFs) is indicated for chemotherapy patients with a significant risk of febrile neutropenia. This study estimates the annual economic burden on patients and caregivers of clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections in the US. Annual clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections (all cancers) were estimated from national cancer incidence, chemotherapy treatment and G-CSF utilization data, and G-CSF sales and pricing information. Patient travel times, plus time spent in the clinic, were estimated from patient survey responses collected during a large prospective cohort study (the Prospective Study of the Relationship between Chemotherapy Dose Intensity and Mortality in Early-Stage (I-III) Breast Cancer Patients). Economic models were created to estimate travel costs, patient co-pays and the economic value of time spent by patients and caregivers in G-CSF clinic visits. Estimated total clinic visits for prophylactic G-CSF injections in the US were 1.713 million for 2015. Mean (SD) travel time per visit was 62 (50) min; mean (SD) time in the clinic was 41 (68) min. Total annual time for travel to and from the clinic, plus time at the clinic, is estimated at 4.9 million hours, with patient and caregiver time valued at $91.8 million ($228 per patient). The estimated cumulative annual travel distance for G-CSF visits is 60.2 million miles, with a total transportation cost of $28.9 million ($72 per patient). Estimated patient co-pays were $61.1 million, ∼$36 per visit, $152 per patient. The total yearly economic impact on patients and caregivers is $182 million, ∼$450 per patient. Data to support model parameters were limited. Study estimates are sensitive to the assumptions used. The burden of clinic visits for G-CSF therapy is a significant addition to the total economic burden borne by cancer patients and their families.

  20. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and umbilical cord blood cell transplantation: Synergistic therapies for the treatment of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Liska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is now characterized as a progressive, degenerative disease and continues to stand as a prevalent cause of death and disability. The pathophysiology of TBI is complex, with a variety of secondary cell death pathways occurring which may persist chronically following the initial cerebral insult. Current therapeutic options for TBI are minimal, with surgical intervention or rehabilitation therapy existing as the only viable treatments. Considering the success of stem-cell therapies in various other neurological diseases, their use has been proposed as a potential potent therapy for patients suffering TBI. Moreover, stem cells are highly amenable to adjunctive use with other therapies, providing an opportunity to overcome the inherent limitations of using a single therapeutic agent. Our research has verified this additive potential by demonstrating the efficacy of co-delivering human umbilical cord blood (hUCB cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF in a murine model of TBI, providing encouraging results which support the potential of this approach to treat patients suffering from TBI. These findings justify ongoing research toward uncovering the mechanisms which underlie the functional improvements exhibited by hUCB + G-CSF combination therapy, thereby facilitating its safe and effect transition into the clinic. This paper is a review article. Referred literature in this paper has been listed in the reference section. The datasets supporting the conclusions of this article are available online by searching various databases, including PubMed. Some original points in this article come from the laboratory practice in our research center and the authors' experiences.

  1. Purity assessment of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in finished drug product by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benković, Goran; Skrlin, Ana; Madić, Tomislav; Debeljak, Zeljko; Medić-Šarić, Marica

    2014-09-01

    Current methods for determination of impurities with different charge-to-volume ratio are limited especially in terms of sensitivity and precision. The main goal of this research was to establish a quantitative method for determination of impurities with charges differing from that of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF, filgrastim) with superior precision and sensitivity compared to existing methods. A CZE method has been developed, optimized, and validated for a purity assessment of filgrastim in liquid pharmaceutical formulations. Optimal separation of filgrastim from the related impurities with different charges was achieved on a 50 μm id fused-silica capillary of a total length of 80.5 cm. A BGE that contains 100 mM phosphoric acid adjusted to pH 7.0 with triethanolamine was used. The applied voltage was 20 kV while the temperature was maintained at 25°C. UV detection was set to 200 nm. Method was validated in terms of selectivity/specificity, linearity, precision, LOD, LOQ, stability, and robustness. Linearity was observed in the concentration range of 6-600 μg/mL and the LOQ was determined to be 0.3% relative to the concentration of filgrastim of 0.6 mg/mL. Other validation parameters were also found to be acceptable; thus the method was successfully applied for a quantitative purity assessment of filgrastim in a finished drug product. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Is febrile neutropenia prophylaxis with granulocyte-colony stimulating factors economically justified for adjuvant TC chemotherapy in breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skedgel, Chris; Rayson, Daniel; Younis, Tallal

    2016-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) during adjuvant chemotherapy is associated with morbidity, mortality risk, and substantial cost, and subsequent chemotherapy dose reductions may result in poorer outcomes. Patients at high risk of, or who develop FN, often receive prophylaxis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF). We investigated whether different prophylaxis strategies with G-CSF offered favorable value-for-money. We developed a decision model to estimate the short- and long-term costs and outcomes of a hypothetical cohort of women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant taxotere + cyclophosphamide (TC) chemotherapy. The short-term phase estimated upfront costs and FN risks with adjuvant TC chemotherapy without G-CSF prophylaxis (i.e., chemotherapy dose reductions) as well as with secondary and primary G-CSF prophylaxis strategies. The long-term phase estimated the expected costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for patients who completed adjuvant TC chemotherapy with or without one or more episodes of FN. Secondary G-CSF was associated with lower costs and greater QALY gains than a no G-CSF strategy. Primary G-CSF appears likely to be cost-effective relative to secondary G-CSF at FN rates greater than 28%, assuming some loss of chemotherapy efficacy at lower dose intensities. The cost-effectiveness of primary vs. secondary G-CSF was sensitive to FN risk and mortality, and loss of chemotherapy efficacy following FN. Secondary G-CSF is more effective and less costly than a no G-CSF strategy. Primary G-CSF may be justified at higher willingness-to-pay thresholds and/or higher FN risks, but this threshold FN risk appears to be higher than the 20% rate recommended by current clinical guidelines.

  3. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Combined with Methylprednisolone Improves Functional Outcomes in Rats with Experimental Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Gemio Jacobsen Teixeira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of combined treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and methylprednisolone in rats subjected to experimental spinal cord injury. METHODS: Forty Wistar rats received a moderate spinal cord injury and were divided into four groups: control (no treatment; G-CSF (G-CSF at the time of injury and daily over the next five days; methylprednisolone (methylprednisolone for 24 h; and G-CSF/Methylprednisolone (methylprednisolone for 24 h and G-CSF at the time of injury and daily over the next five days. Functional evaluation was performed using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score on days 2, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 following injury. Motor-evoked potentials were evaluated. Histological examination of the spinal cord lesion was performed immediately after euthanasia on day 42. RESULTS: Eight animals were excluded (2 from each group due to infection, a normal Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score at their first evaluation, or autophagy, and 32 were evaluated. The combination of methylprednisolone and G-CSF promoted greater functional improvement than methylprednisolone or G-CSF alone (p<0.001. This combination also exhibited a synergistic effect, with improvements in hyperemia and cellular infiltration at the injury site (p<0.001. The groups displayed no neurophysiological differences (latency p=0.85; amplitude p=0.75. CONCLUSION: Methylprednisolone plus G-CSF promotes functional and histological improvements superior to those achieved by either of these drugs alone when treating spinal cord contusion injuries in rats. Combining the two drugs did have a synergistic effect.

  4. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and drugs elevating extracellular adenosine synergize to enhance haematopoietic reconstitution in irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospisil, M.; Hofer, M.; Netikova, J.; Hola, J.; Vacek, A. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Inst. of Biophysics, Brno (Czech Republic); Znojil, V.; Vacha, J. [Masaryk Univ., Medical Faculty, Brno (Czech Republic)

    1998-03-01

    The activation of adenosine receptors has recently been demonstrated to stimulate haematopoiesis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine to influence curative effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in mice exposed to a sublethal dose of 4 Gy of {sup 60}Co radiation. Elevation of extracellular adenosine in mice was induced by the combined administration of dipyridamole, a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), an adenosine prodrug. The effects of dipyridamole plus AMP, and G-CSF, administered either alone or in combination, were evaluated. The drugs were injected to mice in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on d 3 after irradiation and the haematopoietic response was evaluated on d 7, 10, 14, 18 and 24 after irradiation. While the effects of G-CSF on the late maturation stages of blood cells, appearing shortly after the completion of the treatment, were not influenced by dipyridamole plus AMP, positive effects of the combination therapy occurred in the post-irradiation recovery phase which is dependent on the repopulation of haematopoietic stem cells. This was indicated by the significant elevation of counts of granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and granulocytic cells in the bone marrow (d 14), of GM-CFC (d 14), granulocytic and erythroid cells (d 14 and 18) in the spleen, and of neutrophils (d 18), monocytes (d 14 and 18) and platelets (d 18) in the peripheral blood. These effects suggest that the repopulation potential of the combination therapy lies in a common multi-lineage cell population. The results of this study implicate the promising possibility to enhance the curative effects of G-CSF under conditions of myelosuppressive state induced by radiation exposure. (au) 43 refs.

  5. Cost-benefit analysis of prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during CHOP antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranitsaris, G; Altmayer, C; Quirt, I

    1997-06-01

    Several randomised comparative trials have shown that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) reduces the duration of neutropenia, hospitalisation and intravenous antibacterial use in patients with cancer who are receiving high-dosage antineoplastic therapy. However, one area that has received less attention is the role of G-CSF in standard-dosage antineoplastic regimens. One such treatment that is considered to have a low potential for inducing fever and neutropenia is the CHOP regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We conducted a cost-benefit analysis from a societal perspective in order to estimate the net cost or benefit of prophylactic G-CSF in this patient population. This included direct costs for hospitalisation with antibacterial support, as well as indirect societal costs, such as time off work and antineoplastic therapy delays secondary to neutropenia. The findings were then tested by a comprehensive sensitivity analysis. The administration of G-CSF at a dosage of 5 micrograms/kg/day for 11 doses following CHOP resulted in an overall net cost of $Can1257. In the sensitivity analysis, lowering the G-CSF dosage to 2 micrograms/kg/day generated a net benefit of $Can6564, indicating a situation that was cost saving to society. The results of the current study suggest that the use of G-CSF in patients receiving CHOP antineoplastic therapy produces a situation that is close to achieving cost neutrality. However, low-dosage (2 micrograms/kg/day) G-CSF is an economically attractive treatment strategy because it may result in overall savings to society.

  6. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and drugs elevating extracellular adenosine synergize to enhance haematopoietic reconstitution in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospisil, M.; Hofer, M.; Netikova, J.; Hola, J.; Vacek, A.; Znojil, V.; Vacha, J.

    1998-01-01

    The activation of adenosine receptors has recently been demonstrated to stimulate haematopoiesis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine to influence curative effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in mice exposed to a sublethal dose of 4 Gy of 60 Co radiation. Elevation of extracellular adenosine in mice was induced by the combined administration of dipyridamole, a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), an adenosine prodrug. The effects of dipyridamole plus AMP, and G-CSF, administered either alone or in combination, were evaluated. The drugs were injected to mice in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on d 3 after irradiation and the haematopoietic response was evaluated on d 7, 10, 14, 18 and 24 after irradiation. While the effects of G-CSF on the late maturation stages of blood cells, appearing shortly after the completion of the treatment, were not influenced by dipyridamole plus AMP, positive effects of the combination therapy occurred in the post-irradiation recovery phase which is dependent on the repopulation of haematopoietic stem cells. This was indicated by the significant elevation of counts of granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and granulocytic cells in the bone marrow (d 14), of GM-CFC (d 14), granulocytic and erythroid cells (d 14 and 18) in the spleen, and of neutrophils (d 18), monocytes (d 14 and 18) and platelets (d 18) in the peripheral blood. These effects suggest that the repopulation potential of the combination therapy lies in a common multi-lineage cell population. The results of this study implicate the promising possibility to enhance the curative effects of G-CSF under conditions of myelosuppressive state induced by radiation exposure. (au)

  7. Evaluation of Dutch guideline for just-in-time addition of plerixafor to stem cell mobilization in patients who fail with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Yavuz M; Visser, Otto; Beckers, Erik A M; te Boome, Liane C J; Huisman, Cynthia; Ypma, Paula F; Croockewit, Alexandra J; Netelenbos, Tanja; Kramer, Ellen P A; de Greef, Georgine E

    2015-05-01

    Plerixafor in combination with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is approved for the use of stem cell collection in patients who fail to mobilize on G-CSF. In 2009 the Stem Cell Working Party of the Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial group for Hematology Oncology (HOVON) composed a guideline for the use of plerixafor. According to this guideline it is recommended to add plerixafor to G-CSF in patients with circulating CD34+ cell counts of fewer than 20 × 10(6) /L on 2 consecutive days accompanied by increasing white blood cells. In this analysis we evaluated retrospectively the outcome of the use of this guideline in the Netherlands. In total 111 patients received plerixafor with a median one administration (range, one to four administrations). Of these patients 55.8% had non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 31.5% multiple myeloma, 8.1% Hodgkin lymphoma, and 4.5% nonhematologic malignancies. In 63.9% patients sufficient numbers of CD34+ cells were collected. In patients with multiple myeloma more successful mobilizations with plerixafor were observed compared to patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (71.4% vs. 61.3%). In patients with circulating CD34+ cell counts of at least 2.0 × 10(6) /L before administration of plerixafor a successful mobilization was achieved in 76.5%, and in the patients with very low (0-1 × 10(6) /L) circulating CD34+ cell counts the success rate was 44.2%. Application of the HOVON guideline on the just-in-time administration of plerixafor is effective for mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells in the majority of patients. Stem cell yield in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma was lower compared to patients with multiple myeloma. Also patients with very low circulating CD34+ cells before addition of plerixafor might benefit from this approach. © 2014 AABB.

  8. Effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on central and peripheral T lymphocyte reconstitution after sublethal irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongxia; Guo Mei; Sun Xuedong; Ai Huisheng; Sun Wanjun; Hu Hailan; Wei Li

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is one of the most critical cytokines used for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). In addition to the hematopoietic effects of G-CSF on the differentiation and proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells, G-CSF is also known to have immunomodulatory effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether G-CSF could accelerate central and peripheral T lymphocyte recovery after a sublethal dose of irradiation. Female BALB/c mice were subjected to 6 Gy of total body irradiation and then were treated with either 100 μg/kg G-CSF or an equal volume of PBS once daily for 14 days. Percentages of thymocyte subpopulations including CD4- CD8-, CD4+ CD8+, CD4+ CD8- and CD4- CD8+ T cells, peripheral CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific to the 257-bp T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (sjTRECs). The proliferative capacity of splenic mononuclear cells upon exposure to ConA was measured by using the Cell Count Kit-8 (CCK-8). G-CSF treatment promoted thymocyte regeneration, accelerated the recovery of CD4+ CD8+ cells and increased the frequency of thymocyte sjTRECs. These effects were more prominent at early time points (Day 28) after irradiation. G-CSF also increased the rate of recovery of peripheral CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells and shortened the period of severe lymphopenia following irradiation. G-CSF also increased the splenic mononuclear cell mitotic responsiveness to ConA more than control-treated cells. Our results show that G-CSF accelerates T cell recovery through both thymic-dependent and thymic-independent pathways, which could be used to increase the rate of immune reconstitution after sublethal irradiation. (author)

  9. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Use after Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Comparison of Two Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amrita D; Parmar, Sapna; Patel, Khilna; Shah, Shreya; Shore, Tsiporah; Gergis, Usama; Mayer, Sebastian; Phillips, Adrienne; Hsu, Jing-Mei; Niesvizky, Ruben; Mark, Tomer M; Pearse, Roger; Rossi, Adriana; van Besien, Koen

    2018-02-01

    Administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) is generally recommended to reduce the duration of severe neutropenia; however, data regarding the optimal timing of G-CSFs post-transplantation are limited and conflicting. This retrospective study was performed at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center between November 5, 2013, and August 9, 2016, of adult inpatient autologous PBSCT recipients who received G-CSF empirically starting on day +5 (early) versus on those who received G-CSF on day +12 only if absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was ANC-driven). G-CSF was dosed at 300 µg in patients weighing ANC-driven (n = 50) G-CSF regimen. Patient and transplantation characteristics were comparable in the 2 groups. In the ANC-driven group, 24% (n = 12) received G-CSF on day +12 and 60% (n = 30) started G-CSF earlier due to febrile neutropenia or at the physician's discretion, 6% (n = 3) started after day +12 at the physician's discretion, and 10% (n = 5) did not receive any G-CSF. The median start day of G-CSF therapy was day +10 in the ANC-driven group versus day +5 in the early group (P ANC-driven group (P = .07). There were no significant between-group differences in time to platelet engraftment, 1-year relapse rate, or 1-year overall survival. The incidence of febrile neutropenia was 74% in the early group versus 90% in the ANC-driven group (P = .04); however, there was no significant between-group difference in the incidence of positive bacterial cultures or transfer to the intensive care unit. The duration of G-CSF administration until neutrophil engraftment was 6 days in the early group versus 3 days in the ANC-driven group (P ANC-driven group (P = .28). Our data show that early initiation of G-CSF (on day +5) and ANC-driven initiation of G-CSF following autologous PBSCT were associated with a similar time to neutrophil engraftment

  10. Efficacy, safety and proper dose analysis of PEGylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as support for dose-dense adjuvant chemotherapy in node positive Chinese breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Fan; LingHu, RuiXia; Zhan, XingYang; Li, Ruisheng; Feng, Fan; Gao, Xudong; Zhao, Lei; Yang, Junlan

    2017-01-01

    For high-risk breast cancer patients with positive axillary lymph nodes, dose-dense every-two-week epirubicin/cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel (ddEC-P) regimen is the optimal postoperative adjuvant therapy. However, this regimen is limited by the grade 3/4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia (FN). There is an urgent need to explore the efficacy, safety and proper dosage of PEGylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (PEG-G-CSF) as support for ddEC-P in Chinese breast cancer patients with posit...

  11. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on murine thymic emigration and subsets reconstitution after a sublethal dose of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongxia; Guo Mei; Sun Xuedong; Ai Huisheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on murine thymic emigration and subsets reconstitution after a sublethal dose of irradiation. Methods: Female BALB/c mice were irradiated with a 6.0 Gy of γ-ray total-body irradiation and then randomly divided into GCSF group and control group. For mice in the GCSF group, recombinant human G-CSF 100 μg · kg -1 · d -1 was injected subcutaneously once daily for 14 continuous days and mice in the control group were given the same volume of phosphate buffered solution (PBS). At 7, 14, 21 and 28 days later, mice were killed and thymus mononuclear cell suspension were analyzed by flow cytometry for the percentage of the four stages of thymic CD4 - CD8 - double negative cells (DN1-4) and the CD4 + CD8 + double positive ( CD4 + CD8 + DP), CD4 + CD8 - single positive (CD4 + SP), CD4 - CD8 + single positive cells (CD8 + SP).Real-time PCR was used for detection and quantitation of murine T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (sjTRECs) of the thymic cells of 30 and 60 d after irradiation. Results: The percentage of thymic DN1 cells in GCSF group was significantly higher than that of the control group 7 d after irradiation (t=9.59, P<0.05). 21 d later, the proportion of thymic DN3 and DN4 cells were higher than those of the control group (t=16.37, 7.6, P<0.05). The percentage of thymic CD4 + CD8 + DP cells decreased 7 d after irradiation,increased at 14 d, decreased again at 21 days,and then got a permanent recover. The percentage of thymic CD4 + CD8 + DP cells in the GCSF group recovered to normal and was significantly higher than that of the control group 28 days after irradiation (t=12.22, P<0.05). The percentage of thymic CD8 + SP cells of the GCSF group was significantly higher than that of the control group 21 d after irradiation (t=3.77, P<0.05), while G-CSF had no obvious influence on the percentage of the thymic CD4 + SP cells. The sjTRECs copies in the

  12. Comparison of autologous cell therapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) injection vs. G-CSF injection alone for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome in a non-human primate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertho, Jean-Marc; Frick, Johanna; Prat, Marie; Demarquay, Christelle; Dudoignon, Nicolas; Trompier, Francois; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Thierry, Dominique; Gourmelon, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy of autologous cell therapy after irradiation combined with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) injections with G-CSF treatment alone in a heterogeneous model of irradiation representative of an accidental situation. Material and Methods: Non-human primates were irradiated at 8.7 Gy whole-body dose with the right arm shielded to receive 4.8 Gy. The first group of animals received G-CSF (lenograstim) injections starting 6 h after irradiation, and a second group received a combination of G-CSF (lenograstim) injections and autologous expanded hematopoietic cells. Animals were followed up for blood cell counts, circulating progenitors, and bone marrow cellularity. Results: No significant differences were seen between the two treatment groups, whatever the parameter observed: time to leukocyte or platelet recovery and duration and severity of aplasia. Conclusion: Our results indicated that identical recovery kinetic was observed when irradiated animals are treated with G-CSF independently of the reinjection of ex vivo expanded autologous hematopoietic cells. Thus G-CSF injections might be chosen as a first-line therapeutic strategy in the treatment of accidental acute radiation victims

  13. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF RECOMBINANT HUMAN GRANULOCYTIC COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR IN TREATMENT OF GRANULOCYTOPENIA DEVELOPED DURING IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Alexeeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of patients with severe clinical course of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is difficult problem. During the last years genetically engineered biological drugs are used equally with traditional immunosuppressive agents in treatment of severe forms of juvenile arthritis. High effectiveness of these drugs can be accompanied with development of unfavorable effects, for example, febrile neutropenia. The article presents results of a study of effectiveness and safety of recombinant human granulocytic colony-stimulating factor — filgrastim (Leucostim — in treatment of granulocytopenia developed during immunosuppressive therapy in 16 patients with JRA. It was shown that administration of filgrastim arrests leucopenia in 100% of patients and granulocytopenia — in 93% of patients in 24 hours after first injection. High effectiveness of drug was combined with good tolerability and safety.Key words: children, treatment, granulocytopenia, filgrastim, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(4:94-100

  14. Febrile Neutropenia Risk Assessment and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Support in Patients with Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Receiving R-CHOP Regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salar, Antonio; Haioun, Corinne; Rossi, Francesca Gaia

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ASCO and EORTC guidelines recommend granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) primary prophylaxis for cancer patients with a ≥20% overall risk of febrile neutropenia (FN), and to support delivery of dose-dense regimens. CHOP-like regimens (with rituximab [R]) are the current...... standard of care for the management of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but they are often associated with significant myelosuppression. Neutropenic events, particularly febrile neutropenia (FN), can be life-threatening and may lead to dose delays or reductions that compromise the efficacy......-CSF primary prophylaxis. Across all cycles, 29% of R-CHOP-21 patients had an unplanned hospitalization, with neutropenia/FN being the main reason. Subsequently, 67% of patients achieved a relative dose intensity (RDI) of ≥90% of their planned treatment (with respect to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin...

  15. Percutaneous implantation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells mobilized with granulocyte colony stimulating factor in osteoarthritis of the knee. First case reported in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baganet Cobas, Aymara Maria; Hernandez Ramirez, Porfirio; Fernandez Delgado, Norma

    2010-01-01

    The degenerative joint disease, also known as osteoarthrosis affects to 10% of elderlies aged 60. It is mainly characterized by pain in the involved joint, crepitation, morning stiff and a progressive limitation of movement of that joint leading to a partial or total wear of articular cartilage. The treatment of the knee osteoarthrosis is a great challenge. The recent advances in use of regenerative medicine suggest that adult stem cells could represent a promisor alternative in the treatment of this entity. In a female patient aged 61 presenting with knee osteoarthrosis authors placed a percutaneous implant of autologous mononuclear cells mobilized to peripheral blood by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor achieving a fast clinical and radiological improvement. This result suggests that the procedure used is a feasible, simple, safe and less expensive method for treatment of articular degenerative lesions

  16. Evaluating the effects of buffer conditions and extremolytes on thermostability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor using high-throughput screening combined with design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablinger, Elisabeth; Hellweger, Monika; Leitgeb, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    In this study, we combined a high-throughput screening method, differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), with design of experiments (DoE) methodology to evaluate the effects of several formulation components on the thermostability of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). First we performed a primary buffer screening where we tested thermal stability of G-CSF in different buffers, pH values and buffer concentrations. The significance of each factor and the two-way interactions between them were studied by multivariable regression analysis. pH was identified as most critical factor regarding thermal stability. The most stabilizing buffer, sodium glutamate, and sodium acetate were determined for further investigations. Second we tested the effect of 6 naturally occurring extremolytes (trehalose, sucrose, ectoine, hydroxyectoine, sorbitol, mannitol) on the thermal stability of G-CSF, using a central composite circumscribed design. At low pH (3.8) and low buffer concentration (5 mM) all extremolytes led to a significant increase in thermal stability except the addition of ectoine which resulted in a strong destabilization of G-CSF. Increasing pH and buffer concentration led to an increase in thermal stability with all investigated extremolytes. The described systematic approach allowed to create a ranking of stabilizing extremolytes at different buffer conditions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Increased mobilization and yield of stem cells using plerixafor in combination with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for the treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis M Pelus

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Louis M Pelus1, Sherif S Farag21Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 2Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IndianaAbstract: Multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma remain the most common indications for high-dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell rescue. While a CD34+ cell dose of 1 × 106/kg is considered the minimum required for engraftment, higher CD34+ doses correlate with improved outcome. Numerous studies, however, support targeting a minimum CD34+ cell dose of 2.0 × 106/kg, and an “optimal” dose of 4 to 6 × 106/kg for a single transplant. Unfortunately, up to 40% of patients fail to mobilize an optimal CD34+ cell dose using myeloid growth factors alone. Plerixafor is a novel reversible inhibitor of CXCR4 that significantly increases the mobilization and collection of higher numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Two randomized multi-center clinical trials in patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and multiple myeloma have demonstrated that the addition of plerixafor to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor increases the mobilization and yield of CD34+ cells in fewer apheresis days, which results in durable engraftment. This review summarizes the pharmacology and evidence for the clinical efficacy of plerixafor in mobilizing hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and discusses potential ways to utilize plerixafor in a cost-effective manner in patients with these diseases.Keywords: plerixafor, mobilization, stem cells, lymphoma, myeloma

  18. A randomized case-controlled study of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor for the treatment of sepsis in preterm neutropenic infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktaş, Doğukan; Demirel, Bilge; Gürsoy, Tuğba; Ovalı, Fahri

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to treat sepsis in neutropenic preterm infants. Fifty-six neutropenic preterm infants with suspected or culture-proven sepsis hospitalized in Zeynep Kamil Maternity and Children's Educational and Training Hospital, Kozyatağı/Istanbul, Turkey between January 2008 and January 2010 were enrolled. Patients were randomized either to receive rhG-CSF plus empirical antibiotics (Group I) or empirical antibiotics alone (Group II). Clinical features were recorded. Daily complete blood count was performed until neutropenia subsided. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5. Thirty-three infants received rhG-CSF plus antibiotic treatment and 23 infants received antibiotic treatment. No drug-related adverse event was recorded. Absolute neutrophil count values were significantly higher on the 2(nd) study day and 3(rd) study day in Group I. Short-term mortality did not differ between the groups. Treatment with rhG-CSF resulted in a more rapid recovery of ANC in neutropenic preterm infants. However, no reduction in short-term mortality was documented. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Promotive effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabaya, Koji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kusaka, Masaru; Seki, Masatoshi (Kirin Brewery Co., Ltd., Gunma (Japan). Pharmaceutical Research Laboratory); Fushiki, Masato

    1994-08-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on the recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated whole-body irradiation was investigated in mice. Male 7-week old C3H/HeN mice received a total of ten exposures of 0.25 Gy/day from day 1 to 5 and from day 8 to 12. Peripheral neutropenia with a nadir on day 17 was caused by the fractionated irradiation. Daily subcutaneous injections of rhG-CSF at 0.25 and 2.5 [mu]g/body/day from day from day 1 to 21 promoted the recovery of neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. The kinetics of morphologically identifiable bone marrow cells were studied to clarify the mechanism behind the promotive effect of this factor. A slight decrease in mitotic immature granulocytes, such as myeloblasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes on day 5, and a drastic decrease in metamyelocytes and marrow neutrophils on days 5, 9, and 17 were seen in the femur of irradiated mice. Treatment using rhG-CSF caused an increase in immature granulocytes of all differential stages in the femur. Microscopic findings of the femurs and spleens also reveals an increase in immature granulocytes in these organs in mice injected with rhG-CSF. These results indicate that rhG-CSF accelerates granulopoiesis in the femur and spleen, thereby promoting recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation. (author).

  20. Promotive effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabaya, Koji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kusaka, Masaru; Seki, Masatoshi; Fushiki, Masato.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on the recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated whole-body irradiation was investigated in mice. Male 7-week old C3H/HeN mice received a total of ten exposures of 0.25 Gy/day from day 1 to 5 and from day 8 to 12. Peripheral neutropenia with a nadir on day 17 was caused by the fractionated irradiation. Daily subcutaneous injections of rhG-CSF at 0.25 and 2.5 μg/body/day from day from day 1 to 21 promoted the recovery of neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. The kinetics of morphologically identifiable bone marrow cells were studied to clarify the mechanism behind the promotive effect of this factor. A slight decrease in mitotic immature granulocytes, such as myeloblasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes on day 5, and a drastic decrease in metamyelocytes and marrow neutrophils on days 5, 9, and 17 were seen in the femur of irradiated mice. Treatment using rhG-CSF caused an increase in immature granulocytes of all differential stages in the femur. Microscopic findings of the femurs and spleens also reveals an increase in immature granulocytes in these organs in mice injected with rhG-CSF. These results indicate that rhG-CSF accelerates granulopoiesis in the femur and spleen, thereby promoting recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation. (author)

  1. The Effect of Recombinant Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor on Oral and Periodontal Manifestations in a Patient with Cyclic Neutropenia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Matarasso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic Neutropenia (CN is characterized by recurrent infections, fever, oral ulcerations, and severe periodontitis as result of the reduced host defences. The previous studies have established the effectiveness of recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF to increase the number and the function of neutrophils in the peripheral blood in this disease. In a 20-year-old Caucasian female with a diagnosis of cyclic neutropenia, oral clinical examination revealed multiple painful ulcerations of the oral mucosa, poor oral hygiene conditions, marginal gingivitis, and moderate periodontitis. The patient received a treatment with G-CSF (Pegfilgrastim, 6 mg/month in order to improve her immunological status. Once a month nonsurgical periodontal treatment was carefully performed when absolute neutrophil count (ANC was ≥500/L. The treatment with G-CSF resulted in a rapid increase of circulating neutrophils that, despite its short duration, leaded to a reduction in infection related events and the resolution of the multiple oral ulcerations. The disappearance of oral pain allowed an efficacy nonsurgical treatment and a normal tooth brushing that determined a reduction of probing depth (PD≤4 mm and an improvement of the oral hygiene conditions recorded at 6-month follow-up.

  2. Hematological remission and long term hematological control of acute myeloblastic leukemia induced and maintained by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Luciana; Cunha, Manuel; Gonçalves, Cristina; Teixeira, Maria dos Anjos; Coutinho, Jorge; Ribeiro, António Carlos Pinto; Lima, Margarida

    2003-12-01

    We describe a case of a patient with CD34+, TdT+, CD13-, CD33-, MPO- undifferentiated acute leukemia who refused chemotherapy and who achieved complete hematological remission 14 months after the diagnosis, during a short course of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for neutropenia and life threatening infection. Relapse occurred approximately one year later and G-CSF was reintroduced, being maintained for 4 months, at a dose and frequency adapted to maintain normal blood counts, a complete hematological remission being achieved again. Five months after withdrawing the G-CSF therapy a second relapse was observed; G-CSF was tried again with success, resulting in a very good hematological response that was sustained by G-CSF maintenance therapy. One year latter there was the need of increasing the doses of G-CSF in order to obtain the same hematological effect, at same time blast cells acquired a more mature CD34+, TdT-, CD13+, CD33-, MPO+ myeloid phenotype. Finally, the patient developed progressive neutropenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute leukemia in spite of G-CSF therapy, dying 64 months after initial diagnosis (50 months after starting G-CSF therapy) with overt G-CSF resistant acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), after failure of conventional induction chemotherapy.

  3. A pilot cohort study of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the treatment of unresponsive thin endometrium resistant to standard therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleicher, N; Kim, A; Michaeli, T; Lee, H-J; Shohat-Tal, A; Lazzaroni, E; Barad, D H

    2013-01-01

    Is thin endometrium unresponsive to standard treatments expandable by intrauterine perfusion with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)? This cohort study is supportive of the effectiveness of G-CSF in expanding chronically unresponsive endometria. In a previous small case series, we reported the successful off-label use of G-CSF in four consecutive patients, who had previously failed to expand their endometria beyond 6.9 mm with the use of standard treatments. In a prospective observational cohort pilot study over 18 months, we described 21 consecutive infertile women with endometria women had, based on age-specific FSH and anti-Müllerian hormone, an objective diagnosis of diminished ovarian reserve and had failed 2.0 ± 2.1 prior IVF cycles elsewhere. With 5.2 ± 1.9 days between G-CSF perfusions and embryo transfers, endometrial thickness increased from 6.4 ± 1.4 to 9.3 ± 2.1 mm (P inventors on a number of awarded and still pending U.S. patents, none related to the materials presented here. N.G. is on the board of a medically related company, not in any way associated with the data presented here.

  4. Erythropoietin plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes. Identification of a subgroup of responders. The Spanish Erythropathology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacha, A F; Arrizabalaga, B; Villegas, A; Manteiga, R; Calvo, T; Julià, A; Fernández Fuertes, I; González, F A; Font, L; Juncà, J; del Arco, A; Malcorra, J J; Equiza, E P; de Mendiguren, B P; Romero, M

    1999-12-01

    Anemia leading to transfusion is probably the most important problem in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Human recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEpo) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) have been used to treat patients with anemia of MDS, but fewer than 50% respond. The aim of this work was to evaluate the benefit of rHuEpo +/- G-CSF treatment and to isolate the response predictive variables in a group of selected patients with MDS. A non-randomized multicenter trial was carried out in 32 patients with MDS. The inclusion criteria were age >= 18 years, refractory anemia (RA) or refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts, Hb +1 (77% of cases responded). In contrast, when this score was <= 1 only 15 % of the cases responded. Use of the Scandinavian-American response score is to be recommended in a patient-oriented approach to treating MDS cases with the Epo and G-CSF. Treatment with rHuEpo and G-CSF is safe, its main drawback being its cost. However, a long-term study evaluating the regimen's cost-benefit ratio is warranted.

  5. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment at a low dose but for a long duration in patients with coronary heart disease. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Koji; Nagashima, Kenshi; Arai, Masazumi

    2006-01-01

    In animal models, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) improves post-infarct cardiac function. However, in pilot studies involving patients with angina and acute myocardial infarction (AMI), G-CSF at a high dose frequently induced coronary occlusion or restenosis, but those at a low dose showed no significant beneficial effect. We hypothesized that a low dose but long duration of G-CSF will have a beneficial effect without serious complications to patients with coronary heart disease. Forty-six patients with angina or AMI were randomly assigned into G-CSF and non-G-CSF control groups, respectively. Recombinant G-CSF was subcutaneously injected once a day for 10 days. The leukocyte counts in the peripheral blood were controlled at approximately 30,000/μl. One month later, a Thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography revealed the increased percentage uptake and the reduced extent and severity scores in the G-CSF angina group. In the G-CSF AMI group, the curve between the ejection fraction and peak creatine kinase shifted significantly upward, compared with that of the non-G-CSF AMI group. Serious complications were not observed during the 6 months of observation. A low dose but long duration of G-CSF treatment may have a beneficial effect without any serious complications in patients with coronary heart disease. (author)

  6. Identification and in vitro characterization of novel nanobodies against human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor to provide inhibition of G-CSF function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakherad, Hamid; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Aghamollaei, Hossein; Taheri, Ramezan Ali; Torshabi, Maryam; Yazdi, Mojtaba Tabatabaei; Ebrahimizadeh, Walead; Setayesh, Neda

    2017-09-01

    It has been shown that Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has a higher expression in malignant tumors, and anti-G-CSF therapy considerably decreases tumor growth, tumor vascularization and metastasis. Thus, blocking the signaling pathway of G-CSF could be beneficial in cancer therapy. This study is aimed at designing and producing a monoclonal nanobody that could act as an antagonist of G-CSF receptor. Nanobodies are the antigen binding fragments of camelid single-chain antibodies, also known as VHH. These fragments have exceptional properties which makes them ideal for tumor imaging and therapeutic applications. We have used our previously built nanobody phage libraries to isolate specific nanobodies to the G-CSF receptor. After a series of cross-reactivity and affinity experiments, two unique nanobodies were selected for functional analysis. Proliferation assay, real-time PCR and immunofluorescence assays were used to characterize these nanobodies. Finally, VHH26 nanobody that was able to specifically bind G-CSF receptor (G-CSF-R) on the surface of NFS60 cells and efficiently block G-CSF-R downstream signaling pathway in a dose-dependent manner was selected. This nanobody could be further developed into a valuable tool in tumor therapy and it forms a basis for additional studies in preclinical animal models. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Systemic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhances wound healing in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB): Results of a pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Jo-David; Manes, Becky; Frangoul, Haydar

    2015-07-01

    Chronic nonhealing wounds are the norm in patients with inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB), especially those with dystrophic EB (DEB). A possible benefit in wound healing after subcutaneous treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was suggested from an anecdotal report of a patient given this during stem cell mobilization before bone-marrow transplantation. We sought to determine whether benefit in wound healing in DEB skin might result after 6 daily doses of G-CSF and to confirm its safety. Patients were assessed for changes in total body blister and erosion counts, surface areas of selected wounds, and specific symptomatology after treatment. Seven patients with DEB (recessive, 6; dominant, 1) were treated daily with subcutaneous G-CSF (10 μg/kg/dose) and reevaluated on day 7. For all patients combined, median reductions of 75.5% in lesional size and 36.6% in blister/erosion counts were observed. When only the 6 responders were considered, there were median reductions of 77.4% and 38.8% of each of these measured parameters, respectively. No adverse side effects were noted. Limitations include small patient number, more than 1 DEB subtype included, and lack of untreated age-matched control subjects. Subcutaneous G-CSF may be beneficial in promoting wound healing in some patients with DEB when conventional therapies fail. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The impact of donor characteristics on the immune cell composition of mixture allografts of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor-mobilized marrow harvests and peripheral blood harvests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Tong; Zhao, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Yu; Liu, Kai-Yan; Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-12-01

    The association of donor characteristics with immune cell composition in allografts remains poorly understood. In this retrospective study, the effects of donor characteristics on immune cell composition in allografts were investigated. The correlations of donor characteristics with the immune cell composition in mixture allografts of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor-mobilized marrow harvests and peripheral blood harvests of 390 healthy donors (male, 240; female, 150; median age, 40 years old) were analyzed. The median doses of CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD3+CD4-CD8- T cells, and monocytes in mixture allografts were 160.57 × 10(6), 89.29 × 10(6), 56.16 × 10(6), 10.87 × 10(6), and 137.94 × 10(6)/kg, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that younger donor age was associated with a higher dose of CD3+ T cells (p = 0.006), CD3+CD8+ T cells (p donor weight with CD3+ T cells (p blood lymphocyte pre-peripheral blood apheresis was correlated with the yield of CD3+ T cells (p blood monocyte count before marrow harvest predicted the monocyte dose (p = 0.002). The results suggested that older and overweight donors should not be chosen. The monocyte and lymphocyte counts before harvest could predict the yield of immune cells in allografts. © 2015 AABB.

  9. Just-in-time rescue plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Veronica R; Popat, Uday; Ciurea, Stefan; Nieto, Yago; Anderlini, Paolo; Rondon, Gabriela; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard; Hosing, Chitra

    2013-09-01

    Plerixafor, a recently approved peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilizing agent, is often added to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells in patients with lymphoma or myeloma who cannot mobilize enough CD34+ cells with G-CSF alone to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation. However, data are lacking regarding the feasibility and efficacy of just-in-time plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and G-CSF. We reviewed the peripheral blood stem cell collection data of 38 consecutive patients with lymphoma (Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's) and multiple myeloma who underwent chemomobilization and high-dose G-CSF and just-in-time plerixafor to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment combination. All patients with multiple myeloma and all but one patient with lymphoma collected the minimum required number of CD34+ cells to proceed with autologous stem cell transplantation (>2 × 10(6) /kg of body weight). The median CD34+ cell dose collected in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma was 4.93 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. The median CD34+ cell dose collected for patients with multiple myeloma was 8.81 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. Plerixafor was well tolerated; no grade 2 or higher non-hematologic toxic effects were observed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. High pH solubilization and chromatography-based renaturation and purification of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Fan, Hua; Liu, Jiahua; Wang, Minhong; Wang, Lili; Wang, Chaozhan

    2012-03-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) is a very efficient therapeutic protein drug which has been widely used in human clinics to treat cancer patients suffering from chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. In this study, rhG-CSF was solubilized from inclusion bodies by using a high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea. It was found that solubilization of the rhG-CSF inclusion bodies greatly depended on the buffer pH employed; alkalic pH significantly favored the solubilization. In addition, when small amount of urea was added to the solution at high pH, the solubilization was further enhanced. After solubilization, the rhG-CSF was renatured with simultaneous purification by using weak anion exchange, strong anion exchange, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, separately. The results indicated that the rhG-CSF solubilized by the high-pH solution containing low concentration of urea had much higher mass recovery than the one solubilized by 8 M urea when using anyone of the three refolding methods employed in this work. In the case of weak anion exchange chromatography, the high pH solubilized rhG-CSF could get a mass recovery of 73%. The strategy of combining solubilization of inclusion bodies at high pH with refolding of protein using liquid chromatography may become a routine method for protein production from inclusion bodies.

  11. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of Iranian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirzagar, Nasibeh; Nafissi, Shahriar; Tafakhori, Abbas; Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Amirzargar, Aliakbar; Ghaffarpour, Majid; Siroos, Bahaddin; Harirchian, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and tolerability of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in subjects with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Forty subjects with ALS were randomly assigned to two groups, which received either subcutaneous G-CSF (5 μg/kg/q12h) or placebo for 5 days. The subjects were then followed up for 3 months using the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R), manual muscle testing, ALS Assessment Questionnaire-40, and nerve conduction studies. CD34+/CD133+ cell count and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were evaluated at baseline. The rate of disease progression did not differ significantly between the two groups. The reduction in ALSFRS-R scores was greater in female subjects in the G-CSF group than in their counterparts in the placebo group. There was a trend toward a positive correlation between baseline CSF MCP-1 levels and the change in ALSFRS-R scores in both groups (Spearman's ρ=0.370, p=0.070). With the protocol implemented in this study, G-CSF is not a promising option for the treatment of ALS. Furthermore, it may accelerate disease progression in females.

  12. Stem cell mobilization induced by subcutaneous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to improve cardiac regeneration after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction: result of the double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled stem cells in myocardial infarction (STEMMI) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, RS; Jorgensen, E; Wang, Y

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase 1 clinical trials of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment after myocardial infarction have indicated that G-CSF treatment is safe and may improve left ventricular function. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial aimed to assess the efficacy of......: Bone marrow stem cell mobilization with subcutaneous G-CSF is safe but did not lead to further improvement in ventricular function after acute myocardial infarction compared with the recovery observed in the placebo group...

  13. Factor estimulante de colonias de granulocitos en pacientes con cáncer Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in patients with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Céspedes Quevedo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Se efectuó un estudio descriptivo, longitudinal y prospectivo de 26 pacientes con cáncer en diferentes localizaciones asociado a leucopenia y neutropenia inducidas por citotóxicos, atendidos en el Servicio de Quimioterapia del Hospital Oncológico Docente "Conrado Benítez" de Santiago de Cuba, de mayo del 2011 a igual mes del 2012, con vistas a determinar el efecto del factor de colonias granulocítica recombinante Ior® LeukoCIM --producido por el Centro de Inmunología Molecular de Ciudad de La Habana-- en ellos mediante la realización de conteos globales de leucocitos y neutrófilos, antes y después de aplicar el tratamiento. En la serie predominaron el sexo femenino, el cáncer de mama y el estadio clínico II; también se obtuvo que 92,3 % de los pacientes respondieron satisfactoriamente a la terapia, el estadio clínico del cáncer no modificó el efecto mielodepresor de los citotóxicos ni el mieloestimulador de la hormona, y el cisplatino y la adriamicina se relacionaron con las neutropenias mayores y la falta de reacción al factor. Para finalizar, el Ior® LeukoCIM estimuló el sistema granulopoyético de la mayoría de los afectados.A descriptive, longitudinal and prospective study was conducted in 26 patients with cancer in different locations associated with leukopenia and neutropenia induced by cytotoxic drugs, treated at the Chemotherapy Department of "Conrado Benítez" Teaching Oncology Hospital of Santiago de Cuba, from May 2011 to the same month of 2012, with the purpose of determining the effect of the recombinant granulocyte-colony factor Ior® LeukoCIM --produced by the Center of Molecular Immunology in Havana city-- in them by means of global counts of leukocytes and neutrophils before and after applying the treatment. Female sex, breast cancer and clinical stage II prevailed in the series. It was also found that 92.3% of patients responded successfully to the therapy, the clinical stage of cancer did not modify the

  14. OK-432 reduces mortality and bacterial translocation in irradiated and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-treated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, Masako; Uzawa, Akiko; Ogyu, Toshiaki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Gen

    2001-06-01

    Acute radiation induces bacterial translocation from the gut, followed by systemic infection and sepsis. In order to reduce the mortality after acute whole body irradiation, it is essential to control bacterial translocation. In this study, we established a bacterial translocation assay as a sensitive method to detect minor mucosal injury by radiation. By utilizing this assay, we evaluated the adverse effects, if any, of hematopoietic reagents on the mucosal integrity in the respiratory and gastro-intestinal tracts. Bacterial translocation to the liver and spleen occurred after whole-body irradiation if the dose exceeded 6 Gy. The administration of G-CSF unexpectedly increased the bacterial translocation in 8 Gy-irradiated mice. The pharmaceutical preparation of low-virulent Streptococcus pyogenes, OK-432, significantly reduced the endotoxin levels in peripheral blood without any reduction of bacterial translocation. A combined treatment with G-CSF and OK-432 decreased bacterial translocation and prevented death. This result indicates that the early administration of G-CSF has an adverse effect on bacterial translocation, and that a combined treatment of G-CSF and OK-432 attenuates the adverse effect of G-CSF and improves the survival rate after acute irradiation. (author)

  15. The role of donor characteristics and post-granulocyte colony-stimulating factor white blood cell counts in predicting the adverse events and yields of stem cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Huey; Yang, Shang-Hsien; Chu, Sung-Chao; Su, Yu-Chieh; Chang, Chu-Yu; Chiu, Ya-Wen; Kao, Ruey-Ho; Li, Dian-Kun; Yang, Kuo-Liang; Wang, Tso-Fu

    2011-05-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is now widely used for stem cell mobilization. We evaluated the role of post-G-CSF white blood cell (WBC) counts and donor factors in predicting adverse events and yields associated with mobilization. WBC counts were determined at baseline, after the third and the fifth dose of G-CSF in 476 healthy donors. Donors with WBC ≥ 50 × 10(3)/μL post the third dose of G-CSF experienced more fatigue, myalgia/arthralgia, and chills, but final post-G-CSF CD34(+) cell counts were similar. Although the final CD34(+) cell count was higher in donors with WBC ≥ 50 × 10(3)/μL post the fifth G-CSF, the incidence of side effects was similar. Females more frequently experienced headache, nausea/anorexia, vomiting, fever, and lower final CD34(+) cell count than did males. Donors with body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 showed higher incidences of sweat and insomnia as well as higher final CD34(+) cell counts. Donor receiving G-CSF ≥ 10 μg/kg tended to experience bone pain, headache and chills more frequently. Multivariate analysis indicated that female gender is an independent factor predictive of the occurrence of most side effects, except for ECOG > 1 and chills. Higher BMI was also an independent predictor for fatigue, myalgia/arthralgia, and sweat. Higher G-CSF dose was associated with bone pain, while the WBC count post the third G-CSF was associated with fatigue only. In addition, one donor in the study period did not complete the mobilization due to suspected anaphylactoid reaction. Observation for 1 h after the first injection of G-CSF is required to prevent complications from unpredictable side effects.

  16. Characterization of buffy coat-derived granulocytes for clinical use: a comparison with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor/dexamethasone-pretreated donor-derived products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Geer, A; Gazendam, R P; Tool, A T J; van Hamme, J L; de Korte, D; van den Berg, T K; Zeerleder, S S; Kuijpers, T W

    2017-02-01

    Buffy coat-derived granulocytes have been described as an alternative to the apheresis product from donors pretreated with dexamethasone and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The latter is - dependent on the local and national settings - obtained following a demanding and time-consuming procedure, which is undesirable in critically ill septic patients. In contrast, buffy coat-derived products have a large volume and are often heavily contaminated with red cells and platelets. We developed a new pooled buffy coat-derived product with high purity and small volume, and performed a comprehensive functional characterization of these granulocytes. We pooled ten buffy coats following the production of platelet concentrates. Saline 0·9% was added to decrease the viscosity and the product was split into plasma, red cells and a 'super' buffy coat. Functional data of the granulocytes were compared to those obtained with granulocytes from healthy controls and G-CSF/dexamethasone-pretreated donors. Buffy coat-derived granulocytes showed adhesion, chemotaxis, reactive oxygen species production, degranulation, NETosis and in vitro killing of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Aspergillus species comparable to control and G-CSF/dexamethasone-derived granulocytes. Candida killing was superior compared to G-CSF/dexamethasone-derived granulocytes. Immunophenotyping was normal; especially no signs of activation in the buffy coat-derived granulocytes were seen. Viability was reduced. Buffy coats are readily available in the regular blood production process and would take away the concerns around the apheresis product. The product described appears a promising alternative for transfusion purposes. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  17. Transplanted Peripheral Blood Stem Cells Mobilized by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Promoted Hindlimb Functional Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Koda, Masao; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Sakuma, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Kei; Okawa, Akihiko; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Mannoji, Chikato

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) derived from bone marrow. We hypothesized that intraspinal transplantation of PBSCs mobilized by G-CSF could promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury. Spinal cords of adult nonobese diabetes/severe immunodeficiency mice were injured using an Infinite Horizon impactor (60 kdyn). One week after the injury, 3.0 µl of G-CSF-mobilized human mononuclear cells (MNCs; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), G-CSF-mobilized human CD34-positive PBSCs (CD34; 0.5 × 10(5)/µl), or normal saline was injected to the lesion epicenter. We performed immunohistochemistry. Locomotor recovery was assessed by Basso Mouse Scale. The number of transplanted human cells decreased according to the time course. The CD31-positive area was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups compared with the vehicle group. The number of serotonin-positive fibers was significantly larger in the MNC and CD34 groups than in the vehicle group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of apoptotic oligodendrocytes was significantly smaller in cell-transplanted groups, and the areas of demyelination in the MNC- and CD34-transplanted mice were smaller than that in the vehicle group, indicating that cell transplantation suppressed oligodendrocyte apoptosis and demyelination. Both the MNC and CD34 groups showed significantly better hindlimb functional recovery compared with the vehicle group. There was no significant difference between the two types of transplanted cells. Intraspinal transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized MNCs or CD34-positive cells promoted angiogenesis, serotonergic fiber regeneration/sparing, and preservation of myelin, resulting in improved hindlimb function after spinal cord injury in comparison with vehicle-treated control mice. Transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized PBSCs has advantages for treatment of spinal cord injury in the ethical and immunological viewpoints, although further exploration

  18. Advantages of concurrent biochemotherapy modified by decrescendo interleukin-2, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and tamoxifen for patients with metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, S J; Gammon, G; Boasberg, P D; Martin, M A; Kristedja, T S; Guo, M; Stern, S; Edwards, S; Fournier, P; Weisberg, M; Cannon, M; Fawzy, N W; Johnson, T D; Essner, R; Foshag, L J; Morton, D L

    1999-09-01

    Concurrent biochemotherapy results in high response rates but also significant toxicity in patients with metastatic melanoma. We attempted to improve its efficacy and decrease its toxicity by using decrescendo dosing of interleukin-2 (IL-2), posttreatment granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and low-dose tamoxifen. Forty-five patients with poor prognosis metastatic melanoma were treated at a community hospital inpatient oncology unit affiliated with the John Wayne Cancer Institute (Santa Monica, CA) between July 1995 and September 1997. A 5-day modified concurrent biochemotherapy regimen of dacarbazine, vinblastine, cisplatin, decrescendo IL-2, interferon alfa-2b, and tamoxifen was repeated at 21-day intervals. G-CSF was administered beginning on day 6 for 7 to 10 days. The overall response rate was 57% (95% confidence interval, 42% to 72%), the complete response rate was 23%, and the partial response rate was 34%. Complete remissions were achieved in an additional 11% of patients by surgical resection of residual disease after biochemotherapy. The median time to progression was 6.3 months and the median duration of survival was 11.4 months. At a maximum follow-up of 36 months (range, 10 to 36 months), 32% of patients are alive and 14% remain free of disease. Decrescendo IL-2 dosing and administration of G-CSF seemed to reduce toxicity, length of hospital stay, and readmission rates. No patient required intensive care unit monitoring, and there were no treatment-related deaths. The data from this study indicate that the modified concurrent biochemotherapy regimen reduces the toxicity of concurrent biochemotherapy with no apparent decrease in response rate in patients with poor prognosis metastatic melanoma.

  19. Efficacy, safety and proper dose analysis of PEGylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as support for dose-dense adjuvant chemotherapy in node positive Chinese breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; LingHu, RuiXia; Zhan, XingYang; Li, Ruisheng; Feng, Fan; Gao, Xudong; Zhao, Lei; Yang, Junlan

    2017-10-03

    For high-risk breast cancer patients with positive axillary lymph nodes, dose-dense every-two-week epirubicin/cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel (ddEC-P) regimen is the optimal postoperative adjuvant therapy. However, this regimen is limited by the grade 3/4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia (FN). There is an urgent need to explore the efficacy, safety and proper dosage of PEGylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (PEG-G-CSF) as support for ddEC-P in Chinese breast cancer patients with positive axillary lymph nodes. Prospectively, 40 women with stage IIIA to IIIC breast cancer received ddEC-P ± trastuzumab as adjuvant treatment. PEG-G-CSF was injected subcutaneously in a dose of 6 mg or 3 mg on the 2 th day of each treatment cycle. With administration of PEG-G-CSF, all of the 40 patients completed 8 cycles of ddEC-P ± trastuzumab regimen without dose reductions or treatment delays. Moreover, no FN cases were observed. Further analysis showed that the proper dosage of PEG-G-CSF was 6 mg for ddEC treatment, and 3 mg for ddP treatment. PEG-G-CSF exhibits advantages compared with G-CSF in convenient of administration and tolerance for high risk Chinese breast cancer patients. More importantly, the proper dose of PEG-G-CSF for high risk Chinese breast cancer patients during ddEC-P chemotherapy may be 6 mg for ddEC treatment and 3 mg for ddP treatment.

  20. Topical granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for the treatment of oral and genital ulcers of patients with Behçet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacanli, A; Yerebakan Dicle, O; Parmaksizoglu, B; Yilmaz, E; Alpsoy, E

    2006-09-01

    Recurrent and painful ulcers of the oral mucosa and genital skin/mucosa are the most commonly observed manifestations in patients with Behçet's disease (BD). They affect patients' quality of life. Because of the effectiveness of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in wound healing, it may also be useful for the treatment of oral ulcers (OU) and genital ulcers (GU) of BD. We aimed to determine the efficacy of topically applied G-CSF in the treatment of OU and GU of BD. Seven patients with BD diagnosed according to the criteria of the International Study Group for Behçet's Disease were involved in the study. The patients were observed for 3 months before the study, and all occurrences were recorded during this period. Patients were given topical G-CSF for OU (4 x 120 microg/day, for 5 days) and/or GU (4 x 30 microg/day, for 5 days) and followed-up for 3 months after treatment. No concurrent disease-specific or immunosuppressive topical or systemic drugs were given during the study period. G-CSF treatment decreased the healing time and pain of OU and GU in six of seven patients compared with the pretreatment period. However, the effectiveness of the G-CSF treatment on OU and GU healing time and pain severity did not continue during the post-treatment period. G-CSF has beneficial effects on the healing duration and pain severity of OU and GU of patients with BD. However, given the high cost, impractical preparation and inability to cure the disease, G-CSF treatment should be chosen only in selected patients.

  1. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor decreases the Th1/Th2 ratio in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Fei; Zhang, Zhuo; Hou, Jinxiao; Cao, Fenglin; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Ping; Wei, Hong; Zhou, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Chronic immune thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease that exhibits an abnormally high Th1/Th2 ratio. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to decrease the Th1/Th2 ratio in healthy donors. In this study, we investigated the effects of G-CSF treatment on the Th1/Th2 cells and the underlying mechanisms in patients with ITP in vitro. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from patients with ITP and healthy controls were treated with G-CSF. Expression levels of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and IL-13 in supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The expression of IFN-γ, IL-4, and G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) on Th1 and Th2 cells were examined by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The mRNA expression of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-13, and T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet) and GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3) in PBMCs was evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that G-CSF could significantly reduce the Th1/Th2 ratio in PBMCs from patients with ITP in vitro. As the concentration of G-CSF increased, Th1/Th2 ([IFN-γ+IL-2]/[IL-4+IL-13]) cytokine ratios and T-bet/GATA-3 mRNA ratios decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. Th1 cells and Th2 cells both expressed G-CSFR. These results suggest that G-CSF could decrease the Th1/Th2 ratio in the context of ITP, and elucidate the direct and indirect immunomodulatory mechanisms underlying G-CSF functions in Th1/Th2 cells, thus supporting the therapeutic potential of G-CSF in the treatment of patients with ITP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Primary granulocyte colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis during the first two cycles only or throughout all chemotherapy cycles in patients with breast cancer at risk for febrile neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, Maureen J; Peters, Frank P; Mandigers, Caroline M; Dercksen, M Wouter; Stouthard, Jacqueline M; Nortier, Hans J; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W; van Warmerdam, Laurence J; van de Wouw, Agnes J; Jacobs, Esther M; Mattijssen, Vera; van der Rijt, Carin C; Smilde, Tineke J; van der Velden, Annette W; Temizkan, Mehmet; Batman, Erdogan; Muller, Erik W; van Gastel, Saskia M; Borm, George F; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2013-12-01

    Early breast cancer is commonly treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. However, combining these drugs increases the risk of myelotoxicity and may require granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. The highest incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and largest benefit of G-CSF during the first cycles of chemotherapy lead to questions about the effectiveness of continued use of G-CSF throughout later cycles of chemotherapy. In a multicenter study, patients with breast cancer who were considered fit enough to receive 3-weekly polychemotherapy, but also had > 20% risk for FN, were randomly assigned to primary G-CSF prophylaxis during the first two chemotherapy cycles only (experimental arm) or to primary G-CSF prophylaxis throughout all chemotherapy cycles (standard arm). The noninferiority hypothesis was that the incidence of FN would be maximally 7.5% higher in the experimental compared with the standard arm. After inclusion of 167 eligible patients, the independent data monitoring committee advised premature study closure. Of 84 patients randomly assigned to G-CSF throughout all chemotherapy cycles, eight (10%) experienced an episode of FN. In contrast, of 83 patients randomly assigned to G-CSF during the first two cycles only, 30 (36%) had an FN episode (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.54), with a peak incidence of 24% in the third cycle (ie, first cycle without G-CSF prophylaxis). In patients with early breast cancer at high risk for FN, continued use of primary G-CSF prophylaxis during all chemotherapy cycles is of clinical relevance and thus cannot be abandoned.

  3. Therapy with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the chronic stage, but not in the acute stage, improves experimental autoimmune myocarditis in rats via nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kana; Okabe, Taka-aki; Mikami, Yu; Hattori, Miki; Fujita, Masatoshi; Kishimoto, Chiharu

    2010-09-01

    We systematically investigated serial efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy upon experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in rats treated with and without the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) with the analyses of tissue regeneration. G-CSF could mobilize multipotent progenitor cells of bone marrow into the peripheral blood and may improve ventricular function. A rat model of porcine myosin-induced EAM was used. After the immunization of myosin, G-CSF (10 microg/kg/day) or saline was injected intraperitoneally on days 0-21 in experiment 1 and on days 21-42 in experiment 2. Additional myosin-immunized rats were orally given 25 mg/kg/day of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), in each experiment (each group; n=8-21). Serum cytokines and peripheral blood cell counts were measured in each group. In experiment 1, G-CSF treatment aggravated cardiac pathology associated with increased macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels and enhanced superoxide production. In experiment 2, G-CSF treatment reduced the severity of myocarditis with increased capillary density and improved left ventricular ejection fraction. In the rats with EAM treated with G-CSF associated with oral L-NAME treatment in experiment 2, the severity of myocarditis was not reduced. Myocardial c-kit(+) cells were demonstrated only in G-CSF-treated group in experiment 2 but not in other groups. G-CSF has differential effects on EAM in rats associated with the modulation of cytokine network. The overwhelming superoxide production by G-CSF administration in the acute stage may worsen the disease. G-CSF therapy improved cardiac function via NO system in a rat model of myocarditis in the chronic stage, but not in the acute stage, possibly through the myocardial regeneration and acceleration of healing process. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuroprotective effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chung-Hsing; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Shun-Ping; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), as administered in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION). Using laser-induced photoactivation of intravenously administered Rose Bengal in the optic nerve head of 60 adult male Wistar rats, an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION) was inducted. Rats either immediately received G-CSF (subcutaneous injections) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 5 consecutive days. Rats were euthanized at 4 weeks post infarct. Density of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was counted using retrograde labeling of Fluoro-gold. Visual function was assessed by flash visual-evoked potentials (FVEP) at 4 weeks. TUNEL assay in the retinal sections and immunohistochemical staining of ED1 (marker of macrophage/microglia) were investigated in the optic nerve (ON) specimens. The RGC densities in the central and mid-peripheral retinas in the G-CSF treated rats were significantly higher than those of the PBS-treated rats (survival rate was 71.4% vs. 33.2% in the central retina; 61.8% vs. 22.7% in the mid-peripheral retina, respectively; both p optic nerve sections of G-CSF-treated rats (16 ± 6/HPF vs. 35 ± 10/HPF; p = 0.016). In conclusion, administration of G-CSF is neuroprotective in the rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, as demonstrated both structurally by RGC density and functionally by FVEP. G-CSF may work via the dual actions of anti-apoptosis for RGC surviving as well as anti-inflammation in the optic nerves as evidenced by less infiltration of ED1-povitive cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Direct anti-inflammatory effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on activation and functional properties of human T cell subpopulations in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malashchenko, Vladimir Vladimirovich; Meniailo, Maxsim Evgenievich; Shmarov, Viacheslav Anatolievich; Gazatova, Natalia Dinislamovna; Melashchenko, Olga Borisovna; Goncharov, Andrei Gennadievich; Seledtsova, Galina Victorovna; Seledtsov, Victor Ivanovich

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the direct effects of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on functionality of human T-cell subsets. CD3 + T-lymphocytes were isolated from blood of healthy donors by positive magnetic separation. T cell activation with particles conjugated with antibodies (Abs) to human CD3, CD28 and CD2 molecules increased the proportion of cells expressing G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR, CD114) in all T cell subpopulations studied (CD45RA + /CD197 + naive T cells, CD45RA - /CD197 + central memory T cells, CD45RA - /CD197 - effector memory T cells and CD45RA + /CD197 - terminally differentiated effector T cells). Upon T-cell activation in vitro, G-CSF (10.0 ng/ml) significantly and specifically enhanced the proportion of CD114 + T cells in central memory CD4 + T cell compartment. A dilution series of G-CSF (range, 0.1-10.0 ng/ml) was tested, with no effect on the expression of CD25 (interleukin-2 receptor α-chain) on activated T cells. Meanwhile, G-CSF treatment enhanced the proportion of CD38 + T cells in CD4 + naïve T cell, effector memory T cell and terminally differentiated effector T cell subsets, as well as in CD4 - central memory T cells and terminally differentiated effector T cells. G-CSF did not affect IL-2 production by T cells; relatively low concentrations of G-CSF down-regulated INF-γ production, while high concentrations of this cytokine up-regulated IL-4 production in activated T cells. The data obtained suggests that G-CSF could play a significant role both in preventing the development of excessive and potentially damaging inflammatory reactivity, and in constraining the expansion of potentially cytodestructive T cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor accompanied with a balanced diet improves cardiac function alterations induced by high fat diet in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daltro, Pâmela Santana; Alves, Paula Santana; Castro, Murilo Fagundes; Azevedo, Carine M; Vasconcelos, Juliana Fraga; Allahdadi, Kyan James; de Freitas, Luiz Antônio Rodrigues; de Freitas Souza, Bruno Solano; Dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira; Macambira, Simone Garcia

    2015-12-03

    High fat diet (HFD) is a major contributor to the development of obesity and cardiovascular diseases due to the induction of cardiac structural and hemodynamic abnormalities. We used a model of diabetic cardiomyopathy in C57Bl/6 mice fed with a HFD to investigate the effects of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), a cytokine known for its beneficial effects in the heart, on cardiac anatomical and functional abnormalities associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Groups of C57Bl/6 mice were fed with standard diet (n = 8) or HFD (n = 16). After 36 weeks, HFD animals were divided into a group treated with G-CSF + standard diet (n = 8) and a vehicle control group + standard diet (n = 8). Cardiac structure and function were assessed by electrocardiography, echocardiography and treadmill tests, in addition to the evaluation of body weight, fasting glicemia, insulin and glucose tolerance at different time points. Histological analyses were performed in the heart tissue. HFD consumption induced metabolic alterations characteristic of type 2 diabetes and obesity, as well as cardiac fibrosis and reduced exercise capacity. Upon returning to a standard diet, obese mice body weight returned to non-obese levels. G-CSF administration accelerated the reduction in of body weight in obese mice. Additionally, G-CSF treatment reduced insulin levels, diminished heart fibrosis, increased exercise capacity and reversed cardiac alterations, including bradycardia, elevated QRS amplitude, augmented P amplitude, increased septal wall thickness, left ventricular posterior thickening and cardiac output reduction. Our results indicate that G-CSF administration caused beneficial effects on obesity-associated cardiac impairment.

  7. Efficacy of polyethylene glycol-conjugated bovine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for reducing the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis in periparturient dairy cows and heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassfurther, Renee L; TerHune, Terry N; Canning, Peter C

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate effects of various doses of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated bovine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (bG-CSF) on the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis in periparturient dairy cattle. 211 periparturient Holstein cows and heifers. Approximately 7 days before the anticipated date of parturition (day of parturition = day 0), healthy cattle received SC injections of sterile saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control treatment) or PEG-bG-CSF at 5, 10, or 20 μg/kg. Cattle were commingled and housed in a pen with dirt flooring, which was kept wet to maximize the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis. Within 24 hours after parturition, each animal again received the assigned treatment. Mammary glands and milk were visually scored for abnormalities twice daily for 28 days after parturition. Milk samples were aseptically collected from mammary glands with an abnormal appearance or abnormal milk and submitted for microbial culture. Daily milk production was recorded, and milk composition was assessed on days 3, 5, 7, and 10. Cattle treated with PEG-bG-CSF at 10 and 20 μg/kg had significantly fewer cases of clinical mastitis (9/54 and 5/53, respectively), compared with control cattle (18/53). Administration of PEG -bG-CSF did not significantly affect daily milk production or milk composition. Results suggested that PEG-bG-CSF was effective for reducing the incidence of naturally occurring clinical mastitis in periparturient dairy cattle. Further investigations of the use of PEG-bG-CSF as a potential preventative intervention should be conducted.

  8. Defibrotide in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor significantly enhances the mobilization of primitive and committed peripheral blood progenitor cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Di Nicola, Massimo; Magni, Michele; Longoni, Paolo; Milanesi, Marco; Stucchi, Claudio; Cleris, Loredana; Formelli, Franca; Gianni, Massimo A

    2002-11-01

    Defibrotide is a polydeoxyribonucleotide, which significantly reduces the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells. We investigated the activity of Defibrotide alone or in combination with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) in BALB/c mice. A 5-day treatment with Defibrotide alone (1-15 mg/mouse/day) had no effect on WBC counts, frequencies and absolute numbers of total circulating colony-forming cells (CFCs), i.e., granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units, erythroid burst-forming units, and multilineage colony-forming units. As compared with mock-injected mice, administration of rhG-CSF alone (5 micro g/mouse/day) for 5 days significantly (P Defibrotide (15 mg/mouse/day) and rhG-CSF significantly (P Defibrotide plus rhG-CSF resulted in a significant increase (P Defibrotide/rhG-CSF-mobilized mononuclear cells rescued 43% and 71% of recipient mice, respectively. Experiments of CFC homing performed in lethally irradiated or nonirradiated recipients showed that marrow homing of transplanted PBPCs was reduced by 3-fold in Defibrotide-treated animals as compared with mock-injected mice (P Defibrotide might be because of an effect on PBPC trafficking. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that Defibrotide synergizes with rhG-CSF and significantly increases the mobilization of a broad spectrum of PBPCs, including primitive and committed progenitor cells. These data might have relevant implications for autologous and allogeneic anticancer therapy in humans.

  9. Stem cell collection in unmanipulated HLA-haploidentical/mismatched related transplantation with combined granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilised blood and bone marrow for patients with haematologic malignancies: the impact of donor characteristics and procedural settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Chen, X-H; Zhang, X; Gao, L; Gao, L; Kong, P-Y; Peng, X-G; Sun, A-H; Gong, Y; Zeng, D-F; Wang, Q-Y

    2010-06-01

    Unmanipulated haploidentical/mismatched related transplantation with combined granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilised peripheral blood stem cells (G-PBSCs) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilised bone marrow (G-BM) has been developed as an alternative transplantation strategy for patients with haematologic malignancies. However, little information is available about the factors predicting the outcome of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collection and bone marrow (BM) harvest in this transplantation. The effects of donor characteristics and procedure factors on CD34(+) cell yield were investigated. A total of 104 related healthy donors received granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) followed by PBSC collection and BM harvest. Male donors had significantly higher yields compared with female donors. In multiple regression analysis for peripheral blood collection, age and flow rate were negatively correlated with cell yield, whereas body mass index, pre-aphaeresis white blood cell (WBC) and circulating immature cell (CIC) counts were positively correlated with cell yields. For BM harvest, age was negatively correlated with cell yields, whereas pre-BM collection CIC counts were positively correlated with cell yield. All donors achieved the final product of >or=6 x10(6) kg(-1) recipient body weight. This transplantation strategy has been shown to be a feasible approach with acceptable outcomes in stem cell collection for patients who received HLA-haploidentical/mismatched transplantation with combined G-PBSCs and G-BM. In donors with multiple high-risk characteristics for poor aphaeresis CD34(+) cell yield, BM was an alternative source.

  10. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not mitigate disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlink, Sarah N; Lager, Kelly M; Brockmeier, Susan L; Loving, Crystal L; Miller, Laura C; Vorwald, Ann C; Yang, Han-Chun; Kehrli, Marcus E; Faaberg, Kay S

    2016-10-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is responsible for one of the most economically important diseases in swine worldwide. It causes reproductive failure in sows and pneumonia in pigs that predisposes them to secondary bacterial infections. Methods to control PRRSV and/or limit secondary bacterial infections are desired to reduce the impact of this virus on animal health. Neutrophils play a major role in combatting infection; they can act as phagocytes as well as produce and release lytic enzymes that have potent antimicrobial effects leading to the destruction and clearance of bacterial pathogens. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a cytokine that controls the production, differentiation and function of granulocytes (including neutrophils) from the bone marrow. Recent work from our laboratory has shown that encoding porcine G-CSF in a replication-defective adenovirus (Ad5-G-CSF) and delivering a single dose to pigs induced a neutrophilia lasting more than two weeks. As secondary bacterial infection is a common occurrence following PRRSV infection, particularly following challenge with highly pathogenic (HP)-PRRSV, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a single prophylactic dose of adenovirus-encoded G-CSF to mitigate secondary bacterial disease associated with HP-PRRSV infection. Administration of Ad5-G-CSF induced a significant neutrophilia as expected. However, between 1 and 2days following HP-PRRSV challenge the number of circulating neutrophils decreased dramatically in the HP-PRRSV infected group, but not the non-infected Ad5-G-CSF group. Ad5-G-CSF administration induced monocytosis as well, which was also reduced by HP-PRRSV challenge. There was no difference in the progression of disease between the Ad5-G-CSF and Ad5-empty groups following HP-PRRSV challenge, with pneumonia and systemic bacterial infection occurring in both treatment groups. Given the impact of HP-PRRSV infection on the

  11. Multimodal Approaches for Regenerative Stroke Therapies: Combination of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells is Not Superior to G-CSF Alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Tudor Balseanu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Attractive therapeutic strategies to enhance post-stroke recovery of aged brains include methods of cellular therapy that can enhance the endogenous restorative mechanisms of the injured brain. Since stroke afflicts mostly the elderly, it is highly desirable to test the efficacy of cell therapy in the microenvironment of aged brains that is generally refractory to regeneration. In particular, stem cells from the bone marrow allow an autologous transplantation approach that can be translated in the near future to the clinical practice. Such a bone marrow-derived therapy includes the grafting of stem cells as well as the delayed induction of endogenous stem cell mobilization and homing by the stem cell mobilizer granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF. We tested the hypothesis that grafting of bone marrow-derived pre-differentiated mesenchymal cells (BM-MSCs in G-CSF-treated animals improves the long-term functional outcome in aged rodents. To this end, G-CSF alone (50 μg/kg or in combination with a single dose (106 cells of rat BM MSCs was administered intravenously to Sprague-Dawley rats at 6 h after transient occlusion (90 min of the middle cerebral artery. Infarct volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging at 3 and 48 days post-stroke and additionally by immunhistochemistry at day 56. Functional recovery was tested during the entire post-stroke survival period of 56 days. Daily treatment for post-stroke aged rats with G-CSF led to a robust and consistent improvement of neurological function after 28 days. The combination therapy also led to robust angiogenesis in the formerly infarct core and beyond in the “islet of regeneration.” However, G-CSF + BM MSCs may not impact at all on the spatial reference-memory task or infarct volume and therefore did not further improve the post-stroke recovery. We suggest that in a real clinical practice involving older post-stroke patients, successful regenerative therapies

  12. Stem cell mobilization induced by subcutaneous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to improve cardiac regeneration after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction: result of the double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled stem cells in myocardial infarction (STEMMI) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Jørgensen, Erik; Wang, Yongzhong

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase 1 clinical trials of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment after myocardial infarction have indicated that G-CSF treatment is safe and may improve left ventricular function. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial aimed to assess the efficacy...... hours after symptom onset. Patients were randomized to double-blind treatment with G-CSF (10 microg/kg of body weight) or placebo for 6 days. The primary end point was change in systolic wall thickening from baseline to 6 months determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An independent core...

  13. Adsorption of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to polyvinyl chloride, polypropylene, and glass: effect of solvent additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, T P

    1996-01-01

    The adsorption of recombinant-derived proteins to glass and polymeric materials used in their packaging and delivery remains a problem. Loss of these very expensive proteins to surface adsorption not only results in reduced yields during purification and scale-up, but also to decreased therapeutic efficacy. The purpose of the present investigation was to inhibit/minimize adsorption of a model protein, namely, recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to glass, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and polypropylene by inclusion of select solvent additives. Solvent additives used to inhibit/minimize surface adsorption included glycerin, U.S.P. (0.5%, 1%, 5%, and 25% v/v), Pluronic F-127 (0.005%, 0.05%, and 0.5% w/w), Pluronic F-68 (0.005%, 0.05%, and 0.5% w/w), Tween 80 (0.005% and 0.05% w/w) and Tween 20 (0.005%, 0.05%, and 0.5% w/w). Over the rhG-CSF concentration range of 0.0 ng/ml to 300 ng/ml, the amount of rhG-CSF bound per cm2 of PVC increased with an increase in the rhG-CSF concentration tested. At rhG-CSF equilibrium concentrations of 262 +/- 3.7 ng/ml and 136 +/- 1.9 ng/ml, the rhG-CSF bound/cm2 of PVC at 22 degrees C and 45 degrees C reached a maximum of 37.6 +/- 9.8 ng/cm2 and 165.2 +/- 11.7 ng/cm2, respectively. The adsorption isotherms determined at each temperature were described by the classic Freundlich equation. Moreover, the rate of adsorption of rhG-CSF to PVC was extremely rapid. The mean values of the percent of rhG-CSF bound to PVC after only 10 minutes of equilibration at 22 degrees C and 45 degrees C were 92.8 +/- 9.2 percent and 97.3 +/- 17.9 percent, respectively. The mean values of the percent of rhG-CSF bound to PVC at 22 degrees C and 45 degrees C after 24 hours were 52.4 +/- 10.9% and 70.0 +/- 9.7%, respectively, indicating that some desorption of rhG-CSF does occur during 24 hr. However, surface adsorption of rhG-CSF to PVC was shown to be irreversible over a 1 hr time period. Using viscometry, an estimate of the thickness

  14. [Influence of granulocyte colony stimulating factor on distribution of bone marrow stem cells and its role in protecting brain in rats with cerebral ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-sheng; Liu, Jing-xia; Liu, Ke; Wang, Ding-chao; Ren, Wei-hong; Zhang, Xin-feng; Tian, Yu-shou

    2011-06-01

    To explore the influence of recombination granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rG-CSF) on mobilization and distribution of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) in blood and brain tissue, and its role in protecting brain in rats with cerebral ischemia. One hundred and six Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into sham-operated group (n=10),model group (n=48), rG-CSF group (n=48) according to the method of random digital table, and rats in model and rG-CSF groups were divided into four subgroups: i.e. 2, 3, 7 and 14 days subgroups, with 12 rats in each subgroup. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model was reproduced with nylon thread. In rats of rG-CSF group rG-CSF (10 μg/kg) was administered by subcutaneous injection 3 days before and 2 days after operation respectively, once a day. Rats in sham-operated and model groups were administered with normal saline in the same volume, once a day. At the corresponding time after operation, general neural function score (GNFS) of rats was measured. Blood was collected through abdominal aorta, then white blood cell (WBC) and CD34+ cells in peripheral blood were counted. Brain pathologic changes were observed, and expression of CD34+ cells in rats brain tissue was determined by using immunohistochemical method. (1) GNFS was lower obviously in 2-day model group compared with that in sham-operated group, and then increased gradually. At 7 days and 14 days after operation, GNFS in rG-CSF group was higher significantly than that in model group (7 days: 11.86±0.69 vs. 10.53±0.76, 14 days: 13.38±0.52 vs. 12.38±0.52, both P<0.01). (2) WBC and CD34+ cells in peripheral blood in model group increased obviously, with the highest level appeared at 3 days and lowered at 7 days and 14 days. Increase of WBC and CD34+ cells in rats of rG-CSF group was more obvious than that of model group at each time point except CD34+ in 14 days group [WBC (×10(9)/L) 2 days: 11.75±1.76 vs. 8.07±1.27, 3 days: 13.07±1.70 vs. 10.88±1.78, 7 days: 8

  15. Sustained trilineage recovery and disappearance of abnormal chromosome clone in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome following combination therapy with cytokines (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and erythropoietin) and high-dose methylprednisolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Y; Fukuoka, T; Nakatani, A; Ohsaka, A; Takahashi, A

    1996-04-01

    We report a case of hypoplastic myelodyplastic syndrome (MDS) (refractory anemia (RA)) in which sustained trilineage haematological response and persistent disappearance of an abnormal chromosome clone were achieved after treatment with combination therapy of cytokines (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and erythropoietin (Epo)) and methylprednisolone (mPSL) pulse dose. The patient's haematological recovery was rapid and maintained even after cessation of the therapy. In addition, the predominant chromosome clone 13q- in bone marrow cells disappeared in the fourth week. The patient's improved bone marrow haemopoiesis and disappearance of the abnormal chromosome has continued to the present, 13 months after treatment. The occurrence of both trilineage response and abnormal chromosome disappearance in MDS patients treated with cytokine(s) or steroids is rare. Combination therapy might therefore be advantageous in MDS.

  16. Effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on empiric therapy with flomoxef sodium and tobramycin in febrile neutropenic patients with hematological malignancies. Kan-etsu Hematological Disease and Infection Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, M; Karasawa, M; Naruse, T; Fukuda, M; Hirashima, K; Oh, H; Ninomiya, H; Abe, T; Saito, K; Shishido, H; Moriyama, Y; Shibata, A; Motoyoshi, K; Nagata, N; Miura, Y

    1999-02-01

    The clinical effects of concomitant use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on empiric antibiotic therapy in febrile neutropenic patients were evaluated in a randomized fashion. Two hundred and fourteen neutropenic febrile episodes (neutrophil counts flomoxef sodium and tobramycin with or without G-CSF. The resolution of fever at day 4 (excellent response) or at day 7 (good response) was deemed effective. Among 157 evaluable episodes, the observed excellent responses were 31 (38.8%) and the good responses were 20 (25.0%) in the G-CSF group; those in the control group were 26 (33.8%) and 25 (32.5%), respectively. The overall efficacy rate was 63.8% (51/80) in the G-CSF group and 66.2% (51/77) in the control group (not significant). The initial neutrophil count was 0.186 +/- 0.249 x 10(9)/l in the G-CSF group and 0.235 +/- 0.290 x 10(9)/l in the control group, and rose to 2.889 +/- 4.198 x 10(9)/l and 0.522 +/- 0.844 x 10(9)/l, respectively, at day 7. These results indicate that G-CSF does not affect the rate of response to empiric antibiotic therapy in febrile neutropenic patients, although a significant effect of G-CSF was observed on neutrophil recovery.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis in chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia among breast cancer and Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients under Taiwan's national health insurance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Tsun-Jen; Wen, Yu-Wen; Chien, Chun-Ru; Chiang, Shao-Chin; Hsu, William Wei-Yuan; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan

    2017-04-01

    The beneficial effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) prophylaxis on reducing the risk of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (CIFN) were well documented throughout the literature. However, existing data regarding its cost-effectiveness were conflicting. We estimated the cost-effectiveness of G-CSF prophylaxis in CIFN under Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI) system. Data on clinical outcomes and direct medical costs were derived for 5179 newly diagnosed breast cancer and 629 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients from the NHI claims database. Patients were further categorized into three subgroups as "primary-", "secondary-" and "no -" prophylaxis based on their patterns of G-CSF use. Generalized estimating equations were applied to estimate the impact of G-CSF use on the incidence of CIFN. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of primary and secondary prophylactic G-CSF use were calculated and sensitivity analyses were performed. Primary prophylaxis of G-CSF decreased the incidence of CIFN by 27% and 83%, while secondary prophylaxis by 34% and 22% in breast cancer and NHL patients, respectively. Compared with those with no prophylaxis, the incremental cost per CIFN reduced in primary prophylaxis is $931 and $52 among patients with breast cancer and NHL, respectively. In contrast, secondary prophylaxis is dominated by no prophylaxis and primary prophylaxis in both cancer patients. Primary but not secondary prophylactic use of G-CSF was cost-effective in CIFN in breast cancer and NHL patients under Taiwan's NHI system. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Progressive transfusion and growth factor independence with adjuvant sertraline in low risk myelodysplastic syndrome treated with an erythropoiesis stimulating agent and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirtan Nautiyal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Refractoriness to growth factor therapy is commonly associated with inferior outcome in patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (LR-MDS who require treatment for cytopenias. However, the mechanisms leading to refractoriness are unknown. Here we describe a clinically depressed 74-year-old male with refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD and documented growth factor refractory anemia after erythropoeisis stimulating agent (ESA therapy, who attained transfusion and growth factor independence after the addition of sertraline to his medication regimen. Our case demonstrates hematological improvement-erythroid (HI-E in growth factor refractory, low risk MDS and highlights a potential mechanistic link between common inflammatory diseases and LR-MDS.

  19. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: increase in numbers of naive CD4 cells and CD34 cells makes G-CSF a candidate for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Afzelius, P; Dam-Larsen, S

    1998-01-01

    The potential of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize CD4 cells and/or CD34 cells for use in gene therapy or to support antiretroviral therapy was examined. Ten human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients were treated with G-CSF (300 microg/day) for 5 days. Numbers of CD4.......01/microL (P CSF induced increases in numbers of CD34 cells and CD4 cells in HIV-infected patients...

  20. Cardiotoxicity of combined administration of adriamycin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in rats. With special reference to 125I-MIBG cardioautoradiography and histopathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, Nozomi; Yamazaki, Junichi; Serizawa, Isao; Misaizu, Tadashi; Sato, Masanori.

    1995-01-01

    We studied whether adriamycin (ADM)-induced myocardial damage in rats is advanced when recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is administered. Rats were divided into three groups: ADM group, ADM+G-CSF group and vehicle-treated control group. ADM (2 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered for the first 2 days in each cycle and 10 days administration of G-CSF (50lμg/kg, s.c.) was started two days after the second administration of ADM in each cycle. The administration cycle was repeated 3 times. One day after the last administration, following parameters were analyzed: hematological examination including peripheral blood and bone marrow cells, electrocardiogram (ECG) and histopathological findings. At 4 hr after an intravenous administration of 125 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ( 125 I-MIBG), accumulation of 125 I-MIBG in some organs and findings of autoradiography (ARG) of the heart was examined. ECG revealed an extended ventricular activation (VAT) time in the ADM and ADM+G-CSF groups. In the histopathological analysis, vacuolar degeneration of the myocardium was observed in both the ADM and ADM+G-CSF groups. The severity of the change was equivalent in those groups. The accumulation of 125 I-MIBG in the heart was lower in both the ADM and ADM+G-CSF groups than in the control group. The same tendency was observed in ARG, but the difference between the ADM group and the ADM+G-CSF group was not significant. These results suggest that administration of G-CSF in the standard clinical dosage does not aggravate ADM-induced myocardial damage. However, because this disorder may be more clearly manifested by treatment with higher doses of ADM, it is necessary to conduct further studies on the methods of administration. (author)

  1. The use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and management of chemotherapy delivery during adjuvant treatment for early-stage breast cancer--further observations from the IMPACT solid study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäenpää, Johanna; Varthalitis, Ioannis; Erdkamp, Frans; Trojan, Andreas; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof; Lindman, Henrik; Bendall, Kate; Vogl, Florian D; Verma, Shailendra

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the use and impact of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) on chemotherapy delivery and neutropenia management in breast cancer in a clinical practice setting. IMPACT Solid was an international, prospective observational study in patients with a physician-assessed febrile neutropenia (FN) risk of ≥20%. This analysis focused on stages I-III breast cancer patients who received a standard chemotherapy regimen for which the FN risk was published. Chemotherapy delivery and neutropenia-related outcomes were reported according to the FN risk of the regimen and intent of G-CSF use. 690 patients received a standard chemotherapy regimen; 483 received the textbook dose/schedule with a majority of these regimens (84%) having a FN risk ≥10%. Patients receiving a regimen with a FN risk ≥10% were younger with better performance status than those receiving a regimen with a FN risk <10%. Patients who received higher-risk regimens were more likely to receive G-CSF primary prophylaxis (48% vs 22%), complete their planned chemotherapy (97% vs 88%) and achieve relative dose intensity ≥85% (93% vs 86%) than those receiving lower-risk regimens. Most first FN events (56%) occurred in cycles not supported with G-CSF primary prophylaxis. Physicians generally recommend standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimens and were more likely to follow G-CSF guidelines for younger, good performance status patients in the curative setting, and often modify standard regimens in more compromised patients. However, G-CSF support is not optimal, indicated by G-CSF primary prophylaxis use in <50% of high-risk patients and observation of FN without G-CSF support. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Consistent bone marrow-derived cell mobilization following repeated short courses of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: results from a multicenter prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarella, Corrado; Rutella, Sergio; Gualandi, Francesca; Melazzini, Mario; Scimè, Rosanna; Petrini, Mario; Moglia, Cristina; Ulla, Marco; Omedé, Paola; Bella, Vincenzo La; Corbo, Massimo; Silani, Vincenzo; Siciliano, Gabriele; Mora, Gabriele; Caponnetto, Claudia; Sabatelli, Mario; Chiò, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the feasibility and safety of bone marrow-derived cell (BMC) mobilization following repeated courses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Between January 2006 and March 2007, 26 ALS patients entered a multicenter trial that included four courses of BMC mobilization at 3-month intervals. In each course, G-CSF (5 microg/kg b.i.d.) was administered for four consecutive days; 18% mannitol was also given. Mobilization was monitored by flow cytometry analysis of circulating CD34(+) cells and by in vitro colony assay for clonogenic progenitors. Co-expression by CD34(+) cells of CD133, CD90, CD184, CD117 and CD31 was also assessed. Twenty patients completed the four-course schedule. One patient died and one refused to continue the program before starting the mobilization courses; four discontinued the study protocol because of disease progression. Overall, 89 G-CSF courses were delivered. There were two severe adverse events: one prolactinoma and one deep vein thrombosis. There were no discontinuations as a result of toxic complications. Circulating CD34(+) cells were monitored during 85 G-CSF courses and were always markedly increased; the range of median peak values was 41-57/microL, with no significant differences among the four G-CSF courses. Circulating clonogenic progenitor levels paralleled CD34(+) cell levels. Most mobilized CD34(+) cells co-expressed stem cell markers, with a significant increase in CD133 co-expression. It is feasible to deliver repeated courses of G-CSF to mobilize a substantial number of CD34(+) cells in patients with ALS; mobilized BMC include immature cells with potential clinical usefulness.

  3. Influence of the joint treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and drugs elevating extracellular adenosine on erythropoietic recovery following 5-fluorouracil-induced haematotoxicity in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weiterová, Lenka; Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Znojil, V.; Vácha, J.; Vacek, Antonín; Pipalová, Iva

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 65, - (2000), s. 310-316 ISSN 0902-4441 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA306/99/0027; GA AV ČR KSK2039602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.665, year: 2000

  4. Combination of Drugs Elevating Extracellular Adenosine with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Promotes Granulopoietic Recovery in the Murine Bone Marrow after 5-Fluorouracil Treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Weiterová, Lenka; Znojil, V.; Vácha, J.; Holá, Jiřina; Vacek, Antonín; Pipalová, Iva

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 5 (2001), s. 521-524 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA306/99/0027; GA AV ČR IBS5004009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : 5-fluorouracil * granulopoiesis * extracellular adenosine Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor : 1.027, year: 2001

  5. Activation of adenosine A3 receptors supports hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in sublethally irradiated mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Šefc, L.; Dušek, L.; Vacek, Antonín; Holá, Jiřina; Hoferová, Zuzana; Štreitová, Denisa

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 8 (2010), s. 649-656 ISSN 0955-3002 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/08/0158 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : ionising radiation * hematopoiesis * adenosine A3 receptors Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.861, year: 2010

  6. Serpina1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-8-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pel, M; van Os, R; Velders, GA; Hagoort, H; Heegaard, PMH; Lindley, IJD; Willemze, R; Fibbe, WE

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report that cytokine-induced (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-8) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization is completely inhibited after low-dose (0.5 Gy) total-body irradiation (TBI). Because neutrophil granular proteases are regulatory

  7. Serpina1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-8-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Pel, M.; van Os, R.; Velders, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report that cytokine-induced (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-8) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization is completely inhibited after low-dose (0.5 Gy) total-body irradiation (TBI). Because neutrophil granular proteases are regulat...

  8. Flt3 ligand synergizes with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor in bone marrow mobilization to improve functional outcome after spinal cord injury in the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urdzíková, Lucia; Mašínová, Katarína; Vaněček, Václav; Růžička, Jiří; Šedý, Jiří; Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 9 (2011), s. 1090-1104 ISSN 1465-3249 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500390902; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538 Program:1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : axonal sprouting * bone marrow mobilization * Flt3 ligand Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.627, year: 2011

  9. Elevation of extracellular adenosine mobilizes haematopoietic progenitor cells and granulocytes into peripheral blood and enhances the mobilizing effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Weiterová, Lenka; Vacek, Antonín; Znojil, V.; Pospíšil, Milan; Vácha, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 3 (2003), s. 204-210 ISSN 0902-4441 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/02/0423; GA AV ČR IBS5004009; GA AV ČR KSK5011112 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : extracellular adenosine * dipyridamole * adenosine monophosphate Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.714, year: 2003

  10. [Use of filgrastim, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), in radiotherapy to reduce drop-outs because of radiogenic leukopenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gava, A; Bertossi, L; Ferrarese, F; Coghetto, F; Marazzato, G; Andrulli, A D; Zorat, P L

    1998-03-01

    Radiotherapy patients are at risk of developing leukopenia, which risk depends on the irradiated volume, the rate of irradiated bone marrow and the radiation dose. Radiogenic leukopenia may cause radiotherapy drop-out, with consequent effects, on local tumor control and clinical outcome. The introduction of granulocyte growth factors, such as filgrastim, has permitted to accelerate normal neutrophil count recovery in irradiation-related neutropenia both in vitro and animal models; clinical experience in humans is still lacking, relative to both indications and scheduling. In the Oncologic Radiotherapy Department of Treviso Hospital, 31 patients irradiated for Hodgkin disease, rectal cancer and other malignancies, who presented leukopenia requiring treatment discontinuation, were given filgrastim to assess its actual effect in avoiding further drop-outs and to compare two administration schedules (2 or 3 vials, 30 MIU, weekly). Filgrastim treatment was continued throughout the radiotherapy cycles, for 1 to 5 weeks. Eighteen patients had received previous chemotherapy and 11 were undergoing concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy-irradiation. A mean 203% increase in leukocyte count was observed (136% in the patients treated with 2 vials/week and 274% in those receiving 3 vials/week); this increase was more apparent in women that in men (256% versus 91%) and slightly higher in patients 50 years old and with target volumes < 5000 ml. Filgrastin treatment was well tolerated by all patients, with no discontinuations due to adverse effects; 9 patients (29%) reported skeletal pain, which was marked in 2 of them only. Eighty percent of patients completed all the radiotherapy cycles with no discontinuation, while 6 patients dropped out because leukopenia persisted. Biweekly filgrastim administration was effective to prevent unscheduled radiotherapy discontinuation in 75% of patients and triweekly administration was effective in 86% of patients. In our experience, filgrastim

  11. Basal CD34+ Cell Count Predicts Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization in Healthy Donors after Administration of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor: A Longitudinal, Prospective, Observational, Single-Center, Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Massimo; Gori, Mercedes; Pitino, Annalisa; Gentile, Massimo; Dattola, Antonia; Pontari, Antonella; Vigna, Ernesto; Moscato, Tiziana; Recchia, Anna Grazia; Barilla', Santina; Tripepi, Giovanni; Morabito, Fortunato

    2017-07-01

    A longitudinal, prospective, observational, single-center, cohort study on healthy donors (HDs) was designed to identify predictors of CD34 + cells on day 5 with emphasis on the predictive value of the basal CD34 + cell count. As potential predictors of mobilization, age, sex, body weight, height, blood volume as well as white blood cell count, peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells, platelet count, hematocrit, and hemoglobin levels were considered. Two different evaluations of CD34 + cell counts were determined for each donor: baseline (before granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [G-CSF] administration) and in PB after G-CSF administration on the morning of the fifth day (day 5). A total of 128 consecutive HDs (66 males) with a median age of 43 years were enrolled. CD34 + levels on day 5 displayed a non-normal distribution, with a median value of 75.5 cells/µL. To account for the non-normal distribution of the dependent variable, a quantile regression analysis to predict CD34 + on day 5 using the baseline value of CD34 + as the key predictor was performed. On crude analysis, a baseline value of CD34 + ranging from .5 cells/µL to 1 cells/µL predicts a median value of 50 cells/µL on day 5; a value of 2 cells/µL predicts a median value of 70.7 cells/µL; a value of 3 cells/µL to 4 cells/µL predicts a median value of 91.3 cells/µL, and a value ≥ 5 predicts a median value of 112 cells/µL. In conclusion, the baseline PB CD34 + cell count correlates with the effectiveness of allogeneic PB stem cell mobilization and could be useful to plan the collection. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Early applications of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can stabilize the blood-optic-nerve barrier and ameliorate inflammation in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yao-Tseng; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Sung-Ping; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2016-10-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was reported to have a neuroprotective effect in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION model). However, the therapeutic window and anti-inflammatory effects of G-CSF in a rAION model have yet to be elucidated. Thus, this study aimed to determine the therapeutic window of G-CSF and investigate the mechanisms of G-CSF via regulation of optic nerve (ON) inflammation in a rAION model. Rats were treated with G-CSF on day 0, 1, 2 or 7 post-rAION induction for 5 consecutive days, and a control group were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Visual function was assessed by flash visual evoked potentials at 4 weeks post-rAION induction. The survival rate and apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells were determined by FluoroGold labeling and TUNEL assay, respectively. ON inflammation was evaluated by staining of ED1 and Iba1, and ON vascular permeability was determined by Evans Blue extravasation. The type of macrophage polarization was evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The protein levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were analyzed by western blotting. A therapeutic window during which G-CSF could rescue visual function and retinal ganglion cell survival was demonstrated at day 0 and day 1 post-infarct. Macrophage infiltration was reduced by 3.1- and 1.6-fold by G-CSF treatment starting on day 0 and 1 post-rAION induction, respectively, compared with the PBS-treated group (P<0.05). This was compatible with 3.3- and 1.7-fold reductions in ON vascular permeability after G-CSF treatment compared with PBS treatment (P<0.05). Microglial activation was increased by 3.8- and 3.2-fold in the early (beginning treatment at day 0 or 1) G-CSF-treated group compared with the PBS-treated group (P<0.05). Immediate (within 30 mins of infarct) treatment with G-CSF also induced M2 microglia/macrophage activation. The cytokine levels were lower in the group that received immediate G-CSF treatment compared to

  13. A phase I study of different doses and frequencies of pegylated recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (PEG rhG-CSF) in patients with standard-dose chemotherapy-induced neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yan; Han, Xiaohong; Wang, Lin; Du, Ping; Yao, Jiarui; Wu, Di; Song, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Shuxiang; Tang, Le; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-10-01

    The recommended dose of prophylactic pegylated recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (PEG rhG-CSF) is 100 μg/kg once per cycle for patients receiving intense-dose chemotherapy. However, few data are available on the proper dose for patients receiving less-intense chemotherapy. The aim of this phase I study is to explore the proper dose and administration schedule of PEG rhG-CSF for patients receiving standard-dose chemotherapy. Eligible patients received 3-cycle chemotherapy every 3 weeks. No PEG rhG-CSF was given in the first cycle. Patients experienced grade 3 or 4 neutropenia would then enter the cycle 2 and 3. In cycle 2, patients received a single subcutaneous injection of prophylactic PEG rhG-CSF on d 3, and received half-dose subcutaneous injection in cycle 3 on d 3 and d 5, respectively. Escalating doses (30, 60, 100 and 200 μg/kg) of PEG rhG-CSF were investigated. A total of 26 patients were enrolled and received chemotherapy, in which 24 and 18 patients entered cycle 2 and cycle 3 treatment, respectively. In cycle 2, the incidence of grade 3 or 4 neutropenia for patients receiving single-dose PEG rhG-CSF of 30, 60, 100 and 200 μg/kg was 66.67%, 33.33%, 22.22% and 0, respectively, with a median duration less than 1 (0-2) d. No grade 3 or higher neutropenia was noted in cycle 3 in all dose cohorts. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of PEG rhG-CSF used in cancer patients were similar to those reported, as well as the safety. Double half dose administration model showed better efficacy result than a single dose model in terms of grade 3 neutropenia and above. The single dose of 60 μg/kg, 100 μg/kg and double half dose of 30 μg/kg were recommended to the phase II study, hoping to find a preferable method for neutropenia treatment.

  14. 2010 update of EORTC guidelines for the use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to reduce the incidence of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in adult patients with lymphoproliferative disorders and solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aapro, M S; Bohlius, J; Cameron, D A; Dal Lago, Lissandra; Donnelly, J Peter; Kearney, N; Lyman, G H; Pettengell, R; Tjan-Heijnen, V C; Walewski, J; Weber, Damien C; Zielinski, C

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is a major risk factor for infection-related morbidity and mortality and also a significant dose-limiting toxicity in cancer treatment. Patients developing severe (grade 3/4) or febrile neutropenia (FN) during chemotherapy frequently receive dose reductions and/or delays to their chemotherapy. This may impact the success of treatment, particularly when treatment intent is either curative or to prolong survival. In Europe, prophylactic treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factors (G-CSFs), such as filgrastim (including approved biosimilars), lenograstim or pegfilgrastim is available to reduce the risk of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. However, the use of G-CSF prophylactic treatment varies widely in clinical practice, both in the timing of therapy and in the patients to whom it is offered. The need for generally applicable, European-focused guidelines led to the formation of a European Guidelines Working Party by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the publication in 2006 of guidelines for the use of G-CSF in adult cancer patients at risk of chemotherapy-induced FN. A new systematic literature review has been undertaken to ensure that recommendations are current and provide guidance on clinical practice in Europe. We recommend that patient-related adverse risk factors, such as elderly age (≥65 years) and neutrophil count be evaluated in the overall assessment of FN risk before administering each cycle of chemotherapy. It is important that after a previous episode of FN, patients receive prophylactic administration of G-CSF in subsequent cycles. We provide an expanded list of common chemotherapy regimens considered to have a high (≥20%) or intermediate (10-20%) risk of FN. Prophylactic G-CSF continues to be recommended in patients receiving a chemotherapy regimen with high risk of FN. When using a chemotherapy regimen associated with FN in 10-20% of patients, particular attention

  15. Uso de fatores de crescimento epidérmico e estimulador de colônias de granulócitos na prevenção e tratamento da enterocolite necrosante no recém-nascido Use of epidermic and granulocyte-colony stimulating growth factors in the prevention and treatment of necrotizing enterocolitis of the newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dáfne Cardoso B. da Silva

    2008-06-01

    pathophysiology of this disease improves, new therapies, such as the administration of epidermal growth factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, are being discussed. CONCLUSIONS: The use of growth factors for treatment and prevention of NEC seems promising. However, further clinics assays are needed to evaluate the effectiveness and the safety of these growth factors. At this moment, the best clinical practice is the prevention of the disease.

  16. Activation of human gingival epithelial cells by cell-surface components of black-pigmented bacteria: augmentation of production of interleukin-8, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, A; Uehara, A; Iki, K; Matsushita, K; Nakamura, R; Ogawa, T; Sugawara, S; Takada, H

    2002-01-01

    Black-pigmented anaerobic bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, are amongst the predominant bacteria in periodontal pockets and have been implicated in periodontal diseases. To elucidate the roles of gingival keratinocytes, which are the first cells encountered by oral bacteria in periodontal diseases, human gingival keratinocytes in primary culture were stimulated with cell-surface components of P gingivalis and Pr. intermedia. A glycoprotein fraction from Pr. intermedia (PGP) clearly augmented the release of interleukin-8, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This PGP also induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), as determined by flow cytometry. The augmentation of mRNA expression for these molecules was also confirmed by reverse transcription PCR. In contrast, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Pr. intermedia and Escherichia coli was completely inactive in these assays. LPS fraction and purified fimbriae from P gingivalis exhibited weak activities. Cytokine production and ICAM-1 expression by gingival keratinocytes might cause accumulation and activation of neutrophils in the epithelium and, therefore, may be involved in the initiation and development of inflammation in periodontal tissues.

  17. The Potential Role of Recombinant Hematopoietic Colony-Stimulating Factors in Preventing Infections in the Immunocompromised Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Rusthoven

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors coordinate the proliferation and maturation of bone marrow and peripheral blood cells during normal hematopoiesis. Most of these factors are now available as recombinant human colony-stimulating factors, and preclinical and clinical testing is proceeding rapidly. Granulocyte and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factors have been the most extensively studied to date. In human clinical trials, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves neutrophil counts and function, reduces episodes of febrile neutropenia, improves neutrophil recovery after disease- or treatment-induced myelosuppression, and reduces the number of serious infections in several neutropenic disease states. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor has similar biological properties but may also improve eosinophil proliferation and function, and platelet cell recovery after myelotoxic bone marrow injury, Interleukin-1 boosts the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, but also may promote the resolution of established infections in conjunction with antibiotics. The therapeutic realities and future therapeutic implications of these agents for the therapy of infections, cancer and hemopoietic disorders are discussed.

  18. Human progenitor cells rapidly mobilized by AMD3100 repopulate NOD/SCID mice with increased frequency in comparison to cells from the same donor mobilized by granulocyte colony stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, David A; Bonde, Jesper; Craft, Timothy P

    2007-01-01

    ) or purified CD34(+) cells was compared at limiting dilution into NOD/SCID mice. Human AMD3100-mobilized MNC possessed enhanced repopulating frequency in comparison to G-CSF-mobilized MNC from paired donors, and purified CD34(+) progenitors were at least as efficient as the G-CSF mobilized cells....... The frequencies of NOD/SCID repopulating cells (SRC) were 1 SRC in 8.7 x 10(6) AMD3100-mobilized MNC compared to 1 SRC in 29.0 x 10(6) G-CSF-mobilized MNC, and 1 SRC in 1.2 x 10(5) AMD3100-mobilized CD34(+) cells compared to 1 SRC in 1.8 x 10(5) G-CSF-mobilized CD34(+) cells. Hematopoietic differentiation...

  19. 2010 update of EORTC guidelines for the use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to reduce the incidence of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in adult patients with lymphoproliferative disorders and solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aapro, M.S.; Bohlius, J.; Cameron, D.A.; Dal Lago, L.; Donnelly, J.P.; Kearney, N.; Lyman, G.H.; Pettengell, R.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.; Walewski, J.; Weber, D.C.; Zielinski, C.

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is a major risk factor for infection-related morbidity and mortality and also a significant dose-limiting toxicity in cancer treatment. Patients developing severe (grade 3/4) or febrile neutropenia (FN) during chemotherapy frequently receive dose reductions and/or

  20. EORTC guidelines for the use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to reduce the incidence of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in adult patients with lymphomas and solid tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aapro, M.S.; Cameron, D.; Pettengell, R.; Bohlius, J.; Crawford, J.; Ellis, M.; Kearney, N.; Lyman, G.H.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.; Walewski, J.A.; Weber, D.C.; Zielinski, C.

    2006-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is not only a major risk factor for infection-related morbidity and mortality, but is also a significant dose-limiting toxicity in cancer treatment. Patients developing severe (grade 3/4) or febrile neutropenia (FN) during chemotherapy frequently receive dose

  1. The application of hematopoietic growth factors in drug-induced agranulocytosis: a review of 70 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprikkelman, A.; de Wolf, J. T.; Vellenga, E.

    1994-01-01

    Since 1989, granulocyte-macrophage and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (GM-CSF, G-CSF) have been increasingly applied in the treatment of drug-induced agranulocytosis. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of GM-CSF and G-CSF in the treatment of drug-induced agranulocytosis, we have studied

  2. Uso clínico de los factores de crecimiento hematopoyético Clinical use of hematopoietic growth factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Domingo Torres Hernández

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Los factores de crecimiento hematopoyético (FCH son producto de la excitante y prometedora industria de la biología molecular y la Ingeniería gen ética. Se hace una revisión de la farmacología del Factor Estimulador de Colonias de Granulocitos y del Factor Estimulador de Colonias de Granulocitos-Macrófagos, como también de su uso clínico en neutropenia aguda post-quimioterapia mielotóxica anticancerosa, trasplante de médula ósea, leucemia aguda, síndromes mielodisplásicos, anemia aplástica, síndrome de inmunodeficiencia adquirida y neutropenia crónica.

    Hematopoietic growth factors are one of the products of the exciting and promising molecular biology and genetic engineering industries. Two of these factors are the recombinant human - granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and the recombinant human-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor; a review Is presented on their pharmacology and clinical uses in acute neutropenia after myelotoxic anticancer therapy, bone marrow transplantion, acute leukemia, myelodyplastic syndromes, aplastic anemia, AIDS and chronic neutropenia.

  3. Comparación de la eficacia y seguridad de la terapia combinada de cardiomioplastia celular con el factor estimulante de colonias de granulocitos en pacientes con cardiopatía isquémica en dos vías de implatación Comparison of efficacy and safety of combined therapy of cellular cardiomyoplasty and granulocyte colony stimulating factor in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy in two routes of implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M Senior

    2011-04-01

    ía sostenida de la fracción de eyección y los MET más allá de los beneficios que se logran con la revascularización y la terapia farmacológica óptima.The objective of this study is to assess efficacy and safety of combined therapy of cellular cardiomyoplasty and granulocyte colony stimulating factor in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and explore possible differences between the implantation routes. METHODOLOGY: we performed a before and after study for longitudinal data comparing echocardiographic variables and number of Met achieved in the stress test before and at two, six and twelve months after the procedure. Likewise, mortality and adverse therapy effects were evaluated. Differences in the results were analyzed according to the intracoronary vs. epicardiac route of implantation. RESULTS: eighteen patients were included; 62,3% men, with mean age 49.4 ± 11,7 years. Mean ejection fraction was 31% ± 0,04. In twelve patients implantation was performed by intracoronary route and in six by epicardiac route. Mean ejection fraction before cell implantation was 30% with an interquartil range (IQR of 28-35%, and MET average was 6 with an interquartil rage of 5-7. Both variables as well as end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes increased significantly after the procedure, with a tendency to greater increase in ejection fraction in the group of patients whose route was epicardial implantation compared with intracoronary route; however, the number of patients in each subgroup prevented to make a definitive analysis. One patient had surgical wound infection and three died two months after implantation (one of septic shock and two of cardiogenic shock. CONCLUSION: in our environment the performance of combination therapy with cellular cardiomyoplasty and granulocyte colony stimulating factor is feasible. This is a safe procedure that achieved a sustained improvement in ejection fraction and MET beyond benefits achieved with revascularization and optimal pharmacological

  4. Paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor or recombinant human interleukin 3 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in ovarian cancer : A feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, GJ; Willemse, PHB; Beijnen, JH; Piersma, H; vanderGraaf, WTA; deVries, EGE; Boonstra, J.

    1997-01-01

    The tolerability and efficacy of four courses of paclitaxel and ifosfamide plus cisplatin every 3 weeks was evaluated in patients with residual or refractory ovarian cancer. Additionally, supportive haematological effects of recombinant human interleukin 3 (rhIL-3) and recombinant human granulocyte

  5. Effect of granulocyte colony stimulating EPC on cardiac function and myocardial energy expenditure in patients with heart failure after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zilin; Luo, Jianchun; Ma, Lixian; Luo, Xia; Huang, Liangyan

    2015-01-01

    To study the changes of cardiac function and myocardial energy expenditure following treatment with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in patients with heart failure after myocardial infarction. Thirty-eight patients with heart failure after myocardial infarction were randomized into G-CSF treatment group and control group. All the patients received conventional treatment (medication and interventional therapy), and the patients in treatment group were given additional G-CSF (600 μg/day) for 7 consecutive days. The plasma level of brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and the number of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) in the peripheral blood were detected before and at 7 days and 4 months after the treatment. The cardiac functions (LVEF, FS, LVIDs, PWTs, EDV, SV, ET) was evaluated by ultrasonic imaging before and at 2 weeks and 4 months after the treatment. The MEE and circumferential end-systolic wall stress (cESS) were calculated by correlation formula. The number of EPC was significantly higher in the treatment group than in the control group after the treatment especially at 7 days (Pexpenditure were improved in all the patients at 2 weeks and 4 months after the treatment, and the improvement was more obvious in the treatment group (Pexpenditure in patients with heart failure after myocardial infarction.

  6. The Gottingen minipig is a model of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome: G-colony stimulating factor stimulates hematopoiesis and enhances survival from lethal total-body γ-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D; Holt, Rebecca K; Whitnall, Mark H

    2013-08-01

    We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroni, Maria, E-mail: maria.moroni@usuhs.edu [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ngudiankama, Barbara F. [Laboratory of Viral Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Christensen, Christine [Division of Comparative Pathology, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Olsen, Cara H. [Biostatistics Consulting Center, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Owens, Rossitsa [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Lombardini, Eric D. [Veterinary Medicine Department, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangkok (Thailand); Holt, Rebecca K. [Veterinary Science Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Whitnall, Mark H. [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  8. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H.; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D.; Holt, Rebecca K.; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes

  9. Reduced salmonella fecal shedding in swine administered porcine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella colonization of food animals is a concern for animal health, food safety and public health. Key objectives of pre-harvest food safety programs are to detect asymptomatic Salmonella carriage in food animals, reduce colonization, and prevent transmission of Salmonella to other animals and ...

  10. Regulatory Systems in Bone Marrow for Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Mobilization and Homing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Alvarez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell release, migration, and homing from the bone marrow (BM and of the mobilization pathway involves a complex interaction among adhesion molecules, cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, stromal cells, and hematopoietic cells. The identification of new mechanisms that regulate the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs cells has important implications, not only for hematopoietic transplantation but also for cell therapies in regenerative medicine for patients with acute myocardial infarction, spinal cord injury, and stroke, among others. This paper reviews the regulation mechanisms underlying the homing and mobilization of BM hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, investigating the following issues: (a the role of different factors, such as stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, among other ligands; (b the stem cell count in peripheral blood and BM and influential factors; (c the therapeutic utilization of this phenomenon in lesions in different tissues, examining the agents involved in HSPCs mobilization, such as the different forms of G-CSF, plerixafor, and natalizumab; and (d the effects of this mobilization on BM-derived stem/progenitor cells in clinical trials of patients with different diseases.

  11. Use of G-CSF-stimulated marrow in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation settings: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several researchers have unraveled the previously unrecognized effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on hematopoiesis and the immune cell functions of bone marrow in healthy donors. In human leukocyte antigen-matched or haploidentical transplant settings, available data have established the safety of using G-CSF-stimulated bone marrow grafts, as well as the ability of this source to produce rapid and sustained engraftment. Interestingly, G-CSF-primed bone marrow transplants could capture the advantages of blood stem cell transplants, without the increased risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease that is associated with blood stem cell transplants. This review summarizes the growing body of evidence that supports the use of G-CSF-stimulated bone marrow grafts as an alternative stem cell source in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Comparison of different methods of osmotic shocks for extraction of Human Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor produced in periplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharareh Peymanfar

    2018-06-01

    Discussion and conclusion: Regarding the results, it is concluded that the MgSO4 with Tris buffer create a good osmotic pressure and accordingly is a more effective way for G-CSF protein extraction. As a result, this method could be used for production and simple separation of recombinant drug proteins.

  13. Hematologic effects of subcutaneous administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (filgrastim) in healthy alpacas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Erica C; Tornquist, Susan J; Gorman, M Elena; Cebra, Christopher K; Payton, Mark E

    2008-06-01

    To determine the effects of SC administration of filgrastim on cell counts in venous blood and bone marrow of healthy adult alpacas. 10 healthy alpacas. Alpacas were randomly assigned to receive treatment with filgrastim (5 microg/kg, SC; n=5) or an equivalent volume of physiologic saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (5) once a day for 3 days. Blood samples were obtained via jugular venipuncture 1 day prior to treatment and once a day for 5 days commencing 24 hours after the first dose was administered. Complete blood counts were performed for each blood sample. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained from the sternum of each alpaca 48 hours before the first treatment was administered and 72 hours after the third treatment was administered. Myeloid-to-erythroid cell (M:E) ratio was determined via cytologic evaluation of bone marrow aspirates. In filgrastim-treated alpacas, substantial increases in counts of WBCs and neutrophils were detected within 24 hours after the first dose was administered. Band cell count and percentage significantly increased 24 hours after the second dose. Counts of WBCs, neutrophils, and band cells remained high 48 hours after the third dose. Red blood cell counts and PCV were unaffected. The M:E ratio also increased significantly after treatment with filgrastim. Filgrastim induced rapid and substantial increases in numbers of circulating neutrophils and M:E ratios of bone marrow in healthy alpacas. Therefore, filgrastim may be useful in the treatment of camelids with impaired bone marrow function.

  14. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor increases circulating CD34-postive cells in patients with AIDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Dam-Larsen, S; Nielsen, C

    1997-01-01

    G-CSF for 3-5 consecutive days. Within 5 days of initiation of G-CSF therapy, an increase in the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was seen in all patients. There was a median increase in ANC from 0.4 to 3.4 x 10(9)/l. In addition, G-CSF treatment significantly increased the absolute number of CD34...

  15. Alpha-1 antitrypsin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as serum biomarkers of disease severity in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, Christoffer; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Initial assessment of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) is challenging and relies on apparent clinical symptoms and measurements of surrogate markers (e.g., C-reactive protein [CRP] or similar acute phase proteins). As CRP only reliably identifies patients with severe disease, novel...... (Mayo score) and from 40 healthy controls were analyzed by multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for 78 potential disease biomarkers. Using the statistical software SIMCA-P+ and GraphPad Prism, multivariate statistical analyses were conducted to identify a limited number of biomarkers to assess...

  16. The effect of long-term treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on hematopoiesis in HIV-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Sørensen, T U; Aladdin, H

    2000-01-01

    of G-CSF on in vivo function of progenitors the white-blood count was determined. Significant increase in white-blood count was found (P hemoglobin and platelet count decreased (P = 0.001 and P = 0.013, respectively). Significant increase in the CD4 count occurred, but correlation...

  17. Effect of filgrastim (recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor) on IgE responses in human asthma: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Norowitz, Tamar A; Joks, Rauno; Norowitz, Kevin B; Chice, Seto; Durkin, Helen G; Bluth, Martin H

    2013-10-01

    The role of peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization on Immunoglobulin E (IgE) responses has not been studied. Distributions of blood lymphocytes (CD4+, CD8+, CD8+CD60+, CD19+, CD23+, CD16/56+, CD25, CD45RA+, CD45RO+, CD34+), and levels of serum immunoglobulins (IgM, IgG, IgA, IgE) were studied in an allergic asthmatic serum IgE+ (181IU/mL) adult (m/45 y/o) donor undergoing routine stem cell mobilization protocol (American Society of Hematology) before (day-30), during (day 4), and after (1 wk post last dose) filgrastim (subcutaneous, 480 mcg, 2qd) treatment (flow cytometry, nephelometry, UniCAP Total IgE Fluoro enzyme immunoassay). On day 4 of filgrastim treatment, numbers of CD8+CD60+T cells and CD23+ blood cells dramatically increased (98% and 240% respectively) compared with pre treatment. In contrast on day 4 of treatment, serum IgE levels decreased (>50%) compared with pre treatment. CD8+CD60+T cells and CD23+ blood cells and serum IgE levels approached pre-treatment levels at 1 week post treatment. Filgrastim treatment transiently increases numbers of CD8+CD60+T and CD23+ expressing cells, which are known to regulate human IgE responses, while also transiently suppressing ongoing IgE responses. These results suggest that filgrastim affects IgE related responses, and may be useful in modulating allergic responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hematopoietic growth factors and human acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwenberg, B; Touw, I

    1988-10-22

    The study of myelopoietic maturation arrest in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) has been eased by availability of the human recombinant hemopoietic growth factors, macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), granulocyte-(G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage-(GM-CSF) and multilineage stimulating factor (IL-3). Nonphysiological expansion of the leukemic population is not due to escape from control by these factors. Proliferation in vitro of AML cells is dependent on the presence of one or several factors in most cases. The pattern of factor-dependency does not correlate with morphological criteria in individual cases, and may thus offer a new tool for classification of AML. Overproduction of undifferentiated cells is not due to abnormal expression of receptors for the stimulating factors acting at an immature level. Rather, autocrine secretion of early acting lymphokines maintains proliferation of the leukemic clone. When looking at causes of leukemic dysregulation, yet undefined inhibitors of differentiation probably are of equal importance as dysequilibrated stimulation by lymphokines.

  19. Auto-mobilized adult hematopoietic stem cells advance neovasculature in diabetic retinopathy of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Bei; LI Xiao-xin; SHEN Li; ZHAO Min; YU Wen-zhen

    2010-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be used to deliver functionally active angiostatic molecules to the retinal vasculature by targeting active astrocytes and may be useful in targeting pre-angiogenic retinal lesions. We sought to determine whether HSC mobilization can ameliorate early diabetic retinopathy in mice.Methods Mice were devided into four groups: normal mice control group, normal mice HSC-mobilized group, diabetic mice control group and diabetic mice HSC mobilized group. Murine stem cell growth factor (murine SCF) and recombined human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-csf) were administered to the mice with diabetes and without diabetes for continuous 5 days to induce autologous HSCs mobilization, and subcutaneous injection of physiological saline was used as control. Immunohistochemical double staining was conducted with anti-mouse rat CD31 monoclonal antibody and anti-BrdU rat antibody.Results Marked HSCs clearly increased after SCF plus G-csf-mobilization. Non-mobilized diabetic mice showed more HSCs than normal mice (P=0.032), and peripheral blood significantly increased in both diabetic and normal mice (P=0.000).Diabetic mice showed more CD31 positive capillary vessels (P=0.000) and accelerated endothelial cell regeneration. Only diabetic HSC-mobilized mice expressed both BrdU and CD31 antigens in the endothelial cells of new capillaries.Conclusion Auto-mobilized adult hematopoietic stem cells advance neovasculature in diabetic retinopathy of mice.

  20. Direct evaluation of radiation damage in human hematopoietic progenitor cells in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoizumi, Seishi; McCune, J.M.; Namikawa, Reiko

    1994-01-01

    We have developed techniques by which normal functional elements of human bone marrow can be implanted into immunodeficient C.B-17 scid/scid (SCID) mice. Afterward, long-term multilineage human hematopoiesis is sustained in vivo. We evaluated the effect of irradiation on the function of human bone marrow with this in vivo model. After whole-body X irradiation of the engrafted animals, it was determined that the D 0 value of human committed progenitor cells within the human marrow was 1.00 ± 0.09 (SEM) Gy for granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM) and 0.74 ± 0.12 Gy for erythroidburst-forming units (BFU-E). The effects of irradiation on the hematopoietic elements were reduced when the radioprotective agent WR-2721 was administered prior to irradiation. After low-dose irradiation, recovery of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). This small animal model may prove amenable for the analysis of the risk of the exposure of humans to irradiation as well as for the development of new modalities for the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced hematopoietic damage. 41 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  1. Cellular players of hematopoietic stem cell mobilization in the bone marrow niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Joshua; Levesque, Jean-Pierre; Winkler, Ingrid G

    2017-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) reside in perivascular regions of the bone marrow (BM) embedded within a complex regulatory unit called the niche. Cellular components of HSC niches include vascular endothelial cells, mesenchymal stromal progenitor cells and a variety of mature hematopoietic cells such as macrophages, neutrophils, and megakaryocytes-further regulated by sympathetic nerves and complement components as described in this review. Three decades ago the discovery that cytokines induce a large number of HSC to mobilize from the BM into the blood where they are easily harvested, revolutionised the field of HSC transplantation-curative for immune-deficiencies and some malignancies. However, despite now routine use of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilise HSC for transplant, only in last 15 years has research on the mechanisms behind why and how HSC can be induced to move into the blood began. These studies have revealed the complexity of the niche that retains HSC in the BM. This review describes how BM niches and HSC themselves change during administration of G-CSF-or in the recovery phase of chemotherapy-to facilitate movement of HSC into the blood, and research now leading to development of novel therapeutics to further boost HSC mobilization and transplant success.

  2. A comparison of the effect of xinruibai versus filgrastim on hematopoietic reconstruction after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qixiang; Jiang, Hebi; Jiang, Hua

    2018-05-31

    To compare the effect of xinruibai (Pegfilgrastim) and filgrastim injections on white blood cell and platelet (PLT) recovery, adverse events, post-operative complications, and cost effectiveness after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Children who underwent allo-HSCT at our hospital from January 2014 to May 2017 due to thalassemia major, aplastic anemia, leukemia, and mucopolysaccharidosis were included. Among the children, 53 received xinruibai injections and 33 received filgrastim injections. There were no significant differences in the average time to neutrophil and platelet recovery, the incidence of post-operative complications after allo-HSCT, the number of red blood cell and PLT infusions, or the incidence of adverse events related to the injection between two groups (P >  0.05). The pain score was 3.06 (SD 0.41) for the xinruibai group and 25.18 (SD 6.22) for the filgrastim group, indicating significant differences between the two groups (P <  0.001). No difference was found in the hospitalization cost. The cost of the granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was 257.11 ± 61.87 Euro in the xinruibai group and 214.79 ± 0.00 Euro in the filgrastim group, showing significant difference (P <  0.001). Xinruibai injection was more convenient, simple, effective, and safer than filgrastim.

  3. Hematopoietic growth factors for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Penkowa, M; Johnsen, H E

    1998-01-01

    with milder forms of MDS combined with low prestudy endogenous S-Epo levels. The possible synergistic effect of combining rhEpo with rhG-CSF or rhGM-CSF has been studied with erythropoietic response rates of about 40%. The safety of the cytokine administration seems acceptable with no significant stimulation...... of leukemic myelopoiesis and subsequent progression into overt acute myeloid leukemia. In conclusion, combinations of hematopoietic growth factors may be of clinical benefit in some patients with MDS. However, due to the cost and unpredictable clinical outcome there is a need for extended laboratory research...

  4. Factors related to resistance to hematopoietic death in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Nobuko; Okumoto, Masaaki; Yonezawa, Morio; Nishikawa, Ryosuke; Takamori, Yasuhiko; Esaki, Kozaburo.

    1994-01-01

    Mouse strain difference in the radiosensitivity to hematopoietic death is thought to be determined by several factors besides radiosensitivity and the initial number of hematopoietic stem cells. Factors related to the survival of mice exposed to X-irradiation were analyzed using BALB/cHeA and STS/A strains whose LD 50/30 values differ markedly (BALB/cHeA, 5.55 Gy; STS/A, 8.45 Gy). STS/A mice exposed to 4 Gy of X-irradiation showed a small reduction but rapid recovery of blood cells (leukocytes, erythrocytes, and thrombocytes) when compared with BALB/cHeA mice. The survival of endogenous and exogenous CFU-S was much higher, by a magnitude of one log or more, in STS/A mice than those in BALB/cHeA mice; whereas the initial numbers of femoral CFU-S were similar for the two strains. The recovery of exogenous CFU-S was much more rapid in STS/A mice than it was in BALB/cHeA mice after 4 Gy of X-irradiation. Furthermore, spleen colonies produced by the transfusion of STS/A marrow cells into syngeneic recipients were significantly larger than those produced by BALB/cHeA marrow cells, regardless of whether the mice used for sources of marrow cells had been irradiated. But, there was no such difference when unirradiated marrow cells from the two strains were transfused into (BALB/cHeA X STS/A) F 1 recipients. These results indicate the possible contribution of a host factor (s) that stimulates the growth of spleen colonies after radiation to the radioresistance of STS/A mice, in addition to the primary effect of higher number of survivals of endogenous and exogenous CFU-S in STS/A mice. (author)

  5. Explanation of application standards of hematopoietic stimulating factors in the treatment of acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhiwei; Jiang Enhai; Wang Guilin; Luo Qingliang

    2012-01-01

    Occupational standard of the Ministry of health-Application Standards of Hematopoietic Stimulating Factors in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Sickness has been completed as a draft standard. Based on the wide study and analysis of related animal experimental literature about hematopoietic stimulating factor in the treatment of acute radiation sickness and domestic and foreign clinical reports about application of hematopoietic stimulating factor in radiation accidents in the past decade, the standard was enacted according to the suggestions of International Atomic Energy Agency and the United States Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group and European countries about the application of hematopoietic stimulating factor. It is mainly used for nuclear accident emergency and the treatment of the bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness caused by radiation accidents. It also applies to other hematopoietic failure diseases. In order to implement this standard correctly, the relevant contents of the standard were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  6. Bone marrow macrophages maintain hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niches and their depletion mobilizes HSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ingrid G; Sims, Natalie A; Pettit, Allison R; Barbier, Valérie; Nowlan, Bianca; Helwani, Falak; Poulton, Ingrid J; van Rooijen, Nico; Alexander, Kylie A; Raggatt, Liza J; Lévesque, Jean-Pierre

    2010-12-02

    In the bone marrow, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in specific niches near osteoblast-lineage cells at the endosteum. To investigate the regulation of these endosteal niches, we studied the mobilization of HSCs into the bloodstream in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We report that G-CSF mobilization rapidly depletes endosteal osteoblasts, leading to suppressed endosteal bone formation and decreased expression of factors required for HSC retention and self-renewal. Importantly, G-CSF administration also depleted a population of trophic endosteal macrophages (osteomacs) that support osteoblast function. Osteomac loss, osteoblast suppression, and HSC mobilization occurred concomitantly, suggesting that osteomac loss could disrupt endosteal niches. Indeed, in vivo depletion of macrophages, in either macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis (Mafia) transgenic mice or by administration of clodronate-loaded liposomes to wild-type mice, recapitulated the: (1) loss of endosteal osteoblasts and (2) marked reduction of HSC-trophic cytokines at the endosteum, with (3) HSC mobilization into the blood, as observed during G-CSF administration. Together, these results establish that bone marrow macrophages are pivotal to maintain the endosteal HSC niche and that the loss of such macrophages leads to the egress of HSCs into the blood.

  7. Coordinate expansion of murine hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell compartments by SHIPi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, R; Iyer, S; Akada, H; Neelam, S; Russo, C M; Chisholm, J D; Kerr, W G

    2015-03-01

    Promoting the expansion of adult stem cell populations offers the potential to ameliorate radiation or chemotherapy-induced bone marrow failure and allows for expedited recovery for patients undergoing these therapies. Previous genetic studies suggested a pivotal role for SH2 domain-containing inositol-5-phosphatase 1 (SHIP1) in limiting the size of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment. The aim of this study was to determine whether our recent development of small molecule SHIP1 inhibitors offers the potential for pharmacological expansion of the HSC compartment in vivo. We show here that treatment of mice with aminosteroid inhibitors of SHIP1 (SHIPi) more than doubles the size of the adult mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) compartment while simultaneously expanding the HSC pool sixfold. Consistent with its ability to target SHIP1 function in vivo, SHIPi also significantly increases plasma granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels, a growth factor that supports proliferation of HSC. Here, we show that SHIPi-induced G-CSF production mediates HSC and MSC expansion, as in vivo neutralization of G-CSF abrogates the SHIPi-induced expansion of both the HSC and MSC compartments. Due to its expansionary effect on adult stem cell compartments, SHIPi represents a potential novel strategy to improve declining stem cell function in both therapy induced and genetically derived bone marrow failure syndromes. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  8. 5-Androstene-3{beta},17{beta}-diol Promotes Recovery of Immature Hematopoietic Cells Following Myelosuppressive Radiation and Synergizes With Thrombopoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aerts-Kaya, Fatima S.F.; Visser, Trudi P.; Arshad, Shazia [Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Frincke, James; Stickney, Dwight R.; Reading, Chris L. [Harbor Therapeutics, Inc, San Diego, California (United States); Wagemaker, Gerard, E-mail: g.wagemaker@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: 5-Androstene-3{beta},17{beta}-diol (5-AED) stimulates recovery of hematopoiesis after exposure to radiation. To elucidate its cellular targets, the effects of 5-AED alone and in combination with (pegylated) granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and thrombopoietin (TPO) on immature hematopoietic progenitor cells were evaluated following total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were exposed to radiation delivered as a single or as a fractionated dose, and recovery of bone marrow progenitors and peripheral blood parameters was assessed. Results: BALB/c mice treated with 5-AED displayed accelerated multilineage blood cell recovery and elevated bone marrow (BM) cellularity and numbers of progenitor cells. The spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-S) assay, representing the life-saving short-term repopulating cells in BM of irradiated donor mice revealed that combined treatment with 5-AED plus TPO resulted in a 20.1-fold increase in CFU-S relative to that of placebo controls, and a 3.7 and 3.1-fold increase in comparison to 5-AED and TPO, whereas no effect was seen of Peg-G-CSF with or without 5-AED. Contrary to TPO, 5-AED also stimulated reconstitution of the more immature marrow repopulating (MRA) cells. Conclusions: 5-AED potently counteracts the hematopoietic effects of radiation-induced myelosuppression and promotes multilineage reconstitution by stimulating immature bone marrow cells in a pattern distinct from, but synergistic with TPO.

  9. Accelerate Genomic Aging in Congenital Neutropenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching...neutropenia; Shwachman Diamond syndrome; Cyclic neutropenia; Hematopoietic stem cells; Granulocyte colony- stimulating factor; Acute myeloid leukemia...high rate of leukemic transformation. For example, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) expression is induced by neutropenia and may increase

  10. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, Zhiguo [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chao, Nelson J. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Benny J., E-mail: chen0032@mc.duke.edu [Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  11. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S.; Li, Zhiguo; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells

  12. What is the role of biosimilar G-CSF agents in hematopoietic stem cell mobilization at present?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Serdal; Altuntas, Fevzi

    2017-12-01

    Mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells, which has largely replaced bone marrow harvesting as a source of hematopoietic stem cells, using recombinant agents such as filgrastim or lenograstim has become a standard procedure in both patients and healthy donors prior to peripheral blood stem cell collection for autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Published literature data suggest that mobilization with recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is safe and mobilization outcomes are satisfactory. In recent years, besides G-CSF originators, biosimilar G-CSF agents have been approved by the regulatory agencies for the same indications. Current data showed that by using the biosimilar G-CSF, similar results regarding safety and efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell mobilization may be achieved compared to the originator G-CSF. Although the issues such as the similarity to a licenced biological medicine, differences in manufacturing processes, the potential to cause immunogenicity, extrapolation and interchangeability of these biosimilar products are still being discussed by the scientific area, however, more experience with these agents now exists in approved endications and there seems to be no reason to expect significant differences between biosimilar G-CSF and originator G-CSF regarding their efficacy and safety in both patients and healthy donors. Also, the significant cost savings of biosimilars in real life setting may enhance the use of these agents in the future. Nonetheless, the collection of long-term follow-up data is mandatory for both patients and healthy donors, and multicentre randomized clinical trials that directly compare biosimilar G-CSF with the originator G-CSF are needed in order to allow the transplant community to make informed decisions regarding the choice of G-CSF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. HEMATOPOIETIC PROGENITOR CELLS AS A PREDICTIVE OF CD34+ ENUMERATION PRIOR TO PERIPHERAL BLOOD STEM CELLS HARVESTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zulkafli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: To date, the CD34+ cell enumeration has relied predominantly on flow cytometry technique. However, flow cytometry is time consuming and operator dependent. The application of the hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs channel in Sysmex XE-2100, a fully automated hematology analyzer offers an alternative approach, which is with minimal sample manipulation and less operator dependent. This study evaluates the utility of HPC counts as a predictive of CD34+ enumeration prior to peripheral blood stem cells harvesting. Materials and methods: HPC, CD34+, white blood cell (WBC, reticulocytes (retic, immature platelet fraction (IPF and immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF were determined in 61 samples from 19 patients with hematological malignancies (15 lymphoma and 4 multiple myeloma patients at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (Hospital USM who had received granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF and planned for autologous transplantation. Results: CD34+ count showed strong and significant correlation with HPC. The receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve analysis revealed that HPC count > 21.5 x 106 / L can predicts a pre harvest CD34+ count of >20 x 106 / L with sensitivity of 77%, specificity of 64% and area under the curve (AUC of 0.802. Conclusion: We concluded that HPC count can be a useful potential parameter in optimizing timing for CD34+ enumeration prior to leukapheresis.

  14. Hematopoietic effects of early and long terms of rhG-CSF in mice exposed to 6.5 Gy irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong Yuwen; Mao Bingzhi; Luo Qingliang; Dong Bo; Chen Huipeng

    1996-01-01

    In order to evaluate the long-term protective effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on hematopoiesis after a second irradiation, different doses of rhG-CSF were given to 6.5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray irradiated C 57 BL/6 mice. When the peripheral blood cells recovered to normal level, the survived mice were exposed to a second dose of radiation exactly the same as the first one. It was showed that peripheral WBC, RBC and platelet counts recovered much quicker in the mice treated with the factor after irradiation and the effect was dependent on the dose of rhG-CSF. In the survived mice exposed to a second dose of γ-rays 45 days after the first irradiation, as compared with the control, the recovery of peripheral blood cell counts was evidently accelerated and the survival rate was markedly elevated. These results not only demonstrate that the recovery of hematopoiesis in the irradiated mice could be accelerated after the administration of rhG-CSF but also suggest that early administration of the factor could produce a long-term protective effect on the hematopoietic function against a second irradiation given 45 days later

  15. Hematopoietic stem cell mobilizing agents G-CSF, cyclophosphamide or AMD3100 have distinct mechanisms of action on bone marrow HSC niches and bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, I G; Pettit, A R; Raggatt, L J; Jacobsen, R N; Forristal, C E; Barbier, V; Nowlan, B; Cisterne, A; Bendall, L J; Sims, N A; Lévesque, J-P

    2012-07-01

    The CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 is progressively replacing cyclophosphamide (CYP) as adjuvant to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for autologous transplants in patients who failed prior mobilization with G-CSF alone. It has recently emerged that G-CSF mediates HSC mobilization and inhibits bone formation via specific bone marrow (BM) macrophages. We compared the effect of these three mobilizing agents on BM macrophages, bone formation, osteoblasts, HSC niches and HSC reconstitution potential. Both G-CSF and CYP suppressed niche-supportive macrophages and osteoblasts, and inhibited expression of endosteal cytokines resulting in major impairment of HSC reconstitution potential remaining in the mobilized BM. In sharp contrast, although AMD3100 was effective at mobilizing HSC, it did not suppress osteoblasts, endosteal cytokine expression or reconstitution potential of HSC remaining in the mobilized BM. In conclusion, although G-CSF, CYP and AMD3100 efficiently mobilize HSC into the blood, their effects on HSC niches and bone formation are distinct with both G-CSF and CYP targeting HSC niche function and bone formation, whereas AMD3100 directly targets HSC without altering niche function or bone formation.

  16. In vitro generation of long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells by fibroblast growth factor-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, G; Weersing, E; Dontje, B; van Os, R; Bystrykh, LV; Vellenga, E; Miller, G

    The role of fibroblast growth factors and their receptors (FGFRs) in the regulation of normal hematopoietic stem cells is unknown. Here we show that, in mouse bone marrow, long-term repopulating stem cells are found exclusively in the FGFR(+) cell fraction. During differentiation toward committed

  17. Risk Factors for Subsequent Central Nervous System Tumors in Pediatric Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, Melissa; Shaw, Bronwen E; Brazauskas, Ruta

    2017-01-01

    Survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) are at risk of subsequent solid tumors, including central nervous system (CNS) tumors. The risk of CNS tumors after HCT in pediatric HCT recipients is not known. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors for CNS tumors in pediatric recipients...

  18. Reduced intensity conditioning, combined transplantation of haploidentical hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells in patients with severe aplastic anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong Li

    Full Text Available We examined if transplantation of combined haploidentical hematopoietic stem cells (HSC and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC affected graft failure and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD in patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA. Patients with SAA-I (N = 17 received haploidentical HSCT plus MSC infusion. Stem cell grafts used a combination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF-primed bone marrow and G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells of haploidentical donors and the culture-expanded third-party donor-derived umbilical cord MSCs (UC-MSCs, respectively. Reduced intensity conditioning consisted of fludarabine (30 mg/m2·d+cyclosphamide (500 mg/m2·d+anti-human thymocyte IgG. Transplant recipients also received cyclosporin A, mycophenolatemofetil, and CD25 monoclonal antibody. A total of 16 patients achieved hematopoietic reconstitution. The median mononuclear cell and CD34 count was 9.3×10(8/kg and 4.5×10(6/kg. Median time to ANC was >0.5×10(9/L and PLT count >20×10(9/L were 12 and 14 days, respectively. Grade III-IV acute GVHD was seen in 23.5% of the cases, while moderate and severe chronic GVHD were seen in 14.2% of the cases. The 3-month and 6-month survival rates for all patients were 88.2% and 76.5%, respectively; mean survival time was 56.5 months. Combined transplantation of haploidentical HSCs and MSCs on SAA without an HLA-identical sibling donor was safe, effectively reduced the incidence of severe GVHD, and improved patient survival.

  19. Mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells with highest self-renewal by G-CSF precedes clonogenic cell mobilization peak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ingrid G; Wiercinska, Eliza; Barbier, Valerie; Nowlan, Bianca; Bonig, Halvard; Levesque, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Harvest of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) begins at day 5 of G-CSF administration, when most donors have achieved maximal mobilization. This is based on surrogate markers for HSC mobilization, such as CD34(+) cells and colony-forming activity in blood. However, CD34(+) cells or colony-forming units in culture (CFU-C) are heterogeneous cell populations with hugely divergent long-term repopulation potential on transplantation. HSC behavior is influenced by the vascular bed in the vicinity of which they reside. We hypothesized that G-CSF may mobilize sequentially cells proximal and more distal to bone marrow venous sinuses where HSCs enter the blood. We addressed this question with functional serial transplantation assays using blood and bone marrow after specific time points of G-CSF treatment in mice. We found that in mice, blood collected after only 48 hours of G-CSF administration was as enriched in serially reconstituting HSCs as blood collected at 5 days of G-CSF treatment. Similarly, mobilized Lin(-)CD34(+) cells were relatively enriched in more primitive Lin(-)CD34(+)CD38(-) cells at day 2 of G-CSF treatment compared with later points in half of human donors tested (n = 6). This suggests that in both humans and mice, hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells do not mobilize uniformly according to their maturation stage, with most potent HSCs mobilizing as early as day 2 of G-CSF. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bid truncation, Bid/Bax targeting to the mitochondria, and caspase activation associated with neutrophil apoptosis are inhibited by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maianski, Nikolai A.; Roos, Dirk; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2004-01-01

    Neutrophil apoptosis constitutes a way of managing neutrophil-mediated reactions. It allows coping with infections, but avoiding overt bystander tissue damage. Using digitonin-based subcellular fractionation and Western blotting, we found that spontaneous apoptosis of human neutrophils (after

  1. Prevention of febrile leucopenia after chemotherapy in high-risk breast cancer patients : no significant difference between granulocyte-colony stimulating growth factor or ciprofloxacin plus amphotericin B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroder, CP; de Vries, EGE; Muder, NH; Willemse, PHB; Sleijfer, DT; Hospers, GAP; van der Graaf, WTA

    In a prospective randomized trial, 40 stage IV breast cancer patients undergoing intermediate high-dose chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil plus epirubicin or methotrexate), received either recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF, group I) or ciprofloxacin and amphotericin B (CAB, group II) for

  2. Feasibility of a dose-intensive CMF regimen with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as adjuvant therapy in premenopausal patients with node-positive breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, AME; de Graaf, H; de Vries, EGE; Piersma, H; Willemse, PHB

    Our aim was to study the feasibility of an intensified intravenous CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil) schedule with the aim to escalate dose intensity (DI). Twenty-three premenopausal breast cancer patients received 6 cycles of adjuvant CMF intravenously on days 1. and 8 every 3

  3. Mutually potentiating effects of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on erythropoietic recovery following 5-fluorouracil-induced haematotoxicity in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weiterová, L.; Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Znojil, V.; Vácha, J.; Vacek, Antonín; Pipalová, Iva

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2000), s. 89 ISSN 0272-4391. [International Symposium Promoted by the Spanish Purine Club. 09.07.2000-13.07.2000, Madrid] Institutional research plan: CEZ:A17/98:Z5-004-9-ii Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  4. Combination Therapy for Radiation-Induced Bone Marrow Aplasia in Nonhuman Primates Using Synthokine SC-55494 and Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MacVittle, Thomas J; Farese, Ann M; Herodin, Francis; Grab, Lisa B; Baum, Charles M; McKearn, John P

    1996-01-01

    .... After irradiation on day (d) 0, cohorts of animals subcutaneously received single-agent protocols of either human serum albumin (HSA; every day [OD], 15 microng/kg/d. n = 10). Synthokine (twice daily [BID...

  5. Sources of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells and Methods to Optimize Yields for Clinical Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panch, Sandhya R; Szymanski, James; Savani, Bipin N; Stroncek, David F

    2017-08-01

    Bone marrow (BM) aspirates, mobilized peripheral blood, and umbilical cord blood (UCB) have developed as graft sources for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) for stem cell transplantation and other cellular therapeutics. Individualized techniques are necessary to enhance graft HSPC yields and cell quality from each graft source. BM aspirates yield adequate CD34 + cells but can result in relative delays in engraftment. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-primed BM HSPCs may facilitate faster engraftment while minimizing graft-versus-host disease in certain patient subsets. The levels of circulating HSPCs are enhanced using mobilizing agents, such as G-CSF and/or plerixafor, which act via the stromal cell-derived factor 1/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 axis. Alternate niche pathway mediators, including very late antigen-4/vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, heparan sulfate proteoglycans, parathyroid hormone, and coagulation cascade intermediates, may offer promising alternatives for graft enhancement. UCB grafts have been expanded ex vivo with cytokines, notch-ligand, or mesenchymal stromal cells, and most studies demonstrated greater quantities of CD34 + cells ex vivo and improved short-term engraftment. No significant changes were observed in long-term repopulating potential or in patient survival. Early phase clinical trials using nicotinamide and StemReginin1 may offer improved short- and long-term repopulating ability. Breakthroughs in genome editing and stem cell reprogramming technologies may hasten the generation of pooled, third-party HSPC grafts. This review elucidates past, present, and potential future approaches to HSPC graft optimization. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Stem cell factor induces phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase-dependent Lyn/Tec/Dok-1 complex formation in hematopoietic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.B. van Dijk (Thamar); M. Parren-Van Amelsvoort (Martine); H. Mano; M.M. von Lindern (Marieke); B. Löwenberg (Bob); E. van den Akker (Emile)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractStem cell factor (SCF) has an important role in the proliferation, differentiation, survival, and migration of hematopoietic cells. SCF exerts its effects by binding to cKit, a receptor with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. Activation of

  7. Therapeutic effects of combined cytokines on hematopoietic injuries induced by 4.5 Gy γ-rays irradiation in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jianzhi; Li Ming; Xing Shuang; Hu Zhiqing; Xiong Guolin; Xie Ling; Ou Hongling; Huang Haixiao; Zhao Zhenhu; Wang Ning; Wang Jinxiang; Miao Jingcheng; Zhu Nankang; Zhang Xueguang; Cong Yuwen; Zhang Ri; Luo Qingliang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To observe the therapeutic effects of combined cytokines on hematopoietic injuries induced by 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-rays irradiation in beagles, and to provide experimental evidences for the clinical treatment of extremely severe myeloid acute radiation sickness (ARS). Methods: 16 beagles were given 4.5 Gy 60 Co γ-rays total body irradiation, and then randomly assigned into irradiation control group, supportive care group and cytokines group. In addition to supportive care, recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF), recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11) and recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) were administered subcutaneouly to dogs in cytokines group. Peripheral blood hemogram was examined once every two days. Bone marrow and peripheral blood were collected to proceed colony cultivation 4 d pre-irradiation and 1 and 45 d post-irradiation. Conventional histopathological sections sternum were prepared to observe the histomorphology changes. Results: After irradiation, the population of all kinds of cells in peripheral blood declined sharply. WBC nadir was elevated (1.04 x 10 9 /L, but 0.28 x 10 9 /L and 0.68 x 10 9 /L for the irradiation control group and the supportive care group separately), the duration of thrombocytopenia was shortened (24 days, but 33 days for the supportive care group) and red blood cell counts were maintained in the range of normal values after cytokines treatment in combination. The colony forming efficiency of haemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in bone marrow and peripheral blood decreased obviously 1 d post irradiation, but recovered to the level of that before irradiation 45 d post irradiation after supportive care and cytokines treatment. Hematopoietic cells disappeared in bone marrow of animals in irradiation control group, but hematopoietic functions were recovered after cytokines were administrated. Conclusions: RhG-CSF, rhIL-11 and rhIL-2 used in combination could elevate WBC nadir, accelerate the

  8. Combining G-CSF with a blockade of adhesion strongly improves the reconstitutive capacity of mobilized hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, O; Kronenwett, R; Haas, R; Zöller, M

    2001-03-01

    Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells is achieved mainly by application of growth factors and, more recently, by blockade of adhesion. In this report, we describe the advantages of a combined treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and anti-VLA4 (CD49d)/anti-CD44 as compared to treatment with the individual components. Mobilization by intravenous injection of anti-CD44, anti-VLA4, or G-CSF was controlled in spleen and bone marrow with regard to frequencies of multipotential colony-forming unit (C-CFU), marrow repopulating ability, long-term reconstitution, recovery of myelopoiesis, and regain of immunocompetence. Mobilization by anti-CD44 had a strong effect on expansion of early progenitor cells in the bone marrow, while the recovery in the spleen was poor. In anti-CD49d-mobilized noncommitted and committed progenitors, progenitor expansion was less pronounced, but settlement in the spleen was quite efficient. Thus, anti-CD44 and anti-CD49d differently influenced mobilization. Accordingly, mobilization and recovery after transfer were improved by combining anti-CD44 with anti-CD49d treatment. Mobilization by G-CSF was most efficient with respect to recovery of progenitor cells in the spleen. However, when transferring G-CSF-mobilized cells, regain of immunocompetence was strongly delayed. This disadvantage could be overridden when progenitor cells were mobilized via blockade of adhesion and when expansion of these mobilized progenitor cells was supported by low-dose G-CSF only during the last 24 hours before transfer. Mobilization of pluripotent progenitor cells via antibody blockade of CD44 or CD49d or via G-CSF relies on distinct mechanisms. Therefore, the reconstitutive capacity of a transplant can be significantly improved by mobilization regimens combining antibody with low-dose G-CSF treatment.

  9. Hematopoietic growth factors in neonatal medicine: the use of enterally administered hematopoietic growth factors in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Darlene A; Christensen, Robert D

    2004-03-01

    The practice of complete bowel rest in prematurely delivered neonates and those who have undergone surgery for congenital anomalies of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is common in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). However, increased recognition of the critical role of growth factors in GI development suggests that this practice might be modified to include the administration of synthetic amniotic fluid-like solutions designed to bridge the neonate between their intra-uterine environment and that of the NICU. This article reviews advances in administering synthetic amniotic fluid-like solutions in the NICU.

  10. Factors Influencing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Donation Intention in Hong Kong: A Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Janette; Leung, Eva; Wong, William; Leung, Kate; Lee, Cheuk Kwong; Lam, Wendy; Ip, Patrick

    2015-10-08

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become increasingly common for treatment of severe hematological disorders. However, the number of compatible hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) donors is usually limited. Expanding donor pool size would enhance matching success by increasing donor frequency and introducing allelic diversity within the registry. Identifying factors that affect public willingness towards HSC donation allows better strategic recruitment planning to facilitate donor pool expansion. Previous studies in white populations showed knowledge, family attitude, trust towards the healthcare system, fear, self-identity, and social identity are important factors related to HSC donation intention. However, given the differences in cultural and society values that exist across different regions, in particular between the East and West, whether these factors influence HSC donation willingness in Hong Kong remained to be determined. The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with HSC donation motivation in Hong Kong. A large-scale, cross-sectional, observational study involving 3479 local participants. There is a positive correlation of HSC donation intention with younger age (18-32, OR: 1.80, p≤0·001) and higher education (OR: 1·47, p≤0.001). Better HSCT knowledge is also related to greater HSC donation intention (OR: 2.55, p£0.001). Our data suggests HSCT education could help to improve donor recruitment and that more resources should be allocated for public education.

  11. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: comparison with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Bonaventura; Jarque, Isidro; Gascón, Francisco; Hernández-Boluda, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Miralles, Francisco; de la Rubia, Javier; Alcalá, Carmen; Sanz, Jaime; Mallada, Javier; Cervelló, Angeles; Navarré, Arantxa; Carcelén-Gadea, María; Boscá, Isabel; Gil-Perotin, Sara; Solano, Carlos; Sanz, Miguel Angel; Coret, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    The main objective of our work is to describe the long-term results of myeloablative autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (AHSCT) in multiple sclerosis patients. Patients that failed to conventional therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS) underwent an approved protocol for AHSCT, which consisted of peripheral blood stem cell mobilization with cyclophosphamide and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), followed by a conditioning regimen of BCNU, Etoposide, Ara-C, Melphalan IV, plus Rabbit Thymoglobulin. Thirty-eight MS patients have been transplanted since 1999. Thirty-one patients have been followed for more than 2 years (mean 8.4 years). There were 22 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients and 9 secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) patients. No death related to AHSCT. A total of 10 patients (32.3%) had at least one relapse during post-AHSCT evolution, 6 patients in the RRMS group (27.2%) and 4 in the SPMS group (44.4%). After AHSCT, 7 patients (22.6%) experienced progression of disability, all within SP form. By contrast, no patients with RRMS experienced worsening of disability after a median follow-up of 5.4 years, 60% of them showed a sustained reduction in disability (SRD), defined as the improvement of 1.0 point in the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) sustains for 6 months (0.5 in cases of EDSS ≥ 5.5). The only clinical variable that predicted a poor response to AHSCT was a high EDSS in the year before transplant. AHSCT using the BEAM-ATG scheme is safe and efficacious to control the aggressive forms of RRMS.

  12. Biosimilar G-CSF based mobilization of peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells for autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael; Publicover, Amy; Orchard, Kim H; Görlach, Matthias; Wang, Lei; Schmitt, Anita; Mani, Jiju; Tsirigotis, Panagiotis; Kuriakose, Reeba; Nagler, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    The use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) biosimilars for peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell (PBSC) mobilization has stimulated an ongoing debate regarding their efficacy and safety. However, the use of biosimilar G-CSF was approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for all the registered indications of the originator G-CSF (Neupogen (®) ) including mobilization of stem cells. Here, we performed a comprehensive review of published reports on the use of biosimilar G-CSF covering patients with hematological malignancies as well as healthy donors that underwent stem cell mobilization at multiple centers using site-specific non-randomized regimens with a biosimilar G-CSF in the autologous and allogeneic setting. A total of 904 patients mostly with hematological malignancies as well as healthy donors underwent successful autologous or allogeneic stem cell mobilization, respectively, using a biosimilar G-CSF (520 with Ratiograstim®/Tevagrastim, 384 with Zarzio®). The indication for stem cell mobilization in hematology patients included 326 patients with multiple myeloma, 273 with Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), 79 with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), and other disease. 156 sibling or volunteer unrelated donors were mobilized using biosimilar G-CSF. Mobilization resulted in good mobilization of CD34+ stem cells with side effects similar to originator G-CSF. Post transplantation engraftment did not significantly differ from results previously documented with the originator G-CSF. The side effects experienced by the patients or donors mobilized by biosimilar G-CSF were minimal and were comparable to those of originator G-CSF. In summary, the efficacy of biosimilar G-CSFs in terms of PBSC yield as well as their toxicity profile are equivalent to historical data with the reference G-CSF.

  13. Biosimilar G-CSF versus filgrastim and lenograstim in healthy unrelated volunteer hematopoietic stem cell donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Roiya; Urbanowska, Elżbieta; Zborowska, Hanna; Król, Małgorzata; Król, Maria; Torosian, Tigran; Piotrowska, Iwona; Bogusz, Krzysztof; Skwierawska, Kamila; Wiktor-Jędrzejczak, Wiesław; Snarski, Emilian

    2017-10-01

    The World Marrow Donor Organization recommends original granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for the mobilization of stem cells in healthy unrelated hematopoietic stem cell donors. We report the comparison of a biosimilar G-CSF (Zarzio) with two original G-CSFs (filgrastim and lenograstim) in mobilization in unrelated donors. We included data of 313 consecutive donors who were mobilized during the period from October 2014 to March 2016 at the Medical University of Warsaw. The primary endpoints of this study were the efficiency of CD34+ cell mobilization to the circulation and results of the first apheresis. The mean daily dose of G-CSF was 9.1 μg/kg for lenograstim, 9.8 μg/kg for biosimilar filgrastim, and 9.3 μg/kg for filgrastim (p blood before the first apheresis was 111 for lenograstim, 119 for biosimilar filgrastim, and 124 for filgrastim (p = 0.354); the mean difference was even less significant when comparing CD34+ number per dose of G-CSF per kilogram (p = 0.787). Target doses of CD34+ cells were reached with one apheresis in 87% donors mobilized with lenograstim and in 93% donors mobilized with original and biosimilar filgrastim (p = 0.005). The mobilized apheresis outcomes (mean number of CD34+ cells/kg of donor collected during the first apheresis) was similar with lenograstim, biosimilar filgrastim, and filgrastim: 6.2 × 10 6 , 7.6 × 10 6 , and 7.3 × 10 6 , respectively, p = 0.06. There was no mobilization failure in any of the donors. Biosimilar G-CSF is as effective in the mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells in unrelated donors as original G-CSFs. Small and clinically irrelevant differences seen in the study can be attributed to differences in G-CSF dose and collection-related factors. Active safety surveillance concurrent to clinical use and reporting to donor outcome registry (e.g., EBMT donor outcome registry or WMDA SEAR/SPEAR) might help to evaluate the possible short- and long-term complications of

  14. Generating autologous hematopoietic cells from human-induced pluripotent stem cells through ectopic expression of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yongsung; Broxmeyer, Hal E; Lee, Man Ryul

    2017-07-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a successful treatment modality for patients with malignant and nonmalignant disorders, usually when no other treatment option is available. The cells supporting long-term reconstitution after HCT are the hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which can be limited in numbers. Moreover, finding an appropriate human leukocyte antigen-matched donor can be problematic. If HSCs can be stably produced in large numbers from autologous or allogeneic cell sources, it would benefit HCT. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) established from patients' own somatic cells can be differentiated into hematopoietic cells in vitro. This review will highlight recent methods for regulating human (h) iPSC production of HSCs and more mature blood cells. Advancements in transcription factor-mediated regulation of the developmental stages of in-vivo hematopoietic lineage commitment have begun to provide an understanding of the molecular mechanism of hematopoiesis. Such studies involve not only directed differentiation in which transcription factors, specifically expressed in hematopoietic lineage-specific cells, are overexpressed in iPSCs, but also direct conversion in which transcription factors are introduced into patient-derived somatic cells which are dedifferentiated to hematopoietic cells. As iPSCs derived from patients suffering from genetically mutated diseases would express the same mutated genetic information, CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing has been utilized to differentiate genetically corrected iPSCs into normal hematopoietic cells. IPSCs provide a model for molecular understanding of disease, and also may function as a cell population for therapy. Efficient differentiation of patient-specific iPSCs into HSCs and progenitor cells is a potential means to overcome limitations of such cells for HCT, as well as for providing in-vitro drug screening templates as tissue-on-a-chip models.

  15. Ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract (UPLE, IMUNOR) potentiates hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of G-CSF in vitro and improves the outcome of treatment of hematopoietic radiation damage in mice with G-CSF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacek, Antonín; Hofer, Michal; Schneiderová, H.; Svoboda, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 4 (2005), s. 647-659 ISSN 0892-3973 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS5004009; GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK5011112 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : ultrafiltered pig leukocyte extract * Imunor * granulocyte colony-stimulating factor Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.557, year: 2005

  16. The hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 regulates RANK gene expression in myeloid progenitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Oh Hyung; Lee, Chong-Kil; Lee, Young Ik; Paik, Sang-Gi; Lee, Hyun-Jun

    2005-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone resorbing cells of hematopoietic origin. The hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 is critical for osteoclastogenesis; however, the molecular mechanisms of PU.1-regulated osteoclastogenesis have not been explored. Here, we present evidence that the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) gene that has been shown to be crucial for osteoclastogenesis is a transcriptional target of PU.1. The PU.1 -/- progenitor cells failed to express the RANK gene and reconstitution of PU.1 in these cells induced RANK expression. Treatment of the PU.1 reconstituted cells with M-CSF and RANKL further augmented the RANK gene expression. To explore the regulatory mechanism of the RANK gene expression by PU.1, we have cloned the human RANK promoter. Transient transfection assays have revealed that the 2.2-kb RANK promoter was functional in a monocyte line RAW264.7, whereas co-transfection of PU.1 transactivated the RANK promoter in HeLa cells. Taken together, these results suggest that PU.1 regulates the RANK gene transcription and this may represent one of the key roles of PU.1 in osteoclast differentiation

  17. Extended flow cytometry characterization of normal bone marrow progenitor cells by simultaneous detection of aldehyde dehydrogenase and early hematopoietic antigens: implication for erythroid differentiation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascariello Caterina

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH is a cytosolic enzyme highly expressed in hematopoietic precursors from cord blood and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor mobilized peripheral blood, as well as in bone marrow from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. As regards human normal bone marrow, detailed characterization of ALDH+ cells has been addressed by one single study (Gentry et al, 2007. The goal of our work was to provide new information about the dissection of normal bone marrow progenitor cells based upon the simultaneous detection by flow cytometry of ALDH and early hematopoietic antigens, with particular attention to the expression of ALDH on erythroid precursors. To this aim, we used three kinds of approach: i multidimensional analytical flow cytometry, detecting ALDH and early hematopoietic antigens in normal bone marrow; ii fluorescence activated cell sorting of distinct subpopulations of progenitor cells, followed by in vitro induction of erythroid differentiation; iii detection of ALDH+ cellular subsets in bone marrow from pure red cell aplasia patients. Results In normal bone marrow, we identified three populations of cells, namely ALDH+CD34+, ALDH-CD34+ and ALDH+CD34- (median percentages were 0.52, 0.53 and 0.57, respectively. As compared to ALDH-CD34+ cells, ALDH+CD34+ cells expressed the phenotypic profile of primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells, with brighter expression of CD117 and CD133, accompanied by lower display of CD38 and CD45RA. Of interest, ALDH+CD34- population disclosed a straightforward erythroid commitment, on the basis of three orders of evidences. First of all, ALDH+CD34- cells showed a CD71bright, CD105+, CD45- phenotype. Secondly, induction of differentiation experiments evidenced a clear-cut expression of glycophorin A (CD235a. Finally, ALDH+CD34- precursors were not detectable in patients with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA. Conclusion Our study, comparing surface antigen expression of

  18. In vitro effects of recombinant human stem cell factor on hematopoietic cells from patients with acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chuansheng; Cheng Tao; Xu Yanqun

    1994-01-01

    The effects of rhSCF, rhPIXY 321, rhGM-CSF and rhIL-3 on clonal proliferation of hematopoietic cells from five cases of acute radiation sickness were studied. The results showed that rhSCF could stimulate clonal proliferation of normal hematopoietic cells and the best results were obtained when the concentration of rhSCF was 5 x 10 4 ng/L. Clonal proliferation of hematopoietic cells from four cases of acute radiation sickness was stimulated while that from one case was inhibited. Moreover, the responsiveness of cells to rhSCF was correlated with the doses of radiation. Analysis of cell surface antigen, cell morphology and histochemistry revealed that rhSCF promoted predominantly the proliferation of granulocyte-macrophage lineage. rhSCF in combination with other three factors could further enhance the clonal proliferation of hematopoietic cells. The effects of rhPIXY 321, a fusion protein of GM-CSF and IL-3, were also analysed and found it to be a novel valuable hematopoietic growth factor

  19. Chemotaxis of primitive hematopoietic cells in response to stromal cell–derived factor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Deog-Yeon; Rafii, Shahin; Hamada, Tsuneyoshi; Moore, Malcolm A.S.

    2000-01-01

    Stromal cell–derived factor-1 (SDF-1) provides a potent chemotactic stimulus for CD34+ hematopoietic cells. We cultured mobilized peripheral blood (PB) and umbilical cord blood (CB) for up to 5 weeks and examined the migratory activity of cobblestone area–forming cells (CAFCs) and long-term culture–initiating cells (LTC-ICs) in a transwell assay. In this system, SDF-1 or MS-5 marrow stromal cells placed in the lower chamber induced transmembrane and transendothelial migration by 2- and 5-week-old CAFCs and LTC-ICs in 3 hours. Transmigration was blocked by preincubation of input CD34+ cells with antibody to CXCR4. Transendothelial migration of CB CAFCs and LTC-ICs was higher than that of PB. We expanded CD34+ cells from CB in serum-free medium with thrombopoietin, flk-2 ligand, and c-kit ligand, with or without IL-3 and found that CAFCs cultured in the absence of IL-3 had a chemotactic response equivalent to noncultured cells, even after 5 weeks. However, addition of IL-3 to the culture reduced this response by 20–50%. These data indicate that SDF-1 induces chemotaxis of primitive hematopoietic cells signaling through CXCR4 and that the chemoattraction could be downmodulated by culture ex vivo. PMID:10619866

  20. Purification of human recombinant granulocyte colony stimulating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramya

    2012-06-21

    Jun 21, 2012 ... Proteins expressed as inclusion bodies are currently solubilized by the use of high ... by dialyzing with buffer containing reducing and oxidizing agents. Renaturation of ... MATERIALS AND METHODS. Expression system and ...

  1. Prolonged Shedding of Human Coronavirus in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients: Risk Factors and Viral Genome Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogimi, Chikara; Greninger, Alexander L; Waghmare, Alpana A; Kuypers, Jane M; Shean, Ryan C; Xie, Hu; Leisenring, Wendy M; Stevens-Ayers, Terry L; Jerome, Keith R; Englund, Janet A; Boeckh, Michael

    2017-07-15

    Recent data suggest that human coronavirus (HCoV) pneumonia is associated with significant mortality in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Investigation of risk factors for prolonged shedding and intrahost genome evolution may provide critical information for development of novel therapeutics. We retrospectively reviewed HCT recipients with HCoV detected in nasal samples by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). HCoV strains were identified using strain-specific PCR. Shedding duration was defined as time between first positive and first negative sample. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate factors for prolonged shedding (≥21 days). Metagenomic next-generation sequencing (mNGS) was conducted when ≥4 samples with cycle threshold values of Genome changes were consistent with the expected molecular clock of HCoV. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Covalent immobilization of stem cell factor and stromal derived factor 1α for in vitro culture of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuchiara, Maude L; Horter, Kelsey L; Banda, Omar A; West, Jennifer L

    2013-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are currently utilized in the treatment of blood diseases, but widespread application of HSC therapeutics has been hindered by the limited availability of HSCs. With a better understanding of the HSC microenvironment and the ability to precisely recapitulate its components, we may be able to gain control of HSC behavior. In this work we developed a novel, biomimetic PEG hydrogel material as a substrate for this purpose and tested its potential with an anchorage-independent hematopoietic cell line, 32D clone 3 cells. We immobilized a fibronectin-derived adhesive peptide sequence, RGDS; a cytokine critical in HSC self-renewal, stem cell factor (SCF); and a chemokine important in HSC homing and lodging, stromal derived factor 1α (SDF1α), onto the surfaces of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels. To evaluate the system's capabilities, we observed the effects of the biomolecules on 32D cell adhesion and morphology. We demonstrated that the incorporation of RGDS onto the surfaces promotes 32D cell adhesion in a dose-dependent fashion. We also observed an additive response in adhesion on surfaces with RGDS in combination with either SCF or SDF1α. In addition, the average cell area increased and circularity decreased on gel surfaces containing immobilized SCF or SDF1α, indicating enhanced cell spreading. By recapitulating aspects of the HSC microenvironment using a PEG hydrogel scaffold, we have shown the ability to control the adhesion and spreading of the 32D cells and demonstrated the potential of the system for the culture of primary hematopoietic cell populations. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Growth regulation on human acute myeloid leukemia effects of five recombinant hematopoietic factors in a serum-free culture system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delwel, E.; Salem, M.; Pellens, C.; Dorssers, L.; Wagemaker, G.; Clark, S.; Loewenberg, B

    1988-01-01

    The response of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells to the distinct hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs), ie, recombinant interleukin-3 (IL-3), granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF), macrophage-CSF (M-CSF), and erythropoietin (Epo) was investigated under well-defined

  4. Stem cell factor induces phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase-dependent Lyn/Tec/Dok-1 complex formation in hematopoietic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, T. B.; van den Akker, E.; Amelsvoort, M. P.; Mano, H.; Löwenberg, B.; von Lindern, M.

    2000-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) has an important role in the proliferation, differentiation, survival, and migration of hematopoietic cells. SCF exerts its effects by binding to cKit, a receptor with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. Activation of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3-K) by cKit was

  5. Hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization with "just-in-time" plerixafor approach is a cost-effective alternative to routine plerixafor use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Lauren; Cumpston, Aaron; Shillingburg, Alexandra; Wen, Sijin; Luo, Jin; Leadmon, Sonia; Watkins, Kathy; Craig, Michael; Hamadani, Mehdi; Kanate, Abraham S

    2015-12-01

    Hematopoietic cell mobilization with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and plerixafor results in superior CD34+ cell yield compared with G-CSF alone in patients with myeloma and lymphoma. However, plerixafor-based approaches may be associated with high costs. Several institutions use a "just-in-time" plerixafor approach, in which plerixafor is only administered to patients likely to fail mobilization with G-CSF alone. Whether such an approach is cost-effective is unknown. We evaluated 136 patients with myeloma or lymphoma who underwent mobilization with 2 approaches of plerixafor utilization. Between January 2010 and October 2012, 76 patients uniformly received mobilization with G-CSF and plerixafor. Between November 2012 and June 2014, 60 patients were mobilized with plerixafor administered only to those patients likely to fail mobilization with G-CSF alone. The routine plerixafor group had a higher median peak peripheral blood CD34+ cell count (62 versus 29 cells/μL, P just-in-time" group, 40% (n = 24) completed adequate collection without plerixafor. There was no difference in mobilization failure rates. The mean plerixafor doses used was lower with "just-in-time" approach (1.3 versus 2.1, P = 0.0002). The mean estimated cost in the routine plerixafor group was higher (USD 27,513 versus USD 23,597, P = 0.01). Our analysis demonstrates that mobilization with a just-in-time plerixafor approach is a safe, effective, and cost-efficient strategy for HPC collection. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells secrete endocannabinoids that stimulate in vitro hematopoietic stem cell migration effectively comparable to beta-adrenergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köse, Sevil; Aerts-Kaya, Fatima; Köprü, Çağla Zübeyde; Nemutlu, Emirhan; Kuşkonmaz, Barış; Karaosmanoğlu, Beren; Taşkıran, Ekim Zihni; Altun, Belgin; Uçkan Çetinkaya, Duygu; Korkusuz, Petek

    2018-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a well-known hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-mobilizing agent used in both allogeneic and autologous transplantation. However, a proportion of patients or healthy donors fail to mobilize a sufficient number of cells. New mobilization agents are therefore needed. Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are endogenous lipid mediators generated in the brain and peripheral tissues and activate the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. We suggest that eCBs may act as mobilizers of HSCs from the bone marrow (BM) under stress conditions as beta-adrenergic receptors (Adrβ). This study demonstrates that BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) secrete anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) and the peripheral blood (PB) and BM microenvironment contain AEA and 2-AG. 2-AG levels are significantly higher in PB of the G-CSF-treated group compared with BM plasma. BM mononuclear cells (MNCs) and CD34 + HSCs express CB1, CB2, and Adrβ subtypes. CD34 + HSCs had higher CB1 and CB2 receptor expression in G-CSF-untreated and G-CSF-treated groups compared with MSCs. MNCs but not MSCs expressed CB1 and CB2 receptors based on qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. AEA- and 2-AG-stimulated HSC migration was blocked by eCB receptor antagonists in an in vitro migration assay. In conclusion, components of the eCB system and their interaction with Adrβ subtypes were demonstrated on HSCs and MSCs of G-CSF-treated and G-CSF-untreated healthy donors in vitro, revealing that eCBs might be potential candidates to enhance or facilitate G-CSF-mediated HSC migration under stress conditions in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2018 ISEH – Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of hematopoietic growth factors on purified bone marrow progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Bot (Freek)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWe have used highly enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells and in-vitro culture to examine the following questions: 1. The effects of recombinant lL-3 and GM-CSF on proliferation and differentiation of enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells have not been clearly defined: - how do IL~3

  8. Fine-tuning Hematopoiesis: Microenvironmental factors regulating self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C. Luis (Tiago)

    2010-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have the ability to self renew and generate all lineages of blood cells. Although it is currently well established that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) regenerate the blood compartment, it was only in the 1960s that was introduced the

  9. Multilineage hematopoietic recovery with concomitant antitumor effects using low dose Interleukin-12 in myelosuppressed tumor-bearing mice

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    Miller Joseph D

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-12 (IL-12 is a cytokine well known for its role in immunity. A lesser known function of IL-12 is its role in hematopoiesis. The promising data obtained in the preclinical models of antitumor immunotherapy raised hope that IL-12 could be a powerful therapeutic agent against cancer. However, excessive clinical toxicity, largely due to repeat dose regimens, and modest clinical response observed in the clinical trials have pointed to the necessity to design protocols that minimize toxicity without affecting the anti-tumor effect of IL-12. We have focused on the lesser known role of IL-12 in hematopoiesis and hypothesized that an important clinical role for IL-12 in cancer may be as an adjuvant hematological cancer therapy. In this putative clinical function, IL-12 is utilized for the prevention of cancer therapy-related cytopenias, while providing concomitant anti-tumor responses over and above responses observed with the primary therapy alone. This putative clinical function of IL-12 focuses on the dual role of IL-12 in hematopoiesis and immunity. Methods We assessed the ability of IL-12 to facilitate hematopoietic recovery from radiation (625 rad and chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide in two tumor-bearing murine models, namely the EL4 lymphoma and the Lewis lung cancer models. Antitumor effects and changes in bone marrow cellularity were also assessed. Results We show herein that carefully designed protocols, in mice, utilizing IL-12 as an adjuvant to radiation or chemotherapy yield facile and consistent, multilineage hematopoietic recovery from cancer therapy-induced cytopenias, as compared to vehicle and the clinically-utilized cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF (positive control, while still providing concomitant antitumor responses over and above the effects of the primary therapy alone. Moreover, our protocol design utilizes single, low doses of IL-12 that did not yield any apparent toxicity

  10. Specific Factors Influence the Success of Autologous and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

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    Thissiane L. Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, both autologous and allogeneic, requires a rapid and durable engraftment, with neutrophil (>500/µL and platelet (>20,000/µL reconstitution. Factors influencing engraftment after autologous or allogeneic HSCT were investigated in 65 patients: 25 autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation (PBSCT and 40 allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT patients. The major factor affecting engraftment was the graft source for HSCT. Neutrophil and platelet recovery were more rapid in autologous PBSCT than in allogeneic BMT [neutrophil occurring in median on day 10.00 (09.00/11.00 and 19.00 (16.00/23.00 and platelet on day 11.00 (10.00/13.00 and 21.00 (18.00/25.00, respectively; p < 0.0001]. The type of disease also affected engraftment, where multiple myeloma (MM and lymphoma showed faster engraftment when compared with leukemia, syndrome myelodysplastic (SMD and aplastic anemia (AA and MM presented the best overall survival (OS in a period of 12 months. Other factors included the drug used in the conditioning regimen (CR, where CBV, melphalan (M-200 and FluCy showed faster engraftment and M-200 presented the best OS, in a period of 12 months and age, where 50–59 years demonstrated faster engraftment. Sex did not influence neutrophil and platelet recovery.

  11. Age-related changes of healthy bone marrow cell signaling in response to growth factors provide insight into low risk MDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblau, Steven M; Cohen, Aileen C; Soper, David; Huang, Ying-Wen; Cesano, Alessandra

    2014-11-01

    Single Cell Network Profiling (SCNP) is a multiparametric flow cytometry-based assay that quantifiably and simultaneously measures changes in intracellular signaling proteins in response to in vitro extracellular modulators at the single cell level. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous clonal disorder of hematopoietic stem cells that occurs in elderly subjects and is characterized by dysplasia and ineffective hematopoiesis. The functional responsiveness of MDS bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic cells, including functionally distinct myeloid and erythroid precursor subsets, to hematopoietic growth factors (HGF) and the relationship of modulated signaling to disease characteristics is poorly understood. SCNP was used first to examine the effects of age on erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF)-induced signaling in myeloid, nucleated red blood cells (nRBC), and CD34 expressing cell subsets in healthy BM (n = 15). SCNP was then used to map functional signaling profiles in low risk (LR) MDS (n = 7) for comparison to signaling in samples from healthy donors and to probe signaling associations within clinically defined subgroups. In healthy BM samples, signaling responses to HGF were quite homogeneous (i.e., tightly regulated) with age-dependent effects observed in response to EPO but not to GCSF. Despite the relatively small number of samples assayed in the study, LR MDS could be classified into distinct subgroups based on both cell subset frequency and signaling profiles. As a correlate of underlying genetic abnormalities, signal transduction analyses may provide a functional and potentially clinically relevant classification of MDS. Further evaluation in a larger cohort is warranted. © 2013 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  12. Vascular Platform to Define Hematopoietic Stem Cell Factors and Enhance Regenerative Hematopoiesis

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    Michael G. Poulos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs inhabit distinct microenvironments within the adult bone marrow (BM, which govern the delicate balance between HSC quiescence, self-renewal, and differentiation. Previous reports have proposed that HSCs localize to the vascular niche, comprised of endothelium and tightly associated perivascular cells. Herein, we examine the capacity of BM endothelial cells (BMECs to support ex vivo and in vivo hematopoiesis. We demonstrate that AKT1-activated BMECs (BMEC-Akt1 have a unique transcription factor/cytokine profile that supports functional HSCs in lieu of complex serum and cytokine supplementation. Additionally, transplantation of BMEC-Akt1 cells enhanced regenerative hematopoiesis following myeloablative irradiation. These data demonstrate that BMEC-Akt1 cultures can be used as a platform for the discovery of pro-HSC factors and justify the utility of BMECs as a cellular therapy. This technical advance may lead to the development of therapies designed to decrease pancytopenias associated with myeloablative regimens used to treat a wide array of disease states.

  13. Immune suppressor factor confers stromal cell line with enhanced supporting activity for hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Shibata, Fumi; Fukuchi, Yumi; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Ito, Miyuki; Urano, Atsushi; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    Immune suppressor factor (ISF) is a subunit of the vacuolar ATPase proton pump. We earlier identified a short form of ISF (ShIF) as a stroma-derived factor that supports cytokine-independent growth of mutant Ba/F3 cells. Here, we report that ISF/ShIF supports self-renewal and expansion of primary hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Co-culture of murine bone marrow cells with a stromal cell line overexpressing ISF or ShIF (MS10/ISF or MS10/ShIF) not only enhanced their colony-forming activity and the numbers of long-term culture initiating cells, but also maintained the competitive repopulating activity of HSC. This stem cell supporting activity depended on the proton-transfer function of ISF/ShIF. Gene expression analysis of ISF/ShIF-transfected cell lines revealed down-regulation of secreted frizzled-related protein-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3, and the restoration of their expressions in MS10/ISF cells partially reversed its enhanced LTC-IC supporting activity to a normal level. These results suggest that ISF/ShIF confers stromal cells with enhanced supporting activities for HSCs by modulating Wnt-activity and the extracellular matrix

  14. Proliferative status of primitive hematopoietic progenitors from patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Y; Hogge, D E

    2000-12-01

    One possible explanation for the competitive advantage that malignant cells in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) appear to have over normal hematopoietic elements is that leukemic progenitors proliferate more rapidly than their normal progenitor cell counterparts. To test this hypothesis, an overnight 3H-thymidine (3H-Tdr) suicide assay was used to analyze the proliferative status of malignant progenitors detected in both colony-forming cell (CFC) and long-term culture initiating cell (LTC-IC) assays from the peripheral blood of nine patients with newly diagnosed AML. Culture of AML cells in serum-free medium with 100 ng/ml Steel factor (SF), 20 ng/ml interleukin 3 (IL-3) and 20 ng/ml granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for 16-24 h maintained the number of AML-CFC and LTC-IC at near input values (mean % input +/- s.d. for CFC and LTC-IC were 78 +/- 33 and 126 +/- 53, respectively). The addition of 20 muCi/ml high specific activity 3H-Tdr to these cultures reduced the numbers of both progenitor cell types from most of the patient samples substantially: mean % kill +/- s.d. for AML-CFC and LTC-IC were 64 +/- 27 and 82 +/- 16, respectively, indicating that a large proportion of both progenitor populations were actively cycling. FISH analysis of colonies from CFC and LTC-IC assays confirmed that most cytogenetically abnormal CFC and LTC-IC were actively cycling (mean % kill +/- s.d.: 68 +/- 26 and 85 +/- 13, respectively). Interestingly, in six patient samples where a significant number of cytogenetically normal LTC-ICs were detected, the % kill of these cells (74 +/- 20) was similar to that of the abnormal progenitors. These data contrast with the predominantly quiescent cell cycle status of CFC and LTC-IC previously observed in steady-state peripheral blood from normal individuals but also provide evidence that a significant proportion of primitive malignant progenitors from AML patients are quiescent and therefore may be resistant to standard

  15. Soluble factor(s) from bone marrow cells can rescue lethally irradiated mice by protecting endogenous hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Zhan, Yuxia; Burke, Kathleen A; Anderson, W French

    2005-04-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced myeloablation can be rescued via bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or administration of cytokines if given within 2 hours after radiation exposure. There is no evidence for the existence of soluble factors that can rescue an animal after a lethal dose of radiation when administered several hours postradiation. We established a system that could test the possibility for the existence of soluble factors that could be used more than 2 hours postirradiation to rescue animals. Animals with an implanted TheraCyte immunoisolation device (TID) received lethal-dose radiation and then normal bone marrow Lin- cells were loaded into the device (thereby preventing direct interaction between donor and recipient cells). Animal survival was evaluated and stem cell activity was tested with secondary bone marrow transplantation and flow cytometry analysis. Donor cell gene expression of five antiapoptotic cytokines was examined. Bone marrow Lin- cells rescued lethally irradiated animals via soluble factor(s). Bone marrow cells from the rescued animals can rescue and repopulate secondary lethally irradiated animals. Within the first 6 hours post-lethal-dose radiation, there is no significant change of gene expression of the known radioprotective factors TPO, SCF, IL-3, Flt-3 ligand, and SDF-1. Hematopoietic stem cells can be protected in lethally irradiated animals by soluble factors produced by bone marrow Lin- cells.

  16. An All-Recombinant Protein-Based Culture System Specifically Identifies Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance Factors

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    Aki Ieyasu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are considered one of the most promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of various blood disorders. However, due to difficulties in establishing stable maintenance and expansion of HSCs in vitro, their insufficient supply is a major constraint to transplantation studies. To solve these problems we have developed a fully defined, all-recombinant protein-based culture system. Through this system, we have identified hemopexin (HPX and interleukin-1α as responsible for HSC maintenance in vitro. Subsequent molecular analysis revealed that HPX reduces intracellular reactive oxygen species levels within cultured HSCs. Furthermore, bone marrow immunostaining and 3D immunohistochemistry revealed that HPX is expressed in non-myelinating Schwann cells, known HSC niche constituents. These results highlight the utility of this fully defined all-recombinant protein-based culture system for reproducible in vitro HSC culture and its potential to contribute to the identification of factors responsible for in vitro maintenance, expansion, and differentiation of stem cell populations.

  17. Common elements in interleukin 4 and insulin signaling pathways in factor-dependent hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L M; Keegan, A D; Li, W; Lienhard, G E; Pacini, S; Gutkind, J S; Myers, M G; Sun, X J; White, M F; Aaronson, S A

    1993-05-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4), insulin, and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) efficiently induced DNA synthesis in the IL-3-dependent murine myeloid cell lines FDC-P1 and FDC-P2. Although these factors could not individually sustain long-term growth of these lines, a combination of IL-4 with either insulin or IGF-I did support continuous growth. The principal tyrosine-phosphorylated substrate observed in FDC cells stimulated with IL-4, previously designated 4PS, was of the same size (170 kDa) as the major substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I. These substrates had phosphopeptides of the same size when analyzed by digestion with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, and each tightly associated with the 85-kDa component of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase after factor stimulation. IRS-1, the principal substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I stimulation in nonhematopoietic cells, is similar in size to 4PS. However, anti-IRS-1 antibodies failed to efficiently precipitate 4PS, and some phosphopeptides generated by V8 protease digestion of IRS-1 were distinct in size from the phosphopeptides of 4PS. Nevertheless, IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I were capable of stimulating tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 in FDC cells that expressed this substrate as a result of transfection. These findings indicate that (i) IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I use signal transduction pathways in FDC lines that have at least one major feature in common, the rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of 4PS, and (ii) insulin and IGF-I stimulation of hematopoietic cell lines leads to the phosphorylation of a substrate that may be related to but is not identical to IRS-1.

  18. Low-dose total body irradiation and G-CSF without hematopoietic stem cell support in the treatment of relapsed or refractory acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), or AML in second or subsequent remission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulman, Lawrence N.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Storen, Elizabeth; Marcus, Karen; Mauch, Peter M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), who are not eligible for bone marrow transplantation, have a poor prognosis when treated with chemotherapy alone. Total body irradiation (TBI) is an effective modality against AML when used in doses of 1000-1400 cGy with hematopoietic stem cell support. We undertook a phase I study of TBI with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support, without stem cell support in patients with AML either in relapse or second or subsequent remission. Methods and Materials: Patients with relapsed AML, or AML in second or subsequent remission were treated in a phase I study of TBI followed by G-CSF. The first dose level was 200 cGy. After the initial cohort of patients it was clear that patients with overt leukemia did not benefit from this treatment, and subsequent patients were required to be in remission at the time of TBI. Results: Eleven patients were treated, 4 in overt relapse, and 7 in remission. 200 cGy was used in all, and dose escalation was not possible due to prolonged thrombocytopenia in all patients but one. Neutrophil recovery was adequate in those patients who remained in remission after TBI. Patients with overt leukemia had transient reduction in blast counts, but rapid recurrence of their leukemia. Patients treated in remission had short remissions, with the exception of one patient who is in remission 32 months after treatment. Conclusion: There is some antileukemic effect of TBI even at 200 cGy, though this dose appears to be too low to help a significant number of patients. If TBI is to be escalated without stem cell support, then a thrombopoietic agent will need to be used

  19. Transplante de células tronco hematopoéticas para doenças auto-imunes no Brasil Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diseases in Brazil

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    Júlio C. Voltarelli

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available O transplante de células progenitoras hematopoéticas apresenta bases sólidas para ser indicado no tratamento das doenças autoimunes. No relato são apresentados estes dados e a seqüência de eventos que tem contribuído para a implantação de um protocolo brasileiro do procedimento na modalidade autogênica utilizando regimes de mobilização uniforme com Ciclofosfamida 2g/m2 mais fator estimulador de colônias granulocitárias e condicionamentos particulares para o lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, esclerose sistêmica e esclerose múltipla. As entidades descritas anteriormente foram escolhidas para o início do protocolo cooperativo após amplos debates em encontros ocorridos em Ribeirão Preto e São Francisco, EUA.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation presents a solid basis to be indicated for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In this work data related to the procedure and the sequence of events which have contributed to the implantation of a Brazilian protocol are discussed. Included is a discussion of the autogenic procedure using uniform mobilization regimens with Cyclophosphamide 2g/m2 plus granulocyte-colony stimulation factor and particular conditioning for systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. The formerly described entities were chosen for the beginning of a cooperative protocol after wide-ranging debates which took place both in Ribeirão Preto and San Francisco, USA.

  20. Radioprotective effect of hematopoietic growth factor gene therapy regulated by Egr-1 promoter on radiation injury of SCID mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Nan; Pei Xuetao; Luo Chengji; Su Yongping; Cheng Tianmin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the radioprotective effect of the expression of hematopoietic growth factors regulated by radio-inducible promoter on radiation injury. Methods: The human FL cDNA and EGFP cDNA were linked together with an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and then inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector pCI-neo with the Egr-1 promoter (Egr-EF), and further transduced into bone marrow stromal cell lines HFCL (HFCL/EF). The HFCL/EF and CD34 + cells from human umbilical cord blood were transplanted i.v. one after the other into sublethally irradiated severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. The number of peripheral blood WBC and human cells engrafted in recipient mice were detected by flow cytometry and CFU-GM assay. Results: In contrast to two control groups (HFCL and HFCL/F), HFCL/EF (the Egr-1 regulatory element-driven expression of FL gene therapy) resulted in a proportionally obvious increase in the number of the WBC at early stage after irradiation. Significant differences were found for CD45 + , CD34 + , CFU-GM, and nucleated cells in the bone marrow. Conclusion: Hematopoietic growth factor gene therapy regulated by radio-inducible promoter has radioprotective effect on radiation hematopoietic injury

  1. Factores de Crescimento Hematopoiético

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    Maria De Fátima Miguel Rodrigues

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available SUMÁRIO: Os factores de crescimento hematopoiético (FCH são glicoproteinas que regulam a proliferação e diferenciação das células sanguíneas. Com o objectivo de reduzir a morbilidade, melhorar a qualidade de vida e as taxas de sobrevivência dos doentes submetidos a terapêuticas mielossupressoras, tern sido desenvolvida uma intensa investigação clínica e experimental na tentativa de evitar a degradação dos parâmetros hematológicos.Apresenta-se oeste artigo uma breve revisão sobre os FCH: a sua origem endógena, classificação, mecanismos de acção, potencial uso na prática clínica, em particular no carcinoma brônquico, doenças linfoproliferativas e outras doenças hematológicas, SIDA e insuficiêncla renal crónica. É dado maior relevo a três FCH: Eritropoietina (EPO, Factor estimulante das colónias de granulocitos (G-CSF e Factor estimulante das colónias de granulocitos e macrófagos (GM-CSF. Referem-se finalmente a posologia, os efeitos adversos e as indicações internacionalmente aceites para o uso dos FCH na prática clínica. SUMMARY: Hematopoietic growth factors (HGF are glycoproteins that control the proliferation and differentiation of blood cells. In the aim to reduce morbiedity, improve survival and quality of life in patients submitted to mielossupressive therapies, intensive clinical and experimental research has been undertaken in an attempt to avoid the degradation of hematologic parameters.We present a brief review of HGF, describing their endogenous production, classification and mechanisms of action, as well as their potential clinical indications, namely in bronchial carcinoma, lymphoproliferative disorders and other hematological diseases, AIDS and cronic renal failure.Some of these factors are discussed in detail: Erythropoietin (EPO, Granulocyte colony – stimulating factor (G-CSF, and Granulocyte macrophage

  2. Factors affecting autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell collections by large-volume leukapheresis: a single center experience

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    Araci Massami Sakashita

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate factors affecting peripheral bloodhematopoietic stem cell yield in patients undergoing large-volumeleukapheresis for autologous peripheral blood stem cell collection.Methods: Data from 304 consecutive autologous peripheral bloodstem cell donors mobilized with hematopoietic growth factor (usually G-CSF, associated or not with chemotherapy, at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein between February 1999 and June 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The objective was to obtain at least 2 x 106CD34+ cells/kg of body weight. Pre-mobilization factors analyzedincluded patient’s age, gender and diagnosis. Post mobilizationparameters evaluated were pre-apheresis peripheral white bloodcell count, immature circulating cell count, mononuclear cell count,peripheral blood CD34+ cell count, platelet count, and hemoglobinlevel. The effect of pre and post-mobilization factors on hematopoietic stem cell collection yield was investigated using logistic regression analysis (univariate and multivariate approaches. Results: Premobilization factors correlating to poor CD34+ cell yield in univariate analysis were acute myeloid leukemia (p = 0.017 and other hematological diseases (p = 0.023. Significant post-mobilization factors included peripheral blood immature circulating cells (p = 0.001, granulocytes (p = 0.002, hemoglobin level (p = 0.016, and CD34+ cell concentration (p < 0.001 in the first harvesting day. However, according to multivariate analysis, peripheral blood CD34+ cell content (p < 0.001 was the only independent factor that significantly correlated to poor hematopoietic stem cell yield. Conclusion: In this study, peripheral blood CD34+ cell concentration was the only factor significantly correlated to yield in patients submitted to for autologous collection.

  3. Aberrant Levels of Hematopoietic/Neuronal Growth and Differentiation Factors in Euthyroid Women at Risk for Autoimmune Thyroid Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elske T Massolt

    Full Text Available Subjects at risk for major mood disorders have a higher risk to develop autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD and vice-versa, implying a shared pathogenesis. In mood disorder patients, an abnormal profile of hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is observed, suggesting that growth/differentiation abnormalities of these cell lineages may predispose to mood disorders. The first objective of our study was to investigate whether an aberrant profile of these hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is also detectable in subjects at risk for AITD. A second objective was to study the inter relationship of these factors with previously determined and published growth factors/cytokines in the same subjects.We studied 64 TPO-Ab-negative females with at least 1 first- or second-degree relative with AITD, 32 of whom did and 32 who did not seroconvert to TPO-Ab positivity in 5-year follow-up. Subjects were compared with 32 healthy controls (HCs. We measured serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, Stem Cell Factor (SCF, Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 2 (IGFBP-2, Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF and IL-7 at baseline.BDNF was significantly lower (8.2 vs 18.9 ng/ml, P<0.001, while EGF (506.9 vs 307.6 pg/ml, P = 0.003 and IGFBP-2 (388.3 vs 188.5 ng/ml, P = 0.028 were significantly higher in relatives than in HCs. Relatives who seroconverted in the next 5 years had significantly higher levels of SCF than non-seroconverters (26.5 vs 16.7 pg/ml, P = 0.017. In a cluster analysis with the previously published growth factors/cytokines SCF clustered together with IL-1β, IL-6 and CCL-3, of which high levels also preceded seroconversion.Relatives of AITD patients show aberrant serum levels of 4 hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors similar to the aberrancies found in mood disorder patients, suggesting that shared growth and differentiation defects in both the hematopoietic and neuronal system may underlie thyroid autoimmunity and mood disorders. A

  4. FOXO3 Transcription Factor Is Essential for Protecting Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells from Oxidative DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigarella, Carolina L; Li, Jianfeng; Rimmelé, Pauline; Liang, Raymond; Sobol, Robert W; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2017-02-17

    Accumulation of damaged DNA in hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is associated with chromosomal abnormalities, genomic instability, and HSC aging and might promote hematological malignancies with age. Despite this, the regulatory pathways implicated in the HSC DNA damage response have not been fully elucidated. One of the sources of DNA damage is reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by both exogenous and endogenous insults. Balancing ROS levels in HSC requires FOXO3, which is an essential transcription factor for HSC maintenance implicated in HSC aging. Elevated ROS levels result in defective Foxo3 -/- HSC cycling, among many other deficiencies. Here, we show that loss of FOXO3 leads to the accumulation of DNA damage in primitive hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), associated specifically with reduced expression of genes implicated in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. We provide further evidence that Foxo3 -/- HSPC are defective in DNA damage repair. Specifically, we show that the base excision repair pathway, the main pathway utilized for the repair of oxidative DNA damage, is compromised in Foxo3 -/- primitive hematopoietic cells. Treating mice in vivo with N -acetylcysteine reduces ROS levels, rescues HSC cycling defects, and partially mitigates HSPC DNA damage. These results indicate that DNA damage accrued as a result of elevated ROS in Foxo3 -/- mutant HSPC is at least partially reversible. Collectively, our findings suggest that FOXO3 serves as a protector of HSC genomic stability and health. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Hepatic Leukemia Factor Maintains Quiescence of Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Protects the Stem Cell Pool during Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorowska, Karolina; Doyle, Alexander; Wahlestedt, Martin; Subramaniam, Agatheeswaran; Debnath, Shubhranshu; Chen, Jun; Soneji, Shamit; Van Handel, Ben; Mikkola, Hanna K A; Miharada, Kenichi; Bryder, David; Larsson, Jonas; Magnusson, Mattias

    2017-12-19

    The transcription factor hepatic leukemia factor (HLF) is strongly expressed in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and is thought to influence both HSC self-renewal and leukemogenesis. However, the physiological role of HLF in hematopoiesis and HSC function is unclear. Here, we report that mice lacking Hlf are viable with essentially normal hematopoietic parameters, including an intact HSC pool during steady-state hematopoiesis. In contrast, when challenged through transplantation, Hlf-deficient HSCs showed an impaired ability to reconstitute hematopoiesis and became gradually exhausted upon serial transplantation. Transcriptional profiling of Hlf-deficient HSCs revealed changes associated with enhanced cellular activation, and cell-cycle analysis demonstrated a significant reduction of quiescent HSCs. Accordingly, toxic insults targeting dividing cells completely eradicated the HSC pool in Hlf-deficient mice. In summary, our findings point to HLF as a critical regulator of HSC quiescence and as an essential factor for maintaining the HSC pool during regeneration. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Short-term exposure of umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor early in culture improves ex vivo expansion of neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marturana, Flavia; Timmins, Nicholas E; Nielsen, Lars K

    2011-03-01

    Despite the availability of modern antibiotics/antimycotics and cytokine support, neutropenic infection accounts for the majority of chemotherapy-associated deaths. While transfusion support with donor neutrophils is possible, cost and complicated logistics make such an option unrealistic on a routine basis. A manufactured neutrophil product could enable routine prophylactic administration of neutrophils, preventing the onset of neutropenia and substantially reducing the risk of infection. We examined the use of pre-culture strategies and various cytokine/modulator combinations to improve neutrophil expansion from umbilical cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HPC). Enriched UCB HPC were cultured using either two-phase pre-culture strategies or a single phase using various cytokine/modulator combinations. Outcome was assessed with respect to numerical expansion, cell morphology, granulation and respiratory burst activity. Pre-culture in the absence of strong differentiation signals (e.g. granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; G-CSF) failed to provide any improvement to final neutrophil yields. Similarly, removal of differentiating cells during pre-culture failed to improve neutrophil yields to an appreciable extent. Of the cytokine/modulator combinations, the addition of granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-colony-stimulating factor (CSF) alone gave the greatest increase. In order to avoid production of monocytes, it was necessary to remove GM-CSF on day 5. Using this strategy, neutrophil expansion improved 2.7-fold. Although all cytokines and culture strategies employed have been reported previously to enhance HPC expansion, we found that the addition of GM-CSF alone was sufficient to improve total cell yields maximally. The need to remove GM-CSF on day 5 to avoid monocyte differentiation highlights the context and time-dependent complexity of exogenous signaling in hematopoietic cell differentiation and growth.

  7. Dose escalation of the hypoxic cell sensitizer etanidazole combined with ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide, and autologous hematopoietic stem cell support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, A D; Wheeler, C; Ayash, L J; Schwartz, G; Ibrahim, J; Mills, L; McCauley, M; Coleman, N; Warren, D; Schnipper, L; Antman, K H; Teicher, B A; Frei, E

    1998-06-01

    Multiple mechanisms of drug resistance contribute to treatment failure. Although high-dose therapy attempts to overwhelm these defenses pharmacologically, this approach is only successful in a fraction of treated patients. Many drug resistance mechanisms are shared between malignant and normal cells, but the expression of various drug resistance mechanisms associated with hypoxia is largely confined to tumor tissue. Thus, reversal of this mechanism is likely to provide a therapeutic advantage to the host. This study was designed to define the dose-limiting toxicities and maximum tolerated dose of etanidazole when it is given concurrently with high-dose ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE), with hematopoietic stem cell support. The maximum tolerated doses of high-dose ICE were administered concurrently with dose escalations of etanidazole, a hypoxic cell sensitizer. All agents were given by 96-h continuous i.v. infusion beginning on day -7. Mesna uroprotection was provided. Autologous marrow and cytokine mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells were reinfused on day 0. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was administered following reinfusion until the granulocytes recovered to > 1000/microliter. Fifty-five adults with advanced malignancies were enrolled in cohorts of five to nine patients. Four dose levels of etanidazole between 3 and 5.5 g/m2/day (12, 16, 20, and 22 g/m2 total doses) and two doses of carboplatin (1600 and 1800 mg/m2 total doses) were evaluated. Seven patients died of organ toxicity (13%); two each from veno-occlusive disease of liver and sepsis; and one each from sudden death, renal failure, and refractory thrombocytopenic hemorrhage. Five deaths occurred at the top dose level. One additional patient suffered a witnessed cardiorespiratory arrest from ventricular fibrillation and was resuscitated. Dose-dependent and largely reversible peripheral neuropathy was observed consisting of two syndromes: severe cramping myalgic/neuralgic pain

  8. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk Factors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Severe Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I (Hurler Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunlin, Elizabeth; Steinberger, Julia; DeFor, Todd; Orchard, Paul; Kelly, Aaron S

    2018-02-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is a life-saving procedure, but one associated with increasing long-term cardiovascular risk requiring frequent long-term follow-up. This therapy has significantly lengthened survival in mucopolysaccharidosis type IH (Hurler syndrome), a disease with known coronary artery involvement. Metabolic syndrome-a constellation of central obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose-is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, and occurs when any 3 or more of these 5 components is present within a single individual. The incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components is poorly defined after transplantation for Hurler syndrome. Chart review of all long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome ≥9 years of age for factors comprising the metabolic syndrome: obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose. Sixty-three patients were evaluated, 20 of whom had components of the metabolic syndrome available for review. There was no significant difference in age at transplantation, sex, number of transplants, pretransplant radiation, or percent engraftment between those with and without these data. Median follow-up after transplantation for the 20 patients with data was 14.3 years. Only 1 (5%) patient of this group fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Fifty-three percent of the patients had 1 or more components of metabolic syndrome: the most common was high blood pressure occurring in 40%. Metabolic syndrome is uncommon in this cohort of long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome but almost half of the patients had 1 or more components of the syndrome, with high blood pressure being the most common. Further studies are needed to develop guidelines in this diagnosis as well as other nonmalignant diseases of children

  9. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Angiopoietin-1 Stimulate Postnatal Hematopoiesis by Recruitment of Vasculogenic and Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Koichi; Dias, Sergio; Heissig, Beate; Hackett, Neil R.; Lyden, David; Tateno, Masatoshi; Hicklin, Daniel J.; Zhu, Zhenping; Witte, Larry; Crystal, Ronald G.; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Rafii, Shahin

    2001-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase receptors for angiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) are expressed not only by endothelial cells but also by subsets of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). To further define their role in the regulation of postnatal hematopoiesis and vasculogenesis, VEGF and Ang-1 plasma levels were elevated by injecting recombinant protein or adenoviral vectors expressing soluble VEGF165, matrix-bound VEGF189, or Ang-1 into mice. VEGF165, but not VEGF189, induced a rapid mobilization of HSCs and VEGF receptor (VEGFR)2+ circulating endothelial precursor cells (CEPs). In contrast, Ang-1 induced delayed mobilization of CEPs and HSCs. Combined sustained elevation of Ang-1 and VEGF165 was associated with an induction of hematopoiesis and increased marrow cellularity followed by proliferation of capillaries and expansion of sinusoidal space. Concomitant to this vascular remodeling, there was a transient depletion of hematopoietic activity in the marrow, which was compensated by an increase in mobilization and recruitment of HSCs and CEPs to the spleen resulting in splenomegaly. Neutralizing monoclonal antibody to VEGFR2 completely inhibited VEGF165, but not Ang-1–induced mobilization and splenomegaly. These data suggest that temporal and regional activation of VEGF/VEGFR2 and Ang-1/Tie-2 signaling pathways are critical for mobilization and recruitment of HSCs and CEPs and may play a role in the physiology of postnatal angiogenesis and hematopoiesis. PMID:11342585

  10. Limited clinical efficacy of azacitidine in transfusion-dependent, growth factor-resistant, low- and Int-1-risk MDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Mette; Dybedahl, I; Holm, Mette

    2014-01-01

    This prospective phase II study evaluated the efficacy of azacitidine (Aza)+erythropoietin (Epo) in transfusion-dependent patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients ineligible for or refractory to full-dose Epo+granulocyte colony stimulation factors for >8 weeks and a trans...... patients, but efficacy is limited, toxicity substantial and most responses of short duration. This treatment cannot be generally recommended in lower-risk MDS. Mutational screening revealed a high frequency of mutations....

  11. Effect of mobilization of bone marrow stem cells by granulocyte colony stimulating factor on clinical symptoms, left ventricular perfusion and function in patients with severe chronic ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yongzhong; Tägil, Kristina; Ripa, Rasmus S.

    2005-01-01

    . Myocardial perfusion was unchanged at adenosine stress single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) or magnetic resonance images (MRI). Left ventricular ejection fraction decreased from 57% to 52% (p... with echocardiography. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment by G-CSF improved symptoms but not signs of myocardial ischemia in patients with severe IHD. The effects seemed related to mobilization of stem cells. An adverse effect on ejection fraction could not be excluded...

  12. Problems in early diagnosis of bladder cancer in a spinal cord injury patient: Report of a case of simultaneous production of granulocyte colony stimulating factor and parathyroid hormone-related protein by squamous cell carcinoma of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gurpreet

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Typical symptoms and signs of a clinical condition may be absent in spinal cord injury (SCI patients. Case presentation A male with paraplegia was passing urine through penile sheath for 35 years, when he developed urinary infections. There was no history of haematuria. Intravenous urography showed bilateral hydronephrosis. The significance of abnormal outline of bladder was not appreciated. As there was large residual urine, he was advised intermittent catheterisation. Serum urea: 3.5 mmol/L; creatinine: 77 umol/L. A year later, serum urea: 36.8 mmol/l; creatinine: 632 umol/l; white cell count: 22.2; neutrophils: 18.88. Ultrasound: bilateral hydronephrosis. Bilateral nephrostomy was performed. Subsequently, blood tests showed: Urea: 14.2 mmol/l; Creatinine: 251 umol/l; Adjusted Calcium: 3.28 mmol/l; Parathyroid hormone: A repeat ultrasound scan demonstrated a tumour arising from right lateral wall; biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma. In view of persistently high white cell count and high calcium level, immunohistochemistry for G-CSF and PTHrP was performed. Dense staining of tumour cells for G-CSF and faintly positive staining for C-terminal PTHrP were observed. This patient expired about five months later. Conclusion This case demonstrates how delay in diagnosis of bladder cancer could occur in a SCI patient due to absence of characteristic symptoms and signs.

  13. Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) modulates murine hematopoietic stem cell maintenance through upregulation of p57

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dolly D.; Sommer, Andreia Gianotti; Balazs, Alejandro B.; Beerman, Isabel; Murphy, George J.; Rossi, Derrick; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) rely on a highly regulated molecular network to balance self-renewal and lineage specification to sustain life-long hematopoiesis. Despite a plethora of studies aimed at identifying molecules governing HSC fate, our current knowledge of the genes responsible is limited. We have found Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) to be predominantly expressed within long-term HSC. This study examines IGF2 expression patterns and the effects of the gene in HSC. Through the overexpression and knockdown of IGF2 within purified HSC, we demonstrate that IGF2 expression increases HSC-derived multilineage colonies in vitro and enhances hematopoietic contribution in vivo upon competitive bone marrow transplantation. The effects of IGF2 are mediated by direct upregulation of the CDKi p57, exclusively within long-term HSC, via activation of the PI3K-Akt pathway. Increased expression of p57 resulted in a concomitant increase of HSC in the G0/G1 stage of the cell cycle. Analysis of genomic DNA methylation revealed that HSC exhibited a hypomethylated state within the promoter region of the CDKN1C (p57) gene, providing a potential mechanism for the exclusive effects of IGF2 within HSC. Our studies demonstrate a novel role for IGF2 in regulating HSC cell cycle and illustrate potential novel therapeutic targets for hematological diseases. PMID:26872540

  14. Hematopoietic regulatory factors produced in long-term murine bone marrow cultures and the effect of in vitro irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualtieri, R.J.; Shadduck, R.K.; Baker, D.G.; Quesenberry, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The nature of hematopoietic regulatory factors elaborated by the adherent (stromal) cells of long-term murine bone marrow cultures and the effect of in vitro stromal irradiation (XRT) on the production of these factors was investigated. Using an in situ stromal assay it was possible to demonstrate stromal elaboration of at least two colony-stimulating activities, ie, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating activity (G/M-CSA) and megakaryocyte colony-stimulating activity (Meg-CSA). Exposure of the stroma to XRT resulted in dose-dependent elevations of both activities that correlated inversely with total myeloid cell mass. Mixture experiments that combined control and irradiated stroma revealed that the hematopoietically active control stroma could block detection of XRT-related G/M-CSA elevations. Antiserum directed against purified L cell colony-stimulating factor (CSF) reduced granulocyte/macrophage colony formation in the target layer but did not effect the increased Meg-CSA. While a radioimmunoassay for L-cell type CSF was unable to detect significant differences in concentrated media from control and irradiated cultures, bioassays of these media revealed XRT-related G/M-CSA elevations. These results indicate that the G/M-CSA elaborated in these cultures is immunologically distinct from the Meg-CSA produced, and although distinct from L cell CSF, the G/M-CSA is crossreactive with the L cell CSF antiserum. Morphologic, histochemical, and factor VII antigen immunofluorescent studies were performed on the stromal cell population responsible for production of these stimulatory activities. In addition to ''fat'' cells, the stromal cells remaining after XRT were composed of two predominant cell populations. These included a major population of acid phosphatase and nonspecific esterase-positive macrophage-like cells and a minor population of factor VII antigen negative epithelioid cells

  15. Identification of key factors regulating self-renewal and differentiation in EML hematopoietic precursor cells by RNA-sequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Shan; Deng, Shuyun; Chen, Kenian; Wu, Jia Qian

    2014-11-11

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used clinically for transplantation treatment to rebuild a patient's hematopoietic system in many diseases such as leukemia and lymphoma. Elucidating the mechanisms controlling HSCs self-renewal and differentiation is important for application of HSCs for research and clinical uses. However, it is not possible to obtain large quantity of HSCs due to their inability to proliferate in vitro. To overcome this hurdle, we used a mouse bone marrow derived cell line, the EML (Erythroid, Myeloid, and Lymphocytic) cell line, as a model system for this study. RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) has been increasingly used to replace microarray for gene expression studies. We report here a detailed method of using RNA-Seq technology to investigate the potential key factors in regulation of EML cell self-renewal and differentiation. The protocol provided in this paper is divided into three parts. The first part explains how to culture EML cells and separate Lin-CD34+ and Lin-CD34- cells. The second part of the protocol offers detailed procedures for total RNA preparation and the subsequent library construction for high-throughput sequencing. The last part describes the method for RNA-Seq data analysis and explains how to use the data to identify differentially expressed transcription factors between Lin-CD34+ and Lin-CD34- cells. The most significantly differentially expressed transcription factors were identified to be the potential key regulators controlling EML cell self-renewal and differentiation. In the discussion section of this paper, we highlight the key steps for successful performance of this experiment. In summary, this paper offers a method of using RNA-Seq technology to identify potential regulators of self-renewal and differentiation in EML cells. The key factors identified are subjected to downstream functional analysis in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Effect of low dose radiation on expression of hematopoietic growth factors secreted by human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yan; Wang Guanjun; Zhu Jingyan; Wang Juan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of hematopoietic growth factors secreted by human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow (BM-MSC) pretreated with low dose radiation (LDR). Methods: The cultured P4 and P5 BM-MSCs were exposed to X rays at the doses of 50, 75 and 100 mGy (dose rate 12.5 mGy·min -1 ). The changes of levels of stem cell factor (SCF), IL-6, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) secreted by BM- MSCs pretreated with LDR were determined by ELISA method. Results: As compared with control group at the same time, the levels of SCF in experimental group had a tendency of increasing after 24 h and 48 h radiation, but only in 75 mGy group the SCF level was obviously increased (P<0.05). The levels of IL-6 in 50 and 75 mGy groups at 24 h and 48 h, in 100 mGy group at 24 h were obviously increased compared with control group (P< 0.05). The levels of M-CSF in all the groups at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h except for the 50 mGy dose at 72 h were also increased (P<0.05), it increased markedly in 75 mGy dose group at 72 h. Conclusion: LDR has hormesis effect on BM-MSCs. After LDR, the BM-MSCs grow faster and in a certain phase the expression levels of hematopoietic growth factors are increased. (authors)

  17. Selective Depletion of αβ T Cells and B Cells for Human Leukocyte Antigen-Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. A Three-Year Follow-Up of Procedure Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Pira, Giuseppina; Malaspina, David; Girolami, Elia; Biagini, Simone; Cicchetti, Elisabetta; Conflitti, Gianpiero; Broglia, Manuel; Ceccarelli, Stefano; Lazzaro, Stefania; Pagliara, Daria; Meschini, Antonella; Bertaina, Alice; Montanari, Mauro; Locatelli, Franco

    2016-11-01

    HLA-haploidentical family donors represent a valuable option for children requiring allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Because graft-versus-host diseases (GVHD) is a major complication of HLA-haploidentical HSCT because of alloreactive T cells in the graft, different methods have been used for ex vivo T cell depletion. Removal of donor αβ T cells, the subset responsible for GVHD, and of B cells, responsible for post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders, have been recently developed for HLA-haploidentical HSCT. This manipulation preserves, in addition to CD34 +  progenitors, natural killer, γδ T, and monocytes/dendritic cells, contributing to anti-leukemia activity and protection against infections. We analyzed depletion efficiency and cell yield in 200 procedures performed in the last 3 years at our center. Donors underwent CD34 +   hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) peripheral blood mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Poor CD34 +  cell mobilizers (48 of 189, 25%) received plerixafor in addition to G-CSF. Aphereses containing a median of 52.5 × 10 9 nucleated cells and 494 × 10 6 CD34 +  HSC were manipulated using the CliniMACS device. In comparison to the initial product, αβ T cell depletion produced a median 4.1-log reduction (range, 3.1 to 5.5) and B cell depletion led to a median 3.4-log reduction (range, 2.0 to 4.7). Graft products contained a median of 18.5 × 10 6 CD34 +  HSC/kg recipient body weight, with median values of residual αβ T cells and B cells of 29 × 10 3 /kg and 33 × 10 3 /kg, respectively. Depletion efficiency monitored at 6-month intervals demonstrated steady performance, while improved recovery of CD34 +  cells was observed after the first year (P = .0005). These data indicate that αβ T cell and B cell depletion of HSC grafts from HLA-haploidentical donors was efficient and reproducible. Copyright © 2016 The American Society for Blood and Marrow

  18. Daily propranolol prevents prolonged mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells in a rat model of lung contusion, hemorrhagic shock, and chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Letitia E; Pasupuleti, Latha V; Gore, Amy V; Sifri, Ziad C; Kannan, Kolenkode B; Mohr, Alicia M

    2015-09-01

    Propranolol has been shown previously to decrease the mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) after acute injury in rodent models; however, this acute injury model does not reflect the prolonged period of critical illness after severe trauma. Using our novel lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock/chronic restraint stress model, we hypothesize that daily administration of propranolol will decrease prolonged mobilization of HPCs without worsening lung healing. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 6 days of restraint stress after undergoing lung contusion or lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock. Restraint stress consisted of a daily 2-hour period of restraint interrupted every 30 minutes by alarms and repositioning. Each day after the period of restraint stress, the rats received intraperitoneal propranolol (10 mg/kg). On day 7, peripheral blood was analyzed for granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and stromal cell-derived factor 1 via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and for mobilization of HPCs using c-kit and CD71 flow cytometry. The lungs were examined histologically to grade injury. Seven days after lung contusion and lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock, the addition of chronic restraint stress significantly increased the mobilization of HPC, which was associated with persistently increased levels of G-CSF and increased lung injury scores. The addition of propranolol to lung contusion/chronic restraint stress and lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock/chronic restraint stress models greatly decreased HPC mobilization and restored G-CSF levels to that of naïve animals without worsening lung injury scores. The daily administration of propranolol after both lung contusion and lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock subjected to chronic restraint stress decreased the prolonged mobilization of HPC from the bone marrow and decreased plasma G-CSF levels. Despite the decrease in mobilization of HPC, lung healing did not worsen. Alleviating chronic stress with propranolol

  19. Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Mobilization with “Just-in-Time” Plerixafor Approach is a Cost Effective Alternative to Routine Plerixafor Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Lauren; Cumpston, Aaron; Shillingburg, Alexandra; Wen, Sijin; Luo, Jin; Leadmon, Sonia; Watkins, Kathy; Craig, Michael; Hamadani, Mehdi; Kanate, Abraham S.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and plerixafor results in superior CD34+ cell yield, when compared to mobilization with G-CSF alone in patients with myeloma and lymphoma. However, plerixafor-based approaches are associated with high costs. To circumvent this, several institutions use a so-called “just-in-time” plerixafor (JIT-P) approach, where plerixafor is only administered to patients likely to fail mobilization with G-CSF alone. Whether such a JIT-P approach is cost effective has not been confirmed to date. We present here, results of 136 patients with myeloma or lymphoma who underwent mobilization with two different approaches of plerixafor utilization. Between Jan 2010-Oct 2012 (n=76) patients uniformly received mobilization with G-CSF and plerixafor (routine G+P cohort). To reduce mobilization costs, between Nov 2012-Jun 2014 (n=60) patients were mobilized with JIT-P where plerixafor was only administered to patients likely to fail mobilization with G-CSF alone. Patients in routine G+P group had a higher median peak peripheral blood CD34+ cell count (62 vs. 29 cells/μL, p<0.001) and a higher median day 1 CD34+ cell yield (2.9 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg vs. 2.1 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg, p=0.001). The median total CD34+ cell collection was also higher in routine G+P group (5.8 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg vs. 4.5 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg, p=0.007). In the JIT-P group 40% (n=24) completed adequate HPC collection without plerixafor. There was no difference in mobilization failure rates. The mean number of plerixafor doses utilized in JIT-P was lower (1.3 vs. 2.1, p=0.0002). The mean estimated cost in the routine G+P group was higher than that in the JIT-P group (USD 27,513 vs. USD 23,597, p=0.01). Our analysis demonstrates that mobilization with a JIT-P approach is a safe, effective and cost efficient strategy for HPC collection. PMID:26475754

  20. Distinct Stromal Cell Factor Combinations Can Separately Control Hematopoietic Stem Cell Survival, Proliferation, and Self-Renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Wohrer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are identified by their ability to sustain prolonged blood cell production in vivo, although recent evidence suggests that durable self-renewal (DSR is shared by HSC subtypes with distinct self-perpetuating differentiation programs. Net expansions of DSR-HSCs occur in vivo, but molecularly defined conditions that support similar responses in vitro are lacking. We hypothesized that this might require a combination of factors that differentially promote HSC viability, proliferation, and self-renewal. We now demonstrate that HSC survival and maintenance of DSR potential are variably supported by different Steel factor (SF-containing cocktails with similar HSC-mitogenic activities. In addition, stromal cells produce other factors, including nerve growth factor and collagen 1, that can antagonize the apoptosis of initially quiescent adult HSCs and, in combination with SF and interleukin-11, produce >15-fold net expansions of DSR-HSCs ex vivo within 7 days. These findings point to the molecular basis of HSC control and expansion.

  1. Molecular functions of the LIM-homeobox transcription factor Lhx2 in hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Kenji; Kawaguchi, Manami; Iacovino, Michelina; Kyba, Michael; Hara, Takahiko

    2013-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-like cells are robustly expanded from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by enforced expression of Lhx2, a LIM-homeobox domain (LIM-HD) transcription factor. In this study, we analyzed the functions of Lhx2 in that process using an ESC line harboring an inducible Lhx2 gene cassette. When ESCs are cultured on OP9 stromal cells, hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are differentiated and these HPCs are prone to undergo rapid differentiation into mature hematopoietic cells. Lhx2 inhibited differentiation of HPCs into mature hematopoietic cells and this effect would lead to accumulation of HSC-like cells. LIM-HD factors interact with LIM domain binding (Ldb) protein and this interaction abrogates binding of LIM-only (Lmo) protein to Ldb. We found that one of Lmo protein, Lmo2, was unstable due to dissociation of Lmo2 from Ldb1 in the presence of Lhx2. This effect of Lhx2 on the amount of Lmo2 contributed into accumulation of HSC-like cells, since enforced expression of Lmo2 into HSC-like cells inhibited their self-renewal. Expression of Gata3 and Tal1/Scl was increased in HSC-like cells and enforced expression of Lmo2 reduced expression of Gata3 but not Tal1/Scl. Enforced expression of Gata3 into HPCs inhibited mature hematopoietic cell differentiation, whereas Gata3-knockdown abrogated the Lhx2-mediated expansion of HPCs. We propose that multiple transcription factors/cofactors are involved in the Lhx2-mediated expansion of HSC-like cells from ESCs. Lhx2 appears to fine-tune the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of HSC-like cells. © AlphaMed Press.

  2. Addition of plerixafor for CD34+ cell mobilization in six healthy stem cell donors ensured satisfactory grafts for transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauge, Anne Werner; Haastrup, Eva Kannik; Sengeløv, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    In allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, collection of a sufficient number of HSCs at a fixed time point is crucial. For HSC mobilization into the peripheral blood, the standard regimen, that is, granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), may be inadequate. Use of plerixaf...

  3. Longitudinal follow-up of nutritional status and its influencing factors in adults undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbain, P; Birlinger, J; Lambert, C; Finke, J; Bertz, H; Biesalski, H-K

    2013-03-01

    There are few longitudinal data on nutritional status and body composition of patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). We assessed nutritional status of 105 patients before alloHCT and its course during the early post-transplant period to day +30 and day +100 via weight history, body mass index (BMI) normalized for gender and age, Subjective Global Assessment, phase angle normalized for gender, age, and BMI, and fat-free and body fat masses. Furthermore, we present a multivariate regression model investigating the impact of factors on body weight. At admission, 23.8% reported significant weight losses (>5%) in the previous 6 months, and we noted 31.5% with abnormal age- and sex-adjusted BMI values (10th, 90th percentiles). BMI decreased significantly (Panorexia (parameter estimate 1.07; P=0.058) as independent factors influencing early weight loss. In conclusion, our results show a significant deterioration in nutritional status during the early post-transplant period. Predominant alloHCT-associated complications such as anorexia and acute GVHD became evident as significant factors influencing nutritional status.

  4. Inactivation of the forkhead transcription factor FoxO3 is essential for PKB-mediated survival of hematopoietic progenitor cells by kit ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engström, Maria; Karlsson, Richard; Jönsson, Jan-Ingvar

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Kit ligand (KL) is a major survival factor for hematopoietic stem cells. Although anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family members are expressed in these cells, the survival effects by KL appear to involve other mechanisms. Survival signals can also be elicited by the activation of phosphatidylinos......OBJECTIVE: Kit ligand (KL) is a major survival factor for hematopoietic stem cells. Although anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family members are expressed in these cells, the survival effects by KL appear to involve other mechanisms. Survival signals can also be elicited by the activation......, immunofluorescence, and subcellular fractionation, we analyzed the effects of KL on PKB and different forkhead family members in two factor-dependent cell lines, FDCP-mix and FDC-P1, as well as primary mouse bone marrow-derived Lin(-) progenitors. Forced overexpression of triple mutated form of FoxO3 by retroviral...

  5. Risk factors for Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlin, Michael; Wikell, Helena; Sundin, Mikael; Blennow, Ola; Maeurer, Markus; Ringden, Olle; Winiarski, Jacek; Ljungman, Per; Remberger, Mats; Mattsson, Jonas

    2014-02-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a successful treatment for hematologic malignancies and a variety of genetic and metabolic disorders. In the period following stem cell transplantation, the immune-compromised milieu allows opportunistic pathogens to thrive. Epstein-Barr virus-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease can be a life-threatening complication for transplanted patients because of suppressed T-cell-mediated immunity. We analyzed possible risk factors associated with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in a cohort of over 1,000 patients. The incidence of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease was 4%. Significant risk factors identified by multivariate analysis were: human leukocyte antigen-mismatch (PEpstein-Barr virus mismatch recipient-/donor+ (Pdisease grade II to IV (P=0.006), pre-transplant splenectomy (P=0.008) and infusion of mesenchymal stromal cells (P=0.015). The risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease has increased in more recent years, from less than 2% before 1998 to more than 6% after 2011. Additionally, we show that long-term survival of patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease is poor despite initial successful treatment. The 3-year survival rate among the 40 patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease was 20% as opposed to 62% among patients without post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (Pdisease after transplantation in need of pre-emptive measures.

  6. H4 histamine receptors mediate cell cycle arrest in growth factor-induced murine and human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-France Petit-Bertron

    Full Text Available The most recently characterized H4 histamine receptor (H4R is expressed preferentially in the bone marrow, raising the question of its role during hematopoiesis. Here we show that both murine and human progenitor cell populations express this receptor subtype on transcriptional and protein levels and respond to its agonists by reduced growth factor-induced cell cycle progression that leads to decreased myeloid, erythroid and lymphoid colony formation. H4R activation prevents the induction of cell cycle genes through a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway that is not associated with apoptosis. It is mediated specifically through H4R signaling since gene silencing or treatment with selective antagonists restores normal cell cycle progression. The arrest of growth factor-induced G1/S transition protects murine and human progenitor cells from the toxicity of the cell cycle-dependent anticancer drug Ara-C in vitro and reduces aplasia in a murine model of chemotherapy. This first evidence for functional H4R expression in hematopoietic progenitors opens new therapeutic perspectives for alleviating hematotoxic side effects of antineoplastic drugs.

  7. Milestones of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation – From First Human Studies to Current Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juric, Mateja Kralj; Ghimire, Sakhila; Ogonek, Justyna; Weissinger, Eva M.; Holler, Ernst; van Rood, Jon J.; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Dickinson, Anne; Greinix, Hildegard T.

    2016-01-01

    Since the early beginnings, in the 1950s, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become an established curative treatment for an increasing number of patients with life-threatening hematological, oncological, hereditary, and immunological diseases. This has become possible due to worldwide efforts of preclinical and clinical research focusing on issues of transplant immunology, reduction of transplant-associated morbidity, and mortality and efficient malignant disease eradication. The latter has been accomplished by potent graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effector cells contained in the stem cell graft. Exciting insights into the genetics of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system allowed improved donor selection, including HLA-identical related and unrelated donors. Besides bone marrow, other stem cell sources like granulocyte-colony stimulating-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells and cord blood stem cells have been established in clinical routine. Use of reduced-intensity or non-myeloablative conditioning regimens has been associated with a marked reduction of non-hematological toxicities and eventually, non-relapse mortality allowing older patients and individuals with comorbidities to undergo allogeneic HSCT and to benefit from GvL or antitumor effects. Whereas in the early years, malignant disease eradication by high-dose chemotherapy or radiotherapy was the ultimate goal; nowadays, allogeneic HSCT has been recognized as cellular immunotherapy relying prominently on immune mechanisms and to a lesser extent on non-specific direct cellular toxicity. This chapter will summarize the key milestones of HSCT and introduce current developments. PMID:27881982

  8. Identification of factors promoting ex vivo maintenance of mouse hematopoietic stem cells by long-term single-cell quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Drew, Erin; Endele, Max; Loeffler, Dirk; Hoppe, Philipp S; Hilsenbeck, Oliver; Schauberger, Bernhard; Hinzen, Christoph; Skylaki, Stavroula; Theodorou, Marina; Kieslinger, Matthias; Lemischka, Ihor; Moore, Kateri; Schroeder, Timm

    2016-09-01

    The maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during ex vivo culture is an important prerequisite for their therapeutic manipulation. However, despite intense research, culture conditions for robust maintenance of HSCs are still missing. Cultured HSCs are quickly lost, preventing their improved analysis and manipulation. Identification of novel factors supporting HSC ex vivo maintenance is therefore necessary. Coculture with the AFT024 stroma cell line is capable of maintaining HSCs ex vivo long-term, but the responsible molecular players remain unknown. Here, we use continuous long-term single-cell observation to identify the HSC behavioral signature under supportive or nonsupportive stroma cocultures. We report early HSC survival as a major characteristic of HSC-maintaining conditions. Behavioral screening after manipulation of candidate molecules revealed that the extracellular matrix protein dermatopontin (Dpt) is involved in HSC maintenance. DPT knockdown in supportive stroma impaired HSC survival, whereas ectopic expression of the Dpt gene or protein in nonsupportive conditions restored HSC survival. Supplementing defined stroma- and serum-free culture conditions with recombinant DPT protein improved HSC clonogenicity. These findings illustrate a previously uncharacterized role of Dpt in maintaining HSCs ex vivo. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. [Therapeutic use of hematopoietic growth factors. II. GM-CSF and G-CSF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, B; Arock, M

    1998-01-01

    The second part of this review on haematopoietic growth factors is focused on the therapeutic use of GM-CSF and G-CSF. Such therapeutic applications have raised very great hopes for clinical haematology. However, it should not be forgotten that these haematopoietic growth factors, which are very costly, are powerful two-edged weapons capable of triggering a cascade of reactions, and have a field of activity that often goes beyond the single highly specific property which it is hoped they possess. The risks and costs of their use are currently being evaluated. Waited developments concerning these molecules focus on three axes: a best use of factors already commercialized, especially concerning adaptation of posologies and new indications, the development of hybrid molecules from already known haematopoietic growth factors, possessing the advantages of respective factors, but not their disadvantages, the discovery of new haematopoietic growth factors with potential therapeutic application.

  10. Physiopathology, Etiologic Factors, Diagnosis, and Course of Polycythemia Vera as Related to Therapy According to William Dameshek, 1940-1950

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jacques Michiels

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available According to Dameshek, true polycythemia (polycythemia vera: PV is a chronic myeloproliferative disorder of the total bone marrow without any evidence of invasiveness, in which erythrocytosis, leukocytosis, and thrombocytosis are all simultaneously present. A possible hereditary or transmitted tendency may be present, but actual familial polycythemia is rare. As to the etiology, Dameshek proposed 2 highly speculative possibilities in 1950: the presence of excessive bone marrow stimulation by an unknown factor or factors, and a lack or a diminution in the normal inhibitory factor or factors. Dameshek’s hypothesis was confirmed in 2005 by Vainchenker in France by the discovery of the acquired JAK2V617F mutation as the cause of 3 phenotypes of classical myeloproliferative neoplasms: essential thrombocythemia, PV, and myelofibrosis. The JAK2V617F mutation induces a loss of inhibitory activity of the JH2 pseudokinase part on the JH1 kinase part of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2. This leads to enhanced activity of the normal JH1 kinase activity of JAK2, which makes the mutated hematopoietic stem cells hypersensitive to the hematopoietic growth factors thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, insulin-like growth factor-1, stem cell factor, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, resulting in trilinear myeloproliferation. In retrospect, the situation observed by Dameshek where all “stops” to blood production in the bone marrow are pulled in PV is caused by the JAK2V617F mutation. Dameshek considered PV patients as fundamentally normal and therefore the treatment should be as physiologic as possible. For this reason, a systematic phlebotomy/iron deficiency method of treatment was recommended; the use of radioactive phosphorus is reserved for refractory cases and cases of major thrombosis. If the patient lives long enough and does not succumb to the effects of thrombosis or other complications, the marrow will gradually show signs of diminished activity. The blood

  11. Short-term effects of early-acting and multilineage hematopoietic growth factors on the repair and proliferation of irradiated pure cord blood (CB) CD34 hematopoietic progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, Benedikt L.; Sandor, Peter S.; Plappert, Ulla; Thoma, Stefan; Mueller, Robert; Bock, Thomas; Thomas, Christian A.; Nothdurft, Wilhelm; Fliedner, Theodor M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Hematopoietic growth factor(s) (GF) may exert positive effects in vitro or in vivo on the survival of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells after accidental or therapeutic total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: We studied the clonogenic survival and DNA repair of irradiated (0.36, 0.73, and 1.46 Gy) CD34 + cord blood (CB) cells after short-term incubation (24 h) with GFs. CD34 + cells were stimulated with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), stem cell factor/c-kit ligand (SCF), interleukin-3 (IL-3), IL-6, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) alone or in combination in short-term serum-free liquid suspension cultures (LSC) immediately after irradiation and then assayed for clonogenic progenitors. DNA repair was evaluated by analysis of DNA strand breaks using the comet assay. Survival of CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-Mix was determined and dose-response curves were fitted to the data. Results: The radiobiological parameters (D 0 and n) showed significant GF(s) effects. Combination of IL-3 with IL-6, SCF or GM-CSF resulted in best survival for CFU-GM BFU-E and CFU-Mix, respectively. Combinations of three or more GFs did not increase the survival of clonogenic CD34 + cells compared to optimal two-factor combinations. The D 0 values for CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-Mix ranged between 0.56-1.15, 0.41-2.24, and 0.56-1.29 Gy, respectively. As for controls, the curves remained strictly exponential, i.e., all survival curves were strictly exponential without any shoulder (extrapolation numbers n = 1 for all tested GF(s). DNA repair capacity of CD34 + cells determined by comet assay, was measured before, immediately after irradiation, as well as 30 and 120 min after irradiation at 1 Gy. Notably, after irradiation the 2-h repair of cytokine-stimulated and unstimulated CD34 + cells was similar. Conclusion: Our data indicate that increased survival of irradiated CB CD34 + cells after short-term GF treatment is

  12. The Expanding Family of Bone Marrow Homing Factors for Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Stromal Derived Factor 1 Is Not the Only Player in the Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Z. Ratajczak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The α-chemokine stromal derived factor 1 (SDF-1, which binds to the CXCR4 and CXCR7 receptors, directs migration and homing of CXCR4+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs to bone marrow (BM and plays a crucial role in retention of these cells in stem cell niches. However, this unique role of SDF-1 has been recently challenged by several observations supporting SDF-1-CXCR4-independent BM homing. Specifically, it has been demonstrated that HSPCs respond robustly to some bioactive lipids, such as sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P and ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P, and migrate in response to gradients of certain extracellular nucleotides, including uridine triphosphate (UTP and adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Moreover, the responsiveness of HSPCs to an SDF-1 gradient is enhanced by some elements of innate immunity (e.g., C3 complement cascade cleavage fragments and antimicrobial cationic peptides, such as cathelicidin/LL-37 or β2-defensin as well as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Since all these factors are upregulated in BM after myeloblative conditioning for transplantation, a more complex picture of homing emerges that involves several factors supporting, and in some situations even replacing, the SDF-1-CXCR4 axis.

  13. Molecular analysis of the interaction between the hematopoietic master transcription factors GATA-1 and PU.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liew, Chu Wai; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg; Simpson, Raina J Y

    2006-01-01

    GATA-1 and PU.1 are transcription factors that control erythroid and myeloid development, respectively. The two proteins have been shown to function in an antagonistic fashion, with GATA-1 repressing PU.1 activity during erythropoiesis and PU.1 repressing GATA-1 function during myelopoiesis. It has...... also become clear that this functional antagonism involves direct interactions between the two proteins. However, the molecular basis for these interactions is not known, and a number of inconsistencies exist in the literature. We have used a range of biophysical methods to define the molecular details...... of the GATA-1-PU.1 interaction. A combination of NMR titration data and extensive mutagenesis revealed that the PU.1-Ets domain and the GATA-1 C-terminal zinc finger (CF) form a low affinity interaction in which specific regions of each protein are implicated. Surprisingly, the interaction cannot be disrupted...

  14. The transplantation of neural stem cells and predictive factors in hematopoietic recovery in irradiated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, S; Mokrý, J; Karbanová, J; Vávrová, J; Vokurková, J; Bláha, M; English, D

    2005-04-01

    A number of surprising observations have shown that stem cells, in suitable conditions, have the ability to produce a whole spectrum of cell types, regardless, whether these tissues are derived from the same germ layer or not. This phenomenon is called stem cell plasticity, which means that tissue-specific stem cells are mutually interchangeable. In our experiments, as a model, we used neural stem cells (NSCs) harvested from fetal (E14-15) neocortex and beta-galactosidase positive. In the first experiment we found that on days 12 and 30 after sub-lethal irradiation (LD 8.5 Gy) and (beta-galactosidase(+)) NSCs transplantation all mice survived, just as the group with bone marrow transplantation. Moreover, the bone marrow of mice transplanted NSCs contained the number of CFU-GM colonies with beta-galactosidase(+) cells which was as much as 50% higher. These differences were statistically significant, pthird experiment, we verified the mutual interchange of Sca-1 surface antigen in the bone marrow cells and NSCs before transplantation. Analysis of this antigen showed 24.8% Sca-1 positive cells among the bone marrow cells, while NSCs were Sca-1 negative. Our experiments show that NSCs share hemopoietic identity and may significantly influence the recovery of damaged hematopoiesis but do not have typical superficial markers as HSCs. This result is important for the determination of predictive factors for hemopoiesis recovery, for stem cell plasticity and for their use in the cell therapy.

  15. Wnt3a protein reduces growth factor-driven expansion of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in serum-free cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.E. Duinhouwer (Lucia); N. Tüysüz (Nesrin); E.J. Rombouts (Elwin); M.N.D. Ter Borg (Mariëtte N. D.); E. Mastrobattista; J. Spanholtz (Jan); J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); D. ten Berge (Derk); E. Braakman (Eric)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) is a promising approach to improve insufficient engraftment after umbilical cord blood stem cell transplantation (UCB-SCT). Although culturing HSPC with hematopoietic cytokines results in

  16. Zinc finger protein 521 antagonizes early B-cell factor 1 and modulates the B-lymphoid differentiation of primary hematopoietic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Tiziana; Lupia, Michela; Amodio, Nicola; Horton, Sarah J; Mesuraca, Maria; Pelaggi, Daniela; Agosti, Valter; Grieco, Michele; Chiarella, Emanuela; Spina, Raffaella; Moore, Malcolm A S; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Bond, Heather M; Morrone, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    Zinc finger protein 521 (EHZF/ZNF521) is a multi-functional transcription co-factor containing 30 zinc fingers and an amino-terminal motif that binds to the nucleosome remodelling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex. ZNF521 is believed to be a relevant player in the regulation of the homeostasis of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell compartment, however the underlying molecular mechanisms are still largely unknown. Here, we show that this protein plays an important role in the control of B-cell development by inhibiting the activity of early B-cell factor-1 (EBF1), a master factor in B-lineage specification. In particular, our data demonstrate that: (1) ZNF521 binds to EBF1 via its carboxyl-terminal portion and this interaction is required for EBF1 inhibition; (2) NuRD complex recruitment by ZNF521 is not essential for the inhibition of transactivation of EBF1-dependent promoters; (3) ZNF521 represses EBF1 target genes in a human B-lymphoid molecular context; and (4) RNAi-mediated silencing of ZNF521/Zfp521 in primary human and murine hematopoietic progenitors strongly enhances the generation of B-lymphocytes in vitro. Taken together, our data indicate that ZNF521 can antagonize B-cell development and lend support to the notion that it may contribute to conserve the multipotency of primitive lympho-myeloid progenitors by preventing or delaying their EBF1-driven commitment toward the B-cell lineage.

  17. Transplant of stem cells derived from bone marrow and granulocytic growth factor in acute and chronic ischemic myocardiopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senior Juan M; Cuellar Francisco; Velasquez Oscar; Velasquez Margarita; Navas Claudia M; Ortiz Sergio; Delgado Juan A; Guillerrno, Blanco; Londono Juan L; Coronado Manuel A; Gomez Francisco; Alzate, Fernando Leon; Zuluaga Alejandra

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown the safety and efficacy of the stem cells derived from bone marrow (BMC) implant with concomitant administration of stimulating factor of granulocyte colonies in patients with acute myocardial infarction with ST segment elevation and in chronic ischemic cardiopathy. An open prospective (before and after) design was made to evaluate the safety and efficacy of cell therapy associated to growth factor administration. The first experience with this kind of therapy is reported. Methodology: this is a 6 months follow-up report of patients with acute and chronic ischemic cardiopathy to who transplant of stem cells derived from bone marrow mobilized with granulocyte colonies growth stimulating factor via coronary arteries or epicardium was realized. Two groups of patients were included: Ten patients with anterior wall infarct and 2. Five patients with chronic ischemic cardiopathy, all with extensive necrosis demonstrated by absence of myocardial viability through nuclear medicine and ejection fraction of less than 40%. Results: significant improvement of ejection fraction from 29.44 ± 3.36 to 37.6 ± 5.3 with p<0.001 and decrease of ventricular systolic and diastolic volume without statistical significance (p =0.31 and 0.4 respectively) were demonstrated. Exercise capacity evidenced by increment in the six minutes test, exercise time and the MET number achieved, increased in a significant way. There were significant changes in the perfusion defect from the second follow-up month and no complications directly related to the stem cells derived from bone marrow transplant or the use of stimulating granulocyte colony factor were presented. Conclusions: this is the first experience of stem cells derived from bone marrow transplant associated to the administration of stimulating granulocyte growth colony factor in which recovery of left ventricular function was demonstrated, as well as improvement in exercise capacity and in the perfusion defect

  18. Coupling between p210bcr-abl and Shc and Grb2 adaptor proteins in hematopoietic cells permits growth factor receptor-independent link to ras activation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauchi, T; Boswell, H S; Leibowitz, D; Broxmeyer, H E

    1994-01-01

    Enforced expression of p210bcr-abl transforms interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent hematopoietic cell lines to growth factor-independent proliferation. It has been demonstrated that nonreceptor tyrosine kinase oncogenes may couple to the p21ras pathway to exert their transforming effect. In particular, p210bcr-abl was recently found to effect p21ras activation in hematopoietic cells. In this context, experiments were performed to evaluate a protein signaling pathway by which p210bcr-abl might regulate p21ras. It was asked whether Shc p46/p52, a protein containing a src-homology region 2 (SH2) domain, and known to function upstream from p21ras, might form specific complexes with p210bcr-abl and thus, possibly alter p21ras activity by coupling to the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (Sos/CDC25) through the Grb2 protein-Sos complex. This latter complex has been previously demonstrated to occur ubiquitously. We found that p210bcr-abl formed a specific complex with Shc and with Grb2 in three different murine cell lines transfected with a p210bcr-abl expression vector. There appeared to be a higher order complex containing Shc, Grb2, and bcr-abl proteins. In contrast to p210bcr-abl transformed cells, in which there was constitutive tight association between Grb2 and Shc, binding between Grb2 and Shc was Steel factor (SLF)-dependent in a SLF-responsive, nontransformed parental cell line. The SLF-dependent association between Grb2 and Shc in nontransformed cells involved formation of a complex of Grb2 with c-kit receptor after SLF treatment. Thus, p210bcr-abl appears to function in a hematopoietic p21ras activation pathway to allow growth factor-independent coupling between Grb2, which exists in a complex with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (Sos), and p21ras. Shc may not be required for Grb2-c-kit interaction, because it fails to bind strongly to c-kit.

  19. Exogenous endothelial cells as accelerators of hematopoietic reconstitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizer J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the successes of recombinant hematopoietic-stimulatory factors at accelerating bone marrow reconstitution and shortening the neutropenic period post-transplantation, significant challenges remain such as cost, inability to reconstitute thrombocytic lineages, and lack of efficacy in conditions such as aplastic anemia. A possible means of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution would be administration of cells capable of secreting hematopoietic growth factors. Advantages of this approach would include: a ability to regulate secretion of cytokines based on biological need; b long term, localized production of growth factors, alleviating need for systemic administration of factors that possess unintended adverse effects; and c potential to actively repair the hematopoietic stem cell niche. Here we overview the field of hematopoietic growth factors, discuss previous experiences with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in accelerating hematopoiesis, and conclude by putting forth the rationale of utilizing exogenous endothelial cells as a novel cellular therapy for acceleration of hematopoietic recovery.

  20. Wnt3a protein reduces growth factor-driven expansion of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in serum-free cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duinhouwer, Lucia E.; Tüysüz, Nesrin; Rombouts, Elwin W J C; Ter Borg, Mariette N D; Mastrobattista, Enrico; Spanholtz, Jan; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Berge, Derk Ten; Braakman, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) is a promising approach to improve insufficient engraftment after umbilical cord blood stem cell transplantation (UCB-SCT). Although culturing HSPC with hematopoietic cytokines results in robust proliferation, it is accompanied with

  1. Enhanced genetic modification of adult growth factor mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijing; Torres-Coronado, Mónica; Gu, Angel; Rao, Anitha; Gardner, Agnes M; Epps, Elizabeth W; Gonzalez, Nancy; Tran, Chy-Anh; Wu, Xiwei; Wang, Jin-Hui; DiGiusto, David L

    2014-10-01

    Genetic modification of adult human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with lentiviral vectors leads to long-term gene expression in the progeny of the HSPCs and has been used to successfully treat several monogenic diseases. In some cases, the gene-modified cells have a selective growth advantage over nonmodified cells and eventually are the dominant engrafted population. However, in disease indications for which the gene-modified cells do not have a selective advantage, optimizing transduction of HSPC is paramount to successful stem cell-based gene therapy. We demonstrate here that transduction of adult CD34+ HSPCs with lentiviral vectors in the presence of rapamycin, a widely used mTORC1 inhibitor, results in an approximately threefold increase in stable gene marking with minimal effects on HSPC growth and differentiation. Using this approach, we have demonstrated that we can enhance the frequency of gene-modified HSPCs that give rise to clonogenic progeny in vitro without excessive increases in the number of vector copies per cell or changes in integration pattern. The genetic marking of HSPCs and expression of transgenes is durable, and transplantation of gene-modified HSPCs into immunodeficient mice results in high levels of gene marking of the lymphoid and myeloid progeny in vivo. The prior safe clinical history of rapamycin in other applications supports the use of this compound to generate gene-modified autologous HSPCs for our HIV gene therapy clinical trials. ©AlphaMed Press.

  2. Atrial Fibrillation in Hematologic Malignancies, Especially After Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Review of Risk Factors, Current Management, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Pankaj; Paydak, Hakan; Thanendrarajan, Sharmilan; van Rhee, Frits

    2016-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to well-established risk factors, cancer has been increasingly associated with the development of AF. Its increased occurrence in those with hematologic malignancies has been attributed to chemotherapeutic agents and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). Recently, a few studies have attempted to define the etiopathogenesis of AF in hematologic malignancies. The management of AF in these patients is challenging because of the concurrent complicating factors, such as thrombocytopenia, orthostatic hypotension, and cardiac amyloidosis. More studies are needed to define the management of AF, especially rate versus rhythm control and anticoagulation. Arrhythmias, in particular, AF, have been associated with an increased length of stay, increased intensive care unit admissions, and greater cardiovascular mortality. In the present review, we describe AF in patients with hematologic malignancies, the risk factors, especially after AHSCT, and the current management of AF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic modification of bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells and hematopoietic cells with human coagulation factor IX-expressing plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Mohammad Reza; Azadbakhsh, Azadeh Sadat; Farokhi, Farrah; Rezazadeh, Kobra; Sam, Sohrab; Zomorodipour, Alireza; Haddad-Mashadrizeh, Aliakbar; Delirezh, Nowruz; Mokarizadeh, Aram

    2016-05-01

    Ex-vivo gene therapy of hemophilias requires suitable bioreactors for secretion of hFIX into the circulation and stem cells hold great potentials in this regard. Viral vectors are widely manipulated and used to transfer hFIX gene into stem cells. However, little attention has been paid to the manipulation of hFIX transgene itself. Concurrently, the efficacy of such a therapeutic approach depends on determination of which vectors give maximal transgene expression. With this in mind, TF-1 (primary hematopoietic lineage) and rat-bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were transfected with five hFIX-expressing plasmids containing different combinations of two human β-globin (hBG) introns inside the hFIX-cDNA and Kozak element and hFIX expression was evaluated by different methods. In BMSCs and TF-1 cells, the highest hFIX level was obtained from the intron-less and hBG intron-I,II containing plasmids respectively. The highest hFIX activity was obtained from the cells that carrying the hBG intron-I,II containing plasmids. BMSCs were able to produce higher hFIX by 1.4 to 4.7-fold increase with activity by 2.4 to 4.4-fold increase compared to TF-1 cells transfected with the same constructs. BMSCs and TF-1 cells could be effectively bioengineered without the use of viral vectors and hFIX minigene containing hBG introns could represent a particular interest in stem cell-based gene therapy of hemophilias. Copyright © 2016 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hematopoietic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohi, Hiroo

    1992-01-01

    A-bombing panicked many people with anxiety because they suffered from various symptoms after A-bombing (ie, they generally called them A-bomb disease). In this chapter, major two conditions (ie, leukopenia and anemia), which caused their symptoms, are reviewed based on the early data soon after A-bombing. According to the chronological changes in both white blood cell (WBC) and red blood cell (RBC) counts, both leukopenia and anemia are discussed. The findings can be divided into acute (one week or at least 10 days), subacute (2 weeks to one month), and delayed (thereafter) periods. During an acute period, some exposed even at ≤200 m from the hypocenter showed WBC count of 6,000/mm 3 or more one week after exposure but others exposed at 1,500-2,000 m showed WBC count of less than 3,000/mm 3 , suggesting the influence of shielding on WBC count. WBC count sometimes became the lowest during a subacute period, although it was normal during an acute period. A survey for WBC count during a delayed period (one year later) showed that WBC count of less than 4,000/mm 3 was more frequent in the exposed group (78/523 A-bomb survivors, 14.9%) than the non-exposed group (6/173 persons, 3.5%). In the exposed group, leukopenia was independent of distance and symptoms at the time of exposure. For anemia, there was no data available during an acute period. Anemia frequently occurred during a subacute period. Morphological abnormality of RBC tended to be high in death cases. A delayed survey on anemia 10 years after exposure showed that there was no statistically significant difference in any of the factors, such as hemoglobin, RBC count, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin, between the exposed and non-exposed groups. (N.K.)

  5. SIMPL enhancement of tumor necrosis factor-α dependent p65-MED1 complex formation is required for mammalian hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weina Zhao

    Full Text Available Significant insight into the signaling pathways leading to activation of the Rel transcription factor family, collectively termed NF-κB, has been gained. Less well understood is how subsets of NF-κB-dependent genes are regulated in a signal specific manner. The SIMPL protein (signaling molecule that interacts with mouse pelle-like kinase is required for full Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNFα induced NF-κB activity. We show that SIMPL is required for steady-state hematopoiesis and the expression of a subset of TNFα induced genes whose products regulate hematopoietic cell activity. To gain insight into the mechanism through which SIMPL modulates gene expression we focused on the Tnf gene, an immune response regulator required for steady-state hematopoiesis. In response to TNFα SIMPL localizes to the Tnf gene promoter where it modulates the initiation of Tnf gene transcription. SIMPL binding partners identified by mass spectrometry include proteins involved in transcription and the interaction between SIMPL and MED1 was characterized in more detail. In response to TNFα, SIMPL is found in p65-MED1 complexes where SIMPL enhances p65/MED1/SIMPL complex formation. Together our results indicate that SIMPL functions as a TNFα-dependent p65 co-activator by facilitating the recruitment of MED1 to p65 containing transcriptional complexes to control the expression of a subset of TNFα-induced genes.

  6. Hypothetical atopic dermatitis-myeloproliferative neoplasm (AD-MPN syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki eKawakami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs are hematopoietic malignancies caused by uncontrolled proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Recent studies have described several mutant mice exhibiting both AD-like skin inflammation and MPN. Common pathways for skin inflammation encompass overexpression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and reduced signaling of epidermal growth factor receptor in the epidermis, while overproduction of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor by keratinocytes and constitutive activation of Stat5 in hematopoietic stem cells are important for the development of MPN. The murine studies suggest the existence of a similar human disease tentatively termed the AD-MPN syndrome.

  7. Hematopoietic stem cell cytokines and fibroblast growth factor-2 stimulate human endothelial cell-pericyte tube co-assembly in 3D fibrin matrices under serum-free defined conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie O Smith

    Full Text Available We describe a novel 3D fibrin matrix model using recombinant hematopoietic stem cell cytokines under serum-free defined conditions which promotes the assembly of human endothelial cell (EC tubes with co-associated pericytes. Individual ECs and pericytes are randomly mixed together and EC tubes form that is accompanied by pericyte recruitment to the EC tube abluminal surface over a 3-5 day period. These morphogenic processes are stimulated by a combination of the hematopoietic stem cell cytokines, stem cell factor, interleukin-3, stromal derived factor-1α, and Flt-3 ligand which are added in conjunction with fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 into the fibrin matrix. In contrast, this tube morphogenic response does not occur under serum-free defined conditions when VEGF and FGF-2 are added together in the fibrin matrices. We recently demonstrated that VEGF and FGF-2 are able to prime EC tube morphogenic responses (i.e. added overnight prior to the morphogenic assay to hematopoietic stem cell cytokines in collagen matrices and, interestingly, they also prime EC tube morphogenesis in 3D fibrin matrices. EC-pericyte interactions in 3D fibrin matrices leads to marked vascular basement membrane assembly as demonstrated using immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, we show that hematopoietic stem cell cytokines and pericytes stimulate EC sprouting in fibrin matrices in a manner dependent on the α5β1 integrin. This novel co-culture system, under serum-free defined conditions, allows for a molecular analysis of EC tube assembly, pericyte recruitment and maturation events in a critical ECM environment (i.e. fibrin matrices that regulates angiogenic events in postnatal life.

  8. Defibrotide prevents the activation of macrovascular and microvascular endothelia caused by soluble factors released to blood by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Marta; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel; Rovira, Montserrat; Escolar, Ginés; Carreras, Enric

    2011-04-01

    Endothelial activation and damage occur in association with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Several of the early complications associated with HSCT seem to have a microvascular location. Through the present study, we have characterized the activation and damage of endothelial cells of both macro (HUVEC) and microvascular (HMEC) origin, occurring early after autologous HSCT, and the potential protective effect of defibrotide (DF). Sera samples from patients were collected before conditioning (Pre), at the time of transplantation (day 0), and at days 7, 14, and 21 after autologous HSCT. Changes in the expression of endothelial cell receptors at the surface, presence and reactivity of extracellular adhesive proteins, and the signaling pathways involved were analyzed. The expression of ICAM-1 at the cell surface increased progressively in both HUVEC and HMEC. However, a more prothrombotic profile was denoted for HMEC, in particular at the time of transplantation (day 0), reflecting the deleterious effect of the conditioning treatment on the endothelium, especially at a microvascular location. Interestingly, this observation correlated with a higher increase in the expression of both tissue factor and von Willebrand factor on the extracellular matrix, together with activation of intracellular p38 MAPK and Akt. Previous exposure and continuous incubation of cells with DF prevented the signs of activation and damage induced by the autologous sera. These observations corroborate that conditioning treatment in autologous HSCT induces a proinflammatory and a prothrombotic phenotype, especially at a microvascular location, and indicate that DF has protective antiinflammatory and antithrombotic effects in this setting. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced survival of lethally irradiated adenosine A(3) receptor knockout mice. A role for hematopoietic growth factors?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Dušek, L.; Hoferová, Zuzana; Komůrková, Denisa

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2015), s. 79-85 ISSN 1573-9538 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : G- CSF PRODUCTION * CANCER-THERAPY * CELL-GROWTH Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.196, year: 2015

  10. Pharmacological Modulation of Radiation Damage. Does It Exist a Chance for Other Substances than Hematopoietic Growth Factors and Cytokines?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Hoferová, Zuzana; Falk, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 7 (2017) E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-12454S; GA MZd NV16-29835A Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : acute radiation syndrome * radioprotectors * radiomitigators Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.226, year: 2016

  11. Radioresistant canine hematopoietic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, T.G.; Shimizu, J.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Goldman, M.

    1987-01-01

    Survival of dogs that are continuously exposed to a moderate dose-rate of gamma radiation (10 cGy/day) is dependent on the age of the dog at the time of exposure. Most dogs exposed postpartum to gamma radiation suffered from suppressed hematopoiesis and died of aplasia. On the other hand, none of the in utero-exposed dogs suffered from suppressed hematopoiesis and most became long-term survivors, tolerating 10-fold greater total dose, but dying of myeloproliferative disease (MPD). Using acute gamma irradiation of hematopoietic cells and colony forming unit cell assay (CFU), they observed that a canine hematopoietic cell line established from a myeloid leukemic dog that was a long-term survivor of continuous irradiation was approximately 4-fold more radioresistant than a hematopoietic cell line established from a dog with nonradiation-induced myeloid leukemia or hematopoietic cells from normal canine bone marrow. In utero dogs that are long-term survivors of continuous irradiation have radioresistant hematopoietic cells, and radioresistance that is a constitutive property of the cells

  12. Increased levels of NOTCH1, NF-kappaB, and other interconnected transcription factors characterize primitive sets of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre; Oliveira, Lucila Habib B; Zanette, Dalila Luciola; Viu Carrara, Rita de Cassia; Araujo, Amélia Goes; Orellana, Maristela Delgado; Bonini de Palma, Patrícia Vianna; Menezes, Camila C B O; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Zago, Marco Antonio

    2010-03-01

    As previously shown, higher levels of NOTCH1 and increased NF-kappaB signaling is a distinctive feature of the more primitive umbilical cord blood (UCB) CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), as compared to bone marrow (BM). Differences between BM and UCB cell composition also account for this finding. The CD133 marker defines a more primitive cell subset among CD34+ HSC with a proposed hemangioblast potential. To further evaluate the molecular basis related to the more primitive characteristics of UCB and CD133+ HSC, immunomagnetically purified human CD34+ and CD133+ cells from BM and UCB were used on gene expression microarrays studies. UCB CD34+ cells contained a significantly higher proportion of CD133+ cells than BM (70% and 40%, respectively). Cluster analysis showed that BM CD133+ cells grouped with the UCB cells (CD133+ and CD34+) rather than to BM CD34+ cells. Compared with CD34+ cells, CD133+ had a higher expression of many transcription factors (TFs). Promoter analysis on all these TF genes revealed a significantly higher frequency (than expected by chance) of NF-kappaB-binding sites (BS), including potentially novel NF-kappaB targets such as RUNX1, GATA3, and USF1. Selected transcripts of TF related to primitive hematopoiesis and self-renewal, such as RUNX1, GATA3, USF1, TAL1, HOXA9, HOXB4, NOTCH1, RELB, and NFKB2 were evaluated by real-time PCR and were all significantly positively correlated. Taken together, our data indicate the existence of an interconnected transcriptional network characterized by higher levels of NOTCH1, NF-kappaB, and other important TFs on more primitive HSC sets.

  13. The Hematopoietic Transcription Factors RUNX1 and ERG Prevent AML1-ETO Oncogene Overexpression and Onset of the Apoptosis Program in t(8;21) AMLs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandoli, Amit; Singh, Abhishek A.; Prange, Koen H. M.; Tijchon, Esther; Oerlemans, Marjolein; Dirks, Rene; Ter Huurne, Menno; Wierenga, Albertus T. J.; Janssen-Megens, Eva M.; Berentsen, Kim; Sharifi, Nilofar; Kim, Bowon; Matarese, Filomena; Nguyen, Luan N.; Hubner, Nina C.; Rao, Nagesha A.; van den Akker, Emile; Altucci, Lucia; Vellenga, Edo; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Martens, Joost H. A.

    2016-01-01

    The t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-associated oncoprotein AML1-ETO disrupts normal hematopoietic differentiation. Here, we have investigated its effects on the transcriptome and epigenome in t(8,21) patient cells. AML1-ETO binding was found at promoter regions of active genes with high levels

  14. Interleukin-3/granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor promotes stem cell expansion, monocytosis, and atheroma macrophage burden in mice with hematopoietic ApoE deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Mi; Subramanian, Manikandan; Abramowicz, Sandra; Murphy, Andrew J.; Gonen, Ayelet; Witztum, Joseph; Welch, Carrie; Tabas, Ira; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is associated with monocytosis. Studies using animal models of monocytosis and atherosclerosis such as ApoE(-/-) mice have shown bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem and multipotential progenitor cell (HSPC) expansion, associated with increased cell surface expression of the

  15. USE OF HEMATOPOIETIC GROWTH FACTOR IN THE MANAGEMENT OF HEMATOLOGICAL SIDE EFFECTS ASSOCIATED TO ANTIVIRAL TREATMENT FOR HCV HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Mancino

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Haematological abnormalities are common during combination antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C. Although dose reduction or discontinuation can easily treat these side effects, they can adversely affect the efficacy of combination antiviral therapy reducing the likelihood of a sustained viral response (SVR. To avoid potentially diminishing a patient’s chance of response, many physicians have begun using growth factors off-label to manage anaemia and neutropenia in hepatitis C. Haematopoietic growth factors are generally well tolerated and they may be useful for managing haematological side effects of anti-HCV therapy improving patients’ quality of life. To date, the role and benefit of these agents during anti-HCV therapy and their positive impact on SVR have not conclusively determined in the published studies. However, the possibility of a benefit to individual outpatients remains, and an individualized approach is recommended. This review explores the incidence, clinical significance, and management of anaemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia associated with combination therapy for HCV infection.

  16. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in the prevention of postoperative infectious complications and sub-optimal recovery from operation in patients with colorectal cancer and increased preoperative risk (ASA 3 and 4). Protocol of a controlled clinical trial developed by consensus of an international study group. Part three: individual patient, complication algorithm and quality manage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stinner, B.; Bauhofer, A.; Lorenz, W.; Rothmund, M.; Plaul, U.; Torossian, A.; Celik, I.; Sitter, H.; Koller, M.; Black, A.; Duda, D.; Encke, A.; Greger, B.; Goor, H. van; Hanisch, E.; Hesterberg, R.; Klose, K.J.; Lacaine, F.; Lorijn, R.H.; Margolis, C.; Neugebauer, E.; Nystrom, P.O.; Reemst, P.H.M.; Schein, M.; Solovera, J.

    2001-01-01

    GENERAL DESIGN: Presentation of a new type of a study protocol for evaluation of the effectiveness of an immune modifier (rhG-CSF, filgrastim): prevention of postoperative infectious complications and of sub-optimal recovery from operation in patients with colorectal cancer and increased

  17. O fator estimulador de colônias granulocitárias (G-CSF para isquemia cerebral: uma nova aplicação terapêutica? Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF for ischemic stroke: a new therapeutic modality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Luiz Maset

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available G-CSF is a FDA-approved drug, commonly utilized in neutropenic patients, long knows for its anti-inflammatory and angiogenic properties and also for its capacity to mobilize stem cells, hematopoiethic and endogen precursors and progenitor cells. Recently neuroprotective effects have been shown in animals and humans and there are publications mentioning its potential therapeutic role in focal ischemia (medial cerebral artery territory. We describe a case of a 74-year-old male patient, victim of a subarachnoid hemorrhage and brain ischemia due to bilateral involvement of medial cerebral arteries and vertebrobasilar vasospasms (overall ischemia, who was submitted to G-C5F therapy. G-CSF did not cause adverse effects, mobilized cells (as was seen by the exponential increase in leukocytes and possibly contributed to a progressive clinical improvement confirmed using GCS and NIHSS scales. Clinical improvements did not reflect in eithrt CT, MNR or SPECT examinations. This initial experience opens the perspective for G-CSF studies in brain ischemia.

  18. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-I deficiency and replacement therapy on the hematopoietic system in patients with Laron syndrome (primary growth hormone insensitivity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Bezalel; Lilos, Pearl; Laron, Zvi

    2003-01-01

    Primary insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) deficiencies, such as in Laron syndrome (LS), are a unique model in man to study the consequences resulting from defects in growth hormone (GH) signal transmission. To assess retrospectively the effect of IGF-I deficiency and its therapy on the various cells of the hematopoietic system as reflected by peripheral blood counts. Two groups of patients were studied. The first group consisted of 11 untreated patients with LS, seven males and four females, who were followed from childhood into adult age. Average age at the time of data analysis was 45.4 +/- 9.6 years. The second group included ten children with LS, six males and four females, who received IGF-I replacement therapy for an average period of 6 years, ranging in age from 0.9-11 years. The mean age at initiation of therapy was 6.9 +/- 4.28 years. Only the seven children treated for 5 years or more were included in the analysis. Data on blood counts were collected from the patients' charts. Blood samples were drawn at baseline, weekly during the first month, once a month during the first year, and once every 3 months thereafter. Statistical analysis of the change over time was performed using repeated measures ANOVA. Children with LS had red cell indices in the lower normal range and an elevated monocyte count. A statistically significant rise in red blood cell (RBC) indices was seen in children during IGF-I therapy: RBC rose from 4.66 x 10(6)/ml to 4.93 x 10(6)/ml (p = 0.011); hemoglobin from 11.55 g/dl to 13.01 g/dl (p syndrome, confirms that IGF-I has a strong stimulatory effect on erythropoiesis. In addition, IGF-I therapy had a reducing effect on monocytes and platelets, an effect not previously described. The mechanism by which IGF-I mediates these effects needs further elucidation.

  19. The biochemistry of hematopoietic stem cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimakis, P; Crisan, M; Dzierzak, E

    2013-02-01

    The cornerstone of the adult hematopoietic system and clinical treatments for blood-related disease is the cohort of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that is harbored in the adult bone marrow microenvironment. Interestingly, this cohort of HSCs is generated only during a short window of developmental time. In mammalian embryos, hematopoietic progenitor and HSC generation occurs within several extra- and intraembryonic microenvironments, most notably from 'hemogenic' endothelial cells lining the major vasculature. HSCs are made through a remarkable transdifferentiation of endothelial cells to a hematopoietic fate that is long-lived and self-renewable. Recent studies are beginning to provide an understanding of the biochemical signaling pathways and transcription factors/complexes that promote their generation. The focus of this review is on the biochemistry behind the generation of these potent long-lived self-renewing stem cells of the blood system. Both the intrinsic (master transcription factors) and extrinsic regulators (morphogens and growth factors) that affect the generation, maintenance and expansion of HSCs in the embryo will be discussed. The generation of HSCs is a stepwise process involving many developmental signaling pathways, morphogens and cytokines. Pivotal hematopoietic transcription factors are required for their generation. Interestingly, whereas these factors are necessary for HSC generation, their expression in adult bone marrow HSCs is oftentimes not required. Thus, the biochemistry and molecular regulation of HSC development in the embryo are overlapping, but differ significantly from the regulation of HSCs in the adult. HSC numbers for clinical use are limiting, and despite much research into the molecular basis of HSC regulation in the adult bone marrow, no panel of growth factors, interleukins and/or morphogens has been found to sufficiently increase the number of these important stem cells. An understanding of the biochemistry of HSC

  20. Response to rituximab-based therapy and risk factor analysis in epstein barr virus-related lymphoproliferative disorder after hematopoietic stem cell transplant in children and adults: a study from the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Styczynski, J.; Gil, L.; Tridello, G.; Ljungman, P.; Donnelly, J.P.; Velden, W. van der; Omar, H.; Martino, R.; Halkes, C.; Faraci, M.; Theunissen, K.; Kalwak, K.; Hubacek, P.; Sica, S.; Nozzoli, C.; Fagioli, F.; Matthes, S.; Diaz, M.A.; Migliavacca, M.; Balduzzi, A.; Tomaszewska, A.; amara Rde, L. C; Biezen, A. van; Hoek, J. van den; Iacobelli, S.; Einsele, H.; Cesaro, S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this analysis was to investigate prognostic factors that influence the outcome of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after a rituximab-based treatment in the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) setting.

  1. STAT5-mediated self-renewal of normal hematopoietic and leukemic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Hein; Wierenga, Albertus T. J.; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2012-01-01

    The level of transcription factor activity critically regulates cell fate decisions such as hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. The balance between hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation needs to be tightly controlled, as a shift toward differentiation might

  2. Evaluation of the risk factors associated with high-dose chemotherapy-induced dysgeusia in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: possible usefulness of cryotherapy in dysgeusia prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Naoto; Hanafusa, Takeshi; Abe, Shinji; Sato, Chiemi; Nakamura, Toshimi; Teraoka, Kazuhiko; Abe, Masahiro; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Ishizawa, Keisuke

    2016-09-01

    Dysgeusia is one of the sporadic adverse effects induced by chemotherapy, but it remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to retrospectively identify the risk factors related with dysgeusia in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). Forty-eight patients with myeloma or lymphoma undergoing AHSCT were enrolled in this study. Data regarding dysgeusia and symptoms were collected by interviews conducted by medical workers. Patient characteristics and unfavorable effects induced by dysgeusia were obtained from medical records and analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the risk factors related with dysgeusia. Of the 48 patients, 20 (42 %) had dysgeusia after AHSCT. The total period of parenteral nutrition (TPN) administration and period of decreased oral intake in the dysgeusia group were statistically longer than those in the non-dysgeusia group. Multivariate analyses revealed that oral mucositis (odds ratio: 30.3; p cryotherapy was the independent suppressive factor of dysgeusia (odds ratio: 0.14; p cryotherapy was an independent suppressive factor for dysgeusia. Therefore, oral cryotherapy should be implemented into the regimen of supportive care management in patients undergoing AHSCT.

  3. [Clinical roles of vitamins in hematopoietic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, M; Kanamaru, A

    1999-10-01

    Vitamins are essential organisms which promote various metabolisms and physiological systems. Several vitamins play important roles in hematopoietic system. Vitamin B12, C and folic acid are associated with DNA synthesis of erythroid nucleus, the deficiency of which causes the megaloblastic anemia. Some megaloblatic anemia and sideroblastic anemia might response to vitamin B1 and B6, respectively. Vitamin K participates in some coagulation factors in coagulation-fibrinogenolysis system. It has been reported that vitamins A, D and K potentially differentiate leukemic cells and then induce the apoptosis, suggesting that they would be new therapeutic agents in acute leukemia.

  4. Motor skill delays in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy as an important risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverna, Livia; Tremolada, Marta; Bonichini, Sabrina; Tosetto, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Messina, Chiara; Pillon, Marta

    2017-01-01

    CNS-directed therapies for the treatment of leukemia can adversely affect the acquisition of new skills, such as reading/writing and math. Two years after the end of treatments, children show gross and fine motor skill delays that may persist even when patients are considered healed. The goal of the present study was to assess motor skills difficulties in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment. Particular attention has been paid to those patients who had undergone Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) and to the relationship between motor delays and age bands. Participants were 60 children (median age of 5; inter quartile range: 3.07-5.76), including 31 females and 29 males, 91.7% of them were affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 8.3% by acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Five children had undergone HCST. Parents were interviewed by Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) on children's motor skills and filled in the Italian Temperament Questionnaire (QUIT). VABS's total scores were converted into equivalent mental age scores (EMA). A score difference of at least three months between current age and equivalent mental age was considered a developmental delay. Non-parametric analyses were run to understand if HSCT treatment and a specific age band influence children's motor skills. Significant delays were found in global motor skills (56.7%) as well as in fine and gross motor domains. Mann Whitney U tests showed that children with HSCT were reported to have lower gross motor mean ranks (U = 62; p = 0.004; Mean rank = 15.40) than peers without HSCT (Mean rank = 31.87) and lower mean rank values on motor temperament scale (U = 9; p = 0.003; HSCT Mean rank = 4.75 versus no HSCT Mean rank = 27.81). Kruskal Wallis' tests identified the high risk treatment showing that HSCT experience negatively impacted the motor skills and temperamental motor activity of pre-school children one year after the diagnosis of leukemia.

  5. Motor skill delays in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy as an important risk factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Taverna

    Full Text Available CNS-directed therapies for the treatment of leukemia can adversely affect the acquisition of new skills, such as reading/writing and math. Two years after the end of treatments, children show gross and fine motor skill delays that may persist even when patients are considered healed. The goal of the present study was to assess motor skills difficulties in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment. Particular attention has been paid to those patients who had undergone Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT and to the relationship between motor delays and age bands. Participants were 60 children (median age of 5; inter quartile range: 3.07-5.76, including 31 females and 29 males, 91.7% of them were affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, and 8.3% by acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Five children had undergone HCST. Parents were interviewed by Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS on children's motor skills and filled in the Italian Temperament Questionnaire (QUIT. VABS's total scores were converted into equivalent mental age scores (EMA. A score difference of at least three months between current age and equivalent mental age was considered a developmental delay. Non-parametric analyses were run to understand if HSCT treatment and a specific age band influence children's motor skills. Significant delays were found in global motor skills (56.7% as well as in fine and gross motor domains. Mann Whitney U tests showed that children with HSCT were reported to have lower gross motor mean ranks (U = 62; p = 0.004; Mean rank = 15.40 than peers without HSCT (Mean rank = 31.87 and lower mean rank values on motor temperament scale (U = 9; p = 0.003; HSCT Mean rank = 4.75 versus no HSCT Mean rank = 27.81. Kruskal Wallis' tests identified the high risk treatment showing that HSCT experience negatively impacted the motor skills and temperamental motor activity of pre-school children one year after the diagnosis of leukemia.

  6. Motor skill delays in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy as an important risk factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonichini, Sabrina; Tosetto, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Messina, Chiara; Pillon, Marta

    2017-01-01

    CNS-directed therapies for the treatment of leukemia can adversely affect the acquisition of new skills, such as reading/writing and math. Two years after the end of treatments, children show gross and fine motor skill delays that may persist even when patients are considered healed. The goal of the present study was to assess motor skills difficulties in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment. Particular attention has been paid to those patients who had undergone Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) and to the relationship between motor delays and age bands. Participants were 60 children (median age of 5; inter quartile range: 3.07–5.76), including 31 females and 29 males, 91.7% of them were affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 8.3% by acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Five children had undergone HCST. Parents were interviewed by Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) on children’s motor skills and filled in the Italian Temperament Questionnaire (QUIT). VABS’s total scores were converted into equivalent mental age scores (EMA). A score difference of at least three months between current age and equivalent mental age was considered a developmental delay. Non-parametric analyses were run to understand if HSCT treatment and a specific age band influence children’s motor skills. Significant delays were found in global motor skills (56.7%) as well as in fine and gross motor domains. Mann Whitney U tests showed that children with HSCT were reported to have lower gross motor mean ranks (U = 62; p = 0.004; Mean rank = 15.40) than peers without HSCT (Mean rank = 31.87) and lower mean rank values on motor temperament scale (U = 9; p = 0.003; HSCT Mean rank = 4.75 versus no HSCT Mean rank = 27.81). Kruskal Wallis’ tests identified the high risk treatment showing that HSCT experience negatively impacted the motor skills and temperamental motor activity of pre-school children one year after the diagnosis of leukemia. PMID

  7. Differentiation of embryonic stem cells towards hematopoietic cells: progress and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xinghui; Kaufman, Dan S

    2008-07-01

    Hematopoietic development from embryonic stem cells has been one of the most productive areas of stem cell biology. Recent studies have progressed from work with mouse to human embryonic stem cells. Strategies to produce defined blood cell populations can be used to better understand normal and abnormal hematopoiesis, as well as potentially improve the generation of hematopoietic cells with therapeutic potential. Molecular profiling, phenotypic and functional analyses have all been utilized to demonstrate that hematopoietic cells derived from embryonic stem cells most closely represent a stage of hematopoiesis that occurs at embryonic/fetal developmental stages. Generation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells comparable to hematopoietic stem cells found in the adult sources, such as bone marrow and cord blood, still remains challenging. However, genetic manipulation of intrinsic factors during hematopoietic differentiation has proven a suitable approach to induce adult definitive hematopoiesis from embryonic stem cells. Concrete evidence has shown that embryonic stem cells provide a powerful approach to study the early stage of hematopoiesis. Multiple hematopoietic lineages can be generated from embryonic stem cells, although most of the evidence suggests that hematopoietic development from embryonic stem cells mimics an embryonic/fetal stage of hematopoiesis.

  8. Plerixafor (a CXCR4 antagonist following myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation enhances hematopoietic recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. B. Green

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of CXCR4 with its ligand (stromal-derived factor-1 maintains hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs in a quiescent state. We hypothesized that blocking CXCR4/SDF-1 interaction after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT promotes hematopoiesis by inducing HSC proliferation. Methods We conducted a phase I/II trial of plerixafor on hematopoietic cell recovery following myeloablative allogeneic HSCT. Patients with hematologic malignancies receiving myeloablative conditioning were enrolled. Plerixafor 240 μg/kg was administered subcutaneously every other day beginning day +2 until day +21 or until neutrophil recovery. The primary efficacy endpoints of the study were time to absolute neutrophil count >500/μl and platelet count >20,000/μl. The cumulative incidence of neutrophil and platelet engraftment of the study cohort was compared to that of a cohort of 95 allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplant recipients treated during the same period of time and who received similar conditioning and graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. Results Thirty patients received plerixafor following peripheral blood stem cell (n = 28 (PBSC or bone marrow (n = 2 transplantation. Adverse events attributable to plerixafor were mild and indistinguishable from effects of conditioning. The kinetics of neutrophil and platelet engraftment, as demonstrated by cumulative incidence, from the 28 study subjects receiving PBSC showed faster neutrophil (p = 0.04 and platelet recovery >20 K (p = 0.04 compared to the controls. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that plerixafor can be given safely following myeloablative HSCT. It provides proof of principle that blocking CXCR4 after HSCT enhances hematopoietic recovery. Larger, confirmatory studies in other settings are warranted. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01280955

  9. OP9-Lhx2 stromal cells facilitate derivation of hematopoietic progenitors both in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Generating engraftable hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs is an ideal approach for obtaining induced HSCs for cell therapy. However, the path from PSCs to robustly induced HSCs (iHSCs in vitro remains elusive. We hypothesize that the modification of hematopoietic niche cells by transcription factors facilitates the derivation of induced HSCs from PSCs. The Lhx2 transcription factor is expressed in fetal liver stromal cells but not in fetal blood cells. Knocking out Lhx2 leads to a fetal hematopoietic defect in a cell non-autonomous role. In this study, we demonstrate that the ectopic expression of Lhx2 in OP9 cells (OP9-Lhx2 accelerates the hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs. OP9-Lhx2 significantly increased the yields of hematopoietic progenitor cells via co-culture with PSCs in vitro. Interestingly, the co-injection of OP9-Lhx2 and PSCs into immune deficient mice also increased the proportion of hematopoietic progenitors via the formation of teratomas. The transplantation of phenotypic HSCs from OP9-Lhx2 teratomas but not from the OP9 control supported a transient repopulating capability. The upregulation of Apln gene by Lhx2 is correlated to the hematopoietic commitment property of OP9-Lhx2. Furthermore, the enforced expression of Apln in OP9 cells significantly increased the hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs. These results indicate that OP9-Lhx2 is a good cell line for regeneration of hematopoietic progenitors both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Instruction of hematopoietic lineage choice by cytokine signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endele, Max; Etzrodt, Martin; Schroeder, Timm, E-mail: timm.schroeder@bsse.ethz.ch

    2014-12-10

    Hematopoiesis is the cumulative consequence of finely tuned signaling pathways activated through extrinsic factors, such as local niche signals and systemic hematopoietic cytokines. Whether extrinsic factors actively instruct the lineage choice of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells or are only selectively allowing survival and proliferation of already intrinsically lineage-committed cells has been debated over decades. Recent results demonstrated that cytokines can instruct lineage choice. However, the precise function of individual cytokine-triggered signaling molecules in inducing cellular events like proliferation, lineage choice, and differentiation remains largely elusive. Signal transduction pathways activated by different cytokine receptors are highly overlapping, but support the production of distinct hematopoietic lineages. Cellular context, signaling dynamics, and the crosstalk of different signaling pathways determine the cellular response of a given extrinsic signal. New tools to manipulate and continuously quantify signaling events at the single cell level are therefore required to thoroughly interrogate how dynamic signaling networks yield a specific cellular response. - Highlights: • Recent studies provided definite proof for lineage-instructive action of cytokines. • Signaling pathways involved in hematopoietic lineage instruction remain elusive. • New tools are emerging to quantitatively study dynamic signaling networks over time.

  11. Hematopoietic stem cell fate through metabolic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kyoko; Ito, Keisuke

    2018-05-25

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain a quiescent state in the bone marrow to preserve their self-renewal capacity, but also undergo cell divisions as required. Organelles such as the mitochondria sustain cumulative damage during these cell divisions, and this damage may eventually compromise the cells' self-renewal capacity. HSC divisions result in either self-renewal or differentiation, with the balance between the two directly impacting hematopoietic homeostasis; but the heterogeneity of available HSC-enriched fractions, together with the technical challenges of observing HSC behavior, has long hindered the analysis of individual HSCs, and prevented the elucidation of this process. However, recent advances in genetic models, metabolomics analyses and single-cell approaches have revealed the contributions made to HSC self-renewal by metabolic cues, mitochondrial biogenesis, and autophagy/mitophagy, which have highlighted mitochondrial quality as a key control factor in the equilibrium of HSCs. A deeper understanding of precisely how specific modes of metabolism control HSC fate at the single cell level is therefore not only of great biological interest, but will have clear clinical implications for the development of therapies for hematological disease. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Structural studies on leukaemia inhibitory factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, R.S.; Maurer, T.; Smith, D.K. [Biomolecular Research Institute, Parville (Australia); Nicola, N.A. [Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne (Australia)

    1994-12-01

    Leukaemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that acts on a wide range of target cells, including mega-karyocytes, osteoblasts, hepatocytes, adipocytes, neurons, embryonic stem cells, and primordial germ cells. Many of its activities are shared with other cytokines, particularly interleukin-6, oncostatin-M, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Although secreted in vivo as a glycoprotein, nonglycosylated recombinant protein expressed in E. coli is fully active and has been used in our nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of the three-dimensional structure and structure-function relationships of LIF. With 180 amino acids and a molecular mass of about 20 kDa, OF is too large for direct structure determination by two-dimensional and three-dimensional {sup 1}HNMR. It is necessary to label the protein with the stable isotopes {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C and employ heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR in order to resolve and interpret the spectral information required for three-dimensional structure determination. This work has been undertaken with both human LIF and a mouse-human chimaera that binds to the human LIF receptor with the same affinity as the human protein and yet expresses in E. coli at much higher levels. Sequence-specific resonance assignments and secondary structure elements for these proteins will be presented and progress towards determination of their three-dimensional structures described.

  13. Zinc finger protein 521 antagonizes early B-cell factor 1 and modulates the B-lymphoid differentiation of primary hematopoietic progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mega, Tiziana; Lupia, Michela; Amodio, Nicola; Horton, Sarah J.; Mesuraca, Maria; Pelaggi, Daniela; Agosti, Valter; Grieco, Michele; Chiarella, Emanuela; Spina, Raffaella; Moore, Malcolm A. S.; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Bond, Heather M.; Morrone, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Zinc finger protein 521 (EHZF/ZNF521) is a multi-functional transcription co-factor containing 30 zinc fingers and an N-terminal motif that binds to the nucleosome remodelling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex. ZNF521 is believed to be a relevant player in the regulation of the homeostasis of

  14. Association of Macroeconomic Factors With Nonrelapse Mortality After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Adults With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: An Analysis From the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Sebastian; Labopin, Myriam; Ibatici, Adalberto; Browne, Paul; Czerw, Tomasz; Socie, Gerard; Unal, Ali; Kyrcz-Krzemien, Slawomira; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Goker, Hakan; Potter, Mike; Furness, Caroline L; McQuaker, Grant; Beelen, Dietrich; Milpied, Noel; Campos, Antonio; Craddock, Charles; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-03-01

    From a global perspective, the rates of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) are closely related to the economic status of a country. However, a potential association with outcome has not yet been documented. The goal of this study was to evaluate effects of health care expenditure (HCE), Human Development Index (HDI), team density, and center experience on nonrelapse mortality (NRM) after HLA-matched sibling alloHCT for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A total of 983 patients treated with myeloablative alloHCT between 2004 and 2008 in 24 European countries were included. In a univariate analysis, the probability of day 100 NRM was increased for countries with lower current HCE (8% vs. 3%; p = .06), countries with lower HDI (8% vs. 3%; p = .02), and centers with less experience (8% vs. 5%; p = .04). In addition, the overall NRM was increased for countries with lower current HCE (21% vs. 17%; p = .09) and HDI (21% vs. 16%; p = .03) and for centers with lower activity (21% vs. 16%; p = .07). In a multivariate analysis, the strongest predictive model for day 100 NRM included current HCE greater than the median (hazard ratio [HR], 0.39; p = .002). The overall NRM was mostly predicted by HDI greater than the median (HR, 0.65; p = .01). Both lower current HCE and HDI were associated with decreased probability of overall survival. Both macroeconomic factors and the socioeconomic status of a country strongly influence NRM after alloHCT for adults with ALL. Our findings should be considered when clinical studies in the field of alloHCT are interpreted. ©AlphaMed Press.

  15. Rhizomucor and Scedosporium Infection Post Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dânia Sofia Marques

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem-cell transplant recipients are at increased risk of developing invasive fungal infections. This is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. We report a case of a 17-year-old male patient diagnosed with severe idiopathic acquired aplastic anemia who developed fungal pneumonitis due to Rhizomucor sp. and rhinoencephalitis due to Scedosporium apiospermum 6 and 8 months after undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplant from an HLA-matched unrelated donor. Discussion highlights risk factors for invasive fungal infections (i.e., mucormycosis and scedosporiosis, its clinical features, and the factors that must be taken into account to successfully treat them (early diagnosis, correction of predisposing factors, aggressive surgical debridement, and antifungal and adjunctive therapies.

  16. Factors Influencing Pulmonary Toxicity in Children Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in the Setting of Total Body Irradiation-Based Myeloablative Conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abugideiri, Mustafa, E-mail: Mabugid@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Nanda, Ronica H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Butker, Charlotte [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Zhang, Chao [Department of Biostatistics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Kim, Sungjin [Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Research Center, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Chiang, Kuang-Yueh [Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Center, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, and Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, Bone Marrow Transplant, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Butker, Elizabeth; Khan, Mohammad K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Haight, Ann E. [Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Center, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, and Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, Bone Marrow Transplant, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Chen, Zhengjia [Department of Biostatistics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated factors associated with increased risk of pulmonary toxicity (PT) from any cause in pediatric patients after myeloablative conditioning, using total body irradiation (TBI), followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods and Materials: The records of 129 consecutive pediatric patients (range: 1-21 years of age) who underwent TBI-based myeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies at our institution between January 2003 and May 2014 were reviewed. Although total TBI doses ranged from 10.5 to 14 Gy, lung doses were limited to 10 Gy with partial transmission blocks. TBI dose rates ranged from 5.6 cGy/min to 20.9 cGy/min. PT was classified using clinical symptoms, radiographic evidence, and ventilatory defects on pulmonary function tests. Noninfectious (idiopathic) pneumonia syndrome (IPS) was characterized by patients exhibiting PT while demonstrating no signs of infection throughout the follow-up period. Results: PT from any cause developed in 70.5% of patients and was significantly associated with increased transplantation-related mortality (TRM) (P=.03) and decreased overall survival (OS) (P=.02). IPS developed in 23.3% of patients but was not associated with increased TRM (P=.6) or decreased OS (P=.5). Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) significantly affected PT (P=.001) but did not significantly influence the development of IPS (P=.4). Infection was a leading cause of PT (75.8%). TBI dose rate significantly affected development of overall PT (P=.02) and was the sole factor to significantly influence the incidence of IPS (P=.002). TBI total dose, dose per fraction, disease type, transplantation chemotherapy, age of patient, sex, and donor type did not significantly impact overall PT or IPS. Conclusions: A high incidence of PT was noted in this large series of homogeneously treated pediatric patients undergoing TBI for allogeneic HSCT. TBI dose rates affected overall PT and strongly

  17. CXC chemokine receptor 3 expression on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    -induced CD34(+) progenitor chemotaxis. These chemotactic attracted CD34(+) progenitors are colony-forming units-granulocyte-macrophage. gamma IP-10 and Mig also induced GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitor adhesion and aggregation by means of CXCR3, a finding confirmed by the observation that anti-CXCR3 m......Ab blocked these functions of gammaIP-10 and Mig but not of chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha. gamma IP-10-induced and Mig-induced up-regulation of integrins (CD49a and CD49b) was found to play a crucial role in adhesion of GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitors. Moreover, gamma IP-10 and Mig...... stimulated CXCR3 redistribution and cellular polarization in GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitors. These results indicate that CXCR3-gamma IP-10 and CXCR3-Mig receptor-ligand pairs, as well as the effects of GM-CSF on them, may be especially important in the cytokine/chemokine environment...

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell expansion : challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walasek, Marta A.; van Os, Ronald; de Haan, Gerald; Kanz, L; Fibbe, WE; Lengerke, C; Dick, JE

    2012-01-01

    Attempts to improve hematopoietic reconstitution and engraftment potential of ex vivo-expanded hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have been largely unsuccessful due to the inability to generate sufficient stem cell numbers and to excessive differentiation of the starting cell

  19. The biochemistry of hematopoietic stem cell development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Kaimakis (Polynikis); M. Crisan (Mihaela); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The cornerstone of the adult hematopoietic system and clinical treatments for blood-related disease is the cohort of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that is harbored in the adult bone marrow microenvironment. Interestingly, this cohort of HSCs is generated only during a short

  20. Aging of hematopoietic stem cells: DNA damage and mutations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrle, Bettina M; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Aging in the hematopoietic system and the stem cell niche contributes to aging-associated phenotypes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), including leukemia and aging-associated immune remodeling. Among others, the DNA damage theory of aging of HSCs is well established, based on the detection of a significantly larger amount of γH2AX foci and a higher tail moment in the comet assay, both initially thought to be associated with DNA damage in aged HSCs compared with young cells, and bone marrow failure in animals devoid of DNA repair factors. Novel data on the increase in and nature of DNA mutations in the hematopoietic system with age, the quality of the DNA damage response in aged HSCs, and the nature of γH2AX foci question a direct link between DNA damage and the DNA damage response and aging of HSCs, and rather favor changes in epigenetics, splicing-factors or three-dimensional architecture of the cell as major cell intrinsic factors of HSCs aging. Aging of HSCs is also driven by a strong contribution of aging of the niche. This review discusses the DNA damage theory of HSC aging in the light of these novel mechanisms of aging of HSCs. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clonidine reduces norepinephrine and improves bone marrow function in a rodent model of lung contusion, hemorrhagic shock, and chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamo, Ines G; Kannan, Kolenkode B; Ramos, Harry; Loftus, Tyler J; Efron, Philip A; Mohr, Alicia M

    2017-03-01

    Propranolol has been shown previously to restore bone marrow function and improve anemia after lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock. We hypothesized that daily clonidine administration would inhibit central sympathetic outflow and restore bone marrow function in our rodent model of lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock with chronic stress. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 6 days of restraint stress after lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock during which the animals received clonidine (75 μg/kg) after the restraint stress. On postinjury day 7, we assessed urine norepinephrine, blood hemoglobin, plasma granulocyte colony stimulating factor, and peripheral blood mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells, as well as bone marrow cellularity and erythroid progenitor cell growth. The addition of clonidine to lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock with chronic restraint stress significantly decreased urine norepinephrine levels, improved bone marrow cellularity, restored erythroid progenitor colony growth, and improved hemoglobin (14.1 ± 0.6 vs 10.8 ± 0.6 g/dL). The addition of clonidine to lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock with chronic restraint stress significantly decreased hematopoietic progenitor cells mobilization and restored granulocyte colony stimulating factor levels. After lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock with chronic restraint stress, daily administration of clonidine restored bone marrow function and improved anemia. Alleviating chronic stress and decreasing norepinephrine is a key therapeutic target to improve bone marrow function after severe injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ventilator associated pneumonia: risk factors and preventive measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, J L; Lobo, S; Struelens, M

    2001-11-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common nosocomial infection associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Various risk factors for VAP have been identified and include the duration of ICU stay and of mechanical ventilation, a diagnosis of trauma, and severity of illness. Knowledge of these factors can promote early diagnosis and hence treatment. In addition to simple, but very effective, basic hygiene, different preventative strategies have been suggested, and can be divided into those that aim to limit airway colonization, and those that improve host defense mechanisms. Of the former, non-invasive ventilation is effective but not always applicable or available, nursing the patient in the semi-recumbent position is also associated with a reduced incidence of VAP but carries its own problems, stress ulcer prophylaxis remains controversial, and selective digestive decontamination is probably only relevant to certain subgroups of patients. Methods to improve host defense include early nutrition. Immunostimulatory therapies, such as interferon and granulocyte colony stimulating factor, require further research to confirm their place in the prevention or management of VAP.

  3. Aging, Clonality and Rejuvenation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akunuru, Shailaja; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with reduced organ function and increased disease incidence. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) aging driven by both cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is linked to impaired HSC self-renewal and regeneration, aging-associated immune remodeling, and increased leukemia incidence. Compromised DNA damage responses and increased production of reactive oxygen species have been previously causatively attributed to HSC aging. However, recent paradigm-shifting concepts such as global epigenetic and cytoskeletal polarity shifts, cellular senescence, as well as clonal selection of HSCs upon aging provide new insights into HSC aging mechanisms. Rejuvenating agents that can reprogram the epigenetic status of aged HSCs or senolytic drugs that selectively deplete senescent cells provide promising translational avenues for attenuating hematopoietic aging and potentially, alleviating aging-associated immune remodeling and myeloid malignancies. PMID:27380967

  4. Nerve growth factor promotes human hemopoietic colony growth and differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, H.; Coughlin, M.D.; Bienenstock, J.; Denburg, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotropic polypeptide necessary for the survival and growth of some central neurons, as well as sensory afferent and sympathetic neurons. Much is now known of the structural and functional characteristics of NGF, whose gene has recently been clones. Since it is synthesized in largest amounts by the male mouse submandibular gland, its role exclusively in nerve growth is questionable. These experiments indicate that NGF causes a significant stimulation of granulocyte colonies grown from human peripheral blood in standard hemopoietic methylcellulose assays. Further, NGF appears to act in a relatively selective fashion to induce the differentiation of eosinophils and basophils/mast cells. Depletion experiments show that the NGF effect may be T-cell dependent and that NGF augments the colony-stimulating effect of supernatants from the leukemic T-cell (Mo) line. The hemopoietic activity of NGF is blocked by 125 I-polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to NGF. The authors conclude that NGF may indirectly act as a local growth factor in tissues other than those of the nervous system by causing T cells to synthesize or secrete molecules with colony-stimulating activity. In view of the synthesis of NGF in tissue injury, the involvement of basophils/mast cells and eosinophils in allergic and other inflammatory processes, and the association of mast cells with fibrosis and tissue repair, they postulate that NGF plays an important biological role in a variety of repair processes

  5. PARASITIC INFECTIONS IN HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Jarque

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However, they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients.

  6. SBR-Blood: systems biology repository for hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Jens; Heuston, Elisabeth F; Mishra, Tejaswini; Keller, Cheryl A; Hardison, Ross C; Bodine, David M

    2016-01-04

    Extensive research into hematopoiesis (the development of blood cells) over several decades has generated large sets of expression and epigenetic profiles in multiple human and mouse blood cell types. However, there is no single location to analyze how gene regulatory processes lead to different mature blood cells. We have developed a new database framework called hematopoietic Systems Biology Repository (SBR-Blood), available online at http://sbrblood.nhgri.nih.gov, which allows user-initiated analyses for cell type correlations or gene-specific behavior during differentiation using publicly available datasets for array- and sequencing-based platforms from mouse hematopoietic cells. SBR-Blood organizes information by both cell identity and by hematopoietic lineage. The validity and usability of SBR-Blood has been established through the reproduction of workflows relevant to expression data, DNA methylation, histone modifications and transcription factor occupancy profiles. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. Mitochondrial metabolism in hematopoietic stem cells requires functional FOXO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Liang, Raymond; Bigarella, Carolina L; Kocabas, Fatih; Xie, Jingjing; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Chipuk, Jerry; Sadek, Hesham; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are primarily dormant but have the potential to become highly active on demand to reconstitute blood. This requires a swift metabolic switch from glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Maintenance of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of mitochondrial metabolism, is also necessary for sustaining HSC dormancy. Little is known about mechanisms that integrate energy metabolism with hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis. Here, we identify the transcription factor FOXO3 as a new regulator of metabolic adaptation of HSC. ROS are elevated in Foxo3−/− HSC that are defective in their activity. We show that Foxo3−/− HSC are impaired in mitochondrial metabolism independent of ROS levels. These defects are associated with altered expression of mitochondrial/metabolic genes in Foxo3−/− hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We further show that defects of Foxo3−/− HSC long-term repopulation activity are independent of ROS or mTOR signaling. Our results point to FOXO3 as a potential node that couples mitochondrial metabolism with HSC homeostasis. These findings have critical implications for mechanisms that promote malignant transformation and aging of blood stem and progenitor cells. PMID:26209246

  8. Generation of axolotl hematopoietic chimeras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lopez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Wound repair is an extremely complex process that requires precise coordination between various cell types including immune cells.  Unfortunately, in mammals this usually results in scar formation instead of restoration of the original fully functional tissue, otherwise known as regeneration.  Various animal models like frogs and salamanders are currently being studied to determine the intracellular and intercellular pathways, controlled by gene expression, that elicit cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration of cells during regenerative healing.  Now, the necessary genetic tools to map regenerative pathways are becoming available for the axolotl salamander, thus allowing comparative studies between scarring and regeneration.  Here, we describe in detail three methods to produce axolotl hematopoietic cell-tagged chimeras for the study of hematopoiesis and regeneration.

  9. Evaluation of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization Rates with Early Plerixafor Administration for Adult Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Jessica T; Shaw, J Ryan; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Horwitz, Mitchell E; Engemann, Ashley M

    2017-08-01

    The addition of plerixafor to high-dose colony-stimulating growth factor has been shown to improve stem cell mobilization rates in autologous transplant patients with multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. This study evaluates the change in administration time of plerixafor to determine if cell mobilization rates are similar between the US Food and Drug Administration-approved administration time of 11 hours before apheresis and an earlier administration time of 16 hours before apheresis. Medical records of patients age ≥ 18 years undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation requiring the use of plerixafor after at least 4 days of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy to complete stem cell mobilization from January 1, 2010 through September 30, 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The primary outcome was CD34 + cell mobilization success rates when plerixafor was administered 11 ± 2 hours (standard administration group) compared with 16 ± 2 hours before cell apheresis (early administration group), as defined as collection of  ≥2 × 10 6 CD34 + cells/kg. Secondary outcomes included the number of plerixafor therapy days required to collect a total of ≥2 × 10 6 CD34 + cells/kg, the number of apheresis cycles required to achieve ≥2 × 10 6 CD34 + cells/kg, the median CD34 + cells/kg collected in each apheresis session, and the rates of reported adverse events that occurred in the standard administration time group compared with the early administration time group. Of the 197 patients included, 114 patients received plerixafor 11 ± 2 hours before apheresis and 83 patients received plerixafor 16 hours ± 2 hours before apheresis. Ninety-four percent of patients in the early administration group achieved successful stem cell mobilization compared with 81.6% in the standard administration group (P = .0111). The median number of plerixafor days to reach the collection goal of  ≥2 × 10 6 CD34 + cells/kg was 1 day for

  10. AF10 plays a key role in the survival of uncommitted hematopoietic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Chamorro-Garcia

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis is a complex process regulated by both cell intrinsic and cell extrinsic factors. Alterations in the expression of critical genes during hematopoiesis can modify the balance between stem cell differentiation and proliferation, and may ultimately give rise to leukemia and other diseases. AF10 is a transcription factor that has been implicated in the development of leukemia following chromosomal rearrangements between the AF10 gene and one of at least two other genes, MLL and CALM. The link between AF10 and leukemia, together with the known interactions between AF10 and hematopoietic regulators, suggests that AF10 may be important in hematopoiesis and in leukemic transformation. Here we show that AF10 is important for proper hematopoietic differentiation. The induction of hematopoietic differentiation in both human hematopoietic cell lines and murine total bone marrow cells triggers a decrease of AF10 mRNA and protein levels, particularly in stem cells and multipotent progenitors. Gain- and loss-of-function studies demonstrate that over- or under-expression of AF10 leads to apoptotic cell death in stem cells and multipotent progenitors. We conclude that AF10 plays a key role in the maintenance of multipotent hematopoietic cells.

  11. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile eCoste

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs. Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-to-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system.

  12. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, Cécile; Neirinckx, Virginie; Gothot, André; Wislet, Sabine; Rogister, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs). Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system.

  13. Trasplante de células progenitoras derivadas de la médula ósea y factor de crecimiento granulocítico en cardiopatía isquémica aguda y crónica Transplant of stem cells derived from bone marrow and granulocytic growth factor in acute and chronic ischemic myocardiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M Senior

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: estudios recientes demuestran la seguridad y eficacia de la implantación de células progenitoras derivadas de la médula ósea y de la administración del factor estimulante de colonias de granulocito en pacientes con infarto agudo del miocardio con elevación del segmento ST y en cardiopatía isquémica crónica. Se diseñó un estudio prospectivo, abierto de «antes y después» para evaluar la seguridad y eficacia de la terapia celular asociada a la administración del factor de crecimiento. Se reporta la primera experiencia con este tipo de terapia. Metodología: este es el reporte del seguimiento a seis meses, de los pacientes con cardiopatía isquémica aguda y crónica a quienes se les realizó trasplante de células progenitoras derivadas de la médula ósea, movilizadas con factor de crecimiento estimulante de colonias de granulocitos, por vía intracoronaria o epicárdica. Se incluyeron dos grupos de pacientes: 1. Diez pacientes con infarto de pared anterior y 2. Cinco pacientes con cardiopatía isquémica crónica, todos con necrosis extensa demostrada por ausencia de viabilidad miocárdica por medicina nuclear y fracción de eyección menor del 40%. Resultados: se demostró mejoría significativa de la fracción de eyección de 29,44 ± 3,36 a 37,6 ± 5,3 con pIntroduction: recent studies have shown the safety and efficacy of the stem cells derived from bone marrow (BMC implant with concomitant administration of stimulating factor of granulocyte colonies in patients with acute myocardial infarction with ST segment elevation and in chronic ischemic cardiopathy. An open prospective «before and after» design was made to evaluate the safety and efficacy of cell therapy associated to growth factor administration. The first experience with this kind of therapy is reported. Methodology; this is a 6 months follow-up report of patients with acute and chronic ischemic cardiopathy to whom transplant of stem cells derived from

  14. The Role of Cytokines, Chemokines, and Growth Factors in the Pathogenesis of Pityriasis Rosea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Drago

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pityriasis rosea (PR is an exanthematous disease related to human herpesvirus- (HHV- 6/7 reactivation. The network of mediators involved in recruiting the infiltrating inflammatory cells has never been studied. Object. To investigate the levels of serum cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines in PR and healthy controls in order to elucidate the PR pathogenesis. Materials and Methods. Interleukin- (IL- 1, IL-6, IL-17, interferon- (IFN- γ, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, and chemokines, CXCL8 (IL-8 and CXCL10 (IP-10, were measured simultaneously by a multiplex assay in early acute PR patients’ sera and healthy controls. Subsequently, sera from PR patients were analysed at 3 different times (0, 15, and 30 days. Results and discussion. Serum levels of IL-17, IFN-γ, VEGF, and IP-10 resulted to be upregulated in PR patients compared to controls. IL-17 has a key role in host defense against pathogens stimulating the release of proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines. IFN-γ has a direct antiviral activity promoting NK cells and virus specific T cells cytotoxicity. VEGF stimulates vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. IP-10 can induce chemotaxis, apoptosis, cell growth, and angiogenesis. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that these inflammatory mediators may modulate PR pathogenesis in synergistic manner.

  15. Autophagy is required for stem cell mobilization by G-CSF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Vu, Therese; Lineburg, Katie E.

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used clinically to prevent neutropenia after cytotoxic chemotherapy and to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for transplantation. Autophagy, a process of cytoplasmic component recycling, maintains cellular homeostasis and protects...... the cell during periods of metabolic stress or nutrient deprivation. We have observed that G-CSF activates autophagy in neutrophils and HSCs from both mouse and human donors. Furthermore, G-CSF-induced neutrophil and HSC mobilization is impaired in the absence of autophagy. In contrast, autophagy...... is dispensable for direct HSC mobilization in response to the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. Altogether, these data demonstrate an important role for G-CSF in invoking autophagy within hematopoietic and myeloid cells and suggest that this pathway is critical for ensuring cell survival in response to clinically...

  16. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the gene encoding human eosinophil differentiation factor (interleukin 5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, H.D.; Tucker, W.Q.J.; Hort, Y.; Martinson, M.E.; Mayo, G.; Clutterbuck, E.J.; Sanderson, C.J.; Young, I.G.

    1987-01-01

    The human eosinophil differentiation factor (EDF) gene was cloned from a genomic library in λ phage EMBL3A by using a murine EDF cDNA clone as a probe. The DNA sequence of a 3.2-kilobase BamHI fragment spanning the gene was determined. The gene contains three introns. The predicted amino acid sequence of 134 amino acids is identical with that recently reported for human interleukin 5 but shows no significant homology with other known hemopoietic growth regulators. The amino acid sequence shows strong homology (∼ 70% identity) with that of murine EDF. Recombinant human EDF, expressed from the human EDF gene after transfection into monkey COS cells, stimulated the production of eosinophils and eosinophil colonies from normal human bone marrow but had no effect on the production of neutrophils or mononuclear cells (monocytes and lymphoid cells). The apparent specificity of human EDF for the eosinophil lineage in myeloid hemopoiesis contrasts with the properties of human interleukin 3 and granulocyte/macrophage and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors but is directly analogous to the biological properties of murine EDF. Human EDF therefore represents a distinct hemopoietic growth factor that could play a central role in the regulation of eosinophilia

  17. Activation of the canonical Wnt pathway leads to loss of hematopoietic stem cell repopulation and multilineage differentiation block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirstetter, Peggy; Anderson, Kristina; Porse, Bo T

    2006-01-01

    Wnt signaling increases hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and is activated in both myeloid and lymphoid malignancies, indicating involvement in both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. We report here activated canonical Wnt signaling in the hematopoietic system through conditional expression...... of hematopoietic stem cell function was associated with decreased expression of Cdkn1a (encoding the cell cycle inhibitor p21(cdk)), Sfpi1, Hoxb4 and Bmi1 (encoding the transcription factors PU.1, HoxB4 and Bmi-1, respectively) and altered integrin expression in Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+) cells, whereas PU.1...... of a stable form of beta-catenin. This enforced expression led to hematopoietic failure associated with loss of myeloid lineage commitment at the granulocyte-macrophage progenitor stage; blocked erythrocyte differentiation; disruption of lymphoid development; and loss of repopulating stem cell activity. Loss...

  18. Contribution of endothelial progenitors and proangiogenic hematopoietic cells to vascularization of tumor and ischemic tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Hans-Georg; Ramos, Carlos A.; Rafii, Shahin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review During the last several years, a substantial amount of evidence from animal as well as human studies has advanced our knowledge of how bone marrow derived cells contribute to neoangiogenesis. In the light of recent findings, we may have to redefine our thinking of endothelial cells as well as of perivascular mural cells. Recent findings Inflammatory hematopoietic cells, such as macrophages, have been shown to promote neoangiogenesis during tumor growth and wound healing. Dendritic cells, B lymphocytes, monocytes, and other immune cells have also been found to be recruited to neoangiogenic niches and to support neovessel formation. These findings have led to the concept that subsets of hematopoietic cells comprise proangiogenic cells that drive adult revascularization processes. While evidence of the importance of endothelial progenitor cells in adult vasculogenesis increased further, the role of these comobilized hematopoietic cells has been intensely studied in the last few years. Summary Angiogenic factors promote mobilization of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1-positive hematopoietic cells through matrix metalloproteinase-9 mediated release of soluble kit-ligand and recruit these proangiogenic cells to areas of hypoxia, where perivascular mural cells present stromal-derived factor 1 (CXCL-12) as an important retention signal. The same factors are possibly involved in mobilization of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-positive endothelial precursors that may participate in neovessel formation. The complete characterization of mechanisms, mediators and signaling pathways involved in these processes will provide novel targets for both anti and proangiogenic therapeutic strategies. PMID:16567962

  19. Experimental study on relationship between expression of SDF-1 and homing of hematopoietic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Suping; Cai Jianming; Xiang Yingsong; Zhao Fang; Huang Dingde; Gao Jianguo; Yang Rujun

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of chemo-attractant SDF-1 in of homing hematopoietic cells. Methods: A mouse allogeneic bone marrow transplantation model and double staining of immunohistochemistry were used in this study. Relationship between expression of chemo-attractant SDF-1 and of homing hematopoietic cells was observed. Results: In bone marrow, SDF-1 was mainly expressed at sites near endosteum, in microvessel endothelium, osteocytes and around donor cells. Contrast to non-irradiation group, SDF-1 was significantly expressed by osteocytes, and at sites near endosteum in the irradiation group, suggesting that pretreatment with irradiation might enhance secretion of SDF-1 by bone marrow stromal cells and SDF-1 could have a close relation with homing cells. Conclusion: Pretreatment with irradiation might be one of the stimulating factors significantly increasing the level of SDF-1 produced by bone marrow stromal cells and the chemo-attractant SDF-1 could play an important role in homing of hematopoietic cells

  20. Nuclear adaptor Ldb1 regulates a transcriptional program essential for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, LiQi; Jothi, Raja; Cui, Kairong; Lee, Jan Y; Cohen, Tsadok; Gorivodsky, Marat; Tzchori, Itai; Zhao, Yangu; Hayes, Sandra M; Bresnick, Emery H; Zhao, Keji; Westphal, Heiner; Love, Paul E

    2011-02-01

    The nuclear adaptor Ldb1 functions as a core component of multiprotein transcription complexes that regulate differentiation in diverse cell types. In the hematopoietic lineage, Ldb1 forms a complex with the non-DNA-binding adaptor Lmo2 and the transcription factors E2A, Scl and GATA-1 (or GATA-2). Here we demonstrate a critical and continuous requirement for Ldb1 in the maintenance of both fetal and adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Deletion of Ldb1 in hematopoietic progenitors resulted in the downregulation of many transcripts required for HSC maintenance. Genome-wide profiling by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-Seq) identified Ldb1 complex-binding sites at highly conserved regions in the promoters of genes involved in HSC maintenance. Our results identify a central role for Ldb1 in regulating the transcriptional program responsible for the maintenance of HSCs.

  1. Gastrointestinal toxicity, systemic inflammation, and liver biochemistry in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Karina; Pontoppidan, Peter; Uhlving, Hilde Hylland

    2017-01-01

    Liver toxicity is frequently seen in relation to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but pathogenesis and the risk factors are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between liver toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, and levels of immun...

  2. Gastrointestinal toxicity, systemic inflammation, and liver biochemistry in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver toxicity is frequently seen in relation to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but pathogenesis and the risk factors are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between liver toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, and levels of immune-r...

  3. Activated H-Ras regulates hematopoietic cell survival by modulating Survivin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Seiji; Pelus, Louis M.

    2004-01-01

    Survivin expression and Ras activation are regulated by hematopoietic growth factors. We investigated whether activated Ras could circumvent growth factor-regulated Survivin expression and if a Ras/Survivin axis mediates growth factor independent survival and proliferation in hematopoietic cells. Survivin expression is up-regulated by IL-3 in Ba/F3 and CD34 + cells and inhibited by the Ras inhibitor, farnesylthiosalicylic acid. Over-expression of constitutively activated H-Ras (CA-Ras) in Ba/F3 cells blocked down-modulation of Survivin expression, G 0 /G 1 arrest, and apoptosis induced by IL-3 withdrawal, while dominant-negative (DN) H-Ras down-regulated Survivin. Survivin disruption by DN T34A Survivin blocked CA-Ras-induced IL-3-independent cell survival and proliferation; however, it did not affect CA-Ras-mediated enhancement of S-phase, indicating that the anti-apoptotic activity of CA-Ras is Survivin dependent while its S-phase enhancing effect is not. These results indicate that CA-Ras modulates Survivin expression independent of hematopoietic growth factors and that a CA-Ras/Survivin axis regulates survival and proliferation of transformed hematopoietic cells

  4. Periarteriolar Glioblastoma Stem Cell Niches Express Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hira, Vashendriya V. V.; Wormer, Jill R.; Kakar, Hala; Breznik, Barbara; van der Swaan, Britt; Hulsbos, Renske; Tigchelaar, Wikky; Tonar, Zbynek; Khurshed, Mohammed; Molenaar, Remco J.; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2018-01-01

    In glioblastoma, a fraction of malignant cells consists of therapy-resistant glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) residing in protective niches that recapitulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niches in bone marrow. We have previously shown that HSC niche proteins stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α),

  5. Antimicrobial Resistance in Gram-Negative Rods Causing Bacteremia in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Averbuch, Diana; Tridello, Gloria; Hoek, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Background: This intercontinental study aimed to study gram-negative rod (GNR) resistance in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods: GNR bacteremias occurring during 6 months post-HSCT (February 2014-May 2015) were prospectively collected, and analyzed for rates and risk factors...

  6. Effects of humoral factors on amplification of nonrecognizable erythrocytic and granulocytic precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.; Carsten, A.L.; Cohen, R.; Miller, M.E.; Moccia, G.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the effects of humoral factors on amplification of nonrecognizable erythrocytic and granulocytic precursors using the in vivo plasma clot diffusion chamber and the in vitro plasma clot culture methods. Plasma erythropoietin levels changes in the reticulocyte concentration and hematocrits of irradiated and non-irradiated Long-Evans rats exposed to hypoxia were also determined. While erythropoietin plasma levels appeared to effect BFU-E and CFU-E growth, results suggest erythropoietin may not be the sole regulator of red cell production and that inhibitors or chalone-like mechanisms may be involved. Measurements made on granulocyte precursors treated with CSF containing L-cell conditioned medium revealed granulocytic colonies and burst-like formations, similar to those seen for erythrocytic growth. There is strong evidence suggesting that CSF is a regulator of granulopoiesis; however, it is not the sole regulator and it appears that inhibitors may play an in vivo role. Growth of colonies with cell numbers not a power of 2 implies either asymmetric nitosis due to loss of genetic information required for continuing division, or differences in concentration of, or ability to recognize inhibitory factors. These possibilities are examined on the basis of results using in vivo and in vitro culture techniques

  7. In Utero Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hemoglobinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tippi C. Mackenzie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCTx is a promising strategy to circumvent the challenges of postnatal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation. The goal of IUHCTx is to introduce donor cells into a naïve host prior to immune maturation, thereby inducing donor–specific tolerance. Thus, this technique has the potential of avoiding host myeloablative conditioning with cytotoxic agents. Over the past two decades, several attempts at IUHCTx have been made to cure numerous underlying congenital anomalies with limited success. In this review, we will briefly review the history of IUHCTx and give a perspective on alpha thalassemia major, one target disease for its clinical application.

  8. Reconstruction of hematopoietic inductive microenvironment after transplantation of VCAM-1-modified human umbilical cord blood stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Liu

    Full Text Available The hematopoietic inductive microenvironment (HIM is where hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells grow and develop. Hematopoietic stromal cells were the key components of the HIM. In our previous study, we had successfully cultured and isolated human cord blood-derived stromal cells (HUCBSCs and demonstrated that they could secret hemopoietic growth factors such as GM-CSF, TPO, and SCF. However, it is still controversial whether HUCBSCs can be used for reconstruction of HIM. In this study, we first established a co-culture system of HUCBSCs and cord blood CD34(+ cells and then determined that using HUCBSCs as the adherent layer had significantly more newly formed colonies of each hematopoietic lineage than the control group, indicating that HUCBSCs had the ability to promote the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells/progenitor cells. Furthermore, the number of colonies was significantly higher in vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1-modified HUCBSCs, suggesting that the ability of HUCBSCs in promoting the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells/progenitor cells was further enhanced after having been modified with VCAM-1. Next, HUCBSCs were infused into a radiation-damaged animal model, in which the recovery of hematopoiesis was observed. The results demonstrate that the transplanted HUCBSCs were "homed in" to bone marrow and played roles in promoting the recovery of irradiation-induced hematopoietic damage and repairing HIM. Compared with the control group, the HUCBSC group had significantly superior effectiveness in terms of the recovery time for hemogram and myelogram, CFU-F, CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-Meg. Such differences were even more significant in VCAM-1-modified HUCBSCs group. We suggest that HUCBSCs are able to restore the functions of HIM and promote the recovery of radiation-induced hematopoietic damage. VCAM-1 plays an important role in supporting the repair of HIM damage.

  9. Generation of hematopoietic lineage cells from embryonic like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Khamisipour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epigenetic reprogramming of somatic cells into embryonic stem cells has attracted much attention, because of the potential for stem cell transplantation and compatibility with recipient. However, the therapeutic application of either nuclear transfer or nuclear fusion of somatic cell has been hindered by technical complications as well as ethical objections. Recently, a new method is reported whereby ectopic expression of embryonic specific transcription factors was shown to induce fibroblasts to become embryonic like SCs (induced pluripotent stem cells. A major limitation of this method is the use of potentially harmful genome integrating viruses such as reto- or lentivirus. The main aim of this investigation was generation of human hematopoietic stem cells from induced fibroblasts by safe adenovectors carrying embryonically active genes. Material and Methods: Isolated fibroblasts from foreskin were expanded and recombinant adenoviruses carrying human Sox2, Oct4, Klf4, cMyc genes were added to culture. After formation of embryonic like colonies and cell expansion, they were transferred to embryonic media without bFGF, and embryoid bodies were cultured on stromal and non-stromal differentiation media for 14 days. Results: Expression of CD34 gene and antigenic markers, CD34, CD38 & CD133 in stromal culture showed significant difference with non-differentiation and non-stromal media. Conclusion: These findings show high hematopoietic differentiation rate of Adeno-iPS cells in stromal culture and no need to use growth factors. While, there was no difference between non-differentiation and non-stromal media.

  10. Hhex Regulates Hematopoietic Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Stress Hematopoiesis via Repression of Cdkn2a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jacob T; Shields, Benjamin J; Shi, Wei; Di Rago, Ladina; Metcalf, Donald; Nicola, Nicos A; McCormack, Matthew P

    2017-08-01

    The hematopoietically expressed homeobox transcription factor (Hhex) is important for the maturation of definitive hematopoietic progenitors and B-cells during development. We have recently shown that in adult hematopoiesis, Hhex is dispensable for maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and myeloid lineages but essential for the commitment of common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs) to lymphoid lineages. Here, we show that during serial bone marrow transplantation, Hhex-deleted HSCs are progressively lost, revealing an intrinsic defect in HSC self-renewal. Moreover, Hhex-deleted mice show markedly impaired hematopoietic recovery following myeloablation, due to a failure of progenitor expansion. In vitro, Hhex-null blast colonies were incapable of replating, implying a specific requirement for Hhex in immature progenitors. Transcriptome analysis of Hhex-null Lin - Sca + Kit + cells showed that Hhex deletion leads to derepression of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and PRC1 target genes, including the Cdkn2a locus encoding the tumor suppressors p16 Ink 4 a and p19 Arf . Indeed, loss of Cdkn2a restored the capacity of Hhex-null blast colonies to generate myeloid progenitors in vitro, as well as hematopoietic reconstitution following myeloablation in vivo. Thus, HSCs require Hhex to promote PRC2-mediated Cdkn2a repression to enable continued self-renewal and response to hematopoietic stress. Stem Cells 2017;35:1948-1957. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  11. HIF1α is a regulator of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cell development in hypoxic sites of the mouse embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Imanirad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia affects many physiologic processes during early stages of mammalian ontogeny, particularly placental and vascular development. In the adult, the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment plays a role in regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function. HSCs are generated from the major vasculature of the embryo, but whether the hypoxic response affects the generation of these HSCs is as yet unknown. Here we examined whether Hypoxia Inducible Factor1-alpha (HIF1α, a key modulator of the response to hypoxia, is essential for HSC development. We found hypoxic cells in embryonic tissues that generate and expand hematopoietic cells (aorta, placenta and fetal liver, and specifically aortic endothelial and hematopoietic cluster cells. A Cre/loxP conditional knockout (cKO approach was taken to delete HIF1α in Vascular Endothelial-Cadherin expressing endothelial cells, the precursors to definitive hematopoietic cells. Functional assays show that HSC and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs are significantly reduced in cKO aorta and placenta. Moreover, decreases in phenotypic aortic hematopoietic cluster cells in cKO embryos indicate that HIF1α is necessary for generation and/or expansion of HPCs and HSCs. cKO adult BM HSCs are also affected under transplantation conditions. Thus, HIF1α is a regulator of HSC generation and function beginning at the earliest embryonic stages.

  12. Cellular memory and, hematopoietic stem cell aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, Leonie M.; de Haan, Gerald

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) balance self-renewal and differentiation in order to sustain lifelong blood production and simultaneously maintain the HSC pool. However, there is clear evidence that HSCs are subject to quantitative and qualitative exhaustion. In this review, we briefly discuss

  13. Comparison of chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-02-19

    Feb 19, 2013 ... scores before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six patients undergoing HSCT were included in the study. A pre-HSCT dental treatment protocol was implemented that consisted of restoration of all active carious lesions, treatment of ...

  14. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogojan, C; Frederiksen, J L

    2009-01-01

    Intensive immunosuppresion followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been suggested as potential treatment in severe forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Since 1995 ca. 400 patients have been treated with HSCT. Stabilization or improvement occurred in almost 70% of cases at least...

  15. Hematopoiesis and hematopoietic organs in arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorian, Melina; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-03-01

    Hemocytes (blood cells) are motile cells that move throughout the extracellular space and that exist in all clades of the animal kingdom. Hemocytes play an important role in shaping the extracellular environment and in the immune response. Developmentally, hemocytes are closely related to the epithelial cells lining the vascular system (endothelia) and the body cavity (mesothelia). In vertebrates and insects, common progenitors, called hemangioblasts, give rise to the endothelia and blood cells. In the adult animal, many differentiated hemocytes seem to retain the ability to proliferate; however, in most cases investigated closely, the bulk of hemocyte proliferation takes place in specialized hematopoietic organs. Hematopoietic organs provide an environment where undifferentiated blood stem cells are able to self-renew, and at the same time generate offspring that differentiate into different blood cell types. Hematopoiesis in vertebrates, taking place in the bone marrow, has been subject to intensive research by immunologists and stem cell biologists. Much less is known about blood cell formation in invertebrate animals. In this review, we will survey structural and functional properties of invertebrate hematopoietic organs, with a main focus on insects and other arthropod taxa. We will then discuss similarities, at the molecular and structural level, that are apparent when comparing the development of blood cells in hematopoietic organs of vertebrates and arthropods. Our comparative review is intended to elucidate aspects of the biology of blood stem cells that are more easily missed when focusing on one or a few model species.

  16. Molecular regulation of human hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Galen, P.L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Peter van Galen focuses on understanding the determinants that maintain the stem cell state. Using human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as a model, processes that govern self-renewal and tissue regeneration were investigated. Specifically, a role for microRNAs in balancing the human HSC

  17. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long-te...

  18. IP3 3-kinase B controls hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and prevents lethal hematopoietic failure in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegemund, Sabine; Rigaud, Stephanie; Conche, Claire; Broaten, Blake; Schaffer, Lana; Westernberg, Luise; Head, Steven Robert

    2015-01-01

    Tight regulation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) homeostasis ensures lifelong hematopoiesis and prevents blood cancers. The mechanisms balancing HSC quiescence with expansion and differentiation into hematopoietic progenitors are incompletely understood. Here, we identify Inositol-trisphosphate 3-kinase B (Itpkb) as an essential regulator of HSC homeostasis. Young Itpkb−/− mice accumulated phenotypic HSC, which were less quiescent and proliferated more than wild-type (WT) controls. Itpkb−/− HSC downregulated quiescence and stemness associated, but upregulated activation, oxidative metabolism, protein synthesis, and lineage associated messenger RNAs. Although they had normal-to-elevated viability and no significant homing defects, Itpkb−/− HSC had a severely reduced competitive long-term repopulating potential. Aging Itpkb−/− mice lost hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and died with severe anemia. WT HSC normally repopulated Itpkb−/− hosts, indicating an HSC-intrinsic Itpkb requirement. Itpkb−/− HSC showed reduced colony-forming activity and increased stem-cell-factor activation of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) effectors Akt/mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). This was reversed by treatment with the Itpkb product and PI3K/Akt antagonist IP4. Transcriptome changes and biochemistry support mTOR hyperactivity in Itpkb−/− HSC. Treatment with the mTOR-inhibitor rapamycin reversed the excessive mTOR signaling and hyperproliferation of Itpkb−/− HSC without rescuing colony forming activity. Thus, we propose that Itpkb ensures HSC quiescence and function through limiting cytokine-induced PI3K/mTOR signaling and other mechanisms. PMID:25788703

  19. Cord blood hematopoietic cells from preterm infants display altered DNA methylation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goede, Olivia M; Lavoie, Pascal M; Robinson, Wendy P

    2017-01-01

    Premature infants are highly vulnerable to infection. This is partly attributable to the preterm immune system, which differs from that of the term neonate in cell composition and function. Multiple studies have found differential DNA methylation (DNAm) between preterm and term infants' cord blood; however, interpretation of these studies is limited by the confounding factor of blood cell composition. This study evaluates the epigenetic impact of preterm birth in isolated hematopoietic cell populations, reducing the concern of cell composition differences. Genome-wide DNAm was measured using the Illumina 450K array in T cells, monocytes, granulocytes, and nucleated red blood cells (nRBCs) isolated from cord blood of 5 term and 5 preterm (blood cells (nRBCs) showed the most extensive changes in DNAm, with 9258 differentially methylated (DM) sites (FDR  0.10) discovered between preterm and term infants compared to the blood cell populations. The direction of DNAm change with gestational age at these prematurity-DM sites followed known patterns of hematopoietic differentiation, suggesting that term hematopoietic cell populations are more epigenetically mature than their preterm counterparts. Consistent shifts in DNAm between preterm and term cells were observed at 25 CpG sites, with many of these sites located in genes involved in growth and proliferation, hematopoietic lineage commitment, and the cytoskeleton. DNAm in preterm and term hematopoietic cells conformed to previously identified DNAm signatures of fetal liver and bone marrow, respectively. This study presents the first genome-wide mapping of epigenetic differences in hematopoietic cells across the late gestational period. DNAm differences in hematopoietic cells between term and <31 weeks were consistent with the hematopoietic origin of these cells during ontogeny, reflecting an important role of DNAm in their regulation. Due to the limited sample size and the high coincidence of prematurity and

  20. Dissecting the hematopoietic microenvironment. V: Limitations of repair following damage to the hematopoietic support stroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, N.S.

    1982-01-01

    Damage and repair of the hematopoietic microenvironment of the spleen was studied using X-irradiation, anoxic necrosis induced by splenic ligation, or a combination of the two, as the destructive agents. Spleen colony number, size and type, /sup 59/Fe uptake, and microscopic study of splenic structure were used as means of assessment. The most severe or least repaired damage was induced by high dose irradiation (4000 r), by 1000 r followed immediately by splenic ligation, and by two successive splenic ligations separated by a 30 day recovery period. It was seen that reduction of CFUlt. slashsub slt. slash lodgment, as measured by f factor, played a very major role in the lesser number of spleen colonies formed after either kind of damage. Following the several treatments, the numbers of spleen colonies formed, their size and their typing as erythrocytic or granulocytic varied independently of each other, suggesting that these functions of the microenvironment, and the cell types responsible for them, are independent of each other. The exhaustion of regenerative capacity displayed by repeatedly ligated spleens suggested a maximal limit for stromal cell replications commensurate with Hayflick's hypothesis.

  1. Oral changes in individuals undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Haddad Barrach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation receive high doses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which cause severe immunosuppression.OBJECTIVE: To report an oral disease management protocol before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.METHODS: A prospective study was carried out with 65 patients aged > 18 years, with hematological diseases, who were allocated into two groups: A (allogeneic transplant, 34 patients; B (autologous transplant, 31 patients. A total of three dental status assessments were performed: in the pre-transplantation period (moment 1, one week after stem cell infusion (moment 2, and 100 days after transplantation (moment 3. In each moment, oral changes were assigned scores and classified as mild, moderate, and severe risks.RESULTS: The most frequent pathological conditions were gingivitis, pericoronitis in the third molar region, and ulcers at the third moment assessments. However, at moments 2 and 3, the most common disease was mucositis associated with toxicity from the drugs used in the immunosuppression.CONCLUSION: Mucositis accounted for the increased score and potential risk of clinical complications. Gingivitis, ulcers, and pericoronitis were other changes identified as potential risk factors for clinical complications.

  2. Desensitization for solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary, Andrea A; Leffell, Mary S

    2014-03-01

    Desensitization protocols are being used worldwide to enable kidney transplantation across immunologic barriers, i.e. antibody to donor HLA or ABO antigens, which were once thought to be absolute contraindications to transplantation. Desensitization protocols are also being applied to permit transplantation of HLA mismatched hematopoietic stem cells to patients with antibody to donor HLA, to enhance the opportunity for transplantation of non-renal organs, and to treat antibody-mediated rejection. Although desensitization for organ transplantation carries an increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection, ultimately these transplants extend and enhance the quality of life for solid organ recipients, and desensitization that permits transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells is life saving for patients with limited donor options. Complex patient factors and variability in treatment protocols have made it difficult to identify, precisely, the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of donor-specific antibodies. The mechanisms underlying desensitization may differ among the various protocols in use, although there are likely to be some common features. However, it is likely that desensitization achieves a sort of immune detente by first reducing the immunologic barrier and then by creating an environment in which an autoregulatory process restricts the immune response to the allograft. © 2014 The Authors. Immunological Reviews Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Response to rituximab-based therapy and risk factor analysis in Epstein Barr Virus-related lymphoproliferative disorder after hematopoietic stem cell transplant in children and adults: a study from the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styczynski, Jan; Gil, Lidia; Tridello, Gloria; Ljungman, Per; Donnelly, J Peter; van der Velden, Walter; Omar, Hamdy; Martino, Rodrigo; Halkes, Constantijn; Faraci, Maura; Theunissen, Koen; Kalwak, Krzysztof; Hubacek, Petr; Sica, Simona; Nozzoli, Chiara; Fagioli, Franca; Matthes, Susanne; Diaz, Miguel A; Migliavacca, Maddalena; Balduzzi, Adriana; Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Camara, Rafael de la; van Biezen, Anja; Hoek, Jennifer; Iacobelli, Simona; Einsele, Hermann; Cesaro, Simone

    2013-09-01

     The objective of this analysis was to investigate prognostic factors that influence the outcome of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after a rituximab-based treatment in the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) setting.  A total of 4466 allogeneic HSCTs performed between 1999 and 2011 in 19 European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation centers were retrospectively analyzed for PTLD, either biopsy-proven or probable disease.  One hundred forty-four cases of PTLD were identified, indicating an overall EBV-related PTLD frequency of 3.22%, ranging from 1.16% for matched-family donor, 2.86% for mismatched family donor, 3.97% in matched unrelated donors, and 11.24% in mismatched unrelated donor recipients. In total, 69.4% patients survived PTLD. Multivariable analysis showed that a poor response of PTLD to rituximab was associated with an age ≥30 years, involvement of extralymphoid tissue, acute GVHD, and a lack of reduction of immunosuppression upon PTLD diagnosis. In the prognostic model, the PTLD mortality increased with the increasing number of factors: 0-1, 2, or 3 factors being associated with mortality of 7%, 37%, and 72%, respectively (P disease, and acute graft-vs-host disease predicted poor outcome.

  4. Bcl11a Deficiency Leads to Hematopoietic Stem Cell Defects with an Aging-like Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidinh Luc

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available B cell CLL/lymphoma 11A (BCL11A is a transcription factor and regulator of hemoglobin switching that has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for sickle cell disease and thalassemia. In the hematopoietic system, BCL11A is required for B lymphopoiesis, yet its role in other hematopoietic cells, especially hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs remains elusive. The extensive expression of BCL11A in hematopoiesis implicates context-dependent roles, highlighting the importance of fully characterizing its function as part of ongoing efforts for stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Here, we demonstrate that BCL11A is indispensable for normal HSC function. Bcl11a deficiency results in HSC defects, typically observed in the aging hematopoietic system. We find that downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (Cdk6, and the ensuing cell-cycle delay, correlate with HSC dysfunction. Our studies define a mechanism for BCL11A in regulation of HSC function and have important implications for the design of therapeutic approaches to targeting BCL11A.

  5. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with primary immunodeficiencies: Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Juliana Folloni; Kerbauy, Fabio Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Andreza Alice Feitosa; Kutner, Jose Mauro; Camargo, Luis Fernando Aranha; Stape, Adalberto; Troster, Eduardo Juan; Zamperlini-Netto, Gabriele; Azambuja, Alessandra Milani Prandini de; Carvalho, Bruna; Dorna, Mayra de Barros; Vilela, Marluce Dos Santos; Jacob, Cristina Miuki Abe; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Cunha, Jose Marcos; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda Maria; Hamerschlak, Nelson

    2011-06-01

    To report the experience of a tertiary care hospital with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with primary immunodeficiencies. Seven pediatric patients with primary immunodeficiencies (severe combined immunodeficiency: n = 2; combined immunodeficiency: n = 1; chronic granulomatous disease: n = 1; hyper-IgM syndrome: n = 2; and IPEX syndrome: n = 1) who underwent eight hematopoietic stem cell transplants in a single center, from 2007 to 2010, were studied. Two patients received transplants from HLA-identical siblings; the other six transplants were done with unrelated donors (bone marrow: n = 1; cord blood: n = 5). All patients had pre-existing infections before hematopoietic stem cell transplants. One patient received only anti-thymocyte globulin prior to transplant, three transplants were done with reduced intensity conditioning regimens and four transplants were done after myeloablative therapy. Two patients were not evaluated for engraftment due to early death. Three patients engrafted, two had primary graft failure and one received a second transplant with posterior engraftment. Two patients died of regimen related toxicity (hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome); one patient died of progressive respiratory failure due to Parainfluenza infection present prior to transplant. Four patients are alive and well from 60 days to 14 months after transplant. Patients' status prior to transplant is the most important risk factor on the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplants in the treatment of these diseases. Early diagnosis and the possibility of a faster referral of these patients for treatment in reference centers may substantially improve their survival and quality of life.

  6. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with primary immunodeficiencies: Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Folloni Fernandes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the experience of a tertiary care hospital withallogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children withprimary immunodeficiencies. Methods: Seven patients with primaryimmunodeficiencies (severe combined immunodeficiency: n = 2;combined immunodeficiency: n = 1; chronic granulomatous disease:n = 1; hyper-IgM syndrome: n = 2; and IPEX syndrome: n = 1who underwent eight hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCTin a single center, from 2007 to 2010, were studied. Results: Twopatients received transplants from HLA-identical siblings; the othersix transplants were done with unrelated donors (bone marrow: n= 1; cord blood: n = 5. All patients had pre-existing infectionsbefore hematopoietic stem cell transplants. One patient receivedonly anti-thymocyte globulin prior to transplant, three transplantswere done with reduced intensity conditioning regimens and fourtransplants were done after myeloablative therapy. Two patientswere not evaluable for engraftment due to early death. Three patientsengrafted, two had primary graft failure and one received a secondtransplant with posterior engraftment. Two patients died of regimenrelated toxicity (hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome; one patient died of progressive respiratory failure due to Parainfluenza infection diagnosed prior to transplant. Four patients are alive and well from 60 days to 14 months after transplant. Conclusion: Patients’ status prior to transplant is the most important risk factor on the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplants in the treatment of these diseases. Early diagnosis and the possibility of a faster referral of these patients for treatment in reference centers may substantially improve their survival and quality of life.

  7. Endothelial jagged-2 sustains hematopoietic stem and progenitor reconstitution after myelosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peipei; Poulos, Michael G; Palikuqi, Brisa; Badwe, Chaitanya R; Lis, Raphael; Kunar, Balvir; Ding, Bi-Sen; Rabbany, Sina Y; Shido, Koji; Butler, Jason M; Rafii, Shahin

    2017-12-01

    Angiocrine factors, such as Notch ligands, supplied by the specialized endothelial cells (ECs) within the bone marrow and splenic vascular niche play an essential role in modulating the physiology of adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). However, the relative contribution of various Notch ligands, specifically jagged-2, to the homeostasis of HSPCs is unknown. Here, we show that under steady state, jagged-2 is differentially expressed in tissue-specific vascular beds, but its expression is induced in hematopoietic vascular niches after myelosuppressive injury. We used mice with EC-specific deletion of the gene encoding jagged-2 (Jag2) to demonstrate that while EC-derived jagged-2 was dispensable for maintaining the capacity of HSPCs to repopulate under steady-state conditions, by activating Notch2 it did contribute to the recovery of HSPCs in response to myelosuppressive conditions. Engraftment and/or expansion of HSPCs was dependent on the expression of endothelial-derived jagged-2 following myeloablation. Additionally, jagged-2 expressed in bone marrow ECs regulated HSPC cell cycle and quiescence during regeneration. Endothelial-deployed jagged-2 triggered Notch2/Hey1, while tempering Notch2/Hes1 signaling in HSPCs. Collectively, these data demonstrate that EC-derived jagged-2 activates Notch2 signaling in HSPCs to promote hematopoietic recovery and has potential as a therapeutic target to accelerate balanced hematopoietic reconstitution after myelosuppression.

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell origin of connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Makio; Larue, Amanda C; Watson, Patricia M; Watson, Dennis K

    2010-07-01

    Connective tissue consists of "connective tissue proper," which is further divided into loose and dense (fibrous) connective tissues and "specialized connective tissues." Specialized connective tissues consist of blood, adipose tissue, cartilage, and bone. In both loose and dense connective tissues, the principal cellular element is fibroblasts. It has been generally believed that all cellular elements of connective tissue, including fibroblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, and bone cells, are generated solely by mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, a number of studies, including those from our laboratory based on transplantation of single hematopoietic stem cells, strongly suggested a hematopoietic stem cell origin of these adult mesenchymal tissues. This review summarizes the experimental evidence for this new paradigm and discusses its translational implications. Copyright 2010 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. All rights reserved.

  9. Recent advances in hematopoietic stem cell biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A; Nolta, Jan A

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Exciting advances have been made in the field of hematopoietic stem cell biology during the past year. This review summarizes recent progress in the identification, culture, and in vivo tracking of hematopoietic stem cells. RECENT FINDINGS: The roles of Wnt and Notch proteins...... in regulating stem cell renewal in the microenvironment, and how these molecules can be exploited in ex vivo stem cell culture, are reviewed. The importance of identification of stem cells using functional as well as phenotypic markers is discussed. The novel field of nanotechnology is then discussed...... in the context of stem cell tracking in vivo. This review concludes with a section on the unexpected potential of bone marrow-derived stem cells to contribute to the repair of damaged tissues. The contribution of cell fusion to explain the latter phenomenon is discussed. SUMMARY: Because of exciting discoveries...

  10. Proliferative capacity of murine hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellman, S.; Botnick, L.E.; Hannon, E.C.; Vigneulle, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a decrease in self-renewal capacity with serial transfer of murine hematopoietic stem cells. Production of differentiated cell progeny is maintained longer than stem cell self-renewal. In normal animals the capacity for self-renewal is not decreased with increasing donor age. The stem cell compartment in normal animals, both young and old, appears to be proliferatively quiescent. After apparent recovery from the alkylating agent busulfan, the probability of stem cell self-renewal is decreased, there is a permanent defect in the capacity of the bone marrow for serial transplantation, and the stem cells are proliferatively active. These findings support a model of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment as a continuum of cells with decreasing capacities for self-renewal, increasing likelihood for differentiation, and increasing proliferative activity. Cells progress in the continuum in one direction and such progression is not reversible

  11. Proteomic cornerstones of hematopoietic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimmeck, Daniel; Hansson, Jenny; Raffel, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative tissues such as the skin epidermis, the intestinal mucosa or the hematopoietic system are organized in a hierarchical manner with stem cells building the top of this hierarchy. Somatic stem cells harbor the highest self-renewal activity and generate a series of multipotent progenitors...... which differentiate into lineage committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. In this report, we applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare the full proteomes of ex vivo isolated and FACS-sorted populations highly enriched for either multipotent hematopoietic stem....../progenitor cells (HSPCs, Lin(neg)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)) or myeloid committed precursors (Lin(neg)Sca-1(-)c-Kit(+)). By employing stable isotope dimethyl labeling and high-resolution mass spectrometry, more than 5,000 proteins were quantified. From biological triplicate experiments subjected to rigorous statistical...

  12. Hematopoietic cell phosphatase is recruited to CD22 following B cell antigen receptor ligation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankester, A. C.; van Schijndel, G. M.; van Lier, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell phosphatase is a nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase that is preferentially expressed in hematopoietic cell lineages. Motheaten mice, which are devoid of (functional) hematopoietic cell phosphatase, have severe disturbances in the regulation of B cell activation and

  13. Two Hemocyte Lineages Exist in Silkworm Larval Hematopoietic Organ

    OpenAIRE

    Nakahara, Yuichi; Kanamori, Yasushi; Kiuchi, Makoto; Kamimura, Manabu

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insects have multiple hemocyte morphotypes with different functions as do vertebrates, however, their hematopoietic lineages are largely unexplored with the exception of Drosophila melanogaster. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To study the hematopoietic lineage of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, we investigated in vivo and in vitro differentiation of hemocyte precursors in the hematopoietic organ (HPO) into the four mature hemocyte subsets, namely, plasmatocytes, granulocytes, oenocyto...

  14. Prostaglandin E2 regulates hematopoietic stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yingying; Zhou Daohong; Meng Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a bioactive lipid molecule produced by cyclooxygenase (COX), which plays an important role on hematopoiesis. While it can block differentiation of myeloid progenitors but enhance proliferation of erythroid progenitors. Recent research found that PGE2 have the effects on hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function and these effects were independent from effects on progenitor cells. Exposure of HSC cells to PGE2 in vitro can increase homing efficiency of HSC to the murine bone marrow compartment and decrease HSC apoptosis, meanwhile increase long-term stem cell engraftment. In-vivo treatment with PGE2 expands short-term HSC and engraftment in murine bone marrow but not long-term HSC.In addition, PGE2 increases HSC survival after radiation injury and enhance hematopoietic recovery, resulting maintains hematopoietic homeostasis. PGE2 regulates HSC homeostasis by reactive oxygen species and Wnt pathway. Clinical beneficial of 16, 16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E2 treatment to enhance engraftment of umbilical cord blood suggest important improvements to therapeutic strategies. (authors)

  15. bantam miRNA is important for Drosophila blood cell homeostasis and a regulator of proliferation in the hematopoietic progenitor niche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Victoria; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Tokusumi, Yumiko; Schulz, Robert A., E-mail: rschulz@nd.edu

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • bantam miRNA is endogenously expressed in the hematopoietic progenitor niche. • bantam is necessary and sufficient to induce cellular proliferation in the PSC. • bantam is upstream of the Insulin Receptor signaling pathway. • A model for positive regulation of hematopoietic niche growth is proposed. - Abstract: The Drosophila hematopoietic system is utilized in this study to gain novel insights into the process of growth control of the hematopoietic progenitor niche in blood development. The niche microenvironment is an essential component controlling the balance between progenitor populations and differentiated, mature blood cells and has been shown to lead to hematopoietic malignancies in humans when misregulated. MicroRNAs are one class of regulators associated with blood malignancies; however, there remains a relative paucity of information about the role of miRNAs in the niche. Here we demonstrate that bantam miRNA is endogenously active in the Drosophila hematopoietic progenitor niche, the posterior signaling center (PSC), and functions in the primary hematopoietic organ, the lymph gland, as a positive regulator of growth. Loss of bantam leads to a significant reduction in the PSC and overall lymph gland size, as well as a loss of the progenitor population and correlative premature differentiation of mature hemocytes. Interestingly, in addition to being essential for proper lymph gland development, we have determined bantam to be a novel upstream component of the insulin signaling cascade in the PSC and have unveiled dMyc as one factor central to bantam activity. These important findings identify bantam as a new hematopoietic regulator, place it in an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway, present one way in which it is regulated, and provide a mechanism through which it facilitates cellular proliferation in the hematopoietic niche.

  16. bantam miRNA is important for Drosophila blood cell homeostasis and a regulator of proliferation in the hematopoietic progenitor niche

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Victoria; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Tokusumi, Yumiko; Schulz, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • bantam miRNA is endogenously expressed in the hematopoietic progenitor niche. • bantam is necessary and sufficient to induce cellular proliferation in the PSC. • bantam is upstream of the Insulin Receptor signaling pathway. • A model for positive regulation of hematopoietic niche growth is proposed. - Abstract: The Drosophila hematopoietic system is utilized in this study to gain novel insights into the process of growth control of the hematopoietic progenitor niche in blood development. The niche microenvironment is an essential component controlling the balance between progenitor populations and differentiated, mature blood cells and has been shown to lead to hematopoietic malignancies in humans when misregulated. MicroRNAs are one class of regulators associated with blood malignancies; however, there remains a relative paucity of information about the role of miRNAs in the niche. Here we demonstrate that bantam miRNA is endogenously active in the Drosophila hematopoietic progenitor niche, the posterior signaling center (PSC), and functions in the primary hematopoietic organ, the lymph gland, as a positive regulator of growth. Loss of bantam leads to a significant reduction in the PSC and overall lymph gland size, as well as a loss of the progenitor population and correlative premature differentiation of mature hemocytes. Interestingly, in addition to being essential for proper lymph gland development, we have determined bantam to be a novel upstream component of the insulin signaling cascade in the PSC and have unveiled dMyc as one factor central to bantam activity. These important findings identify bantam as a new hematopoietic regulator, place it in an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway, present one way in which it is regulated, and provide a mechanism through which it facilitates cellular proliferation in the hematopoietic niche

  17. Role of HLA in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meerim Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The selection of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT donors includes a rigorous assessment of the availability and human leukocyte antigen (HLA match status of donors. HLA plays a critical role in HSCT, but its involvement in HSCT is constantly in flux because of changing technologies and variations in clinical transplantation results. The increased availability of HSCT through the use of HLA-mismatched related and unrelated donors is feasible with a more complete understanding of permissible HLA mismatches and the role of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR genes in HSCT. The influence of nongenetic factors on the tolerability of HLA mismatching has recently become evident, demonstrating a need for the integration of both genetic and nongenetic variables in donor selection.

  18. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosan, Christian; Godmann, Maren

    2016-01-01

    All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers are involved in this process. These create modifications that regulate the cell fate in a more or less reversible and dynamic way and contribute to HSC homeostasis. In addition, HSC respond in a unique way to DNA damage. These mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of HSC function and are essential to ensure viability after DNA damage. How HSC maintain their quiescent stage during the entire life is still matter of ongoing research. Here we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HSC function. PMID:26798358

  19. The fps/fes proto-oncogene regulates hematopoietic lineage output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangrar, Waheed; Gao, Yan; Zirngibl, Ralph A; Scott, Michelle L; Greer, Peter A

    2003-12-01

    The fps/fes proto-oncogene is abundantly expressed in myeloid cells, and the Fps/Fes cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase is implicated in signaling downstream from hematopoietic cytokines, including interleukin-3 (IL-3), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and erythropoietin (EPO). Studies using leukemic cell lines have previously suggested that Fps/Fes contributes to granulomonocytic differentiation, and that it might play a more selective role in promoting survival and differentiation along the monocytic pathway. In this study we have used a genetic approach to explore the role of Fps/Fes in hematopoiesis. We used transgenic mice that tissue-specifically express a mutant human fps/fes transgene (fps(MF)) that was engineered to encode Fps/Fes kinase that is activated through N-terminal myristoylation (MFps). Hematopoietic function was assessed using lineage analysis, hematopoietic progenitor cell colony-forming assays, and biochemical approaches. fps(MF) transgenic mice displayed a skewed hematopoietic output reflected by increased numbers of circulating granulocytic and monocytic cells and a corresponding decrease in lymphoid cells. Bone marrow colony assays of progenitor cells revealed a significant increase in the number of both granulomonocytic and multi-lineage progenitors. A molecular analysis of signaling in mature monocytic cells showed that MFps promoted GM-CSF-induced STAT3, STAT5, and ERK1/2 activation. These observations support a role for Fps/Fes in signaling pathways that contribute to lineage determination at the level of multi-lineage hematopoietic progenitors as well as the more committed granulomonocytic progenitors.

  20. The Microtubule Plus-End Tracking Protein CLASP2 Is Required for Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Drabek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian CLASPs are microtubule plus-end tracking proteins whose essential function as regulators of microtubule behavior has been studied mainly in cultured cells. We show here that absence of murine CLASP2 in vivo results in thrombocytopenia, progressive anemia, and pancytopenia, due to defects in megakaryopoiesis, in erythropoiesis, and in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell activity. Furthermore, microtubule stability and organization are affected upon attachment of Clasp2 knockout hematopoietic stem-cell-enriched populations, and these cells do not home efficiently toward their bone marrow niche. Strikingly, CLASP2-deficient hematopoietic stem cells contain severely reduced mRNA levels of c-Mpl, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, an essential factor for megakaryopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. Our data suggest that thrombopoietin signaling is impaired in Clasp2 knockout mice. We propose that the CLASP2-mediated stabilization of microtubules is required for proper attachment, homing, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells and that this is necessary to sustain c-Mpl transcription.

  1. Metabolic regulation of hematopoietic and leukemic stem/progenitor cells under homeostatic and stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karigane, Daiki; Takubo, Keiyo

    2017-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit multilineage differentiation and self-renewal activities that maintain the entire hematopoietic system during an organism's lifetime. These abilities are sustained by intrinsic transcriptional programs and extrinsic cues from the microenvironment or niche. Recent studies using metabolomics technologies reveal that metabolic regulation plays an essential role in HSC maintenance. Metabolic pathways provide energy and building blocks for other factors functioning at steady state and in stress. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of metabolic regulation in HSCs relevant to cell cycle quiescence, symmetric/asymmetric division, and proliferation following stress and lineage commitment, and discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting metabolic factors or pathways to treat hematological malignancies.

  2. Functional evaluation of circulating hematopoietic progenitors in Noonan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    TIMEUS, FABIO; CRESCENZIO, NICOLETTA; BALDASSARRE, GIUSEPPINA; DORIA, ALESSANDRA; VALLERO, STEFANO; FOGLIA, LUISELDA; PAGLIANO, SARA; ROSSI, CESARE; SILENGO, MARGHERITA CIRILLO; RAMENGHI, UGO; FAGIOLI, FRANCA; DI MONTEZEMOLO, LUCA CORDERO; FERRERO, GIOVANNI BATTISTA

    2013-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by short stature, multiple dysmorphisms and congenital heart defects. A myeloproliferative disorder (NS/MPD), resembling juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), is occasionally diagnosed in infants with NS. In the present study, we performed a functional evaluation of the circulating hematopoietic progenitors in a series of NS, NS/MPD and JMML patients. The different functional patterns were compared with the aim to identify a possible NS subgroup worthy of stringent hematological follow-up for an increased risk of MPD development. We studied 27 NS and 5 JMML patients fulfilling EWOG-MDS criteria. The more frequent molecular defects observed in NS were mutations in the PTPN11 and SOS genes. The absolute count of monocytes, circulating CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, their apoptotic rate and the number of circulating CFU-GMs cultured in the presence of decreasing concentrations or in the absence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were evaluated. All JMML patients showed monocytosis >1,000/μl. Ten out of the 27 NS patients showed monocytosis >1,000/μl, which included the 3 NS/MPD patients. In JMML patients, circulating CD34+ cells were significantly increased (median, 109.8/μl; range, 44–232) with a low rate of apoptosis (median, 2.1%; range, 0.4–12.1%), and circulating CFU-GMs were hyper-responsive to GM-CSF. NS/MPD patients showed the same flow cytometric pattern as the JMML patients (median, CD34+ cells/μl, 205.7; range, 58–1374; median apoptotic rate, 1.4%; range, 0.2–2.4%) and their circulating CFU-GMs were hyper-responsive to GM-CSF. These functional alterations appeared 10 months before the typical clinical manifestations in 1 NS/MPD patient. In NS, the CD34+ absolute cell count and circulating CFU-GMs showed a normal pattern (median CD34+ cells/μl, 4.9; range, 1.3–17.5), whereas the CD34+ cell apoptotic rate was significantly decreased in

  3. Pleiotrophin Regulates the Retention and Self-Renewal of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in the Bone Marrow Vascular Niche

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    Heather A. Himburg

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms through which the bone marrow (BM microenvironment regulates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC fate remain incompletely understood. We examined the role of the heparin-binding growth factor pleiotrophin (PTN in regulating HSC function in the niche. PTN−/− mice displayed significantly decreased BM HSC content and impaired hematopoietic regeneration following myelosuppression. Conversely, mice lacking protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor zeta, which is inactivated by PTN, displayed significantly increased BM HSC content. Transplant studies revealed that PTN action was not HSC autonomous, but rather was mediated by the BM microenvironment. Interestingly, PTN was differentially expressed and secreted by BM sinusoidal endothelial cells within the vascular niche. Furthermore, systemic administration of anti-PTN antibody in mice substantially impaired both the homing of hematopoietic progenitor cells to the niche and the retention of BM HSCs in the niche. PTN is a secreted component of the BM vascular niche that regulates HSC self-renewal and retention in vivo.

  4. Haematological effects of rhG-CSF on dogs exposed to 6.5 Gy uneven γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Qingliang; Xia Zhenbiao; Dong Bo

    1996-01-01

    The stimulative effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on hematopoietic regeneration were studied in dogs receiving an uneven γ-irradiation with the pelvis shielded at a dose of 6.5 Gy. In the treated dogs, intravenous administration of rhG-CSF at 5 or 10 μg/kg per day for 16 to 20 days caused significant increases of peripheral blood leucocytes, neutrophils, reticulocytes, and platelets. The nucleated cell and CFU-GM counts of bone marrow also showed an obvious rise, while the hemoglobin level did not significantly change during the course of treatment. In the irradiated dogs treated with rhG-CSF, the severity of neutropenia decreased, and its duration shortened

  5. Mobilization of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, Simon N; van Os, Ronald P; Bunting, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Animal models have added significantly to our understanding of the mechanism(s) of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) mobilization. Such models suggest that changes in the interaction between the HSPC and the hematopoietic microenvironmental 'niche' (cellular and extracellular components)

  6. Transformation of human mesenchymal cells and skin fibroblasts into hematopoietic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Harris

    Full Text Available Patients with prolonged myelosuppression require frequent platelet and occasional granulocyte transfusions. Multi-donor transfusions induce alloimmunization, thereby increasing morbidity and mortality. Therefore, an autologous or HLA-matched allogeneic source of platelets and granulocytes is needed. To determine whether nonhematopoietic cells can be reprogrammed into hematopoietic cells, human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs and skin fibroblasts were incubated with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine (Aza and the growth factors (GF granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and stem cell factor. This treatment transformed MSCs to round, non-adherent cells expressing T-, B-, myeloid-, or stem/progenitor-cell markers. The transformed cells engrafted as hematopoietic cells in bone marrow of immunodeficient mice. DNA methylation and mRNA array analysis suggested that Aza and GF treatment demethylated and activated HOXB genes. Indeed, transfection of MSCs or skin fibroblasts with HOXB4, HOXB5, and HOXB2 genes transformed them into hematopoietic cells. Further studies are needed to determine whether transformed MSCs or skin fibroblasts are suitable for therapy.

  7. Low-dose radiation (LDR) induces hematopoietic hormesis: LDR-induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells into peripheral blood circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Guanjun; Cui, Jiuwei; Xue, Lu; Cai, Lu

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the stimulating effect of low-dose radiation (LDR) on bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) proliferation and peripheral blood mobilization. Mice were exposed to 25- to 100-mGy x-rays. Bone marrow and peripheral blood HPCs (BFU-E, CFU-GM, and c-kit+ cells) were measured, and GM-CSF, G-CSF, and IL-3 protein and mRNA expression were detected using ELISA, slot blot hybridization, and Northern blot methods. To functionally evaluate LDR-stimulated and -mobilized HPCs, repopulation of peripheral blood cells in lethally irradiated recipients after transplantation of LDR-treated donor HPCs was examined by WBC counts, animal survival, and colony-forming units in the recipient spleens (CFUs-S). 75-mGy x-rays induced a maximal stimulation for bone marrow HPC proliferation (CFU-GM and BFU-E formation) 48 hours postirradiation, along with a significant increase in HPC mobilization into peripheral blood 48 to 72 hours postradiation, as shown by increases in CFU-GM formation and proportion of c-kit+ cells in the peripheral mononuclear cells. 75-mGy x-rays also maximally induced increases in G-CSF and GM-CSF mRNA expression in splenocytes and levels of serum GM-CSF. To define the critical role of these hematopoietic-stimulating factors in HPC peripheral mobilization, direct administration of G-CSF at a dose of 300 microg/kg/day or 150 microg/kg/day was applied and found to significantly stimulate GM-CFU formation and increase c-kit+ cells in the peripheral mononuclear cells. More importantly, 75-mGy x-rays plus 150 microg/kg/day G-CSF (LDR/150-G-CSF) produced a similar effect to that of 300 microg/kg/day G-CSF alone. Furthermore, the capability of LDR-mobilized donor HPCs to repopulate blood cells was confirmed in lethally irradiated recipient mice by counting peripheral WBC and CFUs-S. These results suggest that LDR induces hematopoietic hormesis, as demonstrated by HPC proliferation and peripheral mobilization, providing a

  8. Angiopoietin-like protein 3 promotes preservation of stemness during Ex Vivo expansion of murine hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Farahbakhshian (Elnaz); M.M.A. Verstegen (Monique); T.P. Visser (Trudi); S. Kheradmandkia (Sima); D. Geerts (Dirk); S. Arshad (Shazia); N. Riaz (Noveen); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); N.P. van Til (Niek); J.P.P. Meijerink (Jules)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAllogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantations from umbilical cord blood or autologous HSCs for gene therapy purposes are hampered by limited number of stem cells. To test the ability to expand HSCs in vitro prior to transplantation, two growth factor cocktails containing stem

  9. The slippery slope of hematopoietic stem cell aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlestedt, Martin; Bryder, David

    2017-12-01

    The late stages of life, in most species including humans, are associated with a decline in the overall maintenance and health of the organism. This applies also to the hematopoietic system, where aging is not only associated with an increased predisposition for hematological malignancies, but also identified as a strong comorbidity factor for other diseases. Research during the last two decades has proposed that alterations at the level of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) might be a root cause for the hematological changes observed with age. However, the recent realization that not all HSCs are alike with regard to fundamental stem cell properties such as self-renewal and lineage potential has several implications for HSC aging, including the synchrony and the stability of the aging HSC state. To approach HSC aging from a clonal perspective, we recently took advantage of technical developments in cellular barcoding and combined this with the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This allowed us to selectively approach HSCs functionally affected by age. The finding that such iPSCs were capable of fully regenerating multilineage hematopoiesis upon morula/blastocyst complementation provides compelling evidence that many aspects of HSC aging can be reversed, which indicates that a central mechanism underlying HSC aging is a failure to uphold the epigenomes associated with younger age. Here we discuss these findings in the context of the underlying causes that might influence HSC aging and the requirements and prospects for restoration of the aging HSC epigenome. Copyright © 2017 ISEH – Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaout, Karim; Patel, Nihar; Jain, Maneesh; El-Amm, Joelle; Amro, Farah; Tabbara, Imad A

    2014-08-01

    Infection, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and to a lesser extent sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) represent the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). During the last decade, progress in prevention and treatment of these complications led to improvement in the outcome of these patients. Despite the fact that nonmyeloablative regimens have been increasingly used in elderly patients and in patients with co-morbidities, the nonrelapse related mortality remains a challenge and long-term follow-up is required. The objective of this manuscript is to provide an updated concise review of the complications of AHSCT and of the available treatment interventions.

  11. Turnover of circulating hematopoietic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorie, M J; Maloney, M A; Patt, H M

    1979-10-01

    Short-term parabiosis of male and female CBA/CaJ mice was used to investigate the turnover of circulating hematopoietic stem cells. The change and subsequent disappearance of donor stem cells were monitored by spleen colony assay and chromosome analysis of individual colonies. The results revealed an exponential disappearance of pluripotent stem cells from blood with a characteristic half time of 1.7 h. Blood-borne stem cells were shown to be equilibrated with a subpopulation of marrow stem cells exhibiting a disappearance half time of 9.5 h. Splenectomy did not change the apparent rate of stem cell removal from the blood.

  12. Mechanism of hematopoietic stem cell homing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Fuquan

    2000-01-01

    The clinical transplantation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) originating from many sources such as bone marrow, peripheral blood and cord blood has been widely applied in recent years. At the same time, the development of the study on the mechanism of HSC homing which involves multi-procedures has been achieved. And a lot of molecular and cytokines on the surface or in the microenvironment of HSC are functioning in homing. The purpose of is to review those molecular and cytokines on which more studies have been focused in the past

  13. Avoidance of Total Knee Arthroplasty in Early Osteoarthritis of the Knee with Intra-Articular Implantation of Autologous Activated Peripheral Blood Stem Cells versus Hyaluronic Acid: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Differential Effects of Growth Factor Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thana Turajane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this randomized controlled trial, in early osteoarthritis (OA that failed conservative intervention, the need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA and WOMAC scores were evaluated, following a combination of arthroscopic microdrilling mesenchymal cell stimulation (MCS and repeated intra-articular (IA autologous activated peripheral blood stem cells (AAPBSCs with growth factor addition (GFA and hyaluronic acid (HA versus IA-HA alone. Leukapheresis-harvested AAPBSCs were administered as three weekly IA injections combined with HA and GFA (platelet-rich plasma [PRP] and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [hG-CSF] and MCS in group 1 and in group 2 but without hG-CSF while group 3 received IA-HA alone. Each group of 20 patients was evaluated at baseline and at 1, 6, and, 12 months. At 12 months, all patients in the AAPBSC groups were surgical intervention free compared to three patients needing TKA in group 3 (p<0.033. Total WOMAC scores showed statistically significant improvements at 6 and 12 months for the AAPBSC groups versus controls. There were no notable adverse events. We have shown avoidance of TKA in the AAPBSC groups at 12 months and potent, early, and sustained symptom alleviation through GFA versus HA alone. Differential effects of hG-CSF were noted with an earlier onset of symptom alleviation throughout.

  14. Avoidance of Total Knee Arthroplasty in Early Osteoarthritis of the Knee with Intra-Articular Implantation of Autologous Activated Peripheral Blood Stem Cells versus Hyaluronic Acid: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Differential Effects of Growth Factor Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turajane, Thana; Chaveewanakorn, Ukrit; Fongsarun, Warachaya; Aojanepong, Jongjate

    2017-01-01

    In this randomized controlled trial, in early osteoarthritis (OA) that failed conservative intervention, the need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and WOMAC scores were evaluated, following a combination of arthroscopic microdrilling mesenchymal cell stimulation (MCS) and repeated intra-articular (IA) autologous activated peripheral blood stem cells (AAPBSCs) with growth factor addition (GFA) and hyaluronic acid (HA) versus IA-HA alone. Leukapheresis-harvested AAPBSCs were administered as three weekly IA injections combined with HA and GFA (platelet-rich plasma [PRP] and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [hG-CSF]) and MCS in group 1 and in group 2 but without hG-CSF while group 3 received IA-HA alone. Each group of 20 patients was evaluated at baseline and at 1, 6, and, 12 months. At 12 months, all patients in the AAPBSC groups were surgical intervention free compared to three patients needing TKA in group 3 (p < 0.033). Total WOMAC scores showed statistically significant improvements at 6 and 12 months for the AAPBSC groups versus controls. There were no notable adverse events. We have shown avoidance of TKA in the AAPBSC groups at 12 months and potent, early, and sustained symptom alleviation through GFA versus HA alone. Differential effects of hG-CSF were noted with an earlier onset of symptom alleviation throughout. PMID:29056974

  15. Formation and hematopoietic differentiation of human embryoid bodies by suspension and hanging drop cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdan, Chantal; Hong, Seok Ho; Bhatia, Mickie

    2007-10-01

    The in vitro aggregation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into clusters termed embryoid bodies (EBs) allows for the spontaneous differentiation of cells representing endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm lineages. This stochastic process results however, in the generation of low numbers of differentiated cells, and can be enhanced to some extent by the addition of exogenous growth factors or overexpression of regulatory genes. In the authors' laboratory, the use of hematopoietic cytokines in combination with the mesoderm inducer bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) was able to generate up to 90% of CD45(+) hematopoietic cells with colony-forming unit (CFU) activity. This unit describes two protocols that have been successfully applied in the authors' laboratory for the generation of EBs in (1) suspension and (2) hanging drop (HD) cultures from enzymatically digested clumps of undifferentiated hESC colonies.

  16. The effect of carbon beam on the survival of hematopoietic stem cells in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, Atsushi; Kojima, Eiichi; Tanaka, Kaoru

    1993-01-01

    The new cyclotron for heavy ion radiotherapy will be completed in the very near future at NIRS. High LET radiations having different qualities are known to produce differences in biological effectiveness. It is necessary to determine the biological effectiveness of this new radiation source in both normal and tumor tissues. In this paper, the effects of 200 kVp x-rays and a 135 MeV/u carbon 12 beam on hematopoietic stem cells (CFU-S and GM-CFC) are described. The rationale for this experimental approach is that the sensitivity of hematopoietic stem cells and the committed stem cells to radiation is often the treatment limiting-factor for radiotherapy. (author)

  17. An In Vitro Study of Differentiation of Hematopoietic Cells to Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Ru Wang

    2011-01-01

    medium (ECCM. BM-EPCs were characterized in terms of phenotype, lineage potential, and their functional properties. Endothelial cell colonies derived from BM-EPC were cultured with ECCM for 3 months. Cultured EPC colony cells expressed endothelial cell markers and formed the capillary-like network in vitro. EPC colony cells expressed differential proliferative capacity; some of the colonies exhibited a high proliferative potential (HPP capacity up to 20 population doublings. More importantly, these HPP-EPCs expressed hematopoietic marker CD45, exhibited endocytic activities, and preserved some of the myeloid cell activity. In addition, the HPP-EPCs secrete various growth factors including VEGF and GM-CSF into the culture medium. The results demonstrate that these EPCs were primarily derived from hematopoietic origin of early precursor cells and maintained high proliferative potential capacity, a feature with a significant potential in the application of cell therapy in ischemic diseases.

  18. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beerman, Isabel; Rossi, Derrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging

  19. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerman, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.beerman@childrens.harvard.edu [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States); Rossi, Derrick J. [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging.

  20. CBFB-MYH11/RUNX1 together with a compendium of hematopoietic regulators, chromatin modifiers and basal transcription factors occupies self-renewal genes in inv(16) acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandoli, A; Singh, A A; Jansen, P W T C; Wierenga, A T J; Riahi, H; Franci, G; Prange, K; Saeed, S; Vellenga, E; Vermeulen, M; Stunnenberg, H G; Martens, J H A

    Different mechanisms for CBF beta-MYH11 function in acute myeloid leukemia with inv(16) have been proposed such as tethering of RUNX1 outside the nucleus, interference with transcription factor complex assembly and recruitment of histone deacetylases, all resulting in transcriptional repression of

  1. Potential Cellular Signatures of Viral Infections in Human Hematopoietic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mikovits

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Expression profiling of cellular genes was performed using a 10,000 cDNA human gene array in order to identify expression changes following chronic infection of human hematopoietic cells with Kapsosi’s Sarcoma -associated Virus (KSHV also known as Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV8 and Human T cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1. We performed cell-free {\\it in vitro} infection of primary bone marrow derived CD34+ cells using semi-purified HHV8 and a mature IL-2 dependent T cell line, KIT 225, using highly concentrated viral stocks prepared from an infectious molecular clone of HTLV-1. Thirty days post infection, mRNA was isolated from infected cultures and uninfected controls and submitted for microarray analysis. More than 400 genes were differentially expressed more than two-fold following HHV8 infection of primary bone marrow derived CD34+ cells. Of these 400, interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4, cyclin B2, TBP-associated factor, eukaryotic elongation factor and pim 2 were up-regulated more than 3.5 fold. In contrast, less than 100 genes were differentially expressed more than two-fold following chronic infection of a mature T cell line with HTLV-1. Of these, only cdc7 was up-regulated more than 3.5 fold. These data may provide insight into cellular signatures of infection useful for diagnosis of infection as well as potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  2. The Chromatin Remodeler BPTF Activates a Stemness Gene-Expression Program Essential for the Maintenance of Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Xu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Self-renewal and differentiation of adult stem cells are tightly regulated partly through configuration of chromatin structure by chromatin remodelers. Using knockout mice, we here demonstrate that bromodomain PHD finger transcription factor (BPTF, a component of the nucleosome remodeling factor (NURF chromatin-remodeling complex, is essential for maintaining the population size of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, including long-term hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Bptf-deficient HSCs are defective in reconstituted hematopoiesis, and hematopoietic-specific knockout of Bptf caused profound defects including bone marrow failure and anemia. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling revealed that BPTF loss caused downregulation of HSC-specific gene-expression programs, which contain several master transcription factors (Meis1, Pbx1, Mn1, and Lmo2 required for HSC maintenance and self-renewal. Furthermore, we show that BPTF potentiates the chromatin accessibility of key HSC “stemness” genes. These results demonstrate an essential requirement of the chromatin remodeler BPTF and NURF for activation of “stemness” gene-expression programs and proper function of adult HSCs. : Wang and colleagues show that a chromatin remodeler, BPTF, sustains appropriate functions of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs. BPTF loss causes bone marrow failure and anemia. The authors further define a BPTF-dependent gene-expression program in HSPCs, which contains key HSC stemness factors. These results demonstrate an essential requirement of the BPTF-associated chromatin remodelers for HSC functionality and adult hematopoiesis. Keywords: Bptf, hematopoietic stem cells, chromatin remodeler, Meis1, Pbx1, Mn1, DNA accessibility, NURF, AP1 complex

  3. Limited clinical efficacy of azacitidine in transfusion-dependent, growth factor-resistant, low- and Int-1-risk MDS: Results from the nordic NMDSG08A phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobiasson, M; Dybedahl, I; Holm, M S; Karimi, M; Brandefors, L; Garelius, H; Grövdal, M; Högh-Dufva, I; Grønbæk, K; Jansson, M; Marcher, C; Nilsson, L; Kittang, A O; Porwit, A; Saft, L; Möllgård, L; Hellström-Lindberg, E

    2014-01-01

    This prospective phase II study evaluated the efficacy of azacitidine (Aza)+erythropoietin (Epo) in transfusion-dependent patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients ineligible for or refractory to full-dose Epo+granulocyte colony stimulation factors for >8 weeks and a transfusion need of ⩾4 units over 8 weeks were included. Aza 75 mg m −2 d −1 , 5/28 days, was given for six cycles; non-responding patients received another three cycles combined with Epo 60 000 units per week. Primary end point was transfusion independence (TI). All patients underwent targeted mutational screen for 42 candidate genes. Thirty enrolled patients received ⩾one cycle of Aza. Ten patients discontinued the study early, 7 due to adverse events including 2 deaths. Thirty-eight serious adverse events were reported, the most common being infection. Five patients achieved TI after six cycles and one after Aza+Epo, giving a total response rate of 20%. Mutational screening revealed a high frequency of recurrent mutations. Although no single mutation predicted for response, SF3A1 (n=3) and DNMT3A (n=4) were only observed in non-responders. We conclude that Aza can induce TI in severely anemic MDS patients, but efficacy is limited, toxicity substantial and most responses of short duration. This treatment cannot be generally recommended in lower-risk MDS. Mutational screening revealed a high frequency of mutations

  4. Whole-transcriptome analysis of endothelial to hematopoietic stem cell transition reveals a requirement for Gpr56 in HSC generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaimani Kartalaei, Parham; Yamada-Inagawa, Tomoko; Vink, Chris S; de Pater, Emma; van der Linden, Reinier; Marks-Bluth, Jonathon; van der Sloot, Anthon; van den Hout, Mirjam; Yokomizo, Tomomasa; van Schaick-Solernó, M Lucila; Delwel, Ruud; Pimanda, John E; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2015-01-12

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are generated via a natural transdifferentiation process known as endothelial to hematopoietic cell transition (EHT). Because of small numbers of embryonal arterial cells undergoing EHT and the paucity of markers to enrich for hemogenic endothelial cells (ECs [HECs]), the genetic program driving HSC emergence is largely unknown. Here, we use a highly sensitive RNAseq method to examine the whole transcriptome of small numbers of enriched aortic HSCs, HECs, and ECs. Gpr56, a G-coupled protein receptor, is one of the most highly up-regulated of the 530 differentially expressed genes. Also, highly up-regulated are hematopoietic transcription factors, including the "heptad" complex of factors. We show that Gpr56 (mouse and human) is a target of the heptad complex and is required for hematopoietic cluster formation during EHT. Our results identify the processes and regulators involved in EHT and reveal the surprising requirement for Gpr56 in generating the first HSCs. © 2015 Solaimani Kartalaei et al.

  5. Tritium contamination of hematopoietic stem cells alters long-term hematopoietic reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giacomo, F.; Barroca, V.; Laurent, D.; Lewandowski, D.; Saintigny, Y.; Romeo, P.H.; Granotier, Ch.; Boussin, F.D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In vivo effects of tritium contamination are poorly documented. Here, we study the effects of tritiated Thymidine ([ 3 H] Thymidine) or tritiated water (HTO) contamination on the biological properties of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Materials and methods: Mouse HSC were contaminated with concentrations of [ 3 H] Thymidine ranging from 0.37-37.03 kBq/ml or of HTO ranging from 5-50 kBq/ml. The biological properties of contaminated HSC were studied in vitro after HTO contamination and in vitro and in vivo after [ 3 H] Thymidine contamination. Results: Proliferation, viability and double-strand breaks were dependent on [ 3 H] Thymidine or HTO concentrations used for contamination but in vitro myeloid differentiation of HSC was not affected by [ 3 H] Thymidine contamination. [ 3 H] Thymidine contaminated HSC showed a compromised long-term capacity of hematopoietic reconstitution and competition experiments showed an up to two-fold decreased capacity of contaminated HSC to reconstitute hematopoiesis. These defects were not due to impaired homing in bone marrow but to an initial decreased proliferation rate of HSC. Conclusion: These results indicate that contaminations of HSC with doses of tritium that do not result in cell death, induce short-term effects on proliferation and cell cycle and long-term effects on hematopoietic reconstitution capacity of contaminated HSC. (authors)

  6. Umbilical cord blood banking in the worldwide hematopoietic stem cell transplantation system: perspectives for Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalynychenko, T O

    2017-09-01

    Significant progress in the promotion of procedural technologies associated with the transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells caused a rapid increase in activity. The exchange of hematopoietic stem cells for unrelated donor transplantations is now much easier due to the relevant international professional structures and organizations established to support cooperation and standard setting, as well as rules for the functioning of both national donor registries and cord blood banks. These processes are increasing every year and are contributing to the outpacing rates of development in this area. Products within their country should be regulated by the competent government authorities. This study analyzes the work of international and national levels of support for transplantation activity in the field of unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the standardization order of technologies, as well as data that justify the need to create a network of donated umbilical cord blood banks in Ukraine as a factor in the development of allogeneic transplantation. This will promote the accessibility of international standards for the treatment of serious diseases for Ukrainian citizens.

  7. Brief Reports: Nfix Promotes Survival of Immature Hematopoietic Cells via Regulation of c-Mpl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Trent; Walker, Megan; Ganuza, Miguel; Holmfeldt, Per; Bordas, Marie; Kang, Guolian; Bi, Wenjian; Palmer, Lance E; Finkelstein, David; McKinney-Freeman, Shannon

    2018-02-12

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are necessary for life-long blood production and replenishment of the hematopoietic system during stress. We recently reported that nuclear factor I/X (Nfix) promotes HSPC survival post-transplant. Here, we report that ectopic expression of Nfix in primary mouse HSPCs extends their ex vivo culture from about 20 to 40 days. HSPCs overexpressing Nfix display hypersensitivity to supportive cytokines and reduced apoptosis when subjected to cytokine deprivation relative to controls. Ectopic Nfix resulted in elevated levels of c-Mpl transcripts and cell surface protein on primary murine HSPCs as well as increased phosphorylation of STAT5, which is known to be activated down-stream of c-MPL. Blocking c-MPL signaling by removal of thrombopoietin or addition of a c-MPL neutralizing antibody negated the antiapoptotic effect of Nfix overexpression on cultured HSPCs. Furthermore, NFIX was capable of binding to and transcriptionally activating a proximal c-Mpl promoter fragment. In sum, these data suggest that NFIX-mediated upregulation of c-Mpl transcription can protect primitive hematopoietic cells from stress ex vivo. Stem Cells 2018. © AlphaMed Press 2018.

  8. Transcriptional profiling of Foxo3a and Fancd2 regulated genes in mouse hematopoietic stem cells

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    Xiaoli Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Functional maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs is constantly challenged by stresses like DNA damage and oxidative stress. Foxo factors particularly Foxo3a function to regulate the self-renewal of HSCs and contribute to the maintenance of the HSC pool during aging by providing resistance to oxidative stress. Fancd2-deficient mice had multiple hematopoietic defects including HSC loss in early development and in response to cellular stresses including oxidative stress. The cellular mechanisms underlying HSC loss in Fancd2-deficient mice include abnormal cell cycle status loss of quiescence and compromised hematopoietic repopulating capacity of HSCs. To address on a genome wide level the genes and pathways that are impacted by deletion of the Fancd2 and Foxo3a we performed microarray analysis on phenotypic HSCs (Lin−ckit+Sca-1+CD150+CD48− from Fancd2 single knockout Foxo3a single knockout and Fancd2−/−Foxo3a−/− double-knockout (dKO mice. Here we provide detailed methods and analysis on these microarray data which has been deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO: GSE64215.

  9. The human and murine hematopoietic stem cell niches: are they comparable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pel, Melissa; Fibbe, Willem E; Schepers, Koen

    2016-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in specific niches that provide various instructive cues that regulate HSC self-renewal and their development into all mature cells of the peripheral blood. Progress in this research field has largely been guided by mouse studies. However, parallel studies with human subjects, tissues, and cells, in combination with xenotransplantation experiments in immunodeficient mice, have contributed to our increased understanding of the human HSC niche. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the various specialized subsets of both stromal and hematopoietic cells that support HSCs through cell-cell interactions and secreted factors, and the many parallels between the murine and human HSC niches. Furthermore, we discuss recent technological advances that are likely to improve our understanding of the human HSC niche, a better understanding of which may allow further identification of unique molecular and cellular pathways in the HSC niche. This information may help to further improve the outcome of HSC transplantation and refine the treatment of hematopoietic diseases. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. Pre-Transplantation Blockade of TNF-α-Mediated Oxygen Species Accumulation Protects Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takashi; Suzuki, Sachie; Lai, Chen-Yi; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Kakuta, Shigeru; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Nojima, Masanori; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Higashihara, Masaaki; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Otsu, Makoto

    2017-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) for malignancy requires toxic pre-conditioning to maximize anti-tumor effects and donor-HSC engraftment. While this induces bone marrow (BM)-localized inflammation, how this BM environmental change affects transplanted HSCs in vivo remains largely unknown. We here report that, depending on interval between irradiation and HSCT, residence within lethally irradiated recipient BM compromises donor-HSC reconstitution ability. Both in vivo and in vitro we demonstrate that, among inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α plays a role in HSC damage: TNF-α stimulation leads to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in highly purified hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs/HSPCs). Transplantation of flow-cytometry-sorted murine HSCs reveals damaging effects of accumulated ROS on HSCs. Short-term incubation either with an specific inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 signaling or an antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) prevents TNF-α-mediated ROS accumulation in HSCs. Importantly, pre-transplantation exposure to NAC successfully demonstrats protective effects in inflammatory BM on graft-HSCs, exhibiting better reconstitution capability than that of nonprotected control grafts. We thus suggest that in vivo protection of graft-HSCs from BM inflammation is a feasible and attractive approach, which may lead to improved hematopoietic reconstitution kinetics in transplantation with myeloablative conditioning that inevitably causes inflammation in recipient BM. Stem Cells 2017;35:989-1002. © 2016 The Authors STEM CELLS published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  11. Distinct Functions of Different scl Isoforms in Zebrafish Definitive Hematopoietic Stem Cell Initiation and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yahui

    2011-07-01

    The establishment of entire blood system relies on the multi-potent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), thus identifying the molecular mechanism in HSC generation is of importance for not only complementing the fundamental knowledge in stem cell biology, but also providing insights to the regenerative therapies. Recent researches have documented the formation of nascent HSCs through a direct transition from ventral aortic endothelium, named as endothelial hematopoietic transition (EHT) process. However, the precise genetic program engaged in this process remains largely elusive. The transcription factor scl plays pivotal and conserved roles in embryonic and adult hematopoiesis from teleosts to mammals. Our lab have previously identified a new truncated scl isoform, scl-beta, which is indispensible for the specification of HSCs in the ventral wall of dorsal aorta (VDA), the zebrafish equivalent of mammalian fetal hematopoietic organ. Here we observe that, by combining time-lapse confocal imaging of transgenic zebrafish and genetic epistasis analysis, scl-beta is expressed in a subset of ventral aortic endothelial cells and critical for their forthcoming transformation to hemogenic endothelium; in contrast, runx1 is required downstream to govern the successful egress of the hemogenic endothelial cells to become naive HSCs. In addition, the traditional known full-length scl-alpha isoform is firstly evidenced to be required for the maintenance or survival of newly formed HSCs in VDA. Collectively our data has established the genetic hierarchy controlling discrete steps in the consecutive process of HSC formation from endothelial cells and further development in VDA.

  12. IMMUNE STATE IN PATIENTS WITH HEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES AT LATE TERMS AFTER AUTOLOGOUS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

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    N. V. Minaeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT is one of the most effective methods for treatment of patients with various forms of hemoblastoses, both in adults and children. However, high-dose chemotherapy protocols used in this procedure are characterized by pronounced myeloand immunotoxicity. Appropriate data concerning immune state at long terms after high-dose chemotherapy and auto-HSCT are sparse and controversial, and there is no consensus on time dynamics of immune system reconstitution. The aim of this study was a comprehensive evaluation of immunity in recipients of auto-HSCT at longer terms. Clinical and immunological testing was performed in ninety-eight patients with hematological malignancies before starting a high-dose chemotherapy, and at late post-transplant period. The state of cellular immunity was assessed as expression of surface CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, CD19+ lymphocyte antigens. Humoral immunity was evaluated by serum IgG, IgA, and IgM levels. The studies have revealed disorders of cellular and humoral immunity, as well as nonspecific immune resistance factors in recipients of autologous hematopoietic stem cells at late terms post-transplant. Immune reconstitution in patients receiving highdose consolidation treatment followed by auto-HSCT takes longer time than in patients who did not receive autologous hematopoietic stem cells. Severity of these disturbances and immune reconstitution rates depend on the type of conditioning regimen, and the source of haematopoietic stem cells used for transplantation.

  13. Deletion of the Imprinted Gene Grb10 Promotes Hematopoietic Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiao; Himburg, Heather A; Pohl, Katherine; Quarmyne, Mamle; Tran, Evelyn; Zhang, Yurun; Fang, Tiancheng; Kan, Jenny; Chao, Nelson J; Zhao, Liman; Doan, Phuong L; Chute, John P

    2016-11-01

    Imprinted genes are differentially expressed by adult stem cells, but their functions in regulating adult stem cell fate are incompletely understood. Here we show that growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (Grb10), an imprinted gene, regulates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and regeneration. Deletion of the maternal allele of Grb10 in mice (Grb10 m/+ mice) substantially increased HSC long-term repopulating capacity, as compared to that of Grb10 +/+ mice. After total body irradiation (TBI), Grb10 m/+ mice demonstrated accelerated HSC regeneration and hematopoietic reconstitution, as compared to Grb10 +/+ mice. Grb10-deficient HSCs displayed increased proliferation after competitive transplantation or TBI, commensurate with upregulation of CDK4 and Cyclin E. Furthermore, the enhanced HSC regeneration observed in Grb10-deficient mice was dependent on activation of the Akt/mTORC1 pathway. This study reveals a function for the imprinted gene Grb10 in regulating HSC self-renewal and regeneration and suggests that the inhibition of Grb10 can promote hematopoietic regeneration in vivo. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of combined 5-fluorouracil and radiation on murine hematopoietic tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, O.S.; Overgaard, J.; Von der Maase, H.

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and radiation in hematopoietic tissue was assessed as the survival of hematopoietic stem cells (CFUs) by means of the spleen colony assay. 5-FU was given intraperitoneally in the dose range 50-500 mg/kg body weight. In this dose range, stem cell survival decreased exponentially as a function of 5-FU dose. After 150 mg/kg of 5-FU alone, the stem cell survival rapidly decreased, reaching a minimum after 1-2 days. A similar regeneration was observed after 0.75 Gy radiation alone 5-FU given 15 min before whole-body irradiation resulted in a pronounced reduction in stem cell survival due to an increase in the slope of the radiation survival curve by a factor of 2.1. After combined 5-FU and radiation, the survival rapidly decreased to a minimum at day 1, and it showed only a slight increase within the next 7 days. After this delay, the stem cells regenerated with a doubling time of about 30 h, reaching pretreatment values on day 15. The delayed stem cell regeneration was not seen following 3.5 Gy radiation alone or 225 mg/kg 5-FU alone, which resulted in the same nadir of CFUs survival as found after the combined treatment. Thus, 5-FU greatly enhances the hematopoietic damage after radiation by reducing the number of surviving stem cells and delaying the stem cell regeneration. 24 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 table

  15. Synergistic actions of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells in vascularizing bioengineered tissues.

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    Eduardo K Moioli

    Full Text Available Poor angiogenesis is a major road block for tissue repair. The regeneration of virtually all tissues is limited by angiogenesis, given the diffusion of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products is limited to a few hundred micrometers. We postulated that co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells improves angiogenesis of tissue repair and hence the outcome of regeneration. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by using bone as a model whose regeneration is impaired unless it is vascularized. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs were isolated from each of three healthy human bone marrow samples and reconstituted in a porous scaffold. MSCs were seeded in micropores of 3D calcium phosphate (CP scaffolds, followed by infusion of gel-suspended CD34(+ hematopoietic cells. Co-transplantation of CD34(+ HSCs and CD34(- MSCs in microporous CP scaffolds subcutaneously in the dorsum of immunocompromised mice yielded vascularized tissue. The average vascular number of co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSC scaffolds was substantially greater than MSC transplantation alone. Human osteocalcin was expressed in the micropores of CP scaffolds and was significantly increased upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Human nuclear staining revealed the engraftment of transplanted human cells in vascular endothelium upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Based on additional in vitro results of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, we adsorbed VEGF with co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSCs in the microporous CP scaffolds in vivo, and discovered that vascular number and diameter further increased, likely owing to the promotion of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by VEGF. Together, co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells may improve the regeneration of vascular dependent tissues such as bone

  16. Safety of growth factor administration for leukapheresis in those with WBC counts greater than 60,000/µl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weihong; Rizzieri, David; Drago, Susan

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral blood stem cell mobilization using growth factors is a common method of stem cell collection for transplantation, however, little is reported concerning safety of continued growth factor delivery in exceptional responders with very high white blood cell (WBC) counts in preparation for pheresis. We performed a retrospective study of the safety of growth factor delivery for leukapheresis in those with WBC counts greater than 60,000/µl. Allogeneic donors received 5 days of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a daily dose of 10 or 16 µg/kg. Autologous donors received G-CSF 10 µg/kg/day +/- chemotherapy until peripheral blood CD34(+) count reached 10/µl. Granulocyte donors received 300 µg dose of G-CSF the day prior to donation. Out of 3,037 leukapheresis collections from 1998 to 2005, we identified 303 collections from 204 donors or patients who had a WBC > 60,000/µl. WBC counts were ≥100,000/µl in seven of these subjects. If inadequate stem cell dose was obtained with pheresis with WBC counts this high, patients had growth factor dosing decreased 50% but still received a dose till stem cell collection was completed. Of the 204 subjects, 122 were patients and 82 were donors. These 204 donors/patients had no serious adverse events reported other than the common reports of myalgia, bone pain, and headache associated with administration of growth factors. Pain levels ranged from mild to severe and usually were managed by over the counter analgesics. Continuing ½ the dose of neupogen to complete the pheresis process appears safe in subjects with very high white blood counts. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Endocrinopathies after Allogeneic and Autologous Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

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    Francesco Orio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo- and autologous- (auto- stem cell transplant (HSCT. This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90–99% of women and 60–90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40–50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma, gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT.

  18. Characterization of Selectin Ligands on Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Hanan

    2013-05-18

    Successful bone marrow (BM) transplantation requires the homing of the transplanted hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to their bone marrow niche, where they undergo differentiation to form mature cells that are eventually released into the peripheral blood. However, the survival rate of patients receiving BM transplants is poor since many of the transplanted HSPCs do not make it to their BM niches in the recipient’s body. Since the availability of HSPCs from traditional sources is limited, transplanting more number of HSPCs is not a solution to this problem. This study aims to characterize the adhesion molecules mediating cell migration in order to better understand the adhesion mechanisms of HSCs with the bone marrow endothelium. This will aid in developing future tools to improve the clinical transplantation of HSPCs. This study also aims to understand the factors that influence HSPC proliferation in the bone marrow niche. E-selectin plays an important role in the process of homing; however, its ligands on HSPCs are not well characterized. We used western blotting and immunoprecipitation to show that endomucin is expressed on HSPCs and plays a role in the binding of HSPCs to E-selectin. We also studied the effect of recombinant E-selectin on the expression of a newly characterized E-selectin ligand in our lab, CD34, in HSPCs. This will provide us insight into novel roles for endomucin and E-selectin and help us to understand the factors influencing HSPC migration to BM endothelium.

  19. Establishing an autologous versus allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant program in nations with emerging economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhri, Naeem A; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Almohareb, Fahad I; Alzahrani, Hazzaa A; Bashir, Qaiser; Savani, Bipin; Gupta, Vikas; Hashmi, Shahrukh K

    2017-12-01

    More than 70,000 hematopoietic cell transplants are currently performed each year, and these continue to increase every year. However, there is a significant variation in the number of absolute transplants and transplant rates between centers, countries, and global regions. The prospect for emerging countries to develop a hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) program, as well as to decide on whether autologous HCT (auto-HCT) or allogeneic HCT (allo-HCT) should be established to start with, relies heavily on factors that can explain differences between these two procedures. Major factors that will influence a decision about establishing the type of HCT program are macroeconomic factors such as organization of the healthcare network, available resources and infrastructure. Prevalence of specific diseases in the region as well genetic background of donors and recipients will also influence the mandate or priority of the HCT in the national healthcare plan to explain some of the country-specific differences. Furthermore, microeconomic factors play a role, such as center-specific experience in treating various disorders requiring hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, along with accreditation status and patient volume. The objective of the transplant procedure was to improve the survival and quality of life of patients. The regional difference that one notices in emerging countries about the higher number of allo-HCT compared with auto-HCT procedures performed is primarily based on suboptimal healthcare network in treating various malignant disorders that are the primary indication for auto-stem cell transplantation. In this context, nonmalignant disorders such as bone marrow failure syndromes, inherited genetic disorders and hemoglobinopathies have become the major indication for stem cell transplantation. Better understanding of these factors will assist in establishing new transplant centers in the emerging countries to achieve their specific objectives and

  20. FAM20: an evolutionarily conserved family of secreted proteins expressed in hematopoietic cells

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    Cobos Everardo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hematopoiesis is a complex developmental process controlled by a large number of factors that regulate stem cell renewal, lineage commitment and differentiation. Secreted proteins, including the hematopoietic growth factors, play critical roles in these processes and have important biological and clinical significance. We have employed representational difference analysis to identify genes that are differentially expressed during experimentally induced myeloid differentiation in the murine EML hematopoietic stem cell line. Results One identified clone encoded a previously unidentified protein of 541 amino acids that contains an amino terminal signal sequence but no other characterized domains. This protein is a member of family of related proteins that has been named family with sequence similarity 20 (FAM20 with three members (FAM20A, FAM20B and FAM20C in mammals. Evolutionary comparisons revealed the existence of a single FAM20 gene in the simple vertebrate Ciona intestinalis and the invertebrate worm Caenorhabditis elegans and two genes in two insect species, Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae. Six FAM20 family members were identified in the genome of the pufferfish, Fugu rubripes and five members in the zebrafish, Danio rerio. The mouse Fam20a protein was ectopically expressed in a mammalian cell line and found to be a bona fide secreted protein and efficient secretion was dependent on the integrity of the signal sequence. Expression analysis revealed that the Fam20a gene was indeed differentially expressed during hematopoietic differentiation and that the other two family members (Fam20b and Fam20c were also expressed during hematcpoiesis but that their mRNA levels did not vary significantly. Likewise FAM20A was expressed in more limited set of human tissues than the other two family members. Conclusions The FAM20 family represents a new family of secreted proteins with potential functions in regulating

  1. Biology and flow cytometry of proangiogenic hematopoietic progenitors cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jonathan A; Erzurum, Serpil; Asosingh, Kewal

    2015-01-01

    During development, hematopoiesis and neovascularization are closely linked to each other via a common bipotent stem cell called the hemangioblast that gives rise to both hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells. In postnatal life, this functional connection between the vasculature and hematopoiesis is maintained by a subset of hematopoietic progenitor cells endowed with the capacity to differentiate into potent proangiogenic cells. These proangiogenic hematopoietic progenitors comprise a specific subset of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells that homes to sites of neovascularization and possess potent paracrine angiogenic activity. There is emerging evidence that this subpopulation of hematopoietic progenitors plays a critical role in vascular health and disease. Their angiogenic activity is distinct from putative "endothelial progenitor cells" that become structural cells of the endothelium by differentiation into endothelial cells. Proangiogenic hematopoietic progenitor cell research requires multidisciplinary expertise in flow cytometry, hematology, and vascular biology. This review provides a comprehensive overview of proangiogenic hematopoietic progenitor cell biology and flow cytometric methods to detect these cells in the peripheral blood circulation and BM. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  2. The Role of Toll Like Receptors in Hematopoietic Malignancies

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    Darlene Monlish

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs that shape the innate immune system by identifying pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS and host-derived damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPS. TLRs are widely expressed on both immune cells and non-immune cells, including hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, effector immune cell populations, and endothelial cells. In addition to their well-known role in the innate immune response to acute infection or injury, accumulating evidence supports a role for TLRs in the development of hematopoietic and other malignancies. Several hematopoietic disorders, including lymphoproliferative disorders and myelodysplastic syndromes, which possess a high risk of transformation to leukemia, have been linked to aberrant TLR signaling. Furthermore, activation of TLRs leads to the induction of a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which can promote tumorigenesis by driving cell proliferation and migration and providing a favorable microenvironment for tumor cells. Beyond hematopoietic malignancies, the upregulation of a number of TLRs has been linked to promoting tumor cell survival, proliferation, and metastasis in a variety of cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and lung. This review focuses on the contribution of TLRs to hematopoietic malignancies, highlighting the known direct and indirect effects of TLR signaling on tumor cells and their microenvironment. In addition, the utility of TLR agonists and antagonists as potential therapeutics in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies is discussed.

  3. Short Stat5-interacting peptide derived from phospholipase C-β3 inhibits hematopoietic cell proliferation and myeloid differentiation.

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    Hiroki Yasudo

    Full Text Available Constitutive activation of the transcription factor Stat5 in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells leads to various hematopoietic malignancies including myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN. Our recent study found that phospholipase C (PLC-β3 is a novel tumor suppressor involved in MPN, lymphoma and other tumors. Stat5 activity is negatively regulated by the SH2 domain-containing protein phosphatase SHP-1 in a PLC-β3-dependent manner. PLC-β3 can form the multimolecular SPS complex together with SHP-1 and Stat5. The close physical proximity of SHP-1 and Stat5 brought about by interacting with the C-terminal segment of PLC-β3 (PLC-β3-CT accelerates SHP-1-mediated dephosphorylation of Stat5. Here we identify the minimal sequences within PLC-β3-CT required for its tumor suppressor function. Two of the three Stat5-binding noncontiguous regions, one of which also binds SHP-1, substantially inhibited in vitro proliferation of Ba/F3 cells. Surprisingly, an 11-residue Stat5-binding peptide (residues 988-998 suppressed Stat5 activity in Ba/F3 cells and in vivo proliferation and myeloid differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, this study further defines PLC-β3-CT as the Stat5- and SHP-1-binding domain by identifying minimal functional sequences of PLC-β3 for its tumor suppressor function and implies their potential utility in the control of hematopoietic malignancies.

  4. Therapeutic approaches of hematopoietic syndrome after serious accidental global irradiation. Ex vivo expansion interest of hematopoietic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry, D.

    1994-01-01

    Aplasia is one of the main syndrome, appearing after one global accidental irradiation by one ionizing radiation source. The hematopoietic syndrome is characterized by a peripheric blood cell number fall; the cell marrow is reduced too

  5. Reported Prestroke Physical Activity Is Associated with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression and Good Outcomes after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cancio, Elena; Ricciardi, Ana Clara; Sobrino, Tomás; Cortés, Jordi; de la Ossa, Natalia Pérez; Millán, Mónica; Hernández-Pérez, María; Gomis, Meritxell; Dorado, Laura; Muñoz-Narbona, Lucía; Campos, Francisco; Arenillas, Juan F; Dávalos, Antoni

    2017-02-01

    Physical activity (PhA) prior to stroke has been associated with good outcomes after the ischemic insult, but there is scarce data on the involved molecular mechanisms. We studied consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to a single tertiary stroke center. Prestroke PhA was evaluated with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (metabolic equivalent of minutes/week). We studied several circulating angiogenic and neurogenic factors at different time points: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) at admission, day 7, and at 3 months. We considered good functional outcome at 3 months (modified Rankin scale  ≤ 2) as primary end point, and final infarct volume as secondary outcome. We studied 83 patients with at least 2 time point serum determinations (mean age 69.6 years, median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 17 at admission). Patients more physically active before stroke had a significantly higher increment of serum VEGF on the seventh day when compared to less active patients. This increment was an independent predictor of good functional outcome at 3 months and was associated with smaller infarct volume in multivariate analyses adjusted for relevant covariates. We did not find independent associations of G-CSF or BDNF levels neither with level of prestroke PhA nor with stroke outcomes. Although there are probably more molecular mechanisms by which PhA exerts its beneficial effects in stroke outcomes, our observation regarding the potential role of VEGF is plausible and in line with previous experimental studies. Further research in this field is needed. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Central nervous system infection following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanajiri, Ryo; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Kosuke; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watakabe, Kyoko; Murata, Yutaka; Hagino, Takeshi; Seno, Yasushi; Najima, Yuho; Igarashi, Aiko; Doki, Noriko; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2017-03-01

    Here, we described the clinical characteristics and outcomes of central nervous system (CNS) infections occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in a single institution over the previous 6 years. Charts of 353 consecutive allogeneic transplant recipients were retrospectively reviewed for CNS infection. A total of 17 cases of CNS infection were identified at a median of 38 days (range, 10-1028 days) after allo-HSCT. Causative pathogens were human herpesvirus-6 (n=6), enterococcus (n=2), staphylococcus (n=2), streptococcus (n=2), varicella zoster virus (n=1), cytomegalovirus (n=1), John Cunningham virus (n=1), adenovirus (n=1), and Toxoplasma gondii (n=1). The cumulative incidence of CNS infection was 4.1% at 1 year and 5.5% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis revealed that high-risk disease status was a risk factor for developing CNS infection (p=.02), and that overall survival at 3 years after allo-HSCT was 33% in patients with CNS infection and 53% in those without CNS infection (p=.04). Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sleep disruption among cancer patients following autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashley M; Jim, Heather S L; Small, Brent J; Nishihori, Taiga; Gonzalez, Brian D; Cessna, Julie M; Hyland, Kelly A; Rumble, Meredith E; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2018-03-01

    Despite a high prevalence of sleep disruption among hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients, relatively little research has investigated its relationships with modifiable cognitive or behavioral factors or used actigraphy to characterize sleep disruption in this population. Autologous HCT recipients who were 6-18 months post transplant completed self-report measures of cancer-related distress, fear of cancer recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors upon enrollment. Patients then wore an actigraph for 7 days and completed a self-report measure of sleep disruption on day 7 of the study. Among the 84 participants (age M = 60, 45% female), 41% reported clinically relevant sleep disruption. Examination of actigraph data confirmed that, on average, sleep was disrupted (wake after sleep onset M = 66 min) and sleep efficiency was less than recommended (sleep efficiency M = 78%). Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors were related to self-reported sleep disruption (p valuesdisruption after transplant. Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and maladaptive sleep behaviors are related to self-reported sleep disruption and should be considered targets for cognitive behavioral intervention in this population.

  8. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

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    Christian Kosan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers are involved in this process. These create modifications that regulate the cell fate in a more or less reversible and dynamic way and contribute to HSC homeostasis. In addition, HSC respond in a unique way to DNA damage. These mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of HSC function and are essential to ensure viability after DNA damage. How HSC maintain their quiescent stage during the entire life is still matter of ongoing research. Here we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HSC function.

  9. HSC-explorer: a curated database for hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrone, Corinna; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Loeffler, Dirk; Lechner, Martin; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Schroeder, Timm; Ruepp, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    HSC-Explorer (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/HSC/) is a publicly available, integrative database containing detailed information about the early steps of hematopoiesis. The resource aims at providing fast and easy access to relevant information, in particular to the complex network of interacting cell types and molecules, from the wealth of publications in the field through visualization interfaces. It provides structured information on more than 7000 experimentally validated interactions between molecules, bioprocesses and environmental factors. Information is manually derived by critical reading of the scientific literature from expert annotators. Hematopoiesis-relevant interactions are accompanied with context information such as model organisms and experimental methods for enabling assessment of reliability and relevance of experimental results. Usage of established vocabularies facilitates downstream bioinformatics applications and to convert the results into complex networks. Several predefined datasets (Selected topics) offer insights into stem cell behavior, the stem cell niche and signaling processes supporting hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. HSC-Explorer provides a versatile web-based resource for scientists entering the field of hematopoiesis enabling users to inspect the associated biological processes through interactive graphical presentation.

  10. HSC-explorer: a curated database for hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Montrone

    Full Text Available HSC-Explorer (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/HSC/ is a publicly available, integrative database containing detailed information about the early steps of hematopoiesis. The resource aims at providing fast and easy access to relevant information, in particular to the complex network of interacting cell types and molecules, from the wealth of publications in the field through visualization interfaces. It provides structured information on more than 7000 experimentally validated interactions between molecules, bioprocesses and environmental factors. Information is manually derived by critical reading of the scientific literature from expert annotators. Hematopoiesis-relevant interactions are accompanied with context information such as model organisms and experimental methods for enabling assessment of reliability and relevance of experimental results. Usage of established vocabularies facilitates downstream bioinformatics applications and to convert the results into complex networks. Several predefined datasets (Selected topics offer insights into stem cell behavior, the stem cell niche and signaling processes supporting hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. HSC-Explorer provides a versatile web-based resource for scientists entering the field of hematopoiesis enabling users to inspect the associated biological processes through interactive graphical presentation.

  11. Clonal dominance and transplantation dynamics in hematopoietic stem cell compartments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ashcroft

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells in mammals are known to reside mostly in the bone marrow, but also transitively passage in small numbers in the blood. Experimental findings have suggested that they exist in a dynamic equilibrium, continuously migrating between these two compartments. Here we construct an individual-based mathematical model of this process, which is parametrised using existing empirical findings from mice. This approach allows us to quantify the amount of migration between the bone marrow niches and the peripheral blood. We use this model to investigate clonal hematopoiesis, which is a significant risk factor for hematologic cancers. We also analyse the engraftment of donor stem cells into non-conditioned and conditioned hosts, quantifying the impact of different treatment scenarios. The simplicity of the model permits a thorough mathematical analysis, providing deeper insights into the dynamics of both the model and of the real-world system. We predict the time taken for mutant clones to expand within a host, as well as chimerism levels that can be expected following transplantation therapy, and the probability that a preconditioned host is reconstituted by donor cells.

  12. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). We have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3-26.3 cGy d -1 ). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup (1), the failure to augment basic m-pair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments particularly marked within erythroid compartments. that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccomodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 ampersand 3 appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high- tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity

  13. Gene expression profiling in the inductive human hematopoietic microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongjun; Chen, Edwin; Li Liheng; Gong Baiwei; Xie Wei; Nanji, Shaherose; Dube, Ian D.; Hough, Margaret R.

    2004-01-01

    Human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and their progenitors can be maintained in vitro in long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMCs) in which constituent HSCs can persist within the adherent layers for up to 2 months. Media replenishment of LTBMCs has been shown to induce transition of HSCs from a quiescent state to an active cycling state. We hypothesize that the media replenishment of the LTBMCs leads to the activation of important regulatory genes uniquely involved in HSC proliferation and differentiation. To profile the gene expression changes associated with HSC activation, we performed suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) on day 14 human LTBMCs following 1-h media replenishment and on unmanipulated controls. The generated SSH library contained 191 differentially up-regulated expressed sequence tags (ESTs), the majority corresponding to known genes related to various intracellular processes, including signal transduction pathways, protein synthesis, and cell cycle regulation. Nineteen ESTs represented previously undescribed sequences encoding proteins of unknown function. Differential up-regulation of representative genes, including IL-8, IL-1, putative cytokine 21/HC21, MAD3, and a novel EST was confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Levels of fibronectin, G-CSF, and stem cell factor also increased in the conditioned media of LTBMCs as assessed by ELISA, indicating increased synthesis and secretion of these factors. Analysis of our library provides insights into some of the immediate early gene changes underlying the mechanisms by which the stromal elements within the LTBMCs contribute to the induction of HSC activation and provides the opportunity to identify as yet unrecognized factors regulating HSC activation in the LTBMC milieu

  14. Hematopoietic stem cell function in motheaten mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shultz, L.D.; Bailey, C.L.; Coman, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    Mice homozygous for the autosomal recessive mutation ''motheaten'' have normal numbers of multipotential hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow and spleen as determined by spleen colony assay. Histologic examination shows no qualitative abnormality in morphology of stem cell colonies in recipients of bone marrow or spleen cells from motheaten mice. Despite the apparently normal ontogeny, distribution, and differentiative capacity of CFU stem cells, bone marrow and spleen cells from motheaten mice fail to save congenic +/+ lethally gamma-irradiated hosts. This impaired lifesparing capacity is not due to defective self-renewal but appears to be due in part to pulmonary hemorrhage from alveolar capillaries in the gamma-irradiated hosts. Treatment of motheaten mice with 500 R gamma-irradiation followed by reconstitution with normal bone marrow cells increases the lifespan of this mutant to 10 months of age. The early onset of pneumonitis and subsequent short lifespan of motheaten mice is determined at the level of progenitor cells in the bone marrow

  15. Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate induces a newly discovered hematopoietic structure in the omentum of an anemic mouse model by stimulating G-CSF production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Hirotada; Yagi, Hideki; Endo, Yasuo; Soeta, Satoshi; Nonaka, Naoko; Nakamura, Masanori

    2017-02-01

    We previously reported that the injection of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate (NBP) induced the site of erythropoiesis to shift from the bone marrow (BM) to the spleen. Our previous study established a severely anemic mouse model that was treated with a combination of NBP with phenylhydrazine (PHZ), which induced newly discovered hematopoietic organs in the omentum. No reports have shown that new hematopoietic organs form under any condition. We characterized the structures and factors related to the formation of these new organs. Splenectomized mice were treated with NBP to inhibit erythropoiesis in the BM and then injected with PHZ to induce hemolytic anemia. The mice showed severe anemia and wine-colored structures appeared in the omentum. Some hematopoietic cells, including megakaryocytes, and well-developed sinuses were observed in these structures. Numerous TER119-positive erythroblasts were located with cells positive for PCNA, a cell proliferation marker. C-kit-positive cells were detected and mRNAs related to hematopoiesis were expressed in these structures. Moreover, TER119-positive erythroblasts emerged and formed clusters and hematopoiesis-related factors were detected in the omentum of mice treated with NBP and PHZ. The levels of G-CSF in the serum and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) in the peripheral blood were increased upon treatment with both NBP and PHZ. These results suggest that the induced hematopoietic structures act as the sites of erythropoiesis and that NBP-induced G-CSF production causes HPC mobilization, homing and colonization in the omentum because they constitutively express some factors, including SDF-1; thus, the newly discovered hematopoietic structure in this study might be formed.

  16. Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cell by fusion protein TAT-Zfx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chong; Zhang Yanbing; Jiang Hua

    2009-01-01

    The relative inability of hemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to reproduce themselves (self-renew) ex vivo imposes substantial limitations on the current use of HSC transplantation. Recently, the transcription factor Zfx has been demonstrated that played an important in controlling the self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells. Here, we reported that Zfx could enable high-level expansion of HSCs in vitro, by combination of protein transduction domain, TAT. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that expanded HSCs population retains their normal in vivo potential of pluripotency. It is thus that TAT-Zfx has the potential to expand HSCs significantly in vitro, and will have enormous clinical potentials.

  17. Viral Pneumonia in Patients with Hematologic Malignancy or Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Erik; Evans, Scott E

    2017-03-01

    Viral pneumonias in patients with hematologic malignancies and recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation cause significant morbidity and mortality. Advances in diagnostic techniques have enabled rapid identification of respiratory viral pathogens from upper and lower respiratory tract samples. Lymphopenia, myeloablative and T-cell depleting chemotherapy, graft-versus-host disease, and other factors increase the risk of developing life-threatening viral pneumonia. Chest imaging is often nonspecific but may aid in diagnoses. Bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is recommended in those at high risk for viral pneumonia who have new infiltrates on chest imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Direct observation of hematopoietic progenitor chimerism in fetal freemartin cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taponen Juhani

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cattle twins are well known as blood chimeras. However, chimerism in the actual hematopoietic progenitor compartment has not been directly investigated. Here, we analyzed fetal liver of chimeric freemartin cattle by combining a new anti-bovine CD34 antibody and Y-chromosome specific in situ hybridization. Results Bull-derived CD34+ cells were detected in the liver of the female sibling (freemartin at 60 days gestation. The level of bull-derived CD34+ cells was lower in the freemartin than in its male siblings. Bull (Y+ and cow hematopoietic cells often occurred in separate clusters. Around clusters of Y+CD34+ cells, Y+CD34- cells were typically observed. The thymi were also strongly chimeric at 60 days of gestation. Conclusion The fetal freemartin liver contains clusters of bull-derived hematopoietic progenitors, suggesting clonal expansion and differentiation. Even the roots of the hematopoietic system in cattle twins are thus strongly chimeric from the early stages of fetal development. However, the hematopoietic seeding of fetal liver apparently started already before the onset of functional vascular anastomosis.

  19. Hematopoietic defects in response to reduced Arhgap21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Xavier-Ferrucio

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Arhgap21 is a member of the Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP family, which function as negative regulators of Rho GTPases. Arhgap21 has been implicated in adhesion and migration of cancer cells. However, the role of Arhgap21 has never been investigated in hematopoietic cells. Herein, we evaluated functional aspects of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC using a haploinsufficient (Arhgap21+/− mouse. Our results show that Arhgap21+/− mice have an increased frequency of phenotypic HSC, impaired ability to form progenitor colonies in vitro and decreased hematopoietic engraftment in vivo, along with a decrease in LSK cell frequency during serial bone marrow transplantation. Arhgap21+/− hematopoietic progenitor cells have impaired adhesion and enhanced mobilization of immature LSK and myeloid progenitors. Arhgap21+/− mice also exhibit reduced erythroid commitment and differentiation, which was recapitulated in human primary cells, in which knockdown of ARHGAP21 in CMP and MEP resulted in decreased erythroid commitment. Finally, we observed enhanced RhoC activity in the bone marrow cells of Arhgap21+/− mice, indicating that Arhgap21 functions in hematopoiesis may be at least partially mediated by RhoC inactivation. Keywords: Arhgap21, Hematopoiesis, Erythroid cells, Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, Fate decision

  20. Bone marrow adipocytes as negative regulators of the hematopoietic microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveiras, Olaia; Nardi, Valentina; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Fahey, Frederic; Daley, George Q.

    2009-01-01

    Osteoblasts and endothelium constitute functional niches that support hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in mammalian bone marrow (BM) 1,2,3 . Adult BM also contains adipocytes, whose numbers correlate inversely with the hematopoietic activity of the marrow. Fatty infiltration of hematopoietic red marrow follows irradiation or chemotherapy and is a diagnostic feature in biopsies from patients with marrow aplasia 4. To explore whether adipocytes influence hematopoiesis or simply fill marrow space, we compared the hematopoietic activity of distinct regions of the mouse skeleton that differ in adiposity. By flow cytometry, colony forming activity, and competitive repopulation assay, HSCs and short-term progenitors are reduced in frequency in the adipocyte-rich vertebrae of the mouse tail relative to the adipocyte-free vertebrae of the thorax. In lipoatrophic A-ZIP/F1 “fatless” mice, which are genetically incapable of forming adipocytes8, and in mice treated with the PPARγ inhibitor Bisphenol-A-DiGlycidyl-Ether (BADGE), which inhibits adipogenesis9, post-irradiation marrow engraftment is accelerated relative to wild type or untreated mice. These data implicate adipocytes as predominantly negative regulators of the bone marrow microenvironment, and suggest that antagonizingmarrow adipogenesis may enhance hematopoietic recovery in clinical bone marrow transplantation. PMID:19516257

  1. Costo- Efectividad Del Uso Profiláctico Del Factor Estimulante De Colonias De Granulocitos En Adultos Con Leucemia Linfoblástica Aguda en Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadiego Rincón, Elkin Javier; Díaz Rojas, Jorge Augusto; Bermúdez, Carlos Daniel; Martínez, Víctor Prieto

    2016-12-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of prophylactic administration of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) compared with no use of it, during the induction phase of chemotherapy in Adults with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) in Colombia. A decision tree with a time horizon of 30 days was built under colombian health system perspective including only direct costs. The costs of procedures and medications were taken from official sources and an institution of national reference of oncology services. The safety and effectiveness data were taken from the literature and two Colombian cohorts with patients older than 15 years. The unit of outcome was the proportion of deaths avoided. Base-case results on a clinical trial indicate that using factor is a dominant strategy. The variable that most impacted the outcome was the incidence of febrile neutropenia. Considering a threshold of $22.228 USD in 80% of cases using factor was cost effective. However, the use of factor is not cost-effective for the country for incidences of febrile neutropenia > 48%. It was not possible to establish cost-effectiveness of pegfilgrastim because no information was found. As per Colombian data, the use of prophylactic factor under chemotherapeutic induction in adults with ALL, turns out to be not cost effective. The difference in the results suggests the need of a careful extrapolation of information from clinical trials (ideal world) for developing economic evaluations in Colombia. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A defined, feeder-free, serum-free system to generate in vitro hematopoietic progenitors and differentiated blood cells from hESCs and hiPSCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Salvagiotto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Human ESC and iPSC are an attractive source of cells of high quantity and purity to be used to elucidate early human development processes, for drug discovery, and in clinical cell therapy applications. To efficiently differentiate pluripotent cells into a pure population of hematopoietic progenitors we have developed a new 2-dimensional, defined and highly efficient protocol that avoids the use of feeder cells, serum or embryoid body formation. Here we showed that a single matrix protein in combination with growth factors and a hypoxic environment is sufficient to generate from pluripotent cells hematopoietic progenitors capable of differentiating further in mature cell types of different lineages of the blood system. We tested the differentiation method using hESCs and 9 iPSC lines generated from different tissues. These data indicate the robustness of the protocol providing a valuable tool for the generation of clinical-grade hematopoietic cells from pluripotent cells.

  3. PLAG1 and USF2 Co-regulate Expression of Musashi-2 in Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muluken S. Belew

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: MSI2, which is expressed predominantly in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs, enforces HSPC expansion when overexpressed and is upregulated in myeloid leukemias, indicating its regulated transcription is critical to balanced self-renewal and leukemia restraint. Despite this, little is understood of the factors that enforce appropriate physiological levels of MSI2 in the blood system. Here, we define a promoter region that reports on endogenous expression of MSI2 and identify USF2 and PLAG1 as transcription factors whose promoter binding drives reporter activity. We show that these factors co-regulate, and are required for, efficient transactivation of endogenous MSI2. Coincident overexpression of USF2 and PLAG1 in primitive cord blood cells enhanced MSI2 transcription and yielded cellular phenotypes, including expansion of CD34+ cells in vitro, consistent with that achieved by direct MSI2 overexpression. Global chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analyses confirm a preferential co-binding of PLAG1 and USF2 at the promoter of MSI2, as well as regulatory regions corresponding to genes with roles in HSPC homeostasis. PLAG1 and USF2 cooperation is thus an important contributor to stem cell-specific expression of MSI2 and HSPC-specific transcriptional circuitry. : MSI2 is an essential human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC regulator, but knowledge of the mechanisms ensuring its appropriate expression in this context are lacking. Here, Hope and colleagues map the MSI2 promoter functional in hematopoietic cells and identify USF2 and PLAG1 as essential, cooperative enforcers of endogenous MSI2 expression and stemness traits in human HSPCs. Keywords: human hematopoietic stem cells, self-renewal, promoter, transcriptional regulation, transcription factors, Musashi-2, genome-wide DNA binding site mapping, PLAG1, USF2

  4. Effect of stromal-cell-derived factor 1 on stem-cell homing and tissue regeneration in ischaemic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Arman T.; Unzek, Samuel; Popovic, Zoran B.; Goldman, Corey K.; Forudi, Farhad; Kiedrowski, Matthew; Rovner, Aleksandr; Ellis, Stephen G.; Thomas, James D.; DiCorleto, Paul E.; hide

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myocardial regeneration via stem-cell mobilisation at the time of myocardial infarction is known to occur, although the mechanism for stem-cell homing to infarcted tissue subsequently and whether this approach can be used for treatment of ischaemic cardiomyopathy are unknown. We investigated these issues in a Lewis rat model (ligation of the left anterior descending artery) of ischaemic cardiomyopathy. METHODS: We studied the effects of stem-cell mobilisation by use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (filgrastim) with or without transplantation of syngeneic cells. Shortening fraction and myocardial strain by tissue doppler imaging were quantified by echocardiography. FINDINGS: Stem-cell mobilisation with filgrastim alone did not lead to engraftment of bone-marrow-derived cells. Stromal-cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), required for stem-cell homing to bone marrow, was upregulated immediately after myocardial infarction and downregulated within 7 days. 8 weeks after myocardial infarction, transplantation into the peri-infarct zone of syngeneic cardiac fibroblasts stably transfected to express SDF-1 induced homing of CD117-positive stem cells to injured myocardium after filgrastim administration (control vs SDF-1-expressing cardiac fibroblasts mean 7.2 [SD 3.4] vs 33.2 [6.0] cells/mm2, n=4 per group, pcell homing to injured myocardium and suggest a strategy for directed stem-cell engraftment into injured tissues. Our findings also indicate that therapeutic strategies focused on stem-cell mobilisation for regeneration of myocardial tissue must be initiated within days of myocardial infarction unless signalling for stem-cell homing is re-established.

  5. Financial burden in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Nandita; Chang, Yu-hui; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Slack, James; Beebe, Timothy; Roy, Vivek; Noel, Pierre; Fauble, Veena; Sproat, Lisa; Tilburt, Jon; Leis, Jose F; Mikhael, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Although allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an expensive treatment for hematological disorders, little is known about the financial consequences for the patients who undergo this procedure. We analyzed factors associated with its financial burden and its impact on health behaviors of allogeneic HCT recipients. A questionnaire was retrospectively mailed to 482 patients who underwent allogeneic HCT from January 2006 to June 2012 at the Mayo Clinic, to collect information regarding current financial concerns, household income, employment, insurance, out-of-pocket expenses, and health and functional status. A multivariable logistic regression analysis identified factors associated with financial burden and treatment nonadherence. Of the 268 respondents (56% response rate), 73% reported that their sickness had hurt them financially. All patients for whom the insurance information was available (missing, n = 13) were insured. Forty-seven percent of respondents experienced financial burden, such as household income decreased by >50%, selling/mortgaging home, or withdrawing money from retirement accounts. Three percent declared bankruptcy. Younger age and poor current mental and physical functioning increased the likelihood of financial burden. Thirty-five percent of patients reported deleterious health behaviors because of financial constraints. These patients were likely to be younger, have lower education, and with a longer time since HCT. Being employed decreased the likelihood of experiencing financial burden and treatment nonadherence due to concern about costs. A significant proportion of allogeneic HCT survivors experience financial hardship despite insurance coverage. Future research should investigate potential interventions to help at-risk patients and prevent adverse financial outcomes after this life-saving procedure. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Persistent Fatigue in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher; Fink, Anne M; Peters, Tara; Park, Chang; Fantuzzi, Giamila; Rondelli, Damiano

    Fatigue is highly prevalent after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). It has been described as intense and may last for years following treatment. The aim of this study is to compare fatigue, physical activity, sleep, emotional distress, cognitive function, and biological measures in HCT survivors with persistent fatigue (n = 25) with age- and gender-matched healthy controls with occasional tiredness (n = 25). Data were collected using (a) objective, real-time assessments of physical activity and sleep over 7 days; (b) patient-reported fatigue assessments; (c) computerized objective testing of cognitive functioning; and (d) biological measures. Differences between groups were examined using multivariate analysis of variance. Survivors of HCT reported increased physical (P < .001), mental (P < .001), and overall (P < .001) fatigue as well as increased anxiety (P < .05) and depression (P < .01) compared with healthy controls. Red blood cell (RBC) levels were significantly lower in HCT survivors (P < .001). Levels of RBC for both groups, however, were in the normal range. Tumor necrosis factor-α (P < .001) and interleukin-6 (P < .05) levels were significantly higher in HCT survivors. Persistent fatigue in HCT survivors compared with healthy controls with occasional tiredness is accompanied by increased anxiety and depression along with decreased RBC counts. Elevated tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 levels may be important biomarkers. This study provides preliminary support for the conceptualization of fatigue as existing on a continuum, with tiredness anchoring one end and exhaustion the other. Persistent fatigue experienced by HCT survivors is more severe than the occasional tiredness of everyday life.

  7. Hematopoietic (stem) cell development — how divergent are the roads taken?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.-L. Kauts (Mari-Liis); C.S. Vink (Chris); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe development of the hematopoietic system during early embryonic stages occurs in spatially and temporally distinct waves. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the most potent and self-renewing cells of this system, are produced in the final ‘definitive’ wave of hematopoietic cell

  8. The Genetic Landscape of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Frequency in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Zhou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Prior efforts to identify regulators of hematopoietic stem cell physiology have relied mainly on candidate gene approaches with genetically modified mice. Here we used a genome-wide association study (GWAS strategy with the hybrid mouse diversity panel to identify the genetic determinants of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC frequency. Among 108 strains, we observed ∼120- to 300-fold variation in three HSPC populations. A GWAS analysis identified several loci that were significantly associated with HSPC frequency, including a locus on chromosome 5 harboring the homeodomain-only protein gene (Hopx. Hopx previously had been implicated in cardiac development but was not known to influence HSPC biology. Analysis of the HSPC pool in Hopx−/− mice demonstrated significantly reduced cell frequencies and impaired engraftment in competitive repopulation assays, thus providing functional validation of this positional candidate gene. These results demonstrate the power of GWAS in mice to identify genetic determinants of the hematopoietic system.

  9. Neural Crossroads in the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwala, Sobhika; Tamplin, Owen J

    2018-05-29

    The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche supports steady-state hematopoiesis and responds to changing needs during stress and disease. The nervous system is an important regulator of the niche, and its influence is established early in development when stem cells are specified. Most research has focused on direct innervation of the niche, however recent findings show there are different modes of neural control, including globally by the central nervous system (CNS) and hormone release, locally by neural crest-derived mesenchymal stem cells, and intrinsically by hematopoietic cells that express neural receptors and neurotransmitters. Dysregulation between neural and hematopoietic systems can contribute to disease, however new therapeutic opportunities may be found among neuroregulator drugs repurposed to support hematopoiesis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Proton MR spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Yasuo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan); Arai, Nobuyuki

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the findings of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow with those of normal bone marrow. Twenty-four samples of normal marrow from eight control subjects and 19 samples of hyperplastic marrow in aplastic anemia were examined with a 1.5 T MR unit. The former showed low intensity on opposed-phase T1-weighted images, while the latter showed high intensity on both fast STIR and opposed-phase T1-weighted images. MR spectroscopy quantitatively confirmed that the water; fat ratio was increased and the transverse relaxation time of water was changed in hyperplastic bone marrow, compared with normal bone marrow. In summary, MR imaging is able to detect hematopoietic regions among a wide range of bone marrow of aplastic anemia, while MR spectroscopy allowed us to quantitatively analyze the cell population of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia. (author)

  11. Proton MR spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yasuo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Arai, Nobuyuki.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the findings of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow with those of normal bone marrow. Twenty-four samples of normal marrow from eight control subjects and 19 samples of hyperplastic marrow in aplastic anemia were examined with a 1.5 T MR unit. The former showed low intensity on opposed-phase T1-weighted images, while the latter showed high intensity on both fast STIR and opposed-phase T1-weighted images. MR spectroscopy quantitatively confirmed that the water; fat ratio was increased and the transverse relaxation time of water was changed in hyperplastic bone marrow, compared with normal bone marrow. In summary, MR imaging is able to detect hematopoietic regions among a wide range of bone marrow of aplastic anemia, while MR spectroscopy allowed us to quantitatively analyze the cell population of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia. (author)

  12. The Chromatin Remodeler BPTF Activates a Stemness Gene-Expression Program Essential for the Maintenance of Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bowen; Cai, Ling; Butler, Jason M; Chen, Dongliang; Lu, Xiongdong; Allison, David F; Lu, Rui; Rafii, Shahin; Parker, Joel S; Zheng, Deyou; Wang, Gang Greg

    2018-03-13

    Self-renewal and differentiation of adult stem cells are tightly regulated partly through configuration of chromatin structure by chromatin remodelers. Using knockout mice, we here demonstrate that bromodomain PHD finger transcription factor (BPTF), a component of the nucleosome remodeling factor (NURF) chromatin-remodeling complex, is essential for maintaining the population size of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), including long-term hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Bptf-deficient HSCs are defective in reconstituted hematopoiesis, and hematopoietic-specific knockout of Bptf caused profound defects including bone marrow failure and anemia. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling revealed that BPTF loss caused downregulation of HSC-specific gene-expression programs, which contain several master transcription factors (Meis1, Pbx1, Mn1, and Lmo2) required for HSC maintenance and self-renewal. Furthermore, we show that BPTF potentiates the chromatin accessibility of key HSC "stemness" genes. These results demonstrate an essential requirement of the chromatin remodeler BPTF and NURF for activation of "stemness" gene-expression programs and proper function of adult HSCs. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Complications of hematopoietic stem transplantation: Fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani, Ali S; Almaghrabi, Reem S

    2017-12-01

    Patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at increased risk of invasive fungal infections, especially during the early neutropenic phase and severe graft-versus-host disease. Mold-active prophylaxis should be limited to the highest risk groups. Empiric antifungal therapy for HSCT with persistent febrile neutropenia is associated with unacceptable response rates, unnecessary antifungal therapy, increased risk of toxicity, and inflated costs. Empiric therapy should not be a substitute for detailed work up to identify the cause of fever in such patients. The improved diagnostic performance of serum biomarkers such as galactomannan and β-D-glucan, as well as polymerase chain reaction assays has allowed the development of diagnostic-driven antifungal therapy strategies for high risk patients. Diagnostic-driven approaches have resulted in reduced unnecessary antifungal exposure, improved diagnosis of invasive fungal disease, and reduced costs without increased risk of mortality. The appropriateness of diagnostic-driven antifungal strategy for individual HSCT centers depends on the availability and turnaround times for diagnostics, multidisciplinary expertise, and the local epidemiology of invasive fungal infections. Echinocandins are the treatment of choice for invasive candidiasis in most HSCT recipients. Fluconazole may be used for the treatment of invasive candidiasis in hemodynamically stable patients with no prior azole exposure. The primary treatment of choice for invasive aspergillosis is voriconazole. Alternatives include isavuconazole and lipid formulations of amphotericin. Currently available evidence does not support routine primary combination antifungal therapy for invasive aspergillosis. However, combination salvage antifungal therapy may be considered in selected patients. Therapeutic drug monitoring is recommended for the majority of HSCT recipients on itraconazole, posaconazole, or voriconazole. Copyright © 2017

  14. Plaquing procedure for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J.A.; Mulcahy, D.

    1980-01-01

    A single overlay plaque assay was designed and evaluated for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus. Epithelioma papillosum carpio cells were grown in normal atmosphere with tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane- or HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid)-buffered media. Plaques were larger and formed more quickly on 1- to 3-day-old cell monolayers than on older monolayers. Cell culture medium with a 10% addition of fetal calf serum (MEM 10) or without serum (MEM 0) were the most efficient virus diluents. Dilution with phosphate-buffered saline, saline, normal broth, or deionized water reduced plaque numbers. Variations in the pH (7.0 to 8.0) of a MEM 0 diluent did not affect plaque numbers. Increasing the volume of viral inoculum above 0.15 ml (15- by 60-mm plate) decreased plaquing efficiency. Significantly more plaques occurred under gum tragacanth and methylcellulose than under agar or agarose overlays. Varying the pH (6.8 to 7.4) of methylcellulose overlays did not significantly change plaque numbers. More plaques formed under the thicker overlays of both methylcellulose and gum tragacanth. Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and HEPES performed equally well, buffering either medium or overlay. Plaque numbers were reduced when cells were rinsed after virus adsorption or less than 1 h was allowed for adsorption. Variation in adsorption time between 60 and 180 min did not change plaque numbers. The mean plaque formation time was 7 days at 16 degrees C. The viral dose response was linear when the standardized assay was used.

  15. Strength Training Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher; Larson, Janet; Kujath, Amber; Peace, David; Rondelli, Damiano; Gaston, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) experience considerable reductions in physical activity and deterioration of their health status. Objective The purpose of this pilot study was to test the effects of strength training compared to usual activity on physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions, and quality of life following HSCT. Interventions/Methods Nineteen subjects were randomized to the exercise or control group. Moderate intensity strength training began following discharge from the hospital. Dependent variables included physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions and quality of life. Variables were measured prior to admission to the hospital for HSCT, day 8 following HSCT, and six weeks following discharge from the hospital. Results Significant time effects were noted for many variables with anticipated declines in physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, and health status perceptions immediately after HSCT with subsequent improvements six weeks following hospital discharge. One group effect was noted with subjects in the exercise group reporting less fatigue than subjects in the control group. Although no significant interactions were detected, the trends suggest that the exercise group may be more physically active following the intervention compared to the usual activity group. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential positive effects of strength training on physical activity, fatigue, and quality of life in people receiving high-dose chemotherapy and HSCT. Implications for Practice Preliminary evidence is provided for using strength training to enhance early recovery following HSCT. Elastic resistance bands are easy to use and relatively inexpensive. PMID:21116175

  16. Hematopoietic Gene Therapies for Metabolic and Neurologic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Alessandra

    2017-10-01

    Increasingly, patients affected by metabolic diseases affecting the central nervous system and neuroinflammatory disorders receive hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in the attempt to slow the course of their disease, delay or attenuate symptoms, and improve pathologic findings. The possible replacement of brain-resident myeloid cells by the transplanted cell progeny contributes to clinical benefit. Genetic engineering of the cells to be transplanted (hematopoietic stem cell) may endow the brain myeloid progeny of these cells with enhanced or novel functions, contributing to therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. In vivo effects of myeloablative alkylator therapy on survival and differentiation of MGMTP140K-transduced human G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shanbao; Hartwell, Jennifer R; Cooper, Ryan J; Juliar, Beth E; Kreklau, Emi; Abonour, Rafat; Goebel, W Scott; Pollok, Karen E

    2006-05-01

    High-intensity alkylator-based chemotherapy is required to eradicate tumors expressing high levels of O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). This treatment, however, can lead to life-threatening myelosuppression. We investigated a gene therapy strategy to protect human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood CD34+ cells (MPB) from a high-intensity alkylator-based regimen. We transduced MPB with an oncoretroviral vector that coexpresses MGMT(P140K) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (n = 5 donors). At 4 weeks posttransplantation into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice, cohorts were not treated or were treated with low- or high-intensity alkylating chemotherapy. In the high-intensity-treated cohort, it was necessary to infuse NOD/SCID bone marrow (BM) to alleviate hematopoietic toxicity. At 8 weeks posttreatment, human CD45+ cells in the BM of mice treated with either regimen were EGFP+ and contained MGMT-specific DNA repair activity. In cohorts receiving low-intensity therapy, both primitive and mature hematopoietic cells were present in the BM. Although B-lymphoid and myeloid cells were resistant to in vivo drug treatment in cohorts that received high-intensity therapy, no human CD34+ cells or B-cell precursors were detected. These data suggest that improved strategies to optimize repair of DNA damage in primitive human hematopoietic cells are needed when using high-intensity anti-cancer therapy.

  18. Attenuative effects of G-CSF in radiation induced intestinal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joong Sun; Gong, Eun Ji; Kim, Sung Dae; Heo, Kyu; Ryoo, Seung Bum; Yang, Kwang Mo

    2011-01-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been reported to protect from radiationinduced myelosuppression. Growing evidence suggests that G-CSF also has many important non-hematopoietic functions in other tissues, including the intestine (Kim et al., 2010; Kim et al., 2011). However, little is known about the influence of G-CSF on intestinal injury. Examination 12 hours after radiation (5 Gy) revealed that the G-CSF treated mice were significantly protected from apoptosis of jejunal crypt, compared with radiation controls. G-CSF treatment attenuated intestinal morphological changes such as decreased survival crypt, the number of villi, villous shortening, crypt depth and length of basal lamina of 10 enterocytes compared with the radiation control 3.5 days after radiation (10 Gy). G-CSF attenuated the change of peripheral blood from radiation-induced myelosuppression and displayed attenuation of mortality in lethally-irradiated (10 Gy) mice. The present results support the suggestion that G-CSF administrated prior to radiation plays an important role in the survival of irradiated mice, possibly due to the protection of hematopoietic cells and intestinal stem cells against radiation. The results indicate that G-CSF protects from radiation-mediated intestinal damage and from hematopoietic injury. G-CSF treatment may be useful clinically in the prevention of injury following radiation.

  19. Mitigation of radiation induced hematopoietic injury via regulation of Nrf-2 and increasing hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patwardhan, R.S.; Sharma, Deepak; Checker, Rahul; Santosh Kumar, S.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation (IR) that can be delivered to tumors are restricted due to radiation induced damage to surrounding normal tissues thereby limiting the effectiveness of radiotherapy. Strategies to develop agents that selectively protect normal cells yielded limited success in the past. There is pressing need to develop safe, syndrome specific and effective radiation countermeasures to prevent or mitigate the harmful consequences of radiation exposure. Survival of bone marrow stem cells (HSCs) play a key role in protecting against IR induced hematopoietic injury. Many studies have shown manipulation of HSC frequency and/or survival as principal mechanism of radioprotection. It is known that, Nrf-2 plays crucial role in HSC survival and maintenance under oxidative stress conditions. In the present study, we have investigated the radioprotective ability of a flavonoid baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), extracted from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, a medicinal plant traditionally used in Oriental medicine. There are numerous reports showing anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-microbial, anti-mutagenic and neuroprotective properties of baicalein. Based on these reports, we have investigated the ability of baicalein to protect against radiation induced hematopoietic injury. Baicalein administration to mice protected against WBI induced mortality. Interestingly, the stem cell frequency increased in bone marrow cells obtained from baicalein administered mice as compared to vehicle treated mice. Baicalein treatment led to increased phospho-Nrf-2 levels in lineage negative BM-MNC. Administration of mice with Nrf-2 inhibitor prior to baicalein treatment led to significant abrogation of radioprotective ability of baicalein. This result suggests that, Nrf-2 may be playing a key role in baicalein mediated radioprotection. Here, we have shown that baicalein administration augments stem cell frequency, induces

  20. Neutrophil-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium is facilitated by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of different cytokines that are present in tumour-conditioned medium on human neutrophil (PMN)-induced tumour cell transmigration. DESIGN: Laboratory study. SETTING: University hospital, Ireland. MATERIAL: Isolated human PMN and cultured human breast tumour cell line, MDA-MB-231. Interventions: Human PMN treated with either tumour-conditioned medium or different media neutralised with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), and MDA-MB-231 cells were plated on macrovascular and microvascular endothelial monolayers in collagen-coated transwells to assess migration of tumour cells. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cytokines present in tumour-conditioned medium, PMN cytocidal function and receptor expression, and tumour cell transmigration. RESULTS: tumour-conditioned medium contained high concentrations of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and interleukin 8 (IL-8), but not granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin 3 (IL-3). Anti-GM-CSF MoAb significantly reduced PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05), whereas anti-VEGF and anti-IL-8 MoAbs did not affect their migration. In addition, anti-GM-CSF MoAb, but not anti-VEGF or anti-IL-8 MoAb, reduced PMN CD11b and CD18 overexpression induced by tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: These results indicate that the GM-CSF that is present in tumour-conditioned medium may be involved, at least in part, in alterations in PMN function mediated by the medium and subsequently PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells.

  1. Reduced Erg Dosage Impairs Survival of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ying; Koch, Mia Lee; Zhang, Xin; Hamblen, Melanie J; Godinho, Frank J; Fujiwara, Yuko; Xie, Huafeng; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Orkin, Stuart H; Li, Zhe

    2017-07-01

    ERG, an ETS family transcription factor frequently overexpressed in human leukemia, has been implicated as a key regulator of hematopoietic stem cells. However, how ERG controls normal hematopoiesis, particularly at the stem and progenitor cell level, and how it contributes to leukemogenesis remain incompletely understood. Using homologous recombination, we generated an Erg knockdown allele (Erg kd ) in which Erg expression can be conditionally restored by Cre recombinase. Erg kd/kd animals die at E10.5-E11.5 due to defects in endothelial and hematopoietic cells, but can be completely rescued by Tie2-Cre-mediated restoration of Erg in these cells. In Erg kd/+ mice, ∼40% reduction in Erg dosage perturbs both fetal liver and bone marrow hematopoiesis by reducing the numbers of Lin - Sca-1 + c-Kit + (LSK) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and megakaryocytic progenitors. By genetic mosaic analysis, we find that Erg-restored HSPCs outcompete Erg kd/+ HSPCs for contribution to adult hematopoiesis in vivo. This defect is in part due to increased apoptosis of HSPCs with reduced Erg dosage, a phenotype that becomes more drastic during 5-FU-induced stress hematopoiesis. Expression analysis reveals that reduced Erg expression leads to changes in expression of a subset of ERG target genes involved in regulating survival of HSPCs, including increased expression of a pro-apoptotic regulator Bcl2l11 (Bim) and reduced expression of Jun. Collectively, our data demonstrate that ERG controls survival of HSPCs, a property that may be used by leukemic cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:1773-1785. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  2. Subsequent donation requests among 2472 unrelated hematopoietic progenitor cell donors are associated with bone marrow harvest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, Robert N.; Tulpule, Sameer; Russell, Nigel H.; Craddock, Charles F.; Roest, Rochelle; Madrigal, J. Alejandro; Shaw, Bronwen E.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 20 unrelated donors are asked to make a second donation of hematopoietic progenitor cells, the majority for the same patient. Anthony Nolan undertook a study of subsequent hematopoietic progenitor cell donations made by its donors from 2005 to 2011, with the aims of predicting those donors more likely to be called for a second donation, assessing rates of serious adverse reactions and examining harvest yields. This was not a study of factors predictive of second allografts. During the study period 2591 donations were made, of which 120 (4.6%) were subsequent donations. The median time between donations was 179 days (range, 21–4016). Indications for a second allogeneic transplant included primary graft failure (11.7%), secondary graft failure (53.2%), relapse (30.6%) and others (1.8%). On multivariate analysis, bone marrow harvest at first donation was associated with subsequent donation requests (odds ratio 2.00, P=0.001). The rate of serious adverse reactions in donors making a subsequent donation appeared greater than the rate in those making a first donation (relative risk=3.29, P=0.005). Harvest yields per kilogram recipient body weight were equivalent between donations, although females appeared to have a lower yield at the subsequent donation. Knowledge of these factors will help unrelated donor registries to counsel their donors. PMID:23812935

  3. The SKI proto-oncogene enhances the in vivo repopulation of hematopoietic stem cells and causes myeloproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singbrant, Sofie; Wall, Meaghan; Moody, Jennifer; Karlsson, Göran; Chalk, Alistair M; Liddicoat, Brian; Russell, Megan R; Walkley, Carl R; Karlsson, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    The proto-oncogene SKI is highly expressed in human myeloid leukemia and also in murine hematopoietic stem cells. However, its operative relevance in these cells remains elusive. We have over-expressed SKI to define its intrinsic role in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms, which resulted in a robust competitive advantage upon transplantation, a complete dominance of the stem and progenitor compartments, and a marked enhancement of myeloid differentiation at the expense of other lineages. Accordingly, enforced expression of SKI induced a gene signature associated with hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid differentiation, as well as hepatocyte growth factor signaling. Here we demonstrate that, in contrast to what has generally been assumed, the significant impact of SKI on hematopoiesis is independent of its ability to inhibit TGF-beta signaling. Instead, myeloid progenitors expressing SKI are partially dependent on functional hepatocyte growth factor signaling. Collectively our results demonstrate that SKI is an important regulator of hematopoietic stem cell activity and its overexpression leads to myeloproliferative disease.

  4. MicroRNAs and Metabolites in Serum Change after Chemotherapy: Impact on Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Walenda

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic regeneration after high dose chemotherapy necessitates activation of the stem cell pool. There is evidence that serum taken after chemotherapy comprises factors stimulating proliferation and self-renewal of CD34(+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs--however, the nature of these feedback signals is yet unclear. Here, we addressed the question if specific microRNAs (miRNAs or metabolites are affected after high dose chemotherapy. Serum taken from the same patients before and after chemotherapy was supplemented for in vitro cultivation of HSPCs. Serum taken after chemotherapy significantly enhanced HSPC proliferation, better maintained a CD34(+ immunophenotype, and stimulated colony forming units. Microarray analysis revealed that 23 miRNAs changed in serum after chemotherapy--particularly, miRNA-320c and miRNA-1275 were down-regulated whereas miRNA-3663-3p was up-regulated. miRNA-320c was exemplarily inhibited by an antagomiR, which seemed to increase proliferation. Metabolomic profiling demonstrated that 44 metabolites were less abundant, whereas three (including 2-hydroxybutyrate and taurocholenate sulphate increased in serum upon chemotherapy. Nine of these metabolites were subsequently tested for effects on HSPCs in vitro, but none of them exerted a clear concentration dependent effect on proliferation, immunophenotype and colony forming unit formation. Taken together, serum profiles of miRNAs and metabolites changed after chemotherapy. Rather than individually, these factors may act in concert to recruit HSPCs into action for hematopoietic regeneration.

  5. Integrated analysis of hematopoietic differentiation outcomes and molecular characterization reveals unbiased differentiation capacity and minor transcriptional memory in HPC/HSC-iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuai; Hou, Xinfeng; Jiang, Yonghua; Xu, Zijian; Cai, Tao; Chen, Jiajie; Chang, Gang

    2017-01-23

    Transcription factor-mediated reprogramming can reset the epigenetics of somatic cells into a pluripotency compatible state. Recent studies show that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) always inherit starting cell-specific characteristics, called epigenetic memory, which may be advantageous, as directed differentiation into specific cell types is still challenging; however, it also may be unpredictable when uncontrollable differentiation occurs. In consideration of biosafety in disease modeling and personalized medicine, the availability of high-quality iPSCs which lack a biased differentiation capacity and somatic memory could be indispensable. Herein, we evaluate the hematopoietic differentiation capacity and somatic memory state of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cell (HPC/HSC)-derived-iPSCs (HPC/HSC-iPSCs) using a previously established sequential reprogramming system. We found that HPC/HSCs are amenable to being reprogrammed into iPSCs with unbiased differentiation capacity to hematopoietic progenitors and mature hematopoietic cells. Genome-wide analyses revealed that no global epigenetic memory was detectable in HPC/HSC-iPSCs, but only a minor transcriptional memory of HPC/HSCs existed in a specific tetraploid complementation (4 N)-incompetent HPC/HSC-iPSC line. However, the observed minor transcriptional memory had no influence on the hematopoietic differentiation capacity, indicating the reprogramming of the HPC/HSCs was nearly complete. Further analysis revealed the correlation of minor transcriptional memory with the aberrant distribution of H3K27me3. This work provides a comprehensive framework for obtaining high-quality iPSCs from HPC/HSCs with unbiased hematopoietic differentiation capacity and minor transcriptional memory.

  6. Reexamination of the role of hematopoietic organs on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... Sciences, 300 Fenglin Rd. Shanghai 200032, P.R. China. ... Key words: Hematopoietic organ, wing disc, hemocytes, surgical operation, silkworm, ... They were reared on artificial diet at 25°C under a 16 h ..... The image was.

  7. Mismatch repair deficient hematopoietic stem cells are preleukemic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulan Qing

    Full Text Available Whereas transformation events in hematopoietic malignancies may occur at different developmental stages, the initial mutation originates in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, creating a preleukemic stem cell (PLSC. Subsequent mutations at either stem cell or progenitor cell levels transform the PLSC into lymphoma/leukemia initiating cells (LIC. Thymic lymphomas have been thought to develop from developing thymocytes. T cell progenitors are generated from HSCs in the bone marrow (BM, but maturation and proliferation of T cells as well as T-lymphomagenesis depends on both regulatory mechanisms and microenvironment within the thymus. We studied PLSC linked to thymic lymphomas. In this study, we use MSH2-/- mice as a model to investigate the existence of PLSC and the evolution of PLSC to LIC. Following BM transplantation, we found that MSH2-/- BM cells from young mice are able to fully reconstitute multiple hematopoietic lineages of lethally irradiated wild-type recipients. However, all recipients developed thymic lymphomas within three and four months post transplantation. Transplantation of different fractions of BM cells or thymocytes from young health MSH2-/- mice showed that an HSC enriched fraction always reconstituted hematopoiesis followed by lymphoma development. In addition, lymphomas did not occur in thymectomized recipients of MSH2-/- BM. These results suggest that HSCs with DNA repair defects such as MSH2-/- are PLSCs because they retain hematopoietic function, but also carry an obligate lymphomagenic potential within their T-cell progeny that is dependent on the thymic microenvironment.

  8. Polycomb group proteins in hematopoietic stem cell aging and malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klauke, Karin; de Haan, Gerald

    Protection of the transcriptional "stemness" network is important to maintain a healthy hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) compartment during the lifetime of the organism. Recent evidence shows that fundamental changes in the epigenetic status of HSCs might be one of the driving forces behind many

  9. Hematopoietic stem cell aging and self-renewal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dykstra, Brad; de Haan, Gerald

    A functional decline of the immune system occurs during organismal aging that is attributable, in large part, to changes in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment. In the mouse, several hallmark age-dependent changes in the HSC compartment have been identified, including an increase in HSC

  10. Childhood Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation involves the infusion of blood stem cells (peripheral/umbilical cord blood, bone marrow) into a patient to reconstitute the blood system. Get detailed information about autologous and allogeneic transplant, including cell selection, HLA matching, and preparative regimens, and the acute complications and late effects of treatment in this summary for clinicians.

  11. Placenta as a source of hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine); C. Robin (Catherine)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe placenta is a large, highly vascularised hematopoietic tissue that functions during the embryonic and foetal development of eutherian mammals. Although recognised as the interface tissue important in the exchange of oxygen, nutrients and waste products between the foetus and mother,