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Sample records for helper bacterium streptomyces

  1. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacterium Streptomyces sp. Strain AcH 505.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkka, M T; Feldhahn, L; Buscot, F; Wubet, T

    2015-04-02

    A draft genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. strain AcH 505 is presented here. The genome encodes 22 secondary metabolite gene clusters and a large arsenal of secreted proteins, and their comparative and functional analyses will help to advance our knowledge of symbiotic interactions and fungal and plant biomass degradation.

  2. Mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces AcH 505 induces differential gene expression in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrey, Silvia D; Schellhammer, Michael; Ecke, Margret; Hampp, Rüdiger; Tarkka, Mika T

    2005-10-01

    The interaction between the mycorrhiza helper bacteria Streptomyces nov. sp. 505 (AcH 505) and Streptomyces annulatus 1003 (AcH 1003) with fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) and spruce (Picea abies) was investigated. The effects of both bacteria on the mycelial growth of different ectomycorrhizal fungi, on ectomycorrhiza formation, and on fungal gene expression in dual culture with AcH 505 were determined. The fungus specificities of the streptomycetes were similar. Both bacterial species showed the strongest effect on the growth of mycelia at 9 wk of dual culture. The effect of AcH 505 on gene expression of A. muscaria was examined using the suppressive subtractive hybridization approach. The responsive fungal genes included those involved in signalling pathways, metabolism, cell structure, and the cell growth response. These results suggest that AcH 505 and AcH 1003 enhance mycorrhiza formation mainly as a result of promotion of fungal growth, leading to changes in fungal gene expression. Differential A. muscaria transcript accumulation in dual culture may result from a direct response to bacterial substances.

  3. Interaction with mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces sp. AcH 505 modifies organisation of actin cytoskeleton in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria (fly agaric).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrey, Silvia D; Salo, Vanamo; Raudaskoski, Marjatta; Hampp, Rüdiger; Nehls, Uwe; Tarkka, Mika T

    2007-08-01

    The actin cytoskeleton (AC) of fungal hyphae is a major determinant of hyphal shape and morphogenesis, implicated in controlling tip structure and secretory vesicle delivery. Hyphal growth of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria and symbiosis formation with spruce are promoted by the mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces sp. AcH 505 (AcH 505). To investigate structural requirements of growth promotion, the effect of AcH 505 on A. muscaria hyphal morphology, AC and actin gene expression were studied. Hyphal diameter and mycelial density decreased during dual culture (DC), and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the dense and polarised actin cap in hyphal tips of axenic A. muscaria changes to a loosened and dispersed structure in DC. Supplementation of growth medium with cell-free bacterial supernatant confirmed that reduction in hyphal diameter and AC changes occurred at the same stage of growth. Transcript levels of both actin genes isolated from A. muscaria remained unaltered, indicating that AC changes are regulated by reorganisation of the existing actin pool. In conclusion, the AC reorganisation appears to result in altered hyphal morphology and faster apical extension. The thus improved spreading of hyphae and increased probability to encounter plant roots highlights a mechanism behind the mycorrhiza helper effect.

  4. Auxofuran, a Novel Metabolite That Stimulates the Growth of Fly Agaric, Is Produced by the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacterium Streptomyces Strain AcH 505†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedlinger, Julia; Schrey, Silvia D.; Tarkka, Mika T.; Hampp, Rüdiger; Kapur, Manmohan; Fiedler, Hans-Peter

    2006-01-01

    The mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces strain AcH 505 improves mycelial growth of ectomycorrhizal fungi and formation of ectomycorrhizas between Amanita muscaria and spruce but suppresses the growth of plant-pathogenic fungi, suggesting that it produces both fungal growth-stimulating and -suppressing compounds. The dominant fungal-growth-promoting substance produced by strain AcH 505, auxofuran, was isolated, and its effect on the levels of gene expression of A. muscaria was investigated. Auxofuran and its synthetic analogue 7-dehydroxy-auxofuran were most effective at a concentration of 15 μM, and application of these compounds led to increased lipid metabolism-related gene expression. Cocultivation of strain AcH 505 and A. muscaria stimulated auxofuran production by the streptomycete. The antifungal substances produced by strain AcH 505 were identified as the antibiotics WS-5995 B and C. WS-5995 B completely blocked mycelial growth at a concentration of 60 μM and caused a cell stress-related gene expression response in A. muscaria. Characterization of these compounds provides the foundation for molecular analysis of the fungus-bacterium interaction in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between fly agaric and spruce. PMID:16672502

  5. Auxofuran, a novel metabolite that stimulates the growth of fly agaric, is produced by the mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces strain AcH 505.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedlinger, Julia; Schrey, Silvia D; Tarkka, Mika T; Hampp, Rüdiger; Kapur, Manmohan; Fiedler, Hans-Peter

    2006-05-01

    The mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces strain AcH 505 improves mycelial growth of ectomycorrhizal fungi and formation of ectomycorrhizas between Amanita muscaria and spruce but suppresses the growth of plant-pathogenic fungi, suggesting that it produces both fungal growth-stimulating and -suppressing compounds. The dominant fungal-growth-promoting substance produced by strain AcH 505, auxofuran, was isolated, and its effect on the levels of gene expression of A. muscaria was investigated. Auxofuran and its synthetic analogue 7-dehydroxy-auxofuran were most effective at a concentration of 15 microM, and application of these compounds led to increased lipid metabolism-related gene expression. Cocultivation of strain AcH 505 and A. muscaria stimulated auxofuran production by the streptomycete. The antifungal substances produced by strain AcH 505 were identified as the antibiotics WS-5995 B and C. WS-5995 B completely blocked mycelial growth at a concentration of 60 microM and caused a cell stress-related gene expression response in A. muscaria. Characterization of these compounds provides the foundation for molecular analysis of the fungus-bacterium interaction in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between fly agaric and spruce.

  6. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhizal Helper Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8. This is the first genome of a mycorrhizal helper bacterium. The draft genome contains 6,952,353 bp and is predicted to encode 6,317 open reading frames. Comparative genomic analyses will help to identify helper traits.

  7. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhizal Helper Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, A; Gross, H; Morin, E; Karpinets, T; Utturkar, S; Mehnaz, S; Martin, F; Frey-Klett, P; Labbé, J

    2014-01-09

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8. This is the first genome of a mycorrhizal helper bacterium. The draft genome contains 6,952,353 bp and is predicted to encode 6,317 open reading frames. Comparative genomic analyses will help to identify helper traits.

  8. Genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deveau, Aurelie [French National Insitute for Agricultural Research (INRA); Grob, Harald [University of Bonn, Germany; Morin, Emmanuelle [INRA, Nancy, France; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Mehnaz, Samina [University of the Punjab, Pakistan; Kurz, Sven [University of Bonn, Germany; Martin, Francis [INRA, Nancy, France; Frey-Klett, Pascale [INRA, Nancy, France; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhiza helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8 . Several traits which could be involved in the mycorrhiza helper ability of the bacterial strain such as multiple secretion systems, auxin metabolism and phosphate mobilization were evidenced in the genome.

  9. Inactivation of Glutamine Synthetase by Ammonia Shock in the Gram-Positive Bacterium Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, R; Synder, L; Kaplan, L

    1982-10-01

    In cultures of the gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces cattleya, a rapid inactivation of glutamine synthetase was seen after ammonia shock. pH activity curves for ammonia-shocked and control cultures are shown. A peak of glutamine synthetase activity was seen during fermentation for production of the antibiotic thienamycin.

  10. Inactivation of Glutamine Synthetase by Ammonia Shock in the Gram-Positive Bacterium Streptomyces cattleya

    OpenAIRE

    Wax, Richard; Synder, Linda; Kaplan, Louis

    1982-01-01

    In cultures of the gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces cattleya, a rapid inactivation of glutamine synthetase was seen after ammonia shock. pH activity curves for ammonia-shocked and control cultures are shown. A peak of glutamine synthetase activity was seen during fermentation for production of the antibiotic thienamycin.

  11. Fluoroacetate biosynthesis from the marine-derived bacterium Streptomyces xinghaiensis NRRL B-24674.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng; Ma, Long; Tong, Ming Him; Yu, Yi; O'Hagan, David; Deng, Hai

    2014-07-21

    Genome sequencing identified a fluorinase gene in the marine bacterium Streptomyces xinghaiensis NRRL B-24674. Fermentation of the organism with inorganic fluoride (2 mM) demonstrated that the organism could biosynthesise fluoroacetate and that fluoroacetate production is sea-salt dependent. This is the first fluorometabolite producing microorganism identified from the marine environment.

  12. Large scale transcriptome analysis reveals interplay between development of forest trees and a beneficial mycorrhiza helper bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Kurth, Florence; Feldhahn, Lasse; Bönn, Markus; Herrmann, Sylvie; Buscot, François; Tarkka, Mika T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pedunculate oak, Quercus robur is an abundant forest tree species that hosts a large and diverse community of beneficial ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMFs), whereby ectomycorrhiza (EM) formation is stimulated by mycorrhiza helper bacteria such as Streptomyces sp. AcH 505. Oaks typically grow rhythmically, with alternating root flushes (RFs) and shoot flushes (SFs). We explored the poorly understood mechanisms by which oaks integrate signals induced by their beneficial microbes and endoge...

  13. TOF-SIMS investigation of Streptomyces coelicolor, a mycelial bacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, Seetharaman [Surface Analytical Research Centre, Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: S.Vaidyanathan@manchester.ac.uk; Fletcher, John S.; Lockyer, Nicholas P.; Vickerman, John C. [Surface Analytical Research Centre, Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Streptomyces coelicolor is a mycelial microorganism that produces several secondary metabolites, including antibiotics. The physiology of the organism has largely been investigated in liquid cultures due to ease of monitoring different physiological parameters and more homogeneous culture conditions. However, solid cultures reflect the natural physiology of the microorganism better, given that in its natural state it grows in the soil. Imaging mass spectrometry with TOF-SIMS and C{sub 60}{sup +} primary ion beams offers a potential route to studying chemical changes at the molecular level, both intracellular and extracellular that can help in understanding the natural physiology of the microorganism. Here, we report the application of the technique for studying the lateral distribution of the chemical species detected in a population, grown in both liquid and solid cultures. The capability of the technique for studying biological systems with minimal system intervention is demonstrated.

  14. TOF-SIMS investigation of Streptomyces coelicolor, a mycelial bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Seetharaman; Fletcher, John S.; Lockyer, Nicholas P.; Vickerman, John C.

    2008-12-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor is a mycelial microorganism that produces several secondary metabolites, including antibiotics. The physiology of the organism has largely been investigated in liquid cultures due to ease of monitoring different physiological parameters and more homogeneous culture conditions. However, solid cultures reflect the natural physiology of the microorganism better, given that in its natural state it grows in the soil. Imaging mass spectrometry with TOF-SIMS and C 60+ primary ion beams offers a potential route to studying chemical changes at the molecular level, both intracellular and extracellular that can help in understanding the natural physiology of the microorganism. Here, we report the application of the technique for studying the lateral distribution of the chemical species detected in a population, grown in both liquid and solid cultures. The capability of the technique for studying biological systems with minimal system intervention is demonstrated.

  15. Regulation of glutamine synthetase activity by adenylylation in the Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streicher, S L; Tyler, B

    1981-01-01

    The enzymatic activity of glutamine synthetase [GS; L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2] from the Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces cattleya is regulated by covalent modification. In whole cells containing high levels of GS the addition of ammonium chloride leads to a rapid decline in GS activity. Crude extracts prepared from such ammonia-shocked cells had very low levels of GS activity as measured by biosynthetic and gamma-glutamyltransferase assays. Incubation of the crude extracts with snake venom phosphodiesterase restored GS activity. In cell extracts, GS was also inactivated by an ATP- and glutamine-dependent reaction. Radioactive labeling studies demonstrated the incorporation of an AmP moiety into GS protein upon modification. Our results suggest a covalent modification of GS in a Gram-positive bacterium. This modification appears to be adenylylation of the GS subunit similar to that found in the Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. Niizalactams A-C, Multicyclic Macrolactams Isolated from Combined Culture of Streptomyces with Mycolic Acid-Containing Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Shotaro; Okada, Masahiro; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Zhang, Huiping; Hayashi, Fumiaki; Onaka, Hiroyasu; Abe, Ikuro

    2015-12-24

    A terrestrial bacterium, Streptomyces sp. NZ-6, produced niizalactams A-C (1-3), unprecedented di- and tricyclic macrolactams, by coculturing with the mycolic acid-containing bacterium Tsukamurella pulmonis TP-B0596. Their complete structures, including absolute configurations, were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data and chemical derivatization. Their unique skeletons are proposed to be biosynthesized from a common 26-membered macrolactam intermediate by SN2 cyclization or an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction.

  17. A mycorrhiza helper bacterium enhances ectomycorrhizal and endomycorrhizal symbiosis of Australian Acacia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duponnois, R; Plenchette, C

    2003-04-01

    The aims of this study were to test the effects of a mycorrhiza helper bacterium (MHB), Pseudomonas monteilii strain HR13 on the mycorrhization of (1) an Australian Acacia, A. holosericea, by several ectomycorrhizal fungi or one endomycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices, and (2) several Australian Acacia species by Pisolithus alba strain IR100 under glasshouse conditions. Bacterial inoculant HR13 significantly promoted ectomycorrhizal colonization for all the Acacia species, from 45.8% ( A. mangium) to 70.3% ( A. auriculiformis). A stimulating effect of HR13 on the ectomycorrhizal establishment was recorded with all the fungal isolates (strains of Pisolithus and Scleroderma). The same effect of bacteria on the frequency of endomycorrhizal colonization of A. holosericea seedlings by G. intraradices with vesicles and hyphae frequencies was recorded. The stimulation of saprophytic fungal growth by MHB is usually the main mechanism that could explain this bacterial effect on mycorrhizal establishment. MHB could stimulate the production of phenolic compounds such as hypaphorine and increase the aggressiveness of the fungal symbiont. However, no significant effect of MHB on fungal growth was recorded with Scleroderma isolates under axenic conditions but positive bacterial effects were observed with Pisolithus strains. From a practical viewpoint, it appears that MHB could stimulate the mycorrhizal colonization of Australian Acacia species with ectomycorrhizal or endomycorrhizal fungi, and could also facilitate controlled mycorrhization in nursery practices where Acacia species are grown for forestation purposes.

  18. A central regulator of morphological differentiation in the multicellular bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kien T; Willey, Joanne M; Nguyen, Liem D; Nguyen, Lieu T; Viollier, Patrick H; Thompson, Charles J

    2002-12-01

    In the multicellular bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor, functions of developmental (bald) genes are required for the biosynthesis of SapB, a hydrophobic peptidic morphogen that facilitates aerial hyphae formation. Here, we show that aerial hyphal growth and SapB biosynthesis could be activated independently from the normal developmental cascade by providing unprogrammed expression of functionally interactive genes within the ram cluster. ramC, ramS and ramR were essential for normal growth of aerial hyphae, and ramR, a response regulator gene, was a key activator of development. The ramR gene restored growth of aerial hyphae and SapB formation in all bald strains tested (albeit only weakly in the bldC mutant), many of which are characterized by physiological defects. Disruption of the ramR gene abolished SapB biosynthesis and severely delayed growth of aerial hyphae. Transcription of ramR was developmentally controlled, and RamR function in vivo depended on its putative phosphorylation site (D53). We identified and mapped RamR targets immediately upstream of the region encoding ramC and ramS, a putative operon. Overexpression of ramR in the wild-type strain increased SapB levels and caused a distinctive wrinkled surface topology. Based on these results, we propose that phenotypes of bald mutations reflect an early stage in the Streptomyces developmental programme similar to the spo0 mutations in the unicellular bacterium Bacillus subtilis, and that RamR has analogies to Spo0A, the Bacillus response regulator that integrates physiological signals before triggering endospore formation.

  19. Study of the Effect of the Cytotoxic Extract of Bacterium Streptomyces on Epidermoid Malignant Cells of the Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Farahmand

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is well known that marine microorganisms have been recognized as an important and untapped resource for novel bioactive compounds. Actinomycetes are gram positive bacteria showing a filamentous growth. They are a group of organisms widespread in nature and play a significant role in the future of drug development. Materials & Methods : Marine bacteria strains of Streptomyces griscoloalbus were isolated from soft coral Sinularia erecta in Persian Gulf. Growth and fermentation character of the Streptomyces griscoloalbus were estimated. Cytotoxic activity of fermentation medium was tested by brine shrimp bioassay. Semi purification on the culture extract was performed. Results: Toxic extract was applied on KB cells ( human epidermoid carcinoma of mouth and results of neutral red test were IC50= 4.19 g/ml from acetone extract and IC 50 = 44.97 g/ml. For methanol extract, cytotologic effects of the acetone extract on KB cells was studied and morphological changes were also studied. Conclusion:The morphological changes in Kb cells due to the cytotoxic extract of the bacteria has made it a good candidate for the production of cytotoxic drugs in the future.

  20. 75 FR 44251 - Wood Oils and Gums, and Streptomyces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... AGENCY EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-0441; FRL-8829-8 Wood Oils and Gums, and Streptomyces Strain K61; Registration...). Streptomyces Strain K61 is a naturally occurring soil bacterium and is classified as a microbial pesticide. It...-mail Address Streptomyces Strain K61 (6066) EPA-HQ-OPP-2009-05 Anna Gross, (703) 09 305-5614,...

  1. The role of sponge-bacteria interactions: the sponge Aplysilla rosea challenged by its associated bacterium Streptomyces ACT-52A in a controlled aquarium system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehbub, Mohammad F; Tanner, Jason E; Barnett, Stephen J; Franco, Christopher M M; Zhang, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Sponge-associated bacteria play a critical role in sponge biology, metabolism and ecology, but how they interact with their host sponges and the role of these interactions are poorly understood. This study investigated the role of the interaction between the sponge Aplysilla rosea and its associated actinobacterium, Streptomyces ACT-52A, in modifying sponge microbial diversity, metabolite profile and bioactivity. A recently developed experimental approach that exposes sponges to bacteria of interest in a controlled aquarium system was improved by including the capture and analysis of secreted metabolites by the addition of an absorbent resin in the seawater. In a series of controlled aquaria, A. rosea was exposed to Streptomyces ACT-52A at 10(6) cfu/ml and monitored for up to 360 h. Shifts in microbial communities associated with the sponges occurred within 24 to 48 h after bacterial exposure and continued until 360 h, as revealed by TRFLP. The metabolite profiles of sponge tissues also changed substantially as the microbial community shifted. Control sponges (without added bacteria) and Streptomyces ACT-52A-exposed sponges released different metabolites into the seawater that was captured by the resin. The antibacterial activity of compounds collected from the seawater increased at 96 and 360 h of exposure for the treated sponges compared to the control group due to new compounds being produced and released. Increased antibacterial activity of metabolites from treated sponge tissue was observed only at 360 h, whereas that of control sponge tissue remained unchanged. The results demonstrate that the interaction between sponges and their associated bacteria plays an important role in regulating secondary metabolite production.

  2. Surface modification using interfacial assembly of the Streptomyces chaplin proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekkers, David Matthias; Claessen, Dennis; Galli, Federica; Stamhuis, Eize

    The chaplin proteins are instrumental in the formation of reproductive aerial structures by the filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. They lower the water surface tension thereby enabling aerial growth. In addition, chaplins provide surface hydrophobicity to the aerial hyphae by assembling

  3. The Extracellular Heme-binding Protein HbpS from the Soil Bacterium Streptomyces reticuli Is an Aquo-cobalamin Binder*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío; Fedosov, Sergey N.; Wedderhoff, Ina; Che, Edith N.; Torda, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular protein HbpS from Streptomyces reticuli interacts with iron ions and heme. It also acts in concert with the two-component sensing system SenS-SenR in response to oxidative stress. Sequence comparisons suggested that the protein may bind a cobalamin. UV-visible spectroscopy confirmed binding (Kd = 34 μm) to aquo-cobalamin (H2OCbl+) but not to other cobalamins. Competition experiments with the H2OCbl+-coordinating ligand CN− and comparison of mutants identified a histidine residue (His-156) that coordinates the cobalt ion of H2OCbl+ and substitutes for water. HbpS·Cobalamin lacks the Asp-X-His-X-X-Gly motif seen in some cobalamin binding enzymes. Preliminary tests showed that a related HbpS protein from a different species also binds H2OCbl+. Furthermore, analyses of HbpS-heme binding kinetics are consistent with the role of HbpS as a heme-sensor and suggested a role in heme transport. Given the high occurrence of HbpS-like sequences among Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, our findings suggest a great functional versatility among these proteins. PMID:25342754

  4. Role of fungal trehalose and bacterial thiamine in the improved survival and growth of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N and the helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, A; Brulé, C; Palin, B; Champmartin, D; Rubini, P; Garbaye, J; Sarniguet, A; Frey-Klett, P

    2010-08-01

    The mycorrhiza helper bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8 enhances the establishment of Laccaria bicolor S238N ectomycorrhizae by improving the pre-symbiotic growth and survival of the fungus. Nothing is known about the effect of the ectomycorrhizal fungus on the helper bacteria or the molecules that are involved in the interaction. In this study, we have monitored the population density of the helper strain P. fluorescens BBc6R8 in soils inoculated with L. bicolor and in control soils and found that the ectomycorhizal fungus improves the survival of the helper bacteria. We investigated the identity of the fungal and bacterial metabolites involved in this reciprocal growth-promoting effect using a combination of growth measurements, chemoattractant assays, HPLC and in silico genome analyses. We showed that trehalose, a disaccharide that accumulates to high levels in the fungal hyphae, chemoattracted and promoted the growth of the helper bacteria. Meanwhile, P. fluorescens BBc6R8 produced thiamine at concentrations that enhanced the fungal growth in vitro. Altogether our data indicate that the interaction between the two microorganisms is beneficial for both species and relies, at least in part, on trophic mutualism.

  5. Mycolic Acid-Containing Bacteria Induce Natural-Product Biosynthesis in Streptomyces Species▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaka, Hiroyasu; Mori, Yukiko; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Furumai, Tamotsu

    2011-01-01

    Natural products produced by microorganisms are important starting compounds for drug discovery. Secondary metabolites, including antibiotics, have been isolated from different Streptomyces species. The production of these metabolites depends on the culture conditions. Therefore, the development of a new culture method can facilitate the discovery of new natural products. Here, we show that mycolic acid-containing bacteria can influence the biosynthesis of cryptic natural products in Streptomyces species. The production of red pigment by Streptomyces lividans TK23 was induced by coculture with Tsukamurella pulmonis TP-B0596, which is a mycolic acid-containing bacterium. Only living cells induced this pigment production, which was not mediated by any substances. T. pulmonis could induce natural-product synthesis in other Streptomyces strains too: it altered natural-product biosynthesis in 88.4% of the Streptomyces strains isolated from soil. The other mycolic acid-containing bacteria, Rhodococcus erythropolis and Corynebacterium glutamicum, altered biosynthesis in 87.5 and 90.2% of the Streptomyces strains, respectively. The coculture broth of T. pulmonis and Streptomyces endus S-522 contained a novel antibiotic, which we named alchivemycin A. We concluded that the mycolic acid localized in the outer cell layer of the inducer bacterium influences secondary metabolism in Streptomyces, and this activity is a result of the direct interaction between the mycolic acid-containing bacteria and Streptomyces. We used these results to develop a new coculture method, called the combined-culture method, which facilitates the screening of natural products. PMID:21097597

  6. Robust, small-scale cultivation platform for Streptomyces coelicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohoni, Sujata Vijay; Bapat, Prashant Madhusudan; Lantz, Anna Eliasson

    2012-01-01

    platform in the form of MTPs (24-square deepwell) for the filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor and compared its performance to that of shake flasks and bench-scale reactors. We observed that re-designing of medium and inoculum preparation recipes resulted in improved reproducibility. Process...

  7. In Situ Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Analyte-Specific Monitoring of Glucose and Ammonium in Streptomyces coelicolor Fermentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nanna; Ödman, Peter; Cervera Padrell, Albert Emili

    2010-01-01

    There are many challenges associated with in situ collection of near infrared (NIR) spectra in a fermentation broth, particularly for highly aerated and agitated fermentations with filamentous organisms. In this study, antibiotic fermentation by the filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor...

  8. Bioremediation of Carbendazim by Streptomyces albogriseolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridhima Arya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbendazim (methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-ylcarbamate, or MBC is a benzimidazole fungicide which is used to protect crops against the attack of fungi. MBC has a half-life of about 3-12 months and remain persistent in the environment which may lead to many harmful consequences. Besides chemical and photo-catalytic degradation of pesticides, microbial degradation has now been evolved as a much effective and safer way to eliminate these harmful compounds from the environment. However, in the literature very few reports are available where microbial community is involved in degrading MBC. Hence, the present study was planned to investigate the role of microbes isolated from the field soils for the bioremediation of MBC. Soil samples were collected from wheat fields of northern regions of India. Enrichment culture technique was employed to isolate the bacterium which was found to be growing at higher concentrations of MBC up to 500µg/ml. After biochemical and morphological analysis, the bacterium was identified as Streptomyces albogriseolus. Streptomyces albogriseolus was found to degrade MBC in a time-dependent manner from the initial concentration of 29 ppm to 285.67ppb and 62.73ppb in 24hrs and 48hrs respectively. LCMS-MS analysis was carried out to detect 2-aminobenzimidazole, a metabolite formed after degradation in 10 hrs of growth which eventually disappeared after 24hrs of growth. The strain Streptomyces albogriseolus holds a promising potential to be an efficient MBC bioremediation agent.

  9. Becoming Care Helper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Winther

    The paper discusses the shaping of students´ identity within a vocational education programme for elderly care in Denmark. The focus is on the correlation between identity construction within the theoretical periods and students´ experiences in the traineeships. In the school setting the future...... care helper is being constructed within the overall term ‘professional’, but students may meet differing ways of being care helper in the traineeships, and the paper points to an ongoing struggle about the definition of ‘being care helper’. The analysis of the identity issues mobilises the concepts...... ‘positioning’ and ‘storyline’, c.f. Bronwyn Davies, and the empirical material consists of interviews and observations in the theoretical periods and in the traineeships. The paper suggests that a shift from identity to subjectivity may help students to deal with the diversity of ‘care helpers’ and thereby...

  10. B cell helper assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrignani, Sergio; Tonti, Elena; Casorati, Giulia; Dellabona, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Activation, proliferation and differentiation of naïve B lymphocytes into memory B cells and plasma cells requires engagement of the B cell receptor (BCR) coupled to T-cell help (1, 2). T cells deliver help in cognate fashion when they are activated upon recognition of specific MHC-peptide complexes presented by B cells. T cells can also deliver help in a non-cognate or bystander fashion, when they do not find specific MHC-peptide complexes on B cells and are activated by alternative mechanisms. T-cell dependent activation of B cells can be studied in vitro by experimental models called "B cell helper assays" that are based on the co-culture of B cells with activated T cells. These assays allow to decipher the molecular bases for productive T-dependent B cell responses. We show here examples of B cell helper assays in vitro, which can be reproduced with any subset of T lymphocytes that displays the appropriate helper signals.

  11. Comparative genomics of Streptomyces avermitilis, Streptomyces cattleya, Streptomyces maritimus and Kitasatospora aureofaciens using a Streptomyces coelicolor microarray system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsiao, Nai-hua; Kirby, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    DNA/DNA microarray hybridization was used to compare the genome content of Streptomyces avermitilis, Streptomyces cattleya, Streptomyces maritimus and Kitasatospora aureofaciens with that of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). The array data showed an about 93% agreement with the genome sequence data ava

  12. Comparative genomics of Streptomyces avermitilis, Streptomyces cattleya, Streptomyces maritimus and Kitasatospora aureofaciens using a Streptomyces coelicolor microarray system

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    DNA/DNA microarray hybridization was used to compare the genome content of Streptomyces avermitilis, Streptomyces cattleya, Streptomyces maritimus and Kitasatospora aureofaciens with that of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). The array data showed an about 93% agreement with the genome sequence data available for S. avermitilis and also showed a number of trends in the genome structure for Streptomyces and closely related Kitasatospora. A core central region was well conserved, which might be pre...

  13. Fluorometabolite biosynthesis and the fluorinase from Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hai; O'Hagan, David; Schaffrath, Christoph

    2004-12-01

    This review outlines the recent developments in uncovering the enzymes and intermediates involved in fluorometabolite biosyntheses in the bacterium Streptomyces cattleya. A particular emphasis is placed on the purification and characterisation of the fluorinase, the C-F bond forming enzyme which initiates the biosynthesis. Nature has hardly developed a biochemistry around fluorine, yet fluorinated organics are important commercial entities, therefore a biotransformation from inorganic to organic fluorine is novel and of contemporary interest.

  14. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Streptomyces coelicolor development demonstrates that onset of secondary metabolism coincides with hyphae differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manteca, Angel; Sanchez, Jesus; Jung, Hye Ryung

    2010-01-01

    Streptomyces species produce many clinically important secondary metabolites, including antibiotics and antitumourals. They have a complex developmental cycle that makes this bacterium a multicellular prokaryotic model including programmed cell death (PCD) phenomena. There are two differentiated...... Streptomyces coelicolor cultures using iTRAQ labelling and LC-MS/MS. A new experimental approach was developed to obtain homogeneous samples at each developmental stage (temporal protein analysis) and also to obtain membrane and cytosolic protein fractions (spatial protein analysis). A total of 345 proteins...

  15. Genome Sequence of Streptomyces viridosporus Strain T7A ATCC 39115, a Lignin-Degrading Actinomycete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jennifer R.; Goodwin, Lynne; Teshima, Hazuki; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Huntemann, Marcel; Wei, Chia-Lin; Han, James; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Szeto, Ernest; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    We announce the availability of the genome sequence of Streptomyces viridosporus strain T7A ATCC 39115, a plant biomass-degrading actinomycete. This bacterium is of special interest because of its capacity to degrade lignin, an underutilized component of plants in the context of bioenergy. It has a full complement of genes for plant biomass catabolism. PMID:23833133

  16. Genome Sequence of Streptomyces viridosporus Strain T7A ATCC 39115, a Lignin-Degrading Actinomycete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Jennifer R. [Brown University; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wei, Chia-Lin [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Szeto, Ernest [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Sello, Jason K. [Brown University

    2013-01-01

    We announce the availability of the genome sequence of Streptomyces viridosporus strain T7A ATCC 39115, a plant biomass- degrading actinomycete. This bacterium is of special interest because of its capacity to degrade lignin, an underutilized compo- nent of plants in the context of bioenergy. It has a full complement of genes for plant biomass catabolism.

  17. Peer Helpers in Hungary: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racz, Jozsef; Lacko, Zsuzsa

    2008-01-01

    Hungary is a country in transition that has no real tradition of peer helping. A qualitative study was carried out involving 13 peer helpers of two kinds (a) age-based peers, and (b) way-of-life-based peers (fellow helpers). The motivations for and the processes of becoming a peer helper were analyzed. Results showed the largest difference being…

  18. THE HOMEWORK HELPER TUTOR MANUAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DEERING, ALBERT R.

    THIS MANUAL FOR TUTORS IN THE MOBILIZATION FOR YOUTH-NEW YORK CITY BOARD OF EDUCATION HOMEWORK HELPER PROGRAM IS DESIGNED TO SUPPLEMENT THE TRAINING AND SUPERVISION THAT THE TUTORS RECEIVE FROM THE MASTER TEACHERS. THE PROGRAM EMPLOYS HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS AS TUTORS FOR OTHER STUDENTS AT ALL GRADE LEVELS--ELEMENTARY, JUNIOR HIGH, AND HIGH SCHOOL.…

  19. HOMEWORK HELPER PROGRAM, FACT SHEET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DEERING, ALBERT R.

    THIS REPORT BRIEFLY OUTLINES THE NEW YORK CITY BOARD OF EDUCATION-MOBILIZATION FOR YOUTH HOMEWORK HELPER PROGRAM IN WHICH HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE STUDENTS ARE PAID $1.50 TO $2.00 PER HOUR TO TUTOR ELEMENTARY AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS. TUTORS WORK UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF MASTER TEACHERS AND ATTEND TUTOR-TRAINING SESSIONS TWICE A MONTH. A…

  20. -Genomic data mining of the marine actinobacteria Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveils insights into multi-stress related genes and metabolic pathways involved in antimicrobial synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undabarrena, Agustina; Ugalde, Juan A; Seeger, Michael; Cámara, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 is an actinobacterial strain isolated from marine sediments of a Chilean Patagonian fjord. Morphological characterization together with antibacterial activity was assessed in various culture media, revealing a carbon-source dependent activity mainly against Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and L. monocytogenes). Genome mining of this antibacterial-producing bacterium revealed the presence of 26 biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) for secondary metabolites, where among them, 81% have low similarities with known BGCs. In addition, a genomic search in Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveiled the presence of a wide variety of genetic determinants related to heavy metal resistance (49 genes), oxidative stress (69 genes) and antibiotic resistance (97 genes). This study revealed that the marine-derived Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 bacterium has the capability to tolerate a diverse set of heavy metals such as copper, cobalt, mercury, chromate and nickel; as well as the highly toxic tellurite, a feature first time described for Streptomyces. In addition, Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 possesses a major resistance towards oxidative stress, in comparison to the soil reference strain Streptomyces violaceoruber A3(2). Moreover, Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 showed resistance to 88% of the antibiotics tested, indicating overall, a strong response to several abiotic stressors. The combination of these biological traits confirms the metabolic versatility of Streptomyces sp. H-KF8, a genetically well-prepared microorganism with the ability to confront the dynamics of the fjord-unique marine environment.

  1. Avenolide, a Streptomyces hormone controlling antibiotic production in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitani, Shigeru; Miyamoto, Kiyoko T; Takamatsu, Satoshi; Herawati, Elisa; Iguchi, Hiroyuki; Nishitomi, Kouhei; Uchida, Miho; Nagamitsu, Tohru; Omura, Satoshi; Ikeda, Haruo; Nihira, Takuya

    2011-09-27

    Gram-positive bacteria of the genus Streptomyces are industrially important microorganisms, producing >70% of commercially important antibiotics. The production of these compounds is often regulated by low-molecular-weight bacterial hormones called autoregulators. Although 60% of Streptomyces strains may use γ-butyrolactone-type molecules as autoregulators and some use furan-type molecules, little is known about the signaling molecules used to regulate antibiotic production in many other members of this genus. Here, we purified a signaling molecule (avenolide) from Streptomyces avermitilis--the producer of the important anthelmintic agent avermectin with annual world sales of $850 million--and determined its structure, including stereochemistry, by spectroscopic analysis and chemical synthesis as (4S,10R)-10-hydroxy-10-methyl-9-oxo-dodec-2-en-1,4-olide, a class of Streptomyces autoregulator. Avenolide is essential for eliciting avermectin production and is effective at nanomolar concentrations with a minimum effective concentration of 4 nM. The aco gene of S. avermitilis, which encodes an acyl-CoA oxidase, is required for avenolide biosynthesis, and homologs are also present in Streptomyces fradiae, Streptomyces ghanaensis, and Streptomyces griseoauranticus, suggesting that butenolide-type autoregulators may represent a widespread and another class of Streptomyces autoregulator involved in regulating antibiotic production.

  2. Production of gold nanoparticles by Streptomyces djakartensis isolate B-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Biglari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available  Objective(s: Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (NGPs is environmentally safer than chemical and physical procedures. This method requires no use of toxic solvents and synthesis of dangerous products and is environmentally safe. In this study, we report the biosynthesis of NGPs using Streptomyces djakartensis isolate B-5. Materials and Methods: NGPs were biosynthesized by reducing aqueous gold chloride solution via a Streptomyces isolate without the need for any additive for protecting nanoparticles from aggregation. We characterized the responsible Streptomycete; its genome DNA was isolated, purified and 16S rRNA was amplified by PCR. The amplified isolate was sequenced; using the BLAST search tool from NCBI, the microorganism was identified to species level. Results: Treating chloroauric acid solutions with this bacterium resulted in reduction of gold ions and formation of stable NGPs. TEM and SEM electro micrographs of NGPs indicated size range from 2- 25 nm with average of 9.09 nm produced intracellular by the bacterium. SEM electro micrographs revealed morphology of spores and mycelia. The amplified PCR fragment of 16S rRNA gene was cloned and sequenced from both sides; it consisted of 741 nucleotides. According to NCBI GenBank, the bacterium had 97.1% homology with Streptomyces djakartensis strain RT-49. The GenBank accession number for partial 16S rRNA gene was recorded as JX162550. Conclusion: Optimized application of such findings may create applications of Streptomycetes for use as bio-factories in eco-friendly production of NGPs to serve in demanding industries and related biomedical areas. Research in this area should also focus on the unlocking the full mechanism of NGPs biosynthesis by Streptomycetes.

  3. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using streptomyces fulvissimus isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Soltani Nejad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: In recent years, the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles has been the focus of interest because of their emerging application in a number of areas such as biomedicine. In the present study we report the extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs by using a positive bacterium named Streptomyces fulvissimus isolate U from rice fields of Guilan Province, Iran. Materials and Methods: From over 20 Streptomyces isolates collected, isolate U showed high AuNPs biosynthesis activity. To determine its taxonomical identity, its morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscope and partial molecular analysis performed by PCR. In this regard, 16S rDNA of isolate U was amplified using universal bacterial primers FD1 and RP2. The PCR products were purified and sequenced. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA was then conducted using NCBI BLAST method. In biosynthesis of AuNPs by this bacterium, the biomass of bacterium exposed to the HAuCl4 solution. Results: The nanoparticles obtained were characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD analyses. Our results indicated that Streptomyces fulvissimus isolateU bio-synthesizes extracellular AuNPs in the range of 20-50 nm. Conclusions: This technique of green synthesis of AuNPs by a microbial source may become a promising method because of its environmental safety. Its optimization may make it a potential procedure for industrial production of gold nanoparticles.

  4. Recombinant production of Streptococcus equisimilis streptokinase by Streptomyces lividans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallín Carlos

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptokinase (SK is a potent plasminogen activator with widespread clinical use as a thrombolytic agent. It is naturally secreted by several strains of beta-haemolytic streptococci. The low yields obtained in SK production, lack of developed gene transfer methodology and the pathogenesis of its natural host have been the principal reasons to search for a recombinant source for this important therapeutic protein. We report here the expression and secretion of SK by the Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces lividans. The structural gene encoding SK was fused to the Streptomyces venezuelae CBS762.70 subtilisin inhibitor (vsi signal sequence or to the Streptomyces lividans xylanase C (xlnC signal sequence. The native Vsi protein is translocated via the Sec pathway while the native XlnC protein uses the twin-arginine translocation (Tat pathway. Results SK yield in the spent culture medium of S. lividans was higher when the Sec-dependent signal peptide mediates the SK translocation. Using a 1.5 L fermentor, the secretory production of the Vsi-SK fusion protein reached up to 15 mg SK/l. SK was partially purified from the culture supernatant by DEAE-Sephacel chromatography. A 44-kDa degradation product co-eluted with the 47-kDa mature SK. The first amino acid residues of the S. lividans-produced SK were identical with those of the expected N-terminal sequence. The Vsi signal peptide was thus correctly cleaved off and the N-terminus of mature Vsi-SK fusion protein released by S. lividans remained intact. This result also implicates that the processing of the recombinant SK secreted by Streptomyces probably occurred at its C-terminal end, as in its native host Streptococcus equisimilis. The specific activity of the partially purified Streptomyces-derived SK was determined at 2661 IU/mg protein. Conclusion Heterologous expression of Streptococcus equisimilis ATCC9542 skc-2 in Streptomyces lividans was successfully achieved. SK can be

  5. Bacterium induces cryptic meroterpenoid pathway in the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Claudia C; Scherlach, Kirstin; Schroeckh, Volker; Horn, Fabian; Nietzsche, Sandor; Brakhage, Axel A; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-05-27

    Stimulating encounter: The intimate, physical interaction between the soil-derived bacterium Streptomyces rapamycinicus and the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus led to the activation of an otherwise silent polyketide synthase (PKS) gene cluster coding for an unusual prenylated polyphenol (fumicycline A). The meroterpenoid pathway is regulated by a pathway-specific activator gene as well as by epigenetic factors.

  6. Attachment of Streptomyces coelicolor is mediated by amyloidal fimbriae that are anchored to the cell surface via cellulose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Wouter; Wosten, Han A. B.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Claessen, Dennis; Wösten, Han A.B.

    2009-01-01

    P>The chaplin proteins ChpA-H enable the filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor to form reproductive aerial structures by assembling into surface-active amyloid-like fibrils. We here demonstrate that chaplins also mediate attachment of S. coelicolor to surfaces. Attachment coincides with the

  7. Attachment of Streptomyces coelicolor is mediated by amyloidal fimbriae that are anchored to the cell surface via cellulose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Wouter; Wosten, Han A. B.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Claessen, Dennis; Wösten, Han A.B.

    2009-01-01

    P>The chaplin proteins ChpA-H enable the filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor to form reproductive aerial structures by assembling into surface-active amyloid-like fibrils. We here demonstrate that chaplins also mediate attachment of S. coelicolor to surfaces. Attachment coincides with the

  8. The mycorrhiza helper bacteria revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey-Klett, P; Garbaye, J; Tarkka, M

    2007-01-01

    In natural conditions, mycorrhizal fungi are surrounded by complex microbial communities, which modulate the mycorrhizal symbiosis. Here, the focus is on the so-called mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB). This concept is revisited, and the distinction is made between the helper bacteria, which assist mycorrhiza formation, and those that interact positively with the functioning of the symbiosis. After considering some examples of MHB from the literature, the ecological and evolutionary implications of the relationships of MHB with mycorrhizal fungi are discussed. The question of the specificity of the MHB effect is addressed, and an assessment is made of progress in understanding the mechanisms of the MHB effect, which has been made possible through the development of genomics. Finally, clear evidence is presented suggesting that some MHB promote the functioning of the mycorrhizal symbiosis. This is illustrated for three critical functions of practical significance: nutrient mobilization from soil minerals, fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, and protection of plants against root pathogens. The review concludes with discussion of future research priorities regarding the potentially very fruitful concept of MHB.

  9. Evolutionary Ecology: Wasp Mother's Little Helpers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Jacobus Jan; Aanen, Duur Kornelis

    2005-01-01

    The medical application of antibiotics dramatically reduced human infant mortality in the previous century. A new study indicates that ground nesting wasps exploit Streptomyces strains that they rear in their antennae for the same purpose.......The medical application of antibiotics dramatically reduced human infant mortality in the previous century. A new study indicates that ground nesting wasps exploit Streptomyces strains that they rear in their antennae for the same purpose....

  10. Comparative genomics of Streptomyces avermitilis, Streptomyces cattleya, Streptomyces maritimus and Kitasatospora aureofaciens using a Streptomyces coelicolor microarray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Nai-Hua; Kirby, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    DNA/DNA microarray hybridization was used to compare the genome content of Streptomyces avermitilis, Streptomyces cattleya, Streptomyces maritimus and Kitasatospora aureofaciens with that of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). The array data showed an about 93% agreement with the genome sequence data available for S. avermitilis and also showed a number of trends in the genome structure for Streptomyces and closely related Kitasatospora. A core central region was well conserved, which might be predicted from previous research and this was linked to a low degree of gene conservation in the terminal regions of the linear chromosome across all four species. Between these regions there are two areas of intermediate gene conservation by microarray analysis where gene synteny is still detectable in S. avermitilis. Nonetheless, a range of conserved genes could be identified within the terminal regions. Variation in the genes involved in differentiation, transcription, DNA replication, etc. provides interesting insights into which genes in these categories are generally conserved and which are not. The results also provide target priorities for possible gene knockouts in a group of bacteria with a very large numbers of genes with unknown functions compared to most bacterial species.

  11. Programming perpetual T helper cell plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Emily; Wilson, Christopher B

    2009-01-16

    In this issue of Immunity,Lee et al. (2009) and Wei et al. (2009) each investigate the stability of T helper cell lineages and find that commitment to these fates is more plastic than previously appreciated.

  12. Streptomyces alfalfae sp. nov. and comparisons with its closest taxa Streptomyces silaceus, Streptomyces flavofungini and Streptomyces intermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Wenqing; Sun, Zhongfeng; Yi, Lei; Zhao, Shumiao; Liang, Yunxiang

    2016-01-01

    A novel streptomycete strain, designated XY25T, was isolated from the rhizosphere soil in an alfalfa field in Jingyang, Shanxi, China. The isolate showed optimal growth at 37 °C, and was capable of growing at pH 6-10 and in the presence of 0-6 % (w/v) NaCl. Mycelia of strain XY25T appeared spiral and developed into white spore chains with long-rod spores and a smooth surface. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of XY25T was determined and was found to be highly similar to those of species of the genus Streptomyces including Streptomyces silaceus DSM 41861T (99.11 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Streptomyces flavofungini DSM 40366T (98.49 %) and Streptomyces intermedius DSM 40372T (98.43 %), all of which were used for further characterization. Each of the four streptomycetes showed distinctive patterns of carbon usage and fatty acids composition. Analysis of cellular components of strain XY25T revealed ll-diaminopimelic acid as diagnostic diamino acid and xylose as the major sugar, whereas polar lipids were determined as phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, an unknown phospholipid, two unknown phosphatidylinositol mannosides and several unknown lipids. Menaquinones were dominated by MK-9(H6) and MK-9(H8), and the main fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0, iso-C16 : 0 and anteiso-C17 : 0. DNA-DNA hybridization studies indicated that strain XY25T showed relatedness values of 35.2-40.42 % with the closest related species. Based on these results, strain XY25T represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces alfalfae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XY25T ( = KCTC 39571T = CCTCC AA2015019T).

  13. Genome Integration and Excision by a New Streptomyces Bacteriophage, ϕJoe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg, Paul C M; Haley, Joshua A; Stark, W Marshall; Smith, Margaret C M

    2017-03-01

    specificities for their integration sites. In order to provide a broad platform of integrases, we identified and validated the integrase from a newly isolated Streptomyces phage, ϕJoe. ϕJoe integrase is active in vitro and in vivo The specific recognition site for integration is present in a wide range of different actinobacteria, including Streptomyces venezuelae, an emerging model bacterium in Streptomyces research.

  14. Laboratory Course on "Streptomyces" Genetics and Secondary Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siitonen, Vilja; Räty, Kaj; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    The "'Streptomyces' genetics and secondary metabolism" laboratory course gives an introduction to the versatile soil dwelling Gram-positive bacteria "Streptomyces" and their secondary metabolism. The course combines genetic modification of "Streptomyces"; growing of the strain and protoplast preparation, plasmid…

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria and nematodes. The 8.2 Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  16. Synthetic Biology in Streptomyces Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H.; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2011-01-01

    Actinomycete bacteria of the genus Streptomyces are major producers of bioactive compounds for the biotechnology industry. They are the source of most clinically used antibiotics, as well as of several widely used drugs against common diseases, including cancer . Genome sequencing has revealed that

  17. SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY IN STREPTOMYCES BACTERIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H.; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko; Voigt, C

    2011-01-01

    Actinomycete bacteria of the genus Streptomyces are major producers of bioactive compounds for the biotechnology industry. They are the source of most clinically used antibiotics, as well as of several widely used drugs against common diseases, including cancer. Genome sequencing has revealed that t

  18. A highly specialized flavin mononucleotide riboswitch responds differently to similar ligands and confers roseoflavin resistance to Streptomyces davawensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrolli, Danielle Biscaro; Matern, Andreas; Wang, Joy; Ester, Miriam; Siedler, Kathrin; Breaker, Ronald; Mack, Matthias

    2012-09-01

    Streptomyces davawensis is the only organism known to synthesize the antibiotic roseoflavin, a riboflavin (vitamin B2) analog. Roseoflavin is converted to roseoflavin mononucleotide (RoFMN) and roseoflavin adenine dinucleotide in the cytoplasm of target cells. (Ribo-)Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitches are genetic elements, which in many bacteria control genes responsible for the biosynthesis and transport of riboflavin. Streptomyces davawensis is roseoflavin resistant, and the closely related bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor is roseoflavin sensitive. The two bacteria served as models to investigate roseoflavin resistance of S. davawensis and to analyze the mode of action of roseoflavin in S. coelicolor. Our experiments demonstrate that the ribB FMN riboswitch of S. davawensis (in contrast to the corresponding riboswitch of S. coelicolor) is able to discriminate between the two very similar flavins FMN and RoFMN and shows opposite responses to the latter ligands.

  19. Nutrient overlap, genetic relatedness and spatial origin influence interaction-mediated shifts in inhibitory phenotype among Streptomyces spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz Jauri, Patricia; Kinkel, Linda L

    2014-10-01

    Chemical communication among kin bacteria modulates diverse activities. Despite the general consensus that signaling among non-kin organisms is likely to influence microbial behavior, there is limited information on the potential for microbial interactions to alter microbial phenotypes in natural habitats. We explored patterns of interaction that alter inhibitory phenotypes among Streptomyces isolates from distinct communities. Shifts in inhibition in response to the presence of a partner were evaluated for 861 isolate combinations, and were considered in relation to nutrient use, 16S sequence, inhibition phenotype and community origin. The frequency of inhibition-shifting interactions was significantly higher among isolates from the same (0.40) than from different (0.33) communities, suggesting local selection for inhibition-shifting interactions. Communities varied in the frequency with which Streptomyces isolates responded to a partner but not in the frequency with which isolates induced changes in partners. Streptomyces isolates were more likely to exhibit increased inhibition of a target bacterium in response to isolates that compete for the same nutrients, are closely-related or are strongly inhibited by their antibiotics. This work documents a high frequency of interactions among Streptomyces that shift the capacity of Streptomyces to inhibit other microbes, and suggests significant potential for such interactions to shape microbial community dynamics.

  20. 30 CFR 56.7009 - Drill helpers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drill helpers. 56.7009 Section 56.7009 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet...

  1. 30 CFR 57.7009 - Drill helpers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drill helpers. 57.7009 Section 57.7009 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet...

  2. Secondary peritonitis caused by Streptomyces viridis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Datta (Priya); S. Arora (Shilpa); A. Jain (Ashok); J. Chander (Jagdish); W.W.J. van de Sande (Wendy)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractStreptomyces organisms are soil inhabitants rarely causing nonmycetomic infections. We describe a case of secondary peritonitis caused by Streptomyces viridis in a chronic alcoholic patient who presented with fever, abdominal distension, and pain in the abdomen. The most likely source of

  3. Streptomyces caldifontis sp. nov., isolated from a hot water spring of Tatta Pani, Kotli, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Arshia; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Khalid, Nauman; Osman, Ghenijan; Khan, Inam Ullah; Xiao, Min; Li, Wen-Jun

    2017-01-01

    A Gram-staining positive, non-motile, rod-shaped, catalase positive and oxidase negative bacterium, designated NCCP-1331(T), was isolated from a hot water spring soil collected from Tatta Pani, Kotli, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan. The isolate grew at a temperature range of 18-40 °C (optimum 30 °C), pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum 7.0) and with 0-6 % NaCl (optimum 2 % NaCl (w/v)). The phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain NCCP-1331(T) belonged to the genus Streptomyces and is closely related to Streptomyces brevispora BK160(T) with 97.9 % nucleotide similarity, followed by Streptomyces drosdowiczii NRRL B-24297(T) with 97.8 % nucleotide similarity. The DNA-DNA relatedness values of strain NCCP-1331(T) with S. brevispora KACC 21093(T) and S. drosdowiczii CBMAI 0498(T) were 42.7 and 34.7 %, respectively. LL-DAP was detected as diagnostic amino acid along with alanine, glycine, leucine and glutamic acid. The isolate contained MK-9(H8) as the predominant menaquinone. Major polar lipids detected in NCCP-1331(T) were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and unidentified phospholipids. Major fatty acids were iso-C16: 0, summed feature 8 (18:1 ω7c/18:1 ω6c), anteiso-C15:0 and C16:0. The genomic DNA G + C content was 69.8 mol %. On the basis of phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic analysis, it is concluded that strain NCCP-1331(T) represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces caldifontis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NCCP-1331(T) (=KCTC 39537(T) = CPCC 204147(T)).

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the DNA-binding domain of AdpA, the central transcription factor in the A-factor regulatory cascade in the filamentous bacterium Streptomyces griseus, in complex with a duplex DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ming Dong; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Ohtsuka, Jun; Hirano, Setsu; Nagata, Koji; Horinouchi, Sueharu; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Tanokura, Masaru

    2012-08-01

    Streptomyces griseus AdpA is the central transcription factor in the A-factor regulatory cascade and activates a number of genes that are required for both secondary metabolism and morphological differentiation, leading to the onset of streptomycin biosynthesis as well as aerial mycelium formation and sporulation. The DNA-binding domain of AdpA consists of two helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motifs and shows low nucleotide-sequence specificity. To reveal the molecular basis of the low nucleotide-sequence specificity, an attempt was made to obtain cocrystals of the DNA-binding domain of AdpA and several kinds of duplex DNA. The best diffracting crystal was obtained using a 14-mer duplex DNA with two-nucleotide overhangs at the 5'-ends. The crystal diffracted X-rays to 2.8 Å resolution and belonged to space group C222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 76.86, b = 100.96, c = 101.25 Å. The Matthews coefficient (V(M) = 3.71 Å(3) Da(-1)) indicated that the crystal was most likely to contain one DNA-binding domain of AdpA and one duplex DNA in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 66.8%.

  5. Two Antimycin A Analogues from Marine-Derived Actinomycete Streptomyces lusitanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiyuan Qian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Two new antimycin A analogues, antimycin B1 and B2 (1–2, were isolated from a spent broth of a marine-derived bacterium, Streptomyces lusitanus. The structures of 1 and 2 were established on the basis of spectroscopic analyses and chemical methods. The isolated compounds were tested for their anti-bacterial potency. Compound 1 was found to be inactive against the bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Staphyloccocus aureus, and Loktanella hongkongensis. Compound 2 showed antibacterial activities against S. aureus and L. hongkongensis with MIC values of 32.0 and 8.0 μg/mL, respectively.

  6. Secure Source Coding with a Helper

    CERN Document Server

    Tandon, Ravi; Ramchandran, Kannan

    2009-01-01

    We consider a secure lossless source coding problem with a rate-limited helper. In particular, Alice observes an i.i.d. source $X^{n}$ and wishes to transmit this source losslessly to Bob at a rate $R_{x}$. A helper, say Helen, observes a correlated source $Y^{n}$ and transmits at a rate $R_{y}$ to Bob. A passive eavesdropper can observe the coded output of Alice. The equivocation $\\Delta$ is measured by the conditional entropy $H(X^{n}|J_{x})/n$, where $J_{x}$ is the coded output of Alice. We first completely characterize the rate-equivocation region for this secure source coding model, where we show that Slepian-Wolf type coding is optimal. We next study two generalizations of this model and provide single-letter characterizations for the respective rate-equivocation regions. In particular, we first consider the case of a two-sided helper where Alice also has access to the coded output of Helen. We show that for this case, Slepian-Wolf type coding is suboptimal and one can further decrease the information l...

  7. ­Genomic data mining of the marine actinobacteria Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveils insights into multi-stress related genes and metabolic pathways involved in antimicrobial synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina Undabarrena

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 is an actinobacterial strain isolated from marine sediments of a Chilean Patagonian fjord. Morphological characterization together with antibacterial activity was assessed in various culture media, revealing a carbon-source dependent activity mainly against Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and L. monocytogenes. Genome mining of this antibacterial-producing bacterium revealed the presence of 26 biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs for secondary metabolites, where among them, 81% have low similarities with known BGCs. In addition, a genomic search in Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveiled the presence of a wide variety of genetic determinants related to heavy metal resistance (49 genes, oxidative stress (69 genes and antibiotic resistance (97 genes. This study revealed that the marine-derived Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 bacterium has the capability to tolerate a diverse set of heavy metals such as copper, cobalt, mercury, chromate and nickel; as well as the highly toxic tellurite, a feature first time described for Streptomyces. In addition, Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 possesses a major resistance towards oxidative stress, in comparison to the soil reference strain Streptomyces violaceoruber A3(2. Moreover, Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 showed resistance to 88% of the antibiotics tested, indicating overall, a strong response to several abiotic stressors. The combination of these biological traits confirms the metabolic versatility of Streptomyces sp. H-KF8, a genetically well-prepared microorganism with the ability to confront the dynamics of the fjord-unique marine environment.

  8. ­Genomic data mining of the marine actinobacteria Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveils insights into multi-stress related genes and metabolic pathways involved in antimicrobial synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undabarrena, Agustina; Ugalde, Juan A.; Seeger, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 is an actinobacterial strain isolated from marine sediments of a Chilean Patagonian fjord. Morphological characterization together with antibacterial activity was assessed in various culture media, revealing a carbon-source dependent activity mainly against Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and L. monocytogenes). Genome mining of this antibacterial-producing bacterium revealed the presence of 26 biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) for secondary metabolites, where among them, 81% have low similarities with known BGCs. In addition, a genomic search in Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveiled the presence of a wide variety of genetic determinants related to heavy metal resistance (49 genes), oxidative stress (69 genes) and antibiotic resistance (97 genes). This study revealed that the marine-derived Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 bacterium has the capability to tolerate a diverse set of heavy metals such as copper, cobalt, mercury, chromate and nickel; as well as the highly toxic tellurite, a feature first time described for Streptomyces. In addition, Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 possesses a major resistance towards oxidative stress, in comparison to the soil reference strain Streptomyces violaceoruber A3(2). Moreover, Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 showed resistance to 88% of the antibiotics tested, indicating overall, a strong response to several abiotic stressors. The combination of these biological traits confirms the metabolic versatility of Streptomyces sp. H-KF8, a genetically well-prepared microorganism with the ability to confront the dynamics of the fjord-unique marine environment. PMID:28229018

  9. Streptopyrrole: An antimicrobial metabolite from Streptomyces armeniacus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, J.; Gürtler, Hanne; Kjær, Anders

    1998-01-01

    A colourless, crystalline metabolite, C14H12ClNO4, named streptopyrrole, has been isolated from submerged fermentation cultures of Streptomyces armeniacus by extraction, followed by chromatographic purification. Its tricyclic molecular framework, seemingly without natural product precedents...

  10. Growth of desferrioxamine-deficient Streptomyces mutants through xenosiderophore piracy of airborne fungal contaminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Anthony Argüelles; Lambert, Stéphany; Martinet, Loïc; Adam, Delphine; Tenconi, Elodie; Hayette, Marie-Pierre; Ongena, Marc; Rigali, Sébastien

    2015-07-01

    Due to the necessity of iron for housekeeping functions, nutrition, morphogenesis and secondary metabolite production, siderophore piracy could be a key strategy in soil and substrate colonization by microorganisms. Here we report that mutants of bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor unable to produce desferrioxamine siderophores could recover growth when the plates were contaminated by indoor air spores of a Penicillium species and Engyodontium album. UPLC-ESI-MS analysis revealed that the HPLC fractions with the extracellular 'resuscitation' factors of the Penicillium isolate were only those that contained siderophores, i.e. Fe-dimerum acid, ferrichrome, fusarinine C and coprogen. The restored growth of the Streptomyces mutants devoid of desferrioxamine is most likely mediated through xenosiderophore uptake as the cultivability depends on the gene encoding the ABC-transporter-associated DesE siderophore-binding protein. That a filamentous fungus allows the growth of desferrioxamine non-producing Streptomyces in cocultures confirms that xenosiderophore piracy plays a vital role in nutritional interactions between these taxonomically unrelated filamentous microorganisms.

  11. Streptomyces development in colonies and soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manteca, Angel; Sanchez, Jesus

    2009-01-01

    Streptomyces development was analyzed under conditions resembling those in soil. The mycelial growth rate was much lower than that in standard laboratory cultures, and the life span of the previously named first compartmentalized mycelium was remarkably increased.......Streptomyces development was analyzed under conditions resembling those in soil. The mycelial growth rate was much lower than that in standard laboratory cultures, and the life span of the previously named first compartmentalized mycelium was remarkably increased....

  12. Structural diversity and possible functional roles of free fatty acids of the novel soil isolate Streptomyces sp. NP10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic-Tomic, Tatjana; Genčić, Marija S; Živković, Milena Z; Vasiljevic, Branka; Djokic, Lidija; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Radulović, Niko S

    2015-06-01

    Herein, a novel soil bacterium Streptomyces sp. NP10 able to grow outside usual streptomycetes optimum conditions (e.g., at 4 °C, pH 9 and high NaCl concentration), exhibiting atypical hemolytic, DNAse, and cellulolytic activities, is described. This strain produces and excretes into the growth medium large amounts of free long-chain fatty acids (FAs). A concurrent lipidomics study revealed a large structural diversity of FAs with over 50 different n- and branched-chain, (un)saturated, and cyclopropane FAs (C7-C30) produced by this strain. Two of these, i-17:0cy9-10 and a-18:0cy9-10, represent new natural products and the first ever identified branched cyclopropane FAs. Both free and bound lipid profiles of Streptomyces sp. NP10 were dominated by saturated branched chain FAs (i-14:0, a-15:0, and i-16:0). Although these free FAs showed only a moderate antimicrobial activity, our results suggest that they could have an ecophysiological role in interspecies signaling with another soil microorganism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This work represents the first comprehensive report on the structural diversity and complexity of the free FA pool in Streptomyces. A naturally occurring streptomycete, such as Streptomyces sp. NP10, which secretes significant amounts of free long-chain FAs (non-cytotoxic) into the medium, could be useful in microbial biodiesel production.

  13. A job analysis of care helpers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung-Sook; Jeong, Seungeun; Kim, Seulgee; Park, Hyeung-Keun; Seok, Jae Eun

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the roles of care helpers through job analysis. To do this, this study used the Developing A Curriculum Method (DACUM) to classify job content and a multi-dimensional study design was applied to identify roles and create a job description by looking into the appropriateness, significance, frequency, and difficulty of job content as identified through workshops and cross-sectional surveys conducted for appropriateness verification. A total of 418 care helpers working in nursing facilities and community senior service facilities across the country were surveyed. The collected data were analyzed using PASW 18.0 software. Six duties and 18 tasks were identified based on the job model. Most tasks were found to be "important task", scoring 4.0 points or above. Physical care duties, elimination care, position changing and movement assistance, feeding assistance, and safety care were identified as high frequency tasks. The most difficult tasks were emergency prevention, early detection, and speedy reporting. A summary of the job of care helpers is providing physical, emotional, housekeeping, and daily activity assistance to elderly patients with problems in independently undertaking daily activities due to physical or mental causes in long-term care facilities or at the client's home. The results of this study suggest a task-focused examination, optimizing the content of the current standard teaching materials authorized by the Ministry of Health and Welfare while supplementing some content which was identified as task elements but not included in the current teaching materials and fully reflecting the actual frequency and difficulty of tasks. PMID:22323929

  14. Grandparent helpers : The adaptive significance of older, postdominant helpers in the Seychelles warbler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, David S.; Burke, Terry; Komdeur, Jan; Wedell, N.

    2007-01-01

    The possibility that older, often nonreproductive, individuals may engage in kin-directed cooperative behavior has been largely overlooked in the study of cooperative breeding. Here, we describe and investigate the adaptive significance of such "grandparent" helpers in the Seychelles warbler, the fi

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of the Streptomyces Phage Nanodon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces phage Nanodon is a temperate double-stranded DNA Siphoviridae belonging to cluster BD1. It was isolated from soil collected in Kilauea, HI, using Streptomyces griseus subsp. griseus as a host.

  16. Streptomyces lactacystinicus sp. nov. and Streptomyces cyslabdanicus sp. nov., producing lactacystin and cyslabdan, respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Také, Akira; Matsumoto, Atsuko; Ōmura, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yōko

    2015-05-01

    Actinomycete strains OM-6519(T) and K04-0144(T) produce the bioactive compounds lactacystin and cyslabdan, respectively. Here, the taxonomic positions of these two strains were determined. The morphological and chemical features of strains OM-6519(T) and K04-0144(T) indicated that they belonged to the genus Streptomyces. Strain OM-6519(T) showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Streptomyces xanthocidicus NBRC 13469(T) (99.7%), Streptomyces chrysomallus subsp. fumigatus NBRC 15394(T) (99.6%) and Streptomyces aburaviensis NRRL B-2218(T) (99.5%). However, the DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain OM-6519(T) and the three related strains were below 70%. Strain K04-0144(T) showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Streptomyces corchorusii NBRC 13032(T) (99.4%), Streptomyces olivaceoviridis NBRC 15394(T) (99.4%) and Streptomyces canarius NRRL B-2218(T) (99.3%). However, the DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain K04-0144(T) and the three related strains were also below 70%. Based on morphological, cultural and physiological characteristics and DNA-DNA relatedness data, strains OM-6519(T) and K04-0144(T) should be classified as new species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the names Streptomyces lactacystinicus sp. nov. and Streptomyces cyslabdanicus sp. nov. are proposed. The type strain of S. lactacystinicus is OM-6519(T) (=NBRC 110082(T), DSM 43136(T)). The type strain of S. cyslabdanicus is K04-0144(T) (=NBRC 110081(T), DSM 42135(T)).

  17. Streptomyces antioxidans sp. nov., a Novel Mangrove Soil Actinobacterium with Antioxidative and Neuroprotective Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ser, Hooi-Leng; Tan, Loh Teng-Hern; Palanisamy, Uma D.; Abd Malek, Sri N.; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Bey-Hing; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    A novel strain, Streptomyces antioxidans MUSC 164T was recovered from mangrove forest soil located at Tanjung Lumpur, Malaysia. The Gram-positive bacterium forms yellowish-white aerial and brilliant greenish yellow substrate mycelium on ISP 2 agar. A polyphasic approach was used to determine the taxonomy status of strain MUSC 164T. The strain showed a spectrum of phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic properties consistent with those of the members of the genus Streptomyces. The cell wall peptidoglycan was determined to contain LL-diaminopimelic acid. The predominant menaquinones were identified as MK-9(H6) and MK-9(H8), while the identified polar lipids consisted of aminolipid, diphosphatidylglycerol, glycolipid, hydroxyphosphatidylethanolamine, phospholipid, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and lipid. The cell wall sugars consist of galactose, glucose and ribose. The predominant cellular fatty acids (>10.0%) were identified as iso-C15:0 (34.8%) and anteiso-C15:0(14.0%). Phylogenetic analysis identified that closely related strains for MUSC 164T as Streptomyces javensis NBRC 100777T (99.6% sequence similarity), Streptomyces yogyakartensis NBRC 100779T (99.6%) and Streptomyces violaceusniger NBRC 13459T (99.6%). The DNA–DNA relatedness values between MUSC 164T and closely related type strains ranged from 23.8 ± 0.3% to 53.1 ± 4.3%. BOX-PCR fingerprints comparison showed that MUSC 164T exhibits a unique DNA profile, with DNA G + C content determined to be 71.6 mol%. Based on the polyphasic study of MUSC 164T, it is concluded that this strain represents a novel species, for which the name Streptomyces antioxidans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MUSC 164T (=DSM 101523T = MCCC 1K01590T). The extract of MUSC 164T showed potent antioxidative and neuroprotective activities against hydrogen peroxide. The chemical analysis of the extract revealed that the strain produces pyrazines and phenolic-related compounds that could explain

  18. Structure and Activity of the Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) β-N-Acetylhexosaminidase Provides Further Insight into GH20 Family Catalysis and Inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Nhung; Offen, Wendy A; Shareck, François; Davies, Gideon J.; Doucet, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    International audience; β-N-acetylhexosaminidases (HEX) are glycosidases that catalyze the glycosidic linkage hydrolysis of gluco-and galacto-configured N-acetyl-β-D-hexosaminides. These enzymes are important in human physiology and are candidates for the biocatalytic production of carbohydrates and glycomimetics. In this study, the three-dimensional structure of the wild-type and catalytically impaired E302Q HEX variant from the soil bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) (ScHEX) were solve...

  19. Transposition of Tn5096 from a temperature-sensitive transducible plasmid in Streptomyces spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenney, M A; Baltz, R H

    1991-09-01

    Transposon Tn5096 was inserted into a derivative of the temperature-sensitive plasmid pMT660 containing the bacteriophage FP43 pac site. The resulting plasmid, pRHB126, was transduced by FP43 into several Streptomyces species. Tn5096 transposed from pRHB126 into different sites in the genomes of Streptomyces ambofaciens, Streptomyces cinnamonensis, Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), Streptomyces fradiae, Streptomyces griseofuscus, and Streptomyces thermotolerans.

  20. Transposition of Tn5096 from a temperature-sensitive transducible plasmid in Streptomyces spp.

    OpenAIRE

    McHenney, M A; Baltz, R H

    1991-01-01

    Transposon Tn5096 was inserted into a derivative of the temperature-sensitive plasmid pMT660 containing the bacteriophage FP43 pac site. The resulting plasmid, pRHB126, was transduced by FP43 into several Streptomyces species. Tn5096 transposed from pRHB126 into different sites in the genomes of Streptomyces ambofaciens, Streptomyces cinnamonensis, Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), Streptomyces fradiae, Streptomyces griseofuscus, and Streptomyces thermotolerans.

  1. SPARK Peer Helper Program, 1993-94. OER Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Phyllis

    The Peer Helper Program was administered by Substance Prevention, Abuse Rehabilitation, and Knowledge (SPARK). Since its beginning in 1971, SPARK has addressed issues such as drug use, teenage pregnancy, HIV/AIDS, sexual abuse and other forms of violence. The Peer Helper Program was designed to train students in the skills required to assist peers…

  2. Managing Stress and Burnout among Helpers in Rural Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, John C.

    Individuals who work in the helping professions (physicians, counselors, nurses, pastors, and social workers) often work with individuals in stressful crisis situations. In addition to working in high stress situations, helpers in rural areas also suffer from isolation from support networks and peers that are available to urban helpers. This…

  3. Location and Survival of Mycorrhiza Helper Pseudomonas fluorescens during Establishment of Ectomycorrhizal Symbiosis between Laccaria bicolor and Douglas Fir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey-Klett, P.; Pierrat, J. C.; Garbaye, J.

    1997-01-01

    The mycorrhiza helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6, isolated from a Laccaria bicolor sporocarp, consistently promotes L. bicolor-Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) ectomycorrhizal formation, even with low doses of bacterial inoculum. In order to describe this phenomenon more accurately, we have looked at the location and survival of the introduced bacterial strain in the soil and in the rhizosphere during the establishment of mycorrhizal symbiosis in glasshouse and nursery experiments. Bacterial populations were quantified with a spontaneous, stable, rifampin-resistant mutant, BBc6R8, which phenotypically conformed to the parental strain. BBc6R8 populations declined rapidly, reaching the detection limit after 19 weeks, and did not increase either when L. bicolor sporocarps were forming in autumn or when Douglas fir roots resumed growing in spring. BBc6R8 was neither an endophyte nor a rhizobacterium. Furthermore, it was not particularly associated with either mycorrhizas of Douglas fir-L. bicolor or L. bicolor sporocarps. Surprisingly, a significant mycorrhiza helper effect was observed when the inoculated BBc6R8 population had dropped as low as 30 CFU g of dry matter(sup-1) in the soil. This study raises questions concerning the bacterial concentration in the soil which is effective for promotion of mycorrhizal establishment and the timing of the bacterial effect. It allows us to develop working hypotheses, which can be tested experimentally, to identify the mechanisms of the mycorrhiza helper effect. PMID:16535478

  4. Comprehensive analysis of the cellulolytic system reveals its potential for deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass in a novel Streptomyces sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Guilherme L; de Azevedo-Martins, Allan C; Albano, Rodolpho M; de Souza, Wanderley; Frases, Susana

    2017-01-01

    The giant snail Achatina fulica is considered an invasive species in most territories in which it was introduced, due to its ability to process a large amount of lignocellulose as a consequence of the presence of a cellulolytic-associated microflora. Streptomyces are well known as crucial agents in the decomposition of complex polymers in soil environments and also as cellulolytic symbionts commonly associated with herbivore insects. Here, we employed a combination of genomic and biochemical tools for a detailed evaluation of the cellulolytic potential of Streptomyces sp. I1.2, an aerobic bacterium isolated from the intestinal lumen of A. fulica in a screening for cellulolytic bacteria. Genomic analysis revealed that the ratio and diversity of CAZy domains and GH families coded by Streptomyces sp. I1.2 are comparable to those present in other highly cellulolytic bacteria. After growth on crystalline cellulose or sugarcane bagasse as sole carbon sources, the functionality of several genes encoding endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases, xylanases, CBMs, and one β-glucosidase were confirmed by the combination of enzymatic activity measurements, zymography, TLC, and cellulose-binding assays. The endoglucanases secreted by this isolate were stable at 50 °C and exhibited activity over a broad pH range between 4.0 and 8.0. The endoglucanases and cellobiohydrolases secreted by Streptomyces sp. I1.2 exhibited specific activities that were similar to the levels present in a commercial cellulase preparation from Trichoderma reesei, while I1.2 xylanase levels were even 350 % higher. The results presented here show that Streptomyces sp. I1.2 is promising for future biotechnological applications, since it is able to produce endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases, and xylanases in appreciable amounts when grown on a low-cost residue such as sugarcane bagasse.

  5. Streptomyces bacteria as potential probiotics in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Loh eTeng Hern

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In response to the increased seafood demand from the ever-going human population, aquaculture has become the fastest growing animal food-producing sector. However, the indiscriminate use of antibiotics as a biological control agents for fish pathogens has led to the emergence of antibiotic resistance bacteria. Probiotics are defined as living microbial supplement that exert beneficial effects on hosts as well as improvement of environmental parameters. Probiotics have been proven to be effective in improving the growth, survival and health status of the aquatic livestock. This review aims to highlight the genus Streptomyces can be a good candidate for probiotics in aquaculture. Studies showed that the feed supplemented with Streptomyces could protect fish and shrimp from pathogens as well as increase the growth of the aquatic organisms. Furthermore, the limitations of Streptomyces as probiotics in aquaculture is also highlighted and solutions are discussed to these limitations.

  6. Streptomyces andamanensis sp. nov., isolated from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripreechasak, Paranee; Tamura, Tomohiko; Shibata, Chiyo; Suwanborirux, Khanit; Tanasupawat, Somboon

    2016-05-01

    A novel actinomycete, strain KC-112T, was isolated from soil collected from Similan Islands, Phang-Nga Province, Thailand. The strain exhibited morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics consistent with those of members of the genus Streptomyces. The formation of smooth spiral spore chains was observed on aerial mycelia. ll-Diaminopimelic acid was detected in whole-cell hydrolysates, but no diagnostic sugars were detected and the strain lacked mycolic acids. The N-acyl type of muramic acid was acetyl. The major menaquinones were MK-9(H8), MK-9(H6) and MK-9(H2). The predominant cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C16 : 0 and C16 : 0. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside, an unknown phospholipid, an unknown aminolipid, unknown lipids and an unknown glycolipid. The DNA G+C content was 73 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain KC-112T was closely related to Streptomyces fumanus NBRC 13042T (98.8 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Streptomyces anandii NBRC 13438T (98.8 %) and Streptomyces capillispiralis NBRC 14222T (98.8 %). DNA-DNA relatedness values among strain KC-112T and type strains of closely related species were lower than 70 %. On the basis of evidence from this taxonomic study using a polyphasic approach, strain KC-112T represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, namely Streptomyces andamanensis sp. nov. The type strain is KC-112T ( = KCTC 29502T = NBRC 110085T = PCU 347T = TISTR 2401T).

  7. Cell wall glycopolymers of Streptomyces albus, Streptomyces albidoflavus and Streptomyces pathocidini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashkov, Alexander S; Streshinskaya, Galina M; Tul'skaya, Elena M; Senchenkova, Sophia N; Baryshnikova, Lidia M; Dmitrenok, Andrey S; Ostash, Bohdan E; Fedorenko, Victor A

    2016-07-01

    The cell wall glycopolymers of three strains of Streptomyces albus and the type strain of Streptomyces pathocidini were investigated. The structures of the glycopolymers were established using a combination of chemical and NMR spectroscopic methods. The cell wall of S. albus subsp. albus VKM Ac-35(T) was found to be comprised of three glycopolymers, viz. unsubstituted 1,5-poly(ribitol phosphate), 1,3-poly(glycerol phosphate) substituted with β-D-glucopyranose, and the major polymer, a 3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galacto-non-2-ulosonic acid (Kdn)-teichulosonic acid: β-D-Glcp-(1 → 8)-α-Kdnp-(2[(→6)-β-D-Glcp-(1 → 8)-α-Kdnp-(2 →] n 6)-β-D-Glcp-(1 → 8)-β-Kdnp-(2-OH, where n ≥ 3. The cell walls of 'S. albus' J1074 and 'S. albus' R1-100 were found to contain three glycopolymers of identical structures, viz. unsubstituted 1,3- and 2,3-poly(glycerol phosphates), and the major polymer, a Kdn-teichulosonic acid with an unusual structure that has not been previously described: β-D-Galp-(1 → 9)-α-Kdnp-(2[(→3)-β-D-Galp-(1 → 9)-α-Kdnp-(2 →] n 3)-β-D-Galp-(1 → 9)-β-Kdnp-(2-OH, where n ~ 7-8. The cell wall of S. pathocidini (formerly S. albus subsp. pathocidicus) VKM Ac-598(T) was found to contain two glycopolymers, viz. 1,3-poly(glycerol phosphate) partially O-glycosylated with 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-D-glucopyranose and/or O-acylated with L-lysine, and a poly(diglycosyl 1-phosphate) of hitherto unknown structure: -6)-α-D-Glcp-(1 → 6)-α-D-GlcpNAc-(1-P-.

  8. A sporulation-specific, sigF-dependent protein, SspA, affects septum positioning in Streptomyces coelicolor

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The RNA polymerase sigma factor SigF controls late development during sporulation in the filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. The only known SigF-dependent gene identified so far, SCO5321, is found in the biosynthetic cluster encoding spore pigment synthesis. Here we identify the first direct target for SigF, the gene sspA, encoding a sporulation-specific protein. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that SspA is a secreted lipoprotein with two PepSY signature domains. The sspA deletion ...

  9. Importance of mycorrhization helper bacteria cell density and metabolite localization for the Pinus sylvestris-Lactarius rufus symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspray, Thomas J; Eirian Jones, E; Whipps, John M; Bending, Gary D

    2006-04-01

    Mycorrhization helper bacteria, Paenibacillus sp. EJP73 and Burkholderia sp. EJP67, were used to study the importance of bacterial inoculum dose and bacterial derived soluble and volatile metabolites localization for enhancing mycorrhiza formation in the Pinus sylvestris-Lactarius rufus symbiosis, using a laboratory based microcosm. EJP73 and EJP67 produced different responses in relation to the inoculum dose; EJP73 significantly enhanced mycorrhiza formation to the same degree at all doses tested (10(5), 10(7), 10(9) and 10(10) CFU mL(-1)), whereas, EJP67 only stimulated mycorrhiza formation within a narrow range of inoculum densities (10(7) and 10(9) CFU mL(-1)). The importance of soluble bacterial metabolites was assessed by applying spent broth derived from exponential and stationary phase bacterial cultures to microcosms. No spent broth enhanced mycorrhiza formation over the control. As EJP73 produced the helper effect over a wide range of inoculum doses, this bacterium was chosen for further study. Physical separation of EJP73 from the fungal and plant symbiosis partners was carried out, in order to determine the contribution of constitutively produced bacterial volatile metabolites to the mycorrhization helper bacteria effect. When EJP73 was physically separated from the symbiosis, it had a significant negative effect on mycorrhiza formation. These results suggest that close proximity, or indeed cell contact, is required for the helper effect. Therefore, fluorescent in situ hybridization in conjunction with cryosectioning was used to determine the localization of EJP73 in mycorrhizal tissue. The cells were found to occur as rows or clusters ( approximately 10 cells) within the mycorrhizal mantle, both at the root tip and along the length of the mycorrhizal short roots.

  10. Streptomyces gilvigriseus sp. nov., a novel actinobacterium isolated from mangrove forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ser, Hooi-Leng; Zainal, Nurullhudda; Palanisamy, Uma Devi; Goh, Bey-Hing; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-06-01

    A novel Streptomyces, strain MUSC 26(T), was isolated from mangrove soil at Tanjung Lumpur, Malaysia. The bacterium was observed to be Gram-positive and to form grayish yellow aerial and substrate mycelium on ISP 7 agar. A polyphasic approach was used to study the taxonomy of strain MUSC 26(T), which shows a range of phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic properties consistent with those of the members of the genus Streptomyces. The cell wall peptidoglycan was determined to contain LL-diaminopimelic acid. The predominant menaquinones were identified as MK-9 (H8) and MK-9(H6). The polar lipids detected were identified as diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, hydroxyphosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylmethylethanolamine and hydroxyphosphatidylmethylethanolamine. The predominant cellular fatty acids (>10.0 %) were identified as anteiso-C15:0 (31.4 %), iso-C16:0 (16.3 %), iso-C15:0 (13.9 %) and anteiso-C17:0 (12.6 %). The cell wall sugars were found to be galactose, glucose, mannose, ribose and rhamnose. These results suggest that MUSC 26(T) should be placed within the genus Streptomyces. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that closely related strains include Streptomyces qinglanensis 172205(T) (96.5 % sequence similarity), S. sodiiphilus YIM 80305(T) (96.5 %) and S. rimosus subsp. rimosus ATCC 10970(T) (96.4 %). DNA-DNA relatedness values between MUSC 26(T) and closely related type strains ranged from 17.0 ± 2.2 to 33.2 ± 5.3 %. Comparison of BOX-PCR fingerprints indicated MUSC 26(T) presents a unique DNA profile. The DNA G+C content was determined to be 74.6 mol%. Based on this polyphasic study of MUSC 26(T), it is concluded that this strain represents a novel species, for which the name Streptomyces gilvigriseus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MUSC 26(T) (=DSMZ 42173(T) = MCCC 1K00504(T)).

  11. Die posisie van die Helper in die sending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. J. van der Walt

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available Gedurende die aanvangsjare van die sending het die helper ’n onmisbare funksie vervul. Hulle het die onherbergsame binnelande geken, waardevolle kontakpunte vir die sendelinge geopen en hulle mense geestelik help voorlig en voorberei.

  12. Suppression induction in vivo by a T helper clone?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crispe, I N; Owens, T

    1985-01-01

    We have previously described a helper T cell clone which augments in vivo cytotoxic T cell responses when injected at 10(4) cells per mouse, but not at 10(5) per mouse (Crispe, I. N. et al., Immunology 1984. 52:55). To test whether this dose-response relationship was due to the induction...... of suppression, naive syngeneic mice were injected with 10(5) cloned T helper cells, and their spleen cells were subsequently assayed for suppressive activity in adoptive transfer experiments. Lymphocytes from such mice indeed suppressed an antigen-specific cytotoxic response, but only in the presence...... of the same T helper cell clone freshly added at the time of adoptive transfer. On this basis we argue that the distinction between T helper cell activity and T suppressor-inducer activity corresponds to differences in cell numbers, rather than to two separate cell lineages....

  13. Physical Layer Security with Uncoordinated Helpers Implementing Cooperative Jamming

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Shuangyu; Petropulu, Athina

    2012-01-01

    A wireless communication network is considered, consisting of a source (Alice), a destination (Bob) and an eavesdropper (Eve), each equipped with a single antenna. The communication is assisted by multiple helpers, each equipped with two antennas, which implement cooperative jamming, i.e., transmitting noise to confound Eve. The optimal structure of the jamming noise that maximizes the secrecy rate is derived. A nulling noise scenario is also considered, in which each helper transmits noise that nulls out at Bob. Each helper only requires knowledge of its own link to Bob to determine the noise locally. For the optimally structured noise, global information of all the links is required. Although analysis shows that under the two-antenna per helper scenario the nulling solution is sub-optimal in terms of the achievable secrecy rate, simulations show that the performance difference is rather small, with the inexpensive and easy to implement nulling scheme performing near optimal.

  14. A new virginae butanolide from Streptomyces sp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang LI; Yi Nan ZHENG; Wen Han LIN; Isabel SATTLER

    2006-01-01

    A novel butanolide, named virginaebutanolide F (1), was isolated from the lyophilized culture broth of Streptomyces sp., along with a known compound virginaebutanolide C (2). Their structures including the stereochemistry were elucidated on the basis of extensive 1D and 2D NMR as well as HRESI-MS and CD spectroscopic analysis.

  15. Central Carbon Metabolic Pathways in Streptomyces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keulen, Geertje; Siebring, Jeroen; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Dyson, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Streptomyces and other actinomycetes are fascinating soil bacteria of major economic importance. They produce 70% of antibiotics known to man and numerous other pharmaceuticals for treatment of, e.g. cancer, a range of infections, high cholesterol, or have immunosuppressive activity. It is not surpr

  16. Streptomyces hygroscopicus Has Two Glutamine Synthetase Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumada, Y.; Takano, E.; Nagaoka, Kozo; Thompson, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    Streptomyces hygroscopicus, which produces the glutamine synthetase inhibitor phosphinothricin, possesses at least two genes (glnA and glnB) encoding distinct glutamine synthetase isoforms (GSI and GSII). The glnB gene was cloned from S. hygroscopicus DNA by complementation in an Escherichia coli gl

  17. Central Carbon Metabolic Pathways in Streptomyces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keulen, Geertje; Siebring, Jeroen; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Dyson, Paul

    Streptomyces and other actinomycetes are fascinating soil bacteria of major economic importance. They produce 70% of antibiotics known to man and numerous other pharmaceuticals for treatment of, e.g. cancer, a range of infections, high cholesterol, or have immunosuppressive activity. It is not

  18. Alcoholics Anonymous-Related Helping and the Helper Therapy Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Maria E; Post, Stephen G; Johnson, Shannon M

    2010-01-01

    The helper therapy principle (HTP) observes the helper's health benefits derived from helping another with a shared malady. The HTP is embodied by the program of Alcoholics Anonymous as a method to diminish egocentrism as a root cause of addiction. This article reviews recent evidence of the HTP in alcohol populations, extends to populations with chronic conditions beyond addiction, and concludes with new directions of empirical inquiry.

  19. WEB SERVICE BASED RELIABLE - SHELTERED MEDI HELPER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Priya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The veracity and secrecy of medical information which is transacted over the Internet is vulnerable to attack. But the transaction of such details is mandatory in order to avail the luxury of medical services anywhere, anytime. Especially in a web service enabled system for hospital management, it becomes necessary to address these security issues. It is mandatory that the services guarantee message delivery to software applications, with a chosen level of quality of service (QoS. This paper presents a VDM++ based specification for modelling a security framework for web services with non repudiation to ensure that a party in a dispute cannot repudiate, or refute the validity of a statement or contract and it is ensured that the transaction happens in a reliable manner. This model presents the procedure and technical options to have a secure communication over Internet with web services. Based on the model the Medi - Helper is developed to use the technologies of WS-Security, WS-Reliability and WS-Policy, WSRN in order to create encrypted messages so that the Patient’s medical records are not tampered with when relayed over Internet, and are sent in a reliable manner. In addition to authentication, integrity, confidentiality, as proposed in this paper security framework for healthcare based web services is equipped with non repudiation which is not inclusive in many existing frameworks.

  20. Taxonomic evaluation of Streptomyces albus and related species using multilocus sequence analysis and proposals to emend the description of Streptomyces albus and describe Streptomyces pathocidini sp. nov

    Science.gov (United States)

    In phylogenetic analyses of the genus Streptomyces using 16S rRNA gene sequences, Streptomyces albus subsp. albus NRRL B-1811T forms a cluster with 5 other species having identical or nearly identical 16S rRNA gene sequences. Moreover, the morphological and physiological characteristics of these oth...

  1. Marine Sponge-Derived Streptomyces sp. SBT343 Extract Inhibits Staphylococcal Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Srikkanth; Othman, Eman M.; Kampik, Daniel; Stopper, Helga; Hentschel, Ute; Ziebuhr, Wilma; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A.; Abdelmohsen, Usama R.

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus are opportunistic pathogens that cause nosocomial and chronic biofilm-associated infections. Indwelling medical devices and contact lenses are ideal ecological niches for formation of staphylococcal biofilms. Bacteria within biofilms are known to display reduced susceptibilities to antimicrobials and are protected from the host immune system. High rates of acquired antibiotic resistances in staphylococci and other biofilm-forming bacteria further hamper treatment options and highlight the need for new anti-biofilm strategies. Here, we aimed to evaluate the potential of marine sponge-derived actinomycetes in inhibiting biofilm formation of several strains of S. epidermidis, S. aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results from in vitro biofilm-formation assays, as well as scanning electron and confocal microscopy, revealed that an organic extract derived from the marine sponge-associated bacterium Streptomyces sp. SBT343 significantly inhibited staphylococcal biofilm formation on polystyrene, glass and contact lens surfaces, without affecting bacterial growth. The extract also displayed similar antagonistic effects towards the biofilm formation of other S. epidermidis and S. aureus strains tested but had no inhibitory effects towards Pseudomonas biofilms. Interestingly the extract, at lower effective concentrations, did not exhibit cytotoxic effects on mouse fibroblast, macrophage and human corneal epithelial cell lines. Chemical analysis by High Resolution Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (HRMS) of the Streptomyces sp. SBT343 extract proportion revealed its chemical richness and complexity. Preliminary physico-chemical characterization of the extract highlighted the heat-stable and non-proteinaceous nature of the active component(s). The combined data suggest that the Streptomyces sp. SBT343 extract selectively inhibits staphylococcal biofilm formation without interfering with bacterial cell viability. Due to

  2. Rapid identification of Streptomyces isolates by MALDI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucif, Lotfi; Bendjama, Esma; Gacemi-Kirane, Djamila; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2014-12-01

    The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria over the last decade has led to a renewal in the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. Streptomyces members are practically unlimited sources of new antibiotics. However, the identification of Streptomyces species is difficult and time-consuming. Therefore, there is a need for alternative methods for their rapid identification. In this study, an efficient protocol of identification using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was developed and applied for the rapid identification of Streptomyces isolates from the El Kala lakes in northeastern Algeria. A collection of 48 Streptomyces isolates were used for this study. The optimized procedure allowed us to obtain specific and reproducible protein spectra for each Streptomyces isolate tested. The spectra generated were used to build a preliminary local database based on their initial 16S rRNA identification. The blind test used for the identification of 20 Streptomyces strains already available in our created database and 20 unknown Streptomyces isolates showed that all (100%) of the Streptomyces strains listed in the database were rapidly (Streptomyces isolates.

  3. DNA Phosphorothioate Modification Plays a Role in Peroxides Resistance in Streptomyces lividans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daofeng Dai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA phosphorothioation, conferred by dnd genes, was originally discovered in the soil-dwelling bacterium Streptomyces lividans, and thereafter found to exist in various bacterial genera. However, the physiological significance of this sulfur modification of the DNA backbone remains unknown in S. lividans. Our studies indicate that DNA phosphorothioation has a major role in resistance to oxidative stress in the strain. Although Streptomyces species express multiple catalase/peroxidase and organic hydroperoxide resistance genes to protect them against peroxide damage, a wild type strain of S. lividans exhibited two-fold to 10-fold higher survival, compared to a dnd- mutant, following treatment with peroxides. RNA-seq experiments revealed that, catalase and organic hydroperoxide resistance gene expression were not up-regulated in the wild type strain, suggesting that the resistance to oxidative stress was not due to the up-regulation of these genes by DNA phosphorothioation. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was conducted to trace the expression of the catalase and the organic hydroperoxide resistance genes after peroxides treatments. A bunch of these genes were activated in the dnd- mutant rather than the wild type strain in response to peroxides. Moreover, the organic hydroperoxide peracetic acid was scavenged more rapidly in the presence than in the absence of phosphorothioate modification, both in vivo and in vitro. The dnd gene cluster can be up-regulated by the disulfide stressor diamide. Overall, our observations suggest that DNA phosphorothioate modification functions as a peroxide resistance system in S. lividans.

  4. In vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Extracts From Marine Streptomyces Isolated From Mangrove Sediments of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Mathias Sosovele

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to isolate Actinomycetes from mangrove sediments of Tanzania and evaluate their potential for production of bioactive metabolites. Starch cacein agar medium was used to isolate the actinomycetes. Extraction of Actinomycetes using ethyl acetate (1:1, afforded dry extracts. The extracts were tested for antimicrobial activity and brine shrimp toxicity test. A total of three isolates (ACTN 1, ACTN 2 and ACTN 3 were obtained by using culture medium selective for Actinomycetes. Actinomycetes specific primers; S-C-Act-235-S-20 and S-C-Act-878-A-19 were used to identify two isolates as Streptomyces sp and one as actinomycetes sp. The strongest activity against bacterium (Bacillus subtillis and fungus (Candida albicans was exhibited by crude extracts of Streptomyces sp (ACTN 2 and ACTN 3. Crude extracts of all three isolates exhibited non- cytotoxic activity against brine shrimp larvae with LC50 values ranging from 250 - 446 μg/ml respectively. These results provide evidence that the mangrove sediments streptomycetes could be promising sources for antimicrobial bioactive agents.

  5. Endophytic Streptomyces in the traditional medicinal plant Arnica montana L.: secondary metabolites and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardecki, Tina; Brötz, Elke; De Ford, Christian; von Loewenich, Friederike D; Rebets, Yuriy; Tokovenko, Bogdan; Luzhetskyy, Andriy; Merfort, Irmgard

    2015-08-01

    Arnica montana L. is a medical plant of the Asteraceae family and grows preferably on nutrient poor soils in mountainous environments. Such surroundings are known to make plants dependent on symbiosis with other organisms. Up to now only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were found to act as endophytic symbiosis partners for A. montana. Here we identified five Streptomyces strains, microorganisms also known to occur as endophytes in plants and to produce a huge variety of active secondary metabolites, as inhabitants of A. montana. The secondary metabolite spectrum of these strains does not contain sesquiterpene lactones, but consists of the glutarimide antibiotics cycloheximide and actiphenol as well as the diketopiperazines cyclo-prolyl-valyl, cyclo-prolyl-isoleucyl, cyclo-prolyl-leucyl and cyclo-prolyl-phenylalanyl. Notably, genome analysis of one strain was performed and indicated a huge genome size with a high number of natural products gene clusters among which genes for cycloheximide production were detected. Only weak activity against the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus was revealed, but the extracts showed a marked cytotoxic activity as well as an antifungal activity against Candida parapsilosis and Fusarium verticillioides. Altogether, our results provide evidence that A. montana and its endophytic Streptomyces benefit from each other by completing their protection against competitors and pathogens and by exchanging plant growth promoting signals with nutrients.

  6. Fluorinated natural products: the biosynthesis of fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine in Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Cormac D; Schaffrath, Christoph; O'Hagan, David

    2003-07-01

    Organofluorine compounds are rare in Nature, with only a handful known to be produced by some species of plant and two microorganisms. Consequently, the mechanism of enzymatic carbon-fluorine bond formation is poorly understood. The bacterium Streptomyces cattleya biosynthesises fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine as secondary metabolites and is a convenient system to study the biosynthesis and enzymology of fluorometabolite production. Using stable-isotope labelled precursors it has been shown that there is a common intermediate in the biosynthesis of the fluorometabolites, which has recently been identified as fluoroacetaldehyde. Studies with cell-free extracts of S. cattleya have identified two enzymes, an aldehyde dehydrogenase and a threonine transaldolase, that are involved in the biotransformation of fluoroacetaldehyde to fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine.

  7. Integrative Gene Cloning and Expression System for Streptomyces sp. US 24 and Streptomyces sp. TN 58 Bioactive Molecule Producing Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiha Sioud

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces sp. US 24 and Streptomyces sp. TN 58, two strains producing interesting bioactive molecules, were successfully transformed using E. coli ET12567 (pUZ8002, as a conjugal donor, carrying the integrative plasmid pSET152. For the Streptomyces sp. US 24 strain, two copies of this plasmid were tandemly integrated in the chromosome, whereas for Streptomyces sp. TN 58, the integration was in single copy at the attB site. Plasmid pSET152 was inherited every time for all analysed Streptomyces sp. US 24 and Streptomyces sp. TN 58 exconjugants under nonselective conditions. The growth, morphological differentiation, and active molecules production of all studied pSET152 integrated exconjugants were identical to those of wild type strains. Consequently, conjugal transfer using pSET152 integration system is a suitable means of genes transfer and expression for both studied strains. To validate the above gene transfer system, the glucose isomerase gene (xylA from Streptomyces sp. SK was expressed in strain Streptomyces sp. TN 58. Obtained results indicated that heterologous glucose isomerase could be expressed and folded effectively. Glucose isomerase activity of the constructed TN 58 recombinant strain is of about eighteenfold higher than that of the Streptomyces sp. SK strain. Such results are certainly of importance due to the potential use of improved strains in biotechnological process for the production of high-fructose syrup from starch.

  8. Alkaline tolerant dextranase from streptomyces anulatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Stephen R.; Adney, William S.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A process for production of an alkaline tolerant dextranase enzyme comprises culturing a dextran-producing microorganism Streptomyces anulatus having accession no. ATCC PTA-3866 to produce an alkaline tolerant dextranase, Dex 1 wherein the protein in said enzyme is characterized by a MW of 63.3 kDa and Dex 2 wherein its protein is characterized by a MW of 81.8 kDa.

  9. Streptomyces somaliensis mediated green synthesis of silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Soltani Nejad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The development of reliable and ecofriendly process for the synthesis of nano-metals is an important aspect in the field of nanotechnology. Nano-metals are a special group of materials with broad area of applications. Materials and Methods: In this study, extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles (SNPs performed by use of the gram positive soil Streptomycetes. Streptomycetes isolated from rice fields of Guilan Province, Iran (5 isolates. Initial characterization of SNPs was performed by visual change color. To determine the bacterium taxonomical identity, its colonies characterized morphologically by use of scanning electron microscope. The PCR molecular analysis of active isolate represented its identity partially. In this regard, 16S rDNA of isolate G was amplified using universal bacterial primers FD1 and RP2. The PCR products were purified and sequenced. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA was then conducted using NCBI GenBank database using BLAST. Also SNPs were characterized by, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD. Results: From all 5 collected Streptomyces somaliensis isolates, isolate G showed highest extracellular synthesis of SNPs via in vitro. SNPs were formed immediately by the addition of (AgNO3 solution (1 mM. UV-visible spectrophotometry for measuring surface plasmon resonance showed a single absorption peak at 450 nm, which confirmed the presence of SNPs. TEM revealed the extracellular formation of spherical silver nanoparticles in the size range of 5-35 nm. Conclusions: The biological approach for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles offers an environmentally benign alternative to the traditional chemical and physical synthesis methods. So, a simple, environmentally friendly and cost-effective method has been developed to synthesize AgNPs using Streptomycetes.

  10. A gene cloning system for 'Streptomyces toyocaensis'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, P; Baltz, R H

    1996-02-01

    We explored different methods of introducing DNA into 'Streptomyces toyocaensis' and Streptomyces virginiae to construct stable recombinant strains. Plasmid pIJ702 isolated from Streptomyces lividans transformed protoplasts of 'S. toyocaensis' at a frequency of 7 x 10(3) transformants (mu g DNA)-1. pIJ702 prepared from 'S. toyocaensis' transformed 'S. toyocaensis' protoplasts at a frequency of 1 center dot 5 x 10(5) (mu g DNA)-1, suggesting that 'S. toyocaensis' expresses restriction and modification. Plasmid pRHB126 was transduced by bacteriophage FP43 into 'S. toyocaensis' at a frequency of 1.2 x 10(-6) (p.f.u)-1. Plasmids pOJ436 and pRHB304 were introduced into 'S. toyocaensis' by conjugation from Escherichia coli S17-1 at frequencies of about 2 x 10(-4) and 1 x 10(-4) per recipient, respectively. Analysis of several exconjugants indicated that pOJ436 and pRHB304 inserted into a unique phiC31 attB site and that some of the insertions had minimal deleterious effects on glycopeptide A47934 production. The results indicate that 'S. toyocaensis' is a suitable host for gene cloning, whereas S. virginiae does not appear to be.

  11. [Amylase inhibitors from Streptomyces lucensis VKPM Ac-1743 and Streptomyces violaceus VKPM Ac-1734].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharova, N Iu

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors synthesized by the Streptomyces lucensis VKPM AS-1743 and Streptomyces violaceus VKPM AS-1734 strains were studied for their influence on amylases of different origin. The effect of the inhibitors was shown to be different on fungal amylase, pancreatic amylase, and amylase from human blood. It has been found that the studied inhibitors are substances of a pseudooligosaccharide nature and exhibit their activity and stability over a wide range of pH and temperature values. The physico-chemical and biochemical properties of isolated inhibitors were compared with those of known microbial inhibitors of α-glucosidases.

  12. Classification of Streptomyces griseus (Krainsky 1914) Waksman and Henrici 1948 and related species and the transfer of 'Microstreptospora cinerea' to the genus Streptomyces as Streptomyces yanii sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiheng; Shi, Yanlin; Zhang, Yamei; Zhou, Zhihong; Lu, Zhitang; Li, Wei; Huang, Ying; Rodríguez, Carlos; Goodfellow, Michael

    2005-07-01

    A soil actinomycete, strain 80-133(T), with the non-validly published name 'Microstreptospora cinerea', was the subject of a polyphasic study designed to clarify its taxonomic status. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence studies indicated that the organism belonged to the genus Streptomyces, a result in line with previous chemotaxonomic and morphological data. The strain belonged to the Streptomyces griseus clade, but could be distinguished from representatives of species assigned to this taxon by using DNA-DNA relatedness and phenotypic data. In light of these findings, it is proposed that the organism should be recognized as a novel species of the genus Streptomyces. The name proposed for this taxon is Streptomyces yanii sp. nov., with isolate 80-133(T) (=AS 4.1146(T)=JCM 3331(T)) as the type strain. It was also shown that representative strains of Streptomyces argenteolus, Streptomyces caviscabies, S. griseus and Streptomyces setonii belong to the same genomic species and have key phenotypic properties in common. It is proposed that S. caviscabies and S. setonii should be considered as later heterotypic synonyms of S. griseus and that S. argenteolus AS 4.1693(T) should also be assigned to this taxon.

  13. Taxonomic evaluation of Streptomyces hirsutus and related species using multi-locus sequence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phylogenetic analyses of species of Streptomyces based on 16S rRNA gene sequences resulted in a statistically well-supported clade (100% bootstrap value) containing 8 species having very similar gross morphology. These species, including Streptomyces bambergiensis, Streptomyces chlorus, Streptomyces...

  14. Genome-based phylogenetic analysis of Streptomyces and its relatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alam, Mohammad Tauqeer; Merlo, Maria Elena; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer

    Motivation: Streptomyces is one of the best-studied genera of the order Actinomycetales due to its great importance in medical science, ecology and the biotechnology industry. A comprehensive, detailed and robust phylogeny of Streptomyces and its relatives is needed for understanding how this group

  15. Genome-based phylogenetic analysis of Streptomyces and its relatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alam, Mohammad Tauqeer; Merlo, Maria Elena; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Streptomyces is one of the best-studied genera of the order Actinomycetales due to its great importance in medical science, ecology and the biotechnology industry. A comprehensive, detailed and robust phylogeny of Streptomyces and its relatives is needed for understanding how this group

  16. Identification and characterization of developmental genes in streptomyces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Le

    2015-01-01

    Actinomycetes produce 70% of all known antibiotics, most of which are produced by members of the genus Streptomyces. Furthermore, streptomycetes produce a plethora of other medically relevant natural products as well as industrial enzymes. Streptomyces is a multicellular mycelial organism, and has a

  17. Multilocus sequence analysis of phytopathogenic species of the genus Streptomyces

    Science.gov (United States)

    The identification and classification of species within the genus Streptomyces is difficult because there are presently 576 validly described species and this number increases every year. The value of the application of multilocus sequence analysis scheme to the systematics of Streptomyces species h...

  18. Streptomyces mangrovi sp. nov., isolated from mangrove forest sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Ghada; Busarakam, Kanungnid; Kim, Byung-Yong; Goodfellow, Michael

    2015-09-01

    A Streptomyces strain isolated from a mangrove sediment was classified using a polyphasic approach. The organism, isolate GY1(T), was found to have chemical and morphological properties typical of members of the genus Streptomyces. The isolate was shown to form a distinct phyletic line within the Streptomyces radiopugnans 16S rRNA gene subclade and to be closely related to the type strain of Streptomyces fenhuangensis (98.7 % similarity). It is also closely related to the type strain of Streptomyces bakulensis which was also closely related to members of the Streptomyces glaucosporus 16S rRNA gene subclade. Isolate GY1(T) was distinguished readily from the S. barkulensis type strain and from species classified in the S. radiopugnans clade using a combination of morphological and physiological properties, including a requirement for seawater for growth. Based on the genotypic and phenotypic data, it is proposed that isolate GY1(T) (=NCIMB 14980(T), NRRL B-69296(T)) be classified in the genus Streptomyces as Streptomyces mangrovi sp. nov.

  19. Identification and characterization of developmental genes in streptomyces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Le

    2015-01-01

    Actinomycetes produce 70% of all known antibiotics, most of which are produced by members of the genus Streptomyces. Furthermore, streptomycetes produce a plethora of other medically relevant natural products as well as industrial enzymes. Streptomyces is a multicellular mycelial organism, and has a

  20. Streptomyces albiflavescens sp. nov., an actinomycete isolated from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiufang; Zheng, Jimei; Xin, Di; Xin, Yuhua; Wei, Xuexin; Zhang, Jianli

    2015-05-01

    Two actinobacterial strains, m20(T) and z8, were isolated from soil taken from rainforest areas/tropic forest region, Yunnan Province, south-west China. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities and DNA-DNA relatedness values between strains m20(T) and z8 were 100 and 88.2%, respectively, which indicated that these two strains should be classified as the same species. The taxonomic position of the strains was determined by a polyphasic approach. Morphological and chemotaxonomic features of the strains were consistent with those of the genus Streptomyces . A phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strains m20(T) and z8 formed an evolutionary branch within the genus Streptomyces and shared relatively high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values with other members of this genus, including 'Streptomyces siamensis' NBRC 108799 (98.95%), Streptomyces graminilatus NBRC 108882(T) (98.25%), Streptomyces seoulensis NBRC 16668(T) (98.11%), Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 29050(T) (98.11%) and Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. ossamyceticus ATCC 15420(T) (98.11%). DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain m20(T) and the five above-mentioned strains were 56.3, 55.1, 52.8, 50.1 and 48.4%, respectively. On the basis of phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic properties, strains m20(T) and z8 could be distinguished from phylogenetically related members of the genus Streptomyces . The isolates thus merit species status within the genus Streptomyces , for which the name http://dx.doi.org/10.1601/nm.6817 Streptomyces albiflavescens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is m20(T) ( =CGMCC 4.7111(T) =KCTC 29196(T)). Strain z8 ( =CGMCC 4.7112=KCTC 29197) is a reference strain.

  1. Lactococcus lactis - a diploid bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; Hansen, Flemming G.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    In contrast to higher eukaryotes, bacteria are haploid, i.e. they store their genetic information in a single chromosome, which is then duplicated during the cell cycle. If the growth rate is sufficiently low, the bacterium is born with only a single copy of the chromosome, which gets duplicated...... before the bacterium divides. Fast-growing bacteria have overlapping rounds of replication, and can contain DNA corresponding to more than four genome equivalents. However, the terminus region of the chromosome is still present in just one copy after division, and is not duplicated until right before...... the next division. Thus, the regions of the chromosome that are the last to be replicated are haploid even in fast-growing bacteria. In contrast to this general rule for bacteria, we found that Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium which has been exploited for thousands of years for the production of fermented...

  2. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  3. The Harpoon Security System for Helper Programs on a Pocket Companion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Havinga, Paul J.M.; van Os, Daniel

    We present a security framework for executing foreign programs, called helpers, on a Pocket Companion: a wireless hand-held computer. A helper program as proposed in this paper is a service program that can migrate once from a server to a Pocket Companion or vice-versa. A helper program is

  4. The Harpoon Security System for Helper Programs on a Pocket Companion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Gerard J.M.; Havinga, Paul J.M.; Os, van Daniel

    1997-01-01

    We present a security framework for executing foreign programs, called helpers, on a Pocket Companion: a wireless hand-held computer. A helper program as proposed in this paper is a service program that can migrate once from a server to a Pocket Companion or vice-versa. A helper program is convenien

  5. A fine romance: T follicular helper cells and B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Cecile

    2011-06-24

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells help B cells to generate affinity-matured antibodies. Three papers in this issue of Immunity (Choi et al., 2011; Kerfoot et al., 2011; Kitano et al., 2011) provide information about the reciprocal relationship between B cells and Tfh cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mycorrhization helper bacteria: a case of specificity for altering ectomycorrhiza architecture but not ectomycorrhiza formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspray, Thomas J; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Jones, Julie E; Whipps, John M; Garbaye, Jean; Bending, Gary D

    2006-11-01

    Mycorrhization helper bacteria (MHB), isolated from phylogenetically distinct ectomycorrhizal symbioses involving Lactarius rufus, Laccaria bicolor or Suillus luteus, were tested for fungus specificity to enhance L. rufus-Pinus sylvestris or L. bicolor-P. sylvestris mycorrhiza formation. As MHB isolated from the L. rufus and S. luteus mycorrhiza were originally characterised using a microcosm system, we assessed their ability to enhance mycorrhiza formation in a glasshouse system in order to determine the extent to which MHB are system-specific. Paenibacillus sp. EJP73, an MHB for L. rufus in the microcosm, significantly enhanced L. bicolor mycorrhiza formation in the glasshouse, demonstrating that the MHB effect of this bacterium is neither fungus-specific nor limited to the original experimental system. Although the five MHB strains studied were unable to significantly enhance L. rufus mycorrhiza formation, two of them did have a significant effect on dichotomous short root branching by L. rufus. The effect was specific to Paenibacillus sp. EJP73 and Burkholderia sp. EJP67, the two strains isolated from L. rufus mycorrhiza, and was not associated with auxin production. Altered mycorrhiza architecture rather than absolute number of mycorrhizal roots may be an important previously overlooked parameter for defining MHB effects.

  7. Craniocervical mycetoma caused bu Streptomyces somaliensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramboer, J.H.; De Graaf, A.S. (Tygerberg Hospital, Bellville (South Africa). Dept. of Internal Medicine); Hewlett, R.H. (Tygerberg Hospital, Bellville (South Africa). Dept. of Radiology); Kirby, P.A. (Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa). Department of Anatomical Pathology); Robson, R.A. (Tygerberg Hospital, Capetown (South Africa). Department of Microbiology)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, computerized tomography (CT) and clinical-pathological findings are described in a case of craniocervical mycetoma caused by the actinomycete Streptomyces somaliensis. Clinical features includes epilepsy, visual and hearing disturbance, quadriplegia and incontinence. CT revealed a hyperdense, diffusely enhancing intra-extracranial mass, further defined by MR to involve the oropharyngeal region, skull base, cranial-cervical peridural spaces and brain. On treatment with Dapsone, the lesion decreased in size, with recovery of spinal cord function. The combined plain film, CT and MR images are considered to be diagnostic of this form of mycetoma. (author). 10 refs.; 4 figs.

  8. Improved Production of Mannanase by Streptomyces lividans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marga, F; Ghakis, C; Dupont, C; Morosoli, R; Kluepfel, D

    1996-12-01

    Replacement of the natural promoter of the (beta)-mannanase gene of Streptomyces lividans by lacp resulted in a 15-fold increase in enzyme production over that of the previously reported clone S. lividans IAF36, a clone carrying multiple copies of manA, and a 350-fold increase over that of the wild-type strain S. lividans 1326. In addition, the use of lacp in the shuttle vector pIAF199 allowed synthesis of the enzymes on carbon sources that did not contain mannan, such as xylan and whey, which offers interesting possibilities for industrial production of the enzyme.

  9. Restriction of bacteriophage plaque formation in Streptomyces spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, K L; Baltz, R H

    1984-08-01

    Several Streptomyces species that produce restriction endonucleases were characterized for their ability to propagate 10 different broad host range bacteriophages. Each species displayed a different pattern of plaque formation. A restrictionless mutant of S. albus G allowed plaque formation by all 10 phages, whereas the wild-type strain showed plaques with only 2 phages. DNA isolated from three of the phages was analyzed for the presence of restriction sites for Streptomyces species-encoded enzymes, and a very strong correlation was established between the failure to form plaques on Streptomyces species that produced particular restriction enzymes and the presence of the corresponding restriction sites in the phage DNA. Also, the phages that lacked restriction sites in their DNA generally formed plaques on the corresponding restriction endonuclease-producing hosts at high efficiency. The DNAs from the three phages analyzed also generally contained either many or no restriction sites for the Streptomyces species-produced enzymes, suggesting a strong evolutionary trend to either eliminate all or tolerate many restriction sites. The data indicate that restriction plays a major role in host range determination for Streptomyces phages. Analysis of bacteriophage host ranges of many other uncharacterized Streptomyces hosts has identified four relatively nonrestricting hosts, at least two of which may be suitable hosts for gene cloning. The data also suggest that several restriction systems remain to be identified in the genus Streptomyces.

  10. Occurrence of Streptomyces aurantiacus in Mangroves of Bhitarkanika

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta, N.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen strains of Streptomyces were isolated from phyllosphere of nine mangrove tree species found in Bhitarkanika mangrove ecosystem of Orissa. According to physiological, biochemical data, all 13 of the isolates were taxonomically identified to the genus Streptomyces as aurantiacus species. All strains are grayish, spirals and forming amorphous colony. Almost all utilized araginose, produced H2S, resistant towards rifampicin and penicillin, urea except few strains. However, they exhibited different extracellular activity like phosphate solubilization, lipase and L asparaginase production. This is a unique report from this mangrove ecosystem as far as Streptomyces occurrence is concerned.

  11. Streptomyces communities in soils polluted with heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishko, V. N.; Syshchikova, O. V.

    2009-02-01

    The contents of differently mobile heavy metal compounds and their influence on the formation of microbial cenoses (particularly, streptomyces communities) in technogenically disturbed soils are considered. Elevated concentrations of mobile Cu, Zn, Ni, Cd, and Fe compounds are shown to determine structural-functional changes in microbial cenoses that are displayed in a decreasing number of microorganisms and a narrower spectrum of the streptomyces species. Some specific features of the formation of streptomyces communities in technogenic soils were revealed on the basis of the analysis of their species structure with the use of the Margalef, Berger-Parker, and Sorensen indices of biodiversity.

  12. Molecular regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Chater, Keith F; Chandra, Govind; Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2013-03-01

    Streptomycetes are the most abundant source of antibiotics. Typically, each species produces several antibiotics, with the profile being species specific. Streptomyces coelicolor, the model species, produces at least five different antibiotics. We review the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in S. coelicolor and other, nonmodel streptomycetes in the light of recent studies. The biosynthesis of each antibiotic is specified by a large gene cluster, usually including regulatory genes (cluster-situated regulators [CSRs]). These are the main point of connection with a plethora of generally conserved regulatory systems that monitor the organism's physiology, developmental state, population density, and environment to determine the onset and level of production of each antibiotic. Some CSRs may also be sensitive to the levels of different kinds of ligands, including products of the pathway itself, products of other antibiotic pathways in the same organism, and specialized regulatory small molecules such as gamma-butyrolactones. These interactions can result in self-reinforcing feed-forward circuitry and complex cross talk between pathways. The physiological signals and regulatory mechanisms may be of practical importance for the activation of the many cryptic secondary metabolic gene cluster pathways revealed by recent sequencing of numerous Streptomyces genomes.

  13. Biotransformation of trinitrotoluene (TNT) by Streptomyces species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, S.B.; Pasti-Grigsby, M.B.; Felicione, E.C.; Crawford, D.L. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Composting has been proposed as one process for use in the bioremediation of 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT)-contaminated soils. However, the biotransformations of TNT that occur during composting, and the specific compost microorganisms involved in TNT metabolism, are not well understood. Both mesophilic and thermophilic actinomycetes are important participants in the biodegradation of organic matter, and possibly TNT, in composts. Here the authors report on the biotransformation of TNT by Streptomyces species growing aerobically in a liquid medium supplemented with 10 to 100 mg/L of TNT. Streptomyces spp. are able to completely remove TNT from the culture medium within 24 hours. As has been observed with other bacteria, these streptomycetes transform TNT first by reducing the 4-nitro and 2-nitro groups to the corresponding amino group; reducing TNT first to 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene and then 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene. These intermediates are transitory and are themselves removed from the medium within 7 days.

  14. Potent antifouling compounds produced by marine Streptomyces

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Ying

    2010-02-01

    Biofouling causes huge economic loss and a recent global ban on organotin compounds as antifouling agents has increased the need for safe and effective antifouling compounds. Five structurally similar compounds were isolated from the crude extract of a marine Streptomyces strain obtained from deep-sea sediments. Antifouling activities of these five compounds and four other structurally-related compounds isolated from a North Sea Streptomyces strain against major fouling organisms were compared to probe structure-activity relationships of compounds. The functional moiety responsible for antifouling activity lies in the 2-furanone ring and that the lipophilicity of compounds substantially affects their antifouling activities. Based on these findings, a compound with a straight alkyl side-chain was synthesized and proved itself as a very effective non-toxic, anti-larval settlement agent against three major fouling organisms. The strong antifouling activity, relatively low toxicity, and simple structures of these compounds make them promising candidates for new antifouling additives. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. VC11: an actinophage virulent to Streptomyces cattleya and Streptomyces olivaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, V E; Kirby, R

    1986-01-01

    Five soil samples were screened for the presence of a virulent actinophage. Phage VC11 was found to be virulent on Streptomyces olivaceus, S. cattleya, S. chartreusis, S. griseus (all important beta-lactam antibiotic producers), S. ambofaciens, S. parvulus, S. alboflavus, S. aureofaciens, and S. lividans TC10. Although restriction-modification systems have been observed in S. olivaceus and S. cattleya, the phage EOP on these hosts remained relatively constant, indicating that these systems do not affect VC11.

  16. Fermentable sugars from agricultural waste materials. [Streptomyces olivaceiscleroticus and Asperigillus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozinic, R.; Drazic, M.

    1982-01-01

    Milled corn cobs, pretreated with NaOH, were subjected to enzymic hydrolysis. Cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes were produced extracellularly during cultivation of Streptomyces olivaceiscleroticus and Aspergillus and used in the hydrolytic process.

  17. Enhancement of clavulanic acid production by Streptomyces sp MU ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: UV-mutagenesis was used to study the effect of Streptomyces sp. NRC77 on CA ... spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Treatment .... 2070 Plus, Intelligent UV/Visible detector,. Japan). .... Peptone-yeast extract iron agar (ISP 6) Negative.

  18. Molecular studies on some soil-Streptomyces strains of western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2013-05-08

    May 8, 2013 ... 2Soil, Water and Environmental Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, 9 Gamaa st., P.O. Box .... The fluorescent-labeled fragments were purified from the ..... Streptomyces spp. isolates from tea plantation soil. Res.

  19. Thaxtomin A-deficient endophytic Streptomyces sp. enhances plant disease resistance to pathogenic Streptomyces scabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lan; Ge, Hui Ming; Yan, Tong; Qin, Yan Hua; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2012-12-01

    Each plant species in nature harbors endophytes, a community of microbes living within host plants without causing any disease symptom. However, the exploitation of endophyte-based phytoprotectants is hampered by the paucity of mechanistic understandings of endophyte-plant interaction. We here reported two endophytic Streptomyces isolates IFB-A02 and IFB-A03 recovered from a stress-tolerant dicotyledonous plant Artemisia annua L. After the determination of their non-pathogenicity at the genomic level and from the toxin (thaxtomin A, TXT) level, the endophytism of both isolates was supported by their successful colonization in planta. Of the two endophytes, IFB-A03 was further studied for the mechanism of endophyte-conferred phytoprotection owing to its plant growth promotion in model eudicot Arabidopsis thaliana. Using the endophyte-Arabidopsis co-cultivation system into which pathogenic Streptomyces scabies was introduced, we demonstrated that IFB-A03 pre-inoculation could activate the salicylic acid (SA)-mediated plant defense responses upon pathogen challenge. Moreover, IFB-A03 was shown to partially rescue the defense deficiency in eds5 (enhanced disease susceptibility 5) Arabidopsis mutants, putatively acting at the upstream of SA accumulation in the defense signaling pathway associated with the systemic acquired resistance (SAR). These data suggest that endophytic Streptomyces sp. IFB-A03 could be a promising candidate for biocontrol agents against S. scabies--a causative pathogen of common scab diseases prevailing in agronomic systems.

  20. Implementation of an Economical Parking Helper Device Using Ultrasound Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Tariq

    2010-06-01

    Every motorist dreams of a car that will take the stress out of parking by finding a suitable space and then maneuvers itself into the space with minimal assistance from the driver. This paper describes a parking helper device using ultrasound sensors, mounted on the car, to monitor both sides of the street for a suitable parking space, and when a large enough parking space is detected, the helper instructs the driver to stop the car and guides him/her via a display screen and voice about steering maneuvers which will ultimately result in the car being properly parked in the given parking space. Ultrasound sensors mounted on the front and rear bumpers of the car will ensure that a safe distance is maintained to other vehicles and objects and the driver will need to operate only the accelerator and the brake pedals. A warning signal sounds if the vehicle gets too close to other objects in the parking space.

  1. Proteomic analysis of Streptomyces coelicolor in response to Ciprofloxacin challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Aishwarya Anand; Patkari, Minal; Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Srivastava, Rajneesh; Pendharkar, Namita; Rapole, Srikanth; Mehra, Sarika; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2014-01-31

    Multi-drug tolerance is an important phenotypic property that complicates treatment of infectious diseases and reshapes drug discovery. Hence a systematic study of the origins and mechanisms of resistance shown by microorganisms is imperative. Since soil-dwelling bacteria are constantly challenged with a myriad of antibiotics, they are potential reservoirs of resistance determinants that can be mobilized into pathogens over a period of time. Elucidating the resistance mechanisms in such bacteria could help future antibiotic discoveries. This research is a preliminary study conducted to determine the effects of ciprofloxacin (CIP) on the intrinsically resistant Gram-positive soil bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. The effect was investigated by performing 2-DE on total protein extracts of cells exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of ciprofloxacin as compared to the controls. Protein identification by MALDI-TOF/TOF revealed 24 unique differentially expressed proteins, which were statistically significant. The down-regulation of proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism indicated a shift in the cell physiology towards a state of metabolic shutdown. Furthermore, the observed decline in protein levels involved in transcription and translation machinery, along with depletion of enzymes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and protein folding could be a cellular response to DNA damage caused by CIP, thereby minimizing the effect of defective and energetically wasteful metabolic processes. This could be crucial for the initial survival of the cells before gene level changes could come into play to ensure survival under prolonged adverse conditions. These results are a first attempt towards profiling the proteome of S. coelicolor in response to antibiotic stress. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Trends in Microbial Proteomics. Soil-dwelling bacteria could serve as a reservoir of resistance determinants for clinically important bacteria. In this work, we

  2. Overproduction of Clavulanic Acid by UV Mutagenesis of Streptomyces clavuligerus

    OpenAIRE

    Korbekandi, Hassan; Darkhal, Parisa; Hojati, Zohreh; Abedi, Daryoush; Hamedi, Javad; Pourhosein, Meraj

    2010-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is produced industrially by fermentation of Streptomyces clavuligerus and researches have increased its production by strain improvement, recombinant DNA technology, and media composition and growth condition optimization. The main objective of this study was to increase the level of clavulanic acid production from Streptomyces clavuligerus (DSM 738), using UV irradiation. After incubation, the spores and aerial mycelia were scraped off the agar plate by a sterile loop. After ...

  3. Plasma cells negatively regulate the follicular helper T cell program

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    B lymphocytes differentiate into antibody-secreting cells under the antigen-specific control of follicular helper T (TFH) cells. Here, we demonstrate that isotype-switched plasma cells expressed MHCII, CD80 and CD86 and intracellular machinery required for antigen presentation. Antigen-specific plasma cells could access, process and present sufficient antigen in vivo to induce multiple TH cell functions. Importantly, antigen-primed plasma cells failed to induce interleukin 21 or Bcl-6 in naïv...

  4. Newly identified helper bacteria stimulate ectomycorrhizal formation in Populus

    OpenAIRE

    Labbé, Jessy L.; Weston, David J; Nora eDunkirk; Pelletier, Dale A.; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2014-01-01

    Mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) are known to increase host root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi but the molecular mechanisms and potential tripartite interactions are poorly understood. Through an effort to study Populus microbiome, we isolated 21 Pseudomonas strains from native Populus deltoides roots. These bacterial isolates were characterized and screened for MHB effectiveness on the Populus-Laccaria system. Two additional Pseudomonas strains (i.e., Pf-5 and BBc6R8) from existing colle...

  5. Memory T follicular helper CD4 T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Scott eHale

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available T follicular helper (Tfh cells are the subset of CD4 T helper cells that are required for generation and maintenance of germinal center reactions and the generation of long-lived humoral immunity. This specialized T helper subset provides help to cognate B cells via their expression of CD40 ligand, IL-21, IL-4, and other molecules. Tfh cells are characterized by their expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR5, expression of the transcriptional repressor Bcl6, and their capacity to migrate to the follicle and promote germinal center B cell responses. Until recently, it remained unclear whether Tfh cells differentiated into memory cells and whether they maintain their Tfh commitment at the memory phase. This review will highlight several recent studies that support the idea of Tfh-committed CD4 T cells at the memory stage of the immune response. The implication of these findings is that memory Tfh cells retain their capacity to recall their Tfh-specific effector functions upon reactivation to provide help for B cell responses and play an important role in prime and boost vaccination or during recall responses to infection. The markers that are useful for distinguishing Tfh effector and memory cells, as well as the limitations of using these markers will be discussed. Tfh effector and memory generation, lineage maintenance, and plasticity relative to other T helper lineages (Th1, Th2, Th17, etc will also be discussed. Ongoing discoveries regarding the maintenance and lineage stability versus plasticity of memory Tfh cells will improve strategies that utilize CD4 T cell memory to modulate antibody responses during prime and boost vaccination.

  6. T-Helper Cytokine Profiles in Patients with Kawasaki Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Bum; Kim, Young Hyun; Hyun, Myung Chul; Kim, Yeo Hyang; Kim, Hee Sun; Lee, Young Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute systemic vasculitis of which pathogenesis suspected is caused by immune dysregulation. The goal of this study is to evaluate the activation pattern of T helper cell type 1 (Th1) and T helper cell type 2 (Th2) in patients with Kawasaki disease. Prospective study of 60 patients (male 36, female 24) with diagnosis of Kawasaki disease were enrolled. One hundred and eighty blood samples from these patients were collected according to the different clinical stages {before initial intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), 5 days after initial IVIG, 2 months after initial IVIG}. The plasma level of Th1 cytokines; interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) & interleukin (IL)-2 and Th2 cytokines; IL-4 & IL-10 were measured by enzyme-liked immunosorbent assay. In all patients, the plasma level of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2) and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) were markedly elevated during the acute stage of Kawasaki disease. Since then, the plasma level of all these cytokines decreased significantly along with the process of clinical stages. Regardless of the existence of coronary artery lesion or no response to initial IVIG treatment, there were no significant differences between them. These data suggest that both Th1 and Th2 cells may be activated simultaneously during the acute stage of Kawasaki disease. Further studies are therefore required to establish the difference of activation pattern of T helper cells between Kawasaki disease and other inflammatory diseases.

  7. The Other T Helper Cells in Asthma Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Vock

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex phenotype of allergic bronchial asthma involves a variable degree of bronchoobstruction, increased mucus production, and airway remodeling. So far it is suggested that it arises from multiple interactions of infiltrating and structural cells in the context of chronic airway inflammation that is orchestrated by T helper 2 (TH2 cells. By secreting a plethora of typical mediators such as interleukin (IL 4, IL-5, and IL-13, these cells hold a key position in asthma pathogenesis. However, therapeutic approaches targeting these TH2-type mediators failed to improve asthma symptoms and impressively showed that asthma pathogenesis cannot be reduced by TH2 cell functions. Recently, other T helper cells, that is, TH9 and TH17 cells, have been identified and these cells also contribute to asthma pathogenesis, the processes leading to formation or aggravation of asthma. Furthermore, TH25 cells, TH3 cells, and regulatory T cells have also been implicated in asthma pathogenesis. This paper aims at summarizing recent insights about these new T helper cells in asthma pathogenesis.

  8. "Little Helper" - An Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulator Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads Hvilshoj

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the concept "autonomous industrial mobile manipulation" (AIMM based on the mobile manipulator "Little Helper" - an ongoing research project at Aalborg University, Denmark, concerning the development of an autonomous and flexible manufacturing assistant. The paper focuses on the contextual aspects and the working principles of AIMM. Furthermore, the paper deals with the design principles and overall hardware and software architectures of "Little Helper" from a functional and modular mechatronics point of view, in order to create a generic AIMM platform. The design challenges faced in the project is to integrate commercial off‐the‐shelf (COTS and dedicated highly integrated systems into an autonomous mobile manipulator system with the ability to perform diverse tasks in industrial environments. We propose an action based domain specific communication language for AIMM for routine and task definition, in order to lower the entry barriers for the users of the technology. To demonstrate the "Little Helper" concept a full‐scale prototype has been built and different application examples carried out. Experiences and knowledge gained from this show promising results regarding industrial integration, exploitation and maturation of the AIMM technology.

  9. Convergent evolution of pathogenicity islands in helper cos phage interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Keith A.; Dokland, Terje; Marina, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are phage satellites that exploit the life cycle of their helper phages for their own benefit. Most SaPIs are packaged by their helper phages using a headful (pac) packaging mechanism. These SaPIs interfere with pac phage reproduction through a variety of strategies, including the redirection of phage capsid assembly to form small capsids, a process that depends on the expression of the SaPI-encoded cpmA and cpmB genes. Another SaPI subfamily is induced and packaged by cos-type phages, and although these cos SaPIs also block the life cycle of their inducing phages, the basis for this mechanism of interference remains to be deciphered. Here we have identified and characterized one mechanism by which the SaPIs interfere with cos phage reproduction. This mechanism depends on a SaPI-encoded gene, ccm, which encodes a protein involved in the production of small isometric capsids, compared with the prolate helper phage capsids. As the Ccm and CpmAB proteins are completely unrelated in sequence, this strategy represents a fascinating example of convergent evolution. Moreover, this result also indicates that the production of SaPI-sized particles is a widespread strategy of phage interference conserved during SaPI evolution. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672154

  10. Convergent evolution of pathogenicity islands in helper cos phage interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpena, Nuria; Manning, Keith A; Dokland, Terje; Marina, Alberto; Penadés, José R

    2016-11-05

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are phage satellites that exploit the life cycle of their helper phages for their own benefit. Most SaPIs are packaged by their helper phages using a headful (pac) packaging mechanism. These SaPIs interfere with pac phage reproduction through a variety of strategies, including the redirection of phage capsid assembly to form small capsids, a process that depends on the expression of the SaPI-encoded cpmA and cpmB genes. Another SaPI subfamily is induced and packaged by cos-type phages, and although these cos SaPIs also block the life cycle of their inducing phages, the basis for this mechanism of interference remains to be deciphered. Here we have identified and characterized one mechanism by which the SaPIs interfere with cos phage reproduction. This mechanism depends on a SaPI-encoded gene, ccm, which encodes a protein involved in the production of small isometric capsids, compared with the prolate helper phage capsids. As the Ccm and CpmAB proteins are completely unrelated in sequence, this strategy represents a fascinating example of convergent evolution. Moreover, this result also indicates that the production of SaPI-sized particles is a widespread strategy of phage interference conserved during SaPI evolution.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'.

  11. Follicular helper T cell in immunity and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mesquita Jr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional concept that effector T helper (Th responses are mediated by Th1/Th2 cell subtypes has been broadened by the recent demonstration of two new effector T helper cells, the IL-17 producing cells (Th17 and the follicular helper T cells (Tfh. These new subsets have many features in common, such as the ability to produce IL-21 and to express the IL-23 receptor (IL23R, the inducible co-stimulatory molecule ICOS, and the transcription factor c-Maf, all of them essential for expansion and establishment of the final pool of both subsets. Tfh cells differ from Th17 by their ability to home to B cell areas in secondary lymphoid tissue through interactions mediated by the chemokine receptor CXCR5 and its ligand CXCL13. These CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells are considered an effector T cell type specialized in B cell help, with a transcriptional profile distinct from Th1 and Th2 cells. The role of Tfh cells and its primary product, IL-21, on B-cell activation and differentiation is essential for humoral immunity against infectious agents. However, when deregulated, Tfh cells could represent an important mechanism contributing to exacerbated humoral response and autoantibody production in autoimmune diseases. This review highlights the importance of Tfh cells by focusing on their biology and differentiation processes in the context of normal immune response to infectious microorganisms and their role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of Streptomyces spp. Isolates from vegetable plantation soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isnaeni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen Streptomyces isolates were isolated from soil in some different location on vegetable plantation at agriculture standard condition. The isolates were assessed for their antibacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB ATCC H37RV and mycobacterial which isolated from Dr. Soetomo Hospital patients in Surabaya. The International Streptomyces Project 4 (ISP4 and Middlebrook 7H9 (MB7H9 wwere used as growth or fermentation medium. The screening of inhibition activity was performed using turbidimetry and spot-test on agar medium. Results shown that 33.3% of the isolates (5 isolates have anti-mycobacterial activities. The first line anti tuberculosis drug rifampicin, (RIF, ethambutol (EMB, isoniazid (INH, and pyrazinamide (PZA were used as standards or positive controls with concentration 20 ppm. Optical density of crude fermentation broth concentrated from five isolates relatively lower than five anti-tuberculosis drug activity standard, although their activities against some microbial were similar to the standard at spot-test. The most efficient isolate shown anti-mycobacterial activity was Streptomyces B10 which identified as Streptomyces violaceousniger. In addition, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME profile of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry chromatogram of each isolates were studied and compared to Streptomyces spp. Keywords: Anti-mycobacterial, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptomyces spp.

  13. Strain-level diversity of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces albus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan F Seipke

    Full Text Available Streptomyces spp. are robust producers of medicinally-, industrially- and agriculturally-important small molecules. Increased resistance to antibacterial agents and the lack of new antibiotics in the pipeline have led to a renaissance in natural product discovery. This endeavor has benefited from inexpensive high quality DNA sequencing technology, which has generated more than 140 genome sequences for taxonomic type strains and environmental Streptomyces spp. isolates. Many of the sequenced streptomycetes belong to the same species. For instance, Streptomyces albus has been isolated from diverse environmental niches and seven strains have been sequenced, consequently this species has been sequenced more than any other streptomycete, allowing valuable analyses of strain-level diversity in secondary metabolism. Bioinformatics analyses identified a total of 48 unique biosynthetic gene clusters harboured by Streptomyces albus strains. Eighteen of these gene clusters specify the core secondary metabolome of the species. Fourteen of the gene clusters are contained by one or more strain and are considered auxiliary, while 16 of the gene clusters encode the production of putative strain-specific secondary metabolites. Analysis of Streptomyces albus strains suggests that each strain of a Streptomyces species likely harbours at least one strain-specific biosynthetic gene cluster. Importantly, this implies that deep sequencing of a species will not exhaust gene cluster diversity and will continue to yield novelty.

  14. Strain-level diversity of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces albus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seipke, Ryan F

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces spp. are robust producers of medicinally-, industrially- and agriculturally-important small molecules. Increased resistance to antibacterial agents and the lack of new antibiotics in the pipeline have led to a renaissance in natural product discovery. This endeavor has benefited from inexpensive high quality DNA sequencing technology, which has generated more than 140 genome sequences for taxonomic type strains and environmental Streptomyces spp. isolates. Many of the sequenced streptomycetes belong to the same species. For instance, Streptomyces albus has been isolated from diverse environmental niches and seven strains have been sequenced, consequently this species has been sequenced more than any other streptomycete, allowing valuable analyses of strain-level diversity in secondary metabolism. Bioinformatics analyses identified a total of 48 unique biosynthetic gene clusters harboured by Streptomyces albus strains. Eighteen of these gene clusters specify the core secondary metabolome of the species. Fourteen of the gene clusters are contained by one or more strain and are considered auxiliary, while 16 of the gene clusters encode the production of putative strain-specific secondary metabolites. Analysis of Streptomyces albus strains suggests that each strain of a Streptomyces species likely harbours at least one strain-specific biosynthetic gene cluster. Importantly, this implies that deep sequencing of a species will not exhaust gene cluster diversity and will continue to yield novelty.

  15. Biogeography and Adaptive evolution of Streptomyces Strains from saline environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fei; Qin, Yu-Hua; Zheng, Xin; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Chai, Dong-Yan; Li, Wei; Pu, Ming-Xiang; Zuo, Xing-Sheng; Qian, Wen; Ni, Ping; Zhang, Yong; Mei, Han; He, Song-Tao

    2016-01-01

    The genus Streptomyces is a widespread genus within the phylum Actinobacteria and has been isolated from various environments worldwide. However, little is known about whether biogeography affects distributional pattern of Streptomyces in salty environments. Such information is essential for understanding the ecology of Streptomyces. Here we analyzed four house-keeping genes (16S rRNA, rpoB, recA and atpD) and salty-tolerance related genes (ectA-ectD) of 38 Streptomyces strains isolated from saline environments in Yunnan and Xinjiang Provinces of western China. The obtained Streptomyces strains were classified into three operational taxonomic units, each comprising habitat-specific geno- and ecotype STs. In combination with expressional variations of salty-tolerance related genes, the statistical analyses showed that spatial distance and environmental factors substantially influenced Streptomyces distribution in saline environments: the former had stronger influence at large spatial scales (>700 km), whereas the latter was influential at large (>700 km) and small spatial scales (ectoine and hydroxyectoine than strains from salt mines, which could help them resist to salinity in the hypersaline environments. PMID:27596681

  16. Streptomyces hyaluromycini sp. nov., isolated from a tunicate (Molgula manhattensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harunari, Enjuro; Hamada, Moriyuki; Shibata, Chiyo; Tamura, Tomohiko; Komaki, Hisayuki; Imada, Chiaki; Igarashi, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive actinomycete, designated MB-PO13(T), was isolated from a tunicate (Molgula manhattensis) collected in Tokyo Bay, Japan, and its taxonomic position was studied by a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons revealed that strain MB-PO13(T) was closely related to Streptomyces graminisoli JR-12(T) (99.72% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and Streptomyces shenzhenensis 172115(T) (99.23%). The strain contained LL-diaminopimelic acid in the whole-cell hydrolysate. The predominant menaquinones were MK-9(H8) and MK-9(H6) and the major fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0, iso-C16:0, iso-C14:0 and C16:0. These data supported the affiliation of the novel strain to the genus Streptomyces. Meanwhile, results of DNA-DNA hybridization and physiological and biochemical tests indicated that strain MB-PO13(T) was distinguished from known Streptomyces type strains. Therefore, strain MB-PO13(T) represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces for which the name Streptomyces hyaluromycini sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is MB-PO13(T) (=NBRC 110483(T) =DSM 100105(T)).

  17. Overproduction of a Model Sec- and Tat-Dependent Secretory Protein Elicits Different Cellular Responses in Streptomyces lividans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Gullón

    Full Text Available Streptomyces lividans is considered an efficient host for the secretory production of homologous and heterologous proteins. To identify possible bottlenecks in the protein production process, a comparative transcriptomic approach was adopted to study cellular responses during the overproduction of a Sec-dependent model protein (alpha-amylase and a Tat-dependent model protein (agarase in Streptomyces lividans. The overproduction of the model secretory proteins via the Sec or the Tat route in S. lividans does elicit a different major cell response in the bacterium. The stringent response is a bacterial response to nutrients' depletion, which naturally occurs at late times of the bacterial cell growth. While the induction of the stringent response at the exponential phase of growth may limit overall productivity in the case of the Tat route, the induction of that response does not take place in the case of the Sec route, which comparatively is an advantage in secretory protein production processes. Hence, this study identifies a potential major drawback in the secretory protein production process depending on the secretory route, and provides clues to improving S. lividans as a protein production host.

  18. Novel plant-microbe rhizosphere interaction involving Streptomyces lydicus WYEC108 and the pea plant (Pisum sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokala, Ranjeet K; Strap, Janice L; Jung, Carina M; Crawford, Don L; Salove, Michelle Hamby; Deobald, Lee A; Bailey, J Franklin; Morra, M J

    2002-05-01

    A previously undescribed plant-microbe interaction between a root-colonizing Streptomyces species, S. lydicus WYEC108, and the legume Pisum sativum is described. The interaction is potentially of great importance to the health and growth in nature of this nodulating legume. The root-colonizing soil actinomycete S. lydicus WYEC108 influences pea root nodulation by increasing root nodulation frequency, possibly at the level of infection by Rhizobium spp. S. lydicus also colonizes and then sporulates within the surface cell layers of the nodules. Colonization leads to an increase in the average size of the nodules that form and improves the vigor of bacteroids within the nodules by enhancing nodular assimilation of iron and possibly other soil nutrients. Bacteroid accumulation of the carbon storage polymer, poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate, is reduced in colonized nodules. Root nodules of peas taken from agricultural fields in the Palouse hills of northern Idaho were also found to be colonized by actinomycete hyphae. We hypothesize that root and nodule colonization is one of several mechanisms by which Streptomyces acts as a naturally occurring plant growth-promoting bacterium in pea and possibly other leguminous plants.

  19. A study on clavulanic acid production by Streptomyces clavuligerus in batch, fed-batch and continuous processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Neto

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Clavulanic acid (CA is a potent inhibitor of beta-lactamases, enzymes that are responsible for the hydrolysis of beta-lactam antibiotics. It is a secondary metabolite produced by the filamentous aerobic bacterium Streptomyces clavuligerus in submerged cultivations. In the present work clavulanic acid production in batch, fed-batch and continuous bioreactors was studied with the objective of increasing productivity. The operating conditions: temperature, aeration and agitation, were the same in all cases, 28º C, 0.5 vvm and 800 rpm, respectively. The CA concentration obtained in the fed-batch culture, 404 mg L-1, was ca twice the value obtained in the batch culture, 194 mg L-1, while 293 mg L-1 was obtained in the continuous culture. The highest productivity was obtained in the continuous cultivation, 10.6 mg L-1 h-1, as compared with 8.8 mg L-1 h-1 in the fed-batch process and 3.5 mg L-1 h-1 in the batch process, suggesting that continuous culture of Streptomyces clavuligerus is a promising strategy for clavulanic acid production.

  20. Overproduction of a Model Sec- and Tat-Dependent Secretory Protein Elicits Different Cellular Responses in Streptomyces lividans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullón, Sonia; Marín, Silvia; Mellado, Rafael P

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces lividans is considered an efficient host for the secretory production of homologous and heterologous proteins. To identify possible bottlenecks in the protein production process, a comparative transcriptomic approach was adopted to study cellular responses during the overproduction of a Sec-dependent model protein (alpha-amylase) and a Tat-dependent model protein (agarase) in Streptomyces lividans. The overproduction of the model secretory proteins via the Sec or the Tat route in S. lividans does elicit a different major cell response in the bacterium. The stringent response is a bacterial response to nutrients' depletion, which naturally occurs at late times of the bacterial cell growth. While the induction of the stringent response at the exponential phase of growth may limit overall productivity in the case of the Tat route, the induction of that response does not take place in the case of the Sec route, which comparatively is an advantage in secretory protein production processes. Hence, this study identifies a potential major drawback in the secretory protein production process depending on the secretory route, and provides clues to improving S. lividans as a protein production host.

  1. Overproduction of a Model Sec- and Tat-Dependent Secretory Protein Elicits Different Cellular Responses in Streptomyces lividans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullón, Sonia; Marín, Silvia; Mellado, Rafael P.

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces lividans is considered an efficient host for the secretory production of homologous and heterologous proteins. To identify possible bottlenecks in the protein production process, a comparative transcriptomic approach was adopted to study cellular responses during the overproduction of a Sec-dependent model protein (alpha-amylase) and a Tat-dependent model protein (agarase) in Streptomyces lividans. The overproduction of the model secretory proteins via the Sec or the Tat route in S. lividans does elicit a different major cell response in the bacterium. The stringent response is a bacterial response to nutrients’ depletion, which naturally occurs at late times of the bacterial cell growth. While the induction of the stringent response at the exponential phase of growth may limit overall productivity in the case of the Tat route, the induction of that response does not take place in the case of the Sec route, which comparatively is an advantage in secretory protein production processes. Hence, this study identifies a potential major drawback in the secretory protein production process depending on the secretory route, and provides clues to improving S. lividans as a protein production host. PMID:26200356

  2. Enhanced production of undecylprodigiosin in Streptomyces coelicolor by co-cultivation with the corallopyronin A-producing myxobacterium, Corallococcus coralloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäberle, Till F; Orland, Annika; König, Gabriele M

    2014-03-01

    Prolific producers of natural products like streptomycetes and myxobacteria live in complex natural frameworks consisting of many microorganisms. Presumably intricate physiological and metabolic regulatory networks have evolved to enable the organisms to respond to intra- and interspecies interactions, e.g. biosynthesis of specific natural products is up-regulated due to competitors in the surrounding area. The soil-dwelling bacterium, Streptomyces coelicolor, produces the biologically-active compound, undecylprodigiosin (Red). Co-incubation with the corallopyronin A-producer, Corallococcus coralloides, was performed to explore the hypothesis that Red production can be enhanced by a myxobacterial competitor. Co-cultivation resulted in earlier onset and increased production of Red (60-fold increase of the intra-cellular concentration). Using different Corallococcus-derived extracts for elicitation, revealed that water-soluble factors triggered the enhanced production of Red which shows antimicrobial, immunosuppressive and anticancer properties.

  3. Tools for metabolic engineering in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, Valerie; Dodd, Amanda; Brady, Dean; Rumbold, Karl

    2014-01-01

    During the last few decades, Streptomycetes have shown to be a very important and adaptable group of bacteria for the production of various beneficial secondary metabolites. These secondary metabolites have been of great interest in academia and the pharmaceutical industries. To date, a vast variety of techniques and tools for metabolic engineering of relevant structural biosynthetic gene clusters have been developed. The main aim of this review is to summarize and discuss the published literature on tools for metabolic engineering of Streptomyces over the last decade. These strategies involve precursor engineering, structural and regulatory gene engineering, and the up or downregulation of genes, as well as genome shuffling and the use of genome scale metabolic models, which can reconstruct bacterial metabolic pathways to predict phenotypic changes and hence rationalize engineering strategies. These tools are continuously being developed to simplify the engineering strategies for this vital group of bacteria.

  4. Tools for metabolic engineering in Streptomyces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, Valerie; Dodd, Amanda; Brady, Dean; Rumbold, Karl

    2014-01-01

    During the last few decades, Streptomycetes have shown to be a very important and adaptable group of bacteria for the production of various beneficial secondary metabolites. These secondary metabolites have been of great interest in academia and the pharmaceutical industries. To date, a vast variety of techniques and tools for metabolic engineering of relevant structural biosynthetic gene clusters have been developed. The main aim of this review is to summarize and discuss the published literature on tools for metabolic engineering of Streptomyces over the last decade. These strategies involve precursor engineering, structural and regulatory gene engineering, and the up or downregulation of genes, as well as genome shuffling and the use of genome scale metabolic models, which can reconstruct bacterial metabolic pathways to predict phenotypic changes and hence rationalize engineering strategies. These tools are continuously being developed to simplify the engineering strategies for this vital group of bacteria. PMID:25482230

  5. Orbital actinomycotic mycetoma caused by Streptomyces cinnamoneus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Walton

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Case summary An 18-month-old male neutered Ragdoll cat presented with an 8 week history of progressive unilateral right-sided mucopurulent nasal discharge and exophthalmos. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heterogeneous right retrobulbar mass and bilateral nasal cavity disease. Filamentous structures seen on cytology of retrobulbar and nasal biopsies were mistakenly identified as filamentous fungal hyphae. Subsequent investigations revealed that the cat had a retrobulbar actinomycotic mycetoma with invasion of the globe. The aetiological agent was identified on 16S recombinant DNA sequencing as Streptomyces cinnamoneus. After exenteration and chronic antimicrobial therapy the cat was alive and well 3 years after presentation. Relevance and novel information This is the first report of a pathogenic role of S cinnamoneus in a cat. Orbital actinomycotic mycetomas in cats can resemble mycotic granulomas.

  6. Chitinase Production by Streptomyces sp. ANU 6277

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolla J.P. Narayana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Chitinase production by a terrestrial Streptomyces sp. ANU 6277 was studied under sub-merged fermentation. Chitinase production started after 24 h of incubation and reached maximum levels after 60 h of cultivation. A high level of chitinase activity was observed in the culture medium with pH 6 at 35ºC. Culture medium amended with 1% chitin was found to be suitable for maximum production of chitinase. An optimum concentration of colloidal chitin for chitinase production was determined. Studies on the influence of additional carbon and nitrogen sources on chitinase production revealed that starch and yeast extract served as good carbon and nitrogen sources to enhance chitinase yield.Chitinase was purified from crude enzyme extract by single step gel filtration by Sephadex G-100. Purified chitinase of the strain exhibited a distinct protein band near 45 kDa by means of SDS-PAGE.

  7. An overview on transcriptional regulators in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Rodríguez, Alba; Robledo-Casados, Ivonne; Sánchez, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Streptomyces are Gram-positive microorganisms able to adapt and respond to different environmental conditions. It is the largest genus of Actinobacteria comprising over 900 species. During their lifetime, these microorganisms are able to differentiate, produce aerial mycelia and secondary metabolites. All of these processes are controlled by subtle and precise regulatory systems. Regulation at the transcriptional initiation level is probably the most common for metabolic adaptation in bacteria. In this mechanism, the major players are proteins named transcription factors (TFs), capable of binding DNA in order to repress or activate the transcription of specific genes. Some of the TFs exert their action just like activators or repressors, whereas others can function in both manners, depending on the target promoter. Generally, TFs achieve their effects by using one- or two-component systems, linking a specific type of environmental stimulus to a transcriptional response. After DNA sequencing, many streptomycetes have been found to have chromosomes ranging between 6 and 12Mb in size, with high GC content (around 70%). They encode for approximately 7000 to 10,000 genes, 50 to 100 pseudogenes and a large set (around 12% of the total chromosome) of regulatory genes, organized in networks, controlling gene expression in these bacteria. Among the sequenced streptomycetes reported up to now, the number of transcription factors ranges from 471 to 1101. Among these, 315 to 691 correspond to transcriptional regulators and 31 to 76 are sigma factors. The aim of this work is to give a state of the art overview on transcription factors in the genus Streptomyces.

  8. 40 CFR 180.1253 - Streptomyces lydicus WYEC 108; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Streptomyces lydicus WYEC 108... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1253 Streptomyces lydicus WYEC 108; exemption from the... the microbial pesticide Streptomyces lydicus WYEC 108 when used in or on all agricultural...

  9. T-Helper I: An Electronic Medical Record Supporting the Treatment of AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Musen, Mark A.; Schreiner, Josef G.; Campbell, Keith E.; Tu, Samson W.; Shortliffe, Edward H; Fagan, Lawrence M.

    1993-01-01

    THERAPY-HELPER (T-HELPER) is an electronic medical-record system developed at Stanford University that is installed at an AIDS clinic in San Jose, California. The system has been developed using an open, distributed architecture. The T-HELPER workstation supports access by physicians and nurses to online progress notes and hypertext descriptions of ongoing clinical trials. Laboratory and patient-registration data are downloaded automatically from existing hospital information systems. Physici...

  10. The Helper Activities of Different Avian Viruses for Propagation of Recombinant Avian Adeno-Associated Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG An-ping; SUN Huai-chang; WANG Jian-ye; WANG Yong-juan; YUAN Wei-feng

    2007-01-01

    To compare the helper activities of different avian viruses for propagation of recombinant avian adeno-associated virus (rAAAV), AAV-293 cells were cotransfected with the AAAV vector pAITR-GFP containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, the AAAV helper vector pcDNA-ARC expressing the rep and cap genes, and the adenovirus helper vector pHelper expressing Ad5 E2A, E4, and VA-RNA genes. Chicken embryonic fibroblast (CEF) or chicken embryonic liver (CEL) cells were cotransfected with the AAAV vector and the AAAV helper vector, followed by infection with Marek's disease virus (MDV), avian adenovirus, chicken embryo lethal orphan (CELO) virus or infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Infectious rAAAV particles generated by the two strategies were harvested and titrated on CEF and CEL cells. A significantly higher viral titer was obtained with the helper activity provided by the pHelper vector than by MDV or CELO virus. Further experiments showed that rAAAV-mediated green fluorescent protein (gfp) expression was overtly enhanced by MDV or CELO virus super infection or treatment with sodium butyric acid, but not by IBDV super infection. These data demonstrated that MDV and CELO viruses could provide weak helper activity for propagation of rAAAV, and rAAAV-mediated transgene expression could be enhanced by super infection with the helper viruses.

  11. Creation of a completely helper cell-dependent recombinant morbillivirus

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Jana; Baron, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We have created a completely helper cell-dependent morbillivirus by modifying the genome to remove the coding sequence of the phosphoprotein (P) and recovering the recombinant virus in a cell line constitutively expressing the P protein. The P protein-deleted virus (P−) grew very inefficiently unless both of the viral accessory proteins (V and C) were also expressed. Growth of the virus was restricted to the P-expressing cell line. The P− virus grew more slowly than the parental virus and exp...

  12. Streptomyces caeruleatus sp. nov., with dark blue diffusible pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-hui; Guo, Jun; Yao, Qing; Yang, Song-zhen; Deng, Ming-rong; Li, Tai-hui

    2011-03-01

    An actinomycete, designated strain GIMN4.002(T), was isolated from a tomato rhizosphere soil sample in Guangzhou, China. The strain produces white aerial mycelium and dark blue diffusible pigment on Gause's synthetic agar, and microscopic observation revealed that it produces looped chains of spiny spores. Morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics of the strain are typical of the genus Streptomyces. Melanin was produced and antibacterial activity was detected against Gram-positive micro-organisms, such as Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain GIMN4.002(T) had highest similarity (99.4  %) to Streptomyces lincolnensis B91; however, DNA-DNA relatedness between strain GIMN4.002(T) and S. lincolnensis NBRC 13054(T) was only 32.17  %. Further, the morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics of strain GIMN4.002(T) are distinct from S. lincolnensis and other species of the genus Streptomyces with which this strain has high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (98-99  %). On the basis of the physiological and molecular properties observed, it is proposed that strain GIMN4.002(T) represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces caeruleatus sp. nov. is proposed, with GIMN4.002(T) (=CCTCC M 208213(T) =NRRL B-24802(T)) as the type strain.

  13. Construction and development of a novel expression system of Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Chengran; Cui, Wenjing; He, Xiaotian; Hu, Xu; Xu, Jun; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Zhou, Zhemin

    2015-09-01

    Streptomyces is well known to be an attractive host for producing large amounts of proteins with potent biological activities into the culture supernatant. To expand its expression system, we constructed a novel expression plasmid for gene expression in Streptomyces by inserting the promoter (P(tg)) and the signal peptide (SP(tg)) of transglutaminase (TGase) from Streptomyces hygroscopicus WSH03-13 into vector pIJ86, followed by multiple cloning sites and a transcriptional terminator fd (fd-ter). The secretion capacity of the vector was further enhanced by optimizing the signal peptidase cleavage site and a rare codon of SP(tg), yielding expression vector pSG02. Using this vector, TGase was actively and greatly expressed in the supernatant in several Streptomyces strains. In addition, the heterologous proteins aminopeptidase from Bacillus subtilis Zj016 (BSAP) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase from Rhodotorula glutinis (PAL) were also expressed in various Streptomyces strains by this vector. This expression system should be useful for the expression of other proteins.

  14. [Progress in developing and applying Streptomyces chassis - A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liping; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Tiangang

    2016-03-04

    Natural products and their derivatives play an important role in modern healthcare. Their diversity in bioactivity and chemical structure inspires scientists to discover new drug entities for clinical use. However, chemical synthesis of natural compounds has insurmountable difficulties in technology and cost. Also, many original-producing bacteria have disadvantages of needing harsh cultivation conditions, having low productivity and other shortcomings. In addition, some gene clusters responsible for secondary metabolite biosynthesis are silence in the original strains. Therefore, it is of great significance to exploit strategy for the heterologous expression of natural products guided by synthetic biology. Recently, researchers pay more attention on using actinomycetes that are the main source of many secondary metabolites, such as antibiotics, anticancer agents, and immunosuppressive drugs. Especially, with huge development of genome sequencing, abundant resources of natural product biosynthesis in Streptomyces have been discovered, which highlight the special advantages on developing Streptomyces as the heterologous expression chassis cells. This review begins with the significance of the development of Streptomyces chassis, focusing on the strategies and the status in developing Streptomyces chassis cells, followed by examples to illustrate the practical applications of a variety of Streptomyces chassis.

  15. Activation and silencing of secondary metabolites in Streptomyces albus and Streptomyces lividans after transformation with cosmids containing the thienamycin gene cluster from Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braña, Alfredo F; Rodríguez, Miriam; Pahari, Pallab; Rohr, Jurgen; García, Luis A; Blanco, Gloria

    2014-05-01

    Activation and silencing of antibiotic production was achieved in Streptomyces albus J1074 and Streptomyces lividans TK21 after introduction of genes within the thienamycin cluster from S. cattleya. Dramatic phenotypic and metabolic changes, involving activation of multiple silent secondary metabolites and silencing of others normally produced, were found in recombinant strains harbouring the thienamycin cluster in comparison to the parental strains. In S. albus, ultra-performance liquid chromatography purification and NMR structural elucidation revealed the identity of four structurally related activated compounds: the antibiotics paulomycins A, B and the paulomenols A and B. Four volatile compounds whose biosynthesis was switched off were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses and databases comparison as pyrazines; including tetramethylpyrazine, a compound with important clinical applications to our knowledge never reported to be produced by Streptomyces. In addition, this work revealed the potential of S. albus to produce many others secondary metabolites normally obtained from plants, including compounds of medical relevance as dihydro-β-agarofuran and of interest in perfume industry as β-patchoulene, suggesting that it might be an alternative model for their industrial production. In S. lividans, actinorhodins production was strongly activated in the recombinant strains whereas undecylprodigiosins were significantly reduced. Activation of cryptic metabolites in Streptomyces species might represent an alternative approach for pharmaceutical drug discovery.

  16. DNA cloning in Streptomyces: a bifunctional replicon comprising pBR322 inserted into a Streptomyces phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, J E; Chater, K F

    1980-07-31

    The Gram-positive, mycelial, differentiating streptomycetes are responsible for the production of many important antibiotics. The availability of gene cloning systems in this microbial group would have many industrial applications besides allowing more penetrating study of the genetics of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) (which, as the best understood streptomycete genetically, serves as a model for much other Streptomyces genetics). Recent successes (see previous paper) in introducing Streptomyces DNA into S. coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans on plasmid vectors would be nicely complemented by the availability of Streptomyces bacteriophage vectors (discussed in ref. 5): for example, many phages have wide and easily defined host ranges; heat-inducible prophages might be used to give high copy number of cloned DNA; efficient phage promoters might be used to increase gene expression; there may be differential stabilities for particular DNA sequences cloned in plasmids vis-à-vis phages; selective insertion of DNA, utilizing packaging constraints, may be possible with phages; and in situ hybridization of radioactive probes to DNA in plaques is likely to be simple. We describe here the use of the moderately wide host range temperate phage, phi C31, for this purpose.

  17. Laboratory course on Streptomyces genetics and secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siitonen, Vilja; Räty, Kaj; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko

    2016-09-10

    The "Streptomyces genetics and secondary metabolism" laboratory course gives an introduction to the versatile soil dwelling Gram-positive bacteria Streptomyces and their secondary metabolism. The course combines genetic modification of Streptomyces; growing of the strain and protoplast preparation, plasmid isolation by alkaline lysis and phenol precipitation, digestions, and ligations prior to protoplast transformation, as well as investigating the secondary metabolites produced by the strains. Thus, the course is a combination of microbiology, molecular biology, and chemistry. After the course the students should understand the relationship between genes, proteins, and the produced metabolites. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(5):492-499, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  18. Deletion of ku homologs increases gene targeting frequency in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojuan; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Libin; Chen, Zhi; Wen, Ying; Li, Jilun

    2012-06-01

    Streptomyces avermitilis is an industrially important soil bacterium known for production of avermectins, which are antiparasitic agents useful in animal health care, agriculture, and treatment of human infections. ku genes play a key role in the non-homologous end-joining pathway for repair of DNA double strand breaks. We identified homologs of eukaryotic ku70 and ku80 genes, termed ku1 and ku2, in S. avermitilis. Mutants with deletion of ku1, ku2, and both genes were constructed and their phenotypic changes were characterized. Deletion of ku genes had no apparent adverse effects on growth, spore formation, or avermectin production. The ku mutants, in comparison to wild-type strain, were slightly more sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent ethyl methanesulfonate, but not to UV exposure or to bleomycin. Gene targeting frequencies by homologous recombination were higher in the ku mutants than in wild-type strain. We conclude that ku-deleted strains will be useful hosts for efficient gene targeting and will facilitate functional analysis of genes in S. avermitilis and other industrially important bacterial strains.

  19. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor, σ(25), differentially regulates avermectin and oligomycin biosynthesis in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shuai; Sun, Di; Zhu, Jianya; Chen, Zhi; Wen, Ying; Li, Jilun

    2014-08-01

    σ(25) is an extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factor in the bacterium Streptomyces avermitilis that plays a differential regulatory role in avermectin and oligomycin biosynthesis. Gene deletion, complementation, and overexpression experiments showed that σ(25) inhibited avermectin production but promoted oligomycin production. σ(25) indirectly inhibited avermectin production by affecting the transcription of the pathway-specific activator gene aveR, whereas it directly activated oligomycin production by initiating transcription of the pathway-specific activator gene olmRI. The divergently transcribed genes smrAB are located upstream of sig25 and encode a putative two-component system (TCS). σ(25) was found to initiate its own transcription, and its expression was directly activated by SmrA. The precise SmrA-binding sites in the region upstream of sig25 were determined by DNase I footprinting assays and identified two direct repeat sequences CTGTGA-n5-CTGTGA, suggesting that SmrA regulates sig25 transcription by binding to these direct repeats. The deletion of smrAB had the similar effect on avermectin and oligomycin A production to the deletion of sig25, indicating that σ(25) and SmrAB function similarly in the regulation of antibiotic production. These findings helpfully clarify the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis by an ECF σ factor-TCS signal transduction system in S. avermitilis.

  20. Transfer-messenger RNA controls the translation of cell-cycle and stress proteins in Streptomyces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barends, Sharief; Zehl, Martin; Bialek, Sylwia

    2010-01-01

    , elongation factor Tu3, and the cell-cycle control proteins DasR, SsgA, SsgF and SsgR. Although tmRNA-tagged proteins are degraded swiftly, the translation of dnaK and dasR messenger RNAs (mRNAs) depends fully on tmRNA, whereas transcription is unaffected. The data unveil a surprisingly dedicated......The transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA)-mediated trans-translation mechanism is highly conserved in bacteria and functions primarily as a system for the rescue of stalled ribosomes and the removal of aberrantly produced proteins. Here, we show that in the antibiotic-producing soil bacterium Streptomyces...... coelicolor, trans-translation has a specialized role in stress management. Analysis of proteins that were carboxy-terminally His(8)-tagged by a recombinant tmRNA identified only 10 targets, including the stress proteins: DnaK heat-shock protein 70, thiostrepton-induced protein A, universal stress protein A...

  1. Cytochrome P450 107U1 is required for sporulation and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Cheng, Qian; Yoshimoto, Francis K; Lei, Li; Lamb, David C; Guengerich, F Peter

    2013-02-15

    The filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor has a complex life cycle involving the formation of hair-like aerial mycelia on the colony surface, which differentiate into chains of spores. Genes required for the initiation of aerial mycelium formation have been termed 'bld' (bald), describing the smooth, undifferentiated colonies of mutant strains. We report the identification of a new bld gene designated as sco3099 and biochemical analysis of its encoded enzyme, cytochrome P450 (P450, or CYP) 107U1. Deletion of sco3099 resulted in a mutant defective in aerial hyphae sporulation and sensitive to heat shock, indicating that P450 107U1 plays a key role in growth and development of S. coelicolor. This is the first P450 reported to participate in a sporulation process in Streptomycetes. The substrate and catalytic properties of P450 107U1 were further investigated in mass spectrometry-based metabolomic studies. Glycocholic acid (from the medium) was identified as a substrate of P450 107U1 and was oxidized to glyco-7-oxo-deoxycholic acid. Although this reaction is apparently not relevant to the observed sporulation deficiency, it suggests that P450 107U1 might exert its physiological function by oxidizing other steroid-like molecules.

  2. Identification of Elaiophylin Skeletal Variants from the Indonesian Streptomyces sp. ICBB 9297.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yan; Lam, Phillip W; Shahab, Salmah; Santosa, Dwi Andreas; Proteau, Philip J; Zabriskie, T Mark; Mahmud, Taifo

    2015-11-25

    Four new elaiophylin macrolides (1-4), together with five known elaiophylins (5-9), have been isolated from cultures of the Indonesian soil bacterium Streptomyces sp. ICBB 9297. The new compounds have macrocyclic skeletons distinct from those of the known dimeric elaiophylins in that one or both of the polyketide chains contain(s) an additional pendant methyl group. Further investigations revealed that 1 and 2 were derived from 3 and 4, respectively, during isolation processes. Compounds 1-3 showed comparable antibacterial activity to elaiophylin against Staphylococcus aureus. However, interestingly, only compounds 1 and 3, which contain a pendant methyl group at C-2, showed activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis, whereas compound 2, which has two pendant methyl groups at C-2 and C-2', and the known elaiophylin analogues (5-7), which lack pendant methyl groups at C-2 and/or C-2', showed no activity. The production of 3 and 4 in strain ICBB 9297 indicates that one of the acyltransferase (AT) domains in the elaiophylin polyketide synthases (PKSs) can recruit both malonyl-CoA and methylmalonyl-CoA as substrates. Bioinformatic analysis of the AT domains of the elaiophylin PKSs revealed that the ela_AT7 domain contains atypical active site amino acid residues, distinct from those conserved in malonyl-CoA- or methylmalonyl-CoA-specific ATs.

  3. Geosmin biosynthesis. Streptomyces coelicolor germacradienol/germacrene D synthase converts farnesyl diphosphate to geosmin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiaoyang; He, Xiaofei; Cane, David E

    2006-06-28

    Geosmin is responsible for the characteristic odor of moist soil. Incubation of recombinant germacradienol synthase, encoded by the SCO6073 (SC9B1.20) gene of the Gram-positive soil bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor, with farnesyl diphosphate (2, FPP) in the presence of Mg2+ gave a mixture of (4S,7R)-germacra-1(10)E,5E-diene-11-ol (3) (74%), (-)-(7S)-germacrene D (4) (10%), geosmin (1) (13%), and a hydrocarbon, tentatively assigned the structure of octalin 5 (3%). Individual incubations of recombinant germacradienol synthase with [1,1-2H2]FPP (2a), (1R)-[1-2H]-FPP (2b), and (1S)-[1-2H]-FPP (2c), as well as with FPP (2) in D2O, and GC-MS analysis of the resulting deuterated products supported a mechanism of geosmin formation involving proton-initiated cyclization and retro-Prins fragmentation of the initially formed germacradienol to give intermediate 5, followed by protonation of 5, 1,2-hydride shift, and capture of water.

  4. T Helper Cell Subsets in Clinical Manifestations of Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Diani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, which is associated with systemic inflammation and comorbidities, such as psoriatic arthritis and cardiovascular diseases. The autoimmune nature of psoriasis has been established only recently, conferring a central role to epidermal CD8 T cells recognizing self-epitopes in the initial phase of the disease. Different subsets of helper cells have also been reported as key players in the psoriasis pathogenesis. Here, we reviewed the knowledge on the role of each subset in the psoriatic cascade and in the different clinical manifestations of the disease. We will discuss the role of Th1 and Th17 cells in the initiation and in the amplification phase of cutaneous inflammation. Moreover, we will discuss the recently proposed role of tissue resident Th22 cells in disease memory in sites of recurrent psoriasis and the possible involvement of Th9 cells. Finally, we will discuss the hypothesis of a link between T helper cell subsets recirculating from the skin and the systemic manifestations of psoriasis.

  5. T Helper Cell Subsets in Clinical Manifestations of Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diani, Marco; Altomare, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, which is associated with systemic inflammation and comorbidities, such as psoriatic arthritis and cardiovascular diseases. The autoimmune nature of psoriasis has been established only recently, conferring a central role to epidermal CD8 T cells recognizing self-epitopes in the initial phase of the disease. Different subsets of helper cells have also been reported as key players in the psoriasis pathogenesis. Here, we reviewed the knowledge on the role of each subset in the psoriatic cascade and in the different clinical manifestations of the disease. We will discuss the role of Th1 and Th17 cells in the initiation and in the amplification phase of cutaneous inflammation. Moreover, we will discuss the recently proposed role of tissue resident Th22 cells in disease memory in sites of recurrent psoriasis and the possible involvement of Th9 cells. Finally, we will discuss the hypothesis of a link between T helper cell subsets recirculating from the skin and the systemic manifestations of psoriasis. PMID:27595115

  6. Emerging concepts in T follicular helper cell responses to malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Diana S; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Ly, Ann; Ioannidis, Lisa J; Crompton, Peter D

    2017-02-01

    Antibody responses to malaria and candidate malaria vaccines are short-lived in children, leaving them susceptible to repeated malaria episodes. Because T follicular helper (TFH) cells provide critical help to B cells to generate long-lived antibody responses, they have become the focus of recent studies of Plasmodium-infected mice and humans. The emerging data converge on common themes, namely, that malaria-induced TH1 cytokines are associated with the activation of (i) T-like memory TFH cells with impaired B cell helper function, and (ii) pre-TFH cells that acquire Th1-like features (T-bet expression, IFN-γ production), which impede their differentiation into fully functional TFH cells, thus resulting in germinal center dysfunction and suboptimal antibody responses. Deeper knowledge of TFH cells in malaria could illuminate strategies to improve vaccines through modulating TFH cell responses. This review summarizes emerging concepts in TFH cell responses to malaria. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Mechanism of enzymatic fluorination in Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Robinson, David A; McEwan, Andrew R; O'Hagan, David; Naismith, James H

    2007-11-28

    Recently a fluorination enzyme was identified and isolated from Streptomyces cattleya, as the first committed step on the metabolic pathway to the fluorinated metabolites, fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine. This enzyme, 5'-fluoro-5'-deoxy adenosine synthetase (FDAS), has been shown to catalyze C-F bond formation by nucleophilic attack of fluoride ion to S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) with the concomitant displacement of l-methionine to generate 5'-fluoro-5'-deoxy adenosine (5'-FDA). Although the structures of FDAS bound to both SAM and products have been solved, the molecular mechanism remained to be elucidated. We now report site-directed mutagenesis studies, structural analyses, and isothermal calorimetry (ITC) experiments. The data establish the key residues required for catalysis and the order of substrate binding. Fluoride ion is not readily distinguished from water by protein X-ray crystallography; however, using chloride ion (also a substrate) with a mutant of low activity has enabled the halide ion to be located in nonproductive co-complexes with SAH and SAM. The kinetic data suggest the positively charged sulfur of SAM is a key requirement in stabilizing the transition state. We propose a molecular mechanism for FDAS in which fluoride weakly associates with the enzyme exchanging two water molecules for protein ligation. The binding of SAM expels remaining water associated with fluoride ion and traps the ion in a pocket positioned to react with SAM, generating l-methionine and 5'-FDA. l-methionine then dissociates from the enzyme followed by 5'-FDA.

  8. Molecular regulation of devel- opment and differentiation in Streptomyces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@\tDevelopment and differentiation is an important and leading research field in modern biology. Streptomyces has a complicated life cycle of morphological differentia-tion including the spore germination, aerial mycelium and spore formation. Each developmental stage has a distin-guished morphological feature which greatly facilitates the identification of developmental mutants, the comple-mentary cloning and the spatial and temporal expression of the genes involved in differentiation. This characteristic of Streptomyces is comparatively superior to other pro-karyotic bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Bacillus sub-tilis and Myxococcus xanthus. Moreover, Streptomyces also possesses a complicated physiological differentiation in which it produces a wide variety of secondary metabo-lites (more than half of the 12 000 or so known antibiot-ics), including many important antibiotics used in medi-cine, agriculture and industry. Studies on the molecular mechanism of antibiotic biosynthesis will be helpful in improving the antibiotic producer and developing some new medicines. In comparison with eukaryotic microor-ganism such as Asperillus nidulans, the structure of ge-netic material in Streptomyces is simple, and it is benefi-cial to studying gene expression and regulation. Remarka-bly, the genome of Streptomyces has some unusual char-acteristics in bacteria; for example, it is linear and con-tains more genes than other prokaryotes, even than eukaryotes such as saccharomyces cerevisiae. The large number of genes are the molecular basis of Streptomyces differentiation, suggesting that the regulation mechanism of gene expression in differentiation and development may be complex[1].

  9. Streptomyces-Aspergillus flavus interactions: impact on aflatoxin B accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheecke, C; Liboz, T; Anson, P; Zhu, Y; Mathieu, F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential of Streptomyces sp. as biocontrol agents against aflatoxins in maize. As such, we assumed that Streptomyces sp. could provide a complementary approach to current biocontrol systems such as Afla-guard(®) and we focused on biocontrol that was able to have an antagonistic contact with A. flavus. A previous study showed that 27 (out of 38) Streptomyces sp. had mutual antagonism in contact with A. flavus. Among these, 16 Streptomyces sp. were able to reduce aflatoxin content to below 17% of the residual concentration. We selected six strains to understand the mechanisms involved in the prevention of aflatoxin accumulation. Thus, in interaction with A. flavus, we monitored by RT-qPCR the gene expression of aflD, aflM, aflP, aflR and aflS. All the Streptomyces sp. were able to reduce aflatoxin concentration (24.0-0.2% residual aflatoxin B1). They all impacted on gene expression, but only S35 and S38 were able to repress expression significantly. Indeed, S35 significantly repressed aflM expression and S38 significantly repressed aflR, aflM and aflP. S6 reduced aflatoxin concentrations (2.3% residual aflatoxin B1) and repressed aflS, aflM and enhanced aflR expression. In addition, the S6 strain (previously identified as the most reducing pure aflatoxin B1) was further tested to determine a potential adsorption mechanism. We did not observe any adsorption phenomenon. In conclusion, this study showed that Streptomyces sp. prevent the production of (aflatoxin gene expression) and decontamination of (aflatoxin B1 reduction) aflatoxins in vitro.

  10. Streptomyces aridus sp. nov., isolated from a high altitude Atacama Desert soil and emended description of Streptomyces noboritoensis Isono et al. 1957.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Hamidah; Labeda, David P; Nouioui, Imen; Castro, Jean Franco; Del Carmen Montero-Calasanz, Maria; Bull, Alan T; Asenjo, Juan A; Goodfellow, Michael

    2017-05-01

    A polyphasic study was undertaken to determine the taxonomic status of a Streptomyces strain which had been isolated from a high altitude Atacama Desert soil and shown to have bioactive properties. The strain, isolate H9(T), was found to have chemotaxonomic, cultural and morphological properties that place it in the genus Streptomyces. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses showed that the isolate forms a distinct branch at the periphery of a well-delineated subclade in the Streptomyces 16S rRNA gene tree together with the type strains of Streptomyces crystallinus, Streptomyces melanogenes and Streptomyces noboritoensis. Multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) based on five house-keeping gene alleles showed that isolate H9(T) is closely related to the latter two type strains and to Streptomyces polyantibioticus NRRL B-24448(T). The isolate was distinguished readily from the type strains of S. melanogenes, S. noboritoensis and S. polyantibioticus using a combination of phenotypic properties. Consequently, the isolate is considered to represent a new species of Streptomyces for which the name Streptomyces aridus sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is H9(T) (=NCIMB 14965(T)=NRRL B65268(T)). In addition, the MLSA and phenotypic data show that the S. melanogenes and S. noboritoensis type strains belong to a single species, it is proposed that S. melanogenes be recognised as a heterotypic synonym of S. noboritoensis for which an emended description is given.

  11. Streptomyces bacteremia in a patient with actinomycotic mycetoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Noyal Mariya; Harish, Belgode Narasimha; Sistla, Sujatha; Thappa, Devinder Mohan; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2010-05-01

    A 29-year-old woman presented with multiple painful swelling with discharging sinuses over the scalp. Histopathological examination of the biopsy tissue was suggestive of actinomycotic mycetoma. Streptomyces spp. was isolated from blood culture. The patient was successfully treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and crystalline penicillin. This case is reported because of the rare occurrence of bacteremia by Streptomyces spp. secondary to subcutaneous actinomycotic mycetoma. Moreover, an interesting association between successive two pregnancies and occurrence of mycetoma of the scalp was observed in this case.

  12. Development and characterization of promoterless helper RNAs for the production of alphavirus replicon particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrud, K I; Alterson, K; Custer, M; Dudek, J; Goodman, C; Owens, G; Smith, J F

    2010-07-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon systems are frequently used as preclinical vectors and as antigen discovery tools, and they have recently been assessed in clinical vaccine trials. Typically, alphavirus replicon RNAs are delivered within virus-like replicon particles (VRP) that are produced following transfection of replicon RNA and two helper RNAs into permissive cells in vitro. The non-structural proteins expressed from the replicon RNA amplify the replicon RNA in cis and the helper RNAs in trans, the latter providing the viral structural proteins necessary to package the replicon RNA into VRP. Current helper RNA designs incorporate the alphavirus 26S promoter to direct the transcription of high levels of structural gene mRNAs. We demonstrate here that the 26S promoter is not required on helper RNAs to produce VRP and propose that such promoterless helper RNAs, by design, reduce the probability of generating replication-competent virus that may otherwise result from RNA recombination.

  13. Helpers' Self-Assessment Biases Before and after Helping Skills Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeken, Marine; Zech, Emmanuelle; Brison, Céline; Verhofstadt, Lesley L; Van Broeck, Nady; Mikolajczak, Moïra

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have shown that therapists are generally biased concerning their performed helping skills, as compared to judges' ratings. As clients' ratings of therapists' performance are better predictors of psychotherapy effectiveness than judges' ratings, this study examined the validity and effectiveness of a helping skills training program at reducing novice helpers' self-enhancement biases concerning their helping skills, in comparison to their clients' ratings. Helping skills were assessed by three objective measures (a knowledge multiple choice test, a video test and a role play), as well as by a self- and peer-reported questionnaire. In addition, some performed helping skills' correlates (relationship quality, session quality, and helpers' therapeutic attitudes) were assessed both by helpers and their simulated helpees. Seventy-two sophomores in psychology participated to this study, 37 being assigned to a 12-h helping skills training program, and 35 to a control group. Helpers were expected to assess the aforementioned performed helping skills and correlates as being better than their helpees' assessments at pretest, thus revealing a self-enhancement bias. At posttest, we expected that trained helpers would objectively exhibit better helping skills than untrained helpers while beginning to underestimate their performance, thus indexing a self-diminishment bias. In contrast, we hypothesized that untrained helpers would continue to overestimate their performance. Our hypotheses were only partly confirmed but results reflected a skilled-unaware pattern among trainees. Trained helpers went either from a pretest overestimation to a posttest equivalence (performed helping skills and performed therapeutic attitudes), or from a pretest equivalence to a posttest underestimation (performed session quality and performed therapeutic relationship), as compared to helpees' ratings. Results showed that trained helpers improved on all helping skills objective measures

  14. Taxonomic status of Kitasatosporia, and proposed unification with Streptomyces on the basis of phenotypic and 16S rRNA analysis and emendation of Streptomyces Waksman and Henrici 1943, 339AL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellington, E M; Stackebrandt, E; Sanders, D; Wolstrup, J; Jorgensen, N O

    1992-01-01

    Species classified within the genus Kitasatosporia share many of the phenotypic characteristics typical of streptomycetes. By using a probabilistic identification scheme, they were identified with Streptomyces exfoliatus cluster 5, a species group within Streptomyces. The four species studied hybridized with a 16S rRNA genus probe for Streptomyces spp., indicating a close relationship between the two genera. The kitasatosporias were resistant to selected polyvalent streptomycete phages tested. Quantitative analysis showed that meso-diaminopimelic acid varied from 49 to 89% in Kitasatosporia species and from 1 to 16% in Streptomyces species depending on growth conditions. On the basis of 16S rRNA analysis, it is proposed to reduce Kitasatosporia to synonymy with Streptomyces. As a result, the new names proposed are Streptomyces mediocidicus comb. nov., Streptomyces phosalacineus comb. nov., Streptomyces setae comb. nov., and Streptomyces griseolosporeus comb. nov., nom. nov.

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  5. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF Streptomyces sp. ON RHIZOSPHERE PLANT BANANA (Musa paradiasica IN PENDEM VILLAGE JEMBRANA REGENCY BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Kawuri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pendem village in Jembrana regency is one of the banana plantation in Bali. Now a days banana plants were attack by bacterial wilt disease with the symptoms of wilting plants, brown spots on the vessel banana stems and fruit to rot and dry. Control of use of chemical fertilizers can cause bad impact on environment and also can not control the disease. Streptomyces bacteria are bacteria that are capable of producing enzymes and antibiotics that can be used as biocontrol agents of several diseases in plants. The purpose of this research is to isolate and identify the bacteria Streptomyces from rhizosphere of banana plants without symptoms in the village Pendem Jembrana regency. The method of isolation of Streptomyces using Platting method, Streptomyces isolated from soil rhizosphere of banana plants without symptoms or health plant. Soil was taken by digging near rooting bananas plant about 15 cm from the ground and and the sample was growth on media Humic Vitamin Agar (HVA and Yeast Extract Malt Agar (ISP4. Identification macros-copically and microscopically and biochemical test using determination key book guide to the Classification and Identification of the Actinomycetes and Their antibiotics of Lechevalier and Waksman (1973. Result showed it was found 9 Streptomyces isolate; Streptomyces sp.1, Streptomyces sp. 2, Streptomyces sp.3, sp.4 Streptomyces, Streptomyces sp.5 sp.6, Streptomyces sp 7, Streptomyces sp.8 and Streptomyces sp.9. Nine isolates of Streptomyces sp. will be tested against the bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum ,the bacteria that causes bacterial wilt disease.

  6. Plasticity of T helper cell subsets: Implications in periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avaneendra Talwar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available T helper (Th cells have an important role in host defence as well in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Th cells differentiate from naive cells into various subsets, each of which is associated with a set of inducing and effector cytokines. Previously, it was thought that this differentiation was an irreversible event. Recent evidence suggest that even differentiated Th cells, retain the flexibility to transform from one lineage to another, a phenomenon referred to as plasticity. This plasticity is thought to be brought about by epigenetic modifications that are regulated by external and internal signals in the micro-environment of these cells. The factors and mechanisms which affect the plasticity of these cells and their potential role in the etio-pathogenesis of periodontal disease has been described in this article.

  7. Estimation with a helper who knows the interference

    CERN Document Server

    Chia, Yeow-Khiang; Weissman, Tsachy

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating a signal corrupted by independent interference with the assistance of a cost-constrained helper who knows the interference causally or noncausally. When the interference is known causally, we characterize the minimum distortion incurred in estimating the desired signal. In the noncausal case, we present a general achievable scheme for discrete memoryless systems and novel lower bounds on the distortion for the binary and Gaussian settings. Our Gaussian setting coincides with that of assisted interference suppression introduced by Grover and Sahai. Our lower bound for this setting is based on the relation recently established by Verd\\'u between divergence and minimum mean squared error. We illustrate with a few examples that this lower bound can improve on those previously developed. Our bounds also allow us to characterize the optimal distortion in several interesting regimes. Moreover, we show that causal and noncausal estimation are not equivalent for this problem. Fina...

  8. Characterization of Streptomyces strain SLO-105 isolated from Lake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... produce a wide range of molecules with broad spectrum of activities, that is, ... The antimicrobial activity of strain SLO-105 was evaluated on solid media by .... Fermentation, Purification and Biological Activities. Aust. J. Basic .... of Streptomyces in soil of protected forest areas from the states of. Assam and ...

  9. New alkaloid from Streptomyces koyangensis residing in Odontotermes formosanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Shu-Feng; Guo, Zhi-Kai; Jiang, Nan; Jiao, Rui-Hua; Ge, Hui-Ming; Tan, Ren-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    A new alkaloid was isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of the culture of a termite-associated Streptomyces koyangensis BY-4. The structure of 1 was elucidated by using MS, NMR, electronic circular dichroism data, and computational approaches. Compound 1 showed weak antimicrobial activities against a panel of test microbes.

  10. The stringent response in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strauch, E.; Takano, E.; Baylis, H.A.; Bibb, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    The stringent response was elicited in the antibiotic producer Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) either by amino acid depletion (nutritional shiftdown) or by the addition of serine hydroxamate; both led to increased levels of ppGpp and to a reduction in transcription from the four promoters of the rrnD

  11. Metabolomic Characterization of the Salt Stress Response in Streptomyces coelicolor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kol, Stefan; Merlo, M. Elena; Scheltema, Richard A.; de Vries, Marcel; Vonk, Roel J.; Kikkert, Niels A.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2010-01-01

    The humicolous actinomycete Streptomyces coelicolor routinely adapts to a wide variety of habitats and rapidly changing environments. Upon salt stress, the organism is also known to increase the levels of various compatible solutes. Here we report the results of the first high-resolution metabolomic

  12. Genome-wide inference of regulatory networks in Streptomyces coelicolor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro-Melchor, Marlene; Charaniya, Salim; Karypis, George; Takano, Eriko; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2010-01-01

    Background: The onset of antibiotics production in Streptomyces species is co-ordinated with differentiation events. An understanding of the genetic circuits that regulate these coupled biological phenomena is essential to discover and engineer the pharmacologically important natural products made b

  13. A New Degraded Sesquiterpene from Marine Actinomycete Streptomyces sp. 0616208

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu Chao XIE; Wen Li MEI; You Xing ZHAO; Kui HONG; Hao Fu DAI

    2006-01-01

    A new degraded sesquiterpene was isolated from the marine actinomycete Streptomyces sp. 0616208. Its structure was elucidated as (1α, 4aα, 5α, 7β, 8aβ)-5, 8a-dimethyl-decahydrona-phthalene-1, 4a, 7-triol on the basis of spectroscopic data.

  14. Colonization of wild potato plants by Streptomyces scabies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bacterial pathogen Streptomyces scabies produces lesions on potato tubers, reducing their marketability and profitability. M6 and 524-8 are two closely related inbred diploid lines of the wild potato species Solanum chacoense. After testing in both field and greenhouse assays, it was found that ...

  15. Field efficacy of nonpathogenic Streptomyces species against potato common scab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reports of potato fields suppressive to common scab (CS) and of association of non-pathogenic streptomycetes with CS resistance suggest that non-pathogenic strains have potential to control or modulate CS disease. Biocontrol potential of non-pathogenic Streptomyces was examined in field experiments ...

  16. Comparative genomic hybridizations reveal absence of large Streptomyces coelicolor genomic islands in Streptomyces lividans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman David H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomes of Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans bear a considerable degree of synteny. While S. coelicolor is the model streptomycete for studying antibiotic synthesis and differentiation, S. lividans is almost exclusively considered as the preferred host, among actinomycetes, for cloning and expression of exogenous DNA. We used whole genome microarrays as a comparative genomics tool for identifying the subtle differences between these two chromosomes. Results We identified five large S. coelicolor genomic islands (larger than 25 kb and 18 smaller islets absent in S. lividans chromosome. Many of these regions show anomalous GC bias and codon usage patterns. Six of them are in close vicinity of tRNA genes while nine are flanked with near perfect repeat sequences indicating that these are probable recent evolutionary acquisitions into S. coelicolor. Embedded within these segments are at least four DNA methylases and two probable methyl-sensing restriction endonucleases. Comparison with S. coelicolor transcriptome and proteome data revealed that some of the missing genes are active during the course of growth and differentiation in S. coelicolor. In particular, a pair of methylmalonyl CoA mutase (mcm genes involved in polyketide precursor biosynthesis, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase implicated in timing of actinorhodin synthesis and bldB, a developmentally significant regulator whose mutation causes complete abrogation of antibiotic synthesis belong to this category. Conclusion Our findings provide tangible hints for elucidating the genetic basis of important phenotypic differences between these two streptomycetes. Importantly, absence of certain genes in S. lividans identified here could potentially explain the relative ease of DNA transformations and the conditional lack of actinorhodin synthesis in S. lividans.

  17. FemtoCaching: Wireless Video Content Delivery through Distributed Caching Helpers

    CERN Document Server

    Golrezaei, Negin; Dimakis, Alexandros G; Molisch, Andreas F; Caire, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    We suggest a novel approach to handle the ongoing explosive increase in the demand for video content in wireless/mobile devices. We envision femtocell-like base stations, which we call helpers, with weak backhaul links but large storage capacity. These helpers form a wireless distributed caching network that assists the macro base station by handling requests of popular files that have been cached. Due to the short distances between helpers and requesting devices, the transmission of cached files can be done very efficiently. A key question for such a system is the wireless distributed caching problem, i.e., which files should be cached by which helpers. If every mobile device has only access to a exactly one helper, then clearly each helper should cache the same files, namely the most popular ones. However, for the case that each mobile device can access multiple caches, the assignment of files to helpers becomes nontrivial. The theoretical contribution of our paper lies in (i) formalizing the distributed ca...

  18. Self-adaptive Worker-Helper Systems with Self-Organized Task Allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Daniel; Middendorf, Martin; Scheidler, Alexander

    In this chapter a self-organized worker helper system is described, which is part of an abstract Organic Computing system (OC system). It consists of normal worker components and helper components, and the workers need some service from time to time in order to continue with their normal work. The service is done by the helpers, which have reconfigurable hardware to perform the different service tasks. The speed of service for a certain task depends on the amount of resources configured for this task. Strategies are presented that can be used by the helpers to decide whether to accept a service task and how to reconfigure themselves. It is also described how the worker helper system can be organized without global knowledge about the type of service requests and the set of available helper components. In order to obtain a decentralized mechanism and to make it suitable for the paradigm of OC a fully decentralized and dynamic clustering algorithm has been combined with a self-organized task allocation system. Empirical results show that the described worker helper system can adapt to dynamic situations with changing probabilities for service, and that decentralized clustering is able to reduce the reconfiguration cost significantly.

  19. Lateral Gene Transfer Dynamics in the Ancient Bacterial Genus Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Bradon R; Currie, Cameron R

    2017-06-06

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) profoundly shapes the evolution of bacterial lineages. LGT across disparate phylogenetic groups and genome content diversity between related organisms suggest a model of bacterial evolution that views LGT as rampant and promiscuous. It has even driven the argument that species concepts and tree-based phylogenetics cannot be applied to bacteria. Here, we show that acquisition and retention of genes through LGT are surprisingly rare in the ubiquitous and biomedically important bacterial genus Streptomyces Using a molecular clock, we estimate that the Streptomyces bacteria are ~380 million years old, indicating that this bacterial genus is as ancient as land vertebrates. Calibrating LGT rate to this geologic time span, we find that on average only 10 genes per million years were acquired and subsequently maintained. Over that same time span, Streptomyces accumulated thousands of point mutations. By explicitly incorporating evolutionary timescale into our analyses, we provide a dramatically different view on the dynamics of LGT and its impact on bacterial evolution.IMPORTANCE Tree-based phylogenetics and the use of species as units of diversity lie at the foundation of modern biology. In bacteria, these pillars of evolutionary theory have been called into question due to the observation of thousands of lateral gene transfer (LGT) events within and between lineages. Here, we show that acquisition and retention of genes through LGT are exceedingly rare in the bacterial genus Streptomyces, with merely one gene acquired in Streptomyces lineages every 100,000 years. These findings stand in contrast to the current assumption of rampant genetic exchange, which has become the dominant hypothesis used to explain bacterial diversity. Our results support a more nuanced understanding of genetic exchange, with LGT impacting evolution over short timescales but playing a significant role over long timescales. Deeper understanding of LGT provides new

  20. Streptomyces leeuwenhoekii sp. nov., the producer of chaxalactins and chaxamycins, forms a distinct branch in Streptomyces gene trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    A polyphasic study was carried out to establish the taxonomic status of an Atacama Desert isolate, Streptomyces strain C34T, which synthesises novel antibiotics, the chaxalactins and chaxamycins. The organism was shown to have chemotaxonomic, cultural, and morphological properties consistent with it...

  1. Characterization of AvaR1, a butenolide-autoregulator receptor for biosynthesis of a Streptomyces hormone in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Suandi Pratama; Kitani, Shigeru; Miyamoto, Kiyoko T; Iguchi, Hiroyuki; Atago, Tokitaka; Ikeda, Haruo; Nihira, Takuya

    2016-11-01

    Streptomyces hormones, sometimes called as autoregulators, are important signaling molecules to trigger secondary metabolism across many Streptomyces species. We recently identified a butenolide-type autoregulator (termed avenolide) as a new class of Streptomyces hormone from Streptomyces avermitilis that produces important anthelmintic agent avermectin. Avenolide triggers the production of avermectin with minimum effective concentration of nanomolar. Here, we describe the characterization of avaR1 encoding an avenolide receptor in the regulation of avermectin production and avenolide biosynthesis. The disruption of avaR1 resulted in transcriptional derepression of avenolide biosynthetic gene with an increase in avenolide production, with no change in the avermectin production profile. Moreover, the avaR1 mutant showed increased transcription of avaR1. Together with clear DNA-binding capacity of AvaR1 toward avaR1 upstream region, it suggests that AvaR1 negatively controls the expression of avaR1 through the direct binding to the promoter region of avaR1. These findings revealed that the avenolide receptor AvaR1 functions as a transcriptional repressor for avenolide biosynthesis and its own synthesis.

  2. General pathologist-helper: The new medical app about general pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Vega, Iván

    2015-01-01

    Smartphone applications (apps) have become increasingly prevalent in medicine. Due to most pathologists, pathology trainees, technicians, and medical students use smartphones; apps can be a different way for general pathology education. "General pathologist-helper (GP-HELPER)" is a novel app developed as a reference tool in general pathology and especially for general pathologists, developed for Android and iOS platforms. "GP-HELPER," was created using Mobincube website platform. This tool also integrates "FORUM GP-HELPER," an external website created using Miarroba website (http://forum-gp-helper.mboards.com) and "COMMUNITY GP-HELPER" a multichannel chat created using Chatango website platform. The application was released in July 2015, and it is been periodically updated since then. The app has permanent information (offline data) about different pathology protocols (TNM latest edition, protocols regarding management of tumors of unknown primary origin, and flowcharts for some of the most difficult tumors to diagnose) and a database with more than 5000 immunohistochemistry results from different tumors. Online data have links to more than 1100 reference pathology video lectures, 250 antibodies information, more than 70 pathology association websites, 46 pathology providers, and 78 outstanding pathology journal websites. Besides this information, the app has two interactive places such as "FORUM GP-HELPER" and "COMMUNITY GP-HELPER" that let users to stay in touch everywhere and every time. Expert consult section is also available. "GP-HELPER" pretends to integrate offline and online data about pathology with two interactive external places in order to represent a reference tool for general pathologists and associate members.

  3. T Helper 1 and T Helper 2 Cytokines Differentially Modulate Expression of Filaggrin and its Processing Proteases in Human Keratinocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-Hong Di; Lei Ma; Rui-Qun Qi; Xiao-Dong Sun; Wei Huo; Li Zhang; Ya-Ni Lyu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by defective skin barrier and imbalance in T helper 1/T helper 2 (Th 1/Th2) cytokine expression.Filaggrin (FLG) is the key protein to maintaining skin barrier function.Recent studies indicated that Th1/Th2 cytokines influence FLG expression in keratinocytes.However, the role ofThl/Th2 cytokines on FLG processing is not substantially documented.Our aim was to investigate the impact ofThl/Th2 cytokines on FLG processing.Methods: HaCaT cells and normal human keratinocytes were cultured in low and high calcium media and stimulated by either interleukin (IL)-4, 13 or interferon-γ(IFN-γ).FLG, its major processing proteases and key protease inhibitor lymphoepithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor (LEKTI) were measured by both real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting.Their expression was also evaluated in acute and chronic AD lesions by immunohistochemistry.Results: IL-4/13 significantly reduced, while IFN-γsignificantly up-regulated FLG expression.IL-4/13 significantly increased, whereas IFN-γsignificantly decreased the expression ofkallikreins 5 and 7, matriptase and channel-activating serine protease 1.On the contrary, IL-4/13 significantly decreased, while IFN-γincreased the expression of LEKTI and caspase-14.Similar trends were observed in AD lesions.Conclusions: Our results suggested that Th1/Th2 cytokines differentially regulated the expression of major FLG processing enzymes.The imbalance between Th1 and Th2 polarized immune response seems to extend to FLG homeostasis, through the network of FLG processing enzymes.

  4. A beta-l-Arabinopyranosidase from Streptomyces avermitilis is a novel member of glycoside hydrolase family 27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Hitomi; Fujimoto, Zui; Honda, Mariko; Harazono, Koichi; Nishimoto, Yukifumi; Uzura, Atsuko; Kaneko, Satoshi

    2009-09-11

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are a family of plant cell surface proteoglycans and are considered to be involved in plant growth and development. Because AGPs are very complex molecules, glycoside hydrolases capable of degrading AGPs are powerful tools for analyses of the AGPs. We previously reported such enzymes from Streptomyces avermitilis. Recently, a beta-l-arabinopyranosidase was purified from the culture supernatant of the bacterium, and its corresponding gene was identified. The primary structure of the protein revealed that the catalytic module was highly similar to that of glycoside hydrolase family 27 (GH27) alpha-d-galactosidases. The recombinant protein was successfully expressed as a secreted 64-kDa protein using a Streptomyces expression system. The specific activity toward p-nitrophenyl-beta-l-arabinopyranoside was 18 micromol of arabinose/min/mg, which was 67 times higher than that toward p- nitrophenyl-alpha-d-galactopyranoside. The enzyme could remove 0.1 and 45% l-arabinose from gum arabic or larch arabinogalactan, respectively. X-ray crystallographic analysis reveals that the protein had a GH27 catalytic domain, an antiparallel beta-domain containing Greek key motifs, another antiparallel beta-domain forming a jellyroll structure, and a carbohydrate-binding module family 13 domain. Comparison of the structure of this protein with that of alpha-d-galactosidase showed a single amino acid substitution (aspartic acid to glutamic acid) in the catalytic pocket of beta-l-arabinopyranosidase, and a space for the hydroxymethyl group on the C-5 carbon of d-galactose bound to alpha-galactosidase was changed in beta-l-arabinopyranosidase. Mutagenesis study revealed that the residue is critical for modulating the enzyme activity. This is the first report in which beta-l-arabinopyranosidase is classified as a new member of the GH27 family.

  5. Characterization of a unique methyl-specific restriction system in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Streptomyces avermitilis contains a unique restriction system that restricts plasmid DNA containing N6-methyladenine or 5-methylcytosine. Shuttle vectors isolated from Escherichia coli RR1 or plasmids isolated from modification-proficient Streptomyces spp. cannot be directly introduced into S. avermitilis. This restriction barrier can be overcome by first transferring plasmids into Streptomyces lividans or a modification-deficient E. coli strain and then into S. avermitilis. The transformatio...

  6. Production of an extracellular polyethylene-degrading enzyme(s) by Streptomyces species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pometto, A L; Lee, B T; Johnson, K E

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular culture concentrates were prepared from Streptomyces viridosporus T7A, Streptomyces badius 252, and Streptomyces setonii 75Vi2 shake flask cultures. Ten-day-heat-treated (70 degrees C) starch-polyethylene degradable plastic films were incubated with shaking with active or inactive enzyme for 3 weeks (37 degrees C). Active enzyme illustrated changes in the films' Fourier transform infrared spectra, mechanical properties, and polyethylene molecular weight distributions. PMID:1610196

  7. Genome sequence of a new Streptomyces coelicolor generalized transducing bacteriophage, ΦCAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Rita; Salmond, George P C

    2012-12-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor is a model system for the study of Streptomyces, a genus of bacteria responsible for the production of many clinically important antibiotics. Here we report the genome sequence of ΦCAM, a new S. coelicolor generalized transducing bacteriophage, isolated from a soil sample originating from Lincolnshire, United Kingdom. Many open reading frames within ΦCAM shared high levels of similarity to a prophage from Salinispora tropica and a putative prophage in Streptomyces sp. strain C.

  8. Characterization of a silent sesquiterpenoid biosynthetic pathway in Streptomyces avermitilis controlling epi-isozizaene albaflavenone biosynthesis and isolation of a new oxidized epi-isozizaene metabolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Satoshi; Lin, Xin; Nara, Ayako; Komatsu, Mamoru; Cane, David E; Ikeda, Haruo

    2011-03-01

    The genome-sequenced, Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces avermitilis harbours an orthologue (SAV_3032) of the previously identified epi-isozizaene synthase (SCO5222) in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). The sav3032 is translationally coupled with the downstream sav3031 gene encoding the cytochrome P450 CYP170A2 analogous to SCO5223 (CYP170A1) of S. coelicolor A3(2), which exhibits a similar translation coupling. Streptomyces avermitilis did not produce epi-isozizaene or any of its oxidized derivatives, albaflavenols and albaflavenone, under in any culture conditions examined. Nonetheless, recombinant SAV_3032 protein expressed in Escherichia coli catalysed the Mg²+-dependent cyclization of farnesyl diphosphate to epi-isozizaene. To effect the production of epi-isozizaene in S. avermitilis, the sav3032 gene was cloned and placed under control of a copy of the native S. avermitilis promoter rpsJp (sav4925). The derived expression construct was introduced by transformation into a large-deletion mutant of S. avermitilis SUKA16 and the resulting transformants accumulated epi-isozizaene. The previously characterized oxidized epi-isozizaene metabolites (4R)- and (4S)-albaflavenols and albaflavenone, as well as a previously undescribed doubly oxidized epi-isozizaene derivative were isolated from cultures of S. avermitilis SUKA16 transformants in which sav3032 was coexpressed with the P450-encoding sav3031. This new metabolite was identified as 4β,5β-epoxy-2-epi-zizaan-6β-ol which is most likely formed by oxidation of (4S)-albaflavenol.

  9. Streptomyces alkalithermotolerans sp. nov., a novel alkaliphilic and thermotolerant actinomycete isolated from a soda lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultanpuram, Vishnuvardhan Reddy; Mothe, Thirumala; Mohammed, Farooq

    2015-02-01

    An alkaliphilic actinomycete, strain AC3(T), was isolated from Lonar soda lake, in India. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis it was identified that the strain belongs to the class Actinobacteria and was most closely related to Streptomyces sodiiphilus JCM 13581(T) (96.4 % sequence similarity), Streptomyces leeuwenhoekii DSM 42122(T) (96.1 %), Streptomyces albus NRRL B-2365(T) (96.1 %), Streptomyces panacagri Gsoil 519(T) (96.0 %), Streptomyces fimbriatus NBRC 15411(T) (95.9 %) and other members of the genus Streptomyces (cream substrate and white aerial mycelia on most tested media. The optimum pH for growth was determined to be 9.5-10.0 with no growth at pH 7.0. The DNA G+C content of strain AC3(T) was determined to be 71.2 mol %. The results of the polyphasic analysis allowed a clear differentiation of strain AC3(T) from all other members of the genus Streptomyces. Strain AC3(T) is thus considered to represent a novel member of the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces alkalithermotolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is AC3(T) (=KCTC 29497(T) = JCM 30167(T)).

  10. Isolation and characterization of Streptomyces, Actinoplanes, and Methylibium strains that are involved in degradation of natural rubber and synthetic poly(cis-1,4-isoprene).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Shunsuke; Ichikawa, Kazuya; Muramatsu, Yuki; Kasai, Daisuke; Masai, Eiji; Fukuda, Masao

    2011-12-10

    Rubber-degrading bacteria were screened for the production of clearing zones around their colonies on latex overlay agar plates. Novel three bacteria, Streptomyces sp. strain LCIC4, Actinoplanes sp. strain OR16, and Methylibium sp. strain NS21, were isolated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the isolation of a Gram-negative rubber-degrading bacterium other than γ-proteobacteria. Gel permeation chromatography analysis revealed that these strains degraded poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) to low-molecular-weight products. The occurrence of aldehyde groups in the degradation products by NS21 was suggested by staining with Schiff's reagent and ¹H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The lcp gene of LCIC4, which showed 99% amino acid sequence identity with that of Streptomyces sp. strain K30, was cloned, and contained a putative twin-arginine motif at its N terminus. It is located next to oxiB, which is estimated to be responsible for oxidation of degradation intermediate of rubber in K30. Southern hybridization analysis using LCIC4 lcp probe revealed the presence of a lcp-homolog in OR16. These results suggest that the lcp-homologs are involved in rubber degradation in LCIC4 and OR16.

  11. The actinobacterial signature protein ParJ (SCO1662) regulates ParA polymerization and affects chromosome segregation and cell division during Streptomyces sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditkowski, Bartosz; Troć, Paulina; Ginda, Katarzyna; Donczew, Magdalena; Chater, Keith F; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta; Jakimowicz, Dagmara

    2010-12-01

    Bacterial chromosome segregation usually involves cytoskeletal ParA proteins, ATPases which can form dynamic filaments. In aerial hyphae of the mycelial bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor, ParA filaments extend over tens of microns and are responsible for segregation of dozens of chromosomes. We have identified a novel interaction partner of S. coelicolor ParA, ParJ. ParJ negatively regulates ParA polymerization in vitro and is important for efficient chromosome segregation in sporulating aerial hyphae. ParJ-EGFP formed foci along aerial hyphae even in the absence of ParA. ParJ, which is encoded by sco1662, turned out to be one of the five actinobacterial signature proteins, and another of the five is a ParJ paralogue. We hypothesize that polar growth, which is characteristic not only of streptomycetes, but even of simple Actinobacteria, may be interlinked with ParA polymer assembly and its specific regulation by ParJ.

  12. Crp is a global regulator of antibiotic production in streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chan; Hindra; Mulder, David; Yin, Charles; Elliot, Marie A

    2012-12-11

    Cyclic AMP receptor protein (Crp) is a transcription regulator controlling diverse cellular processes in many bacteria. In Streptomyces coelicolor, it is well established that Crp plays a critical role in spore germination and colony development. Here, we demonstrate that Crp is a key regulator of secondary metabolism and antibiotic production in S. coelicolor and show that it may additionally coordinate precursor flux from primary to secondary metabolism. We found that crp deletion adversely affected the synthesis of three well-characterized antibiotics in S. coelicolor: actinorhodin (Act), undecylprodigiosin (Red), and calcium-dependent antibiotic (CDA). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-microarray (ChIP-chip) assays, we determined that eight (out of 22) secondary metabolic clusters encoded by S. coelicolor contained Crp-associated sites. We followed the effect of Crp induction using transcription profiling analyses and found secondary metabolic genes to be significantly affected: included in this Crp-dependent group were genes from six of the clusters identified in the ChIP-chip experiments. Overexpressing Crp in a panel of Streptomyces species led to enhanced antibiotic synthesis and new metabolite production, suggesting that Crp control over secondary metabolism is broadly conserved in the streptomycetes and that Crp overexpression could serve as a powerful tool for unlocking the chemical potential of these organisms. IMPORTANCE Streptomyces produces a remarkably diverse array of secondary metabolites, including many antibiotics. In recent years, genome sequencing has revealed that these products represent only a small proportion of the total secondary metabolite potential of Streptomyces. There is, therefore, considerable interest in discovering ways to stimulate the production of new metabolites. Here, we show that Crp (the classical regulator of carbon catabolite repression in Escherichia coli) is a master regulator of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces

  13. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I; Abdel Bar, Fatma M; El-Mahdy, Areej M; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1-V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  14. Quorum sensing inhibiting activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus isolated from soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan eRamadan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1-V6 of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR and Mass spectrometry, as behenic acid (docosanoic acid, borrelidin and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA and pqsR. Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and

  15. Recent advances in understanding Streptomyces [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith F. Chater

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available About 2,500 papers dated 2014–2016 were recovered by searching the PubMed database for Streptomyces, which are the richest known source of antibiotics. This review integrates around 100 of these papers in sections dealing with evolution, ecology, pathogenicity, growth and development, stress responses and secondary metabolism, gene expression, and technical advances. Genomic approaches have greatly accelerated progress. For example, it has been definitively shown that interspecies recombination of conserved genes has occurred during evolution, in addition to exchanges of some of the tens of thousands of non-conserved accessory genes. The closeness of the association of Streptomyces with plants, fungi, and insects has become clear and is reflected in the importance of regulators of cellulose and chitin utilisation in overall Streptomyces biology. Interestingly, endogenous cellulose-like glycans are also proving important in hyphal growth and in the clumping that affects industrial fermentations. Nucleotide secondary messengers, including cyclic di-GMP, have been shown to provide key input into developmental processes such as germination and reproductive growth, while late morphological changes during sporulation involve control by phosphorylation. The discovery that nitric oxide is produced endogenously puts a new face on speculative models in which regulatory Wbl proteins (peculiar to actinobacteria respond to nitric oxide produced in stressful physiological transitions. Some dramatic insights have come from a new model system for Streptomyces developmental biology, Streptomyces venezuelae, including molecular evidence of very close interplay in each of two pairs of regulatory proteins. An extra dimension has been added to the many complexities of the regulation of secondary metabolism by findings of regulatory crosstalk within and between pathways, and even between species, mediated by end products. Among many outcomes from the application of

  16. Tailored immune responses: novel effector helper T cell subsets in protective immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin E Kara

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation of naïve CD4⁺ cells into functionally distinct effector helper T cell subsets, characterised by distinct "cytokine signatures," is a cardinal strategy employed by the mammalian immune system to efficiently deal with the rapidly evolving array of pathogenic microorganisms encountered by the host. Since the T(H1/T(H2 paradigm was first described by Mosmann and Coffman, research in the field of helper T cell biology has grown exponentially with seven functionally unique subsets having now been described. In this review, recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation and function of effector helper T cell subsets will be discussed in the context of microbial infections, with a focus on how these different helper T cell subsets orchestrate immune responses tailored to combat the nature of the pathogenic threat encountered.

  17. Tailored immune responses: novel effector helper T cell subsets in protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Ervin E; Comerford, Iain; Fenix, Kevin A; Bastow, Cameron R; Gregor, Carly E; McKenzie, Duncan R; McColl, Shaun R

    2014-02-01

    Differentiation of naïve CD4⁺ cells into functionally distinct effector helper T cell subsets, characterised by distinct "cytokine signatures," is a cardinal strategy employed by the mammalian immune system to efficiently deal with the rapidly evolving array of pathogenic microorganisms encountered by the host. Since the T(H)1/T(H)2 paradigm was first described by Mosmann and Coffman, research in the field of helper T cell biology has grown exponentially with seven functionally unique subsets having now been described. In this review, recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation and function of effector helper T cell subsets will be discussed in the context of microbial infections, with a focus on how these different helper T cell subsets orchestrate immune responses tailored to combat the nature of the pathogenic threat encountered.

  18. Identification of novel helper epitope peptides of Survivin cancer-associated antigen applicable to developing helper/killer-hybrid epitope long peptide cancer vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Junya; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Togashi, Yuji; Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Okuno, Kiyotaka; Nishimura, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    We identified novel helper epitope peptides of Survivin cancer antigen, which are presented to both HLA-DRB1*01:01 and DQB1*06:01. The helper epitope also contained three distinct Survivin-killer epitopes presented to HLA-A*02:01 and A*24:02. This 19 amino-acids epitope peptide (SU18) induced weak responses of Survivin-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells though it contained both helper and killer epitopes. To enhance the vaccine efficacy, we synthesized a long peptide by conjugating SU18 peptide and another DR53-restricted helper epitope peptide (SU22; 12 amino-acids) using glycine-linker. We designated this artificial 40 amino-acids long peptide containing two helper and three killer epitopes as Survivin-helper/killer-hybrid epitope long peptide (Survivin-H/K-HELP). Survivin-H/K-HELP allowed superior activation of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) Th1 cells and CD8(+) Tc1 cells compared with the mixture of its component peptides (SU18 and SU22) in the presence of OK-432-treated monocyte-derived DC (Mo-DC). Survivin-H/K-HELP-pulsed Mo-DC pretreated with OK-432 also exhibited sustained antigen-presentation capability of stimulating Survivin-specific Th1 cells compared with Mo-DC pulsed with a mixture of SU18 and SU22 short peptides. Moreover, we demonstrated that Survivin-H/K-HELP induced a complete response in a breast cancer patient with the induction of cellular and humoral immune responses. Thus, we believe that an artificially synthesized Survivin-H/K-HELP will become an innovative cancer vaccine.

  19. Development and characterization of promoterless helper RNAs for the production of alphavirus replicon particle

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon systems are frequently used as preclinical vectors and as antigen discovery tools, and they have recently been assessed in clinical vaccine trials. Typically, alphavirus replicon RNAs are delivered within virus-like replicon particles (VRP) that are produced following transfection of replicon RNA and two helper RNAs into permissive cells in vitro. The non-structural proteins expressed from the replicon RNA amplify the replicon RNA in cis and the helper RNAs in trans,...

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF THE BACTERIUM TOMATO STEM CANKER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goner A. Shaker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseased tomato samples were collected from green house was evaluated for isolation, pathogenicity and biochemical tests. The symptoms of the infected tomato plants were as sudden wilting after curled on leaves and necrotic streak regions developed at the crown and base of the stem and the cavities deepen and expand up and down, brown discoloration and necrosis occurring on xylem and phloem vasculer. All of ages of tomato plant were susceptible to bacteria when the weather condition favorable and immediately, seen collapse symptom on tomato plant at once fail and die. The bacterium was isolated from diseased plant in all regions on nutrient Agar; a yellow bacterium was isolated from infected tomato plant in green houses and fields in Abu-Ghraib, Rashiedia and Qanat Al-Geiaysh nurseries in Baghdad provinces of Iraq. The bacterium was found gram positive, rod-shaped, non-motile and capable an aerobic growth and based on the morphological and biochemical characteristics revealed that this bacterium belongs to: Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. (smith pathogenicity and hypersensitivity of the bacterium Cmm showed the disease index were 18.33, 6.66, 16.66, 5, 0% for tomato seedlings were inoculated treatments as the wounding roots, without wounding roots, crown of the stem, petiole and control respectively.

  1. Profiling helper T cell subset gene expression in deer mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjelle Brian

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus are the most common mammals in North America and are reservoirs for several zoonotic agents, including Sin Nombre virus (SNV, the principal etiologic agent of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS in North America. Unlike human HCPS patients, SNV-infected deer mice show no overt pathological symptoms, despite the presence of virus in the lungs. A neutralizing IgG antibody response occurs, but the virus establishes a persistent infection. Limitations of detailed analysis of deer mouse immune responses to SNV are the lack of reagents and methods for evaluating such responses. Results We developed real-time PCR-based detection assays for several immune-related transcription factor and cytokine genes from deer mice that permit the profiling of CD4+ helper T cells, including markers of Th1 cells (T-bet, STAT4, IFNγ, TNF, LT, Th2 cells (GATA-3, STAT6, IL-4, IL-5 and regulatory T cells (Fox-p3, IL-10, TGFβ1. These assays compare the expression of in vitro antigen-stimulated and unstimulated T cells from individual deer mice. Conclusion We developed molecular methods for profiling immune gene expression in deer mice, including a multiplexed real-time PCR assay for assessing expression of several cytokine and transcription factor genes. These assays should be useful for characterizing the immune responses of experimentally- and naturally-infected deer mice.

  2. Transcription factor interplay in T helper cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Catherine M; Jenner, Richard G

    2013-11-01

    The differentiation of CD4 helper T cells into specialized effector lineages has provided a powerful model for understanding immune cell differentiation. Distinct lineages have been defined by differential expression of signature cytokines and the lineage-specifying transcription factors necessary and sufficient for their production. The traditional paradigm of differentiation towards Th1 and Th2 subtypes driven by T-bet and GATA3, respectively, has been extended to incorporate additional T cell lineages and transcriptional regulators. Technological advances have expanded our view of these lineage-specifying transcription factors to the whole genome and revealed unexpected interplay between them. From these data, it is becoming clear that lineage specification is more complex and plastic than previous models might have suggested. Here, we present an overview of the different forms of transcription factor interplay that have been identified and how T cell phenotypes arise as a product of this interplay within complex regulatory networks. We also suggest experimental strategies that will provide further insight into the mechanisms that underlie T cell lineage specification and plasticity.

  3. Differential T helper cell response in tuberculous pleuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was conducted to understand the in vivo and in vitro immune responses and to find whether there exists any difference in the systemic and localized immune responses in tuberculous pleuritis. Methods: The in vivo levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 were compared in plasma (BL and pleural fluid (PF of 47 tuberculous (TB and 31 nontuberculous pleuritis (Non-TB patients. In vitro cytokine response to various mycobacterial antigens was studied in 19 TB patients by ELISA . Both ex vivo and in vitro cytokine responses were further ascertained by intracellular cytokine staining on purified CD4+ T cells from pleural fluid mononuclear cells (PFMC of 10 TB patients. Results: The ex vivo results showed a significant increase in IFN-γ levels and higher IFN-γ + T cells in PF. On the other hand, in vitro results showed simultaneous increase in both IFN-γ and IL-4 levels in the supernatants of antigen stimulated PFMC. Similarly antigen specific increase was observed in both IFN-γ + and IL-4+ T cells in all cultured conditions. However, the percentile increase was more in IL-4 secreting T cells, significant for PPD stimulation ( P < 0.05, indicating that in vitro cellular response was dominated by Th2 type. Conclusions: These results showed a differential T-helper response in TB pleuritis suggestive of predominant Th1 in vivo and mixed response (Th1 and Th2 under in vitro conditions.

  4. A Low-cost, Installable Intelligent Helper Module for Automobiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadman Sakib

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ground vehicles are being intelligent day by day. But in today’s market the price of an autonomous, which is still in its experimental phase, or a semi-autonomous intelligent vehicular system is too high. Apart from the usage of expensive sensors, previously proposed vehicular networking systems for intelligent vehicles need network provider and communication towers like cellular communication networks which is both time consuming and costly to implement. Moreover, the mechatronics part, which controls the vehicle is very much different from a traditional intra-vehicular mechanism making it very difficult to convert a regular vehicle, e.g. a car, into an intelligent one. Due to these facts, these overpriced systems are not suitable for the underdeveloped countries where, these are somewhat more needed. In this paper, I have developed a very cheap intelligent system for providing guidance to the driver while driving. This module will not be connected to the hardware directly, which made it an easy-to-install ―helper module‖ for any kind of ground vehicles. However, this module will reduce the accident rate by collecting and analyzing surrounding data, communicating with nearby vehicles (peer to peer while overtaking and providing continuous guidelines for safe driving. Unlike other systems this could easily be deployed in the underdeveloped countries because of its ultra-low cost

  5. In vitro and in vivo characterization of microRNA-targeted alphavirus replicon and helper RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrud, Kurt I; Coffield, V McNeil; Owens, Gary; Goodman, Christin; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Murphy, Michael A; Lewis, Whitney; Timberlake, Sarah; Wansley, Elizabeth K; Berglund, Peter; Smith, Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon vector systems (family Togaviridae) have been developed as expression vectors with demonstrated potential in vaccine development against both infectious diseases and cancer. The single-cycle nature of virus-like replicon particles (VRP), generated by supplying the structural proteins from separate replicable helper RNAs, is an attractive safety component of these systems. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important cellular RNA regulation elements. Recently, miRNAs have been employed as a mechanism to attenuate or restrict cellular tropism of replication-competent viruses, such as oncolytic adenoviruses, vesicular stomatitis virus, and picornaviruses as well as nonreplicating lentiviral and adenoviral vectors. Here, we describe the incorporation of miRNA-specific target sequences into replicable alphavirus helper RNAs that are used in trans to provide the structural proteins required for VRP production. VRP were found to be efficiently produced using miRNA-targeted helper RNAs if miRNA-specific inhibitors were introduced into cells during VRP production. In the absence of such inhibitors, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating helper RNA replication in vitro. When miRNA targets were incorporated into a replicon RNA, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating replicon RNA replication upon delivery of VRP into animals, demonstrating activity in vivo. These data provide the first example of miRNA-specific repression of alphavirus replicon and helper RNA replication and demonstrate the feasibility of miRNA targeting of expression vector helper functions that are provided in trans.

  6. RNase III Is Required for Actinomycin Production in Streptomyces antibioticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hoon; Gatewood, Marcha L.

    2013-01-01

    Using insertional mutagenesis, we have disrupted the RNase III gene, rnc, of the actinomycin-producing streptomycete, Streptomyces antibioticus. Disruption was verified by Southern blotting. The resulting strain grows more vigorously than its parent on actinomycin production medium but produces significantly lower levels of actinomycin. Complementation of the rnc disruption with the wild-type rnc gene from S. antibioticus restored actinomycin production to nearly wild-type levels. Western blotting experiments demonstrated that the disruptant did not produce full-length or truncated forms of RNase III. Thus, as is the case in Streptomyces coelicolor, RNase III is required for antibiotic production in S. antibioticus. No differences in the chemical half-lives of bulk mRNA were observed in a comparison of the S. antibioticus rnc mutant and its parental strain. PMID:23956389

  7. Antagonistic Effect of Streptomyces sp. BS062 against Botrytis Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Sook; Lee, In-Kyoung; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2015-09-01

    The use of microorganisms and their secreted molecules to prevent plant diseases is considered an attractive alternative and way to supplement synthetic fungicides for the management of plant diseases. Strain BS062 was selected based on its ability to inhibit the mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea, a major causal fungus of postharvest root rot of ginseng and strawberry gray mold disease. Strain BS062 was found to be closely related to Streptomyces hygroscopicus (99% similarity) on the basis of 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. Postharvest root rot of ginseng and strawberry gray mold disease caused by B. cinerea were controlled up to 73.9% and 58%, respectively, upon treatment with culture broth of Streptomyces sp. BS062. These results suggest that strain BS062 may be a potential agent for controlling ginseng postharvest root rot and strawberry gray mold disease.

  8. Purification and Characterization of Streptomyces sp. IK Chitinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Margino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces sp. IK isolated from compost inoculants, could produce extra cellular chitinase in a medium containing 0.2% (w/v colloidal chitin, fermented for 96 hours at 30oC. The enzyme was purified by a combination of ammonium sulphate precipitation and DEAE-Cellulose anion-exchange chromatography. On SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis, the purified enzyme showed a mass of 71 kDa. Chitinase was optimally active at pH of 6.7 and at 37oC. Km value and Vmax of the protein for colloidal chitin were 2.92 mg/ml and 4.26 ìg/h, respectively.Key words : chitinase, Streptomyces, purification, characterization

  9. Streptomyces as host for recombinant production of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallin, Carlos; Ramos, Astrid; Pimienta, Elsa; Rodríguez, Caridad; Hernández, Tairí; Hernández, Ivones; Del Sol, Ricardo; Rosabal, Grisel; Van Mellaert, Lieve; Anné, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    The 45/47 kDa APA protein (Rv1860) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was produced by Streptomyces lividans. The recombinant protein could be recovered from the culture medium of an S. lividans clone containing the apa gene under control of the promoter and signal sequence of the Streptomyces coelicolor agarase gene. The recombinant protein production was further scaled-up using fermentation conditions. The APA protein was subsequently purified from the culture supernatant by means of immunochromatography. About 80 mg of recombinant protein were obtained per liter of culture media. In vivo tests with the APA protein purified from S. lividans TK24/pRGAPA1 revealed that the recombinant protein was antigenic and could induce high titers of specific antibodies in the mouse biological model. Results obtained concerning heterologous production of APA, its immunogenic and antigenic capacity, demonstrated the potential of S. lividans as a valuable host for the production of recombinant proteins from M. tuberculosis.

  10. Secretion of human interferon alpha 2b by Streptomyces lividans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimienta, E; Fando, R; Sánchez, J C; Vallin, C

    2002-02-01

    Biologically active human interferon alpha 2b (HuIFNalpha-2b) was secreted into the culture medium by Streptomyces lividans transformed with recombinant plasmids coding for HuIFNalpha-2b fused to the Streptomyces exfoliatus M11 lipase A signal sequence. Levels were low, 15 or 100 ng/ml, depending on the plasmid used. Neither processed nor unprocessed HuIFNalpha-2b was detected in cell lysates of the transformants secreting the recombinant product. However, the secreted recombinant product was found to partially degrade when cultures reached the stationary phase by the action of an, as yet, unidentified mycelium-associated factor. Experimental evidence suggests that the degrading factor is related to mycelium-associated proteolytic activity.

  11. Challenges in the Heterologous Production of Antibiotics in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekiesch, Paulina; Basitta, Patrick; Apel, Alexander K

    2016-08-01

    The fast growing genome databases provide us with a large number of so far unknown secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters. A key method to study these gene clusters is their heterologous expression in an engineered host strain. Gene clusters derived from actinomycetes are usually expressed in a Streptomyces host strain to identify and investigate the corresponding compounds. However, heterologous expression is often accompanied with some challenges affecting the production rates of secondary metabolites. The first step is therefore the selection of a suitable expression vector and host strain. Once production has been established, there are several possibilities to improve compound yields either by media screens, by overexpression of regulatory or transport genes or by introduction of constitutive or inducible promoters. A surely important, but hitherto little studied factor is also the regulation of a heterologously expressed gene cluster by its host strain. This review gives a short overview on the chances and challenges provided by heterologous production of secondary metabolites in Streptomyces.

  12. BIOCHEMICAL, NUTRIENT AND INHIBITORY CHARACTERISTICS OF STREPTOMYCES CULTURED FROM A HYPERSALINE ESTUARY, THE LAGUNA MADRE (TEXAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Espinoza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces are common soil bacteria that produce secondary metabolites, including several antibiotics; however, the characteristics of marine Streptomyces are largely unknown. Sediment samples were taken from 3 sites in the Laguna Madre to isolate marine Streptomyces. Sediment was diluted, spread onto synthetic seawater media to estimate the total bacterial density of the samples and spread onto starch casein agar to isolate Streptomyces. Isolated Streptomyces were tested for salinity tolerance and optimal growth pH. Isolates were assayed using API 20E® test strips and BIOLOG™ plates to construct biochemical profiles and assess nutrient utilization abilities of the bacteria, respectively. Individual Streptomyces were tested for the ability to inhibit the growth of other isolated Streptomyces (i.e., interference competition and putatively identified by DNA sequencing. Results showed that there was no significant difference in microbial density in sediments from the 3 sampling sites. Eleven (11 Streptomyces pure cultures were obtained in total; most tolerated salinity up to 60 ppt and grew optimally at pH 7.5. Biochemical profile comparisons showed that the Streptomyces were only at least 74% similar; most (8/11 were >90% similar. Isolates could use between 87-95 carbon sources. Three (3 isolates displayed interference toward other isolates. Ten (10 isolates were identified as Streptomyces griseus by DNA sequencing. Laguna Madre Streptomyces organisms display some diverse characteristics with regards to their halotolerance, biochemical profiles, carbon source utilization and inhibition toward other organisms. Further investigations may yield greater understanding of these organisms in this and other marine environments and may be a reservoir of novel microorganisms and secondary metabolites.

  13. Characterization of an α-L-Rhamnosidase from Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Hitomi; Fujimoto, Zui; Kaneko, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    The putative α-L-rhamnosidase gene from Streptomyces avermitilis was cloned and expressed. The recombinant enzyme released L-rhamnose from p-nitrophenyl α-L-rhamnoside, Citrus flavonoids such as naringin, rutin, and hesperidin, and gum arabic which is an arabinogalactan-protein. Calcium ions increased L-rhamnose production by the enzyme from gum arabic, whereas enzyme activity was not affected by any metal ions.

  14. [Advances of genome and secondary metabolism in Streptomyces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue-Chang; Miao, Ke-Pai; Qian, Kai-Xian

    2005-11-01

    Streptomycetes are Gram-positive, soil-inhabiting bacteria of Actinomycetales. These organisms exhibit complex life cycle and secondary metabolic pathways, and produce many economically important secondary metabolites. This review presented recent progress in Streptomycetes chromosome structure,genomics and the research of secondary metabolic pathway in Streptomyces. As more genomic sequences become available, it wiil be greatly facilitated to elucidate metabolic and regulatory networks and gain the over-production of desired metabolites or create the novel production of commercially important compounds.

  15. Crp Is a Global Regulator of Antibiotic Production in Streptomyces

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Chan; Hindra,; Mulder, David; Yin, Charles; Elliot, Marie A.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic AMP receptor protein (Crp) is a transcription regulator controlling diverse cellular processes in many bacteria. In Streptomyces coelicolor, it is well established that Crp plays a critical role in spore germination and colony development. Here, we demonstrate that Crp is a key regulator of secondary metabolism and antibiotic production in S. coelicolor and show that it may additionally coordinate precursor flux from primary to secondary metabolism. We found that crp deletion ...

  16. Testing of the new Streptomyces strains for production of phenoloxidases

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    Claudia POPA (UNGUREANU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thirty wild new strains of filamentous bacteria belonging to the genus Streptomyces isolated from different Romanian soil samples and ten strains from Collection of microorganisms of Bioaliment Research Platform (acronym MIUG were tested and screened for their ability to produce extracellular tyrosinase and laccase. Based on preliminary qualitative screening assays for the extracellular phenoloxidases production carried out by stationary cultivation on Gause agar medium (GMA supplemented with 1% (w/w L-tyrosine, nineteen strains were selected as active producers. Furthermore, a quantitative selection based on active strains ability to produce tyrosinase and laccase by submerged cultivation in liquid Gause salts basal medium supplemented with 1 g L-1 L-tyrosine and 0.001 g L-1 CuSO4, during 168 hours was performed. Results showed that 70% of the Streptomyces strains have a good potential for producing tyrosinase and 30% of strains were remarked for their ability to produce laccase. Moreover, it was observed that, Streptomyces strains coded MIUG 4.89 and MIUG 4.88 from MIUG Collection have the ability to simultaneously produce both enzymes. The effect of temperature and pH on enzymes activity was also investigated. The optimum temperature for both activity (tyrosinase and laccase was found to be 30°C. Laccase was found active over a pH range of 4.0 to 6.0 with maximum activity at pH 5.0. The optimum pH for tyrosinases activity was observed to be around 7.0. The obtained results are important for future applications of Streptomyces phenoloxidases in different areas.

  17. Genome-wide inference of regulatory networks in Streptomyces coelicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takano Eriko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The onset of antibiotics production in Streptomyces species is co-ordinated with differentiation events. An understanding of the genetic circuits that regulate these coupled biological phenomena is essential to discover and engineer the pharmacologically important natural products made by these species. The availability of genomic tools and access to a large warehouse of transcriptome data for the model organism, Streptomyces coelicolor, provides incentive to decipher the intricacies of the regulatory cascades and develop biologically meaningful hypotheses. Results In this study, more than 500 samples of genome-wide temporal transcriptome data, comprising wild-type and more than 25 regulatory gene mutants of Streptomyces coelicolor probed across multiple stress and medium conditions, were investigated. Information based on transcript and functional similarity was used to update a previously-predicted whole-genome operon map and further applied to predict transcriptional networks constituting modules enriched in diverse functions such as secondary metabolism, and sigma factor. The predicted network displays a scale-free architecture with a small-world property observed in many biological networks. The networks were further investigated to identify functionally-relevant modules that exhibit functional coherence and a consensus motif in the promoter elements indicative of DNA-binding elements. Conclusions Despite the enormous experimental as well as computational challenges, a systems approach for integrating diverse genome-scale datasets to elucidate complex regulatory networks is beginning to emerge. We present an integrated analysis of transcriptome data and genomic features to refine a whole-genome operon map and to construct regulatory networks at the cistron level in Streptomyces coelicolor. The functionally-relevant modules identified in this study pose as potential targets for further studies and verification.

  18. Bandunamide, a Novel Cyclopeptide from the Streptomyces Griseovariabilis bandungensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Shan TIAN; Shuang Da XIE; Xue Bing JIANG; Xiao Mao ZHOU; Li Mei YANG; Ding Jun XIAO

    2003-01-01

    A new cyclic octapeptide, bandunamide, was isolated from the acetone extracts of streptomyces griseovariabilis bandungensis. This cyclic octapeptide exhibits strong antimicrobial activity against Phytophthora drechsleri (IC50=15 ng/mL), Colletotrchum higginsiannum (IC50=15.6 ng/mL), Piricularia oxyzae (IC50=0.2 (g/mL), and Fusarium oxysporum f. Sp. (IC50=100 (g/mL). The structure elucidation of bandunamide is herein reported.

  19. Structural and functional characterization of the alanine racemase from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassoni, Raffaella; van der Aart, Lizah T; Ubbink, Marcellus; van Wezel, Gilles P; Pannu, Navraj S

    2017-01-29

    The conversion of l-alanine (L-Ala) into d-alanine (D-Ala) in bacteria is performed by pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzymes called alanine racemases. D-Ala is an essential component of the bacterial peptidoglycan and hence required for survival. The Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor has at least one alanine racemase encoded by alr. Here, we describe an alr deletion mutant of S. coelicolor which depends on D-Ala for growth and shows increased sensitivity to the antibiotic d-cycloserine (DCS). The crystal structure of the alanine racemase (Alr) was solved with and without the inhibitors DCS or propionate, at 1.64 Å and 1.51 Å resolution, respectively. The crystal structures revealed that Alr is a homodimer with residues from both monomers contributing to the active site. The dimeric state of the enzyme in solution was confirmed by gel filtration chromatography, with and without L-Ala or d-cycloserine. The activity of the enzyme was 66 ± 3 U mg(-1) for the racemization of L- to D-Ala, and 104 ± 7 U mg(-1) for the opposite direction. Comparison of Alr from S. coelicolor with orthologous enzymes from other bacteria, including the closely related d-cycloserine-resistant Alr from S. lavendulae, strongly suggests that structural features such as the hinge angle or the surface area between the monomers do not contribute to d-cycloserine resistance, and the molecular basis for resistance therefore remains elusive.

  20. Intracellular Metabolite Pool Changes in Response to Nutrient Depletion Induced Metabolic Switching in Streptomyces coelicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Wentzel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A metabolite profiling study of the antibiotic producing bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2 has been performed. The aim of this study was to monitor intracellular metabolite pool changes occurring as strains of S. coelicolor react to nutrient depletion with metabolic re-modeling, so-called metabolic switching, and transition from growth to secondary metabolite production phase. Two different culture media were applied, providing depletion of the key nutrients phosphate and L-glutamate, respectively, as the triggers for metabolic switching. Targeted GC-MS and LC-MS methods were employed to quantify important primary metabolite groups like amino acids, organic acids, sugar phosphates and other phosphorylated metabolites, and nucleotides in time-course samples withdrawn from fully-controlled batch fermentations. A general decline, starting already in the early growth phase, was observed for nucleotide pools and phosphorylated metabolite pools for both the phosphate and glutamate limited cultures. The change in amino acid and organic acid pools were more scattered, especially in the phosphate limited situation while a general decrease in amino acid and non-amino organic acid pools was observed in the L-glutamate limited situation. A phoP deletion mutant showed basically the same metabolite pool changes as the wild-type strain M145 when cultivated on phosphate limited medium. This implies that the inactivation of the phoP gene has only little effect on the detected metabolite levels in the cell. The energy charge was found to be relatively constant during growth, transition and secondary metabolite production phase. The results of this study and the employed targeted metabolite profiling methodology are directly relevant for the evaluation of precursor metabolite and energy supply for both natural and heterologous production of secondary metabolites in S. coelicolor.

  1. Extracellular complementation and the identification of additional genes involved in aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodwell, J R; Yang, M; Kuo, D; Losick, R

    1999-02-01

    Morphogenesis in the bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor involves the formation of a lawn of hair-like aerial hyphae on the colony surface that stands up in the air and differentiates into chains of spores. bld mutants are defective in the formation of this aerial mycelium and grow as smooth, hairless colonies. When certain pairs of bld mutants are grown close to one another on rich sporulation medium, they exhibit extracellular complementation such that one mutant restores aerial mycelium formation to the other. The extracellular complementation relationships of most of the previously isolated bld mutants placed them in a hierarchy of extracellular complementation groups. We have screened for further bld mutants with precautions intended to maximize the discovery of additional genes. Most of the 50 newly isolated mutant strains occupy one of three of the previously described positions in the hierarchy, behaving like bldK, bldC, or bldD mutants. We show that the mutations in some of the strains that behave like bldK are bldK alleles but that others fall in a cluster at a position on the chromosome distinct from that of any known bld gene. We name this locus bldL. By introducing cloned genes into the strains that exhibit bldC or bldD-like extracellular complementation phenotypes, we show that most of these strains are likely to contain mutations in genes other than bldC or bldD. These results indicate that the genetic control of aerial mycelium formation is more complex than previously recognized and support the idea that a high proportion of bld genes are directly or indirectly involved in the production of substances that are exchanged between cells during morphological differentiation.

  2. Novel extracellular PHB depolymerase from Streptomyces ascomycinicus: PHB copolymers degradation in acidic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier García-Hidalgo

    Full Text Available The ascomycin-producer strain Streptomyces ascomycinicus has been proven to be an extracellular poly(R-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB degrader. The fkbU gene, encoding a PHB depolymerase (PhaZ Sa , has been cloned in E. coli and Rhodococcus sp. T104 strains for gene expression. Gram-positive host Rhodococcus sp. T104 was able to produce and secrete to the extracellular medium an active protein form. PhaZ Sa was purified by two hydrophobic interaction chromatographic steps, and afterwards was biochemically as well as structurally characterized. The enzyme was found to be a monomer with a molecular mass of 48.4 kDa, and displayed highest activity at 45°C and pH 6, thus being the first PHB depolymerase from a gram-positive bacterium presenting an acidic pH optimum. The PHB depolymerase activity of PhaZ Sa was increased in the presence of divalent cations due to non-essential activation, and also in the presence of methyl-β-cyclodextrin and PEG 3350. Protein structure was analyzed, revealing a globular shape with an alpha-beta hydrolase fold. The amino acids comprising the catalytic triad, Ser(131-Asp(209-His(269, were identified by multiple sequence alignment, chemical modification of amino acids and site-directed mutagenesis. These structural results supported the proposal of a three-dimensional model for this depolymerase. PhaZ Sa was able to degrade PHB, but also demonstrated its ability to degrade films made of PHB, PHBV copolymers and a blend of PHB and starch (7∶3 proportion wt/wt. The features shown by PhaZ Sa make it an interesting candidate for industrial applications involving PHB degradation.

  3. 40 CFR 180.1120 - Streptomyces sp. strain K61; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Streptomyces sp. strain K61; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1120 Streptomyces sp. strain K61; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. The biological pesticide Streptomyces sp. strain K61 is exempted from the...

  4. 76 FR 20666 - Streptomyces Strain K61, and Wood Oils and Gums; Registration Review Final Decisions; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... AGENCY Streptomyces Strain K61, and Wood Oils and Gums; Registration Review Final Decisions; Notice of..., name and number No. telephone number, e- mail address Streptomyces Strain K61 Case EPA-HQ-OPP-2009-0509... Sadaf Shaukat, (703) Case No.: 3150 347-8670, shaukat.sadaf@epa.gov . 1. Streptomyces Strain K61...

  5. STREPTOMYCES SPECIES COMPRISING THE BLUE-SPORE SERIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TREJO, W H; BENNETT, R E

    1963-03-01

    Trejo, W. H. (Squibb Institute for Medical Research, New Brunswick, N.J.) and R. E. Bennett. Streptomyces species comprising the blue-spore series. J. Bacteriol. 85:676-690. 1963.-The objective of this study was to define and delimit the streptomycetes of the blue-spored (Viridochromogenes) series. The series, as defined in this study, includes 11 blue and blue-green species. The green-spored species were excluded on the basis of morphology as well as color. It was proposed that NRRL B-1511 be designated as the neotype strain of Streptomyces viridochromogenes (Krainsky) Waksman and Henrici, and that IMRU 3761 be designated as the neotype for Streptomyces cyaneus (Krassilnikov) Waksman. Evidence was presented to show that physiological criteria cannot be used to differentiate these organisms below the series level. The major characteristics of the Viridochromogenes series are blue to blue-green spores borne in spirals, and chromogenicity (melanin-positive). Reverse color and spore morphology provide a basis for separation below the series level.

  6. The Cytotoxic Constituents from Marine-derived Streptomyces 3320#

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The present work studies the chemical constituents from marine-derived streptomyces 3320# and their antitumor activities. The n-BuOH extract of the ferment broth of 3320# was chromatographed on silica gel, Sephadex LH-20, ODS columns and HPLC to separate the compounds with antitoumor activities. Their structures were identified using IR, UV, NMR, MS spectroscopic techniques and compared with published data. The antitumor activities of the isolates were assayed using SRB method and flow cytometry assay, accompanied with the morphological observation of the cells under light microscope against mammalian tsFT210 cells. Ten compounds, cyclo-(Ala-Leu) 1, cyclo-(Ala-Ile) 2, cyclo-(Ala-Val) 3, cyclo-(Phe- Pro) 4, cyclo-(Phe-Gly) 5, cyclo-(Leu-Pro) 6, 1-methyl-1, 2, 3, 4-tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carboxylic acid 7, N-(4-hydroxyphenethyl) acetamide 8, 4-methyoxy-1-(2-hydroxy) ethylbenzene 9 and uridine 10, were isolated from the ferment broth of streptomyces 3320#. Among them, compounds 6, 7, 8 and 10 showed potent cytotoxicity against the tsFT210 cell with the IC50 values of 3 . 6, 7 . 2, 5 . 2 and 1 . 6 mmol L - 1, respectively. Compounds 8, 10 also exhibited apoptosis inducing activity under 2 . 0 mmol L - 1. Compounds 6, 7, 8 and 10 are the principle bioactive constituents responsible for the antitumor activities of marine streptomyces 3320# . Compound 7 was isolated from this species for the first time.

  7. Growth-rate periodicity of Streptomyces levoris during space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, T. D.; Brower, M. E.; Taylor, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    Streptomyces levoris provides a suitable biological test system to investigate the effects of space flight on the rhythms of vegetative and spore phase characteristics of both growth-rate periodicity and culture morphology during the pre-, in-, and post-flight periods of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. The objectives of the American participation were to study the effects of space flight on the biorhythms of Streptomyces levoris based on a comparison of the growth-rate periodicity of the vegetative and spore phase within each culture, to examine the possible alteration of spore morphology and development by SEM, and to compare the effects of a 12-hr phase shift on the periodic growth characteristics of this microorganism in cultures which were exchanged during the joint activities of the space flight. No uniform differences in the biorhythm of Streptomyces levoris during space flight were observed. It appears that the single most variable factor related to the experiment was the lack of temperature control for the space-flight specimens.

  8. Streptomyces strains producing mitochondriotoxic antimycin A found in cereal grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasimus-Sahari, Stiina; Mikkola, Raimo; Andersson, Maria A; Jestoi, Marika; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2016-02-02

    Reasons for mammalian cell toxicity observed in barley and spring wheat grains were sought. Streptomyces sp. isolates from wheat and barley produced heat-stable methanol-soluble substances which inhibited the motility of exposed porcine spermatozoa used as a toxicity indicator. Several barley isolates produced antimycin A (2 to 5 ng/mg wet wt of biomass), a macrolide antibiotic known to block oxygen utilization in mitochondria. The antimycin-producing isolates were members of the Streptomyces albidoflavus group. In in vitro assays with porcine kidney tubular epithelial cells, the specific toxicity of antimycin A towards mitochondria was higher than that of the mycotoxin enniatin B but lower than that of the mitochondriotoxins cereulide and paenilide, produced by food-related Bacillus cereus and Paenibacillus tundrae, respectively. The toxic wheat isolates, related to Streptomyces sedi, did not produce antimycin A and or any other known toxin. Our results suggest that the presence of toxin-producing streptomycetes in stored cereal grains may pose a thus far unrecognized threat for food and feed safety.

  9. Genetics and chemistry of lignin degradation by Streptomyces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Our research goal was to define the involvement of lignin peroxidases and other extracellular enzymes in lignin degradation by Streptomyces. We examined the biochemistry and genetics of lignin degrading enzyme production by several strains of Streptomyces. The lignin peroxidase ALiP-P3 of S. viridosporus was characterized kinetically and its activity optimized for oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol and vanillyl-acetone. Sensitive spectrophotometric assays were developed for monitoring oxidation of these substrates. ALiP-P3 reaction chemistry was examined using both spectrophotometric assays and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Results showed that the enzyme oxidizes phenolic lignin substructure models in strong preference to nonphenolic ones. The peroxidase was also shown to depolymerize native lignin. We also cloned the ALip-P3 gene S. lividans in plasmid vector pIJ702. The cloned gene was partially sequenced, We also immunologically characterized the lignin peroxidase of S. viridosporus T7A and showed it to be structurally related to peroxidases produced by other lignin-solubilizing Streptomyces, but not the the H8 lignin peroxidase of P. chrysosporium. Studies with peroxidase deficient mutants of strain T7A showed that lignin peroxidases of S. viridosporus are directly involved in the solubilization of lignin. Additional research showed that other enzymes are also probably involved in lignin solubilization, possibly including extracellular esterases.

  10. The Roles of T Helper 1, T Helper 17 and Regulatory T Cells in the Pathogenesis of Sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Mortaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disorder of unidentified etiology, with a heterogeneous clinical presentation. It is characterized by a reduced delayed-type hypersensitivity to tuberculin and common antigens. The balance between Th1, Th17 and Regulatory T(Treg cells controls T-cell proliferation and activation.The Th17/Treg ratio in the peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluidis increased in patients with active sarcoidosis. Amplified IL-17A expression in granulomas and the presence of IL-17A+, IL-17A+IL-4+ and IL-17A+IFN-γ+ memory T helper cells in the circulation and BAL indicate Th17 cell involvement in granuloma induction and/or maintenance in sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis should therefore be considered as a Th1/Th17 multisystem disorder and anti-IL-17/Th17 approaches that control and reduce IL-17Amay be an option, therefore, for the treatment of sarcoidosis.Here we provide a short overview as to the role of Th17 cells as critical cells in the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis.

  11. Anti-Aspergillus human host defence relies on type 1 T helper (Th1), rather than type 17 T helper (Th17), cellular immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.Y.A. Chai (Louis); F. van de Veerdonk (Frank); R.J. Marijnissen (Renoud); S.C. Cheng; A.L. Khoo; M. Hectors (Magda); K. Lagrou (Katrien); A.G. Vonk (Alieke); J. Maertens (Johan); L.A.B. Joosten (Leo); B.J. Kullberg (Bart Jan); M.G. Netea (Mihai)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractSummary Both interferon-γ-producing type 1 T helper (Th1)- and interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing Th17 cells have been proposed to be involved in anti-fungal host defence. Although invasive aspergillosis is one of the most severe human fungal infections, little is known regarding the relat

  12. Anti-Aspergillus human host defence relies on type 1 T helper (Th1), rather than type 17 T helper (Th17), cellular immunity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chai, L.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Marijnissen, R.J.; Cheng, S.C.; Khoo, A.L.; Hectors, M.P.C.; Lagrou, K.; Vonk, A.G.; Maertens, J.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Both interferon-gamma-producing type 1 T helper (Th1)- and interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing Th17 cells have been proposed to be involved in anti-fungal host defence. Although invasive aspergillosis is one of the most severe human fungal infections, little is known regarding the relative importance o

  13. The genomes of the non-clearing-zone-forming and natural-rubber- degrading species Gordonia polyisoprenivorans and Gordonia westfalica harbor genes expressing Lcp activity in Streptomyces strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Daniel; Dietz, David; Arenskötter, Matthias; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2008-04-01

    The latex-clearing protein (Lcp(K30)) from the rubber-degrading bacterium Streptomyces sp. strain K30 is involved in the cleavage of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene), yielding isoprenoid aldehydes and ketones. Lcp homologues have so far been detected in all investigated clearing-zone-forming rubber-degrading bacteria. Internal degenerated oligonucleotides derived from lcp genes of Streptomyces sp. strain K30 (lcp(K30)), Streptomyces coelicolor strain A3(2), and Nocardia farcinica strains IFM10152 and E1 were applied in PCR to investigate whether lcp homologues occur also in the non-clearing-zone-forming rubber-utilizing bacteria Gordonia polyisoprenivorans strains VH2 and Y2K, Gordonia alkanivorans strain 44187, and Gordonia westfalica strain Kb1, which grow adhesively on rubber. The 1,230- and 1,224-bp lcp-homologous genes from G. polyisoprenivorans strain VH2 (lcp(VH2)) and G. westfalica strain Kb1 (lcp(Kb1)) were obtained after screening genomic libraries by degenerated PCR amplification, and their translational products exhibited 50 and 52% amino acid identity, respectively, to Lcp(K30). Recombinant lcp(VH2) and lcp(Kb1) harboring cells of the non-rubber-degrading Streptomyces lividans strain TK23 were able to form clearing zones and aldehydes on latex overlay-agar plates, thus indicating that lcp(VH2) and lcp(Kb1) encode functionally active proteins. Analysis by gel permeation chromatography demonstrated lower polymer concentrations and molecular weights of the remaining polyisoprenoid molecules after incubation with these recombinant S. lividans strains. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis demonstrated that lcp(VH2) was transcribed in cells of G. polyisoprenivorans strain VH2 cultivated in the presence of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) but not in the presence of sodium acetate. Anti-Lcp(K30) immunoglobulin Gs, which were raised in this study, were rather specific for Lcp(K30) and did not cross-react with Lcp(VH2) and Lcp(Kb1). A lcp(VH2) disruption mutant was still able to grow

  14. Construction and shuttling of novel bifunctional vectors for Streptomyces spp. and Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Neesen, K; Volckaert, G.

    1989-01-01

    Shuttle vectors for gene transfer between Streptomyces spp. and Escherichia coli have been constructed by fusion of an artificial multicopy E. coli replicon and DNA fragments of pIJ702. Stable transfer to Streptomyces lividans was obtained. Marked differences in transformation efficiency were observed when plasmid DNA isolated from E. coli GM119 was used instead of that from strain HB101.

  15. Streptomyces effect on the bacterial microbiota associated to Crassostrea sikamea oyster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Bernal, M; Trabal Fernández, N; Saucedo Lastra, P E; Medina Marrero, R; Mazón-Suástegui, J M

    2017-03-01

    To determine the composition and diversity of the microbiota associated to Crassostrea sikamea treated during 30 days with Streptomyces strains N7 and RL8. DNA was extracted from oysters followed by 16S rRNA gene amplification and pyrosequencing. The highest and lowest species diversity richness was observed in the initial and final control group, whereas Streptomyces-treated oysters exhibited intermediate values. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum (81·4-95·1%), followed by Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. The genera Anderseniella, Oceanicola, Roseovarius, Ruegeria, Sulfitobacter, Granulosicoccus and Marinicella encompassed the core microbiota of all experimental groups. The genus Bacteriovorax was detected in all groups except in the final control and the depurated N7, whereas Vibrio remained undetected in all Streptomyces-treated groups. RL8 was the only group that harboured the genus Streptomyces in its microbiota. Principal component analysis showed that Streptomyces strains significantly changed oyster microbiota with respect to the initial and final control. Crassostrea sikamea treated with Streptomyces showed high species diversity and a microbiota composition shift, characterized by keeping the predator genus Bacteriovorax and decreasing the pathogenic Vibrio. This is the first culture-independent study showing the effect of Streptomyces over the oyster microbiota. It also sheds light about the potential use of Streptomyces to improve mollusc health and safety for consumers after the depuration process. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Self-resistance in Streptomyces, with Special Reference to β-Lactam Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Ogawara

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is one of the most serious public health problems. Among bacterial resistance, β-lactam antibiotic resistance is the most prevailing and threatening area. Antibiotic resistance is thought to originate in antibiotic-producing bacteria such as Streptomyces. In this review, β-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs in Streptomyces are explored mainly by phylogenetic analyses from the viewpoint of self-resistance. Although PBPs are more important than β-lactamases in self-resistance, phylogenetically diverse β-lactamases exist in Streptomyces. While class A β-lactamases are mostly detected in their enzyme activity, over two to five times more classes B and C β-lactamase genes are identified at the whole genomic level. These genes can subsequently be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. As for PBPs, two pairs of low affinity PBPs protect Streptomyces from the attack of self-producing and other environmental β-lactam antibiotics. PBPs with PASTA domains are detectable only in class A PBPs in Actinobacteria with the exception of Streptomyces. None of the Streptomyces has PBPs with PASTA domains. However, one of class B PBPs without PASTA domain and a serine/threonine protein kinase with four PASTA domains are located in adjacent positions in most Streptomyces. These class B type PBPs are involved in the spore wall synthesizing complex and probably in self-resistance. Lastly, this paper emphasizes that the resistance mechanisms in Streptomyces are very hard to deal with, despite great efforts in finding new antibiotics.

  17. Self-resistance in Streptomyces, with Special Reference to β-Lactam Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawara, Hiroshi

    2016-05-10

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the most serious public health problems. Among bacterial resistance, β-lactam antibiotic resistance is the most prevailing and threatening area. Antibiotic resistance is thought to originate in antibiotic-producing bacteria such as Streptomyces. In this review, β-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in Streptomyces are explored mainly by phylogenetic analyses from the viewpoint of self-resistance. Although PBPs are more important than β-lactamases in self-resistance, phylogenetically diverse β-lactamases exist in Streptomyces. While class A β-lactamases are mostly detected in their enzyme activity, over two to five times more classes B and C β-lactamase genes are identified at the whole genomic level. These genes can subsequently be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. As for PBPs, two pairs of low affinity PBPs protect Streptomyces from the attack of self-producing and other environmental β-lactam antibiotics. PBPs with PASTA domains are detectable only in class A PBPs in Actinobacteria with the exception of Streptomyces. None of the Streptomyces has PBPs with PASTA domains. However, one of class B PBPs without PASTA domain and a serine/threonine protein kinase with four PASTA domains are located in adjacent positions in most Streptomyces. These class B type PBPs are involved in the spore wall synthesizing complex and probably in self-resistance. Lastly, this paper emphasizes that the resistance mechanisms in Streptomyces are very hard to deal with, despite great efforts in finding new antibiotics.

  18. Taxonomic evaluation of Streptomyces albus and related species using multilocus sequence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    In phylogenetic analyses of the genus Streptomyces using 16S rRNA gene sequences, Streptomyces albus subsp. albus NRRL B-1811T formed a cluster with 5 other species having identical or nearly identical 16S rRNA gene sequences. Moreover, the morphological and physiological characteristics of these ot...

  19. Nutrient use preferences among soil Streptomyces suggest greater resource competition in monoculture than polyculture plant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrient use overlap among sympatric Streptomyces populations is correlated with pathogen inhibitory capacity, yet there is little information on either the factors that influence nutrient use overlap among coexisting populations or the diversity of nutrient use among soil Streptomyces. We examined ...

  20. Newly identified helper bacteria stimulate ectomycorrhizal formation in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Jessy L; Weston, David J; Dunkirk, Nora; Pelletier, Dale A; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2014-01-01

    Mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) are known to increase host root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi but the molecular mechanisms and potential tripartite interactions are poorly understood. Through an effort to study Populus microbiome, we isolated 21 Pseudomonas strains from native Populus deltoides roots. These bacterial isolates were characterized and screened for MHB effectiveness on the Populus-Laccaria system. Two additional Pseudomonas strains (i.e., Pf-5 and BBc6R8) from existing collections were included for comparative purposes. We analyzed the effect of co-cultivation of these 23 individual Pseudomonas strains on Laccaria bicolor "S238N" growth rate, mycelial architecture and transcriptional changes. Nineteen of the 23 Pseudomonas strains tested had positive effects on L. bicolor S238N growth, as well as on mycelial architecture, with strains GM41 and GM18 having the most significant effect. Four of seven L. bicolor reporter genes, Tra1, Tectonin2, Gcn5, and Cipc1, thought to be regulated during the interaction with MHB strain BBc6R8, were induced or repressed, while interacting with Pseudomonas strains GM17, GM33, GM41, GM48, Pf-5, and BBc6R8. Strain GM41 promoted the highest roots colonization across three Populus species but most notably in P. deltoides, which is otherwise poorly colonized by L. bicolor. Here we report novel MHB strains isolated from native Populus that improve L. bicolor root colonization on Populus. This tripartite relationship could be exploited for Populus species/genotypes nursery production as a means of improving establishment and survival in marginal lands.

  1. Newly identified helper bacteria stimulate ectomycorrhizal formation in Populus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessy L Labbé

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB are known to increase host root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi but the molecular mechanisms and potential tripartite interactions are poorly understood. Through an effort to study Populus microbiome, we isolated 21 Pseudomonas strains from native Populus deltoides roots. These bacterial isolates were characterized and screened for MHB effectiveness on the Populus-Laccaria system. Two additional Pseudomonas strains (i.e., Pf-5 and BBc6R8 from existing collections were included for comparative purposes. We analyzed the effect of co-cultivation of these 23 individual Pseudomonas strains on Laccaria bicolor ‘S238N’ growth rate, mycelial architecture and transcriptional changes. Nineteen of the 23 Pseudomonas strains tested had positive effects on L. bicolor S238N growth, as well as on mycelial architecture, with strains GM41 and GM18 having the most significant effect. Four of seven L. bicolor reporter genes, Tra1, Tectonin2, Gcn5 and Cipc1, thought to be regulated during the interaction with MHB strain BBc6R8, were induced or repressed, while interacting with Pseudomonas strains GM17, GM33, GM41, GM48, Pf-5 and BBc6R8. Strain GM41 promoted the highest roots colonization across three Populus species but most notably in P. deltoides, which is otherwise poorly colonized by L. bicolor. Here we report novel MHB strains isolated from native Populus that improve L. bicolor root colonization on Populus. This tripartite relationship could be exploited for Populus species/genotypes nursery production as a means of improving establishment and survival in marginal lands.

  2. Plant Community Richness Mediates Inhibitory Interactions and Resource Competition between Streptomyces and Fusarium Populations in the Rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essarioui, Adil; LeBlanc, Nicholas; Kistler, Harold C; Kinkel, Linda L

    2017-07-01

    Plant community characteristics impact rhizosphere Streptomyces nutrient competition and antagonistic capacities. However, the effects of Streptomyces on, and their responses to, coexisting microorganisms as a function of plant host or plant species richness have received little attention. In this work, we characterized antagonistic activities and nutrient use among Streptomyces and Fusarium from the rhizosphere of Andropogon gerardii (Ag) and Lespedeza capitata (Lc) plants growing in communities of 1 (monoculture) or 16 (polyculture) plant species. Streptomyces from monoculture were more antagonistic against Fusarium than those from polyculture. In contrast, Fusarium isolates from polyculture had greater inhibitory capacities against Streptomyces than isolates from monoculture. Although Fusarium isolates had on average greater niche widths, the collection of Streptomyces isolates in total used a greater diversity of nutrients for growth. Plant richness, but not plant host, influenced the potential for resource competition between the two taxa. Fusarium isolates had greater niche overlap with Streptomyces in monoculture than polyculture, suggesting greater potential for Fusarium to competitively challenge Streptomyces in monoculture plant communities. In contrast, Streptomyces had greater niche overlap with Fusarium in polyculture than monoculture, suggesting that Fusarium experiences greater resource competition with Streptomyces in polyculture than monoculture. These patterns of competitive and inhibitory phenotypes among Streptomyces and Fusarium populations are consistent with selection for Fusarium-antagonistic Streptomyces populations in the presence of strong Fusarium resource competition in plant monocultures. Similarly, these results suggest selection for Streptomyces-inhibitory Fusarium populations in the presence of strong Streptomyces resource competition in more diverse plant communities. Thus, landscape-scale variation in plant species richness may be

  3. Cloning and characterization of the gene encoding the PepF endopeptidase from the aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braz Vânia S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The metallopeptidases have a very important role in bacteria, being involved in several processes that rely on protein turnover, such as nutrition, degradation of signal peptides, protein localization and virulence. We have cloned and characterized the gene of the metalloendopeptidase PepF from the aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The gene upstream of pepF (orf1 encodes a conserved hypothetical protein found in Mycobacterium and Streptomyces. pepF is co-transcribed with the gene downstream (orf3, which encodes a protein that belongs to the ABC1 protein kinase family, suggesting that these two proteins may share a common function in the cell. The C. crescentus PepF protein possesses the conserved HEXGH motif present in zinc binding domains of PepF homologs. Disruption of the pepF gene by insertion of a vector sequence did not produced any growth defect, but the mutant strain possesses only 30% of the specific activity of endopeptidases present in the wild type strain. Deletions and point mutations in the regulatory region showed that there are two putative promoter regions, and the operon expression is independent of the transcription regulator CtrA. The results indicate that PepF is not essential for either growth or development of this bacterium using peptides as the sole carbon source, suggesting that other peptidases can be sharing this function.

  4. Zymomonas mobilis: a bacterium for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baratti, J.C.; Bu' Lock, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is a facultative anaerobic gram negative bacterium first isolated in tropical countries from alcoholic beverages like the African palm wine, the Mexican pulque and also as a contaminant of cider (cider sickness) or beer in the European countries. It is one of the few facultative anaerobic bacteria degrading glucose by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway usually found in strictly aerobic microorganisms. Some work was devoted to this bacterium in the 50s and 60s and was reviewed by Swings and De Ley in their classical paper published in 1977. During the 70s there was very little work on the bacterium until 1979 and the first report by the Australian group of P.L. Rogers on the great potentialities of Z. mobilis for ethanol production. At that time the petroleum crisis had led the developed countries to search for alternative fuel from renewable resources. The Australian group clearly demonstrated the advantages of the bacterium compared to the yeasts traditionally used for the alcoholic fermentation. As a result, there was a considerable burst in the Zymomonas literature which started from nearly zero in the late 70s to attain 70 papers published in the field in 1984. In this article, papers published from 1982 to 1986 are reviewed.

  5. Reação de cultivares de batata a Streptomyces scabies, agente causal da sarna comum profunda Reaction of potato cultivars to Streptomyces scabies, causal agent of deep common scab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Herman Fischer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho visou caracterizar quanto a critérios morfológicos e fisiológicos isolados de Streptomyces causadores de sarna comum profunda em batata; avaliar o comportamento de cultivares em relação à doença e a variação na agressividade entre os isolados da bactéria. Os isolados de Streptomyces apresentaram coloração cinza em meio extrato de levedura e malte e cadeias de esporos espiraladas, produzidas sobre um micélio aéreo. Ocorreu produção de melanina em meio de tirosina-ágar e a utilização de oito fontes de carbono recomendadas, propriedades estas que correspondem às descritas para S. scabies. Batatas-semente sadias de seis cultivares foram plantadas em substrato infestado com seis isolados de S. scabies separadamente e as plantas cultivadas em vasos e ambiente aberto. A severidade da doença foi estimada com auxílio de uma escala diagramática e avaliou-se o rendimento de tubérculos (g/planta. As cvs. Mondial e Jaete Bintje foram as mais resistentes à sarna comum com severidade média nos dois experimentos de 10,5% e 14,0%, respectivamente, seguidas por Asterix (17,4%, Ágata (21,8%, Monalisa (23,0% e Cupido (23,3%. A agressividade dos isolados variou quantitativamente, com severidade maior para o isolado M4 (34,7% e menor para o isolado M1 (6,2%. Redução da produção de tubérculos foi verificada na cv. Jaete Bintje, no primeiro experimento, e quando as cultivares foram infectadas pelos isolados A1, M2 e M3, no primeiro experimento, e pelo isolado M4, no segundo experimento.This work aimed to characterize the isolates of Streptomyces, responsible for deep common scab symptoms in potato, according to morphological and physiological criteria; to evaluate the resistance of potato cultivars to the disease and the aggressiveness of bacterium isolates. The Streptomyces isolates presented gray coloration on yeast extract and malt medium and spiral spore chains, produced on aerial hyphae. Production of melanina occurred

  6. Recombination of replicon and helper RNAs and the emergence of propagation-competent vectors upon Sindbis virus vector production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyvärinen, Anna; Yongabi, Felicitas; Mäkinen, Kimmo; Wahlfors, Jarmo; Pellinen, Riikka

    2013-08-01

    Sindbis vectors have shown remarkable antitumor efficacy and tumor-targeting capacity in animal models and hold promise for cancer therapy. Different packaging systems are used to produce propagation-incompetent Sindbis vectors. However, the vectors produced using either DH-BB single helper RNA or split helper RNA can spread in permissive cell cultures. We investigated the mechanisms of vector spreading and show, here, that recombination occurs between the replicon and DH-BB helper RNA, leading to formation of the full-length virus genome. Split helper RNA may not completely prevent wild-type reversion, although the frequency is greatly reduced. Contrary to propagation of Sindbis DH-BB vectors, Sindbis split helper vectors were frequently able to spread without cytopathic effect (CPE), a feature that was linked to wild-type reversion. Our results support the hypothesis that the non-cytopathic local spreading constantly observed with Sindbis split helper vector results from unspecific packaging of helper RNAs into vector particles and co-infection with particles containing replicon and helper RNAs. Several malignant cell lines with defective interferon responses were found to be permissive for non-cytopathic spreading of the Sindbis split helper vector. Interferon-α suppressed the spreading providing a possible option to control the vector.

  7. Streptomyces palmae sp. nov., isolated from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) rhizosphere soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujarit, Kanaporn; Kudo, Takuji; Ohkuma, Moriya; Pathom-Aree, Wasu; Lumyong, Saisamorn

    2016-10-01

    Actinomycete strain CMU-AB204T was isolated from oil palm rhizosphere soil collected in Chiang Mai University (Chiang Mai, Thailand). Based on morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, the organism was considered to belong to the genus Streptomyces. Whole cell-wall hydrolysates consisted of ll-diaminopimelic acid, glucose, ribose and galactose. The predominant menaquinones were MK-9(H4), MK-9(H6), MK-9(H2) and MK-8(H4). The fatty acid profile contained iso-C15 : 0, iso-C16 : 0 and anteiso-C15 : 0 as major components. The principal phospholipids detected were phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol. The DNA G+C content of strain CMU-AB204T was 70.9 mol%. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain CMU-AB204T was closely related to Streptomyces orinoci JCM 4546T (98.7 %), Streptomyces lilacinus NBRC 12884T (98.5 %), Streptomyces abikoensis CGMCC 4.1662T (98.5 %), Streptomyces griseocarneus JCM 4905T (98.4 %) and Streptomyces xinghaiensis JCM 16958T (98.3 %). Phylogenetic trees revealed that the new strain had a distinct taxonomic position from closely related type strains of the genus Streptomyces. Spiny to hairy spores clearly differentiated strain CMU-AB204T from the five most closely related Streptomyces species, which produced smooth spores. On the basis of evidence from this polyphasic study, it is proposed that strain CMU-AB204T represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, namely Streptomyces palmae sp. nov. The type strain is CMU-AB204T (=JCM 31289T=TBRC 1999T).

  8. Distinct T helper cell dependence of memory B-cell proliferation versus plasma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, Franziska; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Vogel, Monique; Johansen, Pål; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2017-03-01

    Several memory B-cell subclasses with distinct functions have been described, of which the most effective is the class-switched (CS) memory B-cell population. We have previously shown, using virus-like particles (VLPs), that the proliferative potential of these CS memory B cells is limited and they fail to re-enter germinal centres (GCs). However, VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into secondary plasma cells (PCs) with the virtue of elevated antibody production compared with primary PCs. Whereas the induction of VLP(+) memory B cells was strongly dependent on T helper cells, we were wondering whether re-stimulation of VLP(+) memory B cells and their differentiation into secondary PCs would also require T helper cells. Global absence of T helper cells led to strongly impaired memory B cell proliferation and PC differentiation. In contrast, lack of interleukin-21 receptor-dependent follicular T helper cells or CD40 ligand signalling strongly affected proliferation of memory B cells, but differentiation into mature secondary PCs exhibiting increased antibody production was essentially normal. This contrasts with primary B-cell responses, where a strong dependence on CD40 ligand but limited importance of interleukin-21 receptor was seen. Hence, T helper cell dependence differs between primary and secondary B-cell responses as well as between memory B-cell proliferation and PC differentiation.

  9. Geosmin biosynthesis in Streptomyces avermitilis. Molecular cloning, expression, and mechanistic study of the germacradienol/geosmin synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cane, David E; He, Xiaofei; Kobayashi, Seiji; Omura, Satoshi; Ikeda, Haruo

    2006-08-01

    Geosmin (1) is responsible for the characteristic odor of moist soil. The Gram-positive soil bacterium Streptomyces avermitilis produces geosmin (1) as well as its precursor germacradienol (3). The S. avermitilis gene SAV2163 (geoA) is extremely similar to the S. coelicolor A3(2) SCO6073 gene that encodes a germacradienol/geosmin synthase. S. avermitilis mutants with a deleted geoA were unable to produce either germacradienol (3) or geosmin (1). Biosynthesis of both compounds was restored by introducing an intact geoA gene into the mutants. Incubation of recombinant GeoA, encoded by the SAV2163 gene of S. avermitilis, with farnesyl diphosphate (2) in the presence of Mg2+ gave a mixture of (4S,7R)-germacra-1(10)E,5E-diene-11-ol (3) (66%), (7S)-germacrene D (4) (24%), geosmin (1) (8%), and a hydrocarbon, tentatively assigned the structure of octalin 5 (2%). Incubation of this germacradienol/geosmin synthase with [1,1-(2)H2] FPP (2a) gave geosmin-d1 (1a), as predicted. When recombinant GeoA from either S. avermitilis or S. coelicolor A3(2) was incubated with nerolidyl diphosphate (8), only the acyclic elimination products beta3-farnesene (10), (Z)-alpha-farnesene (11), and (E)-alpha-farnesene (12) were formed, thereby ruling out nerolidyl diphosphate as an intermediate in the conversion of farnesyl diphosphate to geosmin, germacradienol, and germacrene D.

  10. A sporulation-specific, sigF-dependent protein, SspA, affects septum positioning in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanis, Angelos; Dalton, Kate A; Hesketh, Andrew; den Hengst, Chris D; Buttner, Mark J; Thibessard, Annabelle; Kelemen, Gabriella H

    2014-01-01

    The RNA polymerase sigma factor SigF controls late development during sporulation in the filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. The only known SigF-dependent gene identified so far, SCO5321, is found in the biosynthetic cluster encoding spore pigment synthesis. Here we identify the first direct target for SigF, the gene sspA, encoding a sporulation-specific protein. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that SspA is a secreted lipoprotein with two PepSY signature domains. The sspA deletion mutant exhibits irregular sporulation septation and altered spore shape, suggesting that SspA plays a role in septum formation and spore maturation. The fluorescent translational fusion protein SspA-mCherry localized first to septum sites, then subsequently around the surface of the spores. Both SspA protein and sspA transcription are absent from the sigF null mutant. Moreover, in vitro transcription assay confirmed that RNA polymerase holoenzyme containing SigF is sufficient for initiation of transcription from a single sspA promoter. In addition, in vivo and in vitro experiments showed that sspA is a direct target of BldD, which functions to repress sporulation genes, including whiG, ftsZ and ssgB, during vegetative growth, co-ordinating their expression during sporulation septation.

  11. The figure of the helper advisor in cases of sexual abuse against people with intellectual disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena MARTORELL CAFRANGA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the main barriers that people with intellectual disabilities who have suffered sexual abuse have to face when they access the Justice system. Regarding these barriers, the Victim Support Unit for People with Intellectual Disabilities of the Fundación Carmen Pardo-Valcarce proposes the inclusion in the judicial process of a helper advisor. The entry into force in 2015 of the Law 4/2015, in 27 April, the Statute of the crime victim represents an exemplary opportunity to ensure the incorporation of support proposals involving the insertion of the helper advisor in the judicial process in cases where the victim is a person with intellectual disabilities. In this paper we analyse the impact of the helper advisor, with particular emphasis on cases that have been dismissed under instruction.

  12. Opposite effects of interleukin-4 on memory T helper cell development depend on interleukin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, V; Motta, I; Perret, R; Truffa-Bachi, P

    1996-01-01

    We previously reported that cyclosporin A (CSA) promotes the generation of T helper memory cells during antigenic priming of murine spleen cells in vitro. More recently, we have demonstrated that interleukin-2 (IL2) has a downmodulating effect on T helper memory cell generation. The present data address the role of the other T cell growth factor, IL4, upon induction of these cells. The data presented here show that IL4 can interfere with this process: addition of rIL4 to immunosuppressed priming cultures leads to a considerable decrease in the helper activity of the recovered cells. However, in standard cultures, in which IL2 is normally produced, no effect of IL4 on T helper memory cell generation was found. Addition of IL4 has important consequences for cytokines produced upon antigenic restimulation. In standard cultures, IL4 primes for cells expressing high levels of IL2 and IL4 mRNA. Strikingly, in immunosuppressed priming cultures, IL4 counterbalances the CSA-induced blockade of the IFN gamma gene. Taken together, our results suggest that the unique role of IL4 is to drive T helper memory precursors into an IL4 production differentiation pathway. However, IL4 has a downmodulating effect on memory T helper cell induction when IL2 is not produced. These results confirm that synergy between IL2 and IL4 is mandatory for the directive role of IL4 upon IL4-producing cells. Furthermore, the finding that IL4 promotes the induction of IFN gamma in a CSA-resistant pathway represents a new tool for analysis of regulation of the IFN gamma gene.

  13. [Efficient production of polyketide products in Streptomyces hosts - A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yongpeng; Wang, Weishan; Yang, Keqian

    2016-03-04

    Polyketides represent an important class of structurally and functionally diverse secondary metabolites with high economic value. Among bacteria, Streptomycetes are the main producers of polyketides. To enhance polyketide production in Streptomyces hosts, rational metabolic engineering approaches have been applied, such as overexpressing rate-limiting enzymes, or transcriptional activator, increasing the supply of precursor, removing feedback inhibition by end products and heterologous expression of polyketide biosynthetic gene clusters. In this review, we discuss examples of successful metabolic engineering strategies used to improve polyketide production in Streptomycetes. Meanwhile, we also address future prospective, emerging synthetic biology strategies to dynamically adjust the metabolic fluxes of pathways related to polyketide synthesis.

  14. Cephamycin C biosynthesis in Streptomyces cattleya: nitrogen source regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaoua, S; Lebrihi, A; Germain, P; Lefebvre, G

    1991-05-01

    The production of cephamycin C by Streptomyces cattleya varies with the use of asparagine, glutamine or ammonium as nitrogen sources. Hydroxylase and expandase activities were demonstrated for the first time with this species. A study of the biosynthetic regulation of these enzymes by two different nitrogen sources, glutamine and asparagine, was carried out. Asparagine proved to be a better nitrogen source, both for enzymatic biosynthesis and production of cephamycin C. Moreover, an excess of asparagine in the culture environment provokes, simultaneously, a reduction in cephamycin C production and a decrease in the biosynthesis of expandase and hydroxylase.

  15. Three new amides from Streptomyces sp. H7372

    OpenAIRE

    Cheenpracha, Sarot; Borris,Robert P; Tran,Tammy T.; Jee,Jap Meng; Seow, Heng Fong; Cheah,Hwen-Yee; Ho,Coy Choke; Chang, Leng Chee

    2011-01-01

    Three new amides, methyl phenatate A (1), actiphenamide (2) and actiphenol 1-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), along with thirteen known compounds, were isolated from the organic extract of a fermentation culture of Streptomyces sp. H7372. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques, and MS analyses. Cycloheximide (6) and cyclo(ΔAla-L-Val) (8) gave a clear zone of inhibition of Ras-Raf-1 interaction in the yeast two-hybrid assay which showed hi...

  16. Novel rAAV production system with low contamination of helper virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The Cre-loxP system was introduced in the production of recombinant AAV (rAAV). Defective adenovirus AdLC was used as the helper virus. While doing the mass production of recombinant AAV carrying EGFP or human clotting factor Ⅸ (hFⅨ) gene, the generation of helper virus was significantly limited, it increased the simplicity of rAAV purification. The results from in vivo study demonstrated the superiority of this method. This system provides a novel approach for the application of rAAV system in gene therapy.

  17. BCG stimulated dendritic cells induce an interleukin-10 producing T-cell population with no T helper 1 or T helper 2 bias in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madura Larsen, Jeppe; Benn, Christine Stabell; Fillie, Yvonne;

    2007-01-01

    enhanced IL-10 and diminished IL-12 production. These DCs primed naive T cells to develop into IL-10-producing T cells, with no T helper 1 or T helper 2 bias. These results suggest that BCG vaccination might result in the development of IL-10-producing DCs as well as IL-10-producing T cells that could......Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine has been associated with beneficial effects on overall childhood mortality in low-income countries; this cannot be explained merely by the prevention of tuberculosis (TB) deaths. The beneficial effects of BCG vaccine could be the result...... of either strengthening of pro-inflammatory mechanisms, helping neonates to fight infections, or the induction of an immune-regulatory network restricting overt inflammation and intense pathology. We aimed to study the effect of live BCG on the ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to polarize T-cell responses...

  18. Streptomyces xinjiangensis sp. nov., an actinomycete isolated from Lop Nur region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cong; Li, Yu-Qian; Asem, Mipeshwaree Devi; Lu, Chun-Yan; Shi, Xiao-Han; Chu, Xiao; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Di An, Deng-; Li, Wen-Jun

    2016-10-01

    A novel actinobacterial strain, designated LPA192(T), was isolated from a soil sample collected from Lop Nur, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, Northwest China. A polyphasic approach was used to investigate the taxonomic position of strain LPA192(T). The isolate showed morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics typical of members of the genus Streptomyces. Peptidoglycan was found to contain LL-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. The predominant menaquinones were MK-9(H6) and MK-10(H4). Polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol. Major cellular fatty acids consist of C16:0, anteiso-C15:0 and C18:1 ω9c. The sugar in whole-cell hydrolysates was mannose. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that strain LPA192(T) is closely related to Streptomyces tanashiensis LMG 20274(T) (99.3 %), Streptomyces gulbargensis DAS131(T) (99.3 %), Streptomyces nashvillensis NBRC 13064(T) (99.3 %), Streptomyces roseolus NBRC 12816(T) (99.2 %) and Streptomyces filamentosus NBRC 12767(T) (99.1 %) while showing below 98.5 % sequencing similarities with other validly published Streptomyces species. However, DNA-DNA relatedness values between LPA192(T) and the closely related type strains were below 40 %, which are much lower than 70 % threshold value for species delineation. The genomic DNA G + C content of strain LPA192(T) was 69.3 mol %. Based on the differences in genotypic and phenotypic characteristics from the closely related strains, strain LPA192(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Streptomyces for which the name Streptomyces xinjiangensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LPA192(T) (=KCTC 39601(T) = CGMCC 4.7288(T)).

  19. Streptomyces formicae sp. nov., a novel actinomycete isolated from the head of Camponotus japonicus Mayr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lu; Liu, Chongxi; Guo, Lifeng; Piao, Chenyu; Li, Zhilei; Li, Jiansong; Jia, Feiyu; Wang, Xiangjing; Xiang, Wensheng

    2016-02-01

    During a screening for novel and biotechnologically useful actinobacteria in insects, a novel actinomycete with antifungal activity, designated strain 1H-GS9(T), was isolated from the head of a Camponotus japonicus Mayr ant, which were collected from Northeast Agricultural University (Harbin, Heilongjiang, China). Strain 1H-GS9(T) was characterised using a polyphasic approach. The organism was found to have morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics typical of members of the genus Streptomyces. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity studies showed that strain 1H-GS9(T) belongs to the genus Streptomyces with high sequence similarities to Streptomyces scopuliridis DSM 41917(T) (98.8 %) and Streptomyces mauvecolor JCM 5002(T) (98.6 %). However, phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that it forms a monophyletic clade with Streptomyces kurssanovii JCM 4388(T) (98.6 %), Streptomyces xantholiticus JCM 4282(T) (98.6 %) and Streptomyces peucetius JCM 9920(T) (98.5 %). Thus, a combination of DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and phenotypic tests were carried out between strain 1H-GS9(T) and the above-mentioned five strains, which further clarified their relatedness and demonstrated that strain 1H-GS9(T) could be distinguished from these strains. Therefore, the strain is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces formicae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 1H-GS9(T) (=CGMCC 4.7277(T) = DSM 100524(T)).

  20. Streptomyces bohaiensis sp. nov., a novel actinomycete isolated from Scomberomorus niphonius in the Bohai Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hua-Qi; Cheng, Juan; Zhang, Dao-Feng; Yu, Su-Ya; Khieu, Thi-Nhan; Son, Chu Ky; Jiang, Zhao; Hu, Jiang-Chun; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-04-01

    A novel actinomycete strain, designated 11A07(T), was isolated from young Scomberomorus niphonius in the Bohai Sea. Basic local alignment search tool analyses showed that this isolate had the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 97.41% with Streptomyces rimosus subsp. paromomycinus DSM 41429(T). Phylogenetic tree revealed that strain 11A07(T) formed a distinct lineage clustered with Streptomyces panacagri Gsoil 519(T), Streptomyces sodiiphilus YIM 80305(T) and Streptomyces albus subsp. albus NRRL B-2365(T) having similarities of 97.30%, 97.10% and 96.83%, respectively. Multilocus sequence analysis further demonstrated that the new isolate was different from the selected representatives of Streptomyces as a separate phylogenetic line. Strain 11A07(T) produced straight or rectiflexibile spore chains with smooth surface, white aerial mycelia and brown diffusible pigments on international streptomyces project 2 medium. Maximum tolerated NaCl concentration for growth was 11.0%. Whole-cell sugars were mannose, ribose, glucose, galactose and xylose. The predominant menaquinones were MK-9(H2), MK-9(H4) and MK-9 (H6). The fatty-acid profile contained iso-C16:0, C18:0 10-methyl (tuberculostearic acid) and anteiso-C17:0 as the major compositions. The polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside and an unknown phospholipid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 71.4 mol%. These morphological, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic properties showed that strain 11A07(T) could be readily distinguished from the most closely related members of the genus Streptomyces. Thus, based on the polyphasic taxonomic data, strain 11A07(T) (=JCM 19630(T)=CCTCC AA 2013020(T)=KCTC 29263(T)) represents a novel species within the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces bohaiensis sp. nov. is proposed.

  1. Male and female helper effects on maternal investment and adult survival in red-winged fairy-wrens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lejeune, Léa; van de Pol, Martijn; Cockburn, Andrew; Louter, Marina; Brouwer, Lyanne

    2016-01-01

    Despite its importance for the evolution of cooperative breeding, it has proven difficult to determine whether helpers improve their recipients’ fitness. Helpers affect fitness in multiple ways, both positive and negative, but their effects can also be concealed through reduced maternal investment.

  2. Associations of Warmth and Control of Filipina Domestic Helpers and Mothers to Hong Kong Kindergarten Children's Social Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Hoi Man; Cheung, Sum Kwing; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Chang, Lei

    2008-01-01

    Research Findings: Across 63 Hong Kong families, both Filipina domestic helpers and mothers separately rated their own caregiving style (warmth and control) and kindergarten children's social competence. Results indicated that Filipina helpers rated themselves as higher in warmth than mothers did. In addition, self-rated warmth of both caregivers,…

  3. Potential role of non-antibiotics (helper compounds) in the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Marta; Dastidar, Sujata G; Fanning, Seamus;

    2008-01-01

    that have been shown to be efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) and which, if used as 'helper compounds' in combination with antibiotics to which the organism is initially resistant, may produce the required cure. Although not all of the EPIs may serve a helper role owing to their toxicity, they may nevertheless...... serve as lead compounds....

  4. Lineages of human T-cell clones, including T helper 17/T helper 1 cells, isolated at different stages of anti–factor VIII immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Ettinger, Ruth A.; James, Eddie A.; Kwok, William W.; Arthur R Thompson; Pratt, Kathleen P.

    2009-01-01

    The development of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) after factor VIII (FVIII) infusions is a serious complication that affects approximately one-quarter of hemophilia A patients who have access to replacement therapy. To investigate the differentiation of naive T cells into FVIII-specific helper T cells that promote B-cell activation and antibody secretion, HLA-DRA-DRB1*0101-restricted T-cell clones that respond to a specific epitope in FVIII were isolated from a mild hemophilia A subject...

  5. Amide-transforming activity of Streptomyces: possible application to the formation of hydroxy amides and aminoalcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinya; Miyagawa, Taka-Aki; Yamada, Ren; Shiratori-Takano, Hatsumi; Sayo, Noboru; Saito, Takao; Takano, Hideaki; Beppu, Teruhiko; Ueda, Kenji

    2013-07-01

    To develop an efficient bioconversion process for amides, we screened our collection of Streptomyces strains, mostly obtained from soil, for effective transformers. Five strains, including the SY007 (NBRC 109343) and SY435 (NBRC 109344) of Streptomyces sp., exhibited marked conversion activities from the approximately 700 strains analyzed. These strains transformed diverse amide compounds such as N-acetyltetrahydroquinoline, N-benzoylpyrrolidine, and N-benzoylpiperidine into alcohols or N,O-acetals with high activity and regioselectivity. N,O-acetal was transformed into alcohol by serial tautomerization and reduction reactions. As such, Streptomyces spp. can potentially be used for the efficient preparation of hydroxy amides and aminoalcohols.

  6. A putative transglycosylase encoded by SCO4132 influences morphological differentiation and actinorhodin production in Streptomyces coelicolor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengfei Xie; Ana Zeng; Xiaoting Lv; Qiuxiang Cheng; Zhongjun Qin

    2013-01-01

    Here we report that tgdA,a novel gene encoding a putative transglycosylase,affects both the morphological differentiation and the yield of blue-pigmented compound actinorhodin in Streptomyces coelicolor.The tgdA null mutant displays sparse aerial hyphae and irregular spore chains frequently lacking chromosomal DNA.Elevated actinorhodin production coincides with the overexpression of actⅡ-orf4 in mutant.tgdA expression is temporally and developmentally regulated.The tgdA orthologs in Streptomyces avermilitis and Streptomyces lividans also affect differentiation.

  7. SarA influences the sporulation and secondary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor M145

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xijun Ou; Bo Zhang; Lin Zhang; Kai Dong; Chun Liu; Guoping Zhao; Xiaoming Ding

    2008-01-01

    The filamentous bacteria Streptomyces exhibit a complex life cycle involving morphological differentiation and secondary metabolism. A putative membrane protein gene sarA (sco4069), sporulation and antibiotic production related gene A, was partially characterized in Streptomyces coelicolor M145. The gene product had no characterized functional domains and was highly conserved in Streptomyces. Compared with the wild-type M145, the sarA mutant accelerated sporulation and dramatically decreased the production of actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin.Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that SarA influenced antibiotic production by controlling the abundance of actll-orf4 and redZ messenger RNA.

  8. Predicted Highly Expressed Genes in the Genomes of Streptomyces Coelicolor and Streptomyces Avermitilis and the Implications for their Metabolism.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Gang; Culley, David E.; Zhang, Weiwen

    2005-06-01

    SUMMARY-Highly expressed genes in bacteria often have a stronger codon bias than genes expressed at lower levels. In this study, a comparative analysis of predicted highly expressed (PHX) genes in the Streptomyces coelicolor and S. avermitilis genomes was performed using the codon adaptation index (CAI) as a numerical estimator of gene expression level. Although it has been suggested that there is little heterogeneity in codon usage in G+C rich bacteria, considerable heterogeneity was found among genes in two G+C rich Streptomyces genomes. Using ribosomal protein (RP) genes as references, ~10% of the genes were predicted to be PHX genes using a CAI cutoff value of greater than 0.78 and 0.75 in S. coelicolor and S. avermitilis, respectively. Most of the PHX genes were found to be located within the conserved cores of the Streptomyces linear chromosomes. The predicted PHX genes showed good agreement with the experimental data on expression levels collected by proteomic analysis (Hesketh et al., 2002). Among all PHX genes, 368 were conserved in both genomes. These represented most of the genes essential for cell growth, including those involved in protein and DNA biosynthesis, amino acid metabolism, central intermediary and energy metabolisms. Only a few genes directly involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites were predicted to be PHX genes. Correspondence analysis showed that the genes responsible for biosynthesis of secondary metabolites possessed different codon usage patterns from RP genes, suggesting that they were either under strong translational selection that may have driven the codon preference in another direction, or they were acquired by horizontal transfer during their origin and evolution. Nevertheless, several key genes responsible for producing precursors for secondary metabolites, such as crotonyl-CoA reductase and propionyl-CoA carboxylase, and genes necessary for initiation of secondary metabolism, such as adenosylmethionine synthetase were

  9. ISOLASI STREPTOMYCES SPP. PADA KAWASAN HUTAN PROVINSI BALI SERTA UJI DAYA HAMBATNYA TERHADAP LIMA STRAIN DIARRHEAGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I WAYAN EKA DHARMAWAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An exploration study of natural resources soil bacteria antibiotic-producer, Streptomyces spp. was done in two steps. The first step was isolation of Streptomyces and the second involved testing their inhibition activities against five strains diarrheagenic Escherichia coli. Soil samples were collected from ten forest areas in Bali. As many as 55 isolates were collected with various macroscopic dan microscopic characters. Most isolates (eight Streptomyces isolates were collected from forest area in Penulisan, Kintamani (RTK. 20. The diversities of isolates are influenced by environment condition. All Streptomyces isolated were tested against five strains diarrheagenic Escherichia coli to check antibiotic activity for inhibit growth of E. coli. Streptomycine was used as a control. The result showed that the largest inhibition zones of Streptomyces against E. coli strains EHEC, ETEC, EIEC, EPEC and DAEC were produced by Streptomyces PK5 (48,67 ± 0,58 mm, Streptomyces GAA4 (29,00 ± 2,00 mm, Streptomyces GBK3 (42,67 ± 2,08 mm, Streptomyces SkBB5 (29,00 ± 2,65 mm and Streptomyces GM3 (33,67 ± 3,21 mm respectively.

  10. Transcriptional Reprogramming of Mature CD4+ T helper Cells generates distinct MHC class II-restricted Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucida, Daniel; Husain, Mohammad Mushtaq; Muroi, Sawako; van Wijk, Femke; Shinnakasu, Ryo; Naoe, Yoshinori; Reis, Bernardo Sgarbi; Huang, Yujun; Lambolez, Florence; Docherty, Michael; Attinger, Antoine; Shui, Jr-Wen; Kim, Gisen; Lena, Christopher J.; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Miyamoto, Chizuko; Wang, Peng; Atarashi, Koji; Park, Yunji; Nakayama, Toshinori; Honda, Kenya; Ellmeier, Wilfried; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Cheroutre, Hilde

    2013-01-01

    TCRαβ thymocytes differentiate to either CD8αβ cytotoxic T lymphocytes or CD4+ T helper cells. This functional dichotomy is controlled by key transcription factors, including the T helper master regulator, ThPOK, which suppresses the cytolytic program in MHC class II-restricted CD4+ thymocytes. ThPOK continues to repress CD8-lineage genes in mature CD4+ T cells, even as they differentiate to T helper effector subsets. Here we show that the T helper-fate was not fixed and that mature antigen-stimulated CD4+ T cells could terminate Thpok expression and reactivate CD8-lineage genes. This unexpected plasticity resulted in the post-thymic termination of the T helper-program and the functional differentiation of distinct MHC class II-restricted CD4+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. PMID:23334788

  11. Eosinophilic tracheobronchitis with cough hypersensitivity caused by Streptomyces albus antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhiko Ogawa

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 52-year-old woman is reported with atopic cough, in whom bronchoprovocation with Streptomyces albus antigen induced cough and bronchoscopic biopsy revealed eosinophilic tracheobronchitis. She was admitted for the diagnosis and treatment of severe non-productive cough. Although her induced sputum contained 8% eosinophils of nucleated cells and bronchoscopic biopsy specimens revealed eosinophil infiltration in both tracheal and bronchial wall, she did not have bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine or heightened bronchomotor tone. Bronchodilator therapy was not effective for her coughing. Her symptoms worsened on returning home, suggesting the existence of some etiologic agents in her house. Streptomyces albus was isolated from her house. A high titer of anti-S. albus antibody was detected in her serum and the bronchoprovocation test with S. albus antigen was positive: development of coughing 15 min later and decrease in cough threshold to inhaled capsaicin 24 h later (3.9 μmol/L from 31.3 μmol/L prechallenge. This is the first report on eosinophilic tracheobronchitis with cough hypersensitivity caused by allergic reaction to S. albus antigen.

  12. Isolation and characterization of a temperate bacteriophage from Streptomyces galilaeus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, S P; Lampel, J S; Strohl, W R

    1987-12-01

    A new temperate actinophage from Streptomyces galilaeus ATCC 31133 was purified after that strain was crossed with S. peucetius ATCC 29050. Sensitive hosts became lysogenized and yielded turbid plaques of 2 to 3 mm in diameter. Host-range analysis indicated that 16 of 27 Streptomyces strains tested were sensitive to infection on solid medium. S. lividans and S. coelicolor A3(2) were among those not infected by this new actinophage. The new actinophage, designated phi SPK1, belongs to the Bradley group B morphological type, the pH optimum for infection is 6.75 to 7.0, it is not efficiently induced by mitomycin C or UV irradiation, it has a circular chromosome of 35.8 +/- 0.5 kilobase pairs in length containing overlapping (cohesive) ends, and the G+C content of its DNA was calculated from the buoyant density of 1.7240 to be 69 mol%. The DNA of phage phi SPK1 was cleaved by the restriction endonucleases ApaI, AluII, EcoRI, PvuII, and SalI, but, in all cases except that with EcoRI, treatment yielded greater than 20 restriction fragments. No sites were detected for BamHI, BclI, BglII, ClaI, HindIII, MluI, PstI, SmaI, SphI, SstI, XbaI, or XhoI.

  13. Colonization of lettuce rhizosphere and roots by tagged Streptomyces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eBonaldi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Beneficial microorganisms are increasingly used in agriculture, but their efficacy often fails due to limited knowledge of their interactions with plants and other microorganisms present in rhizosphere. We studied spatio-temporal colonization dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere by genetically modified Streptomyces spp. Five Streptomyces strains, strongly inhibiting in vitro the major soil-borne pathogen of horticultural crops, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, were transformed with pIJ8641 plasmid harboring an enhanced green fluorescent protein marker and resistance to apramycin. The fitness of transformants was compared to the wild-type strains and all of them grew and sporulated at similar rates and retained the production of enzymes and selected secondary metabolites as well as in vitro inhibition of S. sclerotiorum. The tagged ZEA17I strain was selected to study the dynamics of lettuce roots and rhizosphere colonization in non-sterile growth substrate. The transformed strain was able to colonize soil, developing roots and rhizosphere. When the strain was inoculated directly on the growth substrate, significantly more t-ZEA17I was re-isolated both from the rhizosphere and the roots when compared to the amount obtained after seed coating. The re-isolation from the rhizosphere and the inner tissues of surface-sterilized lettuce roots demonstrated that t-ZEA17I is both rhizospheric and endophytic.

  14. Allantoin catabolism influences the production of antibiotics in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navone, Laura; Casati, Paula; Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtémoc; Marcellin, Esteban; Nielsen, Lars K; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Gramajo, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Purines are a primary source of carbon and nitrogen in soil; however, their metabolism is poorly understood in Streptomyces. Using a combination of proteomics, metabolomics, and metabolic engineering, we characterized the allantoin pathway in Streptomyces coelicolor. When cells grew in glucose minimal medium with allantoin as the sole nitrogen source, quantitative proteomics identified 38 enzymes upregulated and 28 downregulated. This allowed identifying six new functional enzymes involved in allantoin metabolism in S. coelicolor. From those, using a combination of biochemical and genetic engineering tools, it was found that allantoinase (EC 3.5.2.5) and allantoicase (EC 3.5.3.4) are essential for allantoin metabolism in S. coelicolor. Metabolomics showed that under these growth conditions, there is a significant intracellular accumulation of urea and amino acids, which eventually results in urea and ammonium release into the culture medium. Antibiotic production of a urease mutant strain showed that the catabolism of allantoin, and the subsequent release of ammonium, inhibits antibiotic production. These observations link the antibiotic production impairment with an imbalance in nitrogen metabolism and provide the first evidence of an interaction between purine metabolism and antibiotic biosynthesis.

  15. Molecular Identification of Streptomyces producing antibiotics and their antimicrobial activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifa A. Al_husnan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Five strains of Streptomyces, namely S, N, W, E and C (designations should be mentioned in detail here isolated from the rhizosphere soil cultivated with palm Alajua (date, pressed dates, AlMedina city, Saudi Arabia, were induced to produce antibiotics. Antimicrobial activities were determined on solid medium supplemented with starch. The detection was based on the formation of transparent zones around colonies. The results indicated that isolates had antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and also showed antifungal activity against Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger. DNA extracted from five isolates was used as template for 16s rDNA gene amplification. The expected PCR size was 1.5 kbp;1.6 kbp; 1.25 kbp; 1.25kbp and 1.0 k bp for S, N, W, E and C isolates respectively using universal 16s rDNA gene primers using direct PCR. The isolates varied morphologically on the basis of spore color, aerial and substrate mycelium formation, and production of diffusible pigment. Isolates were tested under a microscope by using slide culture technique. The results indicate that the soil of this region is source of Streptomyces having antibacterial and antifungal activity and thus better utilization of these microorganisms as biological control agents.

  16. Overproduction of Clavulanic Acid by UV Mutagenesis of Streptomyces clavuligerus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbekandi, Hassan; Darkhal, Parisa; Hojati, Zohreh; Abedi, Daryoush; Hamedi, Javad; Pourhosein, Meraj

    2010-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is produced industrially by fermentation of Streptomyces clavuligerus and researches have increased its production by strain improvement, recombinant DNA technology, and media composition and growth condition optimization. The main objective of this study was to increase the level of clavulanic acid production from Streptomyces clavuligerus (DSM 738), using UV irradiation. After incubation, the spores and aerial mycelia were scraped off the agar plate by a sterile loop. After passing through a cotton wool, the serially diluted spore suspension was spread on GYM- agar containing caffeine. The plates were irradiated with UV light, wrapped in aluminum foil and incubated. The colonies were sub-cultured again to express the mutations. An aliquot of the spore suspension prepared from the resulted culture was poured in GYM agar plates and incubated. The plates were overlaid with nutrient-agar containing penicillin G and Klebsiela pneumoniae, and incubated. The inhibition zone diameter was measured and compared with the wild type colony. Repeating this procedure, the overproducer mutants were selected. Concentration of clavulanic acid was determined by HPLC analysis. It was concluded that secondary metabolites, mainly antibiotics containing clavulanic acid, were produced about 6–7 days after the growth, and concentration of clavulanic acid was increased up to two-folds after UV mutagenesis. PMID:24363725

  17. Lipoteichoic acid in Streptomyces hygroscopicus: structural model and immunomodulatory activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlène Cot

    Full Text Available Gram positive bacteria produce cell envelope macroamphiphile glycopolymers, i.e. lipoteichoic acids or lipoglycans, whose functions and biosynthesis are not yet fully understood. We report for the first time a detailed structure of lipoteichoic acid isolated from a Streptomyces species, i.e. Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. hygroscopicus NRRL 2387T. Chemical, MS and NMR analyses revealed a polyglycerolphosphate backbone substituted with α-glucosaminyl and α-N-acetyl-glucosaminyl residues but devoid of any amino-acid substituent. This structure is very close, if not identical, to that of the wall teichoic acid of this organism. These data not only contribute to the growing recognition that lipoteichoic acid is a cell envelope component of gram positive Actinobacteria but also strongly support the recently proposed hypothesis of an overlap between the pathways of lipoteichoic acid and wall teichoic acid synthesis in these bacteria. S. hygroscopicus lipoteichoic acid induced signalling by human innate immune receptor TLR2, confirming its role as a microbe-associated molecular pattern. Its activity was partially dependant on TLR1, TLR6 and CD14. Moreover, it stimulated TNF-α and IL-6 production by a human macrophage cell line to an extent similar to that of Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid. These results provide new clues on lipoteichoic acid structure/function relationships, most particularly on the role of the polyglycerolphosphate backbone substituents.

  18. Reproductive success depends on the quality of helpers in the endangered, cooperative El Oro parakeet (Pyrrhura orcesi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Nadine; Segelbacher, Gernot; Schaefer, H M

    2013-04-01

    In cooperative species, helping behaviour and reproductive success can be correlated, but understanding this correlation is often impaired by the difficulty to correctly infer causation. While helpers can incur costs by participating in brood care, it is yet unclear if their help depends on their individual quality. We address these questions in the previously unknown cooperative breeding system of the endangered El Oro parakeet (Pyrrhura orcesi). Specifically, we ask (i) whether breeders benefit directly from helpers by an enhanced reproductive success and if so, (ii) whether the amount of this potential benefit is regulated by the quality of contributing group members. Groups consist of a dominant breeding pair accompanied by helpers, but cooperation is not obligate. Microsatellite heterozygosity was used to assess individual quality; its suitability as indicator of quality was reflected in the positive relationship between offspring heterozygosity and recruitment into the population. The reproductive success of breeding pairs depended on helper (genetic) quality and the number of helpers. This relationship occurred on two different levels: clutch size and fledging success, indicating (i) that females profit from high-quality helpers and probably adjust clutch size accordingly and (ii) that the helpers increase fledging success. Congruently, we found that offspring body condition is positively affected by helper quality, which is most probably explained by the increased feeding rates when helpers are present. We suggest a causal link between cooperation and reproductive success in this frugivorous, endangered parakeet. Further, helper (genetic) quality can be a relevant factor for determining reproductive fitness in cooperative species, particularly in small and bottlenecked populations.

  19. Natural Helpers as Street Health Workers Among the Black Urban Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Sharon; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Analyzed five-year experience of neighborhood-based, volunteer geriatric health outreach program developed by consortium of health and social agencies. Found outreach program enhanced network of natural community helpers through organized program in which Street Health Workers provided support to older adults and families. (Author)

  20. "Helping" versus "Being a Helper": Invoking the Self to Increase Helping in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Christopher J.; Master, Allison; Walton, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Can a subtle linguistic cue that invokes the self motivate children to help? In two experiments, 3- to 6-year-old children (N = 149) were exposed to the idea of "being a helper" (noun condition) or "helping" (verb condition). Noun wording fosters the perception that a behavior reflects an identity--the kind of person one is.…

  1. T helper cell polarisation as a measure of the maturation of the immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cameron, S.B.; Stolte, H.H.; Chow, A.W.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: T helper cell polarisation is important under chronic immune stimulatory conditions and drives the type of the evolving immune response. Mice treated with superantigens in vivo display strong effects on T-h subset differentiation. The aim of the study was to detect the intrinsic capacity

  2. Transcription factor achaete-scute homologue 2 initiates follicular T-helper-cell development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Xindong; Chen, Xin; Zhong, Bo; Wang, Aibo; Wang, Xiaohu; Chu, Fuliang; Nurieva, Roza I; Yan, Xiaowei; Chen, Ping; van der Flier, Laurens G; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Neelapu, Sattva S; Chen, Wanjun; Clevers, Hans; Tian, Qiang; Qi, Hai; Wei, Lai; Dong, Chen

    2014-01-01

    In immune responses, activated T cells migrate to B-cell follicles and develop into follicular T-helper (TFH) cells, a recently identified subset of CD4(+) T cells specialized in providing help to B lymphocytes in the induction of germinal centres. Although Bcl6 has been shown to be essential in TFH

  3. CD4 T-helper cell cytokine phenotypes and antibody response following tetanus toxoid booster immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routine methods for enumerating antigen-specific T-helper cells may not identify low-frequency phenotypes such as Th2 cells. We compared methods of evaluating such responses to identify tetanus toxoid- (TT) specific Th1, Th2, Th17 and IL10+ cells. Eight healthy subjects were given a TT booster vacci...

  4. Social Networks and Social Support: Implications for Natural Helper and Community Level Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Barbara A.

    1985-01-01

    Focuses on the linkage between social support and social networks and health educational programs that involve interventions at the network and community level. Addresses programs enhancing entire networks through natural helpers; and programs strengthening overlapping networks/communities through key opinion and informal leaders who are engaged…

  5. Essential competencies for the education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeseburg, Barth; Hilberts, Rudi; Roodbol, Petrie F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Dutch health care system faces huge challenges with regard to the demand on elderly care and the competencies of professionals required to meet this demand. However, a recent study showed that the curricula in vocational education for nursing assistants and care helpers remains inade

  6. Subcellular location of the helper component-proteinase of Cowpea Aphid-Borne Mosaic Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlotshwa, S.; Verver, J.; Sithole-Niang, I.; Gopinath, K.; Carette, J.; Kammen, van A.; Wellink, J.

    2002-01-01

    The helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) of Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV) was expressed in Escherichia coli and used to obtain HC-Pro antiserum that was used as an analytical tool for HC-Pro studies. The antiserum was used in immunofluorescence assays to study the subcellular location of H

  7. A web-based care-requiring client and Home Helper mutual support system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hidekuni; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Maki, Hiromichi; Hahn, Allen W; Caldwell, W Morton

    2005-01-01

    For the improved efficiency of home care of the elderly, a web-based system has been developed to enable faster communications between care-requiring clients, their Home Helper and the care manager. Changes to care items, such as cooking, bathing, washing, cleaning and shopping are usually requested by the elderly client over the telephone. However, the care central office often requires 24 hours to process and respond to such spoken requests. The system we have developed consists of Internet client computers with liquid crystal input tablets, wireless Internet Java enabled mobile phones and a central office server that yields almost instant communication. The care clients enter requests on the liquid crystal tablet at their home and then their computer sends these requests to the server at the Home Helper central office. The server automatically creates a new file of the requested items, and then immediately transfers them to the care manager and Home Helper's mobile phone. With this non-vocal and paperless system, the care-requiring clients, who can easily operate the liquid crystal tablet, can very quickly communicate their needed care change requests to their Home Helper.

  8. Essential competencies for the education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeseburg, Barth; Hilberts, Rudi; Roodbol, Petrie F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Dutch health care system faces huge challenges with regard to the demand on elderly care and the competencies of professionals required to meet this demand. However, a recent study showed that the curricula in vocational education for nursing assistants and care helpers remains inade

  9. The helper component-proteinase of cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlotshwa, S.

    2000-01-01

    Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic potyvirus causes severe yield losses in cowpea, an important legume crop in semi-arid regions of Africa. We have elucidated the genomic sequence of the virus and subsequently focused our attention on the so-called helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro), a virus-encoded multif

  10. T helper cell 2 immune skewing in pregnancy/early life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McFadden, J P; Thyssen, J P; Basketter, D A

    2015-01-01

    During the last 50 years there has been a significant increase in Western societies of atopic disease and associated allergy. The balance between functional subpopulations of T helper cells (Th) determines the quality of the immune response provoked by antigen. One such subpopulation - Th2 cells ...

  11. Genomics of sponge-associated Streptomyces spp. closely related to Streptomyces albus J1074: insights into marine adaptation and secondary metabolite biosynthesis potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ian

    Full Text Available A total of 74 actinomycete isolates were cultivated from two marine sponges, Geodia barretti and Phakellia ventilabrum collected at the same spot at the bottom of the Trondheim fjord (Norway. Phylogenetic analyses of sponge-associated actinomycetes based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated the presence of species belonging to the genera Streptomyces, Nocardiopsis, Rhodococcus, Pseudonocardia and Micromonospora. Most isolates required sea water for growth, suggesting them being adapted to the marine environment. Phylogenetic analysis of Streptomyces spp. revealed two isolates that originated from different sponges and had 99.7% identity in their 16S rRNA gene sequences, indicating that they represent very closely related strains. Sequencing, annotation, and analyses of the genomes of these Streptomyces isolates demonstrated that they are sister organisms closely related to terrestrial Streptomyces albus J1074. Unlike S. albus J1074, the two sponge streptomycetes grew and differentiated faster on the medium containing sea water. Comparative genomics revealed several genes presumably responsible for partial marine adaptation of these isolates. Genome mining targeted to secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters identified several of those, which were not present in S. albus J1074, and likely to have been retained from a common ancestor, or acquired from other actinomycetes. Certain genes and gene clusters were shown to be differentially acquired or lost, supporting the hypothesis of divergent evolution of the two Streptomyces species in different sponge hosts.

  12. tmRNA of Streptomyces collinus and Streptomyces griseus during the growth and in the presence of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palecková, Petra; Bobek, Jan; Mikulík, Karel

    2009-01-01

    Streptomycetes are soil microorganisms with the potential to produce a broad spectrum of secondary metabolities. The production of antibiotics is accompanied by a decrease in protein synthesis, which raises the question of how these bacteria survived the transition from the primary to the secondary metabolism. Translating ribosomes incapable to properly elongate or terminate polypeptide chain activate bacterial trans-translation system. Abundance and stability of the tmRNA during growth of Streptomyces collinus and Streptomyces griseus producing kirromycin and streptomycin, respectively, was analysed. The level of tmRNA is mostly proportional to the activity of the translational system. We demonstrate that the addition of sub-inhibitory concentrations of produced antibiotics to the cultures from the beginning of the exponential phase of growth leads to an increase in tmRNA levels and to an incorporation of amino acids into the tag-peptides at trans-translation of stalled ribosomes. These findings suggest that produced antibiotics induce tmRNA that facilitate reactivation of stalled complex of ribosomes and maintain viability. The effect of antibiotics that inhibit the cell-wall turnover, DNA, RNA or protein synthesis on the level of tmRNA was examined. Antibiotics interfering with ribosomal target sites are more effective at stimulation of the tmRNA level in streptomycetes examined than those affecting the synthesis of DNA, RNA or the cell wall.

  13. γ-Butyrolactones : Streptomyces signalling molecules regulating antibiotic production and differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takano, Eriko

    2006-01-01

    Small signalling molecules called γ-butyrolactones are mainly produced by Streptomyces species in which they regulate antibiotic production and morphological differentiation. Their molecular mechanism of action has recently been unravelled in several streptomycetes, revealing a diverse and complex s

  14. Inhibition of Chlorination in Streptomyces aureofaciens by Nitriles and Related Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Joseph J.; Matrishin, Mary

    1973-01-01

    A number of nitriles and cyano compounds inhibited chlorination by Streptomyces aureofaciens. In most cases, this inhibition was enhanced by bromide. Methylene blue and p-amino-propiophenone reversed the inhibition to some extent. PMID:4208277

  15. Streptomyces infection in Cushing syndrome: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Ataiekhorasgani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces are saprophytic soil organisms rarely known to cause invasive infections. Streptomyces is the largest genus, producing antibacterial, antifungal and antiparasitic drugs. The case was a 24-year-old man, admitted for sudden dyspnea, fever and sputum and decreased sound in the left lung. The chest X-ray showed hydropneumothorax. After chest tube insertion, lung expansion did not happen. Pleural effusion was exudative with gram-positive bacillus and Streptomyces in culture. Owing to symptoms of Cushing in history, examination and laboratory work-up for Cushing was done and finally he underwent bilateral adrenalectomy. The patient was on antibiotic broad spectrum antibiotic and then was changed to antibiotic as organism was sensitive to and discharged with clarithromycin for 6 months. Streptomyces happens in immunodeficient patient. Diagnosis is based on culture and contamination was ruled out. Treatment period is longer for patients owing to slow growing nature.

  16. Mammalian cell entry genes in Streptomyces may provide clues to the evolution of bacterial virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Laura C.; Seipke, Ryan F.; Prieto, Pilar; Willemse, Joost; van Wezel, Gilles P.; Hutchings, Matthew I.; Hoskisson, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of virulence is key to appreciating the role specific loci play in pathogenicity. Streptomyces species are generally non-pathogenic soil saprophytes, yet within their genome we can find homologues of virulence loci. One example of this is the mammalian cell entry (mce) locus, which has been characterised in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To investigate the role in Streptomyces we deleted the mce locus and studied its impact on cell survival, morphology and interaction with other soil organisms. Disruption of the mce cluster resulted in virulence towards amoebae (Acanthamoeba polyphaga) and reduced colonization of plant (Arabidopsis) models, indicating these genes may play an important role in Streptomyces survival in the environment. Our data suggest that loss of mce in Streptomyces spp. may have profound effects on survival in a competitive soil environment, and provides insight in to the evolution and selection of these genes as virulence factors in related pathogenic organisms. PMID:23346366

  17. Subcompartmentalization by cross-membranes during early growth of Streptomyces hyphae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yagüe, Paula; Willemse, Joost; Koning, Roman I;

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Streptomyces are a model system for bacterial multicellularity. Their mycelial life style involves the formation of long multinucleated hyphae during vegetative growth, with occasional cross-walls separating long compartments. Reproduction occurs by specialized aerial hyphae...

  18. High-efficiency multiplex genome editing of Streptomyces species using an engineered CRISPR/Cas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Ryan E; Wang, Yajie; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-06-19

    Actinobacteria, particularly those of genus Streptomyces, remain invaluable hosts for the discovery and engineering of natural products and their cognate biosynthetic pathways. However, genetic manipulation of these bacteria is often labor and time intensive. Here, we present an engineered CRISPR/Cas system for rapid multiplex genome editing of Streptomyces strains, demonstrating targeted chromosomal deletions in three different Streptomyces species and of various sizes (ranging from 20 bp to 30 kb) with efficiency ranging from 70 to 100%. The designed pCRISPomyces plasmids are amenable to assembly of spacers and editing templates via Golden Gate assembly and isothermal assembly (or traditional digestion/ligation), respectively, allowing rapid plasmid construction to target any genomic locus of interest. As such, the pCRISPomyces system represents a powerful new tool for genome editing in Streptomyces.

  19. Evaluation of the toxicity of Streptomyces aburaviensis (R9) towards various agricultural pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    The culture filtrate fraction extracted with dichloromethane from Streptomyces aburaviensis -R9 strain grown on glucose-peptone-molasses (GPM) broth was bioassayed for its effect on phytopathogenic fungi (Colletotrichum acutatum, C. fragariae, C. gloeosoprioids, Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum,...

  20. 77 FR 35291 - Killed, Nonviable Streptomyces acidiscabies Strain RL-110T

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... acidiscabies strain RL-110\\T\\ do not demonstrate toxic potential to mammals, including infants and children.... Loria R, Kers J, Joshi M. 2006. Evolution of plant pathology in Streptomyces. Annual Review of...

  1. Taxonomy and antimicrobial activities of a new Streptomyces sp. TN17 isolated in the soil from an oasis in Tunis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaoui Slim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An actinomycete strain referred to as TN17 was screened for its antimicrobial activities. The taxonomic status of this strain was established. The organism was found to have morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics typical of Streptomycetes. Based on the 16S rRNA nucleotide sequences, Streptomyces sp. TN17 was found to have a relationship with Streptomyces lilaceus, Streptomyces gobitricini and Streptomyces lavendofoliae. Combined analysis of the 16 S rRNA gene sequence (FN687757, phylogenetic analysis, fatty acids profile and physiological tests indicated that there are genotypic and phenotypic differences between TN17 and neighboring Streptomyces species’ neighbors. Therefore, TN17 is a novel species: Streptomyces sp. TN17 (=DSM 42020T=CTM50229T. A cultured extract of this strain inhibits the growth of several Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and fungi.

  2. The role of helper lipids in lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) designed for oligonucleotide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xinwei; Lee, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) have shown promise as delivery vehicles for therapeutic oligonucleotides, including antisense oligos (ONs), siRNA, and microRNA mimics and inhibitors. In addition to a cationic lipid, LNPs are typically composed of helper lipids that contribute to their stability and delivery efficiency. Helper lipids with cone-shape geometry favoring the formation hexagonal II phase, such as dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), can promote endosomal release of ONs. Meanwhile, cylindrical-shaped lipid phosphatidylcholine can provide greater bilayer stability, which is important for in vivo application of LNPs. Cholesterol is often included as a helper that improves intracellular delivery as well as LNP stability in vivo. Inclusion of a PEGylating lipid can enhance LNP colloidal stability in vitro and circulation time in vivo but may reduce uptake and inhibit endosomal release at the cellular level. This problem can be addressed by choosing reversible PEGylation in which the PEG moiety is gradually released in blood circulation. pH-sensitive anionic helper lipids, such as fatty acids and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHEMS), can trigger low-pH-induced changes in LNP surface charge and destabilization that can facilitate endosomal release of ONs. Generally speaking, there is no correlation between LNP activity in vitro and in vivo because of differences in factors limiting the efficiency of delivery. Designing LNPs requires the striking of a proper balance between the need for particle stability, long systemic circulation time, and the need for LNP destabilization inside the target cell to release the oligonucleotide cargo, which requires the proper selection of both the cationic and helper lipids. Customized design and empirical optimization is needed for specific applications.

  3. Diversity and functions of volatile organic compounds produced by Streptomyces from a disease-suppressive soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane eCordovez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In disease-suppressive soils, plants are protected from infections by specific root pathogens due to the antagonistic activities of soil and rhizosphere microorganisms. For most disease-suppressive soils, however, the microorganisms and mechanisms involved in pathogen control are largely unknown. Our recent studies identified Actinobacteria as the most dynamic phylum in a soil suppressive to the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Here we isolated and characterized 300 isolates of rhizospheric Actinobacteria from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil. Streptomyces species were the most abundant, representing approximately 70% of the isolates. Streptomyces are renowned for the production of an exceptionally large number of secondary metabolites, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs. VOC profiling of 12 representative Streptomyces isolates by SPME-GC-MS allowed a more refined phylogenetic delineation of the Streptomyces isolates than the sequencing of 16S rRNA and the house-keeping genes atpD and recA only. VOCs of several Streptomyces isolates inhibited hyphal growth of R. solani and significantly enhanced plant shoot and root biomass. Coupling of Streptomyces VOC profiles with their effects on fungal growth, pointed to VOCs potentially involved in antifungal activity. Subsequent assays with five synthetic analogues of the identified VOCs showed that methyl 2-methylpentanoate, 1,3,5-trichloro-2-methoxy benzene and the VOCs mixture have antifungal activity. In conclusion, our results point to a potential role of VOC-producing Streptomyces in disease suppressive soils and show that VOC profiling of rhizospheric Streptomyces can be used as a complementary identification tool to construct strain-specific metabolic signatures.

  4. Diversity and functions of volatile organic compounds produced by Streptomyces from a disease-suppressive soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordovez, Viviane; Carrion, Victor J.; Etalo, Desalegn W.; Mumm, Roland; Zhu, Hua; van Wezel, Gilles P.; Raaijmakers, Jos M.

    2015-01-01

    In disease-suppressive soils, plants are protected from infections by specific root pathogens due to the antagonistic activities of soil and rhizosphere microorganisms. For most disease-suppressive soils, however, the microorganisms and mechanisms involved in pathogen control are largely unknown. Our recent studies identified Actinobacteria as the most dynamic phylum in a soil suppressive to the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Here we isolated and characterized 300 isolates of rhizospheric Actinobacteria from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil. Streptomyces species were the most abundant, representing approximately 70% of the isolates. Streptomyces are renowned for the production of an exceptionally large number of secondary metabolites, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOC profiling of 12 representative Streptomyces isolates by SPME-GC-MS allowed a more refined phylogenetic delineation of the Streptomyces isolates than the sequencing of 16S rRNA and the house-keeping genes atpD and recA only. VOCs of several Streptomyces isolates inhibited hyphal growth of R. solani and significantly enhanced plant shoot and root biomass. Coupling of Streptomyces VOC profiles with their effects on fungal growth, pointed to VOCs potentially involved in antifungal activity. Subsequent assays with five synthetic analogs of the identified VOCs showed that methyl 2-methylpentanoate, 1,3,5-trichloro-2-methoxy benzene and the VOCs mixture have antifungal activity. In conclusion, our results point to a potential role of VOC-producing Streptomyces in disease suppressive soils and show that VOC profiling of rhizospheric Streptomyces can be used as a complementary identification tool to construct strain-specific metabolic signatures. PMID:26500626

  5. Streptomyces lacrimifluminis sp. nov., a novel actinobacterium that produces antibacterial compounds, isolated from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binglin; Tang, Shukun; Chen, Ximing; Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Gaoseng; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Guangxiu; Chen, Tuo; Li, Shiweng; Dyson, Paul

    2016-12-01

    A novel actinobacterial strain, designated Z1027T, was isolated from a soil sample collected near the Tuotuo River, Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (China). The strain exhibited antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The taxonomic position of strain Z1027T was determined using a polyphasic approach. The organism had chemotaxonomic and morphological properties consistent with its classification in the genus Streptomyces and formed a distinct phyletic line in the 16S rRNA gene tree, together with Streptomyces turgidiscabies ATCC 700248T (99.19 % similarity), Streptomyces graminilatus JL-6T (98.84 %) and Streptomyces reticuliscabiei CFBP 4531T (98.36 %). The genomic DNA G+C content of strain Z1027T was 74±1 mol%. The DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain Z1027T and Streptomyces turgidiscabies ATCC 700248T and Streptomyces reticuliscabiei CFBP 4531T were 38.5±0.4 and 26.2±1.2 %, respectively, both of them significantly lower than 70 %. Chemotaxonomic data revealed that strain Z1027T possessed MK-9(H6) and MK-9(H8) as the major menaquinones, ll-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid and galactose as a whole-cell sugar. Diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatydilinositol and seven other unknown polar lipids were detected; iso-C16 : 0, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) and C16 : 0 were the major fatty acids. On the basis of these genotypic and phenotypic data, it is proposed that isolate Z1027T (=CGMCC 4.7272T=JCM 31054T) should be classified as the type strain of a novel species of the genus Streptomyces,Streptomyces lacrimifluminis sp. nov.

  6. Systems biology and biotechnology of Streptomyces species for the production of secondary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, Kyu-Sang; Kim, Hyun Uk; Charusanti, Pep

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces species continue to attract attention as a source of novel medicinal compounds. Despite a long history of studies on these microorganisms, they still have many biochemical mysteries to be elucidated. Investigations of novel secondary metabolites and their biosynthetic gene clusters h...... collected in the form of databases and knowledgebases, providing predictive information and enabling one to explore experimentally unrecognized biological spaces of secondary metabolism. Herein, we review recent trends in the systems biology and biotechnology of Streptomyces species....

  7. Natalamycin A, an ansamycin from a termite-associated Streptomyces sp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Ramadhar, Timothy R.; Beemelmanns, Christine

    2014-01-01

    We report a preliminary functional and complete structural characterization of a highly unusual geldanamycin analog, natalamycin A, that was isolated from Streptomyces strain M56 recovered from a South African nest of Macrotermes natalensis termites. Bioassay-guided fractionation based on antifun......We report a preliminary functional and complete structural characterization of a highly unusual geldanamycin analog, natalamycin A, that was isolated from Streptomyces strain M56 recovered from a South African nest of Macrotermes natalensis termites. Bioassay-guided fractionation based...

  8. Phosphoproteome analysis of streptomyces development reveals extensive protein phosphorylation accompanying bacterial differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manteca, Angel; Ye, Juanying; Sánchez, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Streptomycetes are bacterial species that undergo a complex developmental cycle that includes programmed cell death (PCD) events and sporulation. They are widely used in biotechnology because they produce most clinically relevant secondary metabolites. Although Streptomyces coelicolor is one...... events were detected during the presporulation and sporulation stages (80%). Most of these phosphorylations were not reported before in Streptomyces, and included sporulation factors, transcriptional regulators, protein kinases and other regulatory proteins. Several of the identified phosphorylated...

  9. Streptomyces bryophytorum sp. nov., an endophytic actinomycete isolated from moss (Bryophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuang; Jin, Pinjiao; Liu, Chongxi; Ma, Zhaoxu; Zhao, Junwei; Li, Jiansong; Wang, Xiangjing; Xiang, Wensheng

    2016-09-01

    A novel endophytic actinomycete, designated strain NEAU-HZ10(T) was isolated from moss and characterised using a polyphasic approach. The strain was found to have morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics typical of the genus Streptomyces. Strain NEAU-HZ10(T) formed grayish aerial mycelia, which differentiated into straight to flexuous chains of cylindrical spores. The cell wall peptidoglycan was found to contain LL-diaminopimelic acid. Predominant menaquinones were identified as MK-9(H6) and MK-9(H8). The polar lipid profile was found to consist of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and two unidentified phospholipids. The major fatty acids were identified as iso-C16:0, anteiso-C15:0 and C16:0. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity studies showed that strain NEAU-HZ10(T) belongs to the genus Streptomyces and exhibits high sequence similarity to Streptomyces cocklensis DSM 42063(T) (98.9 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain NEAU-HZ10(T) clustered with S. cocklensis DSM 42063(T), Streptomyces yeochonensis CGMCC 4.1882(T) (98.7 %), Streptomyces paucisporeus CGMCC 4.2025(T) (98.4 %) and Streptomyces yanglinensis CGMCC 4.2023(T) (98.1 %). However, a combination of DNA-DNA hybridisation results and some phenotypic characteristics indicated that strain NEAU-HZ10(T) can be distinguished from its phylogenetically closely related strains. Therefore, it is proposed that strain NEAU-HZ10(T) represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces for which the name Streptomyces bryophytorum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NEAU-HZ10(T) (= CGMCC 4.7151(T) = DSM 42138(T)).

  10. Biochemical studies on the Natamycin antibiotic produced by Streptomyces lydicus: Fermentation, extraction and biological activities

    OpenAIRE

    Atta, H.M.; A.S. El-Sayed; M.A. El-Desoukey; Hassan, M.; M. El-Gazar

    2015-01-01

    Natamycin “polyene” antibiotic was isolated from the fermentation broth of a Streptomyces strain No. AZ-55. According to the morphological, cultural, physiological and biochemical characteristics, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, strain AZ-55 was identified as Streptomyces lydicus. It is active in vitro against some microbial pathogens viz: Staphylococcus aureus, NCTC 7447; Bacillus subtilis, NCTC 1040; Bacillus pumilus, NCTC 8214 ; Micrococcus luteus, ATCC 9341; Escherichia coli, NCTC 10416; ...

  11. Swimming Efficiency of Bacterium Escherichia Coli

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, S; Wu, X L; Yeung, C; Chattopadhyay, Suddhashil; Moldovan, Radu; Yeung, Chuck

    2005-01-01

    We use in vivo measurements of swimming bacteria in an optical trap to determine fundamental properties of bacterial propulsion. In particular, we determine the propulsion matrix, which relates the angular velocity of the flagellum to the torques and forces propelling the bacterium. From the propulsion matrix dynamical properties such as forces, torques, swimming speed and power can be obtained from measurements of the angular velocity of the motor. We find significant heterogeneities among different individuals even though all bacteria started from a single colony. The propulsive efficiency, defined as the ratio of the propulsive power output to the rotary power input provided by the motors, is found to be 0.2%.

  12. Isolation of a Bacterium Strain Degraded Agar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    One in 58 strains of bacteria isolated from the compost showed clear colonies after a few days of growth on the plates containing medium made of only agar and water.Water suspension contained only agar (2 and 8g·L -1 ) with two controls (normal saline,LB medium) was inoculated with the bacterium BR5-1 to see whether there was an increasement of the alive bacteria concentration after 48 h of the growth.The results showed that there was a significant rising of the alive bacteria concentration in the agar susp...

  13. Taxonomic evaluation of species in the Streptomyces hirsutus clade using multi-locus sequence analysis and proposals to reclassify several species in this clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labeda, David P; Rong, Xiaoying; Huang, Ying; Doroghazi, James R; Ju, Kou-San; Metcalf, William W

    2016-06-01

    Previous phylogenetic analysis of species of the genus Streptomyces based on 16S rRNA gene sequences resulted in a statistically well-supported clade (100 % bootstrap value) containing eight species that exhibited very similar gross morphology in producing open looped (Retinaculum-Apertum) to spiral (Spira) chains of spiny- to hairysurfaced, dark green spores on their aerial mycelium. The type strains of the species in this clade, specifically Streptomyces bambergiensis, Streptomyces cyanoalbus, Streptomyces emeiensis, Streptomyces hirsutus, Streptomyces prasinopilosus and Streptomyces prasinus, were subjected to multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) utilizing partial sequences of the housekeeping genes atpD, gyrB, recA, rpoB and trpB to clarify their taxonomic status. The type strains of several recently described species with similar gross morphology, including Streptomyces chlorus, Streptomyces herbaceus, Streptomyces incanus, Streptomyces pratens and Streptomyces viridis, were also studied along with six unidentified green-spored Streptomyces strains from the ARS Culture Collection. The MLSAs suggest that three of the species under study (S. bambergiensis, S. cyanoalbus and S. emeiensis) represent synonyms of other previously described species (S. prasinus, S. hirsutus and S. prasinopilosus, respectively). These relationships were confirmed through determination of in silico DNA-DNA hybridization estimates based on draft genome sequences. The five recently described species appear to be phylogenetically distinct but the unidentified strains from the ARS Culture Collection could be identified as representatives of S. hirsutus, S. prasinopilosus or S. prasinus.

  14. Production of polypeptide antibiotic from Streptomyces parvulus and its antibacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakasham Reddy Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly potent secondary metabolite producing actinomycetes strain is isolated from marine soil sediments of Visakhapatnam sea coast, Bay of Bengal. Over all ten strains are isolated from the collected soil sediments. Among the ten actinomycetes strains the broad spectrum strain RSPSN2 was selected for molecular characterization, antibiotic production and its purification. The nucleotide sequence of the 1 rRNA gene (1261 base pairs of the most potent strain evidenced a 96% similarity with Streptomyces parvulus 1044 strain, Streptomyces parvulus NBRC 13193 and Streptomyces parvulus BY-F. From the taxonomic features, the actinomycetes isolate RSPSN2 matches with Streptomyces parvulus in the morphological, physiological and biochemical characters. Thus, it was given the suggested name Streptomyces parvulus RSPSN2. The active metabolite was extracted using ethyl acetate (1:3, v/v at pH 7.0. The separation of active ingredient and its purification was performed by using both thin layer chromatography (TLC and column chromatography (CC techniques. Spectrometric studies such as UV-visible, FTIR, and NMR and mass were performed. The antibacterial activity of pure compound was performed by cup plate method against some pathogenic bacteria including of streptomycin resistant bacteria like (Pseudomonas mirabilis. Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus cereus. In conclusion, the collected data emphasized the fact that a polypeptide antibiotic (Actinomycin D was produced by Streptomyces parvulus RSPSN2.

  15. A Latitudinal Diversity Gradient in Terrestrial Bacteria of the Genus Streptomyces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl P. Andam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We show that Streptomyces biogeography in soils across North America is influenced by the regional diversification of microorganisms due to dispersal limitation and genetic drift. Streptomyces spp. form desiccation-resistant spores, which can be dispersed on the wind, allowing for a strong test of whether dispersal limitation governs patterns of terrestrial microbial diversity. We employed an approach that has high sensitivity for determining the effects of genetic drift. Specifically, we examined the genetic diversity and phylogeography of physiologically similar Streptomyces strains isolated from geographically distributed yet ecologically similar habitats. We found that Streptomyces beta diversity scales with geographic distance and both beta diversity and phylogenetic diversity manifest in a latitudinal diversity gradient. This pattern of Streptomyces biogeography resembles patterns seen for diverse species of plants and animals, and we therefore evaluated these data in the context of ecological and evolutionary hypotheses proposed to explain latitudinal diversity gradients. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that niche conservatism limits dispersal, and historical patterns of glaciation have limited the time for speciation in higher-latitude sites. Most notably, higher-latitude sites have lower phylogenetic diversity, higher phylogenetic clustering, and evidence of range expansion from lower latitudes. In addition, patterns of beta diversity partition with respect to the glacial history of sites. Hence, the data support the hypothesis that extant patterns of Streptomyces biogeography have been driven by historical patterns of glaciation and are the result of demographic range expansion, dispersal limitation, and regional diversification due to drift.

  16. Community of environmental streptomyces related to geosmin development in Chinese liquors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hai; Lu, Hu; Xu, Yan; Du, Xiaowei

    2013-02-13

    Diverse Streptomyces species act as geosmin producers in the Chinese liquor-making process. In this paper, the ecology of these Streptomyces species was analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of amplified Actinobacteria -specified rDNA. The result showed that Streptomyces were widely distributed during Daqu incubation, and multiple processing, geographic, and climate factors can affect their distribution and diversity. The genes associated with geosmin production were characterized in four geosmin-producing Streptomyces strains, all of which were isolated from geosmin-contaminated Daqu. On the basis of this information, a real-time PCR method was developed, enabling the detection of traces of Streptomyces in complex solid-state matrices. The primer was targeted at the gene coding for geosmin synthase (geoA). The real-time PCR method was found to be specific for geosmin-producing Streptomyces and did not show any cross-reactivity with geosmin-negative isolates, which are frequently present in the Chinese liquor-brewing process. Quantification of geoA in the Chinese liquor-making process could permit the monitoring of the level of geosmin producers prior to the occurrence of geosmin production. Comparison of the qPCR results based on the gene encoding geosmin synthase and Actinobacteria-specified rDNA showed that about 1-10% of the Actinobacteria carry the geosmin synthesis gene.

  17. Streptomyces castaneus sp. nov., a novel actinomycete isolated from the rhizosphere of Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuyu; Li, Zhilei; Bai, Lu; Yan, Kai; Zhao, Junwei; Lu, Chang; Liu, Chongxi; Wang, Xiangjing; Xiang, Wensheng

    2017-01-01

    During an investigation of microbial diversity in medicinal herbs, a novel actinomycete, strain NEAU-QHHV11(T) was isolated from the rhizosphere of Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn collected from Xianglu Mountain in Heilongjiang Province, northeast China and characterized using a polyphasic approach. The organism was found to have typical characteristics of the genus Streptomyces. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence also indicated that strain NEAU-QHHV11(T) belongs to the genus Streptomyces and was most closely related to Streptomyces graminilatus NBRC 108882(T) (98.7 % sequence similarity) and Streptomyces turgidiscabies NBRC 16080(T) (98.7 % sequence similarity). The results of DNA-DNA hybridization and some phenotypic characteristics indicated that strain NEAU-QHHV11(T) could be distinguished from its close phylogenetic relatives. Thus, strain NEAU-QHHV11(T) represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces castaneus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NEAU-QHHV11(T) (=CGMCC 4.7235(T) = DSM 100520(T)).

  18. Streptomyces fractus sp. nov., a novel streptomycete isolated from the gut of a South African termite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohland, Jeffrey; Meyers, Paul R

    2015-05-01

    An actinobacterial strain, MV32(T), was isolated from the paunch region of the hindgut of a South African termite, Amitermes hastatus, as part of an investigation of the actinobacterial population residing within this higher order termite species. Strain MV32(T) was chosen for further study from amongst the many potentially novel actinomycete isolates because of its strong antibacterial activity against Mycobacterium aurum A+. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analyses clearly placed strain MV32(T) within the genus Streptomyces, with 99.3% sequence similarity to its closest relative, Streptomyces endophyticus YIM 65594(T). Despite this high sequence similarity, DNA-DNA hybridisation analysis showed a DNA relatedness value of 62 ± 2%, to S. endophyticus DSM 41984(T) (indicating that strain MV32(T) belongs to a different genomic species), as well as values of 14.4 ± 0.8 and 10.4 ± 2.9%, respectively, to its next closest relatives, Streptomyces kunmingensis NRRL B-16240(T) and Streptomyces cinnabarinus NRRL B-12382(T). Based on these results and supported by both chemotaxonomic data and a number of phenotypic differences, strain MV32(T) is proposed to represent a new species within the genus Streptomyces, with the name Streptomyces fractus (= DSM 42163(T) = NRRL B-59159(T)).

  19. Streptomyces gamaensis sp. nov., a novel actinomycete with antifungal activity isolated from soil in Gama, Chad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shanshan; Ye, Lan; Liu, Chongxi; Abagana, Adam Yacoub; Zheng, Weiwei; Sun, Pengyu; Li, Jiansong; Xiang, Wensheng; Wang, Xiangjing

    2017-04-01

    During an investigation exploring potential sources of novel species and natural products, a novel actinomycete with antifungal activity, designated strain NEAU-Gz11(T), was isolated from a soil sample, which was collected from Gama, Chad. The isolate was found to have morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics typical of members of the genus Streptomyces. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity studies showed that strain NEAU-Gz11(T) belongs to the genus Streptomyces with high sequence similarity to Streptomyces hiroshimensis JCM 4098(T) (98.0 %). Similarities to other type strains of the genus Streptomyces were lower than 98.0 %. However, the physiological and biochemical characteristics and low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness could differentiate the isolate genotypically and phenotypically from S. hiroshimensis JCM 4098(T). Therefore, the strain is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces gamaensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NEAU-Gz11(T) (=CGMCC 4.7304(T)=DSM 101531(T)).

  20. Streptomyces atlanticus sp. nov., a novel actinomycete isolated from marine sponge Aplysina fulva (Pallas, 1766).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Fábio Sérgio Paulino; Souza, Danilo Tosta; Zucchi, Tiago Domingues; Pansa, Camila Cristiane; de Figueiredo Vasconcellos, Rafael Leandro; Crevelin, Eduardo José; de Moraes, Luiz Alberto Beraldo; Melo, Itamar Soares

    2016-11-01

    The taxonomic position of a novel marine actinomycete isolated from a marine sponge, Aplysina fulva, which had been collected in the Archipelago of Saint Peter and Saint Paul (Equatorial Atlantic Ocean), was determined by using a polyphasic approach. The organism showed a combination of morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics consistent with its classification in the genus Streptomyces and forms a distinct branch within the Streptomyces somaliensis 16S rRNA gene tree subclade. It is closely related to Streptomyces violascens ISP 5183(T) (97.27 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and Streptomyces hydrogenans NBRC 13475(T) (97.15 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The 16S rRNA gene similarities between the isolate and the remaining members of the subclade are lower than 96.77 %. The organism can be distinguished readily from other members of the S. violacens subclade using a combination of phenotypic properties. On the basis of these results, it is proposed that isolate 103(T) (=NRRL B-65309(T) = CMAA 1378(T)) merits recognition as the type strain of a new Streptomyces species, namely Streptomyces atlanticus sp. nov.

  1. Retroviral Transduction of Helper T Cells as a Genetic Approach to Study Mechanisms Controlling their Differentiation and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yogesh; Garden, Oliver A.; Lang, Florian; Cobb, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    Helper T cell development and function must be tightly regulated to induce an appropriate immune response that eliminates specific pathogens yet prevents autoimmunity. Many approaches involving different model organisms have been utilized to understand the mechanisms controlling helper T cell development and function. However, studies using mouse models have proven to be highly informative due to the availability of genetic, cellular, and biochemical systems. One genetic approach in mice used by many labs involves retroviral transduction of primary helper T cells. This is a powerful approach due to its relative ease, making it accessible to almost any laboratory with basic skills in molecular biology and immunology. Therefore, multiple genes in wild type or mutant forms can readily be tested for function in helper T cells to understand their importance and mechanisms of action. We have optimized this approach and describe here the protocols for production of high titer retroviruses, isolation of primary murine helper T cells, and their transduction by retroviruses and differentiation toward the different helper subsets. Finally, the use of this approach is described in uncovering mechanisms utilized by microRNAs (miRNAs) to regulate pathways controlling helper T cell development and function. PMID:27842353

  2. Occurrence of a Lysogenic Streptomyces sp. on the Nodule Surface of Black Gram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, M; Ravindran, A D; Hariharan, K

    1984-07-01

    A lysogenic Streptomyces sp., strain NS.A4, which was isolated from the nodule surface of black gram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper), was found to inhibit rhizobia of fast-and slow-growing strains of cowpeas and soybeans. It exhibited plaques when there was a change in cultural conditions. Repeated culturing of the organism in nutrient agar and broth confirmed the infection of Streptomyces sp. strain NS.A4 by an actinophage. Addition of the culture filtrate of Streptomyces sp. strain NS.A4 to shaken broth cultures of three other Streptomyces spp. resulted in phage infection.

  3. Biodegradation of heavy oils by halophilic bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruixia Hao; Anhuai Lu

    2009-01-01

    A halophilic bacterial strain TM-1 was isolated from the reservoir of the Shengli oil field in East China. Strain TM-1, which was found to be able to degrade crude oils, is a gram-positive non-motile bacterium with a coccus shape that can grow at temperatures of up to 58 ℃ and in 18% NaCl solution. Depending on the culture conditions, the organism may occur in tetrads. In addition, strain TM-1 pro-duced acid from glucose without gas formation and was catalase-negative. Furthermore, strain TM-I was found to be a facultative aer-obe capable of growth under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, it produced butylated hydroxytoluene, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid-bis ester and dibutyl phthalate and could use different organic substrates. Laboratory studies indicated that strain TM-1 affected different heavy oils by degrading various components and by changing the chemical properties of the oils. In addition, growth of the bacterium in heavy oils resulted in the loss of aromatic hydrocarbons, resins and asphaltenes, and enrichment with light hydrocarbons and an overall redistribution of these hydrocarbons.

  4. Biosynthesis of glycosylated derivatives of tylosin in Streptomyces venezuelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ah Reum; Park, Sung Ryeol; Park, Je Won; Lee, Eun Yeol; Kim, Dong-Myung; Kim, Byung-Gee; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2011-06-01

    Streptomyces venezuelae YJ028, bearing a deletion of the entire biosynthetic gene cluster encoding the pikromycin polyketide synthases and desosamine biosynthetic enzymes, was used as a bioconversion system for combinatorial biosynthesis of glycosylated derivatives of tylosin. Two engineered deoxysugar biosynthetic pathways for the biosynthesis of TDP-3-O-demethyl-D-chalcose or TDP-Lrhamnose in conjunction with the glycosyltransferaseauxiliary protein pair DesVII/DesVIII were expressed in a S. venezuelae YJ028 mutant strain. Supplementation of each mutant strain capable of producing TDP-3-O-demethyl- D-chalcose or TDP-L-rhamnose with tylosin aglycone tylactone resulted in the production of the 3-O-demethyl- D-chalcose, D-quinovose, or L-rhamnose-glycosylated tylactone.

  5. Permeation study of the potassium channel from streptomyces Lividans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiuzhi; ZHAN Yong; ZHAO Tongjun

    2004-01-01

    A three-state hopping model is established according to experiments to study permeation of an open-state potassium channel from Streptomyces Lividans (KcsA potassium channel). The master equations are used to characterize the dynamics of the system. In this model, ion conduction involves transitions of three states, with one three-ion state and two two-ion states in the selectivity filter respectively. In equilibrium, the well-known Nernst equation is deduced. It is further shown that the current follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics in steady state. According to the parameters provided by Nelson, the current-voltage relationship is proved to be ohmic and the current-concentration relationship is also obtained reasonably. Additional validation of the model in the characteristic time to reach the steady state for the potassium channel is also discussed. This model lays a possible physical basis for the permeation of ion channel, and opens an avenue for further research.

  6. Bioactive metabolite production by Streptomyces albolongus in favourable environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myn Uddin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Demand for new antibiotic is rising up due to continuous resistance risk against conventional antibiotic.This attempt was taken to find out a novel antimicrobial metabolite.Methods: Chili field antagonistic actinomycetes Streptomyces albolongus was isolated and tested for optimum antimicrobialmetabolite production. Primary screening was done by selective media and antibiotic assay was done by agarcup plate method. Fermented product was recovered by separating funnel using suitable solvent.Results: Maximum antimicrobial metabolite production was found at temperature 35°C and pH 9.0 and on 6th day ofincubation. The medium consisting of corn steep liquor (0.2%, glucose (1.0%, NaCl (0.5%, K2HPO4 (0.1% was screenedout as suitable medium for maximum antimicrobial production. Sucrose was found as the best carbon source amongfour sources. The antimicrobial metabolite was found to be stable at pH and temperature up to 11.0 and 100°C respectively.The active agent was best extracted with chloroform. The antimicrobial spectrum of the metabolite was wideand shows activity against Shigella dysenteriae (AE14612, Shigella sonnei (CRL, ICDDR, B, Salmonella typhi (AE14296,Vibrio cholerae (AE14748, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRL, ICDDR, B, Bacillus cereus (BTCC19, Staphylococcus aureus(ATCC6538, Bacillus subtilis (BTTC17 and Bacillus megaterium (BTTC18.Conclusions: The findings of antibacterial activity of S. albolongus against several species of human pathogens includingboth Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria indicated that our produced material might be an alternative antimicrobialsubstance to control human diseases. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2013; 3(2: 75-82Key words: Streptomyces albolongus, antimicrobial metabolite, optimum production, antimicrobial spectrum

  7. Optimization of medium for antimycotic production by Streptomyces spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajić Bojana Ž.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous species of the genus Streptomyces, on the appropriate cultivation medium in the process of submerged biosynthesis, as a product of the secondary metabolism, and under aerobic conditions synthesize pharmacologically active compounds. The aim of presented study was optimization of different nitrogen sources in the cultivation medium for the production of antimycotics using a strain of Streptomyces spp. isolated from the environment. Experiments were carried out in accordance with Box-Behnken design with three factors at three levels (peptone: 3.0 g/l, 7.0 g/l and 11.0 g/l; yeast extract: 1.0 g/l, 3.0 g/l and 5.0 g/l; soybean meal: 5.0 g/l, 15.0 g/l and 25.0 g/l and three repetitions in the central point. Cultivation mediums were analyzed for determination of residual sugar, residual nitrogen, pellet diameter and RNA. Also, antimycotic activity of the obtained culti­vation mediums was determined using diffusion disc method on the Aspergillus spp. as the test microorganism. For the optimization of selected parameters, a Response Surface Methodology was used and the obtained data were analyzed using the software package DESIGN EXPERT 8.1. Achieved model with a coefficient of determination (R of 0.952 predicted that the maximum inhibition zone diameter (24.0 mm against microorganism Aspergillus spp. and the minimum amount of residual sugar (0.551528 g/l under applied experimental conditions was produced when the contents of varied nitrogen sources were: peptone 11.0 g/l, yeast extract 4.32 g/l and soybean meal 25.00 g/l.

  8. Knowledge and Practices About the Subject Emergency Contraception of the Pharmacists and Their Helpers in the Pharmacies in Manisa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayten Taspinar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The study was carried out as descriptive to determine the knowledge and practices about the subject emergency contraception of the pharmacists and their helpers in the pharmacies in central Manisa. METHOD: The universe of the research was formed by the 113 pharmacies registered to Manisa chamber of pharmacists in the year 2008 and all the pharmacies were included in the study. 47 pharmacists and 88 helpers agreed to join the study. The research which was planned to be descriptive March-to-June 2008. A questionnaire was produced by researchers and filled in during face-to face interviews with the pharmacists and their helpers. RESULTS: The pharmacists and their helpers stated that combined pills (46.8% and 44.5% and condoms (41.5% and 42.7% the most requested family planning methods their pharmacy. It was determined that 48.9% of the pharmacists, 33% of the pharmacist’s helpers gave information to customers about their use of family planning methods, 38.3% of the pharmacists, 23.9 % of the pharmacist’s helpers gave information what to do in case of failure to use/ where to apply to. 91.5% of the pharmacists, 95.5% of the pharmacist’s helpers stated that they had emergency contraception (EC purpose pills in their pharmacies. It was determined that 61.7% of the pharmacists, 28.4% of the pharmacist’s helpers had the knowledge about EC, 61.7% of the pharmacists, 52.3% of the pharmacist’s helpers could consider the EC methods true, 68.1% of the pharmacists, 70.5% of the pharmacist’s helpers gave the correct answers to the question of when the EC – purpose pills would be used. 68.1% of the pharmacists, 45.5% of the pharmacist’s helpers stated that EC methods might have adverse effects, 14.9% of the pharmacists, 25% of the pharmacist’s helpers stated that EC methods were protect agains to STD or not information about it, 12.8% of the pharmacists, 9.1% of the pharmacist’s helpers stated that these pills might be effective after the

  9. Whole genome sequence of two Rathayibacter toxicus strains reveals a tunicamycin biosynthetic cluster similar to Streptomyces chartreusis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechler, Aaron J.; Tancos, Matthew A.; Schneider, David J.; King, Jonas G.; Fennessey, Christine M.; Schroeder, Brenda K.; Murray, Timothy D.; Luster, Douglas G.; Schneider, William L.

    2017-01-01

    Rathayibacter toxicus is a forage grass associated Gram-positive bacterium of major concern to food safety and agriculture. This species is listed by USDA-APHIS as a plant pathogen select agent because it produces a tunicamycin-like toxin that is lethal to livestock and may be vectored by nematode species native to the U.S. The complete genomes of two strains of R. toxicus, including the type strain FH-79, were sequenced and analyzed in comparison with all available, complete R. toxicus genomes. Genome sizes ranged from 2,343,780 to 2,394,755 nucleotides, with 2079 to 2137 predicted open reading frames; all four strains showed remarkable synteny over nearly the entire genome, with only a small transposed region. A cluster of genes with similarity to the tunicamycin biosynthetic cluster from Streptomyces chartreusis was identified. The tunicamycin gene cluster (TGC) in R. toxicus contained 14 genes in two transcriptional units, with all of the functional elements for tunicamycin biosynthesis present. The TGC had a significantly lower GC content (52%) than the rest of the genome (61.5%), suggesting that the TGC may have originated from a horizontal transfer event. Further analysis indicated numerous remnants of other potential horizontal transfer events are present in the genome. In addition to the TGC, genes potentially associated with carotenoid and exopolysaccharide production, bacteriocins and secondary metabolites were identified. A CRISPR array is evident. There were relatively few plant-associated cell-wall hydrolyzing enzymes, but there were numerous secreted serine proteases that share sequence homology to the pathogenicity-associated protein Pat-1 of Clavibacter michiganensis. Overall, the genome provides clear insight into the possible mechanisms for toxin production in R. toxicus, providing a basis for future genetic approaches. PMID:28796837

  10. Dendritic cells utilize the evolutionarily conserved WASH and retromer complexes to promote MHCII recycling and helper T cell priming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B Graham

    Full Text Available Immature dendritic cells (DCs maintain a highly dynamic pool of recycling MHCII that promotes sampling of environmental antigens for presentation to T helper cells. However, the molecular basis of MHCII recycling and the cellular machinery that orchestrates MHCII trafficking are incompletely understood. Using a mouse model we show that WASH, an actin regulatory protein that facilitates retromer function, is essential for MHCII recycling and efficient priming of T helper cells. We further demonstrate that WASH deficiency results in impaired MHCII surface levels, recycling, and an accumulation of polyubiquitinated MHCII complexes, which are subsequently slated for premature lysosomal degradation. Consequently, conditional deletion of the Wash gene in DCs impairs priming of both conventional and autoimmune T helper cells in vivo and attenuates disease progression in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE. Thus, we identify a novel mechanism in which DCs employ the evolutionarily conserved WASH and retromer complex for MHCII recycling in order to regulate T helper cell priming.

  11. Effect of unlabeled helper probes on detection of an RNA target by bead-based sandwich hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barken, K.B.; Cabig-Ciminska, M.; Holmgren, A.;

    2004-01-01

    Unlabeled helper oligonucleotides assisting a bead-based sandwich hybridization assay were tested for the optimal placement of the capture and detection probes. The target used was a full-length in vitro synthesized mRNA molecule. Helper probes complementary to regions adjacent to the binding sit....... Using an electrical chip linked to the detection probe for the detection of p-ominophenol, which is produced by alkaline phosphatase, a detection limit of 2 x 10(-13) M mRNA molecules was reached without the use of a nucleic acid amplification step.......Unlabeled helper oligonucleotides assisting a bead-based sandwich hybridization assay were tested for the optimal placement of the capture and detection probes. The target used was a full-length in vitro synthesized mRNA molecule. Helper probes complementary to regions adjacent to the binding site...

  12. The Potential of Streptomyces as Biocontrol Agents against the Rice Blast Fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae (Pyricularia oryzae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ser, Hooi-Leng; Khan, Tahir M.; Chuah, Lay-Hong; Pusparajah, Priyia; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Bey-Hing; Lee, Learn-Han

    2017-01-01

    Rice is a staple food source for more than three billion people worldwide. However, rice is vulnerable to diseases, the most destructive among them being rice blast, which is caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (anamorph Pyricularia oryzae). This fungus attacks rice plants at all stages of development, causing annual losses of approximately 10–30% in various rice producing regions. Synthetic fungicides are often able to effectively control plant diseases, but some fungicides result in serious environmental and health problems. Therefore, there is growing interest in discovering and developing new, improved fungicides based on natural products as well as introducing alternative measures such as biocontrol agents to manage plant diseases. Streptomyces bacteria appear to be promising biocontrol agents against a wide range of phytopathogenic fungi, which is not surprising given their ability to produce various bioactive compounds. This review provides insight into the biocontrol potential of Streptomyces against the rice blast fungus, M. oryzae. The ability of various Streptomyces spp. to act as biocontrol agents of rice blast disease has been studied by researchers under both laboratory and greenhouse/growth chamber conditions. Laboratory studies have shown that Streptomyces exhibit inhibitory activity against M. oryzae. In greenhouse studies, infected rice seedlings treated with Streptomyces resulted in up to 88.3% disease reduction of rice blast. Studies clearly show that Streptomyces spp. have the potential to be used as highly effective biocontrol agents against rice blast disease; however, the efficacy of any biocontrol agent may be affected by several factors including environmental conditions and methods of application. In order to fully exploit their potential, further studies on the isolation, formulation and application methods of Streptomyces along with field experiments are required to establish them as effective biocontrol agents. PMID:28144236

  13. The Potential of Streptomyces as Biocontrol Agents against the Rice Blast Fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae (Pyricularia oryzae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ser, Hooi-Leng; Khan, Tahir M; Chuah, Lay-Hong; Pusparajah, Priyia; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Bey-Hing; Lee, Learn-Han

    2017-01-01

    Rice is a staple food source for more than three billion people worldwide. However, rice is vulnerable to diseases, the most destructive among them being rice blast, which is caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (anamorph Pyricularia oryzae). This fungus attacks rice plants at all stages of development, causing annual losses of approximately 10-30% in various rice producing regions. Synthetic fungicides are often able to effectively control plant diseases, but some fungicides result in serious environmental and health problems. Therefore, there is growing interest in discovering and developing new, improved fungicides based on natural products as well as introducing alternative measures such as biocontrol agents to manage plant diseases. Streptomyces bacteria appear to be promising biocontrol agents against a wide range of phytopathogenic fungi, which is not surprising given their ability to produce various bioactive compounds. This review provides insight into the biocontrol potential of Streptomyces against the rice blast fungus, M. oryzae. The ability of various Streptomyces spp. to act as biocontrol agents of rice blast disease has been studied by researchers under both laboratory and greenhouse/growth chamber conditions. Laboratory studies have shown that Streptomyces exhibit inhibitory activity against M. oryzae. In greenhouse studies, infected rice seedlings treated with Streptomyces resulted in up to 88.3% disease reduction of rice blast. Studies clearly show that Streptomyces spp. have the potential to be used as highly effective biocontrol agents against rice blast disease; however, the efficacy of any biocontrol agent may be affected by several factors including environmental conditions and methods of application. In order to fully exploit their potential, further studies on the isolation, formulation and application methods of Streptomyces along with field experiments are required to establish them as effective biocontrol agents.

  14. Overproduction of lactimidomycin by cross-overexpression of genes encoding Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Dong; Yan, Yijun; Pan, Guohui; Xiang, Wensheng; Shen, Ben

    2016-03-01

    The glutarimide-containing polyketides represent a fascinating class of natural products that exhibit a multitude of biological activities. We have recently cloned and sequenced the biosynthetic gene clusters for three members of the glutarimide-containing polyketides-iso-migrastatin (iso-MGS) from Streptomyces platensis NRRL 18993, lactimidomycin (LTM) from Streptomyces amphibiosporus ATCC 53964, and cycloheximide (CHX) from Streptomyces sp. YIM56141. Comparative analysis of the three clusters identified mgsA and chxA, from the mgs and chx gene clusters, respectively, that were predicted to encode the PimR-like Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory proteins (SARPs) but failed to reveal any regulatory gene from the ltm gene cluster. Overexpression of mgsA or chxA in S. platensis NRRL 18993, Streptomyces sp. YIM56141 or SB11024, and a recombinant strain of Streptomyces coelicolor M145 carrying the intact mgs gene cluster has no significant effect on iso-MGS or CHX production, suggesting that MgsA or ChxA regulation may not be rate-limiting for iso-MGS and CHX production in these producers. In contrast, overexpression of mgsA or chxA in S. amphibiosporus ATCC 53964 resulted in a significant increase in LTM production, with LTM titer reaching 106 mg/L, which is five-fold higher than that of the wild-type strain. These results support MgsA and ChxA as members of the SARP family of positive regulators for the iso-MGS and CHX biosynthetic machinery and demonstrate the feasibility to improve glutarimide-containing polyketide production in Streptomyces strains by exploiting common regulators.

  15. USP21 prevents the generation of T-helper-1-like Treg cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yangyang; Lu, Yue; Wang, Shuaiwei; Han, Zhijun; Zhu, Fuxiang; Ni, Yingmeng; Liang, Rui; Zhang, Yan; Leng, Qibin; Wei, Gang; Shi, Guochao; Zhu, Ruihong; Li, Dan; Wang, Haikun; Zheng, Song Guo; Xu, Hongxi; Tsun, Andy; Li, Bin

    2016-11-18

    FOXP3(+) Regulatory T (Treg) cells play a key role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis and tolerance. Disruption of Foxp3 expression results in the generation of instable Treg cells and acquisition of effector T-cell-like function. Here we report that the E3 deubiquitinase USP21 prevents the depletion of FOXP3 at the protein level and restricts the generation of T-helper-1-like Treg cells. Mice depleted of Usp21 specifically in Treg cells display immune disorders characterized by spontaneous T-cell activation and excessive T-helper type 1 (Th1) skewing of Treg cells into Th1-like Treg cells. USP21 stabilizes FOXP3 protein by mediating its deubiquitination and maintains the expression of Treg signature genes. Our results demonstrate how USP21 prevents FOXP3 protein depletion and controls Treg lineage stability in vivo.

  16. Psychological well-being and social support among elders employed as lay helpers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammonley, Denise

    2009-01-01

    Impacts on lay helpers of participation in part-time work supporting rural elders with severe mental illness were explored in a group of 17 older adults employed in a demonstration project. Self-rated well-being and social support were assessed over 1 year. Ratings of autonomy and positive relations with others varied over 1 year. Perceptions of the amount of social support provided showed a trend toward improvement at 1 year. Results are considered in the context of role theory and illustrated with an ethnographic case study of the service environment. The lay helper role is a form of productive engagement through paid caregiving, with potential to supplement rural mental health service systems while supporting elders' needs for meaningful civic engagement.

  17. Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns Induced Crosstalk between Dendritic Cells, T Helper Cells, and Natural Killer Helper Cells Can Improve Dendritic Cell Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oth, Tammy; Vanderlocht, Joris; Van Elssen, Catharina H M J; Bos, Gerard M J; Germeraad, Wilfred T V

    2016-01-01

    A coordinated cellular interplay is of crucial importance in both host defense against pathogens and malignantly transformed cells. The various interactions of Dendritic Cells (DC), Natural Killer (NK) cells, and T helper (Th) cells can be influenced by a variety of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and will lead to enhanced CD8(+) effector T cell responses. Specific Pattern Recognition Receptor (PRR) triggering during maturation enables DC to enhance Th1 as well as NK helper cell responses. This effect is correlated with the amount of IL-12p70 released by DC. Activated NK cells are able to amplify the proinflammatory cytokine profile of DC via the release of IFN-γ. The knowledge on how PAMP recognition can modulate the DC is of importance for the design and definition of appropriate therapeutic cancer vaccines. In this review we will discuss the potential role of specific PAMP-matured DC in optimizing therapeutic DC-based vaccines, as some of these DC are efficiently activating Th1, NK cells, and cytotoxic T cells. Moreover, to optimize these vaccines, also the inhibitory effects of tumor-derived suppressive factors, for example, on the NK-DC crosstalk, should be taken into account. Finally, the suppressive role of the tumor microenvironment in vaccination efficacy and some proposals to overcome this by using combination therapies will be described.

  18. Zincophorin – biosynthesis in Streptomyces griseus and antibiotic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walther, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Zincophorin is a polyketide antibiotic that possesses potent activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including human pathogens. While a number of total syntheses of this highly functionalized natural product were reported since its initial discovery, the genetic basis for the biosynthesis of zincophorin has remained unclear. In this study, the co-linearity inherent to polyketide pathways was used to identify the zincophorin biosynthesis gene cluster in the genome of the natural producer HKI 0741. Interestingly, the same locus is fully conserved in the streptomycin-producing actinomycete IFO 13350, suggesting that the latter bacterium is also capable of zincophorin biosynthesis. Biological profiling of zincophorin revealed a dose-dependent inhibition of the Gram-positive bacterium . The antibacterial effect, however, is accompanied by cytotoxicity. Antibiotic and cytotoxic activities were completely abolished upon esterification of the carboxylic acid group in zincophorin.

  19. Fluctuation-Enhanced Sensing of Bacterium Odors

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Hung-Chih; King, Maria D; Kwan, Chiman

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the possibility to detect and identify bacteria by sensing their odor via fluctuation-enhanced sensing with commercial Taguchi sensors. The fluctuations of the electrical resistance during exposure to different bacterial odors, Escherichia coli and anthrax-surrogate Bacillus subtilis, have been measured and analyzed. In the present study, the simplest method, the measurement and analysis of power density spectra was used. The sensors were run in the normal heated and the sampling-and-hold working modes, respectively. The results indicate that Taguchi sensors used in these fluctuation-enhanced modes are effective tools of bacterium detection and identification even when they are utilizing only the power density spectrum of the stochastic sensor signal.

  20. Diffusion of magnetotactic bacterium in rotating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebers, A., E-mail: aceb@tesla.sal.l [Department of Physics, University of Latvia, Zellu 8, Ri-bar ga, LV-1002 (Latvia)

    2011-02-15

    Swimming trajectory of a magnetotactic bacterium in a rotating magnetic field is a circle. Random reversals of the direction of the bacterium motion induces a random walk of the curvature center of the trajectory. In assumption of the distribution of the switching events according to the Poisson process the diffusion coefficient is calculated in dependence on the frequency of the rotating field and the characteristic time between the switching events. It is confirmed by the numerical simulation of the random walk of the bacterium in the rotating magnetic field. - Research highlights: Random switching of the flagella leads to diffusion of a bacterium in the field. Mean square displacement of the curvature center is proportional to time. Diffusion coefficient depends on the period of a rotating field. At zero frequency diffusion coefficient is the same as for a tumbling bacterium.

  1. Growth dynamic of dual culture systems comprising ectomycorrhizal fungi and mycorrhiza helper bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Nadine R.; Ramos, Miguel A.; Castro, Paula M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous root symbionts that associate with the majority of forest trees and often have a crucial role on plant survival and growth in impoverished soils. Within the vast community of soil microorganisms, the mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) are recognizably one of the groups that most directly affect fungal growth and mycorrhiza establishment. Although their positive effect on the mycorrhizal partnership has been previously reported, the specificity of such associ...

  2. Does human bocavirus infection depend on helper viruses? A challenging case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brockmann Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A case of severe diarrhoea associated with synergistic human bocavirus type 1 (HBoV and human herpes virus type 6 (HHV6 is reported. The case supports the hypotheses that HBoV infection under clinical conditions may depend on helper viruses, or that HBoV replicates by a mechanism that is atypical for parvoviruses, or that HBoV infection can be specifically treated with cidofovir.

  3. General pathologist-helper: The new medical app about general pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Fernandez-Vega

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Smartphone applications (apps have become increasingly prevalent in medicine. Due to most pathologists, pathology trainees, technicians, and medical students use smartphones; apps can be a different way for general pathology education. “General pathologist-helper (GP-HELPER” is a novel app developed as a reference tool in general pathology and especially for general pathologists, developed for Android and iOS platforms. Materials and Methods: “GP-HELPER,” was created using Mobincube website platform. This tool also integrates “FORUM GP-HELPER,” an external website created using Miarroba website (http://forum-gp-helper.mboards.com and “COMMUNITY GP-HELPER” a multichannel chat created using Chatango website platform. Results: The application was released in July 2015, and it is been periodically updated since then. The app has permanent information (offline data about different pathology protocols (TNM latest edition, protocols regarding management of tumors of unknown primary origin, and flowcharts for some of the most difficult tumors to diagnose and a database with more than 5000 immunohistochemistry results from different tumors. Online data have links to more than 1100 reference pathology video lectures, 250 antibodies information, more than 70 pathology association websites, 46 pathology providers, and 78 outstanding pathology journal websites. Besides this information, the app has two interactive places such as “FORUM GP-HELPER” and “COMMUNITY GP-HELPER” that let users to stay in touch everywhere and every time. Expert consult section is also available. Conclusions: “GP-HELPER” pretends to integrate offline and online data about pathology with two interactive external places in order to represent a reference tool for general pathologists and associate members.

  4. The chemical formula of a magnetotactic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, Mohit; Das, Sayoni; Mishra, Prashant; Mittal, Aditya

    2012-05-01

    Elucidation of the chemical logic of life is one of the grand challenges in biology, and essential to the progress of the upcoming field of synthetic biology. Treatment of microbial cells explicitly as a "chemical" species in controlled reaction (growth) environments has allowed fascinating discoveries of elemental formulae of a few species that have guided the modern views on compositions of a living cell. Application of mass and energy balances on living cells has proved to be useful in modeling of bioengineering systems, particularly in deriving optimized media compositions for growing microorganisms to maximize yields of desired bio-derived products by regulating intra-cellular metabolic networks. In this work, application of elemental mass balance during growth of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense in bioreactors has resulted in the discovery of the chemical formula of the magnetotactic bacterium. By developing a stoichiometric equation characterizing the formation of a magnetotactic bacterial cell, coupled with rigorous experimental measurements and robust calculations, we report the elemental formula of M. gryphiswaldense cell as CH(2.06)O(0.13)N(0.28)Fe(1.74×10(-3)). Remarkably, we find that iron metabolism during growth of this magnetotactic bacterium is much more correlated individually with carbon and nitrogen, compared to carbon and nitrogen with each other, indicating that iron serves more as a nutrient during bacterial growth rather than just a mineral. Magnetotactic bacteria have not only invoked some interest in the field of astrobiology for the last two decades, but are also prokaryotes having the unique ability of synthesizing membrane bound intracellular organelles. Our findings on these unique prokaryotes are a strong addition to the limited repertoire, of elemental compositions of living cells, aimed at exploring the chemical logic of life.

  5. Streptomyces aridus sp. nov., isolated from a high altitude Atacama Desert soil and emended description of Streptomyces melanogenes Sugawara and Onuma 1957

    Science.gov (United States)

    A polyphasic study was undertaken to determine the taxonomic status of a Streptomyces strain which had been isolated from a high altitude Atacama Desert soil and shown to have bioactive properties. The strain, isolate H9T, was found to have chemotaxonomic, cultural, and morphological properties that...

  6. Some cytokine profiles of T-helper cells in lesions of advanced periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglundh, Tord; Liljenberg, Birgitta; Lindhe, Jan

    2002-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze some cytokine profiles of T-helper cells in periodontitis lesions. 22 adult patients (7 females and 15 males, aged 24-66 years) with advanced and generalized chronic periodontitis were recruited. Clinical and radiographical characteristics of periodontal disease was assessed. From each patient a gingival biopsy was obtained from one randomly selected diseased interproximal site. The soft tissue sample was prepared for immunohistochemical analysis. Double staining was performed to detect cells positive for both the CD4 marker and different cytokines, i.e. interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). The lesions in advanced periodontitis contained similar proportions of cells positive for the different cytokine markers examined. In addition, the number of cells expressing cytokine profiles for either T helper-1 (IFN-gamma + IL-2) or T helper-2 (IL-4 + IL-6) was similar. It is suggested that the lesions of periodontitis are regulated by a combined Th-1 and Th-2 function.

  7. Increased Peripheral Proinflammatory T Helper Subsets Contribute to Cardiovascular Complications in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru-xing Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Coronary atherosclerotic heart disease (CHD is one of the major concerns in type 2 diabetes (T2D. The systemic chronic inflammation has been postulated to bridge the increased risk of cardiovascular disease and T2D. We formulated that increased peripheral proinflammatory T helper subsets contributed to the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients. Methods. The frequencies of peripheral total CD4+ T helper cells, proinflammatory Th1, Th17, and Th22 subsets were determined by flow cytometry in diabetic patients with or without CHD (n=42 and 67, resp.. Results. Both peripheral frequencies and total numbers of Th1, Th17, and Th22 cells were further increased in diabetic patients with CHD. Logistic regression and categorical cross-table analysis further confirmed that increased proinflammatory Th subsets, especially Th22, were independent risk factors of cardiovascular complication in diabetes. Elevated Th subsets also correlated with increased CRP levels and the atherogenic index of plasma. Moreover, Th1 frequency and Th22 numbers demonstrated remarkable potential in predicting CHD in diabetes. Conclusions. Increased peripheral proinflammatory T helper subsets act in concert and contribute to the increased prevalence of diabetic cardiovasculopathy. The recently identified Th22 cells might play an independent role in CHD and represent a novel proxy for cardiovascular risks in diabetes.

  8. Comparison of replication-competent, first generation, and helper-dependent adenoviral vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Weaver

    Full Text Available All studies using human serotype 5 Adenovirus (Ad vectors must address two major obstacles: safety and the presence of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies. Helper-Dependent (HD Ads have been proposed as alternative vectors for gene therapy and vaccine development because they have an improved safety profile. To evaluate the potential of HD-Ad vaccines, we compared replication-competent (RC, first-generation (FG and HD vectors for their ability to induce immune responses in mice. We show that RC-Ad5 and HD-Ad5 vectors generate stronger immune responses than FG-Ad5 vectors. HD-Ad5 vectors gave lower side effects than RC or FG-Ad, producing lower levels of tissue damage and anti-Ad T cell responses. Also, HD vectors have the benefit of being packaged by all subgroup C serotype helper viruses. We found that HD serotypes 1, 2, 5, and 6 induce anti-HIV responses equivalently. By using these HD serotypes in heterologous succession we showed that HD vectors can be used to significantly boost anti-HIV immune responses in mice and in FG-Ad5-immune macaques. Since HD vectors have been show to have an increased safety profile, do not possess any Ad genes, can be packaged by multiple serotype helper viruses, and elicit strong anti-HIV immune responses, they warrant further investigation as alternatives to FG vectors as gene-based vaccines.

  9. Staphylococcal pathogenicity island interference with helper phage reproduction is a paradigm of molecular parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Geeta; Chen, John; Kumar, Krishan; Ross, Hope F; Ubeda, Carles; Damle, Priyadarshan K; Lane, Kristin D; Penadés, José R; Christie, Gail E; Novick, Richard P

    2012-10-02

    Staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) carry superantigen and resistance genes and are extremely widespread in Staphylococcus aureus and in other Gram-positive bacteria. SaPIs represent a major source of intrageneric horizontal gene transfer and a stealth conduit for intergeneric gene transfer; they are phage satellites that exploit the life cycle of their temperate helper phages with elegant precision to enable their rapid replication and promiscuous spread. SaPIs also interfere with helper phage reproduction, blocking plaque formation, sharply reducing burst size and enhancing the survival of host cells following phage infection. Here, we show that SaPIs use several different strategies for phage interference, presumably the result of convergent evolution. One strategy, not described previously in the bacteriophage microcosm, involves a SaPI-encoded protein that directly and specifically interferes with phage DNA packaging by blocking the phage terminase small subunit. Another strategy involves interference with phage reproduction by diversion of the vast majority of virion proteins to the formation of SaPI-specific small infectious particles. Several SaPIs use both of these strategies, and at least one uses neither but possesses a third. Our studies illuminate a key feature of the evolutionary strategy of these mobile genetic elements, in addition to their carriage of important genes-interference with helper phage reproduction, which could ensure their transferability and long-term persistence.

  10. Engineering of weak helper interactions for high-efficiency FRET probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünberg, Raik; Burnier, Julia V; Ferrar, Tony; Beltran-Sastre, Violeta; Stricher, François; van der Sloot, Almer M; Garcia-Olivas, Raquel; Mallabiabarrena, Arrate; Sanjuan, Xavier; Zimmermann, Timo; Serrano, Luis

    2013-10-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based detection of protein interactions is limited by the very narrow range of FRET-permitting distances. We show two different strategies for the rational design of weak helper interactions that co-recruit donor and acceptor fluorophores for a more robust detection of bimolecular FRET: (i) in silico design of electrostatically driven encounter complexes and (ii) fusion of tunable domain-peptide interaction modules based on WW or SH3 domains. We tested each strategy for optimization of FRET between (m)Citrine and mCherry, which do not natively interact. Both approaches yielded comparable and large increases in FRET efficiencies with little or no background. Helper-interaction modules can be fused to any pair of fluorescent proteins and could, we found, enhance FRET between mTFP1 and mCherry as well as between mTurquoise2 and mCitrine. We applied enhanced helper-interaction FRET (hiFRET) probes to study the binding between full-length H-Ras and Raf1 as well as the drug-induced interaction between Raf1 and B-Raf.

  11. Group-size-dependent punishment of idle subordinates in a cooperative breeder where helpers pay to stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Stefan; Zöttl, Markus; Groenewoud, Frank; Taborsky, Barbara

    2014-08-22

    In cooperative breeding systems, dominant breeders sometimes tolerate unrelated individuals even if they inflict costs on the dominants. According to the 'pay-to-stay' hypothesis, (i) subordinates can outweigh these costs by providing help and (ii) dominants should be able to enforce help by punishing subordinates that provide insufficient help. This requires that dominants can monitor helping and can recognize group members individually. In a field experiment, we tested whether cooperatively breeding cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher subordinates increase their help after a forced 'idle' period, how other group members respond to a previously idle helper, and how helper behaviour and group responses depend on group size. Previously, idle helpers increased their submissiveness and received more aggression than control helpers, suggesting that punishment occurred to enforce help. Subordinates in small groups increased their help more than those in large groups, despite receiving less aggression. When subordinates were temporarily removed, dominants in small groups were more likely to evict returning subordinates. Our results suggest that only in small groups do helpers face a latent threat of punishment by breeders as predicted by the pay-to-stay hypothesis. In large groups, cognitive constraints may prevent breeders from tracking the behaviour of a large number of helpers.

  12. Draft Genome of Streptomyces zinciresistens K42, a Novel Metal-Resistant Species Isolated from Copper-Zinc Mine Tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yanbing; Hao, Xiuli; Johnstone, Laurel; Miller, Susan J.; Baltrus, David A.; Rensing, Christopher; Wei, Gehong

    2011-01-01

    A draft genome sequence of Streptomyces zinciresistens K42, a novel Streptomyces species displaying a high level of resistance to zinc and cadmium, is presented here. The genome contains a large number of genes encoding proteins predicted to be involved in conferring metal resistance. Many of these genes appear to have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. PMID:22038968

  13. Managing scab diseases of potato and radish caused by Streptomyces spp. using Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BAC03 and other biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptomyces spp. cause scab disease in plants like potato and radish. To seek effective control methods of this disease, biologically based materials were examined on their efficacies for disease control. In greenhouse or growth chamber tests, potting soil was infested with Streptomyces scabies (10...

  14. The multiple personalities of Streptomyces spp. from the rhizosphere of apple cultivated in brassica seed meal ameded soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassicaceae seed meal soil amendments proved control of Rhizoctonia root rot, in part, through the proliferation of indigenous rhizosphere colonizing Streptomyces spp. Studies were conducted to assess the relative role of antibiosis and nitric oxide (NO) production in the capacity of Streptomyces ...

  15. Systematics of Plant-Pathogenic and Related Streptomyces Species Based on Phylogenetic Analyses of Multiple Gene Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 10 species of Streptomyces implicated as the etiological agents in scab disease of potatoes or soft rot disease of sweet potatoes are distributed among 7 different phylogenetic clades in analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, but high sequence similarity of this gene among Streptomyces speci...

  16. Characterization of cytotoxic compound from marine sediment derived actinomycete Streptomyces avidinii strain SU4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sudha; S; Masilamani; Selvam; M

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the cytotoxic activity of actinomycete isolated from marine sediment.Methods:In the present study the DNA was isolated and the ITS region of 16s rRNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction,using two universal bacterial primers,1492K(5’-GGTTACCTTG’TTAC GACTT-3’)and Eubac27F(5’-AGAGTTTGATCCTGGCTC AG-3’).The amplified products were purified using TIANgel mini purification kit,ligated to MD18-T simple vector(TaKaRa),and transformed into competent cells of Escherichia coli DH5α.16S rRNA gene fragment was sequenced using forward primer M13F(-47)and reverse primer M13R(-48).Blast search sequence similarity was found against the existing non-redundanl nucleotide sequence database thus,identified as Streptomyces sp SU,Streptomyces rubralavandulae strain SU1,Streptomyces cacaoi strain SU2,Streptomyces cavourensis strain SU3,Streptomyces avidinii strain SU4,Streptomyces globisporus strain SU5,Streptomyces variabilis strain SU6,Streptomyces coelicolor strain SU 7.Among the eight identified isolates,one actinomycete Streptomyces avidinii strain SU4 was selected for further study.Results:Crude extract of the actinomycete isolate exhibited IC50in 64.5μg against Hep-2 cell line,250μg in VERO cell line.This value is very close to the criteria of cytotoxicity activity for the crude extracts,as established by the American National Cancer Institute(NCI)is in IC50<30μg/mL.The CC MS analysis showed that the active principle might be 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid,bis(2-methylpropyl)ester(12.17%),isooctyl phthalate(15.29%)with the retention time 15.642 and 21.612,respectively.Conclusions:This study clearly proves that the marine sediment derived actinomycetes with bioactive metabolites can be expected to provide high quality biological material for high throughout biochemical and anticancer screening programs.These results help us to conclude that the potential of using metabolic engineering and post genomic

  17. Taxonomy and Polyphasic Characterization of Alkaline Amylase Producing Marine Actinomycete Streptomyces rochei BTSS 1001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Acharyabhatta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments along the southeast coast of Bay of Bengal were investigated for amylolytic activity. Marine actinomycete BTSS 1001 producing an alkaline amylase was identified from marine sediment of Diviseema coast, Bay of Bengal. The isolate produced alkaline amylase with maximum amylolytic activity at pH 9.5 at 50°C. The organism produced white to pale grey substrate mycelium and grayish aerial mycelium with pinkish brown pigmentation. A comprehensive study of morphological, physiological parameters, cultural characteristics, and biochemical studies was performed. The presence of iso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0, iso-C16 : 0, and anteiso-C17 : 0 as the major cellular fatty acids, LL-diaminopimelic acid as the characteristic cell wall component, and menaquinones MK-9H(6 and MK-9H(8 as the major isoprenoid quinones is attributed to the strain BTSS 1001 belonging to the genus Streptomyces. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain BTSS 1001 exhibited the highest similarities to the type strains of Streptomyces rochei (99%, Streptomyces plicatus (99%, and Streptomyces enissocaesilis (99%. Using the polyphasic taxonomical approach and phenotypic characteristic studies, the isolate BTSS 1001 was characterized as marine actinomycete Streptomyces rochei.

  18. Plasmid cloning vectors for the conjugal transfer of DNA from Escherichia coli to Streptomyces spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, M; Logan, R; O'Brien, K; Seno, E T; Rao, R N; Schoner, B E

    1992-07-01

    We have constructed cloning vectors for the conjugal transfer of DNA from Escherichia coli to Streptomyces spp. All vectors contain the 760-bp oriT fragment from the IncP plasmid, RK2. Transfer functions need to be supplied in trans by the E. coli donor strain. We have incorporated into these vectors selectable antibiotic-resistance markers (AmR, ThR, SpR) that function in Streptomyces spp. and other features that should allow for: (i) integration via homologous recombination between cloned DNA and the Streptomyces spp. chromosome, (ii) autonomous replication, or (iii) site-specific integration at the bacteriophage phi C31 attachment site. Shuttle cosmids for constructing genomic libraries and bacteriophage P1 cloning vector capable of accepting approx. 100-kb fragments are also described. A simple mating procedure has been developed for the conjugal transfer of these vectors from E. coli to Streptomyces spp. that involves plating of the donor strain and either germinated spores or mycelial fragments of the recipient strain. We have shown that several of these vectors can be introduced into Streptomyces fradiae, a strain that is notoriously difficult to transform by PEG-mediated protoplast transformation.

  19. Streptomyces marokkonensis sp. nov., isolated from rhizosphere soil of Argania spinosa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouizgarne, B; Lanoot, B; Loqman, S; Spröer, C; Klenk, H-P; Swings, J; Ouhdouch, Y

    2009-11-01

    The novel actinomycete strain Ap1(T) was isolated from rhizosphere soil of the argan tree (Argania spinosa L.) in the south of Morocco. Strain Ap1(T) has been reported as a novel producer of the pentaene polyene macrolide isochainin, which strongly inhibits the growth of pathogenic yeasts and phytopathogenic fungi. Strain Ap1(T) shows a greyish-white aerial mycelium with chains of smooth-surfaced spores of the Spiralis type and a cell wall containing ll-diaminopimelic acid. Based on chemotaxonomy and morphological features, strain Ap1(T) was identified as a member of the genus Streptomyces. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities based on almost-complete 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain Ap1(T) is closely associated with members of the Streptomyces violaceoruber species group (S. violaceoruber, S. coelescens, S. violaceorubidus, 'S. caesius', 'S. lividans', S. violaceolatus and S. humiferus) and others (Streptomyces aurantiogriseus, S. lienomycini, S. chattanoogensis, S. rubrogriseus and S. tendae). However, protein profiling, DNA-DNA hybridization and BOX-PCR fingerprinting proved a relationship above the species level. In addition, the phenotype also allowed for the differentiation of strain Ap1(T) from its closest neighbours. As a result of this polyphasic approach, we conclude that strain Ap1(T) represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces marokkonensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Ap1(T) (=R-22003(T) =LMG 23016(T) =DSM 41918(T)).

  20. A single Streptomyces symbiont makes multiple antifungals to support the fungus farming ant Acromyrmex octospinosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan F Seipke

    Full Text Available Attine ants are dependent on a cultivated fungus for food and use antibiotics produced by symbiotic Actinobacteria as weedkillers in their fungus gardens. Actinobacterial species belonging to the genera Pseudonocardia, Streptomyces and Amycolatopsis have been isolated from attine ant nests and shown to confer protection against a range of microfungal weeds. In previous work on the higher attine Acromyrmex octospinosus we isolated a Streptomyces strain that produces candicidin, consistent with another report that attine ants use Streptomyces-produced candicidin in their fungiculture. Here we report the genome analysis of this Streptomyces strain and identify multiple antibiotic biosynthetic pathways. We demonstrate, using gene disruptions and mass spectrometry, that this single strain has the capacity to make candicidin and multiple antimycin compounds. Although antimycins have been known for >60 years we report the sequence of the biosynthetic gene cluster for the first time. Crucially, disrupting the candicidin and antimycin gene clusters in the same strain had no effect on bioactivity against a co-evolved nest pathogen called Escovopsis that has been identified in ∼30% of attine ant nests. Since the Streptomyces strain has strong bioactivity against Escovopsis we conclude that it must make additional antifungal(s to inhibit Escovopsis. However, candicidin and antimycins likely offer protection against other microfungal weeds that infect the attine fungal gardens. Thus, we propose that the selection of this biosynthetically prolific strain from the natural environment provides A. octospinosus with broad spectrum activity against Escovopsis and other microfungal weeds.

  1. A single Streptomyces symbiont makes multiple antifungals to support the fungus farming ant Acromyrmex octospinosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seipke, Ryan F; Barke, Jörg; Brearley, Charles; Hill, Lionel; Yu, Douglas W; Goss, Rebecca J M; Hutchings, Matthew I

    2011-01-01

    Attine ants are dependent on a cultivated fungus for food and use antibiotics produced by symbiotic Actinobacteria as weedkillers in their fungus gardens. Actinobacterial species belonging to the genera Pseudonocardia, Streptomyces and Amycolatopsis have been isolated from attine ant nests and shown to confer protection against a range of microfungal weeds. In previous work on the higher attine Acromyrmex octospinosus we isolated a Streptomyces strain that produces candicidin, consistent with another report that attine ants use Streptomyces-produced candicidin in their fungiculture. Here we report the genome analysis of this Streptomyces strain and identify multiple antibiotic biosynthetic pathways. We demonstrate, using gene disruptions and mass spectrometry, that this single strain has the capacity to make candicidin and multiple antimycin compounds. Although antimycins have been known for >60 years we report the sequence of the biosynthetic gene cluster for the first time. Crucially, disrupting the candicidin and antimycin gene clusters in the same strain had no effect on bioactivity against a co-evolved nest pathogen called Escovopsis that has been identified in ∼30% of attine ant nests. Since the Streptomyces strain has strong bioactivity against Escovopsis we conclude that it must make additional antifungal(s) to inhibit Escovopsis. However, candicidin and antimycins likely offer protection against other microfungal weeds that infect the attine fungal gardens. Thus, we propose that the selection of this biosynthetically prolific strain from the natural environment provides A. octospinosus with broad spectrum activity against Escovopsis and other microfungal weeds.

  2. Streptomyces mexicanus sp. nov., a xylanolytic micro-organism isolated from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Pavel; García-Varela, Martin; Luz-Madrigal, Agustín; Huitrón, Carlos; Flores, María Elena

    2003-01-01

    The taxonomic position of a thermophilic actinomycete strain isolated from soil was examined using a polyphasic approach. The strain, designated CH-M-1035T, was assigned to the genus Streptomyces on the basis of chemical and morphological criteria. It formed Rectiflexibiles aerial hyphae that carried long chains of rounded, smooth spores. The almost complete nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene of strain CH-M-1035T was determined and its comparison with the 16S rDNA sequences of previously studied streptomycetes confirmed the assignment of the novel strain to the genus Streptomyces. Strain CH-M-1035T clustered with species belonging to the Streptomyces thermodiastaticus clade in the 1 6S-rDNA-based phylogenetic tree. However, the phenotypic properties of strain CH-M-1035T differed from those of the recognized species within this clade. Therefore, it is proposed that strain CH-M-1035T be classified as a novel species within the genus Streptomyces, as Streptomyces mexicanus (type strain CH-M-1035T =DSM 41796T =BM-B-384T =NRRL B-24196T).

  3. Screening of wild type Streptomyces isolates able to overproduce clavulanic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela A. Viana Marques

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The selection of new microorganisms able to produce antimicrobial compounds is hoped for to reduce their production costs and the side effects caused by synthetic drugs. Clavulanic acid is a β-lactam antibiotic produced by submerged culture, which is widely used in medicine as a powerful inhibitor of β-lactamases, enzymes produced by bacteria resistant to antibiotics such penicillin and cephalosporin. The purpose of this work was to select the best clavulanic acid producer among strains of Streptomyces belonging to the Microorganism Collection of the Department of Antibiotics of the Federal University of Pernambuco (DAUFPE. Initially, the strains were studied for their capacity to inhibit the action of β-lactamases produced by Klebsiella aerogenes ATCC 15380. From these results, five strains were selected to investigate the batch kinetics of growth and clavulanic acid production in submerged culture carried out in flasks. The results were compared with the ones obtained by Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064 selected as a control strain. The best clavulanic acid producer was Streptomyces DAUFPE 3060, molecularly identified as Streptomyces variabilis, which increased the clavulanic acid production by 28% compared to the control strain. This work contributes to the enlargement of knowledge on new Streptomyces wild strains able to produce clavulanic acid by submerged culture.

  4. Screening of wild type Streptomyces isolates able to overproduce clavulanic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana Marques, Daniela A; Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria de Carvalho; de Oliveira, Patrícia Maria Sobral; Lima, Gláucia Manoella de Souza; Araújo, Janete M; Lima-Filho, José L; Converti, Attilio; Pessoa-Júnior, Adalberto; Porto, Ana L F

    2014-01-01

    The selection of new microorganisms able to produce antimicrobial compounds is hoped for to reduce their production costs and the side effects caused by synthetic drugs. Clavulanic acid is a β-lactam antibiotic produced by submerged culture, which is widely used in medicine as a powerful inhibitor of β-lactamases, enzymes produced by bacteria resistant to antibiotics such penicillin and cephalosporin. The purpose of this work was to select the best clavulanic acid producer among strains of Streptomyces belonging to the Microorganism Collection of the Department of Antibiotics of the Federal University of Pernambuco (DAUFPE). Initially, the strains were studied for their capacity to inhibit the action of β-lactamases produced by Klebsiella aerogenes ATCC 15380. From these results, five strains were selected to investigate the batch kinetics of growth and clavulanic acid production in submerged culture carried out in flasks. The results were compared with the ones obtained by Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064 selected as a control strain. The best clavulanic acid producer was Streptomyces DAUFPE 3060, molecularly identified as Streptomyces variabilis, which increased the clavulanic acid production by 28% compared to the control strain. This work contributes to the enlargement of knowledge on new Streptomyces wild strains able to produce clavulanic acid by submerged culture.

  5. In vivo antimalarial activity of the endophytic actinobacteria, Streptomyces SUK 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Mohd Shukri; Zin, Noraziah Mohamad; Hassan, Zainal Abidin Abu; Latip, Jalifah; Pethick, Florence; Hunter, Iain S; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Herron, Paul R

    2015-12-01

    Endophytic bacteria, such as Streptomyces, have the potential to act as a source for novel bioactive molecules with medicinal properties. The present study was aimed at assessing the antimalarial activity of crude extract isolated from various strains of actinobacteria living endophytically in some Malaysian medicinal plants. Using the four day suppression test method on male ICR strain mice, compounds produced from three strains of Streptomyces (SUK8, SUK10, and SUK27) were tested in vivo against Plasmodium berghei PZZ1/100 in an antimalarial screen using crude extracts at four different concentrations. One of these extracts, isolated from Streptomyces SUK10 obtained from the bark of Shorea ovalis tree, showed inhibition of the test organism and was further tested against P. berghei-infected mice for antimalarial activity at different concentrations. There was a positive relationship between the survival of the infected mouse group treated with 50 µg/kg body weight (bw) of ethyl acetate-SUK10 crude extract and the ability to inhibit the parasites growth. The parasite inhibition percentage for this group showed that 50% of the mice survived for more than 90 days after infection with the parasite. The nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic tree suggested that Streptomyces SUK10 may constitute a new species within the Streptomyces genus. As part of the drug discovery process, these promising finding may contribute to the medicinal and pharmaceutical field for malarial treatment.

  6. Comparative Genomics Reveals the Core and Accessory Genomes of Streptomyces Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Nu; Kim, Yeonbum; Jeong, Yujin; Roe, Jung-Hye; Kim, Byung-Gee; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2015-10-01

    The development of rapid and efficient genome sequencing methods has enabled us to study the evolutionary background of bacterial genetic information. Here, we present comparative genomic analysis of 17 Streptomyces species, for which the genome has been completely sequenced, using the pan-genome approach. The analysis revealed that 34,592 ortholog clusters constituted the pan-genome of these Streptomyces species, including 2,018 in the core genome, 11,743 in the dispensable genome, and 20,831 in the unique genome. The core genome was converged to a smaller number of genes than reported previously, with 3,096 gene families. Functional enrichment analysis showed that genes involved in transcription were most abundant in the Streptomyces pan-genome. Finally, we investigated core genes for the sigma factors, mycothiol biosynthesis pathway, and secondary metabolism pathways; our data showed that many genes involved in stress response and morphological differentiation were commonly expressed in Streptomyces species. Elucidation of the core genome offers a basis for understanding the functional evolution of Streptomyces species and provides insights into target selection for the construction of industrial strains.

  7. Streptomyces actinomycinicus sp. nov., isolated from soil of a peat swamp forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasupawat, Somboon; Phongsopitanun, Wongsakorn; Suwanborirux, Khanit; Ohkuma, Moriya; Kudo, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    A novel actinomycete, strain RCU-197T, was isolated from soil of a peat swamp forest in Rayong Province, Thailand. Using a polyphasic approach, the strain was classified in the genus Streptomyces. It contained ll-diaminopimelic acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan. No diagnostic sugars were detected in whole-cell hydrolysates and there was a lack of mycolic acids. The major menaquinones were MK-9(H6) and MK-9(H8). The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C14 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0. The polar lipids profile consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol mannoside, an unknown aminolipid and two unknown phospholipids. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the strain formed distinct clade within the genus Streptomyces and was closely related to Streptomyces echinatus NBRC 12763T (98.78 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). According to the polyphasic approach as well as DNA-DNA relatedness, the strain could be clearly differentiated from closely related species and represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces actinomycinicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RCU-197T ( = JCM 30864T = TISTR 2208T = PCU 342T).

  8. Characterization and Optimization of Biosynthesis of Bioactive Secondary Metabolites Produced by Streptomyces sp. 8812.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajnisz, Aleksandra; Guśpiel, Adam; Postek, Magdalena; Ziemska, Joanna; Laskowska, Anna; Rabczenko, Daniel; Solecka, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    The nutritional requirements and environmental conditions for a submerged culture of Streptomyces sp. 8812 were determined. Batch and fed-batch Streptomyces sp. 8812 fermentations were conducted to obtain high activity of secondary metabolites. In the study several factors were examined for their influence on the biosynthesis of the active metabolites-7-hydroxy-6-oxo-2,3,4,6-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxy acid (C10H9NO4) and N-acetyl-3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (C11H13NO5): changes in medium composition, pH of production medium, various growth phases of seed culture, amino acid supplementation and addition of anion exchange resin to the submerged culture. Biological activities of secondary metabolites were examined with the use of DD-carboxypeptidase 64-575 and horseradish peroxidase. Streptomyces sp. 8812 mycelium was evaluated under fluorescent microscopy and respiratory activity of the strain was analyzed. Moreover, the enzymatic profiles of the strain with the use of Api ZYM test were analyzed and genetic analysis made. Phylogenetic analysis of Streptomyces sp. 8812 revealed that its closest relative is Streptomyces capoamus JCM 4734 (98%), whereas sequence analysis for 16S rRNA gene using NCBI BLAST algorithm showed 100% homology between these two strains. Biosynthetic processes, mycelium growth and enzyme inhibitory activities of these two strains were also compared.

  9. Characterization of the integration and modular excision of the integrative conjugative element PAISt in Streptomyces turgidiscabies Car8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose C Huguet-Tapia

    Full Text Available PAISt is a large genomic island located in the chromosome of the plant pathogen Streptomyces turgidiscabies Car8. The island carries clustered virulence genes, transfers to other Streptomyces species, and integrates by site-specific recombination at the 8 bp palindrome TTCATGAA. The palindrome is located at the 3' end of the bacitracin resistance gene (bacA. We demonstrate that PAISt is able to excise in modules by recombination of one internal and two flanking palindromic direct repeats. The gene intSt located at the 3( end of PAISt encodes a tyrosine recombinase. Site-specific recombination activity of intSt was tested and confirmed by heterologous expression in Streptomyces coelicolor. Comparative analysis of PAISt homologues in Streptomyces scabies 87-22 and Streptomyces acidiscabies 84-104 indicates that these islands have been fixed by sequence erosion of intSt and the recombination sites.

  10. EFEKTIFITAS DAYA HAMBAT BAKTERI Streptomyces sp TERHADAP Erwinia sp PENYEBAB PENYAKIT BUSUK REBAH PADA TANAMAN LIDAH BUAYA (Aloe barbadensis Mill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SARMILA TASNIM

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces sp was conducted from December 2010 - June 2011 at the Laboratoryof Microbiology, Biology Department, Math and Science Faculty, UdayanaUniversity Bukit Jimbaran-Bali. Implementation stages of the research consisted ofisolation and testing of the antibiotic activity Streptomyces sp to inhibit growthbacterial pathogens Erwinia sp as a cause of disease in plants fallen foul (Soft rot ofAloe barbadensis Mill.The results of this study have eight isolates of Streptomyces spwith macroscopic and microscopic characters are varied. Furthermore, all isolateswere obtained and then tested against antibiotic activity to inhibit growth the bacteriaErwinia sp. Test results obtained by Streptomyces sp that has the most effective ininhibiting the ability of the bacteria Erwinia sp isolates are Streptomyces sp2for (45%.

  11. Effect of pamamycin-607 on secondary metabolite production by Streptomyces spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Katsura, Hirotaka; Kato, Risako; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Natsume, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the aerial mycelium-inducing compound, pamamycin-607, on antibiotic production by several Streptomyces spp. was examined. Exposure to 6.6 µM pamamycin-607 stimulated by 2.7 fold the puromycin production by Streptomyces alboniger NBRC 12738, in which pamamycin-607 had first been isolated, and restored aerial mycelium formation. Pamamycin-607 also stimulated the respective production of streptomycin by S. griseus NBRC 12875 and that of cinerubins A and B by S. tauricus JCM 4837 by approximately 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9 fold. The antibiotic produced by Streptomyces sp. 91-a was identified as virginiamycin M(1), and its synthesis was enhanced 2.6 fold by pamamycin-607. These results demonstrate that pamamycin-607 not only restored or stimulated aerial mycelium formation, but also stimulated secondary metabolite production.

  12. Purification and characterization of a keratinolytic serine proteinase from Streptomyces albidoflavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressollier, P; Letourneau, F; Urdaci, M; Verneuil, B

    1999-06-01

    Streptomyces strain K1-02, which was identified as a strain of Streptomyces albidoflavus, secreted at least six extracellular proteases when it was cultured on feather meal-based medium. The major keratinolytic serine proteinase was purified to homogeneity by a two-step procedure. This enzyme had a molecular weight of 18,000 and was optimally active at pH values ranging from 6 to 9.5 and at temperatures ranging from 40 to 70 degrees C. Its sensitivity to protease inhibitors, its specificity on synthetic substrates, and its remarkably high level of NH2-terminal sequence homology with Streptomyces griseus protease B (SGPB) showed that the new enzyme, designated SAKase, was homologous to SGPB. We tested the activity of SAKase with soluble and fibrous substrates (elastin, keratin, and type I collagen) and found that it was very specific for keratinous substrates compared to SGPB and proteinase K.

  13. A novel gene: sawD related to the differentiation of streptomyces ansochromogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, L; Wei, C; Yuqing, T; Huarong, T; Chater, K F; Buttner, M J

    1999-01-01

    A 1.3 kb DNA fragment was cloned from a total DNA library of Streptomyces ansochromogenes using Southern hybridization. Nucleotide sequencing analysis indicated that the 1320 bp DNA fragment contained a complete open reading frame (ORF). In search of databases, the deduced product of ORF containing 213 amino acids is homologous to the serine protease of Caulobacter cresceatus, and a conserved serine-catalytic active site (GPSAG) exists. The gene was designated as sawD. The function of this gene was studied with the strategy of gene disruption, and the result showed that the sawD may be related to sporulation and especially to the spore septation in Streptomyces ansochromogenes. The preliminary result indicated that sawD mutant could produce abundant pigment in contrast with the wild type, it seems that sawD gene may be involved in pigment biosynthesis, and this gene is also dispensable for biosynthesis of nikkomycin in Streptomyces ansochromogenes.

  14. The construction of a library of synthetic promoters revealed some specific features of strong Streptomyces promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seghezzi, Nicolas; Amar, Patrick; Købmann, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Streptomyces are bacteria of industrial interest whose genome contains more than 73% of bases GC. In order to define, in these GC-rich bacteria, specific sequence features of strong promoters, a library of synthetic promoters of various sequence composition was constructed in Streptomyces. To do so......, the sequences located upstream, between and downstream of the −35 and −10 consensus promoter sequences were completely randomized and some variability was introduced in the −35 (position 6) and −10 (positions 3, 4 and 5) hexamers recognized by the major vegetative sigma factor HrdB. The synthetic promoters were...... cloned into the promoter-probe plasmid pIJ487 just upstream of the promoter-less aphII gene that confers resistance to neomycin. This synthetic promoter library was transformed into Streptomyces lividans, and the resulting transformants were screened for their ability to grow in the presence of different...

  15. Systems biology and biotechnology of Streptomyces species for the production of secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyu-Sang; Kim, Hyun Uk; Charusanti, Pep; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Lee, Sang Yup

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces species continue to attract attention as a source of novel medicinal compounds. Despite a long history of studies on these microorganisms, they still have many biochemical mysteries to be elucidated. Investigations of novel secondary metabolites and their biosynthetic gene clusters have been more systematized with high-throughput techniques through inspections of correlations among components of the primary and secondary metabolisms at the genome scale. Moreover, up-to-date information on the genome of Streptomyces species with emphasis on their secondary metabolism has been collected in the form of databases and knowledgebases, providing predictive information and enabling one to explore experimentally unrecognized biological spaces of secondary metabolism. Herein, we review recent trends in the systems biology and biotechnology of Streptomyces species.

  16. Subcompartmentalization by cross-membranes during early growth of Streptomyces hyphae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yagüe, Paula; Willemse, Joost; Koning, Roman I

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Streptomyces are a model system for bacterial multicellularity. Their mycelial life style involves the formation of long multinucleated hyphae during vegetative growth, with occasional cross-walls separating long compartments. Reproduction occurs by specialized aerial hyphae......, which differentiate into chains of uninucleoid spores. While the tubulin-like FtsZ protein is required for the formation of all peptidoglycan-based septa in Streptomyces, canonical divisome-dependent cell division only occurs during sporulation. Here we report extensive subcompartmentalization in young...... vegetative hyphae of Streptomyces coelicolor, whereby 1 μm compartments are formed by nucleic acid stain-impermeable barriers. These barriers possess the permeability properties of membranes and at least some of them are cross-membranes without detectable peptidoglycan. Z-ladders form during the early growth...

  17. Characterization of SAV7471, a TetR-family transcriptional regulator involved in the regulation of coenzyme A metabolism in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanping; Yan, Tingting; Jiang, Libin; Wen, Ying; Song, Yuan; Chen, Zhi; Li, Jilun

    2013-10-01

    The role of a tetR transcriptional regulatory gene (SAV7471) in avermectin production in the Gram-positive soil bacterium Streptomyces avermitilis was investigated by gene deletion, complementation, and overexpression experiments. Gene deletion of the SAV7471 open reading frame resulted in avermectin overproduction. The deletion also resulted in overexpression of SAV7472-SAV7473 transcripts, which encode a protein of unknown function and a flavoprotein possibly involved in pantothenate and coenzyme A (CoA) metabolism. EMSAs and footprinting assays showed that SAV7471 can bind to two palindromic sequences with high similarity in the intergenic region between SAV7471 and SAV7472, a region that contains the apparent transcription start sites for each gene detected by rapid amplification of 5' cDNA ends (5'-RACE). In addition to SAV7472-SAV7473, at least two genes (SAV1104 and SAV1258) involved in CoA metabolism are negatively controlled by SAV7471. By negatively regulating the transcription of the target genes SAV7472-SAV7473 and other genes involved in CoA metabolism, SAV7471 may affect cellular metabolic flux and may thereby indirectly regulate avermectin biosynthesis.

  18. Assay for the enantiomeric analysis of [2H1]-fluoroacetic acid: insight into the stereochemical course of fluorination during fluorometabolite biosynthesis in streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, David; Goss, Rebecca J M; Meddour, Abdelkrim; Courtieu, Jacques

    2003-01-15

    A sensitive method for the configurational analysis of (R)- and (S)-[2H1]-fluoroacetate has been developed using 2H[1H]-NMR in a chiral liquid crystalline solvent. This has enabled biosynthetic experiments to be conducted which reveal stereochemical details on biological fluorination occurring during the biosynthesis of fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine in the bacterium Streptomyces cattleya. In particular, feeding experiments to S. cattleya with isotopically labeled (1R, 2R)- and (1S, 2R)-[1-2H1]-glycerol 3d and 3e and [2,3-2H(4)]-succinate 4a gave rise to samples of enantiomerically enriched [2-2H1]-fluoroacetates 1a. The predominant enantiomer resulting from each experiment suggests that the stereochemical course of biological fluorination takes place with an overall retention of configuration between a glycolytic intermediate and fluoroacetate 1. Consequently, this outcome suggests that the stereochemical course of the recently identified fluorinase enzyme which mediates a reaction between fluoride ion and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM), occurs with an inversion of configuration.

  19. Identification and Characterization of hmr19 Gene Encoding a Multidrug Resistance Efflux Protein from Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp.yingchengensis Strain 10-22

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei QIN; Heng-An WANG; Zhong-Qin WU; Xiao-Feng ZHANG; Mei-Lei JIN; Zi-Xin DENG; Guo-Ping ZHAO

    2004-01-01

    The hmr19 gene was cloned from Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp.yingchengensis strain 10-22,a bacterium strain producing agricultural antibiotics.Sequence similarity comparison indicates that hmr19gene may encode a predicted protein with 14 putative transmembrane α-helical spanners,belonging to the drug:H+ antiporter-2 family of the major facilitator superfamily.The expression ofhmr19 in the mycelium of strain 10-22 was detected by Western blotting analysis.Gene replacement technology was employed to construct an hmr19 disruption mutant.The growth inhibition test against different antibiotics indicated that the mutant strain was 5-20 fold more susceptible to tetracycline,vancomycin and mitomycin C than the parental wild type strain.The mutant took up tetracycline much faster and accumulated more antibiotics than the wild type strain 10-22.While with the addition of an energy uncoupler,carbonyl cyanide mchlorophenylhydrazone,the characteristics of the accumulation of [3H]tetracycline in these two strains were almost the same.It was thus concluded that hmr19 encoded a multidrug resistance efflux protein.

  20. Optimization of Streptomyces peucetius var. caesius N47 cultivation and epsilon-rhodomycinone production using experimental designs and response surface methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviharju, K; Leisola, M; Eerikäinen, T

    2004-11-01

    Streptomyces peucetius var. caesius is an aerobic bacterium that produces doxorubicin as a secondary metabolite. A mixture design was applied for the screening of suitable complex medium components in the cultivation of S. peucetius var. caesius N47, which is an epsilon-rhodomycinone-accumulating mutant strain. epsilon-Rhodomycinone is a non-glycosylated precursor of doxorubicin. Best growth results were obtained with soy peptone and beef extract. A central composite face-centered (CCF) experimental design was constructed for the investigation of pH, temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO) effects on the cultivation growth phase. Another CCF was applied to the production phase to investigate the effects of aeration, pH, temperature and stirring rate on epsilon-rhodomycinone production. An increase in cultivation temperature increased both cell growth and glucose consumption rate. Best epsilon-rhodomycinone productivities were obtained in temperatures around 30 degrees C. DO control increased all growth phase responses, but aeration in the production phase coupled with pH decrease resulted in rapid epsilon-rhodomycinone decay in the medium. In non-aerated production phases a pH change resulted in better productivity than in experiments without pH change. A pH increase with a temperature decrease seemed most beneficial for productivity. This implies that dynamic control strategies in batch production of epsilon-rhodomycinone could increase the overall process productivity.

  1. Cloning of thienamycin biosynthetase genes from Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R; Wang, Y; Zeng, Y

    1993-01-01

    A mutant Y3 blocked in the thienamycin biosynthetic pathway was obtained from thienamycin producing strain Streptomyces cattleya by NTG treatment. Preliminary cloning system has been established on the basis of studies on the conditions for protoplast formation, regeneration, as well as DNA transformation for Y3 mutant strain. The shotgun cloning was carried out from S. cattleya using pIJ680 as a vector and the Y3 mutant as a host. The transformant No. 12 produced a thienamycin-like substance identified by paper chromatography and HPLC analysis. A recombinant plasmid p6BC12, which has molecular size of 9.8kb and an insert of 4.5kb, could be recovered. Southern hybridization confirmed that the transformant No. 12 harbors the recombinant plasmid p6BC12. The intermediate accumulated by Y3 mutant was identified as a polypeptide. The product of transformant containing p6BC12 could turn this polypeptide to a bioactivity substance in vitro. This gene can hybridizate with S. lipmanii IPNS gene. We presume that a cyclase gene from S. cattleya was cloned according to the function of the expression product.

  2. Glutamine synthetase of Streptomyces cattleya: purification and regulation of synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paress, P S; Streicher, S L

    1985-08-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) from Streptomyces cattleya was purified using a single affinity-gel chromatography step, and some of its properties were determined. Levels of GS in S. cattleya cells varied by a factor of 8 depending upon the source of nitrogen in the growth medium. Of 24 nitrogen sources examined only glutamine or NH4Cl utilization resulted in very low GS activity. Addition of NH4Cl to a culture with high GS levels appeared to stop further synthesis and resulted in a progressive decrease in the specific activity of the enzyme. The GS inhibitor methionine sulphoximine (MSX) inhibited GS activity but had no effect on exponentially growing cells. The presence of MSX either lengthened or shortened the period between spore inoculation and initiation of exponential growth, depending on the source of nitrogen. In glutamine minimal medium MSX produced earlier and more efficient spore germination while in glutamate or nitrate minimal medium germination was delayed by its presence.

  3. Oxalic acid biosynthesis and oxalacetate acetylhydrolase activity in Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, D R; Inamine, E

    1987-11-15

    In addition to producing the antibiotic thienamycin, Streptomyces cattleya accumulates large amounts of oxalic acid during the course of a fermentation. Washed cell suspensions were utilized to determine the specific incorporation of carbon-14 into oxalate from a number of labeled organic and amino acids. L-[U-14C]aspartate proved to be the best precursor, whereas only a small percentage of label from [1,5-14C]citrate was found in oxalate. Cell-free extracts catalyzed the formation of [14C]oxalate and [14C]acetate from L-[U-14C]aspartate. When L-[4-14C]aspartate was the substrate only [14C]acetate was formed. The cell-free extracts were found to contain oxalacetate acetylhydrolase (EC 3.7.1.1), the enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of oxalacetate to oxalate and acetate. The enzyme is constitutive and is analogous to enzymes in fungi that produce oxalate from oxalacetate. Properties of the crude enzyme were examined.

  4. Oxalic acid biosynthesis and oxalacetate acetylhydrolase activity in Streptomyces cattleya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houck, D.R.; Inamine, E.

    1987-11-15

    In addition to producing the antibiotic thienamycin, Streptomyces cattleya accumulates large amounts of oxalic acid during the course of a fermentation. Washed cell suspensions were utilized to determine the specific incorporation of carbon-14 into oxalate from a number of labeled organic and amino acids. L-(U-/sup 14/C)aspartate proved to be the best precursor, whereas only a small percentage of label from (1,5-/sup 14/C)citrate was found in oxalate. Cell-free extracts catalyzed the formation of (/sup 14/C)oxalate and (/sup 14/C)acetate from L-(U-/sup 14/C)aspartate. When L-(4-/sup 14/C)aspartate was the substrate only (/sup 14/C)acetate was formed. The cell-free extracts were found to contain oxalacetate acetylhydrolase, the enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of oxalacetate to oxalate and acetate. The enzyme is constitutive and is analogous to enzymes in fungi that produce oxalate from oxalacetate. Properties of the crude enzyme were examined.

  5. Aspartate aminotransferase and tylosin biosynthesis in Streptomyces fradiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S H; Lee, K J

    1993-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase as well as valine dehydrogenase and threonine dehydratase was required for the biosynthesis of tylosin in Streptomyces fradiae NRRL 2702. The biosynthesis of these enzymes and tylosin production were repressed by high concentrations of ammonium ions. The change in specific tylosin production rates in batch cultures with different initial concentrations of ammonium ions showed patterns similar to those of the specific production rates of aspartate aminotransferase, valine dehydrogenase, and threonine dehydratase. Aspartate aminotransferase has been purified by acetone precipitation, DEAE-cellulose, hydroxyapatite, and preparative electrophoresis chromatographies. The purified enzyme (120 kDa) consisted of two subunits identical in molecular mass (54 kDa) and showed homogeneity, giving one band with a pI of 4.2 upon preparative isoelectric focusing. The enzyme was specific for L-aspartate in the forward reaction; the Km values were determined to be 2.7 mM for L-aspartate, 0.7 mM for 2-oxyglutarate, 12.8 mM for L-glutamate, and 0.15 mM for oxaloacetate. The enzyme was somewhat thermostable, having a maximum activity at 55 degrees C, and had a broad pH optimum that ranged from 5.5 to 8.0. The mode of action was a ping-pong-bi-bi mechanism. Images PMID:8481008

  6. The Chitinolytic Activities of Streptomyces sp. TH-11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yi Liau

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Chitin is an abundant biopolymer composed of units of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine linked by b-1,4 glycosidic bonds. Chitin is the main component of the shells of mollusks, the cell wall of fungi and yeast and of the exoskeleton of crustaceans and insects. The degradation of chitin is catalyzed by chitinases that occur in a wide range of organisms. Among them, the chitinases from microorganisms are extremely important for the degradation and recycling of the carbon and nitrogen trapped in the large amount of insoluble chitin in nature. Streptomyces sp. TH-11 was isolated from the sediment of the Tou-Chien River, Taiwan. The chitinolytic enzyme activities were detected using a rapid in-gel detection method from the cell-free preparation of the culture medium of TH-11. The chitinolytic enzyme activity during prolonged liquid culturing was also analyzed by direct measurement of the chitin consumption. Decomposition of the exoskeleton of shrimps was demonstrated using electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy.

  7. [Proposed neotype Streptomyces ruber (Krainsky, 1914) Waksman et Henrici, 1948].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, V D; Filippova, S N; Poltorak, V A

    1987-01-01

    Culture 78 was proposed as a neotype of Streptomyces ruber. It was isolated from the soils of the Baikal region and was closest, in its taxonomic properties, to the original description of the species [13] whose representative had been lost. Cultures from different microbial collections designated as S. ruber were shown to be unlike the original description. The neotype had the following taxononic properties: the cell wall of type I; spiral sporophores with extended spirals having 2-3 coils; oval spores with a smooth envelope; greyish pink aerial and dark-red substrate mycelia; a red pigment not passing into the medium; slow gelatin liquefaction and milk peptonization; weak starch hydrolysis; assimilation of glucose, xylose, rammose, fructose, and inositol; weak growth on arabinose, raffinose and mannitol, but not on sucrose; no formation of melanoid pigments; synthesis of riboflavin and prodigiosin pigments; inhibition of Gram-positive bacterial and acid-resistant mycobacterial growth; no inhibition of yeast and fungal growth. The culture was sensitive to streptomycin, neomycin, gentamycin, monomycin, tetracycline,erythromycin, oleandomycin, lincomycin, ristomycin, levomycetin, polymyxin and fusidin, but resistant in penicillin. The population was composed of six variants [3]: main, faded, asporogenic red, asporogenic yellow, asporogenic white and nocardia-like. The latter two were not capable of riboflavin and prodigiosin formation. The asporogenic yellow variant was a monosynthetic organism: it formed riboflavin, but could not synthesize prodigiosin. The neotype of S. ruber 78 is deposited withthe national Collection of Microorganisms (the reference number is VKM A-611).

  8. Optimization of desferrioxamine E production by Streptomyces parvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gáll, Tamás; Lehoczki, Gábor; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Emri, Tamás; Szigeti, Zsuzsa M; Balla, György; Balla, József; Pócsi, István

    2016-12-01

    Siderophores are produced by a number of microbes to capture iron with outstandingly high affinity, which property also generates biomedical and industrial interests. Desferrioxamine E (DFO-E) secreted by streptomycetes bacteria can be an ideal candidate for iron chelation therapy, which necessitates its cost-effective production for in vitro and animal studies. This study focused on the optimization of DFO-E production by Streptomyces parvulus CBS548.68. Different combinations of various carbon and nitrogen sources as well as the addition of 3-morpholinopropane-1-sulfonic acid (MOPS) markedly affected DFO-E yields, which were attributed, at least in part, to the higher biomass productions found in MOPS-supplemented cultures. In MOPS-supplemented glucose and sodium glutamate medium, DFO-E productions as high as 2,009 ± 90 mg/l of culture medium were reached. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated that a simple two-step purification process yielded DFO-E preparations with purities of ∼97%. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry analysis showed that purified DFO-E always contained traces of desferrioxamine D2.

  9. Extraction of rapamycin (sirolimus) from Streptomyces rapamycinicus using ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Amol S; Gadalkar, Sagar; Rathod, Virendra K

    2017-07-03

    The study was designed to investigate the use of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) of rapamycin (sirolimus) from bacterial strain of Streptomyces rapamycinicus NRRL 5491. To achieve the maximum extraction yield, various parameters were optimized which include S. rapamycinicus (10 g) of biomass in toluene (50 mL), temperature (20°C), acoustic intensity (35.67 W/cm(2)), and duty cycle (40%) for 4 min extraction time with probe tip length of 0.5 cm dipped into extraction solvent from the surface. The maximum extraction yield 60.15 ± 0.01 mg/L was attained under the mentioned optimum parameters. The use of ultrasound for the extraction of rapamycin shows about twofold increase in the yield as compared to the conventional solid-liquid extraction (29.7 ± 0.2 mg/L). The study provides the effective UAE technique to produce potential value-added products.

  10. Biological treatment of colored wastewater by Streptomyces fulvissimus CKS 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntić, A V; Pavlović, M D; Šiler-Marinković, S S; Dimitrijević-Branković, S I

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the biological processes related to the biodegradable potential of growing microbial cells for contaminated water treatment. Thus, the use of the Streptomyces fulvissimus CKS 7 (CKS7) has been evaluated for decolorizing efficiency of a solution containing a cationic triphenylmethane dye, crystal violet. The color reduction was monitored by UV-Vis spectroscopic analysis, through changes in their absorption spectrum and comparing the results with those of the respective controls. It was found that the CKS7 performed well and reached up to 100% effectiveness. The required process parameters have been apparently mild and include the reaction temperature of 27-30 °C, 10% inoculum size, under shaking conditions, whereas the time course of decolorization had been concentration dependent. A possible mechanism for removing dye from the working medium was accomplished in two steps: the binding of the dye on the bacterial cell surface, in addition to the dye biodegradation by the bacterial intracellular enzymes. After one cycle of the complete dye removal, the adapted culture was successfully reused for the same purpose. The phytotoxicity analysis revealed that non-toxic compounds were present in decolorized medium, indicating that the CKS7 bacteria seem to be a promising application for contaminated water treatment.

  11. Heavy metal adsorption of Streptomyces chromofuscus K101

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Said Mohamed Daboor; Amany Mohamed Haroon; Neven Abd Elfatah Esmael; Slah Ibrahem Hanona

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To find the best actinomycete that has potential application value in the heavy metal remediation due to its special morphological and physiological metabolism. Methods: In some areas of River Nile, Egypt, a total of 67 actinomycete isolates (17 isolates from surface water and 50 from sediment) were identified. In addition, the studied area was characterized by a large amount of submerged macrophyte species Ceratophyllum demersum, one free floating species Eichhornia crassipes and two emergent species Polygonum tomentosum and Saccharum spontaneum with the highest biomass production values. Many methods are used in this research like qualitative evaluation of heavy metals, minimum inhibitory concentration of heavy metal determination, metal binding assay, heavy metal assessment, etc. Results: Many actinomycetes isolates were isolated from River Nile, Egypt, the absorbent efficiency of one isolate Streptomyces chromofuscusK101 showed the most efficient metal binding activity. The adsorption process of Zn2+, Pb2+and Fe2+single or mixture metal ions was investigated, where the order of adsorption potential ( Zn2+>Pb2+>Fe2+ ) was observed in single metal reaction. The adsorption in mixed metal reactions was the same order as in single-metal ion with a significant decrease in Fe2+and Pb2+adsorption. Conclusions: In conclusion the metal adsorption reactions were very fast, pH dependent and culture age-independent, suggestive of a physicochemical reaction between cell wall components and heavy metal ions. The absorbent removal efficiency was determined as a function of ion concentration, pH and temperature.

  12. Solubility and crystallization of xylose isomerase from Streptomyces rubiginosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuolanto, Antti; Uotila, Sinikka; Leisola, Matti; Visuri, Kalevi

    2003-10-01

    We have studied the crystallization and crystal solubility of xylose isomerase (XI) from Streptomyces rubiginosus. In this paper, we show a rational approach for developing a large-scale crystallization process for XI. Firstly, we measured the crystal solubility in salt solutions with respect to salt concentration, temperature and pH. In ammonium sulfate the solubility of XI decreased logarithmically when increasing the salt concentration. Surprisingly, the XI crystals had a solubility minimum at low concentration of magnesium sulfate. The solubility of XI in 0.17 M magnesium sulfate was less than 0.5 g l -1. The solubility of XI increased logarithmically when increasing the temperature. We also found a solubility minimum around pH 7. This is far from the isoelectric point of XI (pH 3.95). Secondly, based on the solubility study, we developed a large-scale crystallization process for XI. In a simple and economical cooling crystallization of XI from 0.17 M magnesium sulfate solution, the recovery of crystalline active enzyme was over 95%. Moreover, we developed a process for production of uniform crystals and produced homogenous crystals with average crystal sizes between 12 and 360 μm.

  13. Studies on biological reduction of chromate by Streptomyces griseus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poopal, Ashwini C. [Division of Biochemical Sciences, National Chemical Laboratory, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pune 411008 (India); Laxman, R. Seeta, E-mail: rseetalaxman@yahoo.co.in [Division of Biochemical Sciences, National Chemical Laboratory, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pune 411008 (India)

    2009-09-30

    Chromium is a toxic heavy metal used in various industries and leads to environmental pollution due to improper handling. The most toxic form of chromium Cr(VI) can be converted to less toxic Cr(III) by reduction. Among the actinomycetes tested for chromate reduction, thirteen strains reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III), of which one strain of Streptomyces griseus (NCIM 2020) was most efficient showing complete reduction within 24 h. The organism was able to use a number of carbon sources as electron donors. Sulphate, nitrate, chloride and carbonate had no effect on chromate reduction during growth while cations such as Cd, Ni, Co and Cu were inhibitory to varying degrees. Chromate reduction was associated with the bacterial cells and sonication was the best method of cell breakage to release the enzyme. The enzyme was constitutive and did not require presence of chromate during growth for expression of activity. Chromate reduction with cell free extract (CFE) was observed without added NADH. However, addition of NAD(P)H resulted in 2-3-fold increase in activity. Chromate reductase showed optimum activity at 28 deg. C and pH 7.

  14. Specialised metabolites regulating antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomyces spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Guoqing; Chater, Keith F; Tian, Yuqing; Zhang, Jihui; Tan, Huarong

    2016-07-01

    Streptomyces bacteria are the major source of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites. Various environmental and physiological conditions affect the onset and level of production of each antibiotic by influencing concentrations of the ligands for conserved global regulatory proteins. In addition, as reviewed here, well-known autoregulators such as γ-butyrolactones, themselves products of secondary metabolism, accumulate late in growth to concentrations allowing their effective interaction with cognate binding proteins, in a necessary prelude to antibiotic biosynthesis. Most autoregulator binding proteins target the conserved global regulatory gene adpA, and/or regulatory genes for 'cluster-situated regulators' (CSRs) linked to antibiotic biosynthetic gene clusters. It now appears that some CSRs bind intermediates and end products of antibiotic biosynthesis, with regulatory effects interwoven with those of autoregulators. These ligands can exert cross-pathway effects within producers of more than one antibiotic, and when excreted into the extracellular environment may have population-wide effects on production, and mediate interactions with neighbouring microorganisms in natural communities, influencing speciation. Greater understanding of these autoregulatory and cross-regulatory activities may aid the discovery of new signalling molecules and their use in activating cryptic antibiotic biosynthetic pathways.

  15. Improved production of spiramycin by mutant Streptomyces ambofaciens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金志华; 岑沛霖

    2004-01-01

    Strain improvement and medium optimization to increase the productivity of spiramycin were carried out. Of oil tolerant mutant strains screened, one mutant, Streptomyces ambofaciens XC 2-37, produced 9% more spiramycin than the parent strain S. ambofaciens XC 1-29. The effects of soybean oil and propyl alcohol on spiramycin production with S. ambofaciens XC 2-37 were studied. The potency of S. ambofaciens XC 2-37 was improved by 61.8% with addition of 2% soybean oil in the fermentation medium and 0.4% propyl alcohol at 24 hours after incubation. The suitable time for feeding propyl alcohol is at 24 hours after incubation in flask fermentation and at 20 hours after incubation in fermentor fermentation. The new process with S. ambofaciens XC 2-37 was scaled up for industrial scale production of spiramycin in a 60 m3 fermentor in Xinchang Pharmaceutical Factory, Zhejiang Medicine Company, Ltd., China, and the potency and productivity of fermentation were improved by 42.9%.

  16. Improved production of spiramycin by mutant Streptomyces ambofaciens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金志华; 岑沛霖

    2004-01-01

    Strain improvement and medium optimization to increase the productivity of spiramycin were carried out. Of oil tolerant mutant strains screened, one mutant, Streptomyces ambofaciens XC 2-37, produced 9% more spiramycin than the parent strain S. ambofaciens XC 1-29. The effects of soybean oil and propyl alcohol on spiramycin production with S.ambofaciens XC 2-37 were studied. The potency orS. ambofaciens XC 2-37 was improved by 61.8% with addition of 2% soybean oil in the fermentation medium and 0.4% propyl alcohol at 24 hours after incubation. The suitable time for feeding propyl alcohol is at 24 hours after incubation in flask fermentation and at 20 hours after incubation in fermentor fermentation The new process with S. ambofaciens XC 2-37 was scaled up for industrial scale production of spiramycin in a 60 m3 fermentor in Xinchang Pharmaceutical Factory, Zhejiang Medicine Company, Ltd., China, and the potency and productivity of fermentation were improved by 42.9%.

  17. Expression of Master Regulators of T-cell, Helper T-cell and Follicular Helper T-cell Differentiation in Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yosuke; Nagoshi, Hisao; Yoshida, Mihoko; Kato, Seiichi; Kuroda, Junya; Shimura, Kazuho; Kaneko, Hiroto; Horiike, Shigeo; Nakamura, Shigeo; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2017-09-25

    Objective It has been postulated that the normal counterpart of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) is the follicular helper T-cell (TFH). Recent immunological studies have identified several transcription factors responsible for T-cell differentiation. The master regulators associated with T-cell, helper T-cell (Th), and TFH differentiation are reportedly BCL11B, Th-POK, and BCL6, respectively. We explored the postulated normal counterpart of AITL with respect to the expression of the master regulators of T-cell differentiation. Methods We performed an immunohistochemical analysis in 15 AITL patients to determine the expression of the master regulators and several surface markers associated with T-cell differentiation. Results BCL11B was detected in 10 patients (67%), and the surface marker of T-cells (CD3) was detected in all patients. Only 2 patients (13%) expressed the marker of naïve T-cells (CD45RA), but all patients expressed the marker of effector T-cells (CD45RO). Nine patients expressed Th-POK (60%), and 7 (47%) expressed a set of surface antigens of Th (CD4-positive and CD8-negative). In addition, BCL6 and the surface markers of TFH (CXCL13, PD-1, and SAP) were detected in 11 (73%), 8 (53%), 14 (93%), and all patients, respectively. Th-POK-positive/BCL6-negative patients showed a significantly shorter overall survival (OS) than the other patients (median OS: 33.0 months vs. 74.0 months, p=0.020; log-rank test). Conclusion Many of the AITL patients analyzed in this study expressed the master regulators of T-cell differentiation. The clarification of the diagnostic significance and pathophysiology based on the expression of these master regulators in AITL is expected in the future.

  18. Streptomyces manipurensis sp. nov., a novel actinomycete isolated from a limestone deposit site in Manipur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimaichand, Salam; Zhu, Wen-Yong; Yang, Ling-Ling; Ming, Hong; Nie, Guo-Xing; Tang, Shu-Kun; Ningthoujam, Debananda S; Li, Wen-Jun

    2012-06-01

    A novel actinobacterium, designated MBRL 201(T), was isolated from a sample collected from a limestone quarry at Hundung, Manipur, India. The strain was characterized using polyphasic taxonomy. Comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain MBRL 201(T) and other Streptomyces species showed sequence similarities ranging from 93.0 to 99.6 % and strain MBRL 201(T) showed closest similarities to Streptomyces virginiae NBRC 12827(T) (99.6 %) and Streptomyces cinnamonensis NBRC 15873(T) (99.6 %). The DNA relatedness between MBRL 201(T) and the type strains of S. virginiae NBRC 12827(T) and S. cinnamonensis NBRC 15873(T) were 44.5 and 35.6 % respectively. Strain MBRL 201(T) contained LL: -diaminopimelic acid (A(2)pm) as the diagnostic diamino acid, with glucose as the main sugar, while small amounts of galactose, glucose, mannose, rhamnose, ribose and xylose were also present in cell-wall hydrolysates. The major fatty acids identified were anteiso-C(15:0) (38.9 %), iso-C(15:0) (19.9 %) and anteiso-C(17:1) (14.7 %). The predominant menaquinones detected were MK-9(H(6)) and MK-9(H(8)), while the polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmethylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositolmannosides, with other unknown phospholipids and lipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 72.9 %. The phenotypic and genotypic data showed that strain MBRL 201(T) merits recognition as a representative of a novel species of the genus Streptomyces. It is proposed that the isolate should be classified in the genus Streptomyces as a novel species, Streptomyces manipurensis sp. nov. The type strain is MBRL 201(T) (=DSM 42029(T) = JCM 17351(T)).

  19. A novel transglutaminase substrate from Streptomyces mobaraensis inhibiting papain-like cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafeddinov, Alla; Arif, Atia; Peters, Anna; Fuchsbauer, Hans-Lothar

    2011-06-01

    Transglutaminase from Streptomyces mobaraensis is an enzyme of unknown function that cross-links proteins to high molecular weight aggregates. Previously, we characterized two intrinsic transglutaminase substrates with inactivating activities against subtilisin and dispase. This report now describes a novel substrate that inhibits papain, bromelain, and trypsin. Papain was the most sensitive protease; thus, the protein was designated Streptomyces papain inhibitor (SPI). To avoid transglutaminase-mediated glutamine deamidation during culture, SPI was produced by Streptomyces mobaraensis at various growth temperatures. The best results were achieved by culturing for 30-50 h at 42 degrees C, which yielded high SPI concentrations and negligibly small amounts of mature transglutaminase. Transglutaminasespecific biotinylation displayed largely unmodified glutamine and lysine residues. In contrast, purified SPI from the 28 degrees C culture lost the potential to be cross-linked, but exhibited higher inhibitory activity as indicated by a significantly lower Ki (60 nM vs. 140 nM). Despite similarities in molecular mass (12 kDa) and high thermostability, SPI exhibits clear differences in comparison with all members of the wellknown family of Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitors. The neutral protein (pI of 7.3) shares sequence homology with a putative protein from Streptomyces lavendulae, whose conformation is most likely stabilized by two disulfide bridges. However, cysteine residues are not localized in the typical regions of subtilisin inhibitors. SPI and the formerly characterized dispase-inactivating substrate are unique proteins of distinct Streptomycetes such as Streptomyces mobaraensis. Along with the subtilisin inhibitory protein, they could play a crucial role in the defense of vulnerable protein layers that are solidified by transglutaminase.

  20. Metabolomic Profiling and Genomic Study of a Marine Sponge-Associated Streptomyces sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Viegelmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics and genomics are two complementary platforms for analyzing an organism as they provide information on the phenotype and genotype, respectively. These two techniques were applied in the dereplication and identification of bioactive compounds from a Streptomyces sp. (SM8 isolated from the sponge Haliclona simulans from Irish waters. Streptomyces strain SM8 extracts showed antibacterial and antifungal activity. NMR analysis of the active fractions proved that hydroxylated saturated fatty acids were the major components present in the antibacterial fractions. Antimycin compounds were initially putatively identified in the antifungal fractions using LC-Orbitrap. Their presence was later confirmed by comparison to a standard. Genomic analysis of Streptomyces sp. SM8 revealed the presence of multiple secondary metabolism gene clusters, including a gene cluster for the biosynthesis of the antifungal antimycin family of compounds. The antimycin gene cluster of Streptomyces sp. SM8 was inactivated by disruption of the antimycin biosynthesis gene antC. Extracts from this mutant strain showed loss of antimycin production and significantly less antifungal activity than the wild-type strain. Three butenolides, 4,10-dihydroxy-10-methyl-dodec-2-en-1,4-olide (1, 4,11-dihydroxy-10-methyl-dodec-2-en-1,4-olide (2, and 4-hydroxy-10-methyl-11-oxo-dodec-2-en-1,4-olide (3 that had previously been reported from marine Streptomyces species were also isolated from SM8. Comparison of the extracts of Streptomyces strain SM8 and its host sponge, H. simulans, using LC-Orbitrap revealed the presence of metabolites common to both extracts, providing direct evidence linking sponge metabolites to a specific microbial symbiont.

  1. Streptomyces songpinggouensis sp. nov., a Novel Actinomycete Isolated from Soil in Sichuan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xuejiao; Li, Wenchao; Liu, Chongxi; Jin, Pinjiao; Guo, Siyu; Wang, Xiangjing; Xiang, Wensheng

    2016-12-01

    During a screening for novel and biotechnologically useful actinobacteria, a novel actinobacteria with weak antifungal activity, designated strain NEAU-Spg19(T), was isolated from a soil sample collected from pine forest in Songpinggou, Sichuan, southwest China. The strain was characterized using a polyphasic taxonomic approach which confirmed that it belongs to the genus Streptomyces. Growth occurred at a temperature range of 10-30 °C, pH 5.0-11.0 and NaCl concentrations of 0-5 %. The cell wall peptidoglycan consisted of LL-diaminopimelic acid and glycine. The major menaquinones were MK-9(H6), MK-9(H8) and MK-9(H4). The phospholipid profile contained diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol. The major fatty acids were iso-C15:0, iso-C16:0, and C16:0. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity studies showed that strain NEAU-Spg19(T) belongs to the genus Streptomyces with the highest sequence similarities to Streptomyces tauricus JCM 4837(T) (98.6 %) and Streptomyces rectiviolaceus JCM 9092(T) (98.3 %). Some physiological and biochemical properties and low DNA-DNA relatedness values enabled the strain to be differentiated from S. tauricus JCM 4837(T) and S. rectiviolaceus JCM 9092(T). Hence, on the basis of phenotypic and genetic analyses, it is proposed that strain NEAU-Spg19(T) represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, for which the name Streptomyces songpinggouensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NEAU-Spg19(T) (=CGMCC 4.7140(T)=DSM 42141(T)).

  2. Diversity of free-Living nitrogen fixing Streptomyces in soils of the badlands of South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Bibha; NandaKafle, Gitanjali; Perkins, Lora; Brözel, Volker S

    2017-01-01

    Biological Nitrogen Fixation is critical for ecosystem productivity. Select members of Bacteria and Archaea express a nitrogenase enzyme complex that reduces atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. Several nitrogen fixing bacteria form symbiotic associations with plants, but free-living diazotrophs also contribute a substantial amount of nitrogen to ecosystems. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize free-living diazotrophs in arid lands of South Dakota Badlands. Samples were obtained from sod tables and the surrounding base in spring and fall. Diazotrophs were isolated on solid nitrogen free medium (NFM) under hypoxic conditions, and their16S rRNA and nifH genes sequenced. nifH was also amplified directly from soil DNA extracts. The 16S rRNA gene data indicated a diversity of putative free-living diazotrophs across 4 phyla (Actinomycetes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes), but ∼50% of these clustered with Streptomyces. These Streptomyces isolates grew in liquid NFM in an ammonia-depleted environment. Only 5 of these yielded a nifH gene product using the PolF/PolR primer set. Four of these aligned with nifH of the cyanobacteria Scytonema and Nostoc, and the other one aligned with nifH of Bradyrhizobium. Six selected Streptomyces isolates, three of which were nifH positive by PCR, all indicated (15)N2 incorporation, providing strong support of nitrogen fixation. All nifH amplicons from soil DNA extract resembled Cyanobacteria. This is the first known report of diazotrophic Streptomyces, other than the thermophilic, autotrophic S. thermoautotrophicus. nifH genes of these Streptomyces were related to those from Cyanobacteria. It is possible that the cyanobacteria-like nifH amplicons obtained from soil DNA were associated with Streptomyces.

  3. Natural helper cells contribute to pulmonary eosinophilia by producing IL-13 via IL-33/ST2 pathway in a murine model of respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wu, Jianqi; Qi, Feifei; Zeng, Sheng; Xu, Lei; Hu, Haiyan; Wang, Dandan; Liu, Beixing

    2015-09-01

    It has been reported that natural helper cells, which are a non-T, non-B innate lymphoid cell type expressing c-Kit and ST2, mediate influenza-induced airway hyper-reactivity by producing substantial IL-13. However, little is known about natural helper cells for the development of RSV-induced airway inflammation, particularly eosinophilic infiltration. By using BALB/c mice that were infected intranasally with RSV, it became clear that infection with RSV can induce an increase in the absolute number of natural helper cells in the lungs of mice. It seems likely that these natural helper cells contribute to the massive eosinophilic infiltration in an IL-13-dependent manner. In fact, the number of IL-13-producing natural helper cells as well as the expression of IL-13 mRNA in natural helper cells was enhanced significantly during RSV infection, suggesting that natural helper cells might be cellular source of the Th2-type cytokine IL-13. Indeed, adoptive transfer of pulmonary natural helper cells augmented not only the production of IL-13 but also the infiltration of eosinophils in the lungs of transferred mice. Pulmonary natural helper cells can produce IL-13 following response to IL-33, which was increased markedly in the lungs of mice after intranasal RSV infection. The expression of IL-13 mRNA in pulmonary natural helper cells was up-regulated by in vitro IL-33 stimulation. Furthermore, blockade of IL-33 receptor subunit, ST2, diminished the frequency of IL-13-producing natural helper cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that natural helper cells may play an important role in RSV-induced pulmonary eosinophilia by producing IL-13 via the IL-33/ST2 pathway.

  4. Experimental evolution of aging in a bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stearns Stephen C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging refers to a decline in reproduction and survival with increasing age. According to evolutionary theory, aging evolves because selection late in life is weak and mutations exist whose deleterious effects manifest only late in life. Whether the assumptions behind this theory are fulfilled in all organisms, and whether all organisms age, has not been clear. We tested the generality of this theory by experimental evolution with Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium whose asymmetric division allows mother and daughter to be distinguished. Results We evolved three populations for 2000 generations in the laboratory under conditions where selection was strong early in life, but very weak later in life. All populations evolved faster growth rates, mostly by decreasing the age at first division. Evolutionary changes in aging were inconsistent. The predominant response was the unexpected evolution of slower aging, revealing the limits of theoretical predictions if mutations have unanticipated phenotypic effects. However, we also observed the spread of a mutation causing earlier aging of mothers whose negative effect was reset in the daughters. Conclusion Our results confirm that late-acting deleterious mutations do occur in bacteria and that they can invade populations when selection late in life is weak. They suggest that very few organisms – perhaps none- can avoid the accumulation of such mutations over evolutionary time, and thus that aging is probably a fundamental property of all cellular organisms.

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of l-methionine γ-lyase from Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudou, Daizou; Yasuda, Eri; Hirai, Yoshiyuki; Tamura, Takashi; Inagaki, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    A pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent methionine γ-lyase (MGL) was cloned from Streptomyces avermitilis catalyzed the degradation of methionine to α-ketobutyrate, methanethiol, and ammonia. The sav7062 gene (1,242 bp) was corresponded to 413 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 42,994 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a high degree of similarity to those of other MGL enzymes. The sav7062 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity and exhibited the MGL catalytic activities. We cloned the enzyme that has the MGL activity in Streptomyces for the first time.

  6. New Ikarugamycin Derivatives with Antifungal and Antibacterial Properties from Streptomyces zhaozhouensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacret, Rodney; Oves-Costales, Daniel; Gómez, Cristina; Díaz, Caridad; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Vicente, Francisca; Genilloud, Olga; Reyes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    A bioassay guided fractionation of the ethyl acetate extract from culture broths of the strain Streptomyces zhaozhouensis CA-185989 led to the isolation of three new polycyclic tetramic acid macrolactams (1–3) and four known compounds. All the new compounds were structurally related to the known Streptomyces metabolite ikarugamycin (4). Their structural elucidation was accomplished using a combination of electrospray-time of flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF MS) and 1D and 2D NMR analyses. Compounds 1–3 showed antifungal activity against Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans and antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). PMID:25551780

  7. Phage vectors that allow monitoring of transcription of secondary metabolism genes in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, C J; Guthrie, E P; Chater, K F

    1991-07-01

    We describe a bacteriophage phi C31-based system that permits the transcriptional fusion of the convenient reporter gene xylE to chromosomally located promoters in Streptomyces hosts. Applicability of the system to genes for secondary metabolism is demonstrated in an experiment showing that transcription of genes for actinorhodin production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) depends on a transfer RNA gene (bldA) for the rare UUA codon. Two other phi C31::xylE vectors are described that allow detection of promoter activity away from their natural location, either at single copy in a prophage or during lytic infections in plaques.

  8. Optimization of xylanase and peroxidase production from Streptomyces sp. K37

    OpenAIRE

    MAHMOUD M. NOUR EL-DEIN; ABDOU ELDYME A. SHEREIF; FATHEY A. MANSOUR; MOHAMED I. ABOU-DOBARA; Ball, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    The optimal conditions for the production of xylanase and peroxidase from Streptomyces sp. K37 were investigated. The production of xylanase and peroxidase increased during the growth phase of the cultures after 72 hours. This indicates that the productions of such enzymes are wholly growth associated in these organisms. The optimum pH for xylanase and peroxidase production from Streptomyces sp. K37 occurred at pH 8.0 and pH 7.0. The optimum temperature for xylanase and peroxidase production ...

  9. New ikarugamycin derivatives with antifungal and antibacterial properties from Streptomyces zhaozhouensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacret, Rodney; Oves-Costales, Daniel; Gómez, Cristina; Díaz, Caridad; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Vicente, Francisca; Genilloud, Olga; Reyes, Fernando

    2014-12-29

    A bioassay guided fractionation of the ethyl acetate extract from culture broths of the strain Streptomyces zhaozhouensis CA-185989 led to the isolation of three new polycyclic tetramic acid macrolactams (1-3) and four known compounds. All the new compounds were structurally related to the known Streptomyces metabolite ikarugamycin (4). Their structural elucidation was accomplished using a combination of electrospray-time of flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF MS) and 1D and 2D NMR analyses. Compounds 1-3 showed antifungal activity against Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans and antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

  10. New Ikarugamycin Derivatives with Antifungal and Antibacterial Properties from Streptomyces zhaozhouensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney Lacret

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A bioassay guided fractionation of the ethyl acetate extract from culture broths of the strain Streptomyces zhaozhouensis CA-185989 led to the isolation of three new polycyclic tetramic acid macrolactams (1–3 and four known compounds. All the new compounds were structurally related to the known Streptomyces metabolite ikarugamycin (4. Their structural elucidation was accomplished using a combination of electrospray-time of flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF MS and 1D and 2D NMR analyses. Compounds 1–3 showed antifungal activity against Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans and antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA.

  11. Cloning and starch degradation profile of maltotriose-producing amylases from Streptomyces species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Norimasa; Miyake, Michiru; Hirose, Shuichi; Sota, Masahiro; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-11-01

    The end products from starch hydrolysis by amylases have important applications in various industries. Here, two amylases derived from two Streptomyces species that hydrolyze soluble starch from potato produced maltotriose as the primary maltooligosaccharide product. The genes, annotated as putative glycoside hydrolases, were cloned and expressed in Streptomyces lividans. These amylases displayed hydrolysis activity from pH 3 to 9.5 and were not affected by Ca(2+.) Optimal production of maltotriose was between 20 and 30 °C at pH 6.5. At the optimal temperature, both amylases produced maltotriose-rich end products rather than either maltose or maltotetraose.

  12. Characterization of cytotoxic compound from marine sediment derived actinomycete Streptomyces avidinii strain SU4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sudha S; Masilamani Selvam M

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the cytotoxic activity of actinomycete isolated from marine sediment. Methods: In the present study the DNA was isolated and the ITS region of 16s rRNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, using two universal bacterial primers, 1492R (5′-GGTTACCTTGTTAC GACTT-3′) and Eubac27F (5′-AGAGTTTGATCCTGGCTC AG-3′). The amplified products were purified using TIANgel mini purification kit, ligated to MD18-T simple vector (TaKaRa), and transformed into competent cells of Escherichia coli DH5α. 16S rRNA gene fragment was sequenced using forward primer M13F (-47) and reverse primer M13R (-48). Blast search sequence similarity was found against the existing non-redundant nucleotide sequence database thus, identified as Streptomyces sp SU, Streptomyces rubralavandulae strain SU1, Streptomyces cacaoi strain SU2, Streptomyces cavourensis strain SU3, Streptomyces avidinii strain SU4, Streptomyces globisporus strain SU5, Streptomyces variabilis strain SU6, Streptomycescoelicolor strain SU 7. Among the eight identified isolates, one actinomycete Streptomyces avidinii strain SU4 was selected for further study. Results: Crude extract of the actinomycete isolate exhibited IC50 in 64.5 μg against Hep-2 cell line, 250 μg in VERO cell line. This value is very close to the criteria of cytotoxicity activity for the crude extracts, as established by the American National Cancer Institute (NCI) is in IC50 < 30 μg /mL. The GC MS analysis showed that the active principle might be 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis(2-methylpropyl) ester (12.17%), isooctyl phthalate (15.29%) with the retention time 15.642 and 21.612, respectively. Conclusions: This study clearly proves that the marine sediment derived actinomycetes with bioactive metabolites can be expected to provide high quality biological material for high throughout biochemical and anticancer screening programs. These results help us to conclude that the potential of using metabolic engineering and post genomic

  13. Streptomyces sasae sp. nov., isolated from bamboo (Sasa borealis) rhizosphere soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Jin; Whang, Kyung-Sook

    2015-10-01

    A novel strain of Gram-staining-positive actinobacterium, designated strain JR-39T, was isolated from the rhizosphere soil of bamboo (Sasa borealis) sampled in Damyang, Korea, and its taxonomic position was investigated by a polyphasic approach. The isolate formed flexuous chains of spores that were cylindrical and smooth-surfaced. Strain JR-39T grew at 4–37 °C (optimum 28 °C). The pH range for growth was pH 5–10 (optimum pH 6–8) and the NaCl range for growth was 0–5 % (w/v) with optimum growth at 1 % NaCl. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained ll-diaminopimelic acid, glutamic acid, alanine and glycine. Whole-cell hydrolysates mainly contained glucose, mannose, ribose and rhamnose. Predominant menaquinones were MK-9 (H6), MK-9 (H8) and MK-9 (H4). The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0, iso-C16 : 0, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C14 : 0. The G+C content of the DNA was 72.3 ± 0.34 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain JR-39T belonged to the genus Streptomyces, showing the highest sequence similarity to Streptomyces panaciradicis 1MR-8T (99.4 %), Streptomyces capoamus JCM 4734T (98.8 %), Streptomyces galbus DSM 40089T (98.7 %), Streptomyces longwoodensis LMG 20096T (98.7 %), Streptomyces bungoensis NBRC 15711T (98.7 %) and Streptomyces rhizophilus JR-41T (98.7 %). However, DNA–DNA hybridization assays, as well as physiological and biochemical analyses, showed that strain JR-39T could be differentiated from its closest phylogenetic relatives. On the basis of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain JR-39T represents a novel species for which the name Streptomyces sasae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JR-39T ( = KACC 17182T = NBRC 109809T).

  14. The function of a regulatory gene,scrX related to differentiation in Streptomyces coelicolor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new gene, scrX from Streptomyces coelicolor was cloned and sequenced. It consists of 660 base pair, encoding a peptide of 220 amino acids. There are three rare codons in scrX which are AAA, AAA and ATA. scrX gene may be a typical differentiation regulator which was strictly controlled at translational level. The comparison of amino acids also revealed that ScrX belonged to Ic1R family which acted in transcriptional regulation of prokaryote. Studies on gene function by gene disruption and complementation indicated that scrX may play a positive regulation role in spore formation of Streptomyces coelicolor.

  15. Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi elicits a T helper type 17-mediated pro-inflammatory immune response through Wolbachia surface protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Manisha; Verma, Meenakshi; Srivastava, Mrigank; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2015-02-01

    Wolbachia is an endosymbiotic bacterium of the filarial nematode Brugia malayi. The symbiotic relationship between Wolbachia and its filarial host is dependent on interactions between the proteins of both organisms. However, little is known about Wolbachia proteins that are involved in the inflammatory pathology of the host during lymphatic filariasis. In the present study, we cloned, expressed and purified Wolbachia surface protein (r-wsp) from Wolbachia and administered it to mice, either alone or in combination with infective larvae of B. malayi (Bm-L3) and monitored the developing immune response in infected animals. Our results show that spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes of mice immunized with either r-wsp or infected with Bm-L3 show increased percentages of CD4(+) T helper type 17 (Th17) cells and Th1 cytokines like interferon-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2) along with decreased percentages of regulatory T cells, Th2 cytokines like IL-4 and IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) levels in culture supernatants of splenocytes. These observations were stronger in mice immunized with r-wsp alone. Interestingly, when mice were first immunized with r-wsp and subsequently infected with Bm-L3, percentages of CD4(+) Th17 cells and Th1 cytokines increased even further while that of regulatory T cells, Th2 cytokines and TGF-β levels decreased. These results for the first time show that r-wsp acts synergistically with Bm-L3 in promoting a pro-inflammatory response by increasing Th17 cells and at the same time diminishes host immunological tolerance by decreasing regulatory T cells and TGF-β secretion.

  16. Expansion of CD4+CD25+ helper T cells without regulatory function in smoking and COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bucht Anders

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory T cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD by the increased expression of CD25 on helper T cells along with enhanced intracellular expression of FoxP3 and low/absent CD127 expression on the cell surface. Method Regulatory T cells were investigated in BALF from nine COPD subjects and compared to fourteen smokers with normal lung function and nine never-smokers. Results In smokers with normal lung function, the expression of CD25+CD4+ was increased, whereas the proportions of FoxP3+ and CD127+ were unchanged compared to never-smokers. Among CD4+ cells expressing high levels of CD25, the proportion of FoxP3+ cells was decreased and the percentage of CD127+ was increased in smokers with normal lung function. CD4+CD25+ cells with low/absent CD127 expression were increased in smokers with normal lung function, but not in COPD, when compared to never smokers. Conclusion The reduction of FoxP3 expression in BALF from smokers with normal lung function indicates that the increase in CD25 expression is not associated with the expansion of regulatory T cells. Instead, the high CD127 and low FoxP3 expressions implicate a predominantly non-regulatory CD25+ helper T-cell population in smokers and stable COPD. Therefore, we suggest a smoking-induced expansion of predominantly activated airway helper T cells that seem to persist after COPD development.

  17. Shifted T Helper Cell Polarization in a Murine Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanqing; Zhou, Ming; Gao, Yang; Liu, Heyuan; Yang, Wenyu; Yue, Jinhua; Chen, Dekun

    2015-01-01

    Mastitis, one of the most costly diseases in dairy ruminants, is an inflammation of the mammary gland caused by pathogenic infection. The mechanisms of adaptive immunity against pathogens in mastitis have not been fully elucidated. To investigate T helper cell-mediated adaptive immune responses, we established a mastitis model by challenge with an inoculum of 4 × 106 colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus in the mammary gland of lactating mice, followed by quantification of bacterial burden and histological analysis. The development of mastitis was accompanied by a significant increase in both Th17 and Th1 cells in the mammary gland. Moreover, the relative expression of genes encoding cytokines and transcription factors involved in the differentiation and function of these T helper cells, including Il17, Rorc, Tgfb, Il1b, Il23, Ifng, Tbx21, and Il12, was greatly elevated in the infected mammary gland. IL-17 is essential for neutrophil recruitment to infected mammary gland via CXC chemokines, whereas the excessive IL-17 production contributes to tissue damage in mastitis. In addition, a shift in T helper cell polarization toward Th2 and Treg cells was observed 5 days post-infection, and the mRNA expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine Il10 was markedly increased at day 7 post-infection. These results indicate that immune clearance of Staphylococcus aureus in mastitis is facilitated by the enrichment of Th17, Th1 and Th2 cells in the mammary gland mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokine production, which is tightly regulated by Treg cells and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10.

  18. Necessary and sufficient role for T helper cells to prevent fungal dissemination in allergic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Paul C; Roberts, Luz; Fields, Anna; Knight, Morgan; Qian, Yuping; Delclos, George L; Han, Shuhua; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B

    2011-11-01

    Mucosal immune responses to fungal infection range from T helper type 2 (Th2) cell-directed allergic inflammation to Th1-predominant neutrophilic inflammation, but the mechanisms directing these divergent mucosal immune outcomes and the role of T cells in host defense against mucosal fungal infections are not known. Here we examined the mouse mucosal immune responses to 12 filamentous environmental fungal species over a broad range of exposure doses and determined the requirement of T cells for host defense. For all tested fungi, low-grade conidium exposures induced Th2- and eosinophil-predominant allergic lung disease, whereas higher exposures led to rapid conversion to neutrophil- and Th1 cell-predominant inflammation, a phenomenon we term immune phenotype switching. All fungal exposure doses were further linked to the secretion of interleukin-17A (IL-17A). Fungal infections with Curvularia lunata and Aspergillus fumigatus were typically confined to the airway during allergic inflammation but became locally invasive and disseminated to the brain at higher conidium challenge doses, in association with predominant Th1 responses. Fungal dissemination occurred at relatively low challenge doses with the conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus administered to recombinase activating gene 1 (Rag-1)-deficient mice, which lack B and T cells, but B cell-deficient μMT mice and T helper cell-reconstituted Rag-1-deficient mice were comparable to wild-type mice in preventing fungal dissemination. Our findings demonstrate that Th2 cell-predominant allergic responses followed by immune phenotype switching and fungal dissemination are highly predictable outcomes with progressive fungal infectious burdens and that T helper cell responses are protective against lethal fungal dissemination.

  19. T-Helper Cytokine Patterns and Related Antibodies in Patients with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Alavi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a group of metabolic disorders such as DM I, DM II, secondary causes of DM and gestational diabetes mellitus characterized by hyperglycemic phonotype. The etiology of gestational diabetes mellitus is unknown. Recent studies address the chronic activity of immune system against infections (not autoimmunity as an important cause of gestational diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to compare T-helper cells 1 and 2 cytokines and associated antibodies in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and normal pregnant women. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 45 female patients with GDM and 45 healthy pregnant women in Bandar Abbas, Iran, from 2008- 2009. The exclusion criteria were presence of any infectious diseases or autoimmune disorders such as SLE or RA. Present and past medical histories were taken from the participants thorough physical examination. Blood samples (10 mL were drawn and sent to laboratory for measuring serum IgE, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, interleukin-10 (IL-10, interleukin-12 (IL-12, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF1, and interferon-gamma (IFN measurements. T-test and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test were used for data analysis. Results: The mean age of the patients with GDM and healthy pregnant women was 32.5 and 27.9 yrs, respectively. T-helper 1 and 2 associated antibodies and cytokines had no significant differences between the case and control groups. Conclusion: The changes in T-helper 1 and 2 associated antibodies and cytokines are not associated with gestational diabetes mellitus and could not be considered as a predictor for gestational diabetes mellitus.

  20. CD4 T-helper cell cytokine phenotypes and antibody response following tetanus toxoid booster immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Kimberly A; Jiang, Xiaowen; Stephensen, Charles B

    2013-04-30

    Routine methods for enumerating antigen-specific T-helper cells may not identify low-frequency phenotypes such as Th2 cells. We compared methods of evaluating such responses to identify tetanus toxoid- (TT) specific Th1, Th2, Th17 and IL10(+) cells. Eight healthy subjects were given a TT booster vaccination. Blood was drawn before, 3, 7, 14, and 28days after vaccination and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured for 7days with TT, negative control (diluent), and a positive control (Staphylococcus enterotoxin B [SEB]). Activation markers (CD25 and CD69) were measured after 44h (n=8), cytokines in supernatant after 3 and 7days, and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) of proliferated cells (identified by dye dilution) after 7days (n=6). Vaccination increased TT-specific expression of CD25 and CD69 on CD3(+)CD4(+) lymphocytes, and TT-specific proliferation at 7, 14 and 28days post vaccination. Vaccination induced TT-specific Th1 (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2) Th2 (IL-13, IL-5, and IL-4), Th17 (IL-17A) and IL-10(+) cells as measured by ICS. TT-specific Th1 cells were the most abundant (12-15% of all TT-specific CD4(+) T-cells) while IL10(+) (1.8%) Th17 (1.1%) and Th2 cells (0.2-0.6%) were less abundant. TT-specific cytokine concentrations in PBMC supernatants followed the same pattern where a TT-specific IL-9 response was also seen. In conclusion, TT booster vaccination induced a broad T-helper cell response. This method of evaluating cytokine phenotypes may be useful in examining the impact of nutrition and environmental conditions on the plasticity of T-helper cell memory responses.

  1. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phelps, T. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  2. Influence of geosmin-producing Streptomyces on the growth and volatile metabolites of yeasts during chinese liquor fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hai; Lu, Hu; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-14

    Diverse Streptomyces species act as geosmin producers in the Chinese liquor-making process, causing an earthy, off-odor containment. Through microbiological and metabolite analyses, this paper investigates the influence of several geosmin-producing Streptomyces on the microbial community of a brewing system. The antifungal activity against functional liquor-brewing microbes was assayed by an agar diffusion method. Several Streptomyces, most notably Streptomyces sampsonii QC-2, inhibited the growth of the brewing functional yeasts and molds in pure culture. In a simulated coculture, Streptomyces spp. reduced the flavor compounds (alcohols and esters) contributed by yeasts. Nine components in Streptomyces sampsonii QC-2 broth were detected by ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with photo diode array (UPLC–PDA), with characteristic ultraviolet absorptions at 360, 380, and 400 nm. The main products of Streptomyces sampsonii QC-2 were identified by ultraperformance liquid chromatography–quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF–MS/MS), and confirmed by standard mass spectrometry. The antifungal active components were revealed as a series of heptaene macrolide antibiotics.

  3. Effect of acitretin on the T helper cells of psoriasis vulgaris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of acitretin on T helper cell(Th)1/Th2 balance and Th17 cells in psoriasis vulgaris(PV)patients.Methods A total of 13 men and 17 women with PV were investigated.10 mg of acitretin was administered twice a day for 8 weeks for intervention therapy.Serum levels of interferon-gamma(IFN-γ),interleukin(IL)-4 and IL-17 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.T,Th1,Th2 and Th17 cells in skin biopsies were counted with double-labeled immunofluorescence.Psoriasis Area a...

  4. Circulating T helper and T regulatory subsets in untreated early rheumatoid arthritis and healthy control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Jayesh M; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Hallström, Magnus; Andersson, Kerstin; Nordström, Inger; Rudin, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The pathogenic role and frequency of T cell subtypes in early rheumatoid arthritis are still unclear. We therefore performed a comprehensive analysis of the circulating T cell subtype pattern in patients with untreated early rheumatoid arthritis compared to healthy control subjects. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from 26 patients with untreated early rheumatoid arthritis and from with 18 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. T helper cell types Th0, Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th1/17 and nonclassic T helper subsets were defined by flow cytometry based on the expression of chemokine receptors CCR4, CCR6, and CXCR3. Regulatory T cells were defined by expression of CD25(+) CD127(low) and also FOXP3 CXCR5(+) cells among regulatory and nonregulatory T cells were defined as T follicular regulatory and T follicular helper cells, respectively. The phenotype of T cell subsets was confirmed by transcription factor and cytokine secretion analyses. Multivariate discriminant analysis showed that patients with untreated early rheumatoid arthritis were segregated from healthy control subjects based on the circulating T cell subset profile. Among the discriminator subsets, CCR4(+)CXCR3(-) (Th2 and Th17), CTLA4(+) and FOXP3(+) subsets were present in significantly higher frequencies, whereas CCR4(-) (Th1/Th17, CCR6(+)CCR4(-)CXCR3(-), and Th1) subsets were present in lower frequencies in patients with untreated early rheumatoid arthritis compared with healthy control subjects. The proportions of Th2 and Th17 subsets associated positively with each other and negatively with the CXCR3(+)/interferon γ-secreting subsets (Th1 and Th1/Th17) in patients with untreated rheumatoid arthritis. The proportions of Th2 cells increased with age in patients with untreated early rheumatoid arthritis and healthy control subjects. The dominance of circulating CCR4(+)CXCR3(-) T helper subsets (Th2 and Th17) in untreated early rheumatoid arthritis point toward a pathogenic role of

  5. Innate lymphoid cells and cytokines of the novel subtypes of helper T cells in asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Sherkat, Roya; Yazdani, Reza; Ganjalikhani Hakemi, Mazdak; Homayouni, Vida; Farahani, Rahim; Hosseini, Mohsen; Rezaei, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, the expression of interleukin-9 (IL-9), IL-17, IL-22, and IL-25 genes that might be the potential predisposing factors for asthma as well as count of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) as another source of inflammatory cytokines have been evaluated. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of newly identified helper T cells signature cytokines and amount of ILCs. Methods Blood and sputum samples from 23 patients with moderate to severe asthma and 23 h...

  6. Potential of Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors in Modulating Airway Innate Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rahul Kushwah; Huibi Cao; Jim Hu

    2007-01-01

    Innate immune responses form the first line of defense against foreign insults and recently significant advances have been made in our understanding of the initiation of innate immune response along with its ability to modulate inflammation. In airway diseases such as asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis, over reacting of the airway innate immune responses leads to cytokine imbalance and airway remodeling or damage. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors have the potential to deliver genes to modulate airway innate immune responses and have many advantages over its predecessors. However, there still are a few limitations that need to be addressed prior to their use in clinical applications.

  7. Pangenome Evolution in the Marine Bacterium Alteromonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pérez, Mario; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2016-06-03

    We have examined a collection of the free-living marine bacterium Alteromonas genomes with cores diverging in average nucleotide identities ranging from 99.98% to 73.35%, i.e., from microbes that can be considered members of a natural clone (like in a clinical epidemiological outbreak) to borderline genus level. The genomes were largely syntenic allowing a precise delimitation of the core and flexible regions in each. The core was 1.4 Mb (ca. 30% of the typical strain genome size). Recombination rates along the core were high among strains belonging to the same species (37.7-83.7% of all nucleotide polymorphisms) but they decreased sharply between species (18.9-5.1%). Regarding the flexible genome, its main expansion occurred within the boundaries of the species, i.e., strains of the same species already have a large and diverse flexible genome. Flexible regions occupy mostly fixed genomic locations. Four large genomic islands are involved in the synthesis of strain-specific glycosydic receptors that we have called glycotypes. These genomic regions are exchanged by homologous recombination within and between species and there is evidence for their import from distant taxonomic units (other genera within the family). In addition, several hotspots for integration of gene cassettes by illegitimate recombination are distributed throughout the genome. They code for features that give each clone specific properties to interact with their ecological niche and must flow fast throughout the whole genus as they are found, with nearly identical sequences, in different species. Models for the generation of this genomic diversity involving phage predation are discussed.

  8. 8-Mop选育薰衣草链霉菌(Streptomyces lavendulae)的研究%Study of Selection with 8-methoxy-psoralen in Streptomyces lavendulae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白骅; 郎莉莉; 吴振倡

    2004-01-01

    本文首次报导8-甲氧基补骨脂素(8-Mop)单一选育薰衣草链霉菌(Streptomyces lavendulae)的研究结果,曾有摇瓶发酵单位提高18.3%的高产株获得,高产株已在国内应用.

  9. Heavy metal adsorption of Streptomyces chromofuscus K101

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Mohamed Daboor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find the best actinomycete that has potential application value in the heavy metal remediation due to its special morphological and physiological metabolism. Methods: In some areas of River Nile, Egypt, a total of 67 actinomycete isolates (17 isolates from surface water and 50 from sediment were identified. In addition, the studied area was characterized by a large amount of submerged macrophyte species Ceratophyllum demersum, one free floating species Eichhornia crassipes and two emergent species Polygonum tomentosum and Saccharum spontaneum with the highest biomass production values. Many methods are used in this research like qualitative evaluation of heavy metals, minimum inhibitory concentration of heavy metal determination, metal binding assay, heavy metal assessment, etc. Results: Many actinomycetes isolates were isolated from River Nile, Egypt, the absorbent efficiency of one isolate Streptomyces chromofuscusK101 showed the most efficient metal binding activity. The adsorption process of Zn2+ , Pb2+ and Fe 2+ single or mixture metal ions was investigated, where the order of adsorption potential ( Zn2+ >Pb2+ >Fe 2+ was observed in single metal reaction. The adsorption in mixed metal reactions was the same order as in single-metal ion with a significant decrease in Fe 2+ and Pb2+ adsorption. Conclusions: In conclusion the metal adsorption reactions were very fast, pH dependent and culture age-independent, suggestive of a physicochemical reaction between cell wall components and heavy metal ions. The absorbent removal efficiency was determined as a function of ion concentration, pH and temperature.

  10. [Optimized sample preparation for metabolome studies on Streptomyces coelicolor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yihong; Li, Shanshan; Ai, Guomin; Wang, Weishan; Zhang, Buchang; Yang, Keqian

    2014-04-01

    Streptomycetes produce many antibiotics and are important model microorgansims for scientific research and antibiotic production. Metabolomics is an emerging technological platform to analyze low molecular weight metabolites in a given organism qualitatively and quantitatively. Compared to other Omics platform, metabolomics has greater advantage in monitoring metabolic flux distribution and thus identifying key metabolites related to target metabolic pathway. The present work aims at establishing a rapid, accurate sample preparation protocol for metabolomics analysis in streptomycetes. In the present work, several sample preparation steps, including cell quenching time, cell separation method, conditions for metabolite extraction and metabolite derivatization were optimized. Then, the metabolic profiles of Streptomyces coelicolor during different growth stages were analyzed by GC-MS. The optimal sample preparation conditions were as follows: time of low-temperature quenching 4 min, cell separation by fast filtration, time of freeze-thaw 45 s/3 min and the conditions of metabolite derivatization at 40 degrees C for 90 min. By using this optimized protocol, 103 metabolites were finally identified from a sample of S. coelicolor, which distribute in central metabolic pathways (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway and citrate cycle), amino acid, fatty acid, nucleotide metabolic pathways, etc. By comparing the temporal profiles of these metabolites, the amino acid and fatty acid metabolic pathways were found to stay at a high level during stationary phase, therefore, these pathways may play an important role during the transition between the primary and secondary metabolism. An optimized protocol of sample preparation was established and applied for metabolomics analysis of S. coelicolor, 103 metabolites were identified. The temporal profiles of metabolites reveal amino acid and fatty acid metabolic pathways may play an important role in the transition from primary to

  11. Biosynthesis of fluorinated secondary metabolites by Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, K A; Hamilton, J T; Bowden, R D; O'Hagan, D; Dasaradhi, L; Amin, M R; Harper, D B

    1995-06-01

    The biosynthesis of organofluorine compounds by Streptomyces cattleya NRRL 8057 was examined using 19F NMR spectroscopy. The organism produced 1.2 mM fluoroacetate and 0.5 mM 4-fluorothreonine as secondary metabolites when cultured for 28 d on a chemically defined medium containing 2 mM fluoride. Cell suspensions from batch cultures harvested at the growth maximum of 4 d were not capable of fluoride uptake or fluorometabolite biosynthesis, but by 6 d had developed an efficient fluoride-uptake system and biosynthesized the two fluorometabolites in almost equal proportions. As the harvest age increased, the proportion of fluoroacetate to 4-fluorothreonine formed by cell suspensions rose progressively so that 16-d-old cells showed a ratio of 76:26 for the two compounds. Fluoride uptake and fluorometabolite production by cell suspensions were highly dependent on pH, with both processes showing a maximum rate at pH 6.0 but declining rapidly at higher pH values. This decrease was particularly marked in the case of fluoroacetate biosynthesis which was barely detectable at pH 7.5. Fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine showed only low levels of interconversion by cell suspensions, suggesting that the carbon skeleton of neither was derived by metabolism of the other. The limited interconversion observed is explicable in terms of a small degree of biological defluorination occurring with each compound, followed by reincorporation of the resulting fluoride ion into the organic form by the active fluorinating system, a phenomenon also noted on incubation of cell suspensions with a number of other fluorinated biochemical intermediates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Characterization of virginiamycin S biosynthetic genes from Streptomyces virginiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namwat, Wises; Kamioka, Yuji; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Nihira, Takuya

    2002-03-20

    Streptomyces virginiae produces -butyrolactone autoregulators (virginiae butanolide, VB), which control the biosynthesis of virginiamycin M1 and S. A 6.3-kb region downstream of the virginiamycin S (VS)-resistance operon in S. virginiae was sequenced, and four plausible open reading frames (ORFs) (visA, 1,260 bp; visB, 1,656 bp; visC, 888 bp; visD, 1209 bp) were identified. Homology analysis revealed significant similarities with enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of cyclopeptolide antibiotics: VisA (53% identity, 65% similarity) to -lysine 2-aminotransferase (NikC) of nikkomycin D biosynthesis, VisB (66% identity, 72% similarity) to 3-hydroxypicolinic acid:AMP ligase of pristinamycin I biosynthesis, VisC (48% identity, 59% similarity) to lysine cyclodeaminase of ascomycin biosynthesis, and VisD (43% identity, 56% similarity) to erythromycin C-22 hydroxylase of erythromycin biosynthesis. Northern blotting as well as high-resolution S1 analysis of the ORFs revealed that they were transcribed as two bicistronic transcripts, namely 3.0-kb visB-visA and another 2.7-kb visC-visD transcript, with promoters locating upstream of visB and visC, respectively. Transcription of the two operons was observed only 1 h after the VB production, which was 2 h before the virginiamycin production. Furthermore, prompt induction of the transcription was observed as a result of external VB addition, suggesting that the expression of the two operons was under the control of VB.

  13. Gene therapy of T helper cells in HIV infection: mathematical model of the criteria for clinical effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, O; Lund, O S; Gram, G

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical analysis of the criteria for gene therapy of T helper cells to have a clinical effect on HIV infection. The analysis indicates that for such a therapy to be successful, it must protect the transduced cells against HIV-induced death. The transduced cells...... will not survive as a population if the gene therapy only blocks the spread of virus from transduced cells that become infected. The analysis also suggests that the degree of protection against disease-related cell death provided by the gene therapy is more important than the fraction cells that is initially...... transduced. If only a small fraction of the cells can be transduced, transduction of T helper cells and transduction of haematopoietic progenitor cells will result in the same steady-state level of transduced T helper cells. For gene therapy to be efficient against HIV infection, our analysis suggests...

  14. Gene therapy of T helper cells in HIV infection: mathematical model of the criteria for clinical effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, O; Lund, O S; Gram, G

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical analysis of the criteria for gene therapy of T helper cells to have a clinical effect on HIV infection. The analysis indicates that for such a therapy to be successful, it must protect the transduced cells against HIV-induced death. The transduced cells...... will not survive as a population if the gene therapy only blocks the spread of virus from transduced cells that become infected. The analysis also suggests that the degree of protection against disease-related cell death provided by the gene therapy is more important than the fraction cells that is initially...... transduced. If only a small fraction of the cells can be transduced, transduction of T helper cells and transduction of haematopoietic progenitor cells will result in the same steady-state level of transduced T helper cells. For gene therapy to be efficient against HIV infection, our analysis suggests...

  15. An Adaptive Multi-channel P2P Video-on-Demand System using Plug-and-Play Helpers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hao; Parekh, Abhay; Ramchandran, Kannan

    2010-01-01

    We present a multi-channel P2P Video-on-Demand (VoD) system using "plug-and-play" helpers. Helpers are heterogenous "micro-servers" with limited storage, bandwidth and number of users they can serve simultaneously. Our proposed system has the following salient features: (1) it minimizes the server load; (2) it is distributed, and requires little or no maintenance overhead and which can easily adapt to system dynamics; and (3) it is adaptable to varying supply and demand patterns across multiple video channels irrespective of video popularity. Our proposed solution jointly optimizes over helper-user topology, video storage allocation and bandwidth allocation. The combinatorial nature of the problem and the system demand for distributed algorithms makes the problem uniquely challenging. By utilizing Lagrangian decomposition and Markov chain approximation based arguments, we address this challenge by designing two distributed algorithms running in tandem: a primal-dual storage and bandwidth allocation algorithm ...

  16. Holistic systems biology approaches to molecular mechanisms of human helper T cell differentiation to functionally distinct subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Lönnberg, T; Lahesmaa, R

    2013-08-01

    Current knowledge of helper T cell differentiation largely relies on data generated from mouse studies. To develop therapeutical strategies combating human diseases, understanding the molecular mechanisms how human naïve T cells differentiate to functionally distinct T helper (Th) subsets as well as studies on human differentiated Th cell subsets is particularly valuable. Systems biology approaches provide a holistic view of the processes of T helper differentiation, enable discovery of new factors and pathways involved and generation of new hypotheses to be tested to improve our understanding of human Th cell differentiation and immune-mediated diseases. Here, we summarize studies where high-throughput systems biology approaches have been exploited to human primary T cells. These studies reveal new factors and signalling pathways influencing T cell differentiation towards distinct subsets, important for immune regulation. Such information provides new insights into T cell biology and into targeting immune system for therapeutic interventions.

  17. Total synthesis and absolute configuration of avenolide, extracellular factor in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Miho; Takamatsu, Satoshi; Arima, Shiho; Miyamoto, Kiyoko T; Kitani, Shigeru; Nihira, Takuya; Ikeda, Haruo; Nagamitsu, Tohru

    2011-12-01

    The first total synthesis of extracellular factor, "Avenolide", in Streptomyces avermitilis has been achieved using a convergent approach. The stereogenic centers in two key segments were installed using Sharpless epoxidation and dihydroxylation. This synthetic study allowed the determination of the absolute configuration of avenolide as 4S,10R, and yielded important information on its structure-activity relationship.

  18. Genome Sequence of Streptomyces olindensis DAUFPE 5622, Producer of the Antitumoral Anthracycline Cosmomycin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Juan D.; Starcevic, Antonio; Baranas̆ić, Damir; Ferreira-Torres, Maria A.; Contreras, Camilo A.; Garrido, Leandro M.; Araújo, Welington L.; de Souza, Robson F.; Zucko, Jurica; Hranueli, Daslav; Long, Paul F.; Cullum, John

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces olindensis DAUFPE 5622, which was isolated from a Brazilian soil sample, produces the antitumor anthracycline cosmomycin D. The genome sequence is 9.4 Mb in length, with a G+C content of 71%. Thirty-four putative secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters were identified, including the cosmomycin D cluster. PMID:24970824

  19. Production of actinorhodin-related ''blue pigments'' by Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrykh, LV; FernandezMoreno, MA; Herrema, JK; Malpartida, F; Hopwood, DA; Dijkhuizen, L

    The genetically well-known strain Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) produces the pH indicator (red/blue) antibiotic actinorhodin, but not all the ''blue pigment'' produced by this strain is actinorhodin. When the organism was subjected to various nutrient limitations (ammonium, nitrate, phosphate, or

  20. Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces cattleya NRRL 8057, a producer of antibiotics and fluorometabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbe, Valérie; Bouzon, Madeleine; Mangenot, Sophie; Badet, Bernard; Poulain, Julie; Segurens, Béatrice; Vallenet, David; Marlière, Philippe; Weissenbach, Jean

    2011-09-01

    Streptomyces cattleya, a producer of the antibiotics thienamycin and cephamycin C, is one of the rare bacteria known to synthesize fluorinated metabolites. The genome consists of two linear replicons. The genes involved in fluorine metabolism and in the biosynthesis of the antibiotic thienamycin were mapped on both replicons.